WorldWideScience

Sample records for active neutron interrogation

  1. A review of conventional explosives detection using active neutron interrogation

    Conventional explosives are relatively easy to obtain and may cause massive harm to people and property. There are several tools employed by law enforcement to detect explosives, but these can be subverted. Active neutron interrogation is a viable alternative to those techniques, and includes: fast neutron analysis, thermal neutron analysis, pulsed fast/thermal neutron analysis, neutron elastic scatter, and fast neutron radiography. These methods vary based on neutron energy and radiation detected. A thorough review of the principles behind, advantages, and disadvantages of the different types of active neutron interrogation is presented. (author)

  2. Layered shielding design for an active neutron interrogation system

    Whetstone, Zachary D.; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.

    2016-08-01

    The use of source and detector shields in active neutron interrogation can improve detector signal. In simulations, a shielded detector with a source rotated π/3 rad relative to the opening decreased neutron flux roughly three orders of magnitude. Several realistic source and detector shield configurations were simulated. A layered design reduced neutron and secondary photon flux in the detector by approximately one order of magnitude for a deuterium-tritium source. The shield arrangement can be adapted for a portable, modular design.

  3. Improved Fission Neutron Data Base for Active Interrogation of Actinides

    Pozzi, Sara; Czirr, J. Bart; Haight, Robert; Kovash, Michael; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2013-11-06

    This project will develop an innovative neutron detection system for active interrogation measurements. Many active interrogation methods to detect fissionable material are based on the detection of neutrons from fission induced by fast neutrons or high-energy gamma rays. The energy spectrum of the fission neutrons provides data to identify the fissionable isotopes and materials such as shielding between the fissionable material and the detector. The proposed path for the project is as follows. First, the team will develop new neutron detection systems and algorithms by Monte Carlo simulations and bench-top experiments. Next, They will characterize and calibrate detection systems both with monoenergetic and white neutron sources. Finally, high-fidelity measurements of neutron emission from fissions induced by fast neutrons will be performed. Several existing fission chambers containing U-235, Pu-239, U-238, or Th-232 will be used to measure the neutron-induced fission neutron emission spectra. The challenge for making confident measurements is the detection of neutrons in the energy ranges of 0.01 – 1 MeV and above 8 MeV, regions where the basic data on the neutron energy spectrum emitted from fission is least well known. In addition, improvements in the specificity of neutron detectors are required throughout the complete energy range: they must be able to clearly distinguish neutrons from other radiations, in particular gamma rays and cosmic rays. The team believes that all of these challenges can be addressed successfully with emerging technologies under development by this collaboration. In particular, the collaboration will address the area of fission neutron emission spectra for isotopes of interest in the advanced fuel cycle initiative (AFCI).

  4. Active Interrogation Using Electronic Neutron Generators for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    Chichester, D. L.; Seabury, E. H.

    2009-03-01

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. The most commonly used technique for performing active interrogation is to use an electronic neutron generator as the probe radiation source. Exploiting the unique operating characteristics of these devices, including their monoenergetic neutron emissions and their ability to operate in pulsed modes, presents a number of options for performing prompt and delayed signature analyses using both photon and neutron sensors. A review of literature in this area shows multiple applications of the active neutron interrogation technique for performing nuclear nonproliferation measurements. Some examples include measuring the plutonium content of spent fuel, assaying plutonium residue in spent fuel hull claddings, assaying plutonium in aqueous fuel reprocessing process streams, and assaying nuclear fuel reprocessing facility waste streams to detect and quantify fissile material. This paper discusses the historical use of this technique and examines its context within the scope and challenges of next-generation nuclear fuel cycles and advanced concept nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

  5. Active Interrogation Using Electronic Neutron Generators for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    David L. Chichester; Edward H. Seabury

    2008-08-01

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. The most commonly used technique for performing active interrogation is to use an electronic neutron generator as the probe radiation source. Exploiting the unique operating characteristics of these devices, including their monoenergetic neutron emissions and their ability to operate in pulsed modes, presents a number of options for performing prompt and delayed signature analyses using both photon and neutron sensors. A review of literature in this area shows multiple applications of the active neutron interrogation technique for performing nuclear nonproliferation measurements. Some examples include measuring the plutonium content of spent fuel, assaying plutonium residue in spent fuel hull claddings, assaying plutonium in aqueous fuel reprocessing process streams, and assaying nuclear fuel reprocessing facility waste streams to detect and quantify fissile material. This paper discusses the historical use of this technique and examines its context within the scope and challenges of next-generation nuclear fuel cycles and advanced concept nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

  6. Active Neutron Interrogation and Delayed Neutron Counting (AIDNEC) for assay of 235U

    A method has been developed for non destructive assay of 235U using active neutron interrogation followed by delayed neutron counting (AIDNEC) system. The neutrons from a plasma focus (PF) device were used to bombard the samples containing low enriched uranium ranging from 13 mg to 5 g. The PF device generates (1.2±0.3) x109 D-D fusion neutrons per shot with a pulse width of 46±5 ns. The delayed neutrons were monitored using a bank of six 3He detectors. The sensitivity of the system was found to be about 1000 cps per gram over the accumulation time of 25 seconds per neutron pulse of ∼109. The detection limit of the system is estimated to be 18 mg of 235U. (author)

  7. Radioactive waste package assay facility. Volume 2. Investigation of active neutron and active gamma interrogation

    Volume 2 of this report describes the theoretical and experimental work carried out at Harwell on active neutron and active gamma interrogation of 500 litre cemented intermediate level waste drums. The design of a suitable neutron generating target in conjunction with a LINAC was established. Following theoretical predictions of likely neutron responses, an experimental assay assembly was built. Responses were measured for simulated drums of ILW, based on CAGR, Magnox and PCM wastes. Good correlations were established between quantities of 235-U, nat-U and D2O contained in the drums, and the neutron signals. Expected sensitivities are -1g of fissile actinide and -100g of total actinide. A measure of spatial distribution is obtainable. The neutron time spectra obtained during neutron interrogation were more complex than expected, and more analysis is needed. Another area of discrepancy is the difference between predicted and measured thermal neutron flux in the drum. Clusters of small 3He proportional counters were found to be much superior for fast neutron detection than larger diameter counters. It is necessary to ensure constancy of electron beam position relative to target(s) and drum, and prudent to measure the target neutron or gamma output as appropriate. 59 refs., 77 figs., 11 tabs

  8. Advanced compact accelerator neutron generator technology for active neutron interrogation field work

    Due to a need for security screening instruments capable of detecting explosives and nuclear materials there is growing interest in neutron generator systems suitable for field use for applications broadly referred to as active neutron interrogation (ANI). Over the past two years Thermo Electron Corporation has developed a suite of different compact accelerator neutron generator products specifically designed for ANI field work to meet this demand. These systems incorporate hermetically-sealed particle accelerator tubes designed to produce fast neutrons using either the deuterium-deuterium (En = 2.5 MeV) or deuterium-tritium (En = 14.1 MeV) fusion reactions. Employing next-generation features including advanced sealed-tube accelerator designs, all-digital control electronics and innovative housing configurations these systems are suitable for many different uses. A compact system weighing less than 14 kg (MP 320) with a lifetime exceeding 1000 hours has been developed for portable applications. A system for fixed installations (P 325) has been developed with an operating life exceeding 4500 hours that incorporates specific serviceability features for permanent facilities with difficult-to-access shield blocks. For associated particle imaging (API) investigations a second-generation system (API 120) with an operating life of greater than 1000 hours has been developed for field use in which a high resolution fiberoptic imaging plate is specially configured to take advantage of a neutron point-source spot size of ∼2 mm. (author)

  9. Active Interrogation for Spent Fuel

    Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dougan, Arden [National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-11-05

    The DDA instrument for nuclear safeguards is a fast, non-destructive assay, active neutron interrogation technique using an external 14 MeV DT neutron generator for characterization and verification of spent nuclear fuel assemblies.

  10. Multiple-Coincidence Active Neutron Interrogation of Fissionable Materials

    Using a beam of tagged 14.1 MeV neutrons to probe for the presence of fissionable materials, we have measured n-γ-γ coincidences from depleted uranium (DU). The multiple coincidence rate is substantially above that measured from lead, tungsten, and iron. The presence of coincidences involving delayed gammas in the DU time spectra provides a signature for fissionable materials that is distinct from non-fissionable ones. In addition, the information from the tagged neutron involved in the coincidence gives the position of the fissionable material in all three dimensions. The result is an imaging probe for fissionable materials that is more compact and that produces much less radiation than other solutions

  11. Improvements to an explosives detection algorithm based on active neutron interrogation using statistical modeling

    Earlier efforts have identified an algorithm that uses active neutron interrogation to find explosives hidden in cargo containers. This algorithm uses flags, in the form of specific mathematical manipulations of the exiting neutron and photon radiation at different angles, to classify the cargo type, search for hidden explosives, and minimize certain false positives due to cargo heterogeneities. Statistical modeling software has now been applied to the previously identified flags in an effort to improve the detection algorithm. The new detection models have shown accurate results exceeding 95 % for simplified screening scenarios 80-90 % when more realistic conditions are considered. (author)

  12. Using Electronic Neutron Generators in Active Interrogation to Detect Shielded Fissionable Material

    Experiments have been performed at Idaho National Laboratory to study methodology and instrumentation for performing neutron active interrogation die-away analyses for the purpose of detecting shielded fissionable material. Here we report initial work using a portable DT electronic neutron generator with a He-3 fast neutron detector to detect shielded fissionable material including >2 kg quantities of enriched uranium and plutonium. Measurements have been taken of bare material as well as of material hidden within a large plywood cube. Results from this work have demonstrated the efficacy of the die-away neutron measurement technique for quickly detecting the presence of special nuclear material hidden within plywood shields by analyzing the time dependent neutron signals in-between neutron generator pulses. Using a DT electronic neutron generator operating at 300 Hz with a yield of approximately 0.36 x 10**8 neutrons per second, 2.2 kg of enriched uranium hidden within a 0.60 m x 0.60 m x 0.70 m volume of plywood was positively detected with a measurement signal 2-sigma above the passive background within 1 second. Similarly, for a 500 second measurement period a lower detection limit of approaching the gram level could be expected with the same simple set-up

  13. Estimation of the Performance of Multiple Active Neutron Interrogation Signatures for Detecting Shielded HEU

    David L. Chichester; Scott J. Thompson; Scott M. Watson; James T. Johnson; Edward H. Seabury

    2012-10-01

    A comprehensive modeling study has been carried out to evaluate the utility of multiple active neutron interrogation signatures for detecting shielded highly enriched uranium (HEU). The modeling effort focused on varying HEU masses from 1 kg to 20 kg; varying types of shields including wood, steel, cement, polyethylene, and borated polyethylene; varying depths of the HEU in the shields, and varying engineered shields immediately surrounding the HEU including steel, tungsten, and cadmium. Neutron and gamma-ray signatures were the focus of the study and false negative detection probabilities versus measurement time were used as a performance metric. To facilitate comparisons among different approaches an automated method was developed to generate receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for different sets of model variables for multiple background count rate conditions. This paper summarizes results or the analysis, including laboratory benchmark comparisons between simulations and experiments. The important impact engineered shields can play towards degrading detectability and methods for mitigating this will be discussed.

  14. Active neutron and active gamma interrogation of 500 litre drums of cement-encapsulated intermediate level waste using an electron accelerator

    This report describes work carried out on linac-driven active neutron and active gamma interrogation of 500 litre cement encapsulated ILW drums at Harwell Laboratory, as part of a three year research programme on the development of an integrated radioactive waste package assay facility. Active neutron interrogation is sensitive to the fissile inventory and active gamma interrogation is sensitive to the total actinide inventory of the drum. Techniques for the calculation of neutron energy spectra and yields from a linac neutron target were developed and validated by comparison with published and new measurements. Existing Monte Carlo neutron transport codes and extensions of computer codes previously developed for active gamma interrogation work were also used. A facility for operation in either neutron or gamma interrogation mode was constructed in the Low Energy Cell of the Harwell linac HELIOS and was furnished with a bremsstrahlung target, a neutron target (for use in neutron interrogation mode), a variety of fast and thermal neutron detectors, and a flexible computer-controlled data acquisition system. Measurements were made of the system response in both interrogation modes for three 500 litre drums of simulated cemented CAGR, Magnox and PCM ILW each provided with a series of vertical sample holes into which samples of 235U (for active neutron interrogation) or natU and D2O (for active gamma interrogation) were placed. Measurements were made of the system response as a function of position and as a function of mass of the samples. In general the measurements confirmed the feasibility of the interrogation method. (author)

  15. Non-destructive assay of fissile materials through active neutron interrogation technique using pulsed neutron (plasma focus) device

    Pulsed neutrons emitted from a plasma focus (PF) device have been used for the first time for the non-destructive assay of 235U content in different chemical forms (oxide and metal). The PF device generates (1.2±0.3)×109 D–D fusion neutrons per shot with a pulse width of 46±5 ns. The method involves the measurement of delayed neutrons from an irradiated sample 50 ms after exposure to the neutron pulse for a time of about 100 s in the multichannel scaling (MCS) mode. The calibration of the active interrogation delayed neutron counter (AIDNEC) system was carried out by irradiating U3O8 samples of varying amounts (0.1–40 g) containing enriched 235U (14.8%) in the device. The delayed neutrons were monitored using a bank of six 3He detectors. The sensitivity of the system was found to be about 100 counts/s/g over the accumulation time of 25 s per neutron pulse of ∼109. The detection limit of the system is estimated to be 18 mg of 235U. The system can be suitably modified for applications toward non-destructive assay of fissile content in waste packets. -- Highlights: ► Plasma focus device has been used for the first time for non-destructive assay of 235U. ► Delayed neutron counting in the multichannel scaling mode is used for the determination of 235U. ► The total time taken for the measurement is about 100 s. ► The detection limit of the system is estimated to be 18 mg of 235U

  16. Non-destructive assay of fissile materials through active neutron interrogation technique using pulsed neutron (plasma focus) device

    Tomar, B.S., E-mail: bstomar@barc.gov.in [Radiochemistry and Isotope Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kaushik, T.C.; Andola, Sanjay; Ramniranjan,; Rout, R.K. [Multidisciplinary Research Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kumar, Ashwani; Paranjape, D.B.; Kumar, Pradeep; Ramakumar, K.L. [Radiochemistry and Isotope Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Gupta, S.C.; Sinha, R.K. [Multidisciplinary Research Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2013-03-01

    Pulsed neutrons emitted from a plasma focus (PF) device have been used for the first time for the non-destructive assay of {sup 235}U content in different chemical forms (oxide and metal). The PF device generates (1.2±0.3)×10{sup 9} D–D fusion neutrons per shot with a pulse width of 46±5 ns. The method involves the measurement of delayed neutrons from an irradiated sample 50 ms after exposure to the neutron pulse for a time of about 100 s in the multichannel scaling (MCS) mode. The calibration of the active interrogation delayed neutron counter (AIDNEC) system was carried out by irradiating U{sub 3}O{sub 8} samples of varying amounts (0.1–40 g) containing enriched {sup 235}U (14.8%) in the device. The delayed neutrons were monitored using a bank of six {sup 3}He detectors. The sensitivity of the system was found to be about 100 counts/s/g over the accumulation time of 25 s per neutron pulse of ∼10{sup 9}. The detection limit of the system is estimated to be 18 mg of {sup 235}U. The system can be suitably modified for applications toward non-destructive assay of fissile content in waste packets. -- Highlights: ► Plasma focus device has been used for the first time for non-destructive assay of {sup 235}U. ► Delayed neutron counting in the multichannel scaling mode is used for the determination of {sup 235}U. ► The total time taken for the measurement is about 100 s. ► The detection limit of the system is estimated to be 18 mg of {sup 235}U.

  17. Active interrogation using energetic protons

    Morris, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chung, Kiwhan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Greene, Steven J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hogan, Gary E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Makela, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mariam, Fesseha [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Milner, Edward C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Murray, Matthew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saunders, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spaulding, Randy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Waters, Laurie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wysocki, Frederick [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Energetic proton beams provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and they can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections and neutron yields for delayed neutrons and gamma rays using 800 MeV and 4 GeV proton beams with a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Measurements of neutron energies yield suggest a signature unique to fissile material. Results are presented in this paper.

  18. Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis as an active interrogation technique for nuclear materials

    Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGAA) is proposed as an instant, non-destructive method for the analysis of fissile materials and fission products. Measurements by PGAA were made on technetium and uranium compounds, the latter with various enrichments. Measurements were carried out in thermal and cold neutron beams at the Budapest Research Reactor. A beam chopper was used to collect the delayed decay gamma radiation from short lived nuclides separately. Accurate partial gamma ray production cross-sections were determined with internal standardization for a set of prompt and decay gamma rays following neutron capture in 235U, 238U and 99Tc and compared to those from the literature. In the case of 235U fission, prompt gamma lines were also applied.These cross-sections can be used for non-destructive analyses of uranium and technetium and also for the determination of the enrichment of uranium by prompt gamma activation analysis and neutron activation analysis. (author)

  19. Active neutron interrogation approach to detect special nuclear material in containers

    Cargo interrogation in search for special nuclear materials (SNM) like highly-enriched uranium (HEU) or Pu-239 is a first priority issue of international borders security. In this experimental work we present a thermal pulsed neutron based approach which combined with time-of-flight (TOF), demonstrates capability to detect small quantities of SNM shielded with moderate thicknesses of high or low Z materials providing, in addition, a manner to know the approximate position of the searched material. As many efforts are currently under way to exploit fast neutron penetration through cargo material, this work probes into the applicability of the complementary use of slow neutrons, taking advantage of the higher reaction cross sections, aimed at the usual cases of cargo with low neutron moderation capacity. If the surrounding merchandise were a highly moderating medium, the alternate fast neutron beam should be allowed to impinge on the object and undergo moderation in it, at the expense of loosing TOF information. The actual work employed a 25 MeV electron linac with a refrigerated lead target and a polyethylene neutron moderator as the pulsed source, although the technique is not restricted to that combination which, it must be said, is not the most favourable one. A wide area neutron detection moderating array (shielded from thermal background) was devoted to the detection of fission fast neutrons. Results are presented concerning the detection of an irradiated volume of SNM comprising some 11 grams of isotope U-235 (in aluminum matrix), although when hidden in a moderating surrounding, the whole 27 grams sample can be taken into account. The sample was detected, placed behind 3 mm steel wall and was also hidden under lead 5 cm thick and within a moderating environment provided by high density polyethylene 5 cm thick. As to position sensitivity, a 100 cm movement of the U-235 sample along the irradiation axis shifted the TOF neutron spectrum 300 μs. This movement is

  20. Application of active neutronic interrogation method to the line analysis in reprocessing plant

    In a reprocessing plant of irradiated spent fuels, the knowledge in real time (line analysis) of uranium and plutonium quantities present in solutions is an extremely important parameter to control the proceeding and for the apparatus safety. The active neutronic analysis give a nondestructive non intrusive and quick measure to know the concentrations. This method consists in inducing fissions in nuclides with a neutron source and then to detect the particles which come from

  1. Fissile mass estimation by pulsed neutron source interrogation

    Israelashvili, I., E-mail: israelashvili@gmail.com [Nuclear Research Center of the Negev, P.O.B 9001, Beer Sheva 84190 (Israel); Dubi, C.; Ettedgui, H.; Ocherashvili, A. [Nuclear Research Center of the Negev, P.O.B 9001, Beer Sheva 84190 (Israel); Pedersen, B. [Nuclear Security Unit, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Joint Research Centre, Via E. Fermi, 2749, 21027 Ispra (Italy); Beck, A. [Nuclear Research Center of the Negev, P.O.B 9001, Beer Sheva 84190 (Israel); Roesgen, E.; Crochmore, J.M. [Nuclear Security Unit, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Joint Research Centre, Via E. Fermi, 2749, 21027 Ispra (Italy); Ridnik, T.; Yaar, I. [Nuclear Research Center of the Negev, P.O.B 9001, Beer Sheva 84190 (Israel)

    2015-06-11

    Passive methods for detecting correlated neutrons from spontaneous fissions (e.g. multiplicity and SVM) are widely used for fissile mass estimations. These methods can be used for fissile materials that emit a significant amount of fission neutrons (like plutonium). Active interrogation, in which fissions are induced in the tested material by an external continuous source or by a pulsed neutron source, has the potential advantages of fast measurement, alongside independence of the spontaneous fissions of the tested fissile material, thus enabling uranium measurement. Until recently, using the multiplicity method, for uranium mass estimation, was possible only for active interrogation made with continues neutron source. Pulsed active neutron interrogation measurements were analyzed with techniques, e.g. differential die away analysis (DDA), which ignore or implicitly include the multiplicity effect (self-induced fission chains). Recently, both, the multiplicity and the SVM techniques, were theoretically extended for analyzing active fissile mass measurements, made by a pulsed neutron source. In this study the SVM technique for pulsed neutron source is experimentally examined, for the first time. The measurements were conducted at the PUNITA facility of the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy. First promising results, of mass estimation by the SVM technique using a pulsed neutron source, are presented.

  2. Fissile mass estimation by pulsed neutron source interrogation

    Passive methods for detecting correlated neutrons from spontaneous fissions (e.g. multiplicity and SVM) are widely used for fissile mass estimations. These methods can be used for fissile materials that emit a significant amount of fission neutrons (like plutonium). Active interrogation, in which fissions are induced in the tested material by an external continuous source or by a pulsed neutron source, has the potential advantages of fast measurement, alongside independence of the spontaneous fissions of the tested fissile material, thus enabling uranium measurement. Until recently, using the multiplicity method, for uranium mass estimation, was possible only for active interrogation made with continues neutron source. Pulsed active neutron interrogation measurements were analyzed with techniques, e.g. differential die away analysis (DDA), which ignore or implicitly include the multiplicity effect (self-induced fission chains). Recently, both, the multiplicity and the SVM techniques, were theoretically extended for analyzing active fissile mass measurements, made by a pulsed neutron source. In this study the SVM technique for pulsed neutron source is experimentally examined, for the first time. The measurements were conducted at the PUNITA facility of the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy. First promising results, of mass estimation by the SVM technique using a pulsed neutron source, are presented

  3. Narcotics detection using fast-neutron interrogation

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    Fast-neutron interrogation techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in luggage and cargo containers. This paper discusses two different fast-neutron techniques. The first uses a pulsed accelerator or sealed-tube source to produce monoenergetic fast neutrons. Gamma rays characteristic of carbon and oxygen are detected and the elemental densities determined. Spatial localization is accomplished by either time of flight or collimators. This technique is suitable for examination of large containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the high-energy gamma rays. The second technique uses an accelerator to produce nanosecond pulsed beams of deuterons that strike a target to produce a pulsed beam of neutrons with a continuum of energies. Elemental distributions are obtained by measuring the neutron spectrum after the source neutrons pass through the items being interrogated. Spatial variation of elemental densities is obtained by tomographic reconstruction of projection data obtained for three to five angles and relatively low (2 cm) resolution. This technique is best suited for examination of luggage or small containers with average neutron transmissions greater than about 0.01. Analytic and Monte-Carlo models are being used to investigate the operational characteristics and limitations of both techniques.

  4. Evaluation of a flag-based explosives detection algorithm based on active neutron interrogation for use in sea land cargo containers

    Highly explosive materials smuggled in sea land cargo containers are a security concern. An algorithm based on neutron and photon measurements during active neutron interrogation with 14.1 MeV neutrons was developed. The detection algorithm has now been evaluated for effectiveness over a wide range of explosive sizes, positions, and cargo configurations. Various sources of uncertainty were also studied. An estimate of the false positive and false negative rates was completed for various measurement conditions. Results showed that, although minimum detectable mass depends on the surrounding cargo, explosive position, and cargo configuration, 200 kg RDX could be reliably detected. (author)

  5. Active neutron interrogation for verification of storage of weapons components at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    A nuclear weapons identification system (NWIS), under development since 1984 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and presently in use there, uses active neutron interrogation with low-intensity 252Cf sources in ionization chambers to provide a timed source of fission neutrons from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf. To date, measurements have been performed on ∼15 different weapons systems in a variety of configurations both in and out of containers. Those systems included pits and fully assembled systems ready for deployment at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas, and weapons components at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. These measurements have shown that NWIS can identify nuclear weapons and/or components; nuclear weapons/components can be distinguished from mockups where fissile material has been replaced by nonfissile material; omissions of small amounts (4%) of fissile material can be detected; changes in internal configurations can be determined; trainer parts can be identified as was demonstrated by verification of 512 containers with B33 components at the Y-12 Plant (as many as 32 in one 8-hour shift); and nonfissile components can be identified. The current NWIS activities at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant include: (1) further development of the system for more portability and lower power consumption, (2) collection of reference signatures for all weapons components in containers, and (3) confirmation of a particular weapons component in storage and confirmation of receipts. This paper describes the recent measurements with NWIS for a particular weapons component in storage that have resolved an Inspector General (IG's) audit finding with regard to performance of confirmation of inventory

  6. Cadmium Subtraction Method for the Active Albedo Neutron Interrogation of Uranium

    Worrall, Louise G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Croft, Stephen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-02-01

    This report describes work performed under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) Cadmium Subtraction Project. The project objective was to explore the difference between the traditional cadmium (Cd) ratio signature and a proposed alternative Cd subtraction (or Cd difference) approach. The thinking behind the project was that a Cd subtraction method would provide a more direct measure of multiplication than the existing Cd ratio method. At the same time, it would be relatively insensitive to changes in neutron detection efficiency when properly calibrated. This is the first published experimental comparison and evaluation of the Cd ratio and Cd subtraction methods.

  7. Control of radioactive wastes and coupling of neutron/gamma measurements: use of radiative capture for the correction of matrix effects that penalize the fissile mass measurement by active neutron interrogation; Controle des dechets radioactifs et couplage de mesures neutron/gamma: exploitation de la capture radiative pour corriger les effets de matrice penalisant la mesure de la masse fissile par interrogation neutronique active

    Loche, F

    2006-10-15

    In the framework of radioactive waste drums control, difficulties arise in the nondestructive measurement of fissile mass ({sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu..) by Active Neutron Interrogation (ANI), when dealing with matrices containing materials (Cl, H...) influencing the neutron flux. The idea is to use the neutron capture reaction (n,{gamma}) to determine the matrix composition to adjust the ANI calibration coefficient value. This study, dealing with 118 litres, homogeneous drums of density less than 0,4 and composed of chlorinated and/or hydrogenated materials, leads to build abacus linking the {gamma} ray peak areas to the ANI calibration coefficient. Validation assays of these abacus show a very good agreement between the corrected and true fissile masses for hydrogenated matrices (max. relative standard deviation: 23 %) and quite good for chlorinated and hydrogenated matrices (58 %). The developed correction method improves the measured values. It may be extended to 0,45 density, heterogeneous drums. (author)

  8. Study and development of a method allowing the identification of actinides inside nuclear waste packages, by active neutron or photon interrogation and delayed gamma-ray spectrometry

    An accurate estimation of the alpha-activity of a nuclear waste package is necessary to select the best mode of storage. The main purpose of this work is to develop a non-destructive active method, based on the fission process and allowing the identification of actinides (235U, 238U, 239Pu). These three elements are the main alpha emitters contained inside a package. Our technique is based on the detection of delayed gammas emitted by fission products. These latter are created by irradiation with the help of a neutron or photon beam. Performances of this method have been investigated after an Active Photon or Neutron Interrogation (INA or IPA). Three main objectives were fixed in the framework of this thesis. First, we measured many yields of photofission products to compensate the lack of data in the literature. Then, we studied experimental performances of this method to identify a given actinide (239Pu in fission, 235U in photofission) present in an irradiated mixture. Finally, we assessed the application of this technique on different mock-up packages for both types of interrogation (118 l mock-up package containing EVA in fission, 220 l mock-up package with a wall of concrete in photofission). (author)

  9. Gamma/neutron analysis for SNM signatures at high-data rates (greater than 107 cps) for single-pulse active interrogation

    We are developing a high data gamma/neutron spectrometer suitable for active interrogation of special nuclear materials (SNM) activated by a single burst from an intense source. We have tested the system at Naval Research Laboratory's (NRL) Mercury pulsed-power facility at distances approaching 10 meters from a depleted uranium (DU) target. We have found that the gamma-ray field in the target room 'disappears' 10 milliseconds after the x-ray flash, and that gamma ray spectroscopy will then be dominated by isomeric states/beta decay of fission products. When a polyethylene moderator is added to the DU target, a time-dependent signature of the DU is produced by thermalized neutrons. We observe this signature in gamma-spectra measured consecutively in the 0.1-1.0 ms time range. These spectra contain the Compton edge line (2.2 MeV) from capture in hydrogen, and a continuous high energy gamma-spectrum from capture or fission in minority constituents of the DU.

