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Sample records for active myofascial trigger

  1. Myofascial trigger points: spontaneous electrical activity and its consequences for pain induction and propagation

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas César

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Active myofascial trigger points are one of the major peripheral pain generators for regional and generalized musculoskeletal pain conditions. Myofascial trigger points are also the targets for acupuncture and/or dry needling therapies. Recent evidence in the understanding of the pathophysiology of myofascial trigger points supports The Integrated Hypothesis for the trigger point formation; however unanswered questions remain. Current evidence shows that spontaneous electrical activity at myofascial trigger point originates from the extrafusal motor endplate. The spontaneous electrical activity represents focal muscle fiber contraction and/or muscle cramp potentials depending on trigger point sensitivity. Local pain and tenderness at myofascial trigger points are largely due to nociceptor sensitization with a lesser contribution from non-nociceptor sensitization. Nociceptor and non-nociceptor sensitization at myofascial trigger points may be part of the process of muscle ischemia associated with sustained focal muscle contraction and/or muscle cramps. Referred pain is dependent on the sensitivity of myofascial trigger points. Active myofascial trigger points may play an important role in the transition from localized pain to generalized pain conditions via the enhanced central sensitization, decreased descending inhibition and dysfunctional motor control strategy.

  2. Comparison between four treatment modalities for active myofascial triggers points

    Atef Fouda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study aimed at the painful trigger points (TrPs for the purpose of ablating muscle spasms and restoring normal muscle length to find the most effective treatment for alleviating pain and improving mouth range of motion in patients with myofascial pain dysfunction. Methods: We enrolled 72 patients with pain and reduced mouth opening due to temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Patients assigned to four groups and four treatment modalities used to treat myofascial TrPs pain. We used mean and standard deviation values. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare the two groups. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to study the changes by the time in mean pain scores. The Student's t-test was used to compare maximum mouth opening (MMO groups. Then paired t-test was also used to study the changes of time in an MMO. Results: The results showed that pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF therapy is the most effective treatment modality regarding for pain relief. Both the anesthesia and PEMF groups showed a reduction in mean pain scores throughout all follow-up periods, and a statistically significant increase in mean MMO. Conclusion: The findings suggest that PEMF is the most effective treatment for alleviating pain and improving mouth range of motion in patients with myofascial pain.

  3. Contribution of the local and referred pain from active myofascial trigger points in fibromyalgia syndrome

    Ge, Hong-You; Nie, Hongling; Madeleine, Pascal;

    2009-01-01

    The generalized hypersensitivity associated with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) may in part be driven by peripheral nociceptive sources. The aim of the study was to investigate whether local and referred pain from active myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) contributes to fibromyalgia pain. FMS patients...

  4. Understanding of myofascial trigger points

    Zhuang Xiaoqiang; Tan Shusheng; Huang Qiangmin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the current practice of myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) including current epidemiology,pathology,diagnosis and treatment.Data sources The data analyzed in this review were mainly from relevant articles without restriction on the publication date reported in PubMed,MedSci,Google scholar.The terms "myofasial trigger points" and "myofacial pain syndrome" were used for the literature search.Study selection Original articles with no limitation of research design and critical reviews containing data relevant to myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) and MPS were retrieved,reviewed,analyzed and summarized.Results Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is characterized by painful taut band,referred pain,and local response twitch with a prevalence of 85% to 95% of incidence.Several factors link to the etiology of MTrPs,such as the chronic injury and overload of muscles.Other factors,such as certain nutrient and hormone insufficiency,comorbidities,and muscle imbalance may also maintain the MTrP in an active status and induce recurrent pain.The current pathology is that an extra leakage acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction induces persistent contracture knots,relative to some hypotheses of integration,muscle spindle discharges,spinal segment sensitization,ect.MTrPs can be diagnosed and localized based on a few subjective criteria.Several approaches,including both direct and supplementary treatments,can inactivate MTrPs.Direct treatments are categorized into invasive and conservative.Conclusion This review provides a clear understanding of MTrP pain and introduces the most useful treatment approaches in China.

  5. The effects of arm movement on reaction time in patients with latent and active upper trapezius myofascial trigger point

    Yassin, Marzieh; Talebian, Saeed; Ebrahimi Takamjani, Ismail; Maroufi, Nader; Ahmadi, Amir; Sarrafzadeh, Javad; Emrani, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Background: Myofascial pain syndrome is a significant source of mechanical pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of arm movement on reaction time in females with latent and active upper trapezius myofascial trigger point. Methods: In this interventional study, a convenience sample of fifteen women with one active MTP, fifteen women with one latent MTP in the upper trapezius, and fifteen normal healthy women were participated. Participants were asked to stand for 10 second...

  6. Reproduction of overall spontaneous pain pattern by manual stimulation of active myofascial trigger points in fibromyalgia patients

    Ge, Hong-You; Wang, Ying; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2011-01-01

    It has previously been reported that local and referred pain from active myofascial trigger points (MTPs) in the neck and shoulder region contribute to fibromyalgia (FM) pain and that the pain pattern induced from active MTPs can reproduce parts of the spontaneous clinical FM pain pattern. The...... current study investigated whether the overall spontaneous FM pain pattern can be reproduced by local and referred pain from active MTPs located in different muscles....

  7. Therapeutic approaches in treating myofascial trigger points

    Krstev, Toshe; Nikolovska, Lence; Jovevska, Svetlana; Panova, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) has been described as the most common challenge that general physicians, osteopaths, physical and manual therapists face today. Its’s frequency among the patients admitted to chronic pain practices is about 85 % (Han et al. 1997, Skootsky et al. 1989). MPS is characterized by pain originating from the trigger points (TrPs) at muscles and fascia. It is associated with, muscle spasm, tenderness, restricted motion. Although the exact pathology of this phenomenon is...

  8. The predetermined sites of examination for tender points in fibromyalgia syndrome are frequently associated with myofascial trigger points

    Ge, Hong You; Wang, Ying; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this present study is to test the hypotheses that the 18 predetermined sites of examination for tender points (TP sites) in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) are myofascial trigger points (MTrPs), and that the induced pain from active MTrPs at TP sites may mimic fibromyalgia pain. Each TP site...

  9. Change the Myofascial Pain and Range of Motion of the Temporomandibular Joint Following Kinesio Taping of Latent Myofascial Trigger Points in the Sternocleidomastoid Muscle

    Bae, Youngsook

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the changes in the myofascial pain and range of the motion of temporomandibular joint when Kinesio taping is applied to patients with latent myofascial trigger points of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 42 males and females aged 20 to 30 years (male 17, female 25). They were randomly divided into the control group and the experimental group, which would receive Kinesio taping. Kinesio taping was applie...

  10. Incidence of trapezius myofascial trigger points in patients with the possible carpal tunnel syndrome

    Hamid Azadeh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS often complain of prominent pain in shoulder and arm, also there are patients that have pain in their shoulder and arm which is due to myofascial trigger point (MTP located in their upper trapezius muscle. Despite the frequency of this observation, few studies have previously sought to establish possible relationship between the CTS and MTP in shoulder area. Methods: Samples were 160 patients (221 hands consist of 130 females and 30 males, with suspected diagnosis of CTS, from March 2008 to October 2008. In this study after performing electrodiagnosis searches, another evaluation was performed to find out if there was any sign of myofascial trigger point. The correlation between these two was sought. Results: It was found that all of 36 hands with normal electrodiagnostic findings had myofascial trigger points in their upper trapezius muscle. Out of 185 hands, 130 hands (70% with electrophysiological evidences of CTS showed myofascial trigger points in their trapezius muscles. Statistical analysis revealed significant (p < 0.001 reverse correlation between the severity of CTS and the presence of MTP. Conclusions: The findings of this study imply the significant correlation between occurrence of CTS and MTP. It is suggested that clinicians consider the probability of existence of MTP in patients referred for diagnosis of CTS.

  11. The Ultrasonographic Findings of Trigger Points of Myofascial Pain Syndrome in a Rabbit Model

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a common cause of musculoskeletal pain. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) have been repeatedly described by numerous authors. However, there have been few studies in which their existence and behavior was supported and their location confirmed. The purpose of this study was to determine whether diagnostic ultrasonography is an objective diagnostic tool which is able to significantly identify or detect the soft tissue changes in the region of clinically identified active MTrPs by using a rabbit experimental model. Ten MPS model rabbits were used in this study. We made an MPS animal model by causing the rabbits to overuse one leg for 3 weeks by cutting the contralateral L4 spinal nerve root. We compared the ultrasonographic findings of the taut band at pre-OP with those at post-OP during the consecutive three week period. To find the taut bands of the muscle, after skin exposure, the muscles were gently rubbed or pinched with the thumb and index finger on the two opposing surfaces of the muscle across the direction of the fibers. Then, the muscle was held in the same way, but with a 5-8 MHz stick probe being used in place of the thumb. After the palpation of various muscles, we selected the hardest and largest myofascial trigger nodule, in order to observe the ultrasonographic and power Doppler findings of the MPS. The size, shape, echogenecity and vascularity of the MTrPs were observed. The analysis of the results of the ultrasonography revealed that all MTrPs have a hyperechoic area. The mean thickness of the hyperechoic lesion in the biceps was 0.96±0.14 cm in the MPS site (at pre-OP?), and 0.49±0.12 cm at post-OP 3weeks (p < 0.01). The hyperechoic lesions in all of the studied biceps femoris of the rabbits were observed by high resolution ultrasonography. No definitively decreased vascularity was observed within the hyperechoic area by power Doppler imaging. Until now, there has been no objective method for the diagnosis of MPS

  12. Interrater Reliability of Palpation of Myofascial Trigger Points in Three Shoulder Muscles

    Bron, Carel; Franssen, Jo; Wensing, Michel; Oostendorp, Rob A.B.

    2007-01-01

    This observational study included both asymptomatic subjects (n=8) and patients with unilateral or bilateral shoulder pain (n=32). Patient diagnoses provided by the referring medical physicians included subacromial impingement, rotator cuff disease, tendonitis, tendinopathy, and chronic subdeltoid-subacromial bursitis. Three raters bilaterally palpated the infraspinatus, the anterior deltoid, and the biceps brachii muscles for clinical characteristics of a total of 12 myofascial trigger point...

  13. Mechanical pain sensitivity of deep tissues in children - possible development of myofascial trigger points in children

    Han Ting-I

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is still unclear when latent myofascial trigger points (MTrPs develop during early life. This study is designed to investigate the mechanical pain sensitivity of deep tissues in children in order to see the possible timing of the development of latent MTrPs and attachment trigger points (A-TrPs in school children. Methods Five hundreds and five healthy school children (age 4- 11 years were investigated. A pressure algometer was used to measure the pressure pain threshold (PPT at three different sites in the brachioradialis muscle: the lateral epicondyle at elbow (site A, assumed to be the A-TrP site, the mid-point of the muscle belly (site B, assumed to be the MTrP site, and the muscle-tendon junction as a control site (site C. Results The results showed that, for all children in this study, the mean PPT values was significantly lower (p p Conclusions It is concluded that a child had increased sensitivity at the tendon attachment site and the muscle belly (endplate zone after age of 4 years. Therefore, it is likely that a child may develop an A-Trp and a latent MTrP at the brachioradialis muscle after the age of 4 years. The changes in sensitivity, or the development for these trigger points, may not be related to the activity level of children aged 7-11 years. Further investigation is still required to indentify the exact timing of the initial occurrence of a-Trps and latent MTrPs.

  14. Dry Needling at Myofascial Trigger Spots of Rabbit Skeletal Muscles Modulates the Biochemicals Associated with Pain, Inflammation, and Hypoxia

    Yueh-Ling Hsieh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Dry needling is an effective therapy for the treatment of pain associated with myofascial trigger point (MTrP. However, the biochemical effects of dry needling that are associated with pain, inflammation, and hypoxia are unclear. This study investigated the activities of β-endorphin, substance P, TNF-α, COX-2, HIF-1α, iNOS, and VEGF after different dosages of dry needling at the myofascial trigger spots (MTrSs of a skeletal muscle in rabbit. Materials and Methods. Dry needling was performed either with one dosage (1D or five dosages (5D into the biceps femoris with MTrSs in New Zealand rabbits. Biceps femoris, serum, and dorsal root ganglion (DRG were sampled immediately and 5 d after dry needling for β-endorphin, substance P, TNF-α, COX-2, HIF-1α, iNOS, and VEGF immunoassays. Results. The 1D treatment enhanced the β-endorphin levels in the biceps femoris and serum and reduced substance P in the biceps femoris and DRG. The 5D treatment reversed these effects and was accompanied by increase of TNF-α, COX-2, HIF-1α, iNOS, and VEGF production in the biceps femoris. Moreover, the higher levels of these biochemicals were still maintained 5 d after treatment. Conclusion. Dry needling at the MTrSs modulates various biochemicals associated with pain, inflammation, and hypoxia in a dose-dependent manner.

  15. Change the myofascial pain and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint following kinesio taping of latent myofascial trigger points in the sternocleidomastoid muscle.

    Bae, Youngsook

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the changes in the myofascial pain and range of the motion of temporomandibular joint when Kinesio taping is applied to patients with latent myofascial trigger points of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 42 males and females aged 20 to 30 years (male 17, female 25). They were randomly divided into the control group and the experimental group, which would receive Kinesio taping. Kinesio taping was applied to the sternocleidomastoid muscle three times per week for two weeks. The pain triggered when the taut band or nodule was palpated was measured. Pain intensity was measured using the visual analog scale (VAS) and pressure pain threshold (PPT). The range of motion of the temporomandibular joint was measured. In all subjects, VAS, PPT, and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] In the experimental group, it was found that pain in the SCM was relived, as the VAS and PPT score decrease significantly and range of motion of temporomandibular joint increase significantly. In comparison between the groups, significant differences were shown in the VAS and PPT scores and in the range of motion of the temporomandibular joint. [Conclusion] Kinesio taping is thought to be an intervention method that can be applied to latent myofascial trigger points. PMID:25276008

  16. Treatment of myofascial trigger points in patients with chronic shoulder pain: a randomized, controlled trial

    Stegenga Boudewijn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal problem that is often chronic or recurrent. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs cause shoulder pain and are prevalent in patients with shoulder pain. However, few studies have focused on MTrP therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of multimodal treatment of MTrPs in patients with chronic shoulder pain. Methods A single-assessor, blinded, randomized, controlled trial was conducted. The intervention group received comprehensive treatment once weekly consisting of manual compression of the MTrPs, manual stretching of the muscles and intermittent cold application with stretching. Patients were instructed to perform muscle-stretching and relaxation exercises at home and received ergonomic recommendations and advice to assume and maintain good posture. The control group remained on the waiting list for 3 months. The Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH questionnaire score (primary outcome, Visual Analogue Scale for Pain (VAS-P, Global Perceived Effect (GPE scale and the number of muscles with MTrPs were assessed at 6 and 12 weeks in the intervention group and compared with those of a control group. Results Compared with the control group, the intervention group showed significant improvement (P Conclusions The results of this study show that 12-week comprehensive treatment of MTrPs in shoulder muscles reduces the number of muscles with active MTrPs and is effective in reducing symptoms and improving shoulder function in patients with chronic shoulder pain. Trial registration number ISRCTN: ISRCTN75722066

  17. Treatment of myofascial trigger points in female patients with chronic tension-type headache - A randomized controlled trial

    Berggreen, S.; Wiik, E.; Lund, Hans

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of myofascial trigger point massage in the muscles of the head, neck and shoulders regarding pain in the treatment of females with chronic tension-type headache. They were randomized into either a treatment group (n = 20) (one session of trigger...... point massage per week for 10 weeks) or a control group receiving no treatment (n = 19). The patients kept a diary to record their pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS), and the daily intake of drugs (mg) during the 4 weeks before and after the treatment period. The McGill Pain Questionnaire and the......: 8.8 (95% CI 0.1117.4), p = 0.047). Furthermore, a significant decrease in the number of trigger points was observed in the treatment group compared with the control group. Myofascial trigger point massage has a beneficial effect on pain in female patients with chronic tension-type headache. © 2012...

  18. Effectiveness of dry needling and injections of myofascial trigger points associated with plantar heel pain: a systematic review

    Cotchett Matthew P; Landorf Karl B; Munteanu Shannon E

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Plantar heel pain (plantar fasciitis) is one of the most common musculoskeletal pathologies of the foot. Plantar heel pain can be managed with dry needling and/or injection of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) however the evidence for its effectiveness is uncertain. Therefore, we aimed to systematically review the current evidence for the effectiveness of dry needling and/or injections of MTrPs associated with plantar heel pain. Methods We searched specific electronic data...

  19. Myofascial trigger points:the common cause of clinical tissue pain%肌筋膜疼痛触发点

    刘琳; 黄强民; 汤莉

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Myofascial trigger points have been widely applied in clinical rehabilitation and tissue pain field in the United States and Europe countries, and they have been recognized as the common cause of clinical musculoskeletal pain, joint function limitation, tissue injuries and muscle fatigue by many physiotherapists abroad. However, in China, many experts stil have some mistaken ideas and limitations to understand the pathological mechanism and to diagnosis and treat myofascial trigger points. OBJECTIVE:From the aspects of the etiology, pathological mechanism, diagnosis and positioning, treatments, to elaborate the method issues and the clinical experience of treatments of myofascial trigger points. METHODS:PubMed, ScienceDirect, EBSCO and CNKI databases were searched by the keywords of “myofascial trigger points, myofascial pain syndrome” in Chinese and English, respectively, in the titles and abstract to retrieve relevant articles published from the time of database construction to August 2014. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:It is concluded that a child has myofascial trigger points in some skeletal muscles after age of 4 years. The main causes of myofascial trigger points include issue trauma, the wrong posture, bone and joint degeneration, nutrition deficiency, mental stress, chronic infection and so on. The pathological mechanism of myofascial trigger points remains unknown, but what has been widely accepted is the integrated trigger point hypothesis introduced by Simons. And how to find and position myofascial trigger points is the key point to treat this disease successfuly. The application of myofascial trigger points techniques is important for the rehabilitation of clinical tissue pain and the occurrence and spread of bone and joint injuries, myofascitis, muscle pain, muscle fatigue and so on.%背景:肌筋膜疼痛触发点技术在欧美国家临床康复和组织疼痛领域已得到广泛性应用,国内相关专家对其病理机制认识,

  20. Myofascial trigger points in intercostal muscles secondary to herpes zoster infection of the intercostal nerve.

    Chen, S M; Chen, J T; Kuan, T S; Hong, C Z

    1998-03-01

    Chronic pain in the chest wall is a major complication after herpes zoster infection of intercostal nerves. It is usually difficult to control pain of such origin. Two cases are reported of postherpetic neuralgia after herpes zoster infection involving the intercostal nerves. Both patients had shooting, burning, aching, and localized pain in the muscle supplied by the involved intercostal nerves 1 to 3 months after onset. Compression palpation of a tender spot in one of these muscles induced a referred pain that followed the corresponding interspace, usually in the distal anterior direction. Local twitch responses could be elicited during injection of 0.5% or 1% lidocaine into one of these tender spots; the pain in the interspace was consistently eliminated immediately after injection. One patient had complete pain relief after three series of injections. The effect of pain relief for the other patient lasted for 1 to 2 weeks after the initial injection and lasted progressively longer (up to 2 months) after repeated injections. It appears that many of the tender spots formed in intercostal muscles after herpes zoster are myofascial trigger points that respond to injection with referred pain, local twitch responses, and immediate pain relief. PMID:9523788

  1. Remote Dose-Dependent Effects of Dry Needling at Distant Myofascial Trigger Spots of Rabbit Skeletal Muscles on Reduction of Substance P Levels of Proximal Muscle and Spinal Cords

    Yueh-Ling Hsieh; Chen-Chia Yang; Szu-Yu Liu; Li-Wei Chou; Chang-Zern Hong

    2014-01-01

    Background. Dry needling at distant myofascial trigger points is an effective pain management in patients with myofascial pain. However, the biochemical effects of remote dry needling are not well understood. This study evaluates the remote effects of dry needling with different dosages on the expressions of substance P (SP) in the proximal muscle, spinal dorsal horns of rabbits. Methods. Male New Zealand rabbits (2.5–3.0 kg) received dry needling at myofascial trigger spots of a gastrocnemiu...

  2. Evaluation of dry needling and 0.5% lidocaine injection therapies in myofascial pain trigger points in masticatory muscles

    Renato Oliveira Ferreira da Silva

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of trigger points injections using lidocaine 0.5% and dry needling without any kind of home-based rehabilitation program. METHODS: Sixteen patients with myofascial pain and trigger points in masticatory muscles were randomly assigned to two groups and received only one application session. The pressure pain threshold (PPT was recorded before and after the injection: Ten minutes, 24 hours later, 7, 15, 21 and 30 days after the treatment. Visual analogue scale (VAS was used to in all evaluation periods. RESULTS: There were no difference between groups for PPT, but for all groups the PPT during the time significantly increased when compared the before treatment. VAS showed differences between groups and during the time. The 0.5% lidocaine had the lowest VAS values when compared to dry needling, but at 30 days there were no differences among them. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the differences in VAS and considering there were no differences in PPT increases, we concluded that, in this study, both groups were able to disrupt the mechanisms of trigger point and relieve the myofascial pain symptoms.

  3. Dry needling on tendons and myofascial trigger points in post-traumatic stiffness of elbow: a case report

    Sukumar Shanmugam

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A 42 years old female presented with the complaints of pain and stiffness of right elbow with limited elbow extension, since 8 months, due to fracture of head of the radius. She was receiving conventional physical therapy treatment for pain relief and functional improvement since eight months. The limitation in Elbow extension caused difficulty in carrying household works. Later the patient was treated with dry needling to myofascial trigger points in brachioradiallis, common flexor, and extensor muscles of elbow and upper trapezius of shoulder, dry needling for tendons were added for further muscle relaxation. The interventions were carried out for three sessions, alternatively for one week. Pain (VAS score from 8/10 to 1/10, elbow extension range of motion (from 120-35 to 120-05 and the patient's upper limb functions (Quick DASH score from 63.36 to 13.63 were improved after one week of intervention. This case report results suggest that overall neuro-musculoskeletal function was improved due to dry needle induced myofascial trigger points deactivation and further muscle relaxation caused by tendon needling. This case report may helpful in formulating further treatment tool for better and faster recovery from pain and joint dysfunction in post immobilization pain and stiffness of elbow and other joints. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(6.000: 1529-1532

  4. Mechanisms of Myofascial Pain

    Jafri, M. Saleet

    2014-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome is an important health problem. It affects a majority of the general population, impairs mobility, causes pain, and reduces the overall sense of well-being. Underlying this syndrome is the existence of painful taut bands of muscle that contain discrete, hypersensitive foci called myofascial trigger points. In spite of the significant impact on public health, a clear mechanistic understanding of the disorder does not exist. This is likely due to the complex nature of the disorder which involves the integration of cellular signaling, excitation-contraction coupling, neuromuscular inputs, local circulation, and energy metabolism. The difficulties are further exacerbated by the lack of an animal model for myofascial pain to test mechanistic hypothesis. In this review, current theories for myofascial pain are presented and their relative strengths and weaknesses are discussed. Based on new findings linking mechanoactivation of reactive oxygen species signaling to destabilized calcium signaling, we put forth a novel mechanistic hypothesis for the initiation and maintenance of myofascial trigger points. It is hoped that this lays a new foundation for understanding myofascial pain syndrome and how current therapies work, and gives key insights that will lead to the improvement of therapies for its treatment. PMID:25574501

  5. Treatment of myofascial trigger points in common shoulder disorders by physical therapy: A randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN75722066

    Franssen Jo LM

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder disorders are a common health problem in western societies. Several treatment protocols have been developed for the clinical management of persons with shoulder pain. However available evidence does not support any protocol as being superior over others. Systematic reviews provide some evidence that certain physical therapy interventions (i.e. supervised exercises and mobilisation are effective in particular shoulder disorders (i.e. rotator cuff disorders, mixed shoulder disorders and adhesive capsulitis, but there is an ongoing need for high quality trials of physical therapy interventions. Usually, physical therapy consists of active exercises intended to strengthen the shoulder muscles as stabilizers of the glenohumeral joint or perform mobilisations to improve restricted mobility of the glenohumeral or adjacent joints (shoulder girdle. It is generally accepted that a-traumatic shoulder problems are the result of impingement of the subacromial structures, such as the bursa or rotator cuff tendons. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs in shoulder muscles may also lead to a complex of symptoms that are often seen in patients diagnosed with subacromial impingement or rotator cuff tendinopathy. Little is known about the treatment of MTrPs in patients with shoulder disorders. The primary aim of this study is to investigate whether physical therapy modalities to inactivate MTrPs can reduce symptoms and improve shoulder function in daily activities in a population of chronic a-traumatic shoulder patients when compared to a wait-and-see strategy. In addition we investigate the recurrence rate during a one-year-follow-up period. Methods/Design This paper presents the design for a randomized controlled trial to be conducted between September 2007 – September 2008, evaluating the effectiveness of a physical therapy treatment for non-traumatic shoulder complaints. One hundred subjects are included in this study. All subjects

  6. Effectiveness of dry needling and injections of myofascial trigger points associated with plantar heel pain: a systematic review

    Cotchett Matthew P

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar heel pain (plantar fasciitis is one of the most common musculoskeletal pathologies of the foot. Plantar heel pain can be managed with dry needling and/or injection of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs however the evidence for its effectiveness is uncertain. Therefore, we aimed to systematically review the current evidence for the effectiveness of dry needling and/or injections of MTrPs associated with plantar heel pain. Methods We searched specific electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus and AMI in April 2010 to identify randomised and non-randomised trials. We included trials where participants diagnosed with plantar heel pain were treated with dry needling and/or injections (local anaesthetics, steroids, Botulinum toxin A and saline alone or in combination with acupuncture. Outcome measures that focussed on pain and function were extracted from the data. Trials were assessed for quality using the Quality Index tool. Results Three quasi-experimental trials matched the inclusion criteria: two trials found a reduction in pain for the use of trigger point dry needling when combined with acupuncture and the third found a reduction in pain using 1% lidocaine injections when combined with physical therapy. However, the methodological quality of the three trials was poor, with Quality Index scores ranging form 7 to 12 out of a possible score of 27. A meta-analysis was not conducted because substantial heterogeneity was present between trials. Conclusions There is limited evidence for the effectiveness of dry needling and/or injections of MTrPs associated with plantar heel pain. However, the poor quality and heterogeneous nature of the included studies precludes definitive conclusions being made. Importantly, this review highlights the need for future trials to use rigorous randomised controlled methodology with measures such as blinding to reduce bias. We also recommend that such trials adhere to the

  7. Difference in effect between ischemic compression and muscle energy technique on upper trepezius myofascial trigger points: Comparative study

    Gopal S Nambi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Myofascial trigger point (MTrP is a hyperirritable point or spot, usually within a taut band of skeletal muscle or in the muscle fascia which is painful on compression and can give rise to characteristic-referred pain and motor dysfunction. Studies suggest that various types of massage forms are available for treating MTrPs. Aims: To find the difference in effect of two forms of massage techniques: Ischemic compression and muscle energy technique (MET on upper trepezius MTrPs. Settings and Design: Quasi experimental design was conducted with convenient sampling method. Materials and Methods: Patients ( n = 30 who fulfil the screening criteria were randomly assigned to Group A ( n = 15 treated with ischemic compression and ultrasound and Group B ( n = 15 treated with MET and ultrasound for 4 weeks and they were assessed at baseline and after 4 weeks. Outcome measures included pain intensity by visual analog scale (VAS and range of motion by universal goniometer. Statistical Analysis Used: Intergroup analysis was done with Mann-Whitney test and intragroup analysis was done with Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Statistically, no significant ( P > 0.05 changes in the scores were found in the Groups A and B for VAS, and statistically significant ( P < 0.05 changes in the scores were found in the Groups A and B for Range of Motion (ROM with greater change scores in the Group B compared with Group A. Conclusion: Treatment program consisting of MET with ultrasound may be more effective in reducing pain and improve ROM in patients in upper trepezius MTrPs.

  8. The neurophysiological effects of dry needling in patients with upper trapezius myofascial trigger points: study protocol of a controlled clinical trial

    Abbaszadeh-Amirdehi, Maryam; Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin; Naghdi, Soofia; Olyaei, Gholamreza; Nourbakhsh, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Dry needling (DN) is an effective method for the treatment of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). There is no report on the neurophysiological effects of DN in patients with MTrPs. The aim of the present study will be to assess the immediate neurophysiological efficacy of deep DN in patients with upper trapezius MTrPs. Methods and analysis A prospective, controlled clinical trial was designed to include patients with upper trapezius MTrPs and volunteered healthy participants to re...

  9. Standardized manual palpation of myofascial trigger points in relation to neck/shoulder pain; the influence of clinical experience on inter-examiner reproducibility

    Myburgh, Corrie; Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; Larsen, Anders H;

    2011-01-01

    A diagnosis of Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS) requires palpation for the identification of at least one clinically relevant trigger point (TP). However, few comparable, high quality studies currently exist from which to draw firm conclusions regarding the robustness of TP examination. An inter...... asymptomatic and the remainder suffering from neck/shoulder pain. Examiners received psychomotor skills training and video feedback analysis to improve protocol standardization. Kappa co-efficient calculations indicated good agreement between the experienced pairing (κ = 0.63), moderate agreement between the...

  10. Experienced versus Inexperienced Interexaminer Reliability on Location and Classification of Myofascial Trigger Point Palpation to Diagnose Lateral Epicondylalgia: An Observational Cross-Sectional Study.

    Mora-Relucio, Raquel; Núñez-Nagy, Susana; Gallego-Izquierdo, Tomás; Rus, Alma; Plaza-Manzano, Gustavo; Romero-Franco, Natalia; Ferragut-Garcías, Alejandro; Pecos-Martín, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the interexaminer reliability of experienced and inexperienced examiners on location and classification of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in two epicondylar muscles and the association between the MTrP found and the diagnosis of lateral epicondylalgia (LE). Fifty-two pianists (some suffered LE) voluntarily participated in the study. Three physiotherapists (one inexperienced in myofascial pain) examined, located, and marked MTrPs in the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) and extensor digitorum communis (EDC) muscles. Forearms were photographed and analyzed to establish the degree of agreement on MTrPs diagnosis. Data showed 81.73% and 77.88% of agreement on MTrP classification and 85.58% and 72.12% on MTrP location between the expert evaluators for ECRB and EDC, respectively. The agreement on MTrP classification between experienced and inexperienced examiners was 54.81% and 51.92% for ECRB and 50.00% and 55.77% for EDC. Also, agreement on MTrP location was 54.81% and 60.58% for ECRB and 48.08% and 48.08% for EDC. A strong association was found between presence of relevant MTrPs, LE diagnosis, and forearm pain when the examiners were experts. The analysis of location and classification of MTrPs in the epicondylar muscles through physical examination by experienced evaluators is reliable, reproducible, and suitable for diagnosing LE. PMID:26881005

  11. Experienced versus Inexperienced Interexaminer Reliability on Location and Classification of Myofascial Trigger Point Palpation to Diagnose Lateral Epicondylalgia: An Observational Cross-Sectional Study

    Raquel Mora-Relucio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose was to evaluate the interexaminer reliability of experienced and inexperienced examiners on location and classification of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs in two epicondylar muscles and the association between the MTrP found and the diagnosis of lateral epicondylalgia (LE. Fifty-two pianists (some suffered LE voluntarily participated in the study. Three physiotherapists (one inexperienced in myofascial pain examined, located, and marked MTrPs in the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB and extensor digitorum communis (EDC muscles. Forearms were photographed and analyzed to establish the degree of agreement on MTrPs diagnosis. Data showed 81.73% and 77.88% of agreement on MTrP classification and 85.58% and 72.12% on MTrP location between the expert evaluators for ECRB and EDC, respectively. The agreement on MTrP classification between experienced and inexperienced examiners was 54.81% and 51.92% for ECRB and 50.00% and 55.77% for EDC. Also, agreement on MTrP location was 54.81% and 60.58% for ECRB and 48.08% and 48.08% for EDC. A strong association was found between presence of relevant MTrPs, LE diagnosis, and forearm pain when the examiners were experts. The analysis of location and classification of MTrPs in the epicondylar muscles through physical examination by experienced evaluators is reliable, reproducible, and suitable for diagnosing LE.

  12. Remote Dose-Dependent Effects of Dry Needling at Distant Myofascial Trigger Spots of Rabbit Skeletal Muscles on Reduction of Substance P Levels of Proximal Muscle and Spinal Cords

    Yueh-Ling Hsieh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dry needling at distant myofascial trigger points is an effective pain management in patients with myofascial pain. However, the biochemical effects of remote dry needling are not well understood. This study evaluates the remote effects of dry needling with different dosages on the expressions of substance P (SP in the proximal muscle, spinal dorsal horns of rabbits. Methods. Male New Zealand rabbits (2.5–3.0 kg received dry needling at myofascial trigger spots of a gastrocnemius (distant muscle in one (1D or five sessions (5D. Bilateral biceps femoris (proximal muscles and superficial laminaes of L5-S2, T2-T5, and C2-C5 were sampled immediately and 5 days after dry needling to determine the levels of SP using immunohistochemistry and western blot. Results. Immediately after dry needling for 1D and 5D, the expressions of SP were significantly decreased in ipsilateral biceps femoris and bilateral spinal superficial laminaes (P<.05. Five days after dry needling, these reduced immunoactivities of SP were found only in animals receiving 5D dry needling (P<.05. Conclusions. This remote effect of dry needling involves the reduction of SP levels in proximal muscle and spinal superficial laminaes, which may be closely associated with the control of myofascial pain.

  13. Effects of traditional Thai self-massage using a Wilai massage stick(TM) versus ibuprofen in patients with upper back pain associated with myofascial trigger points: a randomized controlled trial.

