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Sample records for active pixel sensor

  1. Radiation effects on active pixel sensors (APS)

    Active pixel sensor (APS) is a new generation of image sensors which presents several advantages relatively to charge coupled devices (CCDs) particularly for space applications (APS requires only 1 voltage to operate which reduces considerably current consumption). Irradiation was performed using 60Co gamma radiation at room temperature and at a dose rate of 150 Gy(Si)/h. 2 types of APS have been tested: photodiode-APS and photoMOS-APS. The results show that photoMOS-APS is more sensitive to radiation effects than photodiode-APS. Important parameters of image sensors like dark currents increase sharply with dose levels. Nevertheless photodiode-APS sensitivity is one hundred time lower than photoMOS-APS sensitivity

  2. Characterization of active CMOS sensors for capacitively coupled pixel detectors

    Hirono, Toko; Gonella, Laura; Janssen, Jens; Hemperek, Tomasz; Huegging, Fabian; Krueger, Hans; Wermes, Norbert [Institute of Physics, University of Bonn (Germany); Peric, Ivan [Institut fuer Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Active CMOS pixel sensor is one of the most attractive candidates for detectors of upcoming particle physics experiments. In contrast to conventional sensors of hybrid detectors, signal processing circuit can be integrated in the active CMOS sensor. The characterization and optimization of the pixel circuit are indispensable to obtain a good performance from the sensors. The prototype chips of the active CMOS sensor were fabricated in the AMS 180nm and L-Foundry 150 nm CMOS processes, respectively a high voltage and high resistivity technology. Both chips have a charge sensitive amplifier and a comparator in each pixel. The chips are designed to be glued to the FEI4 pixel readout chip. The signals from 3 pixels of the prototype chips are capacitively coupled to the FEI4 input pads. We have performed lab tests and test beams to characterize the prototypes. In this presentation, the measurement results of the active CMOS prototype sensors are shown.

  3. Active pixel sensors with substantially planarized color filtering elements

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A semiconductor imaging system preferably having an active pixel sensor array compatible with a CMOS fabrication process. Color-filtering elements such as polymer filters and wavelength-converting phosphors can be integrated with the image sensor.

  4. CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Star Tracker with Regional Electronic Shutter

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly; Pain, Bedabrata; Staller, Craig; Clark, Christopher; Fossum, Eric

    1996-01-01

    The guidance system in a spacecraft determines spacecraft attitude by matching an observed star field to a star catalog....An APS(active pixel sensor)-based system can reduce mass and power consumption and radiation effects compared to a CCD(charge-coupled device)-based system...This paper reports an APS (active pixel sensor) with locally variable times, achieved through individual pixel reset (IPR).

  5. Active-Pixel Image Sensors With Programmable Resolution

    Kemeny, Sabrina E.; Fossum, Eric R.; Pain, Bedabrata; Nakamura, Junichi; Matthies, Larry H.

    1996-01-01

    Active-pixel image sensors with programmable resolution proposed for use in applications in which speed and efficiency of processing of image data enhanced by providing those data at varying resolutions. Such applications include modeling of biological vision, stereoscopic range-finding, recognition of patterns, tracking targets, and progressive transmission of compressed images. In target-tracking application, sensor initially forms low-resolution image from which area of interest identified, then sensor set at high resolution for examination of identified area. Outputs of contiguous pixels combined. Sensor of this type made to act as though it comprised fewer and larger pixels.

  6. Radiation Tolerance of CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors with Self-Biased Pixels

    Deveaux, M; Besson, A; Claus, G; Colledani, C; Dorokhov, M; Dritsa, C; Dulinski, W; Fröhlich, I; Goffe, M; Grandjean, D; Heini, S; Himmi, A; Hu, C; Jaaskelainen, K; Müntz, C; Shabetai, A; Stroth, J; Szelezniak, M; Valin, I; Winter, M

    2009-01-01

    CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) are proposed as a technology for various vertex detectors in nuclear and particle physics. We discuss the mechanisms of ionizing radiation damage on MAPS hosting the the dead time free, so-called self bias pixel. Moreover, we discuss radiation hardened sensor designs which allow operating detectors after exposing them to irradiation doses above 1 Mrad

  7. Characterization of a Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (DMAPS) prototype

    New monolithic pixel detectors integrating CMOS electronics and sensor on the same silicon substrate are currently explored for particle tracking in future HEP experiments, most notably at the LHC . The innovative concept of Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (DMAPS) is based on high resistive silicon bulk material enabling full substrate depletion and the application of an electrical drift field for fast charge collection, while retaining full CMOS capability for the electronics. The technology (150 nm) used offers quadruple wells and allows to implement the pixel electronics with independently isolated N- and PMOS transistors. Results of initial studies on the charge collection and sensor performance are presented

  8. Characterization of a Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (DMAPS) prototype

    Obermann, T.; Havranek, M.; Hemperek, T.; Hügging, F.; Kishishita, T.; Krüger, H.; Marinas, C.; Wermes, N.

    2015-03-01

    New monolithic pixel detectors integrating CMOS electronics and sensor on the same silicon substrate are currently explored for particle tracking in future HEP experiments, most notably at the LHC . The innovative concept of Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (DMAPS) is based on high resistive silicon bulk material enabling full substrate depletion and the application of an electrical drift field for fast charge collection, while retaining full CMOS capability for the electronics. The technology (150 nm) used offers quadruple wells and allows to implement the pixel electronics with independently isolated N- and PMOS transistors. Results of initial studies on the charge collection and sensor performance are presented.

  9. Charged Particle Detection using a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor

    Matis, H. S.; Bieser, F.; Kleinfelder, S.; Rai, G.; Retiere, F.; H.G. Ritter; Singh, K.; Wurzel, S. E.; Wieman, H.; Yamamoto, E.

    2002-01-01

    Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology has shown promise for next-generation vertex detectors. This paper discusses the design and testing of two generations of APS chips. Both are arrays of 128 by 128 pixels, each 20 by 20 micro-m. Each array is divided into sub-arrays in which different sensor structures (4 in the first version and 16 in the second) and/or readout circuits are employed. Measurements of several of these structures under Fe55 exposure are reported. The sensors have also been ir...

  10. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS): developments and future outlook

    R. Turchetta; A. Fant; P. Gasiorek; C. Esbrand; J.A. Griffiths; M.G. Metaxas; G.J. Royle; R. Speller; C. Venanzi; P.F. van der Stelt; H.G.C. Verheij; G. Li; S. Theodoridis; H. Georgiou; D. Cavouras; G. Hall; M. Noy; J. Jones; J. Leaver; D. Machin; S. Greenwood; M. Khaleeq; H. Schulerud; J.M. Østby; F. Triantis; A. Asimidis; D. Bolanakis; N. Manthos; R. Longo; A. Bergamaschi

    2007-01-01

    Re-invented in the early 1990s, on both sides of the Atlantic, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a CMOS technology are today the most sold solid-state imaging devices, overtaking the traditional technology of Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD). The slow uptake of CMOS MAPS started with low-end app

  11. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS): developments and future outlook

    R. Turchetta; A. Fant; P. Gasiorek; C. Esbrand; J.A. Griffiths; M.G. Metaxas; G.J. Royle; R. Speller; C. Venanzi; P.F. van der Stelt; H.G.C. Verheij; G. Li; S. Theodoridis; H. Georgiou; D. Cavouras; G. Hall; M. Noy; J. Jones; J. Leaver; D. Machin; S. Greenwood; M. Khaleeq; H. Schulerud; J.M. Østby; F. Triantis; A. Asimidis; D. Bolanakis; N. Manthos; R. Longo; A. Bergamaschi

    2006-01-01

    Re-invented in the early 1990s, on both sides of the Atlantic, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a CMOS technology are today the most sold solid-state imaging devices, overtaking the traditional technology of Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD). The slow uptake of CMOS MAPS started with low-end app

  12. E-Beam Effects on CMOS Active Pixel Sensors

    Three different CMOS active pixel structures manufactured in a deep submicron process have been evaluated with electron beam. The devices were exposed to 1 MeV electron beam up to 5kGy. Dark current increased after E-beam irradiation differently at each pixel structure. Dark current change is dependent on CMOS pixel structures. CMOS image sensors are now good candidates in demanding applications such as medical image sensor, particle detection and space remote sensing. In these situations, CISs are exposed to high doses of radiation. In fact radiation is known to generate trapped charge in CMOS oxides. It can lead to threshold voltage shifts and current leakages in MOSFETs and dark current increase in photodiodes. We studied ionizing effects in three types of CMOS APSs fabricated by 0.25 CMOS process. The devices were irradiated by a Co60 source up to 50kGy. All irradiation took place at room temperature. The dark current in the three different pixels exhibits increase with electron beam exposure. From the above figure, the change of dark current is dependent on the pixel structure. Double junction structure has shown relatively small increase of dark current after electron beam irradiation. The dark current in the three different pixels exhibits increase with electron beam exposure. The contribution of the total ionizing dose to the dark current increase is small here, since the devices were left unbiased during the electron beam irradiation. Radiation hardness in dependent on the pixel structures. Pixel2 is relatively vulnerable to radiation exposure. Pixel3 has radiation hardened structure

  13. Monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) in a VLSI CMOS technology

    Turchetta, R; Manolopoulos, S; Tyndel, M; Allport, P P; Bates, R; O'Shea, V; Hall, G; Raymond, M

    2003-01-01

    Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) designed in a standard VLSI CMOS technology have recently been proposed as a compact pixel detector for the detection of high-energy charged particle in vertex/tracking applications. MAPS, also named CMOS sensors, are already extensively used in visible light applications. With respect to other competing imaging technologies, CMOS sensors have several potential advantages in terms of low cost, low power, lower noise at higher speed, random access of pixels which allows windowing of region of interest, ability to integrate several functions on the same chip. This brings altogether to the concept of 'camera-on-a-chip'. In this paper, we review the use of CMOS sensors for particle physics and we analyse their performances in term of the efficiency (fill factor), signal generation, noise, readout speed and sensor area. In most of high-energy physics applications, data reduction is needed in the sensor at an early stage of the data processing before transfer of the data to ta...

  14. New Active Digital Pixel Circuit for CMOS Image Sensor

    2001-01-01

    A new active digital pixel circuit for CMOS image sensor is designed consisting of four components: a photo-transducer, a preamplifier, a sample & hold (S & H) circuit and an A/D converter with an inverter. It is optimized by simulation and adjustment based on 2μm standard CMOS process. Each circuit of the components is designed with specific parameters. The simulation results of the whole pixel circuits show that the circuit has such advantages as low distortion, low power consumption, and improvement of the output performances by using an inverter.

  15. Application-specific architectures of CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors

    Szelezniak, Michal; Besson, Auguste; Claus, Gilles; Colledani, Claude; Degerli, Yavuz; Deptuch, Grzegorz; Deveaux, Michael; Dorokhov, Andrei; Dulinski, Wojciech; Fourches, Nicolas; Goffe, Mathieu; Grandjean, Damien; Guilloux, Fabrice; Heini, Sebastien; Himmi, Abdelkader; Hu, Christine; Jaaskelainen, Kimmo; Li, Yan; Lutz, Pierre; Orsini, Fabienne; Pellicioli, Michel; Shabetai, Alexandre; Valin, Isabelle; Winter, Marc

    2006-11-01

    Several development directions intended to adapt and optimize monolithic active pixel sensors for specific applications are presented in this work. The first example, compatible with the STAR microvertex upgrade, is based on a simple two-transistor pixel circuitry. It is suited for a long integration time, room-temperature operation and minimum power dissipation. In another approach for this application, a specific readout method is proposed, allowing optimization of the integration time independently of the full frame-readout time. The circuit consists of an in-pixel front-end voltage amplifier, with a gain on the order of five, followed by two analog memory cells. The extended version of this scheme, based on the implementation of more memory cells per pixel, is the solution considered for the outer layers of a microvertex detector at the international linear collider. For the two innermost layers, a circuit allowing fast frame scans together with on-line, on-chip data sparsification is proposed. The first results of this prototype demonstrate that the fixed pattern dispersion is reduced below a noise level of 15 e -, allowing the use of a single comparator or a low-resolution ADC per pixel column. A common element for most of the mentioned readout schemes is a low-noise, low power consumption, layout efficient in-pixel amplifier. A review of possible solutions for this element together with some experimental results is presented.

  16. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS): Developments and future outlook

    Turchetta, R. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)], E-mail: r.turchetta@rl.ac.uk; Fant, A.; Gasiorek, P. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Esbrand, C.; Griffiths, J.A.; Metaxas, M.G.; Royle, G.J.; Speller, R.; Venanzi, C. [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London (United Kingdom); Stelt, P.F. van der; Verheij, H.; Li, G. [Academic Centre for Dentistry, Vrije Universiteit and University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Theodoridis, S.; Georgiou, H. [Department of Informatics and Telecommunications, University of Athens (Greece); Cavouras, D. [Medical Image and Signal Processing Laboratory, Department of Medical Instrument Technology, Technological Education Institution of Athens (Greece); Hall, G.; Noy, M.; Jones, J.; Leaver, J.; Machin, D. [High Energy Physics Group, Department of Physics, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)] (and others)

    2007-12-01

    Re-invented in the early 1990s, on both sides of the Atlantic, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a CMOS technology are today the most sold solid-state imaging devices, overtaking the traditional technology of Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD). The slow uptake of CMOS MAPS started with low-end applications, for example web-cams, and is slowly pervading the high-end applications, for example in prosumer digital cameras. Higher specifications are required for scientific applications: very low noise, high speed, high dynamic range, large format and radiation hardness are some of these requirements. This paper will present a brief overview of the CMOS Image Sensor technology and of the requirements for scientific applications. As an example, a sensor for X-ray imaging will be presented. This sensor was developed within a European FP6 Consortium, intelligent imaging sensors (I-ImaS)

  17. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS): Developments and future outlook

    Re-invented in the early 1990s, on both sides of the Atlantic, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a CMOS technology are today the most sold solid-state imaging devices, overtaking the traditional technology of Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD). The slow uptake of CMOS MAPS started with low-end applications, for example web-cams, and is slowly pervading the high-end applications, for example in prosumer digital cameras. Higher specifications are required for scientific applications: very low noise, high speed, high dynamic range, large format and radiation hardness are some of these requirements. This paper will present a brief overview of the CMOS Image Sensor technology and of the requirements for scientific applications. As an example, a sensor for X-ray imaging will be presented. This sensor was developed within a European FP6 Consortium, intelligent imaging sensors (I-ImaS)

  18. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) for future vertex detectors

    This paper reviews the development of CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) for future vertex detectors. MAPS are developed in a standard CMOS technology. In the imaging field, where the technology found its first applications, they are also known as CMOS Image Sensors. The use of MAPS as a detector for particle physics was first proposed at the end of 1999. Since then, their good performance in terms of spatial resolution, efficiency, radiation hardness have been demonstrated and work is now well under way to deliver the first MAPS-based vertex detectors

  19. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) for future vertex detectors

    Turchetta, R

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) for future vertex detectors. MAPS are developed in a standard CMOS technology. In the imaging field, where the technology found its first applications, they are also known as CMOS Image Sensors. The use of MAPS as a detector for particle physics was first proposed at the end of 1999. Since then, their good performance in terms of spatial resolution, efficiency, radiation hardness have been demonstrated and work is now well under way to deliver the first MAPS-based vertex detectors.

  20. CMOS active pixel sensor for fault tolerance and background illumination subtraction

    Cheung, Yu Hin (Desmond)

    2005-01-01

    As the CMOS active pixel sensor evolves, its weaknesses are being overcome and its strengths start to surpass that of the charge-coupled device. This thesis discusses two novel APS designs. The first novel APS design was a Fault Tolerance Active Pixel Sensor (FTAPS) to increase a pixel's tolerance to defects. By dividing a regular APS pixel into two halves, the reliability of the pixel is increased, resulting in higher fabrication yield, longer pixel life time, and reduction in cost. Photodio...

  1. DEPFET Active Pixel Sensors for the Belle II Experiment

    Vazquez, P

    2010-01-01

    DEPleted Field Effect Transistor (DEPFET) active pixel detectors combine a first amplification stage with a fully depleted sensor in one single device, resulting in a very good signal-to-noise ratio even for thin sensors. DEPFET pixels are produced in MOS technology with two metal and two poly-silicon layers and have been developed for the use in Xray imaging and tracking in particle physics experiments. The sensor concept will be presented and all aspects of operation will be detailed with the focus on its application at the upgraded detector Belle II under preparation for the high-luminosity upgrade of the e+e- KEKB collider in Japan. The stringent requirements on excellent spatial resolution can be met by cell sizes as small as 25x25 um2 and minimal material budget. The readout ASICs attached to the sensors will be described as well as the module design and the thinning technology employed to reduced the active sensor thickness to as little as 50 um. DEPFET prototype performance at lab and beam tests will ...

  2. A Single-Transistor Active Pixel CMOS Image Sensor Architecture

    A single-transistor CMOS active pixel image sensor (1 T CMOS APS) architecture is proposed. By switching the photosensing pinned diode, resetting and selecting can be achieved by diode pull-up and capacitive coupling pull-down of the source follower. Thus, the reset and selected transistors can be removed. In addition, the reset and selected signal lines can be shared to reduce the metal signal line, leading to a very high fill factor. The pixel design and operation principles are discussed in detail. The functionality of the proposed 1T CMOS APS architecture has been experimentally verified using a fabricated chip in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS AMIS technology

  3. CMOS VLSI Active-Pixel Sensor for Tracking

    Pain, Bedabrata; Sun, Chao; Yang, Guang; Heynssens, Julie

    2004-01-01

    An architecture for a proposed active-pixel sensor (APS) and a design to implement the architecture in a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit provide for some advanced features that are expected to be especially desirable for tracking pointlike features of stars. The architecture would also make this APS suitable for robotic- vision and general pointing and tracking applications. CMOS imagers in general are well suited for pointing and tracking because they can be configured for random access to selected pixels and to provide readout from windows of interest within their fields of view. However, until now, the architectures of CMOS imagers have not supported multiwindow operation or low-noise data collection. Moreover, smearing and motion artifacts in collected images have made prior CMOS imagers unsuitable for tracking applications. The proposed CMOS imager (see figure) would include an array of 1,024 by 1,024 pixels containing high-performance photodiode-based APS circuitry. The pixel pitch would be 9 m. The operations of the pixel circuits would be sequenced and otherwise controlled by an on-chip timing and control block, which would enable the collection of image data, during a single frame period, from either the full frame (that is, all 1,024 1,024 pixels) or from within as many as 8 different arbitrarily placed windows as large as 8 by 8 pixels each. A typical prior CMOS APS operates in a row-at-a-time ( grolling-shutter h) readout mode, which gives rise to exposure skew. In contrast, the proposed APS would operate in a sample-first/readlater mode, suppressing rolling-shutter effects. In this mode, the analog readout signals from the pixels corresponding to the windows of the interest (which windows, in the star-tracking application, would presumably contain guide stars) would be sampled rapidly by routing them through a programmable diagonal switch array to an on-chip parallel analog memory array. The

  4. Study of plasma charging-induced white pixel defect increase in CMOS active pixel sensor

    Plasma process-induced 'white pixel defect' (WPD) of CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) is studied for Si3N4 spacer etch back process by using a magnetically enhanced reactive ion etching (MERIE) system. WPD preferably takes place at the wafer edge region when the magnetized plasma is applied to Si3N4 etch. Plasma charging analysis reveals that the plasma charge-up characteristic is well matching the edge-intensive WPD generation, rather than the UV radiation. Plasma charging on APS transfer gate might lead to a gate leakage, which could play a role in generation of signal noise or WPD. In this article the WPD generation mechanism will be discussed from plasma charging point of view

  5. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS): New 'eyes' for science

    Re-invented in the early 1990s on both sides of the Atlantic, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a CMOS technology have slowly invaded the world of consumer imaging and are now on the edge of becoming the first technology in this field, previously dominated by Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD). Thanks to the advantages brought by the use of standard CMOS technology, MAPS have great potential in many areas including function integration, leading to the concept of a camera-on-a-chip, pixel size, random access to selected region-of-interest, low power, higher speed and radiation resistance. In many ways, MAPS have introduced a new way of doing imaging. Despite their success in the consumer arena, MAPS are still to make a definitive impact in the world of scientific imaging. This paper first briefly reviews the way radiation is detected by a CMOS sensor, before analysing the main noise source and its relationship with the full well capacity and the dynamic range. This paper will also show first examples of scientific results, obtained in the detection of low-energy electrons

  6. Electronic dosimetry and neutron metrology by CMOS active pixel sensor

    This work aims at demonstrating the possibility to use active pixel sensors as operational neutron dosemeters. To do so, the sensor that has been used has to be γ-transparent and to be able to detect neutrons on a wide energy range with a high detection efficiency. The response of the device, made of the CMOS sensor MIMOSA-5 and a converter in front of the sensor (polyethylene for fast neutron detection and 10B for thermal neutron detection), has been compared with Monte Carlo simulations carried out with MCNPX and GEANT4. These codes have been before-hand validated to check they can be used properly for our application. Experiments to characterize the sensor have been performed at IPHC and at IRSN/LMDN (Cadarache). The results of the sensor irradiation to photon sources and mixed field (241AmBe source) show the γ-transparency of the sensor by applying an appropriate threshold on the deposited energy (around 100 keV). The associated detection efficiency is satisfactory with a value of 10-3, in good agreement with MCNPX and GEANT4. Other features of the device have been tested with the same source, like the angular response. The last part of this work deals with the detection of thermal neutrons (eV-neutrons). Assays have been done in Cadarache (IRSN) with a 252Cf source moderated with heavy water (with and without cadmium shell). Results asserted a very high detection efficiency (up to 6*10-3 for a pure 10B converter) in good agreement with GEANT4. (author)

  7. Development of Active Pixel Photodiode Sensors for Gamma Camera Application

    Salahuddin, Nur Sultan; Heruseto, Brahmantyo; Parmentier, Michel

    2011-01-01

    We designed new photodiodes sensors including current mirror amplifiers. These photodiodes have been fabricated using a CMOS 0.6 micrometers process from Austria Micro System (AMS). The Photodiode areas are respectiveley 1mm x 1mm and 0.4mm x 0.4mm with fill factor 98 % and total chip area is 2 square millimetres. The sensor pixels show a logarithmic response in illumination and are capable of detecting very low blue light (less than 0.5 lux) . These results allow to use our sensor in new Gamma Camera solid-state concept.

  8. Monte Carlo Study of the Dosimetry of Small-Photon Beams Using CMOS Active Pixel Sensors

    Jimenez Spang, F.

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is an increasingly common treatment modality that uses very small photon fields. This technique imposes high dosimetric standards and complexities that remain unsolved. In this work the dosimetric performance of CMOS active pixel sensors is presented for the measurement of small-photons beams. A novel CMOS active pixel sensor called Vanilla developed for scientific applications was used. The detector is an array of 520 × 520 pixels on a 25 μm pitch which allows up to...

  9. Enhancing sensitivity for Active Pixel Sensors with fault tolerance and demosaicing

    La Haye, Michelle Lorraine

    2007-01-01

    A key advantage to the Active Pixel Sensor (APS) over the traditional charge coupled device (CCD) is the ability to integrate electronics on chip. As image sensors become larger the number of defective pixels increases. In this thesis, a fault tolerant APS design is investigated that functions even in the presence of defects typical for image sensors, focusing on its sensitivity and a noise analysis with defects. The design has nearly twice the sensitivity and the signal-to-noise ratio only d...

  10. A 128 x 128 CMOS Active Pixel Image Sensor for Highly Integrated Imaging Systems

    Mendis, Sunetra K.; Kemeny, Sabrina E.; Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    A new CMOS-based image sensor that is intrinsically compatible with on-chip CMOS circuitry is reported. The new CMOS active pixel image sensor achieves low noise, high sensitivity, X-Y addressability, and has simple timing requirements. The image sensor was fabricated using a 2 micrometer p-well CMOS process, and consists of a 128 x 128 array of 40 micrometer x 40 micrometer pixels. The CMOS image sensor technology enables highly integrated smart image sensors, and makes the design, incorporation and fabrication of such sensors widely accessible to the integrated circuit community.

  11. Evaluation of a single-pixel one-transistor active pixel sensor for fingerprint imaging

    Xu, Man; Ou, Hai; Chen, Jun; Wang, Kai

    2015-08-01

    Since it first appeared in iPhone 5S in 2013, fingerprint identification (ID) has rapidly gained popularity among consumers. Current fingerprint-enabled smartphones unanimously consists of a discrete sensor to perform fingerprint ID. This architecture not only incurs higher material and manufacturing cost, but also provides only static identification and limited authentication. Hence as the demand for a thinner, lighter, and more secure handset grows, we propose a novel pixel architecture that is a photosensitive device embedded in a display pixel and detects the reflected light from the finger touch for high resolution, high fidelity and dynamic biometrics. To this purpose, an amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) dual-gate photo TFT working in both fingerprint-imaging mode and display-driving mode will be developed.

  12. Low Power Camera-on-a-Chip Using CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Technology

    Fossum, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    A second generation image sensor technology has been developed at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory as a result of the continuing need to miniaturize space science imaging instruments. Implemented using standard CMOS, the active pixel sensor (APS) technology permits the integration of the detector array with on-chip timing, control and signal chain electronics, including analog-to-digital conversion.

  13. Characterisation of regional variations in a stitched CMOS active pixel sensor

    Stitched, large area, complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS), active pixel sensors (APS) show promises for X-ray imaging applications. In this paper we present an investigation of the effects of stitching on uniformity of sensor response for an experimental APS. The sensor, known as LAS (large area sensor), was made by reticular stitching onto a single silicon wafer of a 5x5 array of regions consisting of 270x270 pixels with 40 μm pixel pitch, to yield 1350x1350 pixels and an imaging area of 54x54 mm. Data acquired from two different sensors of the same type were filtered to remove spiking pixels and electromagnetic interference (EMI). The non-linear compensation (NLC) technique for CMOS sensor analysis was used to determine the variation in gain, read noise, full well capacity and dynamic range between stitched regions. Variations across stitched regions were analysed using profiles, analysis of pixel variations at stitch boundaries and using a measurement of non-uniformity within a stitched region. The results showed that non-uniformity variations were present, which increased with signal (1.5-3.5% at dark signal, rising to 3-8%). However, these were found to be smaller than variations caused by differences in readout electronics, particularly at low signal levels. The results suggest these variations should be correctable using standard calibration methods.

  14. Development of a versatile readout and test system and characterization of a capacitively coupled active pixel sensor

    Janssen, Jens; Gonella, Laura; Hemperek, Tomasz; Hirono, Toko; Huegging, Fabian; Krueger, Hans; Wermes, Norbert [Institute of Physics, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Peric, Ivan [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany); Collaboration: ATLAS-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    With the availability of high voltage and high resistivity CMOS processes, active pixel sensors are becoming increasingly interesting for radiation detection in high energy physics experiments. Although the pixel signal-to-noise ratio and the sensor radiation tolerance were improved, active pixel sensors cannot yet compete with state-of-the-art hybrid pixel detector in a high radiation environment. Hence, active pixel sensors are possible candidates for the outer tracking detector in HEP experiments where production cost plays a role. The investigation of numerous prototyping steps and different technologies is still ongoing and requires a versatile test and readout system, which will be presented in this talk. A capacitively coupled active pixel sensor fabricated in AMS 180 nm high voltage CMOS process is investigated. The sensor is designed to be glued to existing front-end pixel readout chips. Results from the characterization are presented in this talk.

  15. Development of a versatile readout and test system and characterization of a capacitively coupled active pixel sensor

    With the availability of high voltage and high resistivity CMOS processes, active pixel sensors are becoming increasingly interesting for radiation detection in high energy physics experiments. Although the pixel signal-to-noise ratio and the sensor radiation tolerance were improved, active pixel sensors cannot yet compete with state-of-the-art hybrid pixel detector in a high radiation environment. Hence, active pixel sensors are possible candidates for the outer tracking detector in HEP experiments where production cost plays a role. The investigation of numerous prototyping steps and different technologies is still ongoing and requires a versatile test and readout system, which will be presented in this talk. A capacitively coupled active pixel sensor fabricated in AMS 180 nm high voltage CMOS process is investigated. The sensor is designed to be glued to existing front-end pixel readout chips. Results from the characterization are presented in this talk.

  16. Front end optimization for the monolithic active pixel sensor of the ALICE Inner Tracking System upgrade

    ALICE plans to replace its Inner Tracking System during the second long shut down of the LHC in 2019 with a new 10 m2 tracker constructed entirely with monolithic active pixel sensors. The TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS imaging Sensor process has been selected to produce the sensor as it offers a deep pwell allowing full CMOS in-pixel circuitry and different starting materials. First full-scale prototypes have been fabricated and tested. Radiation tolerance has also been verified. In this paper the development of the charge sensitive front end and in particular its optimization for uniformity of charge threshold and time response will be presented

  17. Development of radiation hard CMOS active pixel sensors for HL-LHC

    Pernegger, Heinz

    2016-07-01

    New pixel detectors, based on commercial high voltage and/or high resistivity full CMOS processes, hold promise as next-generation active pixel sensors for inner and intermediate layers of the upgraded ATLAS tracker. The use of commercial CMOS processes allow cost-effective detector construction and simpler hybridisation techniques. The paper gives an overview of the results obtained on AMS-produced CMOS sensors coupled to the ATLAS Pixel FE-I4 readout chips. The SOI (silicon-on-insulator) produced sensors by XFAB hold great promise as radiation hard SOI-CMOS sensors due to their combination of partially depleted SOI transistors reducing back-gate effects. The test results include pre-/post-irradiation comparison, measurements of charge collection regions as well as test beam results.

  18. Characterisation of a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor for use in the TEAM Microscope

    Battaglia, Marco; Contarato, Devis; Denes, Peter; Doering, Dionisio; Duden, Thomas; Krieger, Brad; Giubilato, Piero; Gnani, Dario; Radmilovic, Velimir

    2010-01-01

    A 1M- and a 4M-pixel monolithic CMOS active pixel sensor with 9.5x9.5 micron^2 pixels have been developed for direct imaging in transmission electron microscopy as part of the TEAM project. We present the design and a full characterisation of the detector. Data collected with electron beams at various energies of interest in electron microscopy are used to determine the detector response. Data are compared to predictions of simulation. The line spread function measured with 80 keV and 300 keV...

  19. ALPIDE, the Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor for the ALICE ITS upgrade

    Mager, M.

    2016-07-01

    A new 10 m2 inner tracking system based on seven concentric layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors will be installed in the ALICE experiment during the second long shutdown of LHC in 2019-2020. The monolithic pixel sensors will be fabricated in the 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor process of TowerJazz. The ALPIDE design takes full advantage of a particular process feature, the deep p-well, which allows for full CMOS circuitry within the pixel matrix, while at the same time retaining the full charge collection efficiency. Together with the small feature size and the availability of six metal layers, this allowed a continuously active low-power front-end to be placed into each pixel and an in-matrix sparsification circuit to be used that sends only the addresses of hit pixels to the periphery. This approach led to a power consumption of less than 40 mWcm-2, a spatial resolution of around 5 μm, a peaking time of around 2 μs, while being radiation hard to some 1013 1 MeVneq /cm2, fulfilling or exceeding the ALICE requirements. Over the last years of R & D, several prototype circuits have been used to verify radiation hardness, and to optimize pixel geometry and in-pixel front-end circuitry. The positive results led to a submission of full-scale (3 cm×1.5 cm) sensor prototypes in 2014. They are being characterized in a comprehensive campaign that also involves several irradiation and beam tests. A summary of the results obtained and prospects towards the final sensor to instrument the ALICE Inner Tracking System are given.

  20. Heavily irradiated N-in-p thin planar pixel sensors with and without active edges

    Terzo, S.; Andricek, L.; Macchiolo, A.; Moser, H. G.; Nisius, R.; Richter, R. H.; Weigell, P.

    2014-05-01

    We present the results of the characterization of silicon pixel modules employing n-in-p planar sensors with an active thickness of 150 μm, produced at MPP/HLL, and 100-200 μm thin active edge sensor devices, produced at VTT in Finland. These thin sensors are designed as candidates for the ATLAS pixel detector upgrade to be operated at the HL-LHC, as they ensure radiation hardness at high fluences. They are interconnected to the ATLAS FE-I3 and FE-I4 read-out chips. Moreover, the n-in-p technology only requires a single side processing and thereby it is a cost-effective alternative to the n-in-n pixel technology presently employed in the LHC experiments. High precision beam test measurements of the hit efficiency have been performed on these devices both at the CERN SpS and at DESY, Hamburg. We studied the behavior of these sensors at different bias voltages and different beam incident angles up to the maximum one expected for the new Insertable B-Layer of ATLAS and for HL-LHC detectors. Results obtained with 150 μm thin sensors, assembled with the new ATLAS FE-I4 chip and irradiated up to a fluence of 4 × 1015 neq/cm2, show that they are excellent candidates for larger radii of the silicon pixel tracker in the upgrade of the ATLAS detector at HL-LHC. In addition, the active edge technology of the VTT devices maximizes the active area of the sensor and reduces the material budget to suit the requirements for the innermost layers. The edge pixel performance of VTT modules has been investigated at beam test experiments and the analysis after irradiation up to a fluence of 5 × 1015 neq/cm2 has been performed using radioactive sources in the laboratory.

  1. Performance of a novel wafer scale CMOS active pixel sensor for bio-medical imaging

    Esposito, M; Anaxagoras, T; Konstantinidis, AC; Zheng, Y.; Speller, RD; Evans, PM; Allinson, NM; Wells, K.

    2014-01-01

    Recently CMOS Active Pixels Sensors (APSs) have become a valuable alternative to amorphous Silicon and Selenium Flat Panel Imagers (FPIs) in bio-medical imaging applications. CMOS APSs can now be scaled up to the standard 20 cm diameter wafer size by means of a reticle stitching block process. However despite wafer scale CMOS APS being monolithic, sources of non-uniformity of response and regional variations can persist representing a significant challenge for wafer scale sensor response. Non...

  2. Photon small-field measurements with a CMOS active pixel sensor

    In this work the dosimetric performance of CMOS active pixel sensors for the measurement of small photon beams is presented. The detector used consisted of an array of 520  × 520 pixels on a 25 µm pitch. Dosimetric parameters measured with this sensor were compared with data collected with an ionization chamber, a film detector and GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations. The sensor performance for beam profiles measurements was evaluated for field sizes of 0.5  × 0.5 cm2. The high spatial resolution achieved with this sensor allowed the accurate measurement of profiles, beam penumbrae and field size under lateral electronic disequilibrium. Field size and penumbrae agreed within 5.4% and 2.2% respectively with film measurements. Agreements with ionization chambers better than 1.0% were obtained when measuring tissue-phantom ratios. Output factor measurements were in good agreement with ionization chamber and Monte Carlo simulation. The data obtained from this imaging sensor can be easily analyzed to extract dosimetric information. The results presented in this work are promising for the development and implementation of CMOS active pixel sensors for dosimetry applications. (paper)

  3. Photon small-field measurements with a CMOS active pixel sensor

    Jiménez Spang, F.; Rosenberg, I.; Hedin, E.; Royle, G.

    2015-06-01

    In this work the dosimetric performance of CMOS active pixel sensors for the measurement of small photon beams is presented. The detector used consisted of an array of 520  × 520 pixels on a 25 µm pitch. Dosimetric parameters measured with this sensor were compared with data collected with an ionization chamber, a film detector and GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations. The sensor performance for beam profiles measurements was evaluated for field sizes of 0.5  × 0.5 cm2. The high spatial resolution achieved with this sensor allowed the accurate measurement of profiles, beam penumbrae and field size under lateral electronic disequilibrium. Field size and penumbrae agreed within 5.4% and 2.2% respectively with film measurements. Agreements with ionization chambers better than 1.0% were obtained when measuring tissue-phantom ratios. Output factor measurements were in good agreement with ionization chamber and Monte Carlo simulation. The data obtained from this imaging sensor can be easily analyzed to extract dosimetric information. The results presented in this work are promising for the development and implementation of CMOS active pixel sensors for dosimetry applications.

  4. A CMOS Energy Harvesting and Imaging (EHI) Active Pixel Sensor (APS) Imager for Retinal Prosthesis.

    Ay, S U

    2011-12-01

    A CMOS image sensor capable of imaging and energy harvesting on same focal plane is presented for retinal prosthesis. The energy harvesting and imaging (EHI) active pixel sensor (APS) imager was designed, fabricated, and tested in a standard 0.5 μm CMOS process. It has 54 × 50 array of 21 × 21 μm(2) EHI pixels, 10-bit supply boosted (SB) SAR ADC, and charge pump circuits consuming only 14.25 μW from 1.2 V and running at 7.4 frames per second. The supply boosting technique (SBT) is used in an analog signal chain of the EHI imager. Harvested solar energy on focal plane is stored on an off-chip capacitor with the help of a charge pump circuit with better than 70% efficiency. Energy harvesting efficiency of the EHI pixel was measured at different light levels. It was 9.4% while producing 0.41 V open circuit voltage. The EHI imager delivers 3.35 μW of power was delivered to a resistive load at maximum power point operation. The measured pixel array figure of merit (FoM) was 1.32 pW/frame/pixel while imager figure of merit (iFoM) including whole chip power consumption was 696 fJ/pixel/code for the EHI imager. PMID:23852551

  5. Spectrally tunable pixel sensors

    Langfelder, G.; Buffa, C.; Longoni, A. F.; Zaraga, F.

    2013-01-01

    They are here reported the developments and experimental results of fully operating matrices of spectrally tunable pixels based on the Transverse Field Detector (TFD). Unlike several digital imaging sensors based on color filter arrays or layered junctions, the TFD has the peculiar feature of having electrically tunable spectral sensitivities. In this way the sensor color space is not fixed a priori but can be real-time adjusted, e.g. for a better adaptation to the scene content or for multispectral capture. These advantages come at the cost of an increased complexity both for the photosensitive elements and for the readout electronics. The challenges in the realization of a matrix of TFD pixels are analyzed in this work. First experimental results on an 8x8 (x 3 colors) and on a 64x64 (x 3 colors) matrix will be presented and analyzed in terms of colorimetric and noise performance, and compared to simulation predictions.

  6. Development of CMOS Active Pixel Image Sensors for Low Cost Commercial Applications

    Gee, R.; Kemeny, S.; Kim, Q.; Mendis, S.; Nakamura, J.; Nixon, R.; Ortiz, M.; Pain, B.; Staller, C.; Zhou, Z; Fossum, E.

    1994-01-01

    JPL, under sponsorship from the NASA Office of Advanced Concepts and Technology, has been developing a second-generation solid-state image sensor technology. Charge-coupled devices (CCD) are a well-established first generation image sensor technology. For both commercial and NASA applications, CCDs have numerous shortcomings. In response, the active pixel sensor (APS) technology has been under research. The major advantages of APS technology are the ability to integrate on-chip timing, control, signal-processing and analog-to-digital converter functions, reduced sensitivity to radiation effects, low power operation, and random access readout.

  7. A 512x512 CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor with integrated ADCs for space science

    In the last few years, CMOS sensors have become widely used for consumer applications, but little has been done for scientific instruments. In this paper we present the design and experimental characterisation of a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) intended for a space science application. The sensor incorporates a 525x525 array of pixels on a 25 μm pitch. Each pixel contains a detector together with three transistors that are used for pixel reset, pixel selection and charge-to-voltage conversion. The detector consists of four n-well/p-substrate diodes combining optimum charge collection and low noise performance. The array readout is column-parallel with adjustable gain column amplifiers and a 10-bit single slope ADC. Data conversion takes place simultaneously for all the 525 pixels in one row. The ADC slope can be adjusted in order to give the best dynamic range for a given brightness of a scene. The digitised data are output on a 10-bit bus at 3 MHz. An on-chip state machine generates all of the control signals needed for the readout. All of the bias currents and voltages are generated on chip by a DAC that is programmable through an I2C compatible interface. The sensor was designed and fabricated on a standard 0.5 μm CMOS technology. The overall die size is 16.7 mmx19.9 mm including the associated readout electronics and bond pads. Preliminary test results show that the full-scale design works well, meeting the Star Tracker requirements with less than 1-bit noise, good linearity and good optical performance

  8. A 512×512 CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor with integrated ADCs for space science

    Prydderch, M. L.; Waltham, N. J.; Turchetta, R.; French, M. J.; Holt, R.; Marshall, A.; Burt, D.; Bell, R.; Pool, P.; Eyles, C.; Mapson-Menard, H.

    2003-10-01

    In the last few years, CMOS sensors have become widely used for consumer applications, but little has been done for scientific instruments. In this paper we present the design and experimental characterisation of a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) intended for a space science application. The sensor incorporates a 525×525 array of pixels on a 25 μm pitch. Each pixel contains a detector together with three transistors that are used for pixel reset, pixel selection and charge-to-voltage conversion. The detector consists of four n-well/p-substrate diodes combining optimum charge collection and low noise performance. The array readout is column-parallel with adjustable gain column amplifiers and a 10-bit single slope ADC. Data conversion takes place simultaneously for all the 525 pixels in one row. The ADC slope can be adjusted in order to give the best dynamic range for a given brightness of a scene. The digitised data are output on a 10-bit bus at 3 MHz. An on-chip state machine generates all of the control signals needed for the readout. All of the bias currents and voltages are generated on chip by a DAC that is programmable through an I 2C compatible interface. The sensor was designed and fabricated on a standard 0.5 μm CMOS technology. The overall die size is 16.7 mm×19.9 mm including the associated readout electronics and bond pads. Preliminary test results show that the full-scale design works well, meeting the Star Tracker requirements with less than 1-bit noise, good linearity and good optical performance.

  9. Thin n-in-p planar pixel sensors and active edge sensors for the ATLAS upgrade at HL-LHC

    Terzo, S.; Macchiolo, A; Nisius, R.; Paschen, B.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon pixel modules employing n-in-p planar sensors with an active thickness of 200 $\\mu$m, produced at CiS, and 100-200 $\\mu$m thin active/slim edge sensor devices, produced at VTT in Finland have been interconnected to ATLAS FE-I3 and FE-I4 read-out chips. The thin sensors are designed for high energy physics collider experiments to ensure radiation hardness at high fluences. Moreover, the active edge technology of the VTT production maximizes the sensitive region of the assembly, allowin...

  10. Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (DMAPS) implemented in LF-150 nm CMOS technology

    We present the recent development of Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (DMAPS), implemented with an LFoundry (LF) 150 nm CMOS process. MAPS detectors based on an epi-layer have been matured in recent years and have attractive features in terms of reducing material budget and handling cost compared to conventional hybrid pixel detectors. However, the obtained signal is relatively small (∼1000 e−) due to the thin epi-layer, and charge collection time is relatively slow, e.g., in the order of 100 ns, because charges are mainly collected by diffusion. Modern commercial CMOS technology, however, offers advanced process options to overcome such difficulties and enable truly monolithic devices as an alternative to hybrid pixel sensors and charge coupled devices. Unlike in the case of the standard MAPS technologies with epi-layers, the LF process provides a high-resistivity substrate that enables large signal and fast charge collection by drift in a ∼50 μm thick depleted layer. Since this process also enables the use of deep n- and p-wells to isolate the collection electrode from the thin active device layer, PMOS and NMOS transistors are available for the readout electronics in each pixel cell. In order to evaluate the sensor and transistor characteristics, several collection electrodes variants and readout architectures have been implemented. In this report, we focus on its design aspect of the LF-DMAPS prototype chip

  11. Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (DMAPS) implemented in LF-150 nm CMOS technology

    Kishishita, T.; Hemperek, T.; Krüger, H.; Wermes, N.

    2015-03-01

    We present the recent development of Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (DMAPS), implemented with an LFoundry (LF) 150 nm CMOS process. MAPS detectors based on an epi-layer have been matured in recent years and have attractive features in terms of reducing material budget and handling cost compared to conventional hybrid pixel detectors. However, the obtained signal is relatively small (~1000 e-) due to the thin epi-layer, and charge collection time is relatively slow, e.g., in the order of 100 ns, because charges are mainly collected by diffusion. Modern commercial CMOS technology, however, offers advanced process options to overcome such difficulties and enable truly monolithic devices as an alternative to hybrid pixel sensors and charge coupled devices. Unlike in the case of the standard MAPS technologies with epi-layers, the LF process provides a high-resistivity substrate that enables large signal and fast charge collection by drift in a ~50 μm thick depleted layer. Since this process also enables the use of deep n- and p-wells to isolate the collection electrode from the thin active device layer, PMOS and NMOS transistors are available for the readout electronics in each pixel cell. In order to evaluate the sensor and transistor characteristics, several collection electrodes variants and readout architectures have been implemented. In this report, we focus on its design aspect of the LF-DMAPS prototype chip.

  12. Simulation of monolithic active pixel sensor with high resistivity epitaxial layer

    The time and efficiency of charge collection are the key factors of monolithic active pixel sensor devices for minimum ionizing particles tracking detection. In this paper, 3D models of pixels with different resistivity epitaxial layers (epi-layers) are built and simulated using Synopsys-Sentaurus. The basic characteristics of detectors are evaluated, including electric potential, electric field, and depleted region. Results indicate that the high resistivity (HR) epi-layer is a better choice. Further, simulation results show that the key collection performance is significantly improved owing to a wider and stronger electric field in the N type HR epi-layer. (authors)

  13. Heavily Irradiated N-in-p Thin Planar Pixel Sensors with and without Active Edges

    Terzo, S; Macchiolo, A; Moser, H G; Nisius, R; Richter, R H; Weigell, P

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of the characterization of silicon pixel modules employing n-in-p planar sensors with an active thickness of 150 $\\mathrm{\\mu}$m, produced at MPP/HLL, and 100-200 $\\mathrm{\\mu}$m thin active edge sensor devices, produced at VTT in Finland. These thin sensors are designed as candidates for the ATLAS pixel detector upgrade to be operated at the HL-LHC, as they ensure radiation hardness at high fluences. They are interconnected to the ATLAS FE-I3 and FE-I4 read-out chips. Moreover, the n-in-p technology only requires a single side processing and thereby it is a cost-effective alternative to the n-in-n pixel technology presently employed in the LHC experiments. High precision beam test measurements of the hit efficiency have been performed on these devices both at the CERN SpS and at DESY, Hamburg. We studied the behavior of these sensors at different bias voltages and different beam incident angles up to the maximum one expected for the new Insertable B-Layer of ATLAS and for HL-LHC detect...

  14. Development of active edge pixel sensors and four-side buttable modules using vertical integration technologies

    Macchiolo, A; Moser, H-G; Nisius, R; Richter, R H; Terzo, S; Weigell, P

    2014-01-01

    We present an R&D activity focused on the development of novel modules for the upgrade of the ATLAS pixel system at the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). The modules consist of n-in-p pixel sensors, 100 or 200 $\\mu$m thick, produced at VTT (Finland) with an active edge technology, which considerably reduces the dead area at the periphery of the device. The sensors are interconnected with solder bump-bonding to the ATLAS FE-I3 and FE-I4 read-out chips, and characterized with radioactive sources and beam tests at the CERN-SPS and DESY. The results of these measurements will be discussed for devices before and after irradiation up to a fluence of $5\\times 10^{15}$ \

  15. Thin n-in-p planar pixel sensors and active edge sensors for the ATLAS upgrade at HL-LHC

    Terzo, S.; Macchiolo, A.; Nisius, R.; Paschen, B.

    2014-12-01

    Silicon pixel modules employing n-in-p planar sensors with an active thickness of 200 μm, produced at CiS, and 100-200 μm thin active/slim edge sensor devices, produced at VTT in Finland have been interconnected to ATLAS FE-I3 and FE-I4 read-out chips. The thin sensors are designed for high energy physics collider experiments to ensure radiation hardness at high fluences. Moreover, the active edge technology of the VTT production maximizes the sensitive region of the assembly, allowing for a reduced overlap of the modules in the pixel layer close to the beam pipe. The CiS production includes also four chip sensors according to the module geometry planned for the outer layers of the upgraded ATLAS pixel detector to be operated at the HL-LHC. The modules have been characterized using radioactive sources in the laboratory and with high precision measurements at beam tests to investigate the hit efficiency and charge collection properties at different bias voltages and particle incidence angles. The performance of the different sensor thicknesses and edge designs are compared before and after irradiation up to a fluence of 1.4 × 1016 neq/cm2.

  16. Thin n-in-p planar pixel sensors and active edge sensors for the ATLAS upgrade at HL-LHC

    Silicon pixel modules employing n-in-p planar sensors with an active thickness of 200 μm, produced at CiS, and 100-200 μm thin active/slim edge sensor devices, produced at VTT in Finland have been interconnected to ATLAS FE-I3 and FE-I4 read-out chips. The thin sensors are designed for high energy physics collider experiments to ensure radiation hardness at high fluences. Moreover, the active edge technology of the VTT production maximizes the sensitive region of the assembly, allowing for a reduced overlap of the modules in the pixel layer close to the beam pipe. The CiS production includes also four chip sensors according to the module geometry planned for the outer layers of the upgraded ATLAS pixel detector to be operated at the HL-LHC. The modules have been characterized using radioactive sources in the laboratory and with high precision measurements at beam tests to investigate the hit efficiency and charge collection properties at different bias voltages and particle incidence angles. The performance of the different sensor thicknesses and edge designs are compared before and after irradiation up to a fluence of 1.4 × 1016 neq/cm2

  17. Development of active edge pixel sensors and four-side buttable modules using vertical integration technologies

    Macchiolo, A.; Andricek, L.; Moser, H.-G.; Nisius, R.; Richter, R. H.; Terzo, S.; Weigell, P.

    2014-11-01

    We present an R&D activity focused on the development of novel modules for the upgrade of the ATLAS pixel system at the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). The modules consist of n-in-p pixel sensors, 100 or 200 μm thick, produced at VTT (Finland) with an active edge technology, which considerably reduces the dead area at the periphery of the device. The sensors are interconnected with solder bump-bonding to the ATLAS FE-I3 and FE-I4 read-out chips, and characterised with radioactive sources and beam tests at the CERN-SPS and DESY. The results of these measurements will be discussed for devices before and after irradiation up to a fluence of 5 ×1015neq /cm2. We will also report on the R&D activity to obtain Inter Chip Vias (ICVs) on the ATLAS read-out chip in collaboration with the Fraunhofer Institute EMFT. This step is meant to prove the feasibility of the signal transport to the newly created readout pads on the backside of the chips allowing for four side buttable devices without the presently used cantilever for wire bonding. The read-out chips with ICVs will be interconnected to thin pixel sensors, 75 μm and 150 μm thick, with the Solid Liquid Interdiffusion (SLID) technology, which is an alternative to the standard solder bump-bonding.

  18. Development of active edge pixel sensors and four-side buttable modules using vertical integration technologies

    Macchiolo, A., E-mail: Anna.Macchiolo@mpp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut for Physics, Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805 Munich (Germany); Andricek, L. [Semiconductor Laboratory of the Max-Planck-Society, Otto Hahn Ring 6, D-81739 Munich (Germany); Moser, H.-G.; Nisius, R. [Max-Planck-Institut for Physics, Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805 Munich (Germany); Richter, R.H. [Semiconductor Laboratory of the Max-Planck-Society, Otto Hahn Ring 6, D-81739 Munich (Germany); Terzo, S.; Weigell, P. [Max-Planck-Institut for Physics, Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805 Munich (Germany)

    2014-11-21

    We present an R and D activity focused on the development of novel modules for the upgrade of the ATLAS pixel system at the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). The modules consist of n-in-p pixel sensors, 100 or 200 μm thick, produced at VTT (Finland) with an active edge technology, which considerably reduces the dead area at the periphery of the device. The sensors are interconnected with solder bump-bonding to the ATLAS FE-I3 and FE-I4 read-out chips, and characterised with radioactive sources and beam tests at the CERN-SPS and DESY. The results of these measurements will be discussed for devices before and after irradiation up to a fluence of 5×10{sub 15}n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}. We will also report on the R and D activity to obtain Inter Chip Vias (ICVs) on the ATLAS read-out chip in collaboration with the Fraunhofer Institute EMFT. This step is meant to prove the feasibility of the signal transport to the newly created readout pads on the backside of the chips allowing for four side buttable devices without the presently used cantilever for wire bonding. The read-out chips with ICVs will be interconnected to thin pixel sensors, 75 μm and 150 μm thick, with the Solid Liquid Interdiffusion (SLID) technology, which is an alternative to the standard solder bump-bonding.

  19. Development of active edge pixel sensors and four-side buttable modules using vertical integration technologies

    We present an R and D activity focused on the development of novel modules for the upgrade of the ATLAS pixel system at the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). The modules consist of n-in-p pixel sensors, 100 or 200 μm thick, produced at VTT (Finland) with an active edge technology, which considerably reduces the dead area at the periphery of the device. The sensors are interconnected with solder bump-bonding to the ATLAS FE-I3 and FE-I4 read-out chips, and characterised with radioactive sources and beam tests at the CERN-SPS and DESY. The results of these measurements will be discussed for devices before and after irradiation up to a fluence of 5×1015neq/cm2. We will also report on the R and D activity to obtain Inter Chip Vias (ICVs) on the ATLAS read-out chip in collaboration with the Fraunhofer Institute EMFT. This step is meant to prove the feasibility of the signal transport to the newly created readout pads on the backside of the chips allowing for four side buttable devices without the presently used cantilever for wire bonding. The read-out chips with ICVs will be interconnected to thin pixel sensors, 75 μm and 150 μm thick, with the Solid Liquid Interdiffusion (SLID) technology, which is an alternative to the standard solder bump-bonding

  20. Active Pixel Sensors for direct detection of soft X-rays

    The imaging of soft X-ray images is typically performed with charge coupled devices (CCDs). However, these can have limited readout speed, dynamic range and can also require significant cooling to obtain the required signal to noise ratio. Active pixel sensors (APS) are able to combine faster readout speeds and higher dynamic range with in-pixel intelligence to allow region of interest readout and adaptive gain. To obtain high detection efficiency and 100% pixel fill factor the sensor is back thinned and illuminated from the backside. We report on the characterization of a back-thinned APS (Vanilla); an array of 512 × 512 pixels of size 25 × 25 microns. The sensor has a 12-bit digital output for full frame mode, as well as being able to be readout in a fully programmable Region-Of-Interest (ROI) analogue mode. In full frame, the sensor can operate at a readout rate of more than 100 frames per second. Characterization of the detector was carried out through the analysis of photon transfer curves to yield measurements of the full well capacity, noise levels, gain constants and device linearity. Spectral response measurements were made to show the improvement in detection efficiency using a backthinned sensor. A typical synchrotron experiment was performed at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) using Soft X-rays ( ∼ 700 eV) to produce a diffraction pattern from a permalloy sample. The pattern was imaged at a range of frame rates, up to 20Hz, and a range of temperatures for both a back-thinned Vanilla and a Princeton PIXIS-XO: 2048B CCD. The results of which are compared. The detection efficiency of the APS is shown to be comparable to the CCD for a given frame rate (0.1Hz), with similar noise levels. We suggest that the back-thinned APS are a viable technology choice for the direct detection of soft X-rays for synchrotron applications.

  1. Thin n-in-p planar pixel sensors and active edge sensors for the ATLAS upgrade at HL-LHC

    Terzo, S; Nisius, R; Paschen, B

    2014-01-01

    Silicon pixel modules employing n-in-p planar sensors with an active thickness of 200 $\\mu$m, produced at CiS, and 100-200 $\\mu$m thin active/slim edge sensor devices, produced at VTT in Finland have been interconnected to ATLAS FE-I3 and FE-I4 read-out chips. The thin sensors are designed for high energy physics collider experiments to ensure radiation hardness at high fluences. Moreover, the active edge technology of the VTT production maximizes the sensitive region of the assembly, allowing for a reduced overlap of the modules in the pixel layer close to the beam pipe. The CiS production includes also four chip sensors according to the module geometry planned for the outer layers of the upgraded ATLAS pixel detector to be operated at the HL-LHC. The modules have been characterized using radioactive sources in the laboratory and with high precision measurements at beam tests to investigate the hit efficiency and charge collection properties at different bias voltages and particle incidence angles. The perfo...

  2. On drift fields in CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors with point-like collection diodes

    Deveaux, M; Dorokhov, A; Doering, D; Heymes, J; Kachel, M; Koziel, M; Linnik, B; Müntz, C; Stroth, J

    2016-01-01

    CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for charged particle tracking are considered as technology for numerous experiments in heavy ion and particle physics. To match the requirements for those applications in terms of tolerance to non-ionizing radiation, it is being tried to deplete the sensitive volume of the, traditionally non-depleted, silicon sensors. We study the feasibility of this approach for the common case that the collection diodes of the pixel are small as compared to the pixel pitch. An analytic equation predicting the thickness of the depletion depth and the capacity of this point-like junction is introduced. We find that the predictions of this equations differs qualitatively from the usual results for flat PN junctions and that $dC/dU$-measurements are not suited to measure the depletion depth of diodes with point-like geometry. The predictions of the equation is compared with measurements on the depletion depth of CMOS sensors, which were carried out with a novel measurement protocol. It is fo...

  3. Analysis of noise characteristics for the active pixels in CMOS image sensors for X-ray imaging

    Kim, Young Soo; Cho, Gyuseong; Bae, Jun-Hyung

    2006-09-01

    CMOS image sensors have poorer performance compared to conventional charge coupled devices (CCDs). Since CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) in general have higher temporal noise, higher dark current, smaller full well charge capacitance, and lower spectral response, they cannot provide the same wide dynamic range and superior signal to noise ratio as CCDs. In view of electronic noise, the main source for the CMOS APS is the pixel, along with other signal processing blocks such as row and column decoder, analog signal processor (ASP), analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and timing and control logic circuitry. Therefore, it is important and necessary to characterize noise of the active pixels in CMOS APSs, and we performed experimental measurements and comparisons with theoretical estimations. To derive noise source of the pixels, we designed and fabricated four types of CMOS active pixels, and each pixel is composed of a photodiode and three MOS transistors. The size of these pixels is 100 μm×100 μm. The test chip was fabricated using ETRI 0.8 μm (2P/2M) standard CMOS process. It was found that the dominant noise in CMOS active pixels is shot noise during integration under normal operating conditions. And, it was also seen that epitaxial type pixels have similar noise level compared to non-epitaxial type, and the noise of diffusion type pixel is larger than for a well type pixel on the same substrate type.

  4. Analysis of noise characteristics for the active pixels in CMOS image sensors for X-ray imaging

    CMOS image sensors have poorer performance compared to conventional charge coupled devices (CCDs). Since CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) in general have higher temporal noise, higher dark current, smaller full well charge capacitance, and lower spectral response, they cannot provide the same wide dynamic range and superior signal to noise ratio as CCDs. In view of electronic noise, the main source for the CMOS APS is the pixel, along with other signal processing blocks such as row and column decoder, analog signal processor (ASP), analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and timing and control logic circuitry. Therefore, it is important and necessary to characterize noise of the active pixels in CMOS APSs, and we performed experimental measurements and comparisons with theoretical estimations. To derive noise source of the pixels, we designed and fabricated four types of CMOS active pixels, and each pixel is composed of a photodiode and three MOS transistors. The size of these pixels is 100 μmx100 μm. The test chip was fabricated using ETRI 0.8 μm (2P/2M) standard CMOS process. It was found that the dominant noise in CMOS active pixels is shot noise during integration under normal operating conditions. And, it was also seen that epitaxial type pixels have similar noise level compared to non-epitaxial type, and the noise of diffusion type pixel is larger than for a well type pixel on the same substrate type

  5. New generation of monolithic active pixel sensors for charged particle detection

    Vertex detectors are of great importance in particle physics experiments, as the knowledge of the event flavour is becoming an issue for the physics programme at Future Linear Colliders. Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) based on a novel detector structure have been proposed. Their fabrication is compatible with a standard CMOS process. The sensor is inseparable from the readout electronics, since both of them are integrated on the same, low-resistivity silicon wafer. The basic pixel configuration comprises only three MOS transistors and a diode collecting the charge through thermal diffusion. The charge is generated in the thin non-depleted epitaxial layer underneath the readout electronics. This approach provides, at low cost, a high resolution and thin device with the whole area sensitive to radiation. Device simulations using the ISE-TCAD package have been carried out to study the charge collection mechanism. In order to demonstrate the viability of the technique, four prototype chips have been fabricated using different submicrometer CMOS processes. The pixel gain has been calibrated using a 55Fe source and the Poisson sequence method. The prototypes have been exposed to high-energy particle beams at CERN. The tests proved excellent detection performances expressed in a single-track spatial resolution of 1.5 μm and detection efficiency close to 100%, resulting from a SNR ratio of more than 30. Irradiation tests showed immunity of MAPS to a level of a few times 1012 n/cm2 and a few hundred kRad of ionising radiation. The ideas for future work, including on-pixel signal amplification, double sampling operation and current mode pixel design are present as well. (author)

  6. Research and Development of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for the Detection of the Elementary Particles

    In order to develop high spatial resolution and readout speed vertex detectors for the future International Linear Collider (ILC), fast CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) are studied on this work. Two prototypes of MAPS, MIMOSA 8 and MIMOSA 16, based on the same micro-electronic architecture were developed in CMOS processes with different thickness of epitaxial layer. The size of pixel matrix is 32 x 128: 8 columns of the pixel array are readout directly with analog outputs and the other 24 columns are connected to the column level auto-zero discriminators. The Correlated Double Sampling (CDS) structures are successfully implemented inside pixel and discriminator. The photo diode type pixels with different diode sizes are used in these prototypes. With a 55Fe X-ray radioactive source, the important parameters, such as Temporal Noise, Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN), Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), Charge-to-Voltage conversion Factor (CVF) and Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE), are studied as function of readout speed and diode size. For MIMOSA 8, the effect of fast neutrons irradiation is also. Two beam tests campaigns were made: at DESY with a 5 GeV electrons beam and at CERN with a 180 GeV pions beam. Detection Efficiency and Spatial Resolution are studied in function of the discriminator threshold. For these two parameters, the influences of diode size and SNR of the central pixel of a cluster are also discussed. In order to improve the spatial resolution of the digital outputs, a very compact (25 μm x 1 mm) and low consumption (300 μW) column level ADC is designed in AMS 0.35 μm OPTO process. Based on successive approximation architecture, the auto-offset cancellation structure is integrated. A new column level auto-zero discriminator using static latch is also designed. (author)

  7. Characterisation of a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor for use in the TEAM Microscope

    Battaglia, Marco; Denes, Peter; Doering, Dionisio; Duden, Thomas; Krieger, Brad; Giubilato, Piero; Gnani, Dario; Radmilovic, Velimir

    2010-01-01

    A 1M- and a 4M-pixel monolithic CMOS active pixel sensor with 9.5x9.5 micron^2 pixels have been developed for direct imaging in transmission electron microscopy as part of the TEAM project. We present the design and a full characterisation of the detector. Data collected with electron beams at various energies of interest in electron microscopy are used to determine the detector response. Data are compared to predictions of simulation. The line spread function measured with 80 keV and 300 keV electrons is (12.1+/-0.7) micron and (7.4+/-0.6) micron, respectively, in good agreement with our simulation. We measure the detection quantum efficiency to be 0.78+/-0.04 at 80 keV and 0.74+/-0.03 at 300 keV. Using a new imaging technique, based on single electron reconstruction, the line spread function for 80 keV and 300 keV electrons becomes (6.7+/-0.3) micron and (2.4+/-0.2) micron, respectively. The radiation tolerance of the pixels has been tested up to 5 Mrad and the detector is still functional with a decrease o...