  10. Control of radioactive wastes and coupling of neutron/gamma measurements: use of radiative capture for the correction of matrix effects that penalize the fissile mass measurement by active neutron interrogation

    In the framework of radioactive waste drums control, difficulties arise in the nondestructive measurement of fissile mass (235U, 239Pu..) by Active Neutron Interrogation (ANI), when dealing with matrices containing materials (Cl, H...) influencing the neutron flux. The idea is to use the neutron capture reaction (n,γ) to determine the matrix composition to adjust the ANI calibration coefficient value. This study, dealing with 118 litres, homogeneous drums of density less than 0,4 and composed of chlorinated and/or hydrogenated materials, leads to build abacus linking the γ ray peak areas to the ANI calibration coefficient. Validation assays of these abacus show a very good agreement between the corrected and true fissile masses for hydrogenated matrices (max. relative standard deviation: 23 %) and quite good for chlorinated and hydrogenated matrices (58 %). The developed correction method improves the measured values. It may be extended to 0,45 density, heterogeneous drums. (author)

  11. SIMULATION OF CARGO CONTAINER INTERROGATION BY D-D NEUTRONS

    High fidelity, three-dimensional computer models based on a CAD drawing of an intermodal cargo container, representative payload objects, and detector array panels were developed to simulate the underlying physical events taking place during active interrogation. These computer models are used to assess the performance of interrogation systems with different sources and detection schemes. In this presentation, we will show that the use oversimplified models, such as analyzing homogenized payloads only, can lead to errors in determining viable approaches for interrogation

  12. SIMULATION OF CARGO CONTAINER INTERROGATION BY D-D NEUTRONS

    Lou, Tak Pui; Antolak, Arlyn

    2007-02-15

    High fidelity, three-dimensional computer models based on a CAD drawing of an intermodal cargo container, representative payload objects, and detector array panels were developed to simulate the underlying physical events taking place during active interrogation. These computer models are used to assess the performance of interrogation systems with different sources and detection schemes. In this presentation, we will show that the use oversimplified models, such as analyzing homogenized payloads only, can lead to errors in determining viable approaches for interrogation.

  13. Active interrogation of highly enriched uranium

    Fairrow, Nannette Lea

    Safeguarding special nuclear material (SNM) in the Department of Energy Complex is vital to the national security of the United States. Active and passive nondestructive assays are used to confirm the presence of SNM in various configurations ranging from waste to nuclear weapons. Confirmation measurements for nuclear weapons are more challenging because the design complicates the detection of a distinct signal for highly enriched uranium. The emphasis of this dissertation was to investigate a new nondestructive assay technique that provides an independent and distinct signal to confirm the presence of highly enriched uranium (HEU). Once completed and tested this assay method could be applied to confirmation measurements of nuclear weapons. The new system uses a 14-MeV neutron source for interrogation and records the arrival time of neutrons between the pulses with a high efficiency detection system. The data is then analyzed by the Feynman reduced variance method. The analysis determined the amount of correlation in the data and provided a unique signature of correlated fission neutrons. Measurements of HEU spheres were conducted at Los Alamos with the new system. Then, Monte Carlo calculations were performed to verify hypothesis made about the behavior of the neutrons in the experiment. Comparisons of calculated counting rates by the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) were made with the experimental data to confirm that the measured response reflected the desired behavior of neutron interactions in the highly enriched uranium. In addition, MCNP calculations of the delayed neutron build-up were compared with the measured data. Based on the results obtained from this dissertation, this measurement method has the potential to be expanded to include mass determinations of highly enriched uranium. Although many safeguards techniques exist for measuring special nuclear material, the number of assays that can be used to confirm HEU in shielded systems is

  14. Neutron Interrogation System For Underwater Threat Detection And Identification

    Barzilov, Alexander P.; Novikov, Ivan S.; Womble, Phil C.

    2009-03-01

    Wartime and terrorist activities, training and munitions testing, dumping and accidents have generated significant munitions contamination in the coastal and inland waters in the United States and abroad. Although current methods provide information about the existence of the anomaly (for instance, metal objects) in the sea bottom, they fail to identify the nature of the found objects. Field experience indicates that often in excess of 90% of objects excavated during the course of munitions clean up are found to be non-hazardous items (false alarm). The technology to detect and identify waterborne or underwater threats is also vital for protection of critical infrastructures (ports, dams, locks, refineries, and LNG/LPG). We are proposing a compact neutron interrogation system, which will be used to confirm possible threats by determining the chemical composition of the suspicious underwater object. The system consists of an electronic d-T 14-MeV neutron generator, a gamma detector to detect the gamma signal from the irradiated object and a data acquisition system. The detected signal then is analyzed to quantify the chemical elements of interest and to identify explosives or chemical warfare agents.

  15. Neutron Interrogation System For Underwater Threat Detection And Identification

    Wartime and terrorist activities, training and munitions testing, dumping and accidents have generated significant munitions contamination in the coastal and inland waters in the United States and abroad. Although current methods provide information about the existence of the anomaly (for instance, metal objects) in the sea bottom, they fail to identify the nature of the found objects. Field experience indicates that often in excess of 90% of objects excavated during the course of munitions clean up are found to be non-hazardous items (false alarm). The technology to detect and identify waterborne or underwater threats is also vital for protection of critical infrastructures (ports, dams, locks, refineries, and LNG/LPG). We are proposing a compact neutron interrogation system, which will be used to confirm possible threats by determining the chemical composition of the suspicious underwater object. The system consists of an electronic d-T 14-MeV neutron generator, a gamma detector to detect the gamma signal from the irradiated object and a data acquisition system. The detected signal then is analyzed to quantify the chemical elements of interest and to identify explosives or chemical warfare agents.

  16. System design considerations for fast-neutron interrogation systems

    Nonintrusive interrogation techniques that employ fast neutrons are of interest because of their sensitivity to light elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. The primary requirement of a fast-neutron inspection system is to determine the value of atomic densities, or their ratios, over a volumetric grid superimposed on the object being interrogated. There are a wide variety of fast-neutron techniques that can provide this information. The differences between the various nuclear systems can be considered in light of the trade-offs relative to the performance requirements for each system's components. Given a set of performance criteria, the operational requirements of the proposed nuclear systems may also differ. For instance, resolution standards will drive scanning times and tomographic requirements, both of which vary for the different approaches. We are modelling a number of the fast-neutron interrogation techniques currently under consideration, to include Fast Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy (FNTS), Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis (PFNA), and its variant, 14-MeV Associated Particle Imaging (API). The goals of this effort are to determine the component requirements for each technique, identify trade-offs that system performance standards impose upon those component requirements, and assess the relative advantages and disadvantages of the different approaches. In determining the component requirements, we will consider how they are driven by system performance standards, such as image resolution, scanning time, and statistical uncertainty. In considering the trade-offs between system components, we concentrate primarily on those which are common to all approaches, for example: source characteristics versus detector array requirements. We will then use the analysis to propose some figures-of-merit that enable performance comparisons between the various fast-neutron systems under consideration. The status of this ongoing effort is presented

  17. Study and development of a method allowing the identification of actinides inside nuclear waste packages, by active neutron or photon interrogation and delayed gamma-ray spectrometry; Etude et developpement d'une technique de dosage des actinides dans les colis de dechets radioactifs par interrogation photonique ou neutronique active et spectrometrie des gamma retardes

    Carrel, F

    2007-10-15

    An accurate estimation of the alpha-activity of a nuclear waste package is necessary to select the best mode of storage. The main purpose of this work is to develop a non-destructive active method, based on the fission process and allowing the identification of actinides ({sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu). These three elements are the main alpha emitters contained inside a package. Our technique is based on the detection of delayed gammas emitted by fission products. These latter are created by irradiation with the help of a neutron or photon beam. Performances of this method have been investigated after an Active Photon or Neutron Interrogation (INA or IPA). Three main objectives were fixed in the framework of this thesis. First, we measured many yields of photofission products to compensate the lack of data in the literature. Then, we studied experimental performances of this method to identify a given actinide ({sup 239}Pu in fission, {sup 235}U in photofission) present in an irradiated mixture. Finally, we assessed the application of this technique on different mock-up packages for both types of interrogation (118 l mock-up package containing EVA in fission, 220 l mock-up package with a wall of concrete in photofission). (author)

  18. Measurement of uranium and plutonium in solid waste by passive photon or neutron counting and isotopic neutron source interrogation

    A summary of the status and applicability of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques for the measurement of uranium and plutonium in 55-gal barrels of solid waste is reported. The NDA techniques reviewed include passive gamma-ray and x-ray counting with scintillator, solid state, and proportional gas photon detectors, passive neutron counting, and active neutron interrogation with neutron and gamma-ray counting. The active neutron interrogation methods are limited to those employing isotopic neutron sources. Three generic neutron sources (alpha-n, photoneutron, and 252Cf) are considered. The neutron detectors reviewed for both prompt and delayed fission neutron detection with the above sources include thermal (3He, 10BF3) and recoil (4He, CH4) proportional gas detectors and liquid and plastic scintillator detectors. The instrument found to be best suited for low-level measurements (252Cf Shuffler. The measurement technique consists of passive neutron counting followed by cyclic activation using a 252Cf source and delayed neutron counting with the source withdrawn. It is recommended that a waste assay station composed of a 252Cf Shuffler, a gamma-ray scanner, and a screening station be tested and evaluated at a nuclear waste site. 34 figures, 15 tables

  19. Scoping studies - photon and low energy neutron interrogation

    Becker, G.; Harker, Y.; Jones, J. [LMITCo, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harmon, F. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States)

    1997-11-01

    High energy photon interrogation of waste containers, with the aim of producing photo nuclear reactions, in specific materials, holds the potential of good penetration and rapid analysis. Compact high energy ({le} 10 MeV) photon sources in the form of electron linacs producing bremstrahlung radiation are readily available. Work with the Varitron variable energy accelerator at ISU will be described. Advantages and limitations of the technique will be discussed. Using positive ion induced neutron producing reactions, it is possible to generate neutrons in a specific energy range. By this means, variable penetration and specific reactions can be excited in the assayed material. Examples using the {sup 3}H(p,n) and {sup 7}Li(p,n) reactions as neutron sources will be discussed. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Irradiation Effects for the Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis (PFNA) Cargo Interrogation System

    Slater, C.O.

    2001-02-02

    At the request of Safety and Ecology Corporation of Tennessee, radiation effects of the proposed Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis (PFNA) Cargo Interrogation System have been examined. First, fissile cargo were examined to determine if a significant neutron signal would be observable during interrogation. Results indicated that ample multiplication would be seen for near critical bare targets. The water-reflected sphere showed relatively little multiplication. By implication, a fissile target shielded by hydrogenous cargo might not be detectable by neutron interrogation, particularly if reliance is placed on the neutron signal. The cargo may be detectable if use can be made of the ample increase in the photon signal. Second, dose rates were calculated at various locations within and just outside the facility building. These results showed that some dose rates may be higher than the target dose rate of 0.05 mrem/h. However, with limited exposure time, the total dose may be well below the allowed total dose. Lastly, estimates were made of the activation of structures and typical cargo. Most cargo will not be exposed long enough to be activated to levels of concern. On the other hand, portions of the structure may experience buildup of some radionuclides to levels of concern.

  1. INL Neutron Interrogation R&D: FY2010 MPACT End of Year Report

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury; J. Wharton; S. M. Watson

    2010-08-01

    Experiments have been carried out to investigate the feasibility and utility of using neutron interrogation and small-scale, portable prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) instruments for assaying uranium for safeguards applications. Prior work has shown the potential of the PGNAA technique for assaying uranium using reactor-based neutron sources and high-yield electronic neutron generators (ENGs). In this project we adapted Idaho National Laboratory's portable isotopic neutron spectroscopy (PINS) PGNAA system for measuring natural-enrichment uranium yellowcake and metallic depleted uranium and highly enriched uranium. This work used 252Cf as well as deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) ENGs. For PGNAA measurements a limiting factor when assaying large objects is the detector dead time due to fast-neutron scattering off of the uranium; this limits the maximum useable neutron source strength to O(107) neutrons per second. Under these conditions the low PGNAA reaction cross sections for uranium prohibited the collection of useful uranium PGNAA signatures from either the yellowcake or metallic uranium samples. Measurement of the decay product activation in these materials following irradiation in the PGNAA geometry similarly did not produce useful uranium activation product – fission product signatures. A customized irradiation geometry tailored to optimally thermalize the interrogation neutron source, intended only for generating long-lived activation products – fission products and not intended for PGNAA measurements, might be possible using small scale ENGs but an application need and a modeling and simulation exercise would be recommended before advancing to experiments. Neutron interrogation PGNAA using a DT-ENG was found to be a quick and useful qualitative method for detecting the presence of oxygen in natural-enrichment uranium yellowcake. With a low effort of development work it would be reasonable to expect this

  2. Neutron interrogation of actinides with a 17 MeV electron accelerator and first results from photon and neutron interrogation non-simultaneous measurements combination

    Sari, A., E-mail: adrien.sari@cea.fr [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Electroniques, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Carrel, F.; Lainé, F. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Electroniques, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Lyoussi, A. [CEA, DEN, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2013-10-01

    In this article, we demonstrate the feasibility of neutron interrogation using the conversion target of a 17 MeV linear electron accelerator as a neutron generator. Signals from prompt neutrons, delayed neutrons, and delayed gamma-rays, emitted by both uranium and plutonium samples were analyzed. First results from photon and neutron interrogation non-simultaneous measurements combination are also reported in this paper. Feasibility of this technique is shown in the frame of the measurement of uranium enrichment. The latter was carried out by combining detection of prompt neutrons from thermal fission and delayed neutrons from photofission, and by combining delayed gamma-rays from thermal fission and delayed gamma-rays from photofission.

  3. Accelerator requirements for fast-neutron interrogation of luggage and cargo

    Several different fast-neutron based techniques are being studied for the detection of contraband substances in luggage and cargo containers. The present work discusses the accelerator requirements for fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy (FNTS), pulsed fast-neutron analysis (PFNA), and 14-MeV neutron interrogation. These requirements are based on the results of Monte-Carlo simulations of neutron or gamma detection rates. Accelerator requirements are driven by count-rate considerations, spatial resolution and acceptable uncertainties in elemental compositions. The authors have limited their analyses to luggage inspection with FNTS and to cargo inspection with PFNA or 14-MeV neutron interrogation

  4. INL Active Interrogation Testing In Support of the GNEP Safeguards Campaign

    David L. Chichester

    2008-04-01

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. Work at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in the area of active interrogation, using neutron and photon sources, has been under way for many years to develop methods for detecting and quantifying nuclear material for national and homeland security research areas. This research knowledge base is now being extended to address nuclear safeguards and process monitoring issues related to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). As a first step in this area preliminary scoping studies have been performed to investigate the usefulness of using active neutron interrogation, with a low-power electronic neutron generator, to assay Department of Transportation 6M shipping drums containing uranium oxide fuel rodlets from INL’s zero power physics reactor. Using the paired-counting technique during the die-away time period of interrogation, a lower detection limit of approximately 4.2 grams of enriched uranium (40% 235U) was calculated for a 40 minute measurement using a field portable 2.5 MeV neutron source and an array of 16 moderated helium-3 neutron tubes. Future work in this area, including the use of a more powerful neutron source and a better tailored detector array, would likely improve this limit to a much lower level. Further development work at INL will explore the applicability of active interrogation in association with the nuclear safeguards and process monitoring needs of the advanced GNEP facilities under consideration. This work, which will include both analyses and field demonstrations, will be performed in collaboration with colleagues at INL and elsewhere that have expertise in nuclear fuel reprocessing as well as active interrogation and its use for nuclear material analyses.

  5. INL Active Interrogation Testing In Support of the GNEP Safeguards Campaign

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. Work at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in the area of active interrogation, using neutron and photon sources, has been under way for many years to develop methods for detecting and quantifying nuclear material for national and homeland security research areas. This research knowledge base is now being extended to address nuclear safeguards and process monitoring issues related to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). As a first step in this area preliminary scoping studies have been performed to investigate the usefulness of using active neutron interrogation, with a low-power electronic neutron generator, to assay Department of Transportation 6M shipping drums containing uranium oxide fuel rodlets from INL's zero power physics reactor. Using the paired-counting technique during the die-away time period of interrogation, a lower detection limit of approximately 4.2 grams of enriched uranium (40% 235U) was calculated for a 40 minute measurement using a field portable 2.5 MeV neutron source and an array of 16 moderated helium-3 neutron tubes. Future work in this area, including the use of a more powerful neutron source and a better tailored detector array, would likely improve this limit to a much lower level. Further development work at INL will explore the applicability of active interrogation in association with the nuclear safeguards and process monitoring needs of the advanced GNEP facilities under consideration. This work, which will include both analyses and field demonstrations, will be performed in collaboration with colleagues at INL and elsewhere that have expertise in nuclear fuel reprocessing as well as active interrogation and its use for nuclear material analyses

  6. The simultaneous neutron and photon interrogation method for fissile and non-fissile element separation in radioactive waste drums

    Measuring α-emitters such as (234,235,236,238U, 238,239,240,242,244Pu, 237Np, 241,243Am, ...), in solid radioactive waste allows us to quantify the α-activity in a drum and then to classify it. The simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation experiment (SIMPHONIE) method dealt with in this paper, combines both active neutron interrogation and induced photofission interrogation techniques simultaneously. Its purpose is to quantify fissile (235U, 239,241Pu, ...) and non-fissile (236,238U, 238,240Pu, ...) elements separately in only one measurement. This paper presents the principle of the method, the experimental setup, and the first experimental results obtained using the DGA/ETCA Linac and MiniLinatron pulsed linear electron accelerators located at Arcueil, France. First studies were carried out with U and Pu bare samples

  7. Design of a neutron interrogation cell based on an electron accelerator and performance assessment on 220 liter nuclear waste mock-up drums

    Radiological characterization of nuclear waste drums is an important task for the nuclear industry. The amount of actinides, such as 235U or 239Pu, contained in a package can be determined using non-destructive active methods based on the fission process. One of these techniques, known as neutron interrogation, uses a neutron beam to induce fission reactions on the actinides. Optimization of the neutron flux is an important step towards improving this technique. Electron accelerators enable to achieve higher neutron flux intensities than the ones delivered by deuterium-tritium generators traditionally used on neutron interrogation industrial facilities. In this paper, we design a neutron interrogation cell based on an electron accelerator by MCNPX simulation. We carry out photoneutron interrogation measurements on uranium samples placed at the center of 220 liter nuclear waste drums containing different types of matrices. We quantify impact of the matrix on the prompt neutron signal, on the ratio between the prompt and delayed neutron signals, and on the interrogative neutron half-life time. We also show that characteristics of the conversion target of the electron accelerator enable to improve significantly measurement performances. (authors)

  8. Verification of plutonium content in spent fuel assemblies using neutron self-interrogation

    Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Apencer H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The large amounts of plutonium in reactor spent fuel assemblies has led to increased research directed toward the measurement of the plutonium for safeguards verification. The high levels of fission product gamma-ray activity and curium neutron backgrounds have made the plutonium measurement difficult. We have developed a new technique that can directly measure both the {sup 235}U concentration and the plutonium fissile concentration using the intrinsic neutron emission fronl the curium in the fuel assembly. The passive neutron albedo reactivity (PNAR) method has been described previously where the curium neutrons are moderated in the surrounding water and reflect back into the fuel assembly to induce fissions in the fissile material in the assembly. The cadmium (Cd) ratio is used to separate the spontaneous fission source neutrons from the reflected thermal neutron fission reactions. This method can measure the sum of the {sup 235}U and the plutonium fissile mass, but not the separate components. Our new differential die-away self-interrogation method (DDSI) can be used to separate the {sup 235}U from the {sup 239}Pu. The method has been applied to both fuel rods and full assemblies. For fuel rods the epi-thermal neutron reflection method filters the reflected neutrons through thin Cd filters so that the reflected neutrons are from the epi-cadmium energy region. The neutron fission energy response in the epi-cadmium region is distinctly different for {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. We are able to measure the difference between {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu by sampling the neutron induced fission rate as a function of time and multiplicity after the initial fission neutron is detected. We measure the neutron fission rate using list-mode data collection that stores the time correlations between all of the counts. The computer software can select from the data base the time correlations that include singles, doubles, and triples. The die-away time for the doubles

  9. Hidden explosives detector employing pulsed neutron and x-ray interrogation

    Methods and systems for the detection of small amounts of modern, highly-explosive nitrogen-based explosives, such as plastic explosives, hidden in airline baggage. Several techniques are employed either individually or combined in a hybrid system. One technique employed in combination is X-ray imaging. Another technique is interrogation with a pulsed neutron source in a two-phase mode of operation to image both nitrogen and oxygen densities. Another technique employed in combination is neutron interrogation to form a hydrogen density image or three-dimensional map. In addition, deliberately-placed neutron-absorbing materials can be detected

  10. Detection of Special Nuclear Material in Cargo Containers Using Neutron Interrogation

    Slaughter, D; Accatino, M; Bernstein, A; Candy, J; Dougan, A; Hall, J; Loshak, A; Manatt, D; Meyer, A; Pohl, B; Prussin, S; Walling, R; Weirup, D

    2003-08-01

    The goal of the work reported here is to develop a concept for an active neutron interrogation system that can detect small targets of SNM contraband in cargo containers, roughly 5 kg HEU or 1 kg Pu, even when well shielded by a thick cargo. It is essential that the concept be reliable and have low false-positive and false-negative error rates. It also must be rapid to avoid interruption of commerce, completing the analysis in minutes. A new radiation signature unique to SNM has been identified that utilizes high-energy (E{sub {gamma}} = 3-7 MeV) fission product {gamma}-ray emission. Fortunately, this high-energy {gamma}-ray signature is robust in that it is very distinct compared to normal background radiation where there is no comparable high-energy {gamma}-ray radiation. Equally important, it has a factor of 10 higher yield than delayed neutrons that are the basis of classical interrogation technique normally used on small unshielded specimens of SNM. And it readily penetrates two meters of low-Z and high-Z cargo at the expected density of {approx} 0.5 gm/cm{sup 3}. Consequently, we expect that in most cases the signature flux at the container wall is at least 2-3 decades more intense than delayed neutron signals used historically and facilitates the detection of SNM even when shielded by thick cargo. Experiments have verified this signature and its predicted characteristics. However, they revealed an important interference due to the activation of {sup 16}O by the {sup 16}O(n,p){sup 16}N reaction that produces a 6 MeV {gamma}-ray following a 7-sec {beta}-decay of the {sup 16}N. This interference is important when irradiating with 14 MeV neutrons but is eliminated when lower energy neutron sources are utilized since the reaction threshold for {sup 16}O(n,p){sup 16}N is 10 MeV. The signature {gamma}-ray fluxes exiting a thick cargo can be detected in large arrays of scintillation detectors to produce useful signal count rates of 2-4 x 10{sup 4} cps. That is high

  11. Detection of Special Nuclear Material in Cargo Containers Using Neutron Interrogation

    The goal of the work reported here is to develop a concept for an active neutron interrogation system that can detect small targets of SNM contraband in cargo containers, roughly 5 kg HEU or 1 kg Pu, even when well shielded by a thick cargo. It is essential that the concept be reliable and have low false-positive and false-negative error rates. It also must be rapid to avoid interruption of commerce, completing the analysis in minutes. A new radiation signature unique to SNM has been identified that utilizes high-energy (Eγ = 3-7 MeV) fission product γ-ray emission. Fortunately, this high-energy γ-ray signature is robust in that it is very distinct compared to normal background radiation where there is no comparable high-energy γ-ray radiation. Equally important, it has a factor of 10 higher yield than delayed neutrons that are the basis of classical interrogation technique normally used on small unshielded specimens of SNM. And it readily penetrates two meters of low-Z and high-Z cargo at the expected density of ∼ 0.5 gm/cm3. Consequently, we expect that in most cases the signature flux at the container wall is at least 2-3 decades more intense than delayed neutron signals used historically and facilitates the detection of SNM even when shielded by thick cargo. Experiments have verified this signature and its predicted characteristics. However, they revealed an important interference due to the activation of 16O by the 16O(n,p)16N reaction that produces a 6 MeV γ-ray following a 7-sec β-decay of the 16N. This interference is important when irradiating with 14 MeV neutrons but is eliminated when lower energy neutron sources are utilized since the reaction threshold for 16O(n,p)16N is 10 MeV. The signature γ-ray fluxes exiting a thick cargo can be detected in large arrays of scintillation detectors to produce useful signal count rates of 2-4 x 104 cps. That is high enough to quickly identify SNM fission by its characteristic high energy γ-ray emission and

  12. Detection and identification of unexploded ordnance (UXO) by neutron interrogation

    This document reviews the principle of operation and unexploded ordnance (UXO) signatures of the PINS Chemical Assay System, a prompt-gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) for the identification of recovered UXO. Two related low cost methods for buried landmine detection are also suggested. Nuclear methods may compliment existing search techniques to improve the overall probability of detection and to reduce the false positive rate of other technologies. In addition, nuclear methods are a proven method for identification of UXO such as landmines

  13. Monte Carlo parametric studies of neutron interrogation with the Associated Particle Technique for cargo container inspections

    Deyglun, Clément; Carasco, Cédric; Pérot, Bertrand

    2014-06-01

    The detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) by neutron interrogation is extensively studied by Monte Carlo simulation at the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory of CEA Cadarache (French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission). The active inspection system is based on the Associated Particle Technique (APT). Fissions induced by tagged neutrons (i.e. correlated to an alpha particle in the DT neutron generator) in SNM produce high multiplicity coincidences which are detected with fast plastic scintillators. At least three particles are detected in a short time window following the alpha detection, whereas nonnuclear materials mainly produce single events, or pairs due to (n,2n) and (n,n'γ) reactions. To study the performances of an industrial cargo container inspection system, Monte Carlo simulations are performed with the MCNP-PoliMi transport code, which records for each neutron history the relevant information: reaction types, position and time of interactions, energy deposits, secondary particles, etc. The output files are post-processed with a specific tool developed with ROOT data analysis software. Particles not correlated with an alpha particle (random background), counting statistics, and time-energy resolutions of the data acquisition system are taken into account in the numerical model. Various matrix compositions, suspicious items, SNM shielding and positions inside the container, are simulated to assess the performances and limitations of an industrial system.