    Wamontree, Phanida; Kanchanakhan, Naowarat; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Jeensawek, Apichon

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of traditional Thai self-massage using a Wilai massage stick(TM) versus ibuprofen on reducing upper back pain associated with myofascial trigger points. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty patients who were diagnosed as having upper back pain associated with myofascial trigger points were randomly allocated to either a massage group using a Wilai massage stick(TM) or a medication group taking ibuprofen for 5 days. Both groups were advised to perform the same daily stretching exercise program. Pain intensity, pressure pain threshold, tissue hardness, and cervical range of motion were assessed at baseline, immediately after the first treatment session, and on the fifth day after the last treatment session. [Results] The massage group had significant improvement in all parameters at all assessment time points. Similar changes were observed in the medication group except for the pressure pain threshold and tissue hardness. The adjusted post-test mean values for each assessment time point were significantly better in the massage group than in the medication group. [Conclusion] Tradition Thai self-massage using a Wilai massage stick(TM) provides better results than taking ibuprofen for patients who have upper back pain associated with myofascial trigger points. It could be an alternative treatment for this patient population. PMID:26696724

  14. Effects of traditional Thai self-massage using a Wilai massage stickTM versus ibuprofen in patients with upper back pain associated with myofascial trigger points: a randomized controlled trial

    Wamontree, Phanida; Kanchanakhan, Naowarat; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Jeensawek, Apichon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of traditional Thai self-massage using a Wilai massage stickTM versus ibuprofen on reducing upper back pain associated with myofascial trigger points. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty patients who were diagnosed as having upper back pain associated with myofascial trigger points were randomly allocated to either a massage group using a Wilai massage stickTM or a medication group taking ibuprofen for 5 days. Both groups were advised to perform the same daily stretching exercise program. Pain intensity, pressure pain threshold, tissue hardness, and cervical range of motion were assessed at baseline, immediately after the first treatment session, and on the fifth day after the last treatment session. [Results] The massage group had significant improvement in all parameters at all assessment time points. Similar changes were observed in the medication group except for the pressure pain threshold and tissue hardness. The adjusted post-test mean values for each assessment time point were significantly better in the massage group than in the medication group. [Conclusion] Tradition Thai self-massage using a Wilai massage stickTM provides better results than taking ibuprofen for patients who have upper back pain associated with myofascial trigger points. It could be an alternative treatment for this patient population. PMID:26696724

  15. Efficacy of kinesio tape application on pain and muscle strength in patients with myofascial pain syndrome: a placebo-controlled trial

    Öztürk, Gülcan; KÜLCÜ, Duygu Geler; Mesci, Nilgün; Şilte, Ayşe Duygu; Aydog, Ece

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the short- and mid-term effects of Kinesio taping on the trapezius muscle in individuals with myofascial pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven patients with active upper trapezius myofascial trigger points were randomly divided to 2 groups: group 1 received Kinesio taping for the upper trapezius muscle, and group 2 received a sham Kinesio taping application. Neck pain (Visual Analog Scale and pressure algometry) and trapezius m...

  16. The immediate effects of traditional Thai massage on heart rate variability and stress-related parameters in patients with back pain associated with myofascial trigger points.

    Buttagat, Vitsarut; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Chatchawan, Uraiwon; Kharmwan, Samerduen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the immediate effects of traditional Thai massage (TTM) on stress-related parameters including heart rate variability (HRV), anxiety, muscle tension, pain intensity, pressure pain threshold, and body flexibility in patients with back pain associated with myofascial trigger points. Thirty-six patients were randomly allocated to receive a 30-min session of either TTM or control (rest on bed) for one session. Results indicated that TTM was associated with significant increases in HRV (increased total power frequency (TPF) and high frequency (HF)), pressure pain threshold (PPT) and body flexibility (p<0.05) and significant decreases in self-reported pain intensity, anxiety and muscle tension (p<0.001). For all outcomes, similar changes were not observed in the control group. The adjusted post-test mean values for TPF, HF, PPT and body flexibility were significantly higher in the TTM group when compared with the control group (p<0.01) and the values for pain intensity, anxiety and muscle tension were significantly lower. We conclude that TTM can increase HRV and improve stress-related parameters in this patient population. PMID:21147414

  17. The Kinesio Taping Method for Myofascial Pain Control

    Wei-Ting Wu; Chang-Zern Hong; Li-Wei Chou

    2015-01-01

    Many people continue suffering from myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) defined as a regional pain syndrome characterized by muscle pain caused by myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) clinically. Muscle spasm and block of blood circulation can be noticed in the taut bands. In the MTrP region, nociceptors can be sensitized by the peripheral inflammatory factors and contracture of fascia can also be induced. Traditional treatments of MPS include stretching therapy, thermal treatment, electrical stimula...

  18. [Cervical myofascial pain syndrome. Narrative review of physiotherapeutic treatment].

    Capó-Juan, M A

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a complex and multifactorial phenomenon that depends on the interaction of biopsychosocial factors. Between 15-25% of adults suffer from chronic pain at some point in their lives. Cervical chronic pain is considered a public health problem affecting 9.6% men and 21.9% women, according to the latest National Health Survey 2011-12. A high percentage of medical consultations due to muscle pain turn out to be myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). Its existence implies the presence of myofascial trigger points which can be latent or active throughout the whole population. The aim of this review is to update knowledge in the various therapies applied by the physiotherapist in the treatment of this syndrome at cervical level. From the review it appears that some of the most used techniques that may be useful in the short or medium term are: ischemic compression and/or trigger point pressure release and dry needling. Furthermore, various combinations of treatment modalities are used to treat this syndrome, taking other aspects into account, such as education. PMID:25963463

  19. Skeletal muscle contractility, self-reported pain and tissue sensitivity in females with neck/shoulder pain and upper Trapezius myofascial trigger points - a randomized intervention study

    Myburgh, Corrie; Hartvigsen, Jan; Aagaard, Per;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In relation to Myofascial Triggerpoints (MFTrPs) of the upper Trapezius, this study explored muscle contractility characteristics, the occurrence of post-intervention muscle soreness and the effect of dry needling on muscle contractile characteristics and clinical outcomes......-intervention and 48 hours post-intervention. Symptomatic and asymptomatic participant groups were each randomized into two treatment sub-groups (superficial (SDN) and deep dry needling (DDN)) after baseline testing. At 48 hours post-intervention participants were asked whether delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and...... or intervention (p=0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In selected female neck/shoulder pain sufferers, maximum voluntary contraction and rapid force generation of the upper Trapezius was not influenced by clinically relevant self-reported pain or the presence of diagnostically relevant MFTrPs. Dry needling, deep or superficial...

  20. An evidence-informed review of the current myofascial pain literature--January 2015.

    Dommerholt, Jan; Grieve, Rob; Layton, Michelle; Hooks, Todd

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an up-to-date review of the most recent publications about myofascial pain, trigger points (TrPs) and other related topics. We have added some commentaries where indicated with supporting references. In the Basic Research section, we reviewed the work by Danish researchers about the influence of latent TrPs and a second study of the presence and distribution of both active and latent TrPs in whiplash-associated disorders. The section on Soft Tissue Approaches considered multiple studies and case reports of the efficacy of myofascial release (MFR), classic and deep muscle massage, fascial techniques, and connective tissue massage. Dry needling (DN) is becoming a common approach and we included multiple studies, reviews, and case reports, while the section on Injection Techniques features an article on TrP injections following mastectomy and several articles about the utilization of botulinum toxin. Lastly, we review several articles on modalities and other clinical approaches. PMID:25603753

  1. A critical overview of the current myofascial pain literature - March 2016.

    Dommerholt, Jan; Hooks, Todd; Finnegan, Michelle; Grieve, Rob

    2016-04-01

    The worldwide interest in myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) and trigger points (TrPs) is reflected in the increasing number of publications. In this overview of the literature, we included 26 studies, case reports and review articles by authors from 18 different countries. Several research groups are exploring the characteristic of TrPs such as Chen and colleagues, who continued their work on the quantification of the taut bands. Meng and colleagues studied the relationships between TrPs and central sensitization, while Yu and colleagues examined the electrophysiological characteristics that occur as a result of active TrPs. Several researchers used objective measurements to determine clinical outcomes, such as Koppenhaver and colleagues who measured objective changes in the function and nociceptive sensitivity of lumbar multifidus muscle subjects with low back pain. Turo and colleagues quantified muscle tissue changes after dry needling in chronic myofascial pain using elastography. Multiple studies explored various treatment options for TrPs, such as dry needling, injections with lidocaine or granisetron, traditional Thai massage, self-myofascial release, kinesiotaping, and monochromatic infrared photo energy, among others. PMID:27210859

  2. Effect of yoga on the Myofascial Pain Syndrome of neck

    D Sharan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS refers to pain attributed to muscle and its surrounding fascia, which is associated with ′′myofascial trigger points′′ (MTrPs. MTrPs in the trapezius has been proposed as the main cause of temporal and cervicogenic headache and neck pain. Literature shows that the prevalence of various musculoskeletal disorders (MSD among physiotherapists is high. Yoga has traditionally been used to treat MSDs in various populations. But there is scarcity of literature which explains the effects of yoga on reducing MPS of the neck in terms of various physical parameters and subjective responses. Therefore, a pilot study was done among eight physiotherapists with minimum six months of experience. A structured yoga protocol was designed and implemented for five days in a week for four weeks. The outcome variables were Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hands (DASH score, Neck Disability Index (NDI, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT for Trigger Points, Cervical Range of Motion (CROM - active & passive, grip and pinch strengths. The variables were compared before and after the intervention. Finally, the result revealed that all the variables (DASH: P<0.00, NDI: P<0.00, VAS: P<0.00, PPT: Left: P<0.00, PPT: Right: P<0.00, Grip strength: left: P<0.00, Grip strength: right: P<0.01, Key pinch: left: P<0.01, Key pinch: right: P<0.01, Palmar pinch: left: P<0.01, Palmar pinch: right: P<0.00, Tip pinch: left: P<0.01, Tip pinch: Right: P<0.01 improved significantly after intervention.

  3. Equal Improvement in Men and Women in the Treatment of Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome Using a Multi-modal Protocol with an Internal Myofascial Trigger Point Wand.

    Anderson, Rodney U; Wise, David; Sawyer, Tim; Nathanson, Brian H; Nevin Smith, J

    2016-06-01

    Both men and women require treatment for urologic chronic pelvic pain syndromes (UCPPS), which includes interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, pelvic floor dysfunction, and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. However, it is unknown if men and women respond differently to a protocol that includes specific physical therapy self-treatment using an internal trigger point wand and training in paradoxical relaxation. We performed a retrospective analysis by gender in a single arm, open label, single center clinical trial designed to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a protocol for the treatment of UCPPS from October, 2008 to May, 2011. 314 adult men (79.9 %) and 79 (20.1 %) women met inclusion criteria. The median duration of symptoms was 60 months. The protocol required an initial 6-day clinic for training followed by a 6-month self-treatment period. The treatment included self-administered pelvic floor trigger point release with an internal trigger point device for physical therapy along with paradoxical relaxation training. Notable gender differences in prior treatments were observed. Men had a lower median [Interquartile Range] NIH-CPSI score at baseline than women (27 [21, 31] vs. 29 [22, 33], p = 0.04). Using a 1-10 scale with 10 = Most Severe, the median reduction in trigger point sensitivity was 3 units for both men and women after 6 months therapy (p = 0.74). A modified Intention to Treat analysis and a multivariate regression analysis found similar results. We conclude that men and women have similar, significant reductions in trigger point sensitivity with this protocol. PMID:26721470

  4. 针刺配合干针刺肌筋膜触发点治疗腰椎间盘突出症疗效观察%Efficacy Observation on Acupuncture Combined with Dry Needling Myofascial Trigger Points for Lumbar Disc Herniation

    植剑龙

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the efficacy of acupuncture combined with dry needling myofascial trigger points for lumbar disc herniation. Methods:136 cases of patients were randomly divided into observation group and control group, the observation group used conventional acupunc-ture combined with dry needling myofascial trigger points, the control group only used conventional acupuncture. Results:The total effective rate of observation group was 92.65%, which was higher than 73.53 that of control group (P<0.01). Conclusion:Conventional acupuncture combined with dry needling myofascial trigger points has significant curative effect on lumbar disc herniation.%目的:探讨针刺配合干针刺肌筋膜触发点治疗腰椎间盘突出症的疗效。方法:将136例患者随机分为观察组和对照组,观察组采用常规针刺配合干针刺肌筋膜触发点治疗,对照组单纯采用常规针刺治疗。结果:观察组总有效率为92.65%,高于对照组的73.53%(P<0.01)。结论:常规针刺配合干针刺肌筋膜触发点治疗腰椎间盘突出症疗效显著。

  5. TRIGGER

    by Wesley Smith

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The overall status of the L1 trigger has been excellent and the running efficiency has been high during physics fills. The timing is good to about 1%. The fine-tuning of the time synchronization of muon triggers is ongoing and will be completed after more than 10 nb-1 of data have been recorded. The CSC trigger primitive and RPC trigger timing have been refined. A new configuration for the CSC Track Finder featured modified beam halo cuts and improved ghost cancellation logic. More direct control was provided for the DT opto-receivers. New RPC Cosmic Trigger (RBC/TTU) trigger algorithms were enabled for collision runs. There is further work planned during the next technical stop to investigate a few of the links from the ECAL to the Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT). New firmware and a new configuration to handle trigger rate spikes in the ECAL barrel are also being tested. A board newly developed by the tracker group (ReTRI) has been installed and activated to block re...

  6. TRIGGER

    W. Smith from contributions of C. Leonidopoulos

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Since nearly all of the Level-1 (L1) Trigger hardware at Point 5 has been commissioned, activities during the past months focused on the fine-tuning of synchronization, particularly for the ECAL and the CSC systems, on firmware upgrades and on improving trigger operation and monitoring. Periodic resynchronizations or hard resets and a shortened luminosity section interval of 23 seconds were implemented. For the DT sector collectors, an automatic power-off was installed in case of high temperatures, and the monitoring capabilities of the opto-receivers and the mini-crates were enhanced. The DTTF and the CSCTF now have improved memory lookup tables. The HCAL trigger primitive logic implemented a new algorithm providing better stability of the energy measurement in the presence of any phase misalignment. For the Global Calorimeter Trigger, additional Source Cards have been manufactured and tested. Testing of the new tau, missing ET and missing HT algorithms is underw...

  7. Myofascial Temporomandibular Disorder.

    Fernandez-de-Las-Penas, César; Svensson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) have been discussed for more than 70 years without reaching consensus on causes, etiological factors, pathophysiology, or rationale management. Indeed, TMD pain remains an enigma and a diagnostic and management challenge for many clinicians. Perhaps the many and often conflicting views on TMD pain by different health care providers are routed in professional traditions, personal beliefs, experience, and clinical training. This review aims to provide an updated and critical discussion on what is known and supported by scientific evidence about myofascial TMD pain and which gaps there still may be in our understanding of this condition. It has not been the intention to make a systematic review on all aspects of TMD but rather to point out some of the more recent (and important) pieces of information that may help us to better appreciate TMD pain as a complex and multifaceted pain disorder manifested in the craniofacial system. PMID:26717949

  8. Intermuscular force transmission along myofascial chains: a systematic review.

    Krause, Frieder; Wilke, Jan; Vogt, Lutz; Banzer, Winfried

    2016-06-01

    The present review aims to provide a systematic overview on tensile transmission along myofascial chains based on anatomical dissection studies and in vivo experiments. Evidence for the existence of myofascial chains is growing, and the capability of force transmission via myofascial chains has been hypothesized. However, there is still a lack of evidence concerning the functional significance and capability for force transfer. A systematic literature research was conducted using MEDLINE (Pubmed), ScienceDirect and Google Scholar. Studied myofascial chains encompassed the superficial backline (SBL), the back functional line (BFL) and the front functional line (FFL). Peer-reviewed human dissection studies as well as in vivo experiments reporting intermuscular tension transfer between the constituents of a myofascial chain were included. To assess methodic quality, two independent investigators rated studies by means of validated assessment tools (QUACS and PEDro Scale). The literature research identified 1022 articles. Nine studies (moderate to excellent methodological quality) were included. Concerning the SBL and the BFL, there is moderate evidence for force transfer at all three transitions (based on six studies), and one of two transitions (three studies). One study yields moderate evidence for a slight, but not significant force transfer at one transition in the FFL. The findings of the present study indicate that tension can be transferred between some of the examined adjacent structures. Force transfer might have an impact in overuse conditions as well as on sports performance. However, different methods of force application and measurement hinder the comparability of results. Considering anatomical variations in the degree of continuity and histological differences of the linking structures is crucial for interpretation. Future studies should focus on the in vivo function of myofascial continuity during isolated active or passive tissue tensioning. PMID

  9. The Kinesio Taping Method for Myofascial Pain Control.

    Wu, Wei-Ting; Hong, Chang-Zern; Chou, Li-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Many people continue suffering from myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) defined as a regional pain syndrome characterized by muscle pain caused by myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) clinically. Muscle spasm and block of blood circulation can be noticed in the taut bands. In the MTrP region, nociceptors can be sensitized by the peripheral inflammatory factors and contracture of fascia can also be induced. Traditional treatments of MPS include stretching therapy, thermal treatment, electrical stimulation, massage, manipulation, trigger points injection, acupuncture, and medicine. However, the pain syndrome may not be relieved even under multiple therapies. Recently, the Kinesio Taping (KT) method is popularly used in sports injuries, postoperative complications, and various pain problems, but little research is focused on MPS with KT method. In this paper, we review the research studies on the application to KT in treating MPS and other related issues. It appears that the KT application can elevate the subcutaneous space and then increase the blood circulation and lymph fluid drainage to reduce the chemical factors around the MTrP region. Therefore, it is suggested that KT method can be used as a regular treatment or added to the previous treatment for myofascial pain. PMID:26185522

  10. The Kinesio Taping Method for Myofascial Pain Control

    Wei-Ting Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many people continue suffering from myofascial pain syndrome (MPS defined as a regional pain syndrome characterized by muscle pain caused by myofascial trigger points (MTrPs clinically. Muscle spasm and block of blood circulation can be noticed in the taut bands. In the MTrP region, nociceptors can be sensitized by the peripheral inflammatory factors and contracture of fascia can also be induced. Traditional treatments of MPS include stretching therapy, thermal treatment, electrical stimulation, massage, manipulation, trigger points injection, acupuncture, and medicine. However, the pain syndrome may not be relieved even under multiple therapies. Recently, the Kinesio Taping (KT method is popularly used in sports injuries, postoperative complications, and various pain problems, but little research is focused on MPS with KT method. In this paper, we review the research studies on the application to KT in treating MPS and other related issues. It appears that the KT application can elevate the subcutaneous space and then increase the blood circulation and lymph fluid drainage to reduce the chemical factors around the MTrP region. Therefore, it is suggested that KT method can be used as a regular treatment or added to the previous treatment for myofascial pain.

  11. Botulinum Toxin for the Treatment of Myofascial Pain Syndromes Involving the Neck and Back: A Review from a Clinical Perspective

    José M. Climent; Ta-Shen Kuan; Pedro Fenollosa; Francisco Martin-del-Rosario

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Botulinum toxin inhibits acetylcholine (ACh) release and probably blocks some nociceptive neurotransmitters. It has been suggested that the development of myofascial trigger points (MTrP) is related to an excess release of ACh to increase the number of sensitized nociceptors. Although the use of botulinum toxin to treat myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) has been investigated in many clinical trials, the results are contradictory. The objective of this paper is to identify sources o...

  12. Myofascial pain: from Virchow's to our days

    I. V. Egorov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Myalgia is not a definite nosological entity and fixes the attention of neurologists, rheumatologists, and physicians in other specialties. This is first of all associated with the high incidence of chronic pain syndrome that leads to long-term disability mainly in young and middle-aged persons. One of the most common reasons for seeking advice from a therapist and neurologist is low back pain that may be due to the involvement of three key anatomical players: facet joints (arthrosis treatment should make an emphasis on  hondroprotectors, intervertebral disks (in case of discopathy, clinicians tend to favor nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs – NSAIDs, and a muscular frame. In this case, two thirds of patients with pain syndromes in the trunk and limbs are found to have myofascial dysfunction that is defined as impaired function of one orother muscle, which occurs with its overload and manifests itself as muscle spasm and the presence of painful muscle infiltrations or local muscle hypertonus and trigger points in the tense muscles. Ignoring this fact gives rise to the irrational use of analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs and further to the increase of their doses because the treatment is ineffective. Modern-day therapy for myofascial syndrome is multimodal and encompasses physiotherapic and manual procedures and the use of myorelaxants rather than NSAIDs. To prescribe myorelaxants, it is necessary to understand their mechanisms of action and the effects of different agents in this group.

  13. TRIGGER

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The hardware of the trigger components has been mostly finished. The ECAL Endcap Trigger Concentrator Cards (TCC) are in production while Barrel TCC firmware has been upgraded, and the Trigger Primitives can now be stored by the Data Concentrator Card for readout by the DAQ. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) system is complete, and the timing is being finalized. All 502 HCAL trigger links to RCT run without error. The HCAL muon trigger timing has been equalized with DT, RPC, CSC and ECAL. The hardware and firmware for the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) jet triggers are being commissioned and data from these triggers is available for readout. The GCT energy sums from rings of trigger towers around the beam pipe beam have been changed to include two rings from both sides. The firmware for Drift Tube Track Finder, Barrel Sorter and Wedge Sorter has been upgraded, and the synchronization of the DT trigger is satisfactory. The CSC local trigger has operated flawlessly u...

  14. TRIGGER

    Roberta Arcidiacono

    2013-01-01

    Trigger Studies Group (TSG) The Trigger Studies Group has just concluded its third 2013 workshop, where all POGs presented the improvements to the physics object reconstruction, and all PAGs have shown their plans for Trigger development aimed at the 2015 High Level Trigger (HLT) menu. The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for Trigger menu development, path timing, Trigger performance studies coordination, HLT offline DQM as well as HLT release, menu and conditions validation – this last task in collaboration with PdmV (Physics Data and Monte Carlo Validation group). In the last months the group has delivered several HLT rate estimates and comparisons, using the available data and Monte Carlo samples. The studies were presented at the Trigger workshops in September and December, and STEAM has contacted POGs and PAGs to understand the origin of the discrepancies observed between 8 TeV data and Monte Carlo simulations. The most recent results show what the...

  15. Efficacy of kinesio tape application on pain and muscle strength in patients with myofascial pain syndrome: a placebo-controlled trial.

    Öztürk, Gülcan; Külcü, Duygu Geler; Mesci, Nilgün; Şilte, Ayşe Duygu; Aydog, Ece

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the short- and mid-term effects of Kinesio taping on the trapezius muscle in individuals with myofascial pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven patients with active upper trapezius myofascial trigger points were randomly divided to 2 groups: group 1 received Kinesio taping for the upper trapezius muscle, and group 2 received a sham Kinesio taping application. Neck pain (Visual Analog Scale and pressure algometry) and trapezius muscle strength data were collected at baseline, immediately after Kinesio taping application, and at one month follow-up. [Results] The mean changes in Visual Analog Scale scores were significantly different between groups at T2 and T1, with less pain in group 1. The mean changes in algometry scores were significantly different between groups at T3 compared with T2 in favor of group 1. The mean changes in trapezius muscle strength were significantly different between the groups at T2 compared with T1 in favor of group 1. [Conclusion] Patients with myofascial pain syndrome receiving an application of Kinesio taping exhibited statistically significant improvements in pain and upper trapezius muscle strength. PMID:27190430

  16. TRIGGER

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The trigger synchronization procedures for running with cosmic muons and operating with the LHC were reviewed during the May electronics week. Firmware maintenance issues were also reviewed. Link tests between the new ECAL endcap trigger concentrator cards (TCC48) and the Regional Calorimeter Trigger have been performed. Firmware for the energy sum triggers and an upgraded tau trigger of the Global Calorimeter Triggers has been developed and is under test. The optical fiber receiver boards for the Track-Finder trigger theta links of the DT chambers are now all installed. The RPC trigger is being made more robust by additional chamber and cable shielding and also by firmware upgrades. For the CSC’s the front-end and trigger motherboard firmware have been updated. New RPC patterns and DT/CSC lookup tables taking into account phi asymmetries in the magnetic field configuration are under study. The motherboard for the new pipeline synchronizer of the Global Trigg...

  17. TRIGGER

    W. Smith

    2012-01-01

      Level-1 Trigger The Level-1 Trigger group is ready to deploy improvements to the L1 Trigger algorithms for 2012. These include new high-PT patterns for the RPC endcap, an improved CSC PT assignment, a new PT-matching algorithm for the Global Muon Trigger, and new calibrations for ECAL, HCAL, and the Regional Calorimeter Trigger. These should improve the efficiency, rate, and stability of the L1 Trigger. The L1 Trigger group also is migrating the online systems to SLC5. To make the data transfer from the Global Calorimeter Trigger to the Global Trigger more reliable and also to allow checking the data integrity online, a new optical link system has been developed by the GCT and GT groups and successfully tested at the CMS electronics integration facility in building 904. This new system is now undergoing further tests at Point 5 before being deployed for data-taking this year. New L1 trigger menus have recently been studied and proposed by Emmanuelle Perez and the L1 Detector Performance Group...

  18. TRIGGER

    W. Smith

    At the March meeting, the CMS trigger group reported on progress in production, tests in the Electronics Integration Center (EIC) in Prevessin 904, progress on trigger installation in the underground counting room at point 5, USC55, the program of trigger pattern tests and vertical slice tests and planning for the Global Runs starting this summer. The trigger group is engaged in the final stages of production testing, systems integration, and software and firmware development. Most systems are delivering final tested electronics to CERN. The installation in USC55 is underway and integration testing is in full swing. A program of orderly connection and checkout with subsystems and central systems has been developed. This program includes a series of vertical subsystem slice tests providing validation of a portion of each subsystem from front-end electronics through the trigger and DAQ to data captured and stored. After full checkout, trigger subsystems will be then operated in the CMS Global Runs. Continuous...

  19. TRIGGER

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The production of the trigger hardware is now basically finished, and in time for the turn-on of the LHC. The last boards produced are the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcaps (TCC-EE). After the recent installation of the four EE Dees, the TCC-EE prototypes were used for their commissioning. Production boards are arriving and are being tested continuously, with the last ones expected in November. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger hardware is fully integrated after installation of the last EE cables. Pattern tests from the HCAL up to the GCT have been performed successfully. The HCAL triggers are fully operational, including the connection of the HCAL-outer and forward-HCAL (HO/HF) technical triggers to the Global Trigger. The HCAL Trigger and Readout (HTR) board firmware has been updated to permit recording of the tower “feature bit” in the data. The Global Calorimeter Trigger hardware is installed, but some firmware developments are still n...

  20. A critical overview of current myofascial pain literature - March 2015.

    Dommerholt, Jan; Layton, Michelle; Hooks, Todd; Grieve, Rob

    2015-04-01

    The second article in this review series considers multiple recent publications about myofascial pain, trigger points (TrPs) and other related topics. The article is divided into several sections, including a Basic Research section (4 articles), a section on Soft Tissue Approaches (5 articles), a Dry Needling and Acupuncture section (7 articles), an Injection section (2 articles), a section on. Modalities (1 article), Other Clinical Approaches (3 articles) and finally a Reviews section (7 articles). The thirty publications reviewed in this article originated in all corners of the world. PMID:25892390

  1. TRIGGER

    Wesley Smith

    Trigger Hardware The status of the trigger components was presented during the September CMS Week and Annual Review and at the monthly trigger meetings in October and November. Procedures for cold and warm starts (e.g. refreshing of trigger parameters stored in registers) of the trigger subsystems have been studied. Reviews of parts of the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) and the Global Trigger (GT) have taken place in October and November. The CERN group summarized the status of the Trigger Timing and Control (TTC) system. All TTC crates and boards are installed in the underground counting room, USC55. The central clock system will be upgraded in December (after the Global Run at the end of November GREN) to the new RF2TTC LHC machine interface timing module. Migration of subsystem's TTC PCs to SLC4/ XDAQ 3.12 is being prepared. Work is on going to unify the access to Local Timing Control (LTC) and TTC CMS interface module (TTCci) via SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol, a lightweight XML-based messaging ...

  2. TRIGGER

    W. Smith

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The Level-1 Trigger hardware has performed well during both the recent proton-proton and heavy ion running. Efforts were made to improve the visibility and handling of alarms and warnings. The tracker ReTRI boards that prevent fixed frequencies of Level-1 Triggers are now configured through the Trigger Supervisor. The Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) team has introduced a buffer cleanup procedure at stops and a reset of the QPLL during configuring to ensure recalibration in case of a switch from the LHC clock to the local clock. A device to test the cables between the Regional Calorimeter Trigger and the GCT has been manufactured. A wrong charge bit was fixed in the CSC Trigger. The ECAL group is improving crystal masking and spike suppression in the trigger primitives. New firmware for the Drift Tube Track Finder (DTTF) sorters was developed to improve fake track tagging and sorting. Zero suppression was implemented in the DT Sector Collector readout. The track finder b...

  3. TRIGGER

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The final parts of the Level-1 trigger hardware are now being put in place. For the ECAL endcaps, more than half of the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcap (TCC-EE) are now available at CERN, such that one complete endcap can be covered. The Global Trigger now correctly handles ECAL calibration sequences, without being influenced by backpressure. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) hardware is complete and working in USC55. Intra-crate tests of all 18 RCT crates and the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) are regularly taking place. Pattern tests have successfully captured data from HCAL through RCT to the GCT Source Cards. HB/HE trigger data are being compared with emulator results to track down the very few remaining hardware problems. The treatment of hot and dead cells, including their recording in the database, has been defined. For the GCT, excellent agreement between the emulator and data has been achieved for jets and HF ET sums. There is still som...

  4. TRIGGER

    R. Carlin with contributions from D. Acosta

    2012-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Data-taking continues at cruising speed, with high availability of all components of the Level-1 trigger. We have operated the trigger up to a luminosity of 7.6E33, where we approached 100 kHz using the 7E33 prescale column.  Recently, the pause without triggers in case of an automatic "RESYNC" signal (the "settle" and "recover" time) was reduced in order to minimise the overall dead-time. This may become very important when the LHC comes back with higher energy and luminosity after LS1. We are also preparing for data-taking in the proton-lead run in early 2013. The CASTOR detector will make its comeback into CMS and triggering capabilities are being prepared for this. Steps to be taken include improved cooperation with the TOTEM trigger system and using the LHC clock during the injection and ramp phases of LHC. Studies are being finalised that will have a bearing on the Trigger Technical Design Report (TDR), which is to be rea...

  5. TRIGGER

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The trigger system has been constantly in use in cosmic and commissioning data taking periods. During CRAFT running it delivered 300 million muon and calorimeter triggers to CMS. It has performed stably and reliably. During the abort gaps it has also provided laser and other calibration triggers. Timing issues, namely synchronization and latency issues, have been solved. About half of the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcap (TCC-EE) are installed, and the firmware is being worked on. The production of the other half has started. The HCAL Trigger and Readout (HTR) card firmware has been updated, and new features such as fast parallel zero-suppression have been included. Repairs of drift tube (DT) trigger mini-crates, optical links and receivers of sector collectors are under way and have been completed on YB0. New firmware for the optical receivers of the theta links to the drift tube track finder is being installed. In parallel, tests with new eta track finde...

  6. TRIGGER

    W. Smith

    At the December meeting, the CMS trigger group reported on progress in production, tests in the Electronics Integration Center (EIC) in Prevessin 904, progress on trigger installation in the underground counting room at point 5, USC55, and results from the Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC) phase II. The trigger group is engaged in the final stages of production testing, systems integration, and software and firmware development. Most systems are delivering final tested electronics to CERN. The installation in USC55 is underway and moving towards integration testing. A program of orderly connection and checkout with subsystems and central systems has been developed. This program includes a series of vertical subsystem slice tests providing validation of a portion of each subsystem from front-end electronics through the trigger and DAQ to data captured and stored. This is combined with operations and testing without beam that will continue until startup. The plans for start-up, pilot and early running tri...

  7. TRIGGER

    Wesley Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software New Forward Scintillating Counters (FSC) for rapidity gap measurements have been installed and integrated into the Trigger recently. For the Global Muon Trigger, tuning of quality criteria has led to improvements in muon trigger efficiencies. Several subsystems have started campaigns to increase spares by recovering boards or producing new ones. The barrel muon sector collector test system has been reactivated, new η track finder boards are in production, and φ track finder boards are under revision. In the CSC track finder, an η asymmetry problem has been corrected. New pT look-up tables have also improved efficiency. RPC patterns were changed from four out of six coincident layers to three out of six in the barrel, which led to a significant increase in efficiency. A new PAC firmware to trigger on heavy stable charged particles allows looking for chamber hit coincidences in two consecutive bunch-crossings. The redesign of the L1 Trigger Emulator...

  8. TRIGGER

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The road map for the final commissioning of the level-1 trigger system has been set. The software for the trigger subsystems is being upgraded to run under CERN Scientific Linux 4 (SLC4). There is also a new release for the Trigger Supervisor (TS 1.4), which implies upgrade work by the subsystems. As reported by the CERN group, a campaign to tidy the Trigger Timing and Control (TTC) racks has begun. The machine interface was upgraded by installing the new RF2TTC module, which receives RF signals from LHC Point 4. Two Beam Synchronous Timing (BST) signals, one for each beam, can now be received in CMS. The machine group will define the exact format of the information content shortly. The margin on the locking range of the CMS QPLL is planned for study for different subsystems in the next Global Runs, using a function generator. The TTC software has been successfully tested on SLC4. Some TTC subsystems have already been upgraded to SLC4. The TTCci Trigger Supervisor ...

  9. TRIGGER

    W. Smith from contributions of C. Leonidopoulos, I. Mikulec, J. Varela and C. Wulz.

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Over the past few months, the Level-1 trigger has successfully recorded data with cosmic rays over long continuous stretches as well as LHC splash events, beam halo, and collision events. The L1 trigger hardware, firmware, synchronization, performance and readiness for beam operation were reviewed in October. All L1 trigger hardware is now installed at Point 5, and most of it is completely commissioned. While the barrel ECAL Trigger Concentrator Cards are fully operational, the recently delivered endcap ECAL TCC system is still being commissioned. For most systems there is a sufficient number of spares available, but for a few systems additional reserve modules are needed. It was decided to increase the overall L1 latency by three bunch crossings to increase the safety margin for trigger timing adjustments. In order for CMS to continue data taking during LHC frequency ramps, the clock distribution tree needs to be reset. The procedures for this have been tested. A repl...

  10. TRIGGER

    W. Smith, from contributions of D. Acosta

    2012-01-01

      The L1 Trigger group deployed several major improvements this year. Compared to 2011, the single-muon trigger rate has been reduced by a factor of 2 and the η coverage has been restored to 2.4, with high efficiency. During the current technical stop, a higher jet seed threshold will be applied in the Global Calorimeter Trigger in order to significantly reduce the strong pile-up dependence of the HT and multi-jet triggers. The currently deployed L1 menu, with the “6E33” prescales, has a total rate of less than 100 kHz and operates with detector readout dead time of less than 3% for luminosities up to 6.5 × 1033 cm–2s–1. Further prescale sets have been created for 7 and 8 × 1033 cm–2s–1 luminosities. The L1 DPG is evaluating the performance of the Trigger for upcoming conferences and publication. Progress on the Trigger upgrade was reviewed during the May Upgrade Week. We are investigating scenarios for stagin...

  11. TRIGGER

    R. Arcidiacono

    2013-01-01

      In 2013 the Trigger Studies Group (TSG) has been restructured in three sub-groups: STEAM, for the development of new HLT menus and monitoring their performance; STORM, for the development of HLT tools, code and actual configurations; and FOG, responsible for the online operations of the High Level Trigger. The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for Trigger Menu development, path timing, trigger performance studies coordination, HLT offline DQM as well as HLT release, menu and conditions validation – in collaboration and with the technical support of the PdmV group. Since the end of proton-proton data taking, the group has started preparing for 2015 data taking, with collisions at 13 TeV and 25 ns bunch spacing. The reliability of the extrapolation to higher energy is being evaluated comparing the trigger rates on 7 and 8 TeV Monte Carlo samples with the data taken in the past two years. The effect of 25 ns bunch spacing is being studied on the d...