  8. Characterisation of a CMOS active pixel sensor for use in the TEAM microscope

    Battaglia, Marco; Contarato, Devis; Denes, Peter; Doering, Dionisio; Duden, Thomas; Krieger, Brad; Giubilato, Piero; Gnani, Dario; Radmilovic, Velimir

    2010-10-01

    A 1M- and a 4M-pixel monolithic CMOS active pixel sensor with 9.5×9.5 μm2 pixels have been developed for direct imaging in transmission electron microscopy as part of the TEAM project. We present the design and a full characterisation of the detector. Data collected with electron beams at various energies of interest in electron microscopy are used to determine the detector response. Data are compared to predictions of simulation. The line spread function measured with 80 and 300 keV electrons is (12.1±0.7) and (7.4±0.6) μm, respectively, in good agreement with our simulation. We measure the detection quantum efficiency to be 0.78±0.04 at 80 keV and 0.74±0.03 at 300 keV. Using a new imaging technique, based on single electron reconstruction, the line spread function for 80 and 300 keV electrons becomes (6.7±0.3) and (2.4±0.2) μm, respectively. The radiation tolerance of the pixels has been tested up to 5 Mrad and the detector is still functional with a decrease of dynamic range by ≃30%, corresponding to a reduction in full-well depth from ˜39 to ˜27 primary 300 keV electrons, due to leakage current increase, but identical line spread function performance.

  9. Characterisation of a CMOS active pixel sensor for use in the TEAM microscope

    Battaglia, Marco, E-mail: MBattaglia@lbl.go [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics, University of California at Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Contarato, Devis; Denes, Peter; Doering, Dionisio; Duden, Thomas; Krieger, Brad [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Giubilato, Piero [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi, Padova I-35131 (Italy); Gnani, Dario; Radmilovic, Velimir [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-10-21

    A 1M- and a 4M-pixel monolithic CMOS active pixel sensor with 9.5x9.5{mu}m{sup 2} pixels have been developed for direct imaging in transmission electron microscopy as part of the TEAM project. We present the design and a full characterisation of the detector. Data collected with electron beams at various energies of interest in electron microscopy are used to determine the detector response. Data are compared to predictions of simulation. The line spread function measured with 80 and 300 keV electrons is (12.1{+-}0.7) and (7.4{+-}0.6){mu}m, respectively, in good agreement with our simulation. We measure the detection quantum efficiency to be 0.78{+-}0.04 at 80 keV and 0.74{+-}0.03 at 300 keV. Using a new imaging technique, based on single electron reconstruction, the line spread function for 80 and 300 keV electrons becomes (6.7{+-}0.3) and (2.4{+-}0.2){mu}m, respectively. The radiation tolerance of the pixels has been tested up to 5 Mrad and the detector is still functional with a decrease of dynamic range by {approx_equal}30%, corresponding to a reduction in full-well depth from {approx}39 to {approx}27 primary 300 keV electrons, due to leakage current increase, but identical line spread function performance.

  10. Performance of a novel wafer scale CMOS active pixel sensor for bio-medical imaging

    Recently CMOS active pixels sensors (APSs) have become a valuable alternative to amorphous silicon and selenium flat panel imagers (FPIs) in bio-medical imaging applications. CMOS APSs can now be scaled up to the standard 20 cm diameter wafer size by means of a reticle stitching block process. However, despite wafer scale CMOS APS being monolithic, sources of non-uniformity of response and regional variations can persist representing a significant challenge for wafer scale sensor response. Non-uniformity of stitched sensors can arise from a number of factors related to the manufacturing process, including variation of amplification, variation between readout components, wafer defects and process variations across the wafer due to manufacturing processes. This paper reports on an investigation into the spatial non-uniformity and regional variations of a wafer scale stitched CMOS APS. For the first time a per-pixel analysis of the electro-optical performance of a wafer CMOS APS is presented, to address inhomogeneity issues arising from the stitching techniques used to manufacture wafer scale sensors. A complete model of the signal generation in the pixel array has been provided and proved capable of accounting for noise and gain variations across the pixel array. This novel analysis leads to readout noise and conversion gain being evaluated at pixel level, stitching block level and in regions of interest, resulting in a coefficient of variation ⩽1.9%. The uniformity of the image quality performance has been further investigated in a typical x-ray application, i.e. mammography, showing a uniformity in terms of CNR among the highest when compared with mammography detectors commonly used in clinical practice. Finally, in order to compare the detection capability of this novel APS with the technology currently used (i.e. FPIs), theoretical evaluation of the detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at zero-frequency has been performed, resulting in a higher DQE for this

  11. Performance of a novel wafer scale CMOS active pixel sensor for bio-medical imaging.

    Esposito, M; Anaxagoras, T; Konstantinidis, A C; Zheng, Y; Speller, R D; Evans, P M; Allinson, N M; Wells, K

    2014-07-01

    Recently CMOS active pixels sensors (APSs) have become a valuable alternative to amorphous silicon and selenium flat panel imagers (FPIs) in bio-medical imaging applications. CMOS APSs can now be scaled up to the standard 20 cm diameter wafer size by means of a reticle stitching block process. However, despite wafer scale CMOS APS being monolithic, sources of non-uniformity of response and regional variations can persist representing a significant challenge for wafer scale sensor response. Non-uniformity of stitched sensors can arise from a number of factors related to the manufacturing process, including variation of amplification, variation between readout components, wafer defects and process variations across the wafer due to manufacturing processes. This paper reports on an investigation into the spatial non-uniformity and regional variations of a wafer scale stitched CMOS APS. For the first time a per-pixel analysis of the electro-optical performance of a wafer CMOS APS is presented, to address inhomogeneity issues arising from the stitching techniques used to manufacture wafer scale sensors. A complete model of the signal generation in the pixel array has been provided and proved capable of accounting for noise and gain variations across the pixel array. This novel analysis leads to readout noise and conversion gain being evaluated at pixel level, stitching block level and in regions of interest, resulting in a coefficient of variation ⩽1.9%. The uniformity of the image quality performance has been further investigated in a typical x-ray application, i.e. mammography, showing a uniformity in terms of CNR among the highest when compared with mammography detectors commonly used in clinical practice. Finally, in order to compare the detection capability of this novel APS with the technology currently used (i.e. FPIs), theoretical evaluation of the detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at zero-frequency has been performed, resulting in a higher DQE for this

  12. Development of a new electronic personal neutron dosemeter using a CMOS active pixel sensor

    A CMOS active pixel sensor, originally designed for the tracking of minimum ionising charged particles in high-energy physics, has been recently used for the detection of fast neutrons. Data were taken at the IRSN Cadarache facility with a 241Am-Be ISO source and a polyethylene radiator. A high-intrinsic efficiency (1.2 x 10-3) has been obtained. It is in good agreement with both calculations and a MCNPX Monte Carlo simulation. This experiment paves the way for a fully electronic personal neutron dosemeter. (authors)

  13. Radiation hardness of a large area CMOS active pixel sensor for bio-medical applications

    Esposito, M; Diaz, O; Wells, K.; Anaxagoras, T; Allinson, NM

    2012-01-01

    A wafer scale CMOS Active Pixel Sensor has been designed employing design techniques of transistor enclosed geometry and P+ doped guard rings to offer ionizing radiation tolerance. The detector was irradiated with 160 kVp X-rays up to a total dose of 94 kGy(Si) and remained functional. The radiation damage produced in the device has been studied, resulting in a dark current density increase per decade of 96±5 pA/cm/decade and a damage threshold of 204 Gy(Si). The damage produced in the detect...

  14. DMAPS: a fully depleted monolithic active pixel sensor - analog performance characterization

    Havránek, Miroslav; Krüger, Hans; Fu, Yunan; Germic, Leonard; Kishishita, Tetsuichi; Obermann, Theresa; Wermes, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) have been developed since the late 1990s based on silicon substrates with a thin epitaxial layer (thickness of 10-15 $\\mu$m) in which charge is collected on an electrode, albeit by disordered and slow diffusion rather than by drift in a directed electric field. As a consequence, the signal is small ($\\approx$ 1000 e$^-$) and the radiation tolerance is much below the LHC requirements by factors of 100 to 1000. In this paper we present the development of a fully Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (DMAPS) based on a high resistivity substrate allowing the creation of a fully depleted detection volume. This concept overcomes the inherent limitations of charge collection by diffusion in the standard MAPS designs. We present results from a test chip EPCB01 designed in a commercial 150 nm CMOS technology. The technology provides a thin (50 $\\mu$m) high resistivity n-type silicon substrate as well as an additional deep p-well which allows to integrate full CMOS circuitry i...

  15. CMOS Active Pixel Sensors as energy-range detectors for proton Computed Tomography

    Since the first proof of concept in the early 70s, a number of technologies has been proposed to perform proton CT (pCT), as a means of mapping tissue stopping power for accurate treatment planning in proton therapy. Previous prototypes of energy-range detectors for pCT have been mainly based on the use of scintillator-based calorimeters, to measure proton residual energy after passing through the patient. However, such an approach is limited by the need for only a single proton passing through the energy-range detector in a read-out cycle. A novel approach to this problem could be the use of pixelated detectors, where the independent read-out of each pixel allows to measure simultaneously the residual energy of a number of protons in the same read-out cycle, facilitating a faster and more efficient pCT scan. This paper investigates the suitability of CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) to track individual protons as they go through a number of CMOS layers, forming an energy-range telescope. Measurements performed at the iThemba Laboratories will be presented and analysed in terms of correlation, to confirm capability of proton tracking for CMOS APSs

  16. CMOS Active Pixel Sensors as energy-range detectors for proton Computed Tomography

    Esposito, M.; Anaxagoras, T.; Evans, P. M.; Green, S.; Manolopoulos, S.; Nieto-Camero, J.; Parker, D. J.; Poludniowski, G.; Price, T.; Waltham, C.; Allinson, N. M.

    2015-06-01

    Since the first proof of concept in the early 70s, a number of technologies has been proposed to perform proton CT (pCT), as a means of mapping tissue stopping power for accurate treatment planning in proton therapy. Previous prototypes of energy-range detectors for pCT have been mainly based on the use of scintillator-based calorimeters, to measure proton residual energy after passing through the patient. However, such an approach is limited by the need for only a single proton passing through the energy-range detector in a read-out cycle. A novel approach to this problem could be the use of pixelated detectors, where the independent read-out of each pixel allows to measure simultaneously the residual energy of a number of protons in the same read-out cycle, facilitating a faster and more efficient pCT scan. This paper investigates the suitability of CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) to track individual protons as they go through a number of CMOS layers, forming an energy-range telescope. Measurements performed at the iThemba Laboratories will be presented and analysed in terms of correlation, to confirm capability of proton tracking for CMOS APSs.

  17. Design and testing of monolithic active pixel sensors for charged particle tracking

    Deptuch, G; Claus, G; Colledani, C; Dulinski, W; Gornushkin, Y; Husson, D; Riester, J L; Winter, M

    2002-01-01

    A monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) for charged particle tracking based on a novel detector structure has been proposed, simulated, fabricated and tested. This detector is inseparable from the readout electronics, since both of them are integrated on the same, low- resistivity silicon wafer standard for a CMOS process. The individual pixel is comprised of only three MOS transistors and a photodiode collecting the charge created in the thin undepleted epitaxial layer. This approach provides a low cost, high resolution and thin device with the whole detector area sensitive to radiation (100% fill factor). Detailed device simulations using the ISE-TCAD package have been carried out in order to study the charge. collection mechanism and to validate the proposed idea. In order to demonstrate viability of the technique, two prototype chips were successively fabricated using 0.6 mu m and 0.35 mu m CMOS processes. Both chips have been fully characterized. The pixel conversion gain has been calibrated using a /sup...

  18. Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a quadruple well technology for nearly 100% fill factor and full CMOS pixels

    Ballin, J A; Dauncey, P D; Magnan, A -M; Mikami, Y; Miller, O D; Noy, M; Rajovic, V; Stanitzki, M M; Stefanov, K D; Turchetta, R; Tyndel, M; Villani, E G; Watson, N K; Wilson, J A

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel, quadruple well process developed in a modern 0.18mu CMOS technology called INMAPS. On top of the standard process, we have added a deep P implant that can be used to form a deep P-well and provide screening of N-wells from the P-doped epitaxial layer. This prevents the collection of radiation-induced charge by unrelated N-wells, typically ones where PMOS transistors are integrated. The design of a sensor specifically tailored to a particle physics experiment is presented, where each 50mu pixel has over 150 PMOS and NMOS transistors. The sensor has been fabricated in the INMAPS process and first experimental evidence of the effectiveness of this process on charge collection is presented, showing a significant improvement in efficiency.

  19. Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS in a Quadruple Well Technology for Nearly 100% Fill Factor and Full CMOS Pixels

    John Allan Wilson

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a novel, quadruple well process developed in a modern 0.18 mm CMOS technology called INMAPS. On top of the standard process, we have added a deep P implant that can be used to form a deep P-well and provide screening of N-wells from the P-doped epitaxial layer. This prevents the collection of radiation-induced charge by unrelated N-wells, typically ones where PMOS transistors are integrated. The design of a sensor specifically tailored to a particle physics experiment is presented, where each 50 mm pixel has over 150 PMOS and NMOS transistors. The sensor has been fabricated in the INMAPS process and first experimental evidence of the effectiveness of this process on charge collection is presented, showing a significant improvement in efficiency.

  20. Novel Logarithmic Active Pixel Sensor with High Dynamic Range and High Output Swing

    FU Xian-song; YAO Su-ying; YUAN Yi-dong; XU Jiang-tao; DING Ke; YAN Kun-shan

    2008-01-01

    The logarithmic response complementary metal oxide semiconductor(CMOS) image sensor provides a wide dynamic range, but its drawback is the lack of simple fixed pattern noise(FPN) cancellation scheme. Designed is a novel logarithmic active pixel sensor(APS) with high dynamic range and high output swing. Firstly, the operation principle of mixed-model APS is introduced. The pixel can work in three operation modes by choosing the proper control signals. Then, FPN sources of logarithmic APS are analyzed, and double-sampled technique is implemented to reduce FPN. Finally, according to the simulation results, layout is designed and has passed design rule check(DRC), electronic rule check(ERC) and layout versus schematic(LVS) verifications, and the post-simulation results are basically in agreement with the simulation results. Dynamic range of the new logarithmic APS can reach about 140 dB; and the output swing is about 750 mV. Results show that by using double sampled technique, most FPN is eliminated and the dynamic range is enhanced.

  1. 12-inch-wafer-scale CMOS active-pixel sensor for digital mammography

    Heo, Sung Kyn; Kosonen, Jari; Hwang, Sung Ha; Kim, Tae Woo; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes the development of an active-pixel sensor (APS) panel, which has a field-of-view of 23.1×17.1 cm and features 70-μm-sized pixels arranged in a 3300×2442 array format, for digital mammographic applications. The APS panel was realized on 12-inch wafers based on the standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology without physical tiling processes of several small-area sensor arrays. Electrical performance of the developed panel is described in terms of dark current, full-well capacity and leakage current map. For mammographic imaging, the optimized CsI:Tl scintillator is experimentally determined by being combined with the developed panel and analyzing im aging characteristics, such as modulation-transfer function, noise-power spectrum, detective quantum efficiency, image l ag, and contrast-detail analysis by using the CDMAM 3.4 phantom. With these results, we suggest that the developed CMOS-based detector can be used for conventional and advanced digital mammographic applications.

  2. TFA pixel sensor technology for vertex detectors

    Jarron, P.; Moraes, D.; Despeisse, M.; Dissertori, G.; Dunand, S.; Kaplon. J.; Miazza, C.; Shah, Arvind; Viertel, G M.; Wyrsch, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    Pixel microvertex detectors at the SLHC and a future linear collider face very challenging issues: extreme radiation hardness, cooling design, interconnections density and fabrication cost. As an alternative approach we present a novel pixel detector based on the deposition of a Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon (a-Si:H) film on top of a readout ASIC. The Thin-Film on ASIC (TFA) technology is inspired by an emerging microelectronic technology envisaged for visible light Active Pixel Sensor (APS)...

  3. Design and implementation of fast and sparsified readout for Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors

    Torheim, Olav

    2010-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the development of smart pixel readout architectures that should ultimately be targeted for the Micro-Vertex Detector (MVD) of the CBM (Compressed Baryonic Matter) experiment. The technical challenge of building a pixel detector for this experiment is to design particle sensors capable of meeting at the same time very strict requirements on both spatial resolution, time resolution and radiation hardness. The MVD is required to obtain data for the open ...

  4. Performance of a Fast Binary Readout CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Chip Designed for Charged Particle Detection

    Degerli, Y.; Besancon, M.; Besson, A.; Claus, G; Deptuch, G; Dulinski, W.; Fourches, N.; Goffe, M.; Himmi, A.; Li, Y.; Li, Y.; Lutz, P.; Orsini, F.; Szelezniak, M.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the performance of the MIMOSA8 (HiMAPS1) chip. The chip is a 128$, times ,$32 pixels array where 24 columns have discriminated binary outputs and eight columns analog test outputs. Offset correction techniques are used extensively in this chip to overcome process related mismatches. The array is divided in four blocks of pixels with different conversion factors and is controlled by a serially programmable sequencer. MIMOSA8 is a representative of the CMOS sensors development opti...

  5. A low noise reference generator in Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for STAR

    In order to reduce the number of cables and gain a lower material budget, this paper presents an on-chip reference generator to provide the clamping voltage in monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) for the STAR experiment. It is realized by a regulator utilizing a buffer and a serial RC network. The proposed circuits can achieve good stability, low power dissipation and low noise. Moreover, the output voltage is adjustable to compensate the influence of the process. A prototype has been implemented in a 0.35 μm CMOS process. Its die area is 327 μm x 119 μm. The power dissipation is 677 μW. The measured results show that 5.3% of the noise in MAPS is induced by the reference generator.

  6. Effect and suppression of parasitic surface damage in neutron irradiated CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors

    Deveaux, M; Scharrer, P; Stroth, J

    2016-01-01

    CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) were chosen as sensor technology for the vertex detectors of STAR, CBM and the upgraded ALICE-ITS. They also constitute a valuable option for tracking devices at future e+e- colliders. Those applications require a substantial tolerance to both, ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. To allow for a focused optimization of the radiation tolerance, prototypes are tested by irradiating the devices either with purely ionizing radiation (e.g. soft X-rays) or the most pure sources of non-ionizing radiation available (e.g. reactor neutrons). In the second case, it is typically assumed that the impact of the parasitic $\\gamma$-rays found in the neutron beams is negligible. We checked this assumption by irradiating MAPS with $\\gamma$-rays and comparing the radiation damage generated with the one in neutron irradiated sensors. We conclude that the parasitic radiation doses may cause non-negligible radiation damage. Based on the results we propose a procedure to recognize and to ...

  7. Charge collection properties of a depleted monolithic active pixel sensor using a HV-SOI process

    New pixel detector concepts, based on commercial high voltage and/or high resistivity CMOS processes, are being investigated as a possible candidate to the inner and outer layers of the ATLAS Inner Tracker in the HL-LHC upgrade. A depleted monolithic active pixel sensor on thick film SOI technology is being extensively investigated for that purpose. This particular technology provides a double well structure, which shields the thin gate oxide transistors from the Buried Oxide (BOX). In addition, the distance between transistors and BOX is one order of magnitude bigger than conventional SOI technologies, making the technology promising against its main limitations, as radiation hardness or back gate effects. Its radiation hardness to Total Ionizing Dose (TID) and the absence of back gate effect up to 700 Mrad has been measured and published [1]. The process allows the use of high voltages (up to 300V) which are used to partially deplete the substrate. The process allows fabrication in higher resistivity, therefore a fully depleted substrate could be achieved after thinning. This article shows the results on charge collection properties of the silicon bulk below the BOX by different techniques, in a laboratory with radioactive sources and by edge Transient Current Technique, for unirradiated and irradiated samples

  8. A proposed STAR microvertex detector using Active Pixel Sensors with some relevant studies on APS performance

    A vertex detector that can measure particles with charm or bottom quarks would dramatically expand the physics capability of the STAR detector at RHIC. To accomplish this, we are proposing to build the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) using 2x2 cm Active Pixels Sensors (APS). Ten of these APS chips will be arranged on a ladder (0.28% of a radiation length) at radii of 1.5 and at 5.0 cm. We have examined several properties of APS chips, so that we can characterize the performance of this detector. Using 1.5 GeV/c electrons, we have measured the charge collected and compared it to the expected charge. To achieve high efficiency, we have considered two different cluster finding algorithms and found that the choice of algorithm is dependent on noise level. We have demonstrated that a Scanning Electron Microscope can probe properties of an APS chip. In particular, we studied several position resolution algorithms. Finally, we studied the properties of pixel pitches from 5 to 30 μm

  9. Charge collection properties of a depleted monolithic active pixel sensor using a HV-SOI process

    Fernandez-Perez, S.; Backhaus, M.; Fernandez-Garcia, M.; Gallrapp, C.; Hemperek, T.; Kishishita, T.; Krueger, H.; Moll, M.; Padilla, C.; Pernegger, H.

    2016-01-01

    New pixel detector concepts, based on commercial high voltage and/or high resistivity CMOS processes, are being investigated as a possible candidate to the inner and outer layers of the ATLAS Inner Tracker in the HL-LHC upgrade. A depleted monolithic active pixel sensor on thick film SOI technology is being extensively investigated for that purpose. This particular technology provides a double well structure, which shields the thin gate oxide transistors from the Buried Oxide (BOX). In addition, the distance between transistors and BOX is one order of magnitude bigger than conventional SOI technologies, making the technology promising against its main limitations, as radiation hardness or back gate effects. Its radiation hardness to Total Ionizing Dose (TID) and the absence of back gate effect up to 700 Mrad has been measured and published [1]. The process allows the use of high voltages (up to 300V) which are used to partially deplete the substrate. The process allows fabrication in higher resistivity, therefore a fully depleted substrate could be achieved after thinning. This article shows the results on charge collection properties of the silicon bulk below the BOX by different techniques, in a laboratory with radioactive sources and by edge Transient Current Technique, for unirradiated and irradiated samples.

  10. Improved Design of Active Pixel CMOS Sensors for Charged Particle Detection

    The Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear physics program requires developments in detector instrumentation electronics with improved energy, position and timing resolution, sensitivity, rate capability, stability, dynamic range, and background suppression. The current Phase-I project was focused on analysis of standard-CMOS photogate Active Pixel Sensors (APS) as an efficient solution to this challenge. The advantages of the CMOS APS over traditional hybrid approaches (i.e., separate detection regions bump-bonded to readout circuits) include greatly reduced cost, low power and the potential for vastly larger pixel counts and densities. However, challenges remain in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and readout speed (currently on the order of milliseconds), which is the major problem for this technology. Recent work has shown that the long readout time for photogate APS is due to the presence of (interface) traps at the semiconductor-oxide interface. This Phase-I work yielded useful results in two areas: (a) Advanced three-dimensional (3D) physics-based simulation models and simulation-based analysis of the impact of interface trap density on the transient charge collection characteristics of existing APS structures; and (b) Preliminary analysis of the feasibility of an improved photogate pixel structure (i.e., new APS design) with an induced electric field under the charge collecting electrode to enhance charge collection. Significant effort was dedicated in Phase-I to the critical task of implementing accurate interface trap models in CFDRC's NanoTCAD 3D semiconductor device-physics simulator. This resulted in validation of the new NanoTCAD models and simulation results against experimental (published) data, within the margin of uncertainty associated with obtaining device geometry, material properties, and experimentation details. Analyses of the new, proposed photogate APS design demonstrated several promising trends

  11. SMARTPIX, a photon-counting pixel detector for synchrotron applications based on Medipix3RX readout chip and active edge pixel sensors

    Photon-counting pixel detectors are now routinely used on synchrotron beamlines. Many applications benefit from their noiseless mode of operation, single-pixel point spread function and high frame rates. One of their drawbacks is a discontinuous detection area due to the space-consuming wirebonded connections of the readout chips. Moreover, charge sharing limits their efficiency and their energy discrimination capabilities. In order to overcome these issues the ESRF is developing SMARTPIX,a scalable and versatile pixel detector system with minimized dead areas and with energy resolving capabilities based on the MEDIPIX3RX readout chip. SMARTPIX exploits the through-silicon via technology implemented on MEDIPIX3RX, the active edge sensor processing developed in particular at ADVACAM, and the on-chip analog charge summing feature of MEDIPIX3RX. This article reports on system architecture, unit module structure, data acquisition electronics, target characteristics and applications

  12. SMARTPIX, a photon-counting pixel detector for synchrotron applications based on Medipix3RX readout chip and active edge pixel sensors

    Ponchut, C.; Collet, E.; Hervé, C.; Le Caer, T.; Cerrai, J.; Siron, L.; Dabin, Y.; Ribois, J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Photon-counting pixel detectors are now routinely used on synchrotron beamlines. Many applications benefit from their noiseless mode of operation, single-pixel point spread function and high frame rates. One of their drawbacks is a discontinuous detection area due to the space-consuming wirebonded connections of the readout chips. Moreover, charge sharing limits their efficiency and their energy discrimination capabilities. In order to overcome these issues the ESRF is developing SMARTPIX,a scalable and versatile pixel detector system with minimized dead areas and with energy resolving capabilities based on the MEDIPIX3RX readout chip. SMARTPIX exploits the through-silicon via technology implemented on MEDIPIX3RX, the active edge sensor processing developed in particular at ADVACAM, and the on-chip analog charge summing feature of MEDIPIX3RX. This article reports on system architecture, unit module structure, data acquisition electronics, target characteristics and applications.

  13. First evidence of phase-contrast imaging with laboratory sources and active pixel sensors

    The aim of the present work is to achieve a first step towards combining the advantages of an innovative X-ray imaging technique-phase-contrast imaging (XPCi)-with those of a new class of sensors, i.e. CMOS-based active pixel sensors (APSs). The advantages of XPCi are well known and include increased image quality and detection of details invisible to conventional techniques, with potential application fields encompassing the medical, biological, industrial and security areas. Vanilla, one of the APSs developed by the MI-3 collaboration (see (http://mi3.shef.ac.uk)), was thoroughly characterised and an appropriate scintillator was selected to provide X-ray sensitivity. During this process, a set of phase-contrast images of different biological samples was acquired by means of the well-established free-space propagation XPCi technique. The obtained results are very encouraging and are in optimum agreement with the predictions of a simulation recently developed by some of the authors thus further supporting its reliability. This paper presents these preliminary results in detail and discusses in brief both the background to this work and its future developments

  14. Active Pixel Sensors in ams H18/H35 HV-CMOS Technology for the ATLAS HL-LHC Upgrade

    Ristic, Branislav

    2016-01-01

    Deep sub micron HV-CMOS processes offer the opportunity for sensors built by industry standard techniques while being HV tolerant, making them good candidates for drift-based, fast collecting, thus radiation-hard pixel detectors. For the upgrade of the ATLAS Pixel Detector towards the HL-LHC requirements, active pixel sensors in HV-CMOS technology were investigated. These implement amplifier and discriminator stages directly in insulating deep n-wells, which also act as collecting electrodes. The deep n-wells allow for bias voltages up to 150V leading to a depletion depth of several 10um. Prototype sensors in the ams H18 180nm and H35 350nm HV-CMOS processes have been manufactured, acting as a potential drop-in replacement for the current ATLAS Pixel sensors, thus leaving higher level processing such as trigger handling to dedicated read-out chips. Sensors were thoroughly tested in lab measurements as well as in testbeam experiments. Irradiation with X-rays and protons revealed a tolerance to ionizing doses o...

  15. The ATLAS Silicon Pixel Sensors

    Alam, M S; Einsweiler, K F; Emes, J; Gilchriese, M G D; Joshi, A; Kleinfelder, S A; Marchesini, R; McCormack, F; Milgrome, O; Palaio, N; Pengg, F; Richardson, J; Zizka, G; Ackers, M; Andreazza, A; Comes, G; Fischer, P; Keil, M; Klasen, V; Kühl, T; Meuser, S; Ockenfels, W; Raith, B; Treis, J; Wermes, N; Gössling, C; Hügging, F G; Wüstenfeld, J; Wunstorf, R; Barberis, D; Beccherle, R; Darbo, G; Gagliardi, G; Gemme, C; Morettini, P; Musico, P; Osculati, B; Parodi, F; Rossi, L; Blanquart, L; Breugnon, P; Calvet, D; Clemens, J-C; Delpierre, P A; Hallewell, G D; Laugier, D; Mouthuy, T; Rozanov, A; Valin, I; Aleppo, M; Caccia, M; Ragusa, F; Troncon, C; Lutz, Gerhard; Richter, R H; Rohe, T; Brandl, A; Gorfine, G; Hoeferkamp, M; Seidel, SC; Boyd, GR; Skubic, P L; Sícho, P; Tomasek, L; Vrba, V; Holder, M; Ziolkowski, M; D'Auria, S; del Papa, C; Charles, E; Fasching, D; Becks, K H; Lenzen, G; Linder, C

    2001-01-01

    Prototype sensors for the ATLAS silicon pixel detector have been developed. The design of the sensors is guided by the need to operate them in the severe LHC radiation environment at up to several hundred volts while maintaining a good signal-to-noise ratio, small cell size, and minimal multiple scattering. The ability to be operated under full bias for electrical characterization prior to the attachment of the readout integrated circuit electronics is also desired.

  16. A Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor for ionizing radiation using a 180 nm HV-SOI process

    An improved SOI-MAPS (Silicon On Insulator Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor) for ionizing radiation based on thick-film High Voltage SOI technology (HV-SOI) has been developed. Similar to existing Fully Depleted SOI-based (FD-SOI) MAPS, a buried silicon oxide inter-dielectric (BOX) layer is used to separate the CMOS electronics from the handle wafer which is used as a depleted charge collection layer. FD-SOI MAPS suffers from radiation damage such as transistor threshold voltage shifts due to charge traps in the oxide layers and charge states created at the silicon oxide boundaries (back gate effect). The X-FAB 180-nm HV-SOI technology offers an additional isolation by deep non-depleted implant between the BOX layer and the active circuitry which mitigates this problem. Therefore we see in this technology a high potential to implement radiation-tolerant MAPS with fast charge collection property. The design and measurement results from a first prototype are presented including charge collection in neutron irradiated samples

  17. A Monolithic active pixel sensor for ionizing radiation using a 180nm HV-SOI process

    Hemperek, Tomasz; Krüger, Hans; Wermes, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    An improved SOI-MAPS (Silicon On Insulator Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor) for ionizing radiation based on Partially Depleted High Voltage SOI technology (PD-SOI) has been developed. Similar to existing Fully Depleted SOI-based (FD-SOI) MAPS, a buried silicon oxide inter-dielectric (BOX) layer is used to separate the CMOS electronics from the handle wafer which is used as a depleted charge collection layer while FD-SOI MAPS suffer from radiation damage such as transistor threshold voltage shifts due to charge traps in the oxide layers and charge states created at the silicon oxide boundaries (back gate effect). The XFAB 180-nm HV-SOI technology offers an additional isolation by deep non-depleted implant between the BOX layer and the active circuitry witch mitigates this problem. Therefore we see in this technology a high potential to implement radiation-tolerant MAPS with fast charge collection property. The design and measurement results from a first prototype are presented including charge collection in neu...

  18. A Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor for ionizing radiation using a 180 nm HV-SOI process

    Hemperek, Tomasz, E-mail: hemperek@uni-bonn.de; Kishishita, Tetsuichi; Krüger, Hans; Wermes, Norbert

    2015-10-01

    An improved SOI-MAPS (Silicon On Insulator Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor) for ionizing radiation based on thick-film High Voltage SOI technology (HV-SOI) has been developed. Similar to existing Fully Depleted SOI-based (FD-SOI) MAPS, a buried silicon oxide inter-dielectric (BOX) layer is used to separate the CMOS electronics from the handle wafer which is used as a depleted charge collection layer. FD-SOI MAPS suffers from radiation damage such as transistor threshold voltage shifts due to charge traps in the oxide layers and charge states created at the silicon oxide boundaries (back gate effect). The X-FAB 180-nm HV-SOI technology offers an additional isolation by deep non-depleted implant between the BOX layer and the active circuitry which mitigates this problem. Therefore we see in this technology a high potential to implement radiation-tolerant MAPS with fast charge collection property. The design and measurement results from a first prototype are presented including charge collection in neutron irradiated samples.

  19. A Two-Tier Monolithically Stacked CMOS Active Pixel Sensor to Measure Charged Particle Direction

    Passeri, Daniele; Servoli, L.; Meroli, S.; Magalotti, D; Placidi, P; Marras, A.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present an innovative approach to particle tracking based on CMOSActive Pixel Sensors (APS) layers, monolithically integrated in an all-in-one chip featuring multiple,stacked, fully functional detector layers capable to provide momentum measurement (particledirection) within a single detector by using multiple layer impact point coordinates. The wholesystem will results in a very low material detector, since each layer can be thinned down to tensof micrometres, thus dramatical...

  20. A digital monolithic active pixel sensor chip in a quadruple-well CIS process

    A CMOS sensor chip for charged particle detection has been developed and submitted for fabrication in a 0.18 m Quadruple-Well (N and P-Wells, Deep N and P-Wells) CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) process. Improvement of the radiation hardness, the readout speed and the power dissipation of the mainstream CMOS sensors is expected with the exploration of this process. In order to ensure better charge collection and neutron tolerance, wafers with high-resistivity epitaxial layer have been chosen. The chip comprises several sub-chips, and in this paper one of them, a digital CMOS sensor prototype developed in order to validate the key analog blocs (from sensing element to I-bit digital conversion) of a binary MAPS in this process will be presented. The digital sensor prototype comprises four different sub-arrays of 20 μm pitch 64 * 32 pixels, 128 column-level auto-zeroed discriminators, a sequencer and an output digital multiplexer. Laboratory tests results including the charge-to-voltage conversion factor, the charge collection efficiency, the temporal noise and the fixed-pattern noise are presented in details. A 55Fe source is used for calibration of pixels. Some irradiation results will also be given. (authors)

  1. Radiation hardness of a 180 nm SOI monolithic active pixel sensor

    Fernandez-Perez, S.; Backhaus, M.; Pernegger, H.; Hemperek, T.; Kishishita, T.; Krüger, H.; Wermes, N.

    2015-10-01

    The use of Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) technology as a particle detector in a high radiation environment is, at present, limited mostly by radiation effects on the transistor characteristics, back gate effect, and mutual coupling between the Buried Oxide (BOX) and the sensor. We have fabricated and tested a new 0.18 μm SOI CMOS monolithic pixel sensor using the XFAB process. In contrast to the most commonly used SOI technologies, this particular technology uses partially depleted SOI transistors, offering a double well structure, which shields the thin gate oxide transistors from the BOX. In addition, an increased distance between transistors and a thicker BOX than has been previously used offers promising solutions to the performance limitations mentioned above. The process further allows the use of high voltages (up to 200 V), which are used to partially deplete the substrate. Thus, the newly fabricated device in the XFAB process is especially interesting for applications in extremely high radiation environments, such as LHC experiments. A four stage validation programme of the technology and the fabricated monolithic pixel sensor has been performed and its results are shown in this paper. The first targets radiation hardness of the transistor characteristics up to 700 Mrad, the second investigates the existence of the back gate effect, the third one targets the coupling between the BOX and the sensor, and the fourth investigates the characterization of charge collection in the sensor diode below the BOX.

  2. Radiation-hard active CMOS pixel sensors for HL-LHC detector upgrades

    Backhaus, Malte

    2015-02-01

    The luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be increased during the Long Shutdown of 2022 and 2023 (LS3) in order to increase the sensitivity of its experiments. A completely new inner detector for the ATLAS experiment needs to be developed to withstand the extremely harsh environment of the upgraded, so-called High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). High radiation hardness as well as granularity is mandatory to cope with the requirements in terms of radiation damage as well as particle occupancy. A new silicon detector concept that uses commercial high voltage and/or high resistivity full complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processes as active sensor for pixel and/or strip layers has risen high attention, because it potentially provides high radiation hardness and granularity and at the same time reduced price due to the commercial processing and possibly relaxed requirements for the hybridization technique. Results on the first prototypes characterized in a variety of laboratory as well as test beam environments are presented.

  3. Planar pixel sensors in commercial CMOS technologies

    For the upgrade of the ATLAS experiment at the high luminosity LHC, an all-silicon tracker is foreseen to cope with the increased rate and radiation levels. Pixel and strip detectors will have to cover an area of up to 200m2. To produce modules in high number at reduced costs, new sensor and bonding technologies have to be investigated. Commercial CMOS technologies on high resistive substrates can provide significant advantages in this direction. They offer cost effective, large volume sensor production. In addition to this, production is done on 8'' wafers allowing wafer-to-wafer bonding to the electronics, an interconnection technology substantially cheaper than the bump bonding process used for hybrid pixel detectors at the LHC. Both active and passive n-in-p pixel sensor prototypes have been submitted in a 150 nm CMOS technology on a 2kΩ cm substrate. The passive sensor design will be used to characterize sensor properties and to investigate wafer-to-wafer bonding technologies. This first prototype is made of a matrix of 36 x 16 pixels of size compatible with the FE-I4 readout chip (i.e. 50 μm x 250 μm). Results from lab characterization of this first submission are shown together with TCAD simulations. Work towards a full size FE-I4 sensor for wafer-to-wafer bonding is discussed.

  4. High voltage monolithic active pixel sensors for the PANDA luminosity detector

    The PANDA-Experiment will be part of the new FAIR accelerator center at Darmstadt, Germany. It is a fixed target experiment using a antiproton beam with very high resolution for precision measurements. For a variety of measurements like energy-scans the precise determination of the luminosity is needed. The luminosity detector will determine the luminosity by measuring the angular distribution of elastically scattered antiprotons very close to the beam axis (3-8 mrad). To reconstruct antiproton tracks four layers of thinned silicon sensors with smart pixel readout on chip (HV-MAPS) will be used. Those sensors are currently under development by the Mu3e-collaboration. In the talk the concept of the luminosity measurement is shortly introduced before a summary of the status of HV-MAP prototypes and recent test beam results are presented.

  5. 50 μm pixel pitch wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray detector for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Zhao, C.; Konstantinidis, A. C.; Zheng, Y.; Anaxagoras, T.; Speller, R. D.; Kanicki, J.

    2015-12-01

    Wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensors (APSs) have been developed recently for x-ray imaging applications. The small pixel pitch and low noise are very promising properties for medical imaging applications such as digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). In this work, we evaluated experimentally and through modeling the imaging properties of a 50 μm pixel pitch CMOS APS x-ray detector named DynAMITe (Dynamic Range Adjustable for Medical Imaging Technology). A modified cascaded system model was developed for CMOS APS x-ray detectors by taking into account the device nonlinear signal and noise properties. The imaging properties such as modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were extracted from both measurements and the nonlinear cascaded system analysis. The results show that the DynAMITe x-ray detector achieves a high spatial resolution of 10 mm-1 and a DQE of around 0.5 at spatial frequencies  CMOS APS x-ray detector, image aquisition geometry and image reconstruction techniques should be considered.

  6. TFA pixel sensor technology for vertex detectors

    Jarron, P. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)]. E-mail: Pierre.Jarron@cern.ch; Moraes, D. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)]. E-mail: Danielle.Moraes@cern.ch; Despeisse, M. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Dissertori, G. [ETH-Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Dunand, S. [IMT, Rue A.-L. Breguet 2, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Kaplon, J. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Miazza, C. [IMT, Rue A.-L. Breguet 2, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Shah, A. [IMT, Rue A.-L. Breguet 2, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Viertel, G.M. [ETH-Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Wyrsch, N. [IMT, Rue A.-L. Breguet 2, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland)

    2006-05-01

    Pixel microvertex detectors at the SLHC and a future linear collider face very challenging issues: extreme radiation hardness, cooling design, interconnections density and fabrication cost. As an alternative approach we present a novel pixel detector based on the deposition of a Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon (a-Si:H) film on top of a readout ASIC. The Thin-Film on ASIC (TFA) technology is inspired by an emerging microelectronic technology envisaged for visible light Active Pixel Sensor (APS) devices. We present results obtained with a-Si:H sensor films deposited on a glass substrate and on ASIC, including the radiation hardness of this material up to a fluence of 3.5x10{sup 15} p/cm{sup 2}.

  7. TFA pixel sensor technology for vertex detectors

    Pixel microvertex detectors at the SLHC and a future linear collider face very challenging issues: extreme radiation hardness, cooling design, interconnections density and fabrication cost. As an alternative approach we present a novel pixel detector based on the deposition of a Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon (a-Si:H) film on top of a readout ASIC. The Thin-Film on ASIC (TFA) technology is inspired by an emerging microelectronic technology envisaged for visible light Active Pixel Sensor (APS) devices. We present results obtained with a-Si:H sensor films deposited on a glass substrate and on ASIC, including the radiation hardness of this material up to a fluence of 3.5x1015 p/cm2

  8. Next-Generation Active-Pixel Sensor Devices With CMOS-avalanche photodiodes

    Modern high-energy physics experiments that explore the fundamental properties of matter rely on large, sophisticated instruments for tracking particle decay events with large detector arrays. The performance of these instruments is limited by the available detector technology. Future progress depends on breakthroughs in the sensitivity, speed and signal-to-noise performance of the detectors. Phase I research successfully developed and tested many different pixel designs. Several different pixel and circuit applications were designed based on previously manufactured chips, but with the vertex detector application in mind. We have characterized the noise performance and sensitivity of CMOS APD pixels using several different types of radiation and selected the best designs. Phase II will were are concerned with transforming our test structures into fully functional detector elements with the appropriate processing and readout electronics integrated with large arrays of pixels. We investigated methods to increase the active area and reduce the noise while implementing an event-driven readout scheme to drastically increase the readout speed and simplify the data stream

  9. Radiation-hard Active Pixel Sensors for HL-LHC Detector Upgrades based on HV-CMOS Technology

    Luminosity upgrades are discussed for the LHC (HL-LHC) which would make updates to the detectors necessary, requiring in particular new, even more radiation-hard and granular, sensors for the inner detector region. A proposal for the next generation of inner detectors is based on HV-CMOS: a new family of silicon sensors based on commercial high-voltage CMOS technology, which enables the fabrication of part of the pixel electronics inside the silicon substrate itself. The main advantages of this technology with respect to the standard silicon sensor technology are: low material budget, fast charge collection time, high radiation tolerance, low cost and operation at room temperature. A traditional readout chip is still needed to receive and organize the data from the active sensor and to handle high-level functionality such as trigger management. HV-CMOS has been designed to be compatible with both pixel and strip readout. In this paper an overview of HV2FEI4, a HV-CMOS prototype in 180 nm AMS technology, will be given. Preliminary results after neutron and X-ray irradiation are shown

  10. Radiation-hard Active Pixel Sensors for HL-LHC Detector Upgrades based on HV-CMOS Technology

    Miucci, A.; Gonella, L.; Hemperek, T.; Hügging, F.; Krüger, H.; Obermann, T.; Wermes, N.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Backhaus, M.; Capeans, M.; Feigl, S.; Nessi, M.; Pernegger, H.; Ristic, B.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Ferrere, D.; Iacobucci, G.; La Rosa, A.; Muenstermann, D.; George, M.; Große-Knetter, J.; Quadt, A.; Rieger, J.; Weingarten, J.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Buttar, C.; Hynds, D.; Kreidl, C.; Peric, I.; Breugnon, P.; Pangaud, P.; Godiot-Basolo, S.; Fougeron, D.; Bompard, F.; Clemens, J. C.; Liu, J.; Barbero, M.; Rozanov, A.; HV-CMOS Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    Luminosity upgrades are discussed for the LHC (HL-LHC) which would make updates to the detectors necessary, requiring in particular new, even more radiation-hard and granular, sensors for the inner detector region. A proposal for the next generation of inner detectors is based on HV-CMOS: a new family of silicon sensors based on commercial high-voltage CMOS technology, which enables the fabrication of part of the pixel electronics inside the silicon substrate itself. The main advantages of this technology with respect to the standard silicon sensor technology are: low material budget, fast charge collection time, high radiation tolerance, low cost and operation at room temperature. A traditional readout chip is still needed to receive and organize the data from the active sensor and to handle high-level functionality such as trigger management. HV-CMOS has been designed to be compatible with both pixel and strip readout. In this paper an overview of HV2FEI4, a HV-CMOS prototype in 180 nm AMS technology, will be given. Preliminary results after neutron and X-ray irradiation are shown.

  11. 50 μm pixel pitch wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray detector for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensors (APSs) have been developed recently for x-ray imaging applications. The small pixel pitch and low noise are very promising properties for medical imaging applications such as digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). In this work, we evaluated experimentally and through modeling the imaging properties of a 50 μm pixel pitch CMOS APS x-ray detector named DynAMITe (Dynamic Range Adjustable for Medical Imaging Technology). A modified cascaded system model was developed for CMOS APS x-ray detectors by taking into account the device nonlinear signal and noise properties. The imaging properties such as modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were extracted from both measurements and the nonlinear cascaded system analysis. The results show that the DynAMITe x-ray detector achieves a high spatial resolution of 10 mm−1 and a DQE of around 0.5 at spatial frequencies  <1 mm−1. In addition, the modeling results were used to calculate the image signal-to-noise ratio (SNRi) of microcalcifications at various mean glandular dose (MGD). For an average breast (5 cm thickness, 50% glandular fraction), 165 μm microcalcifications can be distinguished at a MGD of 27% lower than the clinical value (∼1.3 mGy). To detect 100 μm microcalcifications, further optimizations of the CMOS APS x-ray detector, image aquisition geometry and image reconstruction techniques should be considered. (paper)

  12. A Real-time Auto-detection Method for Random Telegraph Signal (RTS) Noise Detection in CMOS Active pixel sensors

    CMOS Active pixel sensors (CMOS APS) are attractive for use in the innermost layers of charged particle trackers, due to their good tradeoffs among the key performances. However, CMOS APS can be greatly influenced by random telegraph signal (RTS) noise, which can cause particle tracking or energy calculation failures. In-depth research of pixels' RTS behavior stimulates the interest of the methods for RTS noise detection, reconstruction and parameters extraction. In this paper, a real-time auto-detection method is proposed, using real-time Gaussian noise standard deviation as the detection threshold. Experimental results show that, compared with current methods using signal standard deviation as the thresholds, the proposed method is more sensitive in multi-level RTS detection and more effective in the case of RTS noise degradation

  13. Non-linear responsivity characterisation of a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor for high resolution imaging of the Jovian system

    The Jovian system is the subject of study for the Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer (JUICE), an ESA mission which is planned to launch in 2022. The scientific payload is designed for both characterisation of the magnetosphere and radiation environment local to the spacecraft, as well as remote characterisation of Jupiter and its satellites. A key instrument on JUICE is the high resolution and wide angle camera, JANUS, whose main science goals include detailed characterisation and study phases of three of the Galilean satellites, Ganymede, Callisto and Europa, as well as studies of other moons, the ring system, and irregular satellites. The CIS115 is a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor from e2v technologies selected for the JANUS camera. It is fabricated using 0.18 μ m CMOS imaging sensor process, with an imaging area of 2000 × 1504 pixels, each 7 μ m square. A 4T pixel architecture allows for efficient correlated double sampling, improving the readout noise to better than 8 electrons rms, whilst the sensor is operated in a rolling shutter mode, sampling at up to 10 Mpixel/s at each of the four parallel outputs.A primary parameter to characterise for an imaging device is the relationship that converts the sensor's voltage output back to the corresponding number of electrons that were detected in a pixel, known as the Charge to Voltage Factor (CVF). In modern CMOS sensors with small feature sizes, the CVF is known to be non-linear with signal level, therefore a signal-dependent measurement of the CIS115's CVF has been undertaken and is presented here. The CVF is well modelled as a quadratic function leading to a measurement of the maximum charge handling capacity of the CIS115 to be 3.4 × 104 electrons. If the CIS115's response is assumed linear, its CVF is 21.1 electrons per mV (1/47.5 μ V per electron)

  14. CMOS monolithic pixel sensors research and development at LBNL

    D Contarato; J-M Bussat; P Denes; L Griender; T Kim; T Stezeberger; H Weiman; M Battaglia; B Hooberman; L Tompkins

    2007-12-01

    This paper summarizes the recent progress in the design and characterization of CMOS pixel sensors at LBNL. Results of lab tests, beam tests and radiation hardness tests carried out at LBNL on a test structure with pixels of various sizes are reported. The first results of the characterization of back-thinned CMOS pixel sensors are also reported, and future plans and activities are discussed.

  15. A FPGA-based cluster finder for CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors of the MIMOSA-26 family

    CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) demonstrated excellent performances in the field of charged particle tracking. Among their strong points are an single point resolution few μm, a light material budget of 0.05% X0 in combination with a good radiation tolerance and high rate capability. Those features make the sensors a valuable technology for vertex detectors of various experiments in heavy ion and particle physics. To reduce the load on the event builders and future mass storage systems, we have developed algorithms suited for preprocessing and reducing the data streams generated by the MAPS. This real-time processing employs remaining free resources of the FPGAs of the readout controllers of the detector and complements the on-chip data reduction circuits of the MAPS.

  16. Low-power priority Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder data-driven readout for Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for tracker system

    Yang, P., E-mail: yangping0710@126.com [Central China Normal University, Wuhan (China); Aglieri, G.; Cavicchioli, C. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Chalmet, P.L. [MIND, Archamps (France); Chanlek, N. [Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima (Thailand); Collu, A. [University of Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); INFN (Italy); Gao, C. [Central China Normal University, Wuhan (China); Hillemanns, H.; Junique, A. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Kofarago, M. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); University of Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Keil, M.; Kugathasan, T. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Kim, D. [Dongguk and Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J. [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lattuca, A. [University of Torino, Torino (Italy); INFN (Italy); Marin Tobon, C.A. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Marras, D. [University of Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); INFN (Italy); Mager, M.; Martinengo, P. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Mazza, G. [University of Torino, Torino (Italy); INFN (Italy); and others

    2015-06-11

    Active Pixel Sensors used in High Energy Particle Physics require low power consumption to reduce the detector material budget, low integration time to reduce the possibilities of pile-up and fast readout to improve the detector data capability. To satisfy these requirements, a novel Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder (AERD) asynchronous circuit for a fast readout of a pixel matrix has been developed. The AERD data-driven readout architecture operates the address encoding and reset decoding based on an arbitration tree, and allows us to readout only the hit pixels. Compared to the traditional readout structure of the rolling shutter scheme in Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), AERD can achieve a low readout time and a low power consumption especially for low hit occupancies. The readout is controlled at the chip periphery with a signal synchronous with the clock, allows a good digital and analogue signal separation in the matrix and a reduction of the power consumption. The AERD circuit has been implemented in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor (CIS) process with full complementary CMOS logic in the pixel. It works at 10 MHz with a matrix height of 15 mm. The energy consumed to read out one pixel is around 72 pJ. A scheme to boost the readout speed to 40 MHz is also discussed. The sensor chip equipped with AERD has been produced and characterised. Test results including electrical beam measurement are presented.

  17. Low-power priority Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder data-driven readout for Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for tracker system

    Yang, P.; Aglieri, G.; Cavicchioli, C.; Chalmet, P. L.; Chanlek, N.; Collu, A.; Gao, C.; Hillemanns, H.; Junique, A.; Kofarago, M.; Keil, M.; Kugathasan, T.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.; Lattuca, A.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Marras, D.; Mager, M.; Martinengo, P.; Mazza, G.; Mugnier, H.; Musa, L.; Puggioni, C.; Rousset, J.; Reidt, F.; Riedler, P.; Snoeys, W.; Siddhanta, S.; Usai, G.; van Hoorne, J. W.; Yi, J.

    2015-06-01

    Active Pixel Sensors used in High Energy Particle Physics require low power consumption to reduce the detector material budget, low integration time to reduce the possibilities of pile-up and fast readout to improve the detector data capability. To satisfy these requirements, a novel Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder (AERD) asynchronous circuit for a fast readout of a pixel matrix has been developed. The AERD data-driven readout architecture operates the address encoding and reset decoding based on an arbitration tree, and allows us to readout only the hit pixels. Compared to the traditional readout structure of the rolling shutter scheme in Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), AERD can achieve a low readout time and a low power consumption especially for low hit occupancies. The readout is controlled at the chip periphery with a signal synchronous with the clock, allows a good digital and analogue signal separation in the matrix and a reduction of the power consumption. The AERD circuit has been implemented in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor (CIS) process with full complementary CMOS logic in the pixel. It works at 10 MHz with a matrix height of 15 mm. The energy consumed to read out one pixel is around 72 pJ. A scheme to boost the readout speed to 40 MHz is also discussed. The sensor chip equipped with AERD has been produced and characterised. Test results including electrical beam measurement are presented.

  18. Advanced pixel architectures for scientific image sensors

    Coath, R; Godbeer, A; Wilson, M; Turchetta, R

    2009-01-01

    We present recent developments from two projects targeting advanced pixel architectures for scientific applications. Results are reported from FORTIS, a sensor demonstrating variants on a 4T pixel architecture. The variants include differences in pixel and diode size, the in-pixel source follower transistor size and the capacitance of the readout node to optimise for low noise and sensitivity to small amounts of charge. Results are also reported from TPAC, a complex pixel architecture with ~160 transistors per pixel. Both sensors were manufactured in the 0.18μm INMAPS process, which includes a special deep p-well layer and fabrication on a high resistivity epitaxial layer for improved charge collection efficiency.

  19. First use of a high-sensitivity active pixel sensor array as a detector for electron microscopy

    Xuong, Nguyen-Huu; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; LeBlanc, Philippe; Duttweiler, Fred; Bouwer, James; Peltier, Steve; Ellisman, Mark; Denes, Peter; Bieser, Fred; Matis, Howard S.; Wieman, Howard; Kleinfelder, Stuart

    2004-06-01

    There is an urgent need to replace film and CCD cameras as recording instruments for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Film is too cumbersome to process and CCD cameras have low resolution, marginal to poor signal-to-noise ratio for single electron detection and high spatial distortion. To find a replacement device, we have tested a high sensitivity active pixel sensor (APS) array currently being developed for nuclear physics. The tests were done at 120 keV in a JEOL 1200 electron microscope. At this energy, each electron produced on average a signal-tonoise ratio about 20/1. The spatial resolution was also excellent with the full width at half maximum (FWHM) about 20 microns. Since it is very radiation tolerant and has almost no spatial distortion, the above tests showed that a high sensitivity CMOS APS array holds great promise as a direct detection device for electron microscopy.

  20. Synchrotron based planar imaging and digital tomosynthesis of breast and biopsy phantoms using a CMOS active pixel sensor.

    Szafraniec, Magdalena B; Konstantinidis, Anastasios C; Tromba, Giuliana; Dreossi, Diego; Vecchio, Sara; Rigon, Luigi; Sodini, Nicola; Naday, Steve; Gunn, Spencer; McArthur, Alan; Olivo, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    The SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline at Elettra is performing the first mammography study on human patients using free-space propagation phase contrast imaging. The stricter spatial resolution requirements of this method currently force the use of conventional films or specialized computed radiography (CR) systems. This also prevents the implementation of three-dimensional (3D) approaches. This paper explores the use of an X-ray detector based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology as a possible alternative, for acquisitions both in planar and tomosynthesis geometry. Results indicate higher quality of the images acquired with the synchrotron set-up in both geometries. This improvement can be partly ascribed to the use of parallel, collimated and monochromatic synchrotron radiation (resulting in scatter rejection, no penumbra-induced blurring and optimized X-ray energy), and partly to phase contrast effects. Even though the pixel size of the used detector is still too large - and thus suboptimal - for free-space propagation phase contrast imaging, a degree of phase-induced edge enhancement can clearly be observed in the images. PMID:25498332

  1. A High-Speed, Event-Driven, Active Pixel Sensor Readout for Photon-Counting Microchannel Plate Detectors

    Kimble, Randy A.; Pain, Bedabrata; Norton, Timothy J.; Haas, J. Patrick; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon array readouts for microchannel plate intensifiers offer several attractive features. In this class of detector, the electron cloud output of the MCP intensifier is converted to visible light by a phosphor; that light is then fiber-optically coupled to the silicon array. In photon-counting mode, the resulting light splashes on the silicon array are recognized and centroided to fractional pixel accuracy by off-chip electronics. This process can result in very high (MCP-limited) spatial resolution while operating at a modest MCP gain (desirable for dynamic range and long term stability). The principal limitation of intensified CCD systems of this type is their severely limited local dynamic range, as accurate photon counting is achieved only if there are not overlapping event splashes within the frame time of the device. This problem can be ameliorated somewhat by processing events only in pre-selected windows of interest of by using an addressable charge injection device (CID) for the readout array. We are currently pursuing the development of an intriguing alternative readout concept based on using an event-driven CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. APS technology permits the incorporation of discriminator circuitry within each pixel. When coupled with suitable CMOS logic outside the array area, the discriminator circuitry can be used to trigger the readout of small sub-array windows only when and where an event splash has been detected, completely eliminating the local dynamic range problem, while achieving a high global count rate capability and maintaining high spatial resolution. We elaborate on this concept and present our progress toward implementing an event-driven APS readout.

  2. A novel position and time sensing active pixel sensor with field-assisted electron collection for charged particle tracking and electron microscopy

    De Geronimo, G.; Deptuch, G.; Dragone, A.; Radeka, V.; Rehak, P.; Castoldi, A.; Fazzi, A.; Gatti, E.; Guazzoni, C.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Dulinski, W.; Besson, A.; Deveaux, M.; Winter, M.

    2006-11-01

    A new type of active pixel sensors (APSs) to track charged particles for particle physics experiments or to count number of electrons that cross any pixel at the focal plane of electron microscopes is described. The electric field of desirable shape is created inside the active volume of the pixel introducing the drift component in the movement of the signal electrons towards charge collecting electrodes. The electric field results from the flow of ˜100 mA/cm 2 hole currents within individual pixels of the sensor. The proposed sensor is produced using a standard industrially available complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) process. There are two main advantages of the proposed detectors when compared to the present (February 2005) state-of-the-art, i.e. field-free APS sensors. The first advantage of a field-assisted transport mechanism is the reduction of the charge collection time and of the sharing of the signal electrons between adjacent pixels by diffusion. The second advantage is the freedom to use both kinds of MOS transistors within each pixel of the sensor. Thus, the full functional power of CMOS circuits can be embedded in situ. As an example, 16-bit scalers will be implemented in each pixel of the sensor for electron microscopy. The reduced collection time combined with the state-of-the-art electronics within each pixel provides the most complete information about the position and the timing of incident charged particles for particle physics experiments. Position resolution of new sensors was computationally simulated to be a few microns, that is, the same as the resolution of standard APSs. Moreover, the active depth of the sensor and the associate electronics is less than about 20 μm and a thinned down sensor together with its beryllium backing can have a total thickness of less than 0.1% of one radiation length. The reduction of the thickness of the detector reduces the amount of multiple scattering within the detector. The determination of the

  3. Overview of HVCMOS pixel sensors

    High voltage CMOS (HVCMOS) sensors are presently considered for the use in Mu3e experiment, ATLAS and CLIC. These sensors can be implemented in commercial HVCMOS processes. HVCMOS sensors feature fast charge collection by drift and high radiation tolerance. The sensor element is an n-well/p-type diode. This proceeding-paper gives an overview of HVCMOS projects and the recent results

  4. Development of CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for the ALICE-ITS Outer Barrel and for the CBM-MVD

    Deveaux, Michael

    2015-01-01

    After more than a decade of R&D;, CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS or CPS) have proven to offer concrete answers to the demanding requirements of subatomic physics experi- ments. Their main advantages result from their low material budget, their very high granularity and their integrated signal processing circuitry, which allows coping with high particle rates. Moreover, they offer a valuable radiation tolerance and may be produced at low cost. Sensors of the MIMOSA series have offered an opportunity for nuclear and particle physics exper- iments to address with improved sensitivity physics studies requiring an accurate reconstruction of short living and soft particles. One of their major applications is the STAR-PXL detector, which is the first vertex detector based on MAPS. While this experiment is successfully taking data since two years, it was found that the 0.35 m CMOS technology used for this purpose is not suited for upcoming applications like the CBM micro-vertex detector (MVD) and the ...

  5. Advanced monolithic pixel sensors using SOI technology

    Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Arai, Yasuo; Asano, Mari; Fujita, Yowichi; Hamasaki, Ryutaro; Hara, Kazuhiko; Honda, Shunsuke; Ikegami, Yoichi; Kurachi, Ikuo; Mitsui, Shingo; Nishimura, Ryutaro; Tauchi, Kazuya; Tobita, Naoshi; Tsuboyama, Toru; Yamada, Miho

    2016-07-01

    We are developing advanced pixel sensors using silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology. A SOI wafer is used; top silicon is used for electric circuit and bottom silicon is used as a sensor. Target applications are high-energy physics, X-ray astronomy, material science, non-destructive inspection, medical application and so on. We have developed two integration-type pixel sensors, FPIXb and INTPIX7. These sensors were processed on single SOI wafers with various substrates in n- or p-type and double SOI wafers. The development status of double SOI sensors and some up-to-date test results of n-type and p-type SOI sensors are shown.

  6. Quality control on planar n-in-n pixel sensors — Recent progress of ATLAS planar pixel sensors

    To extend the physics reach of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), upgrades to the accelerator are planned which will increase the peak luminosity by a factor 5–10. To cope with the increased occupancy and radiation damage, the ATLAS experiment plans to introduce an all-silicon inner tracker with the high luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). To investigate the suitability of pixel sensors using the proven planar technology for the upgraded tracker, the ATLAS Upgrade Planar Pixel Sensor (PPS) R and D Project was established. Main areas of research are the performance of planar pixel sensors at highest fluences, the exploration of possibilities for cost reduction to enable the instrumentation of large areas, the achievement of slim or active edges to provide low geometric inefficiencies without the need for shingling of modules and the investigation of the operation of highly irradiated sensors at low thresholds to increase the efficiency. The Insertable b-layer (IBL) is the first upgrade project within the ATLAS experiment and will employ a new detector layer consisting of silicon pixel sensors, which were improved and prototyped in the framework of the planar pixel sensor R and D project. A special focus of this paper is the status of the development and testing of planar n-in-n pixel sensors including the quality control of the on-going series production and postprocessing of sensor wafers. A high yield of produced planar sensor wafers and FE-I4 double chip sensors after first steps of post-processing including under bump metallization and dicing is observed. -- Highlights: ► Prototypes of irradiated planar n-in-n sensors have been successfully tested under laboratory conditions. ► A quality assurance programme on the series production of planar sensors for the IBL has started. ► A high yield of double chip sensors during the series production is observed which are compatible to the specifications to this detector component.

  7. Edge pixel response studies of edgeless silicon sensor technology for pixellated imaging detectors

    Maneuski, D.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Buttar, C.; Doonan, K.; Eklund, L.; Gimenez, E. N.; Hynds, D.; Kachkanov, S.; Kalliopuska, J.; McMullen, T.; O'Shea, V.; Tartoni, N.; Plackett, R.; Vahanen, S.; Wraight, K.

    2015-03-01

    Silicon sensor technologies with reduced dead area at the sensor's perimeter are under development at a number of institutes. Several fabrication methods for sensors which are sensitive close to the physical edge of the device are under investigation utilising techniques such as active-edges, passivated edges and current-terminating rings. Such technologies offer the goal of a seamlessly tiled detection surface with minimum dead space between the individual modules. In order to quantify the performance of different geometries and different bulk and implant types, characterisation of several sensors fabricated using active-edge technology were performed at the B16 beam line of the Diamond Light Source. The sensors were fabricated by VTT and bump-bonded to Timepix ROICs. They were 100 and 200 μ m thick sensors, with the last pixel-to-edge distance of either 50 or 100 μ m. The sensors were fabricated as either n-on-n or n-on-p type devices. Using 15 keV monochromatic X-rays with a beam spot of 2.5 μ m, the performance at the outer edge and corners pixels of the sensors was evaluated at three bias voltages. The results indicate a significant change in the charge collection properties between the edge and 5th (up to 275 μ m) from edge pixel for the 200 μ m thick n-on-n sensor. The edge pixel performance of the 100 μ m thick n-on-p sensors is affected only for the last two pixels (up to 110 μ m) subject to biasing conditions. Imaging characteristics of all sensor types investigated are stable over time and the non-uniformities can be minimised by flat-field corrections. The results from the synchrotron tests combined with lab measurements are presented along with an explanation of the observed effects.