  14. Evaluation of the neutron self-interrogation approach for assay of plutonium in high-α,n materials

    Neutron self-interrogation is a proposed method for assay of plutonium in bulk materials with very high α,n activity. The simple assay approach assumes that neutron multiplication for the calibration standards is the same as that for the bulk items. Efforts to use bulk properties to determine corrections to the calibration for changing multiplication have been initiated. Self-interrogation assays of bulk pyrochemical residues have been performed. Comparison with tag values obtained by difference gives poor agreement. Comparison with tag values obtained by dissolution and destructive analysis gives agreement at the 10% (1σ) level with no corrections for changing package dimensions or matrix amounts. The agreement improves by a factor of 2 or more if a bulk correction factor (derived from a packaging/matrix study with standards) is applied

  15. High-sensitivity transuranic waste assay by simultaneous proton and thermal-neutron interrogation using an electron linear accelerator

    Simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation from electron linear accelerator pulses is used as the basis for a unique assay technique for transuranics. Both prompt and delayed neutrons from the induced fissions are counted on a single detection system, and the contributions from each interrogating flux are resolved. Detection limits (3 sigma) for 239Pu were estimated to be 3 mg for prompt fission neutrons and 6 mg for delayed neutrons. The technique also provides a clear distinction between fissile and fertile nuclides

  16. FY09 Advanced Instrumentation and Active Interrogation Research for Safeguards

    D. L. Chichester; S. A. Pozzi; E. H. Seabury; J. L. Dolan; M. Flaska; J. T. Johnson; S. M. Watson; J. Wharton

    2009-08-01

    Multiple small-scale projects have been undertaken to investigate advanced instrumentation solutions for safeguard measurement challenges associated with advanced fuel cycle facilities and next-generation fuel reprocessing installations. These activities are in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Research and Development program and its Materials Protection, Accounting, and Control for Transmutation (MPACT) campaign. 1) Work was performed in a collaboration with the University of Michigan (Prof. Sara Pozzi, co-PI) to investigate the use of liquid-scintillator radiation detectors for assaying mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel, to characterize its composition and to develop advanced digital pulse-shape discrimination algorithms for performing time-correlation measurements in the MOX fuel environment. This work included both simulations and experiments and has shown that these techniques may provide a valuable approach for use within advanced safeguard measurement scenarios. 2) Work was conducted in a collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Dr. Paul Hausladen, co-PI) to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the fast-neutron coded-aperture imaging technique for locating and characterizing fissile material, and as a tool for performing hold-up measurements in fissile material handling facilities. This work involved experiments at Idaho National Laboratory, using MOX fuel and uranium metal, in both passive and active interrogation configurations. A complete analysis has not yet been completed but preliminary results suggest several potential uses for the fast neutron imaging technique. 3) Work was carried out to identify measurement approaches for determining nitric acid concentration in the range of 1 – 4 M and beyond. This work included laboratory measurements to investigate the suitability of prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis for this measurement and product reviews of other commercial solutions. Ultrasonic density analysis appears to

  17. Simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation using an electron accelerator in order to quantify actinides in encapsulated radioactive wastes

    Measuring out alpha emitters, such as (234,235,236,238U 238,239,240,242,244Pu, 237Np 241,243Am...), in solid radioactive waste, allows us to quantify the alpha activity in a drum and then to classify it. The SIMPHONIE (SIMultaneous PHOton and Neutron Interrogation Experiment) method, developed in this Ph.D. work, combines both the Active Neutron Interrogation and the Induced Photofission Interrogation techniques simultaneously. Its purpose is to quantify in only one measurement, fissile (235U, 239,241Pu...) and fertile (236,238U, 238,240Pu...) elements separately. In the first chapter of this Ph.D. report, we present the principle of the Radioactive Waste Management in France. The second chapter deals with the physical properties of neutron fission and of photofission. These two nuclear reactions are the basis of the SIMPHONIE method. Moreover, one of our purposes was to develop the ELEPHANT (ELEctron PHoton And Neutron Transport) code in view to simulate the electron, photon and neutron transport, including the (γ, n), (γ, 2n) and (γ, f) photonuclear reactions that are not taken into account in the MCNP4 (Monte Carlo N-Particle) code. The simulation codes developed and used in this work are detailed in the third chapter. Finally, the fourth chapter gives the experimental results of SIMPHONIE obtained by using the DGA/ETCA electron linear accelerators located at Arcueil, France. Fissile (235U, 239Pu) and fertile (238U) samples were studied. Furthermore, comparisons between experimental results and calculated data of photoneutron production in tungsten, copper, praseodymium and beryllium by using an electron LINear Accelerator (LINAC) are given. This allows us to evaluate the validity degree of the ELEPHANT code, and finally the feasibility of the SIMPHONIE method. (author)

  18. X-ray and neutron interrogation of air cargo for mobile applications

    A system for scanning break-bulk cargo for mobile applications is presented. This combines a 140 kV multi-view, multi-energy X-ray system with 2.5 MeV neutrons. The system uses dual energy X-ray radiography with neutron radiography. The X-ray and neutron systems were designed to be collocated in a mobile environment. Various materials were interrogated with the intent of distinguishing threat materials such as explosives from similar benign materials. In particular, the identification of threats and bengins with nearly identical effective atomic numbers has been demonstrated

  19. X-ray and neutron interrogation of air cargo for mobile applications

    Van Liew, Seth

    2015-06-01

    A system for scanning break-bulk cargo for mobile applications is presented. This combines a 140 kV multi-view, multi-energy X-ray system with 2.5 MeV neutrons. The system uses dual energy X-ray radiography with neutron radiography. The X-ray and neutron systems were designed to be collocated in a mobile environment. Various materials were interrogated with the intent of distinguishing threat materials such as explosives from similar benign materials. In particular, the identification of threats and bengins with nearly identical effective atomic numbers has been demonstrated.

  20. Hybrid Monte Carlo/Deterministic Methods for Accelerating Active Interrogation Modeling

    Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL; Miller, Thomas Martin [ORNL; Patton, Bruce W [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The potential for smuggling special nuclear material (SNM) into the United States is a major concern to homeland security, so federal agencies are investigating a variety of preventive measures, including detection and interdiction of SNM during transport. One approach for SNM detection, called active interrogation, uses a radiation source, such as a beam of neutrons or photons, to scan cargo containers and detect the products of induced fissions. In realistic cargo transport scenarios, the process of inducing and detecting fissions in SNM is difficult due to the presence of various and potentially thick materials between the radiation source and the SNM, and the practical limitations on radiation source strength and detection capabilities. Therefore, computer simulations are being used, along with experimental measurements, in efforts to design effective active interrogation detection systems. The computer simulations mostly consist of simulating radiation transport from the source to the detector region(s). Although the Monte Carlo method is predominantly used for these simulations, difficulties persist related to calculating statistically meaningful detector responses in practical computing times, thereby limiting their usefulness for design and evaluation of practical active interrogation systems. In previous work, the benefits of hybrid methods that use the results of approximate deterministic transport calculations to accelerate high-fidelity Monte Carlo simulations have been demonstrated for source-detector type problems. In this work, the hybrid methods are applied and evaluated for three example active interrogation problems. Additionally, a new approach is presented that uses multiple goal-based importance functions depending on a particle s relevance to the ultimate goal of the simulation. Results from the examples demonstrate that the application of hybrid methods to active interrogation problems dramatically increases their calculational efficiency.

  1. The development of enabling technologies for producing active interrogation beams

    A U.S./Russian collaboration of accelerator scientists was directed to the development of high averaged-current (∼1 mA) and high-quality (emittance ∼15 πmm mrad; energy spread ∼0.1%) 1.75 MeV proton beams to produce active interrogation beams that could be applied to counterterrorism. Several accelerator technologies were investigated. These included an electrostatic tandem accelerator of novel design, a compact cyclotron, and a storage ring with energy compensation and electron cooling. Production targets capable of withstanding the beam power levels were designed, fabricated, and tested. The cyclotron/storage-ring system was theoretically studied and computationally designed, and the electrostatic vacuum tandem accelerator at BINP was demonstrated for its potential in active interrogation of explosives and special nuclear materials.

  2. APSTNG: Neutron interrogation for detection of nuclear and CW weapons, explosives, and drugs

    A recently developed neutron diagnostic probe system has the potential to satisfy a significant number of van-mobile and fixed- portal requirements for nondestructive verification of sealed munitions and detection of contraband explosives and drugs. The probe is based on a unique associated-particle sealed-tube neutron generator (APSTNG) that interrogates the object of interest with a low-intensity beam of 14-MeV neutrons generated from the deuterium-tritium reaction and that detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron. Gamma-ray spectra of resulting neutron inelastic scattering and fission reactions identify nuclides associated with all major chemicals in chemical warfare agents, explosives, and drugs, as well as many pollutants and fissile and fertile special nuclear material. Flight times determined from determined from detection times of the gamma-rays and alpha-particles yield a separate tomographic image of each identified nuclide. The APSTNG also forms the basis for a compact fast-neutron transmission imaging system that can be used along with or instead of the emission imaging system; a collimator is not required since scattered neutrons are removed by ''electronic collimation'' (detected neutrons not having the proper flight time to be uncollided are discarded). The small and relatively inexpensive APSTNG exhibits high reliability and can be quickly replaced. Proof-of-concept experiments have been performed under laboratory conditions for simulated nuclear and chemical warfare munitions and for explosives and drugs

  3. APSTNG: Neutron interrogation for detection of nuclear and CW weapons, explosives, and drugs

    Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.; De Volpi, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Peters, C.W. [Nuclear Diagnostic Systems, Inc., Springfield, VA (United States)

    1992-07-01

    A recently developed neutron diagnostic probe system has the potential to satisfy a significant number of van-mobile and fixed- portal requirements for nondestructive verification of sealed munitions and detection of contraband explosives and drugs. The probe is based on a unique associated-particle sealed-tube neutron generator (APSTNG) that interrogates the object of interest with a low-intensity beam of 14-MeV neutrons generated from the deuterium-tritium reaction and that detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron. Gamma-ray spectra of resulting neutron inelastic scattering and fission reactions identify nuclides associated with all major chemicals in chemical warfare agents, explosives, and drugs, as well as many pollutants and fissile and fertile special nuclear material. Flight times determined from determined from detection times of the gamma-rays and alpha-particles yield a separate tomographic image of each identified nuclide. The APSTNG also forms the basis for a compact fast-neutron transmission imaging system that can be used along with or instead of the emission imaging system; a collimator is not required since scattered neutrons are removed by ``electronic collimation`` (detected neutrons not having the proper flight time to be uncollided are discarded). The small and relatively inexpensive APSTNG exhibits high reliability and can be quickly replaced. Proof-of-concept experiments have been performed under laboratory conditions for simulated nuclear and chemical warfare munitions and for explosives and drugs.

  4. APSTNG: Neutron interrogation for detection of nuclear and CW weapons, explosives, and drugs

    Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.; De Volpi, A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Peters, C.W. (Nuclear Diagnostic Systems, Inc., Springfield, VA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    A recently developed neutron diagnostic probe system has the potential to satisfy a significant number of van-mobile and fixed- portal requirements for nondestructive verification of sealed munitions and detection of contraband explosives and drugs. The probe is based on a unique associated-particle sealed-tube neutron generator (APSTNG) that interrogates the object of interest with a low-intensity beam of 14-MeV neutrons generated from the deuterium-tritium reaction and that detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron. Gamma-ray spectra of resulting neutron inelastic scattering and fission reactions identify nuclides associated with all major chemicals in chemical warfare agents, explosives, and drugs, as well as many pollutants and fissile and fertile special nuclear material. Flight times determined from determined from detection times of the gamma-rays and alpha-particles yield a separate tomographic image of each identified nuclide. The APSTNG also forms the basis for a compact fast-neutron transmission imaging system that can be used along with or instead of the emission imaging system; a collimator is not required since scattered neutrons are removed by electronic collimation'' (detected neutrons not having the proper flight time to be uncollided are discarded). The small and relatively inexpensive APSTNG exhibits high reliability and can be quickly replaced. Proof-of-concept experiments have been performed under laboratory conditions for simulated nuclear and chemical warfare munitions and for explosives and drugs.

  5. Active Interrogation using Photofission Technique for Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability

    Yang, Haori [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Innovative systems with increased sensitivity and resolution are in great demand to detect diversion and to prevent misuse in support of nuclear materials management for the U.S. fuel cycle. Nuclear fission is the most important multiplicative process involved in non-destructive active interrogation. This process produces the most easily recognizable signature for nuclear materials. In addition to thermal or high-energy neutrons, high-energy gamma rays can also excite a nucleus and cause fission through a process known as photofission. Electron linear accelerators (linac) are widely used as the interrogating photon sources for inspection methods involving photofission technique. After photofission reactions, prompt signals are much stronger than the delayed signals, but it is difficult to quantify them in practical measurements. Delayed signals are easily distinguishable from the interrogating radiation. linac-based, advanced inspection techniques utilizing the delayed signals after photofission have been extensively studied for homeland security applications. Previous research also showed that a unique delayed gamma ray energy spectrum exists for each fissionable isotope.

  6. Neutron absorbers and detector types for spent fuel verification using the self-interrogation neutron resonance densitometry

    The Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) is a passive non-destructive assay (NDA) technique that is proposed for the direct measurement of 239Pu in a spent fuel assembly. The insertion of neutron detectors wrapped with different neutron absorbing materials, or neutron filters, in the central guide tube of a PWR fuel assembly is envisaged to measure the neutron flux in the energy region close to the 0.3 eV resonance of 239Pu. In addition, the measurement of the fast neutron flux is foreseen. This paper is focused on the determination of the Gd and Cd neutron filters thickness to maximize the detection of neutrons within the resonance region. Moreover, several detector types are compared to identify the optimal condition and to assess the expected total neutron counts that can be obtained with the SINRD measurements. Results from Monte Carlo simulations showed that ranges between 0.1–0.3 mm and 0.5–1.0 mm ensure the optimal conditions for the Gd and Cd filters, respectively. Moreover, a 239Pu fission chamber is better suited to measure neutrons close to the 0.3 eV resonance and it has the highest sensitivity to 239Pu, in comparison with a 235U fission chamber, with a 3He proportional counter, and with a 10B proportional counter. The use of a thin Gd filter and a thick Cd filter is suggested for the 239Pu and 235U fission chambers to increase the total counts achieved in a measurement, while a thick Gd filter and a thin Cd filter are envisaged for the 3He and 10B proportional counters to increase the sensitivity to 239Pu. We concluded that an optimization process that takes into account measurement time, filters thickness, and detector size is needed to develop a SINRD detector that can meet the requirement for an efficient verification of spent fuel assemblies

  7. Investigations of active interrogation techniques to detect special nuclear material in maritime environments: Standoff interrogation of small- and medium-sized cargo ships

    In this work, several active interrogation (AI) sources are evaluated to determine their usefulness in detecting the presence of special nuclear material (SNM) in fishing trawlers, small cargo transport ships, and luxury yachts at large standoff distances from the AI source and detector. This evaluation is performed via computational analysis applying Monte Carlo methods with advanced variance reduction techniques. The goal is to determine the AI source strength required to detect the presence of SNM. The general conclusion of this study is that AI is not reliable when SNM is heavily shielded and not tightly coupled geometrically with the source and detector, to the point that AI should not be considered a via interrogation option in these scenarios. More specifically, when SNM is shielded by hydrogenous material large AI source strengths are required if detection is based on neutrons, which is not surprising. However, if the SNM is shielded by high-Z material the required AI source strengths are not significantly different if detection is based on neutrons or photons, which is somewhat surprising. Furthermore, some of the required AI source strengths that were calculated are very large. These results coupled with the realities of two ships moving independently at sea and other assumptions made during this analysis make the use of standoff AI in the maritime environment impractical

  8. A flag-based algorithm and associated neutron interrogation system for the detection of explosives in sea–land cargo containers

    Recent efforts in the simulation of sea–land cargo containers in active neutron interrogation scenarios resulted in the identification of several flags indicating the presence of conventional explosives. These flags, defined by specific mathematical manipulations of the neutron and photon spectra, have been combined into a detection algorithm for screening cargo containers at international borders and seaports. The detection algorithm's steps include classifying the cargo type, identifying containers filled with explosives, triggering in the presence of concealed explosives, and minimizing the number of false positives due to cargo heterogeneity. The algorithm has been implemented in a system that includes both neutron and photon detectors. This system will take about 10 min to scan a container and cost approximately $1M to construct. Dose calculations resulted in estimates of less than 0.5 mSv for a person hidden in the container, and an operator annual dose of less than 0.9 mSv. - Highlights: • Monte Carlo model of explosives screening in cargo containers using fast neutrons. • Monte Carlo model also explores neutron detector response. • Development of an explosives detection algorithm using active neutron interrogation. • Implementation of the algorithm, including equipment, infrastructure, cost and dose. • System will cost ~1M USD and an entire container may be scanned in ~10 min

  9. Development of a Liquid Scintillator-Based Active Interrogation System for LEU Fuel Assemblies

    The IAEA, in collaboration with the Joint Research Center (Ispra, IT) and Hybrid Instruments (Lancaster, UK), has developed a full scale, liquid scintillator-based active interrogation system to determine uranium (U) mass in fresh fuel assemblies. The system implements an array of moderate volume (∼1000 ml) liquid scintillator detectors, a multichannel pulse shape discrimination (PSD) system, and a high-speed data acquisition and signal processing system to assess the U content of fresh fuel assemblies. Extensive MCNPX-PoliMi modelling has been carried out to refine the system design and optimize the detector performance. These measurements, traditionally performed with 3He-based assay systems (e.g., Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar [UNCL], Active Well Coincidence Collar [AWCC]), can now be performed with higher precision in a fraction of the acquisition time. The system uses a high-flash point, non-hazardous scintillating fluid (EJ309) enabling their use in commercial nuclear facilities and achieves significantly enhanced performance and capabilities through the combination of extremely short gate times, adjustable energy detection threshold, real-time PSD electronics, and high-speed, FPGA-based data acquisition. Given the possible applications, this technology is also an excellent candidate for the replacement of select 3He-based systems. Comparisons to existing 3He-based active interrogation systems are presented where possible to provide a baseline performance reference. This paper will describe the laboratory experiments and associated modelling activities undertaken to develop and initially test the prototype detection system. (authors)

  10. Neutron absorbers and detector types for spent fuel verification using the self-interrogation neutron resonance densitometry

    Rossa, Riccardo, E-mail: rrossa@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang, 200, B2400 Mol (Belgium); Université libre de Bruxelles, Ecole polytechnique de Bruxelles, Service de Métrologie Nucléaire (CP 165/84), Avenue F.D. Roosevelt, 50, B1050 Brussels (Belgium); Borella, Alessandro, E-mail: aborella@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang, 200, B2400 Mol (Belgium); Labeau, Pierre-Etienne, E-mail: pelabeau@ulb.ac.be [Université libre de Bruxelles, Ecole polytechnique de Bruxelles, Service de Métrologie Nucléaire (CP 165/84), Avenue F.D. Roosevelt, 50, B1050 Brussels (Belgium); Pauly, Nicolas, E-mail: nipauly@ulb.ac.be [Université libre de Bruxelles, Ecole polytechnique de Bruxelles, Service de Métrologie Nucléaire (CP 165/84), Avenue F.D. Roosevelt, 50, B1050 Brussels (Belgium); Meer, Klaas van der, E-mail: kvdmeer@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang, 200, B2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2015-08-11

    The Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) is a passive non-destructive assay (NDA) technique that is proposed for the direct measurement of {sup 239}Pu in a spent fuel assembly. The insertion of neutron detectors wrapped with different neutron absorbing materials, or neutron filters, in the central guide tube of a PWR fuel assembly is envisaged to measure the neutron flux in the energy region close to the 0.3 eV resonance of {sup 239}Pu. In addition, the measurement of the fast neutron flux is foreseen. This paper is focused on the determination of the Gd and Cd neutron filters thickness to maximize the detection of neutrons within the resonance region. Moreover, several detector types are compared to identify the optimal condition and to assess the expected total neutron counts that can be obtained with the SINRD measurements. Results from Monte Carlo simulations showed that ranges between 0.1–0.3 mm and 0.5–1.0 mm ensure the optimal conditions for the Gd and Cd filters, respectively. Moreover, a {sup 239}Pu fission chamber is better suited to measure neutrons close to the 0.3 eV resonance and it has the highest sensitivity to {sup 239}Pu, in comparison with a {sup 235}U fission chamber, with a {sup 3}He proportional counter, and with a {sup 10}B proportional counter. The use of a thin Gd filter and a thick Cd filter is suggested for the {sup 239}Pu and {sup 235}U fission chambers to increase the total counts achieved in a measurement, while a thick Gd filter and a thin Cd filter are envisaged for the {sup 3}He and {sup 10}B proportional counters to increase the sensitivity to {sup 239}Pu. We concluded that an optimization process that takes into account measurement time, filters thickness, and detector size is needed to develop a SINRD detector that can meet the requirement for an efficient verification of spent fuel assemblies.

  11. Influence of fuel composition on the spent fuel verification by Self‑Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry

    The Self‑Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) is a passive Non‑Destructive Assay (NDA) that is developed for the safeguards verification of spent nuclear fuel. The main goal of SINRD is the direct quantification of 239Pu by estimating the SINRD signature, which is the ratio between the neutron flux in the fast energy region and in the region close to the 0.3 eV resonance of 239Pu. The resonance region was chosen because the reduction of the neutron flux within 0.2-0.4 eV is due mainly to neutron absorption from 239Pu, and therefore the SINRD signature can be correlated to the 239Pu mass in the fuel assembly. This work provides an estimate of the influence of 239Pu and other nuclides on the SINRD signature. This assessment is performed by Monte Carlo simulations by introducing several nuclides in the fuel material composition and by calculating the SINRD signature for each case. The reference spent fuel library developed by SCK CEN was used for the detailed fuel compositions of PWR 17x17 fuel assemblies with different initial enrichments, burnup, and cooling times. The results from the simulations show that the SINRD signature is mainly correlated to the 239Pu mass, with significant influence by 235U. Moreover, the SINRD technique is largely insensitive to the cooling time of the assembly, while it is affected by the burnup and initial enrichment of the fuel. Apart from 239Pu and 235U, many other nuclides give minor contributions to the SINRD signature, especially at burnup higher than 20 GWd/tHM.

  12. A flag-based algorithm and associated neutron interrogation system for the detection of explosives in sea-land cargo containers

    Lehnert, A. L.; Kearfott, K. J.

    2015-07-01

    Recent efforts in the simulation of sea-land cargo containers in active neutron interrogation scenarios resulted in the identification of several flags indicating the presence of conventional explosives. These flags, defined by specific mathematical manipulations of the neutron and photon spectra, have been combined into a detection algorithm for screening cargo containers at international borders and seaports. The detection algorithm's steps include classifying the cargo type, identifying containers filled with explosives, triggering in the presence of concealed explosives, and minimizing the number of false positives due to cargo heterogeneity. The algorithm has been implemented in a system that includes both neutron and photon detectors. This system will take about 10 min to scan a container and cost approximately 1M to construct. Dose calculations resulted in estimates of less than 0.5 mSv for a person hidden in the container, and an operator annual dose of less than 0.9 mSv.

  13. Simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation using an electron accelerator in order to quantify actinides in encapsulated radioactive wastes; Double interrogation simultanee neutrons et photons utilisant un accelerateur d'electrons pour la caracterisation separee des actinides dans les dechets radioactifs enrobes

    Jallu, F

    1999-09-24

    Measuring out alpha emitters, such as ({sup 234,235,236,238}U {sup 238,239,240,242,}2{sup 44P}u, {sup 237}Np {sup 241,243}Am...), in solid radioactive waste, allows us to quantify the alpha activity in a drum and then to classify it. The SIMPHONIE (SIMultaneous PHOton and Neutron Interrogation Experiment) method, developed in this Ph.D. work, combines both the Active Neutron Interrogation and the Induced Photofission Interrogation techniques simultaneously. Its purpose is to quantify in only one measurement, fissile ({sup 235}U, {sup 239,241}Pu...) and fertile ({sup 236,238}U, {sup 238,240}Pu...) elements separately. In the first chapter of this Ph.D. report, we present the principle of the Radioactive Waste Management in France. The second chapter deals with the physical properties of neutron fission and of photofission. These two nuclear reactions are the basis of the SIMPHONIE method. Moreover, one of our purposes was to develop the ELEPHANT (ELEctron PHoton And Neutron Transport) code in view to simulate the electron, photon and neutron transport, including the ({gamma}, n), ({gamma}, 2n) and ({gamma}, f) photonuclear reactions that are not taken into account in the MCNP4 (Monte Carlo N-Particle) code. The simulation codes developed and used in this work are detailed in the third chapter. Finally, the fourth chapter gives the experimental results of SIMPHONIE obtained by using the DGA/ETCA electron linear accelerators located at Arcueil, France. Fissile ({sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu) and fertile ({sup 238}U) samples were studied. Furthermore, comparisons between experimental results and calculated data of photoneutron production in tungsten, copper, praseodymium and beryllium by using an electron LINear Accelerator (LINAC) are given. This allows us to evaluate the validity degree of the ELEPHANT code, and finally the feasibility of the SIMPHONIE method. (author)

  14. The Nuclear Car Wash: Neutron interrogation of cargo containers to detect hidden SNM

    LLNL is actively involved in the development of advanced technologies for use in detecting threats in sea-going cargo containers, particularly the presence of hidden special nuclear materials (SNM). The 'Nuclear Car Wash' (NCW) project presented here uses a high-energy (E n ∼ 3.5-7.0 MeV) neutron probe to scan a container and then takes high-energy (E γ ≥ 2.5 MeV), β-delayed γ-rays emitted during the subsequent decay of any short-lived, neutron-induced fission products as a signature of fissionable material. The components of the proposed system (e.g. neutron source, gamma detectors, etc.) will be discussed along with data processing schemes, possible threat detection metrics and potential interference signals. Results from recent laboratory experiments using a prototype system at LLNL will also be presented

  15. The Nuclear Car Wash: Neutron interrogation of cargo containers to detect hidden SNM

    Hall, J. M.; Asztalos, S.; Biltoft, P.; Church, J.; Descalle, M.-A.; Luu, T.; Manatt, D.; Mauger, G.; Norman, E.; Petersen, D.; Pruet, J.; Prussin, S.; Slaughter, D.

    2007-08-01

    LLNL is actively involved in the development of advanced technologies for use in detecting threats in sea-going cargo containers, particularly the presence of hidden special nuclear materials (SNM). The "Nuclear Car Wash" (NCW) project presented here uses a high-energy (En ≈ 3.5-7.0 MeV) neutron probe to scan a container and then takes high-energy (Eγ ⩾ 2.5 MeV), β-delayed γ-rays emitted during the subsequent decay of any short-lived, neutron-induced fission products as a signature of fissionable material. The components of the proposed system (e.g. neutron source, gamma detectors, etc.) will be discussed along with data processing schemes, possible threat detection metrics and potential interference signals. Results from recent laboratory experiments using a prototype system at LLNL will also be presented.

  16. The synchronous active neutron detection assay system

    We have begun to develop a novel technique for active neutron assay of fissile material in spent nuclear fuel. This approach will exploit a 14-MeV neutron generator developed by Schlumberger. The technique, termed synchronous active neutron detection (SAND), follows a method used routinely in other branches of physics to detect very small signals in presence of large backgrounds. Synchronous detection instruments are widely available commercially and are termed ''lock-in'' amplifiers. We have implemented a digital lock-in amplifier in conjunction with the Schlumberger neutron generator to explore the possibility of synchronous detection with active neutrons. The Schlumberger system can operate at up to a 50% duty factor, in effect, a square wave of neutron yield. Results are preliminary but promising. The system is capable of resolving the fissile material contained in a small fraction of the fuel rods in a cold fuel assembly; it also appears resilient to background neutron interference. The interrogating neutrons appear to be non-thermal and penetrating. Work remains to fully explore relevant physics and optimize instrument design

  17. Californium interrogation prompt neutron (CIPN) instrument for non-destructive assay of spent nuclear fuel-Design concept and experimental demonstration

    Henzlova, D.; Menlove, H. O.; Rael, C. D.; Trellue, H. R.; Tobin, S. J.; Park, Se-Hwan; Oh, Jong-Myeong; Lee, Seung-Kyu; Ahn, Seong-Kyu; Kwon, In-Chan; Kim, Ho-Dong

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results of the first experimental demonstration of the Californium Interrogation Prompt Neutron (CIPN) instrument developed within a multi-year effort launched by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Spent Fuel Project of the United States Department of Energy. The goals of this project focused on developing viable non-destructive assay techniques with capabilities to improve an independent verification of spent fuel assembly characteristics. For this purpose, the CIPN instrument combines active and passive neutron interrogation, along with passive gamma-ray measurements, to provide three independent observables. This paper describes the initial feasibility demonstration of the CIPN instrument, which involved measurements of four pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel assemblies with different levels of burnup and two initial enrichments. The measurements were performed at the Post-Irradiation Examination Facility at the Korea Atomic Energy Institute in the Republic of Korea. The key aim of the demonstration was to evaluate CIPN instrument performance under realistic deployment conditions, with the focus on a detailed assessment of systematic uncertainties that are best evaluated experimentally. The measurements revealed good positioning reproducibility, as well as a high degree of insensitivity of the CIPN instrument's response to irregularities in a radial burnup profile. Systematic uncertainty of individual CIPN instrument signals due to assembly rotation was found to be orientation in the instrument.

  18. Active neutron instrumentation

    An introduction to neutron interactions in tissue and a discussion of pertinent nuetron cross-sections will be given. A brief description of the statistics of energy deposition due to interactions of neutron secondaries in tissue equivalent media is presented. Present and past techniques for measurement of neutron radiation fields are given with advantages and disadvantages in the light of legal limits and proposed changes in those requirements. Neutron dose measuring devices, such as the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) developed by Rossi, are discussed with emphasis on their response in varying neutron energy spectra. Techniques for determining neutron quality factors from TEPC response functions are discussed along with implications of possible new definitions of quality factor. A brief description of high-resolution spectrometry systems, which use hydrogen, methane and He-3 fill gases, is given with discussion of their limitations. Low resolution systems, such as multisphere spectrometers and activation foils, are also presented

  19. Nuclear Material Detection by One-Short-Pulse-Laser-Driven Neutron Source

    Favalli, Andrea [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Aymond, F. [Univ. of Texas at Austin, TX (United States); Bridgewater, Jon S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Croft, Stephen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Deppert, O. [Technische Universitat Darmstadt (Germany); Devlin, Matthew James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Falk, Katerina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fernandez, Juan Carlos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gautier, Donald Cort [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gonzales, Manuel A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Goodsell, Alison Victoria [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Guler, Nevzat [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hamilton, Christopher Eric [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hegelich, Bjorn Manuel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Henzlova, Daniela [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ianakiev, Kiril Dimitrov [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Iliev, Metodi [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Johnson, Randall Philip [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jung, Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kleinschmidt, Annika [Technische Universitat Darmstadt (Germany); Koehler, Katrina Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pomerantz, Ishay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Roth, Markus [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Santi, Peter Angelo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Shimada, Tsutomu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Taddeucci, Terry Nicholas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wurden, Glen Anthony [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Palaniyappan, Sasikumar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); McCary, E. [Univ. of Texas at Austin, TX (United States)

    2015-01-28

    Covered in the PowerPoint presentation are the following areas: Motivation and requirements for active interrogation of nuclear material; laser-driven neutron source; neutron diagnostics; active interrogation of nuclear material; and, conclusions, remarks, and future works.