  12. Contributions of myofascial pain in diagnosis and treatment of shoulder pain. A randomized control trial

    Gaspar-Calvo Elena

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotator cuff tendinopathy and subacromial impingement syndrome present complex patomechanical situations, frequent difficulties in clinical diagnosis and lack of effectiveness in treatment. Based on clinical experience, we have therefore considered the existence of another pathological entity as the possible origin of pain and dysfunction. The hypothesis of this study is to relate subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS with myofascial pain syndrome (MPS, since myofascial trigger points (MTrPs cause pain, functional limitation, lack of coordination and alterations in quality of movement, even prior to a tendinopathy. MTrPs can coexist with any degenerative subacromial condition. If they are not taken into consideration, they could perpetuate and aggravate the problem, hindering diagnosis and making the applied treatments ineffective. The aims and methods of this study are related with providing evidence of the relationship that may exist between this condition and MPS in the diagnosis and treatment of rotator cuff tendonitis and/or SIS. Method/design A descriptive transversal study will be made to find the correlation between the diagnosis of SIS and rotator cuff tendonitis, positive provocation test responses, the existence of active MTrPs and the results obtained with ultrasonography (US and Magnetic Renonance Imaging (MRI. A randomized double blinded clinical trial will be carried out in experimental conditions: A Protocolized treatment based on active and passive joint repositioning, stabilization exercises, stretching of the periarticular shoulder muscles and postural reeducation. B. The previously described protocolized treatment, with the addition of dry needling applied to active MTrPs with the purpose of isolating the efficacy of dry needling in treatment. Discussion This study aims to provide a new vision of shoulder pain, from the perspective of MPS. This syndrome can, by itself, account for shoulder pain and

  13. TRIGGER

    by Wesley Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software After the winter shutdown minor hardware problems in several subsystems appeared and were corrected. A reassessment of the overall latency has been made. In the TTC system shorter cables between TTCci and TTCex have been installed, which saved one bunch crossing, but which may have required an adjustment of the RPC timing. In order to tackle Pixel out-of-syncs without influencing other subsystems, a special hardware/firmware re-sync protocol has been introduced in the Global Trigger. The link between the Global Calorimeter Trigger and the Global Trigger with the new optical Global Trigger Interface and optical receiver daughterboards has been successfully tested in the Electronics Integration Centre in building 904. New firmware in the GCT now allows a setting to remove the HF towers from energy sums. The HF sleeves have been replaced, which should lead to reduced rates of anomalous signals, which may allow their inclusion after this is validated. For ECAL, improvements i...

  14. TRIGGER

    J. Alimena

    2013-01-01

    Trigger Strategy Group The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for the development of future High-Level Trigger menus, as well as of its DQM and validation, in collaboration and with the technical support of the PdmV group. Taking into account the beam energy and luminosity expected in 2015, a rough estimate of the trigger rates indicates a factor four increase with respect to 2012 conditions. Assuming that a factor two can be tolerated thanks to the increase in offline storage and processing capabilities, a toy menu has been developed using the new OpenHLT workflow to estimate the transverse energy/momentum thresholds that would halve the current trigger rates. The CPU time needed to run the HLT has been compared between data taken with 25 ns and 50 ns bunch spacing, for equivalent pile-up: no significant difference was observed on the global time per event distribution at the only available data point, corresponding to a pile-up of about 10 interactions. Using th...

  15. TRIGGER

    W. Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Overall the L1 trigger hardware has been running very smoothly during the last months of proton running. Modifications for the heavy-ion run have been made where necessary. The maximal design rate of 100 kHz can be sustained without problems. All L1 latencies have been rechecked. The recently installed Forward Scintillating Counters (FSC) are being used in the heavy ion run. The ZDC scintillators have been dismantled, but the calorimeter itself remains. We now send the L1 accept signal and other control signals to TOTEM. Trigger cables from TOTEM to CMS will be installed during the Christmas shutdown, so that the TOTEM data can be fully integrated within the CMS readout. New beam gas triggers have been developed, since the BSC-based trigger is no longer usable at high luminosities. In particular, a special BPTX signal is used after a quiet period with no collisions. There is an ongoing campaign to provide enough spare modules for the different subsystems. For example...

  16. TRIGGER

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware The CERN group is working on the TTC system. Seven out of nine sub-detector TTC VME crates with all fibers cabled are installed in USC55. 17 Local Trigger Controller (LTC) boards have been received from production and are in the process of being tested. The RF2TTC module replacing the TTCmi machine interface has been delivered and will replace the TTCci module used to mimic the LHC clock. 11 out of 12 crates housing the barrel ECAL off-detector electronics have been installed in USC55 after commissioning at the Electronics Integration Centre in building 904. The cabling to the Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) is terminated. The Lisbon group has completed the Synchronization and Link mezzanine board (SLB) production. The Palaiseau group has fully tested and installed 33 out of 40 Trigger Concentrator Cards (TCC). The seven remaining boards are being remade. The barrel TCC boards have been tested at the H4 test beam, and good agreement with emulator predictions were found. The cons...

  17. A critical overview of the current myofascial pain literature - October 2015.

    Dommerholt, Jan; Grieve, Rob; Hooks, Todd; Layton, Michelle

    2015-10-01

    The number of publications about myofascial pain and trigger points (TrP) seems to increase every year. In the current overview we include 27 articles published in past months. The Basic Review section includes articles about the presence and characteristics of TrPs in various neck and shoulder muscles, the correlation between referred pain from active TrPs and knee osteoarthritis, and an anatomical study exploring whether the location of TrPs may be related to the nerve innervation of muscles. Zuil-Escobar and colleagues from Spain considered the intra-rater reliability of the identification of latent TrPs in several leg muscles and the possible correlation of TrP and the presence of a lower medial longitudinal arch. In the section on manual approaches, contributing author Rob Grieve and colleagues continue their studies of TrPs in the lower extremity muscles, while Méndez-Rebolledo and colleagues studied the impact of cross taping and compression. Dry needling (DN) continues to be a topic of interest. We included twelve papers addressing a wide range of topics, such as the effectiveness and safety of DN, and the impact of DN on proprioception, spasticity, and fibromyalgia. Two papers investigated the utilization of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and laser on TrPs, The final section on other clinical studies and reviews includes 8 papers. The studies originated in thirteen different countries with Spain leading the charts with 7 contributions to the literature, followed by Brazil with four. As we have mentioned in previous editions of this literature overview, many studies suffer from very small sample sizes, which makes it difficult to reach definitive conclusions. Nevertheless, myofascial pain continues to be a topic of interest to researchers and clinicians around the globe. PMID:26592232

  18. Probable Mechanisms of Needling Therapies for Myofascial Pain Control

    Li-Wei Chou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS has been defined as a regional pain syndrome characterized by muscle pain caused by myofascial trigger points (MTrPs clinically. MTrP is defined as the hyperirritable spot in a palpable taut band of skeletal muscle fibers. Appropriate treatment to MTrPs can effectively relieve the clinical pain of MPS. Needling therapies, such as MTrP injection, dry needling, or acupuncture (AcP can effectively eliminate pain immediately. AcP is probably the first reported technique in treating MPS patients with dry needling based on the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM theory. The possible mechanism of AcP analgesia were studied and published in recent decades. The analgesic effect of AcP is hypothesized to be related to immune, hormonal, and nervous systems. Compared to slow-acting hormonal system, nervous system acts in a faster manner. Given these complexities, AcP analgesia cannot be explained by any single mechanism. There are several principles for selection of acupoints based on the TCM principles: “Ah-Shi” point, proximal or remote acupoints on the meridian, and extra-meridian acupoints. Correlations between acupoints and MTrPs are discussed. Some clinical and animal studies of remote AcP for MTrPs and the possible mechanisms of remote effectiveness are reviewed and discussed.

  19. Botulinum Toxin for the Treatment of Myofascial Pain Syndromes Involving the Neck and Back: A Review from a Clinical Perspective

    José M. Climent

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Botulinum toxin inhibits acetylcholine (ACh release and probably blocks some nociceptive neurotransmitters. It has been suggested that the development of myofascial trigger points (MTrP is related to an excess release of ACh to increase the number of sensitized nociceptors. Although the use of botulinum toxin to treat myofascial pain syndrome (MPS has been investigated in many clinical trials, the results are contradictory. The objective of this paper is to identify sources of variability that could explain these differences in the results. Material and Methods. We performed a content analysis of the clinical trials and systematic reviews of MPS. Results and Discussion. Sources of differences in studies were found in the diagnostic and selection criteria, the muscles injected, the injection technique, the number of trigger points injected, the dosage of botulinum toxin used, treatments for control group, outcome measures, and duration of followup. The contradictory results regarding the efficacy of botulinum toxin A in MPS associated with neck and back pain do not allow this treatment to be recommended or rejected. There is evidence that botulinum toxin could be useful in specific myofascial regions such as piriformis syndrome. It could also be useful in patients with refractory MPS that has not responded to other myofascial injection therapies.

  20. Short-Term Effects of Kinesio Taping and Cross Taping Application in the Treatment of Latent Upper Trapezius Trigger Points: A Prospective, Single-Blind, Randomized, Sham-Controlled Trial

    Halski, Tomasz; Ptaszkowski, Kuba; Słupska, Lucyna; Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata; Dymarek, Robert; Taradaj, Jakub; Bidzińska, Gabriela; Marczyński, Daniel; Cynarska, Aleksandra; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Kinesio taping (KT) may be a new treatment in patients with myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). A new method available for taping practitioners is cross taping (CT). The main objective was to determine how CT, KT, and medical adhesive tape (sham group) affect the subjective assessment of resting bioelectrical activity and pain of the upper trapezius muscle (UT) in patients with MTrPs. 105 volunteers were recruited to participate. The primary outcome was resting bioelectrical activity of UT mus...

  1. A critical overview of the current myofascial pain literature - January 2016.

    Dommerholt, Jan; Finnegan, Michelle; Grieve, Rob; Hooks, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Reflecting on the past year, the number of publications on myofascial pain continues to increase in a steady rate. The current review includes 30 basic and clinical studies, case reports, reviews, and reports from fifteen different countries about trigger points (TrP), myofascial pain (MP), dry needling (DN) and other related interventions. We are pleased that during 2015 this article made the top 15 of most downloaded articles as many as three times! In general, the quality of published papers is improving as well. Nevertheless, several papers included in this overview, mention the application of "ischemic compression", which is a questionable concept in the context of TrP inactivation. As we have outlined previously, in the current thinking about myofascial pain, TrPs feature significant hypoxia and a lowered pH (Ballyns et al., 2011; Shah and Gilliams, 2008), and attempts to induce more ischemia would be counterproductive. Already in 1999, Simons, Travell and Simons changed the terminology from ischemic compression to TrP compression (Simons et al., 1999) and we recommend that contemporary researchers and clinicians adopt the new terminology and stop using the term "ischemic compression." PMID:26891651

  2. Can myofascial techniques modify immunological parameters?

    Fern??ndez-P??rez, Antonio Manuel; Peralta-Ram??rez, Mar??a Isabel; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen; Pilat, Andrzej; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel; Villaverde-Guti??rrez, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The objective was to determine the effect of myofascial techniques on the modulation of immunological variables. Design: Thirty-nine healthy male volunteers were randomly assigned to an experimental or control group. Interventions: The experimental group underwent three manual therapy modalities: suboccipital muscle release, so-called fourth intracranial ventricle compression, and deep cervical fascia release. The control group remained in a resting position for the sa...

  3. Cinobufagin Modulates Human Innate Immune Responses and Triggers Antibacterial Activity.

    Xie, Shanshan; Spelmink, Laura; Codemo, Mario; Subramanian, Karthik; Pütsep, Katrin; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Olliver, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The traditional Chinese medicine Chan-Su is widely used for treatment of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, but also as a remedy for infections such as furunculosis, tonsillitis and acute pharyngitis. The clinical use of Chan-Su suggests that it has anti-infective effects, however, the mechanism of action is incompletely understood. In particular, the effect on the human immune system is poorly defined. Here, we describe previously unrecognized immunomodulatory activities of cinobufagin (CBG), a major bioactive component of Chan-Su. Using human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), we show that LPS-induced maturation and production of a number of cytokines was potently inhibited by CBG, which also had a pro-apoptotic effect, associated with activation of caspase-3. Interestingly, CBG triggered caspase-1 activation and significantly enhanced IL-1β production in LPS-stimulated cells. Finally, we demonstrate that CBG upregulates gene expression of the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) hBD-2 and hBD-3 in DCs, and induces secretion of HNP1-3 and hCAP-18/LL-37 from neutrophils, potentiating neutrophil antibacterial activity. Taken together, our data indicate that CBG modulates the inflammatory phenotype of DCs in response to LPS, and triggers an antibacterial innate immune response, thus proposing possible mechanisms for the clinical effects of Chan-Su in anti-infective therapy. PMID:27529866

  4. Macrophagic myofasciitis in childhood: a controversial entity.

    Rivas, Eloy; Gómez-Arnáiz, Mercedes; Ricoy, Jose R; Mateos, Fernando; Simón, Rogelio; García-Peñas, Juan J; Garcia-Silva, Maria T; Martín, Elena; Vázquez, María; Ferreiro, Ana; Cabello, Ana

    2005-11-01

    Macrophagic myofasciitis is an unusual inflammatory myopathy, which has been almost exclusively reported in French adults with diffuse arthromyalgias and asthenia. It is characterized by an infiltrate of densely packed macrophages, with granular periodic-acid-Schiff positive content, on muscle biopsies at the site of vaccination. The presence of aluminum inclusions in these macrophages points to an inappropriate reaction to aluminum used as an adjuvant in some vaccines. Although in adults this entity is well defined, less than 15 cases have been reported in children. This study describes seven children, younger than 3 years of age, with typical lesions of macrophagic myofasciitis on quadriceps muscle biopsy. In five cases, biopsies were performed to exclude mitochondrial pathology. All the children developed hypotonia and motor or psychomotor delay, associated with others symptoms. Abnormal neuroimaging was evident in six cases. Spectrometry studies detected elevated levels of aluminum in muscle in three of four cases tested. Despite the wide use of vaccines in childhood, macrophagic myofasciitis was rarely observed in children and its characteristic histologic pattern could not be correlated with a distinctive clinical syndrome. PMID:16243223

  5. DRY NEEDLING AS A PAIN MODULATING MODALITY IN MYOFASCIAL PAIN SYNDROME

    Ravinder Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS is a significant health problem affecting as much as 85% of the general population, sometime in their lifetime, while the estimated overall prevalence is 46%. Low back pain is the most common MPS affecting all age groups with no gender discrimination. It can be acute or chronic. It can cause localised, diffuse, radicular or referred type of pains. Dry Needling or intramuscular stimulation is a skilled intervention that uses a thin filiform needle to penetrate the skin and stimulate underlying myofascial trigger points, muscular and connective tissues for the management of neuromusculoskeletal pain and movement impairments in Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS. MATERIALS AND METHODS 90 patients (57 male and 33 female who attended the Department of Physio-Occupation Therapy, which is a part of the Department of Orthopaedics, Osmania General Hospital, were randomly chosen after clearance from the Ethical Committee. The study period extended from June 2015 to Jan 2016. They were divided into groups according to their position in Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and their respective scores were noted. Their scores were once again noted after they received the Dry Needling treatment of about 6 sittings. RESULTS Out of the 90 cases, 65 cases showed excellent results (VAS 0-1 after treatment, 18 cases showed good results (VAS 2-3 after treatment, 6 cases showed fair results (VAS 4-5 after treatment, 2 cases showed VAS-6 after treatment. CONCLUSION Dry Needling is a relatively new treatment modality with specific subjective pain modulation efficacy in myofascial pain syndrome, which can help us in alleviating the pain in chronic conditions and acts adjuvant to the specific treatment.

  6. The Effect of Dry Needling on Range of Motion of Neck Lateral Flexion in Subjects With Active Trigger Point in Upper Trapezius Muscle

    Ziaeifar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Myofascial trigger point is one of the most common causes of musculoskeletal disorders. Myofascial trigger point in upper trapezius has been reported as a symptom in patients with neck and upper thoracic pain. Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of dry needling compared with ischemic pressure on trigger point in upper trapezius muscle. Materials and Methods 28 subjects with myofascial trigger point in upper trapezius participated in this study. The subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: dry needling (n = 13 and ischemic pressure (n = 15. The neck lateral flexion range of motion was measured before and after treatment in both groups using a standard goniometer. Paired t-test was used to determine any significant difference in range of motion after treatment sessions compared with pre-treatment score in control and experimental group. Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA was calculated to determine the significance of differences between the control and experimental groups in post-test scores, with pre-treatment scores used as covariates in the analysis. Results Statistical analysis (paired t-test revealed significant increase in neck lateral flexion range of motion in contra-lateral side after treatment sessions in control and experimental group compared with pre-treatment score (P < 0.05. However, only dry needling was effective in increase of range of motion in Ipsi-lateral side (P = 0.001. In the ANCOVA, controlling for pre-test scores, no significant difference was found between the two groups in the after treatment sessions (P = 0.06 and (P = 0.15. Conclusions The application of DN produces an improvement in ILF and CLF can be prescribed for subjects with MTP in UT muscles.

  7. A randomized, placebo-controlled double-blinded comparative clinical study of five over-the-counter non-pharmacological topical analgesics for myofascial pain: single session findings

    Avrahami Daniel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To investigate the effects of topical agents for the treatment of Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS and Myofascial Trigger Point (MTRP. Methods Subjects with an identifiable trigger point in the trapezius muscle, age 18-80 were recruited for a single-session randomized, placebo-blinded clinical study. Baseline measurements of trapezius muscle pressure pain threshold (PPT: by pressure algometer along with right and left cervical lateral flexion (rangiometer were obtained by a blinded examiner. An assessor blinded to the outcomes assessments applied one of 6 topical formulations which had been placed in identical plastic containers. Five of these topicals were proposed active formulations; the control group was given a non-active formulation (PLA. Five minutes after the application of the formula the outcome measures were re-tested. Data were analyzed with a 5-way ANOVA and Holms-adjusted t-tests with an alpha level of 0.05. Results 120 subjects were entered into the study (63 females; ages 16-82; 20 subjects randomly allocated into each group. The pre- and post-treatment results for pressure threshold did show significant intra-group increases for the Ben-Gay Ultra Strength Muscle Pain Ointment (BG, the Professional Therapy MuscleCare Roll-on (PTMC roll-on and Motion Medicine Cream (MM with an increased threshold of 0.5 kg/cm2 (+/-0.15, 0.72 kg/cm2 (+/-0.17 and 0.47 Kg/cm2 (+/-0.19 respectively. With respect to the inter-group comparisons, PTMC roll-on showed significant increases in pressure threshold compared with Placebo (PLA (p = 0.002 and Icy Hot Extra Strength Cream (IH (p = 0.006. In addition, BG demonstrated significant increases in pressure threshold compared with PLA (p = 0.0003. Conclusions With regards to pressure threshold, PTMC roll-on, BG and MM showed significant increases in pain threshold tolerance after a short-term application on a trigger points located in the trapezius muscle. PTMC roll-on and BG were both

  8. Sunspot Waves and Triggering of Homologous Active Region Jets

    Chandra, Ramesh; Mulay, Sargam; Tripathi, Durgesh

    2014-01-01

    We present and discuss multi-wavelength observations of five homologous recurrent solar jets that occurred in active region NOAA 11133 on 11 December, 2010. These jets were well observed by the Solar Dynamic observatory (SDO) with high spatial and temporal resolution. The speed of the jets ranged between 86 and 267 km/s. A type III radio burst was observed in association with all the five jets. The investigation of the over all evolution of magnetic field in the source regions suggested that the flux was continuously emerging on longer term. However, all the jets but J5 were triggered during a local dip in the magnetic flux, suggesting the launch of the jets during localised submergence of magnetic flux. Additionally, using the PFSS modelling of the photospheric magnetic field, we found that all the jets were ejected in the direction of open field lines. We also traced sunspot oscillations from the sunspot interior to foot-point of jets and found presence of ~ 3 minute oscillations in all the SDO/AIA passband...

  9. Cellular Mechanisms of Calcium-Mediated Triggered Activity

    Song, Zhen

    Life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias continue to pose a major health problem. Ventricular fibrillation, which is a complex form of electrical wave turbulence in the lower chambers of the heart, stops the heart from pumping and is the largest cause of natural death in the United States. Atrial fibrillation, a related form of wave turbulence in the upper heart chambers, is in turn the most common arrhythmia diagnosed in clinical practice. Despite extensive research to date, mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias remain poorly understood. It is well established that both spatial disorder of the refractory period of heart cells and triggered activity (TA) jointly contribute to the initiation and maintenance of arrhythmias. TA broadly refers to the abnormal generation of a single or a sequence of abnormal excitation waves from a small submillimeter region of the heart in the interval of time between two normal waves generated by the heart's natural pacemaker (the sinoatrial node). TA has been widely investigated experimentally and occurs in several pathological conditions where the intracellular concentration of free Ca2+ ions in heart cells becomes elevated. Under such conditions, Ca2+ can be spontaneously released from intracellular stores, thereby driving an electrogenic current that exchanges 3Na+ ions for one Ca2+ ion across the cell membrane. This current in turn depolarizes the membrane of heart cells after a normal excitation. If this calcium-mediated "delayed after depolarization'' (DAD) is sufficiently large, it can generate an action potential. While the arrhythmogenic importance of spontaneous Ca2+ release and DADs is well appreciated, the conditions under which they occur in heart pathologies remain poorly understood. Calcium overload is only one factor among several other factors that can promote DADs, including sympathetic nerve stimulation, different expression levels of membrane ion channels and calcium handling proteins, and different mutations of those

  10. Treatment of myofascial pain syndrome with lidocaine injection and physical therapy, alone or in combination: a single blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial

    Lugo, Luz Helena; García, Hector Ivan; Rogers, Heather L.; Plata, Jesús Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) of the shoulder girdle and cervical region is a common musculoskeletal problem that is often chronic or recurrent. Physical therapy (PT) and lidocaine injections (LI) are two treatments with demonstrated effectiveness compared to a control group, however little is known about their combined value. The objective of this study was to determine whether LI into trigger points combined with a PT program would be more effective than each separate treatment ...

  11. A New Algorithm to Detect the Non-Termination of Triggers in Active Databases

    Dr. R.Manicka chezian

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Active Databases are a combination of traditional static databases and active rules, meant to be automated mechanisms to maintain integrity and facilitate in providing database functionalities. Active database systems can react to the occurrence of some predefined events automatically. In many applications, active rules or triggers may interact in complex and sometimes unpredictable ways, thus possibly yielding infinite rule executions by triggering each other indefinitely causing nontermination. The termination of active rules is an unpredictable problem, except when rule languages with very limited number of rules are used. This paper presents new algorithms for detecting termination / non-termination of rule execution using triggering graph and complex triggering graph, and these algorithms do not pose any limitation on the number of rules.

  12. A critical overview of the current myofascial pain literature - July 2015.

    Dommerholt, Jan; Hooks, Todd; Grieve, Rob; Layton, Michelle

    2015-07-01

    The current overview includes thirty articles published in the recent past about myofascial pain, trigger points (TrPs) and related topics. In the Basic Research section, several interesting new studies are reviewed addressing the presence of TrPs in patients with low back pain, episodic migraine, or following a meniscectomy. An animal study of the impact of laser fluency opens the door to future studies regarding optimal dosage of low-level laser therapy in the treatment of individuals with TrPs. Six papers focus on TrP dry needling (DN), two on manual therapies, and two on injection therapy. On of the injection papers discusses the occurrence of a cardiac tamponade, which is a very rare potential complication of invasive needling therapies that can easily be avoided with proper needling techniques. Several review studies and other clinical studies conclude this overview. PMID:26118521

  13. Educational course of deep tissue massage and myofascial release techniques for SAMK physiotherapy students

    Kopacz, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the thesis was to create an educational course of Deep Tissue Massage and Myofascial Release Techniques for SAMK physiotherapy students. The theoretical part of the course covers introduction to the notion of Fascia (anatomy, physiology and pathology) together with main principles of Myofascial Release, and familiarizes students with various Myofascial Release methods practised worldwide. The main, practical part of the course is dedicated to learn and develop manual skills in ...

  14. Triggering Sublimation-Driven Activity of Main Belt Comets

    Haghighipour, Nader; Schaefer, Christoph; Speith, Roland; Dvorak, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that the comet-like activity of Main Belt Comets are due to the sublimation of sub-surface water-ice that has been exposed as a result of their surfaces being impacted by m-sized bodies. We have examined the viability of this scenario by simulating impacts between m-sized and km-sized objects using a smooth particle hydrodynamics approach. Simulations have been carried out for different values of the impact velocity and impact angle as well as different target material and water-mass fraction. Results indicate that for the range of impact velocities corresponding to those in the asteroid belt, the depth of an impact crater is slightly larger than 10 m suggesting that if the activation of MBCs is due to the sublimation of sub-surface water-ice, this ice has to exist no deeper than a few meters from the surface. Results also show that ice-exposure occurs in the bottom and on the interior surface of impact craters as well as the surface of the target where some of the ejected icy inclusions...

  15. Evaluation of Women with Myofascial Abdominal Syndrome Based on Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Andréia Mitidieri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study used semiology based on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM to investigate vital energy (Qi behavior in women with abdominal myofascial pain syndrome (AMPS. Methods: Fifty women diagnosed with chronic pelvic pain (CPP secondary to AMPS were evaluated by using a questionnaire based on the theories of “yin-yang,” “zang-fu”, and “five elements”. We assessed the following aspects of the illness: symptomatology; specific location of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs; onset, cause, duration and frequency of symptoms; and patient and family history. The patients tongues, lips, skin colors, and tones of speech were examined. Patients were questioned on various aspects related to breathing, sweating, sleep quality, emotions, and preferences related to color, food, flavors, and weather or seasons. Thirst, gastrointestinal dysfunction, excreta (feces and urine, menstrual cycle, the five senses, and characteristic pain symptoms related to headache, musculoskeletal pain, abdomen, and chest were also investigated. Results: Patients were between 22 and 56 years old, and most were married (78%, possessed a elementary school (66%, and had one or two children (76%. The mean body mass index and body fat were 26.86 kg/ cm2 (range: 17.7 — 39.0 and 32.4% (range: 10.7 — 45.7, respectively. A large majority of women (96% exhibited alterations in the kidney meridian, and 98% had an altered gallbladder meridian. We observed major changes in the kidney and the gallbladder Qi meridians in 76% and 62% of patients, respectively. Five of the twelve meridians analyzed exhibited Qi patterns similar to pelvic innervation Qi and meridians, indicating that the paths of some of these meridians were directly related to innervation of the pelvic floor and abdominal region. Conclusion: The women in this study showed changes in the behavior of the energy meridians, and the paths of some of the meridians were directly related to innervation of the

  16. Activation of protein kinase Ceta triggers cortical granule exocytosis in Xenopus oocytes.

    Gundersen, Cameron B; Kohan, Sirus A; Chen, Qian; Iagnemma, Joseph; Umbach, Joy A

    2002-03-15

    Previous work has shown that phorbol esters or diacylglycerol trigger cortical granule exocytosis in Xenopus oocytes. We sought to identify the isoform(s) of protein kinase C (PKC) that mediate(s) this regulated secretory event. Because this process is initiated by lipid activators of PKC but is independent of calcium ions, we focused on the family of novel (calcium-independent) PKCs. Pharmacological investigations using Gö6976 and Gö6983 tended to exclude PKCdelta, epsilon and mu as secretory triggers. Subcellular fractionation and immunoblot data revealed that these oocytes expressed all five members of the novel PKC family, but it was only PKCeta that colocalized with cortical granules. Finally, expression of wild type or constitutively active forms of PKCdelta and eta strongly supported the conclusion that it is PKCeta that initiates cortical granule exocytosis in these cells. These observations represent an important step in identifying the mechanism of secretory triggering in this system. PMID:11884530

  17. Clinical observation of medical ozone injection in trigger point on psoas myofascial pain syndrom%医用臭氧疼痛触发点注射治疗腰部肌筋膜疼痛综合征临床研究

    王建国; 耿葆梁; 闫洪涛; 张雷; 冯建来; 郜时华; 贾春雨

    2010-01-01

    目的 评价医用臭氧疼痛触发点注射治疗腰部肌筋膜疼痛综合征(Myofascial Pain Syndrom,MPS)的效果与安全性.方法 采用前瞻性随机对照的研究方法,将78例患者随机分为两组,臭氧治疗组应用低浓度医用臭氧,常规治疗组应用利多卡因+维生素B6+甲钴胺和地塞米松棕榈酸酯,均行疼痛触发点漫润注射.治疗2周后采用视觉模拟评分(Visual Analogue Scale,VAS)和日本骨科学会下腰痛评估量表(Low Lumbar Pain Scales,LLPS)对照评价两组疗效.结果 治疗前后比较,两组VAS评分分别从6.2±1.7降至1.1±0.8和从5.6±1.2降至2.3±1.1(均P<0.05),LLPS明显改善(均P<0.01);两组比较,臭氧组VAS评分降低幅值显著大于对照组(P<0.05),优良率明显高于对照组(89.74%比71.79%,P<0.05);LLPS改善程度明显优干对照组(均P<0.05);不良反应明显少于对照组.结论 医用臭氧疼痛触发点注射治疗腰部MPS与常规麻醉剂加激素封闭同样有效,优良率更高,安全性较高,未见明显不良反应.

  18. The twilight zone: ambient light levels trigger activity in primitive ants

    Narendra, Ajay; Reid, Samuel F.; Hemmi, Jan M.

    2010-01-01

    Many animals become active during twilight, a narrow time window where the properties of the visual environment are dramatically different from both day and night. Despite the fact that many animals including mammals, reptiles, birds and insects become active in this specific temporal niche, we do not know what cues trigger this activity. To identify the onset of specific temporal niches, animals could anticipate the timing of regular events or directly measure environmental variables. We sho...

  19. Intramuscular Hemangioma Mimicking Myofascial Pain Syndrome : A Case Report

    Kim, Dong Hwee; Hwang, Miriam; Kang, Yoon Kyoo; Kim, In Jong; Park, Yoon Kun

    2007-01-01

    Intramuscular hemangioma, an infrequent but important cause of musculoskeletal pain, is often difficult to establish the diagnosis clinically. This report describes a case of a 32-yr-old woman who presented with severe left calf pain for 10 yr. Initial conservative treatments consisting of intramuscular electrical stimulation, herb medication, acupuncture, and intramuscular lidocaine injection under the diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome in other facilities, failed to alleviate the symptom...

  20. Atypical presentation of macrophagic myofasciitis 10 years post vaccination.

    Ryan, Aisling M

    2012-02-03

    Macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF) is an uncommon inflammatory disorder of muscle believed to be due to persistence of vaccine-derived aluminium hydroxide at the site of injection. The condition is characterised by diffuse myalgias, arthralgia and fatigue. We describe a patient with histologically confirmed MMF whose presentation was atypical with left chest and upper limb pain beginning more than 10 years post vaccination. Treatment with steroids led to symptomatic improvement. Although rare, clinicians should consider MMF in cases of atypical myalgia.

  1. TRIGGERED ACTIVITY AS ARRHYTHMOGENIC MECHANISM AFTER MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION - CLINICAL AND ELECTROPHYSIOLOGIC STUDY OF ONE CASE

    WIESFELD, ACP; CRIJNS, HJGM; VANVELDHUISEN, DJ; VANGILST, WH; LIE, KI

    1992-01-01

    In a woman with an old infarction and sustained ventricular tachycardia, tachycardias were only inducible after short-long RR sequences. After isoprenaline, tachycardias became incessant and all were preceded by short-long RR sequences. This strongly suggests that triggered activity plays a role in

  2. Constraining AGN triggering mechanisms through the clustering analysis of active black holes

    Gatti, M; Bouillot, V; Menci, N; Lamastra, A; Hirschmann, M; Fiore, F

    2015-01-01

    The triggering mechanisms for Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are still debated. Some of the most popular ones include galaxy interactions (IT) and disk instabilities (DI). Using an advanced semi analytic model (SAM) of galaxy formation, coupled to accurate halo occupation distribution modeling, we investigate the imprint left by each separate triggering process on the clustering strength of AGN at small and large scales. Our main results are as follows: i) DIs, irrespective of their exact implementation in the SAM, tend to fall short in triggering AGN activity in galaxies at the center of halos with $M_h>10^{13.5} h^{-1}M_{\\odot}$. On the contrary, the IT scenario predicts abundance of active, central galaxies that generally agrees well with observations at every halo mass. ii) The relative number of satellite AGN in DIs at intermediate-to-low luminosities is always significantly higher than in IT models, especially in groups and clusters. The low AGN satellite fraction predicted for the IT scenario might sugge...

  3. Augmented supraorbital skin sympathetic nerve activity responses to symptom trigger events in rosacea patients.

    Metzler-Wilson, Kristen; Toma, Kumika; Sammons, Dawn L; Mann, Sarah; Jurovcik, Andrew J; Demidova, Olga; Wilson, Thad E

    2015-09-01

    Facial flushing in rosacea is often induced by trigger events. However, trigger causation mechanisms are currently unclear. This study tested the central hypothesis that rosacea causes sympathetic and axon reflex-mediated alterations resulting in trigger-induced symptomatology. Twenty rosacea patients and age/sex-matched controls participated in one or a combination of symptom triggering stressors. In protocol 1, forehead skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA; supraorbital microneurography) was measured during sympathoexcitatory mental (2-min serial subtraction of novel numbers) and physical (2-min isometric handgrip) stress. In protocol 2, forehead skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) and transepithelial water loss/sweat rate (capacitance hygrometry) were measured during sympathoexcitatory heat stress (whole body heating by perfusing 50°C water through a tube-lined suit). In protocol 3, cheek, forehead, forearm, and palm skin blood flow were measured during nonpainful local heating to induce axon reflex vasodilation. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded via finger photoplethysmography to calculate cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; flux·100/MAP). Higher patient transepithelial water loss was observed (rosacea 0.20 ± 0.02 vs. control 0.10 ± 0.01 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1), P MAP changes were not different between groups during sympathoexcitatory stressors or local heating. SSNA during early mental (32 ± 9 and 9 ± 4% increase) and physical (25 ± 4 and 5 ± 1% increase, rosacea and controls, respectively) stress was augmented in rosacea (both P < 0.05). Heat stress induced more rapid sweating and cutaneous vasodilation onset in rosacea compared with controls. No axon reflex vasodilation differences were observed between groups. These data indicate that rosacea affects SSNA and that hyperresponsiveness to trigger events appears to have a sympathetic component. PMID:26133800

  4. Constraining AGN triggering mechanisms through the clustering analysis of active black holes

    Gatti, M.; Shankar, F.; Bouillot, V.; Menci, N.; Lamastra, A.; Hirschmann, M.; Fiore, F.