  8. The APSEL4D Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor and its Usage in a Single Electron Interference Experiment

    Alberghi, Gian Luigi

    We have realized a Data Acquisition chain for the use and characterization of APSEL4D, a 32 x 128 Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor, developed as a prototype for frontier experiments in high energy particle physics. In particular a transition board was realized for the conversion between the chip and the FPGA voltage levels and for the signal quality enhancing. A Xilinx Spartan-3 FPGA was used for real time data processing, for the chip control and the communication with a Personal Computer through a 2.0 USB port. For this purpose a firmware code, developed in VHDL language, was written. Finally a Graphical User Interface for the online system monitoring, hit display and chip control, based on windows and widgets, was realized developing a C++ code and using Qt and Qwt dedicated libraries. APSEL4D and the full acquisition chain were characterized for the first time with the electron beam of the transmission electron microscope and with 55Fe and 90Sr radioactive sources. In addition, a beam test was performed at ...

  9. Development and characterisation of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor prototypes for the upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    Collu, Alberto

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is dedicated to the study and characterisation of the Quark-­‐Gluon Plasma (QGP), exploiting the unique potential of ultrarelativistic heavy-­‐ion collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The increase of the LHC luminosity leading up to about 50 kHz Pb-­‐Pb interaction rate after the second long shutdown (in 2018-­‐2019) will offer the possibility to perform high precision measurements of rare probes over a wide range of momenta. These measurements are statistically limited or not even possible with the present experimental set up. For this reason, an upgrade strategy for several ALICE detectors is being pursued. In particular, it is foreseen to replace the Inner Tracking System (ITS) by a new detector which will significantly improve the tracking and vertexing capabilities of ALICE in the upgrade scenario. The new ITS will have a barrel geometry consisting of seven layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) with high granularity, which will...

  10. A full on-chip, low noise, low power consumption reference generator in monolithic active pixel sensors

    The monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) is a promising choice to track charged particles in high energy physics experiments, such as the solenoidal tracker at RHIC (STAR). In order to achieve a clean reference voltage and simplify the cable placement, a full on-chip reference generator is presented in this paper. By utilizing a buffer and a series RC network, the proposed circuit can achieve good stability, low power and low noise, without any external components. The output voltage is adjustable to compensate the influence of the fabrication process. The generator has been implemented and fabricated in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS process. Its silicon area is 327 μm×119 μm. The total power dissipation is 677 μW at a supply voltage of 3.3 V. The measured results show that only 5.84% of the total noise in MAPS is induced by the proposed reference generator. The comparison with the other optional circuit based on a current buffer is also presented.

  11. Large area CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray imager for digital breast tomosynthesis: Analysis, modeling, and characterization

    Zhao, Chumin; Kanicki, Jerzy, E-mail: kanicki@eecs.umich.edu [Solid-State Electronics Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Konstantinidis, Anastasios C. [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom and Diagnostic Radiology and Radiation Protection, Christie Medical Physics and Engineering, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Patel, Tushita [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Large area x-ray imagers based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology have been proposed for various medical imaging applications including digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). The low electronic noise (50–300 e{sup −}) of CMOS APS x-ray imagers provides a possible route to shrink the pixel pitch to smaller than 75 μm for microcalcification detection and possible reduction of the DBT mean glandular dose (MGD). Methods: In this study, imaging performance of a large area (29 × 23 cm{sup 2}) CMOS APS x-ray imager [Dexela 2923 MAM (PerkinElmer, London)] with a pixel pitch of 75 μm was characterized and modeled. The authors developed a cascaded system model for CMOS APS x-ray imagers using both a broadband x-ray radiation and monochromatic synchrotron radiation. The experimental data including modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were theoretically described using the proposed cascaded system model with satisfactory consistency to experimental results. Both high full well and low full well (LFW) modes of the Dexela 2923 MAM CMOS APS x-ray imager were characterized and modeled. The cascaded system analysis results were further used to extract the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for microcalcifications with sizes of 165–400 μm at various MGDs. The impact of electronic noise on CNR was also evaluated. Results: The LFW mode shows better DQE at low air kerma (K{sub a} < 10 μGy) and should be used for DBT. At current DBT applications, air kerma (K{sub a} ∼ 10 μGy, broadband radiation of 28 kVp), DQE of more than 0.7 and ∼0.3 was achieved using the LFW mode at spatial frequency of 0.5 line pairs per millimeter (lp/mm) and Nyquist frequency ∼6.7 lp/mm, respectively. It is shown that microcalcifications of 165–400 μm in size can be resolved using a MGD range of 0.3–1 mGy, respectively. In comparison to a General Electric GEN2 prototype DBT system (at

  12. Electrical Characteristics of Silicon Pixel Sensors

    Gorelov, I; Hoeferkamp, M; Mata-Bruni, V; Santistevan, G; Seidel, S C; Ciocio, A; Einsweiler, K F; Emes, J; Gilchriese, M G D; Joshi, A; Kleinfelder, S A; Marchesini, R; McCormack, F; Milgrome, O; Palaio, N; Pengg, F; Richardson, J; Zizka, G; Ackers, M; Comes, G; Fischer, P; Keil, M; Klasen, V; Kühl, T; Meuser, S; Ockenfels, W; Raith, B; Treis, J; Wermes, N; Gössling, C; Hügging, F G; Klaiber Lodewigs, Jonas M; Krasel, O; Wüstenfeld, J; Wunstorf, R; Barberis, D; Beccherle, R; Caso, Carlo; Cervetto, M; Darbo, G; Gagliardi, G; Gemme, C; Morettini, P; Netchaeva, P; Osculati, B; Rossi, L; Charles, E; Fasching, D; Blanquart, L; Breugnon, P; Calvet, D; Clemens, J-C; Delpierre, P A; Hallewell, G D; Laugier, D; Mouthuy, T; Rozanov, A; Valin, I; Andreazza, A; Caccia, M; Citterio, M; Lari, T; Meroni, C; Ragusa, F; Troncon, C; Vegni, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Richter, R H; Rohe, T; Boyd, GR; Skubic, P L; Sícho, P; Tomasek, L; Vrba, V; Holder, M; Ziolkowski, M; Cauz, D; Cobal-Grassmann, M; D'Auria, S; De Lotto, B; del Papa, C; Grassmann, H; Santi, L; Becks, K H; Lenzen, G; Linder, C

    2001-01-01

    Prototype sensors for the ATLAS silicon pixel detector have been electrically characterized. The current and voltage characteristics, charge collection efficiencies, and resolutions have been examined. Devices were fabricated on oxygenated and standard detector-grade silicon wafers. Results from prototypes which examine p-stop and standard and moderated p-spray isolation are presented for a variety of geometrical options. Some of the comparisons relate unirradiated sensors with those that have received fluences relevant to LHC operation.

  13. Development of a Standardised Readout System for Active Pixel Sensors in HV/HR-CMOS Technologies for ATLAS Inner Detector Upgrades

    The LHC Phase-II Upgrade results in new challenges for tracking detectors for example in terms of cost effectiveness, resolution and radiation hardness. Active Pixel Sensors in HV/HR-CMOS technologies show promising results coping with these challenges. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of hybrid modules with active CMOS sensors and readout chips for the future ATLAS Inner Tracker, ATLAS R and D activities have started. After introducing the basic concepts and the demonstrator program, the development of an ATLAS compatible readout system will be presented as well as tuning procedures and measurements with demonstrator modules to test the readout system

  14. What's A Pixel Particle Sensor Chip?

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS particle physics experiment aided with collaboration ON Semiconductor was recently honored by the European Council for Nuclear Research (CERN), with an Industrial Award recognizing the company's contribution in supplying complex "Pixel Particle Sensor" chips for use in CERN's ATLAS particle physics experiment.

  15. A CMOS active pixel sensor system for laboratory- based x-ray diffraction studies of biological tissue.

    Bohndiek, Sarah E; Cook, Emily J; Arvanitis, Costas D; Olivo, Alessandro; Royle, Gary J; Clark, Andy T; Prydderch, Mark L; Turchetta, Renato; Speller, Robert D

    2008-02-01

    X-ray diffraction studies give material-specific information about biological tissue. Ideally, a large area, low noise, wide dynamic range digital x-ray detector is required for laboratory-based x-ray diffraction studies. The goal of this work is to introduce a novel imaging technology, the CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) that has the potential to fulfil all these requirements, and demonstrate its feasibility for coherent scatter imaging. A prototype CMOS APS has been included in an x-ray diffraction demonstration system. An industrial x-ray source with appropriate beam filtration is used to perform angle dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD). Optimization of the experimental set-up is detailed including collimator options and detector operating parameters. Scatter signatures are measured for 11 different materials, covering three medical applications: breast cancer diagnosis, kidney stone identification and bone mineral density calculations. Scatter signatures are also recorded for three mixed samples of known composition. Results are verified using two independent models for predicting the APS scatter signature: (1) a linear systems model of the APS and (2) a linear superposition integral combining known monochromatic scatter signatures with the input polychromatic spectrum used in this case. Cross validation of experimental, modelled and literature results proves that APS are able to record biologically relevant scatter signatures. Coherent scatter signatures are sensitive to multiple materials present in a sample and provide a means to quantify composition. In the future, production of a bespoke APS imager for x-ray diffraction studies could enable simultaneous collection of the transmitted beam and scattered radiation in a laboratory-based coherent scatter system, making clinical transfer of the technique attainable. PMID:18199908

  16. The Dexela 2923 CMOS X-ray detector: A flat panel detector based on CMOS active pixel sensors for medical imaging applications

    Konstantinidis, A. C.; Szafraniec, M. B.; Speller, R.D.; Olivo, A.

    2012-01-01

    Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) active pixel sensors (APS) have been introduced recently in many scientific applications. This work reports on the performance (in terms of signal and noise transfer) of an X-ray detector that uses a novel CMOS APS which was developed for medical X-ray imaging applications. For a full evaluation of the detector's performance, electro-optical and X-ray characterizations were carried out. The former included measuring read noise, full well capacit...

  17. Performance evaluation and calibration issues of large format infrared hybrid active pixel sensors used for ground- and space-based astronomy

    Instruments for large 10-m class telescopes increasingly require high sensitivity large format focal planes. The high spatial resolution achieved with adaptive optics combined with multiple integral field units feeding high resolution spectrographs are driving the pixel performance and require large detector formats. In the infrared spectral range, the array formats have arrived at 2Kx2K pixels with both LPE and MBE grown HgCdTe on CdZnTe substrates. In the optical, fully depleted Si-PIN diodes of the same format are used. The light-sensitive diode arrays are hybridized to CMOS FET switched multiplexers such as the Hawaii-2RG array, which has recently been installed in one of the infrared instruments of the Very Large Telescope (VLT). Basic performance characteristics of the Hawaii-2RG arrays will be discussed such as the noise performance when a special technique of using reference pixels is employed. Larger focal planes are realized as mosaics of 2Kx2K arrays. In order to increase the format of single arrays to 4Kx4K and larger, the limited substrate sizes make it necessary to reduce the pixel size. However, with smaller pixels the coupling between pixels becomes a limiting factor for the detector point spread function. Fundamental calibration issues relevant to photon transfer techniques of modern CMOS active pixel sensors with special regard to the influence of interpixel coupling capacitances will be analyzed in detail. A novel technique will be presented to directly measure the point spread function generated by the capacitive coupling between adjacent pixels

  18. A novel CMOS sensor with in-pixel auto-zeroed discrimination for charged particle tracking

    With the aim of developing fast and granular Monolithic Active Pixels Sensors (MAPS) as new charged particle tracking detectors for high energy physics experiments, a new rolling shutter binary pixel architecture concept (RSBPix) with in-pixel correlated double sampling, amplification and discrimination is presented. The discriminator features auto-zeroing in order to compensate process-related transistor mismatches. In order to validate the pixel, a first monolithic CMOS sensor prototype, including a pixel array of 96 × 64 pixels, has been designed and fabricated in the Tower-Jazz 0.18 μm CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) process. Results of laboratory tests are presented

  19. Empirical electro-optical and x-ray performance evaluation of CMOS active pixels sensor for low dose, high resolution x-ray medical imaging.

    Arvanitis, C D; Bohndiek, S E; Royle, G; Blue, A; Liang, H X; Clark, A; Prydderch, M; Turchetta, R; Speller, R

    2007-12-01

    Monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors with high performance have gained attention in the last few years in many scientific and space applications. In order to evaluate the increasing capabilities of this technology, in particular where low dose high resolution x-ray medical imaging is required, critical electro-optical and physical x-ray performance evaluation was determined. The electro-optical performance includes read noise, full well capacity, interacting quantum efficiency, and pixels cross talk. The x-ray performance, including x-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detection quantum efficiency, has been evaluated in the mammographic energy range. The sensor is a 525 x 525 standard three transistor CMOS active pixel sensor array with more than 75% fill factor and 25 x 25 microm pixel pitch. Reading at 10 f/s, it is found that the sensor has 114 electrons total additive noise, 10(5) electrons full well capacity with shot noise limited operation, and 34% interacting quantum efficiency at 530 nm. Two different structured CsI:Tl phosphors with thickness 95 and 115 microm, respectively, have been optically coupled via a fiber optic plate to the array resulting in two different system configurations. The sensitivity of the two different system configurations was 43 and 47 electrons per x-ray incident on the sensor. The MTF at 10% of the two different system configurations was 9.5 and 9 cycles/mm with detective quantum efficiency of 0.45 and 0.48, respectively, close to zero frequency at approximately 0.44 microC/kg (1.72 mR) detector entrance exposure. The detector was quantum limited at low spatial frequencies and its performance was comparable with high resolution a: Si and charge coupled device based x-ray imagers. The detector also demonstrates almost an order of magnitude lower noise than active matrix flat panel imagers. The results suggest that CMOS active pixel sensors when coupled

  20. Scaling and Pixel Crosstalk Considerations for CMOS Image Sensor

    JIN Xiang-liang; CHEN Jie(member,IEEE); QIU Yu-lin

    2003-01-01

    With the scaling development of the minimum lithographic size,the scaling trend of CMOS imager pixel size and fill factor has been computed according to the Moore rule.When the CMOS minimum lithographic feature scales down to 0.35 μm,the CCD image pixel size is not so easy to be reduced and but the CMOS image pixel size benefits from the scaling minimum lithographic feature. However, when the CMOS technology is downscaled to or under 0.35 μm,the fabrication of CMOS image sensors will be limited by the standard CMOS process in both ways of shallow trench isolation and source/drain junction,which results in pixel crosstalk.The impact of the crosstalk on the active pixel CMOS image sensor is analyzed based on the technology scaling.Some suppressed crosstalk methods have been reviewed.The best way is that combining the advantages of CMOS and SOI technology to fabricate the image sensors will reduce the pixel crosstalk.

  1. Noise in a CMOS digital pixel sensor

    Zhang Chi; Yao Suying; Xu Jiangtao

    2011-01-01

    Based on the study of noise performance in CMOS digital pixel sensor (DPS),a mathematical model of noise is established with the pulse-width-modulation (PWM) principle.Compared with traditional CMOS image sensors,the integration time is different and A/D conversion is implemented in each PWM DPS pixel.Then,the quantitative calculating formula of system noise is derived.It is found that dark current shot noise is the dominant noise source in low light region while photodiode shot noise becomes significantly important in the bright region.In this model,photodiode shot noise does not vary with luminance,but dark current shot noise does.According to increasing photodiode capacitance and the comparator's reference voltage or optimizing the mismatch in the comparator,the total noise can be reduced.These results serve as a guideline for the design of PWM DPS.

  2. Noise in a CMOS digital pixel sensor

    Based on the study of noise performance in CMOS digital pixel sensor (DPS), a mathematical model of noise is established with the pulse-width-modulation (PWM) principle. Compared with traditional CMOS image sensors, the integration time is different and A/D conversion is implemented in each PWM DPS pixel. Then, the quantitative calculating formula of system noise is derived. It is found that dark current shot noise is the dominant noise source in low light region while photodiode shot noise becomes significantly important in the bright region. In this model, photodiode shot noise does not vary with luminance, but dark current shot noise does. According to increasing photodiode capacitance and the comparator's reference voltage or optimizing the mismatch in the comparator, the total noise can be reduced. These results serve as a guideline for the design of PWM DPS. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  3. Radiation-hard Active Pixel Sensors for HL-LHC Detector Upgrades based on HV-CMOS Technology

    Miucci, A; Hemperek, T.; Hügging, F.; Krüger, H.; Obermann, T.; Wermes, N.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Backhaus, M.; Capeans, M.; Feigl, S.; Nessi, M.; Pernegger, H.; Ristic, B.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Ferrere, D.; Iacobucci, G.; Rosa, A.La; Muenstermann, D.; George, M.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Quadt, A.; Rieger, J.; Weingarten, J.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Buttar, C.; Hynds, D.; Kreidl, C.; Peric, I.; Breugnon, P.; Pangaud, P.; Godiot-Basolo, S.; Fougeron, D.; Bompard, F.; Clemens, J.C.; Liu, J; Barbero, M.; Rozanov, A

    2014-01-01

    Luminosity upgrades are discussed for the LHC (HL-LHC) which would make updates to the detectors necessary, requiring in particular new, even more radiation-hard and granular, sensors for the inner detector region. 1Corresponding author. c CERN 2014, published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License by IOP Publishing Ltd and Sissa Medialab srl. Any further distribution of this work must maintain attribution to the author(s) and the published article’s title, journal citation and DOI. doi:10.1088/1748-0221/9/05/C050642014 JINST 9 C05064 A proposal for the next generation of inner detectors is based on HV-CMOS: a new family of silicon sensors based on commercial high-voltage CMOS technology, which enables the fabrication of part of the pixel electronics inside the silicon substrate itself. The main advantages of this technology with respect to the standard silicon sensor technology are: low material budget, fast charge collection time, high radiation tolerance, low cost and operation a...

  4. Edge pixel response studies of edgeless silicon sensor technology for pixellated imaging detectors

    Silicon sensor technologies with reduced dead area at the sensor's perimeter are under development at a number of institutes. Several fabrication methods for sensors which are sensitive close to the physical edge of the device are under investigation utilising techniques such as active-edges, passivated edges and current-terminating rings. Such technologies offer the goal of a seamlessly tiled detection surface with minimum dead space between the individual modules. In order to quantify the performance of different geometries and different bulk and implant types, characterisation of several sensors fabricated using active-edge technology were performed at the B16 beam line of the Diamond Light Source. The sensors were fabricated by VTT and bump-bonded to Timepix ROICs. They were 100 and 200 μ m thick sensors, with the last pixel-to-edge distance of either 50 or 100 μ m. The sensors were fabricated as either n-on-n or n-on-p type devices. Using 15 keV monochromatic X-rays with a beam spot of 2.5 μ m, the performance at the outer edge and corners pixels of the sensors was evaluated at three bias voltages. The results indicate a significant change in the charge collection properties between the edge and 5th (up to 275 μ m) from edge pixel for the 200 μ m thick n-on-n sensor. The edge pixel performance of the 100 μ m thick n-on-p sensors is affected only for the last two pixels (up to 110 μ m) subject to biasing conditions. Imaging characteristics of all sensor types investigated are stable over time and the non-uniformities can be minimised by flat-field corrections. The results from the synchrotron tests combined with lab measurements are presented along with an explanation of the observed effects

  5. New generation of monolithic active pixel sensors for charged particle detection; Developpement d'un capteur de nouvelle generation et son electronique integree pour les collisionneurs futurs

    Deptuch, G

    2002-09-01

    Vertex detectors are of great importance in particle physics experiments, as the knowledge of the event flavour is becoming an issue for the physics programme at Future Linear Colliders. Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) based on a novel detector structure have been proposed. Their fabrication is compatible with a standard CMOS process. The sensor is inseparable from the readout electronics, since both of them are integrated on the same, low-resistivity silicon wafer. The basic pixel configuration comprises only three MOS transistors and a diode collecting the charge through thermal diffusion. The charge is generated in the thin non-depleted epitaxial layer underneath the readout electronics. This approach provides, at low cost, a high resolution and thin device with the whole area sensitive to radiation. Device simulations using the ISE-TCAD package have been carried out to study the charge collection mechanism. In order to demonstrate the viability of the technique, four prototype chips have been fabricated using different submicrometer CMOS processes. The pixel gain has been calibrated using a {sup 55}Fe source and the Poisson sequence method. The prototypes have been exposed to high-energy particle beams at CERN. The tests proved excellent detection performances expressed in a single-track spatial resolution of 1.5 {mu}m and detection efficiency close to 100%, resulting from a SNR ratio of more than 30. Irradiation tests showed immunity of MAPS to a level of a few times 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} and a few hundred kRad of ionising radiation. The ideas for future work, including on-pixel signal amplification, double sampling operation and current mode pixel design are present as well. (author)

  6. Development of fast and radiation hard Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) optimized for open charm meson detection with the CBM experiment

    The adequacy of CMOS MAPS (Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors) to provide high spatial resolution while submitted to high particle flux and radiation level is assessed in this work. A 55Fe-source and minimum ionizing particle beams were used to study the performances of MAPS being irradiated either with neutrons and X-rays. As expected, ionizing radiation dominantly causes an increase of the leakage current of the pixels, which translates into increased shot noise. Non-ionizing radiation generates increases in terms of leakage currents but can reduce substantially the lifetime of the signal electrons in the pixel. The latter was found to cause a dramatic drop of the signal if the lifetime of the electrons shrinks below the time required for charge collection. The performances of irradiated detectors were studied as a function of the operation conditions, i.e. in terms of temperature and integration time of the pixel. It was demonstrated that running the detectors at low temperature (7 collisions per second, would shrink the lifetime of the detector to a few days. It was however demonstrated that a balanced configuration exists where, for lower beam interaction rate, enough D0-mesons can be collected and analyzed to investigate their production properties with a satisfactory sensitivity. (A.C.)

  7. Measurements with a CMOS pixel sensor in magnetic fields

    Boer, W. de; Bartsch, V.; Bol, J.; Dierlamm, A.; Grigoriev, E.; Hauler, F.; Herz, O.; Jungermann, L. E-mail: levin.jungermann@cern.ch; Koppenhoefer, M.; Sopczak, A.; Schneider, Th

    2002-07-11

    CMOS technique, which is the standard process used by most of the semiconductor factories worldwide, allows the production of both cheap and highly integrated sensors. The prototypes MIMOSA -I and MIMOSA-II were designed by the IReS-LEPSI collaboration in order to investigate the potential of this new technique for charged particle tracking (Design and Testing of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for Charged Particle Tracking, LEPSI, IN2P3, Strasbourg, France). For this purpose it is necessary to study the effects of magnetic fields as they appear in high-energy physics on these sensors.

  8. Design and tests of offset-compensated in-pixel amplifiers for CMOS pixel sensors

    This paper presents novel in-pixel amplifiers for CMOS pixel sensors. Two kinds of offset-compensated amplifiers allow the sensors to achieve a high signal-to-noise ratio. Based on theoretical analysis, the gain of the input offset-compensated amplifier is less sensitive to threshold voltage variation than the output offset-compensated amplifier. A 12μm pitch CMOS pixel sensor with the input offset-compensated amplifier was therefore designed and fabricated in a 0.13μm CMOS technology. Measurements indicate that the implementation of this amplifier can result in a high signal-to-noise ratio for a CMOS pixel sensor.

  9. Performance of capacitively coupled active pixel sensors in 180 nm HV-CMOS technology after irradiation to HL-LHC fluences

    Feigl, S.

    2014-03-01

    In this ATLAS upgrade R&D project, we explore the concept of using a deep-submicron HV-CMOS process to produce a drop-in replacement for traditional radiation-hard silicon sensors. Such active sensors contain simple circuits, e.g. amplifiers and discriminators, but still require a traditional (pixel or strip) readout chip. This approach yields most advantages of MAPS (improved resolution, reduced cost and material budget, etc.), without the complication of full integration on a single chip. After outlining the basic design of the HV2FEI4 test ASIC, results after irradiation with X-rays to 862 Mrad and neutrons up to 1016(1 MeV neq)/cm2 will be presented. Finally, a brief outlook on further development plans is given.

  10. Performance of capacitively coupled active pixel sensors in 180 nm HV-CMOS technology after irradiation to HL-LHC fluences

    In this ATLAS upgrade R and D project, we explore the concept of using a deep-submicron HV-CMOS process to produce a drop-in replacement for traditional radiation-hard silicon sensors. Such active sensors contain simple circuits, e.g. amplifiers and discriminators, but still require a traditional (pixel or strip) readout chip. This approach yields most advantages of MAPS (improved resolution, reduced cost and material budget, etc.), without the complication of full integration on a single chip. After outlining the basic design of the HV2FEI4 test ASIC, results after irradiation with X-rays to 862 Mrad and neutrons up to 1016(1 MeV neq)/cm2 will be presented. Finally, a brief outlook on further development plans is given

  11. Amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistor active pixel sensor x-ray imager for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Purpose: The breast cancer detection rate for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is limited by the x-ray image quality. The limiting Nyquist frequency for current DBT systems is around 5 lp/mm, while the fine image details contained in the high spatial frequency region (>5 lp/mm) are lost. Also today the tomosynthesis patient dose is high (0.67–3.52 mGy). To address current issues, in this paper, for the first time, a high-resolution low-dose organic photodetector/amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistor (a-IGZO TFT) active pixel sensor (APS) x-ray imager is proposed for next generation DBT systems. Methods: The indirect x-ray detector is based on a combination of a novel low-cost organic photodiode (OPD) and a cesium iodide-based (CsI:Tl) scintillator. The proposed APS x-ray imager overcomes the difficulty of weak signal detection, when small pixel size and low exposure conditions are used, by an on-pixel signal amplification with a significant charge gain. The electrical performance of a-IGZO TFT APS pixel circuit is investigated by SPICE simulation using modified Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) TFT model. Finally, the noise, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and resolvability of the complete system are modeled using the cascaded system formalism. Results: The result demonstrates that a large charge gain of 31–122 is achieved for the proposed high-mobility (5–20 cm2/V s) amorphous metal-oxide TFT APS. The charge gain is sufficient to eliminate the TFT thermal noise, flicker noise as well as the external readout circuit noise. Moreover, the low TFT (<10−13 A) and OPD (<10−8 A/cm2) leakage currents can further reduce the APS noise. Cascaded system analysis shows that the proposed APS imager with a 75 μm pixel pitch can effectively resolve the Nyquist frequency of 6.67 lp/mm, which can be further improved to ∼10 lp/mm if the pixel pitch is reduced to 50 μm. Moreover, the detector entrance exposure per

  12. Amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistor active pixel sensor x-ray imager for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Zhao, Chumin; Kanicki, Jerzy, E-mail: kanicki@eecs.umich.edu [Solid-State Electronic Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The breast cancer detection rate for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is limited by the x-ray image quality. The limiting Nyquist frequency for current DBT systems is around 5 lp/mm, while the fine image details contained in the high spatial frequency region (>5 lp/mm) are lost. Also today the tomosynthesis patient dose is high (0.67–3.52 mGy). To address current issues, in this paper, for the first time, a high-resolution low-dose organic photodetector/amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistor (a-IGZO TFT) active pixel sensor (APS) x-ray imager is proposed for next generation DBT systems. Methods: The indirect x-ray detector is based on a combination of a novel low-cost organic photodiode (OPD) and a cesium iodide-based (CsI:Tl) scintillator. The proposed APS x-ray imager overcomes the difficulty of weak signal detection, when small pixel size and low exposure conditions are used, by an on-pixel signal amplification with a significant charge gain. The electrical performance of a-IGZO TFT APS pixel circuit is investigated by SPICE simulation using modified Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) TFT model. Finally, the noise, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and resolvability of the complete system are modeled using the cascaded system formalism. Results: The result demonstrates that a large charge gain of 31–122 is achieved for the proposed high-mobility (5–20 cm{sup 2}/V s) amorphous metal-oxide TFT APS. The charge gain is sufficient to eliminate the TFT thermal noise, flicker noise as well as the external readout circuit noise. Moreover, the low TFT (<10{sup −13} A) and OPD (<10{sup −8} A/cm{sup 2}) leakage currents can further reduce the APS noise. Cascaded system analysis shows that the proposed APS imager with a 75 μm pixel pitch can effectively resolve the Nyquist frequency of 6.67 lp/mm, which can be further improved to ∼10 lp/mm if the pixel pitch is reduced to 50 μm. Moreover, the

  13. SOI Pixel Sensor for Gamma-Ray Imaging

    Shimazoe, Kenji; Yoshihara, Yuri; Koyama, Akihiko; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Orita, Tadashi; Kamada, Kei; Takeda, Ayaki; Tsuru, Takeshi; Arai, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    SOI (Silicon-On-Insulator) pixel sensor is promising technology for developing the high position resolution detector by integrating the small pixels and circuits in the monolithic way. The event driven (trigger mode) SOI based pixel sensor has also been developed for the application of X-ray astronomy with the purpose of reducing the noise using anti-coincidence event. This trigger mode SOI pixel sensor working with in the rate of kilo Hz is also a promising scatter detector for advanced Compton imaging to track the Compton recoiled electrons.

  14. Silicon sensors for the upgrades of the CMS pixel detector

    Centis Vignali, Matteo

    2015-12-15

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHC luminosity is constantly increased through upgrades of the accelerator and its injection chain. Two major upgrades will take place in the next years. The first upgrade involves the LHC injector chain and allows the collider to achieve a luminosity of about 2.10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. A further upgrade of the LHC foreseen for 2025 will boost its luminosity to 5.10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. As a consequence of the increased luminosity, the detectors need to be upgraded. In particular, the CMS pixel detector will undergo two upgrades in the next years. The first upgrade (phase I) consists in the substitution of the current pixel detector in winter 2016/2017. The upgraded pixel detector will implement new readout electronics that allow efficient data taking up to a luminosity of 2.10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, twice as much as the LHC design luminosity. The modules that will constitute the upgraded detector are being produced at different institutes. Hamburg (University and DESY) is responsible for the production of 350 pixel modules. The second upgrade (phase II) of the pixel detector is foreseen for 2025. The innermost pixel layer of the upgraded detector will accumulate a radiation damage corresponding to an equivalent fluence of Φ{sub eq}=2.10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} and a dose of ∼10 MGy after an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb{sup -1}. Several groups are investigating sensor designs and configurations able to withstand such high doses and fluences. This work is divided into two parts related to important aspects of the upgrades of the CMS pixel detector. For the phase I upgrade, a setup has been developed to provide an absolute energy calibration of the pixel modules that will constitute the detector. The calibration is obtained using monochromatic X-rays. The same setup is used to test the buffering capabilities of the modules' readout chip

  15. Silicon sensors for the upgrades of the CMS pixel detector

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHC luminosity is constantly increased through upgrades of the accelerator and its injection chain. Two major upgrades will take place in the next years. The first upgrade involves the LHC injector chain and allows the collider to achieve a luminosity of about 2.1034 cm-2s-1. A further upgrade of the LHC foreseen for 2025 will boost its luminosity to 5.1034 cm-2s-1. As a consequence of the increased luminosity, the detectors need to be upgraded. In particular, the CMS pixel detector will undergo two upgrades in the next years. The first upgrade (phase I) consists in the substitution of the current pixel detector in winter 2016/2017. The upgraded pixel detector will implement new readout electronics that allow efficient data taking up to a luminosity of 2.1034 cm-2s-1, twice as much as the LHC design luminosity. The modules that will constitute the upgraded detector are being produced at different institutes. Hamburg (University and DESY) is responsible for the production of 350 pixel modules. The second upgrade (phase II) of the pixel detector is foreseen for 2025. The innermost pixel layer of the upgraded detector will accumulate a radiation damage corresponding to an equivalent fluence of Φeq=2.1016 cm-2 and a dose of ∼10 MGy after an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1. Several groups are investigating sensor designs and configurations able to withstand such high doses and fluences. This work is divided into two parts related to important aspects of the upgrades of the CMS pixel detector. For the phase I upgrade, a setup has been developed to provide an absolute energy calibration of the pixel modules that will constitute the detector. The calibration is obtained using monochromatic X-rays. The same setup is used to test the buffering capabilities of the modules' readout chip. The maximum rate experienced by the modules produced in Hamburg will be 120 MHz

  16. Mapping Electrical Crosstalk in Pixelated Sensor Arrays

    Seshadri, Suresh (Inventor); Cole, David (Inventor); Smith, Roger M (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The effects of inter pixel capacitance in a pixilated array may be measured by first resetting all pixels in the array to a first voltage, where a first image is read out, followed by resetting only a subset of pixels in the array to a second voltage, where a second image is read out, where the difference in the first and second images provide information about the inter pixel capacitance. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  17. A low power and low signal 4 bit 50MS/s double sampling pipelined ADC for monolithie active pixel sensors

    Dahoumane, M; Bouvier, J; Lagorio, E; Hostachy, J Y; Gallin-Martel, L; Hostachy, J Y; Rossetto, O; Hu, Y; Ghazlane, H; Dallet, D

    2007-01-01

    A 4 bit very low power and low incoming signal analog to digital converter (ADC) using a double sampling switched capacitor technique, designed for use in CMOS monolithic active pixels sensor readout, has been implemented in 0.35μm CMOS technology. A non-resetting sample and hold stage is integrated to amplify the incoming signal by 4. This first stage compensates both the amplifier offset effect and the input common mode voltage fluctuations. The converter is composed of a 2.5 bit pipeline stage followed by a 2 bit flash stage. This prototype consists of 4 ADC double-channels; each one is sampling at 50MS/s and dissipates only 2.6mW at 3.3V supply voltage. A bias pulsing stage is integrated in the circuit. Therefore, the analog part is switched OFF or ON in less than 1μs. The size for the layout is 80μm*0.9mm. This corresponds to the pitch of 4 pixel columns, each one is 20μm wide.

  18. A low power and low signal 4 bit 50MS/s double sampling pipelined ADC for Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors

    A 4 bit very low power and low incoming signal analog to digital converter (ADC) using a double sampling switched capacitor technique, designed for use in CMOS monolithic active pixels sensor readout, has been implemented in 0.35μm CMOS technology. A non-resetting sample and hold stage is integrated to amplify the incoming signal by 4. This first stage compensates both the amplifier offset effect and the input common mode voltage fluctuations. The converter is composed of a 2.5 bit pipeline stage followed by a 2 bit flash stage. This prototype consists of 4 ADC double-channels; each one is sampling at 50MS/s and dissipates only 2.6mW at 3.3V supply voltage. A bias pulsing stage is integrated in the circuit. Therefore, the analog part is switched OFF or ON in less than 1μs. The size for the layout is 80μm*0.9mm. This corresponds to the pitch of 4 pixel columns, each one is 20μm wide

  19. Ionizing and non Ionizing radiation damage in a large area CMOS active pixel sensor for medical applications

    Esposito, Michela; Anaxagoras, Thalis; Price, Tony; Manolopoulos, Spyros; Evans, Philip; Wells, Kevin; Allinson, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Currently, large-area medical sensors are based on amorphous flat panel technology. Sensors based on monolithic CMOS APS can offer many advantages in terms of image quality and reduced dose requirements. One constraint on the take-up of APS has been their restricted operating life due to radiation damage. Here we present a new wafer scale CMOS APS, designed for medical applications and hardened-by-design with reference to its performance in typical operating environments. The detector was ...

  20. Development of radiation hardened pixel sensors for charged particle detection

    Koziel, Michal

    2014-01-01

    CMOS Pixel Sensors are being developed since a few years to equip vertex detectors for future high-energy physics experiments with the crucial advantages of a low material budget and low production costs. The features simultaneously required are a short readout time, high granularity and high tolerance to radiation. This thesis mainly focuses on the radiation tolerance studies. To achieve the targeted readout time (tens of microseconds), the sensor pixel readout was organized in parallel columns restricting in addition the readout to pixels that had collected the signal charge. The pixels became then more complex, and consequently more sensitive to radiation. Different in-pixel architectures were studied and it was concluded that the tolerance to ionizing radiation was limited to 300 krad with the 0.35- m fabrication process currently used, while the targeted value was several Mrad. Improving this situation calls for implementation of the sensors in processes with a smaller feature size which naturally imp...

  1. Mapping Capacitive Coupling Among Pixels in a Sensor Array

    Seshadri, Suresh; Cole, David M.; Smith, Roger M.

    2010-01-01

    An improved method of mapping the capacitive contribution to cross-talk among pixels in an imaging array of sensors (typically, an imaging photodetector array) has been devised for use in calibrating and/or characterizing such an array. The method involves a sequence of resets of subarrays of pixels to specified voltages and measurement of the voltage responses of neighboring non-reset pixels.

  2. High-voltage pixel sensors for ATLAS upgrade

    Perić, I.; Kreidl, C.; Fischer, P.; Bompard, F.; Breugnon, P.; Clemens, J.-C.; Fougeron, D.; Liu, J.; Pangaud, P.; Rozanov, A.; Barbero, M.; Feigl, S.; Capeans, M.; Ferrere, D.; Pernegger, H.; Ristic, B.; Muenstermann, D.; Gonzalez Sevilla, S.; La Rosa, A.; Miucci, A.; Nessi, M.; Iacobucci, G.; Backhaus, M.; Hügging, Fabian; Krüger, H.; Hemperek, T.; Obermann, T.; Wermes, N.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Quadt, A.; Weingarten, J.; George, M.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Rieger, J.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Buttar, C.; Hynds, D.

    2014-11-01

    The high-voltage (HV-) CMOS pixel sensors offer several good properties: a fast charge collection by drift, the possibility to implement relatively complex CMOS in-pixel electronics and the compatibility with commercial processes. The sensor element is a deep n-well diode in a p-type substrate. The n-well contains CMOS pixel electronics. The main charge collection mechanism is drift in a shallow, high field region, which leads to a fast charge collection and a high radiation tolerance. We are currently evaluating the use of the high-voltage detectors implemented in 180 nm HV-CMOS technology for the high-luminosity ATLAS upgrade. Our approach is replacing the existing pixel and strip sensors with the CMOS sensors while keeping the presently used readout ASICs. By intelligence we mean the ability of the sensor to recognize a particle hit and generate the address information. In this way we could benefit from the advantages of the HV sensor technology such as lower cost, lower mass, lower operating voltage, smaller pitch, smaller clusters at high incidence angles. Additionally we expect to achieve a radiation hardness necessary for ATLAS upgrade. In order to test the concept, we have designed two HV-CMOS prototypes that can be readout in two ways: using pixel and strip readout chips. In the case of the pixel readout, the connection between HV-CMOS sensor and the readout ASIC can be established capacitively.

  3. Planar pixel sensors for the ATLAS upgrade: beam tests results

    The performance of planar silicon pixel sensors, in development for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer and High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrades, has been examined in a series of beam tests at the CERN SPS facilities since 2009. Salient results are reported on the key parameters, including the spatial resolution, the charge collection and the charge sharing between adjacent cells, for different bulk materials and sensor geometries. Measurements are presented for n+-in-n pixel sensors irradiated with a range of fluences and for p-type silicon sensors with various layouts from different vendors. All tested sensors were connected via bump-bonding to the ATLAS Pixel read-out chip. The tests reveal that both n-type and p-type planar sensors are able to collect significant charge even after the lifetime fluence expected at the HL-LHC.

  4. Study of Silicon Pixel Sensors for Synchrotron Radiation Detection

    Li, Zhen-Jie; Hu, Ling-Fei; Liu, Peng; Yin, Hua-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid pixel single-photon-counting detectors have been successfully employed and widely used in Synchrotron radiation X-ray detection. In this paper, the silicon pixel sensors for single X-ray photon detection, which operate in full-depletion mode have been studied. The pixel sensors were fabricated on 4-inch, N type, 320{\\mu}m thick, high-resistivity silicon wafers. The pixel sensors has a p+-in-n structure with varies of pixel size and gap size including guard-ring structures. Later, the pixel sensor was wire bonded to the ASIC circuits and tested for the performance of X-ray response in the synchrotron beam line (BSRF, 1W2B). From the S-curve scan, we could get the energy resolution and the linear properties between input energy and the equivalent generator amplitude. The pixel sensors we fabricated have a good energy linear and high count rate depending on the ASIC readout circuit. We get the 20% energy resolution above 10 keV photon energy via wire bonding. The energy resolution would get better if we b...

  5. On-chip Phase Locked Loop (PLL) design for clock multiplier in CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS)

    Sun, Q; Valin, I; Claus, G; Hu-Guo, Ch; Hu, Yu

    2009-01-01

    In a detector system, clock distribution to sensors must be controlled at a level allowing proper synchronisation. In order to reach theses requirements for the HFT (Heavy Flavor Tracker) upgrade at STAR (Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC), we have proposed to distribute a low frequency clock at 10 MHz which will be multiplied to 160 MHz in each sensor by a PLL. A PLL has been designed for period jitter less than 20 ps rms, low power consumption and manufactured in a 0.35 μm CMOS process.

  6. Small pitch pixel sensors\\\\ for the CMS Phase II upgrade

    Steinbrueck, Georg

    2015-01-01

    The CMS collaboration has undertaken two sensor R\\&D programs on thin n-in-p planar and 3D silicon sensor technologies. To cope with the increase in instantaneous luminosity, the pixel area has to be reduced to approximately 2500 $\\mu$m$^{2}$ to keep the occupancy at the percent level. Suggested pixel cell geometries to match this requirement are {50$\\times$50 }$\\mu$...

  7. The Dexela 2923 CMOS X-ray detector: A flat panel detector based on CMOS active pixel sensors for medical imaging applications

    Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) active pixel sensors (APS) have been introduced recently in many scientific applications. This work reports on the performance (in terms of signal and noise transfer) of an X-ray detector that uses a novel CMOS APS which was developed for medical X-ray imaging applications. For a full evaluation of the detector's performance, electro-optical and X-ray characterizations were carried out. The former included measuring read noise, full well capacity and dynamic range. The latter, which included measuring X-ray sensitivity, presampling modulation transfer function (pMTF), noise power spectrum (NPS) and the resulting detective quantum efficiency (DQE), was assessed under three beam qualities (28 kV, 50 kV (RQA3) and 70 kV (RQA5) using W/Al) all in accordance with the IEC standard. The detector features an in-pixel option for switching the full well capacity between two distinct modes, high full well (HFW) and low full well (LFW). Two structured CsI:Tl scintillators of different thickness (a “thin” one for high resolution and a thicker one for high light efficiency) were optically coupled to the sensor array to optimize the performance of the system for different medical applications. The electro-optical performance evaluation of the sensor results in relatively high read noise (∼360 e−), high full well capacity (∼1.5×106 e−) and wide dynamic range (∼73 dB) under HFW mode operation. When the LFW mode is used, the read noise is lower (∼165) at the expense of a reduced full well capacity (∼0.5×106 e−) and dynamic range (∼69 dB). The maximum DQE values at low frequencies (i.e. 0.5 lp/mm) are high for both HFW (0.69 for 28 kV, 0.71 for 50 kV and 0.75 for 70 kV) and LFW (0.69 for 28 kV and 0.7 for 50 kV) modes. The X-ray performance of the studied detector compares well to that of other mammography and general radiography systems, obtained under similar experimental conditions. This demonstrates the

  8. Development and characterization of the latest X-ray SOI pixel sensor for a future astronomical mission

    We have been developing active pixel sensors based on silicon-on-insulator technology for future X-ray astronomy missions. Recently we fabricated the new prototype named “XRPIX2”, and investigated its spectroscopic performance. For comparison and evaluation of different chip designs, XRPIX2 consists of 3 pixel types: Small Pixel, Large Pixel 1, and Large Pixel 2. In Small Pixel, we found that the gains of the 68% pixels are within 1.4% of the mean value, and the energy resolution is 656 eV (FWHM) for 8 keV X-rays, which is the best spectroscopic performance in our development. The pixel pitch of Large Pixel 1 and Large Pixel 2 is twice as large as that of Small Pixel. Charge sharing events are successfully reduced for Large Pixel 1. Moreover Large Pixel 2 has multiple nodes for charge collection in a pixel. We confirmed that the multi-nodes structure is effective to increase charge collection efficiency. -- Highlights: •We performed the evaluation of the newly fabricated SOI sensor for X-ray astronomy. •The pixel-to-pixel gain variation is small in the 64 ×144 pixel format. •The energy resolution is improved by the optimization of the pixel design. •The multi charge collection nodes improved the charge collection efficiency

  9. Development and characterization of the latest X-ray SOI pixel sensor for a future astronomical mission

    Nakashima, Shinya, E-mail: shinya@cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Gando Ryu, Syukyo; Tanaka, Takaaki; Go Tsuru, Takeshi [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Takeda, Ayaki [Department of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Graduate School of High Energy Accelerator Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Arai, Yasuo [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Imamura, Toshifumi; Ohmoto, Takafumi; Iwata, Atsushi [A-R-Tec Corp., Hiroshima Techno Plaza 405, 3-13-26 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan)

    2013-12-11

    We have been developing active pixel sensors based on silicon-on-insulator technology for future X-ray astronomy missions. Recently we fabricated the new prototype named “XRPIX2”, and investigated its spectroscopic performance. For comparison and evaluation of different chip designs, XRPIX2 consists of 3 pixel types: Small Pixel, Large Pixel 1, and Large Pixel 2. In Small Pixel, we found that the gains of the 68% pixels are within 1.4% of the mean value, and the energy resolution is 656 eV (FWHM) for 8 keV X-rays, which is the best spectroscopic performance in our development. The pixel pitch of Large Pixel 1 and Large Pixel 2 is twice as large as that of Small Pixel. Charge sharing events are successfully reduced for Large Pixel 1. Moreover Large Pixel 2 has multiple nodes for charge collection in a pixel. We confirmed that the multi-nodes structure is effective to increase charge collection efficiency. -- Highlights: •We performed the evaluation of the newly fabricated SOI sensor for X-ray astronomy. •The pixel-to-pixel gain variation is small in the 64 ×144 pixel format. •The energy resolution is improved by the optimization of the pixel design. •The multi charge collection nodes improved the charge collection efficiency.

  10. Radiation-hard active pixel sensors for HL-LHC detector upgrades based on HV-CMOS technology

    Miucci, A.; Gonella, L.; Hemperek, T.; Hügging, F.; H. Krüger; Obermann, T.; N. Wermes; M. Garcia-Sciveres; Backhaus, M.; Capeans, M.; Feigl, S.; Nessi, M; Pernegger, H.(CERN, Geneva, Switzerland); Ristic, B.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S

    2014-01-01

    Luminosity upgrades are discussed for the LHC (HL-LHC) which would make updates to the detectors necessary, requiring in particular new, even more radiation-hard and granular, sensors for the inner detector region. 1Corresponding author. c CERN 2014, published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License by IOP Publishing Ltd and Sissa Medialab srl. Any further distribution of this work must maintain attribution to the author(s) and the published article’s title, journal ci...

  11. Development of CMOS Pixel Sensors with digital pixel dedicated to future particle physics experiments

    Zhao, W.; Wang, T.; Pham, H.; Hu-Guo, C.; Dorokhov, A.; Hu, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Two prototypes of CMOS pixel sensor with in-pixel analog to digital conversion have been developed in a 0.18 μm CIS process. The first design integrates a discriminator into each pixel within an area of 22 × 33 μm2 in order to meet the requirements of the ALICE inner tracking system (ALICE-ITS) upgrade. The second design features 3-bit charge encoding inside a 35 × 35 μm2 pixel which is motivated by the specifications of the outer layers of the ILD vertex detector (ILD-VXD). This work aims to validate the concept of in-pixel digitization which offers higher readout speed, lower power consumption and less dead zone compared with the column-level charge encoding.

  12. Testbeam and Laboratory Characterization of CMS 3D Pixel Sensors

    Bubna, M; Krzywda, A; Koybasi, O; Arndt, K; Bortoletto, D; Shipsey, I; Bolla, G; Kok, A; Hansen, T -E; Hansen, T A; Jensen, G U; Brom, J M; Boscardin, M; Chramowicz, J; Cumalat, J; Betta, G F Dalla; Dinardo, M; Godshalk, A; Jones, M; Krohn, M D; Kumar, A; Lei, C M; Moroni, L; Perera, L; Povoli, M; Prosser, A; Rivera, R; Solano, A; Obertino, M M; Kwan, S; Uplegger, L; Via, C D; Vigani, L; Wagner, S

    2014-01-01

    The pixel detector is the innermost tracking device in CMS, reconstructing interaction vertices and charged particle trajectories. The sensors located in the innermost layers of the pixel detector must be upgraded for the ten-fold increase in luminosity expected with the High- Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) phase. As a possible replacement for planar sensors, 3D silicon technology is under consideration due to its good performance after high radiation fluence. In this paper, we report on pre- and post- irradiation measurements for CMS 3D pixel sensors with different electrode configurations. The effects of irradiation on electrical properties, charge collection efficiency, and position resolution of 3D sensors are discussed. Measurements of various test structures for monitoring the fabrication process and studying the bulk and surface properties, such as MOS capacitors, planar and gate-controlled diodes are also presented.

  13. Design and test of pixel sensors for the CMS experiment

    Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Rott, C.; Roy, A.; Kwan, S.; Chien, C. Y.; Cho, H.; Gobbi, B.; Horisberger, R.; Kaufmann, R.

    2001-04-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will have a silicon pixel detector as its innermost tracking device. The pixel system will be exposed to the harsh radiation environment of the LHC. Prototype sensors have been designed to meet the specifications of the CMS experiment. The sensors are n +-n devices to allow partial depletion operation after bulk type inversion. The isolation of the n + pixels is provided through a novel double open p-ring design that allows sensors testing before bump bonding and flip chipping. The prototype wafers contain a variety of p-stop designs and are fabricated by two vendors on different bulk substrates including oxygenated silicon. A study of the static measurement of the prototype sensors before irradiation is presented.

  14. Design and test of pixel sensors for the CMS experiment

    Bölla, G; Rott, C; Roy, A; Kwan, S; Chien, C Y; Cho, H; Gobbi, B; Horisberger, R P; Kaufmann, R

    2001-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will have a silicon pixel detector as its innermost tracking device. The pixel system will be exposed to the harsh radiation environment of the LHC. Prototype sensors have been designed to meet the specifications of the CMS experiment. The sensors are n/sup +/-n devices to allow partial depletion operation after bulk type inversion. The isolation of the n/sup +/ pixels is provided through a novel double open p-ring design that allows sensor testing before bump bonding and flip chipping. The prototype wafers contain a variety of p-stop designs and are fabricated by two vendors on different bulk substrates including oxygenated silicon. A study of the static measurement of the prototype sensors before irradiation is presented. (2 refs).

  15. Calculation stellar detection limit for active pixel sensor%有源像素传感器恒星探测极限计算方法

    张晨; 沈绪榜; 陈朝阳

    2005-01-01

    恒星探测极限是星跟踪器的一个关键参数,在导航星库的建立和星图识别过程中起着重要作用.根据恒星辐射模型和CMOS有源像素传感器的噪声计算模型,提出了一种在给定信噪比和有源像素传感器噪声条件下,计算星跟踪器恒星探测极限的方法.该方法利用单位时间内、单位面积上有源像素传感器对0星等恒星的响应来求取恒星探测极限.最后,在信噪比为8的条件下,结合星跟踪器的有关参数给出了一个计算恒星探测极限的具体实例.%The stellar detection limit(SDL) of image sensor is a key parameter of star tracker. It plays an important role in the selection of guide stars and the star pattern identification. In order to calculate the SDL of CMOS active pixel sensor (APS), the model of star influx and the noise model of APS are presented. The main noise sources of APS are analyzed. If SNR and total noise of APS are given, the SDL of APS can be calculated based on the typical response of 0 magnitude visual star per second per mm2. As an example, a specific SDL of APS is provided with given optical parameters and exposure time.

  16. Status and perspectives of pixel sensors based on 3D vertical integration

    This paper reviews the most recent developments of 3D integration in the field of silicon pixel sensors and readout integrated circuits. This technology may address the needs of future high energy physics and photon science experiments by increasing the electronic functional density in small pixel readout cells and by stacking various device layers based on different technologies, each optimized for a different function. Current efforts are aimed at improving the performance of both hybrid pixel detectors and of CMOS sensors. The status of these activities is discussed here, taking into account experimental results on 3D devices developed in the frame of the 3D-IC consortium. The paper also provides an overview of the ideas that are being currently devised for novel 3D vertically integrated pixel sensors. - Highlights: • 3D integration is a promising technology for pixel sensors in high energy physics. • Experimental results on two-layer 3D CMOS pixel sensors are presented. • The outcome of the first run from the 3D-IC consortium is discussed. • The AIDA network is studying via-last 3D integration of heterogeneous layers. • New ideas based on 3D vertically integrated pixels are being developed for HEP

  17. Image Restoration After Pixel Binning in Image Sensors

    LI Hao; ZHANG Hui; GUO Xiaolian; HU Guangshu

    2009-01-01

    A method was developed to restore degraded images to some extent after the pixel binning pro-cess in image sensors to improve the resolution. A pixel binning model was used to approximate the original un-binned image. Then, the least squares error criterion was used as a constraint to reconstruct the re-stored pixel values from the binning model. The technique achieves about a one-decibel increase in the peak signal-to-noise ratio compared with the odginal estimated image. The technique has good detail pre-servation performance as well as low computation load. Thus, this restoration technique provides valuable improvements in practical, real time image processing.

  18. Achievements of the ATLAS Upgrade Planar Pixel Sensors R&D Project

    Nellist, C

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of the HL-LHC upgrade, the ATLAS experiment plans to introduce an all-silicon inner tracker to cope with the elevated occupancy. To investigate the suitability of pixel sensors using the proven planar technology for the upgraded tracker, the ATLAS Planar Pixel Sensor R&D Project (PPS) was established comprising 19 institutes and more than 90 scientists. The paper provides an overview of the research and development project and highlights accomplishments, among them: beam test results with planar sensors up to innermost layer fluences (> 10^16 n_eq cm^2); measurements obtained with irradiated thin edgeless n-in-p pixel assemblies; recent studies of the SCP technique to obtain almost active edges by postprocessing already existing sensors based on scribing, cleaving and edge passivation; an update on prototyping efforts for large areas: sensor design improvements and concepts for low-cost hybridisation; comparison between Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry results and TCAD simulations. Togethe...

  19. Improving charge-collection efficiency of SOI pixel sensors for X-ray astronomy

    Matsumura, Hideaki; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Tanaka, Takaaki; Takeda, Ayaki; Arai, Yasuo; Mori, Koji; Nishioka, Yusuke; Takenaka, Ryota; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Nakashima, Shinya; Hatsui, Takaki; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Takei, Dai; Kameshima, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    We have been developing a new type of active pixel sensor, referred to as "XRPIX" for future X-ray astronomy satellites on the basis of silicon-on-insulator CMOS technology. The problem on our previous device, XRPIX1b, was degradation of the charge-collection efficiency (CCE) at pixel borders. In order to investigate the non-uniformity of the CCE within a pixel, we measured sub-pixel response with X-ray beams whose diameters are 10 μmΦ at SPring-8. We found that the X-ray detection efficiency and CCE degrade in the sensor region under the pixel circuitry placed outside the buried p-wells (BPW). A 2D simulation of the electric fields with the semiconductor device simulator HyDeLEOS shows that the isolated pixel circuitry outside the BPW makes local minimums in the electric potentials at the interface between the sensor and buried oxide layers, where a part of charge is trapped and is not collected to the BPW. Based on this result, we modified the placement of the in-pixel circuitry in the next device, XRPIX2b, for the electric fields to be converged toward the BPW, and confirmed that the CCE at pixel borders is successfully improved.

  20. Status and perspectives of pixel sensors based on 3D vertical integration

    Re, V

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the most recent developments of 3D integration in the field of silicon pixel sensors and readout integrated circuits. This technology may address the needs of future high energy physics and photon science experiments by increasing the electronic functional density in small pixel readout cells and by stacking various device layers based on different technologies, each optimized for a different function. Current efforts are aimed at improving the performance of both hybrid pixel detectors and of CMOS sensors. The status of these activities is discussed here, taking into account experimental results on 3D devices developed in the frame of the 3D-IC consortium. The paper also provides an overview of the ideas that are being currently devised for novel 3D vertically integrated pixel sensors.

  1. Optimization of radiation hardness and charge collection of edgeless silicon pixel sensors for photon science

    Recent progress in active-edge technology of silicon sensors enables the development of large-area tiled silicon pixel detectors with small dead space between modules by utilizing edgeless sensors. Such technology has been proven in successful productions of ATLAS and Medipix-based silicon pixel sensors by a few foundries. However, the drawbacks of edgeless sensors are poor radiation hardness for ionizing radiation and non-uniform charge collection by edge pixels. In this work, the radiation hardness of edgeless sensors with different polarities has been investigated using Synopsys TCAD with X-ray radiation-damage parameters implemented. Results show that if no conventional guard ring is present, none of the current designs are able to achieve a high breakdown voltage (typically < 30 V) after irradiation to a dose of ∼ 10 MGy. In addition, a charge-collection model has been developed and was used to calculate the charges collected by the edge pixels of edgeless sensors when illuminated with X-rays. The model takes into account the electric field distribution inside the pixel sensor, the absorption of X-rays, drift and diffusion of electrons and holes, charge sharing effects, and threshold settings in ASICs. It is found that the non-uniform charge collection of edge pixels is caused by the strong bending of the electric field and the non-uniformity depends on bias voltage, sensor thickness and distance from active edge to the last pixel (''edge space). In particular, the last few pixels close to the active edge of the sensor are not sensitive to low-energy X-rays ( < 10 keV), especially for sensors with thicker Si and smaller edge space. The results from the model calculation have been compared to measurements and good agreement was obtained. The model can be used to optimize the edge design. From the edge optimization, it is found that in order to guarantee the sensitivity of the last few pixels to low-energy X-rays, the edge space should be kept at

  2. Intrinsic Pixel Size Variation in an LSST Prototype Sensor

    Baumer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The ambitious science goals of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) have motivated a search for new and unexpected sources of systematic error in the LSST camera. Flat-field images are a rich source of data on sensor anomalies, although such effects are typically dwarfed by shot noise in a single flat field. After combining many ($\\sim 500$) such images into `ultraflats' to reduce the impact of shot noise, we perform photon transfer analysis on a pixel-by-pixel basis and observe no spatial structure in pixel linearity or gain at light levels of 100 ke$^-$ and below. At 125 ke$^-$, a columnar structure is observed in the gain map--we attribute this to a flux-dependent charge transfer inefficiency. We also probe small-scale variations in effective pixel size by analyzing pixel-neighbor correlations in ultraflat images, where we observe clear evidence of intrinsic variation in effective pixel size in an LSST prototype sensor near the $\\sim .3\\%$ level.

  3. Intrinsic pixel size variation in an LSST prototype sensor

    The ambitious science goals of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) have motivated a search for new and unexpected sources of systematic error in the LSST camera. Flat field images are a rich source of data on sensor anomalies, although such effects are typically dwarfed by shot noise in a single flat field. After combining many (0∼50) such images into 'ultraflats' to reduce the impact of shot noise, we perform photon transfer analysis on a pixel-by-pixel basis and observe no spatial structure in pixel linearity or gain at light levels of 100 ke− and below. At 125 ke−, a columnar structure is observed in the gain map—we attribute this to a flux-dependent charge-transfer inefficiency. We also probe small-scale variations in effective pixel size by analyzing pixel-neighbor correlations in ultraflat images, where we observe clear evidence of intrinsic variation in effective pixel size in an LSST prototype sensor near the ∼ .3% level

  4. Digital Pixel Sensor Array with Logarithmic Delta-Sigma Architecture

    Jing Li

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Like the human eye, logarithmic image sensors achieve wide dynamic range easily at video rates, but, unlike the human eye, they suffer from low peak signal-to-noise-and-distortion ratios (PSNDRs. To improve the PSNDR, we propose integrating a delta-sigma analog-to-digital converter (ADC in each pixel. An image sensor employing this architecture is designed, built and tested in 0.18 micron complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS technology. It achieves a PSNDR better than state-of-the-art logarithmic sensors and comparable to the human eye. As the approach concerns an array of many ADCs, we use a small-area low-power delta-sigma design. For scalability, each pixel has its own decimator. The prototype is compared to a variety of other image sensors, linear and nonlinear, from industry and academia.

  5. Digital pixel sensor array with logarithmic delta-sigma architecture.

    Mahmoodi, Alireza; Li, Jing; Joseph, Dileepan

    2013-01-01

    Like the human eye, logarithmic image sensors achieve wide dynamic range easily at video rates, but, unlike the human eye, they suffer from low peak signal-to-noise-and-distortion ratios (PSNDRs). To improve the PSNDR, we propose integrating a delta-sigma analog-to-digital converter (ADC) in each pixel. An image sensor employing this architecture is designed, built and tested in 0.18 micron complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. It achieves a PSNDR better than state-of-the-art logarithmic sensors and comparable to the human eye. As the approach concerns an array of many ADCs, we use a small-area low-power delta-sigma design. For scalability, each pixel has its own decimator. The prototype is compared to a variety of other image sensors, linear and nonlinear, from industry and academia. PMID:23959239

  6. Electron Pattern Recognition using trigger mode SOI pixel sensor for Advanced Compton Imaging

    Compton imaging is a useful method for localizing sub MeV to a few MeV gamma-rays and widely used for environmental and medical applications. The direction of recoiled electrons in Compton scattering process provides the additional information to limit the Compton cones and increases the sensitivity in the system. The capability of recoiled electron tracking using trigger-mode Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) sensor is investigated with various radiation sources. The trigger-mode SOI sensor consists of 144 by 144 active pixels with 30 μm cells and the thickness of sensor is 500 μm. The sensor generates the digital output when it is hit by gamma-rays and 25 by 25 pixel pattern of surrounding the triggered pixel is readout to extract the recoiled electron track. The electron track is successfully observed for 60Co and 137Cs sources, which provides useful information for future electron tracking Compton camera

  7. Electron Pattern Recognition using trigger mode SOI pixel sensor for Advanced Compton Imaging

    Shimazoe, K.; Yoshihara, Y.; Fairuz, A.; Koyama, A.; Takahashi, H.; Takeda, A.; Tsuru, T.; Arai, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Compton imaging is a useful method for localizing sub MeV to a few MeV gamma-rays and widely used for environmental and medical applications. The direction of recoiled electrons in Compton scattering process provides the additional information to limit the Compton cones and increases the sensitivity in the system. The capability of recoiled electron tracking using trigger-mode Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) sensor is investigated with various radiation sources. The trigger-mode SOI sensor consists of 144 by 144 active pixels with 30 μm cells and the thickness of sensor is 500 μm. The sensor generates the digital output when it is hit by gamma-rays and 25 by 25 pixel pattern of surrounding the triggered pixel is readout to extract the recoiled electron track. The electron track is successfully observed for 60Co and 137Cs sources, which provides useful information for future electron tracking Compton camera.

  8. Test Beam Results of 3D Silicon Pixel Sensors for the ATLAS upgrade

    Grenier, P; Barbero, M; Bates, R; Bolle, E; Borri, M; Boscardin, M; Buttar, C; Capua, M; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cobal, M; Cristofoli, A; Dalla Betta, G F; Darbo, G; Da Via, C; Devetak, E; DeWilde, B; Di Girolamo, B; Dobos, D; Einsweiler, K; Esseni, D; Fazio, S; Fleta, C; Freestone, J; Gallrapp, C; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Gariano, G; Gemme, C; Giordani, M P; Gjersdal, H; Grinstein, S; Hansen, T; Hansen, T E; Hansson, P; Hasi, J; Helle, K; Hoeferkamp, M; Hugging, F; Jackson, P; Jakobs, K; Kalliopuska, J; Karagounis, M; Kenney, C; Köhler, M; Kocian, M; Kok, A; Kolya, S; Korokolov, I; Kostyukhin, V; Krüger, H; La Rosa, A; Lai, C H; Lietaer, N; Lozano, M; Mastroberardino, A; Micelli, A; Nellist, C; Oja, A; Oshea, V; Padilla, C; Palestri, P; Parker, S; Parzefall, U; Pater, J; Pellegrini, G; Pernegger, H; Piemonte, C; Pospisil, S; Povoli, M; Roe, S; Rohne, O; Ronchin, S; Rovani, A; Ruscino, E; Sandaker, H; Seidel, S; Selmi, L; Silverstein, D; Sjøbaek, K; Slavicek, T; Stapnes, S; Stugu, B; Stupak, J; Su, D; Susinno, G; Thompson, R; Tsung, J W; Tsybychev, D; Watts, S J; Wermes, N; Young, C; Zorzi, N

    2011-01-01

    Results on beam tests of 3D silicon pixel sensors aimed at the ATLAS Insertable-B-Layer and High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC)) upgrades are presented. Measurements include charge collection, tracking efficiency and charge sharing between pixel cells, as a function of track incident angle, and were performed with and without a 1.6 T magnetic field oriented as the ATLAS Inner Detector solenoid field. Sensors were bump bonded to the front-end chip currently used in the ATLAS pixel detector. Full 3D sensors, with electrodes penetrating through the entire wafer thickness and active edge, and double-sided 3D sensors with partially overlapping bias and read-out electrodes were tested and showed comparable performance.