  20. Nuclear Material Detection by One-Short-Pulse-Laser-Driven Neutron Source

    Covered in the PowerPoint presentation are the following areas: Motivation and requirements for active interrogation of nuclear material; laser-driven neutron source; neutron diagnostics; active interrogation of nuclear material; and, conclusions, remarks, and future works.

  1. Direct fissile assay of highly enriched UF6 using random self-interrogation and neutron coincidence response

    A new nondestructive method for direct assay of 235U mass contained in Model 5A uranium hexafluoride (UF6) product storage cylinders has been successfully tested in the laboratory and under field conditions. The technique employs passive neutron self-interrogation and uses the ratio of coincidences-to-totals counts as a measure of bulk fissile mass. The accuracy of the method is 6.8% (1 sigma) based on field measurements of 44 Model 5A cylinders, 11 of which were either only partially filled or contained reactor return material. The cylinders contained UF6 with enrichments from 5.96% to 97.6%. Count times were 3 to 6 min depending on 235U mass. Samples ranged from below 1 kg to over 16 kg of 235U. Because the method relies primarily on fast neutron self-interrogation, complete sampling of the UF6 takes place. This feature alleviates inhomogeneity problems and offers increased assurance of the presence of stated amounts of bulk fissile material as compared with current verification methods

  2. Neutron Activation Analysis

    Corliss, William R.

    1968-01-01

    In activation analysis, a sample of an unknown material is first irradiated (activated) with nuclear particles. In practice these nuclear particles are almost always neutrons. The success of activation analysis depends upon nuclear reactions which are completely independent of an atom's chemical associations. The value of activation analysis as a research tool was recognized almost immediately upon the discovery of artificial radioactivity. This book discusses activation analysis experiments, applications and technical considerations.

  3. Chemical weapons detection by fast neutron activation analysis techniques

    A neutron diagnostic experimental apparatus has been tested for nondestructive verification of sealed munitions. Designed to potentially satisfy a significant number of van-mobile requirements, this equipment is based on an easy to use industrial sealed tube neutron generator that interrogates the munitions of interest with 14 MeV neutrons. Gamma ray spectra are detected with a high purity germanium detector, especially shielded from neutrons and gamma ray background. A mobile shell holder has been used. Possible configurations allow the detection, in continuous or in pulsed modes, of gamma rays from neutron inelastic scattering, from thermal neutron capture, and from fast or thermal neutron activation. Tests on full scale sealed munitions with chemical simulants show that those with chlorine (old generation materials) are detectable in a few minutes, and those including phosphorus (new generation materials) in nearly the same time. (orig.)

  4. Analysis of experimental measurements of PWR fresh and spent fuel assemblies using Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry

    Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) is a new NDA technique that was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to improve existing nuclear safeguards measurements for LWR fuel assemblies. The SINRD detector consists of four fission chambers (FCs) wrapped with different absorber filters to isolate different parts of the neutron energy spectrum and one ion chamber (IC) to measure the gross gamma rate. As a result, two different techniques can be utilized using the same SINRD detector unit and hardware. These techniques are the Passive Neutron Multiplication Counter (PNMC) method and the SINRD method. The focus of the work described in this paper is the analysis of experimental measurements of fresh and spent PWR fuel assemblies that were performed at LANL and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), respectively, using the SINRD detector. The purpose of these experiments was to assess the following capabilities of the SINRD detector: 1) reproducibility of measurements to quantify systematic errors, 2) sensitivity to water gap between detector and fuel assembly, 3) sensitivity and penetrability to the removal of fuel rods from the assembly, and 4) use of PNMC/SINRD ratios to quantify neutron multiplication and/or fissile content. The results from these simulations and measurements provide valuable experimental data that directly supports safeguards research and development (R&D) efforts on the viability of passive neutron NDA techniques and detector designs for partial defect verification of spent fuel assemblies. - Highlights: • Experimental measurements of PWR fresh and spent FAs were performed with SINRD. • Good agreement of MCNPX and measured results confirmed accuracy of SINRD model. • For fresh fuel, SINRD and PNMC ratios were not sensitive to water gaps of ≤5-mm. • Practical use of SINRD would be in Fork detector to reduce systematic uncertainties

  5. Isotopic neutron sources for neutron activation analysis

    This User's Manual is an attempt to provide for teaching and training purposes, a series of well thought out demonstrative experiments in neutron activation analysis based on the utilization of an isotopic neutron source. In some cases, these ideas can be applied to solve practical analytical problems. 19 refs, figs and tabs

  6. SLOWPOKE: neutron activation analysis

    Neutron activation analysis permits the non-destructive determination of trace elements in crude oil and its derivatives at high sensitivity (up to 10-9 g/g) and good precision. This article consists of a quick survey of the method followed by an illustration based on the results of recent work at the SLOWPOKE reactor laboratory at the Ecole Polytechnique

  7. Neutron production, shielding and activation

    This chapter contains information on neutron cross-sections, production, spectra and yields; detection and detectors; shielding with various materials, particularly with ordinary concrete; and neutron activation products of interest to health physicists. Neutron energy terminology as well as neutron energy spectrum calculations are included

  8. Calibration of Cherenkov detectors for monoenergetic photon imaging in active interrogation applications

    Rose, P.B., E-mail: prose6@gatech.edu; Erickson, A.S., E-mail: anna.erickson@me.gatech.edu

    2015-11-01

    Active interrogation of cargo containers using monoenergetic photons offers a rapid and low-dose approach to search for shielded special nuclear materials. Cherenkov detectors can be used for imaging of the cargo provided that gamma ray energies used in interrogation are well resolved, as the case in {sup 11}B(d,n-γ){sup 12}C reaction resulting in 4.4 MeV and 15.1 MeV photons. While an array of Cherenkov threshold detectors reduces low energy background from scatter while providing the ability of high contrast transmission imaging, thus confirming the presence of high-Z materials, these detectors require a special approach to energy calibration due to the lack of resolution. In this paper, we discuss the utility of Cherenkov detectors for active interrogation with monoenergetic photons as well as the results of computational and experimental studies of their energy calibration. The results of the studies with sources emitting monoenergetic photons as well as complex gamma ray spectrum sources, for example {sup 232}Th, show that calibration is possible as long as the energies of photons of interest are distinct.

  9. Self-interrogation of spent fuel

    A new method for the assay of spent-fuel assemblies has been developed that eliminates the need for external isotopic neutron sources, yet retains the advantages of an active interrogation system. The assay is accomplished by changing the reactivity of the system and correlating the measurements to burnup

  10. Educational activities for neutron sciences

    Since now we have several world-leading neutron science facilities in Japan, enlightenment activities for introducing neutron sciences, for example, to young people is an indispensable issue. Hereafter, we will report present status of the activities based on collaborations between universities and neutron facilities. A few suggestions for future educational activity of JSNS are also shown. (author)

  11. Development of neutron interrogation techniques for detection of hazardous substances in containers port

    This work is aimed at contributing to the effort of nations seeking to control international borders movement of dangerous chemical substances and nuclear material, in accordance with a multitude of agreements signed to that purpose. At this stage, we try to identify the signature of pure substances: chlorine (Cl), nitrogen (N), chromium (Cr), mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), uranium (U) y arsenic (As) and, later, to detect their presence in simulated large cargo containers. The technique employed in previous and in current work, consists in the detection of prompt and early decay gammas induced by incident thermal neutrons or fast neutrons thermalized in the cargo array. Uranium has also been detected through the counting of fast neutrons originated in induced fissions. (author)

  12. Active detection of shielded SNM with 60-keV neutrons

    Hagmann, C; Dietrich, D; Hall, J; Kerr, P; Nakae, L; Newby, R; Rowland, M; Snyderman, N; Stoeffl, W

    2008-07-08

    Fissile materials, e.g. {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu, can be detected non-invasively by active neutron interrogation. A unique characteristic of fissile material exposed to neutrons is the prompt emission of high-energy (fast) fission neutrons. One promising mode of operation subjects the object to a beam of medium-energy (epithermal) neutrons, generated by a proton beam impinging on a Li target. The emergence of fast secondary neutrons then clearly indicates the presence of fissile material. Our interrogation system comprises a low-dose 60-keV neutron generator (5 x 10{sup 6}/s), and a 1 m{sup 2} array of scintillators for fast neutron detection. Preliminary experimental results demonstrate the detectability of small quantities (370 g) of HEU shielded by steel (200 g/cm{sup 2}) or plywood (30 g/cm{sup 2}), with a typical measurement time of 1 min.

  13. Investigation of active interrogation techniques to detect special nuclear material in maritime environments: Boarded search of a cargo container ship

    The detonation of a terrorist nuclear weapon in the United States would result in the massive loss of life and grave economic damage. Even if a device was not detonated, its known or suspected presence aboard a cargo container ship in a U.S. port would have major economic and political consequences. One possible means to prevent this threat would be to board a ship at sea and search for the device before it reaches port. The scenario considered here involves a small Coast Guard team with strong intelligence boarding a container ship to search for a nuclear device. Using active interrogation, the team would nonintrusively search a block of shipping containers to locate the fissile material. Potential interrogation source and detector technologies for the team are discussed. The methodology of the scan is presented along with a technique for calculating the required interrogation source strength using computer simulations. MCNPX was used to construct a computer model of a container ship, and several search scenarios were simulated. The results of the simulations are presented in terms of the source strength required for each interrogation scenario. Validation measurements were performed in order to scale these simulation results to expected performance. Interrogations through the short (2.4 m) axis of a standardized shipping container appear to be feasible given the entire range of container loadings tested. Interrogations through several containers at once or a single container through its long (12.2 m) axis do not appear to be viable with a portable interrogation system

  14. Recent developments in fast neutron radiography for the interrogation of air cargo containers

    There is a worldwide need for improved methods for the scanning of consolidated air cargo for contraband such as illicit drugs and explosives. Ideally, cargo containers must be imaged without unpacking and with scan times of less than a few minutes. Fast neutron radiography techniques are particularly attractive for screening cargo. Neutrons have the required penetration, they interact with matter in a manner complementary to X-rays and they can be used to determine cargo composition. The Commonwealth Science and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) has developed a scanner for fully-loaded air cargo containers. The scanner combines fast (14 MeV) neutron and γ-ray (or X-ray) radiography, using intense radiation sources and custom high-efficiency detector arrays. The ratio of the transmissions of neutrons and X-rays provides a measure of material composition that is much more sensitive than alternative dual high-energy (MeV) X-ray systems. A full-scale prototype scanner was used by Australian Customs Service to screen incoming air cargo at Brisbane International Airport in 2005/6. The trial of the scanner at Brisbane demonstrated the material discrimination capability of the technology and its ability to make hidden organic materials more obvious. Consolidated cargo was scanned in less than two minutes allowing high volumes of cargo to be screened rapidly. CSIRO is working directly with Nuctech Company Limited, Beijing, China to develop and commercialise the next generation in air cargo scanning technology. A commercial version of the airport scanner being developed by Nuctech and CSIRO is expected to be commissioned by January 2009. The commercial scanner combines a 14 MeV fast neutron radiography system with Nuctech's dual-energy X-ray technology that uses a 6 MeV LINAC X-ray source and Binocular Stereoscopic imaging technology. The commercial scanner will have much better spatial resolution than the Brisbane scanner. The improved resolution, combined with

  15. Simulated Performance of the Integrated Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity and Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry Detector Designed for Spent Fuel Measurement at the Fugen Reactor in Japan

    Ulrich, Timothy J. II [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lafleur, Adrienne M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seya, Michio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolind, Alan M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-16

    An integrated nondestructive assay instrument, which combined the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity (PNAR) and the Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) techniques, is the research focus for a collaborative effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency as part of the Next Generation Safeguard Initiative. We will quantify the anticipated performance of this experimental system in two physical environments: (1) At LANL we will measure fresh Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) assemblies for which the average enrichment can be varied from 0.2% to 3.2% and for which Gd laced rods will be included. (2) At Fugen we will measure spent Mixed Oxide (MOX-B) and LEU spent fuel assemblies from the heavy water moderated Fugen reactor. The MOX-B assemblies will vary in burnup from {approx}3 GWd/tHM to {approx}20 GWd/tHM while the LEU assemblies ({approx}1.9% initial enrichment) will vary from {approx}2 GWd/tHM to {approx}7 GWd/tHM. The estimated count rates will be calculated using MCNPX. These preliminary results will help the finalization of the hardware design and also serve a guide for the experiment. The hardware of the detector is expected to be fabricated in 2012 with measurements expected to take place in 2012 and 2013. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  16. Reference neutron activation library

    Many scientific endeavors require accurate nuclear data. Examples include studies of environmental protection connected with the running of a nuclear installation, the conceptual designs of fusion energy producing devices, astrophysics and the production of medical isotopes. In response to this need, many national and international data libraries have evolved over the years. Initially nuclear data work concentrated on materials relevant to the commercial power industry which is based on the fission of actinides, but recently the topic of activation has become of increasing importance. Activation of materials occurs in fission devices, but is generally overshadowed by the primary fission process. In fusion devices, high energy (14 MeV) neutrons produced in the D-T fusion reaction cause activation of the structure, and (with the exception of the tritium fuel) is the dominant source of activity. Astrophysics requires cross-sections (generally describing neutron capture) or its studies of nucleosynthesis. Many analytical techniques require activation analysis. For example, borehole logging uses the detection of gamma rays from irradiated materials to determine the various components of rocks. To provide data for these applications, various specialized data libraries have been produced. The most comprehensive of these have been developed for fusion studies, since it has been appreciated that impurities are of the greatest importance in determining the overall activity, and thus data on all elements are required. These libraries contain information on a wide range of reactions: (n,γ), (n,2n), (n,α), (n,p), (n,d), (n,t), (n,3He)and (n,n')over the energy range from 10-5 eV to 15 or 20 MeV. It should be noted that the production of various isomeric states have to be treated in detail in these libraries,and that the range of targets must include long-lived radioactive nuclides in addition to stable nuclides. These comprehensive libraries thus contain almost all the

  17. The synchronous active neutron detection system for spent fuel assay

    The authors have begun to develop a novel technique for active neutron assay of fissile material in spent nuclear fuel. This approach will exploit the unique operating features of a 14-MeV neutron generator developed by Schlumberger. This generator and a novel detection system will be applied to the direct measurement of the fissile material content in spent fuel in place of the indirect measures used at present. The technique they are investigating is termed synchronous active neutron detection (SAND). It closely follows a method that has been used routinely in other branches of physics to detect very small signals in the presence of large backgrounds. Synchronous detection instruments are widely available commercially and are termed open-quotes lock-inclose quotes amplifiers. The authors have implemented a digital lock-in amplifier in conjunction with the Schlumberger neutron generator to explore the possibility of synchronous detection with active neutrons. This approach is possible because the Schlumberger system can operate at up to a 50% duty factor, in effect, a square wave of neutron yield. The results to date are preliminary but quite promising. The system is capable of resolving the fissile material contained in a small fraction of the fuel rods in a cold fuel assembly. It also appears to be quite resilient to background neutron interference. The interrogating neutrons appear to be nonthermal and penetrating. Although a significant amount of work remains to fully explore the relevant physics and optimize the instrument design, the underlying concept appears sound

  18. JAEA − JRC collaboration on the development of active neutron NDA techniques

    KURETA M.; Koizumi, M.; OHZU A.; Furutaka, K.; Tsuchiya, H.; SEYA M.; Harada, H.; ABOUSAHL Said; HEYSE JAN; Kopecky, Stefan; MONDELAERS Willy; PEDERSEN Bent; SCHILLEBEECKX Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency in collaboration with the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission started a program titled “Development of active neutron NDA techniques”. The program aims at developing an innovative non-destructive analysis (NDA) system for various applications in the field of nuclear safety, security and safeguards. A Non Destructive Analysis (NDA) system is proposed that is based on a combination of different active neutron interrogation techniques, i.e. DDA (Di...

  19. Applications of neutron activation spectroscopy

    Silarski, M

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery in 1932, neutrons became a basis of many methods used not only in research, but also in industry and engineering. Among others, the exceptional role in the modern nuclear engineering is played by the neutron activation spectroscopy, based on the interaction of neutron flux with atomic nuclei. In this article we shortly describe application of this method in medicine and detection of hazardous substances.

  20. Neutron activation analysis of coins

    Activation analysis was applied to the study of coins using 14MeV neutrons produced by an accelerator for the determination of oxygen and neutrons emitted from a 252Cf source for the determination of the other elements (Au, Ag, Cu, As etc...). The advantages of this technique are presented

  1. Unexploded Ordnance identification-A gamma-ray spectral analysis method for Carbon, Nitrogen and Oxygen signals following tagged neutron interrogation

    Mitra, S., E-mail: sudeepmitra@hotmail.com [Environmental Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Bell Avenue, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Dioszegi, I. [Nonproliferation and National Security Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2012-11-21

    A novel gamma-ray spectral analysis method has been demonstrated to optimally extract the signals of the signature elements of explosives, carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) from 57-155 mm projectiles following tagged neutron interrogation with 14 MeV neutrons. The method was implemented on Monte Carlo simulated, synthetic spectra of Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) that contained high explosive fillers (Composition B, TNT or Explosive D) within steel casings of appropriate thicknesses. The analysis technique defined three broad regions-of-interest (ROI) between 4-7.5 MeV of a spectrum and from a system of three equations for the three unknowns namely C, N and O, the maximum counts from each of these elements were extracted. Unlike conventional spectral analysis techniques, the present method included the Compton continuum under a spectrum. For a neutron output of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} ns{sup -1} and using four 12.7 cm diameter Multiplication-Sign 12.7 cm NaI(Tl) detectors, the C/N and C/O gamma-ray counts ratios of the explosive fillers were vastly different from that of an inert substance like sand. Conversion of the counts ratios to elemental ratios could further discriminate the different types of explosive fillers. The interrogation time was kept at ten minutes for each projectile.

  2. Unexploded Ordnance identification—A gamma-ray spectral analysis method for Carbon, Nitrogen and Oxygen signals following tagged neutron interrogation

    A novel gamma-ray spectral analysis method has been demonstrated to optimally extract the signals of the signature elements of explosives, carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) from 57–155 mm projectiles following tagged neutron interrogation with 14 MeV neutrons. The method was implemented on Monte Carlo simulated, synthetic spectra of Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) that contained high explosive fillers (Composition B, TNT or Explosive D) within steel casings of appropriate thicknesses. The analysis technique defined three broad regions-of-interest (ROI) between 4–7.5 MeV of a spectrum and from a system of three equations for the three unknowns namely C, N and O, the maximum counts from each of these elements were extracted. Unlike conventional spectral analysis techniques, the present method included the Compton continuum under a spectrum. For a neutron output of ∼2×107 ns−1 and using four 12.7 cm diameter×12.7 cm NaI(Tl) detectors, the C/N and C/O gamma-ray counts ratios of the explosive fillers were vastly different from that of an inert substance like sand. Conversion of the counts ratios to elemental ratios could further discriminate the different types of explosive fillers. The interrogation time was kept at ten minutes for each projectile.

  3. Development of self-interrogation neutron resonance densitometry (SINRD) to measure U-235 and Pu-239 content in a PWR spent fuel assembly

    Lafleur, Adrienne M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Charlton, William S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The use of Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) to measure the {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu content in a PWR spent fuel assembly was investigated via Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended transport code (MCNPX) simulations. The sensitivity of SINRD is based on using the same fissile materials in the fission chambers as are present in the fuel because the effect of resonance absorption lines in the transmitted flux is amplified by the corresponding (n, f) reaction peaks in fission chamber. These simulations utilize the {sup 244}Cm spontaneous fission neutrons to self-interrogate the fuel pins. The amount of resonance absorption of these neutrons in the fuel can be measured using {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu fission chambers placed adjacent to the assembly. We used ratios of different fission chambers to reduce the sensitivity of the measurements to extraneous material present in fuel. The development of SINRD to measure the fissile content in spent fuel is of great importance to the improvement of nuclear safeguards and material accountability. Future work includes the use of this technique to measure the fissile content in FBR spent fuel and heavy metal product from reprocessing methods.

  4. Epithermal interrogation of fissile waste

    Coop, K.L.; Hollas, C.L.

    1996-09-01

    Self-shielding of interrogating thermal neutrons in lumps of fissile material can be a major source of error in transuranic waste assay using the widely employed differential dieaway technique. We are developing a new instrument, the combined thermal/epithermal neutron (CTEN) interrogation instrument to detect the occurrence of self- shielding and mitigate its effects. Neutrons are moderated in the graphite walls of the CTEN instrument to provide an interrogating flux of epithermal and thermal neutrons. The induced prompt fission neutrons are detected in proportional counters. We report the results of measurements made with the CTEN instrument, using minimal and highly self-shielding plutonium and uranium sources in 55 gallon drums containing a variety of mock waste matrices. Fissile isotopes and waste forms for which the method is most applicable, and limitations associated with the hydrogen content of the waste package/matrix are described.

  5. Epithermal interrogation of fissile waste

    Self-shielding of interrogating thermal neutrons in lumps of fissile material can be a major source of error in transuranic waste assay using the widely employed differential dieaway technique. We are developing a new instrument, the combined thermal/epithermal neutron (CTEN) interrogation instrument to detect the occurrence of self- shielding and mitigate its effects. Neutrons are moderated in the graphite walls of the CTEN instrument to provide an interrogating flux of epithermal and thermal neutrons. The induced prompt fission neutrons are detected in proportional counters. We report the results of measurements made with the CTEN instrument, using minimal and highly self-shielding plutonium and uranium sources in 55 gallon drums containing a variety of mock waste matrices. Fissile isotopes and waste forms for which the method is most applicable, and limitations associated with the hydrogen content of the waste package/matrix are described

  6. A wearable passive force sensor/active interrogator intended for intra-splint use for the detection and recording of bruxism

    Gonzáles, C.; Diaz Lantada, Andres

    2009-01-01

    A wearable bite force sensing system proto type made up of a passive force sensor and an active interrogator/reader is described. The system is aimed a* bite sensing using a wireless link between the passive sensor to be located in (lie moutb and the external interrogator that can record the evolution of detected force. The interrogator generates a magnetic field that energizes the passive sensor which is also used as the information transmission earlier. The passive farce sensor does not nee...

  7. Development of a Compact Neutron Generator to be Used For Associated Particle Imaging Utilizing a RF-Driven Ion Source

    Wu, Ying

    2009-01-01

    Ion source development plays an important role for improving and advancing the neutron generator technology used for active interrogation techniques employed by the Department of Homeland Security. Active neutron interrogation using compact neutron generators has been around since the late 1950's for use in oil well logging. However, since the September 11th, 2001 terrorists attack, much attention has been paid to the field of active neutron interrogation for detecting hidden explosives and...

  8. Integrated FBG sensors interrogator in silicon photonic platform using active interferometer monitoring

    Marin, Y. E.; Nannipieri, T.; Di Pasquale, F.; Oton, C. J.

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of Fiber Bragg Grating sensors interrogation using integrated unbalanced Mach-Zehnder Interferometers (MZI) and phase sensitive detection in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform. The Phase- Generated Carrier (PGC) demodulation technique is used to detect phase changes, avoiding signal fading. Signal processing allows us to extract the wavelength shift from the signal patterns, allowing accurate dynamic FBG interrogation. High resolution and low cost chips with multiple interrogators and photodetectors on board can be realized by exploiting the advantages of large scale fabrication capabilities of well-established silicon based industrial infrastructures. Simultaneous dynamic reading of a large number of FBG sensors can lead to large volume market applications of the technology in several strategic industrial fields. The performance of the proposed integrated FBG interrogator is validated by comparing with a commercial FBG readout based on a spectrometer and used as a reference.

  9. Insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity through interrogation of cis elements disrupted in human erythroid disorders.

    Wakabayashi, Aoi; Ulirsch, Jacob C; Ludwig, Leif S; Fiorini, Claudia; Yasuda, Makiko; Choudhuri, Avik; McDonel, Patrick; Zon, Leonard I; Sankaran, Vijay G

    2016-04-19

    Whole-exome sequencing has been incredibly successful in identifying causal genetic variants and has revealed a number of novel genes associated with blood and other diseases. One limitation of this approach is that it overlooks mutations in noncoding regulatory elements. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which mutations in transcriptionalcis-regulatory elements result in disease remain poorly understood. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to interrogate three such elements harboring mutations in human erythroid disorders, which in all cases are predicted to disrupt a canonical binding motif for the hematopoietic transcription factor GATA1. Deletions of as few as two to four nucleotides resulted in a substantial decrease (>80%) in target gene expression. Isolated deletions of the canonical GATA1 binding motif completely abrogated binding of the cofactor TAL1, which binds to a separate motif. Having verified the functionality of these three GATA1 motifs, we demonstrate strong evolutionary conservation of GATA1 motifs in regulatory elements proximal to other genes implicated in erythroid disorders, and show that targeted disruption of such elements results in altered gene expression. By modeling transcription factor binding patterns, we show that multiple transcription factors are associated with erythroid gene expression, and have created predictive maps modeling putative disruptions of their binding sites at key regulatory elements. Our study provides insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity and may prove a useful resource for investigating the pathogenicity of noncoding variants in human erythroid disorders. PMID:27044088

  10. High-sensitive detection by direct interrogation of 14 MeV Acc neutrons, (2). Uranium-contained cloth matrix in a waste dram

    Previously reported 'high sensitive detection of the fissile material in a solidification waste dram by 14 MeV neutron direct interrogation method' is the skillful method effecting the neutron moderation by the waste matrix itself. About this detection method, it is already reported to confirm and to be able to achieve an effective measurement for a concrete solidification waste. Moreover, even if it is only of the metal waste that the neutron moderation is not effective in the waste matrix, it was confirmed that positional sensitivity difference can be small and highly sensitive by using the additional moderator skillfully. In this report, it is examined that this detection method can be applicable effectively or not to a cloth and papers matrix waste filling within a dram. Here, in order to understand and to evaluate the detection characteristic by the difference of the filling density and the level of the position sensitivity difference, neutron transportation calculation of the model by assuming the amount of content cloth matrix waste (which depends on the filling density) as a calculation parameter was done. The method of reducing the positional sensitivity difference was also examined. As a result, it became clear that the detection limit of the natural uranium cloth matrix waste was reached to 0.1123 Bq/g and the positional sensitivity difference was reached in ±5%. (author)

  11. Application of neutron activation analysis

    The physical basis and analytical possibilities of neutron activation analysis have been performed. The number of applications in material engineering, geology, cosmology, oncology, criminology, biology, agriculture, environment protection, archaeology, history of art and especially in chemical analysis have been presented. The place of the method among other methods of inorganic quantitative chemical analysis for trace elements determination has been discussed

  12. Neutron activation analysis in Bulgaria

    The development of instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) as a routine method started in 1960 with bringing into use of the experimental nuclear reactor 2 MW -IRT-2000. For the purposes of INAA the vertical channels were used. The neutron flux vary from 1 to 6x1012n/cm2s, with Cd ratio for gold of about 4,4. In one of the channels the neutron flux is additionally thermalised with grafite, in others - a pneumatic double-tube rabbit system is installed. One of the irradiation positions is equiped with 1 mm Cd shield constantly. With the pressure of the working gas (air) of 2 bar the transport time in one direction is 2,5 sec. Because of lack of special system for uniform irradiation an accuracy of 3% can be reached by use of iron monitors for long irradiations and copper monitors for use in the rabbit system. Two neutron generators are also working but the application of 14 MeV neutrons for INAA is still quite limited. The most developed are the applications of INAA in the fields of geology and paedology, medicine and biology, environment and pollution, archaeology, metallurgy, metrology and hydrology, criminology

  13. Activation analysis with reactor neutrons

    The potentialities of neutron as an analytical probe are indicated, pointing out the need for development of other approaches, besides the conventional activation method. Development of instrumental approach to activation and applications, carried out at Analytical Chemistry Division are outlined. The role of, and the need for, the development and application of mathematical methods in enhancing the information content, and in turn the interpretation of the analytical results, is demonstrated. (author)

  14. Neutron activation spectrometry and neutron activation analysis in analytical geochemistry

    The present report is to show the geochemists who are interested in neutron activation spectrometry (NAS) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) which analytical possibilities these methods offer him. As a review of these analytical possibilities, a lieterature compolation is given which is subdivided into two groups: 1) rock (basic, intermediary, acid, sediments, soils and nuds, diverse minerals, tectites, meteorites and lunar material). 2) ore (Al, Au, Be, Cr, Cu, Mn, Mo, Fe, Pb, Pt, Sn, Ti, W, Zn, Zr, U and phosphate ore, polymetallic ores, fluorite, monazite and diverse ores). The applied methods as well as the determinable elements in the given materials can be got from the tables. On the whole, the literature evaluation carried out makes it clear that neutron activation spectrometry is a very useful multi-element method for the analysis of rocks. The analysis of ores, however, is subjected to great limitations. As rock analysis is very frequently of importance in prospecting for ore deposits, the NAS proves to be extremely useful for this very field of application. (orig./LH)

  15. Neutronic measurements of radioactive waste

    This document presents the general matters involved in the radioactive waste management and the different non destructive assays of radioactivity. The neutronic measurements used in the characterization of waste drums containing emitters are described with more details, especially the active neutronic interrogation assays with prompt or delayed neutron detection: physical principle, signal processing and evaluation of the detection limit. (author)

  16. Neutron activations at the neutron facility of TU-Dresden

    Domula, Alexander; Zuber, Kai [TU Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Gehre, Daniel [TU Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, 01069 Dresden (Germany); FZD, Institut fuer Strahlenphysik, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Klix, Axel [KIT, Institut fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The Technical University of Dresden (TUD) operates at the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD) a 14 MeV Neutron Generator (NG) with fast, mono energetic neutrons from the T(d,{alpha})n reaction and 2.5 MeV neutrons from the D(d,x)n reaction. Since its commissioning in 2004 the NG is involved in the validation of European Activation File and mockup experiments for validation of neutron transport data in collaborations with FZK/KIT, PTB, ENEA, JAEA, Osaka University and University Vienna. Cross section measurements have been limited to long living isotopes. An automated sample changer is currently set up in order to extend the capabilities to radioisotopes with half-lives in the range from seconds to a few minutes. The general layout of the neutron facility is described. First example activations for GERDA and SNO+ have been made and are presented here.