    2016-02-01

    The triggering mechanisms for active galactic nuclei (AGN) are still debated. Some of the most popular ones include galaxy interactions (IT) and disc instabilities (DIs). Using an advanced semi-analytic model (SAM) of galaxy formation, coupled to accurate halo occupation distribution modelling, we investigate the imprint left by each separate triggering process on the clustering strength of AGN at small and large scales. Our main results are as follows: (i) DIs, irrespective of their exact implementation in the SAM, tend to fall short in triggering AGN activity in galaxies at the centre of haloes with Mh > 1013.5 h-1 M⊙. On the contrary, the IT scenario predicts abundance of active central galaxies that generally agrees well with observations at every halo mass. (ii) The relative number of satellite AGN in DIs at intermediate-to-low luminosities is always significantly higher than in IT models, especially in groups and clusters. The low AGN satellite fraction predicted for the IT scenario might suggest that different feeding modes could simultaneously contribute to the triggering of satellite AGN. (iii) Both scenarios are quite degenerate in matching large-scale clustering measurements, suggesting that the sole average bias might not be an effective observational constraint. (iv) Our analysis suggests the presence of both a mild luminosity and a more consistent redshift dependence in the AGN clustering, with AGN inhabiting progressively less massive dark matter haloes as the redshift increases. We also discuss the impact of different observational selection cuts in measuring AGN clustering, including possible discrepancies between optical and X-ray surveys.

  5. Magnetic Systems Triggering the M6.6-class Solar Flare in NOAA Active Region 11158

    Toriumi, Shin; Bamba, Yumi; Kusano, Kanya; Imada, Shinsuke; Inoue, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    We report a detailed event analysis on the M6.6-class flare in the active region (AR) NOAA 11158 on 2011 February 13. AR 11158, which consisted of two major emerging bipoles, showed prominent activities including one X- and several M-class flares. In order to investigate the magnetic structures related to the M6.6 event, particularly the formation process of a flare-triggering magnetic region, we analyzed multiple spacecraft observations and numerical results of a flare simulation. We observed that, in the center of this quadrupolar AR, a highly sheared polarity inversion line (PIL) was formed through proper motions of the major magnetic elements, which built a sheared coronal arcade lying over the PIL. The observations lend support to the interpretation that the target flare was triggered by a localized magnetic region that had an intrusive structure, namely a positive polarity penetrating into a negative counterpart. The geometrical relationship between the sheared coronal arcade and the triggering region w...

  6. Análise da atividade eletromiográfica de superfície de pontos gatilhos miofasciais Surface electromyography activity analysis of the miofascial triggers points

    Aline Bigongiari

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Os pontos gatilhos miofasciais (PGMs são manifestações comumente encontradas na prática clínica e estão relacionados à alteração de tônus e à síndrome dolorosa miofascial (SDM. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a capacidade da EMG de superfície e detectar alterações da atividade neuromuscular no PGM, em situações de repouso e de contração isométrica voluntária máxima. MÉTODO: Participaram do estudo 56 indivíduos distribuídos em dois grupos: grupo Saudável com 28 indivíduos, que necessariamente não possuíam PGM, e o grupo Dor, constituído de 28 indivíduos que possuíam necessariamente PGM no músculo escolhido. O grupo Dor apresentava indivíduos com PGM latente e ativo, e com e sem fenômenos autonômicos (FA. RESULTADOS: O sinal EMG da porção muscular com PGM mostrou-se significativamente maior quando comparado com a porção muscular sadia do grupo Dor, e do grupo Saudável durante o repouso (26,56 ± 44,54, 5,39 ± 6,29 e 1,56 ± 0,76, respectivamente, p = 0,0001. Os indivíduos com PGM ativo obtiveram maior intensidade do sinal EMG do que aqueles que apresentaram PGM latente (17,85 ± 30,25 versus 3,74 ± 1,52, p = 0,04. Além disso, os indivíduos que apresentaram fenômenos autonômicos tiveram maior intensidade do sinal EMG do que aqueles que não os apresentaram (16,78 ± 28,44 versus 3,51 ± 3,65, na condição de repouso. CONLUSÃO: A EMG de superfície é capaz de mensurar a atividade do PGM, principalmente na condição de repouso.There are examples of common clinical conditions that clinical signals are related to alterations in muscle tone, including myofascial pain syndrome. OBJECTIVE: to discuss the application of surface EMG to detect effect of miofascial trigger point (MTP on neuromuscular activity at rest and maximum voluntary contraction of the trapezoid muscle. METHODS: Fifty-six subjects participated in the study and were divided into two groups: Healthy group (n = 28, with subjects who necessarily did not

  7. Effect of occlusal splints for the management of patients with myofascial pain: a randomized, controlled, double-blind study

    ZHANG Fei-yu; WANG Xiao-geng; DONG Jian; ZHANG Jie-fu; L(U) Ya-lin

    2013-01-01

    Background Occlusal splints have been the preferred modalities in the management of myofascial temporomandibular disorders (TMDs),but now controversy exists in reporting whether they are successful for TMDs treatments.The aim of this study was to give objective evidence to the assessment of treatment effect of occlusal splints for myofascial TMDs patients by clinical assessments and surface electromyography (sEMG) measurements of masseter muscles (MM).Methods Thirty-six patients (12 males and 24 females) aged 16-57 (38±11) years participated in the study.All participants diagnosed with myofascial TMD were randomized into two groups (18 of each).Patients in the first group (A) were treated with occlusal splints for 1 month,while patients in the second group (B) were treated with placebo (non-occluding palatal) splints.Clinical assessments were performed at the beginning of the study and 1 month after treatment.sEMG measurements for MM were performed at mandibular postural position (MPP) and maximum intercuspal contacted position (ICP) 1 month after the treatment.The root mean square (RMS) and the median frequency (MF) as linear indices of sEMG data were used to demonstrate muscle activity and muscle fatigue.Data were analyzed by ANOVA and post hoc SNK test.The differences were considered significant at P <0.05.Results It was found that 89% of group A either completely recovered (39%) or clinically improved (50%),while only 22% of group B had a spontaneous improvement.sEMG analysis showed that at MPP,the mean of RMS value of MM in group A was lower than that of group B,which shows statistical differences (P <0.01).At ICP,the RMS value of MM in group A was higher than that of group B,which shows statistical differences (P <0.01).At MPP,MF value of MM in group A was higher than that of group B (P <0.05).At ICP,MF value of MM was lower than that of group B (P <0.01).Conclusions Occlusal splint could eliminate or improve the signs and symptoms of TMD

  8. Headaches and myofascial temporomandibular disorders: overlapping entities, separate managements?

    Conti, P C R; Costa, Y M; Gonçalves, D A; Svensson, P

    2016-09-01

    There are relevant clinical overlaps between some of the painful temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and headache conditions that may hamper the diagnostic process and treatment. A non-systematic search for studies on the relationship between TMD and headaches was carried out in the following databases: PubMed, Cochrane Library and Embase. Important pain mechanisms contributing to the close association and complex relationship between TMD and headache disorders are as follows: processes of peripheral and central sensitisation which take place in similar anatomical areas, the possible impairment of the descending modulatory pain pathways and the processes of referred pain. In addition, the clinical examination does not always provide distinguishing information to differentiate between headaches and TMD. So, considering the pathophysiology and the clinical presentation of some types of headache and myofascial TMD, such overlap can be considered not only a matter of comorbid relationship, but rather a question of disorders where the distinction lines are sometimes hard to identify. These concerns are certainly reflected in the current classification systems of both TMD and headache where the clinical consequences of diagnosis such as headache attributed to or associated with TMD are uncertain. There are several similarities in terms of therapeutic strategies used to manage myofascial TMD and headaches. Considering all these possible levels of interaction, we reinforce the recommendation for multidisciplinary approaches, by a team of oro-facial pain specialists and a neurologist (headache specialist), to attain the most precise differential diagnosis and initiate the best and most efficient treatment. PMID:27191928

  9. The twilight zone: ambient light levels trigger activity in primitive ants.

    Narendra, Ajay; Reid, Samuel F; Hemmi, Jan M

    2010-05-22

    Many animals become active during twilight, a narrow time window where the properties of the visual environment are dramatically different from both day and night. Despite the fact that many animals including mammals, reptiles, birds and insects become active in this specific temporal niche, we do not know what cues trigger this activity. To identify the onset of specific temporal niches, animals could anticipate the timing of regular events or directly measure environmental variables. We show that the Australian bull ant, Myrmecia pyriformis, starts foraging only during evening twilight throughout the year. The onset occurs neither at a specific temperature nor at a specific time relative to sunset, but at a specific ambient light intensity. Foraging onset occurs later when light intensities at sunset are brighter than normal or earlier when light intensities at sunset are darker than normal. By modifying ambient light intensity experimentally, we provide clear evidence that ants indeed measure light levels and do not rely on an internal rhythm to begin foraging. We suggest that the reason for restricting the foraging onset to twilight and measuring light intensity to trigger activity is to optimize the trade-off between predation risk and ease of navigation. PMID:20129978

  10. Active microwave pulse compressor using an electron-beam triggered switch.

    Ivanov, O A; Lobaev, M A; Vikharev, A L; Gorbachev, A M; Isaev, V A; Hirshfield, J L; Gold, S H; Kinkead, A K

    2013-03-15

    A high-power active microwave pulse compressor is described that operates by modulating the quality factor of an energy storage cavity by means of mode conversion controlled by a triggered electron-beam discharge across a switch cavity. This Letter describes the principle of operation, the design of the switch cavity, the configuration used for the tests, and the experimental results. The pulse compressor produced output pulses with 140-165 MW peak power, record peak power gains of 16∶1-20∶1, and FWHM pulse duration of 16-20 ns at a frequency of 11.43 GHz. PMID:25166547

  11. Cortical Effects on Ipsilateral Hindlimb Muscles Revealed with Stimulus-Triggered Averaging of EMG Activity.

    Messamore, William G; Van Acker, Gustaf M; Hudson, Heather M; Zhang, Hongyu Y; Kovac, Anthony; Nazzaro, Jules; Cheney, Paul D

    2016-07-01

    While a large body of evidence supports the view that ipsilateral motor cortex may make an important contribution to normal movements and to recovery of function following cortical injury (Chollet et al. 1991; Fisher 1992; Caramia et al. 2000; Feydy et al. 2002), relatively little is known about the properties of output from motor cortex to ipsilateral muscles. Our aim in this study was to characterize the organization of output effects on hindlimb muscles from ipsilateral motor cortex using stimulus-triggered averaging of EMG activity. Stimulus-triggered averages of EMG activity were computed from microstimuli applied at 60-120 μA to sites in both contralateral and ipsilateral M1 of macaque monkeys during the performance of a hindlimb push-pull task. Although the poststimulus effects (PStEs) from ipsilateral M1 were fewer in number and substantially weaker, clear and consistent effects were obtained at an intensity of 120 μA. The mean onset latency of ipsilateral poststimulus facilitation was longer than contralateral effects by an average of 0.7 ms. However, the shortest latency effects in ipsilateral muscles were as short as the shortest latency effects in the corresponding contralateral muscles suggesting a minimal synaptic linkage that is equally direct in both cases. PMID:26088970

  12. Effectiveness comparison between Thai traditional massage and Chinese acupuncture for myofascial back pain in Thai military personnel: a preliminary report.

    Kumnerddee, Wipoo

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this randomized comparative study was to provide preliminary data of comparative effectiveness of Thai traditional massage (TTM) and Chinese acupuncture for the treatment of myofascial back pain in young military personnel. Eighteen Thai military personnel, aged ranging from 20-40 years were randomly divided into TTM and acupuncture groups. Each group received 5 sessions of massage or acupuncture during a 10-day period. The Thai version McGill Pain Questionnaire, 100-mm, visual analog scale (VAS) and summation of pain threshold in each trigger point measured by pressure algometer were assessed at day 0, 3, 8 and 10. At the end of treatment protocols, McGill scores decreased significantly in TTM and acupuncture groups (p = 0.024 and 0.002, respectively). VAS also decreased significantly (p = 0.029 and 0.003, respectively). However, the pain pressure threshold increased significantly in the acupuncture group but not in the TTM group (p = 0.006 and 0.08, respectively). When outcomes were compared between the two groups, no significant difference was found in the VAS (p = 0.115) and pain pressure threshold (p = 0.116), whereas the acupuncture group showed significantly lower McGill scores than the TTM group (p = 0.039). In conclusion, five sessions of Thai traditional massage and Chinese acupuncture were effective for the treatment of myofascial back pain in young Thai military personnel. Significant effects in both groups begin after the first session. Acupuncture is more effective than Thai traditional massage when affective aspect is also evaluated. PMID:21299184

  13. Triggered tremors beneath the seismogenic zone of an active fault zone, Kyushu, Japan

    Miyazaki, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Non-volcanic tremors were induced by the surface waves of the 2012 Sumatra earthquake around the Hinagu fault zone in Kyushu, Japan. We inferred from dense seismic observation data that the hypocenters of these tremors were located beneath the seismogenic zone of the Hinagu fault. Focal mechanisms of the tremors were estimated using S-wave polarization angles. The estimated focal mechanisms show similarities to those of shallow earthquakes in this region. In addition, one of the nodal planes of the focal mechanisms is almost parallel to the strike direction of the Hinagu fault. These observations suggest that the tremors were triggered at the deeper extension of the active fault zone under stress conditions similar to those in the shallower seismogenic region. A low-velocity anomaly beneath the hypocentral area of the tremors might be related to the tremor activity.

  14. The effects of myofascial release with foam rolling on performance.

    Healey, Kellie C; Hatfield, Disa L; Blanpied, Peter; Dorfman, Leah R; Riebe, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, self-myofascial release has become an increasingly common modality to supplement traditional methods of massage, so a masseuse is not necessary. However, there are limited clinical data demonstrating the efficacy or mechanism of this treatment on athletic performance. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of myofascial rollers before athletic tests can enhance performance. Twenty-six (13 men and 13 women) healthy college-aged individuals (21.56 ± 2.04 years, 23.97 ± 3.98 body mass index, 20.57 ± 12.21 percent body fat) were recruited. The study design was a randomized crossover design in which subject performed a series of planking exercises or foam rolling exercises and then performed a series of athletic performance tests (vertical jump height and power, isometric force, and agility). Fatigue, soreness, and exertion were also measured. A 2 × 2 (trial × gender) analysis of variance with repeated measures and appropriate post hoc was used to analyze the data. There were no significant differences between foam rolling and planking for all 4 of the athletic tests. However, there was a significant difference between genders on all the athletic tests (p ≤ 0.001). As expected, there were significant increases from pre to post exercise during both trials for fatigue, soreness, and exertion (p ≤ 0.01). Postexercise fatigue after foam rolling was significantly less than after the subjects performed planking (p ≤ 0.05). The reduced feeling of fatigue may allow participants to extend acute workout time and volume, which can lead to chronic performance enhancements. However, foam rolling had no effect on performance. PMID:23588488

  15. H(1)-Receptor activation triggers the endogenous nitric oxide signalling system in the rat submandibular gland.

    Borda, Enri; Stranieri, Graciela; Sterin-Borda, Leonor

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Histamine is released from mast cells by immunologic and non-immunologic stimuli during salivary gland inflammation, regulating salivary secretion. The receptor-secretory mechanism has not been studied in detail. AIMS: The studies reported were directed toward elucidating signal transduction/second messenger pathways within the rat submandibular gland associated with 2-thiazolylethylamine (ThEA)-induced H(1)-receptor responses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To assess the H(1) receptor subtype expression in the rat submandibular gland, a radioligand binding assay was performed. The study also included inositolphosphates and cyclic GMP accumulation, protein kinase C and nitric oxide synthase activities, and amylase release. RESULTS: The histamine H(1) receptor subtype is expressed on the rat submandibular gland with high-affinity binding sites. The ThEA effect was associated with activation of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C, translocation of protein kinase C, stimulation of nitric oxide synthase activity and increased production of cyclic GMP. ThEA stimulation of nitric oxide synthase and cyclic GMP was blunted by agents able to interfere with calcium movilization, while a protein kinase C inhibitor was able to stimulate ThEA action. On the other hand, ThEA stimulation evoked amylase release via the H1 receptor but was not followed by the L-arginine/nitric oxide pathway activation. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that, apart from the effect of ThEA on amylase release, it also appears to be a vasoactive chemical mediator that triggers vasodilatation, modulating the course of inflammation. PMID:12581497

  16. A Burkholderia Type VI Effector Deamidates Rho GTPases to Activate the Pyrin Inflammasome and Trigger Inflammation.

    Aubert, Daniel F; Xu, Hao; Yang, Jieling; Shi, Xuyan; Gao, Wenqing; Li, Lin; Bisaro, Fabiana; Chen, She; Valvano, Miguel A; Shao, Feng

    2016-05-11

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen of the cystic fibrosis lung that elicits a strong inflammatory response. B. cenocepacia employs a type VI secretion system (T6SS) to survive in macrophages by disarming Rho-type GTPases, causing actin cytoskeletal defects. Here, we identified TecA, a non-VgrG T6SS effector responsible for actin disruption. TecA and other bacterial homologs bear a cysteine protease-like catalytic triad, which inactivates Rho GTPases by deamidating a conserved asparagine in the GTPase switch-I region. RhoA deamidation induces caspase-1 inflammasome activation, which is mediated by the familial Mediterranean fever disease protein Pyrin. In mouse infection, the deamidase activity of TecA is necessary and sufficient for B. cenocepacia-triggered lung inflammation and also protects mice from lethal B. cenocepacia infection. Therefore, Burkholderia TecA is a T6SS effector that modifies a eukaryotic target through an asparagine deamidase activity, which in turn elicits host cell death and inflammation through activation of the Pyrin inflammasome. PMID:27133449

  17. Triggering an eruptive flare by emerging flux in a solar active-region complex

    Louis, Rohan E; Ravindra, B; Chintzoglou, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    A flare and fast coronal mass ejection originated between solar active regions NOAA 11514 and 11515 on July 1, 2012 in response to flux emergence in front of the leading sunspot of the trailing region 11515. Analyzing the evolution of the photospheric magnetic flux and the coronal structure, we find that the flux emergence triggered the eruption by interaction with overlying flux in a non-standard way. The new flux neither had the opposite orientation nor a location near the polarity inversion line, which are favorable for strong reconnection with the arcade flux under which it emerged. Moreover, its flux content remained significantly smaller than that of the arcade (approximately 40 %). However, a loop system rooted in the trailing active region ran in part under the arcade between the active regions, passing over the site of flux emergence. The reconnection with the emerging flux, leading to a series of jet emissions into the loop system, caused a strong but confined rise of the loop system. This lifted th...

  18. Low-intensity continuous ultrasound triggers effective bisphosphonate anticancer activity in breast cancer

    Tardoski, Sophie; Ngo, Jacqueline; Gineyts, Evelyne; Roux, Jean-Paul; Clézardin, Philippe; Melodelima, David

    2015-11-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a non-ionizing pressure wave that can produce mechanical and thermal effects. Bisphosphonates have demonstrated clinical utility in bone metastases treatment. Preclinical studies suggest that bisphosphonates have anticancer activity. However, bisphosphonates exhibit a high affinity for bone mineral, which reduces their bioavailibity for tumor cells. Ultrasound has been shown to be effective for drug delivery but in interaction with gas bubbles or encapsulated drugs. We examined the effects of a clinically relevant dose of bisphosphonate zoledronate (ZOL) in combination with US. In a bone metastasis model, mice treated with ZOL+US had osteolytic lesions that were 58% smaller than those of ZOL-treated animals as well as a reduced skeletal tumor burden. In a model of primary tumors, ZOL+US treatment reduced by 42% the tumor volume, compared with ZOL-treated animals. Using a fluorescent bisphosphonate, we demonstrated that US forced the release of bisphosphonate from the bone surface, enabling a continuous impregnation of the bone marrow. Additionally, US forced the penetration of ZOL within tumors, as demonstrated by the intratumoral accumulation of unprenylated Rap1A, a surrogate marker of ZOL antitumor activity. Our findings made US a promising modality to trigger bisphosphonate anticancer activity in bone metastases and in primary tumors.

  19. DEFORMATION WAVES AS A TRIGGER MECHANISM OF SEISMIC ACTIVITY IN SEISMIC ZONES OF THE CONTINENTAL LITHOSPHERE

    S. I. Sherman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Deformation waves as a trigger mechanism of seismic activity and migration of earthquake foci have been under discussion by researchers in seismology and geodynamics for over 50 years. Four sections of this article present available principal data on impacts of wave processes on seismicity and new data. The first section reviews analytical and experimental studies aimed at identification of relationships between wave processes in the lithosphere and seismic activity manifested as space-and-time migration of individual earthquake foci or clusters of earthquakes. It is concluded that with a systematic approach, instead of using a variety of terms to denote waves that trigger seismic process in the lithosphere, it is reasonable to apply the concise definition of ‘deformation waves’, which is most often used in fact.The second section contains a description of deformation waves considered as the trigger mechanism of seismic activity. It is concluded that a variety of methods are applied to identify deformation waves, and such methods are based on various research methods and concepts that naturally differ in sensitivity concerning detection of waves and/or impact of the waves on seismic process. Epicenters of strong earthquakes are grouped into specific linear or arc-shaped systems, which common criterion is the same time interval of the occurrence of events under analysis. On site the systems compose zones with similar time sequences, which correspond to the physical notion of moving waves (Fig. 9. Periods of manifestation of such waves are estimated as millions of years, and a direct consideration of the presence of waves and wave parameters is highly challenging. In the current state-of-the-art, geodynamics and seismology cannot provide any other solution yet.The third section presents a solution considering record of deformation waves in the lithosphere. With account of the fact that all the earthquakes with М≥3.0 are associated with

  20. Changes in diacylglycerol labeling, cell shape, and protein phosphorylation distinguish triggering from activation of human neutrophils

    Upon activation neutrophils release reactive oxygen intermediates such as superoxide anion (O2-) which are potent mediators of inflammation. Various agents elicit different responses. In contrast, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA, 1.6 μM) acting directly via protein kinase C is a potent stimulus for O2-. The authors compared the kinetics of appearance of various second messengers with the capacity of these ligands to elicit O2- generation. Kinetic analysis showed a two-phase response to membrane ligands; both an early (≥ 15 s) and a late (>15 s) increase in [3H]- and [14C]diacylglycerol (DG) was noted in response to fMLP. In contrast, LTB4 elicited only a rapid early increase in DG. The rise in DG evoked by PMA was late. Moreover, comparison of increases in [3H]DG versus those of [14C]DG at early and late time points suggested that DG was not formed exclusively from the hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositides. Kinetic analysis of protein phosphorylation was compared to the early and late increments of DG labeling. A 47,000 M/sub r/ protein was phosphorylated with kinetics consistent with the production of O2- and DG in response to fMLP and PMA. The temporal pattern of the formation of diacylglycerol and the phosphorylation of proteins describe a dual signal. The data suggest that neutrophils require not only triggering (the rapid generation of a signal) but also activation (the maintenance of a signal) to sustain responses

  1. A trigger for the identification of pions stopped in an active target

    The total cross sections of the π+p→ π+π+n and π-p→ π+π-n reactions threshold can be used to obtain scattering lengths which are directly comparable to predictions of chiral perturbation theory. Data for these reactions were taken at TRIUMF using a segmented active scintillator target. The signature of a π+ in an active target segment was a prompt pulse caused by the particle stopping, followed by a second pulse due to the π+ to μ+ decay. TRIUMF 500 Mhz transient digitisers were used to record the scintillator outputs in 2 ns steps so that the double pulses could be identified with high efficiency in off-line data analysis. A second level trigger able to reject events in less than 10 μs was necessary to avoid a prohibitively high deadtime due to the long read-out time of the digitisers. It was implemented with fast ECLine electronics and increased the useful event acquisition rate by a factor of more than forty. (author)

  2. Regime shift in Arabian dust activity, triggered by persistent Fertile Crescent drought

    Notaro, Michael; Yu, Yan; Kalashnikova, Olga V.

    2015-10-01

    The Arabian Peninsula has experienced pronounced interannual to decadal variability in dust activity, including an abrupt regime shift around 2006 from an inactive dust period during 1998-2005 to an active period during 2007-2013. Corresponding in time to the onset of this regime shift, the climate state transitioned into a combined La Niña and negative phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, which incited a hiatus in global warming in the 2000s. Superimposed upon a long-term regional drying trend, synergistic interactions between these teleconnection modes triggered the establishment of a devastating and prolonged drought, which engulfed the Fertile Crescent, namely, Iraq and Syria, and led to crop failure and civil unrest. Dried soils and diminished vegetation cover in the Fertile Crescent, as evident through remotely sensed enhanced vegetation indices, supported greater dust generation and transport to the Arabian Peninsula in 2007-2013, as identified both in increased dust days observed at weather stations and enhanced remotely sensed aerosol optical depth. According to backward trajectory analysis of dust days on the Arabian Peninsula, increased dust lifting and atmospheric dust concentration in the Fertile Crescent during this recent, prolonged drought episode supported a greater frequency of dust events across the peninsula with associated northerly trajectories and led to the dust regime shift. These findings are particularly concerning, considering projections of warming and drying for the eastern Mediterranean region and potential collapse of the Fertile Crescent during this century.

  3. Airway mucus obstruction triggers macrophage activation and matrix metalloproteinase 12-dependent emphysema.

    Trojanek, Joanna B; Cobos-Correa, Amanda; Diemer, Stefanie; Kormann, Michael; Schubert, Susanne C; Zhou-Suckow, Zhe; Agrawal, Raman; Duerr, Julia; Wagner, Claudius J; Schatterny, Jolanthe; Hirtz, Stephanie; Sommerburg, Olaf; Hartl, Dominik; Schultz, Carsten; Mall, Marcus A

    2014-11-01

    Whereas cigarette smoking remains the main risk factor for emphysema, recent studies in β-epithelial Na(+) channel-transgenic (βENaC-Tg) mice demonstrated that airway surface dehydration, a key pathophysiological mechanism in cystic fibrosis (CF), caused emphysema in the absence of cigarette smoke exposure. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The aim of this study was to elucidate mechanisms of emphysema formation triggered by airway surface dehydration. We therefore used expression profiling, genetic and pharmacological inhibition, Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based activity assays, and genetic association studies to identify and validate emphysema candidate genes in βENaC-Tg mice and patients with CF. We identified matrix metalloproteinase 12 (Mmp12) as a highly up-regulated gene in lungs from βENaC-Tg mice, and demonstrate that elevated Mmp12 expression was associated with progressive emphysema formation, which was reduced by genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of MMP12 in vivo. By using FRET reporters, we show that MMP12 activity was elevated on the surface of airway macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage from βENaC-Tg mice and patients with CF. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a functional polymorphism in MMP12 (rs2276109) was associated with severity of lung disease in CF. Our results suggest that MMP12 released by macrophages activated on dehydrated airway surfaces may play an important role in emphysema formation in the absence of cigarette smoke exposure, and may serve as a therapeutic target in CF and potentially other chronic lung diseases associated with airway mucus dehydration and obstruction. PMID:24828142

  4. Headache attributed to temporomandibular disorders and masticatory myofascial pain.

    Hara, Kazuhiko; Shinozaki, Takahiro; Okada-Ogawa, Akiko; Matsukawa, Yumiko; Dezawa, Ko; Nakaya, Yuka; Chen, Jui-Yen; Noma, Noboru; Oka, Shunichi; Iwata, Koichi; Imamura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the temporal association between temporomandibular disorders (TMD)-related symptoms and headache during TMD treatment for patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to TMD (HATMD) specified in the Diagnostic criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) and International classification of headache disorders (ICHD)-3 beta. The study enrolled 34 patients with HATMD induced by masticatory myofascial pain but not by temporomandibular arthralgia. Facial pain intensity, the pressure pain threshold of pericranial muscles, and maximum unassisted opening of the jaw were assessed at an initial examination and before and after physical therapy. The intensity and frequency of headache episodes and tooth contact ratio were also recorded before and after the intervention. Headache intensity and frequency significantly decreased, and these reductions were temporally related to improvements in facial pain intensity, maximum unassisted opening, and pressure pain threshold during TMD treatment. Linear regression analysis showed significant correlations between facial pain intensity and headache intensity and between tooth contact ratio and pressure pain threshold. Among patients who fulfilled the DC/TMD and ICHD-3 beta diagnostic criteria for HATMD, headache improved during TMD treatment, and the improvement was temporally related to amelioration of TMD symptoms. These findings suggest that sensitization in the central and peripheral nervous systems is responsible for HATMD. (J Oral Sci 58, 195-204, 2016). PMID:27349540

  5. Clinical features in patients with long-lasting macrophagic myofasciitis

    Muriel eRIGOLET

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF is an emerging condition characterized by specific muscle lesions assessing abnormal long-term persistence of aluminium hydroxide within macrophages at the site of previous immunization. Affected patients usually are middle-aged adults, mainly presenting with diffuse arthromyalgias, chronic fatigue, and marked cognitive deficits, not related to pain, fatigue or depression. Clinical features usually correspond to that observed in chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis. Representative features of MMF-associated cognitive dysfunction include dysexecutive syndrome, visual memory impairment and left ear extinction at dichotic listening test. Most patients fulfil criteria for non-amnestic/dysexecutive mild cognitive impairment, even if some cognitive deficits appear unusually severe. Cognitive dysfunction seems stable over time despite marked fluctuations. Evoked potentials may show abnormalities in keeping with central nervous system involvement, with a neurophysiological pattern suggestive of demyelination. Brain perfusion SPECT shows a pattern of diffuse cortical and subcortical abnormalities, with hypoperfusions correlating with cognitive deficiencies. The combination of musculoskeletal pain, chronic fatigue and cognitive disturbance generates chronic disability with possible social exclusion. Classical therapeutic approaches are usually unsatisfactory making patient care difficult.

  6. Action-projection in Japanese conversation: topic particles wa, mo, and tte for triggering categorization activities.

    Tanaka, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    Conversation analytic work has revealed how anticipatory completions and preemptive actions can offer invaluable glimpses into the cognitive, contextual, grammatical, and temporal bases of projectability in turn-taking, by virtue of their potential not only as a display of participants' online prediction of roughly what it might take to complete a turn-in-progress but also to plan the next move. While the predicate-final word order and the incremental transformability of turns in Japanese generally lead to delayed projectability of turn-endings, this may be partially offset by the capacity of certain postpositional particles to trigger and propel prospective action trajectories. This article engages in a case study of the topic particle wa (and related particles mo and tte), by demonstrating how its grammatical affordances, the categorization activities, and cognitive processing it can set in motion, coupled with the immediate contextual, and temporal-productional features may coalesce to a point of critical mass, thereby enhancing the projectability of the not-yet-produced trajectory of the current turn. The discussion attempts to contribute to recent debates on ways language-specific lexicogrammatical resources are deeply interlinked with the types of opportunities that are provided for social action. PMID:26379565

  7. Action-projection in Japanese conversation: Topic particles wa, mo and tte for triggering categorization activities

    Hiroko eTanaka

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Conversation analytic work has revealed how anticipatory completions and preemptive actions can offer invaluable glimpses into the cognitive, contextual, grammatical and temporal bases of projectability in turn-taking, by virtue of their potential not only as a display of participants’ online prediction of roughly what it might take to complete a turn-in-progress but also to plan the next move. While the predicate-final word order and the incremental transformability of turns in Japanese generally lead to delayed projectability of turn-endings, this may be partially offset by the capacity of certain postpositional particles to trigger and propel prospective action trajectories. This article engages in a case study of the topic particle wa (and related particles mo and tte, by demonstrating how its grammatical affordances, the categorization activities and cognitive processing it can set in motion, coupled with the immediate contextual and temporal-productional features may coalesce to a point of critical mass, thereby enhancing the projectability of the not-yet-produced trajectory of the current turn. The discussion attempts to contribute to recent debates on ways language-specific lexicogrammatical resources are deeply interlinked with the types of opportunities that are provided for social action.

  8. Special astronomical configurations, solar activity and deep degassing as a trigger of natural hazards

    Natyaganov, Vladimir; Syvorotkin, Vladimir; Fedorov, Valeriy; Shopin, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Extraordinary cases of tectonic events (strong earthquakes, volcano eruptions), mine explosions, typhoons, hurricanes, tornado outbreak sequences, ball lightnings, transient luminous events are analyzed in relation with special astronomical configurations, which are specific relative positions of the Sun, Earth, Moon and the closest planets of the Solar System (Venus, Mars and Jupiter) [1]. Usage of special astronomical coordinate systems give evidence not only of correlations but also of hidden causes-and-effect relations between the analyzed phenomena. The geocentric ecliptic latitude system is an example of such astronomical coordinate systems. It gives clear evidence of coherence between strong earthquakes and the maximal Moon declination from the plane of the ecliptic. Extraordinary cases of planet activity from the beginning of XX century till the present time are shown in the years of special astronomical configurations and abrupt increasing of solar activity. According to the empirical scheme of short-term earthquake prediction [3], geomagnetic disturbances are the triggers of earthquakes. Geomagnetic disturbances perform electromagnetic pumping (electromagnetic excitation) of the Earth's interior in the regions of intersections of seismomagnetic meridians with the plate boundaries as a result of electrothermal breakdowns in the heterogeneous medium of tectonic faults. This results in the local intensification of deep degassing [4], decreasing of shear strength of the medium that triggers earthquakes usually after 2 or 3 weeks (±2 days) after the geomagnetic disturbance. Examples of officially registered predictions of Kamchatka earthquakes with M7+ without missing events, including deep-focus earthquakes in the Okhotsk Sea since the year of 2002, are shown. It is discussed correlations and possible cause-and-effect relations between a different phenomena such as - dangerous natural hazardous events such as the record tornado outbreak sequences in the USA

  9. THE MAGNETIC SYSTEMS TRIGGERING THE M6.6 CLASS SOLAR FLARE IN NOAA ACTIVE REGION 11158

    We report a detailed event analysis of the M6.6 class flare in the active region (AR) NOAA 11158 on 2011 February 13. AR 11158, which consisted of two major emerging bipoles, showed prominent activity including one X- and several M-class flares. In order to investigate the magnetic structures related to the M6.6 event, particularly the formation process of a flare-triggering magnetic region, we analyzed multiple spacecraft observations and numerical results of a flare simulation. We observed that, in the center of this quadrupolar AR, a highly sheared polarity inversion line (PIL) was formed through proper motions of the major magnetic elements, which built a sheared coronal arcade lying over the PIL. The observations lend support to the interpretation that the target flare was triggered by a localized magnetic region that had an intrusive structure, namely, a positive polarity penetrating into a negative counterpart. The geometrical relationship between the sheared coronal arcade and the triggering region is consistent with the theoretical flare model based on the previous numerical study. We found that the formation of the trigger region was due to the continuous accumulation of small-scale magnetic patches. A few hours before the flare occurred, the series of emerged/advected patches reconnected with a pre-existing field. Finally, the abrupt flare eruption of the M6.6 event started around 17:30 UT. Our analysis suggests that in the process of triggering flare activity, all magnetic systems on multiple scales are included, not only the entire AR evolution but also the fine magnetic elements

  10. Inflammatory myopathy with abundant macrophages (IMAM): a condition sharing similarities with cytophagic histiocytic panniculitis and distinct from macrophagic myofasciitis.