  9. Test beam results of 3D silicon pixel sensors for the ATLAS upgrade

    Results on beam tests of 3D silicon pixel sensors aimed at the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer and High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrades are presented. Measurements include charge collection, tracking efficiency and charge sharing between pixel cells, as a function of track incident angle, and were performed with and without a 1.6 T magnetic field oriented as the ATLAS inner detector solenoid field. Sensors were bump-bonded to the front-end chip currently used in the ATLAS pixel detector. Full 3D sensors, with electrodes penetrating through the entire wafer thickness and active edge, and double-sided 3D sensors with partially overlapping bias and read-out electrodes were tested and showed comparable performance.

  10. Improving Charge-Collection Efficiency of Kyoto's SOI Pixel Sensors

    Matsumura, Hideaki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Takeda, Ayaki; Ito, Makoto; Ohmura, Syunichi; Arai, Yasuo; Mori, Koji; Nishioka, Yusuke; Takenaka, Ryota; Kohmura, Takayoshi

    2015-01-01

    We have been developing X-ray SOIPIXs for next-generation satellites for X-ray astronomy. Their high time resolution ($\\sim10~\\mu$s) and event-trigger-output function enable us to read out without pile-ups and to use anti-coincidence systems. Their performance in imaging spectroscopy is comparable to that in the CCDs. A problem in our previous model was degradation of charge-collection efficiency (CCE) at pixel borders. We measured the response in the sub-pixel scale, using finely collimated X-ray beams at $10~\\mu$m\\Phi$ at SPring-8, and investigated the non-uniformity of the CCE within a pixel. We found that the X-ray detection efficiency and CCE degrade in the sensor region under the pixel circuitry placed outside the buried p-wells (BPW). A 2D simulation of the electric fields shows that the isolated pixel-circuitry outside the BPW creates local minimums in the electric potentials at the interface between the sensor and buried oxide layers. Thus, a part of signal charge is trapped there and is not collecte...

  11. From vertex detectors to inner trackers with CMOS pixel sensors

    Besson, A.; Pérez, A. Pérez; Spiriti, E.; Baudot, J.; Claus, G; Goffe, M.; de Winter, M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of CMOS Pixel Sensors (CPS) for high resolution and low material vertex detectors has been validated with the 2014 and 2015 physics runs of the STAR-PXL detector at RHIC/BNL. This opens the door to the use of CPS for inner tracking devices, with 10-100 times larger sensitive area, which require therefore a sensor design privileging power saving, response uniformity and robustness. The 350 nm CMOS technology used for the STAR-PXL sensors was considered as too poorly suited to upcoming ...

  12. Characterization of a three side abuttable CMOS pixel sensor with digital pixel and data compression for charged particle tracking

    Guilloux, F.; Değerli, Y.; Flouzat, C.; Lachkar, M.; Monmarthe, E.; Orsini, F.; Venault, P.

    2016-02-01

    CMOS monolithic pixel sensor technology has been chosen to equip the new ALICE trackers for HL-LHC . PIXAM is the final prototype from an R&D program specific to the Muon Forward Tracker which intends to push significantly forward the performances of the mature rolling shutter architecture. By implementing a digital pixel allowing to readout of a group of rows in parallel, the PIXAM sensor increases the rolling shutter readout speed while keeping the same power consumption as that of analogue pixel sensors. This paper will describe shortly the ASIC architecture and will focus on the analogue and digital performances of the sensor, obtained from laboratory measurements.

  13. Characterization of a three side abuttable CMOS pixel sensor with digital pixel and data compression for charged particle tracking

    CMOS monolithic pixel sensor technology has been chosen to equip the new ALICE trackers for HL-LHC . PIXAM is the final prototype from an R and D program specific to the Muon Forward Tracker which intends to push significantly forward the performances of the mature rolling shutter architecture. By implementing a digital pixel allowing to readout of a group of rows in parallel, the PIXAM sensor increases the rolling shutter readout speed while keeping the same power consumption as that of analogue pixel sensors. This paper will describe shortly the ASIC architecture and will focus on the analogue and digital performances of the sensor, obtained from laboratory measurements

  14. Design and characterization of novel monolithic pixel sensors for the ALICE ITS upgrade

    Cavicchioli, C., E-mail: costanza.cavicchioli@cern.ch [CERN European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Chalmet, P.L. [MIND, Archamps Technopole, Saint-Julien-en-Genevois, Cedex 74166 (France); Giubilato, P. [Università and INFN, Padova (Italy); Hillemanns, H.; Junique, A.; Kugathasan, T.; Mager, M. [CERN European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Marin Tobon, C.A. [Valencia Polytechnic University, Valencia (Spain); Martinengo, P. [CERN European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Mattiazzo, S. [Università and INFN, Padova (Italy); Mugnier, H. [MIND, Archamps Technopole, Saint-Julien-en-Genevois, Cedex 74166 (France); Musa, L. [CERN European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Pantano, D. [Università and INFN, Padova (Italy); Rousset, J. [MIND, Archamps Technopole, Saint-Julien-en-Genevois, Cedex 74166 (France); Reidt, F. [CERN European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Physikalisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Riedler, P.; Snoeys, W. [CERN European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Van Hoorne, J.W. [CERN European Organization for Nuclear Research, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Technische Universitaet Wien, Vienna (Austria); Yang, P. [Central China Normal University CCNU, Wuhan (China)

    2014-11-21

    Within the R and D activities for the upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS), Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) are being developed and studied, due to their lower material budget (∼0.3%X{sub 0} in total for each inner layer) and higher granularity (∼20μm×20μm pixels) with respect to the present pixel detector. This paper presents the design and characterization results of the Explorer0 chip, manufactured in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor process, based on a wafer with high-resistivity (ρ>1kΩcm) and 18 μm thick epitaxial layer. The chip is organized in two sub-matrices with different pixel pitches (20 μm and 30 μm), each of them containing several pixel designs. The collection electrode size and shape, as well as the distance between the electrode and the surrounding electronics, are varied; the chip also offers the possibility to decouple the charge integration time from the readout time, and to change the sensor bias. The charge collection properties of the different pixel variants implemented in Explorer0 have been studied using a {sup 55}Fe X-ray source and 1–5 GeV/c electrons and positrons. The sensor capacitance has been estimated, and the effect of the sensor bias has also been examined in detail. A second version of the Explorer0 chip (called Explorer1) has been submitted for production in March 2013, together with a novel circuit with in-pixel discrimination and a sparsified readout. Results from these submissions are also presented.

  15. Design and characterization of novel monolithic pixel sensors for the ALICE ITS upgrade

    Within the R and D activities for the upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS), Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) are being developed and studied, due to their lower material budget (∼0.3%X0 in total for each inner layer) and higher granularity (∼20μm×20μm pixels) with respect to the present pixel detector. This paper presents the design and characterization results of the Explorer0 chip, manufactured in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor process, based on a wafer with high-resistivity (ρ>1kΩcm) and 18 μm thick epitaxial layer. The chip is organized in two sub-matrices with different pixel pitches (20 μm and 30 μm), each of them containing several pixel designs. The collection electrode size and shape, as well as the distance between the electrode and the surrounding electronics, are varied; the chip also offers the possibility to decouple the charge integration time from the readout time, and to change the sensor bias. The charge collection properties of the different pixel variants implemented in Explorer0 have been studied using a 55Fe X-ray source and 1–5 GeV/c electrons and positrons. The sensor capacitance has been estimated, and the effect of the sensor bias has also been examined in detail. A second version of the Explorer0 chip (called Explorer1) has been submitted for production in March 2013, together with a novel circuit with in-pixel discrimination and a sparsified readout. Results from these submissions are also presented

  16. Optimization of radiation hardness and charge collection of edgeless silicon pixel sensors for photon science

    Zhang, Jiaguo; Pennicard, David; Sarajlic, Milija; Graafsma, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in active-edge technology of silicon sensors enables the development of large-area tiled silicon pixel detectors with small dead space between modules by utilizing edgeless sensors. Such technology has been proven in successful productions of ATLAS and Medipix-based silicon pixel sensors by a few foundries. However, the drawbacks of edgeless sensors are poor radiation hardness for ionizing radiation and non-uniform charge collection by edge pixels. In this work, the radiation hardness of edgeless sensors with different polarities has been investigated using Synopsys TCAD with X-ray radiation-damage parameters implemented. Results show that if no conventional guard ring is present, none of the current designs are able to achieve a high breakdown voltage (typically < 30 V) after irradiation to a dose of ~10 MGy. In addition, a charge-collection model has been developed and was used to calculate the charges collected by the edge pixels of edgeless sensors when illuminated with X-rays. The mode...

  17. Design and TCAD simulation of planar p-on-n active-edge pixel sensors for the next generation of FELs

    Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Batignani, G.; Benkechkache, M. A.; Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G.; Comotti, D.; Fabris, L.; Forti, F.; Grassi, M.; Latreche, S.; Lodola, L.; Malcovati, P.; Manghisoni, M.; Mendicino, R.; Morsani, F.; Paladino, A.; Pancheri, L.; Paoloni, E.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Rizzo, G.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.; Verzellesi, G.; Xu, H.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the design and TCAD simulations of planar p-on-n sensors with active edge aimed at a four-side buttable X-ray detector module for future FEL applications. Edge terminations with different number of guard rings were designed to find the best trade-off between breakdown voltage and border gap size. The methodology of the sensor design, the optimization of the most relevant parameters to maximize the breakdown voltage and the final layout are described.

  18. Research and Development of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for the Detection of the Elementary Particles; Recherche et developpement de capteurs actifs monolithiques CMOS pour la detection de particules elementaires

    Li, Y

    2007-09-15

    In order to develop high spatial resolution and readout speed vertex detectors for the future International Linear Collider (ILC), fast CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) are studied on this work. Two prototypes of MAPS, MIMOSA 8 and MIMOSA 16, based on the same micro-electronic architecture were developed in CMOS processes with different thickness of epitaxial layer. The size of pixel matrix is 32 x 128: 8 columns of the pixel array are readout directly with analog outputs and the other 24 columns are connected to the column level auto-zero discriminators. The Correlated Double Sampling (CDS) structures are successfully implemented inside pixel and discriminator. The photo diode type pixels with different diode sizes are used in these prototypes. With a {sup 55}Fe X-ray radioactive source, the important parameters, such as Temporal Noise, Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN), Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), Charge-to-Voltage conversion Factor (CVF) and Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE), are studied as function of readout speed and diode size. For MIMOSA 8, the effect of fast neutrons irradiation is also. Two beam tests campaigns were made: at DESY with a 5 GeV electrons beam and at CERN with a 180 GeV pions beam. Detection Efficiency and Spatial Resolution are studied in function of the discriminator threshold. For these two parameters, the influences of diode size and SNR of the central pixel of a cluster are also discussed. In order to improve the spatial resolution of the digital outputs, a very compact (25 {mu}m x 1 mm) and low consumption (300 {mu}W) column level ADC is designed in AMS 0.35 {mu}m OPTO process. Based on successive approximation architecture, the auto-offset cancellation structure is integrated. A new column level auto-zero discriminator using static latch is also designed. (author)

  19. Development and characterization of the latest X-ray SOI pixel sensor for a future astronomical mission

    Nakashima, Shinya; Gando Ryu, Syukyo; Tanaka, Takaaki; Go Tsuru, Takeshi; Takeda, Ayaki; Arai, Yasuo; Imamura, Toshifumi; Ohmoto, Takafumi; Iwata, Atsushi

    2013-12-01

    We have been developing active pixel sensors based on silicon-on-insulator technology for future X-ray astronomy missions. Recently we fabricated the new prototype named “XRPIX2”, and investigated its spectroscopic performance. For comparison and evaluation of different chip designs, XRPIX2 consists of 3 pixel types: Small Pixel, Large Pixel 1, and Large Pixel 2. In Small Pixel, we found that the gains of the 68% pixels are within 1.4% of the mean value, and the energy resolution is 656 eV (FWHM) for 8 keV X-rays, which is the best spectroscopic performance in our development. The pixel pitch of Large Pixel 1 and Large Pixel 2 is twice as large as that of Small Pixel. Charge sharing events are successfully reduced for Large Pixel 1. Moreover Large Pixel 2 has multiple nodes for charge collection in a pixel. We confirmed that the multi-nodes structure is effective to increase charge collection efficiency.

  20. Design and characterization of novel monolithic pixel sensors for the ALICE ITS upgrade

    Cavicchioli, C; Giubilato, P; Hillemanns, H; Junique, A; Kugathasan, T; Mager, M; Marin Tobon, C A; Martinengo, P; Mattiazzo, S; Mugnier, H; Musa, L; Pantano, D; Rousset, J; Reidt, F; Riedler, P; Snoeys, W; Van Hoorne, J W; Yang, P

    2014-01-01

    Within the R&D activities for the upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS), Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) are being developed and studied, due to their lower material budget (~0.3%X0~0.3%X0 in total for each inner layer) and higher granularity (View the MathML source~20μm×20μm pixels) with respect to the present pixel detector. This paper presents the design and characterization results of the Explorer0 chip, manufactured in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor process, based on a wafer with high-resistivity View the MathML source(ρ>1kΩcm) and 18 μm thick epitaxial layer. The chip is organized in two sub-matrices with different pixel pitches (20 μm and 30 μm), each of them containing several pixel designs. The collection electrode size and shape, as well as the distance between the electrode and the surrounding electronics, are varied; the chip also offers the possibility to decouple the charge integration time from the readout time, and to change the sensor bias. The charge c...

  1. Recent Results of the ATLAS Upgrade Planar Pixel Sensors R&D Project

    Weigell, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    To cope with the higher occupancy and radiation damage at the HL-LHC also the LHC experiments will be upgraded. The ATLAS Planar Pixel Sensor R&D Project (PPS) is an international collaboration of 17 institutions and more than 80 scientists, exploring the feasibility of employing planar pixel sensors for this scenario. Depending on the radius, different pixel concepts are investigated using laboratory and beam test measurements. At small radii the extreme radiation environment and strong space constraints are addressed with very thin pixel sensors active thickness in the range of (75-150) mum, and the development of slim as well as active edges. At larger radii the main challenge is the cost reduction to allow for instrumenting the large area of (7-10) m^2. To reach this goal the pixel productions are being transferred to 6 inch production lines. Additionally, investigated are more cost-efficient and industrialised interconnection techniques as well as the n-in-p technology, which, being a single-sided pr...

  2. Signal processing algorithms for staring single pixel hyperspectral sensors

    Manolakis, Dimitris; Rossacci, Michael; O'Donnell, Erin; D'Amico, Francis M.

    2006-08-01

    Remote sensing of chemical warfare agents (CWA) with stand-off hyperspectral sensors has a wide range of civilian and military applications. These sensors exploit the spectral changes in the ambient photon flux produced thermal emission or absorption after passage through a region containing the CWA cloud. In this work we focus on (a) staring single-pixel sensors that sample their field of view at regular intervals of time to produce a time series of spectra and (b) scanning single or multiple pixel sensors that sample their FOV as they scan. The main objective of signal processing algorithms is to determine if and when a CWA enters the FOV of the sensor. We shall first develop and evaluate algorithms for staring sensors following two different approaches. First, we will assume that no threat information is available and we design an adaptive anomaly detection algorithm to detect a statistically-significant change in the observed spectrum. The algorithm processes the observed spectra sequentially-in-time, estimates adaptively the background, and checks whether the next spectrum differs significantly from the background based on the Mahalanobis distance or the distance from the background subspace. In the second approach, we will assume that we know the spectral signature of the CWA and develop sequential-in-time adaptive matched filter detectors. In both cases, we assume that the sensor starts its operation before the release of the CWA; otherwise, staring at a nearby CWA-free area is required for background estimation. Experimental evaluation and comparison of the proposed algorithms is accomplished using data from a long-wave infrared (LWIR) Fourier transform spectrometer.

  3. Design and characterization of high precision in-pixel discriminators for rolling shutter CMOS pixel sensors with full CMOS capability

    In order to exploit the ability to integrate a charge collecting electrode with analog and digital processing circuitry down to the pixel level, a new type of CMOS pixel sensors with full CMOS capability is presented in this paper. The pixel array is read out based on a column-parallel read-out architecture, where each pixel incorporates a diode, a preamplifier with a double sampling circuitry and a discriminator to completely eliminate analog read-out bottlenecks. The sensor featuring a pixel array of 8 rows and 32 columns with a pixel pitch of 80μm×16μm was fabricated in a 0.18μm CMOS process. The behavior of each pixel-level discriminator isolated from the diode and the preamplifier was studied. The experimental results indicate that all in-pixel discriminators which are fully operational can provide significant improvements in the read-out speed and the power consumption of CMOS pixel sensors

  4. A charge pump for driving CMOS active pixel reset

    XU Jiang-tao; LI Bin-qiao; YAO Su-ying; SUN Zhong-yan

    2009-01-01

    To overcome the limitation of low image signal swing range and long reset time in four transistor CMOS active pixel image sensor, a charge pump circuit is presented to improve the pixel reset performance. The charge pump circuit consists of two stage switch capacitor serial voltage doubler. Cross-coupled MOSFET switch structure with well close and open perfor-mance is used in the second stage of the charge pump. The pixel reset transistor with gate voltage driven by output of the pump works in linear region, which can accelerate reset process and complete reset is achieved. The simulation results show that output of the charge pump is enhanced from 1.2 to 4.2 V with voltage tipple lower than 6 inV. The pixel reset time is reduced to 1.14 ns in dark. Image smear due to non-completely reset is eliminated and the image signal swing range is enlarged. The charge pump is successfully embedded in a CMOS image sensor chip with 0.3 ~ 106 pixeis.

  5. Development of a novel pixel-level signal processing chain for fast readout 3D integrated CMOS pixel sensors

    Fu, Y.; Torheim, O.; Hu-Guo, C. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (IPHC), 23 rue du loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Degerli, Y. [CEA Saclay, IRFU/SEDI, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Hu, Y., E-mail: yann.hu@iphc.cnrs.fr [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (IPHC), 23 rue du loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France)

    2013-03-11

    In order to resolve the inherent readout speed limitation of traditional 2D CMOS pixel sensors, operated in rolling shutter readout, a parallel readout architecture has been developed by taking advantage of 3D integration technologies. Since the rows of the pixel array are zero-suppressed simultaneously instead of sequentially, a frame readout time of a few microseconds is expected for coping with high hit rates foreseen in future collider experiments. In order to demonstrate the pixel readout functionality of such a pixel sensor, a 2D proof-of-concept chip including a novel pixel-level signal processing chain was designed and fabricated in a 0.13μm CMOS technology. The functionalities of this chip have been verified through experimental characterization.

  6. Development of a novel pixel-level signal processing chain for fast readout 3D integrated CMOS pixel sensors

    In order to resolve the inherent readout speed limitation of traditional 2D CMOS pixel sensors, operated in rolling shutter readout, a parallel readout architecture has been developed by taking advantage of 3D integration technologies. Since the rows of the pixel array are zero-suppressed simultaneously instead of sequentially, a frame readout time of a few microseconds is expected for coping with high hit rates foreseen in future collider experiments. In order to demonstrate the pixel readout functionality of such a pixel sensor, a 2D proof-of-concept chip including a novel pixel-level signal processing chain was designed and fabricated in a 0.13μm CMOS technology. The functionalities of this chip have been verified through experimental characterization

  7. Recent results of the ATLAS upgrade planar pixel sensors R&D project

    Weigell, Philipp

    2013-12-01

    To extend the physics reach of the LHC experiments, several upgrades to the accelerator complex are planned, culminating in the HL-LHC, which eventually leads to an increase of the peak luminosity by a factor of five to ten compared to the LHC design value. To cope with the higher occupancy and radiation damage also the LHC experiments will be upgraded. The ATLAS Planar Pixel Sensor R&D Project is an international collaboration of 17 institutions and more than 80 scientists, exploring the feasibility of employing planar pixel sensors for this scenario. Depending on the radius, different pixel concepts are investigated using laboratory and beam test measurements. At small radii the extreme radiation environment and strong space constraints are addressed with very thin pixel sensors active thickness in the range of (75-150) μm, and the development of slim as well as active edges. At larger radii the main challenge is the cost reduction to allow for instrumenting the large area of (7-10) m2. To reach this goal the pixel productions are being transferred to 6 in production lines and more cost-efficient and industrialised interconnection techniques are investigated. Additionally, the n-in-p technology is employed, which requires less production steps since it relies on a single-sided process. An overview of the recent accomplishments obtained within the ATLAS Planar Pixel Sensor R&D Project is given. The performance in terms of charge collection and tracking efficiency, obtained with radioactive sources in the laboratory and at beam tests, is presented for devices built from sensors of different vendors connected to either the present ATLAS read-out chip FE-I3 or the new Insertable B-Layer read-out chip FE-I4. The devices, with a thickness varying between 75 μm and 300 μm, were irradiated to several fluences up to 2×1016 neq/cm2. Finally, the different approaches followed inside the collaboration to achieve slim or active edges for planar pixel sensors are presented.

  8. Study of silicon pixel sensor for synchrotron radiation detection

    Li, Zhen-Jie; Jia, Yun-Cong; Hu, Ling-Fei; Liu, Peng; Yin, Hua-Xiang

    2016-03-01

    The silicon pixel sensor (SPS) is one of the key components of hybrid pixel single-photon-counting detectors for synchrotron radiation X-ray detection (SRD). In this paper, the design, fabrication, and characterization of SPSs for single beam X-ray photon detection is reported. The designed pixel sensor is a p+-in-n structure with guard-ring structures operated in full-depletion mode and is fabricated on 4-inch, N type, 320 μm thick, high-resistivity silicon wafers by a general Si planar process. To achieve high energy resolution of X-rays and obtain low dark current and high breakdown voltage as well as appropriate depletion voltage of the SPS, a series of technical optimizations of device structure and fabrication process are explored. With optimized device structure and fabrication process, excellent SPS characteristics with dark current of 2 nA/cm2, full depletion voltage 150 V are achieved. The fabricated SPSs are wire bonded to ASIC circuits and tested for the performance of X-ray response to the 1W2B synchrotron beam line of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The measured S-curves for SRD demonstrate a high discrimination for different energy X-rays. The extracted energy resolution is high (10 keV) and the linear properties between input photo energy and the equivalent generator amplitude are well established. It confirmed that the fabricated SPSs have a good energy linearity and high count rate with the optimized technologies. The technology is expected to have a promising application in the development of a large scale SRD system for the Beijing Advanced Photon Source. Supported by Prefabrication Research of Beijing Advanced Photon Source (R&D for BAPS) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11335010)

  9. From vertex detectors to inner trackers with CMOS pixel sensors

    Besson, A; Spiriti, E; Baudot, J; Claus, G; Goffe, M; Winter, M

    2016-01-01

    The use of CMOS Pixel Sensors (CPS) for high resolution and low material vertex detectors has been validated with the 2014 and 2015 physics runs of the STAR-PXL detector at RHIC/BNL. This opens the door to the use of CPS for inner tracking devices, with 10-100 times larger sensitive area, which require therefore a sensor design privileging power saving, response uniformity and robustness. The 350 nm CMOS technology used for the STAR-PXL sensors was considered as too poorly suited to upcoming applications like the upgraded ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS), which requires sensors with one order of magnitude improvement on readout speed and improved radiation tolerance. This triggered the exploration of a deeper sub-micron CMOS technology, Tower-Jazz 180 nm, for the design of a CPS well adapted for the new ALICE-ITS running conditions. This paper reports the R&D results for the conception of a CPS well adapted for the ALICE-ITS.

  10. Radiation Damage of the ATLAS Pixel Sensors Using Leakage Current Measurement System

    Gorelov, I; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The current measurement system measures directly the leakage current in pixel sensors. The system is integrated with the ATLAS Pixel high voltage delivery system. The system runs as a monitor of a radiation damage of the pixel sensors. The leakage current data collected for the completed data taking period are analyzed. The recent status of the sensor's radiation damage and a comparison with the theoretical predictions are presented.

  11. Design and realisation of integrated circuits for the readout of pixel sensors in high-energy physics and biomedical imaging

    Radiation tolerant pixel-readout chip for the ATLAS pixel detector has been designed, implemented in a deep-submicron CMOS technology and successfully tested. The chip contains readout-channels with complex analog and digital circuits. Chip for steering of the DEPFET active-pixel matrix has been implemented in a high-voltage CMOS technology. The chip contains channels which generate fast sequences of high-voltage signals. Detector containing this chip has been successfully tested. Pixel-readout test chip for an X-ray imaging pixel sensor has been designed, implemented in a CMOS technology and tested. Pixel-readout channels are able to simultaneously count the signals generated by passage of individual photons and to sum the total charge generated during exposure time. (orig.)

  12. Design and realisation of integrated circuits for the readout of pixel sensors in high-energy physics and biomedical imaging

    Peric, I.

    2004-08-01

    Radiation tolerant pixel-readout chip for the ATLAS pixel detector has been designed, implemented in a deep-submicron CMOS technology and successfully tested. The chip contains readout-channels with complex analog and digital circuits. Chip for steering of the DEPFET active-pixel matrix has been implemented in a high-voltage CMOS technology. The chip contains channels which generate fast sequences of high-voltage signals. Detector containing this chip has been successfully tested. Pixel-readout test chip for an X-ray imaging pixel sensor has been designed, implemented in a CMOS technology and tested. Pixel-readout channels are able to simultaneously count the signals generated by passage of individual photons and to sum the total charge generated during exposure time. (orig.)

  13. The MOS-type DEPFET pixel sensor for the ILC environment

    Andricek, L. [MPI Halbleiterlabor, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, 81739 Munich (Germany)]|[Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich (Germany)]. E-mail: lca@hll.mpg.de; Fischer, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Heinzinger, K. [MPI Halbleiterlabor, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, 81739 Munich (Germany)]|[PNSensor GmbH, Roemerstr. 28, 80803 Munich (Germany); Herrmann, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Herz, D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich (Germany)]|[Mannheim University, D-68159 Mannheim (Germany)]|[Bonn Unversity, D-53112 Bonn (Germany); Karagounis, M.; Kohrs, R.; Krueger, H.; Lechner, P.; Reuen, L.; Sandow, C.; Trimpl, M.; Toerne, E.V.; Velthuis, J.; Wermes, N. [PNSensor GmbH, Roemerstr. 28, 80803 Munich (Germany); Lutz, G. [MPI Halbleiterlabor, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, 81739 Munich (Germany)]|[Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich (Germany); Moser, H.-G. [MPI Halbleiterlabor, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, 81739 Munich (Germany)]|[Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich (Germany); Peric, I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Richter, R.H. [MPI Halbleiterlabor, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, 81739 Munich (Germany)]|[Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich (Germany); Schnecke, M. [MPI Halbleiterlabor, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, 81739 Munich (Germany)]|[Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich (Germany); Schopper, F.; Strueder, L.; Treis, J.; Woelfel, S. [MPI Halbleiterlabor, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, 81739 Munich (Germany)]|[Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2006-09-01

    A new generation of MOS-type DEPFET active pixel sensors in double metal/double poly technology with {approx}25 {mu}m pixel size has been developed to meet the requirements of the vertex detector at the International Linear Collider (ILC). The paper presents the design and technology of the new linear MOS-type DEPFET sensors including a module concept and results of a feasibility study on how to build ultra-thin fully depleted sensors. One of the major challenges at the ILC is the dominant e{sup +}e{sup -} pair background from beam-beam interactions. The resulting high occupancy in the first layer of the vertex detector can be reduced by an extremely fast read out of the pixel arrays but the pair-produced electrons will also damage the sensor by ionization. Like all MOS devices, the DEPFET is inherently susceptible to ionizing radiation. The predominant effect of this kind of irradiation is the shift of the threshold voltage to more negative values due to the build up of positive oxide charges. The paper presents the first results of the irradiation of such devices with hard X-rays and gamma rays from a {sup 60}Co source up to 1 Mrad(Si) under various biasing conditions.

  14. Investigation of the Design Boundaries of a 3,072 X 2,048 Image Sensor Pixel Array

    Eid, El-Sayed I.

    2002-09-01

    The practical boundaries surrounding the design of very high resolution image sensors have been studied. The case study used to analyze these practical boundaries is a CMOS photodiode active pixel sensor (APS) image sensor with pixel array format of 3,072 (H) X 2,048 (V). The frame rate of the image sensor is variable up to 30 frames per second (fps), leading to a maximum image data throughput of 180 M pixels per second. The pixel size is 6.0 im, resulting in a pixel fill factor of approximately 48% (implemented in a 0.25 μm CMOS fabrication process) and a 4/3 inch optical format. The resultant die fill factor is approximately 54%. The column-parallel approach, which works well for both the on-chip analog signal processing and analog-to-digital conversion, is adopted. The 10-bit successive approximation ADC was deemed suitable for on-chip integration. The projected total power consumption of the case study image sensor chip is below 200 mW at 3.3-V power supply and below 100 mW at 1.5-V power supply. These power estimates were made for operation at full resolution (6 M pixels per frame) and at maximum frame rate (30 fps), leading to a maximum digital image data throughput of 1.8 G bits per second.

  15. Sensor studies of n+-in-n planar pixel sensors for the ATLAS upgrades

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC is planning upgrades of its pixel detector to cope with the luminosity increase foreseen in the coming years within the transition from LHC to Super-LHC (SLHC/HL-LHC). Associated with an increase in instantaneous luminosity is a rise of the target integrated luminosity from 730 fb-1 to about 3000 fb-1 which directly translates into significantly higher radiation damage. These upgrades consist of the installation of a 4th pixel layer, the insertable b-layer IBL, with a mean sensor radius of only 32 mm from the beam axis, before 2016/17. In addition, the complete pixel detector will be exchanged before 2020/21. Being very close to the beam, the radiation damage of the IBL sensors might be as high as 5.1015neqcm-2 at their end-of-life. The total fluence of the innermost pixel layer after the SLHC upgrade might even reach 2.1016neqcm-2. We have performed systematic measurements of planar pixel detectors based on the current ATLAS readout chip FE-I3 and obtained first experience with the new IBL readout chip FE-I4. First results will be presented.

  16. Design optimization of pixel sensors using device simulations for the phase-II CMS tracker upgrade

    Jain, G.; Bhardwaj, A.; Dalal, R.; Eber, R.; Eichorn, T.; Fernandez, M.; Lalwani, K.; Messineo, A.; Palomo, F. R.; Peltola, T.; Printz, M.; Ranjan, K.; Villa, I.; Hidalgo, S.

    2016-07-01

    In order to address the problems caused by the harsh radiation environment during the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC), all silicon tracking detectors (pixels and strips) in the CMS experiment will undergo an upgrade. And so to develop radiation hard pixel sensors, simulations have been performed using the 2D TCAD device simulator, SILVACO, to obtain design parameters. The effect of various design parameters like pixel size, pixel depth, implant width, metal overhang, p-stop concentration, p-stop depth and bulk doping density on the leakage current and critical electric field are studied for both non-irradiated as well as irradiated pixel sensors. These 2D simulation results of planar pixels are useful for providing insight into the behaviour of non-irradiated and irradiated silicon pixel sensors and further work on 3D simulation is underway.

  17. Low noise, low power front end electronics for pixelized TFA sensors

    Poltorak, K; Dabrowski, W; Despeisse, M; Jarron, P; Kaplon, J; Wyrschb, N

    2009-01-01

    Thin Film on ASIC (TFA) technology combines advantages of two commonly used pixel imaging detectors, namely, Monolithic Active Pixels (MAPs) and Hybrid Pixel detectors. Thanks to direct deposition of a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a- Si:H) sensor lm on top of the readout ASIC, TFA shows the similarity to MAP imagers, allowing, however, more sophisticated front–end circuitry to extract the signals, like in case of Hybrid Pixel technology. In this paper we present preliminary experimental results of TFA structures, obtained with 10 μm thick hydrogenated amorphous silicon sensors, deposited directly on top of integrated circuit optimized for tracking applications at linear collider experiments. The signal charges delivered by such a-Si:H n-i-p diode are small; about 37 e-/μm for minimum ionizing particles, therefore a low noise, high gain and very low power of the front- end are of primary importance. The developed demonstrator chip, designed in 250 nm CMOS technology, comprises an array of 64 by 64 pi...

  18. LePIX: First results from a novel monolithic pixel sensor

    We present a monolithic pixel sensor developed in the framework of the LePIX project aimed at tracking/triggering tasks where high granularity, low power consumption, material budget, radiation hardness and production costs are a concern. The detector is built in a 90 nm CMOS process on a substrate of moderate resistivity. This maintains the advantages usually offered by Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), like a low input capacitance, having a single piece detector and using a standard CMOS production line, but offers charge collection by drift from a depleted region and therefore an excellent signal to noise ratio and a radiation tolerance superior to conventional undepleted MAPS. Measurement results obtained with the first prototypes from laser, radioactive source and beam test experiments are described. The excellent signal-to-noise performance is demonstrated by the capability of the device to separate the peaks in the spectrum of a 55Fe source. We will also highlight the interaction between pixel cell design and architecture which points toward a very precise direction in the development of such depleted monolithic pixel devices for high energy physics

  19. Design of an ultra low power CMOS pixel sensor for a future neutron personal dosimeter

    Zhang, Y.; Hu-Guo, C.; Husson, D.; Hu, Y. [Institut Pluridisplinaire Hubert Curien IPHC, Univ. of Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3, 23 Rue du Loess, 67037 Strasbourg (France)

    2011-07-01

    Despite a continuously increasing demand, neutron electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) are still far from being completely established because their development is a very difficult task. A low-noise, ultra low power consumption CMOS pixel sensor for a future neutron personal dosimeter has been implemented in a 0.35 {mu}m CMOS technology. The prototype is composed of a pixel array for detection of charged particles, and the readout electronics is integrated on the same substrate for signal processing. The excess electrons generated by an impinging particle are collected by the pixel array. The charge collection time and the efficiency are the crucial points of a CMOS detector. The 3-D device simulations using the commercially available Synopsys-SENTAURUS package address the detailed charge collection process. Within a time of 1.9 {mu}s, about 59% electrons created by the impact particle are collected in a cluster of 4 x 4 pixels with the pixel pitch of 80 {mu}m. A charge sensitive preamplifier (CSA) and a shaper are employed in the frond-end readout. The tests with electrical signals indicate that our prototype with a total active area of 2.56 x 2.56 mm{sup 2} performs an equivalent noise charge (ENC) of less than 400 e - and 314 {mu}W power consumption, leading to a promising prototype. (authors)

  20. Simulations of planar pixel sensors for the ATLAS high luminosity upgrade

    Calderini, G; Dinu, N; Lounis, A; Marchiori, G

    2011-01-01

    A physics-based device simulation was used to study the charge carrier distribution and the electric field configuration inside simplified two-dimensional models for pixel layouts based on the ATLAS pixel sensor. In order to study the behavior of such detectors under different levels of irradiation, a three-level defect model was implemented into the simulation. Using these models, the number of guard rings, the dead edge width and the detector thickness were modified to investigate their influence on the detector depletion at the edge and on its internal electric field distribution in order to optimize the layout parameters. Simulations indicate that the number of guard rings can be reduced by a few hundred microns with respect to the layout used for the present ATLAS sensors, with a corresponding extension of the active area of the sensors. A study of the inter-pixel capacitance and of the capacitance between the implants and the high-voltage contact as a function of several parameters affecting the geometr...

  1. Development of n-in-p silicon planar pixel sensors and flip-chip modules for very high radiation environments

    Unno, Y.; Ikegami, Y.; Terada, S.; Mitsui, S.; Jinnouchi, O.; Kamada, S.; Yamamura, K.; Ishida, A.; Ishihara, M.; Inuzuka, T.; Hanagaki, K.; Hara, K.; Kondo, T.; Kimura, N.; Nakano, I.; Nagai, K.; Takashima, R.; Tojo, J.; Yorita, K.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we present R&D of n-in-p pixel sensors, aiming for a very high radiation environment up to a fluence of 10 16 n eq/cm 2. To fabricate these sensors, two batches with different mask sets were employed: the first resulted in pixel sensors compatible with the ATLAS pixel readout frontend chip called FE-I3, and the second in FE-I3 and a new frontend chip, FE-I4, compatible sensors; small diodes were employed to investigate the width from the active diode to the dicing edge and the guard rings. Tests involving the diodes showed that the strong increase of leakage current was attributed to the edge current when the lateral depletion zone reaches the dicing edge and the lateral depletion along the silicon surface was correlated with the 'field' width. The onset was observed at a voltage of 1000 V when the width was equal to ˜400 μm. The pixel sensors that were diced at a width of 450 μm could successfully maintain a bias voltage of 1000 V. Hybrid flip-chip pixel modules with dummy and real chips were also fabricated. Lead (PbSn) solder bump bonding proved to be successful. However, lead-free (SnAg) solder bump bonding requires further optimization.

  2. Error Resilient Image Communication with Chaotic Pixel Interleaving for Wireless Camera Sensors

    Duran-Faundez, Cristian; Lecuire, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    New applications of wireless sensor networks require vision capabilities. Considering the high loss rates found in sensor networks, and the limited hardware resources of current sensor nodes, low-complexity robust image transmission must be implemented, avoiding as much as possible the need for retransmission or redundancy. In this paper we propose a pixel interleaving scheme based in Torus Automorphisms, thus, neighboring pixels are transmitted in different packets. Hence, if packets are los...

  3. High Speed, Radiation Hard CMOS Pixel Sensors for Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Contarato, Devis; Denes, Peter; Doering, Dionisio; Joseph, John; Krieger, Brad

    CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors are currently being established as the technology of choice for new generation digital imaging systems in Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). A careful sensor design that couples μm-level pixel pitches with high frame rate readout and radiation hardness to very high electron doses enables the fabrication of direct electron detectors that are quickly revolutionizing high-resolution TEM imaging in material science and molecular biology. This paper will review the principal characteristics of this novel technology and its advantages over conventional, optically-coupled cameras, and retrace the sensor development driven by the Transmission Electron Aberration corrected Microscope (TEAM) project at the LBNL National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), illustrating in particular the imaging capabilities enabled by single electron detection at high frame rate. Further, the presentation will report on the translation of the TEAM technology to a finer feature size process, resulting in a sensor with higher spatial resolution and superior radiation tolerance currently serving as the baseline for a commercial camera system.

  4. Characterization and performance studies of high-voltage CMOS based pixel sensors

    Smaranda, Dumitru Dan

    2015-01-01

    The high luminosity upgrade of the LHC will push the limits for detectors, specially the silicon trackers which are closest to the interaction point. The ATLAS CMOS Sensor R&D efort is investigating a new technology using high-voltage CMOS processes for producing pixel and strip sensors. In contrast to the currently used technology these devices implement active electronics on the sensor itself, offering a multitude of tuning parameters for achieving the best performance. My summer project revolved around characterising existing samples along with assembling and debugging hardware required for their improvement and functionality. Other tasks involved writing communication protocols using pyBAR to remotely control injection circuitry on a GPAC card, and helping various members of the group with data collection and analysis. Through the summer student programme I have had the opportunity to be part of a vibrant scientic community at the forefront of research, to create bonds with fellow students from univ...

  5. Development of a highly pixelated direct charge sensor, Topmetal-I, for ionizing radiation imaging

    Fan, Yan; Huang, Guangming; Li, Xiaoting; Mei, Yuan; Pei, Hua; Sun, Quan; Sun, Xiangming; Wang, Dong; Wang, Zhen; Xiao, Le; Yang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Using industrial standard 0.35{\\mu}m CMOS Integrated Circuit process, we realized a highly pixelated sensor that directly collects charge via metal nodes placed on the top of each pixel and forms two dimensional images of charge cloud distribution. The first version, Topmetal-I, features a 64x64 pixel array of 80{\\mu}m pitch size. Direct charge calibration reveals an average capacitance of 210fF per pixel. The charge collection noise is near the thermal noise limit. With the readout, individual pixel channels exhibit a most probable equivalent noise charge of 330e-.

  6. 1T Pixel Using Floating-Body MOSFET for CMOS Image Sensors

    Guo-Neng Lu; Arnaud Tournier; François Roy; Benoît Deschamps

    2009-01-01

    We present a single-transistor pixel for CMOS image sensors (CIS). It is a floating-body MOSFET structure, which is used as photo-sensing device and source-follower transistor, and can be controlled to store and evacuate charges. Our investigation into this 1T pixel structure includes modeling to obtain analytical description of conversion gain. Model validation has been done by comparing theoretical predictions and experimental results. On the other hand, the 1T pixel structure has been impl...

  7. Characterization of thin irradiated epitaxial silicon sensors for the CMS phase II pixel 2 upgrade

    The high-luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider foreseen around 2023 resulted in the decision to replace the entire tracking system of the CMS experiment. The new pixel detector will be exposed to severe radiation corresponding to 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluence up to φeq ∼ 1016 cm-2 and ionizing dose of ∼ 5 MGy after 3000 fb-1. Thin planar silicon sensors are good candidates to build the pixel detector since the degradation of the signal is less severe than for thicker devices. A study has been carried out in order to characterize highly irradiated planar epitaxial silicon sensors with an active thickness of 100 μm, in addition other silicon materials with a thickness of 200 μm have been studied. The investigation includes pad diodes and strip detectors irradiated up to a fluence of φeq = 1.3 x 1016 cm-2. The diodes have been characterized using laboratory measurements, while measurements have been carried out at the DESY II test beam facility to characterize the charge collection of the strip detectors. In this talk, the results obtained for p-bulk sensors are shown.

  8. A High-Speed CMOS Image Sensor with Global Electronic Shutter Pixels Using Pinned Diodes

    Yasutomi, Keita; Tamura, Toshihiro; Furuta, Masanori; Itoh, Shinya; Kawahito, Shoji

    This paper describes a high-speed CMOS image sensor with a new type of global electronic shutter pixel. A global electronic shutter is necessary for imaging fast-moving objects without motion blur or distortion. The proposed pixel has two potential wells with pinned diode structure for two-stage charge transfer that enables a global electronic shuttering and reset noise canceling. A prototype high-speed image sensor fabricated in 0.18μm standard CMOS image sensor process consists of the proposed pixel array, 12-bit column-parallel cyclic ADC arrays and 192-channel digital outputs. The sensor achieves a good linearity at low-light intensity, demonstrating the perfect charge transfer between two pinned diodes. The input referred noise of the proposed pixel is measured to be 6.3 e-.

  9. Development of Edgeless n-on-p Planar Pixel Sensors for future ATLAS Upgrades

    Bomben, M; Boscardin, M; Bosisio, L; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Giacomini, G; La Rosa, A; Marchori, G; Zorzi, N

    2012-01-01

    The development of n-on-p "edgeless" planar pixel sensors being fabricated at FBK (Trento, Italy), aimed at the upgrade of the ATLAS Inner Detector for the High Luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), is reported. A characterizing feature of the devices is the reduced dead area at the edge, achieved by adopting the "active edge" technology, based on a deep etched trench, suitably doped to make an ohmic contact to the substrate. The project is presented, along with the active edge process, the sensor design for this first n-on-p production and a selection of simulation results, including the expected charge collection efficiency after radiation fluence of $1 \\times 10^{15} {\\rm n_{eq}}/{\\rm cm}^2$ comparable to those expected at HL-LHC (about ten years of running, with an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb$^{-1}$) for the outer pixel layers. We show that, after irradiation, more than 50% of the signal should be collected in the edge region; this confirms the validity of the active edge approach.

  10. Development of edgeless n-on-p planar pixel sensors for future ATLAS upgrades

    Bomben, Marco; Bagolini, Alvise; Boscardin, Maurizio; Bosisio, Luciano; Calderini, Giovanni; Chauveau, Jacques; Giacomini, Gabriele; La Rosa, Alessandro; Marchiori, Giovanni; Zorzi, Nicola

    2013-06-01

    The development of n-on-p "edgeless" planar pixel sensors being fabricated at FBK (Trento, Italy), aimed at the upgrade of the ATLAS Inner Detector for the High Luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), is reported. A characterizing feature of the devices is the reduced dead area at the edge, achieved by adopting the "active edge" technology, based on a deep etched trench, suitably doped to make an ohmic contact to the substrate. The project is presented, along with the active edge process, the sensor design for this first n-on-p production and a selection of simulation results, including the expected charge collection efficiency after radiation fluence of 1×1015 neq/cm2 comparable to those expected at HL-LHC (about ten years of running, with an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1) for the outer pixel layers. We show that, after irradiation and at a bias voltage of 500 V, more than 50% of the signal should be collected in the edge region; this confirms the validity of the active edge approach.

  11. CMOS Active Pixel Sensors Based Detector for High-Energy Particle Tracking%基于CMOS集成有源传感器的新型高能物理粒子轨迹追踪器

    李琰; Yavuz De(g)erli; 纪震

    2009-01-01

    本文研究了一个采用标准0.35μm CMOS工艺制造的新型高能物理粒子轨迹追踪器.这个新型的追踪器运用CMOS有源像素传感器技术(CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors,MAPS)将信号的探测与处理电路集成在一起,在像素的内部实现了相关双次采样操作(Correlated Doubled Sampling,CDS).实验芯片包含一个128行×32列的像素矩阵,其中,像素的大小为25×25μm2.通过采用放射源55Fe的测定,得到像素的等效输入随机噪声(Temporal Noise)仅为12个电子而固定噪声(Fixed Pattern Noise,FPN)仅为4个电子.传感器的电荷-电压转换系数(Charge-to-Voltage conversion Factor,CVF)为60μV/e-.测试中,芯片的信号读取速度达到了12μs/帧.

  12. Power and area efficient 4-bit column-level ADC in a CMOS pixel sensor for the ILD vertex detector

    Zhang, L.; Morel, F.; Hu-Guo, Ch; Hu, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A 48 × 64 pixels prototype CMOS pixel sensor (CPS) integrated with 4-bit column-level, self triggered ADCs for the outer layers of the ILD vertex detector (VTX) was developed and fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS process with a pixel pitch of 35 μm. The pixel concept combines in-pixel amplification with a correlated double sampling (CDS) operation. The ADCs accommodating the pixel read out in a rolling shutter mode complete the conversion by performing a multi-bit/step approximation. The design was optimised for power saving at sampling frequency. The prototype sensor is currently at the stage of being started testing and evaluation. So what is described is based on post simulation results rather than test data. This 4-bit ADC dissipates, at a 3-V supply and 6.25-MS/s sampling rate, 486 μW in its inactive mode, which is by far the most frequent. This value rises to 714 μW in case of the active mode. Its footprint amounts to 35 × 545 μm2.

  13. Power and area efficient 4-bit column-level ADC in a CMOS pixel sensor for the ILD vertex detector

    A 48 × 64 pixels prototype CMOS pixel sensor (CPS) integrated with 4-bit column-level, self triggered ADCs for the outer layers of the ILD vertex detector (VTX) was developed and fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS process with a pixel pitch of 35 μm. The pixel concept combines in-pixel amplification with a correlated double sampling (CDS) operation. The ADCs accommodating the pixel read out in a rolling shutter mode complete the conversion by performing a multi-bit/step approximation. The design was optimised for power saving at sampling frequency. The prototype sensor is currently at the stage of being started testing and evaluation. So what is described is based on post simulation results rather than test data. This 4-bit ADC dissipates, at a 3-V supply and 6.25-MS/s sampling rate, 486 μW in its inactive mode, which is by far the most frequent. This value rises to 714 μW in case of the active mode. Its footprint amounts to 35 × 545 μm2.

  14. 1T Pixel Using Floating-Body MOSFET for CMOS Image Sensors.

    Lu, Guo-Neng; Tournier, Arnaud; Roy, François; Deschamps, Benoît

    2009-01-01

    We present a single-transistor pixel for CMOS image sensors (CIS). It is a floating-body MOSFET structure, which is used as photo-sensing device and source-follower transistor, and can be controlled to store and evacuate charges. Our investigation into this 1T pixel structure includes modeling to obtain analytical description of conversion gain. Model validation has been done by comparing theoretical predictions and experimental results. On the other hand, the 1T pixel structure has been implemented in different configurations, including rectangular-gate and ring-gate designs, and variations of oxidation parameters for the fabrication process. The pixel characteristics are presented and discussed. PMID:22389592

  15. Rad Tolerant CMOS Image Sensor Based on Hole Collection 4T Pixel Pinned Photodiode

    Place, Sébastien; Carrere, Jean-Pierre; Allegret, Stephane; Magnan, Pierre; Goiffon, Vincent; Roy, François

    2012-01-01

    1.4μm pixel pitch CMOS Image sensors based on hole collection pinned photodiode (HPD) have been irradiated with 60Co source. The HPD sensors exhibit much lower dark current degradation than equivalent commercial sensors using an Electron collection Pinned Photodiode (EPD). This hardness improvement is mainly attributed to carrier accumulation near the interfaces induced by the generated positive charges in dielectrics. The pre-eminence of this image sensor based on hole collection pinned phot...

  16. Development of Edgeless n-on-p Planar Pixel Sensors for future ATLAS Upgrades

    Bomben, M

    2013-01-01

    The development of n-on-p “edgeless” planar pixel sensors being fabricated at FBK (Trento, Italy), aimed at the upgrade of the ATLAS Inner Detector for the High Luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), is reported. A characterizing feature of the devices is the reduced dead area at the edge, achieved by adopting the “active edge” technology, based on a deep etched trench, suitably doped to make an ohmic contact to the substrate. The project is presented, along with the active edge process, the sensor design for this first n-on-p production and a selection of simulation results, including the expected charge collection efficiency after radiation fluence of View the MathML source1×1015neq/cm2 comparable to those expected at HL-LHC (about ten years of running, with an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb−1) for the outer pixel layers. We show that, after irradiation and at a bias voltage of 500 V, more than 50% of the signal should be collected in the edge region; this confirms the validity...

  17. Study of planar pixel sensors hardener to radiations for the upgrade of the ATLAS vertex detector

    In this work, we present a study, using TCAD (Technology Computer-Assisted Design) simulation, of the possible methods of designing planar pixel sensors by reducing their inactive area and improving their radiation hardness for use in the Insertable B-Layer (IBL) project and for SLHC upgrade phase for the ATLAS experiment. Different physical models available have been studied to develop a coherent model of radiation damage in silicon that can be used to predict silicon pixel sensor behavior after exposure to radiation. The Multi-Guard Ring Structure, a protection structure used in pixel sensor design was studied to obtain guidelines for the reduction of inactive edges detrimental to detector operation while keeping a good sensor behavior through its lifetime in the ATLAS detector. A campaign of measurement of the sensor process parameters and electrical behavior to validate and calibrate the TCAD simulation models and results are also presented. A model for diode charge collection in highly irradiated environment was developed to explain the high charge collection observed in highly irradiated devices. A simple planar pixel sensor digitization model to be used in test beam and full detector system is detailed. It allows for easy comparison between experimental data and prediction by the various radiation damage models available. The digitizer has been validated using test beam data for unirradiated sensors and can be used to produce the first full scale simulation of the ATLAS detector with the IBL that include sensor effects such as slim edge and thinning of the sensor. (author)

  18. A reticle size CMOS pixel sensor dedicated to the STAR HFT

    Valin, I.; Hu-Guo, C.; Baudot, J.; Bertolone, G.; Besson, A.; Colledani, C.; Claus, G.; Dorokhov, A.; Dozière, G.; Dulinski, W.; Gelin, M.; Goffe, M.; Himmi, A.; Jaaskelainen, K.; Morel, F.; Pham, H.; Santos, C.; Senyukov, S.; Specht, M.; Voutsinas, G.; Wang, J.; Winter, M.

    2012-01-01

    ULTIMATE is a reticle size CMOS Pixel Sensor (CPS) designed to meet the requirements of the STAR pixel detector (PXL). It includes a pixel array of 928 rows and 960 columns with a 20.7 μm pixel pitch, providing a sensitive area of ~ 3.8 cm2. Based on the sensor designed for the EUDET beam telescope, the device is a binary output sensor with integrated zero suppression circuitry featuring a 320 Mbps data throughput capability. It was fabricated in a 0.35 μm OPTO process early in 2011. The design and preliminary test results, including charged particle detection performances measured at the CERN-SPS, are presented.

  19. A reticle size CMOS pixel sensor dedicated to the STAR HFT

    ULTIMATE is a reticle size CMOS Pixel Sensor (CPS) designed to meet the requirements of the STAR pixel detector (PXL). It includes a pixel array of 928 rows and 960 columns with a 20.7 μm pixel pitch, providing a sensitive area of ∼ 3.8 cm2. Based on the sensor designed for the EUDET beam telescope, the device is a binary output sensor with integrated zero suppression circuitry featuring a 320 Mbps data throughput capability. It was fabricated in a 0.35 μm OPTO process early in 2011. The design and preliminary test results, including charged particle detection performances measured at the CERN-SPS, are presented.

  20. A low-noise CMOS pixel direct charge sensor, Topmetal-II-

    An, Mangmang; Chen, Chufeng; Gao, Chaosong; Han, Mikyung; Ji, Rong; Li, Xiaoting; Mei, Yuan; Sun, Quan; Sun, Xiangming; Wang, Kai; Xiao, Le; Yang, Ping; Zhou, Wei

    2016-02-01

    We report the design and characterization of a CMOS pixel direct charge sensor, Topmetal-II-, fabricated in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS Integrated Circuit process. The sensor utilizes exposed metal patches on top of each pixel to directly collect charge. Each pixel contains a low-noise charge-sensitive preamplifier to establish the analog signal and a discriminator with tunable threshold to generate hits. The analog signal from each pixel is accessible through time-shared multiplexing over the entire array. Hits are read out digitally through a column-based priority logic structure. Tests show that the sensor achieved a advantages in low background and low rate-density experiments.

  1. Simulations of 3D-Si sensors for the innermost layer of the ATLAS pixel upgrade

    Baselga, Marta; Quirion, David

    2016-01-01

    The LHC is expected to reach luminosities up to 3000fb-1 and the innermost layer of the ATLAS upgrade plans to cope with higher occupancy and to decrease the pixel size. 3D-Si sensors are a good candidate for the innermost layer of the ATLAS pixel upgrade since they exhibit good performance under high fluences and the new designs will have smaller pixel size to fulfill the electronics expectations. This paper reports TCAD simulations of the 3D-Si sensors designed at IMB-CNM with non passing-through columns that are being fabricated for the next innermost layer of the ATLAS pixel upgrade, shows the charge collection response before and after irradiation, and the response of 3D-Si sensors located at large $\\eta$ angles.

  2. Detection of thermal neutrons with a CMOS pixel sensor for a future dosemeter

    Vanstalle, M.; Husson, D.; Higueret, S.; Le, T. D.; Nourreddine, A. M. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, Univ. of Strasbourg, CNRS, 67037 Strasbourg (France)

    2011-07-01

    The RaMsEs group (Radioprotection et Mesures Environnementales) is developing a new compact device for operational neutron dosimetry. The electronic part of the detector is made of an integrated active pixel sensor, originally designed for tracking in particle physics. This device has useful features for neutrons, such as high detection efficiency for charged particles, good radiation resistance, high readout speed, low power consumption and high rejection of photon background. A good response of the device to fast neutrons has already been demonstrated [1]. In order to test the sensibility of the detector to thermal neutrons, experiments have been carried out with a 512 x 512 pixel CMOS sensor on a californium source moderated with heavy water (Cf.D{sub 2}O) on the Van Gogh irradiator at the LMDN, IRSN, Cadarache (France)). A thin boron converter is used to benefit from the significant cross section of the {sup 10}B (n,{alpha}) {sup 7}Li reaction. Results show a high detection efficiency (around 10{sup -3}) of the device to thermal neutrons. Our measurements are in good agreement with GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations. (authors)

  3. High-resolution hybrid pixel sensors for the e+e- Tesla linear collider vertex tracker

    In order to fully exploit the physics potential of a future high-energy e+e- linear collider, a Vertex Tracker, providing high-resolution track reconstruction, is required. Hybrid silicon pixel sensors are an attractive option, for the sensor technology, due to their read-out speed and radiation hardness, favoured in the high-rate environment of the TESLA e+e- linear collider design, but have been so far limited by the achievable single point space resolution. In this paper, a conceptual design of the TESLA Vertex Tracker, based on a novel layout of hybrid pixel sensors with interleaved cells to improve their spatial resolution, is presented

  4. Testbeam Measurements with Pixel Sensors for the ATLAS Insertable b-Layer Project

    George, Matthias; Quadt, Arnulf

    During the current long machine shutdown of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva), the innermost part of the ATLAS experiment, the pixel detector, is upgraded. The existing ATLAS pixel system is equipped with silicon sensors, organized in three barrel layers and three end cap disks on either side. To cope with the higher instantaneous luminosity in the future and for compensation of radiation damages due to past and near future running time of the experiment, a new fourth pixel detector layer is inserted into the existing system. This additional pixel layer is called “Insertable b-Layer” (IBL). The IBL is a detector system, based on silicon pixel sensors. Due to the smaller radius, compared to all other detectors of the ATLAS experiment, it has to be more radiation tolerant, than e.g. the current pixel layers. Furthermore, a reduced pixel size is necessary to cope with the expected higher particle flux. During the planning phase for the IBL upgrade, three different sensor technologies were comp...

  5. 320×240 Pixels CMOS Digital Image Sensor with Wide Dynamic Range

    FANG Jie; WANG Jing-guang; HONG Zhi-liang

    2004-01-01

    A 320×240 CMOS image sensor is demonstrated,which is implemented by a standard 0.6 μm 2P2M CMOS process.For reducing the chip area,each 2×2-pixel block shares a sample/hold circuit,analog-to-digital converter and 1-b memory.The 2×2 pixel pitch has an area of 40 μm×40 μm and the fill factor is about 16%.While operating at a low frame rate,the sensor dissipates a very low power by power-management circuit making pixel-level comparators in an idle state.A digital correlated double sampling,which eliminates fixed pattern noise,improves SNR of the sensor, and multiple sampling operations make the sensor have a wide dynamic range.

  6. Performance of Edgeless Silicon Pixel Sensors on p-type substrate for the ATLAS High-Luminosity Upgrade

    Bomben, Marco; Boscardin, Maurizio; Bosisio, Luciano; Calderini, Giovanni; Chauveau, Jacques; Ducourthial, Audrey; Giacomini, Gabriele; Marchiori, Giovanni; Zorzi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    In view of the LHC upgrade phases towards the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the ATLAS experiment plans to upgrade the Inner Detector with an all-silicon system. The n-on-p silicon technology is a promising candidate to achieve a large area instrumented with pixel sensors, since it is radiation hard and cost effective. The paper reports on the performance of novel n-on-p edgeless planar pixel sensors produced by FBK-CMM, making use of the active trench for the reduction of the dead area at the periphery of the device. After discussing the sensor technology an overview of the first beam test results will be given.

  7. Active Pixel Sensors for electron microscopy

    Denes, P.; Bussat, J.-M.; Lee, Z.; Radmillovic, V.

    2007-09-01

    The technology used for monolithic CMOS imagers, popular for cell phone cameras and other photographic applications, has been explored for charged particle tracking by the high-energy physics community for several years. This technology also lends itself to certain imaging detector applications in electron microscopy. We have been developing such detectors for several years at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and we and others have shown that this technology can offer excellent point-spread function, direct detection and high readout speed. In this paper, we describe some of the design constraints peculiar to electron microscopy and summarize where such detectors could play a useful role.

  8. Development of thin sensors and a novel interconnection technology for the upgrade of the ATLAS pixel system

    Beimforde, Michael

    2010-07-19

    To extend the discovery potential of the experiments at the LHC accelerator a two phase luminosity upgrade towards the super LHC (sLHC) with a maximum instantaneous luminosity of 10{sup 35}/cm{sup 2}s{sup 1} is planned. Retaining the reconstruction efficiency and spatial resolution of the ATLAS tracking detector at the sLHC, new pixel modules have to be developed that have a higher granularity, can be placed closer to the interaction point, and allow for a cost-efficient coverage of a larger pixel detector volume compared to the present one. The reduced distance to the interaction point calls for more compact modules that have to be radiation hard to supply a sufficient charge collection efficiency up to an integrated particle fluence equivalent to that of (1-2).10{sup 16} 1-MeV-neutrons per square centimeter (n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}). Within this thesis a new module concept was partially realised and evaluated for the operation within an ATLAS pixel detector at the sLHC. This module concept utilizes a novel thin sensor production process for thin n-in-p silicon sensors which potentially allow for a higher radiation hardness at a reduced cost. Furthermore, the new 3D-integration technology ICV-SLID is explored which will allow for increasing the active area of the modules from 71% to about 90% and hence, for employing the modules in the innermost layer of the upgraded ATLAS pixel detector. A semiconductor simulation and measurements of irradiated test sensors are used to optimize the implantation parameters for the inter-pixel isolation of the thin sensors. These reduce the crosstalk between the pixel channels and should allow for operating the sensors during the whole runtime of the experiment without causing junction breakdowns. The characterization of the first production of sensors with active thicknesses of 75 {mu}m and 150 {mu}m proved that thin pixel sensors can be successfully produced with the new process technology. Thin pad sensors with a reduced inactive

  9. Development of thin sensors and a novel interconnection technology for the upgrade of the ATLAS pixel system

    To extend the discovery potential of the experiments at the LHC accelerator a two phase luminosity upgrade towards the super LHC (sLHC) with a maximum instantaneous luminosity of 1035/cm2s1 is planned. Retaining the reconstruction efficiency and spatial resolution of the ATLAS tracking detector at the sLHC, new pixel modules have to be developed that have a higher granularity, can be placed closer to the interaction point, and allow for a cost-efficient coverage of a larger pixel detector volume compared to the present one. The reduced distance to the interaction point calls for more compact modules that have to be radiation hard to supply a sufficient charge collection efficiency up to an integrated particle fluence equivalent to that of (1-2).1016 1-MeV-neutrons per square centimeter (neq/cm2). Within this thesis a new module concept was partially realised and evaluated for the operation within an ATLAS pixel detector at the sLHC. This module concept utilizes a novel thin sensor production process for thin n-in-p silicon sensors which potentially allow for a higher radiation hardness at a reduced cost. Furthermore, the new 3D-integration technology ICV-SLID is explored which will allow for increasing the active area of the modules from 71% to about 90% and hence, for employing the modules in the innermost layer of the upgraded ATLAS pixel detector. A semiconductor simulation and measurements of irradiated test sensors are used to optimize the implantation parameters for the inter-pixel isolation of the thin sensors. These reduce the crosstalk between the pixel channels and should allow for operating the sensors during the whole runtime of the experiment without causing junction breakdowns. The characterization of the first production of sensors with active thicknesses of 75 μm and 150 μm proved that thin pixel sensors can be successfully produced with the new process technology. Thin pad sensors with a reduced inactive edge demonstrate that the active sensor

  10. Development of Fast and High Precision CMOS Pixel Sensors for an ILC Vertex Detector

    Hu-Guo, Christine; Collaboration, IPHC; Collaboration, IRFU

    2010-01-01

    The development of CMOS pixel sensors with column parallel read-out and integrated zero-suppression has resulted in a full size, nearly 1 Megapixel, prototype with ~100 \\mu s read-out time. Its performances are quite close to the ILD vertex detector specifications, showing that the sensor architecture can presumably be evolved to meet these specifications exactly. Starting from the existing architecture and achieved performances, the paper will expose the details of how the sensor will be evo...