  17. The Atomic Fingerprint: Neutron Activation Analysis

    Keisch, Bernard [Carnegie-Mellon University

    1972-01-01

    The nuclei of atoms are stable only when they contain certain numbers of neutrons and protons. Since nuclei can absorb additional neutrons, which in many cases results in the conversion of a stable nucleus to a radioactive one, neutron activation analysis is possible.

  18. Instrumentation in neutron activation analysis

    The rise of neutron activation analysis (NAA) as a tool in geochemical research has parallelled advances in detector, multi-channel analyzer, and computer technology. Micro-computers are now being integrated into NAA systems, and gamma-ray spectrometer instrumentation is evolving towards direct-reading systems. The investigator is faced with a wide range of possibilities and choices when equipping or re-equipping a laboratory. The geoscientist is provided with an overview of the available instrumentation and what soon may be feasible. (L.L.)

  19. Recent activities on neutron beam utilization

    In Japan, the utilization of neutron beam brought out in research reactors had mainly been carried out in KUR of Kyoto University and JRR-2 of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in the fields of neutron scattering experiment, neutron radiography, neutron induced prompt-gamma ray analysis, medical and biological irradiation and so on. After the completion of upgrading work of JRR-3 in JAERI in 1990 (JRR-3M), the quality and quantity for the neutron beam experiments are extremely improved by means of its high intensity of neutron flux and high signal-to-noise ratio of cold and thermal neutron beams at more than twenty neutron beam ports. Especially, the cold neutron beam has brought the field of the utilization expanded and the neutron guide tubes have increased the number of neutron beam facilities as if there are three research reactors. These facilities induced to more active use of research reactors and increased the researchers in the many fields. At present, research reactors are utilized widely in various fields of not only nuclear researches but also non-nuclear researches and industrial uses. The JRR-3M has been operated only for about three years, however, interesting results have already been obtained using cold and thermal neutron beams. The current status of the neutron beam utilization using the research reactors in JAERI is reported and also several research topics obtained at JRR-3M are introduced in this presentation. (author)

  20. New evaluation methods for plutonium assay by passive neutron interrogation of barrels with heavy and heterogeneous waste

    To detect minute quantities of plutonium in 220 liter drums, a new method and a data analysis system were developed, the LCA (local correlation analysis system). With this, it is possible to determine the exact probe location. It has the ability to distinguish between a homogeneous Pu-distribution and a Pu-probe in the center of the container. Within each neutron signal, the time of pulse and the counter number are registered, therefore analysis methods currently in practice can utilize. For drums having a higher plutonium content the detection efficiency can be determined directly without knowledge of the matrix composition or the probe location. The data analysis system is tailored to be used with an ordinary PC. (orig.)

  1. Neutron fluence spectrometry using disk activation

    A simple and robust detector for spectrometry of environmental neutrons has been developed. The technique is based on neutron activation of a series of different metal disks followed by low-level gamma-ray spectrometry of the activated disks and subsequent neutron spectrum unfolding. The technique is similar to foil activation but here the applied neutron fluence rates are much lower than usually in the case of foil activation. The detector has been tested in quasi mono-energetic neutron fields with fluence rates in the order of 1000-10000 cm-2 s-1, where the obtained spectra showed good agreement with spectra measured using a Bonner sphere spectrometer. The detector has also been tested using an AmBe source and at a neutron fluence rate of about 40 cm-2 s-1, again, a good agreement with the assumed spectrum was achieved

  2. Fast neutron activation dosimetry with TLDS

    Pearson, D.W.; Moran, P.R.

    1975-01-01

    Fast neutron activation using threshold reactions is the only neutron dosimetry method which offers complete discrimination against gamma-rays and preserves some information about the neutron energy. Conventional activation foil technique requires sensitive radiation detectors to count the decay of the neutron induced activity. For extensive measurements at low neutron fluences, vast outlays of counting equipment are required. TL dosimeters are inexpensive, extremely sensitive radiation detectors. The work of Mayhugh et al. (Proc. Third Int. Conf. on Luminescence Dosimetry, Riso Report 249, 1040, (1971)) showed that CaSO/sub 4/: DyTLDs could be used to measure the integrated dose from the decay of the radioactivity produced in the dosimeters by exposure to thermal neutrons. This neatly combines the activation detector and counter functions in one solid state device. This work has been expanded to fast neutron exposures and other TL phosphors. The reactions /sup 19/F(n, 2n)/sup 18/F, /sup 32/S(n,p)/sup 32/P, /sup 24/Mg(n,p)/sup 24/, and /sup 64/Zn(n,p)/sup 64/Cu were found useful for fast neutron activation in commercial TLDs. As each TLD is its own integrating decay particle counter, many activation measurements can be made at the same time. The subsequent readings of the TL signals can be done serially after the induced radioactivity has decayed, using only one TL reader. The neutron detection sensitivity is limited mainly by the number statistics of the neutron activations. The precision of the neutron measurement is within a factor of two of conventional foil activation for comparable mass detectors. Commercially available TLDs can measure neutron fluences of 10/sup 9/n/cm/sup 2/ with 10 percent precision.

  3. Fast neutron activation dosimetry with TLDS

    Fast neutron activation using threshold reactions is the only neutron dosimetry method which offers complete discrimination against gamma-rays and preserves some information about the neutron energy. Conventional activation foil technique requires sensitive radiation detectors to count the decay of the neutron induced activity. For extensive measurements at low neutron fluences, vast outlays of counting equipment are required. TL dosimeters are inexpensive, extremely sensitive radiation detectors. The work of Mayhugh et al. (Proc. Third Int. Conf. on Luminescence Dosimetry, Riso Report 249, 1040, (1971)) showed that CaSO4: DyTLDs could be used to measure the integrated dose from the decay of the radioactivity produced in the dosimeters by exposure to thermal neutrons. This neatly combines the activation detector and counter functions in one solid state device. This work has been expanded to fast neutron exposures and other TL phosphors. The reactions 19F(n, 2n)18F, 32S(n,p)32P, 24Mg(n,p)24, and 64Zn(n,p)64Cu were found useful for fast neutron activation in commercial TLDs. As each TLD is its own integrating decay particle counter, many activation measurements can be made at the same time. The subsequent readings of the TL signals can be done serially after the induced radioactivity has decayed, using only one TL reader. The neutron detection sensitivity is limited mainly by the number statistics of the neutron activations. The precision of the neutron measurement is within a factor of two of conventional foil activation for comparable mass detectors. Commercially available TLDs can measure neutron fluences of 109n/cm2 with 10 percent precision

  4. DD neutron yield diagnosis by indium activation

    The measurement of DD neutron yield by activation is presented. This method is based on the inelastic scattering reaction of 115In with DD neutron, and the activated γ spectrum is counted by HPGe detector. The relation between the counts of detected y rays and the neutron yield is analyzed. The optimal thickness of sample is given by Monte Carlo simulation, which is 1 cm. The entire counting system has been calibrated on the K-400 accelerator. The result shows that the DD neutron measurement by indium activation can be used in the ICF experiment when the neutron yield is above 2 × 109. The total error of the system is below 10% in this condition. The total error will reduce when the neutron yield is larger. (authors)

  5. Manually controlled neutron-activation system

    Johns, R. A.; Carothers, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    A manually controlled neutron activation system, the Manual Reactor Activation System, was designed and built and has been operating at one of the Savannah River Plant's production reactors. With this system, samples can be irradiated for up to 24 hours and pneumatically transferred to a shielded repository for decay until their activity is low enough for them to be handled at a radiobench. The Manual Reactor Activation System was built to provide neutron activation of solid waste forms for the Alternative Waste Forms Leach Testing Program. Neutron activation of the bulk sample prior to leaching permits sensitive multielement radiometric analyses of the leachates.

  6. An Analysis Technique for Active Neutron Multiplicity Measurements Based on First Principles

    Evans, Louise G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goddard, Braden [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Charlton, William S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peerani, Paolo [European Commission, EC-JRC-IPSC

    2012-08-13

    Passive neutron multiplicity counting is commonly used to quantify the total mass of plutonium in a sample, without prior knowledge of the sample geometry. However, passive neutron counting is less applicable to uranium measurements due to the low spontaneous fission rates of uranium. Active neutron multiplicity measurements are therefore used to determine the {sup 235}U mass in a sample. Unfortunately, there are still additional challenges to overcome for uranium measurements, such as the coupling of the active source and the uranium sample. Techniques, such as the coupling method, have been developed to help reduce the dependence of calibration curves for active measurements on uranium samples; although, they still require similar geometry known standards. An advanced active neutron multiplicity measurement method is being developed by Texas A&M University, in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in an attempt to overcome the calibration curve requirements. This method can be used to quantify the {sup 235}U mass in a sample containing uranium without using calibration curves. Furthermore, this method is based on existing detectors and nondestructive assay (NDA) systems, such as the LANL Epithermal Neutron Multiplicity Counter (ENMC). This method uses an inexpensive boron carbide liner to shield the uranium sample from thermal and epithermal neutrons while allowing fast neutrons to reach the sample. Due to the relatively low and constant fission and absorption energy dependent cross-sections at high neutron energies for uranium isotopes, fast neutrons can penetrate the sample without significant attenuation. Fast neutron interrogation therefore creates a homogeneous fission rate in the sample, allowing for first principle methods to be used to determine the {sup 235}U mass in the sample. This paper discusses the measurement method concept and development, including measurements and simulations performed to date, as well as the potential

  7. Determination of the plutonium content in a spent fuel assembly by passive and active interrogation using a differential die-away instrument

    Henzl, V.; Croft, S.; Richard, J.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Tobin, S. J.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to estimating the total plutonium content in a spent fuel assembly (SFA) that is based on combining information from a passive measurement of the total neutron count rate (PN) of the assayed SFA and a measure of its multiplication. While PN can be measured essentially with any non-destructive assay (NDA) technique capable of neutron detection, the measure of multiplication is, in our approach, determined by means of active interrogation using an instrument based on the Differential Die-Away technique (DDA). The DDA is a NDA technique developed within the U.S. Department of Energy's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) project focused on the utilization of NDA techniques to determine the elemental plutonium content in commercial nuclear SFA's [1]. This approach was adopted since DDA also allows determination of other SFA characteristics, such as burnup, initial enrichment, and cooling time, and also allows for detection of certain types of diversion of nuclear material. The quantification of total plutonium is obtained using an analytical correlation function in terms of the observed PN and active multiplication. Although somewhat similar approaches relating Pu content with PN have been adopted in the past, we demonstrate by extensive simulation of the fuel irradiation and NDA process that our analytical method is independent of explicit knowledge of the initial enrichment, burnup, and an absolute value of the SFA's reactivity (i.e. multiplication factor). We show that when tested with MCNPX™ simulations comprising the 64 SFA NGSI Spent Fuel Library-1 we were able to determine elemental plutonium content, using just a few calibration parameters, with an average variation in the prediction of around 1-2% across the wide dynamic range of irradiation history parameters used, namely initial enrichment (IE=2-5%), burnup (BU=15-60 GWd/tU) and cooling time (CT=1-80 y). In this paper we describe the basic approach and the

  8. Determination of the plutonium content in a spent fuel assembly by passive and active interrogation using a differential die-away instrument

    Henzl, V., E-mail: henzl@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Croft, S.; Richard, J.; Swinhoe, M.T.; Tobin, S.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to estimating the total plutonium content in a spent fuel assembly (SFA) that is based on combining information from a passive measurement of the total neutron count rate (PN) of the assayed SFA and a measure of its multiplication. While PN can be measured essentially with any non-destructive assay (NDA) technique capable of neutron detection, the measure of multiplication is, in our approach, determined by means of active interrogation using an instrument based on the Differential Die-Away technique (DDA). The DDA is a NDA technique developed within the U.S. Department of Energy's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) project focused on the utilization of NDA techniques to determine the elemental plutonium content in commercial nuclear SFA's [1]. This approach was adopted since DDA also allows determination of other SFA characteristics, such as burnup, initial enrichment, and cooling time, and also allows for detection of certain types of diversion of nuclear material. The quantification of total plutonium is obtained using an analytical correlation function in terms of the observed PN and active multiplication. Although somewhat similar approaches relating Pu content with PN have been adopted in the past, we demonstrate by extensive simulation of the fuel irradiation and NDA process that our analytical method is independent of explicit knowledge of the initial enrichment, burnup, and an absolute value of the SFA's reactivity (i.e. multiplication factor). We show that when tested with MCNPX{sup ™} simulations comprising the 64 SFA NGSI Spent Fuel Library-1 we were able to determine elemental plutonium content, using just a few calibration parameters, with an average variation in the prediction of around 1–2% across the wide dynamic range of irradiation history parameters used, namely initial enrichment (IE=2–5%), burnup (BU=15–60 GWd/tU) and cooling time (CT=1–80 y). In this paper we

  9. Instrumental neutron activation analysis - a routine method

    This thesis describes the way in which at IRI instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) has been developed into an automated system for routine analysis. The basis of this work are 20 publications describing the development of INAA since 1968. (Auth.)

  10. Neutron activation analysis of reference materials

    The importance is pointed out of neutron activation analysis in the preparation of reference materials, and studies are reported conducted recently by UJV. Instrumental neutron activation analysis has been used in testing homogeneity and in determining 28 elements in newly prepared reference standards of coal fly ash designated ENO, EOP and ECH. For accuracy testing, the same method was used in the analysis of NBS SRM-1633a Trace Elements in Coal Fly Ash and IAEA CRM Soil-5 and RM Soil-7. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis was used in determining Cd, Cu, Mn, Mo, and Zn in biological materials NBS SRM-1577 Bovine Liver, Bowen's Kale and in IAEA RM Milk Powder A-11 and Animal Muscle H-4. In all instances very good precision and accuracy of neutron activation analysis results were shown. (author)

  11. Application of active and passive neutron non destructive assay methods to concrete radioactive waste drums

    This paper deals with the application of non-destructive neutron measurement methods to control and characterize 200 l radioactive waste drums filled with a concrete matrix. Due to its composition, and particularly to hydrogen, concrete penalizes the use of such methods to quantify uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) components, which are mainly responsible of the α-activity of the waste. The determination of the alpha activity is the main objective of neutron measurements, in view to verify acceptance criteria in surface storage. Calibration experiments of the Active Neutron Interrogation (ANI) method lead to Detection Limit Masses (DLM) of about 1 mg of 239Pueff in the total counting mode, and of about 10 mg of 239Pueff in the coincidence counting mode, in case of a homogeneous Pu source and measurement times between one and two hours. Monte Carlo calculation results show a very satisfactory agreement between experimental values and calculated ones. Results of the application of passive and active neutron methods to control two real drums are presented in the last part of the paper. They show a good agreement between measured data and values declared by the waste producers. The main difficulties that had to be overcome are the low neutron signal in passive and active coincidence counting modes due to concrete, the analysis of the passive neutron signal in presence of 244Cm in the drum, which is a strong spontaneous fission neutron emitter, the variation of the active background with the concrete composition, and the analysis of the active prompt neutron signal due to the simultaneous presence of U and Pu in the drums.

  12. KFUPM fast neutron activation analysis facility

    A newly established Fast Neutron Activation Analysis facility at the Energy Research Laboratory is described. The facility mainly consists of a fast neutron irradiation station and a gamma ray counting station. Both stations are connected by a fast pneumatic sample transfer system which transports the sample from the irradiation station to the counting station in a short time of 3 s. The fast neutron activation analysis facility has been tested by measuring the 27A(n, α)24Na and 115In(n, n')115mIn cross sections at 14.8 and 2.5 MeV neutron energies, respectively. Within the experimental uncertainties, the measured cross sections for these elements agree with the published values. (orig.)

  13. Applications of neutron activation analysis in industry

    Neutron activation analysis technique is discussed in brief. This technique is used for quality control of raw materials, process materials and finished products, as well as activities in research and development for the improvement of the products and new products. The uses of this technique in several experienced industries are mentioned (author)

  14. Carbon Activation Diagnostic for Tertiary Neutron Measurements

    Glebov, V.Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T.C.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Radha, P.B.; Padalino, S.; Baumgart, L.; Fuschino, J.

    2003-03-28

    OAK B202 The yield of tertiary neutrons with energies greater than 20 MeV has been proposed to determine the high rho R of inertial confinement fusion targets. The activation of carbon is a valuable measurement technique because of its high reaction threshold, the availability of high-purity samples, and relatively low cost. The 12C(n,2n)11C reaction has a Q value of 18.7 MeV, well above the 14.1 MeV primary DT neutron energy. The isotope 11C decays with a half-life of 20.3 min and emits a positron, resulting in the production of two back-to-back, 511 keV gamma rays upon annihilation. The positron decay of 11C is nearly identical to the copper decay used in the activation measurements of 14.1 MeV primary DT yields; therefore, the present copper activation gamma-detection system can be used to detect the tertiary-produced carbon activation. Because the tertiary neutron yield is more than six orders of magnitude lower than primary neutron yield, the carbon activation diagnostic requires ultrapure carbon samples, free from any positron-emitting contamination. In recent years we have developed carbon purification, packaging, and handling procedures that minimize the contamination signal to a level low enough to use carbon activation for tertiary neutron measurements in direct-drive implosion experiments with DT cryogenic targets on OMEGA. Experimental results of contamination measurements in carbon samples performed on high-neutron-yield shots on OMEGA in 2001-2002 will be presented. A concept for implementing a carbon activation system on the National Ignition Facility (NIF)will be discussed.

  15. Neutron Activation analysis of waste water

    An instrumental neutron activation analysis for the simultaneous determination of chlorine, bromine, sodium, manganese, cobalt, copper, chromium, zinc, nickel, antimony and iron in waste water is described. They were determined in waste water samples under normal conditions by non-destructive neutron activation simultaneously using a suitable monostandard method. Standardized water samples were used and irradiated in polyethylene ampoules at a neutron flux of 1013 cm-2 s-1 for periods of 1 minute, 1 and 10 hours. A Ge hyperpure detector was used for your activity determination, with count times of 60, 180, 300 and 600 seconds. The obtained results show than the method can be utilized for the determination of this elements without realize anything previous treatment of the samples. (Author)

  16. Neutron beam characteristics of the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis system at HANARO

    Neutron beam characteristics of the Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis facility at HANARO were measured. The neutron beam of this facility is polychromatic thermal neutrons diffracted vertically by a set of pyrolytic graphite crystals at the Bragg angle of 45 .deg. from a horizontal beam line. Three conditions of thermal neutron extraction were applied by varying graphite crystal thickness and focusing geometry of diffracted beam. Thermal neutron profile, thermal neutron flux and Cd-ratio were measured at the sample position for each extraction condition. Thermal neutron flux of 6.1x107 n/cm2s and Cd-ratio of 364 are achieved finally

  17. Design of Neutron Activation Analysis Laboratorium Room

    Base on the planning to increase of the research and service quality in the ''Neutron activation analysis'' (APN),the design of mentioned ''Neutron activation analysis laboratories room'' has been done in the multi purpose reactor G.A. Siwabessy. By the using the designed installation, the irradiation preparation and counting sample can be done. The design doing by determination of installation lay out and maximum particle contain in the air. The design installation required a unit of 1 HP blower, a unit of 1 HP split air condition and 2 units 1200 x 800 mm HEPA filter. This paper concluded that this design is feasible to fabricated

  18. Interferences in reactor neutron activation analyses

    It has been shown that interfering reactions may occur in neutron activation analyses of aluminum and zinc matrixes, commonly used in nuclear areas. The interferences analysed were: Al2713 (n, α) Na2411 and Zn6430 (n, p) Cu6429. The method used was the non-destructive neutron activation analysis and the spectra were obtained in a 1024 multichannel system coupled with a Ge(Li) detector. Sodium was detected in aluminum samples from the reactor tank and pneumatic transfer system. The independence of the sodium concentration in samples in the range of 0 - 100 ppm is shown by the attenuation obtained with the samples encapsulated in cadmium. (Author)

  19. Neutron activation analysis of geochemical samples

    The present paper will describe the work done at the Technical Research Centre of Finland in developing methods for the large-scale activation analysis of samples for the geochemical prospecting of metals. The geochemical prospecting for uranium started in Finland in 1974 and consequently a manually operated device for the delayed neutron activation analysis of uranium was taken into use. During 1974 9000 samples were analyzed. The small capacity of the analyzer made it necessary to develop a completely automated analyzer which was taken into use in August 1975. Since then 20000-30000 samples have been analyzed annually the annual capacity being about 60000 samples when running seven hours per day. Multielemental instrumental neutron activation analysis is used for the analysis of more than 40 elements. Using instrumental epithermal neutron activation analysis 25-27 elements can be analyzed using one irradiation and 20 min measurement. During 1982 12000 samples were analyzed for mining companies and Geological Survey of Finland. The capacity is 600 samples per week. Besides these two analytical methods the analysis of lanthanoids is an important part of the work. 11 lanthanoids have been analyzed using instrumental neutron activation analysis. Radiochemical separation methods have been developed for several elements to improve the sensitivity of the analysis

  20. Monte-Carlo Simulations of Radiation-Induced Activation in a Fast-Neutron and Gamma- Based Cargo Inspection System

    Bromberger, B; Brandis, M; Dangendorf, V; Goldberg, M B; Kaufmann, F; Mor, I; Nolte, R; Schmiedel, M; Tittelmeier, K; Vartsky, D; Wershofen, H

    2012-01-01

    An air cargo inspection system combining two nuclear reaction based techniques, namely Fast-Neutron Resonance Radiography and Dual-Discrete-Energy Gamma Radiography is currently being developed. This system is expected to allow detection of standard and improvised explosives as well as special nuclear materials. An important aspect for the applicability of nuclear techniques in an airport inspection facility is the inventory and lifetimes of radioactive isotopes produced by the neutron and gamma radiation inside the cargo, as well as the dose delivered by these isotopes to people in contact with the cargo during and following the interrogation procedure. Using MCNPX and CINDER90 we have calculated the activation levels for several typical inspection scenarios. One example is the activation of various metal samples embedded in a cotton-filled container. To validate the simulation results, a benchmark experiment was performed, in which metal samples were activated by fast-neutrons in a water-filled glass jar. T...

  1. New studies in forensic neutron activation analysis

    Three recently completed studies in forensic neutron activation analysis are reported: a study of 0.22-caliber rimfire cartridge primers, a large-scale study of shotgun pellets, and a new 5-element procedure for the analysis of bullet-lead and shotgun-pellet samples. (author) 12 refs

  2. New studies in forensic neutron activation analysis

    Earlier studies in forensic neutron activation analysis are being extended in This Laboratory. Three of these new studies are reported here: 1) a study of 0.22-caliber rimfire cartridge primers, 2) a large-scale study of shotgun pellets, and 3) a new 5-element procedure for the analysis of bullet-lead and shotgun-pellet samples. (author)

  3. Neutron activation analysis helps in picture attribution

    The neutron activation analysis application for obtaining the data useful for proper attribution of paintings has been presented on the base of several examples. The identification on this way of dye elements, pigments and other painting materials is an important element among the physico-chemical methods helping the attribution procedure of old painting objects

  4. Neutron Activation Analysis with k0 Standardization

    SCK-CEN's programme on Neutron Activation Analysis with k0-standardisation aims to: (1) develop and implement k0-standardisation method for NAA; (2) to exploit the inherent qualities of NAA such as accuracy, traceability, and multi-element capability; (3) to acquire technical spin-off for nuclear measurements services. Main achievements in 1997 are reported

  5. Passive neutron dosemeter with activation detector

    Valero L, C.; Banuelos F, A.; Guzman G, K. A.; Borja H, C. G.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    A passive neutron dosemeter with {sup 197}Au activation detector has been developed. The area dosemeter was made as a 20.5 {phi} x 20.5 cm{sup 2} polyethylene moderator, with a polyethylene pug where a {sup 197}Au foil can be located either parallel or perpendicular to moderator axis. Using Monte Carlo methods, with the MCNP5 code. With the fluence response and the fluence-to-equivalent dose conversion coefficients from ICRP-74, responses to H*(10) were also calculated, these were compared against responses of commercially available neutron area monitors and dosemeters. (Author)

  6. Fast neutron activation measurement of concealed explosives

    Spectra of 0.511 MeV γ-ray of nitrogen and 6.13 MeV γ-ray of oxygen and their ratio are measured by using two neutron sourses of different yield for explosive or non-explosive materials. Sensitivity and detecting speed are determined. A planar distribution of the explosive or non-explosive materials with different contents of nitrogen and oxygen is given. The whole design and security of detection method of fast neutron activation analysis system is discussed for concealed explosives

  7. High-capacity neutron activation analysis facility

    A high-capacity neutron activation analysis facility, the Reactor Activation Facility, was designed and built and has been in operation for about a year at one of the Savannah River Plant's production reactors. The facility determines uranium and about 19 other elements in hydrogeochemical samples collected in the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program, which is sponsored and funded by the United States Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office. The facility has a demonstrated average analysis rate of over 10,000 samples per month, and a peak rate of over 16,000 samples per month. Uranium is determined by cyclic activation and delayed neutron counting of the U-235 fission products; other elements are determined from gamma-ray spectra recorded in subsequent irradiation, decay, and counting steps. The method relies on the absolute activation technique and is highly automated for round-the-clock unattended operation

  8. Malay Interrogative Knowledge Corpus

    Fatimah Sidi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The growth in the number of documents written in Malay language is enormously available on the web and intranets. There is a need to identify the information in the Malay documents that contain knowledge. This triggers the need to investigate the availability of knowledge in them. Approach: This study uses interrogative theory to identify knowledge from documents or texts. Results: The results are expected to lead towards establishment of new set of interrogative rules for Malay corpus. Conclusions/Recommendations: This study contributes the interrogative knowledge identification thru the development of Malay Interrogative Knowledge Corpus (MalayIKCorpus. It facilitates to explicitly capture and make available Malay knowledge representation in a knowledge-base system.

  9. Monitoring and characterization of radioactive wastes by neutronic methods

    In order to characterize a radioactive waste parcel, different techniques of analysis and nondestructive testing were developed during these last years. The most used are the gamma spectrometry, the passive neutron counting, the neutron interrogation and the photon interrogation with a electron accelerator. The neutron measurement are divided in two families: the active measurement and the passive measurement. The passive methods consist in measuring the neutron radiation emitted spontaneously by the contaminant. The active methods consist in the detection of neutron radiation after an external neutron irradiation. In this article are exposed the principal needs that lead to develop the neutrons measurement. Then, the passive and active neutron measurements are described. (N.C.)

  10. Fast-Neutron Surveys Using Indium-Foil Activation

    Stephens, Lloyd D.; Smith, Alan R.

    1958-08-13

    Activation of indium foils by thermal neutrons has been applied to measurement of fast-neutron fluxes. Foils are encased in paraffin spheres placed in cadmium boxes. The high-energy neutrons that penetrate the cadmium become thermal neutrons; the thermal-neutron flux is proportional to the incident fast-neutron flux over a range of about 20 kev to 20 Mev. The foils are removed from the boxes and counted on a methane-flow proportional counter. High instantaneous neutron fluxes are easily detected and counted by use of these foils. Many simultaneous measurements have been made easily by this method.