    Bassez, Guillaume; Authier, Francois-Jérôme; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuèle; Delfau-Larue, Marie Hélène; Plonquet, Anne; Coquet, Michelle; Illa, Isabel; Gherardi, Romain K

    2003-05-01

    We describe the unreported pattern of inflammatory myopathy with abundant macrophages (IMAM) as a main differential diagnosis of postimmunization aluminum hydroxide-induced macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF). IMAM was mainly detected among patients with a dermatomyositis (DM)-like disease. Among 113 muscle biopsies from DM patients collected from 1974 to 2000, intensity of macrophage infiltration was highly variable: 41.5% (-/+); 34.5% (+); 17% (++): and 7% (+++). The 27 patients from groups (++) and (+++) had a similar pattern of macrophagic infiltration and were considered to have IMAM. They were compared to 40 MMF patients. In IMAM, macrophage infiltrates were diffuse and correlated positively with both T cell infiltrates and acute muscle fiber damage, and showed pictures of hemophagocytosis (21/27). Connective tissue structures were infiltrated by noncohesive, ribbon-forming collections of large basophilic macrophages containing no crystalline inclusions. In MMF, macrophage infiltrates were focal and formed compact well-delineated aggregates of granular PAS+ cells, loaded with crystalline aluminum hydroxide particles, in the absence of either hemophagocytosis or conspicuous muscle damage. Review of the literature indicates similarities between IMAM and "cytophagic histiocytic panniculitis" (CHP), a condition characterized by T cell-triggered macrophage hyperactivation. Both IMAM and CHP, but not MMF, may be associated with a life-threatening hemophagocytic syndrome. PMID:12769186

  11. Radiation-Induced Hypomethylation Triggers Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Transcription in Meningioma Cells

    Kiran Kumar Velpula

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies have shown the role of radiation-induced urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA expression in the progression of meningioma. In the present study, we investigated whether modulation of DNA methylation profiles could regulate uPA expression. Initially, radiation treatment was found to induce hypomethylation in meningioma cells with a decrease in DNA (cytosine-5-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1 and methyl-CpG binding domain protein (MBD expression. However, oxidative damage by H2O2 or pretreatment of irradiated cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC did not show any influence on these proteins, thereby indicating a radiation-specific change in the methylation patterns among meningioma cells. Further, we identified that hypomethylation is coupled to an increase in uPA expression in these cells. Azacytidine treatment induced a dose-dependent surge of uPA expression, whereas pre-treatment with sodium butyrate inhibited radiation-induced uPA expression, which complemented our prior results. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction on bisulfite-treated genomic DNA revealed a diminished methylation of uPA promoter in irradiated cells. Transfection with small hairpin RNA (shRNA-expressing plasmids targeting CpG islands of the uPA promoter showed a marked decline in uPA expression with subsequent decrease in invasion and proliferation of meningioma cells. Further, radiation treatment was found to recruit SP1 transcription factor, which was abrogated by shRNA treatment. Analysis on signaling events demonstrated the activation of MAP kinase kinase (MEK-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK in radiation-treated cells, while U0126 (MEK/ERK inhibitor blocked hypomethylation, recruitment of SP1, and uPA expression. In agreement with our in vitro data, low DNMT1 levels and high uPA were found in intracranial tumors treated with radiation compared to untreated tumors. In conclusion, our data suggest that radiation-mediated hypomethylation

  12. Export of earthquake-triggered landslides in active mountain ranges: insights from 2D morphodynamic modelling.

    Croissant, Thomas; Lague, Dimitri; Davy, Philippe; Steer, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    In active mountain ranges, large earthquakes (Mw > 5-6) trigger numerous landslides that impact river dynamics. These landslides bring local and sudden sediment piles that will be eroded and transported along the river network causing downstream changes in river geometry, transport capacity and erosion efficiency. The progressive removal of landslide materials has implications for downstream hazards management and also for understanding landscape dynamics at the timescale of the seismic cycle. The export time of landslide-derived sediments after large-magnitude earthquakes has been studied from suspended load measurements but a full understanding of the total process, including the coupling between sediment transfer and channel geometry change, still remains an issue. Note that the transport of small sediment pulses has been studied in the context of river restoration, but the magnitude of sediment pulses generated by landslides may make the problem different. Here, we study the export of large volumes (>106 m3) of sediments with the 2D hydro-morphodynamic model, Eros. This model uses a new hydrodynamic module that resolves a reduced form of the Saint-Venant equations with a particle method. It is coupled with a sediment transport and lateral and vertical erosion model. Eros accounts for the complex retroactions between sediment transport and fluvial geometry, with a stochastic description of the floods experienced by the river. Moreover, it is able to reproduce several features deemed necessary to study the evacuation of large sediment pulses, such as river regime modification (single-thread to multi-thread), river avulsion and aggradation, floods and bank erosion. Using a synthetic and simple topography we first present how granulometry, landslide volume and geometry, channel slope and flood frequency influence 1) the dominance of pulse advection vs. diffusion during its evacuation, 2) the pulse export time and 3) the remaining volume of sediment in the catchment

  13. The structure of host galaxies of radio-loud quasars and possible triggering mechanisms for quasar activity

    Romanishin, W.; Hintzen, P. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe (USA); NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (USA))

    1989-06-01

    An image modeling program is used to analyze optical imaging data for a sample of radio-loud quasars with redshifts between 0.2 and 0.7. It is found that the host galaxies of these quasars tend to be more compact than normal ellipticals. The cooling flow cluster elliptical galaxies near these host galaxies are studied. It is suggested that these cooling flow galaxies are also compact due to star formation in their central regions. Two populations of quasars are identified. One, in which activity is triggered by galaxy mergers of interactions has predominately spiral galaxies and are radio quiet. The other, in which activity is triggered by star formation bursts induced by cooling flows, has predominately elliptical hosts and may be radio loud. 28 refs.

  14. The structure of host galaxies of radio-loud quasars and possible triggering mechanisms for quasar activity

    An image modeling program is used to analyze optical imaging data for a sample of radio-loud quasars with redshifts between 0.2 and 0.7. It is found that the host galaxies of these quasars tend to be more compact than normal ellipticals. The cooling flow cluster elliptical galaxies near these host galaxies are studied. It is suggested that these cooling flow galaxies are also compact due to star formation in their central regions. Two populations of quasars are identified. One, in which activity is triggered by galaxy mergers of interactions has predominately spiral galaxies and are radio quiet. The other, in which activity is triggered by star formation bursts induced by cooling flows, has predominately elliptical hosts and may be radio loud. 28 refs

  15. The structure of host galaxies of radio-loud quasars and possible triggering mechanisms for quasar activity

    Romanishin, W.; Hintzen, Paul

    1989-01-01

    An image modeling program is used to analyze optical imaging data for a sample of radio-loud quasars with redshifts between 0.2 and 0.7. It is found that the host galaxies of these quasars tend to be more compact than normal ellipticals. The cooling flow cluster elliptical galaxies near these host galaxies are studied. It is suggested that these cooling flow galaxies are also compact due to star formation in their central regions. Two populations of quasars are identified. One, in which activity is triggered by galaxy mergers of interactions has predominately spiral galaxies and are radio quiet. The other, in which activity is triggered by star formation bursts induced by cooling flows, has predominately elliptical hosts and may be radio loud.

  16. The accurate assessment and physiotherapeutic treatment of rotator cuff myofascial Pain Syndrome: A case report

    B. B. Barker

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Management  of  patients  with  rotator  cuff  myofascial  pain syndrome varies  and  successful  intervention  is  dependent  on accurate assessment. The aim of this case report is to show the importance of accurate assessment  and  clinical  reasoning  in  the  physiotherapeutic management  of a  patient  suffering  from  ante-cubital  and  anterior shoulder  pain.  The  patient was  referred  for  physiotherapy  after proving refractory  to  treatment  with  non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication. The physiotherapist diagnosed a rotator cuff myofascial pain syndrome and treatment proceeded on that basis. Treatment consisted of twitch-obtaining dry needling, myofascial release and exercise therapy.  The result was a change in the harryman rotator cuff functional Assessment Scale score from 22/52 to 43/52 over eight treatments. Strength was regained and subjective pain report on the visual rating scale was improved to 1/10. The case study highlights the importance of accurate assessment and consideration of alternative myofascial sources for pain even in circumstances which initially seem trauma related. Precise diagnosis of the cause - in this case rotator cuff myofascial pain syndrome – will result in effective treatment being administered.

  17. A pilot study of myofascial release therapy compared to Swedish massage in fibromyalgia.

    Liptan, Ginevra; Mist, Scott; Wright, Cheryl; Arzt, Anna; Jones, Kim Dupree

    2013-07-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is characterized by widespread muscle pain and soft tissue tenderness. However, a lack of definitive muscle pathology has made FM both a diagnostic and a treatment puzzle. Much of the evidence for pathology in FM lies in the central nervous system - in particular abnormal amplification of pain signals in the spinal cord - a manifestation of central sensitization. An emerging body of evidence posits that peripheral pain generated from the muscles and fascia may trigger and maintain central sensitization in FM. Since FM patients so frequently seek manual therapy to relieve muscle symptoms, the present study compared two different manual therapy techniques in a parallel study of women with FM. Eight subjects received myofascial release (MFR) while four subjects received Swedish massage, 90 min weekly for four weeks. Overall symptom burden and physical function were assessed by the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire Revised (FIQ-R). A unique challenge for the manual therapist in treating conditions involving central sensitization is to determine if localized pain reduction can be achieved with targeted therapy in the context of ongoing widespread pain. Localized pain improvement was measured by a novel questionnaire developed for this study, the modified Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ). Between-group differences in FIQ-R did not reach statistical significance, but the total change scores on FIQ-R for the MFR group (mean = 10.14, SD = 16.2) trended in the hypothesized and positive direction compared to the Swedish massage group (mean = 0.33, SD = 4.93) yielding a positive Aikin separation test. Although overall modified NMQ scores improved in both groups there were no consistent focal areas of improvement for the Swedish massage group. In contrast, the MFR group reported consistent pain reductions in the neck and upper back regions on the NMQ. These data support the need for larger randomized controlled trials of MFR versus other

  18. Turn-Amplitude Analysis as a Diagnostic Test for Myofascial Syndrome in Patients with Chronic Pelvic Pain

    Fernando Itza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myofascial pain syndrome of the pelvic floor (MPSPF is a common disease in the context of chronic pelvic pain (CPP; however, there is currently no gold-standard test to diagnose it.

  19. An Acute Bout of Self-Myofascial Release in the Form of Foam Rolling Improves Performance Testing

    Peacock, Corey A; KREIN, DARREN D.; Silver, Tobin A.; Sanders, Gabriel J; VON CARLOWITZ, KYLE-PATRICK A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in the strength and conditioning field have shown the incorporation of foam rolling self-myofascial release in adjunct with a dynamic warm-up. This is thought to improve overall training performance; however, minimal research exists supporting this theory. Therefore, determining if an acute bout of foam rolling self-myofascial release in addition to a dynamic warm-up could influence performance is of importance. In order to do so, eleven athletically trained male subjects ...

  20. Validity of self-reported sleep bruxism among myofascial temporomandibular disorder patients and controls.

    Raphael, K G; Janal, M N; Sirois, D A; Dubrovsky, B; Klausner, J J; Krieger, A C; Lavigne, G J

    2015-10-01

    Sleep bruxism (SB), primarily involving rhythmic grinding of the teeth during sleep, has been advanced as a causal or maintenance factor for a variety of oro-facial problems, including temporomandibular disorders (TMD). As laboratory polysomnographic (PSG) assessment is extremely expensive and time-consuming, most research testing this belief has relied on patient self-report of SB. The current case-control study examined the accuracy of those self-reports relative to laboratory-based PSG assessment of SB in a large sample of women suffering from chronic myofascial TMD (n = 124) and a demographically matched control group without TMD (n = 46). A clinical research coordinator administered a structured questionnaire to assess self-reported SB. Participants then spent two consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory. Audiovisual and electromyographic data from the second night were scored to assess whether participants met criteria for the presence of 2 or more (2+) rhythmic masticatory muscle activity episodes accompanied by grinding sounds, moderate SB, or severe SB, using previously validated research scoring standards. Contingency tables were constructed to assess positive and negative predictive values, sensitivity and specificity, and 95% confidence intervals surrounding the point estimates. Results showed that self-report significantly predicted 2+ grinding sounds during sleep for TMD cases. However, self-reported SB failed to significantly predict the presence or absence of either moderate or severe SB as assessed by PSG, for both cases and controls. These data show that self-report of tooth grinding awareness is highly unlikely to be a valid indicator of true SB. Studies relying on self-report to assess SB must be viewed with extreme caution. PMID:26010126

  1. Synergistic Nanomedicine: Passive, Active, and Ultrasound-Triggered Drug Delivery in Cancer Treatment.

    Elkhodiry, Mohamed A; Momah, Christian C; Suwaidi, Shaima R; Gadalla, Dina; Martins, Ana M; Vitor, Rute F; Husseini, Ghaleb A

    2016-01-01

    Nanocarriers are heavily researched as drug delivery vehicles capable of sequestering antineoplastic agents and then releasing their contents at the desired location. The feasibility of using such carriers stems from their ability to produce a multimodel delivery system whereby passive, ligand and triggered targeting can be applied in the fight against cancer. Passive targeting capitalizes on the leaky nature of tumor tissue which allows for the extravasation of particles with a size smaller than 0.5 µm into the tumors. Ligand targeting utilizes the concept of receptor-mediated endocytosis and involves the conjugation of ligands onto the surface of nanoparticles, while triggered targeting involves the use of external and internal stimuli to release the carriers contents upon reaching the diseased location. In this review, micelles and liposomes have been considered due to the promising results they have shown in vivo and in vitro and their potential for advancements into clinical trials. Thus, this review focuses on the most recent advancements in the field of micellar and liposomal drug delivery and considers the synergistic effect of passive- and ligand-targeting strategies, and the use of ultrasound in triggering drug release at the tumor site. PMID:27398430

  2. Delayed triggering of radio Active Galactic Nuclei in gas-rich minor mergers in the local Universe

    Shabala, Stanislav; Kaviraj, Sugata; Middelberg, Enno; Turner, Ross; Ting, Yuan-Sen; Allison, James; Davis, Tim

    2016-01-01

    We examine the processes triggering star formation and Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) activity in a sample of 25 low redshift ($z10^7$ K) brightness temperature required for an mJIVE-20 detection allows us to unambiguously identify the radio AGN in our sample. We find three such objects. Our VLBI AGN identifications are classified as Seyferts or LINERs in narrow line optical diagnostic plots; mid-infrared colours of our targets and the comparison of H$\\alpha$ star formation rates with integrated radio luminosity are also consistent with the VLBI identifications. We reconstruct star formation histories in our galaxies using optical and UV photometry, and find that these radio AGN are not triggered promptly in the merger process, consistent with previous findings for non-VLBI samples of radio AGN. This delay can significantly limit the efficiency of feedback by radio AGN triggered in galaxy mergers. We find that radio AGN hosts have lower star formation rates than non-AGN radio-selected galaxies at the same star...

  3. Diagnostico clínico de artrosis en la articulación temporomandibular asociado a un síndrome de dolor miofascial: Análisis de un caso Clinical diagnosis of osteoarthrosis in the Temporomandibular Joint Associated with Myofascial Pain Syndrome: Analysis of a case report

    R. La Touche

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un caso de una paciente de 70 años que presenta dolor orofacial simétrico y dolor local a nivel de la articulación temporomandibular (ATM derecha. La exploración clínica muestra disminución del rango de movimiento articular, un end feel blando, crepitación a la auscultación, y puntos gatillos miofasciales (PGMs a nivel de la musculatura masticatoria y del cuello. El estudio radiológico confirma artrosis en la ATM y se termina concluyendo que la sintomatología es provocada, principalmente, por el síndrome de dolor miofascial. Se reafirma la importancia de realizar un diagnóstico diferencial preciso para orientar adecuadamente las pautas del tratamiento.A case report of a 70 year-old patient with bilateral orofacial pain and local pain in the right temporomandibular joint (TMJ. The physical examination shows a decrease in the articular range of motion, a soft end feel, crepitation and trigger points activated at the jaw and neck muscles. The image study confirmed TMJ osteoarthrosis and it was concluded that the symptoms were primarily produced by myofascial pain syndrome. A precise differential diagnoses is important in order to orientate the treatment stages.

  4. Evidence for the Use of Ischemic Compression and Dry Needling in the Management of Trigger Points of the Upper Trapezius in Patients with Neck Pain: A Systematic Review.

    Cagnie, Barbara; Castelein, Birgit; Pollie, Flore; Steelant, Lieselotte; Verhoeyen, Hanne; Cools, Ann

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this review was to describe the effects of ischemic compression and dry needling on trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle in patients with neck pain and compare these two interventions with other therapeutic interventions aiming to inactivate trigger points. Both PubMed and Web of Science were searched for randomized controlled trials using different key word combinations related to myofascial neck pain and therapeutic interventions. Four main outcome parameters were evaluated on short and medium term: pain, range of motion, functionality, and quality-of-life, including depression. Fifteen randomized controlled trials were included in this systematic review. There is moderate evidence for ischemic compression and strong evidence for dry needling to have a positive effect on pain intensity. This pain decrease is greater compared with active range of motion exercises (ischemic compression) and no or placebo intervention (ischemic compression and dry needling) but similar to other therapeutic approaches. There is moderate evidence that both ischemic compression and dry needling increase side-bending range of motion, with similar effects compared with lidocaine injection. There is weak evidence regarding its effects on functionality and quality-of-life. On the basis of this systematic review, ischemic compression and dry needling can both be recommended in the treatment of neck pain patients with trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle. Additional research with high-quality study designs are needed to develop more conclusive evidence. PMID:25768071

  5. Triggering Active Galactic Nuclei in Hierarchical Galaxy Formation: Disk instability vs. Interactions

    Menci, N; Fiore, F; Lamastra, A

    2014-01-01

    Using a semi analytic model for galaxy formation we investigate the effects of Black Hole accretion triggered by disk instabilities (DI) in isolated galaxies on the evolution of AGN. Specifically, we took on, developed and expanded the Hopkins & Quataert (2011) model for the mass inflow following disk perturbations, and compare the corresponding evolution of the AGN population with that arising in a scenario where galaxy interactions trigger AGN (IT mode). We extended and developed the DI model by including different disk surface density profiles, to study the maximal contribution of DI to the evolution of the AGN population. We obtained the following results: i) for luminosities corresponding to $M_{1450}\\gtrsim -26$ the DI mode can provide the BH accretion needed to match the observed AGN luminosity functions up to $z \\approx 4.5$; in such a luminosity range and redshift, it can compete with the IT scenario as the main driver of cosmological evolution of AGN; ii) The DI scenario cannot provide the obser...

  6. EFFECTS OF NEURAL MOBILIZATION IN POSTERIOR MYOFASCIAL CHAIN FLEXIBILITY IN NORMAL SUBJECTS

    Stuti Sharma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aims and objectives: The aim of this research is to see the effectiveness of neural mobilization on posterior myofascial chain flexibility. Methodology: Samples of 70 subjects were recruited for the study. Pre mobilization readings for finger floor distance, tibiotarsal angle and finger floor grades were taken for each individual, after whom slump mobilization was given and post mobilization readings were again taken in the same sequence after mobilization. Results: Both finger floor distance and grades were significantly changed, while tibiotarsal angle showed no significant difference. Discussion: Neural mobilization tries to restore the nervous system’s movement and elasticity, rehabilitating its normal functions by relieving the tensions in the muscular chains thereby increasing its flexibility. Conclusion: This study concludes that neural mobilization can improve posterior myofascial chain flexibility.

  7. Dolor de origen muscular: dolor miofascial y fibromialgia Muscular pain: myofascial pain syndrome and fibromyalgia

    M. Ruiz

    2007-01-01

    estiramiento y relajación junto a la terapia psicológica, ayudarán a disminuir la intensidad de los síntomasMyofascial pain syndromes have a very high prevalence. Two concepts are essential: muscular tension and trigger points. Autonomous and central sensitization components are implicated. Physical examination and a complete clinical history are mandatory. It requires a multidisciplinary treatment, especially with physical therapy. Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread pain and the presence of tender points. In its origin numerous theories exist, but none is totally accepted. Patients present morning rigidity, chronic fatigue, cephalalgia, sleep disturbances, paresthesia, mood disorders, irritable bowel and joint pain. The diagnosis is based upon the classification criteria of the American College of Rheumatology 1990. The treatment aims to recover functionality and quality of life, at least partially. Tricyclic antidepressants therapy will improve depression and sleep disturbances. The non pharmacological treatment with stretching and relaxation programs alongside psychological therapy will help to reduce the intensity of symptoms

  8. Association of anxiety with intracortical inhibition and descending pain modulation in chronic myofascial pain syndrome

    Vidor, Liliane Pinto; Torres, Iraci LS; Medeiros, Liciane Fernandes; Dussán-Sarria, Jairo Alberto; Dall’Agnol, Letizzia; Deitos, Alicia; Brietzke, Aline; Laste, Gabriela; Joanna R Rozisky; Fregni, Felipe; Caumo, Wolnei

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to answer three questions related to chronic myofascial pain syndrome (MPS): 1) Is the motor cortex excitability, as assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation parameters (TMS), related to state-trait anxiety? 2) Does anxiety modulate corticospinal excitability changes after evoked pain by Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST)? 3) Does the state-trait anxiety predict the response to pain evoked by QST if simultaneously receiving a heterotopic stimulus [Conditional...

  9. Effects of Low-level Laser in the Treatment of Myofascial Pain Dysfunction Syndrome

    2007-01-01

    Background and aims Muscular pain in the facial region is the most common cause of facial pains. Myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome (MPDS) is one of the most important facial muscle disorders comprising of signs and symptoms including pain during function, tenderness in the muscles of mastication and restricted jaw movement. Due to the lack of an accepted therapeutic approach, the purpose of this paper was to find an effective treatment to decrease the pain of such patients. Considering the...

  10. Current concepts in MRI of rectus femoris musculotendinous (myotendinous) and myofascial injuries in elite athletes

    Kassarjian, A., E-mail: Kassarjian@mac.com [Consultant Radiologist, Corades, S. L., Calle Galeon 2, 28220 Majadahonda, Madrid (Spain); Rodrigo, R.M., E-mail: rmrodrigo@resonanciamagneticabilbao.com [Resonancia Magnetica Bilbao, Hospital San Francisco Javier, Gordoniz 12, 40010 Bilbao, Vizcaya, Basque Country (Spain); Santisteban, J.M., E-mail: j.santisteban@athletic-club.net [Medical Services, Athletic Club Bilbao, Basurto Medical Institute, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of the Basque Country, Barrio de Garaioltza 147, 48197 Lezama, Vizcaya, Basque Country (Spain)

    2012-12-15

    Rectus femoris injuries are extremely common in athletes, particularly in soccer players, rugby player, and sprinters. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in diagnosis, prognosis, and rehabilitation of these injuries. The current article discusses current concepts in the diagnosis and treatment of rectus femoris injuries in elite athletes, including a discussion of the less well known myofascial injuries and key prognostic factors as seen at MR imaging.

  11. Current concepts in MRI of rectus femoris musculotendinous (myotendinous) and myofascial injuries in elite athletes

    Rectus femoris injuries are extremely common in athletes, particularly in soccer players, rugby player, and sprinters. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in diagnosis, prognosis, and rehabilitation of these injuries. The current article discusses current concepts in the diagnosis and treatment of rectus femoris injuries in elite athletes, including a discussion of the less well known myofascial injuries and key prognostic factors as seen at MR imaging.

  12. Alexithymia, anger and psychological distress in patients with myofascial pain: a case-control study

    Castelli, Lorys; De Santis, Federica; Giorgi, Ilaria; Deregibus, Andrea; Tesio, Valentina; Leombruni, Paolo; Granieri, Antonella; Debernardi, Cesare; Torta, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate psychological distress, anger and alexithymia in a group of patients affected by myofascial pain (MP) in the facial region. Methods: 45 MP patients [mean (SD) age: 38.9 (11.6)] and 45 female healthy controls [mean (SD) age: 37.8 (13.7)] were assessed medically and psychologically. The medically evaluation consisted of muscle palpation of the pericranial and cervical muscles. The psychological evaluation included the assessment of depression (B...

  13. Alexithymia, anger and psychological distress in patients with myofascial pain: a case-control study.

    Lorys eCastelli; Federica eDe Santis; Ilaria eDe Giorgi; Andrea eDeregibus; Valentina eTesio; Paolo eLeombruni; Antonella eGranieri; Cesare eDebernardi; Riccardo eTorta

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate psychological distress, anger and alexithymia in a group of patients affected by myofascial pain (MP) in the facial region.Methods: 45 MP patients (mean (SD) age: 38.9 (11.6)) and 45 female healthy controls (mean (SD) age: 37.8 (13.7)) were assessed medically and psychologically. The medically evaluation consisted of muscle palpation of the pericranial and cervical muscles. The psychological evaluation included the assessment of depression (Beck ...

  14. Improvement in Anxiety and Pain After Whole Body Whirlpool Hydrotherapy Among Patients With Myofascial Pain Syndrome

    Im, Sang Hee; Han, Eun Young

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of the Whirlpool hydrotherapy on pain and anxiety in chronic myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) patients, compared to the conventional hydrocollator pack therapy. Methods Forty-one subjects who have MPS in the upper trapezius muscles without depression were recruited. The patients were randomly assigned into two groups: the whirlpool therapy group whose bodies were immersed in a whirlpool bath at 34℃-36℃ for 30 minutes; the hydrocollator group who took a 30-minute...

  15. Central poststroke pain: somatosensory abnormalities and the presence of associated myofascial pain syndrome

    de Oliveira Rogério Adas; de Andrade Daniel; Machado André Guelman; Teixeira Manoel

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Central post-stroke pain (CPSP) is a neuropathic pain syndrome associated with somatosensory abnormalities due to central nervous system lesion following a cerebrovascular insult. Post-stroke pain (PSP) refers to a broader range of clinical conditions leading to pain after stroke, but not restricted to CPSP, including other types of pain such as myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), painful shoulder, lumbar and dorsal pain, complex regional pain syndrome, and spasticity-related ...

  16. Control And Configuration Of The ATLAS Trigger And Data Acquisition System During Data Taking Activities

    Bianchi, R M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN relies on a complex and highly distributed Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system to gather and select particle collision data at unprecedented energy and rates. The control and configuration (CC) system is responsible for all the software required to configure and control the ATLAS data taking. This ranges from high level applications, such as the graphical user interfaces and the desktops used within the ATLAS control room, to low level packages, such as access, process and resource management. Currently the CC system is required to supervise more than 15000 processes running on more than 1500 computers. At these scales, issues such as access, process and resource management, distribution of configuration data and access to them, run control, diagnostic and especially error recovery become predominant to guarantee a high availability of the TDAQ system and minimize the dead time of the experiment. And it is indeed during the data taking activitie...

  17. Opioid receptor activation triggering downregulation of cAMP improves effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma

    Friesen, Claudia; Hormann, Inis; Roscher, Mareike; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma are the most frequent and malignant human brain tumors, having a very poor prognosis. The enhanced radio- and chemoresistance of glioblastoma and the glioblastoma stem cells might be the main reason why conventional therapies fail. The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) controls cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Downregulation of cAMP sensitizes tumor cells for anti-cancer treatment. Opioid receptor agonists triggering opioid receptors can activate inhibitory Gi proteins, which, in turn, block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. In this study, we show that downregulation of cAMP by opioid receptor activation improves the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma. The µ-opioid receptor agonist D,L-methadone sensitizes glioblastoma as well as the untreatable glioblastoma stem cells for doxorubicin-induced apoptosis and activation of apoptosis pathways by reversing deficient caspase activation and deficient downregulation of XIAP and Bcl-xL, playing critical roles in glioblastomas’ resistance. Blocking opioid receptors using the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone or increasing intracellular cAMP by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) strongly reduced opioid receptor agonist-induced sensitization for doxorubicin. In addition, the opioid receptor agonist D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux, whereas doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in glioblastomas. Furthermore, opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone inhibited tumor growth significantly in vivo. Our findings suggest that opioid receptor activation triggering downregulation of cAMP is a promising strategy to inhibit tumor growth and to improve the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma and in killing glioblastoma stem cells. PMID:24626197

  18. Lipid derivatives activate GPR119 and trigger GLP-1 secretion in primary murine L-cells

    Moss, Catherine E.; Glass, Leslie L.; Diakogiannaki, Eleftheria; Pais, Ramona; Lenaghan, Carol; Smith, David M.; Wedin, Marianne; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone derived from proglucagon, which is released from intestinal L-cells and increases insulin secretion in a glucose dependent manner. GPR119 is a lipid derivative receptor present in L-cells, believed to play a role in the detection of dietary fat. This study aimed to characterize the responses of primary murine L-cells to GPR119 agonism and assess the importance of GPR119 for the detection of ingested lipid. Methods GLP-1 secretion was measured from murine primary cell cultures stimulated with a panel of GPR119 ligands. Plasma GLP-1 levels were measured in mice lacking GPR119 in proglucagon-expressing cells and controls after lipid gavage. Intracellular cAMP responses to GPR119 agonists were measured in single primary L-cells using transgenic mice expressing a cAMP FRET sensor driven by the proglucagon promoter. Results L-cell specific knockout of GPR119 dramatically decreased plasma GLP-1 levels after a lipid gavage. GPR119 ligands triggered GLP-1 secretion in a GPR119 dependent manner in primary epithelial cultures from the colon, but were less effective in the upper small intestine. GPR119 agonists elevated cAMP in ∼70% of colonic L-cells and 50% of small intestinal L-cells. Conclusions/interpretation GPR119 ligands strongly enhanced GLP-1 release from colonic cultures, reflecting the high proportion of colonic L-cells that exhibited cAMP responses to GPR119 agonists. Less GPR119-dependence could be demonstrated in the upper small intestine. In vivo, GPR119 in L-cells plays a key role in oral lipid-triggered GLP-1 secretion. PMID:26144594

  19. RESCUE OF HIPPO CO-ACTIVATOR YAP1 TRIGGERS DNA DAMAGE-INDUCED APOPTOSIS IN HEMATOLOGICAL CANCERS

    Cottini, Francesca; Hideshima, Teru; Xu, Chunxiao; Sattler, Martin; Dori, Martina; Agnelli, Luca; Hacken, Elisa ten; Bertilaccio, Maria Teresa; Antonini, Elena; Neri, Antonino; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Marcatti, Magda; Richardson, Paul G.; Carrasco, Ruben; Kimmelman, Alec C.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico; Blandino, Giovanni; Kuehl, W. Michael; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Tonon, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Oncogene–induced DNA damage elicits genomic instability in epithelial cancer cells, but apoptosis is blocked through inactivation of the tumor suppressor p53. In hematological cancers, the relevance of ongoing DNA damage and mechanisms by which apoptosis is suppressed are largely unknown. We found pervasive DNA damage in hematologic malignancies including multiple myeloma, lymphoma and leukemia, which leads to activation of a p53–independent, pro-apoptotic network centered on nuclear relocalization of ABL1 kinase. Although nuclear ABL1 triggers cell death through its interaction with the Hippo pathway co–activator YAP1 in normal cells, we show that low YAP1 levels prevent nuclear ABL1–induced apoptosis in these hematologic malignancies. YAP1 is under the control of a serine–threonine kinase, STK4. Importantly, genetic inactivation of STK4 restores YAP1 levels, triggering cell death in vitro and in vivo. Our data therefore identify a novel synthetic–lethal strategy to selectively target cancer cells presenting with endogenous DNA damage and low YAP1 levels. PMID:24813251

  20. Are luminous radio-loud active galactic nuclei triggered by galaxy interactions?

    Almeida, C Ramos; Tadhunter, C; Pérez-González, P G; Barro, G; Inskip, K J; Morganti, R; Holt, J; Dicken, D

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a comparison between the optical morphologies of a complete sample of 46 southern 2Jy radio galaxies at intermediate redshifts (0.05triggering of powerful radio galaxies (PRGs). We find that a significant fraction of quiescent ellipticals at low and intermediate redshifts show evidence for disturbed morphologies at relatively high surface brightness levels, which are likely the result of past or on-going galaxy interactions. However, the morphological features detected in the galaxy hosts of the PRGs (e.g. tidal tails, shells, bridges, etc.) are up to 2 magnitudes brighter than those present in their quiescent counterparts. Indeed, if...

  1. Gut microbiota translocation to the pancreatic lymph nodes triggers NOD2 activation and contributes to T1D onset.

    Costa, Frederico R C; Françozo, Marcela C S; de Oliveira, Gabriela G; Ignacio, Aline; Castoldi, Angela; Zamboni, Dario S; Ramos, Simone G; Câmara, Niels O; de Zoete, Marcel R; Palm, Noah W; Flavell, Richard A; Silva, João S; Carlos, Daniela

    2016-06-27

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that is triggered by both genetic and environmental factors, resulting in the destruction of pancreatic β cells. The disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier and consequent escape of microbial products may be one of these environmental triggers. However, the immune receptors that are activated in this context remain elusive. We show here that during streptozotocin (STZ)-induced T1D, the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 2 (NOD2), but not NOD1, participates in the pathogenesis of the disease by inducing T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 cells in the pancreatic LNs (PLNs) and pancreas. Additionally, STZ-injected wild-type (WT) diabetic mice displayed an altered gut microbiota compared with vehicle-injected WT mice, together with the translocation of bacteria to the PLNs. Interestingly, WT mice treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics (Abx) were fully protected from STZ-induced T1D, which correlated with the abrogation of bacterial translocation to the PLNs. Notably, when Abx-treated STZ-injected WT mice received the NOD2 ligand muramyl dipeptide, both hyperglycemia and the proinflammatory immune response were restored. Our results demonstrate that the recognition of bacterial products by NOD2 inside the PLNs contributes to T1D development, establishing a new putative target for intervention during the early stages of the disease. PMID:27325889

  2. Programmed Cell-to-Cell Variability in Ras Activity Triggers Emergent Behaviors during Mammary Epithelial Morphogenesis

    Jennifer S. Liu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Variability in signaling pathway activation between neighboring epithelial cells can arise from local differences in the microenvironment, noisy gene expression, or acquired genetic changes. To investigate the consequences of this cell-to-cell variability in signaling pathway activation on coordinated multicellular processes such as morphogenesis, we use DNA-programmed assembly to construct three-dimensional MCF10A microtissues that are mosaic for low-level expression of activated H-Ras. We find two emergent behaviors in mosaic microtissues: cells with activated H-Ras are basally extruded or lead motile multicellular protrusions that direct the collective motility of their wild-type neighbors. Remarkably, these behaviors are not observed in homogeneous microtissues in which all cells express the activated Ras protein, indicating that heterogeneity in Ras activity, rather than the total amount of Ras activity, is critical for these processes. Our results directly demonstrate that cell-to-cell variability in pathway activation within local populations of epithelial cells can drive emergent behaviors during epithelial morphogenesis.