  11. Fast Contour-Tracing Algorithm Based on a Pixel-Following Method for Image Sensors.

    Seo, Jonghoon; Chae, Seungho; Shim, Jinwook; Kim, Dongchul; Cheong, Cheolho; Han, Tack-Don

    2016-01-01

    Contour pixels distinguish objects from the background. Tracing and extracting contour pixels are widely used for smart/wearable image sensor devices, because these are simple and useful for detecting objects. In this paper, we present a novel contour-tracing algorithm for fast and accurate contour following. The proposed algorithm classifies the type of contour pixel, based on its local pattern. Then, it traces the next contour using the previous pixel's type. Therefore, it can classify the type of contour pixels as a straight line, inner corner, outer corner and inner-outer corner, and it can extract pixels of a specific contour type. Moreover, it can trace contour pixels rapidly because it can determine the local minimal path using the contour case. In addition, the proposed algorithm is capable of the compressing data of contour pixels using the representative points and inner-outer corner points, and it can accurately restore the contour image from the data. To compare the performance of the proposed algorithm to that of conventional techniques, we measure their processing time and accuracy. In the experimental results, the proposed algorithm shows better performance compared to the others. Furthermore, it can provide the compressed data of contour pixels and restore them accurately, including the inner-outer corner, which cannot be restored using conventional algorithms. PMID:27005632

  12. Simulations of planar pixel sensors for the ATLAS high luminosity upgrade

    Calderini, G.; Benoit, M; Dinu, N.; Lounis, A.; Marchiori, G.

    2011-01-01

    A physics-based device simulation was used to study the charge carrier distribution and the electric field configuration inside simplified two-dimensional models for pixel layouts based on the ATLAS pixel sensor. In order to study the behavior of such detectors under different levels of irradiation, a three-level defect model was implemented into the simulation. Using these models, the number of guard rings, the dead edge width and the detector thickness were modified to investigate their inf...

  13. Development of thin sensors and a novel interconnection technology for the upgrade of the ATLAS pixel system

    A new pixel module concept is presented utilizing thin sensors and a novel vertical integration technique for the ATLAS pixel detector in view of the foreseen LHC luminosity upgrades. A first set of pixel sensors with active thicknesses of 75 and 150μm has been produced from wafers of standard thickness using a thinning process developed at the Max-Planck-Institut Halbleiterlabor (HLL) and the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (MPP). Pre-irradiation characterizations of these sensors show a very good device yield and high break down voltage. First proton irradiations up to a fluence of 1015 neq cm-2 have been carried out and their impact on the electrical properties of thin sensors has been studied. The novel ICV-SLID vertical integration technology will allow for routing signals vertically to the back side of the readout chips. With this, four-side buttable detector devices with an increased active area fraction are made possible. A first production of SLID test structures was performed and showed a high connection efficiency for different pad sizes and a mild sensitivity to disturbances of the surface planarity.

  14. A 128 × 128 Pixel Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Image Sensor with an Improved Pixel Architecture for Detecting Modulated Light Signals

    Yamamoto, Koji; Oya, Yu; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Nunoshita, Masahiro; Ohta, Jun; Watanabe, Kunihiro

    A complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor for the detection of modulated light under background illumination has been developed. When an object is illuminated by a modulated light source under background illumination the sensor enables the object alone to be captured. This paper describes improvements in pixel architecture for reducing fixed pattern noise (FPN) and improving the sensitivity of the image sensor. The improved 128 × 128 pixel CMOS image sensor with a column parallel analog-to-digital converter (ADC) circuit was fabricated using 0.35-mm CMOS technology. The resulting captured images are shown and the properties of improved pixel architecture are described. The image sensor has FPN of 1/28 that of the previous image sensor and an improved pixel architecture comprising a common in-pixel amp and a correlated double sampling (CDS) circuit. The use of a split photogate increases the sensitivity of the image sensor to 1.3 times that of the previous image sensor.

  15. A Low-Noise CMOS Pixel Direct Charge Sensor, Topmetal-II-

    An, Mangmang; Gao, Chaosong; Han, Mikyung; Ji, Rong; Li, Xiaoting; Mei, Yuan; Sun, Quan; Sun, Xiangming; Wang, Kai; Xiao, Le; Xu, Nu; Yang, Ping; Zhou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We report the design and characterization of a CMOS pixel direct charge sensor, Topmetal-II-, fabricated in a standard 0.35um CMOS Integrated Circuit process. The sensor utilizes exposed metal patches on top of each pixel to directly collect charge. Each pixel contains a low-noise charge-sensitive preamplifier to establish the analog signal and a discriminator with tunable threshold to generate hits. The analog signal from each pixel is accessible through time-shared multiplexing over the entire array. Hits are read out digitally through a column-based priority logic structure. Tests show that the sensor achieved a <15e- analog noise and a 200e- minimum threshold for digital readout per pixel. The sensor is capable of detecting both electrons and ions drifting in gas. These characteristics enable its use as the charge readout device in future Time Projection Chambers without gaseous gain mechanism, which has unique advantages in low background and low rate-density experiments.

  16. Physical characterization and performance comparison of active- and passive-pixel CMOS detectors for mammography.

    Elbakri, I A; McIntosh, B J; Rickey, D W

    2009-03-21

    We investigated the physical characteristics of two complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) mammography detectors. The detectors featured 14-bit image acquisition, 50 microm detector element (del) size and an active area of 5 cm x 5 cm. One detector was a passive-pixel sensor (PPS) with signal amplification performed by an array of amplifiers connected to dels via data lines. The other detector was an active-pixel sensor (APS) with signal amplification performed at each del. Passive-pixel designs have higher read noise due to data line capacitance, and the APS represents an attempt to improve the noise performance of this technology. We evaluated the detectors' resolution by measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF) using a tilted edge. We measured the noise power spectra (NPS) and detective quantum efficiencies (DQE) using mammographic beam conditions specified by the IEC 62220-1-2 standard. Our measurements showed the APS to have much higher gain, slightly higher MTF, and higher NPS. The MTF of both sensors approached 10% near the Nyquist limit. DQE values near dc frequency were in the range of 55-67%, with the APS sensor DQE lower than the PPS DQE for all frequencies. Our results show that lower read noise specifications in this case do not translate into gains in the imaging performance of the sensor. We postulate that the lower fill factor of the APS is a possible cause for this result. PMID:19242050

  17. Rigorous Three-dimension Electromagnetic Simulations and Optimization for CMOS Image Sensor pixels

    The size of pixels in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor image sensor has steadily decreased during the last decade, which leads to a challenge on maintaining the pixels' optical performance. The diffraction effects result in increased spatial crosstalk and decreased optical efficiency, so rigorous simulation and optimization are important. FDTD method is used to simulate the optical performance and a diffuse-like source is used to reproduce real conditions. A commercial tool from Lumerical Solutions is used to do three-dimension FDTD simulation. The diffuse-like sources are simulated by the uniform sum of several focused beams characterized by a given f-number of the objective len. The typical 1.75μm, 1.45μm and 1.1μm pixels are simulated and analyzed. The results show that the optical efficiency of the pixels decreases dramatically when the pixels size scaling down. Several approaches to produce better device performance for sub-2um pixels are analyzed. Micro-lens optimization, dielectric stack height reduction can decrease the optical power loss and optical confinement realized by an air-gap can reduce the spatial crosstalk. The results show that the optical performances of the optimized 1.1μm pixel are comparable to those of conventional 1.75μm pixel.

  18. Fast Contour-Tracing Algorithm Based on a Pixel-Following Method for Image Sensors

    Jonghoon Seo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Contour pixels distinguish objects from the background. Tracing and extracting contour pixels are widely used for smart/wearable image sensor devices, because these are simple and useful for detecting objects. In this paper, we present a novel contour-tracing algorithm for fast and accurate contour following. The proposed algorithm classifies the type of contour pixel, based on its local pattern. Then, it traces the next contour using the previous pixel’s type. Therefore, it can classify the type of contour pixels as a straight line, inner corner, outer corner and inner-outer corner, and it can extract pixels of a specific contour type. Moreover, it can trace contour pixels rapidly because it can determine the local minimal path using the contour case. In addition, the proposed algorithm is capable of the compressing data of contour pixels using the representative points and inner-outer corner points, and it can accurately restore the contour image from the data. To compare the performance of the proposed algorithm to that of conventional techniques, we measure their processing time and accuracy. In the experimental results, the proposed algorithm shows better performance compared to the others. Furthermore, it can provide the compressed data of contour pixels and restore them accurately, including the inner-outer corner, which cannot be restored using conventional algorithms.

  19. Giga-Pixel Lensfree Holographic Microscopy and Tomography Using Color Image Sensors

    Isikman, Serhan O.; Greenbaum, Alon; Luo, Wei; Coskun, Ahmet F.; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    We report Giga-pixel lensfree holographic microscopy and tomography using color sensor-arrays such as CMOS imagers that exhibit Bayer color filter patterns. Without physically removing these color filters coated on the sensor chip, we synthesize pixel super-resolved lensfree holograms, which are then reconstructed to achieve ∼350 nm lateral resolution, corresponding to a numerical aperture of ∼0.8, across a field-of-view of ∼20.5 mm2. This constitutes a digital image with ∼0.7 Billion effecti...

  20. Development of N+ in P pixel sensors for a high-luminosity large hadron collider

    Kamada, Shintaro; Yamamura, Kazuhisa; Unno, Yoshinobu; Ikegami, Yoichi

    2014-11-01

    Hamamatsu Photonics K. K. is developing an N+ in a p planar pixel sensor with high radiation tolerance for the high-luminosity large hadron collider (HL-LHC). The N+ in the p planar pixel sensor is a candidate for the HL-LHC and offers the advantages of high radiation tolerance at a reasonable price compared with the N+ in an n planar sensor, the three-dimensional sensor, and the diamond sensor. However, the N+ in the p planar pixel sensor still presents some problems that need to be solved, such as its slim edge and the danger of sparks between the sensor and readout integrated circuit. We are now attempting to solve these problems with wafer-level processes, which is important for mass production. To date, we have obtained a 250-μm edge with an applied bias voltage of 1000 V. To protect against high-voltage sparks from the edge, we suggest some possible designs for the N+ edge.

  1. Development of N+ in P pixel sensors for a high-luminosity large hadron collider

    Kamada, Shintaro, E-mail: skamada@ssd.hpk.co.jp [Hamamatsu Photonics, 1126-1 Ichino-cho, Hamamatsu City 435-8558 (Japan); Yamamura, Kazuhisa [Hamamatsu Photonics, 1126-1 Ichino-cho, Hamamatsu City 435-8558 (Japan); Unno, Yoshinobu; Ikegami, Yoichi [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Study, KEK, Oho 1-1, Ibaraki, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

    2014-11-21

    Hamamatsu Photonics K. K. is developing an N+ in a p planar pixel sensor with high radiation tolerance for the high-luminosity large hadron collider (HL-LHC). The N+ in the p planar pixel sensor is a candidate for the HL-LHC and offers the advantages of high radiation tolerance at a reasonable price compared with the N+ in an n planar sensor, the three-dimensional sensor, and the diamond sensor. However, the N+ in the p planar pixel sensor still presents some problems that need to be solved, such as its slim edge and the danger of sparks between the sensor and readout integrated circuit. We are now attempting to solve these problems with wafer-level processes, which is important for mass production. To date, we have obtained a 250-μm edge with an applied bias voltage of 1000 V. To protect against high-voltage sparks from the edge, we suggest some possible designs for the N+ edge. - Highlights: • We achieved a tolerance of 1000 V with a 250-μm edge by Al2O3 side wall passivation. • Above is a wafer process and suitable for mass production. • For edge-spark protection, we suggest N+ edge with an isolation.

  2. Development of N+ in P pixel sensors for a high-luminosity large hadron collider

    Hamamatsu Photonics K. K. is developing an N+ in a p planar pixel sensor with high radiation tolerance for the high-luminosity large hadron collider (HL-LHC). The N+ in the p planar pixel sensor is a candidate for the HL-LHC and offers the advantages of high radiation tolerance at a reasonable price compared with the N+ in an n planar sensor, the three-dimensional sensor, and the diamond sensor. However, the N+ in the p planar pixel sensor still presents some problems that need to be solved, such as its slim edge and the danger of sparks between the sensor and readout integrated circuit. We are now attempting to solve these problems with wafer-level processes, which is important for mass production. To date, we have obtained a 250-μm edge with an applied bias voltage of 1000 V. To protect against high-voltage sparks from the edge, we suggest some possible designs for the N+ edge. - Highlights: • We achieved a tolerance of 1000 V with a 250-μm edge by Al2O3 side wall passivation. • Above is a wafer process and suitable for mass production. • For edge-spark protection, we suggest N+ edge with an isolation

  3. High dynamic range CMOS image sensor with pixel level ADC and in-situ image enhancement

    Harton, Austin V.; Ahmed, Mohamed I.; Beuhler, Allyson; Castro, Francisco; Dawson, Linda M.; Herold, Barry W.; Kujawa, Gregory; Lee, King F.; Mareachen, Russell D.; Scaminaci, Tony J.

    2005-03-01

    We describe a CMOS image sensor with pixel level analog to digital conversion (ADC) having high dynamic range (>100db) and the capability of performing many image processing functions at the pixel level during image capture. The sensor has a 102x98 pixel array and is implemented in a 0.18um CMOS process technology. Each pixel is 15.5um x15.5um with 15% fill factor and is comprised of a comparator, two 10 bit memory registers and control logic. A digital to analog converter and system processor are located off-chip. The photodetector produces a photocurrent yielding a photo-voltage proportional to the impinging light intensity. Once the photo-voltage is less than a predetermined global reference voltage; a global code value is latched into the pixel data buffer. This process prevents voltage saturation resulting in high dynamic range imaging. Upon completion of image capture, a digital representation of the image exists at the pixel array, thereby, allowing image data to be accessed in a parallel fashion from the focal plane array. It is demonstrated that by appropriate variation of the global reference voltage with time, it is possible to perform, during image capture, thresholding and image enhancement operations, such as, contrast stretching in a parallel manner.

  4. Novel silicon n-in-p pixel sensors for the future ATLAS upgrades

    In view of the LHC upgrade phases towards HL-LHC the ATLAS experiment plans to upgrade the inner detector with an all silicon system. The n-in-p silicon technology is a promising candidate for the pixel upgrade thanks to its radiation hardness and cost effectiveness that allow for enlarging the area instrumented with pixel detectors. We present the characterization and performance of novel n-in-p planar pixel sensors produced by CiS (Germany) connected by bump bonding to the ATLAS readout chip FE-I3. These results are obtained before and after irradiation up to a fluence of 10161-MeV neqcm−2, and prove the operability of this kind of sensors in the harsh radiation environment foreseen for the pixel system at HL-LHC. We also present an overview of the new pixel production, which is on-going at CiS for sensors compatible with the new ATLAS readout chip FE-I4

  5. Novel Silicon n-in-p Pixel Sensors for the future ATLAS Upgrades

    La Rosa, A; Macchiolo, A; Nisius, R; Pernegger, H; Richter,R H; Weigell, P

    2013-01-01

    In view of the LHC upgrade phases towards HL-LHC the ATLAS experiment plans to upgrade the Inner Detector with an all silicon system. The n-in-p silicon technology is a promising candidate for the pixel upgrade thanks to its radiation hardness and cost eectiveness, that allow for enlarging the area instrumented with pixel detectors. We present the characterization and performance of novel n-in-p planar pixel sensors produced by CiS (Germany) connected by bump bonding to the ATLAS readout chip FE-I3. These results are obtained before and after irradiation up to a fluence of 1016 1-MeV $n_{eq}cm^{-2}$, and prove the operability of this kind of sensors in the harsh radiation environment foreseen for the pixel system at HL-LHC. We also present an overview of the new pixel production, which is on-going at CiS for sensors compatible with the new ATLAS readout chip FE-I4.

  6. Novel silicon n-in-p pixel sensors for the future ATLAS upgrades

    La Rosa, A.; Gallrapp, C.; Macchiolo, A.; Nisius, R.; Pernegger, H.; Richter, R. H.; Weigell, P.

    2013-08-01

    In view of the LHC upgrade phases towards HL-LHC the ATLAS experiment plans to upgrade the inner detector with an all silicon system. The n-in-p silicon technology is a promising candidate for the pixel upgrade thanks to its radiation hardness and cost effectiveness that allow for enlarging the area instrumented with pixel detectors. We present the characterization and performance of novel n-in-p planar pixel sensors produced by CiS (Germany) connected by bump bonding to the ATLAS readout chip FE-I3. These results are obtained before and after irradiation up to a fluence of 10161-MeV neq cm-2, and prove the operability of this kind of sensors in the harsh radiation environment foreseen for the pixel system at HL-LHC. We also present an overview of the new pixel production, which is on-going at CiS for sensors compatible with the new ATLAS readout chip FE-I4.

  7. A low-power and small-area column-level ADC for high frame-rate CMOS pixel sensor

    Zhang, L.; Morel, F.; Hu-Guo, C.; Hu, Y.

    2014-07-01

    CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) have demonstrated performances meeting the specifications of the International Linear Collider (ILC) vertex detector (VTX). This paper presents a low-power and small-area 4-bit column-level analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for CMOS pixel sensors. The ADC employs a self-timed trigger and completes the conversion by performing a multi-bit/step approximation. As in the outer layers of the ILC vertex detector hit density is of the order of a few per thousand, in order to reduce power consumption, the ADC is designed to work in two modes: active mode and idle mode. The ADC is fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS process with a pixel pitch of 35 μm. It is implemented with 48 columns in a sensor prototype. Each column ADC covers an area of 35 ×545 μm2. The measured temporal noise and Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN) are 0.96 mV and 0.40 mV, respectively. The power consumption, for a 3 V supply and 6.25 MS/s sampling rate, is 486 μW during idle time, which is by far the most frequently employed one. This value rises to 714 μW in the case of the active mode. The measured differential nonlinearity (DNL) and integral nonlinearity (INL) are 0.49/-0.28 LSB and 0.29/-0.20 LSB, respectively.

  8. Slim edge studies, design and quality control of planar ATLAS IBL pixel sensors

    One of the four large experiments at the LHC at CERN is the ATLAS detector, a multi purpose detector. Its pixel detector, composed of three layers, is the innermost part of the tracker. As it is closest to the interaction point, it represents a basic part of the track reconstruction. Besides the requested high resolution one main requirement is the radiation hardness. In the coming years the radiation damage will cause deteriorations of the detector performance. With the planned increase of the luminosity, especially after the upgrade to the High Luminosity LHC, this radiation damage will be even intensified. This circumstance necessitates a new pixel detector featuring improved radiation hard sensors and read-out chips. The present shutdown of the LHC is already utilized to insert an additional b-layer (IBL) into the existing ATLAS pixel detector. The current n-in-n pixel sensor design had to be adapted to the new read-out chip and the module specifications. The new stave geometry requests a reduction of the inactive sensor edge. In a prototype wafer production all modifications have been implemented. The sensor quality control was supervised which led to the decision of the final sensor thickness. In order to evaluate the performance of the sensor chip assemblies with an innovative slim edge design, they have been operated in test beam setups before and after irradiation. Furthermore, the quality control of the planar IBL sensor wafer production was supervised from the stage of wafer delivery to that before the flip chip process to ensure a sufficient amount of functional sensors for the module production.

  9. A DVP-Based Bridge Architecture to Randomly Access Pixels of High-Speed Image Sensors

    Khan TareqHasan; Wahid KhanA

    2011-01-01

    A design of a novel bridge is proposed to interface digital-video-port (DVP) compatible image sensors with popular microcontrollers. Most commercially available CMOS image sensors send image data at high speed and in a row-by-row fashion. On the other hand, commercial microcontrollers run at relatively slower speed, and many embedded system applications need random access of pixel values. Moreover, commercial microcontrollers may not have sufficient internal memory to store a complete image ...

  10. Slim edge studies, design and quality control of planar ATLAS IBL pixel sensors

    Wittig, Tobias

    2013-05-08

    One of the four large experiments at the LHC at CERN is the ATLAS detector, a multi purpose detector. Its pixel detector, composed of three layers, is the innermost part of the tracker. As it is closest to the interaction point, it represents a basic part of the track reconstruction. Besides the requested high resolution one main requirement is the radiation hardness. In the coming years the radiation damage will cause deteriorations of the detector performance. With the planned increase of the luminosity, especially after the upgrade to the High Luminosity LHC, this radiation damage will be even intensified. This circumstance necessitates a new pixel detector featuring improved radiation hard sensors and read-out chips. The present shutdown of the LHC is already utilized to insert an additional b-layer (IBL) into the existing ATLAS pixel detector. The current n-in-n pixel sensor design had to be adapted to the new read-out chip and the module specifications. The new stave geometry requests a reduction of the inactive sensor edge. In a prototype wafer production all modifications have been implemented. The sensor quality control was supervised which led to the decision of the final sensor thickness. In order to evaluate the performance of the sensor chip assemblies with an innovative slim edge design, they have been operated in test beam setups before and after irradiation. Furthermore, the quality control of the planar IBL sensor wafer production was supervised from the stage of wafer delivery to that before the flip chip process to ensure a sufficient amount of functional sensors for the module production.

  11. Characterisation of a Thin Fully-Depleted SOI Pixel Sensor with Soft X-ray Radiation

    Battaglia, Marco; Celestre, Richard; Contarato, Devis; Denes, Peter; Mattiazzo, Serena; Tindall, Craig

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the characterisation of a back-illuminated pixel sensor manufactured in Silicon-On-Insulator technology on a high-resistivity substrate with soft X-rays. The sensor is thinned and a thin Phosphor layer contact is implanted on the back-plane. The response to X-rays from 2.12 up to 8.6 keV is evaluated with fluorescence radiation at the LBNL Advanced Light Source.

  12. Multi-pixel readout of transition-edge sensors using a multi-input SQUID

    We propose a new method to read out signals from a TES (superconducting Transition-Edge Sensor) calorimeter array with a single or a small number of SQUIDs. Since phonon noise and Johnson noise of a calorimeter can be made very small in these calorimeters, an increase in noise, thus a degradation of energy resolution by adding signals from plural pixels together at some stage of signal processing may be acceptable for some applications of TES calorimeters. We propose to use a SQUID with multi-input coils which will sense signals from different pixels. The input coils of a SQUID are electrically well-isolated from each other. The pixel that generates a signal can be identified by utilizing additional information, such as the pulse shape. We studied the feasibility of this method with analysis and simulations, and show for example, that a 16x16 pixel array can be read out with 16 SQUIDs

  13. 1T Pixel Using Floating-Body MOSFET for CMOS Image Sensors

    Guo-Neng Lu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a single-transistor pixel for CMOS image sensors (CIS. It is a floating-body MOSFET structure, which is used as photo-sensing device and source-follower transistor, and can be controlled to store and evacuate charges. Our investigation into this 1T pixel structure includes modeling to obtain analytical description of conversion gain. Model validation has been done by comparing theoretical predictions and experimental results. On the other hand, the 1T pixel structure has been implemented in different configurations, including rectangular-gate and ring-gate designs, and variations of oxidation parameters for the fabrication process. The pixel characteristics are presented and discussed.

  14. Characterisation of a PERCIVAL monolithic active pixel prototype using synchrotron radiation

    Correa, J.; Bayer, M.; Göttlicher, P.; Lange, S.; Marras, A.; Niemann, M.; Reza, S.; Shevyakov, I.; Smoljanin, S.; Tennert, M.; Xia, Q.; Viti, M.; Wunderer, C. B.; Zimmer, M.; Dipayan, D.; Guerrini, N.; Marsh, B.; Sedgwick, I.; Turchetta, R.; Cautero, G.; Giuressi, D.; Khromova, A.; Pinaroli, G.; Menk, R.; Stebel, L.; Fan, R.; Marchal, J.; Pedersen, U.; Rees, N.; Steadman, P.; Sussmuth, M.; Tartoni, N.; Yousef, H.; Hyun, H. J.; Kim, K.; Rah, S.; Graafsma, H.

    2016-02-01

    PERCIVAL ("Pixelated Energy Resolving CMOS Imager, Versatile And Large") is a monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) based on CMOS technology. Is being developed by DESY, RAL/STFC, Elettra, DLS, and PAL to address the various requirements of detectors at synchrotron radiation sources and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) in the soft X-ray regime. These requirements include high frame rates and FELs base-rate compatibility, large dynamic range, single-photon counting capability with low probability of false positives, high quantum efficiency (QE), and (multi-)megapixel arrangements with good spatial resolution. Small-scale back-side-illuminated (BSI) prototype systems are undergoing detailed testing with X-rays and optical photons, in preparation of submission of a larger sensor. A first BSI processed prototype was tested in 2014 and a preliminary result—first detection of 350eV photons with some pixel types of PERCIVAL—reported at this meeting a year ago. Subsequent more detailed analysis revealed a very low QE and pointed to contamination as a possible cause. In the past year, BSI-processed chips on two more wafers were tested and their response to soft X-ray evaluated. We report here the improved charge collection efficiency (CCE) of different PERCIVAL pixel types for 400eV soft X-rays together with Airy patterns, response to a flat field, and noise performance for such a newly BSI-processed prototype sensor.

  15. A high frame rate, 16 million pixels, radiation hard CMOS sensor

    Guerrini, N.; Turchetta, R.; Van Hoften, G.; Henderson, R.; McMullan, G.; Faruqi, A. R.

    2011-03-01

    CMOS sensors provide the possibility of designing detectors for a large variety of applications with all the benefits and flexibility of the widely used CMOS process. In this paper we describe a novel CMOS sensor designed for transmission electron microscopy. The overall design consists of a large 61 × 63 mm2 silicon area containing 16 million pixels arranged in a 4K × 4K array, with radiation hard geometry. All this is combined with a very fast readout, the possibility of region of interest (ROI) readout, pixel binning with consequent frame rate increase and a dynamic range close to 12 bits. The high frame rate has been achieved using 32 parallel analogue outputs each one operating at up to 20 MHz. Binning of pixels can be controlled externally and the flexibility of the design allows several possibilities, such as 2 × 2 or 4 × 4 binning. Other binning configurations where the number of rows and the number of columns are not equal, such as 2 × 1 or 2 × 4, are also possible. Having control of the CMOS design allowed us to optimise the pixel design, in particular with regard to its radiation hardness, and to make optimum choices in the design of other regions of the final sensor. An early prototype was also designed with a variety of geometries in order to optimise the readout structure and these are presented. The sensor was manufactured in a 0.35 μm standard CMOS process.

  16. A low-power and small-area column-level ADC for high frame-rate CMOS pixel sensor

    CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) have demonstrated performances meeting the specifications of the International Linear Collider (ILC) vertex detector (VTX). This paper presents a low-power and small-area 4-bit column-level analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for CMOS pixel sensors. The ADC employs a self-timed trigger and completes the conversion by performing a multi-bit/step approximation. As in the outer layers of the ILC vertex detector hit density is of the order of a few per thousand, in order to reduce power consumption, the ADC is designed to work in two modes: active mode and idle mode. The ADC is fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS process with a pixel pitch of 35 μm. It is implemented with 48 columns in a sensor prototype. Each column ADC covers an area of 35 ×545 μm2. The measured temporal noise and Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN) are 0.96 mV and 0.40 mV, respectively. The power consumption, for a 3 V supply and 6.25 MS/s sampling rate, is 486 μW during idle time, which is by far the most frequently employed one. This value rises to 714 μW in the case of the active mode. The measured differential nonlinearity (DNL) and integral nonlinearity (INL) are 0.49/−0.28 LSB and 0.29/−0.20 LSB, respectively. - Highlights: • CMOS sensor integrated with column-level ADC is proposed for ILC VTX outer layers. • A low-power and small-area column-level ADC for high frame-rate CPS is presented. • The test results demonstrate the power and area efficiency. • The architecture is suitable for the outer layer CMOS sensors

  17. A low-power and small-area column-level ADC for high frame-rate CMOS pixel sensor

    Zhang, L., E-mail: liang.zhang@iphc.cnrs.fr [School of Physics, Key Laboratory of Particle Physics and Particle Irradiation, Shandong University, 250100 Jinan (China); Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, University of Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3/UDS, 23 rue du loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Morel, F.; Hu-Guo, C.; Hu, Y. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, University of Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3/UDS, 23 rue du loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France)

    2014-07-01

    CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) have demonstrated performances meeting the specifications of the International Linear Collider (ILC) vertex detector (VTX). This paper presents a low-power and small-area 4-bit column-level analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for CMOS pixel sensors. The ADC employs a self-timed trigger and completes the conversion by performing a multi-bit/step approximation. As in the outer layers of the ILC vertex detector hit density is of the order of a few per thousand, in order to reduce power consumption, the ADC is designed to work in two modes: active mode and idle mode. The ADC is fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS process with a pixel pitch of 35 μm. It is implemented with 48 columns in a sensor prototype. Each column ADC covers an area of 35 ×545 μm{sup 2}. The measured temporal noise and Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN) are 0.96 mV and 0.40 mV, respectively. The power consumption, for a 3 V supply and 6.25 MS/s sampling rate, is 486 μW during idle time, which is by far the most frequently employed one. This value rises to 714 μW in the case of the active mode. The measured differential nonlinearity (DNL) and integral nonlinearity (INL) are 0.49/−0.28 LSB and 0.29/−0.20 LSB, respectively. - Highlights: • CMOS sensor integrated with column-level ADC is proposed for ILC VTX outer layers. • A low-power and small-area column-level ADC for high frame-rate CPS is presented. • The test results demonstrate the power and area efficiency. • The architecture is suitable for the outer layer CMOS sensors.

  18. Compact SPAD-Based Pixel Architectures for Time-Resolved Image Sensors.

    Perenzoni, Matteo; Pancheri, Lucio; Stoppa, David

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the state of the art of single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) image sensors for time-resolved imaging. The focus of the paper is on pixel architectures featuring small pixel size (20%) as a key enabling technology for the successful implementation of high spatial resolution SPAD-based image sensors. A summary of the main CMOS SPAD implementations, their characteristics and integration challenges, is provided from the perspective of targeting large pixel arrays, where one of the key drivers is the spatial uniformity. The main analog techniques aimed at time-gated photon counting and photon timestamping suitable for compact and low-power pixels are critically discussed. The main features of these solutions are the adoption of analog counting techniques and time-to-analog conversion, in NMOS-only pixels. Reliable quantum-limited single-photon counting, self-referenced analog-to-digital conversion, time gating down to 0.75 ns and timestamping with 368 ps jitter are achieved. PMID:27223284

  19. Compact SPAD-Based Pixel Architectures for Time-Resolved Image Sensors

    Matteo Perenzoni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the state of the art of single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD image sensors for time-resolved imaging. The focus of the paper is on pixel architectures featuring small pixel size (<25 μm and high fill factor (>20% as a key enabling technology for the successful implementation of high spatial resolution SPAD-based image sensors. A summary of the main CMOS SPAD implementations, their characteristics and integration challenges, is provided from the perspective of targeting large pixel arrays, where one of the key drivers is the spatial uniformity. The main analog techniques aimed at time-gated photon counting and photon timestamping suitable for compact and low-power pixels are critically discussed. The main features of these solutions are the adoption of analog counting techniques and time-to-analog conversion, in NMOS-only pixels. Reliable quantum-limited single-photon counting, self-referenced analog-to-digital conversion, time gating down to 0.75 ns and timestamping with 368 ps jitter are achieved.

  20. 3D-FBK pixel sensors with CMS readout: First test results

    Obertino, M., E-mail: margherita.obertino@cern.ch [Università del Piemonte Orientale, Novara, and INFN, Torino (Italy); Solano, A. [Università di Torino and INFN, Torino (Italy); Vilela Pereira, A. [INFN, Torino (Italy); Alagoz, E. [Physics Department, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Andresen, J. [Colorado University, Colorado (United States); Arndt, K.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D. [Physics Department, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Boscardin, M. [Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Povo di Trento (Italy); Brosius, R. [SUNY, Buffalo (United States); Bubna, M. [Physics Department, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Dalla Betta, G.-F. [INFN Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento) and Università di Trento, Povo di Trento (Italy); Jensen, F. [Colorado University, Colorado (United States); Krzywda, A. [Physics Department, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Kumar, A. [SUNY, Buffalo (United States); Kwan, S. [Università di Milano Bicocca and INFN, Milano (Italy); Lei, C.M. [Colorado University, Colorado (United States); Menasce, D.; Moroni, L. [INFN Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Ngadiuba, J. [Università di Milano Bicocca and INFN, Milano (Italy); and others

    2013-08-01

    Silicon 3D detectors consist of an array of columnar electrodes of both doping types which penetrate entirely in the detector bulk, perpendicularly to the surface. They are emerging as one of the most promising technologies for innermost layers of tracking devices for the foreseen upgrades of the LHC. Until recently, properties of 3D sensors have been investigated mostly with ATLAS readout electronics. 3D pixel sensors compatible with the CMS readout were first fabricated at SINTEF (Oslo, Norway), and more recently at FBK (Trento, Italy) and CNM (Barcelona, Spain). Several sensors with different electrode configurations, bump-bonded with the CMS pixel PSI46 readout chip, were characterized in laboratory and tested at Fermilab with a proton beam of 120 GeV/c. Preliminary results of the data analysis are presented.

  1. Sub pixel analysis and processing of sensor data for mobile target intelligence information and verification

    Williams, Theresa Allen

    This dissertation introduces a novel process to study and analyze sensor data in order to obtain information pertaining to mobile targets at the sub-pixel level. The process design is modular in nature and utilizes a set of algorithmic tools for change detection, target extraction and analysis, super-pixel processing and target refinement. The scope of this investigation is confined to a staring sensor that records data of sub-pixel vehicles traveling horizontally across the ground. Statistical models of the targets and background are developed with noise and jitter effects. Threshold Change Detection, Duration Change Detection and Fast Adaptive Power Iteration (FAPI) Detection techniques are the three methods used for target detection. The PolyFit and FermiFit are two tools developed and employed for target analysis, which allows for flexible processing. Tunable parameters in the detection methods, along with filters for false alarms, show the adaptability of the procedures. Super-pixel processing tools are designed, and Refinement Through Tracking (RTT) techniques are investigated as post-processing refinement options. The process is tested on simulated datasets, and validated with sensor datasets obtained from RP Flight Systems, Inc.

  2. Radiation resistance of double-type double-sided 3D pixel sensors

    Fernandez, M; Lozano, M; Munoz, F.J; Pellegrini, G; Quirion, D; Rohe, T; Vila, I

    2013-01-01

    The proposed high-luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider is expected to increase the instantaneous luminosity at the experiments' interaction points by a factor of ten. The vertex detector will be the subsystem most affected by the luminosity increase, raising substantially their occupancy and radiation-induced damage. To preserve the vertex physics performance under these new conditions, current pixel technologies have to be improved. Hybrid pixel sensors with double-sided double-type vertical electrodes (3D sensors) are becoming a mature technology for the detector layers closest to the interaction point due to their intrinsic radiation hardness. In addition, the double-sided implementation of the 3D pixel technology provides some additional technical advantages with respect to the single-sided implementation. For this study, 3D pixel sensors manufactured at the Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica of Barcelona (IMB-CNM) have been bonded to the PSI46 readout chip currently used by the Compact Muon ...

  3. Photon Counting Imaging with an Electron-Bombarded Pixel Image Sensor

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Electron-bombarded pixel image sensors, where a single photoelectron is accelerated directly into a CCD or CMOS sensor, allow wide-field imaging at extremely low light levels as they are sensitive enough to detect single photons. This technology allows the detection of up to hundreds or thousands of photon events per frame, depending on the sensor size, and photon event centroiding can be employed to recover resolution lost in the detection process. Unlike photon events from electron-multiplying sensors, the photon events from electron-bombarded sensors have a narrow, acceleration-voltage-dependent pulse height distribution. Thus a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an electron-bombarded sensor could allow photon arrival time determination from the pulse height with sub-frame exposure time resolution. We give a brief overview of our work with electron-bombarded pixel image sensor technology and recent developments in this field for single photon counting imaging, and examples of some applications. PMID:27136556

  4. Photon Counting Imaging with an Electron-Bombarded Pixel Image Sensor.

    Hirvonen, Liisa M; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Electron-bombarded pixel image sensors, where a single photoelectron is accelerated directly into a CCD or CMOS sensor, allow wide-field imaging at extremely low light levels as they are sensitive enough to detect single photons. This technology allows the detection of up to hundreds or thousands of photon events per frame, depending on the sensor size, and photon event centroiding can be employed to recover resolution lost in the detection process. Unlike photon events from electron-multiplying sensors, the photon events from electron-bombarded sensors have a narrow, acceleration-voltage-dependent pulse height distribution. Thus a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an electron-bombarded sensor could allow photon arrival time determination from the pulse height with sub-frame exposure time resolution. We give a brief overview of our work with electron-bombarded pixel image sensor technology and recent developments in this field for single photon counting imaging, and examples of some applications. PMID:27136556

  5. Photon Counting Imaging with an Electron-Bombarded Pixel Image Sensor

    Liisa M. Hirvonen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Electron-bombarded pixel image sensors, where a single photoelectron is accelerated directly into a CCD or CMOS sensor, allow wide-field imaging at extremely low light levels as they are sensitive enough to detect single photons. This technology allows the detection of up to hundreds or thousands of photon events per frame, depending on the sensor size, and photon event centroiding can be employed to recover resolution lost in the detection process. Unlike photon events from electron-multiplying sensors, the photon events from electron-bombarded sensors have a narrow, acceleration-voltage-dependent pulse height distribution. Thus a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an electron-bombarded sensor could allow photon arrival time determination from the pulse height with sub-frame exposure time resolution. We give a brief overview of our work with electron-bombarded pixel image sensor technology and recent developments in this field for single photon counting imaging, and examples of some applications.

  6. DEPFET Active Pixel Detectors for a Future Linear e(+}e({-)) Collider

    Alonso, O.; Casanova, R.; Dieguez, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Hemperek, T.; Kishishita, T.; Kleinohl, T.; Koch, M.; Kruger, H.; Lemarenko, M.; Lutticke, F.; Marinas, C.; Schnell, M.; Wermes, N.; Campbell, A.; Ferber, T.; Kleinwort, C.; Niebuhr, C.; Soloviev, Y.; Steder, M.; Volkenborn, R.; Yaschenko, S.; Fischer, P.; Kreidl, C.; Peric, I.; Knopf, J.; Ritzert, M.; Curras, E.; Lopez-Virto, A.; Moya, D.; Vila, I.; Boronat, M.; Esperante, D.; Fuster, J.; Garcia, I. Garcia; Lacasta, C.; Oyanguren, A.; Ruiz, P.; Timon, G.; Vos, M.; Gessler, T.; Kuhn, W.; Lange, S.; Munchow, D.; Spruck, B.; Frey, A.; Geisler, C.; Schwenker, B.; Wilk, F.; Barvich, T.; Heck, M.; Heindl, S.; Lutz, O.; Muller, Th.; Pulvermacher, C.; Simonis, H. J.; Weiler, T.; Krausser, T.; Lipsky, O.; Rummel, S.; Schieck, J.; Schluter, T.; Ackermann, K.; Andricek, L.; Chekelian, V.; Chobanova, V.; Dalseno, J.; Kiesling, C.; Koffmane, C.; Gioi, L. Li; Moll, A.; Moser, H. G.; Muller, F.; Nedelkovska, E.; Ninkovic, J.; Petrovics, S.; Prothmann, K.; Richter, R.; Ritter, A.; Ritter, M.; Simon, F.; Vanhoefer, P.; Wassatsch, A.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Kodys, P.; Kvasnicka, P.; Scheirich, J.

    2013-04-01

    The DEPFET collaboration develops highly granular, ultra-transparent active pixel detectors for high-performance vertex reconstruction at future collider experiments. The characterization of detector prototypes has proven that the key principle, the integration of a first amplification stage in a detector-grade sensor material, can provide a comfortable signal to noise ratio of over 40 for a sensor thickness of 50-75 $\\mathrm{\\mathbf{\\mu m}}$. ASICs have been designed and produced to operate a DEPFET pixel detector with the required read-out speed. A complete detector concept is being developed, including solutions for mechanical support, cooling and services. In this paper the status of DEPFET R & D project is reviewed in the light of the requirements of the vertex detector at a future linear $\\mathbf{e^+ e^-}$ collider.

  7. DEPFET active pixel detectors for a future linear e+e− collider

    Vos, M

    2010-01-01

    The DEPFET collaboration develops highly granular, ultra-transparent active pixel detectors for high-performance vertex reconstruction at future collider experiments. The characterization of detector prototypes has proven that the key principle, the integration of a first amplification stage in a detector-grade sensor material, can provide a comfortable signal to noise ratio of over 40 for a sensor thickness of 50-75 µm. ASICs have been designed and produced to operate a DEPFET pixel detector with the required read-out speed. A complete detector concept is being developed, including solutions for mechanical support, cooling and services. In this paper the status of DEPFET R & D project is reviewed in the light of the requirements of the vertex detector at a future linear e^+e^− collider.

  8. 3D-FBK Pixel sensors: recent beam tests results with irradiated devices

    Micelli, A; Sandaker, H; Stugu, B; Barbero, M; Hugging, F; Karagounis, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kruger, H; Tsung, J W; Wermes, N; Capua, M; Fazio, S; Mastroberardino, A; Susinno, G; Gallrapp, C; Di Girolamo, B; Dobos, D; La Rosa, A; Pernegger, H; Roe, S; Slavicek, T; Pospisil, S; Jakobs, K; Kohler, M; Parzefall, U; Darbo, G; Gariano, G; Gemme, C; Rovani, A; Ruscino, E; Butter, C; Bates, R; Oshea, V; Parker, S; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Grinstein, S; Korokolov, I; Pradilla, C; Einsweiler, K; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Borri, M; Da Via, C; Freestone, J; Kolya, S; Lai, C H; Nellist, C; Pater, J; Thompson, R; Watts, S J; Hoeferkamp, M; Seidel, S; Bolle, E; Gjersdal, H; Sjobaek, K N; Stapnes, S; Rohne, O; Su, D; Young, C; Hansson, P; Grenier, P; Hasi, J; Kenney, C; Kocian, M; Jackson, P; Silverstein, D; Davetak, H; DeWilde, B; Tsybychev, D; Dalla Betta, G F; Gabos, P; Povoli, M; Cobal, M; Giordani, M P; Selmi, L; Cristofoli, A; Esseni, D; Palestri, P; Fleta, C; Lozano, M; Pellegrini, G; Boscardin, M; Bagolini, A; Piemonte, C; Ronchin, S; Zorzi, N; Hansen, T E; Hansen, T; Kok, A; Lietaer, N; Kalliopuska, J; Oja, A

    2011-01-01

    The Pixel detector is the innermost part of the ATLAS experiment tracking device at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and plays a key role in the reconstruction of the primary and secondary vertices of short-lived particles. To cope with the high level of radiation produced during the collider operation, it is planned to add to the present three layers of silicon pixel sensors which constitute the Pixel Detector, an additional layer (Insertable B-Layer, or IBL) of sensors. 3D silicon sensors are one of the technologies which are under study for the IBL. 3D silicon technology is an innovative combination of very-large-scale integration (VLSI) and Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) where electrodes are fabricated inside the silicon bulk instead of being implanted on the wafer surfaces. 3D sensors, with electrodes fully or partially penetrating the silicon substrate, are currently fabricated at different processing facilities in Europe and USA. This paper reports on the 2010 June beam test results for irradi...

  9. Development of Kilo-Pixel Arrays of Transition-Edge Sensors for X-Ray Spectroscopy

    Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Busch, S. E.; Chervenak, J. A.; Chiao, M. P.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. J.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kelly, D. P.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Porst, J.-P.; Porter, F. S.; Ray, C. A.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Wassell, E. J.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; Reintsema, C. D.; Smith, D. R.; Swetz, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing kilo-pixel arrays of transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters for future X-ray astronomy observatories or for use in laboratory astrophysics applications. For example, Athena/XMS (currently under study by the european space agency) would require a close-packed 32x32 pixel array on a 250-micron pitch with < 3.0 eV full-width-half-maximum energy resolution at 6 keV and at count-rates of up to 50 counts/pixel/second. We present characterization of 32x32 arrays. These detectors will be readout using state of the art SQUID based time-domain multiplexing (TDM). We will also present the latest results in integrating these detectors and the TDM readout technology into a 16 row x N column field-able instrument.

  10. Investigation of properties of novel silicon pixel assemblies employing thin n-in-p sensors and 3D-integration

    Weigell, Philipp

    2013-01-15

    Until the end of the 2020 decade the LHC programme will be defining the high energy frontier of particle physics. During this time, three upgrade steps of the accelerator are currently planned to further increase the luminosity and energy reach. In the course of these upgrades the specifications of several parts of the current LHC detectors will be exceeded. Especially, the innermost tracking detectors are challenged by the increasing track densities and the radiation damage. This thesis focuses on the implications for the ATLAS experiment. Here, around 2021/2, after having collected an integrated luminosity of around 300 fb{sup -1}, the silicon and gas detector components of the inner tracker will reach the end of their lifetime and will need to be replaced to ensure sufficient performance for continued running - especially if the luminosity is raised to about 5 x 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} as currently planned. An all silicon inner detector is foreseen to be installed. This upgrade demands cost effective pixel assemblies with a minimal material budget, a larger active area fraction as compared to the current detectors, and a higher granularity. Furthermore, the assemblies must be able to withstand received fluences up to 2 . 10{sup 16} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}. A new pixel assembly concept answering the challenges posed by the high instantaneous luminosities is investigated in this thesis. It employs five novel technologies, namely n-in-p pixel sensors, thin pixel sensors, slim edges with or without implanted sensor sides, and 3D-integration incorporating a new interconnection technology, named Solid Liquid InterDiffusion (SLID) as well as Inter-Chip-Vias (ICVs). n-in-p sensors are cost-effective, since they only need patterned processing on one side. Their performance before and after irradiation is investigated and compared to results obtained with currently used n-in-n sensors. Reducing the thickness of the sensors lowers the amount of multiple scattering

  11. Investigation of properties of novel silicon pixel assemblies employing thin n-in-p sensors and 3D-integration

    Until the end of the 2020 decade the LHC programme will be defining the high energy frontier of particle physics. During this time, three upgrade steps of the accelerator are currently planned to further increase the luminosity and energy reach. In the course of these upgrades the specifications of several parts of the current LHC detectors will be exceeded. Especially, the innermost tracking detectors are challenged by the increasing track densities and the radiation damage. This thesis focuses on the implications for the ATLAS experiment. Here, around 2021/2, after having collected an integrated luminosity of around 300 fb-1, the silicon and gas detector components of the inner tracker will reach the end of their lifetime and will need to be replaced to ensure sufficient performance for continued running - especially if the luminosity is raised to about 5 x 1035 cm-2s-1 as currently planned. An all silicon inner detector is foreseen to be installed. This upgrade demands cost effective pixel assemblies with a minimal material budget, a larger active area fraction as compared to the current detectors, and a higher granularity. Furthermore, the assemblies must be able to withstand received fluences up to 2 . 1016 neq/cm2. A new pixel assembly concept answering the challenges posed by the high instantaneous luminosities is investigated in this thesis. It employs five novel technologies, namely n-in-p pixel sensors, thin pixel sensors, slim edges with or without implanted sensor sides, and 3D-integration incorporating a new interconnection technology, named Solid Liquid InterDiffusion (SLID) as well as Inter-Chip-Vias (ICVs). n-in-p sensors are cost-effective, since they only need patterned processing on one side. Their performance before and after irradiation is investigated and compared to results obtained with currently used n-in-n sensors. Reducing the thickness of the sensors lowers the amount of multiple scattering within the tracking system and leads to higher

  12. Remote sensing of Alaskan boreal forest fires at the pixel and sub-pixel level: multi-sensor approaches and sensitivity analysis

    Waigl, C.; Stuefer, M.; Prakash, A.

    2013-12-01

    Wildfire is the main disturbance regime of the boreal forest ecosystem, a region acutely sensitive to climate change. Large fires impact the carbon cycle, permafrost, and air quality on a regional and even hemispheric scale. Because of their significance as a hazard to human health and economic activity, monitoring wildfires is relevant not only to science but also to government agencies. The goal of this study is to develop pathways towards a near real-time assessment of fire characteristics in the boreal zones of Alaska based on satellite remote sensing data. We map the location of active burn areas and derive fire parameters such as fire temperature, intensity, stage (smoldering or flaming), emission injection points, carbon consumed, and energy released. For monitoring wildfires in the sub-arctic region, we benefit from the high temporal resolution of data (as high as 8 images a day) from MODIS on the Aqua and Terra platforms and VIIRS on NPP/Suomi, downlinked and processed to level 1 by the Geographic Information Network of Alaska at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. To transcend the low spatial resolution of these sensors, a sub-pixel analysis is carried out. By applying techniques from Bayesian inverse modeling to Dozier's two-component approach, uncertainties and sensitivity of the retrieved fire temperatures and fractional pixel areas to background temperature and atmospheric factors are assessed. A set of test cases - large fires from the 2004 to 2013 fire seasons complemented by a selection of smaller burns at the lower end of the MODIS detection threshold - is used to evaluate the methodology. While the VIIRS principal fire detection band M13 (centered at 4.05 μm, similar to MODIS bands 21 and 22 at 3.959 μm) does not usually saturate for Alaskan wildfire areas, the thermal IR band M15 (10.763 μm, comparable to MODIS band 31 at 11.03 μm) indeed saturates for a percentage, though not all, of the fire pixels of intense burns. As this limits the

  13. Characterization of CdTe Sensors with Schottky Contacts Coupled to Charge-Integrating Pixel Array Detectors for X-Ray Science

    Becker, Julian; Shanks, Katherine S; Philipp, Hugh T; Weiss, Joel T; Purohit, Prafull; Chamberlain, Darol; Ruff, Jacob P C; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-01-01

    Pixel Array Detectors (PADs) consist of an x-ray sensor layer bonded pixel-by-pixel to an underlying readout chip. This approach allows both the sensor and the custom pixel electronics to be tailored independently to best match the x-ray imaging requirements. Here we present characterizations of CdTe sensors hybridized with two different charge-integrating readout chips, the Keck PAD and the Mixed-Mode PAD (MM-PAD), both developed previously in our laboratory. The charge-integrating architecture of each of these PADs extends the instantaneous counting rate by many orders of magnitude beyond that obtainable with photon counting architectures. The Keck PAD chip consists of rapid, 8-frame, in-pixel storage elements with framing periods $<$150 ns. The second detector, the MM-PAD, has an extended dynamic range by utilizing an in-pixel overflow counter coupled with charge removal circuitry activated at each overflow. This allows the recording of signals from the single-photon level to tens of millions of x-rays/...

  14. A CMOS image sensor using high-speed lock-in pixels for stimulated Raman scattering

    Lioe, DeXing; Mars, Kamel; Takasawa, Taishi; Yasutomi, Keita; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Kawahito, Shoji

    2016-03-01

    A CMOS image sensor using high-speed lock-in pixels for stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectroscopy is presented in this paper. The effective SRS signal from the stimulated emission of SRS mechanism is very small in contrast to the offset of a probing laser source, which is in the ratio of 10-4 to 10-5. In order to extract this signal, the common offset component is removed, and the small difference component is sampled using switched-capacitor integrator with a fully differential amplifier. The sampling is performed over many integration cycles to achieve appropriate amplification. The lock-in pixels utilizes high-speed lateral electric field charge modulator (LEFM) to demodulate the SRS signal which is modulated at high-frequency of 20MHz. A prototype chip is implemented using 0.11μm CMOS image sensor technology.

  15. Readout cross-talk for alpha-particle measurements in a pixelated sensor system

    Simulations in Medici are performed to quantify crosstalk and charge sharing in a hybrid pixelated silicon detector. Crosstalk and charge sharing degrades the spatial and spectral resolution of single photon processing X-ray imaging systems. For typical medical X-ray imaging applications, the process is dominated by charge sharing between the pixels in the sensor. For heavier particles each impact generates a large amount of charge and the simulation seems to over predict the charge collection efficiency. This indicates that some type of non modelled degradation of the charge transport efficiency exists, like the plasma effect where the plasma might shield the generated charges from the electric field and hence distorts the charge transport process. Based on the simulations it can be reasoned that saturation of the amplifiers in the Timepix system might generate crosstalk that increases the charge spread measured from ion impact on the sensor

  16. Two-dimensional pixel image lag simulation and optimization in a 4-T CMOS image sensor

    Pixel image lag in a 4-T CMOS image sensor is analyzed and simulated in a two-dimensional model. Strategies of reducing image lag are discussed from transfer gate channel threshold voltage doping adjustment, PPD N-type doping dose/implant tilt adjustment and transfer gate operation voltage adjustment for signal electron transfer. With the computer analysis tool ISE-TCAD, simulation results show that minimum image lag can be obtained at a pinned photodiode n-type doping dose of 7.0 x 1012 cm-2, an implant tilt of -20, a transfer gate channel doping dose of 3.0 x 1012 cm-2 and an operation voltage of 3.4 V. The conclusions of this theoretical analysis can be a guideline for pixel design to improve the performance of 4-T CMOS image sensors. (semiconductor devices)

  17. Development of CMOS pixel sensors for tracking and vertexing in high energy physics experiments

    Senyukov, Serhiy; Besson, Auguste; Claus, Giles; Cousin, Loic; Dulinski, Wojciech; Goffe, Mathieu; Hippolyte, Boris; Maria, Robert; Molnar, Levente; Castro, Xitzel Sanchez; Winter, Marc

    2014-01-01

    CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) represent a novel technological approach to building charged particle detectors. CMOS processes allow to integrate a sensing volume and readout electronics in a single silicon die allowing to build sensors with a small pixel pitch ($\\sim 20 \\mu m$) and low material budget ($\\sim 0.2-0.3\\% X_0$) per layer. These characteristics make CPS an attractive option for vertexing and tracking systems of high energy physics experiments. Moreover, thanks to the mass production industrial CMOS processes used for the manufacturing of CPS the fabrication construction cost can be significantly reduced in comparison to more standard semiconductor technologies. However, the attainable performance level of the CPS in terms of radiation hardness and readout speed is mostly determined by the fabrication parameters of the CMOS processes available on the market rather than by the CPS intrinsic potential. The permanent evolution of commercial CMOS processes towards smaller feature sizes and high resistivity ...

  18. Readout cross-talk for alpha-particle measurements in a pixelated sensor system

    Norlin, B.; Reza, S.; Krapohl, D.; Fröjdh, E.; Thungström, G.

    2015-05-01

    Simulations in Medici are performed to quantify crosstalk and charge sharing in a hybrid pixelated silicon detector. Crosstalk and charge sharing degrades the spatial and spectral resolution of single photon processing X-ray imaging systems. For typical medical X-ray imaging applications, the process is dominated by charge sharing between the pixels in the sensor. For heavier particles each impact generates a large amount of charge and the simulation seems to over predict the charge collection efficiency. This indicates that some type of non modelled degradation of the charge transport efficiency exists, like the plasma effect where the plasma might shield the generated charges from the electric field and hence distorts the charge transport process. Based on the simulations it can be reasoned that saturation of the amplifiers in the Timepix system might generate crosstalk that increases the charge spread measured from ion impact on the sensor.

  19. The brighter-fatter effect and pixel correlations in CCD sensors

    We present evidence that spots imaged using astronomical CCDs do not exactly scale with flux: bright spots tend to be broader than faint ones, using the same illumination pattern. We measure that the linear size of spots or stars, of typical size 3 to 4 pixels FWHM, increase linearly with their flux by up to 2 % over the full CCD dynamic range. This brighter-fatter effect affects both deep-depleted and thinned CCD sensors. We propose that this effect is a direct consequence of the distortions of the drift electric field sourced by charges accumulated within the CCD during the exposure and experienced by forthcoming light-induced charges in the same exposure. The pixel boundaries then become slightly dynamical: overfilled pixels become increasingly smaller than their neighbors, so that bright star sizes, measured in number of pixels, appear larger than those of faint stars. This interpretation of the brighter-fatter effect implies that pixels in flat-fields should exhibit statistical correlations, sourced by Poisson fluctuations, that we indeed directly detect. We propose to use the measured correlations in flat-fields to derive how pixel boundaries shift under the influence of a given charge pattern, which allows us in turn to predict how star shapes evolve with flux. We show that, within the precision of our tests, we are able to quantitatively relate the correlations of flat-field pixels and the broadening of stars with flux. This physical model of the brighter-fatter effect also explains the commonly observed phenomenon that the spatial variance of CCD flat-fields increases less rapidly than their average

  20. Giga-Pixel Lensfree Holographic Microscopy and Tomography Using Color Image Sensors

    Coskun, Ahmet F.; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    We report Giga-pixel lensfree holographic microscopy and tomography using color sensor-arrays such as CMOS imagers that exhibit Bayer color filter patterns. Without physically removing these color filters coated on the sensor chip, we synthesize pixel super-resolved lensfree holograms, which are then reconstructed to achieve ∼350 nm lateral resolution, corresponding to a numerical aperture of ∼0.8, across a field-of-view of ∼20.5 mm2. This constitutes a digital image with ∼0.7 Billion effective pixels in both amplitude and phase channels (i.e., ∼1.4 Giga-pixels total). Furthermore, by changing the illumination angle (e.g., ±50°) and scanning a partially-coherent light source across two orthogonal axes, super-resolved images of the same specimen from different viewing angles are created, which are then digitally combined to synthesize tomographic images of the object. Using this dual-axis lensfree tomographic imager running on a color sensor-chip, we achieve a 3D spatial resolution of ∼0.35 µm×0.35 µm×∼2 µm, in x, y and z, respectively, creating an effective voxel size of ∼0.03 µm3 across a sample volume of ∼5 mm3, which is equivalent to >150 Billion voxels. We demonstrate the proof-of-concept of this lensfree optical tomographic microscopy platform on a color CMOS image sensor by creating tomograms of micro-particles as well as a wild-type C. elegans nematode. PMID:22984606

  1. Giga-pixel lensfree holographic microscopy and tomography using color image sensors.

    Serhan O Isikman

    Full Text Available We report Giga-pixel lensfree holographic microscopy and tomography using color sensor-arrays such as CMOS imagers that exhibit Bayer color filter patterns. Without physically removing these color filters coated on the sensor chip, we synthesize pixel super-resolved lensfree holograms, which are then reconstructed to achieve ~350 nm lateral resolution, corresponding to a numerical aperture of ~0.8, across a field-of-view of ~20.5 mm(2. This constitutes a digital image with ~0.7 Billion effective pixels in both amplitude and phase channels (i.e., ~1.4 Giga-pixels total. Furthermore, by changing the illumination angle (e.g., ± 50° and scanning a partially-coherent light source across two orthogonal axes, super-resolved images of the same specimen from different viewing angles are created, which are then digitally combined to synthesize tomographic images of the object. Using this dual-axis lensfree tomographic imager running on a color sensor-chip, we achieve a 3D spatial resolution of ~0.35 µm × 0.35 µm × ~2 µm, in x, y and z, respectively, creating an effective voxel size of ~0.03 µm(3 across a sample volume of ~5 mm(3, which is equivalent to >150 Billion voxels. We demonstrate the proof-of-concept of this lensfree optical tomographic microscopy platform on a color CMOS image sensor by creating tomograms of micro-particles as well as a wild-type C. elegans nematode.

  2. Studies of vertex tracking with SOI pixel sensors for future lepton colliders

    Battaglia, Marco; Contarato, Devis; Denes, Peter; Liko, Dietrich; Mattiazzo, Serena; Pantano, Devis

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a study of vertex tracking with a beam hodoscope consisting of three layers of monolithic pixel sensors in SOI technology on high-resistivity substrate. We study the track extrapolation accuracy, two-track separation and vertex reconstruction accuracy in π- Cu interactions with 150 and 300 GeV/c pions at the CERN SPS. Results are discussed in the context of vertex tracking at future lepton colliders.

  3. Studies of Vertex Tracking with SOI Pixel Sensors for Future Lepton Colliders

    Battaglia, Marco; Denes, Peter; Liko, Dietrich; Mattiazzo, Serena; Pantano, Devis

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a study of vertex tracking with a beam hodoscope consisting of three layers of monolithic pixel sensors in SOI technology on high-resistivity substrate. We study the track extrapolation accuracy, two-track separation and vertex reconstruction accuracy in pion-Cu interactions with 150 and 300 GeV/c pions at the CERN SPS. Results are discussed in the context of vertex tracking at future lepton colliders.

  4. Giga-pixel lensfree holographic microscopy and tomography using color image sensors.

    Isikman, Serhan O; Greenbaum, Alon; Luo, Wei; Coskun, Ahmet F; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    We report Giga-pixel lensfree holographic microscopy and tomography using color sensor-arrays such as CMOS imagers that exhibit Bayer color filter patterns. Without physically removing these color filters coated on the sensor chip, we synthesize pixel super-resolved lensfree holograms, which are then reconstructed to achieve ~350 nm lateral resolution, corresponding to a numerical aperture of ~0.8, across a field-of-view of ~20.5 mm(2). This constitutes a digital image with ~0.7 Billion effective pixels in both amplitude and phase channels (i.e., ~1.4 Giga-pixels total). Furthermore, by changing the illumination angle (e.g., ± 50°) and scanning a partially-coherent light source across two orthogonal axes, super-resolved images of the same specimen from different viewing angles are created, which are then digitally combined to synthesize tomographic images of the object. Using this dual-axis lensfree tomographic imager running on a color sensor-chip, we achieve a 3D spatial resolution of ~0.35 µm × 0.35 µm × ~2 µm, in x, y and z, respectively, creating an effective voxel size of ~0.03 µm(3) across a sample volume of ~5 mm(3), which is equivalent to >150 Billion voxels. We demonstrate the proof-of-concept of this lensfree optical tomographic microscopy platform on a color CMOS image sensor by creating tomograms of micro-particles as well as a wild-type C. elegans nematode. PMID:22984606

  5. Development of CMOS Pixel Sensors fully adapted to the ILD Vertex Detector Requirements

    Winter, Marc; Besson, Auguste; Claus, Gilles; Dorokhov, Andrei; Goffe, Mathieu; Hu-Guo, Christine; Morel, Frederic; Valin, Isabelle; Voutsinas, Georgios; Zhang, Liang

    2012-01-01

    CMOS Pixel Sensors are making steady progress towards the specifications of the ILD vertex detector. Recent developments are summarised, which show that these devices are close to comply with all major requirements, in particular the read-out speed needed to cope with the beam related background. This achievement is grounded on the double- sided ladder concept, which allows combining signals generated by a single particle in two different sensors, one devoted to spatial resolution and the other to time stamp, both assembled on the same mechanical support. The status of the development is overviewed as well as the plans to finalise it using an advanced CMOS process.