  11. Impact of electrolyte composition on the reactivity of a redox active polymer studied through surface interrogation and ion-sensitive scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    Burgess, Mark; Hernández-Burgos, Kenneth; Cheng, Kevin J; Moore, Jeffrey S; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín

    2016-06-21

    Elucidating the impact of interactions between the electrolyte and electroactive species in redox active polymers is key to designing better-performing electrodes for electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Here, we present on the improvement of the electrochemical activity of poly(para-nitrostyrene) (PNS) in solution and as a film by exploiting the ionic interactions between reduced PNS and K(+), which showed increased reactivity when compared to tetrabutylammonium (TBA(+))- and Li(+)-containing electrolytes. While cyclic voltammetry enabled the study of the effects of cations on the electrochemical reversibility and the reduction potential of PNS, scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) provided new tools to probe the ionic and redox reactivity of this system. Using an ion-sensitive Hg SECM tip allowed to probe the ingress of ions into PNS redox active films, while surface interrogation SECM (SI-SECM) measured the specific kinetics of PNS and a solution phase mediator in the presence of the tested electrolytes. SI-SECM measurements illustrated that the interrogation kinetics of PNS in the presence of K(+) compared to TBA(+) and Li(+) are greatly enhanced under the same surface concentration of adsorbed radical anion, exhibiting up to a 40-fold change in redox kinetics. We foresee using this new application of SECM methods for elucidating optimal interactions that enhance polymer reactivity for applications in redox flow batteries. PMID:27064026

  12. Neutron spectra unfolding from measured detector activations

    Our knowledge of the neutron spectrum in irradiation facilities essentially rests on the calculation and on the unfolding resp. adjustment based on measured activations, more generally said reactions rates, since the other direct or indirect experimental methods here frequently are not applicable on account of technical reasons. In this situation the neutronic calculation by no means renders superfluous the unfolding because the measurements can confirm or possibly correct resp. improve the calculational results. The FORTRAN code SAND-MX2 is a contribution of the KFA to the international repertoire of unfolding codes. With regard to its contents it is one of the newer versions of the original code SAND-II which are presently used as SAND-II also in the laboratories of several countries as especially practice related unfolding calculational methods. This report may serve as an instruction manual for the routinely neutron spectrum unfolding by means of the code SAND-MX2. It appeared to us not to be superfluous in addition to the above mentioned aim also to give a general view of the present situation in unfolding technique and to touch shortly the other advanced methods because we believed thereby also to give a better understanding of the characteristic features of our programme. In some laboratories several of the here described calculational programmes are alternatively in current use for the purpose of giving a greater confidence to the result of the neutron spectrum unfolding in question. (orig.)

  13. Applications of neutron activation analysis technique

    The technique was developed as far back as 1936 by G. Hevesy and H. Levy for the analysis of Dy using an isotopic source. Approximately 40 elements can be analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INNA) technique with neutrons from a nuclear reactor. By applying radiochemical separation, the number of elements that can be analysed may be increased to almost 70. Compared with other analytical methods used in environmental and industrial research, NAA has some unique features. These are multi-element capability, rapidity, reproducibility of results, complementarity to other methods, freedom from analytical blank and independency of chemical state of elements. There are several types of neutron sources namely: nuclear reactors, accelerator-based and radioisotope-based sources, but nuclear reactors with high fluxes of neutrons from the fission of 235U give the most intense irradiation, and hence the highest available sensitivities for NAA. In this paper, the applications of NAA of socio-economic importance are discussed. The benefits of using NAA and related nuclear techniques for on-line applications in industrial process control are highlighted. A brief description of the NAA set-ups at CERT is enumerated. Finally, NAA is compared with other leading analytical techniques

  14. Neutron activation analysis of biological substances

    A Bowen cabbage sample was used as a reference material for the neutron activation studies, and the method was checked by the analysis of other biological substances (blood or serum etc.). For nondestructive measurements also some non-trace elements were determined in order to decide whether the activation analysis is a useful means for such measurements. The new activation analysis procedure was used for biomedical studies as, e.g., for trace element determination in body fluids, and for the analysis of inorganic components in air samples. (R.P.)

  15. Neutron activation analysis of geothermal water

    Instrumental technique of determination of 16 microimpurities in geothermal water samples is worked out. Probes and standard samples with cadmium filter have been irradiated by the thermal neutron flux of 5x1013 neutr.xcm-2xc-1. Cadmium filter permitted to considerably decrease 24Na radio activity caused by its high content in geothermal water, and to measure radioactivity in several hours after irradiation. Radioactivity measurement has been carried out without probe unpacking

  16. Reactor neutron activation analysis of industrial materials

    The specific application of neutron activation analysis (n.a.a.) for industrial materials is demonstrated by the determination of impurities in BeO, Al, Si, Cu, Ge, GaP, GaAs, steel, and irradiated uranium. A group scheme gives an orientation about the possibilities of n.a.a. The use of different standards, methods for the measurement of low radioactivities and errors caused by recoil reaction and radiation stimulated diffusion are discussed. (author)

  17. Development of Cold Neutron Activation Station at HANARO Cold Neutron Source

    A new cold neutron source at the HANARO Research Reactor had been constructed in the framework of a five-year project, and ended in 2009. It has seven neutron guides, among which five guides were already allocated for a number of neutron scattering instruments. A new two-year project to develop a Cold Neutron Activation Station (CONAS) was carried out at the two neutron guides since May 2010, which was supported by the program of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology, Korea. Fig. 1 shows the location of CONAS. CONAS is a complex facility including several radioanalytical instruments utilizing neutron capture reaction to analyze elements in a sample. It was designed to include three instruments like a CN-PGAA (Cold Neutron - Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis), a CN-NIPS (Cold Neutron - Neutron Induced Pair Spectrometer), and a CN-NDP (Cold Neutron - Neutron-induced prompt charged particle Depth Profiling). Fig. 2 shows the conceptual configuration of the CONAS concrete bioshield and the instruments. CN-PGAA and CN-NIPS measure the gamma-rays promptly emitted from the sample after neutron capture, whereas CN-NDP is a probe to measure the charged particles emitted from the sample surface after neutron capture. For this, we constructed two cold neutron guides called CG1 and CG2B guides from the CNS

  18. Active neutron/photon personal dosemeters

    Though active personal dosemeters for photon fields reflect already a high level of development, there is still a need to advance the design of dosemeters for use in mixed neutron/photon fields and especially for monitoring the staff of nuclear power plants and the personnel accompanying transports of spent fuel flasks. The measurement of the neutron component is usually associated with problems. After a short description of the complex mixed fields in the nuclear fuel cycle, the commercially available active dosemeters and those under development will be listed and problems arising from their use in these fields will be discussed. Two new developments, the Siemens EPD-N2 and the PTB DOS-2002, which both are capable of indicating neutron and photon doses, will be described and discussed in detail. New response functions with respect to personal dose equivalent Hp(10) will be presented for neutrons. They have been determined by measurements in the quasi-monoenergetic reference fields at PTB in the energy range from 24 keV to 14.8 MeV and in fields with broad spectral distributions using the radionuclide sources 252Cf(bare), 252Cf(D2O,mod) - with and without cadmium shielding - 241Am-Be as well as a thermal neutron beam. The spectral distributions of all fields and the readings of the dosemeters in these fields were taken as inputs for an unfolding procedure to determine the dosemeter response in the overall energy region from thermal to 15 MeV. The procedure was tested by folding the dosemeter response with the broad neutron spectra and comparing with the readings of the dosemeters. Another problem in practical workplace fields is linked with high energy photons. Photons with energies from 6 MeV to 7 MeV from the 16O(n,pγ) reaction contribute to dose, particularly at reactors, and have to be taken into account when dosemeters are processed. Measurements with high energy photons were therefore performed with both devices and will be discussed. Finally, practical

  19. Neutron activation analysis of geological materials

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is an extremely sensitive, selective and precise method, which yields a wealth of elemental information from even a small-sized sample. With the recent advances in nuclear reactors and high-efficiency and high-resolution semiconductor detectors, NAA has become a powerful method for multielemental analysis. The concentration of major, minor, and trace elements vary from 1 to 4 orders of magnitude in geological materials. By varying neutron fluxes, irradiation times, decay and counting intervals and using both instrumental and radiochemical techniques in NAA, it is possible to accurately determine about 50 elements in a sample aliquant. The practical aspects of the NAA method as applied to geological materials are discussed in detail, and are demonstrated by the analysis of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standard reference geological materials. General aspects of the elemental interpretations in terrestrial samples are also discussed. (author)

  20. Prospects for absolute neutron activation analysis

    The desirability for absolute neutron activation analysis(ANAA) is two-fold. Results by the comparitor method are only as good as the standards used, and also the method offers a chance of having the final results available within minutes of completing the analysis. In the past ANAA was not seriously considered because of the scarcity and poor qaulity of the nuclear data that were available. This situation is however steadily improving and the possible applications are being investigated. This report reviews the present status by considering the basic activation equation, calculation of parameters, the factors of importance and the size error one might expect

  1. Neutron activation analysis applied to archaeological problems

    Among the various techniques, the main analytical methods used to characterize ceramics are undoubtedly XRF and INAA. The principles of NAA differ from those of XRF in that samples are irradiated by thermal neutrons from a nuclear reactor. During irradiation, a few neutrons are captured by the nuclei of atoms in the specimen. This process, called activation, causes some of the nuclei to become unstable. During and after neutron irradiation, these unstable nuclei emit γ rays with unique energies at rates defined by the characteristic half-lives of the radioactive nuclei. Identification of the radioactive nucleus is possible by measuring the γ ray energies. Determination of their intensities permits quantitative analysis of the elements in the sample. The use of NAA in ceramics by a combination of two or three irradiation, decay and measurement strategies allows the determination of the elements Ba, Ce, Cl, Co, Cs, Dy, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Mn, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, U, Yb, Zn and Zr, if necessary by changing the irradiation, decay and measurement schemes. In general, XRF is more available, more rapid and less expensive than NAA. However, NAA offers a far greater number of elements, more sensitivity, superior precision and greater accuracy than XRF. On the other hand, NAA can be performed on extremely small samples (5-10 mg), meaning that only minor damage to valuable artefacts may be required

  2. Integrated Box Interrogation System (IBIS) Preliminary Design Study

    DR. Stephen Croft; Mr. David Martancik; Dr. Brian Young; Dr. Patrick MJ Chard; Dr. Robert J Estop; Sheila Melton; Gaetano J. Arnone

    2003-01-13

    Canberra Industries has won the tendered solicitation, INEEL/EST-99-00121 for boxed waste Nondestructive Assay Development and Demonstration. Canberra will provide the Integrated Box Interrogation System (IBIS) which is a suite of assay instrumentation and a data reduction system that addresses the measurement needs for Boxed Wastes identified in the solicitation and facilitates the associated experimental program and demonstration of system capability. The IBIS system will consist of the next generation CWAM system, i.e. CWAM II, which is a Scanning Passive/Active Neutron interrogation system which we will call a Box Segmented Neutron Scanner (BSNS), combined with a physically separate Box Segmented Gamma-ray Scanning (BSGS) system. These systems are based on existing hardware designs but will be tailored to the large sample size and enhanced to allow the program to evaluate the following measurement criteria:Characterization and correction for matrix heterogeneity Characterization of non-uniform radio-nuclide and isotopic compositions Assay of high density matrices (both high-Z and high moderator contents)Correction for radioactive material physical form - such as self shielding or multiplication effects due to large accumulations of radioactive materials.Calibration with a minimal set of reference standards and representative matrices.THis document summarizes the conceptual design parameters of the IBIS and indicates areas key to the success of the project where development is to be centered. The work presented here is a collaborative effort between scientific staff within Canberra and within the NIS-6 group at LANL.

  3. Integrated Box Interrogation System (IBIS) Preliminary Design Study

    Canberra Industries has won the tendered solicitation, INEEL/EST-99-00121 for boxed waste Nondestructive Assay Development and Demonstration. Canberra will provide the Integrated Box Interrogation System (IBIS) which is a suite of assay instrumentation and a data reduction system that addresses the measurement needs for Boxed Wastes identified in the solicitation and facilitates the associated experimental program and demonstration of system capability. The IBIS system will consist of the next generation CWAM system, i.e. CWAM II, which is a Scanning Passive/Active Neutron interrogation system which we will call a Box Segmented Neutron Scanner (BSNS), combined with a physically separate Box Segmented Gamma-ray Scanning (BSGS) system. These systems are based on existing hardware designs but will be tailored to the large sample size and enhanced to allow the program to evaluate the following measurement criteria:Characterization and correction for matrix heterogeneity Characterization of non-uniform radio-nuclide and isotopic compositions Assay of high density matrices (both high-Z and high moderator contents)Correction for radioactive material physical form - such as self shielding or multiplication effects due to large accumulations of radioactive materials.Calibration with a minimal set of reference standards and representative matrices.THis document summarizes the conceptual design parameters of the IBIS and indicates areas key to the success of the project where development is to be centered. The work presented here is a collaborative effort between scientific staff within Canberra and within the NIS-6 group at LANL

  4. The orientation effect in the activities of neutronic probes

    The formulae relating activity and position of a neutron irradiated Indium foil, have been verified experimentally. Measurements with both thin and thick foils for epithermal neutrons and with thick foils for thermal neutrons have been carried out. The experimental results agree qualitatively with the theoretical predictions. (Author)

  5. Neutron activation analysis of zirconium niobium alloys

    Full text: One of the important problems in nuclear reactor projecting is the choice of constructional materials, which meet to the requirements concerned with function, technical characteristics and expected performance of the reactor construction. Also it is necessary to take into account change of their properties under the influence of intensive neutron radiation. Zirconium and zirconium-niobium alloys are used in nuclear engineering as a fuel cladding and both matrix and impurity composition have an influence on their performance capabilities.Under intensive neutron radiation high content of undesirable trace elements in constructional materials can cause forming long-lived radionuclides with high induced activity and hence severe problems may occur at service, control of the equipment and carrying out experiments. Therefore analytical control of component and impurity composition of these materials is an important problem.Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is one of multielemental and high sensitivity methods, which widely applied for the analysis of high purity materials. Prior experiments have shown that instrumental NAA is not suitable for analysis of Zr-Nb alloys due to strong induced matrix activity. Therefore we have developed radiochemical procedure for separation of impurities from matrix elements. Study of the literature data has shown that zirconium and niobium are good extracted from hydrochloric medium by 0 75 M solution of di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid (DEHPA) in ortho-xylene. Also this system good extracts hafnium which being accompanying element has high content and interferes with determining impurity elements. To improve separation efficiency we have used 'DEHPA - ZM HCl' chromatography system. On the basis of the carried out researches the radiochemical NAA technique for analysis of high purity zirconium and zirconium-niobium alloys has been developed. The technique is based on extraction-chromatographic separation of matrix radionuclides

  6. Support system for Neutron Activation Analysis

    In the research reactor of JAERI, the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) has been utilized as a major part of an irradiation usage. To utilize NAA, research participants are always required to learn necessary technique. Therefore, we started to examine a support system that will enable to carry out INAA easily even by beginners. The system is composed of irradiation device, gamma-ray spectrometer and data analyzing instruments. The element concentration is calculated by using KAYZERO/SOLCOI software with the K0 standardization method. In this paper, we review on a construction of this INAA support system in JRR-3M of JAERI. (author)

  7. Toxicological applications of neutron-activation analysis

    Thermal neutron-activation analysis is recognised as a useful tool for trace element studies in toxicology. This paper describes some recent applications of the technique to three elements when ingested by people in excess of normal intake Two of the elements (copper and chromium) are essential to life and one (bromine) is as yet unclassified. Three deaths were investiagted and trace element levels compared with normal levels from healthy subjects in the same geographical area who had died as a result of violence. (author)

  8. Quality assurance in biomedical neutron activation analysis

    The summary report represents an attempt to identify some of the possible sources of error in in vitro neutron activation analysis of trace elements applied to specimens of biomedical origin and to advise on practical means to avoid them. The report is intended as guidance for all involved in analysis, including sample collection and preparation for analysis. All these recommendations constitute part of quality assurance which is here taken to encompass the two concepts - quality control and quality assessment. Quality control is the mechanism established to control errors, while quality assessment is the mechanism used to verify that the analytical procedure is operating within acceptable limits

  9. Neutron activation analysis of medicinal plant extracts

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis was applied to the determination of the elements Br, Ca, Cl, Cs, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Na, Rb and Zn in medicinal extracts obtained from Centella asiatica, Citrus aurantium L., Achyrolcline satureoides DC, Casearia sylvestris, Solano lycocarpum, Zingiber officinale Roscoe, Solidago microglossa and Stryphnondedron barbatiman plants. The elements Hg and Se were determined using radiochemical separation by means of retention of Se in HMD inorganic exchanger and solvent extraction of Hg by bismuth diethyldithiocarbamate solution. Precision and accuracy of the results were evaluated by analyzing biological reference materials. The therapeutic action of some elements found in plant extracts analyzed is briefly discussed. (author). 15 refs., 5 tabs

  10. Rapid radiochemical separations in neutron activation analysis

    Rapid radiochemical separation procedures based on the removal of metal ions by columns of C18-bonded silica gel after selective complexation are examined and the simplicity of the method demonstrated by its application to the determination of Mn, Cu and Zn in neutron-activated biological material. The method is rapid and reliable and readily adaptable in all radiochemical laboratories. An alternative separation procedure for selenium in blood plasma involving desalination and concentration of the selenium protein complex by gel filtration or ultrafiltration is briefly discussed. (author)

  11. Neutron activation analysis of Etruscan pottery

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) has been widely used in archaeology for compositional analysis of pottery samples taken from sites of archaeological importance. Elemental profiles can determine the place of manufacture. At Cornell, samples from an Etruscan site near Siena, Italy, are being studied. The goal of this study is to compile a trace element concentration profile for a large number of samples. These profiles will be matched with an existing data bank in an attempt to understand the place of origin for these samples. The 500 kW TRIGA reactor at the Ward Laboratory is used to collect NAA data for these samples. Experiments were done to set a procedure for the neutron activation analysis with respect to sample preparation, selection of irradiation container, definition of activation and counting parameters and data reduction. Currently, we are able to analyze some 27 elements in samples of mass 500 mg with a single irradiation of 4 hours and two sequences of counting. Our sensitivity for many of the trace elements is better than 1 ppm by weight under the conditions chosen. In this talk, details of our procedure, including quality assurance as measured by NIST standard reference materials, will be discussed. In addition, preliminary results from data treatment using cluster analysis will be presented. (author)

  12. Activities induced in the human body by thermal neutrons

    Activities of 17 radionuclides induced in the human body by the activation of 14 elements with thermal neutrons were calculated. Resulting dependences of these activities on the activation time are shown in graphs. (author)

  13. Reactor neutron activation for multielemental analysis

    Neutron Activation Analysis using single comparator (K0 NAA method) has been used for obtaining multielemental profiles in a variety of matrices related to environment. Gold was used as the comparator. Neutron flux was characterised by determining f, the epithermal to thermal neutron flux ratio and cc, the deviation from ideal shape of the neutron spectrum. The f and a were determined in different irradiation positions in APSARA reactor, PCF position in CIRUS reactor and tray rod position in Dhruva reactor using both cadmium cut off and multi isotope detector methods. High resolution gamma ray spectrometry was used for radioactive assay of the activation products. This technique is being used for multielement analysis in a variety of matrices like lake sediments, sea nodules and crusts, minerals, leaves, cereals, pulses, leaves, water and soil. Elemental profiles of the sediments corresponding to different depths from Nainital lake were determined and used to understand the history of natural absorption/desorption pattern of the previous 160 years. Ferromanganese crusts from different locations of Indian Ocean were analysed with a view to studying the distribution of some trace elements along with Fe and Mn. Variation of Mn/Fe ratio was used to identify the nature of the crusts as hydrogenous or hydrothermal. Fe-rich and Fe-depleted nodules from Indian Ocean were analysed to understand the REE patterns and it is proposed that REE-Th associated minerals could be the potential Th contributors to the sea water and thus reached ferromanganese nodules. Dolomites (unaltered and altered), two types of serpentines and intrusive rock dolerite from the asbestos mines of Cuddapah basin were analysed for major, minor and trace elements. The elemental concentrations are used for distinguishing and characterising these minerals. From our investigations, it was concluded that both dolomite and dolerite contribute elements in the serpentinisation process. Chemical neutron

  14. Silicate rock and rock forming mineral neutron activation analysis

    A neutron-activation scheme for the determination of nine rare earths and other trace elements in various rock forming minerals (feldspars, ilmenite, magnetite, pyroxenes) and silicate rocks is presented. The procedure is based on three different irradiations involving three separate samples: - epithermal neutron irradiation (2 days) followed by nondestructive analysis; - thermal neutron irradiation (1 day) followed by instrumental analysis; - thermal neutron irradiation (1 week) followed by radiochemical analysis (precipitation, anion exchange separation, liquid-liquid extraction). Two USGS reference samples - granite G-2 and andesite AGV-1 - have been analysed in order to assess the accuracy of the proposed procedure. Our results agree with previous neutron-activation data. (orig.)

  15. Medical chemistry of boron neutron capture agents having pharmacological activity

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a cancer treatment that selectively destroys cancer cells following administering a cancer-selective drug containing stable isotope boron-10 and neutron irradiation. In clinical trial of BNCT, disodium mercaptoundecahydro-closo-dodecaborate (BSH) and p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) have been used, however, development of a new drugs with high cancer selectivity and therapeutic efficiency is expected. Therefore, we review boron-containing drugs as a boron neutron capture agents having pharmacological activity, BNCT research on boron-modified porphyrin derivatives which have photosensitivity and neutron capture activity and our proposed neutron sensitizing agent. (author)

  16. Monte-Carlo simulations of neutron-induced activation in a Fast-Neutron and Gamma-Based Cargo Inspection System

    Bromberger, B.; Bar, D.; Brandis, M.; Dangendorf, V.; Goldberg, M. B.; Kaufmann, F.; Mor, I.; Nolte, R.; Schmiedel, M.; Tittelmeier, K.; Vartsky, D.; Wershofen, H.

    2012-03-01

    An air cargo inspection system combining two nuclear reaction based techniques, namely Fast-Neutron Resonance Radiography and Dual-Discrete-Energy Gamma Radiography is currently being developed. This system is expected to allow detection of standard and improvised explosives as well as special nuclear materials. An important aspect for the applicability of nuclear techniques in an airport inspection facility is the inventory and lifetimes of radioactive isotopes produced by the neutron radiation inside the cargo, as well as the dose delivered by these isotopes to people in contact with the cargo during and following the interrogation procedure. Using MCNPX and CINDER90 we have calculated the activation levels for several typical inspection scenarios. One example is the activation of various metal samples embedded in a cotton-filled container. To validate the simulation results, a benchmark experiment was performed, in which metal samples were activated by fast-neutrons in a water-filled glass jar. The induced activity was determined by analyzing the gamma spectra. Based on the calculated radioactive inventory in the container, the dose levels due to the induced gamma radiation were calculated at several distances from the container and in relevant time windows after the irradiation, in order to evaluate the radiation exposure of the cargo handling staff, air crew and passengers during flight. The possibility of remanent long-lived radioactive inventory after cargo is delivered to the client is also of concern and was evaluated.

  17. Epithermal neutron activation analysis of food

    Food samples were irradiated with thermal and epithermal neutrons. The average ratios of thermal to epithermal activity were determined for 80Br, 49Ca, 38Cl, 60mCo, 42K, 27Mg, 56Mn, 24Na, and 86mRb. They were equal to 2.1, 26, 24, 6.6, 19, 16, 11, 23 and 1.9, respectively. Then, 57 food samples were analyzed by epithermal neutron activation analysis for Br and Rb. The concentrations (in ppm) of Br and Rb were in asparagus (2) 2.3, 11.5; beets (3) 0.5, 0.8; beef (3) 1.7, 3.6; cabbage (5) 0.5, 10.8; carrot (3) 0.2, 3.7; chicken (3) 0.6, 4.4; chocolate (7) 11.1, 18.7; egg (3) 0.9, 1.9; french bean (3) 0.3, 1.0; goose (2) 1.3, 9.3; lettuce (2) 0.9, 1.7; pork (1) 1.5, 4.4; potato (7) 1.0, 1.2; sausage (3) 4.8, 3.5; spinach (3) 3.6, 4.0; strawberry jam (3) 0.4, 1.4; tomato (1) 13.5, 14.6; turkey (3) 1.2, 4.9. respectively. The number of samples and analyzed is indicated in parentheses. (author)

  18. Measurement of neutron flux spectra in a tungsten benchmark by neutron foil activation method

    The nuclear designs of fusion devices such as ITER (international thermonuclear experimental reactor), which is an experimental fusion reactor based on the ''tokamak'' concept, rely on the results of neutron physical calculations. These depend on the knowledge of the neutron and photon flux spectra which is particularly important because it permits to anticipate the possible answers of the whole structure to phenomena such as nuclear heating, tritium breeding, atomic displacements, radiation shielding, power generation and material activation. The flux spectra can be calculated with transport codes, but validating measurements are also required. An important constituent of structural materials and divertor areas of fusion reactors is tungsten. This thesis deals with the measurement of the neutron fluence and neutron energy spectrum in a tungsten assembly by means of multiple foil neutron activation technique. In order to check and qualify the experimental tools and the codes to be used in the tungsten benchmark experiment, test measurements in the D-T and D-D neutron fields of the neutron generator at Technische Universitaet Dresden were performed. The characteristics of the D-D and D-T reactions, used to produce monoenergetic neutrons, together with the selection of activation reactions suitable for fusion applications and details of the activation measurements are presented. Corrections related to the neutron irradiation process and those to the sample counting process are discussed, too. The neutron fluence and its energy distribution in a tungsten benchmark, irradiated at the frascati neutron generator with 14 MeV neutrons produced by the T(d,n)4He reaction, are then derived from the measurements of the neutron induced γ-ray activity in the foils using the STAYNL unfolding code, based on the linear least-squares-errors method, together with the IRDF-90.2 (international reactor dosimetry file) cross section library. The differences between the neutron flux

  19. Selected industrial and environmental applications of neutron activation analysis

    A review of the applications of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) in the industrial and environmental fields is given. Detection limits for different applications are also given. (author)

  20. Imaging of heterogeneous materials by prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis

    We have used a Tomographic Gamma Scanner (TGS) to produce tomographic Prompt Gamma-Ray Neutron Activation Imaging of heterogeneous matrices [T.H. Prettyman, R.J. Estep, G.A. Sheppard, Trans. Am. Nucl. Soc. 69 (1993) 183-184]. The TGS was modified by the addition of graphite reflectors that contain isotopic neutron sources for sample interrogation. We are in the process of developing the analysis methodology necessary for a quantitative assay of large containers of heterogeneous material. This nondestructive analysis technique can be used for material characterization and the determination of neutron assay correction factors. The most difficult question to be answered is the determination of the source to sample coupling term. To assist in the determination of the coupling term we have obtained images for a range of samples that are very well characterized; such as, homogenous pseudo one-dimensional samples to three-dimensional heterogeneous samples. We then compare the measurements to Monte Carlo N-particle calculations. For an accurate quantitative measurement it is also necessary to determine the sample gamma-ray self attenuation at higher gamma-ray energies, namely pair production should be incorporated into the analysis codes

  1. Activation Spectrometry of Fast Neutrons by IAEA Threshold Detectors at Neutron Generators

    The suitability of the IAEA set of threshold detectors for neutron accident purposes was investigated. A generator producing 14.3-MeV neutrons by the T(d, n)4He reaction was employed for this purpose. 237Np, 232Th, 58Ni and 27Al threshold detectors were used. The induced activity was determined by gamma spectrometry using a multichannel analyser. Fast neutron spectra have been estimated from the experimental results. Measurements at the surface and at the depth of a phantom were provided. Some difficulties from low induced and fission activities (caused by the small neutron flux density and the light weight of the detectors) are pointed out. (author)

  2. Estimation of thermal neutron flux from natZr activity

    Neutron transmutation doped (NTD) Ge thermistors are developed as low temperature thermometry (in mK range) in the cryogenic Tin bolometer, the India-based TIN detector (TIN.TIN). For this purpose, semiconductor grade Ge wafers are irradiated with thermal neutron at Dhruva reactor, BARC and dopant concentration critically depends on thermal neutron fluence. In order to obtain an independent estimate of the thermal neutron flux, natZr is used in one of the irradiations. The irradiated natZr samples have been studied in the Tifr Low background Experimental Setup (TiLES). The thermal neutron flux is estimated from the activity of 95Zr