  3. Nitroreductase-triggered activation of a novel caged fluorescent probe obtained from methylene blue.

    Bae, Jungeun; McNamara, Louis E; Nael, Manal A; Mahdi, Fakhri; Doerksen, Robert J; Bidwell, Gene L; Hammer, Nathan I; Jo, Seongbong

    2015-08-18

    A near-infrared fluorescent probe based on methylene blue (p-NBMB) was developed for the detection of nitroreductase. Conjugating methylene blue with a p-nitrobenzyl moiety enables it to be activated by nitroreductase-catalyzed 1,6-elimination, resulting in the release of an active methylene blue fluorophore. PMID:26165999

  4. Mild Alkalization Acutely Triggers the Warburg Effect by Enhancing Hexokinase Activity via Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel Binding

    Lee, Jin Hee; Park, Jin Won; Moon, Seung Hwan; Cho, Young Seok; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung-Han

    2016-01-01

    To fully understand the glycolytic behavior of cancer cells, it is important to recognize how it is linked to pH dynamics. Here, we evaluated the acute effects of mild acidification and alkalization on cancer cell glucose uptake and glycolytic flux and investigated the role of hexokinase (HK). Cancer cells exposed to buffers with graded pH were measured for 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake, lactate production and HK activity. Subcellular localization of HK protein was assessed by western blots and confocal microscopy. The interior of T47D breast cancer cells was mildly alkalized to pH 7.5 by a buffer pH of 7.8, and this was accompanied by rapid increases of FDG uptake and lactate extrusion. This shift toward glycolytic flux led to the prompt recovery of a reversed pH gradient. In contrast, mild acidification rapidly reduced cellular FDG uptake and lactate production. Mild acidification decreased and mild alkalization increased mitochondrial HK translocation and enzyme activity. Cells transfected with specific siRNA against HK-1, HK-2 and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC)1 displayed significant attenuation of pH-induced changes in FDG uptake. Confocal microscopy showed increased co-localization of HK-1 and HK-2 with VDAC1 by alkaline treatment. In isolated mitochondria, acidic pH increased and alkaline pH decreased release of free HK-1 and HK-2 from the mitochondrial pellet into the supernatant. Furthermore, experiments using purified proteins showed that alkaline pH promoted co-immunoprecipitation of HK with VDAC protein. These findings demonstrate that mild alkalization is sufficient to acutely trigger cancer cell glycolytic flux through enhanced activity of HK by promoting its mitochondrial translocation and VDAC binding. This process might serve as a mechanism through which cancer cells trigger the Warburg effect to maintain a dysregulated pH. PMID:27479079

  5. Caspase-10 triggers Bid cleavage and caspase cascade activation in FasL-induced apoptosis.

    Milhas, Delphine; Cuvillier, Olivier; Therville, Nicole; Clavé, Patricia; Thomsen, Mogens; Levade, Thierry; Benoist, Hervé; Ségui, Bruno

    2005-05-20

    In contrast to caspase-8, controversy exists as to the ability of caspase-10 to mediate apoptosis in response to FasL. Herein, we have shown activation of caspase-10, -3, and -7 as well as B cell lymphoma-2-interacting domain (Bid) cleavage and cytochrome c release in caspase-8-deficient Jurkat (I9-2) cells treated with FasL. Apoptosis was clearly induced as illustrated by nuclear and DNA fragmentation. These events were inhibited by benzyloxycarbonyl-VAD-fluoromethyl ketone, a broad spectrum caspase inhibitor, indicating that caspases were functionally and actively involved. Benzyloxycarbonyl-AEVD-fluoromethyl ketone, a caspase-10 inhibitor, had a comparable effect. FasL-induced cell death was not completely abolished by caspase inhibitors in agreement with the existence of a cytotoxic caspase-independent pathway. In subpopulations of I9-2 cells displaying distinct caspase-10 expression levels, cell sensitivity to FasL correlated with caspase-10 expression. A robust caspase activation, Bid cleavage, and DNA fragmentation were observed in cells with high caspase-10 levels but not in those with low levels. In vitro, caspase-10, as well as caspase-8, could cleave Bid to generate active truncated Bid (p15). Altogether, our data strongly suggest that caspase-10 can serve as an initiator caspase in Fas signaling leading to Bid processing, caspase cascade activation, and apoptosis. PMID:15772077

  6. Curcumin Triggers p16-Dependent Senescence in Active Breast Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts and Suppresses Their Paracrine Procarcinogenic Effects

    Siti-Fauziah Hendrayani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Activated cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs or myofibroblasts not only facilitate tumor growth and spread but also affect tumor response to therapeutic agents. Therefore, it became clear that efficient therapeutic regimens should also take into account the presence of these supportive cells and inhibit their paracrine effects. To this end, we tested the effect of low concentrations of curcumin, a pharmacologically safe natural product, on patient-derived primary breast CAF cells. We have shown that curcumin treatment upregulates p16INK4A and other tumor suppressor proteins while inactivates the JAK2/STAT3 pathway. This reduced the level of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA and the migration/invasion abilities of these cells. Furthermore, curcumin suppressed the expression/secretion of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2, MMP-9, and transforming growth factor-β, which impeded their paracrine procarcinogenic potential. Intriguingly, these effects were sustained even after curcumin withdrawal and cell splitting. Therefore, using different markers of senescence [senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal activity, Ki-67 and Lamin B1 levels, and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation], we have shown that curcumin markedly suppresses Lamin B1 and triggers DNA damage-independent senescence in proliferating but not quiescent breast stromal fibroblasts. Importantly, this curcumin-related senescence was p16INK4A-dependent and occurred with no associated inflammatory secretory phenotype. These results indicate the possible inactivation of cancer-associated myofibroblasts and present the first indication that curcumin can trigger DNA damage-independent and safe senescence in stromal fibroblasts.

  7. Activation of raphe nuclei triggers rapid and distinct effects on parallel olfactory bulb output channels.

    Kapoor, Vikrant; Provost, Allison C; Agarwal, Prateek; Murthy, Venkatesh N

    2016-02-01

    The serotonergic raphe nuclei are involved in regulating brain states over timescales of minutes and hours. We examined more rapid effects of raphe activation on two classes of principal neurons in the mouse olfactory bulb, mitral and tufted cells, which send olfactory information to distinct targets. Brief stimulation of the raphe nuclei led to excitation of tufted cells at rest and potentiation of their odor responses. While mitral cells at rest were also excited by raphe activation, their odor responses were bidirectionally modulated, leading to improved pattern separation of odors. In vitro whole-cell recordings revealed that specific optogenetic activation of raphe axons affected bulbar neurons through dual release of serotonin and glutamate. Therefore, the raphe nuclei, in addition to their role in neuromodulation of brain states, are also involved in fast, sub-second top-down modulation similar to cortical feedback. This modulation can selectively and differentially sensitize or decorrelate distinct output channels. PMID:26752161

  8. Small molecule activators of SIRT1 replicate signaling pathways triggered by calorie restriction in vivo

    Lavu Siva

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calorie restriction (CR produces a number of health benefits and ameliorates diseases of aging such as type 2 diabetes. The components of the pathways downstream of CR may provide intervention points for developing therapeutics for treating diseases of aging. The NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1 has been implicated as one of the key downstream regulators of CR in yeast, rodents, and humans. Small molecule activators of SIRT1 have been identified that exhibit efficacy in animal models of diseases typically associated with aging including type 2 diabetes. To identify molecular processes induced in the liver of mice treated with two structurally distinct SIRT1 activators, SIRT501 (formulated resveratrol and SRT1720, for three days, we utilized a systems biology approach and applied Causal Network Modeling (CNM on gene expression data to elucidate downstream effects of SIRT1 activation. Results Here we demonstrate that SIRT1 activators recapitulate many of the molecular events downstream of CR in vivo, such as enhancing mitochondrial biogenesis, improving metabolic signaling pathways, and blunting pro-inflammatory pathways in mice fed a high fat, high calorie diet. Conclusion CNM of gene expression data from mice treated with SRT501 or SRT1720 in combination with supporting in vitro and in vivo data demonstrates that SRT501 and SRT1720 produce a signaling profile that mirrors CR, improves glucose and insulin homeostasis, and acts via SIRT1 activation in vivo. Taken together these results are encouraging regarding the use of small molecule activators of SIRT1 for therapeutic intervention into type 2 diabetes, a strategy which is currently being investigated in multiple clinical trials.

  9. Hesperetin Induces Apoptosis in Breast Carcinoma by Triggering Accumulation of ROS and Activation of ASK1/JNK Pathway.

    Palit, Shreyasi; Kar, Susanta; Sharma, Gunjan; Das, Pijush K

    2015-08-01

    Hesperetin, a flavanone glycoside predominantly found in citrus fruits, exhibits a wide array of biological properties. In the present study hesperetin exhibited a significant cytotoxic effect in human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner without affecting normal (HMEC) as well as immortalized normal mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10A). The cytotoxic effect of hesperetin was due to the induction of apoptosis as evident from the phosphatidyl-serine externalization, DNA fragmentation, caspase-7 activation, and PARP cleavage. Apoptosis was associated with caspase-9 activation, mitochondrial membrane potential loss, release of cytochrome c, and increase in Bax:Bcl-2 ratio. Pre-treatment with caspase-9 specific inhibitor (Z-LEHD-fmk) markedly attenuated apoptosis suggesting an involvement of intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic cascade. Further, DCFDA flow-cytometric analysis revealed triggering of ROS in a time-dependent manner. Pre-treatment with ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and glutathione markedly abrogated hesperetin-mediated apoptosis whereas carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) pretreatment along with DHR123-based flow-cytometry indicated the generation of cytosolic ROS. Profiling of MAPKs revealed activation of JNK upon hesperetin treatment which was abrogated upon NAC pre-treatment. Additionally, inhibition of JNK by SP600125 significantly reversed hesperetin-mediated apoptosis. The activation of JNK was associated with the activation of ASK1. Silencing of ASK1 resulted in significant attenuation of JNK activation as well as reversed the hesperetin-mediated apoptosis suggesting that hesperetin-mediated apoptosis of MCF-7 cells involves accumulation of ROS and activation of ASK1/JNK pathway. In addition, hesperetin also induced apoptosis in triple negative breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells via intrinsic pathway via activation of caspase -9 and -3 and increase in Bax:Bcl-2 ratio. PMID:25204891

  10. Does Cluster Policy Trigger R&D Activity? – Evidence from German Biotech Contests

    Engel, Dirk; Mitze, Timo; Patuelli, Roberto; Reinkowski, Janina

    in research clusters. We apply a Difference-in-Differences estimation technique in a generalized linear model framework, which allows us to control for different initial regional conditions in R&D activity of the biotech sector. Our econometric findings support the view that winners generally...... outperform non-winning participants during the treatment period, thus indicating that exclusive funding as well as the stimulating effect of being a “winner” have positive effects on R&D activity in the short-term. Apart from this direct winner effect, for the non-winning participants no beneficial indirect...

  11. Activation of the cold-sensing TRPM8 channel triggers UCP1-dependent thermogenesis and prevents obesity

    Shuangtao Ma; Zhenyu Zhu; Li Li; Jian Zhong; Daoyan Liu; Bernd Nilius; Zhiming Zhu; Hao Yu; Zhigang Zhao; Zhidan Luo; Jing Chen; Yinxing Ni; Rongbing Jin; Liqun Ma; Peijian Wang

    2012-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is an energy-expending organ that produces heat.Expansion or activation of BAT prevents obesity and diabetes.Chronic cold exposure enhances thermogenesis in BAT through uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) activation triggered via a β-adrenergic pathway.Here,we report that the cold-sensing transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) is functionally present In mouse BAT.Challenging brown adipocytes with menthol,a TRPM8 agonist,up-regulates UCP1 expression and requires protein kinase A activation.Upon mimicking long-term cold exposure with chronic dietary menthol application,menthol significantly increased the core temperatures and locomotor activity in wild-type mice; these effects were absent in both TRPM8-/- and UCP1-/- mice.Dietary obesity and glucose abnormalities were also prevented by menthol treatment.Our results reveal a previously unrecognized role for TRPM8,suggesting that stimulation of this channel mediates BAT thermogenesis,which could constitute a promising way to treat obesity.

  12. Salt stress response triggers activation of the jasmonate signaling pathway leading to inhibition of cell elongation in Arabidopsis primary root.

    Valenzuela, Camilo E; Acevedo-Acevedo, Orlando; Miranda, Giovanna S; Vergara-Barros, Pablo; Holuigue, Loreto; Figueroa, Carlos R; Figueroa, Pablo M

    2016-07-01

    Salinity is a severe abiotic stress that affects irrigated croplands. Jasmonate (JA) is an essential hormone involved in plant defense against herbivory and in responses to abiotic stress. However, the relationship between the salt stress response and the JA pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana is not well understood at molecular and cellular levels. In this work we investigated the activation of JA signaling by NaCl and its effect on primary root growth. We found that JA-responsive JAZ genes were up-regulated by salt stress in a COI1-dependent manner in the roots. Using a JA-Ile sensor we demonstrated that activation of JA signaling by salt stress occurs in the meristematic zone and stele of the differentiation zone and that this activation was dependent on JAR1 and proteasome functions. Another finding is that the elongation zone (EZ) and its cortical cells were significantly longer in JA-related mutants (AOS, COI1, JAZ3 and MYC2/3/4 genes) compared with wild-type plants under salt stress, revealing the participation of the canonical JA signaling pathway. Noteworthy, osmotic stress - a component of salt stress - inhibited cell elongation in the EZ in a COI1-dependent manner. We propose that salt stress triggers activation of the JA signaling pathway followed by inhibition of cell elongation in the EZ. We have shown that salt-inhibited root growth partially involves the jasmonate signaling pathway in Arabidopsis. PMID:27217545

  13. One-way membrane trafficking of SOS in receptor-triggered Ras activation.

    Christensen, Sune M; Tu, Hsiung-Lin; Jun, Jesse E; Alvarez, Steven; Triplet, Meredith G; Iwig, Jeffrey S; Yadav, Kamlesh K; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Roose, Jeroen P; Groves, Jay T

    2016-09-01

    SOS is a key activator of the small GTPase Ras. In cells, SOS-Ras signaling is thought to be initiated predominantly by membrane recruitment of SOS via the adaptor Grb2 and balanced by rapidly reversible Grb2-SOS binding kinetics. However, SOS has multiple protein and lipid interactions that provide linkage to the membrane. In reconstituted-membrane experiments, these Grb2-independent interactions were sufficient to retain human SOS on the membrane for many minutes, during which a single SOS molecule could processively activate thousands of Ras molecules. These observations raised questions concerning how receptors maintain control of SOS in cells and how membrane-recruited SOS is ultimately released. We addressed these questions in quantitative assays of reconstituted SOS-deficient chicken B-cell signaling systems combined with single-molecule measurements in supported membranes. These studies revealed an essentially one-way trafficking process in which membrane-recruited SOS remains trapped on the membrane and continuously activates Ras until being actively removed via endocytosis. PMID:27501536

  14. Inferior Frontal Gyrus Activity Triggers Anterior Insula Response to Emotional Facial Expressions

    Jabbi, Mbemba; Keysers, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The observation of movies of facial expressions of others has been shown to recruit similar areas involved in experiencing one's own emotions: the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). the anterior insula and adjacent frontal operculum (IFO). The Causal link bet between activity in these 2 regions, associat

  15. Triggering Klystrons

    Stefan, Kelton D.; /Purdue U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    To determine if klystrons will perform to the specifications of the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) project, a new digital trigger controller is needed for the Klystron/Microwave Department Test Laboratory. The controller needed to be programmed and Windows based user interface software needed to be written to interface with the device over a USB (Universal Serial Bus). Programming the device consisted of writing logic in VHDL (VHSIC (Very High Speed Integrated Circuits) hardware description language), and the Windows interface software was written in C++. Xilinx ISE (Integrated Software Environment) was used to compile the VHDL code and program the device, and Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 was used to compile the C++ based Windows software. The device was programmed in such a way as to easily allow read/write operations to it using a simple addressing model, and Windows software was developed to interface with the device over a USB connection. A method of setting configuration registers in the trigger device is absolutely necessary to the development of a new triggering system, and the method developed will fulfill this need adequately. More work is needed before the new trigger system is ready for use. The configuration registers in the device need to be fully integrated with the logic that will generate the RF signals, and this system will need to be tested extensively to determine if it meets the requirements for low noise trigger outputs.

  16. An insecticidal protein from Xenorhabdus ehlersii triggers prophenoloxidase activation and hemocyte decrease in Galleria mellonella.

    Shi, Huaixing; Zeng, Hongmei; Yang, Xiufen; Zhao, Jing; Chen, Mingjia; Qiu, Dewen

    2012-06-01

    The bacteria Xenorhabdus spp. are entomopathogenic symbionts that can produce several toxic proteins that interfere the immune system of insects. We purified an insecticidal protein from Xenorhabdus ehlersii, and designated it as XeGroEL with an estimated molecular mass of ~58 kDa. Galleria mellonella larva injected with XeGroEL presented prophenoloxidase activation and hemocyte decrease. XeGroEL can kill G. mellonella larva in 48 h with an LD(50) of 0.76 ± 0.08 μg/larva. Our results demonstrate that X. ehlersii possesses a toxic XeGroEL protein acting as a potential factor to activate proPO in host insect, which also provides a meaningful hypothesis to understand the interaction between nematode-symbiotic bacteria and host. PMID:22477033

  17. Breathing of heliospheric structures triggered by the solar-cycle activity

    K. Scherer

    Full Text Available Solar wind ram pressure variations occuring within the solar activity cycle are communicated to the outer heliosphere as complicated time-variabilities, but repeating its typical form with the activity period of about 11 years. At outer heliospheric regions, the main surviving solar cycle feature is a periodic variation of the solar wind dynamical pressure or momentum flow, as clearly recognized by observations of the VOYAGER-1/2 space probes. This long-periodic variation of the solar wind dynamical pressure is modeled here through application of appropriately time-dependent inner boundary conditions within our multifluid code to describe the solar wind – interstellar medium interaction. As we can show, it takes several solar cycles until the heliospheric structures adapt to an average location about which they carry out a periodic breathing, however, lagged in phase with respect to the solar cycle. The dynamically active heliosphere behaves differently from a static heliosphere and especially shows a historic hysteresis in the sense that the shock structures move out to larger distances than explained by the average ram pressure. Obviously, additional energies are pumped into the heliosheath by means of density and pressure waves which are excited. These waves travel outwards through the interface from the termination shock towards the bow shock. Depending on longitude, the heliospheric sheath region memorizes 2–3 (upwind and up to 6–7 (downwind preceding solar activity cycles, i.e. the cycle-induced waves need corresponding travel times for the passage over the heliosheath. Within our multifluid code we also adequately describe the solar cycle variations in the energy distributions of anomalous and galactic cosmic rays, respectively. According to these results the distribution of these high energetic species cannot be correctly described on the basis of the actually prevailing solar wind conditions.

    Key words. Interplanetary

  18. Low-intensity continuous ultrasound triggers effective bisphosphonate anticancer activity in breast cancer

    Sophie Tardoski; Jacqueline Ngo; Evelyne Gineyts; Jean-Paul Roux; Philippe Clézardin; David Melodelima

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a non-ionizing pressure wave that can produce mechanical and thermal effects. Bisphosphonates have demonstrated clinical utility in bone metastases treatment. Preclinical studies suggest that bisphosphonates have anticancer activity. However, bisphosphonates exhibit a high affinity for bone mineral, which reduces their bioavailibity for tumor cells. Ultrasound has been shown to be effective for drug delivery but in interaction with gas bubbles or encapsulated drugs. We exam...

  19. Laminin α2-mediated focal adhesion kinase activation triggers Alport glomerular pathogenesis.

    Duane Delimont

    Full Text Available It has been known for some time that laminins containing α1 and α2 chains, which are normally restricted to the mesangial matrix, accumulate in the glomerular basement membranes (GBM of Alport mice, dogs, and humans. We show that laminins containing the α2 chain, but not those containing the α1 chain activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK on glomerular podocytes in vitro and in vivo. CD151-null mice, which have weakened podocyte adhesion to the GBM rendering these mice more susceptible to biomechanical strain in the glomerulus, also show progressive accumulation of α2 laminins in the GBM, and podocyte FAK activation. Analysis of glomerular mRNA from both models demonstrates significant induction of MMP-9, MMP-10, MMP-12, MMPs linked to GBM destruction in Alport disease models, as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. SiRNA knockdown of FAK in cultured podocytes significantly reduced expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and IL-6, but not MMP-12. Treatment of Alport mice with TAE226, a small molecule inhibitor of FAK activation, ameliorated fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis, significantly reduced proteinuria and blood urea nitrogen levels, and partially restored GBM ultrastructure. Glomerular expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and MMP-12 mRNAs was significantly reduced in TAE226 treated animals. Collectively, this work identifies laminin α2-mediated FAK activation in podocytes as an important early event in Alport glomerular pathogenesis and suggests that FAK inhibitors, if safe formulations can be developed, might be employed as a novel therapeutic approach for treating Alport renal disease in its early stages.

  20. Hypoglycemic neuronal death is triggered by glucose reperfusion and activation of neuronal NADPH oxidase

    Suh, Sang Won; Gum, Elizabeth T.; Hamby, Aaron M.; Chan, Pak H.; Swanson, Raymond A

    2007-01-01

    Hypoglycemic coma and brain injury are potential complications of insulin therapy. Certain neurons in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex are uniquely vulnerable to hypoglycemic cell death, and oxidative stress is a key event in this cell death process. Here we show that hypoglycemia-induced oxidative stress and neuronal death are attributable primarily to the activation of neuronal NADPH oxidase during glucose reperfusion. Superoxide production and neuronal death were blocked by the NADPH ox...

  1. Ovarian activation in Melipona quadrifasciata queens triggered by mating plug stimulation (Hymenoptera, Apidae)

    Melo, Gabriel; Maria Luisa T. Buschini,; Campos, Lucio

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the detached male genital capsule on ovarian activation in queens of the stingless bee Melipona quadrifasciata, and the amount of time the genital capsule remains attached to the queen genital chamber after mating, were investigated. Twenty-four controlled matings were carried out and the male capsules were manually removed at preset time intervals. The results indicate that the experimental removal of the mating plug on the first three days after mating inhibits ovarian activat...

  2. Immune targeting of fibroblast activation protein triggers recognition of multipotent bone marrow stromal cells and cachexia

    Tran, Eric; Chinnasamy, Dhanalakshmi; Yu, Zhiya; Morgan, Richard A.; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Restifo, Nicholas P; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a candidate universal target antigen because it has been reported to be selectively expressed in nearly all solid tumors by a subset of immunosuppressive tumor stromal fibroblasts. We verified that 18/18 human tumors of various histologies contained pronounced stromal elements staining strongly for FAP, and hypothesized that targeting tumor stroma with FAP-reactive T cells would inhibit tumor growth in cancer-bearing hosts. T cells genetically engineered...

  3. Pulsed Laser-Triggered High-Speed Microfluidic Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorter

    Chen, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, various microfluidic fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) systems have been demonstrated aiming to provide a fully enclosed environment for sterile, contamination and infectious free sorting, and better downstream microfluidic integration for further analysis after sorting. The biggest challenge of μFACS systems, however, is the orders of magnitude lower sorting throughput and purity than commercial aerosol based FACS (90% purity at 70,000 cells/sec). To solve th...

  4. Fusion-Triggered Switching of Enzymatic Activity on an Artificial Cell Membrane

    Jun-ichi Kikuchi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A nanosensory membrane device was constructed for detecting liposome fusion through changes in an enzymatic activity. Inspired by a biological signal transduction system, the device design involved functionalized liposomal membranes prepared by self-assembly of the following molecular components: a synthetic peptide lipid and a phospholipid as matrix membrane components, a Schiff’s base of pyridoxal 5’-phosphate with phosphatidylethanolamine as a thermo-responsive artificial receptor, NADH-dependent L-lactate dehydrogenase as a signal amplifier, and Cu2+ ion as a signal mediator between the receptor and enzyme. The enzymatic activity of the membrane device was adjustable by changing the matrix lipid composition, reflecting the thermotropic phase transition behavior of the lipid membranes, which in turn controlled receptor binding affinity toward the enzyme-inhibiting mediator species. When an effective fusogen anionic polymer was added to these cationic liposomes, membrane fusion occurred, and the functionalized liposomal membranes responded with changes in enzymatic activity, thus serving as an effective nanosensory device for liposome fusion detection.

  5. Neuro Emotional Technique for the treatment of trigger point sensitivity in chronic neck pain sufferers: A controlled clinical trial

    Pollard Henry

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trigger points have been shown to be active in many myofascial pain syndromes. Treatment of trigger point pain and dysfunction may be explained through the mechanisms of central and peripheral paradigms. This study aimed to investigate whether the mind/body treatment of Neuro Emotional Technique (NET could significantly relieve pain sensitivity of trigger points presenting in a cohort of chronic neck pain sufferers. Methods Sixty participants presenting to a private chiropractic clinic with chronic cervical pain as their primary complaint were sequentially allocated into treatment and control groups. Participants in the treatment group received a short course of Neuro Emotional Technique that consists of muscle testing, general semantics and Traditional Chinese Medicine. The control group received a sham NET protocol. Outcome measurements included pain assessment utilizing a visual analog scale and a pressure gauge algometer. Pain sensitivity was measured at four trigger point locations: suboccipital region (S; levator scapulae region (LS; sternocleidomastoid region (SCM and temporomandibular region (TMJ. For each outcome measurement and each trigger point, we calculated the change in measurement between pre- and post- treatment. We then examined the relationships between these measurement changes and six independent variables (i.e. treatment group and the above five additional participant variables using forward stepwise General Linear Model. Results The visual analog scale (0 to 10 had an improvement of 7.6 at S, 7.2 at LS, 7.5 at SCM and 7.1 at the TMJ in the treatment group compared with no improvement of at S, and an improvement of 0.04 at LS, 0.1 at SCM and 0.1 at the TMJ point in the control group, (P Conclusion After a short course of NET treatment, measurements of visual analog scale and pressure algometer recordings of four trigger point locations in a cohort of chronic neck pain sufferers were significantly

  6. Ursolic Acid Triggers Apoptosis in Human Osteosarcoma Cells via Caspase Activation and the ERK1/2 MAPK Pathway.

    Wu, Chia-Chieh; Cheng, Chun-Hsiang; Lee, Yi-Hui; Chang, Ing-Lin; Chen, Hsin-Yao; Hsieh, Chen-Pu; Chueh, Pin-Ju

    2016-06-01

    Ursolic acid (UA), a naturally occurring pentacyclic triterpene acid found in many medicinal herbs and edible plants, has been shown to trigger apoptosis in several lines of tumor cells in vitro. We found that treatment with UA suppressed the viability of human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells and induced cell cycle arrest at sub-G1 and G2/M phases. Furthermore, exposure to UA induced intracellular oxidative stress and collapse of mitochondrial membrane permeability, resulting in the subsequent activation of apoptotic caspases 8, 9, and 3 as well as PARP cleavage, and ultimately apoptosis in MG-63 cells. Moreover, protein analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-related protein expression showed an increase in activated ERK1/2, JNK, and p38 MAPK in UA-treated MG-63 cells. In addition, UA-induced apoptosis was significantly abolished in MG-63 cells that had been pretreated with inhibitors of caspase 3, 8, and 9 and ERK1/2. Furthermore, UA-treated MG-63 cells also exhibited an enhancement in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, whereas anti-apoptotic XIAP and survivin were down-regulated. Taken together, we provide evidence demonstrating that UA mediates caspase-dependent and ERK1/2 MAPK-associated apoptosis in osteosarcoma MG-63 cells. PMID:27171502

  7. Complement activation-related pseudoallergy: a stress reaction in blood triggered by nanomedicines and biologicals.

    Szebeni, Janos

    2014-10-01

    Intravenous injection of a variety of nanotechnology enhanced (liposomal, micellar, polymer-conjugated) and protein-based (antibodies, enzymes) drugs can lead to hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), also known as infusion, or anaphylactoid reactions. The molecular mechanism of mild to severe allergy symptoms may differ from case to case and is mostly not known, however, in many cases a major cause, or contributing factor is activation of the complement (C) system. The clinical relevance of C activation-related HSRs, a non-IgE-mediated pseudoallergy (CARPA), lies in its unpredictability and occasional lethal outcome. Accordingly, there is an unmet medical need to develop laboratory assays and animal models that quantitate CARPA. This review provides basic information on CARPA; a short history, issues of nomenclature, incidence, classification of reactogenic drugs and symptoms, and the mechanisms of C activation via different pathways. It is pointed out that anaphylatoxin-induced mast cell release may not entirely explain the severe reactions; a "second hit" on allergy mediating cells may also contribute. In addressing the increasing requirements for CARPA testing, the review evaluates the available assays and animal models, and proposes a possible algorithm for the screening of reactogenic drugs and hypersensitive patients. Finally, an analogy is proposed between CARPA and the classic stress reaction, suggesting that CARPA represents a "blood stress" reaction, a systemic fight of the body against harmful biological and chemical agents via the anaphylatoxin/mast-cell/circulatory system axis, in analogy to the body's fight of physical and emotional stress via the hypothalamo/pituitary/adrenal axis. In both cases the response to a broad variety of noxious effects are funneled into a uniform pattern of physiological changes. PMID:25124145

  8. The lack of autophagy triggers precocious activation of Notch signaling during Drosophila oogenesis

    Barth Julia MI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The proper balance of autophagy, a lysosome-mediated degradation process, is indispensable for oogenesis in Drosophila. We recently demonstrated that egg development depends on autophagy in the somatic follicle cells (FC, but not in the germline cells (GCs. However, the lack of autophagy only affects oogenesis when FCs are autophagy-deficient but GCs are wild type, indicating that a dysfunctional signaling between soma and germline may be responsible for the oogenesis defects. Thus, autophagy could play an essential role in modulating signal transduction pathways during egg development. Results Here, we provide further evidence for the necessity of autophagy during oogenesis and demonstrate that autophagy is especially required in subsets of FCs. Generation of autophagy-deficient FCs leads to a wide range of phenotypes that are similar to mutants with defects in the classical cell-cell signaling pathways in the ovary. Interestingly, we observe that loss of autophagy leads to a precocious activation of the Notch pathway in the FCs as monitored by the expression of Cut and Hindsight, two downstream effectors of Notch signaling. Conclusion Our findings point to an unexpected function for autophagy in the modulation of the Notch signaling pathway during Drosophila oogenesis and suggest a function for autophagy in proper receptor activation. Egg development is affected by an imbalance of autophagy between signal sending (germline and signal receiving cell (FC, thus the lack of autophagy in the germline is likely to decrease the amount of active ligand and accordingly compensates for increased signaling in autophagy-defective follicle cells.

  9. Selective and potent Akt inhibition triggers anti-myeloma activities and enhances fatal endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by proteasome inhibition

    Mimura, Naoya; Hideshima, Teru; Shimomura, Toshiyasu; Suzuki, Rikio; Ohguchi, Hiroto; Rizq, Ola; Kikuchi, Shohei; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Cottini, Francesca; Jakubikova, Jana; Cirstea, Diana; Gorgun, Gullu; Minami, Jiro; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Richardson, Paul G.; Utsugi, Teruhiro; Iwama, Atsushi; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    The PI3K/Akt pathway plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma (MM) in the bone marrow (BM) milieu. However, efficacy of selective and potent Akt inhibition has not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, we therefore examined the biologic impact of selective and potent Akt inhibition by a novel allosteric inhibitor TAS-117. TAS-117 induced significant growth inhibition, associated with downregulation of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt), selectively in MM cell lines with high baseline p-Akt. Cytotoxicity of TAS-117 was also observed in patients MM cells, but not in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Importantly, TAS-117 induced significant cytotoxicity in MM cells even in the presence of BM stromal cells, associated with inhibition of IL-6 secretion. Oral administration of TAS-117 significantly inhibited human MM cell growth in murine xenograft models. TAS-117 triggered apoptosis and autophagy, as well as induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response with minimal expression of CHOP, a fatal ER-stress marker. Importantly, TAS-117 enhanced bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity, associated with increased CHOP and PARP cleavage and blockade of bortezomib-induced p-Akt, suggesting that TAS-117 augments bortezomib-induced ER stress and apoptotic signaling. Carfilzomib-induced cytotoxicity was similarly enhanced by TAS-117. Importantly, TAS-117 enhanced bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity in vivo, associated with prolonged host survival. Our results show that selective and potent Akt inhibition by TAS-117 triggers anti-MM activities in vitro and in vivo, as well as enhances cytotoxicity of proteasome inhibition, providing the preclinical framework for clinical evaluation of selective Akt inhibitors, alone and in combination with proteasome inhibitors in MM. PMID:24934808

  10. Self-myofascial release -menetelmällä lisää lihaselastisuutta ja nivelliikkuvuutta

    Kukko, Arttu; Vainio-Hynnilä, Aki

    2014-01-01

    Self-myofascial release (SMR) tarkoittaa lihaskalvojen omatoimista käsittelyä. SMR-harjoittelua voidaan tehdä erilaisten välineiden avulla, kuten pilatesrullalla, tennispallolla tai hieromatikulla. Opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena on selvittää fascia-kudoksen merkitystä kehon toiminnassa ja tuottaa uutta tietoa SMR-harjoittelusta ja sen vaikutuksesta rectus femoris- ja hamstring -lihasten sekä IT-jänteen kireyteen sekä kivunkokemuksen muutoksiin SMR-harjoittelua tehtäessä kahdeksan viikon mitta...

  11. Earthworms strongly modify microbial biomass and activity triggering enzymatic activities during vermicomposting independently of the application rates of pig slurry

    We studied the relationships between earthworm activity, microbial biomass and the activation and dynamics of several enzyme activities. We carried out an experiment in which low and high rates (1.5 and 3 kg respectively) of pig slurry were applied to small scale reactors with and without earthworms. We found that extracellular enzyme activity increased with rate of pig slurry. In both rates of pig slurry applied, the presence of earthworms in young layers stimulated microbial growth which decreased once earthworms left the slurry and the layers aged. This increase was related to the initial activation of the microbial enzymes studied as correlations between microbial biomass and enzymes showed, which indicated an increase of intracellular enzyme activity. In the aged slurry, the pattern of activity of the four enzymes assayed depended on the rate of pig slurry applied. Thus, in low rate reactors, enzymatic activity through layers appeared to be related to microbial biomass, but in high rate reactors the activity of enzymes was more or less continuous. Further, these differences in overall enzyme activity agree with the variation found in extracellular enzyme activity suggesting certain dependence on substrate availability

  12. Earthworms strongly modify microbial biomass and activity triggering enzymatic activities during vermicomposting independently of the application rates of pig slurry

    Aira, Manuel E-mail: aira@uvigo.es; Monroy, Fernando; Dominguez, Jorge

    2007-10-15

    We studied the relationships between earthworm activity, microbial biomass and the activation and dynamics of several enzyme activities. We carried out an experiment in which low and high rates (1.5 and 3 kg respectively) of pig slurry were applied to small scale reactors with and without earthworms. We found that extracellular enzyme activity increased with rate of pig slurry. In both rates of pig slurry applied, the presence of earthworms in young layers stimulated microbial growth which decreased once earthworms left the slurry and the layers aged. This increase was related to the initial activation of the microbial enzymes studied as correlations between microbial biomass and enzymes showed, which indicated an increase of intracellular enzyme activity. In the aged slurry, the pattern of activity of the four enzymes assayed depended on the rate of pig slurry applied. Thus, in low rate reactors, enzymatic activity through layers appeared to be related to microbial biomass, but in high rate reactors the activity of enzymes was more or less continuous. Further, these differences in overall enzyme activity agree with the variation found in extracellular enzyme activity suggesting certain dependence on substrate availability.