  6. Design of a radiation hard silicon pixel sensor for X-ray science

    At DESY Hamburg the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser (EuXFEL) is presently under construction. The EuXFEL has unique properties with respect to X-ray energy, instantaneous intensity, pulse length, coherence and number of pulses/sec. These properties of the EuXFEL pose very demanding requirements for imaging detectors. One of the detector systems which is currently under development to meet these challenges is the Adaptive Gain Integrating Pixel Detector, AGIPD. It is a hybrid pixel-detector system with 1024 x 1024 p+ pixels of dimensions 200 μm x 200 μm, made of 16 p+nn+- silicon sensors, each with 10.52 cm x 2.56 cm sensitive area and 500 μm thickness. The particular requirements for the AGIPD are a separation between noise and single photons down to energies of 5 keV, more than 104 photons per pixel for a pulse duration of less than 100 fs, negligible pile-up at the EuXFEL repetition rate of 4.5 MHz, operation for X-ray doses up to 1 GGy, good efficiency for X-rays with energies between 5 and 20 keV, and minimal inactive regions at the edges. The main challenge in the sensor design is the required radiation tolerance and high operational voltage, which is required to reduce the so-called plasma effect. This requires a specially optimized sensor. The X-ray radiation damage results in a build-up of oxide charges and interface traps which lead to a reduction of the breakdown voltage, increased leakage current, increased interpixel capacitances and charge losses. Extensive TCAD simulations have been performed to understand the impact of X-ray radiation damage on the detector performance and optimize the sensor design. To take radiation damage into account in the simulation, radiation damage parameters have been determined on MOS capacitors and gate-controlled diodes as function of dose. The optimized sensor design was fabricated by SINTEF. Irradiation tests on test structures and sensors show that the sensor design is radiation hard and performs as predicted by

  7. Characterisation of a Thin Fully Depleted SOI Pixel Sensor with High Momentum Charged Particles

    Battaglia, Marco; Contarato, Devis; Denes, Peter; Giubilato, Piero; Mattiazzo, Serena; Pantano, Devis

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the characterisation of a thin, fully depleted pixel sensor manufactured in SOI technology on high-resistivity substrate with high momentum charged particles. The sensor is thinned to 70 $\\mu$m and a thin phosphor layer contact is implanted on the back-plane. Its response is compared to that of thick sensors of same design in terms of signal and noise, detection efficiency and single point resolution based on data collected with 300 GeV pions at the CERN SPS. We observe that the charge collected and the signal-to-noise ratio scale according to the estimated thickness of the sensitive volume and the efficiency and single point resolution of the thinned chip are comparable to those measured for the thick sensors.

  8. Characterization of Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel detectors implemented with a high-resistive CMOS technology

    Kishishita, T.; Hemperek, T.; Rymaszewski, P.; Hirono, T.; Krüger, H.; Wermes, N.

    2016-07-01

    We present the recent development of DMAPS (Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor), implemented with a Toshiba 130 nm CMOS process. Unlike in the case of standard MAPS technologies which are based on an epi-layer, this process provides a high-resistive substrate that enables larger signal and faster charge collection by drift in a 50 - 300 μm thick depleted layer. Since this process also enables the use of deep n-wells to isolate the collection electrodes from the thin active device layer, NMOS and PMOS transistors are available for the readout electronics in each pixel cell. In order to characterize the technology, we implemented a simple three transistor readout with a variety of pixel pitches and input FET sizes. This layout variety gives us a clue on sensor characteristics for future optimization, such as the input detector capacitance or leakage current. In the initial measurement, the radiation spectra were obtained from 55Fe with an energy resolution of 770 eV (FWHM) and 90Sr with the MVP of 4165 e-.

  9. The upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System - Status of the R&D; on monolithic silicon pixel sensors

    Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem

    2014-01-01

    s a major part of its upgrade plans, the ALICE experiment schedules the installation of a novel Inner Tracking System (ITS) during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in 2018/19. It will replace the present silicon tracker with seven layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) and significantly improve the detector performance in terms of tracking and rate capabilities. The choice of technology has been guided by the tight requirements on the material budget of 0 : 3 % X = X 0 /layer for the three innermost layers and backed by the significant progress in the field of MAPS in recent years. The pixel chips are manufactured in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS imaging sensor process on wafers with a high resistivity epitaxial layer. Within the ongoing R&D; phase, several sensor chip prototypes have been developed and produced on different epitaxial layer thicknesses and resistivities. These chips are being characterized for their performance before and after irradiation using source tests, test beam and measu...

  10. Development of Fast and High Precision CMOS Pixel Sensors for an ILC Vertex Detector

    Hu-Guo, Christine

    2010-01-01

    The development of CMOS pixel sensors with column parallel read-out and integrated zero-suppression has resulted in a full size, nearly 1 Megapixel, prototype with ~100 \\mu s read-out time. Its performances are quite close to the ILD vertex detector specifications, showing that the sensor architecture can presumably be evolved to meet these specifications exactly. Starting from the existing architecture and achieved performances, the paper will expose the details of how the sensor will be evolved in the coming 2-3 years in perspective of the ILD Detector Baseline Document, to be delivered in 2012. Two different devices are foreseen for this objective, one being optimized for the inner layers and their fast read-out requirement, while the other exploits the dimmed background in the outer layers to reduce the power consumption. The sensor evolution relies on a high resistivity epitaxial layer, on the use of an advanced CMOS process and on the combination of column-level ADCs with a pixel array. The paper will p...

  11. A CMOS pixel sensor prototype for the outer layers of linear collider vertex detector

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) expresses a stringent requirement for high precision vertex detectors (VXD). CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) have been considered as an option for the VXD of the International Large Detector (ILD), one of the detector concepts proposed for the ILC. MIMOSA-31 developed at IPHC-Strasbourg is the first CPS integrated with 4-bit column-level ADC for the outer layers of the VXD, adapted to an original concept minimizing the power consumption. It is composed of a matrix of 64 rows and 48 columns. The pixel concept combines in-pixel amplification with a correlated double sampling (CDS) operation in order to reduce the temporal noise and fixed pattern noise (FPN). At the bottom of the pixel array, each column is terminated with a self-triggered analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The ADC design was optimized for power saving at a sampling frequency of 6.25 MS/s. The prototype chip is fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS technology. This paper presents the details of the prototype chip and its test results

  12. A CMOS pixel sensor prototype for the outer layers of linear collider vertex detector

    Zhang, L.; Morel, F.; Hu-Guo, C.; Himmi, A.; Dorokhov, A.; Hu, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) expresses a stringent requirement for high precision vertex detectors (VXD). CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) have been considered as an option for the VXD of the International Large Detector (ILD), one of the detector concepts proposed for the ILC. MIMOSA-31 developed at IPHC-Strasbourg is the first CPS integrated with 4-bit column-level ADC for the outer layers of the VXD, adapted to an original concept minimizing the power consumption. It is composed of a matrix of 64 rows and 48 columns. The pixel concept combines in-pixel amplification with a correlated double sampling (CDS) operation in order to reduce the temporal noise and fixed pattern noise (FPN). At the bottom of the pixel array, each column is terminated with a self-triggered analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The ADC design was optimized for power saving at a sampling frequency of 6.25 MS/s. The prototype chip is fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS technology. This paper presents the details of the prototype chip and its test results.

  13. A Compact Digital Pixel Sensor (DPS Using 2T-DRAM

    Xiaoxiao Zhang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In digital pixel sensors (DPS, memory elements typically occupy large silicon area of the pixel, which significantly reduces the pixel’s fill factor while increases its size, power and cost. In this work, we propose to reduce DPS memory’s area and power overhead by reducing the memory requirements with a multi-reset integration scheme, and meanwhile employing a dynamic memory instead of traditionally exploited large 6T-SRAM cell. The operation of the DPS takes advantage from the chronological change of the code, which results in reduced memory needs without affecting the light resolution. In the proposed implementation, a 4-bit in-pixel memory is used to reduce the pixel size, and an 8-bit resolution is achieved with multi-reset scheme. In addition, full complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS 2T DRAM and selective refresh scheme are adoptedto implement the memory elements and further increase the area savings. This paper presents the proposed multi-reset integration methodology and its implementation with dedicated memory circuits. Proposed architecture is validated by a prototype chip fabricated using AMS 0.35 μm CMOS technology. Reported experimental results are compared with relative works.

  14. M.i.p. detection performances of a 100 us read-out CMOS pixel sensor with digitised outputs

    Winter, Marc; Besson, Auguste; Colledani, Claude; Degerli, Yavuz; De Masi, Rita; Dorokhov, Andrei; Doziere, Guy; Dulinski, Wojciech; Gelin, Marie; Guilloux, Fabrice; Himmi, Abdelkader; Hu-Guo, Christine; Morel, Frederic; Orsini, Fabienne; Valin, Isabelle; Voutsinas, Georgios

    2009-01-01

    Swift, high resolution CMOS pixel sensors are being developed for the ILC vertex detector, aiming to allow approaching the interaction point very closely. A major issue is the time resolution of the sensors needed to deal with the high occupancy generated by the beam related background. A 128x576 pixel sensor providing digitised outputs at a read-out time of 92.5 us, was fabricated in 2008 within the EU project EUDET, and tested with charged particles at the CERN-SPS. Its prominent performances in terms of noise, detection efficiency versus fake hit rate, spatial resolution and radiation tolerance are overviewed. They validate the sensor architecture.

  15. Thin n-in-p pixel sensors and the SLID-ICV vertical integration technology for the ATLAS upgrade at the HL-LHC

    Macchiolo, A

    2013-01-01

    The R&D activity presented is focused on the development of new modules for the upgrade of the ATLAS pixel system at the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). The performance after irradiation of n-in-p pixel sensors of different active thicknesses is studied, together with an investigation of a novel interconnection technique offered by the Fraunhofer Institute EMFT in Munich, the Solid-Liquid-InterDiffusion (SLID), which is an alternative to the standard solder bump-bonding. The pixel modules are based on thin n-in-p sensors, with an active thickness of 75 um or 150 um, produced at the MPI Semiconductor Laboratory (MPI HLL) and on 100 um thick sensors with active edges, fabricated at VTT, Finland. Hit efficiencies are derived from beam test data for thin devices irradiated up to a fluence of 4e15 neq/cm^2. For the active edge devices, the charge collection properties of the edge pixels before irradiation is discussed in detail, with respect to the inner ones, using measurements with radioactive sources. Beyond ...

  16. Design and test of pixel sensors for operation in severe radiation environments

    Hügging, F.; Lutz, G.; Richter, R. H.; Rohe, T.; Wunstorf, R.; Wüstenfeld, J.

    2000-01-01

    The inner detectors of LHC experiments will contain pixel detectors covering an area of several square meters. In addition they are facing the harsh radiation environment of the LHC. A first prototype sensor has been designed according to the requirements of the ATLAS experiment, produced and successfully tested with static measurements. Irradiation tests have also been performed with excellent results. The sensor is an n + n-device in order to allow partial depleted operation after bulk inversion and a guard ring scheme keeping the entire detector surface close to the electronic chip on ground potential. Further, a bias structure is introduced providing testability of the sensors prior to bump bonding and flip chipping.

  17. Design and test of pixel sensors for operation in severe radiation environments

    Hügging, F G; Richter, R H; Rohe, T; Wunstorf, R; Wüstenfeld, J

    2000-01-01

    The inner detectors of LHC experiments will contain pixel detectors covering an area of several square meters. In addition they are facing the harsh radiation environment of the LHC. A first prototype sensor has been designed according to the requirements of the ATLAS experiment, produced and successfully tested with static measurements. Irradiation tests have also been performed with excellent results. The sensor is an n/sup +/n-device in order to allow partial depleted operation after bulk inversion and a guard ring scheme keeping the entire detector surface close to the electronic chip on ground potential. Further, a bias structure is introduced providing testability of the sensors prior to bump bonding and flip chipping. (13 refs).

  18. Production quality characterisation techniques of sensors and prototypes for the BELLE II Pixel Detector

    The Belle II detector is a system currently under upgrade at the B-factory SuperKEKB in Tsukuba, Japan. The main novelty is the introduction of an additional position sensitive sub-detector in the vertex detector, between the beam pipe and the strip detector system. The sensor of choice for the Belle II Pixel Detector is the Depleted p-channel Field Effect Transistor (DEPFET) sensor. In this paper the latest production of sensors and prototypes performed at the semiconductor Laboratory of the Max Planck Society, i.e. the PXD9 and the Electrical Multi-Chip Module (EMCM), are described. Wafer-level characterisation methods and techniques for faults in the metal system are also reported

  19. Thin n-in-p pixel sensors and the SLID-ICV vertical integration technology for the ATLAS upgrade at the HL-LHC

    Macchiolo, A.; Andricek, L.; Ellenburg, M.; Moser, H. G.; Nisius, R.; Richter, R. H.; Terzo, S.; Weigell, P.

    2013-12-01

    This R&D activity is focused on the development of new modules for the upgrade of the ATLAS pixel system at the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). The performance after irradiation of n-in-p pixel sensors of different active thicknesses is studied, together with an investigation of a novel interconnection technique offered by the Fraunhofer Institute EMFT in Munich, the Solid-Liquid-InterDiffusion (SLID), which is an alternative to the standard solder bump-bonding. The pixel modules are based on thin n-in-p sensors, with an active thickness of 75 μm or 150 μm, produced at the MPI Semiconductor Laboratory (MPI HLL) and on 100 μm thick sensors with active edges, fabricated at VTT, Finland. Hit efficiencies are derived from beam test data for thin devices irradiated up to a fluence of 4×1015 neq/cm2. For the active edge devices, the charge collection properties of the edge pixels before irradiation are discussed in detail, with respect to the inner ones, using measurements with radioactive sources. Beyond the active edge sensors, an additional ingredient needed to design four side buttable modules is the possibility of moving the wire bonding area from the chip surface facing the sensor to the backside, avoiding the implementation of the cantilever extruding beyond the sensor area. The feasibility of this process is under investigation with the FE-I3 SLID modules, where Inter Chip Vias are etched, employing an EMFT technology, with a cross section of 3 μm×10 μm, at the positions of the original wire bonding pads.

  20. The DEPFET Sensor-Amplifier Structure: A Method to Beat 1/f Noise and Reach Sub-Electron Noise in Pixel Detectors.

    Lutz, Gerhard; Porro, Matteo; Aschauer, Stefan; Wölfel, Stefan; Strüder, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    Depleted field effect transistors (DEPFET) are used to achieve very low noise signal charge readout with sub-electron measurement precision. This is accomplished by repeatedly reading an identical charge, thereby suppressing not only the white serial noise but also the usually constant 1/f noise. The repetitive non-destructive readout (RNDR) DEPFET is an ideal central element for an active pixel sensor (APS) pixel. The theory has been derived thoroughly and results have been verified on RNDR-DEPFET prototypes. A charge measurement precision of 0.18 electrons has been achieved. The device is well-suited for spectroscopic X-ray imaging and for optical photon counting in pixel sensors, even at high photon numbers in the same cell. PMID:27136549

  1. The DEPFET Sensor-Amplifier Structure: A Method to Beat 1/f Noise and Reach Sub-Electron Noise in Pixel Detectors

    Lutz, Gerhard; Porro, Matteo; Aschauer, Stefan; Wölfel, Stefan; Strüder, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    Depleted field effect transistors (DEPFET) are used to achieve very low noise signal charge readout with sub-electron measurement precision. This is accomplished by repeatedly reading an identical charge, thereby suppressing not only the white serial noise but also the usually constant 1/f noise. The repetitive non-destructive readout (RNDR) DEPFET is an ideal central element for an active pixel sensor (APS) pixel. The theory has been derived thoroughly and results have been verified on RNDR-DEPFET prototypes. A charge measurement precision of 0.18 electrons has been achieved. The device is well-suited for spectroscopic X-ray imaging and for optical photon counting in pixel sensors, even at high photon numbers in the same cell. PMID:27136549

  2. Color filter array patterns for small-pixel image sensors with substantial cross talk.

    Anzagira, Leo; Fossum, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    Digital image sensor outputs usually must be transformed to suit the human visual system. This color correction amplifies noise, thus reducing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the image. In subdiffraction-limit (SDL) pixels, where optical and carrier cross talk can be substantial, this problem can become significant when conventional color filter arrays (CFAs) such as the Bayer patterns (RGB and CMY) are used. We present the design and analysis of new color filter array patterns for improving the color error and SNR deterioration caused by cross talk in these SDL pixels. We demonstrate an improvement in the color reproduction accuracy and SNR in high cross-talk conditions. Finally, we investigate the trade-off between color accuracy and SNR for the different CFA patterns. PMID:26366487

  3. Beam test studies of 3D pixel sensors irradiated non-uniformly for the ATLAS forward physics detector

    Pixel detectors with cylindrical electrodes that penetrate the silicon substrate (so called 3D detectors) offer advantages over standard planar sensors in terms of radiation hardness, since the electrode distance is decoupled from the bulk thickness. In recent years significant progress has been made in the development of 3D sensors, which culminated in the sensor production for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) upgrade carried out at CNM (Barcelona, Spain) and FBK (Trento, Italy). Based on this success, the ATLAS Forward Physics (AFP) experiment has selected the 3D pixel sensor technology for the tracking detector. The AFP project presents a new challenge due to the need for a reduced dead area with respect to IBL, and the in-homogeneous nature of the radiation dose distribution in the sensor. Electrical characterization of the first AFP prototypes and beam test studies of 3D pixel devices irradiated non-uniformly are presented in this paper

  4. Beam test studies of 3D pixel sensors irradiated non-uniformly for the ATLAS forward physics detector

    Grinstein, S., E-mail: sgrinstein@ifae.es [ICREA and Institut de Física d' Altes Energies (IFAE), Barcelona (Spain); Baselga, M. [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, CNM-IMB (CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Boscardin, M. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, FBK-CMM, Trento (Italy); Christophersen, M. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington (United States); Da Via, C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Dalla Betta, G.-F. [Universita degli Studi di Trento and INFN, Trento (Italy); Darbo, G. [INFN Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Fadeyev, V. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz (United States); Fleta, C. [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, CNM-IMB (CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Gemme, C. [Universita degli Studi di Trento and INFN, Trento (Italy); Grenier, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park (United States); Jimenez, A.; Lopez, I.; Micelli, A. [ICREA and Institut de Física d' Altes Energies (IFAE), Barcelona (Spain); Nelist, C. [INFN Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Parker, S. [University of Hawaii, c/o Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley (United States); Pellegrini, G. [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, CNM-IMB (CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Phlips, B. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington (United States); Pohl, D.-L. [University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Sadrozinski, H.F.-W. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz (United States); and others

    2013-12-01

    Pixel detectors with cylindrical electrodes that penetrate the silicon substrate (so called 3D detectors) offer advantages over standard planar sensors in terms of radiation hardness, since the electrode distance is decoupled from the bulk thickness. In recent years significant progress has been made in the development of 3D sensors, which culminated in the sensor production for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) upgrade carried out at CNM (Barcelona, Spain) and FBK (Trento, Italy). Based on this success, the ATLAS Forward Physics (AFP) experiment has selected the 3D pixel sensor technology for the tracking detector. The AFP project presents a new challenge due to the need for a reduced dead area with respect to IBL, and the in-homogeneous nature of the radiation dose distribution in the sensor. Electrical characterization of the first AFP prototypes and beam test studies of 3D pixel devices irradiated non-uniformly are presented in this paper.

  5. Beam Test Studies of 3D Pixel Sensors Irradiated Non-Uniformly for the ATLAS Forward Physics Detector

    Grinstein, S; Boscardin, M; Christophersen, M; Da Via, C; Betta, G -F Dalla; Darbo, G; Fadeyev, V; Fleta, C; Gemme, C; Grenier, P; Jimenez, A; Lopez, I; Micelli, A; Nelist, C; Parker, S; Pellegrini, G; Phlips, B; Pohl, D L; Sadrozinski, H F -W; Sicho, P; Tsiskaridze, S

    2013-01-01

    Pixel detectors with cylindrical electrodes that penetrate the silicon substrate (so called 3D detectors) offer advantages over standard planar sensors in terms of radiation hardness, since the electrode distance is decoupled from the bulk thickness. In recent years significant progress has been made in the development of 3D sensors, which culminated in the sensor production for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) upgrade carried out at CNM (Barcelona, Spain) and FBK (Trento, Italy). Based on this success, the ATLAS Forward Physics (AFP) experiment has selected the 3D pixel sensor technology for the tracking detector. The AFP project presents a new challenge due to the need for a reduced dead area with respect to IBL, and the in-homogeneous nature of the radiation dose distribution in the sensor. Electrical characterization of the first AFP prototypes and beam test studies of 3D pixel devices irradiated non-uniformly are presented in this paper.

  6. An ultra-low power self-timed column-level ADC for a CMOS pixel sensor based vertex detector

    Zhang, L.; Wang, M.

    2014-11-01

    The International Large Detector (ILD) is a detector concept for the future linear collider experiment. The vertex detector is the key tool to achieve high precision measurements for flavor tagging, which puts stringent requirements on the CMOS pixel sensors. Due to the cooling systems which deteriorate the material budget and increase the multiple scattering, it is important to reduce the power consumption. This paper presents an ultra-low power self-timed column-level ADC for the CMOS pixel sensors, aiming to equip the outer layers of the vertex detector. The ADC was designed to operate in two modes (active and idle) adapted to the low hit density in the outer layers. The architecture employs an enhanced sample-and-hold circuit and a self-timed technique. The total power consumption with a 3-V supply is 225μW during idle mode, which is the most frequent situation. This value rises to 425μW in the case of the active mode. It occupies an area of 35 × 590μm2.

  7. An ultra-low power self-timed column-level ADC for a CMOS pixel sensor based vertex detector

    The International Large Detector (ILD) is a detector concept for the future linear collider experiment. The vertex detector is the key tool to achieve high precision measurements for flavor tagging, which puts stringent requirements on the CMOS pixel sensors. Due to the cooling systems which deteriorate the material budget and increase the multiple scattering, it is important to reduce the power consumption. This paper presents an ultra-low power self-timed column-level ADC for the CMOS pixel sensors, aiming to equip the outer layers of the vertex detector. The ADC was designed to operate in two modes (active and idle) adapted to the low hit density in the outer layers. The architecture employs an enhanced sample-and-hold circuit and a self-timed technique. The total power consumption with a 3-V supply is 225μW during idle mode, which is the most frequent situation. This value rises to 425μW in the case of the active mode. It occupies an area of 35 × 590μm2

  8. Detailed study of the column-based priority logic readout of Topmetal-II- CMOS pixel direct charge sensor

    An, Mangmang; Gao, Chaosong; Han, Mikyung; Huang, Guangming; Ji, Rong; Li, Xiaoting; Mei, Yuan; Pei, Hua; Sun, Quan; Sun, Xiangming; Wang, Kai; Xiao, Le; Yang, Ping; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We present the detailed study of the digital readout of Topmetal-II- CMOS pixel direct charge sensor. Topmetal-II- is an integrated sensor with an array of 72X72 pixels each capable of directly collecting external charge through exposed metal electrodes in the topmost metal layer. In addition to the time-shared multiplexing readout of the analog output from Charge Sensitive Amplifiers in each pixel, hits are also generated through comparators with individually DAC settable thresholds in each pixel. The hits are read out via a column-based priority logic structure, retaining both hit location and time information. The in-array column-based priority logic is fully combinational hence there is no clock distributed in the pixel array. Sequential logic and clock are placed on the peripheral of the array. We studied the detailed working behavior and performance of this readout, and demonstrated its potential in imaging applications.

  9. A high speed, low power consumption LVDS interface for CMOS pixel sensors

    Shi, Zhan, E-mail: sz1134@163.com [Dalian University of Technology, No. 2 Linggong Road, 116024 Dalian (China); Tang, Zhenan, E-mail: tangza@dlut.edu.cn [Dalian University of Technology, No. 2 Linggong Road, 116024 Dalian (China); Tian, Yong [Dalian University of Technology, No. 2 Linggong Road, 116024 Dalian (China); Pham, Hung; Valin, Isabelle; Jaaskelainen, Kimmo [IPHC, 23 rue du Loess 67037 Strasbourg (France); CNRS, UMR7178, 67037 Strasbourg (France)

    2015-01-01

    The use of CMOS Pixel Sensors (CPSs) offers a promising approach to the design of vertex detectors in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. As the CPS equipping the upgraded Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) pixel detector, ULTIMATE perfectly illustrates the potential of CPSs for HEP applications. However, further development of CPSs with respect to readout speed is required to fulfill the readout time requirement of the next generation HEP detectors, such as the upgrade of A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) Inner Tracking System (ITS), the International Linear Collider (ILC), and the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) vertex detectors. One actual limitation of CPSs is related to the speed of the Low-Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS) circuitry implementing the interface between the sensor and the Data Acquisition (DAQ) system. To improve the transmission rate while keeping the power consumption at a low level, a source termination technique and a special current comparator were adopted for the LVDS driver and receiver, respectively. Moreover, hardening techniques are used. The circuitry was designed and submitted for fabrication in a 0.18-µm CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) process at the end of 2011. The test results indicated that the LVDS driver and receiver can operate properly at the data rate of 1.2 Gb/s with power consumption of 19.6 mW.

  10. A high speed, low power consumption LVDS interface for CMOS pixel sensors

    The use of CMOS Pixel Sensors (CPSs) offers a promising approach to the design of vertex detectors in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. As the CPS equipping the upgraded Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) pixel detector, ULTIMATE perfectly illustrates the potential of CPSs for HEP applications. However, further development of CPSs with respect to readout speed is required to fulfill the readout time requirement of the next generation HEP detectors, such as the upgrade of A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) Inner Tracking System (ITS), the International Linear Collider (ILC), and the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) vertex detectors. One actual limitation of CPSs is related to the speed of the Low-Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS) circuitry implementing the interface between the sensor and the Data Acquisition (DAQ) system. To improve the transmission rate while keeping the power consumption at a low level, a source termination technique and a special current comparator were adopted for the LVDS driver and receiver, respectively. Moreover, hardening techniques are used. The circuitry was designed and submitted for fabrication in a 0.18-µm CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) process at the end of 2011. The test results indicated that the LVDS driver and receiver can operate properly at the data rate of 1.2 Gb/s with power consumption of 19.6 mW

  11. Filter-free image sensor pixels comprising silicon nanowires with selective color absorption.

    Park, Hyunsung; Dan, Yaping; Seo, Kwanyong; Yu, Young J; Duane, Peter K; Wober, Munib; Crozier, Kenneth B

    2014-01-01

    The organic dye filters of conventional color image sensors achieve the red/green/blue response needed for color imaging, but have disadvantages related to durability, low absorption coefficient, and fabrication complexity. Here, we report a new paradigm for color imaging based on all-silicon nanowire devices and no filters. We fabricate pixels consisting of vertical silicon nanowires with integrated photodetectors, demonstrate that their spectral sensitivities are governed by nanowire radius, and perform color imaging. Our approach is conceptually different from filter-based methods, as absorbed light is converted to photocurrent, ultimately presenting the opportunity for very high photon efficiency. PMID:24588103

  12. Analysis methods of testbeam data of irradiated ATLAS Planar Pixel Sensors

    The ATLAS Pixel detector is the innermost subdetector of the ATLAS-Experiment at CERN. The development of new sensor technologies is going on as detector-upgrades are foreseen to cope with higher fluences and more pile-up-events after accelerator upgrades (SLHC). For testing properties of sensors, testbeams are used. Beam-telescopes such as the EUDET-Telescope have been used for measuring the exact position of beam-tracks to determine the properties of different sensor technologies. Several sensors with different designs (e.g. slim edges) were read-out in testbeam after irradiation at differing fluences (up to 2.1016 neqcm-2) and voltages (up to 1500 V) to observe the performance of the sensors under conditions up to the end-lifetime of the ATLAS detector. The reconstruction chain of the so called Eutelescope framework including adaptions and the evaluation of the reconstructed data are presented. Typical results including hit- and charge-efficiency plots are shown and interpreted.

  13. MISTRAL & ASTRAL: two CMOS Pixel Sensor architectures suited to the Inner Tracking System of the ALICE experiment

    Morel, F.; Hu-Guo, C.; Bertolone, G.; Claus, G.; Colledani, C.; Dorokhov, A.; Dozière, G.; Dulinski, W.; Fang, X.; Goffe, M.; Himmi, A.; Jaaskelainen, K.; Senyukov, S.; Specht, M.; Szelezniak, M.; Pham, H.; Valin, I.; Wang, T.; Winter, M.

    2014-01-01

    A detector, equipped with 50 μm thin CMOS Pixel Sensors (CPS), is being designed for the upgrade of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE experiment at LHC. Two CPS flavours, MISTRAL and ASTRAL, are being developed at IPHC aiming to meet the requirements of the ITS upgrade. The first is derived from the MIMOSA28 sensor designed for the STAR-PXL detector. The second integrates a discriminator in each pixel to improve the readout speed and power consumption. This paper will describe in details the sensor development and show some preliminary test results.

  14. M.i.p. detection performances of a 100 us read-out CMOS pixel sensor with digitised outputs

    Winter, Marc; Baudot, Jerome; Besson, Auguste; Colledani, Claude; Degerli, Yavuz; De Masi, Rita; Dorokhov, Andrei; Doziere, Guy; Dulinski, Wojciech; Gelin, Marie; Guilloux, Fabrice; Himmi, Abdelkader; Hu-Guo, Christine; Morel, Frederic; Orsini, Fabienne

    2009-01-01

    Swift, high resolution CMOS pixel sensors are being developed for the ILC vertex detector, aiming to allow approaching the interaction point very closely. A major issue is the time resolution of the sensors needed to deal with the high occupancy generated by the beam related background. A 128x576 pixel sensor providing digitised outputs at a read-out time of 92.5 us, was fabricated in 2008 within the EU project EUDET, and tested with charged particles at the CERN-SPS. Its prominent performanc...

  15. High-resolution hybrid pixel sensors for the e sup + e sup - Tesla linear collider vertex tracker

    Battaglia, Marco; Tammi, K; Österberg, K; Kucewicz, W; Zalewska-Bak, A; Caccia, M; Campagnolo, R; Meroni, C; Grabiec, P; Jaroszewicz, B; Marczewski, J

    2000-01-01

    In order to fully exploit the physics potential of a future high-energy e sup + e sup - linear collider, a Vertex Tracker, providing high-resolution track reconstruction, is required. Hybrid silicon pixel sensors are an attractive option, for the sensor technology, due to their read-out speed and radiation hardness, favoured in the high-rate environment of the TESLA e sup + e sup - linear collider design, but have been so far limited by the achievable single point space resolution. In this paper, a conceptual design of the TESLA Vertex Tracker, based on a novel layout of hybrid pixel sensors with interleaved cells to improve their spatial resolution, is presented.

  16. Probing active-edge silicon sensors using a high precision telescope

    K. Akiba; M. Artuso; V. van Beveren; M. van Beuzekom; H. Boterenbrood; J. Buytaert; P. Collins; R. Dumps; B. van der Heijden; C. Hombach; D. Hynds; D. Hsu; M. John; E. Koffeman; A. Leflat; Y. Li; I. Longstaff; A. Morton; E. PérezTrigo; R. Plackett; M.M. Reid; P. Rodríguez Perez; H. Schindler; P. Tsopelas; C. Vázquez Sierra; M. Wysokiński

    2015-01-01

    The performance of prototype active-edge VTT sensors bump-bonded to the Timepix ASIC is presented. Non-irradiated sensors of thicknesses 100-200 μm and pixel-to-edge distances of 50 μm and 100 μm were probed with a beam of charged hadrons with sub-pixel precision using the Timepix telescope assemble

  17. Evaluation of the breakdown behaviour of ATLAS silicon pixel sensors after partial guard-ring removal

    To avoid geometrical inefficiencies in the ATLAS pixel detector, the concept of shingling is used up to now in the barrel section. For the upgrades of ATLAS, it is desired to avoid this as it increases the volume and material budget of the pixel layers and complicates the cooling. A direct planar edge-to-edge arrangement of pixel modules has not been possible in the past due to about 1100μm of inactive edge composed of approximately 600μm of guard rings and 500μm of safety margin. In this work, the safety margin and guard rings of ATLAS SingleChip sensors were cut at different positions using a standard diamond dicing saw and irradiated afterwards to explore the breakdown behaviour and the leakage current development. It is found that the inactive edge can be reduced to about 400μm of guard rings with almost no reduction in pre-irradiation testability and leakage current performance. This is in particular important for the insertable b-layer upgrade of ATLAS (IBL) where inactive edges of less than 450μm width are required.

  18. Evaluation of the breakdown behaviour of ATLAS silicon pixel sensors after partial guard-ring removal

    Goessling, C.; Klingenberg, R.; Muenstermann, D.; Wittig, T.

    2010-12-01

    To avoid geometrical inefficiencies in the ATLAS pixel detector, the concept of shingling is used up to now in the barrel section. For the upgrades of ATLAS, it is desired to avoid this as it increases the volume and material budget of the pixel layers and complicates the cooling. A direct planar edge-to-edge arrangement of pixel modules has not been possible in the past due to about 1100 μm of inactive edge composed of approximately 600 μm of guard rings and 500 μm of safety margin. In this work, the safety margin and guard rings of ATLAS SingleChip sensors were cut at different positions using a standard diamond dicing saw and irradiated afterwards to explore the breakdown behaviour and the leakage current development. It is found that the inactive edge can be reduced to about 400 μm of guard rings with almost no reduction in pre-irradiation testability and leakage current performance. This is in particular important for the insertable b-layer upgrade of ATLAS (IBL) where inactive edges of less than 450 μm width are required.

  19. Evaluation of the breakdown behaviour of ATLAS silicon pixel sensors after partial guard-ring removal

    Goessling, C.; Klingenberg, R. [Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentelle Physik IV, TU Dortmund, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Muenstermann, D., E-mail: Daniel.Muenstermann@TU-Dortmund.d [Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentelle Physik IV, TU Dortmund, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Wittig, T. [Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentelle Physik IV, TU Dortmund, 44221 Dortmund (Germany)

    2010-12-11

    To avoid geometrical inefficiencies in the ATLAS pixel detector, the concept of shingling is used up to now in the barrel section. For the upgrades of ATLAS, it is desired to avoid this as it increases the volume and material budget of the pixel layers and complicates the cooling. A direct planar edge-to-edge arrangement of pixel modules has not been possible in the past due to about 1100{mu}m of inactive edge composed of approximately 600{mu}m of guard rings and 500{mu}m of safety margin. In this work, the safety margin and guard rings of ATLAS SingleChip sensors were cut at different positions using a standard diamond dicing saw and irradiated afterwards to explore the breakdown behaviour and the leakage current development. It is found that the inactive edge can be reduced to about 400{mu}m of guard rings with almost no reduction in pre-irradiation testability and leakage current performance. This is in particular important for the insertable b-layer upgrade of ATLAS (IBL) where inactive edges of less than 450{mu}m width are required.

  20. 128x96 pixel field emitter-array image sensor with HARP target

    Yamagishi, Toshio; Nanba, Masakazu; Osada, Katsunori; Takiguchi, Yoshiro; Okazaki, Saburo; Egami, Norifumi; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Itoh, Shigeo

    2002-04-01

    In pursuit of developing a next-generation pick-up device having high definition and ultrahigh sensitivity features, research continues on a new type of image sensor that combines a HARP target and a field emitter array. A new field emitter array on a small-sized substrate is designed and a unique packaging technique is proposed. The prototype device is sealed in a vacuum package with a thickness of only about 10 mm and has 128 horizontal and 96 vertical pixels. Experimental results show that images could be successfully reproduced for the first time ever in a device of this type. Highly sensitive characteristics and propr resolution were also obtained with the device. The prototype image sensor can operate stably for more than 250 hours, demonstrating its feasibility and potential as a next- generation image pickup device.

  1. 2PFCTM (two pixels, full color): Image sensor demosaicing and characterization

    Tamburrino, Daniel; Speigle, Jon M.; Tweet, Douglas J.; Lee, Jong-Jan

    2010-04-01

    We propose a modification to the standard Bayer color filter array (CFA) and photodiode structure for CMOS image sensors, which we call 2PFC™ (two pixels, full color). The blue and red filters of the Bayer pattern are replaced by a magenta filter. Under each magenta filter are two stacked, pinned photodiodes; the diode nearest the surface absorbs mostly blue light, and the deeper diode absorbs mostly red light. The magenta filter absorbs green light, improving color separation between the blue and red diodes. We first present a frequency-based demosaicing method, which takes advantage of the new 2PFC geometry. Due to the spatial arrangement of red, green, and blue pixels, luminance and chrominance are very well separated in the Fourier space, allowing for computationally inexpensive linear filtering. In comparison with state-of-the-art demosaicing methods for the Bayer CFA, we show that our sensor and demosaicing method outperform the others in terms of color aliasing, peak signal to noise ratio, and zipper effect. As demosaicing alone does not determine image quality, we also analyze the whole system performance in terms of resolution and noise.

  2. Monolithic Active Pixel Matrix with Binary Counters (MAMBO) ASIC

    Khalid, Farah F.; Deptuch, Grzegorz; Shenai, Alpana; Yarema, Raymond J.; /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    Monolithic Active Matrix with Binary Counters (MAMBO) is a counting ASIC designed for detecting and measuring low energy X-rays from 6-12 keV. Each pixel contains analogue functionality implemented with a charge preamplifier, CR-RC{sup 2} shaper and a baseline restorer. It also contains a window comparator which can be trimmed by 4 bit DACs to remove systematic offsets. The hits are registered by a 12 bit ripple counter which is reconfigured as a shift register to serially output the data from the entire ASIC. Each pixel can be tested individually. Two diverse approaches have been used to prevent coupling between the detector and electronics in MAMBO III and MAMBO IV. MAMBO III is a 3D ASIC, the bottom ASIC consists of diodes which are connected to the top ASIC using {mu}-bump bonds. The detector is decoupled from the electronics by physically separating them on two tiers and using several metal layers as a shield. MAMBO IV is a monolithic structure which uses a nested well approach to isolate the detector from the electronics. The ASICs are being fabricated using the SOI 0.2 {micro}m OKI process, MAMBO III is 3D bonded at T-Micro and MAMBO IV nested well structure was developed in collaboration between OKI and Fermilab.

  3. Monolithic active pixel radiation detector with shielding techniques

    Deptuch, Grzegorz W.

    2016-09-06

    A monolithic active pixel radiation detector including a method of fabricating thereof. The disclosed radiation detector can include a substrate comprising a silicon layer upon which electronics are configured. A plurality of channels can be formed on the silicon layer, wherein the plurality of channels are connected to sources of signals located in a bulk part of the substrate, and wherein the signals flow through electrically conducting vias established in an isolation oxide on the substrate. One or more nested wells can be configured from the substrate, wherein the nested wells assist in collecting charge carriers released in interaction with radiation and wherein the nested wells further separate the electronics from the sensing portion of the detector substrate. The detector can also be configured according to a thick SOA method of fabrication.

  4. Design and noise analysis of charge sensitive amplifier for readout of pixelized thin film amorphous silicon sensors

    Poltorak, K; Jarron, P; Kaplon, J; 10.1109/NSSMIC.2008.4774982

    2009-01-01

    Future high-energy physics experiments entail the need to improve the existing detection technologies, as well as develop new ones. Larger luminosities of the new accelerators require greater granularity of tracking detectors, which will be exposed to much higher doses of radiation. One of the newly-investigated solutions for tracking detectors is the Thin Film on ASIC (TFA) technology, which allows combining advantages of Monolithic Active Pixel and Hybrid Pixel technologies. In the paper we present noise analysis of a front-end circuit for readout of a TFA sensor. The circuit is based on a charge sensitive preamplifier built around an un-buffered cascode stage with active reset circuit. The feedback capacitance is reset through a transistor biased with a constant current instead of a voltage controlled reset transistor in order to limit parasitic charge injection into a very small feedback capacitance. Detailed analysis of noise in the reset and the readout phase and design optimization based on the Enz-Kru...

  5. A DVP-Based Bridge Architecture to Randomly Access Pixels of High-Speed Image Sensors

    Khan TareqHasan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A design of a novel bridge is proposed to interface digital-video-port (DVP compatible image sensors with popular microcontrollers. Most commercially available CMOS image sensors send image data at high speed and in a row-by-row fashion. On the other hand, commercial microcontrollers run at relatively slower speed, and many embedded system applications need random access of pixel values. Moreover, commercial microcontrollers may not have sufficient internal memory to store a complete image of high resolution. The proposed bridge addresses these problems and provides an easy-to-use and compact way to interface image sensors with microcontrollers. The proposed design is verified in FPGA and later implemented using CMOS 0.18 um Artisan library cells. The design costs 4,735 gates and 0.12 mm2 silicon area. The synthesis results show that the bridge can support a data rate up to 254 megasamples/sec. Its applications may include pattern recognition, robotic vision, tracking system, and medical imaging.

  6. A Measurement of Lorentz Angle and Spatial Resolution of Radiation Hard Silicon Pixel Sensors

    Gorelov, I; Hoeferkamp, M; Seidel, S C; Ciocio, A; Einsweiler, Kevin F; Gilchriese, M G D; Joshi, A; Kleinfelder, S A; Marchesini, R; Milgrome, O; Palaio, N; Pengg, F X; Richardson, J; Zizka, G; Ackers, M; Fischer, P; Keil, M; Meuser, S; Stockmanns, T; Treis, J; Wermes, N; Gössling, C; Hügging, F G; Wüstenfeld, J; Wunstorf, R; Barberis, D; Beccherle, R; Cervetto, M; Darbo, G; Gagliardi, G; Gemme, C; Morettini, P; Netchaeva, P; Osculati, B; Parodi, F; Rossi, L; Dao, K; Fasching, D; Blanquart, L; Breugnon, P; Calvet, D; Clemens, J C; Delpierre, P A; Hallewell, G D; Laugier, D; Mouthuy, T; Rozanov, A N; Trouilleau, C; Valin, I; Aleppo, M; Andreazza, A; Caccia, M; Lari, T; Meroni, C; Ragusa, F; Troncon, C; Vegni, G; Rohe, T; Boyd, G; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Snow, J; Sícho, P; Tomasek, L; Vrba, V; Holder, M; Lipka, D; Ziolkowski, M; Cauz, D; D'Auria, S; del Papa, C; Grassman, H; Santi, L; Becks, K H; Gerlach, P; Grah, C; Gregor, I; Harenberg, T; Linder, C

    2002-01-01

    Silicon pixel sensors developed by the ATLAS collaboration to meet LHC requirements and to withstand hadronic irradiation to fluences of up to $10^{15} n_eq/cm^{2}$ have been evaluated using a test beam facility at CERN providing a magnetic field. The Lorentz angle was measured and found to alter from 9.0 deg. before irradiation, when the detectors operated at 150 V bias at B=1.48 T, to 3.1 deg after irradiation and operating at 600 V bias at 1.01 T. In addition to the effect due to magnetic field variation, this change is explained by the variation of the electric field inside the detectors arising from the different bias conditions. The depletion depths of irradiated sensors at various bias voltages were also measured. At 600 V bias 280 micron thick sensors depleted to ~200 micron after irradiation at the design fluence of 1 10^{15} 1 MeV n_eq/cm2 and were almost fully depleted at a fluence of 0.5 * 10^{15} 1 MeV n_eq/cm2. The spatial resolution was measured for angles of incidence between 0 deg and 30 deg....

  7. A 15 × 15 single photon avalanche diode sensor featuring breakdown pixels extraction architecture for efficient data readout

    Yang, Xiao; Zhu, Hongbo; Nakura, Toru; Iizuka, Tetsuya; Asada, Kunihiro

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a breakdown pixels extraction architecture for single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) based faint light detection systems. The proposed extraction circuit detects the breakdown pixels and only their addresses are readout. Therefore, under the faint light environment, this SPAD-based sensor significantly improves the data readout efficiency. In addition, since the readout sequence is 4× faster than that of the conventional architecture in the dark condition, the proposed system does not need an independent on-chip event detection circuit that consumes additional area and power. A test-of-concept chip with a 15 × 15 SPAD pixels array was fabricated in a 0.18 µm 1P5M standard CMOS process and pinhole diffraction patterns were successfully captured thanks to the high sensitivity of the SPAD sensor. Under the faint light condition, a high-speed readout is verified by measurement and the robustness of the proposed architecture is successfully demonstrated.

  8. High Chromaticity Aluminum Plasmonic Pixels for Active Liquid Crystal Displays.

    Olson, Jana; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Basu, Tiyash; Huang, Da; Schlather, Andrea E; Zheng, Bob; Halas, Naomi J; Nordlander, Peter; Link, Stephan

    2016-01-26

    Chromatic devices such as flat panel displays could, in principle, be substantially improved by incorporating aluminum plasmonic nanostructures instead of conventional chromophores that are susceptible to photobleaching. In nanostructure form, aluminum is capable of producing colors that span the visible region of the spectrum while contributing exceptional robustness, low cost, and streamlined manufacturability compatible with semiconductor manufacturing technology. However, individual aluminum nanostructures alone lack the vivid chromaticity of currently available chromophores because of the strong damping of the aluminum plasmon resonance in the visible region of the spectrum. In recent work, we showed that pixels formed by periodic arrays of Al nanostructures yield far more vivid coloration than the individual nanostructures. This progress was achieved by exploiting far-field diffractive coupling, which significantly suppresses the scattering response on the long-wavelength side of plasmonic pixel resonances. In the present work, we show that by utilizing another collective coupling effect, Fano interference, it is possible to substantially narrow the short-wavelength side of the pixel spectral response. Together, these two complementary effects provide unprecedented control of plasmonic pixel spectral line shape, resulting in aluminum pixels with far more vivid, monochromatic coloration across the entire RGB color gamut than previously attainable. We further demonstrate that pixels designed in this manner can be used directly as switchable elements in liquid crystal displays and determine the minimum and optimal numbers of nanorods required in an array to achieve good color quality and intensity. PMID:26639191

  9. Status of the ATLAS pixel detector

    Saavedra Aldo, F

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is currently being constructed and will be installed in 2006 to be ready for commissioning at the Large Hadron Collider. The complete pixel detector is composed of three concentric barrels and six disks that are populated by 1744 ATLAS Pixel modules. The main components of the pixel module are the readout electronics and the silicon sensor whose active region is instrumented with rectangular pixels. The module has been designed to be able to survive 10 years of operation within the ATLAS detector. A brief description of the pixel detector will be presented with results and problems encountered during the production stage.

  10. Beam test results of a monolithic pixel sensor in the 0.18 μm tower-jazz technology with high resistivity epitaxial layer

    Mattiazzo, S., E-mail: serena.mattiazzo@pd.infn.it [Università degli Studi di Padova, Padova IT 35131 (Italy); Aimo, I. [Politecnico di Torino and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) Sezione di Torino, Torino IT 10129 (Italy); Baudot, J. [Universitè de Strasbourg, IPHC, Strasbourg F67037 (France); CNRS, MMR7178, Strasbourg F67037 (France); Bedda, C. [Politecnico di Torino and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) Sezione di Torino, Torino IT 10129 (Italy); La Rocca, P. [Università di Catania and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) Sezione di Catania, Catania IT 95123 (Italy); Perez, A. [Universitè de Strasbourg, IPHC, Strasbourg F67037 (France); CNRS, MMR7178, Strasbourg F67037 (France); Riggi, F. [Università di Catania and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) Sezione di Catania, Catania IT 95123 (Italy); Spiriti, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati and Sezione di Roma 3, Roma IT 00146 (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    The ALICE experiment at CERN will undergo a major upgrade in the second Long LHC Shutdown in the years 2018–2019; this upgrade includes the full replacement of the Inner Tracking System (ITS), deploying seven layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS). For the development of the new ALICE ITS, the Tower-Jazz 0.18 μm CMOS imaging sensor process has been chosen as it is possible to use full CMOS in the pixel and different silicon wafers (including high resistivity epitaxial layers). A large test campaign has been carried out on several small prototype chips, designed to optimize the pixel sensor layout and the front-end electronics. Results match the target requirements both in terms of performance and of radiation hardness. Following this development, the first full scale chips have been designed, submitted and are currently under test, with promising results. A telescope composed of 4 planes of Mimosa-28 and 2 planes of Mimosa-18 chips is under development at the DAFNE Beam Test Facility (BTF) at the INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) in Italy with the final goal to perform a comparative test of the full scale prototypes. The telescope has been recently used to test a Mimosa-22THRb chip (a monolithic pixel sensor built in the 0.18 μm Tower-Jazz process) and we foresee to perform tests on the full scale chips for the ALICE ITS upgrade at the beginning of 2015. In this contribution we will describe some first measurements of spatial resolution, fake hit rate and detection efficiency of the Mimosa-22THRb chip obtained at the BTF facility in June 2014 with an electron beam of 500 MeV.

  11. A Dynamic Range Expansion Technique for CMOS Image Sensors with Dual Charge Storage in a Pixel and Multiple Sampling

    Shinya Itoh; Shoji Kawahito; Suhaidi Shafie

    2008-01-01

    A dynamic range expansion technique for CMOS image sensors with dual charge storage in a pixel and multiple sampling technique is presented. Each pixel contains a photodiode and a storage diode which is connected to the photodiode via a separation gate. The sensitivity of the signal charge in the storage diode can be controlled either by a separation gate which limits the charge to flow into the storage diode or by controlling the accumulation time in the storage diode. The operation of the s...

  12. Evaluation of a SOI pixel sensor with thick depletion layer for future X-ray astronomical missions

    Nakashima, Shinya; Ryu, Sykyo Gando; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Takeda, Ayaki; Arai, Yasuo; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Ichimiya, Ryo; Ikemoto, Yukiko; Imamura, Toshifumi; Ohmoto, Takafumi; Iwata, Atsushi

    2012-03-01

    We report on the evaluation test of our novel pixel sensor named "XRPIX1-FZ" which is developed for the future X-ray astronomy mission. The mean gain of XRPIX1-FZ is 3.3 µV/e. and the dispersion of the gain among the pixels is 1% in the standard deviation. We confirmed the energy resolution of 260 eV in FWHM at 8 keV. We achieved the full depletion (250 µm) at 30 V back bias voltage.

  13. Flexible Gd2O2S:Tb scintillators pixelated with polyethylene microstructures for digital x-ray image sensors

    Flexible scintillators for digital x-ray image sensors were designed, fabricated and characterized. In these scintillaotrs, terbium-doped gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) scintillator pixels were embedded into a polyethylene (PE) substrate. To evaluate the difference in the spatial resolution according to the pixel size, we designed three scintillators with pixels of different pitch sizes: 50 µm pitch size (P50), 100 µm pitch size (P100) and 200 µm pitch size (P200). Because of the high flexibility and good formability, polyethylene was used as the substrate of the scintillator. To fabricate nickel micromolds with high-aspect-ratio microstructures, two microfabrication techniques were employed: silicon dry-etching using a deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) process and nickel electroforming. The pixelated PE microstructures were fabricated by a hot embossing process. Because the solution-type Gd2O2S:Tb precursor can be handled at room temperature, Gd2O2S:Tb was used as the scintillator material. The measured sensitivities of the P50 and P100 models were, respectively, about 65% and 97% of that of the P200 model. The lower sensitivity values of the models with a small pitch size were due to two factors, such as the different pixel heights and the different fill factors. Because a scintillator with a small pixel size has a low fill factor, the sensitivity of the scintillator decreases as the pixel size decreases. The fill factors of the P50, P100 and P200 models were 36%, 49% and 56.25%, respectively. On the other hand, the spatial resolution of the scintillator increases as the pixel size decreases. Therefore, P50 gave the best spatial resolution among the designed models. The spatial frequency at 10% of the modulation transfer function (MTF) with P50 was 13.5 mm−1, while that with P200 was 10.0 mm−1. The resolution pattern and the tooth x-ray images obtained from a scintillator with a smaller pixel size was also clearer than that obtained from a scintillator

  14. Development of novel n{sup +}-in-p Silicon Planar Pixel Sensors for HL-LHC

    Unno, Y., E-mail: yoshinobu.unno@kek.jp [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Study, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken 305-0801 (Japan); Gallrapp, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), CH-1211, Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Hori, R. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Study, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken 305-0801 (Japan); Idarraga, J. [Institut Universitaire de Technologie d' Orsay, Universite de Paris Sud, plateau de Moulon, 91400 Orsay (France); Mitsui, S. [The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken 305-0801 (Japan); Nagai, R.; Kishida, T. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Ishida, A.; Ishihara, M.; Kamada, S.; Inuzuka, T.; Yamamura, K. [Solid-State Division, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 1126-1 Ichino-cho, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu-shi, Shizuoka 435-8558 (Japan); Hara, K. [Institute of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Ikegami, Y. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Study, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken 305-0801 (Japan); Jinnouchi, O. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Lounis, A. [Institut Universitaire de Technologie d' Orsay, Universite de Paris Sud, plateau de Moulon, 91400 Orsay (France); Takahashi, Y. [Institute of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Takubo, Y.; Terada, S. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Study, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken 305-0801 (Japan); Hanagaki, K. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka-shi, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); and others

    2013-01-21

    We have been developing highly radiation-tolerant n{sup +}-in-p planar pixel sensors for use in the high-luminosity LHC. Novel n{sup +}-in-p structures were made using various combinations of the bias structures (punch-through or polysilicon resistor), isolation structures (p-stop or p-spray), and thicknesses (320μm or 150μm). The 1-chip pixel modules with thin FE-I4 pixel sensors were evaluated using test beams, before and after 2×10{sup 15}n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} irradiation. The full depletion voltages were estimated to be 44±10 V and 380±70 V, in the non-irradiated and the irradiated modules, respectively. A reduction of efficiency was observed in the vicinity of the four pixel corners and underneath the bias rail after the irradiation. The global efficiencies were >99% and >95% in the non-irradiated and the irradiated modules, respectively. The collected charges were uniform in the depth direction at bias voltages well above the full depletion voltages. The encapsulation of vulnerable edges with adhesive or parylene prevented HV sparking. Bump bonding with the SnAg solder bumps was performed at HPK with 150μm- and 320μm-thick sensors and chips. No disconnection of bumps was observed after 10 thermal cycles between −40 and +50 °C, with a temperature slew rate of >70K/min. -- Highlights: ► Novel n{sup +}-in-p pixel sensors were made of punch-through/poly-Si biasing, p-stop/p-spray isolation, and 320/150μm thickness. ► The thin pixel modules were evaluated in testbeams, before and after 2×10{sup 15}n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} irradiation. ► A reduction of efficiency was observed in the vicinity of four-corners of pixels and underneath the bias rail after irradiation. ► Encapsulating the vulnerable edges with adhesive or parylene achieved prevention of HV sparking up to 1000 V. ► No disconnection of SnAg bump-bonds was observed in dummy modules after 10 thermal cycles with a slew rate of >70K/min.

  15. Performance of a prototype 32×32 pixel indirect x-ray imager based on a lateral selenium passive pixel sensor

    Keshavarzi, Rasoul; Wang, Kai; Yazdandoost, Mohammad Y.; Shin, Kyung-Wook; Chen, Feng; Majid, Shaikh Hasibul; Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Karim, Karim S.

    2012-03-01

    An interface has been developed to capture frames taken by X-ray array imagers up to 64×64 pixels. An application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) designed solely for X-ray flat panel imaging readout circuitry, manufactured by FLIR® called Indigo (also known as ISC9717), was used as part of charge-amplifier block. An Altera Cyclone II FPGA is used to serve three purposes: Create pulses required for gate-driver block, Receive fast-stream data coming from the Indigo chip, and Send data through RS-232 protocol over a serial cable to a personal computer. Initial results for a 32×32 passive pixel sensor (PPS) with lateral amorphous Selenium metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetector were presented in [1]. This work focuses more on methods used to improve the images obtained from the array. Sharper images produced in sync with the light source are presented. In addition, insight into array readout circuitry and capturing a frame from an array is discussed.

  16. Studies Of Radiation Effects On Pixel Sensors For The Cms Experiment And Design Of Radiation Hard Sensors For Future Upgrades Of Lhc Upgrade

    Roy, A

    2005-01-01

    The CMS experiment which is currently under construction at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva, Switzerland) will contain a pixel detector that provides in its final configuration three space points per track close to the interaction point of the colliding beams. The readout chip is expected to survive a particle fluence of 6 × 1014 neq/cm2 and therefore all components of the hybrid pixel detector have to perform well up to at least this fluence. This requires the silicon to operate partially depleted after irradiation and therefore “n in n” concept has been chosen. In order to perform IV tests on wafers to certify the quality of sensors and to hold accidentally unconnected pixels close to ground potential a resistive path between the pixels has been implemented by openings in the p -stop implants surrounding every pixel cell. Prototypes of such sensors have been produced by two different companies and their properties have been extensively tested before and after ir...

  17. Production and characterisation of SLID interconnected n-in-p pixel modules with 75 μm thin silicon sensors

    The performance of pixel modules built from 75 μm thin silicon sensors and ATLAS read-out chips employing the Solid Liquid InterDiffusion (SLID) interconnection technology is presented. This technology, developed by the Fraunhofer EMFT, is a possible alternative to the standard bump-bonding. It allows for stacking of different interconnected chip and sensor layers without destroying the already formed bonds. In combination with Inter-Chip-Vias (ICVs) this paves the way for vertical integration. Both technologies are combined in a pixel module concept which is the basis for the modules discussed in this paper. Mechanical and electrical parameters of pixel modules employing both SLID interconnections and sensors of 75 μm thickness are covered. The mechanical features discussed include the interconnection efficiency, alignment precision and mechanical strength. The electrical properties comprise the leakage currents, tuning characteristics, charge collection, cluster sizes and hit efficiencies. Targeting at a usage at the high luminosity upgrade of the LHC accelerator called HL-LHC, the results were obtained before and after irradiation up to fluences of 1016neq/cm2

  18. Evaluation of KEK n-in-p planar pixel sensor structures for very high radiation environments with testbeam

    Various structures for n-in-p planar pixel sensors have been developed at KEK in order to cope with the huge particle fluence in the upcoming LHC upgrades. Performances of the sensors with different structures have been evaluated with testbeam. The n-in-p devices were connected by bump-bonding to the ATLAS Pixel front-end chip (FE-I4A) and characterized before and after the irradiation to 1×1016 1 MeV neq/cm2. Results of measurements with 120 GeV/c momentum pion beam at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) in September 2012 are presented. - Highlights: • Pixel sensors with two biasing and two isolation structures were evaluated. • Overall hit efficiency of 97.6% was confirmed at −1200 V after 1×1016neq/cm2. • Inefficiency regions were observed in non-irradiated samples with P-spray isolation. • Inefficiency regions after high irradiation were observed under bias rail and PolySi. • The potential of the surface structure is thought to affect the charge collection

  19. K-edge imaging with the XPAD3 hybrid pixel detector, direct comparison of CdTe and Si sensors

    We investigate the improvement from the use of high-Z CdTe sensors for pre-clinical K-edge imaging with the hybrid pixel detectors XPAD3. We compare XPAD3 chips bump bonded to Si or CdTe sensors in identical experimental conditions. Image performance for narrow energy bin acquisitions and contrast-to-noise ratios of K-edge images are presented and compared. CdTe sensors achieve signal-to-noise ratios at least three times higher than Si sensors within narrow energy bins, thanks to their much higher detection efficiency. Nevertheless Si sensors provide better contrast-to-noise ratios in K-edge imaging when working at equivalent counting statistics, due to their better estimation of the attenuation coefficient of the contrast agent. Results are compared to simulated data in the case of the XPAD3/Si detector. Good agreement is observed when including charge sharing between pixels, which have a strong impact on contrast-to-noise ratios in K-edge images. (paper)

  20. K-edge imaging with the XPAD3 hybrid pixel detector, direct comparison of CdTe and Si sensors

    Cassol, F.; Portal, L.; Graber-Bolis, J.; Perez-Ponce, H.; Dupont, M.; Kronland, C.; Boursier, Y.; Blanc, N.; Bompard, F.; Boudet, N.; Buton, C.; Clémens, J. C.; Dawiec, A.; Debarbieux, F.; Delpierre, P.; Hustache, S.; Vigeolas, E.; Morel, C.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the improvement from the use of high-Z CdTe sensors for pre-clinical K-edge imaging with the hybrid pixel detectors XPAD3. We compare XPAD3 chips bump bonded to Si or CdTe sensors in identical experimental conditions. Image performance for narrow energy bin acquisitions and contrast-to-noise ratios of K-edge images are presented and compared. CdTe sensors achieve signal-to-noise ratios at least three times higher than Si sensors within narrow energy bins, thanks to their much higher detection efficiency. Nevertheless Si sensors provide better contrast-to-noise ratios in K-edge imaging when working at equivalent counting statistics, due to their better estimation of the attenuation coefficient of the contrast agent. Results are compared to simulated data in the case of the XPAD3/Si detector. Good agreement is observed when including charge sharing between pixels, which have a strong impact on contrast-to-noise ratios in K-edge images.

  1. 3D silicon sensors: Design, large area production and quality assurance for the ATLAS IBL pixel detector upgrade

    3D silicon sensors, where electrodes penetrate the silicon substrate fully or partially, have successfully been fabricated in different processing facilities in Europe and USA. The key to 3D fabrication is the use of plasma micro-machining to etch narrow deep vertical openings allowing dopants to be diffused in and form electrodes of pin junctions. Similar openings can be used at the sensor's edge to reduce the perimeter's dead volume to as low as ∼4 μm. Since 2009 four industrial partners of the 3D ATLAS R and D Collaboration started a joint effort aimed at one common design and compatible processing strategy for the production of 3D sensors for the LHC Upgrade and in particular for the ATLAS pixel Insertable B-Layer (IBL). In this project, aimed for installation in 2013, a new layer will be inserted as close as 3.4 cm from the proton beams inside the existing pixel layers of the ATLAS experiment. The detector proximity to the interaction point will therefore require new radiation hard technologies for both sensors and front end electronics. The latter, called FE-I4, is processed at IBM and is the biggest front end of this kind ever designed with a surface of ∼4 cm2. The performance of 3D devices from several wafers was evaluated before and after bump-bonding. Key design aspects, device fabrication plans and quality assurance tests during the 3D sensors prototyping phase are discussed in this paper.

  2. Detection systems for mass spectrometry imaging: a perspective on novel developments with a focus on active pixel detectors.

    Jungmann, Julia H; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-01-15

    Instrumental developments for imaging and individual particle detection for biomolecular mass spectrometry (imaging) and fundamental atomic and molecular physics studies are reviewed. Ion-counting detectors, array detection systems and high mass detectors for mass spectrometry (imaging) are treated. State-of-the-art detection systems for multi-dimensional ion, electron and photon detection are highlighted. Their application and performance in three different imaging modes--integrated, selected and spectral image detection--are described. Electro-optical and microchannel-plate-based systems are contrasted. The analytical capabilities of solid-state pixel detectors--both charge coupled device (CCD) and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) chips--are introduced. The Medipix/Timepix detector family is described as an example of a CMOS hybrid active pixel sensor. Alternative imaging methods for particle detection and their potential for future applications are investigated. PMID:23239313

  3. Weighted Local Active Pixel Pattern (WLAPP for Face Recognition in Parallel Computation Environment

    Gundavarapu Mallikarjuna Rao

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract  - The availability of multi-core technology resulted totally new computational era. Researchers are keen to explore available potential in state of art-machines for breaking the bearer imposed by serial computation. Face Recognition is one of the challenging applications on so ever computational environment. The main difficulty of traditional Face Recognition algorithms is lack of the scalability. In this paper Weighted Local Active Pixel Pattern (WLAPP, a new scalable Face Recognition Algorithm suitable for parallel environment is proposed.  Local Active Pixel Pattern (LAPP is found to be simple and computational inexpensive compare to Local Binary Patterns (LBP. WLAPP is developed based on concept of LAPP. The experimentation is performed on FG-Net Aging Database with deliberately introduced 20% distortion and the results are encouraging. Keywords — Active pixels, Face Recognition, Local Binary Pattern (LBP, Local Active Pixel Pattern (LAPP, Pattern computing, parallel workers, template, weight computation.  

  4. Modeling Inter-Pixel Crosstalk in Teledyne Imaging Sensors H4RG Detectors

    Dudik, R P; Dorland, B N; Veillette, D; Waczynski, A; Lane, B; Loose, M; Kan, E; Waterman, J; Pravdo, S

    2012-01-01

    CMOS-hybrid arrays have recently surfaced as competitive optical detectors for use in ground- and space-based astronomy. One source of error in these detectors that does not appear in more traditional CCD arrays is the inter-pixel capacitance component of crosstalk. In this paper we use a single pixel reset method to model inter-pixel capacitance (IPC). We combine this IPC model with a model for charge diffusion to estimate the total crosstalk on H4RG arrays. Finally, we compare our model results to Fe55 data obtained using an astrometric camera built to test the H4RG-B0 generation detectors.