  3. Industrial applications of neutron activation analysis

    Neutron activation analysis has been widely used in the industry and over the years played a key role in the development of manufacturing process as well as monitoring of the process flow. In this context NAA has been utilized both in R and D, and in the factory as a flexible analytical tool. It has been used successfully in numerous industries including broad categories such as Chemical, Pharmaceutical, Mining, Photographic, Oil and Gas, Automobile, Defense, Semiconductor and Electronic industries. Dow Chemical owns and operates a research reactor for analytical measurements of samples generated in both R and D, and manufacturing area in its plant in Midland, Michigan. Although most industries do not have reactors on their campus but use an off site reactor regularly, and often have in-house neutron sources such as a 252Cf used primarily for NAA. In most industrial materials analysis laboratory NAA is part of a number of analytical techniques such as ICP-MS, AA, SIMS, FTIR, XRF, TXRF etc. Analysis of complex industrial samples may require data from each of these methods to provide a clear picture of the materials issues involved. With the improvement of classical analytical techniques, and the introduction of new techniques, e.g. TXRF, the role of NAA continues to be a key bench mark technique that provides accurate and reliable data. The strength of the NAA in bulk analysis is balanced by its weakness in providing surface sensitive or spatially resolved analysis as is required by many applications. (author)

  4. Development of high flux thermal neutron generator for neutron activation analysis

    The new model DD110MB neutron generator from Adelphi Technology produces thermal (<0.5 eV) neutron flux that is normally achieved in a nuclear reactor or larger accelerator based systems. Thermal neutron fluxes of 3–5 · 107 n/cm2/s are measured. This flux is achieved using four ion beams arranged concentrically around a target chamber containing a compact moderator with a central sample cylinder. Fast neutron yield of ∼2 · 1010 n/s is created at the titanium surface of the target chamber. The thickness and material of the moderator is selected to maximize the thermal neutron flux at the center. The 2.5 MeV neutrons are quickly thermalized to energies below 0.5 eV and concentrated at the sample cylinder. The maximum flux of thermal neutrons at the target is achieved when approximately half of the neutrons at the sample area are thermalized. In this paper we present simulation results used to characterize performance of the neutron generator. The neutron flux can be used for neutron activation analysis (NAA) prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) for determining the concentrations of elements in many materials. Another envisioned use of the generator is production of radioactive isotopes. DD110MB is small enough for modest-sized laboratories and universities. Compared to nuclear reactors the DD110MB produces comparable thermal flux but provides reduced administrative and safety requirements and it can be run in pulsed mode, which is beneficial in many neutron activation techniques

  5. Computer modeling for neutron activation analysis methods

    Full text: The INP AS RU develops databases for the neutron-activation analysis - ND INAA [1] and ELEMENT [2]. Based on these databases, the automated complex is under construction aimed at modeling of methods for natural and technogenic materials analysis. It is well known, that there is a variety of analysis objects with wide spectra, different composition and concentration of elements, which makes it impossible to develop universal methods applicable for every analytical research. The modelling is based on algorithm, that counts the period of time in which the sample was irradiated in nuclear reactor, providing the sample's total absorption and activity analytical peaks areas with given errors. The analytical complex was tested for low-elemental analysis (determination of Fe and Zn in vegetation samples, and Cu, Ag and Au - in technological objects). At present, the complex is applied for multielemental analysis of sediment samples. In this work, modern achievements in the analytical chemistry (measurement facilities, high-resolution detectors, IAEA and IUPAC databases) and information technology applications (Java software, database management systems (DBMS), internet technologies) are applied. Reference: 1. Tillaev T., Umaraliev A., Gurvich L.G., Yuldasheva K., Kadirova J. Specialized database for instrumental neutron activation analysis - ND INAA 1.0, The 3-rd Eurasian Conference Nuclear Science and its applications, 2004, pp.270-271.; 2. Gurvich L.G., Tillaev T., Umaraliev A. The Information-analytical database on the element contents of natural objects. The 4-th International Conference Modern problems of Nuclear Physics, Samarkand, 2003, p.337. (authors)

  6. Large sample neutron activation analysis of a ceramic vase

    Stamatelatos, I.E.; Tzika, F.; Vasilopoulou, T.; Koster-Ammerlaan, M.J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Large Sample Neutron Activation Analysis (LSNAA) was applied to perform non-destructive elemental analysis of a ceramic vase. Appropriate neutron self-shielding and gamma ray detection efficiency calibration factors were derived using Monte Carlo code MCNP5. The results of LSNAA were compared against Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) results and a satisfactory agreement between the two methods was observed. The ratio of derived concentrations between the two methods was within 0...

  7. Neutron activation of gold dental restorations in small primates

    Zellmer, R.W.; Hartley, J.L.; Richey, E.O.; Harris, N.O.

    1959-07-01

    Dental gold alloys of various kinds were used to cast inlays which were placed in the molars of 10 small primates. These primates were then exposed to the neutron flux of an atomic detonation. The inlays were removed and the neutron-induced activity of the gold was measured in a scintillation counter. Calculation of the total activity showed a correlation with the neutron dosages received by the primates.

  8. Neutron activation in EBT-P

    Neutron activation due to photoneutron production in the lead shields proposed to protect the EBT-P superconducting coils from excessive x-ray heating was investigated. The photoneutron flux distribution in various EBT-P structural components was calculated for typical upgrade operating conditions using a standard two-dimensional transport model (TWOTRAN). Activity levels were then evaluated for major structural materials using activation cross sections tabulated in the GAMMON library. Activation dose rates in the device enclosure following several days of 8h/day upgrade (90GHz) operation were found to be approx. 6 mrem/h, decaying to <0.25 mrem/h in approx. 3 days. This requires radiation monitoring of all personnel entering the device enclosure during this time, but should not generally restrict hands on access to the device. There is thus no strong motivation to replace lead with another shield material; however, it may be desirable to borate the enclosure walls in order to reduce the effect which impurities might have on activity levels

  9. Neutron Activation Analysis of Biological Materials by Means of Neutron Multiplicator

    We have studied the possibilities of instrumental neutron activation analysis of freeze-dried biological materials performed with neutron multiplicator of average power (subcritical assembly PS-1). Neutron flux in the vertical channel amounts to 2.3*106n/cm2sec, concentrations of Na, Al and Mn were determined in freeze-dried samples of blue-green alga Spirulina platensis (S.platensis) (author)

  10. Comparison of activation in fission and fusion spectrum neutron beams

    The materials used in the construction of fusion reactors have to satisfy a number of criterions, one of the important being low activation due to neutron irradiation. Experimental analysis of the activation of candidate materials for the first wall is performed with the irradiation of samples in various neutron fields, frequently in the field of a fission reactor. In the present work a calculation is performed to compare the expected activation of candidate materials intended to be used for the first wall in fusion reactors with the activation of a sample of the same material in a fission reactor beam. The FISPACT code is used for activation calculations. An investigation, to what extent the results of activation in a fission spectrum neutron beam, where most neutrons have energies of less than 2 MeV, mimic the real situation in a fusion reactor with the peak neutron energy around 14 MeV, is performed. (author)

  11. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of soil sample

    This paper describes the analysis of soil samples collected from 5 different location around Sungai Lui, Kajang, Selangor, Malaysia. These sample were taken at 22-24 cm from the top of the ground and were analysed using the techniques of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA). The analysis on soil sample taken above 22-24 cm level were done in order to determine if there is any variation in elemental contents at different sampling levels. The results indicate a wide variation in the contents of the samples. About 30 elements have been analysed. The major ones are Na, I, Cl, Mg, Al, K, Ti, Ca and Fe. Trace elements analysed were Ba, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Ga, As, Zn, Br, Rb, Co, Hf, Zr, Th, U, Sb, Cs, Ce, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Yb, Lu and La. (author)

  12. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of kidney stones

    Kidney stone samples of the types calcium oxalate, uric acid, and xanthine were analyzed for their elemental contents by neutron activation analysis to study both the elemental correlation and influence of element on stone precipitation processes. Elements, such as Al, Au, Br, Ca, Cl, Co, Cr, Fe,H, I, K, Mg, Na, Sb, Se, Sr, and Zn, were determined quantitatively. Calcium oxalate stones contained higher concentration of all the elements analyzed compared to uric acid or xanthine stones. The concentrations of Cl, Fe, K, Na, Sr, and Zn were relatively higher than Au, Co, Cr, and Sb. A positive correlation exists between Ca and Zn, whereas a negative correlation exists between Sr and Ca. Zinc may play an important role in the formation of calcium oxalate stone

  13. Neutron activation analysis of human hair

    In an attempt to study the availability and limitation of analytical data of human hair as an indicator of environmental pollution and/or of human health effect, concentrations of elements in 202 scalp hair samples collected from local population in the Tokyo Metropolitan area were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The correlation coefficients between concentrations of 13 elements in each sex and in each age group were calculated and discussed. There were significant correlations between some pairs of elements, i.e. Na-K, Br-Cl, Ca-Zn and Ca-Mg, in all five age classes in both of male and female, indicating that the correlations were consistent. Ca was observed to be reversely correlated with Cl. No significant correlation was apparent between Hg and Se, when the correlation coefficient was calculated using logarithmic converted concentration data. (author)

  14. Neutron activation analysis of urinary calculi

    Urinary calculi resulting from disorders in the urinary system are mostly composed of uric acid, urates, calcium oxalate, alkaline earth phosphates (Ca and Mg), triple phosphate (magnesium ammonium phosphate), calcium carbonate, cystine, xanthine, and traces of proteins. The determination of these macro-constituents has been carried out by different analytical procedures. No attempts however, have been reported regarding the determination of trace elements in urinary stones, apart from that of Herring et al., who investigated the consumption of strontium by urolithiasis patients. The present work is a non-destructive neutron activation analysis of urinary calculi, to search the variation in concentration of certain trace elements with the chemical composition of the calculus

  15. Measurements of fusion neutron yields by neutron activation technique: Uncertainty due to the uncertainty on activation cross-sections

    The neutron activation technique is routinely used in fusion experiments to measure the neutron yields. This paper investigates the uncertainty on these measurements as due to the uncertainties on dosimetry and activation reactions. For this purpose, activation cross-sections were taken from the International Reactor Dosimetry and Fusion File (IRDFF-v1.05) in 640 groups ENDF-6 format for several reactions of interest for both 2.5 and 14 MeV neutrons. Activation coefficients (reaction rates) have been calculated using the neutron flux spectra at JET vacuum vessel, both for DD and DT plasmas, calculated by MCNP in the required 640-energy group format. The related uncertainties for the JET neutron spectra are evaluated as well using the covariance data available in the library. These uncertainties are in general small, but not negligible when high accuracy is required in the determination of the fusion neutron yields

  16. Development of educational program for neutron activation analysis

    This technical report is developed to apply an educational and training program for graduate student and analyst utilizing neutron activation analysis. The contents of guide book consists of five parts as follows; introduction, gamma-ray spectrometry and measurement statistics, its applications, to understand of comprehensive methodology and to utilize a relevant knowledge and information on neutron activation analysis

  17. Trace Analysis of Ancient Gold Objects Using Radiochemical Neutron Activation

    Olariu, A; Constantinescu, O; Badica, T; Popescu, I V; Besliu, C; Leahu, D; Olariu, Agata; Constantinescu, Mioara; Leahu, Doina

    1999-01-01

    Radiochemical neutron activation analysis has been applied to investigate the microelements in gold samples with archaeological importance. Chemical separation has allowed the determination of traces of Ir, Os, Sb, Zn, Co, Fe, Ni. Instrumental neutron activation analysis has been used for the determination of Cu.

  18. Development of educational program for neutron activation analysis

    Chung, Yong Sam; Moon, Jong Hwa; Kim, Sun Ha; Ryel, Sung; Kang, Young Hwan; Lee, Kil Yong; Yeon, Yeon Yel; Cho, Seung Yeon

    2000-08-01

    This technical report is developed to apply an educational and training program for graduate student and analyst utilizing neutron activation analysis. The contents of guide book consists of five parts as follows; introduction, gamma-ray spectrometry and measurement statistics, its applications, to understand of comprehensive methodology and to utilize a relevant knowledge and information on neutron activation analysis.

  19. Determination of average activating thermal neutron flux in bulk samples

    A previous method used for the determination of the average neutron flux within bulky samples has been applied for the measurements of hydrogen contents of different samples. An analytical function is given for the description of the correlation between the activity of Dy foils and the hydrogen concentrations. Results obtained by the activation and the thermal neutron reflection methods are compared

  20. On the potential of active coincidence counting using a spontaneous fission source to induce fission

    Using the one-group point-model equations as a guide, we compare the active neutron Doubles rate from a multiplying item interrogated with a spontaneous fission neutron source with that of a random neutron source of equal emission rate. We find that, especially for highly multiplying items, 252Cf is likely to provide a viable alternative to the commonly used Am/Li interrogation source. We conclude that detailed design studies and experiments are warranted to develop this concept into practical assay tools. Keywords: coincidence counting; active interrogation; 252Cf active driver; point-model; collar detector

  1. Design of a prompt gamma neutron activation analysis system and neutron beam characteristics at HANARO

    The design features and neutron beam characteristics are described for a prompt gamma neutron activation analysis(PGNAA) system at HANARO in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI). As a method to obtain clean beam of thermal neutrons, Bragg diffraction technique of using PG crystal is applied. The Bragg angle is set at 45 .deg. and the diffracted beam is a polychromatic one composed of neutrons from all diffraction orders n(≤n≤6). The fast neutron and gamma backgrounds will be low enough due to the use of diffracted beam and a tapered collimator. A neutron flux of 1.0x108 n/cm2sec is calculated at sample position by considering the reflectivity of PG crystal. The γ-ray detection system is comprised of a 30% n-type HPGe detector, signal electronics and a fast ADC. Construction of the beam line and setting up of the detection system is proceeding

  2. Neutron activation diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (invited).

    Bleuel, D L; Yeamans, C B; Bernstein, L A; Bionta, R M; Caggiano, J A; Casey, D T; Cooper, G W; Drury, O B; Frenje, J A; Hagmann, C A; Hatarik, R; Knauer, J P; Johnson, M Gatu; Knittel, K M; Leeper, R J; McNaney, J M; Moran, M; Ruiz, C L; Schneider, D H G

    2012-10-01

    Neutron yields are measured at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by an extensive suite of neutron activation diagnostics. Neutrons interact with materials whose reaction cross sections threshold just below the fusion neutron production energy, providing an accurate measure of primary unscattered neutrons without contribution from lower-energy scattered neutrons. Indium samples are mounted on diagnostic instrument manipulators in the NIF target chamber, 25-50 cm from the source, to measure 2.45 MeV deuterium-deuterium fusion neutrons through the (115)In(n,n')(115 m) In reaction. Outside the chamber, zirconium and copper are used to measure 14 MeV deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons via (90)Zr(n,2n), (63)Cu(n,2n), and (65)Cu(n,2n) reactions. An array of 16 zirconium samples are located on port covers around the chamber to measure relative yield anisotropies, providing a global map of fuel areal density variation. Neutron yields are routinely measured with activation to an accuracy of 7% and are in excellent agreement both with each other and with neutron time-of-flight and magnetic recoil spectrometer measurements. Relative areal density anisotropies can be measured to a precision of less than 3%. These measurements reveal apparent bulk fuel velocities as high as 200 km/s in addition to large areal density variations between the pole and equator of the compressed fuel. PMID:23126840

  3. Transmission and Reflection of Neutrons Using Foil Activation Technique

    A new neutron irradiation facility has been designed, constructed .and located at the Experimental Nuclear Physics Department, NRC, AEA, cairo. The neutrons were obtained from CNIF2 (Second Cairo Neutron Irradiation Facility) that is based on one 241 Am-Be(α, n) isotopic neutron source with a present activity of about 175 GBq results in a neutron yield of about 1.04 x107 n/s. The geometrical arrangements of the facility consider the safety and protection rules aspects. MCNP5 code is used to estimate radiation doses and neutron fluxes. This new irradiation facility provides fast and epithermal neutrons that can be used in basic research and industrial applications. The aim of the present work is to study the characteristics of this new irradiation facility and to develop methods able to use fast and epithermal neutron in some different applications. Experimental measurements for the transmission and reflection of neutrons were carried out via a number of hydrogenous materials using the activation foil technique. A comparison of the experimental results with that calculated by using Monte Carlo simulation method is presented Using the neutron transmission technique in combination with foil activation method, our arrangement is used to measure the total neutron microscopic cross-sections for some compounds. The facility is calibrated and suitable to estimate the hydrogen content H (wt %) and the weight ratios C/H in hydrocarbon materials and was used to measure these ratios for some Egyptian crude oil samples. A brief overview of the neutron activation analysis methods for elemental concentrations in bulk samples in natural conditions is presented.

  4. Measurement of 14.8 MeV neutron flux of a neutron generator using neutron activation technique

    Fast neutron flux (14.8 MeV) of a neutron generator has been measured by activation technique. The measurements performed using Cu and Ni threshold detectors. 62Cu and 57Ni were produced through 63Cu(n,2n)62Cu and 58Ni (n,2n)57Ni reactions. They decay by emitting 511 keV and 1377 keV gamma rays. respectively. The half life of 62Cu is 9.74min and that of 57Ni is 36 hours. The flux of neutron has been calculated by measuring the activity after the irradiation time. Gamma spectroscopy of the activated foils was performed using a HPGe detector. By employing this technique the neutron flux of 2.64 107±3% n/s was obtained for 60 μA deuteron of 110 keV energy, bombarding a solid target of 3H

  5. Neutron activation analysis of human hair

    As a part of IAEA research project, ''Activation analysis of hair as an indicator of contamination of man by environmental trace element pollutants'', a survey was carried out to elucidate the levels of various trace element concentration in hair of local population in the Tokyo Metropolitan areas, by applying instrumental neutron activation analysis. A total of 202 scalp hair samples were collected from the inhabitants classified by sex and five age classes. Irradiation was made in the Rikkyo University 100 kW TRIGA MARK-II reactor. Using several combinations of irradiation time, cooling time and counting time, forty elements were determined. The relationship between several trace element contents in hair and such factors as sex, age class, hair treatment, smoking habit and dental treatment, was analyzed by using the method of multiple regression. It was shown that (1) Hair treatment had a predominant effect on the contents of bromine, magnesium and calcium in hair, (2) Aging and amoking contributed increasing mercury content in hair, and hair treatment acted reversely. (author)

  6. Neutron activation analysis of arsenic in Greece

    Arsenic is considered a toxic trace element for plant, animal, and human organisms. Arsenic and certain arsenic compounds have been listed as carcinogens by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Arsenic is emitted in appreciable quantities into the atmosphere by coal combustion and the production of cement. Arsenic enters the aquatic environment through industrial activities such as smelting of metallic ores, metallurgical glassware, and ceramics as well as insecticide production and use. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a very sensitive, precise, and accurate method for determining arsenic. This paper is a review of research studies of arsenic in the Greek environment by NAA performed at our radioanalytical laboratory. The objectives of these studies were (a) to determine levels of arsenic concentrations in environmental materials, (b) to pinpoint arsenic pollution sources and estimate the extent of arsenic pollution, and (c) to find out whether edible marine organisms from the gulfs of Greece receiving domestic, industrial, and agricultural wastes have elevated concentrations of arsenic in their tissues that could render them dangerous for human consumption

  7. Neutron activation analysis of ancient silver coins

    The amounts of gold and copper present as impurities in 500 Creek silver coins of the fifth century B.C. have been determined with a gamma-ray spectrometer, following neutron activation. The coinage from eight cities and kingdoms was studied; the average gold-content for different groups of coins varies between 0.02% and 0.3%, and the copper content between 0.1% and 10%. Evidence about trading connexions and of deliberate debasements of the coinage has been obtained, and several unsuspected plated coins were detected. The gold content was determined by measuring the intensity of the 0.411 MeV gamma-ray from Au198 (2.69 d); for the copper content the 0.511 MeV positron annihilation radiation from Cu64 (12.8 h) was used, and for silver the 0.884 MeV gamma-ray from Ag110m (253 d). Decay measurements were used as a check of identity. The technique of using total gamma-activity decay curves by themselves is insufficiently sensitive. For accurate work, the importance of approximate facsimile standards is stressed. (author)

  8. Fast neutron activation analysis of ancient mirror

    About fifty specimens of ancient Chinese bronze mirror from various dynasties are analysed by fast neutron radiated from neutron generator. The contents of copper, tin and lead in the mirror are listed in this paper. Experimental method and measurement equipment are described too

  9. Simulation Of A Photofission-Based Cargo Interrogation System

    King, Michael; Gozani, Tsahi; Stevenson, John; Shaw, Timothy

    2011-06-01

    A comprehensive model has been developed to characterize and optimize the detection of Bremsstrahlung x-ray induced fission signatures from nuclear materials hidden in cargo containers. An effective active interrogation system should not only induce a large number of fission events but also efficiently detect their signatures. The proposed scanning system utilizes a 9-MV commercially available linear accelerator and the detection of strong fission signals i.e. delayed gamma rays and prompt neutrons. Because the scanning system is complex and the cargo containers are large and often highly attenuating, the simulation method segments the model into several physical steps, representing each change of radiation particle. Each approximation is carried-out separately, resulting in a major reduction in computational time and a significant improvement in tally statistics. The model investigates the effect on the fission rate and detection rate by various cargo types, densities and distributions. Hydrogenous and metallic cargos, homogeneous and heterogeneous, as well as various locations of the nuclear material inside the cargo container were studied. We will show that for the photofission-based interrogation system simulation, the final results are not only in good agreement with a full, single-step simulation but also with experimental results, further validating the full-system simulation.

  10. Simulation Of A Photofission-Based Cargo Interrogation System

    A comprehensive model has been developed to characterize and optimize the detection of Bremsstrahlung x-ray induced fission signatures from nuclear materials hidden in cargo containers. An effective active interrogation system should not only induce a large number of fission events but also efficiently detect their signatures. The proposed scanning system utilizes a 9-MV commercially available linear accelerator and the detection of strong fission signals i.e. delayed gamma rays and prompt neutrons. Because the scanning system is complex and the cargo containers are large and often highly attenuating, the simulation method segments the model into several physical steps, representing each change of radiation particle. Each approximation is carried-out separately, resulting in a major reduction in computational time and a significant improvement in tally statistics. The model investigates the effect on the fission rate and detection rate by various cargo types, densities and distributions. Hydrogenous and metallic cargos, homogeneous and heterogeneous, as well as various locations of the nuclear material inside the cargo container were studied. We will show that for the photofission-based interrogation system simulation, the final results are not only in good agreement with a full, single-step simulation but also with experimental results, further validating the full-system simulation.

  11. Neutron activation analysis (NAA), radioisotope production via neutron activation (PNA) and fission product gas-jet (GJA)

    Gaeggeler, H.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    Three different non-diffractive applications of neutrons are outlined, neutron activation analysis, production of radionuclides, mostly for medical applications, and production of short-lived fission nuclides with a so-called gas-jet. It is shown that all three devices may be incorporated into one single insert at SINQ due to their different requests with respect to thermal neutron flux. Some applications of these three facilities are summarized. (author) 3 figs., 1 tab., 8 refs.

  12. Neutron activation analysis at the Californium User Facility for Neutron Science

    The Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science has been established to provide 252Cf-based neutron irradiation services and research capabilities including neutron activation analysis (NAA). A major advantage of the CUF is its accessibility and controlled experimental conditions compared with those of a reactor environment The CUF maintains the world's largest inventory of compact 252Cf neutron sources. Neutron source intensities of ≤ 1011 neutrons/s are available for irradiations within a contamination-free hot cell, capable of providing thermal and fast neutron fluxes exceeding 108 cm-2 s-1 at the sample. Total flux of ≥109 cm-2 s-1 is feasible for large-volume irradiation rabbits within the 252Cf storage pool. Neutron and gamma transport calculations have been performed using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP to estimate irradiation fluxes available for sample activation within the hot cell and storage pool and to design and optimize a prompt gamma NAA (PGNAA) configuration for large sample volumes. Confirmatory NAA irradiations have been performed within the pool. Gamma spectroscopy capabilities including PGNAA are being established within the CUF for sample analysis

  13. Neutron spectrum determination by activation method in fast neutron fields at the RB reactors

    The fast neutron fields of the RB reactor are presented in this paper. The activation method for spectrum determination is described and explained. The obtained results for intermediate and fast spectrum are given and discussed. (authors). 7 refs., 3 tabs

  14. Ten year's activity in the field of neutron scattering workshop

    'Neutron scattering' is in the frame of the 'Utilization of Research Reactor's of the FNCA (Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia) project, which held the workshops from FY 1992. This report is a summary of the results and activities of neutron scattering workshops and sub-workshops since the start in FY 1992. (author)

  15. Progress in small angle neutron scattering activities in Malaysia

    Research activities by use of small angle neutron scattering in Malaysia are briefly reported. Scattered neutron data are displayed in two or three-dimensional isometric view by the data acquisition system. Visual Basic is utilized for data acquisition and MathCad for data processing and analyses. (Y. Kazumata)

  16. A synopsis of the activities on neutron standard reference data at the Institute of Atomic Energy

    The activities of neutron standard reference data including neutron standard cross section measurements, 252Cf spontaneous fission nubar and neutron energy spectrum measurements, neutron flux measurements, neutron source strength calibrations and neutron standard data evaluations carried out at the Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing are presented. Some experimental results and recommended values are given

  17. Monitoring and characterization of radioactive wastes by neutronic methods; Controle et caracterisation de dechets radioactifs par methodes neutroniques

    Lyoussi, A. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Etudes des Dechets, DED, Lab. de Developpement de Mesures Nucleaires, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2001-07-01

    In order to characterize a radioactive waste parcel, different techniques of analysis and nondestructive testing were developed during these last years. The most used are the gamma spectrometry, the passive neutron counting, the neutron interrogation and the photon interrogation with a electron accelerator. The neutron measurement are divided in two families: the active measurement and the passive measurement. The passive methods consist in measuring the neutron radiation emitted spontaneously by the contaminant. The active methods consist in the detection of neutron radiation after an external neutron irradiation. In this article are exposed the principal needs that lead to develop the neutrons measurement. Then, the passive and active neutron measurements are described. (N.C.)

  18. Quality assurance in neutron activation analysis

    As a potential reference method, neutron activation analysis does not have to rely on other reference materials to ascertain the quality of analytical results. The fundamental characteristics of the method with the clear separation between irradiation, processing, and counting makes possible the estimation of uncertainties of individual results from a priori assumptions. Such estimates of the standard deviation from a series of independent sources of variation are compared with the a posteriori variability of replicate determinations in order to ascertain that the analytical method is in a state of statistical control. This Analysis of Precision tests the absence of unknown errors by means of a statistic T, which is closely approximated by a chi-square distribution. In this manner an evaluation is made of a commercially available computer program for peak evaluation in γ-spectrometry, as well as of other factors affecting the precision and accuracy of the counting process. An attempt is also made to determine sampling constants of one gram or less in a candidate biological reference material

  19. Epithermal neutron activation analysis in applied microbiology

    Some results from applying epithermal neutron activation analysis at FLNP JINR, Dubna, Russia, in medical biotechnology, environmental biotechnology and industrial biotechnology are reviewed. In the biomedical experiments biomass from the blue-green alga Spirulina platensis (S. platensis) has been used as a matrix for the development of pharmaceutical substances containing such essential trace elements as selenium, chromium and iodine. The feasibility of target-oriented introduction of these elements into S. platensis biocomplexes retaining its protein composition and natural beneficial properties was shown. The absorption of mercury on growth dynamics of S. platensis and other bacterial strains was observed. Detoxification of Cr and Hg by Arthrobacter globiformis 151B was demonstrated. Microbial synthesis of technologically important silver nanoparticles by the novel actinomycete strain Streptomyces glaucus 71 MD and blue-green alga S. platensis were characterized by a combined use of transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive analysis of X-rays. It was established that the tested actinomycete S. glaucus 71 MD produces silver nanoparticles extracellularly when acted upon by the silver nitrate solution, which offers a great advantage over an intracellular process of synthesis from the point of view of applications. The synthesis of silver nanoparticles by S. platensis proceeded differently under the short-term and long-term silver action. (author)

  20. Substoichiometric neutron activation determination of gold

    A highly precise and selective method is described for the determination of traces of gold by substoichiometric extraction from hydrochloric acid with tri-n-octylphosphine sulfide in cyclohexane following thermal neutron activation. Fundamental aspects of the extraction system are discussed and results are reported for the determination of gold in an effluent from a recovery process containing a complexed species of gold and unknown amounts of cyanide, citrate, phosphate, potassium and sodium. Other constituents of the effluent stream include traces of the transition elements Co, Ni, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb and Sn at concentrations less than 50 ppm. One hour was allowed for the Au3+ carrier and the 198Au complexed species in samples and standards to oxidize, exchange, and reach chemical equilibrium. Samples were then equilibrated by shaking with the organic phase for thirty min. The percentage extractions (%E) for the substoichiometric separation of gold from the effluent and from the corresponding comparison standards were monitored. The mean percentage extractions for the substoichiometric separations of carrier from the effluent, and its corresponding standard were 75.3 and 59.3, respectively. These data are estimated to be accurate within +-2.0%. (T.G.)