  13. Direct visualization of free-volume-triggered activation of β relaxation in colloidal glass

    Lu, Yunzhuo; Lu, Xing; Qin, Zuoxiang; Shen, Jun

    2016-07-01

    β relaxation, which is predicted by mode coupling theory and involves the localized motions of particles, initiates in a supercooled liquid and continues into glassy state. It correlates essentially with many fundamental properties of amorphous materials. Despite its importance, the underlying mechanisms leading to the β relaxation have remained elusive. As natural heterogeneity, the original distributed free volume has been supposed to be associated with the activation of β relaxation in amorphous solids. However, there has been no direct experimental proof for this hypothesis. Here we used a colloidal glass to directly observe the β relaxation and free-volume distribution. We found a spatial correlation between the β relaxation and free volume. The large free volume regions were observed to possess a low-energy cost of relaxation-induced strain, indicating that the large free volume region presenting a low-energy barrier for structural relaxation benefits the β relaxation.

  14. Coxsackievirus cloverleaf RNA containing a 5' triphosphate triggers an antiviral response via RIG-I activation.

    Qian Feng

    Full Text Available Upon viral infections, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and stimulate an antiviral state associated with the production of type I interferons (IFNs and inflammatory markers. Type I IFNs play crucial roles in innate antiviral responses by inducing expression of interferon-stimulated genes and by activating components of the adaptive immune system. Although pegylated IFNs have been used to treat hepatitis B and C virus infections for decades, they exert substantial side effects that limit their use. Current efforts are directed toward the use of PRR agonists as an alternative approach to elicit host antiviral responses in a manner similar to that achieved in a natural infection. RIG-I is a cytosolic PRR that recognizes 5' triphosphate (5'ppp-containing RNA ligands. Due to its ubiquitous expression profile, induction of the RIG-I pathway provides a promising platform for the development of novel antiviral agents and vaccine adjuvants. In this study, we investigated whether structured RNA elements in the genome of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3, a picornavirus that is recognized by MDA5 during infection, could activate RIG-I when supplied with 5'ppp. We show here that a 5'ppp-containing cloverleaf (CL RNA structure is a potent RIG-I inducer that elicits an extensive antiviral response that includes induction of classical interferon-stimulated genes, as well as type III IFNs and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. In addition, we show that prophylactic treatment with CVB3 CL provides protection against various viral infections including dengue virus, vesicular stomatitis virus and enterovirus 71, demonstrating the antiviral efficacy of this RNA ligand.

  15. Coxsackievirus cloverleaf RNA containing a 5' triphosphate triggers an antiviral response via RIG-I activation.

    Feng, Qian; Langereis, Martijn A; Olagnier, David; Chiang, Cindy; van de Winkel, Roel; van Essen, Peter; Zoll, Jan; Hiscott, John; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2014-01-01

    Upon viral infections, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and stimulate an antiviral state associated with the production of type I interferons (IFNs) and inflammatory markers. Type I IFNs play crucial roles in innate antiviral responses by inducing expression of interferon-stimulated genes and by activating components of the adaptive immune system. Although pegylated IFNs have been used to treat hepatitis B and C virus infections for decades, they exert substantial side effects that limit their use. Current efforts are directed toward the use of PRR agonists as an alternative approach to elicit host antiviral responses in a manner similar to that achieved in a natural infection. RIG-I is a cytosolic PRR that recognizes 5' triphosphate (5'ppp)-containing RNA ligands. Due to its ubiquitous expression profile, induction of the RIG-I pathway provides a promising platform for the development of novel antiviral agents and vaccine adjuvants. In this study, we investigated whether structured RNA elements in the genome of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), a picornavirus that is recognized by MDA5 during infection, could activate RIG-I when supplied with 5'ppp. We show here that a 5'ppp-containing cloverleaf (CL) RNA structure is a potent RIG-I inducer that elicits an extensive antiviral response that includes induction of classical interferon-stimulated genes, as well as type III IFNs and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. In addition, we show that prophylactic treatment with CVB3 CL provides protection against various viral infections including dengue virus, vesicular stomatitis virus and enterovirus 71, demonstrating the antiviral efficacy of this RNA ligand. PMID:24759703

  16. Specific interaction with cardiolipin triggers functional activation of Dynamin-Related Protein 1.

    Itsasne Bustillo-Zabalbeitia

    Full Text Available Dynamin-Related Protein 1 (Drp1, a large GTPase of the dynamin superfamily, is required for mitochondrial fission in healthy and apoptotic cells. Drp1 activation is a complex process that involves translocation from the cytosol to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM and assembly into rings/spirals at the MOM, leading to membrane constriction/division. Similar to dynamins, Drp1 contains GTPase (G, bundle signaling element (BSE and stalk domains. However, instead of the lipid-interacting Pleckstrin Homology (PH domain present in the dynamins, Drp1 contains the so-called B insert or variable domain that has been suggested to play an important role in Drp1 regulation. Different proteins have been implicated in Drp1 recruitment to the MOM, although how MOM-localized Drp1 acquires its fully functional status remains poorly understood. We found that Drp1 can interact with pure lipid bilayers enriched in the mitochondrion-specific phospholipid cardiolipin (CL. Building on our previous study, we now explore the specificity and functional consequences of this interaction. We show that a four lysine module located within the B insert of Drp1 interacts preferentially with CL over other anionic lipids. This interaction dramatically enhances Drp1 oligomerization and assembly-stimulated GTP hydrolysis. Our results add significantly to a growing body of evidence indicating that CL is an important regulator of many essential mitochondrial functions.

  17. Immune targeting of fibroblast activation protein triggers recognition of multipotent bone marrow stromal cells and cachexia

    Chinnasamy, Dhanalakshmi; Yu, Zhiya; Morgan, Richard A.; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a candidate universal target antigen because it has been reported to be selectively expressed in nearly all solid tumors by a subset of immunosuppressive tumor stromal fibroblasts. We verified that 18/18 human tumors of various histologies contained pronounced stromal elements staining strongly for FAP, and hypothesized that targeting tumor stroma with FAP-reactive T cells would inhibit tumor growth in cancer-bearing hosts. T cells genetically engineered with FAP-reactive chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) specifically degranulated and produced effector cytokines upon stimulation with FAP or FAP-expressing cell lines. However, adoptive transfer of FAP-reactive T cells into mice bearing a variety of subcutaneous tumors mediated limited antitumor effects and induced significant cachexia and lethal bone toxicities in two mouse strains. We found that FAP was robustly expressed on PDGFR-α+, Sca-1+ multipotent bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in mice, as well as on well-characterized, clinical-grade multipotent human BMSCs. Accordingly, both mouse and human multipotent BMSCs were recognized by FAP-reactive T cells. The lethal bone toxicity and cachexia observed after cell-based immunotherapy targeting FAP cautions against its use as a universal target. Moreover, the expression of FAP by multipotent BMSCs may point toward the cellular origins of tumor stromal fibroblasts. PMID:23712432

  18. Activation of Proinflammatory Responses in Cells of the Airway Mucosa by Particulate Matter: Oxidant- and Non-Oxidant-Mediated Triggering Mechanisms.

    Øvrevik, Johan; Refsnes, Magne; Låg, Marit; Holme, Jørn A; Schwarze, Per E

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is considered to play a central role in a diverse range of disease outcomes associated with exposure to various types of inhalable particulates. The initial mechanisms through which particles trigger cellular responses leading to activation of inflammatory responses are crucial to clarify in order to understand what physico-chemical characteristics govern the inflammogenic activity of particulate matter and why some particles are more harmful than others. Recent research suggests that molecular triggering mechanisms involved in activation of proinflammatory genes and onset of inflammatory reactions by particles or soluble particle components can be categorized into direct formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with subsequent oxidative stress, interaction with the lipid layer of cellular membranes, activation of cell surface receptors, and direct interactions with intracellular molecular targets. The present review focuses on the immediate effects and responses in cells exposed to particles and central down-stream signaling mechanisms involved in regulation of proinflammatory genes, with special emphasis on the role of oxidant and non-oxidant triggering mechanisms. Importantly, ROS act as a central second-messenger in a variety of signaling pathways. Even non-oxidant mediated triggering mechanisms are therefore also likely to activate downstream redox-regulated events. PMID:26147224

  19. Activation of Proinflammatory Responses in Cells of the Airway Mucosa by Particulate Matter: Oxidant- and Non-Oxidant-Mediated Triggering Mechanisms

    Johan Øvrevik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is considered to play a central role in a diverse range of disease outcomes associated with exposure to various types of inhalable particulates. The initial mechanisms through which particles trigger cellular responses leading to activation of inflammatory responses are crucial to clarify in order to understand what physico-chemical characteristics govern the inflammogenic activity of particulate matter and why some particles are more harmful than others. Recent research suggests that molecular triggering mechanisms involved in activation of proinflammatory genes and onset of inflammatory reactions by particles or soluble particle components can be categorized into direct formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS with subsequent oxidative stress, interaction with the lipid layer of cellular membranes, activation of cell surface receptors, and direct interactions with intracellular molecular targets. The present review focuses on the immediate effects and responses in cells exposed to particles and central down-stream signaling mechanisms involved in regulation of proinflammatory genes, with special emphasis on the role of oxidant and non-oxidant triggering mechanisms. Importantly, ROS act as a central second-messenger in a variety of signaling pathways. Even non-oxidant mediated triggering mechanisms are therefore also likely to activate downstream redox-regulated events.

  20. 8,9-Dehydrohispanolone-15,16-lactol diterpene prevents LPS-triggered inflammatory responses by inhibiting endothelial activation.

    Jiménez-García, Lidia; Través, Paqui G; López-Fontal, Raquel; Herranz, Sandra; Higueras, María Angeles; de Las Heras, Beatriz; Hortelano, Sonsoles; Luque, Alfonso

    2016-07-15

    Endothelial activation contributes to lung inflammatory disorders by inducing leucocyte recruitment to pulmonary parenchyma. Consequently, vascular-targeted therapies constitute promising strategies for the treatment of inflammatory pathologies. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of 8,9-dehydrohispanolone-15,16-lactol diterpene (DT) on lung endothelium during inflammation. Lung endothelial cells pre-treated with DT and activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) exhibited reduced expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines Cxcl10, Ccl5 and Cxcl1, whereas the anti-inflammatory molecules IL1r2 and IL-10 were induced. Consistent with this result, DT pre-treatment inhibited nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) nuclear translocation, by interfering with IκBα phosphorylation, and consequently NF-κB transcriptional activity in endothelium activated by LPS or TNF-α. Furthermore, DT, probably through p38 signalling, induced transcriptional activation of genes containing activator protein 1 (AP-1)-binding elements. Inhibition of p38 prevented IL1r2 mRNA expression in endothelium incubated with DT alone or in combination with LPS or TNF-α. Accordingly, conditioned medium (CM) from these cells failed to stimulate leucocytes as measured by a reduction in adhesive ability of the leucocyte cell line J774 to fibronectin (FN). Additionally, DT reduced the expression of the endothelial adhesion molecules E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) after activation. Similarly, expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 molecules on the lung endothelial layer of C57/BL6 mice pre-treated with DT and challenged with LPS were unchanged. Finally, inhibition of vascular adhesion molecule expression by DT decreased the interaction of J774 cells with lung endothelial cells in an inflammatory environment. Our findings establish DT as a novel endothelial inhibitor for the treatment of inflammatory

  1. Runaway electron generation as possible trigger for enhancement of magnetohydrodynamic plasma activity and fast changes in runaway beam behavior

    Pankratov, I. M., E-mail: pankratov@kipt.kharkov.ua, E-mail: rjzhou@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Academicheskaya Str. 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Zhou, R. J., E-mail: pankratov@kipt.kharkov.ua, E-mail: rjzhou@ipp.ac.cn; Hu, L. Q. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Peculiar phenomena were observed during experiments with runaway electrons: rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) signal (cyclotron radiation of suprathermal electrons). These phenomena were initially observed in TEXTOR (Tokamak Experiment for Technology Oriented Research), where these events only occurred in the current decay phase or in discharges with thin stable runaway beams at a q = 1 drift surface. These rapid changes in the synchrotron spot were interpreted by the TEXTOR team as a fast pitch angle scattering event. Recently, similar rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the non-thermal ECE signal were observed in the EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) runaway discharge. Runaway electrons were located around the q = 2 rational magnetic surface (ring-like runaway electron beam). During the EAST runaway discharge, stepwise ECE signal increases coincided with enhanced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity. This behavior was peculiar to this shot. In this paper, we show that these non-thermal ECE step-like jumps were related to the abrupt growth of suprathermal electrons induced by bursting electric fields at reconnection events during this MHD plasma activity. Enhancement of the secondary runaway electron generation also occurred simultaneously. Local changes in the current-density gradient appeared because of local enhancement of the runaway electron generation process. These current-density gradient changes are considered to be a possible trigger for enhancement of the MHD plasma activity and the rapid changes in runaway beam behavior.

  2. Runaway electron generation as possible trigger for enhancement of magnetohydrodynamic plasma activity and fast changes in runaway beam behavior

    Peculiar phenomena were observed during experiments with runaway electrons: rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) signal (cyclotron radiation of suprathermal electrons). These phenomena were initially observed in TEXTOR (Tokamak Experiment for Technology Oriented Research), where these events only occurred in the current decay phase or in discharges with thin stable runaway beams at a q = 1 drift surface. These rapid changes in the synchrotron spot were interpreted by the TEXTOR team as a fast pitch angle scattering event. Recently, similar rapid changes in the synchrotron spot and its intensity that coincided with stepwise increases in the non-thermal ECE signal were observed in the EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) runaway discharge. Runaway electrons were located around the q = 2 rational magnetic surface (ring-like runaway electron beam). During the EAST runaway discharge, stepwise ECE signal increases coincided with enhanced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity. This behavior was peculiar to this shot. In this paper, we show that these non-thermal ECE step-like jumps were related to the abrupt growth of suprathermal electrons induced by bursting electric fields at reconnection events during this MHD plasma activity. Enhancement of the secondary runaway electron generation also occurred simultaneously. Local changes in the current-density gradient appeared because of local enhancement of the runaway electron generation process. These current-density gradient changes are considered to be a possible trigger for enhancement of the MHD plasma activity and the rapid changes in runaway beam behavior

  3. Kaurenoic Acid Possesses Leishmanicidal Activity by Triggering a NLRP12/IL-1β/cNOS/NO Pathway.

    Miranda, Milena Menegazzo; Panis, Carolina; da Silva, Suelen Santos; Macri, Juliana Aparecida; Kawakami, Natalia Yoshie; Hayashida, Thiago Hideki; Madeira, Tiago Bervelieri; Acquaro, Vinicius Ricardo; Nixdorf, Suzana Lucy; Pizzatti, Luciana; Ambrósio, Sérgio Ricardo; Cecchini, Rubens; Arakawa, Nilton Syogo; Verri, Waldiceu Aparecido; Costa, Ivete Conchon; Pavanelli, Wander Rogério

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis (L. amazonensis) infection can cause severe local and diffuse injuries in humans, a condition clinically known as American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL). Currently, the therapeutic approach for ACL is based on Glucantime, which shows high toxicity and poor effectiveness. Therefore, ACL remains a neglected disease with limited options for treatment. Herein, the in vitro antiprotozoal effect and mechanisms of the diterpene kaurenoic acid [ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid] (KA) against L. amazonensis were investigated. KA exhibited a direct antileishmanial effect on L. amazonensis promastigotes. Importantly, KA also reduced the intracellular number of amastigote forms and percentage of infected peritoneal macrophages of BALB/c mice. Mechanistically, KA treatment reestablished the production of nitric oxide (NO) in a constitutive NO synthase- (cNOS-) dependent manner, subverting the NO-depleting escape mechanism of L. amazonensis. Furthermore, KA induced increased production of IL-1β and expression of the inflammasome-activating component NLRP12. These findings demonstrate the leishmanicidal capability of KA against L. amazonensis in macrophage culture by triggering a NLRP12/IL-1β/cNOS/NO mechanism. PMID:26074677

  4. Kaurenoic Acid Possesses Leishmanicidal Activity by Triggering a NLRP12/IL-1β/cNOS/NO Pathway

    Milena Menegazzo Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania amazonensis (L. amazonensis infection can cause severe local and diffuse injuries in humans, a condition clinically known as American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL. Currently, the therapeutic approach for ACL is based on Glucantime, which shows high toxicity and poor effectiveness. Therefore, ACL remains a neglected disease with limited options for treatment. Herein, the in vitro antiprotozoal effect and mechanisms of the diterpene kaurenoic acid [ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid] (KA against L. amazonensis were investigated. KA exhibited a direct antileishmanial effect on L. amazonensis promastigotes. Importantly, KA also reduced the intracellular number of amastigote forms and percentage of infected peritoneal macrophages of BALB/c mice. Mechanistically, KA treatment reestablished the production of nitric oxide (NO in a constitutive NO synthase- (cNOS- dependent manner, subverting the NO-depleting escape mechanism of L. amazonensis. Furthermore, KA induced increased production of IL-1β and expression of the inflammasome-activating component NLRP12. These findings demonstrate the leishmanicidal capability of KA against L. amazonensis in macrophage culture by triggering a NLRP12/IL-1β/cNOS/NO mechanism.

  5. A giant molecular cloud falling through the heart of Cygnus A: clues to the triggering of the activity

    Bellamy, M J

    2004-01-01

    We present intermediate resolution near-IR long-slit spectroscopic data for the nearby radio galaxy Cygnus A (3C 405) (obtained with the NIRSPEC spectrograph on the Keck II telescope). The data reveal considerable complexity in the near-IR emission line kinematics, including line splittings of 200-350 km/s and a mixture of narrow (FWHM ~200 km/s) and broad (FWHM ~700 km/s) components to the emission lines. It is notable that the Pa alpha and H2 emission lines show markedly different kinematics, both on- and off-nucleus. Overall, the data provide evidence for the presence of a giant molecular cloud falling through the heart of the Cygnus A host galaxy, the motion of which is not driven by the AGN itself. We suggest that this cloud may be connected to the triggering of the activity in this highly powerful AGN. We also detect split H2 components on the nucleus that are likely to originate in the circum-nuclear torus.

  6. A Framework for Understanding the Relationship between Descending Pain Modulation, Motor Corticospinal, and Neuroplasticity Regulation Systems in Chronic Myofascial Pain.

    Botelho, Leonardo M; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Rozisky, Joanna R; Brietzke, Aline P; Torres, Iraci L S; Deitos, Alicia; Fregni, Felipe; Caumo, Wolnei

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a leading cause of chronic musculoskeletal pain. However, its neurobiological mechanisms are not entirely elucidated. Given the complex interaction between the networks involved in pain process, our approach, to providing insights into the neural mechanisms of pain, was to investigate the relationship between neurophysiological, neurochemical and clinical outcomes such as corticospinal excitability. Recent evidence has demonstrated that three neural systems are affected in chronic pain: (i) motor corticospinal system; (ii) internal descending pain modulation system; and (iii) the system regulating neuroplasticity. In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to examine the relationship between these three central systems in patients with chronic MPS of whom do/do not respond to the Conditioned Pain Modulation Task (CPM-task). The CPM-task was to immerse her non-dominant hand in cold water (0-1°C) to produce a heterotopic nociceptive stimulus. Corticospinal excitability was the primary outcome; specifically, the motor evoked potential (MEP) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) as assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Secondary outcomes were the cortical excitability parameters [current silent period (CSP) and short intracortical inhibition (SICI)], serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), heat pain threshold (HPT), and the disability related to pain (DRP). We included 33 women, (18-65 years old). The MANCOVA model using Bonferroni's Multiple Comparison Test revealed that non-responders (n = 10) compared to responders (n = 23) presented increased intracortical facilitation (ICF; mean ± SD) 1.43 (0.3) vs. 1.11 (0.12), greater motor-evoked potential amplitude (μV) 1.93 (0.54) vs. 1.40 (0.27), as well a higher serum BDNF (pg/Ml) 32.56 (9.95) vs. 25.59 (10.24), (P < 0.05 for all). Also, non-responders presented a higher level of DRP and decreased HPT (P < 0.05 for all). These findings suggest that the loss of net

  7. Burn injury triggered dysfunction in dendritic cell response to TLR9 activation and resulted in skewed T cell functions.

    Haitao Shen

    Full Text Available Severe trauma such as burn injury is often associated with a systemic inflammatory syndrome characterized by a hyperactive innate immune response and suppressed adaptive immune function. Dendritic cells (DCs, which sense pathogens via their Toll-like receptors (TLRs, play a pivotal role in protecting the host against infections. The effect of burn injury on TLR-mediated DC function is a debated topic and the mechanism controlling the purported immunosuppressive response remains to be elucidated. Here we examined the effects of burn injury on splenic conventional DC (cDC and plasmacytoid DC (pDC responses to TLR9 activation. We demonstrate that, following burn trauma, splenic cDCs' cytokine production profile in response to TLR9 activation became anti-inflammatory dominant, with high production of IL-10 (>50% increase and low production of IL-6, TNF-α and IL-12p70 (∼25-60% reduction. CD4+ T cells activated by these cDCs were defective in producing Th1 and Th17 cytokines. Furthermore, burn injury had a more accentuated effect on pDCs than on cDCs. Following TLR9 activation, pDCs displayed an immature phenotype with an impaired ability to secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-α, IL-6 and TNF-α and to activate T cell proliferation. Moreover, cDCs and pDCs from burn-injured mice had low transcript levels of TLR9 and several key molecules of the TLR signaling pathway. Although hyperactive innate immune response has been associated with severe injury, our data show to the contrary that DCs, as a key player in the innate immune system, had impaired TLR9 reactivity, an anti-inflammatory phenotype, and a dysfunctional T cell-priming ability. We conclude that burn injury induced impairments in DC immunobiology resulting in suppression of adaptive immune response. Targeted DC immunotherapies to promote their ability in triggering T cell immunity may represent a strategy to improve immune defenses against infection following burn injury.

  8. ZnO nanoparticle-induced oxidative stress triggers apoptosis by activating JNK signaling pathway in cultured primary astrocytes

    Wang, Jieting; Deng, Xiaobei; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Deliang; Ding, Wenjun

    2014-03-01

    It has been documented in in vitro studies that zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are capable of inducing oxidative stress, which plays a crucial role in ZnO NP-mediated apoptosis. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of apoptosis in neurocytes induced by ZnO NP exposure was not fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the potential mechanisms of apoptosis provoked by ZnO NPs in cultured primary astrocytes by exploring the molecular signaling pathways triggered after ZnO NP exposure. ZnO NP exposure was found to reduce cell viability in MTT assays, increase lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, stimulate intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and elicit caspase-3 activation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Apoptosis occurred after ZnO NP exposure as evidenced by nuclear condensation and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP) cleavage. A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) with a concomitant increase in the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio suggested that the mitochondria also mediated the pathway involved in ZnO NP-induced apoptosis. In addition, exposure of the cultured cells to ZnO NPs led to phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). Moreover, JNK inhibitor (SP600125) significantly reduced ZnO NP-induced cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3 expression, but not ERK inhibitor (U0126) or p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB203580), indicating that JNK signaling pathway is involved in ZnO NP-induced apoptosis in primary astrocytes.

  9. A codimension-2 bifurcation controlling endogenous bursting activity and pulse-triggered responses of a neuron model.

    William H Barnett

    Full Text Available The dynamics of individual neurons are crucial for producing functional activity in neuronal networks. An open question is how temporal characteristics can be controlled in bursting activity and in transient neuronal responses to synaptic input. Bifurcation theory provides a framework to discover generic mechanisms addressing this question. We present a family of mechanisms organized around a global codimension-2 bifurcation. The cornerstone bifurcation is located at the intersection of the border between bursting and spiking and the border between bursting and silence. These borders correspond to the blue sky catastrophe bifurcation and the saddle-node bifurcation on an invariant circle (SNIC curves, respectively. The cornerstone bifurcation satisfies the conditions for both the blue sky catastrophe and SNIC. The burst duration and interburst interval increase as the inverse of the square root of the difference between the corresponding bifurcation parameter and its bifurcation value. For a given set of burst duration and interburst interval, one can find the parameter values supporting these temporal characteristics. The cornerstone bifurcation also determines the responses of silent and spiking neurons. In a silent neuron with parameters close to the SNIC, a pulse of current triggers a single burst. In a spiking neuron with parameters close to the blue sky catastrophe, a pulse of current temporarily silences the neuron. These responses are stereotypical: the durations of the transient intervals-the duration of the burst and the duration of latency to spiking-are governed by the inverse-square-root laws. The mechanisms described here could be used to coordinate neuromuscular control in central pattern generators. As proof of principle, we construct small networks that control metachronal-wave motor pattern exhibited in locomotion. This pattern is determined by the phase relations of bursting neurons in a simple central pattern generator

  10. Analysis of Non-Enzymatically Glycated Peptides: Neutral-Loss Triggered MS3 Versus Multi-Stage Activation Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Zhang, Qibin; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-10-15

    Non-enzymatic glycation of tissue proteins has important implications in the development of complications of diabetes mellitus. While electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has been shown to outperform collision-induced dissociation (CID) in sequencing glycated peptides by tandem mass spectrometry, ETD instrumentation is not yet available in all laboratories. In this study, we evaluated different advanced CID techniques (i.e., neutral-loss triggered MS3 and multi-stage activation) during LC-MSn analyses of Amadori-modified peptides enriched from human serum glycated in vitro. During neutral-loss triggered MS3 experiments, MS3 scans triggered by neutral-losses of 3 H2O or 3 H2O + HCHO produced similar results in terms of glycated peptide identifications. However, neutral losses of 3 H2O resulted in significantly more glycated peptide identifications during multi-stage activation experiments. Overall, the multi-stage activation approach produced more glycated peptide identifications, while the neutral-loss triggered MS3 approach resulted in much higher specificity. Both techniques offer a viable alternative to ETD for identifying glycated peptides when that method is unavailable.

  11. Triggering Artefacts

    Mogensen, Preben Holst; Robinson, Mike

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents a general critique of the use of conceptual frameworks in design, illustrated by the well known synchronous/asynchronous, co-located/non-co-located framework. It argues that while frameworks are a necessary and inevitable starting point for design, the business of tailoring and...... adapting them to specific situations need not be ad hoc.Triggering artefacts are a way of systematically challenging both designers' preunderstandings and the conservatism of work practice. Experiences from the Great Belt tunnel and bridge project are used to illustrate howtriggering artefacts change...

  12. Activation of Proinflammatory Responses in Cells of the Airway Mucosa by Particulate Matter: Oxidant- and Non-Oxidant-Mediated Triggering Mechanisms

    Johan Øvrevik; Magne Refsnes; Marit Låg; Holme, Jørn A.; Schwarze, Per E

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is considered to play a central role in a diverse range of disease outcomes associated with exposure to various types of inhalable particulates. The initial mechanisms through which particles trigger cellular responses leading to activation of inflammatory responses are crucial to clarify in order to understand what physico-chemical characteristics govern the inflammogenic activity of particulate matter and why some particles are more harmful than others. Recent research suggests...

  13. Cadmium sulfide nanoparticles trigger DNA alterations and modify the bioturbation activity of tubificidae worms exposed through the sediment.

    Dedeh, Amina; Ciutat, Aurélie; Lecroart, Pascal; Treguer-Delapierre, Mona; Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul

    2016-04-01

    To address the impact of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles (CdS NPs) in freshwater ecosystems, aquatic oligochaete Tubifex tubifex were exposed through the sediment to a low dose (0.52 mg of 8 nm in size of CdS NPs/kg) for 20 days using microcosms. Cadmium (Cd) was released from the CdS NPs-contaminated sediment to the water column, and during this period the average concentrations of Cd in the filtered water fraction were 0.026 ± 0.006 µg/L in presence of oligochaetes. Similar experiments with microparticular CdS and cadmium chloride (CdCl2) were simultaneously performed for comparative purposes. CdS NPs exposure triggered various effects on Tubifex worms compared to control, microsized and ionic reference, including modification of genome composition as assessed using RAPD-PCR genotoxicity tests. Bioaccumulation levels showed that CdS NPs were less bioavailable than CdCl2 to oligochaetes and reached 0.08 ± 0.01 µg Cd/g for CdS NPs exposure versus 0.76 ± 0.3 µg Cd/g for CdCl2 exposure (fresh weight). CdS NPs altered worm's behavior by decreasing significantly the bioturbation activity as assessed after the exposure period using conservative fluorescent particulate tracers. This study demonstrated the high potential harm of the CdS nanoparticular form despite its lower bioavailability for Tubifex worms. PMID:26618487

  14. Inactivation of PNKP by mutant ATXN3 triggers apoptosis by activating the DNA damage-response pathway in SCA3.

    Rui Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3, also known as Machado-Joseph disease (MJD, is an untreatable autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease, and the most common such inherited ataxia worldwide. The mutation in SCA3 is the expansion of a polymorphic CAG tri-nucleotide repeat sequence in the C-terminal coding region of the ATXN3 gene at chromosomal locus 14q32.1. The mutant ATXN3 protein encoding expanded glutamine (polyQ sequences interacts with multiple proteins in vivo, and is deposited as aggregates in the SCA3 brain. A large body of literature suggests that the loss of function of the native ATNX3-interacting proteins that are deposited in the polyQ aggregates contributes to cellular toxicity, systemic neurodegeneration and the pathogenic mechanism in SCA3. Nonetheless, a significant understanding of the disease etiology of SCA3, the molecular mechanism by which the polyQ expansions in the mutant ATXN3 induce neurodegeneration in SCA3 has remained elusive. In the present study, we show that the essential DNA strand break repair enzyme PNKP (polynucleotide kinase 3'-phosphatase interacts with, and is inactivated by, the mutant ATXN3, resulting in inefficient DNA repair, persistent accumulation of DNA damage/strand breaks, and subsequent chronic activation of the DNA damage-response ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM signaling pathway in SCA3. We report that persistent accumulation of DNA damage/strand breaks and chronic activation of the serine/threonine kinase ATM and the downstream p53 and protein kinase C-δ pro-apoptotic pathways trigger neuronal dysfunction and eventually neuronal death in SCA3. Either PNKP overexpression or pharmacological inhibition of ATM dramatically blocked mutant ATXN3-mediated cell death. Discovery of the mechanism by which mutant ATXN3 induces DNA damage and amplifies the pro-death signaling pathways provides a molecular basis for neurodegeneration due to PNKP inactivation in SCA3, and for the first time offers

  15. Firearm trigger assembly

    Crandall, David L.; Watson, Richard W.

    2010-02-16

    A firearm trigger assembly for use with a firearm includes a trigger mounted to a forestock of the firearm so that the trigger is movable between a rest position and a triggering position by a forwardly placed support hand of a user. An elongated trigger member operatively associated with the trigger operates a sear assembly of the firearm when the trigger is moved to the triggering position. An action release assembly operatively associated with the firearm trigger assembly and a movable assembly of the firearm prevents the trigger from being moved to the triggering position when the movable assembly is not in the locked position.

  16. Acute effects of self-myofascial release using a foam roller on arterial function.

    Okamoto, Takanobu; Masuhara, Mitsuhiko; Ikuta, Komei

    2014-01-01

    Flexibility is associated with arterial distensibility. Many individuals involved in sport, exercise, and/or fitness perform self-myofascial release (SMR) using a foam roller, which restores muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia, and/or soft-tissue extensibility. However, the effect of SMR on arterial stiffness and vascular endothelial function using a foam roller is unknown. This study investigates the acute effect of SMR using a foam roller on arterial stiffness and vascular endothelial function. Ten healthy young adults performed SMR and control (CON) trials on separate days in a randomized controlled crossover fashion. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), blood pressure, heart rate, and plasma nitric oxide (NO) concentration were measured before and 30 minutes after both SMR and CON trials. The participants performed SMR of the adductor, hamstrings, quadriceps, iliotibial band, and trapezius. Pressure was self-adjusted during myofascial release by applying body weight to the roller and using the hands and feet to offset weight as required. The roller was placed under the target tissue area, and the body was moved back and forth across the roller. In the CON trial, SMR was not performed. The baPWV significantly decreased (from 1,202 ± 105 to 1,074 ± 110 cm·s-1) and the plasma NO concentration significantly increased (from 20.4 ± 6.9 to 34.4 ± 17.2 μmol·L-1) after SMR using a foam roller (both p < 0.05), but neither significantly differed after CON trials. These results indicate that SMR using a foam roller reduces arterial stiffness and improves vascular endothelial function. PMID:23575360

  17. Reconstruction of Abdominal Wall of a Chronically Infected Postoperative Wound with a Rectus Abdominis Myofascial Splitting Flap

    Sung Kyu Bae; Seok Joo Kang; Jin Woo Kim; Young Hwan Kim; Hook Sun

    2013-01-01

    Background If a chronically infected abdominal wound develops, complications such as peritonitis and an abdominal wall defect could occur. This could prolong the patient's hospital stay and increase the possibility of re-operation or another infection as well. For this reason, a solution for infection control is necessary. In this study, surgery using a rectus abdominis muscle myofascial splitting flap was performed on an abdominal wall defect. Methods From 2009 to 2012, 5 patients who underw...

  18. Muscle Repositioning: Combining Subjective and Objective Feedbacks in the Teaching and Practice of a Reflex-Based Myofascial Release Technique

    Bertolucci, Luiz Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Muscle Repositioning (MR) is a new style of myofascial release that elicits involuntary motor reactions detectable by electromyography. This article* describes the principal theoretical and practical concepts of MR, and summarizes a workshop presented October 31, 2009, after the Second International Fascia Research Congress, held at Vrije Universitiet, Amsterdam. The manual mechanical input of MR integrates the client’s body segments into a block, which is evident as a result of the diagnosti...

  19. Short-Term Effects of Kinesio Taping and Cross Taping Application in the Treatment of Latent Upper Trapezius Trigger Points: A Prospective, Single-Blind, Randomized, Sham-Controlled Trial.

    Halski, Tomasz; Ptaszkowski, Kuba; Słupska, Lucyna; Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata; Dymarek, Robert; Taradaj, Jakub; Bidzińska, Gabriela; Marczyński, Daniel; Cynarska, Aleksandra; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Kinesio taping (KT) may be a new treatment in patients with myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). A new method available for taping practitioners is cross taping (CT). The main objective was to determine how CT, KT, and medical adhesive tape (sham group) affect the subjective assessment of resting bioelectrical activity and pain of the upper trapezius muscle (UT) in patients with MTrPs. 105 volunteers were recruited to participate. The primary outcome was resting bioelectrical activity of UT muscle as assessed by surface electromyography (sEMG) in each group and pain intensity on a visual analog scale (VAS). Assessments were collected before and after intervention and after the 24-hours follow-up. No significant differences were observed in bioelectrical activity of UT between pre-, post-, and follow-up results. In three groups patients had significantly lower pain VAS score after the intervention (CT-p tapes does not influence the resting bioelectrical activity of UT muscle and may not lead to a reduction in muscle tone in the case of MTrPs. PMID:26491458

  20. Short-Term Effects of Kinesio Taping and Cross Taping Application in the Treatment of Latent Upper Trapezius Trigger Points: A Prospective, Single-Blind, Randomized, Sham-Controlled Trial

    Tomasz Halski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kinesio taping (KT may be a new treatment in patients with myofascial trigger points (MTrPs. A new method available for taping practitioners is cross taping (CT. The main objective was to determine how CT, KT, and medical adhesive tape (sham group affect the subjective assessment of resting bioelectrical activity and pain of the upper trapezius muscle (UT in patients with MTrPs. 105 volunteers were recruited to participate. The primary outcome was resting bioelectrical activity of UT muscle as assessed by surface electromyography (sEMG in each group and pain intensity on a visual analog scale (VAS. Assessments were collected before and after intervention and after the 24-hours follow-up. No significant differences were observed in bioelectrical activity of UT between pre-, post-, and follow-up results. In three groups patients had significantly lower pain VAS score after the intervention (CT—p<0.001, KT—p<0.001, and sham—p<0.01. The Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA showed no significant differences in almost all measurements between groups. The application of all three types of tapes does not influence the resting bioelectrical activity of UT muscle and may not lead to a reduction in muscle tone in the case of MTrPs.