  5. Improved AC pixel electrode circuit for active matrix of organic light-emitting display

    Si, Yujuan; Lang, Liuqi; Chen, Wanzhong; Liu, Shiyong

    2004-05-01

    In this paper, a modified four-transistor pixel circuit for active-matrix organic light-emitting displays (AMOLED) was developed to improve the performance of OLED device. This modified pixel circuit can provide an AC driving mode to make the OLED working in a reversed-biased voltage during the certain cycle. The optimized values of the reversed-biased voltage and the characteristics of the pixel circuit were investigated using AIM-SPICE. The simulated results reveal that this circuit can provide a suitable output current and voltage characteristic, and little change was made in luminance current.

  6. A Dynamic Range Expansion Technique for CMOS Image Sensors with Dual Charge Storage in a Pixel and Multiple Sampling

    Shinya Itoh

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic range expansion technique for CMOS image sensors with dual charge storage in a pixel and multiple sampling technique is presented. Each pixel contains a photodiode and a storage diode which is connected to the photodiode via a separation gate. The sensitivity of the signal charge in the storage diode can be controlled either by a separation gate which limits the charge to flow into the storage diode or by controlling the accumulation time in the storage diode. The operation of the sensitivity control with separation gate techniques is simulated and it is found that a blocking layer to the storage diode plays an important role for high controllability of sensitivity of the storage diode. A prototype chip for testing multiple short time accumulations is fabricated and measured.

  7. X-ray radiation damage studies and design of a silicon pixel sensor for science at the XFEL

    Zhang, Jiaguo

    2013-06-15

    Experiments at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) require silicon pixel sensors which can withstand X-ray doses up to 1 GGy. For the investigation of Xray radiation damage up to these high doses, MOS capacitors and gate-controlled diodes built on high resistivity n-doped silicon with crystal orientations left angle 100 right angle and left angle 111 right angle produced by four vendors, CiS, Hamamatsu, Canberra and Sintef have been irradiated with 12 keV X-rays at the DESY DORIS III synchrotron-light source. Using capacitance/ conductance-voltage, current-voltage and thermal dielectric relaxation current measurements, the densities of oxide charges and interface traps at the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface, and the surface-current densities have been determined as function of dose. Results indicate that the dose dependence of the oxide-charge density, the interface-trap density and the surface-current density depend on the crystal orientation and producer. In addition, the influence of the voltage applied to the gates of the MOS capacitor and the gate-controlled diode during X-ray irradiation on the oxide-charge density, the interface-trap density and the surface-current density has been investigated at doses of 100 kGy and 100 MGy. It is found that both strongly depend on the gate voltage if the electric field in the oxide points from the surface of the SiO{sub 2} to the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface. To verify the long-term stability of irradiated silicon sensors, annealing studies have been performed at 60 C and 80 C on MOS capacitors and gate-controlled diodes irradiated to 5 MGy as well, and the annealing kinetics of oxide charges and surface current were determined. Moreover, the macroscopic electrical properties of segmented sensors have slao been investigated as function of dose. It is found that the defects introduced by X-rays increase the full depletion voltage, the surface leakage current and the inter-electrode capacitance of the segmented sensor. An

  8. X-ray radiation damage studies and design of a silicon pixel sensor for science at the XFEL

    Experiments at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) require silicon pixel sensors which can withstand X-ray doses up to 1 GGy. For the investigation of Xray radiation damage up to these high doses, MOS capacitors and gate-controlled diodes built on high resistivity n-doped silicon with crystal orientations left angle 100 right angle and left angle 111 right angle produced by four vendors, CiS, Hamamatsu, Canberra and Sintef have been irradiated with 12 keV X-rays at the DESY DORIS III synchrotron-light source. Using capacitance/ conductance-voltage, current-voltage and thermal dielectric relaxation current measurements, the densities of oxide charges and interface traps at the Si-SiO2 interface, and the surface-current densities have been determined as function of dose. Results indicate that the dose dependence of the oxide-charge density, the interface-trap density and the surface-current density depend on the crystal orientation and producer. In addition, the influence of the voltage applied to the gates of the MOS capacitor and the gate-controlled diode during X-ray irradiation on the oxide-charge density, the interface-trap density and the surface-current density has been investigated at doses of 100 kGy and 100 MGy. It is found that both strongly depend on the gate voltage if the electric field in the oxide points from the surface of the SiO2 to the Si-SiO2 interface. To verify the long-term stability of irradiated silicon sensors, annealing studies have been performed at 60 C and 80 C on MOS capacitors and gate-controlled diodes irradiated to 5 MGy as well, and the annealing kinetics of oxide charges and surface current were determined. Moreover, the macroscopic electrical properties of segmented sensors have slao been investigated as function of dose. It is found that the defects introduced by X-rays increase the full depletion voltage, the surface leakage current and the inter-electrode capacitance of the segmented sensor. An electron

  9. Monolithic pixel detectors in a 0.13μm CMOS technology with sensor level continuous time charge amplification and shaping

    This work studies the feasibility of a new implementation of CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) for applications to charged particle tracking. As compared to standard three MOSFET MAPS, where the charge signal is readout by a source follower, the proposed front-end scheme relies upon a charge sensitive amplifier (CSA), embedded in the elementary pixel cell, to perform charge-to-voltage conversion. The area required for the integration of the front-end electronics is mostly provided by the collecting electrode, which consists of a deep n-type diffusion, available as a shielding frame for n-channel devices in deep submicron, triple well CMOS technologies. Based on the above concept, a chip, which includes several test structures differing in the sensitive element area, has been fabricated in a 0.13μm CMOS process. In this paper, the criteria underlying the design of the pixel level analog processor will be presented, together with some preliminary experimental results demonstrating the feasibility of the proposed approach

  10. Radiation effects in pinned photodiode CMOS image sensors: pixel performance degradation due to total ionizing dose

    Several Pinned Photodiode (PPD) CMOS Image Sensors (CIS) are designed, manufactured, characterized and exposed biased to ionizing radiation up to 10 kGy(SiO2). In addition to the usually reported dark current increase and quantum efficiency drop at short wavelengths, several original radiation effects are shown: an increase of the pinning voltage, a decrease of the buried photodiode full well capacity, a large change in charge transfer efficiency, the creation of a large number of Total Ionizing Dose (TID) induced Dark Current Random Telegraph Signal (DC-RTS) centers active in the photodiode (even when the Transfer Gate (TG) is accumulated) and the complete depletion of the Pre-Metal Dielectric (PMD) interface at the highest TID leading to a large dark current and the loss of control of the TG on the dark current. The proposed mechanisms at the origin of these degradations are discussed. It is also demonstrated that biasing (i.e., operating) the PPD CIS during irradiation does not enhance the degradations compared to sensors grounded during irradiation. (authors)

  11. Probing active-edge silicon sensors using a high precision telescope

    Akiba, K. [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Artuso, M. [Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY (United States); Beveren, V. van; Beuzekom, M. van; Boterenbrood, H. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Buytaert, J.; Collins, P.; Dumps, R. [CERN, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Heijden, B. van der [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hombach, C. [University of Manchester, Manchester, Lancashire (United Kingdom); Hynds, D. [Glasgow University, Glasgow, Lanarkshire (United Kingdom); Hsu, D. [Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY (United States); John, M. [University of Oxford, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Koffeman, E. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Leflat, A. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Li, Y. [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Longstaff, I.; Morton, A. [Glasgow University, Glasgow, Lanarkshire (United Kingdom); Pérez Trigo, E. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Plackett, R. [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-03-21

    The performance of prototype active-edge VTT sensors bump-bonded to the Timepix ASIC is presented. Non-irradiated sensors of thicknesses 100–200 μm and pixel-to-edge distances of 50 μm and 100 μm were probed with a beam of charged hadrons with sub-pixel precision using the Timepix telescope assembled at the SPS at CERN. The sensors are shown to be highly efficient up to a few micrometers from the physical edge of the sensor. The distortion of the electric field lines at the edge of the sensors is studied by reconstructing the streamlines of the electric field using two-pixel clusters. These results are supported by TCAD simulations. The reconstructed streamlines are used to study the field distortion as a function of the bias voltage and to apply corrections to the cluster positions at the edge.

  12. Probing active-edge silicon sensors using a high precision telescope

    Akiba, K.; Artuso, M.; van Beveren, V.; van Beuzekom, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Buytaert, J.; Collins, P.; Dumps, R.; van der Heijden, B.; Hombach, C.; Hynds, D.; Hsu, D.; John, M.; Koffeman, E.; Leflat, A.; Li, Y.; Longstaff, I.; Morton, A.; Pérez Trigo, E.; Plackett, R.; Reid, M. M.; Rodríguez Perez, P.; Schindler, H.; Tsopelas, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Wysokiński, M.

    2015-03-01

    The performance of prototype active-edge VTT sensors bump-bonded to the Timepix ASIC is presented. Non-irradiated sensors of thicknesses 100-200 μm and pixel-to-edge distances of 50 μm and 100 μm were probed with a beam of charged hadrons with sub-pixel precision using the Timepix telescope assembled at the SPS at CERN. The sensors are shown to be highly efficient up to a few micrometers from the physical edge of the sensor. The distortion of the electric field lines at the edge of the sensors is studied by reconstructing the streamlines of the electric field using two-pixel clusters. These results are supported by TCAD simulations. The reconstructed streamlines are used to study the field distortion as a function of the bias voltage and to apply corrections to the cluster positions at the edge.

  13. Probing active-edge silicon sensors using a high precision telescope

    The performance of prototype active-edge VTT sensors bump-bonded to the Timepix ASIC is presented. Non-irradiated sensors of thicknesses 100–200 μm and pixel-to-edge distances of 50 μm and 100 μm were probed with a beam of charged hadrons with sub-pixel precision using the Timepix telescope assembled at the SPS at CERN. The sensors are shown to be highly efficient up to a few micrometers from the physical edge of the sensor. The distortion of the electric field lines at the edge of the sensors is studied by reconstructing the streamlines of the electric field using two-pixel clusters. These results are supported by TCAD simulations. The reconstructed streamlines are used to study the field distortion as a function of the bias voltage and to apply corrections to the cluster positions at the edge

  14. An active pixels spectrometers for neutronic fields metrology

    The fundamental metrology is responsible for the sustainability of the measurement systems and handles to supply the reference standards. Concerning the metrology of ionizing radiations and, in particular the neutron metrology, detectors standards are used to characterize reference fields, in terms of energy and fluence. The dosimeters or particle detectors are calibrated on these reference fields. This thesis presents the development of a neutron spectrometer neutron candidate to the status of primary standard for the characterization of neutron fields in the range from 5 to 20 MeV. The spectrometer uses the recoil proton telescope as detection principle; the CMOS technology, through three sensor positions, is taking advantage to realize the tracking of protons. A Si(Li) detector handles the measure of the residual proton energy. The device simulations, realized under MCNPX, allow to estimate its performances and to validate the neutron energy reconstruction. An essential step of characterization of the telescope elements and in particular of CMOS sensors is also proposed to guarantee the validity of posterior experimental measurements. The tests realized as well in mono-energy fields as in radionuclide source show the very good performances of the system. The quantification of uncertainties indicates an energy estimation with 1.5 % accuracy and a resolution of less than 6 %. The fluence measurement is performed with an uncertainty about 4 to 6%. (author)

  15. ISIS2: Pixel Sensor with Local Charge Storage for ILC Vertex Detector

    Li, Yiming; Damerell, Chris; Gao, Rui; Gauld, Rhorry; John, Jaya John; Murray, Peter; Nomerotski, Andrei; Stefanov, Konstantin; Thomas, Steve; Wilding, Helena; Zhang, Zhige

    2010-01-01

    ISIS (In-situ Storage Imaging Sensor) is a novel CMOS sensor with multiple charge storage capability developed for the ILC vertex detector by the Linear Collider Flavour Identification (LCFI) collaboration. This paper reports test results for ISIS2, the second generation of ISIS sensors implemented in a 0.18 micron CMOS process. The local charge storage and charge transfer were unambiguously demonstrated.

  16. Sensor Activation and Radius Adaptation (SARA) in Heterogeneous Sensor Networks

    Bartolini, Novella; la Porta, Thomas; Petrioli, Chiara; Silvestri, Simone

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we address the problem of prolonging the lifetime of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) deployed to monitor an area of interest. In this scenario, a helpful approach is to reduce coverage redundancy and therefore the energy expenditure due to coverage. We introduce the first algorithm which reduces coverage redundancy by means of Sensor Activation and sensing Radius Adaptation (SARA)in a general applicative scenario with two classes of devices: sensors that can adapt their sensing range (adjustable sensors) and sensors that cannot (fixed sensors). In particular, SARA activates only a subset of all the available sensors and reduces the sensing range of the adjustable sensors that have been activated. In doing so, SARA also takes possible heterogeneous coverage capabilities of sensors belonging to the same class into account. It specifically addresses device heterogeneity by modeling the coverage problem in the Laguerre geometry through Voronoi-Laguerre diagrams. SARA executes quickly and is guarante...

  17. Efficiency enhancement in a backside illuminated 1.12 μm pixel CMOS image sensor via parabolic color filters.

    Lee, Jong-Kwon; Kim, Ahreum; Kang, Dong-Wan; Lee, Byung Yang

    2016-07-11

    The shrinkage of pixel size down to sub-2 μm in high-resolution CMOS image sensors (CISs) results in degraded efficiency and increased crosstalk. The backside illumination technology can increase the efficiency, but the crosstalk still remains an critical issue to improve the image quality of the CIS devices. In this paper, by adopting a parabolic color filter (P-CF), we demonstrate efficiency enhancement without any noticeable change in optical crosstalk of a backside illuminated 1.12 μm pixel CIS with deep-trench-isolation structure. To identify the observed results, we have investigated the effect of radius of curvature (r) of the P-CF on the efficiency and optical crosstalk of the CIS by performing an electromagnetic analysis. As the r of P-CF becomes equal to (or half) that of the microlens, the efficiencies of the B-, G-, and R-pixels increase by a factor of 14.1% (20.3%), 9.8% (15.3%), and 15.0% (15.7%) with respect to the flat CF cases without any noticeable crosstalk change. Also, as the incident angle increases up to 30°, the angular dependence of the efficiency and crosstalk significantly decreases by utilizing the P-CF in the CIS. Meanwhile, further reduction of r severely increases the optical crosstalk due to the increased diffraction effect, which has been confirmed with the simulated electric-field intensity distribution inside the devices. PMID:27410872

  18. Development of Edgeless Silicon Pixel Sensors on p-type substrate for the ATLAS High-Luminosity Upgrade

    Calderini, G; Bomben, M; Boscardin, M; Bosisio, L; Chauveau, J; Giacomini, G; La Rosa, A; Marchiori, G; Zorzi, N

    2014-01-01

    In view of the LHC upgrade for the high luminosity phase (HL-LHC), the ATLAS experiment is planning to replace the inner detector with an all-silicon system. The n-in-p bulk technology represents a valid solution for the modules of most of the layers, given the significant radiation hardness of this option and the reduced cost. The large area necessary to instrument the outer layers will demand to tile the sensors, a solution for which the inefficient region at the border of each sensor needs to be reduced to the minimum size. This paper reports on a joint R&D project by the ATLAS LPNHE Paris group and FBK Trento on a novel n-in-p edgeless planar pixel design, based on the deep-trench process available at FBK.

  19. Diamond Pixel Detectors

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D' Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Doroshenko, J.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foster, J.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Gobbi, B.; Grim, G.P.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Lander, R.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Lynne, L.M.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Pernicka, M.; Perera, L. E-mail: perera@physics.rutgers.edu; Pirollo, S.; Plano, R.; Procario, M.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Rott, C.; Rousseau, L.; Rudge, A.; Russ, J.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Vittone, E.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M

    2001-06-01

    Diamond based pixel detectors are a promising radiation-hard technology for use at the LHC. We present first results on a CMS diamond pixel sensor. With a threshold setting of 2000 electrons, an average pixel efficiency of 78% was obtained for normally incident minimum ionizing particles.

  20. Diamond pixel detectors

    Adam, W; Bergonzo, P; Bertuccio, G; Bognai, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; D'Angelo, P; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Deneuville, A; Doroshenko, J; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foster, J; Foulon, F; Friedl, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Gobbi, B; Grim, G P; Hallewell, G D; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Kass, R; Koeth, T W; Krammer, Manfred; Lander, R; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; MacLynne, L; Manfredotti, C; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Moroni, L; Oh, A; Pan, L S; Pernicka, Manfred; Perera, L P; Pirollo, S; Plano, R; Procario, M; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Rott, C; Rousseau, L; Rudge, A; Russ, J; Sala, S; Sampietro, M; Schnetzer, S; Sciortino, S; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Suter, B; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R; Trischuk, W; Tromson, D; Vittone, E; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; White, C; Zeuner, W; Zöller, M

    2001-01-01

    Diamond based pixel detectors are a promising radiation-hard technology for use at the LHC. We present first results on a CMS diamond pixel sensor. With a threshold setting of 2000 electrons, an average pixel efficiency of 78% was obtained for normally incident minimum ionizing particles. (3 refs).

  1. Diamond Pixel Detectors

    Diamond based pixel detectors are a promising radiation-hard technology for use at the LHC. We present first results on a CMS diamond pixel sensor. With a threshold setting of 2000 electrons, an average pixel efficiency of 78% was obtained for normally incident minimum ionizing particles

  2. The RD50 activity in the context of future pixel detector systems

    Casse, G.

    2015-05-01

    The CERN/RD50 collaboration is dedicated to the radiation hardening of semiconductor sensors for future super-collider needs. The findings of this collaboration are therefore especially relevant to the pixel devices for the LHC experiment upgrades. A considerable amount of results on the enhancement of the radiation tolerance of silicon sensors has been found within RD50. The research towards radiation hardening has highlighted, and increased the knowledge on properties of sensors that are relevant to other applications. For example radiation hardening relies on the speed of signal collection in irradiated devices. As a consequence, the methods envisaged for increasing this collection speed turn out to be promising for significantly improving the performance of time resolved, high spatial resolution systems. A new type of device processing strongly emerging for production of future pixel sensor systems is the HV-CMOS technology. The RD50 research methodology provides the tools for characterising the behaviour of the deep collecting electrode (deep n-well) for this type of device after irradiation and the optimal framework for comparing the performance of the new devices with the current state of the art.

  3. The RD50 activity in the context of future pixel detector systems

    The CERN/RD50 collaboration is dedicated to the radiation hardening of semiconductor sensors for future super-collider needs. The findings of this collaboration are therefore especially relevant to the pixel devices for the LHC experiment upgrades. A considerable amount of results on the enhancement of the radiation tolerance of silicon sensors has been found within RD50. The research towards radiation hardening has highlighted, and increased the knowledge on properties of sensors that are relevant to other applications. For example radiation hardening relies on the speed of signal collection in irradiated devices. As a consequence, the methods envisaged for increasing this collection speed turn out to be promising for significantly improving the performance of time resolved, high spatial resolution systems. A new type of device processing strongly emerging for production of future pixel sensor systems is the HV-CMOS technology. The RD50 research methodology provides the tools for characterising the behaviour of the deep collecting electrode (deep n-well) for this type of device after irradiation and the optimal framework for comparing the performance of the new devices with the current state of the art

  4. 3D Particle Track Reconstrution in a Single Layer Cadmium-Telluride Hybrid Active Pixel Detector

    Filipenko, Mykhaylo; Anton, Gisela; Michel, Thilo

    2014-01-01

    In the past 20 years the search for neutrinoless double beta decay has driven many developements in all kind of detector technology. A new branch in this field are highly-pixelated semiconductor detectors - such as the CdTe-Timepix detectors. It compromises a cadmium-telluride sensor of 14 mm x 14 mm x 1 mm size with an ASIC which has 256 x 256 pixel of 55 \\textmu m pixel pitch and can be used to obtain either spectroscopic or timing information in every pixel. In regular operation it can provide a 2D projection of particle trajectories; however, three dimensional trajectories are desirable for neutrinoless double beta decay and other applications. In this paper we present a method to obtain such trajectories. The method was developed and tested with simulations that assume some minor modifications to the Timepix ASIC. Also, we were able to test the method experimentally and in the best case achieved a position resolution of about 90 \\textmu m with electrons of 4.4 GeV.

  5. Evaluation of novel KEK/HPK n-in-p pixel sensors for ATLAS upgrade with testbeam

    A new type of n-in-p planar pixel sensors have been developed at KEK/HPK in order to cope with the maximum particle fluence of 1–3×1016 1 MeV equivalent neutrons per square centimeter (neq/cm2) in the upcoming LHC upgrades. Four n-in-p devices were connected by bump-bonding to the new ATLAS Pixel front-end chip (FE-I4A) and characterized before and after the irradiation to 2×1015neq/cm2. These planar sensors are 150μm thick, using biasing structures made out of polysilicon or punch-through dot and isolation structures of common or individual p-stop. Results of measurements with radioactive 90Sr source and with a 120 GeV/c momentum pion beam at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) are presented. The common p-stop isolation structure shows a better performance than the individual p-stop design, after the irradiation. The flat distribution of the collected charge in the depth direction after the irradiation implies that the effect of charge trapping is small, at the fluence, with the bias voltage well above the full depletion voltage.

  6. SOI monolithic pixel detector

    Miyoshi, T.; Ahmed, M. I.; Arai, Y.; Fujita, Y.; Ikemoto, Y.; Takeda, A.; Tauchi, K.

    2014-05-01

    We are developing monolithic pixel detector using fully-depleted (FD) silicon-on-insulator (SOI) pixel process technology. The SOI substrate is high resistivity silicon with p-n junctions and another layer is a low resistivity silicon for SOI-CMOS circuitry. Tungsten vias are used for the connection between two silicons. Since flip-chip bump bonding process is not used, high sensor gain in a small pixel area can be obtained. In 2010 and 2011, high-resolution integration-type SOI pixel sensors, DIPIX and INTPIX5, have been developed. The characterizations by evaluating pixel-to-pixel crosstalk, quantum efficiency (QE), dark noise, and energy resolution were done. A phase-contrast imaging was demonstrated using the INTPIX5 pixel sensor for an X-ray application. The current issues and future prospect are also discussed.

  7. A high dynamic range digital LinLog CMOS image sensor architecture based on Event Readout of pixels and suitable for low voltage operation

    Guilvard, Alexandre; Magnan, Pierre; Segura, Josep; Martin-Gonthier, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Several approaches have been developed to extend the dynamic range of image sensor in order to keep all the information content of natural scenes covering a very broad range of illumination. Digital CMOS image sensor are especially well suited to wide dynamic range imaging by implementing dual sampling, multiple exposure methods using either column or in pixel ADC, or Address Event Representation. A new architecture of digital high dynamic range CMOS image sensor, suitable for low voltage ope...

  8. Active pixels of transverse field detector based on a charge preamplifier

    Langfelder, G.; Buffa, C.; Longoni, A. F.; Pelamatti, A.; Zaraga, F.

    2012-01-01

    The Transverse Field Detector (TFD), a filter-less and tunable color sensitive pixel, is based on the generation of specific electric field configurations within a depleted Silicon volume. Each field configuration determines a set of three or more spectral responses that can be used for direct color acquisition at each pixel position. In order to avoid unpredictable changes of the electric field configuration during the single image capture, a specific active pixel (AP) has been designed. In this AP the dark- and photo-generated charge is not integrated directly on the junction capacitance, but, for each color, it is integrated on the feedback capacitance of a single-transistor charge pre-amplifier. The AP further includes a bias transistor, a reset transistor and a follower. In this work the design of such a pixel is discussed and the experimental results obtained on a 2x2 matrix of these active pixels are analyzed in terms of spectral response, linearity, noise, dynamic range and repeatability.

  9. Integration of an amorphous silicon passive pixel sensor array with a lateral amorphous selenium detector for large area indirect conversion x-ray imaging applications

    Wang, Kai; Yazdandoost, Mohammad Y.; Keshavarzi, Rasoul; Shin, Kyung-Wook; Hristovski, Christos; Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Chen, Feng; Majid, Shaikh Hasibul; Karim, Karim S.

    2011-03-01

    Previously, we reported on a single-pixel detector based on a lateral a-Se metal-semiconductor-metal structure, intended for indirect conversion X-ray imaging. This work is the continuous effort leading to the first prototype of an indirect conversion X-ray imaging sensor array utilizing lateral amorphous selenium. To replace a structurally-sophisticated vertical multilayer amorphous silicon photodiode, a lateral a-Se MSM photodetector is employed which can be easily integrated with an amorphous silicon thin film transistor passive pixel sensor array. In this work, both 2×2 macro-pixel and 32×32 micro-pixel arrays were fabricated and tested along with discussion of the results.

  10. The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector System (SPD)

    Kluge, A; Antinori, Federico; Burns, M; Cali, I A; Campbell, M; Caselle, M; Ceresa, S; Dima, R; Elias, D; Fabris, D; Krivda, Marian; Librizzi, F; Manzari, Vito; Morel, M; Moretto, Sandra; Osmic, F; Pappalardo, G S; Pepato, Adriano; Pulvirenti, A; Riedler, P; Riggi, F; Santoro, R; Stefanini, G; Torcato De Matos, C; Turrisi, R; Tydesjo, H; Viesti, G; PH-EP

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE silicon pixel detector (SPD) comprises the two innermost layers of the ALICE inner tracker system. The SPD includes 120 detector modules (half-staves) each consisting of 10 ALICE pixel chips bump bonded to two silicon sensors and one multi-chip read-out module. Each pixel chip contains 8192 active cells, so that the total number of pixel cells in the SPD is ≈ 107. The on-detector read-out is based on a multi-chip-module containing 4 ASICs and an optical transceiver module. The constraints on material budget and detector module dimensions are very demanding.

  11. Développement d'un capteur de pixels CMOS pour les couches externes du détecteur de vertex ILC

    Zhang, Liang

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the design of a CMOS pixel sensor prototype (called MIMOSA 31) for the outer layers of the International Linear Collider (ILC) vertex detector. CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) also called monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) have demonstrated attractive performance towards the requirements of the vertex detector of the future linear collider. MIMOSA 31developed at IPHC-Strasbourg is the first pixel sensor integrated with 4-bit column-level ADC for the outer layers. It is compo...

  12. Active spectral sensor evaluation under varying conditions

    Plant stress has been estimated by spectral signature using both passive and active sensors. As optical sensors measure reflected light from a target, changes in illumination characteristics critically affect sensor response. Active sensors are of benefit in minimizing uncontrolled illumination effe...

  13. Small-Scale Readout Systems Prototype for the STAR PIXEL Detector

    Szelezniak, Michal A.

    2008-01-01

    A prototype readout system for the STAR PIXEL detector in the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) vertex detector upgrade is presented. The PIXEL detector is a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) based silicon pixel vertex detector fabricated in a commercial CMOS process that integrates the detector and front-end electronics layers in one silicon die. Two generations of MAPS prototypes designed specifically for the PIXEL are discussed. We have constructed a prototype telescope system consisting of t...

  14. Pixel-by-pixel analysis of DCE-MRI curve shape patterns in knees of active and inactive juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    Hemke, Robert; Lavini, Cristina; Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nusman, Charlotte M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berg, J.M. van den; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Kuijpers, Taco W. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam (Netherlands); St. Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-07-15

    To compare DCE-MRI parameters and the relative number of time-intensity curve (TIC) shapes as derived from pixel-by-pixel DCE-MRI TIC shape analysis between knees of clinically active and inactive juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. DCE-MRI data sets were prospectively obtained. Patients were classified into two clinical groups: active disease (n = 43) and inactive disease (n = 34). Parametric maps, showing seven different TIC shape types, were created per slice. Statistical measures of different TIC shapes, maximal enhancement (ME), maximal initial slope (MIS), initial area under the curve (iAUC), time-to-peak (TTP), enhancing volume (EV), volume transfer constant (K {sup trans}), extravascular space fractional volume (V{sub e}) and reverse volume transfer constant (k{sub ep}) of each voxel were calculated in a three-dimensional volume-of-interest of the synovial membrane. Imaging findings from 77 JIA patients were analysed. Significantly higher numbers of TIC shape 4 (P = 0.008), median ME (P = 0.015), MIS (P = 0.001) and iAUC (P = 0.002) were observed in clinically active compared with inactive patients. TIC shape 5 showed higher presence in the clinically inactive patients (P = 0.036). The pixel-by-pixel DCE-MRI TIC shape analysis method proved capable of differentiating clinically active from inactive JIA patients by the difference in the number of TIC shapes, as well as the descriptive parameters ME, MIS and iAUC. (orig.)

  15. Pixel-by-pixel analysis of DCE-MRI curve shape patterns in knees of active and inactive juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    To compare DCE-MRI parameters and the relative number of time-intensity curve (TIC) shapes as derived from pixel-by-pixel DCE-MRI TIC shape analysis between knees of clinically active and inactive juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. DCE-MRI data sets were prospectively obtained. Patients were classified into two clinical groups: active disease (n = 43) and inactive disease (n = 34). Parametric maps, showing seven different TIC shape types, were created per slice. Statistical measures of different TIC shapes, maximal enhancement (ME), maximal initial slope (MIS), initial area under the curve (iAUC), time-to-peak (TTP), enhancing volume (EV), volume transfer constant (K trans), extravascular space fractional volume (Ve) and reverse volume transfer constant (kep) of each voxel were calculated in a three-dimensional volume-of-interest of the synovial membrane. Imaging findings from 77 JIA patients were analysed. Significantly higher numbers of TIC shape 4 (P = 0.008), median ME (P = 0.015), MIS (P = 0.001) and iAUC (P = 0.002) were observed in clinically active compared with inactive patients. TIC shape 5 showed higher presence in the clinically inactive patients (P = 0.036). The pixel-by-pixel DCE-MRI TIC shape analysis method proved capable of differentiating clinically active from inactive JIA patients by the difference in the number of TIC shapes, as well as the descriptive parameters ME, MIS and iAUC. (orig.)

  16. Beam test results of 3D silicon pixel sensors for future upgrades

    Nellist, C.; Gligorova, A.; Huse, T.; Pacifico, N.; Sandaker, H.

    2013-12-01

    3D silicon has undergone an intensive beam test programme which has resulted in the successful qualification for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) upgrade project to be installed in 2013-2014. This paper presents selected results from this study with a focus on the final IBL test beam of 2012 where IBL prototype sensors were investigated. 3D devices were studied with 4 GeV positrons at DESY and 120 GeV pions at the SPS at CERN. Measurements include tracking efficiency, charge sharing, time over threshold and cluster size distributions as a function of incident angle for IBL 3D design sensors. Studies of 3D silicon sensors in an anti-proton beam test for the AEgIS experiment are also presented.

  17. High-resolution X-ray imaging based on pixel-structured CsI:Tl scintillating screens for indirect X-ray image sensors

    We introduce the development of pixel-structured screens with a thallium-doped CsI (CsI:Tl) scintillator for indirect digital X-ray imaging sensors. The indirect-conversion detection method based on the pixel-structured CsI:Tl scintillator provides high spatial resolution X-ray imaging without sacrificing the light spread in thick scintillation layers. The scintillation screens were fabricated by using a vacuum deposition process and filling the CsI:Tl scintillating powders into a two-dimensional pixel-structured silicon array. Pixel structures with 100 μm and 50 μm pixel sizes with wall widths of 20 μm and 200 μm thickness were prepared and the fabricated CsI:Tl scintillating powders were filled into the trench of the pixel structure through a vacuum process. The final scintillation screens with 2.5 cm x 2.5 cm size were prepared and directly coupled to a CCD image sensor with an optical lens for performance evaluation of X-ray imaging. The imaging performance of the samples was investigated in terms of the relative light intensity, the X-ray linearity and the spatial resolution under practical X-ray exposure conditions. These preliminary results imply that pixel-structured CsI:Tl scintillating screens show high spatial resolution by less lateral spread of the emitted visible photons within pixel-structured silicon arrays. However, these X-ray detectors still require improved X-ray sensitivity by coating the reflective layer onto an inner silicon wall surface and filling the scintillating power into pixel structures completely.

  18. Performance of the reconstruction algorithms of the FIRST experiment pixel sensors vertex detector

    Rescigno, R; Juliani, D; Spiriti, E; Baudot, J; Abou-Haidar, Z; Agodi, C; Alvarez, M A G; Aumann, T; Battistoni, G; Bocci, A; Böhlen, T T; Boudard, A; Brunetti, A; Carpinelli, M; Cirrone, G A P; Cortes-Giraldo, M A; Cuttone, G; De Napoli, M; Durante, M; Gallardo, M I; Golosio, B; Iarocci, E; Iazzi, F; Ickert, G; Introzzi, R; Krimmer, J; Kurz, N; Labalme, M; Leifels, Y; Le Fevre, A; Leray, S; Marchetto, F; Monaco, V; Morone, M C; Oliva, P; Paoloni, A; Patera, V; Piersanti, L; Pleskac, R; Quesada, J M; Randazzo, N; Romano, F; Rossi, D; Rousseau, M; Sacchi, R; Sala, P; Sarti, A; Scheidenberger, C; Schuy, C; Sciubba, A; Sfienti, C; Simon, H; Sipala, V; Tropea, S; Vanstalle, M; Younis, H

    2014-01-01

    Hadrontherapy treatments use charged particles (e.g. protons and carbon ions) to treat tumors. During a therapeutic treatment with carbon ions, the beam undergoes nuclear fragmentation processes giving rise to significant yields of secondary charged particles. An accurate prediction of these production rates is necessary to estimate precisely the dose deposited into the tumours and the surrounding healthy tissues. Nowadays, a limited set of double differential carbon fragmentation cross-section is available. Experimental data are necessary to benchmark Monte Carlo simulations for their use in hadrontherapy. The purpose of the FIRST experiment is to study nuclear fragmentation processes of ions with kinetic energy in the range from 100 to 1000 MeV/u. Tracks are reconstructed using information from a pixel silicon detector based on the CMOS technology. The performances achieved using this device for hadrontherapy purpose are discussed. For each reconstruction step (clustering, tracking and vertexing), different...

  19. Evaluation of test structures for the novel n+-in-p pixel and strip sensors for very high radiation environments

    Radiation-tolerant n+-in-p silicon sensors were developed for use in very high radiation environments. Novel n+-in-p silicon strip and pixel sensors and test structures were fabricated, tested and evaluated, in order to understand the designs implemented. The resistance between the n+ implants (interstrip resistance), the electric potential of the p-stop, and the punch-through-protection (PTP) onset voltage were measured before and as a function of fluence after irradiation. The technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulations were used to understand the radiation damage and fluence dependence of the structures. The decrease in the interstrip resistance is a consequence of increased leakage current. The decrease in the electric potential of the p-stop results from a build-up of positive charge in the silicon–silicon oxide interface. The decrease and subsequent increase in the PTP onset voltages results from the interface charge build-up and an increase in acceptor states

  20. X-ray Performance of Back-Side Illuminated Type of Kyoto's X-ray Astronomical SOI Pixel Sensor, XRPIX

    Itou, Makoto; Tanaka, Takaaki; Takeda, Ayaki; Matsumura, Hideaki; Ohmura, Shunichi; Nakashima, Shinya; Arai, Yasuo; Mori, Koji; Takenaka, Ryota; Nishioka, Yusuke; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Tamasawa, Koki; Tindall, Craig

    2016-01-01

    We have been developing X-ray SOI pixel Sensors, called "XRPIX", for future X-ray astronomy satellites that enable us to observe in the wide energy band of 0.5-40 keV. Since XRPIXs have the circuitry layer with a thickness of about 8 {\\mu}m in the front side of the sensor, it is impossible to detect low energy X-rays with a front-illuminated type. So, we have been developing back-illuminated type of XRPIX with a less 1 {\\mu}m dead layer in the back-side, which enables the sensitivity to reach 0.5 keV. We produced two types of back-side illuminated (BI) XRPIXs, one of which is produced in "Pizza process" which LBNL developed and the other is processed in the ion implantation and laser annealing. We irradiated both of the BI-XRPIXs with soft X-ray and investigate soft X-ray performance of them. We report results from soft X-ray evaluation test of the device.

  1. Performance of the reconstruction algorithms of the FIRST experiment pixel sensors vertex detector

    Rescigno, R., E-mail: regina.rescigno@iphc.cnrs.fr [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, 23 rue du Loess, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Finck, Ch.; Juliani, D. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, 23 rue du Loess, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Spiriti, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Roma 3 (Italy); Baudot, J. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, 23 rue du Loess, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Abou-Haidar, Z. [CNA, Sevilla (Spain); Agodi, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (Italy); Alvarez, M.A.G. [CNA, Sevilla (Spain); Aumann, T. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Battistoni, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Milano (Italy); Bocci, A. [CNA, Sevilla (Spain); Böhlen, T.T. [European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Boudard, A. [CEA-Saclay, IRFU/SPhN, Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Brunetti, A.; Carpinelli, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Cagliari (Italy); Università di Sassari (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (Italy); Cortes-Giraldo, M.A. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, University of Sevilla, 41080-Sevilla (Spain); Cuttone, G.; De Napoli, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (Italy); Durante, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2014-12-11

    Hadrontherapy treatments use charged particles (e.g. protons and carbon ions) to treat tumors. During a therapeutic treatment with carbon ions, the beam undergoes nuclear fragmentation processes giving rise to significant yields of secondary charged particles. An accurate prediction of these production rates is necessary to estimate precisely the dose deposited into the tumours and the surrounding healthy tissues. Nowadays, a limited set of double differential carbon fragmentation cross-section is available. Experimental data are necessary to benchmark Monte Carlo simulations for their use in hadrontherapy. The purpose of the FIRST experiment is to study nuclear fragmentation processes of ions with kinetic energy in the range from 100 to 1000 MeV/u. Tracks are reconstructed using information from a pixel silicon detector based on the CMOS technology. The performances achieved using this device for hadrontherapy purpose are discussed. For each reconstruction step (clustering, tracking and vertexing), different methods are implemented. The algorithm performances and the accuracy on reconstructed observables are evaluated on the basis of simulated and experimental data.

  2. Optimized sampling strategy of Wireless sensor network for validation of remote sensing products over heterogeneous coarse-resolution pixel

    Peng, J.; Liu, Q.; Wen, J.; Fan, W.; Dou, B.

    2015-12-01

    Coarse-resolution satellite albedo products are increasingly applied in geographical researches because of their capability to characterize the spatio-temporal patterns of land surface parameters. In the long-term validation of coarse-resolution satellite products with ground measurements, the scale effect, i.e., the mismatch between point measurement and pixel observation becomes the main challenge, particularly over heterogeneous land surfaces. Recent advances in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) technologies offer an opportunity for validation using multi-point observations instead of single-point observation. The difficulty is to ensure the representativeness of the WSN in heterogeneous areas with limited nodes. In this study, the objective is to develop a ground-based spatial sampling strategy through consideration of the historical prior knowledge and avoidance of the information redundancy between different sensor nodes. Taking albedo as an example. First, we derive monthly local maps of albedo from 30-m HJ CCD images a 3-year period. Second, we pick out candidate points from the areas with higher temporal stability which helps to avoid the transition or boundary areas. Then, the representativeness (r) of each candidate point is evaluated through the correlational analysis between the point-specific and area-average time sequence albedo vector. The point with the highest r was noted as the new sensor point. Before electing a new point, the vector component of the selected points should be taken out from the vectors in the following correlational analysis. The selection procedure would be ceased once if the integral representativeness (R) meets the accuracy requirement. Here, the sampling method is adapted to both single-parameter and multi-parameter situations. Finally, it is shown that this sampling method has been effectively worked in the optimized layout of Huailai remote sensing station in China. The coarse resolution pixel covering this station could be

  3. Alpine Pixel Detector Layout

    Delebecque, P; The ATLAS collaboration; Geffroy, N; Massol, N; Rambure, T; Todorov, T

    2013-01-01

    A description of an optimized layout of pixel sensors based on a stave that combines both barrel and endcap module orientations. The mechanical stiffness of the structure is provided by carbon fiber shells spaced by carbon foam. The cooling of the modules is provided by two-phase $CO_{2}$ flowing in a thin titanium pipe glued inside the carbon fiber foam. The electrical services of all modules are provided by a single stave flex. This layout eliminates the need for separate barrel and endcap detector structures, and therefore the barrel services material in front of the endcap. The transition from barrel to endcap module orientation is optimized separately for each layer in order to minimize the active pixel area and the traversed material. The sparse module spacing in the endcap part of the stave allows for multiple fixation points, and for a stiff overall structure composed only of staves interconnected by stiff disks.

  4. Active Targets For Capacitive Proximity Sensors

    Jenstrom, Del T.; Mcconnell, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    Lightweight, low-power active targets devised for use with improved capacitive proximity sensors described in "Capacitive Proximity Sensor Has Longer Range" (GSC-13377), and "Capacitive Proximity Sensors With Additional Driven Shields" (GSC-13475). Active targets are short-distance electrostatic beacons; they generate known alternating electro-static fields used for alignment and/or to measure distances.

  5. System for Digital 1D-Image Processing with 1024 Pixel CCD Sensor

    J. Misun; M. Chrenek; Sevcik, P; P. Kulla

    1993-01-01

    The conception of system for digital 1D-images processing with digital CCD camera is presented. The system is created from these three basic parts: the digital CCD camera with linear image sensor CCD L133C, 8-bit interface and a personal computer. The scanning digital CCD camera generated a video signals, which are processed in the analog signal processor. The output signal is continually converted to 8-bit data words in A/D converter. This data words maybe transfer over a bus driver to the o...

  6. Monolithic CMOS Pixel R&D for the ILC at LBNL

    M. Battaglia; Abrams, G.; Denes, P.; Greiner, L. C.; Hooberman., B; Tompkins, L.; Wieman, H. H.

    2005-01-01

    An R&D program on monolithic CMOS pixel sensors for application at the ILC has been started at LBNL. This program profits of significant synergies with other R&D activities on CMOS pixel sensors. The project activities after the first semester of the R&D program are reviewed.

  7. Pixel and Column Fixed Pattern Noise Suppression Mechanism in CMOS Image Sensor

    XU Jiangtao; YAO Suying; LI Binqiao

    2006-01-01

    A double sampling circuit to eliminating fixed pattern noise(FPN) in CMOS image sensor (CIS) is presented.Double sampling is implemented by column switch capacitor amplifier directly.and offset compensation is added to the amplifier to suppress column FPN.The amplifier is embedded in a 64 × 64 CIS and successfully fabricated with chartered 0.35 μm process.Theory analysis and circuit simulation indicate that FPN can be suppressed from millivolt to microvolt.Test results show that FPN is smaller than one least-significant bit of 8 bit ADC.FPN is reduced to an acceptable level with double sampling technique implemented with switch capacitor amplifier.

  8. System for Digital 1D-Image Processing with 1024 Pixel CCD Sensor

    J. Misun

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available The conception of system for digital 1D-images processing with digital CCD camera is presented. The system is created from these three basic parts: the digital CCD camera with linear image sensor CCD L133C, 8-bit interface and a personal computer. The scanning digital CCD camera generated a video signals, which are processed in the analog signal processor. The output signal is continually converted to 8-bit data words in A/D converter. This data words maybe transfer over a bus driver to the operation memory of personal computer, by setting one of the three work regimes of digital CCD camera. Some application possibilities and basic technical parameters of this system are given.

  9. Pixel pitch and particle energy influence on the dark current distribution of neutron irradiated CMOS image sensors.

    Belloir, Jean-Marc; Goiffon, Vincent; Virmontois, Cédric; Raine, Mélanie; Paillet, Philippe; Duhamel, Olivier; Gaillardin, Marc; Molina, Romain; Magnan, Pierre; Gilard, Olivier

    2016-02-22

    The dark current produced by neutron irradiation in CMOS Image Sensors (CIS) is investigated. Several CIS with different photodiode types and pixel pitches are irradiated with various neutron energies and fluences to study the influence of each of these optical detector and irradiation parameters on the dark current distribution. An empirical model is tested on the experimental data and validated on all the irradiated optical imagers. This model is able to describe all the presented dark current distributions with no parameter variation for neutron energies of 14 MeV or higher, regardless of the optical detector and irradiation characteristics. For energies below 1 MeV, it is shown that a single parameter has to be adjusted because of the lower mean damage energy per nuclear interaction. This model and these conclusions can be transposed to any silicon based solid-state optical imagers such as CIS or Charged Coupled Devices (CCD). This work can also be used when designing an optical imager instrument, to anticipate the dark current increase or to choose a mitigation technique. PMID:26907077

  10. Low-Voltage 96 dB Snapshot CMOS Image Sensor with 4.5 nW Power Dissipation per Pixel

    Orly Yadid-Pecht

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern “smart” CMOS sensors have penetrated into various applications, such as surveillance systems, bio-medical applications, digital cameras, cellular phones and many others. Reducing the power of these sensors continuously challenges designers. In this paper, a low power global shutter CMOS image sensor with Wide Dynamic Range (WDR ability is presented. This sensor features several power reduction techniques, including a dual voltage supply, a selective power down, transistors with different threshold voltages, a non-rationed logic, and a low voltage static memory. A combination of all these approaches has enabled the design of the low voltage “smart” image sensor, which is capable of reaching a remarkable dynamic range, while consuming very low power. The proposed power-saving solutions have allowed the maintenance of the standard architecture of the sensor, reducing both the time and the cost of the design. In order to maintain the image quality, a relation between the sensor performance and power has been analyzed and a mathematical model, describing the sensor Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR and Dynamic Range (DR as a function of the power supplies, is proposed. The described sensor was implemented in a 0.18 um CMOS process and successfully tested in the laboratory. An SNR of 48 dB and DR of 96 dB were achieved with a power dissipation of 4.5 nW per pixel.

  11. PIXEL 2010 - a Resume

    Wermes, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    The Pixel 2010 conference focused on semiconductor pixel detectors for particle tracking/vertexing as well as for imaging, in particular for synchrotron light sources and XFELs. The big LHC hybrid pixel detectors have impressively started showing their capabilities. X-ray imaging detectors, also using the hybrid pixel technology, have greatly advanced the experimental possibilities for diiffraction experiments. Monolithic or semi-monolithic devices like CMOS active pixels and DEPFET pixels have now reached a state such that complete vertex detectors for RHIC and superKEKB are being built with these technologies. Finally, new advances towards fully monolithic active pixel detectors, featuring full CMOS electronics merged with efficient signal charge collection, exploiting standard CMOS technologies, SOI and/or 3D integration, show the path for the future. This r\\'esum\\'e attempts to extract the main statements of the results and developments presented at this conference.

  12. PIXEL 2010 - A Resume

    The Pixel 2010 conference focused on semiconductor pixel detectors for particle tracking/vertexing as well as for imaging, in particular for synchrotron light sources and XFELs. The big LHC hybrid pixel detectors have impressively started showing their capabilities. X-ray imaging detectors, also using the hybrid pixel technology, have greatly advanced the experimental possibilities for diffraction experiments. Monolithic or semi-monolithic devices like CMOS active pixels and DEPFET pixels have now reached a state such that complete vertex detectors for RHIC and superKEKB are being built with these technologies. Finally, new advances towards fully monolithic active pixel detectors, featuring full CMOS electronics merged with efficient signal charge collection, exploiting standard CMOS technologies, SOI and/or 3D integration, show the path for the future. This resume attempts to extract the main statements of the results and developments presented at this conference.

  13. Active sensor planning for multiview vision tasks

    Chen, Shengyong; Zhang, Jianwei; Wang, Wanliang

    2008-01-01

    An active robot system can change its visual parameters in an intentional manner and perform its sensing actions purposefully. A general vision task thus can be performed in an efficient way by means of strategic control of the perception process. The controllable processes include 3D active sensing, sensor configuration and recalibration, automatic sensor placement, and 3D sensing. This book explores these important issues in studying for active visual perception.Vision sensors have limited fields of views and can only ""see"" a portion of a scene from a single viewpoint. To make the entire o

  14. Qualitative and quantitative measurement of human brain activity using pixel subtraction algorithm

    To develop an automated quantification program, which is called FALBA (Functional and Anatomical Labeling of Brain Activation), and to provide information on the brain centers, brain activity (%) and hemispheric lateralization index on the basis of a brain activation map obtained from functional MR imaging. The 3-dimensional activation MR images were processed by a statistical parametric mapping program (SPM99, The Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, University College London, UK) and MRIcro software (www.micro.com). The 3-dimensional images were first converted into 2-dimensional sectional images, and then overlapped with the corresponding T1-weighted images. Then, the image dataset was extended to -59 mm to 83 mm with a 2 mm slice-gap, giving 73 axial images. By using a pixeI subtraction method, the differences in the R, G, B values between the T1-weighted images and the activation images were extracted, in order to produce black and white (B/W) differentiation images, in which each pixel is represented by 24-bit R, G, B true colors. Subsequently, another pixel differentiation method was applied to two template images, namely one functional and one anatomical index image, in order to generate functional and anatomical differentiation images containing regional brain activation information based on the Brodmann's and anatomical areas, respectively. In addition, the regional brain lateralization indices were automatically determined, in order to evaluate the hemispheric predominance, with the positive (+) and negative (-) indices showing left and right predominance, respectively. The manual counting method currently used is time consuming and has limited accuracy and reliability in the case of the activated cerebrocortical regions. The FALBA program we developed was 240 times faster than the manual counting method: -10 hours for manual accounting and -2.5 minutes for the FALBA program using a Pentium IV processor. Compared with the FALBA program, the manual

  15. Semiconductor sensors for the CALICE SiW EMC and study of the cross-talk between guard rings and pixels in the CALICE SiW prototype

    The CALICE collaboration is studying high granularity and compact calorimeters for the future International Linear Collider. The electromagnetic calorimeter is made up of tungsten as absorber and silicon detectors implementing PIN diodes arrays. Calibration tests of a first prototype are describe first. Data taken in test beam environment have shown an unexpected behavior of the sensors found to be related to a crosstalk. This crosstalk is suspected to generate the so called 'square events' seen in the test beam data where all bordering pixels of the sensor are illuminated. An analytic model is proposed to describe the crosstalk couplings within the sensors. Analytic results are compared with electrical simulation with the aim to understand forthcoming measurements on real hardware. A new design of guard rings is then discussed according to its impact on square events.

  16. Semiconductor sensors for the CALICE SiW EMC and study of the cross-talk between guard rings and pixels in the CALICE SiW prototype

    Cornat, Remi, E-mail: remi.cornat@in2p3.f [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet CNRS/IN2P3-Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France)

    2009-04-01

    The CALICE collaboration is studying high granularity and compact calorimeters for the future International Linear Collider. The electromagnetic calorimeter is made up of tungsten as absorber and silicon detectors implementing PIN diodes arrays. Calibration tests of a first prototype are describe first. Data taken in test beam environment have shown an unexpected behavior of the sensors found to be related to a crosstalk. This crosstalk is suspected to generate the so called 'square events' seen in the test beam data where all bordering pixels of the sensor are illuminated. An analytic model is proposed to describe the crosstalk couplings within the sensors. Analytic results are compared with electrical simulation with the aim to understand forthcoming measurements on real hardware. A new design of guard rings is then discussed according to its impact on square events.

  17. Simulation of monolithic active pixels in deep sub-micron technologies

    The use of monolithic active pixels (MAPS) has quickly spread in a number of scientific fields ranging from imaging to high-energy particle physics applications. The success of MAPS is due to a number of reasons, for example their low power consumption, fast readout, high spatial resolution and low cost. The latter reflects the use of standard CMOS processes for fabrication. In this paper, the performance of MAPS designed in 0.25 μm technology will be modelled by means of TCAD device simulation software. The dependence of the device performance on parameters that affect the detection of minimum ionising particles (MIP) will be studied aiming at the optimisation of the detector performance. More specifically, the simulations will focus on the influence of the epitaxial layer thickness on the amount of collected charge, that defines the signal and the cluster size, that affects the spatial resolution

  18. Chromatic X-ray imaging with a fine pitch CdTe sensor coupled to a large area photon counting pixel ASIC

    An innovative X-ray imaging sensor based on Chromatic Photon Counting technology with intrinsic digital characteristics is presented. The system counts individually the incident X-ray photons and selects them according to their energy to produce two color images per exposure. The energy selection occurs in real time and at radiographic imaging speed (GHz global counting rate). Photon counting, color mode and a very fine spatial resolution (more than 10 LP/mm at MTF50) allow to obtain a high ratio between image quality and absorbed dose. The individual building block of the imaging system is a two-side buttable semiconductor radiation detector made of a thin pixellated CdTe crystal coupled to a large area VLSI CMOS pixel ASIC. Modules with 1, 2, 4, and 8 block units have been built. The largest module has 25 × 2.5 cm2 sensitive area. Results and images obtained from testing different modules are presented.

  19. Development of enhanced double-sided 3D radiation sensors for pixel detector upgrades at HL-LHC

    Povoli, Marco

    The upgrades of High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will call for new radiation hard technologies to be applied in the next generations of tracking devices that will be required to withstand extremely high radiation doses. In this sense, one of the most promising approaches to silicon detectors, is the so called 3D technology. This technology realizes columnar electrodes penetrating vertically into the silicon bulk thus decoupling the active volume from the inter-electrode distance. 3D detectors were first proposed by S. Parker and collaborators in the mid ’90s as a new sensor geometry intended to mitigate the effects of radiation damage in silicon. 3D sensors are currently attracting growing interest in the field of High Energy Physics, despite their more complex and expensive fabrication, because of the much lower operating voltages and enhanced radiation hardness. 3D technology was also investigated in other laboratories, with the intent of reducing the fabrication co...

  20. Charged particle detection performances of CMOS pixel sensors produced in a 0.18 um process with a high resistivity epitaxial layer

    Senyukov, Serhiy; Baudot, Jerome; Besson, Auguste; Claus, Gilles; Cousin, Loic; Dorokhov, Andrei; Dulinski, Wojciech; Goffe, Mathieu; Hu-Guo, Christine; Winter, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The apparatus of the ALICE experiment at CERN will be upgraded in 2017/18 during the second long shutdown of the LHC (LS2). A major motivation for this upgrade is to extend the physics reach for charmed and beauty particles down to low transverse momenta. This requires a substantial improvement of the spatial resolution and the data rate capability of the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS). To achieve this goal, the new ITS will be equipped with 50 um thin CMOS Pixel Sensors (CPS) covering eit...

  1. Chromatic X-Ray imaging with a fine pitch CdTe sensor coupled to a large area photon counting pixel ASIC

    Bellazzini, R; Brez, A; Minuti, M; Pinchera, M; Mozzo, P

    2012-01-01

    An innovative X-ray imaging sensor with intrinsic digital characteristics is presented. It is based on Chromatic Photon Counting technology. The detector is able to count individually the incident X-ray photons and to separate them according to their energy (two 'color' images per exposure). The energy selection occurs in real time and at radiographic imaging speed (GHz global counting rate). Photon counting, color mode and a very high spatial resolution (more than 10 l.p./mm at MTF50) allow to obtain an optimal ratio between image quality and absorbed dose. The individual block of the imaging system is a two-side buttable semiconductor radiation detector made of a thin pixellated CdTe crystal (the sensor) coupled to a large area VLSI CMOS pixel ASIC. 1, 2, 4, 8 tile units have been built. The 8 tiles unit has 25cm x 2.5cm sensitive area. Results and images obtained from in depth testing of several configurations of the system are presented. The X-Ray imaging system is the technological platform of PIXIRAD Im...

  2. Development of SERS active fibre sensors

    Polwart, E

    2002-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is sensitive and selective and when coupled with fibre-optics could potentially produce an effective chemical sensing system. This thesis concerns the development of a single-fibre-based sensor, with an integral SERS-active substrate. A number of different methods for the manufacture of SERS-active surfaces on glass substrates were investigated and compared. The immobilisation of metal nanoparticles on glass functionalised with (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane emerged as a suitable approach for the production of sensors. Substrates prepared by this approach were characterised using UV-visible spectroscopy, electron microscopy and Raman mapping. It was found that exposure of substrates to laser radiation led to a decrease in the signal recorded from adsorbed analytes. This speed of the decrease was shown to depend on the analyte, and the exciting wavelength and power. SERS-active fibre sensors were produced by immobilisation of silver nanoparticles at the distal end of a...

  3. Physical Activity Recognition from Smartphone Embedded Sensors

    Prudêncio, João; Aguiar, Ana; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquity of smartphones has motivated efforts to use the embedded sensors to detect various aspects of user context to transparently provide personalized and contextualized services to the user. One relevant piece of context is the physical activity of the smartphone user. In this paper, we...... propose a novel set of features for distinguishing five physical activities using only sensors embedded in the smartphone. Specifically, we introduce features that are normalized using the orientation sensor such that horizontal and vertical movements are explicitly computed. We evaluate a neural network...... classifier in experiments in the wild with multiple users and hardware, we achieve accuracies above 90% for a single user and phone, and above 65% for multiple users, which is higher that similar works on the same set of activities, demonstrating the potential of our approach....

  4. Design and First Tests of a Radiation-Hard Pixel Sensor for the European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser

    Schwandt, Joern; Klanner, Robert; Kopsalis, Ioannis; Zhang, Jiaguo

    2014-01-01

    The high intensity and high repetition rate of the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser, presently under construction in Hamburg, requires silicon sensors which can stand X-ray doses of up to 1 GGy for 3 years of operation at high bias voltage. Within the AGIPD Collaboration the X-ray-radiation damage in MOS Capacitors and Gate-Controlled Diodes fabricated by four vendors on high-ohmic n-type silicon with two crystal orientations and dif- ferent technological parameters, has been studied for doses between 1 kGy and 1 GGy. The extracted values of oxide-charge and surface-current densi- ties have been used in TCAD simulations, and the layout and technological parameters of the AGIPD pixel sensor optimized. It is found that the op- timized layout for high X-ray doses is significantly different from the one for non-irradiated sensors. First sensors and test structures have been de-livered in early 2013. Measurement results for X-ray doses of 0 to 10 MGy and their comparison to simulations are presented. They demons...

  5. Studies for a 10 μs, thin, high resolution CMOS pixel sensor for future vertex detectors

    Voutsinas, G.; Amar-Youcef, S.; Baudot, J.; Bertolone, G.; Brogna, A.; Chon-Sen, N.; Claus, G.; Colledani, C.; Dorokhov, A.; Dozière, G.; Dulinski, W.; Degerli, Y.; De Masi, R.; Deveaux, M.; Gelin, M.; Goffe, M.; Hu-Guo, Ch.; Himmi, A.; Jaaskelainen, K.; Koziel, M.; Morel, F.; Müntz, C.; Orsini, F.; Santos, C.; Schrader, C.; Specht, M.; Stroth, J.; Valin, I.; Wagner, F. M.; Winter, M.

    2011-06-01

    Future high energy physics (HEP) experiments require detectors with unprecedented performances for track and vertex reconstruction. These requirements call for high precision sensors, with low material budget and short integration time. The development of CMOS sensors for HEP applications was initiated at IPHC Strasbourg more than 10 years ago, motivated by the needs for vertex detectors at the International Linear Collider (ILC) [R. Turchetta et al, NIM A 458 (2001) 677]. Since then several other applications emerged. The first real scale digital CMOS sensor MIMOSA26 equips Flavour Tracker at RHIC, as well as for the microvertex detector of the CBM experiment at FAIR. MIMOSA sensors may also offer attractive performances for the ALICE upgrade at LHC. This paper will demonstrate the substantial performance improvement of CMOS sensors based on a high resistivity epitaxial layer. First studies for integrating the sensors into a detector system will be addressed and finally the way to go to a 10 μs readout sensor will be discussed.

  6. Studies for a 10{mu}s, thin, high resolution CMOS pixel sensor for future vertex detectors

    Voutsinas, G. [IPHC/IN2P3/CNRS and Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Amar-Youcef, S. [IFK, Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Baudot, J.; Bertolone, G.; Brogna, A.; Chon-Sen, N.; Claus, G.; Colledani, C.; Dorokhov, A.; Doziere, G.; Dulinski, W. [IPHC/IN2P3/CNRS and Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Degerli, Y. [IRFU / SEDI (CEA) Saclay (France); De Masi, R. [IPHC/IN2P3/CNRS and Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Deveaux, M. [IFK, Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Gelin, M.; Goffe, M.; Hu-Guo, Ch.; Himmi, A.; Jaaskelainen, K.; Koziel, M. [IPHC/IN2P3/CNRS and Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France)

    2011-06-15

    Future high energy physics (HEP) experiments require detectors with unprecedented performances for track and vertex reconstruction. These requirements call for high precision sensors, with low material budget and short integration time. The development of CMOS sensors for HEP applications was initiated at IPHC Strasbourg more than 10 years ago, motivated by the needs for vertex detectors at the International Linear Collider (ILC) [R. Turchetta et al, NIM A 458 (2001) 677]. Since then several other applications emerged. The first real scale digital CMOS sensor MIMOSA26 equips Flavour Tracker at RHIC, as well as for the microvertex detector of the CBM experiment at FAIR. MIMOSA sensors may also offer attractive performances for the ALICE upgrade at LHC. This paper will demonstrate the substantial performance improvement of CMOS sensors based on a high resistivity epitaxial layer. First studies for integrating the sensors into a detector system will be addressed and finally the way to go to a 10{mu}s readout sensor will be discussed.

  7. Hybrid Pixel Detectors for gamma/X-ray imaging

    Hatzistratis, D.; Theodoratos, G.; Zografos, V.; Kazas, I.; Loukas, D.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors are made by direct converting high-Z semi-insulating single crystalline material coupled to complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) readout electronics. They are attractive because direct conversion exterminates all the problems of spatial localization related to light diffusion, energy resolution, is far superior from the combination of scintillation crystals and photomultipliers and lithography can be used to pattern electrodes with very fine pitch. We are developing 2-D pixel CMOS ASICs, connect them to pixilated CdTe crystals with the flip chip and bump bonding method and characterize the hybrids. We have designed a series of circuits, whose latest member consists of a 50×25 pixel array with 400um pitch and an embedded controller. In every pixel a full spectroscopic channel with time tagging information has been implemented. The detectors are targeting Compton scatter imaging and they can be used for coded aperture imaging too. Hybridization using CMOS can overcome the limit put on pixel circuit complexity by the use of thin film transistors (TFT) in large flat panels. Hybrid active pixel sensors are used in dental imaging and other applications (e.g. industrial CT etc.). Thus X-ray imaging can benefit from the work done on dynamic range enhancement methods developed initially for visible and infrared CMOS pixel sensors. A 2-D CMOS ASIC with 100um pixel pitch to demonstrate the feasibility of such methods in the context of X-ray imaging has been designed.

  8. Simulation of active-edge pixelated CdTe radiation detectors

    Duarte, D. D.; Lipp, J. D.; Schneider, A.; Seller, P.; Veale, M. C.; Wilson, M. D.; Baker, M. A.; Sellin, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    The edge surfaces of single crystal CdTe play an important role in the electronic properties and performance of this material as an X-ray and γ-ray radiation detector. Edge effects have previously been reported to reduce the spectroscopic performance of the edge pixels in pixelated CdTe radiation detectors without guard bands. A novel Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) model based on experimental data has been developed to investigate these effects. The results presented in this paper show how localized low resistivity surfaces modify the internal electric field of CdTe creating potential wells. These result in a reduction of charge collection efficiency of the edge pixels, which compares well with experimental data.