  1. Chart of nuclides relating to neutron activation

    This chart is for frequent use in the prediction of the product species of neutron activation. The first edition of the chart has been made in 1976 after the repeated trial preparation. It has the following good points. (1) Any letter in chart is as large as one can read easily. [This condition has been obtained by the selection of items to be shown in chart. They are the name (the symbol of element, mass number, and half-life) of nuclide or of isomer, and the type of decay.]. (2) Decay product has been shown indirectly for branchings with two-step decay via short-lived daughter in an excited state. [This matter has been realized by use of the new mode of indication.] (3) Nuclides shown in chart are (a) naturally occurring nuclides and (b) nuclides formed from naturally occurring nuclides through one of the following reactions: (n, γ), (n, n'), (n, p), (n, α), (n, 2n), (n, pn), (n, 3n), (n, αn), (n, t), (n, 3He), (n, 2p), and (n, γ)(n, γ). In the revision of the first edition, some modes of indication have become a little simpler, and the isomers of shorter half-lives (0.1 - 1 μs) have been added. (author)

  2. Neutron-activation analysis of plant materials

    The possibilities offered by non-destructive neutron activation analysis (NAA) for simultaneously determining a large number of micro- and macro-components in plant samples of Bulgarian origin have been studied. Three groups of elements are determined: short half-life isotopes: Al, Mg, Ca, Na, Mn, Cl, Cu; medium half-life isotopes: Br, Na, K; and long half-life isotopes: Fe, Cr, Co, Sc, Pb, Zn. The samples are kept for 1 minute in a fluxes of 6x1012 n.cm2.sec-1 (first group), and of 3x1011 n.cm2.sec-1 for 18 hours (second and third groups). Use is made of a Ge/Li detector and 4000-channel analyser. To test the accuracy of the method, the results of NAA for some standard specimens have been compared with the indicators of other conventional methods tested in 18 laboratories in various countries. The data from NAA for the content of K, Mo, Ca, Mn, Fe, Zn and Cu demonstrate a high degree of coincidence with those from the other methods. Chemical composition of 23 samples of experimental and field crops is determined

  3. Active neutron multiplicity counting of bulk uranium

    This paper describes a new nondestructive assay technique being developed to assay bulk uranium containing kilogram quantities of 235U. The new technique uses neutron multiplicity analysis of data collected with a coincidence counter outfitted with AmLi neutron sources. We have calculated the expected neutron multiplicity count rate and assay precision for this technique and will report on its expected performance as a function of detector design characteristics, 235U sample mass, AmLi source strength, and source-to-sample coupling. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  4. A dosimetry study of deuterium-deuterium neutron generator-based in vivo neutron activation analysis

    Sowers, Daniel A.

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo Neutron Activation Analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator which produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 x 108 +/-30% s-1. A moderator/reflector/shielding (5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite & 5.7 cm borated HDPE) assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeter (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and photon dose by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10 min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 +/- 0.8 mSv for neutron and 4.2 +/- 0.2 mSv for photon for 10 mins; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population.

  5. The dynamic nature of interrogation.

    Kelly, Christopher E; Miller, Jeaneé C; Redlich, Allison D

    2016-06-01

    Building on a substantial body of literature examining interrogation methods employed by police investigators and their relationship to suspect behaviors, we analyzed a sample of audio and video interrogation recordings of individuals suspected of serious violent crimes. Existing survey research has focused on the tactics reportedly used, at what rate, and under what conditions; observational studies detail which methods are actually employed. With a few notable exceptions, these foundational studies were static examinations of interrogation methods that documented the absence or presence of various approaches. In the present study, we cast interrogation as a dynamic phenomenon and code the recordings in 5-min intervals to examine how interrogation methods and suspect cooperation change over time. Employing the interrogation taxonomy framework, particularly 4 discrete domains-rapport and relationship building, emotion provocation, presentation of evidence, and confrontation/competition-we found that the emphasis of the domains varied across interrogations and were significantly different when suspects confessed versus when they denied involvement. In regression models, suspect cooperation was positively influenced by the rapport and relationship building domain, though it was negatively impacted by presentation of evidence and confrontation/competition. Moreover, we found that the negative effects of confrontation/competition on suspect cooperation lasted for up to 15 min. The implications of the findings for practice and future research include the benefits of a rapport-based approach, the deleterious effects of accusatorial methods, and the importance of studying when, not just if, certain interrogation techniques are employed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26651622

  6. Physics of enriched uranyl fluoride deposit characterizations using active neutron and gamma interrogation techniques with 252Cf

    A method was developed and successfully applied to characterize large uranyl fluoride (UO2F21) deposits at the former Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. These deposits were formed by a wet air in-leakage into the UF6 process gas lines over a period of years. The resulting UO2F2 is hygroscopic, readily absorbing moisture from the air to form hydrates as UO2F2-nH2O. The ratio of hydrogen to uranium, denoted H/U, can vary from 0--16, and has significant nuclear criticality safety impacts for large deposits. In order to properly formulate the required course of action, a non-intrusive characterization of the distribution of the fissile material within the pipe, its total mass, and amount of hydration was needed. The Nuclear Weapons Identification System (NWIS) previously developed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for identification of uranium weapons components in storage containers was used to successfully characterize the distribution, hydration, and total mass of these deposits

  7. Triton burnup measurements by neutron activation at JT-60U

    This paper describes measurements on triton burnup in a deuterium plasma by the detection of the 2.5 MeV neutrons (from DD fusion) and the 14 MeV neutrons (from DT fusion). The 2.5 MeV neutrons have been measured by fission chambers and activation of indium foils while the 14 MeV neutrons have been detected by activation of silicon, aluminum, and copper foils. The measured yields of the 2.5 MeV neutrons utilizing In foils are similar 20-40% higher than the yields obtained from fission chambers depending on what calibration factors are used. The deviation decreases with the plasma major radius (or increasing plasma volume). When the triton burnup is measured by utilizing neutron threshold reactions (En>2.5 MeV) and In foils, then systematic errors in the calibration factors cancel and the maximum deviation between the measured triton burnup for different calibration factors is reduced to similar 5%. The measurements indicate that triton burnup increases with the 14 MeV neutron yield, indicating that the relative yield of 14 MeV neutrons increases depending on the time duration of the deuterium neutral beam injection (NBI). Furthermore, the triton burnup decreases with an increased plasma major radius, indicating increased triton ripple losses, and increases with plasma current, indicating reduced banana orbit losses. (orig.)

  8. Neutron activation analysis of polyethylene from neutron shield of EDELWEISS experiment

    Rakhimov, Alimardon V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation); Uzbek Academy of Sciences (INP AS RUz), Tashkent (Uzbekistan). Inst. of Nuclear Physics; Brudanin, Viktor B.; Filosofov, Dmitry V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation); and others

    2015-07-01

    Instrumental neutron-activation analysis (INAA) was applied to estimate trace contaminations in polyethylene (PE) used as a neutron shield for low background setup of the EDELWEISS Dark Matter search experiment. PE samples with masses of 1-10 grams each were irradiated at the WWR-SM nuclear reactor by neutron flux of 1 x 10{sup 14}n/(cm{sup 2}s) for 5-48 h. The radioactivity was measured by high-resolution γ-ray spectrometry. In PE samples of two types, more than 30 trace elements were determined at a concentration level of 10{sup -5} to 10{sup -11} g/g.

  9. Simultaneous speciation analysis using neutron activation

    Full text: Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a well-established analytical technique for the simultaneous determination of multielement concentrations. Although various forms of NAA have been traditionally applied to measuring the total concentrations of elements, the scope of NAA can be further extended in conjunction with pre-irradiation chemical separations to determine the species of an element. The technique can then be called speciation NAA (SNAA). Since much of the toxicity of an element depends on its physico-chemical forms, there is an increasing interest in studying its speciation. A number of characteristic features of NAA, which other techniques normally do not possess, can be advantageously exploited in SNAA. For example, SNAA has simultaneous multielement specificity unlike AAS and AFS. The SNAA technique can be applied to the simultaneous speciation of elements which are not chemically similar such as Cd, Se and I, as well as to the elements such as Cl, Br and I which are rather difficult to determine by most other techniques. Qualitative as well as quantitative analysis of small samples can be done by SNAA with excellent precision, accuracy, sensitivity, and rapidity. Unlike many other techniques, SNAA has some enhanced quality assurance capabilities. We have developed SNAA methods for separating various inorganic and organic arsenic species in water and in sea foods. We are presently extending these methods to include simultaneous speciation of As, Sb and Se. We have also developed SNAA methods employing biochemical techniques for the characterization of metalloproteins and protein-bound trace element species of Se along with Cd, Cu, Mn, Mo and Zn in bovine kidneys. Lately, we have concentrated our efforts to develop SNAA methods in conjunction with HPLC, RPC, SEC, NMR and MS for the simultaneous separation and characterization of extractable organo chlorine, organo bromine and organo iodine species in fisheries samples. An overview of the

  10. Diagnosis of mucoviscidosis by neutron activation analysis. Part 1

    Symptoms pathology, incidence, and gravity of the inherent syndrome called mucoviscidosis, or cystic fibrosis are described in this Part I. The analytical methods used for its diagnosis, both the conventional chemical ones and by neutron activation analysis are also summarised. Finally, an analytical method to study the incidence of mucoviscidosis in Brazil is presented. This , essentially, consists in bromine determination, in fingernails, by resonance neutron activation analysis. (author)

  11. Application of inelastic neutron scattering and prompt neutron activation analysis in coal quality assessment

    The basic principles are assessed of the determination of ash content in coal based on the measurement of values proportional to the effective proton number. Discussed is the principle of coal quality assessment using the method of inelastic neutron scattering and prompt neutron activation analysis. This is done with respect both to theoretical relations between measured values and coal quality attributes and to practical laboratory measurements of coal sample quality by the said methods. (author)

  12. The instrumental neutron activation determination of impurities in technical cobalt

    Instrumental neutron activation techniques for determination of 13 impurities with detection limit 10-5 - 10-2% in technical cobalt have been developed by using thermal and epithermal neutrons of nuclear reactor. Self-shielding and disturbance of neutron flux(Co59 has high capture cross-section of neutrons) by sample were taken into account by using some references and from the results obtained in preliminary experiments. Samples and standards have been placed in such a way that neutron flux disturbance was less than 2-3%. The Al-Pb-Cd-Cu filter was used for absorption of low energy γ-rays of Co60m and Co61. (author)

  13. The Coordination of Talk and Typing in Police Interrogations

    van Charldorp, Tessa

    2011-01-01

    In this article, I examine the conduct and coordination of two activities that are relevant in the Dutch police interrogation: talking and typing. By taking a closer look at these activities, I can see how the police record is mutually constructed by officers and suspects and begin to understand what kind of orientation is required for these dual activities. Additionally, I explore how participants orient to and coordinate talking and typing during interrogations and explicate what this tells...

  14. In vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Ma, R.; Yasumura, Seiichi; Dilmanian, F.A.

    1997-11-01

    Seven important body elements, C, N, Ca, P, K, Na, and Cl, can be measured with great precision and accuracy in the in vivo neutron activation facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The facilities include the delayed-gamma neutron activation, the prompt-gamma neutron activation, and the inelastic neutron scattering systems. In conjunction with measurements of total body water by the tritiated-water dilution method several body compartments can be defined from the contents of these elements, also with high precision. In particular, body fat mass is derived from total body carbon together with total body calcium and nitrogen; body protein mass is derived from total body nitrogen; extracellular fluid volume is derived from total body sodium and chlorine; lean body mass and body cell mass are derived from total body potassium; and, skeletal mass is derived from total body calcium. Thus, we suggest that neutron activation analysis may be valuable for calibrating some of the instruments routinely used in clinical studies of body composition. The instruments that would benefit from absolute calibration against neutron activation analysis are bioelectric impedance analysis, infrared interactance, transmission ultrasound, and dual energy x-ray/photon absorptiometry.

  15. Raw materials for low-activation concrete neutron shields

    Concrete surrounding a nuclear accumulates radioisotopes induced by neutron reactions during operation, and this concrete still remains to an enormous degree as radioactive waste after decommissioning. The disposal of such activated concrete is very costly and requires strict supervision. Hence, there has been a strong desire to develop a concrete that retains little residual radioactivity, that is, ''low-activation'' concrete. In the present study, we have identified several raw materials for such concrete - low-activation limestone, quartzite, colemanite, alumina-ceramics, while Portland cement and high-alumina cement - by performing a screening test for neutron irradiation. The results show that low-activation concrete compounded from such low-activation raw materials should serve for neutron shielding. Another noteworthy finding is that limestone occurring near schalstein deposits, and especially when sandwiched between two beds of schalstein, is an excellent low-activation raw material. (author)

  16. Absolute technique for neutron source calibration by radiation induced activity

    The neutron yield from a Radium Beryllium neutron source has been determined experimentally by the induced Mn-56 activity. The neutron source was placed in the center of a tank filled with aqueous manganese sulphate (MnSO4) solution. Irradiation time usually lasted about 16-18 hours in order to secure saturation. The average induced Mn-56 activity within the MnSO4 bath was then measured by the use of NaI scintillation detector. This detector was placed in a sealed aluminum jacket at the center of the tank. This detector was connected with the necessary electronic counting system and was pre calibrated against a 4 πβ-γ coincidence counting system. The efficiency of the NaI counting system as a function of MnSO4 solution density is investigated as well as the proper dimension of the used tank for the sake of calibration purposes. The neutron leakage within the MnSO4 baths was also investigated for different dimensions of tanks. The experimental errors involved in the counting system were also considered. The numerical value of neutron yield from the used radium beryllium neutron source was given with its corresponding statistical errors as (1.10 + 0.065) x 106 neutron per second

  17. Beryllium neutron activation detector for pulsed DD fusion sources

    A compact fast neutron detector based on beryllium activation has been developed to perform accurate neutron fluence measurements on pulsed DD fusion sources. It is especially well suited to moderate repetition-rate (9Be(n,α)6He cross-section, energy calibration of the proportional counters, and numerical simulations of neutron interactions and beta-particle paths using MCNP5. The response function R(En) is determined over the neutron energy range 2-4 MeV. The count rate capability of the detector has been studied and the corrections required for high neutron fluence measurements are discussed. For pulsed DD neutron fluencies >3×104 cm-2, the statistical uncertainty in the fluence measurement is better than 1%. A small plasma focus device has been employed as a pulsed neutron source to test two of these new detectors, and their responses are found to be practically identical. Also the level of interfering activation is found to be sufficiently low as to be negligible.

  18. Elemental analysis of brazing alloy samples by neutron activation technique

    Two brazing alloy samples (C P2 and C P3) have been investigated by Neutron activation analysis (NAA) technique in order to identify and estimate their constituent elements. The pneumatic irradiation rabbit system (PIRS), installed at the first egyptian research reactor (ETRR-1) was used for short-time irradiation (30 s) with a thermal neutron flux of 1.6 x 1011 n/cm2/s in the reactor reflector, where the thermal to epithermal neutron flux ratio is 106. Long-time irradiation (48 hours) was performed at reactor core periphery with thermal neutron flux of 3.34 x 1012 n/cm2/s, and thermal to epithermal neutron flux ratio of 79. Activation by epithermal neutrons was taken into account for the (1/v) and resonance neutron absorption in both methods. A hyper pure germanium detection system was used for gamma-ray acquisitions. The concentration values of Al, Cr, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Se, Ag and Sb were estimated as percentages of the sample weight and compared with reported values. 1 tab

  19. Neutrons and Photons in Nondestructive Detection

    Harmon, J. F.; Wells, D. P.; Hunt, A. W.

    2011-02-01

    Active, nondestructive interrogation with neutrons and photons has seen a renaissance in recent years, owing to a broad spectrum of important applications in security, nuclear nonproliferation, contraband detection and materials analysis. Active methods are of high interest for such applications because they provide at least an order of magnitude greater sensitivity than passive methods. Accelerator-based neutron and photon active methods exploit two important factors to attain greater sensitivity: these are (i) the control of interrogating beam properties such as directionality, energy, intensity, polarization and the temporal distribution of radiation; (ii) well-founded, low energy nuclear physics that yields distinct "signatures" for elemental and isotopic content. This review addresses accelerator-based neutron and photon nondestructive testing methods and issues when applied to modern and emerging wide-ranging challenges in nondestructive detection.

  20. Neutron activation analysis of wheat samples

    Galinha, C. [CERENA-IST, Technical University of Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Instituto Tecnoclogico e Nuclear, URSN, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Anawar, H.M. [Instituto Tecnoclogico e Nuclear, URSN, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Freitas, M.C., E-mail: cfreitas@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnoclogico e Nuclear, URSN, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Pacheco, A.M.G. [CERENA-IST, Technical University of Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Almeida-Silva, M. [Instituto Tecnoclogico e Nuclear, URSN, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Coutinho, J.; Macas, B.; Almeida, A.S. [INRB/INIA-Elvas, National Institute of Biological Resources, Est. Gil Vaz, 7350-228 Elvas (Portugal)

    2011-11-15

    The deficiency of essential micronutrients and excess of toxic metals in cereals, an important food items for human nutrition, can cause public health risk. Therefore, before their consumption and adoption of soil supplementation, concentrations of essential micronutrients and metals in cereals should be monitored. This study collected soil and two varieties of wheat samples-Triticum aestivum L. (Jordao/bread wheat), and Triticum durum L. (Marialva/durum wheat) from Elvas area, Portugal and analyzed concentrations of As, Cr, Co, Fe, K, Na, Rb and Zn using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) to focus on the risk of adverse public health issues. The low variability and moderate concentrations of metals in soils indicated a lower significant effect of environmental input on metal concentrations in agricultural soils. The Cr and Fe concentrations in soils that ranged from 93-117 and 26,400-31,300 mg/kg, respectively, were relatively high, but Zn concentration was very low (below detection limit <22 mg/kg) indicating that soils should be supplemented with Zn during cultivation. The concentrations of metals in roots and straw of both varieties of wheat decreased in the order of K>Fe>Na>Zn>Cr>Rb>As>Co. Concentrations of As, Co and Cr in root, straw and spike of both varieties were higher than the permissible limits with exception of a few samples. The concentrations of Zn in root, straw and spike were relatively low (4-30 mg/kg) indicating the deficiency of an essential micronutrient Zn in wheat cultivated in Portugal. The elemental transfer from soil to plant decreases with increasing growth of the plant. The concentrations of various metals in different parts of wheat followed the order: Root>Straw>Spike. A few root, straw and spike samples showed enrichment of metals, but the majority of the samples showed no enrichment. Potassium is enriched in all samples of root, straw and spike for both varieties of wheat. Relatively to the seed used for cultivation

  1. Neutron activation analysis of wheat samples

    The deficiency of essential micronutrients and excess of toxic metals in cereals, an important food items for human nutrition, can cause public health risk. Therefore, before their consumption and adoption of soil supplementation, concentrations of essential micronutrients and metals in cereals should be monitored. This study collected soil and two varieties of wheat samples-Triticum aestivum L. (Jordao/bread wheat), and Triticum durum L. (Marialva/durum wheat) from Elvas area, Portugal and analyzed concentrations of As, Cr, Co, Fe, K, Na, Rb and Zn using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) to focus on the risk of adverse public health issues. The low variability and moderate concentrations of metals in soils indicated a lower significant effect of environmental input on metal concentrations in agricultural soils. The Cr and Fe concentrations in soils that ranged from 93-117 and 26,400-31,300 mg/kg, respectively, were relatively high, but Zn concentration was very low (below detection limit Fe>Na>Zn>Cr>Rb>As>Co. Concentrations of As, Co and Cr in root, straw and spike of both varieties were higher than the permissible limits with exception of a few samples. The concentrations of Zn in root, straw and spike were relatively low (4-30 mg/kg) indicating the deficiency of an essential micronutrient Zn in wheat cultivated in Portugal. The elemental transfer from soil to plant decreases with increasing growth of the plant. The concentrations of various metals in different parts of wheat followed the order: Root>Straw>Spike. A few root, straw and spike samples showed enrichment of metals, but the majority of the samples showed no enrichment. Potassium is enriched in all samples of root, straw and spike for both varieties of wheat. Relatively to the seed used for cultivation, Jordao presented higher transfer coefficients than Marialva, in particular for Co, Fe, and Na. The Jordao and Marialva cultivars accumulated not statistically significant different

  2. Research and development activities of a neutron generator facility

    The neutron generator facility at YNRC is used for elemental analysis, nuclear data measurement and education. In nuclear data measurement the focus is on re-evaluating the existing scattered nuclear activation cross-section to obtain systematic data for nuclear reactions such as (n,p), (n,α), and (n,2n). In elemental analysis it is used for analyzing the Nitrogen (N), Phosphor (P) and Potassium (K) contents in chemical and natural fertilizers (compost), protein in rice, soybean, and corn and pollution level in rivers. The neutron generator is also used for education and training of BATAN staff and university students. The facility can also produce neutron generator components. (author)

  3. Background by neutron activation in GERDA

    The observation of the neutrinoless double beta decay is a proof of the Majorana nature of the neutrino. The long half-life of this decay requires experiments of very low background rates in the region of interest at Qββ. Prompt γ-rays after neutron capture on germanium and the β-decay of 77Ge contribute to the background in experiments using 76Ge for the search of the neutrinoless double beta decay. The poorly known prompt γ-ray spectra and the neutron capture cross sections for the (n,γ) reactions of 74Ge and 76Ge were measured at the research reactor FRM II (Munich). The obtained data are needed in MC simulations for qualitative and quantitative background prediction in the Gerda experiment. The data and their implication on the background in Gerda are presented.

  4. Interpretation of active neutron measurements by the heterogeneous theory

    In this paper are presented results from a study on the application of the heterogeneous method for the interpretation of active neutron measurements. The considered apparatus consists out of a cylindrical lead pile, which is provided with two axial channels: a central channel incorporates an antimony beryllium photoneutron source and an excentric channel serves for the insertion of the sample to be assayed for fissionable materials contents. The mathematical model of this apparatus is the heterogeneous group diffusion theory. Sample and source channel are described by multigroup monopolar and dipolar sources and sinks. Monopolar sources take account of neutron production within energy group and in-scatter from upper groups. Monopolar sinks represent neutron removal by absorption within energy group and outscatter to lower groups. Dipol sources describe radial streaming of neutrons across the sample channel. Multigroup diffusion theory is applied throughout the lead pile. The strengths of the monopolar and dipolar sources and sinks are determined by linear extrapolation distances of azimuthal mean and first harmonic flux values at the channels' surface. In an experiment we may measure the neutrons leaking out of the lead pile and linear extrapolation distances at the channels' surface. Such informations are utilized for interpretation in terms of fission neutron source strengh and mean neutron flux values in the sample. In this paper we summarized the theoretical work in course

  5. Evaluation of new pharmaceuticals using in vivo neutron inelastic scattering and neutron activation analysis

    Nutritional status of patients can be evaluated by monitoring changes in body composition, including depletion of protein and muscle, adipose tissue distribution and changes in hydration status, bone or cell mass. Fast neutron activation (for N and P) and neutron inelastic scattering (for C and O) are used to assess in vivo elements characteristic of specific body compartments. The fast neutrons are produced with a sealed deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron generator. This method provides the most direct assessment of body composition. Non-bone phosphorus for muscle is measured by the 31P(n,α)28Al reaction, and nitrogen for protein via the (n,2n) fast neutron reaction. Inelastic neutron scattering is used for the measurement of total body carbon and oxygen. Carbon is used to derive body fat, after subtracting carbon contributions due to protein, bone and glycogen. Carbon-to-oxygen (C/O) ratio is used to measure distribution of fat and lean tissue in the body and to monitor small changes of lean mass and its quality. In addition to evaluating the efficacy of new treatments, the system is used to study the mechanisms of lean tissue depletion with aging and to investigate methods for preserving function and quality of life in the elderly. (author)

  6. The comparison of four neutron sources for Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) in vivo detections of boron

    Fantidis, J. G.; Nicolaou, G. E.; C. Potolias; N. Vordos; Bandekas, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    A Prompt Gamma Ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) system, incorporating an isotopic neutron source has been simulated using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. In order to improve the signal to noise ratio different collimators and a filter were placed between the neutron source and the object. The effect of the positioning of the neutron beam and the detector relative to the object has been studied. In this work the optimisation procedure is demonstrated for boron. Monte Carlo calculations were...

  7. Cadmium filtered neutron flux determination. Comparison of activation methods

    Neutron fluxes under cadmium filters are determined by the cadmium ratio and sandwich activation methods. The thermal neutron flux levels obtained with 7 detectors of different kinds: In, Au, Ag, W, Co, Mn, Zn are compared. The cadmium ratio method was used in locations for which the epithermal and thermal neutron flux ratio are quite different. By irradiating materials under different thicknesses of cadmium it was possible to establish experimental curves from which the flux depression factors for intermediate neutrons may be determined whatever the thickness of the filter used. Whereas the cadmium ratio method can only measure the mean flux above the cadmium cut-off energy the sandwich method enables the flux value to be determined in a narrow band around the resonance energy of each detector used

  8. NaI detector neutron activation spectra for PGNAA applications

    Gardner; El; Zheng; Hayden; Mayo

    2000-10-01

    When NaI detectors are used in prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis devices, they are activated by neutrons that penetrate the detector. While thermal neutron filters like boron or lithium can be used to reduce this activation, it can never be completely eliminated by this approach since high energy neutrons can penetrate the detector and thermalize inside it. This activation results in the emission of prompt gamma rays from both the I and Na and the production of the radioisotopes 128I and 24Na that subsequently decay and emit their characteristic beta particles and gamma rays. The resulting three spectra represent a background for this measurement. An experimental method for obtaining these three spectra is described and results are reported for 2" x 2", 5" x 5", 6" x 6", and 1" x 6" NaI detectors using the thermal neutron beam of the NCSU PULSTAR nuclear reactor. In addition, Monte Carlo simulation programs have been developed and used for simulating these spectra. Good results have been obtained by the Monte Carlo method for the two radioisotope spectra, and it is anticipated that good results will also be obtained for the prompt gamma-ray spectrum when the I and Na coincidence schemes are known. PMID:11003483

  9. NaI detector neutron activation spectra for PGNAA applications

    Gardner, R.P. E-mail: gardner@ncsu.edu; Sayyed, El; Zheng Yuanshui; Hayden, Stephanie; Mayo, C.W

    2000-11-15

    When NaI detectors are used in prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis devices, they are activated by neutrons that penetrate the detector. While thermal neutron filters like boron or lithium can be used to reduce this activation, it can never be completely eliminated by this approach since high energy neutrons can penetrate the detector and thermalize inside it. This activation results in the emission of prompt gamma rays from both the I and Na and the production of the radioisotopes {sup 128}I and {sup 24}Na that subsequently decay and emit their characteristic beta particles and gamma rays. The resulting three spectra represent a background for this measurement. An experimental method for obtaining these three spectra is described and results are reported for 2x2, 5x5, 6x6, and 1x6 NaI detectors using the thermal neutron beam of the NCSU PULSTAR nuclear reactor. In addition, Monte Carlo simulation programs have been developed and used for simulating these spectra. Good results have been obtained by the Monte Carlo method for the two radioisotope spectra, and it is anticipated that good results will also be obtained for the prompt gamma-ray spectrum when the I and Na coincidence schemes are known.

  10. Study on palladium determination by neutron activation analysis

    This study presents results of Pd determinations in neutron activation analysis of spiked biological tissues and CCQM-P63 automotive catalyst. Pd spiked biological tissues of bovine muscle and liver were prepared using a blender with titanium blades and Pd solutions. These materials obtained in a past form were freeze-dried and homogenized before the analysis. Thermal and epithermal neutron activation analyses were applied in these determinations. Separations of Pd from interfering elements were also carried out using solvent extraction and solid-phase extraction techniques, before the irradiations with epithermal neutrons. The irradiations were carried out at the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor under thermal neutron flux of about 4 x 1012 n cm-2 s-1 during 4 and 16 h for thermal and epithermal irradiations, respectively. The gamma activities of 109Pd of the irradiated samples and Pd standard were measured using an HGe detector coupled to a gamma ray spectrometer. Results obtained in these analyses indicated that the epithermal irradiation presented higher sensitivity, due to the reduction of interferences. The pre-separation procedure of solid-phase extraction applied also yielded low detection limit. Comparisons made between the Pd results obtained using different procedures of neutron activation analysis indicated a good agreement. The analyses carried out in replicates also indicated a good precision with relative standard deviations varying from 1.2 to 14 %. (author)