  1. Reconstruction of Abdominal Wall of a Chronically Infected Postoperative Wound with a Rectus Abdominis Myofascial Splitting Flap

    Sung Kyu Bae

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background If a chronically infected abdominal wound develops, complications such asperitonitis and an abdominal wall defect could occur. This could prolong the patient’s hospitalstay and increase the possibility of re-operation or another infection as well. For this reason,a solution for infection control is necessary. In this study, surgery using a rectus abdominismuscle myofascial splitting flap was performed on an abdominal wall defect.Methods From 2009 to 2012, 5 patients who underwent surgery due to ovarian rupture,cesarean section, or uterine myoma were chosen. In each case, during the first week afteroperation, the wound showed signs of infection. Surgery was chosen because the wounds didnot resolve with dressing. Debridement was performed along the previous operation woundand dissection of the skin was performed to separate the skin and subcutaneous tissue fromthe attenuated rectus muscle and Scarpa’s fascial layers. Once the anterior rectus sheath andmuscle were adequately mobilized, the fascia and muscle flap were advanced medially sothat the skin defect could be covered for reconstruction.Results Upon 3-week follow-up after a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap operation,no major complication occurred. In addition, all of the patients showed satisfaction in termsof function and esthetics at 3 to 6 months post-surgery.Conclusions Using a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap has many esthetic andfunctional benefits over previous methods of abdominal defect treatment, and notably, itenabled infection control by reconstruction using muscle.

  2. Increased long-flight activity triggered in beet armyworm by larval feeding on diet containing Cry1Ac protoxin.

    Xing Fu Jiang

    Full Text Available Evaluating ecological safety and conducting pest risk analysis for transgenic crops are vitally important before their commercial planting. The beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, a long-distance migratory insect pest, is not a direct target of transgenic Cry1Ac-expressing cotton in China, but nevertheless it has recently become an important pest. Migrants leaving their natal field arrive in other appropriate habitat far away in a short time, often followed by larval outbreaks. S. exigua has low susceptibility to Cry1Ac. However, our results from laboratory experiments identified (i sublethal effects of Cry1Ac protoxin on larval development rate, larval and pupal weight, and adult lifetime fecundity, and (ii increased long-flight behavior triggered by Cry1Ac which may contribute to larval outbreaks elsewhere. No significant differences in larval mortality, pupation rate, adult emergence rate, longevity, pre-oviposition period, or oviposition period were observed between controls and larvae fed on artificial diet incorporating a low concentration of Cry1Ac protoxin. The negative sublethal effects on some developmental and reproductive traits and lack of effect on others suggest they do not contribute to the observed severity of S. exigua outbreaks after feeding on Cry1Ac cotton. Interestingly, the percentage of long fliers increased significantly when larvae were reared on diet containing either of two low-dose treatments of Cry1Ac, suggesting a possible increased propensity to disperse long distances triggered by Cry1Ac. We hypothesize that negative effects on development and reproduction caused by Cry1Ac in the diet are offset by increased flight propensity triggered by the poor food conditions, thereby improving the chances of escaping adverse local conditions before oviposition. Increased long-flight propensity in turn may amplify the area damaged by outbreak populations. This phenomenon might be common in other migratory insect pests receiving

  3. Increased long-flight activity triggered in beet armyworm by larval feeding on diet containing Cry1Ac protoxin.

    Jiang, Xing Fu; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Sappington, Thomas W; Luo, Li Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating ecological safety and conducting pest risk analysis for transgenic crops are vitally important before their commercial planting. The beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, a long-distance migratory insect pest, is not a direct target of transgenic Cry1Ac-expressing cotton in China, but nevertheless it has recently become an important pest. Migrants leaving their natal field arrive in other appropriate habitat far away in a short time, often followed by larval outbreaks. S. exigua has low susceptibility to Cry1Ac. However, our results from laboratory experiments identified (i) sublethal effects of Cry1Ac protoxin on larval development rate, larval and pupal weight, and adult lifetime fecundity, and (ii) increased long-flight behavior triggered by Cry1Ac which may contribute to larval outbreaks elsewhere. No significant differences in larval mortality, pupation rate, adult emergence rate, longevity, pre-oviposition period, or oviposition period were observed between controls and larvae fed on artificial diet incorporating a low concentration of Cry1Ac protoxin. The negative sublethal effects on some developmental and reproductive traits and lack of effect on others suggest they do not contribute to the observed severity of S. exigua outbreaks after feeding on Cry1Ac cotton. Interestingly, the percentage of long fliers increased significantly when larvae were reared on diet containing either of two low-dose treatments of Cry1Ac, suggesting a possible increased propensity to disperse long distances triggered by Cry1Ac. We hypothesize that negative effects on development and reproduction caused by Cry1Ac in the diet are offset by increased flight propensity triggered by the poor food conditions, thereby improving the chances of escaping adverse local conditions before oviposition. Increased long-flight propensity in turn may amplify the area damaged by outbreak populations. This phenomenon might be common in other migratory insect pests receiving sublethal doses

  4. Central poststroke pain: somatosensory abnormalities and the presence of associated myofascial pain syndrome

    de Oliveira Rogério Adas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central post-stroke pain (CPSP is a neuropathic pain syndrome associated with somatosensory abnormalities due to central nervous system lesion following a cerebrovascular insult. Post-stroke pain (PSP refers to a broader range of clinical conditions leading to pain after stroke, but not restricted to CPSP, including other types of pain such as myofascial pain syndrome (MPS, painful shoulder, lumbar and dorsal pain, complex regional pain syndrome, and spasticity-related pain. Despite its recognition as part of the general PSP diagnostic possibilities, the prevalence of MPS has never been characterized in patients with CPSP patients. We performed a cross-sectional standardized clinical and radiological evaluation of patients with definite CPSP in order to assess the presence of other non-neuropathic pain syndromes, and in particular, the role of myofascial pain syndrome in these patients. Methods CPSP patients underwent a standardized sensory and motor neurological evaluation, and were classified according to stroke mechanism, neurological deficits, presence and profile of MPS. The Visual Analogic Scale (VAS, McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ, and Beck Depression Scale (BDS were filled out by all participants. Results Forty CPSP patients were included. Thirty-six (90.0% had one single ischemic stroke. Pain presented during the first three months after stroke in 75.0%. Median pain intensity was 10 (5 to 10. There was no difference in pain intensity among the different lesion site groups. Neuropathic pain was continuous-ongoing in 34 (85.0% patients and intermittent in the remainder. Burning was the most common descriptor (70%. Main aggravating factors were contact to cold (62.5%. Thermo-sensory abnormalities were universal. MPS was diagnosed in 27 (67.5% patients and was more common in the supratentorial extra-thalamic group (P Conclusions The presence of MPS is not an exception after stroke and may present in association with CPSP

  5. Triggered Release from Polymer Capsules

    Esser-Kahn, Aaron P. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry; Odom, Susan A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry; Sottos, Nancy R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; White, Scott R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Aerospace Engineering; Moore, Jeffrey S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry

    2011-07-06

    Stimuli-responsive capsules are of interest in drug delivery, fragrance release, food preservation, and self-healing materials. Many methods are used to trigger the release of encapsulated contents. Here we highlight mechanisms for the controlled release of encapsulated cargo that utilize chemical reactions occurring in solid polymeric shell walls. Triggering mechanisms responsible for covalent bond cleavage that result in the release of capsule contents include chemical, biological, light, thermal, magnetic, and electrical stimuli. We present methods for encapsulation and release, triggering methods, and mechanisms and conclude with our opinions on interesting obstacles for chemically induced activation with relevance for controlled release.

  6. Comparisons of Prediction Models of Myofascial Pain Control after Dry Needling: A Prospective Study

    Yuan-Ting Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study purposed to validate the use of artificial neural network (ANN models for predicting myofascial pain control after dry needling and to compare the predictive capability of ANNs with that of support vector machine (SVM and multiple linear regression (MLR. Methods. Totally 400 patients who have received dry needling treatments completed the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI at baseline and at 1 year postoperatively. Results. Compared to the MLR and SVM models, the ANN model generally had smaller mean square error (MSE and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE values in the training dataset and testing dataset. Most ANN models had MAPE values ranging from 3.4% to 4.6% and most had high prediction accuracy. The global sensitivity analysis also showed that pretreatment BPI score was the best parameter for predicting pain after dry needling. Conclusion. Compared with the MLR and SVM models, the ANN model in this study was more accurate in predicting patient-reported BPI scores and had higher overall performance indices. Further studies of this model may consider the effect of a more detailed database that includes complications and clinical examination findings as well as more detailed outcome data.

  7. Effects of Temperature on Chronic Trapezius Myofascial Pain Syndrome during Dry Needling Therapy

    Gang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of temperature on chronic trapezius myofascial pain syndrome during dry needling therapy. Sixty patients were randomized into two groups of dry needling (DN alone (group A and DN combined with heat therapy group (group B. Each patient was treated once and the therapeutic effect was assessed by the visual analogue scale (VAS, pressure pain threshold (PPT, and the 36-item short form health survey (SF-36 at seven days, one month, and three months after treatment. Evaluation based on VAS and PPT showed that the pain of patients in groups A and B was significantly (P<0.05 relieved at seven days, one month, and three months after treatment Compared to before treatment. There was significantly (P<0.05 less pain in group B than group A at one and three months after treatment. The SF-36 evaluation demonstrated that the physical condition of patients in both groups showed significant (P<0.05 improvement at one month and three months after treatment than before treatment. Our study suggests that both DN and DN heating therapy were effective in the treatment of trapezius MPS, and that DN heating therapy had better long-term effects than DN therapy.

  8. Effects of Temperature on Chronic Trapezius Myofascial Pain Syndrome during Dry Needling Therapy.

    Wang, Gang; Gao, Qian; Hou, Jingshan; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of temperature on chronic trapezius myofascial pain syndrome during dry needling therapy. Sixty patients were randomized into two groups of dry needling (DN) alone (group A) and DN combined with heat therapy group (group B). Each patient was treated once and the therapeutic effect was assessed by the visual analogue scale (VAS), pressure pain threshold (PPT), and the 36-item short form health survey (SF-36) at seven days, one month, and three months after treatment. Evaluation based on VAS and PPT showed that the pain of patients in groups A and B was significantly (P < 0.05) relieved at seven days, one month, and three months after treatment Compared to before treatment. There was significantly (P < 0.05) less pain in group B than group A at one and three months after treatment. The SF-36 evaluation demonstrated that the physical condition of patients in both groups showed significant (P < 0.05) improvement at one month and three months after treatment than before treatment. Our study suggests that both DN and DN heating therapy were effective in the treatment of trapezius MPS, and that DN heating therapy had better long-term effects than DN therapy. PMID:25383083

  9. Ear Acupuncture Therapy for Masticatory Myofascial and Temporomandibular Pain: A Controlled Clinical Trial

    Luciano Ambrosio Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ear acupuncture works by reducing painful sensations with analgesic effect through microsystem therapy and has been demonstrated to be as effective as conventional therapies in the control of facial pain. This clinical trial aimed to evaluate the adjuvant action of auricular acupuncture through an observation of the evolution of temporomandibular and masticatory myofascial symptoms in two groups defined by the therapies elected: auricular acupuncture associated with occlusal splint (study and the use of the occlusal splint plate alone (control. We have selected 20 patients, who were randomly allocated into two groups of ten individuals. Symptoms were evaluated in five different moments, every seven days. We analyzed the orofacial muscle and joint palpation in order to measure the intensity of the experienced pain. Both groups showed a statistically significant decrease in muscle and joint symptoms (p<0.05. However, comparisons between the groups showed an expressive and significant reduction of symptomatology in the study group (p<0.05 already on the first week of therapy. According to the results, to the methodological criteria developed and statistical analysis applied, the conclusion is that auricular acupuncture therapy has synergistic action on conventional occlusal splint treatment. It was demonstrated to be effective in the reduction of symptoms in the short term.

  10. Ear Acupuncture Therapy for Masticatory Myofascial and Temporomandibular Pain: A Controlled Clinical Trial

    Ferreira, Luciano Ambrosio; Grossmann, Eduardo; Januzzi, Eduardo; Gonçalves, Rafael Tardin Rosa Ferraz; Mares, Fernando Antonio Guedes; de Paula, Marcos Vinicius Queiroz; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires

    2015-01-01

    Ear acupuncture works by reducing painful sensations with analgesic effect through microsystem therapy and has been demonstrated to be as effective as conventional therapies in the control of facial pain. This clinical trial aimed to evaluate the adjuvant action of auricular acupuncture through an observation of the evolution of temporomandibular and masticatory myofascial symptoms in two groups defined by the therapies elected: auricular acupuncture associated with occlusal splint (study) and the use of the occlusal splint plate alone (control). We have selected 20 patients, who were randomly allocated into two groups of ten individuals. Symptoms were evaluated in five different moments, every seven days. We analyzed the orofacial muscle and joint palpation in order to measure the intensity of the experienced pain. Both groups showed a statistically significant decrease in muscle and joint symptoms (p < 0.05). However, comparisons between the groups showed an expressive and significant reduction of symptomatology in the study group (p < 0.05) already on the first week of therapy. According to the results, to the methodological criteria developed and statistical analysis applied, the conclusion is that auricular acupuncture therapy has synergistic action on conventional occlusal splint treatment. It was demonstrated to be effective in the reduction of symptoms in the short term. PMID:26351510

  11. Craniosacral therapy and myofascial release in entry-level physical therapy curricula.

    Ehrett, S L

    1988-04-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to discover the extent to which craniosacral therapy (CST) and myofascial release (MFR) instruction are included in entry-level physical therapy curricula; 2) to determine the amount of faculty and program director interest in such instruction; and 3) to determine what educational materials, if any, are desired. A one-page questionnaire was distributed to the program directors of 109 accredited entry-level physical therapy programs in the United States. Of the 95 respondents, 1 (1%) included a unit on CST only, 14 (15%) included a unit on MFR only, 14 (15%) included units on both CST and MFR, and 66 (69%) included neither. The highest percentages of programs with CST and MFR units were entry-level masters' degree programs and programs located in the Pacific Coast and Middle Atlantic regions. All of the units were presented within required courses, usually during the second year; most were taught by physical therapists. The greatest amount of instructional time was allotted for CST laboratory sessions (mean = 5.8 hours), and the least amount of time was allotted for MFR lectures (mean = 1.7 hours). The mos frequently cited reason for noninclusion of CST or MFR instruction was inadequate room in the current curricula. The most frequently requested materials were bibliographies and laboratory guides on CST and MFR. Implications of these findings are addressed, and suggestions for further research are given. PMID:3353463

  12. Management of myofascial pain by therapeutic ultrasound and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation: A comparative study

    Rai, Shalu; Ranjan, Vikash; Misra, Deepankar; Panjwani, Sapna

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present comparative study was aimed to determine the effectiveness of Th US and TENS in the management of myofascial pain in TMD patients. Materials and Methods: The present randomized comparative study was on 90 patients who were further assigned in three different groups each having 30 patients; Group I was healthy control patients, Group II was receiving Th US therapy, and Group III was receiving TENS therapy. All the 90 patients were further evaluated for maximum inter incisor subjective evaluation regarding muscle pain, impediment to daily life, massage impression on visual analog scale (VAS) scale, and intensity and duration used in Th US massage. Results: The masseter muscle thickness in control group was 12.00 (standard deviation [SD] ±1.1) mm when compared with TMD patient of 13.00 (SD ± 1.1) mm before treatment. Statistical significant findings on VAS score of muscle pain, impediment to daily life, and massage impression were observed in Th US. After treatment, the anechoic areas disappeared or were reduced in Th US group by 95.6% and in TENS by 74.4%. Conclusion: Th US appeared to be subjectively better which was related to VAS score of massage impression, muscle pain, and impediment to daily life after treatment as well as sonographically related to existence of anechoic areas. PMID:27011739

  13. Chronic myofascial pain: management by low-output helium-neon laser therapy.

    Waylonis, G W; Wilke, S; O'Toole, D; Waylonis, D A; Waylonis, D B

    1988-12-01

    Therapeutic benefits of low-output helium-neon laser therapy have not been established, but laser therapy has been suggested as an effective means of treating many acute and chronic musculoskeletal pain syndromes. Although not released for general clinical use by the FA, the helium-neon laser has been promoted to physical therapists and athletic trainers as potentially useful for the treatment of pain syndromes. In particular, it has been proposed that it may be more effective than conventional measures such as medication and conventional physical therapy in the treatment of myofascial pain syndromes (fibrositis, fibromyalgia). The citations in the literature include only case reports. Sixty-two patients were treated by using acupuncture points. Two sessions of five treatments were given six weeks apart. A crossover double-blind technique was used in the treatments. The clinical responses were assessed using portions of the McGill Pain Questionnaire. No statistical difference between the treatment and the placebo groups could be determined. PMID:3063230

  14. Optogenetic activation of intracellular adenosine A2A receptor signaling in the hippocampus is sufficient to trigger CREB phosphorylation and impair memory.

    Li, P; Rial, D; Canas, P M; Yoo, J-H; Li, W; Zhou, X; Wang, Y; van Westen, G J P; Payen, M-P; Augusto, E; Gonçalves, N; Tomé, A R; Li, Z; Wu, Z; Hou, X; Zhou, Y; IJzerman, A P; PIJzerman, Ad; Boyden, E S; Cunha, R A; Qu, J; Chen, J-F

    2015-11-01

    Human and animal studies have converged to suggest that caffeine consumption prevents memory deficits in aging and Alzheimer's disease through the antagonism of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs). To test if A2AR activation in the hippocampus is actually sufficient to impair memory function and to begin elucidating the intracellular pathways operated by A2AR, we have developed a chimeric rhodopsin-A2AR protein (optoA2AR), which retains the extracellular and transmembrane domains of rhodopsin (conferring light responsiveness and eliminating adenosine-binding pockets) fused to the intracellular loop of A2AR to confer specific A2AR signaling. The specificity of the optoA2AR signaling was confirmed by light-induced selective enhancement of cAMP and phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-MAPK) (but not cGMP) levels in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells, which was abolished by a point mutation at the C terminal of A2AR. Supporting its physiological relevance, optoA2AR activation and the A2AR agonist CGS21680 produced similar activation of cAMP and p-MAPK signaling in HEK293 cells, of p-MAPK in the nucleus accumbens and of c-Fos/phosphorylated-CREB (p-CREB) in the hippocampus, and similarly enhanced long-term potentiation in the hippocampus. Remarkably, optoA2AR activation triggered a preferential p-CREB signaling in the hippocampus and impaired spatial memory performance, while optoA2AR activation in the nucleus accumbens triggered MAPK signaling and modulated locomotor activity. This shows that the recruitment of intracellular A2AR signaling in the hippocampus is sufficient to trigger memory dysfunction. Furthermore, the demonstration that the biased A2AR signaling and functions depend on intracellular A2AR loops prompts the possibility of targeting the intracellular A2AR-interacting partners to selectively control different neuropsychiatric behaviors. PMID:25687775

  15. Lumbar facet injection for the treatment of chronic piriformis myofascial pain syndrome: 52 case studies

    Huang JT

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Jen-Ting Huang,1 Han-Yu Chen,2 Chang-Zern Hong,2 Ming-Ta Lin,3 Li-Wei Chou,4,5 Hsin-Shui Chen,6,7 Chien-Tsung Tsai,8 Wen-Dien Chang9  1Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 2Department of Physical Therapy, Hung-Kuang University, Sha Lu, 3Kuan-Ta Rehabilitation and Pain Clinic, Taichung, Taiwan; 4Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, China Medical University Hospital, 5School of Chinese Medicine, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; 6Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Bei-Gang Hospital, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Yun-Lin, Taiwan; 7School of Medicine, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; 8Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Da-Chien Hospital, Miao-Li City, Taiwan; 9Department of Sports Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan Background and aims: The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness of lumbar facet joint injection for piriformis myofascial pain syndrome. Methods: Fifty-two patients with chronic myofascial pain in the piriformis muscle each received a lumbar facet injection into the ipsilateral L5–S1 facet joint region, using the multiple insertion technique. Subjective pain intensity, trunk extension range, and lumbar facet signs were measured before, immediately after, and 2 weeks after injection. Thirty-six patients received follow-up for 6 months. Results: Immediately after the injection, 27 patients (51.9% had complete pain subsidence, 19 patients (36.5% had pain reduction to a tolerable level, and only 6 patients (11.5% had no pain relief to a tolerable level. Mean pain intensity was reduced from 7.4±0.9 to 1.6±2.1 after injection (P<0.01. This effectiveness lasted for 2 weeks in 49 patients (94.2%, and lasted for approximately 6 months in 35 (97.2% of 36 patients. The mean range of motion increased from 13.4±6.8 degrees to 22.1±6.0 degrees immediately

  16. Bacillus cereus AR156 activates PAMP-triggered immunity and induces a systemic acquired resistance through a NPR1-and SA-dependent signaling pathway.

    Niu, Dongdong; Wang, Xiujuan; Wang, Yanru; Song, Xiaoou; Wang, Jiansheng; Guo, Jianhua; Zhao, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Induced resistance responses play a potent role in plant defense system against pathogen attack. Bacillus cereus AR156 is a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) that installs induced systemic resistance (ISR) to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) in Arabidopsis. Here, we show that AR156 leaf infiltration enhances disease resistance in Arabidopsis through the activation of a systemic acquired resistance (SAR). PR1 protein expression and reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst are strongly induced in plants treated with AR156 and inoculated with Pst than that in plants inoculated with Pst only. Moreover, AR156 can trigger SAR in jar1 or ein2 mutants, but not in the NahG transgenic and NPR1 mutant plants. Our results indicate that AR156-induced SAR depends on SA-signaling pathway and NPR1, but not JA and ET. Also, AR156-treated plants are able to rapidly activate MAPK signaling and FRK1 gene expression, which are involved in pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI). Altogether, our results indicate that AR156 can induce SAR by the SA-signaling pathways in an NPR1-dependent manner and involves multiple PTI components. PMID:26616055

  17. Anthropogenic Triggering of Large Earthquakes

    Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    The physical mechanism of the anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes on active faults is studied on the basis of experimental phenomenology, i.e., that earthquakes occur on active tectonic faults, that crustal stress values are those measured in situ and, on active faults, comply to the values of the stress drop measured for real earthquakes, that the static friction coefficients are those inferred on faults, and that the effective triggering stresses are those inferred for real earthquakes. Deriving the conditions for earthquake nucleation as a time-dependent solution of the Tresca-Von Mises criterion applied in the framework of poroelasticity yields that active faults can be triggered by fluid overpressures < 0.1 MPa. Comparing this with the deviatoric stresses at the depth of crustal hypocenters, which are of the order of 1-10 MPa, we find that injecting in the subsoil fluids at the pressures typical of oil and gas production and storage may trigger destructive earthquakes on active faults at a few tens of kilometers. Fluid pressure propagates as slow stress waves along geometric paths operating in a drained condition and can advance the natural occurrence of earthquakes by a substantial amount of time. Furthermore, it is illusory to control earthquake triggering by close monitoring of minor ``foreshocks'', since the induction may occur with a delay up to several years.

  18. Continuous Validity of Pedicled Myocutaneous and Myofascial Flaps in Reconstruction after Surgery for Head and Neck Cancer

    The aim of this study was to reevaluate the role and effectiveness of pedicled myocutanous and myofascial flaps in reconstruction after resection of head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: This study represents the authors own experience using pedicled myocutanous and myofascial flaps in reconstruction after resection of malignant tumors of different sites in the head and neck. The study included 121 patients with head and neck cancer operated upon at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University and Alminia Cancer Center over 3 years duration, between July 2005 and the end of July 2008. Four types of flaps were used namely the Pectoralis major (Group I), lower trapezius (Group II), Latissimus dorsi (Group III), and the temporalis ((Group IV) flaps. Utility of the different types of these flaps was reevaluated in terms of indications, advantages, and postoperative complications. Results: This study included 121 patients, 83 males and 38 females. The mean age was 56 years (range, 14- 65 years). Oral malignancies represented most of the cases (71 cases). Pectoralis major myocutaneous (PMMC) flap was the most commonly used flap (84 cases) and its main indication was oral and pharyngeal defects. Lower trapezius and Latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps were used in 14 and 12 cases respectively. Their main indications were tumors in the occiput, ear pinna, parotid and neck regions. The Latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap was also used for reconstruction of oral and pharyngeal defects in 7 female patients with large breasts and for salvage reconstruction after failure of reconstruction by (PMMC) flap in one patient and for reconstruction after excision of local recurrence on top of previous (PMMC) flap in another patient. Temporalis myofascial flap was used in 12 cases and the main indication was orbital defects. The overall postoperative complications was 19.8% (24/121). It was 20% (17/84) in group I, 28.6% (4/14) in group II, and 25% (3/12) in group III. No flap

  19. Anthropogenic and temporal components in a complex trigger of type 1 diabetes suggest the active participation of antipyretics.

    Veteikis, Darijus

    2016-08-01

    Tremendous efforts in research without a conclusion on the cause of type 1 diabetes allow the presumption that there is still a blind spot in the development of T1D that is not covered by current hypotheses. The review of geographical knowledge suggests that there is a well-expressed anthropogenic element within the complex environmental trigger of T1D. On the other hand, the initiation of T1D's directed autoimmunity is temporally related to the organism's immune response, induced by entero-viruses, most expectedly. Consequently, the searched for anthropogenic environmental factor is a player temporally linked to enteroviral infections. This paper discusses the participation of antipyretic medicines, and especially paracetamol, with a whole century's history of growing sales and popularity, including indirect influence through phenacetin during the first half of the 20th century. As proposed by several independent studies, the use of pharmaceuticals to reduce fever may counteract with the protective features of the immune system and create favourable conditions for a virus to spread within the organism and damage specific tissue. A preliminary comparison of paracetamol sales with the incidence of T1D data in Lithuania and the other countries in the North-eastern Baltic region supports this hypothesis. PMID:27372871

  20. ESTHER 1.3: integrating in-situ prompts to trigger self-reflection of physical activity in knowledge workers

    Jimenez Garcia, Juan; Romero, Natalia A.; Keyson, David; Havinga, Paul

    2013-01-01

    There are little initiatives supporting knowledge workers in implementing physical activity as part of their work routines. Due to the sedentary nature of their work, knowledge workers have little opportunities to engage in physical activities during the working hours. In addition, physical activity

  1. The ATLAS Muon Trigger

    Ventura, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) deploys a three-levels processing scheme for the trigger system. The Level-1 muon trigger system gets its input from fast muon trigger detectors. Fast sector logic boards select muon candidates, which are passed via an interface board to the central trigger processor and then to the High Level Trigger (HLT). The muon HLT is purely software based and encompasses a Level-2 trigger followed by an event filter for a staged trigger approach. It has access to the data of the precision muon detectors and other detector elements to refine the muon hypothesis. The ATLAS experiment has taken data with high efficiency continuously over entire running periods from 2010 to 2012, for which sophisticated triggers to guard the highest physics output while reducing effectively the event rate were mandatory. The ATLAS muon trigger has successfully adapted to this changing environment. The selection strategy has been optimized for the various physics analyses involving ...

  2. Subtle Structural Differences Trigger Inhibitory Activity of Propafenone Analogues at the Two Polyspecific ABC Transporters: P-Glycoprotein (P-gp) and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP).

    Schwarz, Theresa; Montanari, Floriane; Cseke, Anna; Wlcek, Katrin; Visvader, Lene; Palme, Sarah; Chiba, Peter; Kuchler, Karl; Urban, Ernst; Ecker, Gerhard F

    2016-06-20

    The transmembrane ABC transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) are widely recognized for their role in cancer multidrug resistance and absorption and distribution of compounds. Furthermore, they are linked to drug-drug interactions and toxicity. Nevertheless, due to their polyspecificity, a molecular understanding of the ligand-transporter interaction, which allows designing of both selective and dual inhibitors, is still in its infancy. This study comprises a combined approach of synthesis, in silico prediction, and in vitro testing to identify molecular features triggering transporter selectivity. Synthesis and testing of a series of 15 propafenone analogues with varied rigidity and basicity of substituents provide first trends for selective and dual inhibitors. Results indicate that both the flexibility of the substituent at the nitrogen atom, as well as the basicity of the nitrogen atom, trigger transporter selectivity. Furthermore, inhibitory activity of compounds at P-gp seems to be much more influenced by logP than those at BCRP. Exploiting these differences further should thus allow designing specific inhibitors for these two polyspecific ABC-transporters. PMID:26970257

  3. The Central Trigger Processor (CTP)

    Franchini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    The Central Trigger Processor (CTP) receives trigger information from the calorimeter and muon trigger processors, as well as from other sources of trigger. It makes the Level-1 decision (L1A) based on a trigger menu.

  4. Aspirin-triggered lipoxin A4 attenuates LPS-induced pro-inflammatory responses by inhibiting activation of NF-κB and MAPKs in BV-2 microglial cells

    Yuan Shi-Ying; Zhou Jie-Ping; Liu Ren-Gang; Zheng Jin; Li Long-Yan; Wu Yan; Wang Yan-Ping; Shang You; Yao Shang-Long

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Microglial activation plays an important role in neurodegenerative diseases through production of nitric oxide (NO) and several pro-inflammatory cytokines. Lipoxins (LXs) and aspirin-triggered LXs (ATLs) are considered to act as 'braking signals' in inflammation. In the present study, we investigated the effect of aspirin-triggered LXA4 (ATL) on infiammatory responses induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in murine microglial BV-2 cells. Methods BV-2 cells were treated with ...

  5. Alexithymia, anger and psychological distress in patients with myofascial pain: a case-control study.

    Lorys eCastelli

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate psychological distress, anger and alexithymia in a group of patients affected by myofascial pain (MP in the facial region.Methods: 45 MP patients (mean (SD age: 38.9 (11.6 and 45 female healthy controls (mean (SD age: 37.8 (13.7 were assessed medically and psychologically. The medically evaluation consisted of muscle palpation of the pericranial and cervical muscles. The psychological evaluation included the assessment of depression (Beck Depression Inventory – short form, anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Form Y, emotional distress (Distress Thermometer, anger (State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory - 2 and alexithymia (Toronto Alexithymia Scale.Results: the MP patients showed significantly higher scores in the depression, anxiety and emotional distress inventories. With regard to anger, only the Anger Expression-In scale showed a significant difference between the groups, with higher scores for the MP patients. In addition, the MP patients showed significantly higher alexithymic scores, in particular in the Difficulty in identifying feelings (F1 subscale of the Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 (TAS-20. Alexithymia was positively correlated with the Anger Expression-In scale. Both anger and alexithymia showed significant positive correlations with anxiety scores, but only anger was positively correlated with depression. Conclusion: A higher prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms associated with a higher prevalence of alexithymia and expression-in modality to cope with anger was found in the MP patients. Because the presence of such psychological aspects could contribute to generate or exacerbate the suffering of these patients, our results highlight the need to include accurate investigation of psychological aspects in MP patients in normal clinical practice in order to allow clinicians to carry out more efficacious management and treatment strategies.

  6. Mergers as triggers for nuclear activity: a near-IR study of the close environment of AGN in the VISTA-VIDEO survey

    Karouzos, M.; Jarvis, M. J.; Bonfield, D.

    2014-03-01

    There is an ongoing debate concerning the driver of nuclear activity in galaxies, with active galactic nuclei (AGN) either being triggered by major or minor galactic mergers or, alternatively, through secular processes like cold gas accretion and/or formation of bars. We investigate the close environment of active galaxies selected in the X-ray, the radio and the mid-IR. We utilize the first data release of the new near-IR VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) survey of the XMM-Large Scale Structure field. We use two measures of environment density, namely counts within a given aperture and a finite redshift slice (pseudo-3D density) and closest neighbour density measures Σ2 and Σ5. We select both AGN and control samples, matching them in redshift and apparent Ks-band magnitude. We find that AGN are found in a range of environments, with a subset of the AGN samples residing in overdense environments. Seyfert-like X-ray AGN and flat-spectrum radio-AGN are found to inhabit significantly overdense environments compared to their control sample. The relation between overdensities and AGN luminosity does not however reveal any positive correlation. Given the absence of an environment density-AGN luminosity relation, we find no support for a scheme where high-luminosity AGN are preferentially triggered by mergers. On the contrary, we find that AGN likely trace over dense environments at high redshift due to the fact that they inhabit the most massive galaxies, rather than being an AGN.

  7. Myofascial Structural Integration Therapy on Gross Motor Function and Gait of Young Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Loi, Elizabeth C.; Buysse, Christina A.; Price, Karen S.; Jaramillo, Theresa M.; Pico, Elaine L.; Hansen, Alexis B.; Feldman, Heidi M.

    2015-01-01

    Though the cause of motor abnormalities in cerebral palsy is injury to the brain, structural changes in muscle and fascia may add to stiffness and reduced function. This study examined whether myofascial structural integration therapy, a complementary treatment that manipulates muscle and fascia, would improve gross motor function and gait in children

  8. Evaluation of the short-term effectiveness of education versus an occlusal splint for the treatment of myofascial pain of the jaw muscles

    Michelotti, Ambra; Iodice, Giorgio; Vollaro, Stefano; Steenks, Michel H.; Farella, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Background. The authors conducted a clinical trial to compare the effectiveness of an education program with that of an occlusal splint in treating myofascial pain of the jaw muscles across a short period. Method. The authors assigned 44 patients randomly to two treatment groups; 41 patients complet

  9. Collectin-11/MASP complex formation triggers activation of the lectin complement pathway--the fifth lectin pathway initiation complex

    Ma, Ying Jie; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole; Garred, Peter

    2013-01-01

    complement pathway regulator MAP-1. Furthermore, we found that complex formation between recombinant collectin-11 and recombinant MASP-2 on Candida albicans leads to deposition of C4b. Native collectin-11 in serum mediated complement activation and deposition of C4b and C3b, and formation of the terminal...... complement complex on C. albicans. Moreover, spiking collectin-11-depleted serum, which did not mediate complement activation, with recombinant collectin-11 restored the complement activation capability. These results define collectin-11 as the fifth recognition molecule in the lectin complement pathway in...

  10. Trigger Finger (Stenosing Tenosynovitis)

    ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ... Symptom Picker Hand and Arm Conditions Carpal Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Trigger Finger Arthritis Base of the Thumb See ...