  9. Online Activity Matching Using Wireless Sensor Nodes

    Horst, Arie; Meratnia, Nirvana

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the capability of wireless sensor networks to perform online activity matching for sport coaching applications. The goal is to design an algorithm to match movements of a trainee and a trainer online and to find their spatial and temporal differences. Such an algorithm can

  10. From hybrid to CMOS pixels ... a possibility for LHC's pixel future?

    Hybrid pixel detectors have been invented for the LHC to make tracking and vertexing possible at all in LHC's radiation intense environment. The LHC pixel detectors have meanwhile very successfully fulfilled their promises and R and D for the planned HL-LHC upgrade is in full swing, targeting even higher ionising doses and non-ionising fluences. In terms of rate and radiation tolerance hybrid pixels are unrivaled. But they have disadvantages as well, most notably material thickness, production complexity, and cost. Meanwhile also active pixel sensors (DEPFET, MAPS) have become real pixel detectors but they would by far not stand the rates and radiation faced from HL-LHC. New MAPS developments, so-called DMAPS (depleted MAPS) which are full CMOS-pixel structures with charge collection in a depleted region have come in the R and D focus for pixels at high rate/radiation levels. This goal can perhaps be realised exploiting HV technologies, high ohmic substrates and/or SOI based technologies. The paper covers the main ideas and some encouraging results from prototyping R and D, not hiding the difficulties

  11. From Hybrid to CMOS Pixels ... a possibility for LHC's pixel future?

    Wermes, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors have been invented for the LHC to make tracking and vertexing possible at all in LHC's radiation intense environment. The LHC pixel detectors have meanwhile very successfully fulfilled their promises and R\\&D for the planned HL-LHC upgrade is in full swing, targeting even higher ionising doses and non-ionising fluences. In terms of rate and radiation tolerance hybrid pixels are unrivaled. But they have disadvantages as well, most notably material thickness, production complexity, and cost. Meanwhile also active pixel sensors (DEPFET, MAPS) have become real pixel detectors but they would by far not stand the rates and radiation faced from HL-LHC. New MAPS developments, so-called DMAPS (depleted MAPS) which are full CMOS-pixel structures with charge collection in a depleted region have come in the R\\&D focus for pixels at high rate/radiation levels. This goal can perhaps be realised exploiting HV technologies, high ohmic substrates and/or SOI based technologies. The paper covers t...

  12. From hybrid to CMOS pixels ... a possibility for LHC's pixel future?

    Wermes, N.

    2015-12-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors have been invented for the LHC to make tracking and vertexing possible at all in LHC's radiation intense environment. The LHC pixel detectors have meanwhile very successfully fulfilled their promises and R&D for the planned HL-LHC upgrade is in full swing, targeting even higher ionising doses and non-ionising fluences. In terms of rate and radiation tolerance hybrid pixels are unrivaled. But they have disadvantages as well, most notably material thickness, production complexity, and cost. Meanwhile also active pixel sensors (DEPFET, MAPS) have become real pixel detectors but they would by far not stand the rates and radiation faced from HL-LHC. New MAPS developments, so-called DMAPS (depleted MAPS) which are full CMOS-pixel structures with charge collection in a depleted region have come in the R&D focus for pixels at high rate/radiation levels. This goal can perhaps be realised exploiting HV technologies, high ohmic substrates and/or SOI based technologies. The paper covers the main ideas and some encouraging results from prototyping R&D, not hiding the difficulties.

  13. Simulation of active-edge pixelated CdTe radiation detectors

    Duarte, DD; Lipp, JD; Schneider, A.; Seller, P; Veale, MC; Wilson, MD; Baker, MA; Sellin, PJ

    2016-01-01

    The edge surfaces of single crystal CdTe play an important role in the electronic properties and performance of this material as an X-ray and γ-ray radiation detector. Edge effects have previously been reported to reduce the spectroscopic performance of the edge pixels in pixelated CdTe radiation detectors without guard bands. A novel Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) model based on experimental data has been developed to investigate these effects. The results presented in this paper sh...

  14. Active-edge planar radiation sensors

    Kenney, C. J.; Segal, J.D.; Westbrook, E.; Parker, Sherwood; Hasi, J.; Da Via, C.; Watts, S.; Morse, J

    2006-01-01

    Many systems in medicine, biology, high-energy physics, and astrophysics require large area radiation sensors. In most of these applications, minimizing the amount of dead area or dead material is crucial. We have developed a new type of silicon radiation sensor in which the device is active to within a few microns of the mechanical edge. Their perimeter is made by a plasma etcher rather than a diamond saw. Their edges can be defined and also passivated by growing, in an intermediate step, a ...

  15. Active-edge planar radiation sensors

    Many systems in medicine, biology, high-energy physics, and astrophysics require large area radiation sensors. In most of these applications, minimizing the amount of dead area or dead material is crucial. We have developed a new type of silicon radiation sensor in which the device is active to within a few microns of the mechanical edge. Their perimeter is made by a plasma etcher rather than a diamond saw. Their edges can be defined and also passivated by growing, in an intermediate step, a field oxide on the side surfaces. In this paper, the basic architecture and results from a synchrotron beam test are presented

  16. Pixel Experiments

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Augustesen, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Pixel Experiments The term pixel is traditionally defined as any of the minute elements that together constitute a larger context or image. A pixel has its own form and is the smallest unit seen within a larger structure. In working with the potentials of LED technology in architectural lighting...... design it became relevant to investigate the use of LEDs as the physical equivalent of a pixel as a design approach. In this book our interest has been in identifying how the qualities of LEDs can be used in lighting applications. With experiences in the planning and implementation of architectural...... lighting design in practice, one quickly experiences and realises that there are untapped potentials in the attributes of LED technology. In this research, speculative studies have been made working with the attributes of LEDs in architectural contexts, with the ambition to ascertain new strategies for...

  17. Towards a 10{mu}s, thin and high resolution pixelated CMOS sensor system for future vertex detectors

    De Masi, R., E-mail: rita.demasi@ires.in2p3.f [IPHC/IN2P3/CNRS and Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Amar-Youcef, S. [IFK, Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Baudot, J.; Bertolone, G.; Brogna, A.; Chon-Sen, N.; Claus, G.; Colledani, C. [IPHC/IN2P3/CNRS and Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Degerli, Y. [IRFU/SEDI (CEA) Saclay (France); Deveaux, M. [IFK, Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Dorokhov, A.; Doziere, G.; Dulinski, W. [IPHC/IN2P3/CNRS and Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Gelin, M. [IRFU/SEDI (CEA) Saclay (France); Goffe, M.; Fontaine, J.C.; Hu-Guo, Ch.; Himmi, A.; Jaaskelainen, K.; Koziel, M. [IPHC/IN2P3/CNRS and Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France)

    2011-02-01

    The physics goals of many high energy experiments require a precise determination of decay vertices, imposing severe constraints on vertex detectors (readout speed, granularity, material budget,...). The IPHC-IRFU collaboration developed a sensor architecture to comply with these requirements. The first full scale CMOS sensor was realised and equips the reference planes of the EUDET beam telescope. Its architecture is being adapted to the needs of the STAR (RHIC) and CBM (FAIR) experiments. It is a promising candidate for the ILC experiments and the ALICE detector upgrade (LHC). A substantial improvement to the CMOS sensor performances, especially in terms of radiation hardness, should come from a new fabrication technology with depleted sensitive volume. A prototype sensor was fabricated to explore the benefits of the technology. The crucial system integration issue is also currently being addressed. In 2009 the PLUME collaboration was set up to investigate the feasibility and performances of a light double sided ladder equipped with CMOS sensors, aimed primarily for the ILC vertex detector but also of interest for other applications such as the CBM vertex detector.

  18. Towards a 10 μs, thin and high resolution pixelated CMOS sensor system for future vertex detectors

    De Masi, R.; Amar-Youcef, S.; Baudot, J.; Bertolone, G.; Brogna, A.; Chon-Sen, N.; Claus, G.; Colledani, C.; Degerli, Y.; Deveaux, M.; Dorokhov, A.; Doziére, G.; Dulinski, W.; Gelin, M.; Goffe, M.; Fontaine, J. C.; Hu-Guo, Ch.; Himmi, A.; Jaaskelainen, K.; Koziel, M.; Morel, F.; Müntz, C.; Orsini, F.; Santos, C.; Schrader, C.; Specht, M.; Stroth, J.; Valin, I.; Voutsinas, G.; Wagner, F. M.; Winter, M.

    2011-02-01

    The physics goals of many high energy experiments require a precise determination of decay vertices, imposing severe constraints on vertex detectors (readout speed, granularity, material budget,…). The IPHC-IRFU collaboration developed a sensor architecture to comply with these requirements. The first full scale CMOS sensor was realised and equips the reference planes of the EUDET beam telescope. Its architecture is being adapted to the needs of the STAR (RHIC) and CBM (FAIR) experiments. It is a promising candidate for the ILC experiments and the ALICE detector upgrade (LHC). A substantial improvement to the CMOS sensor performances, especially in terms of radiation hardness, should come from a new fabrication technology with depleted sensitive volume. A prototype sensor was fabricated to explore the benefits of the technology. The crucial system integration issue is also currently being addressed. In 2009 the PLUME collaboration was set up to investigate the feasibility and performances of a light double sided ladder equipped with CMOS sensors, aimed primarily for the ILC vertex detector but also of interest for other applications such as the CBM vertex detector.

  19. Design methodology: edgeless 3D ASICs with complex in-pixel processing for pixel detectors

    Fahim Farah, Fahim Farah [Northwestern U. (main); Deptuch, Grzegorz W. [Fermilab; Hoff, James R. [Fermilab; Mohseni, Hooman [Northwestern U. (main)

    2015-08-28

    The design methodology for the development of 3D integrated edgeless pixel detectors with in-pixel processing using Electronic Design Automation (EDA) tools is presented. A large area 3 tier 3D detector with one sensor layer and two ASIC layers containing one analog and one digital tier, is built for x-ray photon time of arrival measurement and imaging. A full custom analog pixel is 65μm x 65μm. It is connected to a sensor pixel of the same size on one side, and on the other side it has approximately 40 connections to the digital pixel. A 32 x 32 edgeless array without any peripheral functional blocks constitutes a sub-chip. The sub-chip is an indivisible unit, which is further arranged in a 6 x 6 array to create the entire 1.248cm x 1.248cm ASIC. Each chip has 720 bump-bond I/O connections, on the back of the digital tier to the ceramic PCB. All the analog tier power and biasing is conveyed through the digital tier from the PCB. The assembly has no peripheral functional blocks, and hence the active area extends to the edge of the detector. This was achieved by using a few flavors of almost identical analog pixels (minimal variation in layout) to allow for peripheral biasing blocks to be placed within pixels. The 1024 pixels within a digital sub-chip array have a variety of full custom, semi-custom and automated timing driven functional blocks placed together. The methodology uses a modified mixed-mode on-top digital implementation flow to not only harness the tool efficiency for timing and floor-planning but also to maintain designer control over compact parasitically aware layout. The methodology uses the Cadence design platform, however it is not limited to this tool.

  20. Selected results from the static characterization of edgeless n-on-p planar pixel sensors for ATLAS upgrades

    Giacomini, Gabriele; Bomben, Marco; Boscardin, Maurizio; Bosisio, Luciano; Calderini, Giovanni; Chauveau, Jacques; La Rosa, Alessandro; Marchiori, Giovanni; Zorzi, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    In view of the LHC upgrade for the High Luminosity Phase (HL-LHC), the ATLAS experiment is planning to replace the Inner Detector with an all-Silicon system. The n-on-p technology represents a valid solution for the modules of most of the layers, given the significant radiation hardness of this option and the reduced cost. There is also the demand to reduce the inactive areas to a minimum. The ATLAS LPNHE Paris group and FBK Trento started a collaboration for the development on a novel n-on-p edgeless planar pixel design, based on the deep-trench process which can cope with all these requirements. This paper reports selected results from the electrical characterization, both before and after irradiation, of test structures from the first production batch.

  1. Measurement of charm and beauty-production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA and test beam studies of ATLAS pixel sensors

    A measurement of charm and beauty production in Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA is presented. The analysis is based on the data sample collected by the ZEUS detector in the period from 2003 to 2007 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 354 pb-1. The kinematic region of the measurement is given by 522 and 0.022 is the photon virtuality and y is the inelasticity. A lifetime technique is used to tag the production of charm and beauty quarks. Secondary vertices due to decays of charm and beauty hadrons are reconstructed, in association with jets. The jet kinematics is defined by EjetT>4.2(5) GeV for charm (beauty) and -1.6jetjetT and ηjet are the transverse energy and pseudorapidity of the jet, respectively. The significance of the decay length and the invariant mass of charged tracks associated with the secondary vertex are used as discriminating variables to distinguish between signal and background. Differential cross sections of jet production in charm and beauty events as a function of Q2, y, EjetT and ηjet are measured. Results are compared to Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) predictions from Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) in the fixed flavour number scheme. Good agreement between data and theory is observed. Contributions of the charm and beauty production to the inclusive proton structure function, Fcbarc2 and Fbantib2, are determined by extrapolating the double differential cross sections using NLO QCD predictions. Contributions to the test beam program for the Insertable B-Layer upgrade project of the ATLAS pixel detector are discussed. The test beam data analysis software package EUTelescope was extended, which allowed an efficient analysis of ATLAS pixel sensors. The USBPix DAQ system was integrated into the EUDET telescope allowing test beam measurements with the front end chip FE-I4. Planar and 3D ATLAS pixel sensors were studied at the first IBL test beam at the CERN SPS.

  2. Measurement of charm and beauty-production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA and test beam studies of ATLAS pixel sensors

    Libov, Vladyslav

    2013-08-15

    A measurement of charm and beauty production in Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA is presented. The analysis is based on the data sample collected by the ZEUS detector in the period from 2003 to 2007 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 354 pb{sup -1}. The kinematic region of the measurement is given by 54.2(5) GeV for charm (beauty) and -1.6<{eta}{sup jet}<2.2 for both charm and beauty, where E{sup jet}{sub T} and {eta}{sup jet} are the transverse energy and pseudorapidity of the jet, respectively. The significance of the decay length and the invariant mass of charged tracks associated with the secondary vertex are used as discriminating variables to distinguish between signal and background. Differential cross sections of jet production in charm and beauty events as a function of Q{sup 2}, y, E{sup jet}{sub T} and {eta}{sup jet} are measured. Results are compared to Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) predictions from Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) in the fixed flavour number scheme. Good agreement between data and theory is observed. Contributions of the charm and beauty production to the inclusive proton structure function, F{sup cbar} {sup c}{sub 2} and F{sup b} {sup anti} {sup b}{sub 2}, are determined by extrapolating the double differential cross sections using NLO QCD predictions. Contributions to the test beam program for the Insertable B-Layer upgrade project of the ATLAS pixel detector are discussed. The test beam data analysis software package EUTelescope was extended, which allowed an efficient analysis of ATLAS pixel sensors. The USBPix DAQ system was integrated into the EUDET telescope allowing test beam

  3. High-Sensitivity X-ray Polarimetry with Amorphous Silicon Active-Matrix Pixel Proportional Counters

    Black, J. K.; Deines-Jones, P.; Jahoda, K.; Ready, S. E.; Street, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    Photoelectric X-ray polarimeters based on pixel micropattern gas detectors (MPGDs) offer order-of-magnitude improvement in sensitivity over more traditional techniques based on X-ray scattering. This new technique places some of the most interesting astronomical observations within reach of even a small, dedicated mission. The most sensitive instrument would be a photoelectric polarimeter at the focus of 2 a very large mirror, such as the planned XEUS. Our efforts are focused on a smaller pathfinder mission, which would achieve its greatest sensitivity with large-area, low-background, collimated polarimeters. We have recently demonstrated a MPGD polarimeter using amorphous silicon thin-film transistor (TFT) readout suitable for the focal plane of an X-ray telescope. All the technologies used in the demonstration polarimeter are scalable to the areas required for a high-sensitivity collimated polarimeter. Leywords: X-ray polarimetry, particle tracking, proportional counter, GEM, pixel readout

  4. Sensor Configuration and Activation for Field Detection in Large Sensor Arrays

    Sung, Youngchul; Tong, Lang; Poor, H. Vincent

    2005-01-01

    The problems of sensor configuration and activation for the detection of correlated random fields using large sensor arrays are considered. Using results that characterize the large-array performance of sensor networks in this application, the detection capabilities of different sensor configurations are analyzed and compared. The dependence of the optimal choice of configuration on parameters such as sensor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), field correlation, etc., is examined, yielding insights ...

  5. CVD diamond pixel detectors for LHC experiments

    This paper reviews the development of CVD diamond pixel detectors. The preparation of the diamond pixel sensors for bump-bonding to the pixel readout electronics for the LHC and the results from beam tests carried out at CERN are described

  6. CVD diamond pixel detectors for LHC experiments

    Wedenig, R; Bauer, C; Berdermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Deneuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foulon, F; Friedl, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Grigoriev, E; Hallewell, G D; Hall-Wilton, R; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Karl, C; Kass, R; Knöpfle, K T; Krammer, Manfred; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; Manfredi, P F; Manfredotti, C; Marshall, R D; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Oh, A; Pan, L S; Palmieri, V G; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Pirollo, S; Polesello, P; Pretzl, Klaus P; Procario, M; Re, V; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Roff, D G; Rudge, A; Runólfsson, O; Russ, J; Schnetzer, S R; Sciortino, S; Speziali, V; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Suter, B; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R J; Trawick, M L; Trischuk, W; Vittone, E; Wagner, A; Walsh, A M; Weilhammer, Peter; White, C; Zeuner, W; Ziock, H J; Zöller, M

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of CVD diamond pixel detectors. The preparation of the diamond pixel sensors for bump-bonding to the pixel readout electronics for the LHC and the results from beam tests carried out at CERN are described. (9 refs).

  7. CVD diamond pixel detectors for LHC experiments

    Wedenig, R.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredi, P.F.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R.D.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Pretzl, K.; Procario, M.; Re, V.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Runolfsson, O.; Russ, J.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, A.; Walsh, A.M.; Weilhammer, P.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M.; Blanquart, L.; Breugnion, P.; Charles, E.; Ciocio, A.; Clemens, J.C.; Dao, K.; Einsweiler, K.; Fasching, D.; Fischer, P.; Joshi, A.; Keil, M.; Klasen, V.; Kleinfelder, S.; Laugier, D.; Meuser, S.; Milgrome, O.; Mouthuy, T.; Richardson, J.; Sinervo, P.; Treis, J.; Wermes, N

    1999-08-01

    This paper reviews the development of CVD diamond pixel detectors. The preparation of the diamond pixel sensors for bump-bonding to the pixel readout electronics for the LHC and the results from beam tests carried out at CERN are described.

  8. Evaluation of test structures for the novel n{sup +}-in-p pixel and strip sensors for very high radiation environments

    Unno, Y., E-mail: yoshinobu.unno@kek.jp [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Study, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba-shi 305-0801 (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba-shi 305-0801 (Japan); Mitsui, S. [The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba-shi 305-0801 (Japan); Hori, R.; Ikegami, Y.; Terada, S. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Study, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba-shi 305-0801 (Japan); Kamada, S.; Yamamura, K. [Solid-state Division, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 1126-1 Ichino-cho, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu-shi 435-8558 (Japan); Hanagaki, K. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka-shi, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Hara, K. [Institute of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba-shi 305-8571 (Japan); Jinnouchi, O. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Kimura, N. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishi-Waseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Nagai, K. [Institute of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba-shi 305-8571 (Japan); Nakano, I. [Department of Physics, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tshushima-naka, Kita-ku, Okayama-shi 700-8530 (Japan); Oda, S. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, 6-10-11 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka-shi 812-8581 (Japan); Takashima, R. [Department of Education, Kyoto University of Education, 1 Fukakusa-Fujimori-cho, Fushimi-ku, Kyoto 612-8522 (Japan); Takubo, Y. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Study, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba-shi 305-0801 (Japan); Tojo, J. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, 6-10-11 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka-shi 812-8581 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-11

    Radiation-tolerant n{sup +}-in-p silicon sensors were developed for use in very high radiation environments. Novel n{sup +}-in-p silicon strip and pixel sensors and test structures were fabricated, tested and evaluated, in order to understand the designs implemented. The resistance between the n{sup +} implants (interstrip resistance), the electric potential of the p-stop, and the punch-through-protection (PTP) onset voltage were measured before and as a function of fluence after irradiation. The technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulations were used to understand the radiation damage and fluence dependence of the structures. The decrease in the interstrip resistance is a consequence of increased leakage current. The decrease in the electric potential of the p-stop results from a build-up of positive charge in the silicon–silicon oxide interface. The decrease and subsequent increase in the PTP onset voltages results from the interface charge build-up and an increase in acceptor states.

  9. Investigation of Properties of Novel Silicon Pixel Assemblies Employing Thin n-in-p Sensors and 3D-Integration

    Weigell, Philipp

    Until the end of the 2020 decade the LHC programme will be defining the high energy frontier of particle physics. During this time, three upgrade steps of the accelerator are currently planned to further increase the luminosity and energy reach. In the course of these upgrades the specifications of several parts of the current LHC detectors will be exceeded. Especially, the innermost tracking detectors are challenged by the increasing track densities and the radiation damage. This thesis focuses on the implications for the ATLAS experiment. Here, around 2021/2, after having collected an integrated luminosity of around 300/fb¹ , the silicon and gas detector components of the inner tracker will reach the end of their lifetime and will need to be replaced to ensure sufficient performance for continued running|especially if the luminosity is raised to about 5x10^35/(cm²s¹ ) as currently planned. An all silicon inner detector is foreseen to be installed. This upgrade demands cost-effective pixel assemblies with...

  10. Development and characterization of diamond and 3D-silicon pixel detectors with ATLAS-pixel readout electronics

    Hybrid pixel detectors are used for particle tracking in the innermost layers of current high energy experiments like ATLAS. After the proposed luminosity upgrade of the LHC, they will have to survive very high radiation fluences of up to 1016 particles per cm2 per life time. New sensor concepts and materials are required, which promise to be more radiation tolerant than the currently used planar silicon sensors. Most prominent candidates are so-called 3D-silicon and single crystal or poly-crystalline diamond sensors. Using the ATLAS pixel electronics different detector prototypes with a pixel geometry of 400 x 50 μm2 have been built. In particular three devices have been studied in detail: a 3D-silicon and a single crystal diamond detector with an active area of about 1 cm2 and a poly-crystalline diamond detector of the same size as a current ATLAS pixel detector module (2 x 6 cm2). To characterize the devices regarding their particle detection efficiency and spatial resolution, the charge collection inside a pixel cell as well as the charge sharing between adjacent pixels was studied using a high energy particle beam. (orig.)

  11. Development and characterization of diamond and 3D-silicon pixel detectors with ATLAS-pixel readout electronics

    Mathes, Markus

    2008-12-15

    Hybrid pixel detectors are used for particle tracking in the innermost layers of current high energy experiments like ATLAS. After the proposed luminosity upgrade of the LHC, they will have to survive very high radiation fluences of up to 10{sup 16} particles per cm{sup 2} per life time. New sensor concepts and materials are required, which promise to be more radiation tolerant than the currently used planar silicon sensors. Most prominent candidates are so-called 3D-silicon and single crystal or poly-crystalline diamond sensors. Using the ATLAS pixel electronics different detector prototypes with a pixel geometry of 400 x 50 {mu}m{sup 2} have been built. In particular three devices have been studied in detail: a 3D-silicon and a single crystal diamond detector with an active area of about 1 cm{sup 2} and a poly-crystalline diamond detector of the same size as a current ATLAS pixel detector module (2 x 6 cm{sup 2}). To characterize the devices regarding their particle detection efficiency and spatial resolution, the charge collection inside a pixel cell as well as the charge sharing between adjacent pixels was studied using a high energy particle beam. (orig.)

  12. Development of SOI pixel detector in Cracow

    Bugiel, Szymon; Dasgupta, Roma; Glab, Sebastian; Idzik, Marek; Moron, Jakub; Kapusta, Piotr Julian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Turala, Michal

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a new monolithic Silicon-On-Insulator pixel sensor in $200~nm$ SOI CMOS technology. The main application of the proposed pixel detector is the spectroscopy, but it can also be used for the minimum ionizing particle (MIP) tracking in particle physics experiments. For this reason few different versions of pixel cells are developed: a source-follower based pixel for tracking, a low noise pixel with preamplifier for spectroscopy, and a self-triggering pixel for t...

  13. Exploring properties of the integrating pixels

    Kapusta, Piotr Julian; Bugiel, Szymon; Dasgupta, Roma; Glab, Sebastian; Idzik, Marek; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Turala, Michal

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents some observations and ideas collected during the tests of the SOI sensors, based on the integration type pixels. First, it contains a rough analysis of the Correlated Double Sampling filtering properties with respect to different noise sources and long sampling intervals, which are typical for the pixels under consideration. Second, results of the pixel leakage current measurements in the pix_2012 and DIPIX pixel detector chips are presented.

  14. Pixel-One

    Pedichini, F.; Di Paola, A.; Testa, V.

    2010-07-01

    The early future of astronomy will be dominated by Extremely Large Telescopes where the focal lengths will be of the order of several hundred meters. This yields focal plane sizes of roughly one square meter to obtain a field of view of about 5 x 5 arcmin. When operated in seeing limited mode this field is correctly sampled with 1x1mm pixels. Such a sampling can be achieved using a peculiar array of tiny CMOS active photodiodes illuminated through microlenses or lightpipes. If the photodiode is small enough and utilizes the actual pixel technology, its dark current can be kept well below the sky background photocurrent, thus avoiding the use of cumbersome cryogenics systems. An active smart electronics will manage each pixel up to the A/D conversion and data transfer. This modular block is the Pixel-One. A 30x30 mm tile filled with 1000 Pixel-Ones could be the basic unit to mosaic very large focal planes. By inserting dispersion elements inside the optical path of the lenslet array one could also produce a low dispersed spectrum of each focal plane sub-aperture and, by using an array of few smart photodiodes, also get multi-wavelength information in the optical band for each equivalent focal plane pixel. An application to the E-ELT is proposed.

  15. Multiple objective optimization for active sensor management

    Page, Scott F.; Dolia, Alexander N.; Harris, Chris J.; White, Neil M.

    2005-03-01

    The performance of a multi-sensor data fusion system is inherently constrained by the configuration of the given sensor suite. Intelligent or adaptive control of sensor resources has been shown to offer improved fusion performance in many applications. Common approaches to sensor management select sensor observation tasks that are optimal in terms of a measure of information. However, optimising for information alone is inherently sub-optimal as it does not take account of any other system requirements such as stealth or sensor power conservation. We discuss the issues relating to developing a suite of performance metrics for optimising multi-sensor systems and propose some candidate metrics. In addition it may not always be necessary to maximize information gain, in some cases small increases in information gain may take place at the cost of large sensor resource requirements. Additionally, the problems of sensor tasking and placement are usually treated separately, leading to a lack of coherency between sensor management frameworks. We propose a novel approach based on a high level decentralized information-theoretic sensor management architecture that unifies the processes of sensor tasking and sensor placement into a single framework. Sensors are controlled using a minimax multiple objective optimisation approach in order to address probability of target detection, sensor power consumption, and sensor survivability whilst maintaining a target estimation covariance threshold. We demonstrate the potential of the approach through simulation of a multi-sensor, target tracking scenario and compare the results with a single objective information based approach.

  16. Charged particle detection performances of CMOS pixel sensors produced in a 0.18μm process with a high resistivity epitaxial layer

    The apparatus of the ALICE experiment at CERN will be upgraded in 2017/18 during the second long shutdown of the LHC (LS2). A major motivation for this upgrade is to extend the physics reach for charmed and beauty particles down to low transverse momenta. This requires a substantial improvement of the spatial resolution and the data rate capability of the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS). To achieve this goal, the new ITS will be equipped with 50μm thin CMOS Pixel Sensors (CPS) covering either the three innermost layers or all the 7 layers of the detector. The CPS being developed for the ITS upgrade at IPHC (Strasbourg) is derived from the MIMOSA 28 sensor realised for the STAR-PXL at RHIC in a 0.35μm CMOS process. In order to satisfy the ITS upgrade requirements in terms of readout speed and radiation tolerance, a CMOS process with a reduced feature size and a high resistivity epitaxial layer should be exploited. In this respect, the charged particle detection performance and radiation hardness of the TowerJazz0.18μm CMOS process were studied with the help of the first prototype chip MIMOSA 32. The beam tests performed with negative pions of 120 GeV/c at the CERN-SPS allowed to measure a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the non-irradiated chip in the range between 22 and 32 depending on the pixel design. The chip irradiated with the combined dose of 1 MRad and 1013neq/cm2 was observed to yield an SNR ranging between 11 and 23 for coolant temperatures varying from 15 °C to 30 °C. These SNR values were measured to result in particle detection efficiencies above 99.5% and 98% before and after irradiation, respectively. These satisfactory results allow to validate the TowerJazz0.18μm CMOS process for the ALICE ITS upgrade

  17. Physical Human Activity Recognition Using Wearable Sensors

    Ferhat Attal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review of different classification techniques used to recognize human activities from wearable inertial sensor data. Three inertial sensor units were used in this study and were worn by healthy subjects at key points of upper/lower body limbs (chest, right thigh and left ankle. Three main steps describe the activity recognition process: sensors’ placement, data pre-processing and data classification. Four supervised classification techniques namely, k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN, Support Vector Machines (SVM, Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM, and Random Forest (RF as well as three unsupervised classification techniques namely, k-Means, Gaussian mixture models (GMM and Hidden Markov Model (HMM, are compared in terms of correct classification rate, F-measure, recall, precision, and specificity. Raw data and extracted features are used separately as inputs of each classifier. The feature selection is performed using a wrapper approach based on the RF algorithm. Based on our experiments, the results obtained show that the k-NN classifier provides the best performance compared to other supervised classification algorithms, whereas the HMM classifier is the one that gives the best results among unsupervised classification algorithms. This comparison highlights which approach gives better performance in both supervised and unsupervised contexts. It should be noted that the obtained results are limited to the context of this study, which concerns the classification of the main daily living human activities using three wearable accelerometers placed at the chest, right shank and left ankle of the subject.

  18. Prototype Active Silicon Sensor in 150 nm HR-CMOS Technology for ATLAS Inner Detector Upgrade

    Rymaszewski, Piotr; Breugnon, Patrick; Godiot, Stépahnie; Gonella, Laura; Hemperek, Tomasz; Hirono, Toko; Hügging, Fabian; Krüger, Hans; Liu, Jian; Pangaud, Patrick; Peric, Ivan; Rozanov, Alexandre; Wang, Anqing; Wermes, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    The LHC Phase-II upgrade will lead to a significant increase in luminosity, which in turn will bring new challenges for the operation of inner tracking detectors. A possible solution is to use active silicon sensors, taking advantage of commercial CMOS technologies. Currently ATLAS R&D programme is qualifying a few commercial technologies in terms of suitability for this task. In this paper a prototype designed in one of them (LFoundry 150 nm process) will be discussed. The chip architecture will be described, including different pixel types incorporated into the design, followed by simulation and measurement results.

  19. Prototype Active Silicon Sensor in 150 nm HR-CMOS technology for ATLAS Inner Detector Upgrade

    Rymaszewski, P.; Barbero, M.; Breugnon, P.; Godiot, S.; Gonella, L.; Hemperek, T.; Hirono, T.; Hügging, F.; Krüger, H.; Liu, J.; Pangaud, P.; Peric, I.; Rozanov, A.; Wang, A.; Wermes, N.

    2016-02-01

    The LHC Phase-II upgrade will lead to a significant increase in luminosity, which in turn will bring new challenges for the operation of inner tracking detectors. A possible solution is to use active silicon sensors, taking advantage of commercial CMOS technologies. Currently ATLAS R&D programme is qualifying a few commercial technologies in terms of suitability for this task. In this paper a prototype designed in one of them (LFoundry 150 nm process) will be discussed. The chip architecture will be described, including different pixel types incorporated into the design, followed by simulation and measurement results.

  20. Pixel detectors

    Passmore, M S

    2001-01-01

    positions on the detector. The loss of secondary electrons follows the profile of the detector and increases with higher energy ions. studies of the spatial resolution predict a value of 5.3 lp/mm. The image noise in photon counting systems is investigated theoretically and experimentally and is shown to be given by Poisson statistics. The rate capability of the LAD1 was measured to be 250 kHz per pixel. Theoretical and experimental studies of the difference in contrast for ideal charge integrating and photon counting imaging systems were carried out. It is shown that the contrast differs and that for the conventional definition (contrast = (background - signal)/background) the photon counting device will, in some cases, always give a better contrast than the integrating system. Simulations in MEDICI are combined with analytical calculations to investigate charge collection efficiencies (CCE) in semiconductor detectors. Different pixel sizes and biasing conditions are considered. The results show charge shari...

  1. Active Sensor Configuration Validation for Refrigeration Systems

    Hovgaard, Tobias Gybel; Blanke, Mogens; Niemann, Hans Henrik; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    Major faults in the commissioning phase of refrigeration systems are caused by defects related to sensors. With a number of similar sensors available that do not differ by type but only by spatial location in the plant, interchange of sensors is a common defect. With sensors being used quite...... identify the sensor configuration. The method as such is generic and is shown in the paper to work convincingly on refrigeration systems with significant nonlinear behaviors...

  2. Active Sensor Configuration Validation for Refrigeration Systems

    Hovgaard, Tobias Gybel; Blanke, Mogens; Niemann, Hans Henrik;

    2010-01-01

    Major faults in the commissioning phase of refrigeration systems are caused by defects related to sensors. With a number of similar sensors available that do not differ by type but only by spatial location in the plant, interchange of sensors is a common defect. With sensors being used quite...... identify the sensor configuration. The method as such is generic and is shown in the paper to work convincingly on refrigeration systems with significant nonlinear behaviors...

  3. Capacitively coupled hybrid pixel assemblies for the CLIC vertex detector

    Alipour Tehrani, Niloufar; Benoit, Mathieu; Dannheim, Dominik; Dette, Karola; Hynds, Daniel; Kulis, Szymon; Peric, Ivan; Petric, Marko; Redford, Sophie; Sicking, Eva; Valerio, Pierpaolo

    2015-01-01

    The vertex detector at the proposed CLIC multi-TeV linear e+e- collider must have minimal material content and high spatial resolution, combined with accurate time-stamping to cope with the expected high rate of beam-induced backgrounds. One of the options being considered is the use of active sensors implemented in a commercial high-voltage CMOS process, capacitively coupled to hybrid pixel ASICs. A prototype of such an assembly, using two custom designed chips (CCPDv3 as active sensor glued to a CLICpix readout chip), has been characterised both in the lab and in beam tests at the CERN SPS using 120 GeV/c positively charged hadrons. Results of these characterisation studies are presented both for single and dual amplification stages in the active sensor. Pixel cross-coupling results are also presented, showing the sensitivity to placement precision and planarity of the glue layer.

  4. CMOS Image Sensors: Electronic Camera On A Chip

    Fossum, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    Recent advancements in CMOS image sensor technology are reviewed, including both passive pixel sensors and active pixel sensors. On- chip analog to digital converters and on-chip timing and control circuits permit realization of an electronic camera-on-a-chip. Highly miniaturized imaging systems based on CMOS image sensor technology are emerging as a competitor to charge-coupled devices for low cost uses.

  5. Abnormal Activity Detection Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors

    Xiaomu Luo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Healthy aging is one of the most important social issues. In this paper, we propose a method for abnormal activity detection without any manual labeling of the training samples. By leveraging the Field of View (FOV modulation, the spatio-temporal characteristic of human activity is encoded into low-dimension data stream generated by the ceiling-mounted Pyroelectric Infrared (PIR sensors. The similarity between normal training samples are measured based on Kullback-Leibler (KL divergence of each pair of them. The natural clustering of normal activities is discovered through a self-tuning spectral clustering algorithm with unsupervised model selection on the eigenvectors of a modified similarity matrix. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs are employed to model each cluster of normal activities and form feature vectors. One-Class Support Vector Machines (OSVMs are used to profile the normal activities and detect abnormal activities. To validate the efficacy of our method, we conducted experiments in real indoor environments. The encouraging results show that our method is able to detect abnormal activities given only the normal training samples, which aims to avoid the laborious and inconsistent data labeling process.

  6. Abnormal Activity Detection Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors.

    Luo, Xiaomu; Tan, Huoyuan; Guan, Qiuju; Liu, Tong; Zhuo, Hankz Hankui; Shen, Baihua

    2016-01-01

    Healthy aging is one of the most important social issues. In this paper, we propose a method for abnormal activity detection without any manual labeling of the training samples. By leveraging the Field of View (FOV) modulation, the spatio-temporal characteristic of human activity is encoded into low-dimension data stream generated by the ceiling-mounted Pyroelectric Infrared (PIR) sensors. The similarity between normal training samples are measured based on Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence of each pair of them. The natural clustering of normal activities is discovered through a self-tuning spectral clustering algorithm with unsupervised model selection on the eigenvectors of a modified similarity matrix. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are employed to model each cluster of normal activities and form feature vectors. One-Class Support Vector Machines (OSVMs) are used to profile the normal activities and detect abnormal activities. To validate the efficacy of our method, we conducted experiments in real indoor environments. The encouraging results show that our method is able to detect abnormal activities given only the normal training samples, which aims to avoid the laborious and inconsistent data labeling process. PMID:27271632

  7. A Sub Pixel Resolution Method

    Khademi, Siamak; Darudi, Ahmad; ABBASI, Zahra

    2012-01-01

    One of the main limitations for the resolution of optical instruments is the size of the sensor's pixels. In this paper we introduce a new sub pixel resolution algorithm to enhance the resolution of images. This method is based on the analysis of multi-images which are fast recorded during the fine relative motion of image and pixel arrays of CCDs. It is shown that by applying this method for a sample noise free image one will enhance the resolution with order of error.

  8. A Novel LTPS-TFT Pixel Circuit to Compensate the Electronic Degradation for Active-Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    Ching-Lin Fan; Fan-Ping Tseng; Hui-Lung Lai; Bo-Jhang Sun; Kuang-Chi Chao; Yi-Chiung Chen

    2013-01-01

    A novel pixel driving circuit for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays with low-temperature polycrystalline-silicon thin-film transistors (LTPS-TFTs) is studied. The proposed compensation pixel circuit is driven by voltage programming scheme, which is composed of five TFTs and one capacitor, and has been certified to provide uniform output current by the Automatic Integrated Circuit Modeling Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis (AIM-SPICE) simulator. The...

  9. Comparison of relevant parameters of multi-pixel sensors for tracker detectors after irradiation with high proton and neutron fluences; Vergleich relevanter Parameter von Multipixelsensoren fuer Spurdetektoren nach Bestrahlung mit hohen Proton- und Neutronfluessen

    Bergholz, Matthias

    2016-03-15

    The further increase of the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN requires new sensors for the tracking detector of the Compact Muon Soleniod (CMS) experiment. These sensors must be more radiation hard and of a finer granularity to lower the occupancy. In addition the new sensor modules must have a lower material budget and have to be self triggering. Sensor prototypes, the so called ''MPix''-sensors, produced on different materials were investigated for their radiation hardness. These sensors were fully characterized before and after irradiation. Of particular interest was the comparison of different bias methods, different materials and the influence of various geometries. The degeneration rate differs for the different sensor materials. The increase of the dark current of Float-Zone-Silicon is stronger for thicker sensors and less than for Magnetic-Czochralski-Silicon sensors. Both tested bias structures are damaged by the irradiation. The poly silicon resistance increases after irradiation by fifty percent. The Punch-Through-Structure is more effected by irradiation. The punch-through voltage increase by a factor of two. Due to the higher pixel current, the working point of the sensor is shifted to smaller differential resistances.

  10. PIXELS: Using field-based learning to investigate students' concepts of pixels and sense of scale

    Pope, A.; Tinigin, L.; Petcovic, H. L.; Ormand, C. J.; LaDue, N.

    2015-12-01

    Empirical work over the past decade supports the notion that a high level of spatial thinking skill is critical to success in the geosciences. Spatial thinking incorporates a host of sub-skills such as mentally rotating an object, imagining the inside of a 3D object based on outside patterns, unfolding a landscape, and disembedding critical patterns from background noise. In this study, we focus on sense of scale, which refers to how an individual quantified space, and is thought to develop through kinesthetic experiences. Remote sensing data are increasingly being used for wide-reaching and high impact research. A sense of scale is critical to many areas of the geosciences, including understanding and interpreting remotely sensed imagery. In this exploratory study, students (N=17) attending the Juneau Icefield Research Program participated in a 3-hour exercise designed to study how a field-based activity might impact their sense of scale and their conceptions of pixels in remotely sensed imagery. Prior to the activity, students had an introductory remote sensing lecture and completed the Sense of Scale inventory. Students walked and/or skied the perimeter of several pixel types, including a 1 m square (representing a WorldView sensor's pixel), a 30 m square (a Landsat pixel) and a 500 m square (a MODIS pixel). The group took reflectance measurements using a field radiometer as they physically traced out the pixel. The exercise was repeated in two different areas, one with homogenous reflectance, and another with heterogeneous reflectance. After the exercise, students again completed the Sense of Scale instrument and a demographic survey. This presentation will share the effects and efficacy of the field-based intervention to teach remote sensing concepts and to investigate potential relationships between students' concepts of pixels and sense of scale.

  11. Development of pixel front-end electronics using advanced deep submicron CMOS technologies

    The content of this thesis is oriented on the R and D of microelectronic integrated circuits for processing the signal from particle sensors and partially on the sensors themselves. This work is motivated by ongoing upgrades of the ATLAS Pixel Detector at CERN laboratory and by exploration of new technologies for the future experiments in particle physics. Evolution of technologies for the fabrication of microelectronic circuits follows Moore's laws. Transistors become smaller and electronic chips reach higher complexity. Apart from this, silicon foundries become more open to smaller customers and often provide non-standard process options. Two new directions in pixel technologies are explored in this thesis: design of pixel electronics using ultra deep submicron (65 nm) CMOS technology and Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (DMAPS). An independent project concerning the measurement of pixel capacitance with a dedicated measurement chip is a part of this thesis. Pixel capacitance is one of the key parameters for design of the pixel front-end electronics and thus it is closely related to the content of the thesis. The theoretical background, aspects of chip design, performance of chip prototypes and prospect for design of large pixel chips are comprehensively described in five chapters of the thesis.

  12. A high efficiency readout architecture for a large matrix of pixels

    In this work we present a fast readout architecture for silicon pixel matrix sensors that has been designed to sustain very high rates, above 1 MHz/mm2 for matrices greater than 80k pixels. This logic can be implemented within MAPS (Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors), a kind of high resolution sensor that integrates on the same bulk the sensor matrix and the CMOS logic for readout, but it can be exploited also with other technologies. The proposed architecture is based on three main concepts. First of all, the readout of the hits is performed by activating one column at a time; all the fired pixels on the active column are read, sparsified and reset in parallel in one clock cycle. This implies the use of global signals across the sensor matrix. The consequent reduction of metal interconnections improves the active area while maintaining a high granularity (down to a pixel pitch of 40 μm). Secondly, the activation for readout takes place only for those columns overlapping with a certain fired area, thus reducing the sweeping time of the whole matrix and reducing the pixel dead-time. Third, the sparsification (x-y address labeling of the hits) is performed with a lower granularity with respect to single pixels, by addressing vertical zones of 8 pixels each. The fine-grain Y resolution is achieved by appending the zone pattern to the zone address of a hit. We show then the benefits of this technique in presence of clusters. We describe this architecture from a schematic point of view, then presenting the efficiency results obtained by VHDL simulations.

  13. Studies on monolithic active pixel sensors for the Inner Tracking System upgrade of ALICE experiment

    Aimo, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a general-purpose, heavy-ion detector at the CERN LHC. It is designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter, and in particular the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), using nucleus- nucleus collisions at unprecedented energy densities. One of the major goals of the ALICE physics program is the study of rare probes at low transverse momentum. The reconstruction of the rare probes requires a precise determination of the primary an...

  14. C autoradiography with a novel wafer scale CMOS Active Pixel Sensor

    Esposito, M; Wells, K.; Anaxagoras, T; Allinson, NM; Larner, J

    2013-01-01

    C autoradiography is a well established technique for structural and metabolic analysis of cells and tissues. The most common detection medium for this application is film emulsion, which offers unbeatable spatial resolution due to its fine granularity but at the same time has some limiting drawbacks such as poor linearity and rapid saturation. In recent years several digital detectors have been developed, following the technological transition from analog to digital-based detection systems i...

  15. A novel depleted monolithic active pixel sensor for future high energy physics detectors

    Fernandez-Perez, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    El Gran Colisionador de Hadrones (LHC) tiene previsto aumentar su luminosidad hasta siete veces su valor actual con el objetivo de ampliar su actual programa de física. Esta mejora se conoce con el nombre de High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) y está prevista para el año 2024-2026. El actual Inner Detector (ID) del detector de ALTAS será completamente reemplazado por uno nuevo para ajustarse a los rigurosos requisitos que impone el HL-LHC. Nuevos detectores de píxeles están siendo investigados para ...

  16. The First JFET-Based Silicon Carbide Active Pixel Sensor UV Imager Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Solar-blind ultraviolet (UV) imaging is needed in the fields of astronomy, national defense, and bio-chemistry. United Silicon Carbide, Inc. proposes to develop a...

  17. The First Monolithic Silicon Carbide Active Pixel Sensor Array for Solar Blind UV Detection Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will address the needs of space astronomy, military threat detection, and scientific research for image...

  18. The First JFET-based Silicon Carbide Active Pixel Sensor UV Imager Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Solar-blind ultraviolet (UV) imaging is critically important in the fields of space astronomy, national defense, and bio-chemistry. United Silicon Carbide, Inc....

  19. Electrical simulation of a DEPFET pixel matrix

    The Belle II experiment will use two layers of pixel detectors to achieve a good vertex resolution. The two layers will consist of 40 pixel sensors each with roughly 190.000 DEPFET pixels to provide the necessary spatial resolution. In addition to the array of DEPFET pixels steering and read-out ASICs are bump bonded on the pixel sensor. The high luminosity of the Belle-II experiment requires a fast and parallel read-out. The pixel sensor will be read-out in rolling shutter-mode with a row read-out time of 100 ns and a frame time of 20 μs. To find design solutions which allow such short read-out times simulations and measurements of prototypes are performed. The electrical simulations incorporating the ASICs and DEPFET pixel array allow early investigations on the interaction between the chips and the pixel array e.g. the pixel output signal depending on the position of the pixel within the array. In the following a model describing the DEPFETs intrinsic properties like the MOS-FET characteristic, the internal amplification and the reset mechanism as well as parasitic resistive and capacitive elements is presented and simulation results are discussed.

  20. Investigation of Toshiba 130nm CMOS process as a possible candidate for active silicon sensors in HEP and X-ray experiments

    Following the advances of commercial semiconductor manufacturing technologies there has recently been an increased interest within experimental physics community in applying CMOS manufacturing processes to developing active silicon sensors. Possibility of applying high voltage bias combined with high resistivity substrate allows for better depletion of sensor and therefore quicker and more efficient charge collection. One of processes that accommodates those features is Toshiba 130 nm CMOS technology (CMOS3E). Within our group a test chip was designed to examine the suitability of this technology for physics experiment (both for HEP and X-ray imaging). Design consisted of 4 pixel matrices with total of 12 different pixel flavors allowing for evaluation of various pixel geometries and architectures in terms of depletion depth, noise performance, charge collection efficiency, etc. During this talk initial outcome of this evaluation is presented, starting with brief introduction to technology itself, followed by results of TCAD simulations, description of final design and first measurements results.

  1. Active hyperspectral imaging using a quantum cascade laser (QCL) array and digital-pixel focal plane array (DFPA) camera.

    Goyal, Anish; Myers, Travis; Wang, Christine A; Kelly, Michael; Tyrrell, Brian; Gokden, B; Sanchez, Antonio; Turner, George; Capasso, Federico

    2014-06-16

    We demonstrate active hyperspectral imaging using a quantum-cascade laser (QCL) array as the illumination source and a digital-pixel focal-plane-array (DFPA) camera as the receiver. The multi-wavelength QCL array used in this work comprises 15 individually addressable QCLs in which the beams from all lasers are spatially overlapped using wavelength beam combining (WBC). The DFPA camera was configured to integrate the laser light reflected from the sample and to perform on-chip subtraction of the passive thermal background. A 27-frame hyperspectral image was acquired of a liquid contaminant on a diffuse gold surface at a range of 5 meters. The measured spectral reflectance closely matches the calculated reflectance. Furthermore, the high-speed capabilities of the system were demonstrated by capturing differential reflectance images of sand and KClO3 particles that were moving at speeds of up to 10 m/s. PMID:24977536

  2. An investigation of signal performance enhancements achieved through innovative pixel design across several generations of indirect detection, active matrix, flat-panel arrays

    Active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) technology is being employed for an increasing variety of imaging applications. An important element in the adoption of this technology has been significant ongoing improvements in optical signal collection achieved through innovations in indirect detection array pixel design. Such improvements have a particularly beneficial effect on performance in applications involving low exposures and/or high spatial frequencies, where detective quantum efficiency is strongly reduced due to the relatively high level of additive electronic noise compared to signal levels of AMFPI devices. In this article, an examination of various signal properties, as determined through measurements and calculations related to novel array designs, is reported in the context of the evolution of AMFPI pixel design. For these studies, dark, optical, and radiation signal measurements were performed on prototype imagers incorporating a variety of increasingly sophisticated array designs, with pixel pitches ranging from 75 to 127 μm. For each design, detailed measurements of fundamental pixel-level properties conducted under radiographic and fluoroscopic operating conditions are reported and the results are compared. A series of 127 μm pitch arrays employing discrete photodiodes culminated in a novel design providing an optical fill factor of ∼80% (thereby assuring improved x-ray sensitivity), and demonstrating low dark current, very low charge trapping and charge release, and a large range of linear signal response. In two of the designs having 75 and 90 μm pitches, a novel continuous photodiode structure was found to provide fill factors that approach the theoretical maximum of 100%. Both sets of novel designs achieved large fill factors by employing architectures in which some, or all of the photodiode structure was elevated above the plane of the pixel addressing transistor. Generally, enhancement of the fill factor in either discrete or continuous

  3. Resource Discovery in Activity-Based Sensor Networks

    Bucur, Doina; Bardram, Jakob

    This paper proposes a service discovery protocol for sensor networks that is specifically tailored for use in humancentered pervasive environments. It uses the high-level concept of computational activities (as logical bundles of data and resources) to give sensors in Activity-Based Sensor Networks...... (ABSNs) knowledge about their usage even at the network layer. ABSN redesigns classical network-level service discovery protocols to include and use this logical structuring of the network for a more practically applicable service discovery scheme. Noting that in practical settings activity-based sensor...... patches are localized, ABSN designs a completely distributed, hybrid discovery protocol which is proactive in a neighbourhood zone and reactive outside, tailored so that any query among the sensors of one activity is routed through the network with minimum overhead, guided by the bounds of that activity...

  4. Summary of One Year Operation of the EUDET CMOS Pixel Telescope

    Gregor, Ingrid-Maria

    2009-01-01

    Within the EUDET consortium a high resolution pixel beam telescope is being developed. The telescope consists of up to six planes of monolithic active pixel sensors. A flexible data acquisition environment is available for the telescope and the system is equipped with all the required infrastructure. Since the first installation of a demonstrator telescope in 2007, it has been extensively tested and used by various detector R&D groups. The results of test beam measurements are described here,...

  5. Development of SOI pixel detector in Cracow

    Bugiel, Szymon; Glab, Sebastian; Idzik, Marek; Moron, Jakub; Kapusta, Piotr Julian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Turala, Michal

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a new monolithic Silicon-On-Insulator pixel sensor in $200~nm$ SOI CMOS technology. The main application of the proposed pixel detector is the spectroscopy, but it can also be used for the minimum ionizing particle (MIP) tracking in particle physics experiments. For this reason few different versions of pixel cells are developed: a source-follower based pixel for tracking, a low noise pixel with preamplifier for spectroscopy, and a self-triggering pixel for time and amplitude measurements. In addition the design of a Successive Approximation Register Analog-to-Digital Converter (SAR ADC) is also presented. A 10-bit SAR ADC is developed for spectroscopic measurements and a lower resolution 6-bit SAR ADC is integrated in the pixel matrix as a column ADC, for tracking applications.

  6. Pulse-Driven Magnetoimpedance Sensor Detection of Cardiac Magnetic Activity

    Nakayama, Shinsuke; Sawamura, Kenta; Mohri, Kaneo; Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to establish a convenient method for detecting biomagnetic activity in the heart. Electrical activity of the heart simultaneously induces a magnetic field. Detection of this magnetic activity will enable non-contact, noninvasive evaluation to be made. We improved the sensitivity of a pulse-driven magnetoimpedance (PMI) sensor, which is used as an electric compass in mobile phones and as a motion sensor of the operation handle in computer games, toward a pico-Tesla (pT) level...

  7. Low-power high-accuracy micro-digital sun sensor by means of a CMOS image sensor

    Xie, N.; Theuwissen, A.J.P.

    2013-01-01

    A micro-digital sun sensor (μDSS) is a sun detector which senses a satellite’s instant attitude angle with respect to the sun. The core of this sensor is a system-on-chip imaging chip which is referred to as APS+. The APS+ integrates a CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) array of 368×368  pixels , a 12-b

  8. Development and Characterization of Diamond and 3D-Silicon Pixel Detectors with ATLAS-Pixel Readout Electronics

    Mathes, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: Hybrid pixel detectors are used for particle tracking in the innermost layers of current high energy experiments like ATLAS. After the proposed luminosity upgrade of the LHC, they will have to survive very high radiation fluences of up to 10^16 particles per cm^2 per life time. New sensor concepts and materials are required, which promise to be more radiation tolerant than the currently used planar silicon sensors. Most prominent candidates are so-called 3D-silicon and single crystal or poly-crystalline diamond sensors. Using the ATLAS pixel electronics different detector prototypes with a pixel geometry of 400 × 50 um^2 have been built. In particular three devices have been studied in detail: a 3D-silicon and a single crystal diamond detector with an active area of about 1 cm^2 and a poly-crystalline diamond detector of the same size as a current ATLAS pixel detector module (2 × 6 cm^2). To characterize the devices regarding their particle detection efficiency and spatial resolution, the charge c...

  9. Large area CMOS image sensors

    CMOS image sensors, also known as CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APS) or Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), are today the dominant imaging devices. They are omnipresent in our daily life, as image sensors in cellular phones, web cams, digital cameras, ... In these applications, the pixels can be very small, in the micron range, and the sensors themselves tend to be limited in size. However, many scientific applications, like particle or X-ray detection, require large format, often with large pixels, as well as other specific performance, like low noise, radiation hardness or very fast readout. The sensors are also required to be sensitive to a broad spectrum of radiation: photons from the silicon cut-off in the IR down to UV and X- and gamma-rays through the visible spectrum as well as charged particles. This requirement calls for modifications to the substrate to be introduced to provide optimized sensitivity. This paper will review existing CMOS image sensors, whose size can be as large as a single CMOS wafer, and analyse the technical requirements and specific challenges of large format CMOS image sensors.

  10. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-11-01

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0-60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems.

  11. Characterisation of edgeless technologies for pixellated and strip silicon detectors with a micro-focused X-ray beam

    Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Christophersen, M.; Eklund, L.; Ely, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Gimenez, E.; Kachkanov, V.; Kalliopuska, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Maneuski, D.; Phlips, B. F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Stewart, G.; Tartoni, N.; Zain, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    Reduced edge or ``edgeless'' detector design offers seamless tileability of sensors for a wide range of applications from particle physics to synchrotron and free election laser (FEL) facilities and medical imaging. Combined with through-silicon-via (TSV) technology, this would allow reduced material trackers for particle physics and an increase in the active area for synchrotron and FEL pixel detector systems. In order to quantify the performance of different edgeless fabrication methods, 2 edgeless detectors were characterized at the Diamond Light Source using an 11 μm FWHM 15 keV micro-focused X-ray beam. The devices under test were: a 150 μm thick silicon active edge pixel sensor fabricated at VTT and bump-bonded to a Medipix2 ROIC; and a 300 μm thick silicon strip sensor fabricated at CIS with edge reduction performed by SCIPP and the NRL and wire bonded to an ALiBaVa readout system. Sub-pixel resolution of the 55 μm active edge pixels was achieved. Further scans showed no drop in charge collection recorded between the centre and edge pixels, with a maximum deviation of 5% in charge collection between scanned edge pixels. Scans across the cleaved and standard guard ring edges of the strip detector also show no reduction in charge collection. These results indicate techniques such as the scribe, cleave and passivate (SCP) and active edge processes offer real potential for reduced edge, tiled sensors for imaging detection applications.

  12. Characterisation of edgeless technologies for pixellated and strip silicon detectors with a micro-focused X-ray beam

    Reduced edge or ''edgeless'' detector design offers seamless tileability of sensors for a wide range of applications from particle physics to synchrotron and free election laser (FEL) facilities and medical imaging. Combined with through-silicon-via (TSV) technology, this would allow reduced material trackers for particle physics and an increase in the active area for synchrotron and FEL pixel detector systems. In order to quantify the performance of different edgeless fabrication methods, 2 edgeless detectors were characterized at the Diamond Light Source using an 11 μm FWHM 15 keV micro-focused X-ray beam. The devices under test were: a 150 μm thick silicon active edge pixel sensor fabricated at VTT and bump-bonded to a Medipix2 ROIC; and a 300 μm thick silicon strip sensor fabricated at CIS with edge reduction performed by SCIPP and the NRL and wire bonded to an ALiBaVa readout system. Sub-pixel resolution of the 55 μm active edge pixels was achieved. Further scans showed no drop in charge collection recorded between the centre and edge pixels, with a maximum deviation of 5% in charge collection between scanned edge pixels. Scans across the cleaved and standard guard ring edges of the strip detector also show no reduction in charge collection. These results indicate techniques such as the scribe, cleave and passivate (SCP) and active edge processes offer real potential for reduced edge, tiled sensors for imaging detection applications.

  13. Pulse-driven magnetoimpedance sensor detection of cardiac magnetic activity.

    Shinsuke Nakayama

    Full Text Available This study sought to establish a convenient method for detecting biomagnetic activity in the heart. Electrical activity of the heart simultaneously induces a magnetic field. Detection of this magnetic activity will enable non-contact, noninvasive evaluation to be made. We improved the sensitivity of a pulse-driven magnetoimpedance (PMI sensor, which is used as an electric compass in mobile phones and as a motion sensor of the operation handle in computer games, toward a pico-Tesla (pT level, and measured magnetic fields on the surface of the thoracic wall in humans. The changes in magnetic field detected by this sensor synchronized with the electric activity of the electrocardiogram (ECG. The shape of the magnetic wave was largely altered by shifting the sensor position within 20 mm in parallel and/or perpendicular to the thoracic wall. The magnetic activity was maximal in the 4th intercostals near the center of the sterna. Furthermore, averaging the magnetic activity at 15 mm in the distance between the thoracic wall and the sensor demonstrated magnetic waves mimicking the P wave and QRS complex. The present study shows the application of PMI sensor in detecting cardiac magnetic activity in several healthy subjects, and suggests future applications of this technology in medicine and biology.

  14. 基于4T结构的高灵敏度CMOS图像传感器设计%Design of High Sensitivity CMOS Image Sensor Based on 4T Pixel Structure

    刘昌举; 吴治军; 祝晓笑; 熊平; 吕玉冰

    2013-01-01

    Based on 0.35 μm process,CMOS image sensor with low noise and high sensitivity are designed for use in low light environment.The sensor applying PPD 4T pixel with the array of 512× 512,includes column amplifiers,shift register,digital controller,single slope ADC and bias circuit.By adopting the low noise structure of PPD 4T pixel and column the column-level circuit and optimal design about the layout of 4T pixel,the CMOS sensors design with low-noise and high sensitivity is realized.%基于0.35 μm工艺,设计了应用于低光照环境下的低噪声、高灵敏度CMOS图像传感器.该图像传感器采用PPD 4T像素结构,像素阵列512×512,包含列级运放、水平移位寄存器、逻辑控制单元、单斜率模数转换器和偏置电路等模块.通过采用低噪声PPD 4T像素结构、低噪声列级放大器电路结构,以及对版图的优化设计等措施实现了低噪声、高灵敏度的CMOS图像传感器设计.

  15. Active Self-Testing Noise Measurement Sensors for Large-Scale Environmental Sensor Networks

    Federico Domínguez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale noise pollution sensor networks consist of hundreds of spatially distributed microphones that measure environmental noise. These networks provide historical and real-time environmental data to citizens and decision makers and are therefore a key technology to steer environmental policy. However, the high cost of certified environmental microphone sensors render large-scale environmental networks prohibitively expensive. Several environmental network projects have started using off-the-shelf low-cost microphone sensors to reduce their costs, but these sensors have higher failure rates and produce lower quality data. To offset this disadvantage, we developed a low-cost noise sensor that actively checks its condition and indirectly the integrity of the data it produces. The main design concept is to embed a 13 mm speaker in the noise sensor casing and, by regularly scheduling a frequency sweep, estimate the evolution of the microphone’s frequency response over time. This paper presents our noise sensor’s hardware and software design together with the results of a test deployment in a large-scale environmental network in Belgium. Our middle-range-value sensor (around €50 effectively detected all experienced malfunctions, in laboratory tests and outdoor deployments, with a few false positives. Future improvements could further lower the cost of our sensor below €10.

  16. The Sandia MEMS passive shock sensor : FY07 maturation activities.

    Houston, Jack E.; Blecke, Jill; Mitchell, John Anthony; Wittwer, Jonathan W.; Crowson, Douglas A.; Clemens, Rebecca C.; Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Epp, David S.; Baker, Michael Sean

    2008-08-01

    This report describes activities conducted in FY07 to mature the MEMS passive shock sensor. The first chapter of the report provides motivation and background on activities that are described in detail in later chapters. The second chapter discusses concepts that are important for integrating the MEMS passive shock sensor into a system. Following these two introductory chapters, the report details modeling and design efforts, packaging, failure analysis and testing and validation. At the end of FY07, the MEMS passive shock sensor was at TRL 4.

  17. Active low intrusion hybrid monitor for wireless sensor networks

    Marlon Navia; Campelo, Jose C.; Alberto Bonastre; Rafael Ors; Capella, Juan V.; Juan J. Serrano

    2015-01-01

    Several systems have been proposed to monitor wireless sensor networks (WSN). These systems may be active (causing a high degree of intrusion) or passive (low observability inside the nodes). This paper presents the implementation of an active hybrid (hardware and software) monitor with low intrusion. It is based on the addition to the sensor node of a monitor node (hardware part) which, through a standard interface, is able to receive the monitoring information sent by a piece of software ex...

  18. MAPLE activities and applications in gas sensors

    Jelínek, Miroslav; Remsa, Jan; Kocourek, Tomáš; Kubešová, B.; Schůrek, J.; Myslík, V.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 3 (2011), 643-649. ISSN 0947-8396 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : MAPLE * gas sensors * biomedicine * thin film s Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.630, year: 2011

  19. An EUDET/AIDA Pixel Beam Telescope for Detector Development

    Rubinskiy, I

    2015-01-01

    A high resolution (σ∼2μm) beam telescope based on monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) was developed within the EUDET collaboration. The telescope consists of six monolithic active pixel sensor planes (Mimosa26) with a pixel pitch of 18.4 \\mu m and thinned down to 50 \\mu m. The excellent resolution, readout rate and DAQ integration capabilities made the telescope a primary test beam tool for many groups including several CERN based experiments. Within the European detector infrastructure project AIDA the test beam telescope is being further extended in terms of cooling and powering infrastructure, read-out speed, area of acceptance, and precision. In order to provide a system optimized for the different requirements by the user community a combination of various state-of-the-art pixel technologies is foreseen. Furthermore, new central dead-time-free trigger logic unit (TLU) has been developed to provide LHC-speed response with one-trigger-per-particle operating mode and a synchronous clock for all conn...

  20. Pixel electronics for the ATLAS experiment

    Fischer, P

    2001-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at LHC will use 3 barrel layers and 2*5 disks of silicon pixel detectors as the innermost elements of the semiconductor tracker. The basic building blocks are pixel modules with an active area of 16.4 mm*60.8 mm which include an n/sup +/ on n-type silicon sensor and 16 VLSI front-end (FE) chips. Every FE chip contains a low power, high speed charge sensitive preamplifier, a fast discriminator, and a readout system which operates at the 40 MHz rate of LHC. The addresses of hit pixels (as well as a low resolution pulse height information) are stored on the FE chips until arrival of a level 1 trigger signal. Hits are then transferred to a module controller chip (MCC) which collects the data of all 16 FE chips, builds complete events and sends the data through two optical links to the data acquisition system. The MCC receives clock and data through an additional optical link and provides timing and configuration information for the FE chips. Two additional chips are used to amplify and decode...