WorldWideScience

Sample records for active galactic nuclear

  1. NUCLEAR RADIO JET FROM A LOW-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS IN NGC 4258

    Doi, Akihiro [The Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuou-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Kohno, Kotaro [Institute of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Nakanishi, Kouichiro [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kameno, Seiji [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kagoshima University, 1-21-35 Korimoto, Kagoshima, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Inoue, Makoto [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Hada, Kazuhiro [INAF, Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, Bologna I-40129 (Italy); Sorai, Kazuo [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Kita 10 Nishi 8, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2013-03-01

    The nearby low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN) NGC 4258 has a weak radio continuum component at the galactic center. We investigate its radio spectral properties on the basis of our new observations using the Nobeyama Millimeter Array at 100 GHz and archival data from the Very Large Array at 1.7-43 GHz and the James Clerk Maxwell telescope at 347 GHz. The NGC 4258 nuclear component exhibits (1) an intra-month variable and complicated spectral feature at 5-22 GHz and (2) a slightly inverted spectrum at 5-100 GHz ({alpha} {approx} 0.3; F {sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup {alpha}}) in time-averaged flux densities, which are also apparent in the closest LLAGN M81. These similarities between NGC 4258 and M81 in radio spectral natures in addition to previously known core shift in their AU-scale jet structures produce evidence that the same mechanism drives their nuclei. We interpret the observed spectral property as the superposition of emission spectra originating at different locations with frequency-dependent opacity along the nuclear jet. Quantitative differences between NGC 4258 and M81 in terms of jet/counter jet ratio, radio loudness, and degree of core shift can be consistently understood by fairly relativistic speeds ({Gamma} {approx}> 3) of jets and their quite different inclinations. The picture established from the two closest LLAGNs is useful for understanding the physical origin of unresolved and flat/inverted spectrum radio cores that are prevalently found in LLAGNs, including Sgr A*, with starved supermassive black holes in the present-day universe.

  2. THE NUCLEAR INFRARED EMISSION OF LOW-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Mason, R. E. [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 N. A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Lopez-Rodriguez, E.; Packham, C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Alonso-Herrero, A. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-UC, Avenida de los Castros s/n, 39005 Santander (Spain); Levenson, N. A.; Radomski, J. [Gemini Observatory, Southern Operations Center, c/o AURA, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Ramos Almeida, C. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea, s/n, E-38205, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Colina, L. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC/INTA), Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial, Crta de Torrejon a Ajalvir, km 4, 28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Elitzur, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Aretxaga, I. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Aptdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Roche, P. F. [Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, DWB, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Oi, N. [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2012-07-15

    We present high-resolution mid-infrared (MIR) imaging, nuclear spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and archival Spitzer spectra for 22 low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs; L{sub bol} {approx}< 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}). Infrared (IR) observations may advance our understanding of the accretion flows in LLAGNs, the fate of the obscuring torus at low accretion rates, and, perhaps, the star formation histories of these objects. However, while comprehensively studied in higher-luminosity Seyferts and quasars, the nuclear IR properties of LLAGNs have not yet been well determined. We separate the present LLAGN sample into three categories depending on their Eddington ratio and radio emission, finding different IR characteristics for each class. (1) At the low-luminosity, low-Eddington-ratio (log L{sub bol}/L{sub Edd} < -4.6) end of the sample, we identify 'host-dominated' galaxies with strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bands that may indicate active (circum-)nuclear star formation. (2) Some very radio-loud objects are also present at these low Eddington ratios. The IR emission in these nuclei is dominated by synchrotron radiation, and some are likely to be unobscured type 2 AGNs that genuinely lack a broad-line region. (3) At higher Eddington ratios, strong, compact nuclear sources are visible in the MIR images. The nuclear SEDs of these galaxies are diverse; some resemble typical Seyfert nuclei, while others lack a well-defined MIR 'dust bump'. Strong silicate emission is present in many of these objects. We speculate that this, together with high ratios of silicate strength to hydrogen column density, could suggest optically thin dust and low dust-to-gas ratios, in accordance with model predictions that LLAGNs do not host a Seyfert-like obscuring torus. We anticipate that detailed modeling of the new data and SEDs in terms of accretion disk, jet, radiatively inefficient accretion flow, and torus components will provide further

  3. DO MOST ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI LIVE IN HIGH STAR FORMATION NUCLEAR CUSPS?

    We present early results of the Herschel PACS (70 and 160 μm) and SPIRE (250, 350, and 500 μm) survey of 313 low redshift (z < 0.05), ultra-hard X-ray (14-195 keV) selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the 58 month Swift/Burst Alert Telescope catalog. Selection of AGNs from ultra-hard X-rays avoids bias from obscuration, providing a complete sample of AGNs to study the connection between nuclear activity and star formation in host galaxies. With the high angular resolution of PACS, we find that >35% and >20% of the sources are ''point-like'' at 70 and 160 μm respectively and many more have their flux dominated by a point source located at the nucleus. The inferred star formation rates (SFRs) of 0.1-100 M ☉ yr–1 using the 70 and 160 μm flux densities as SFR indicators are consistent with those inferred from Spitzer Ne II fluxes, but we find that 11.25 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon data give ∼3× lower SFR. Using GALFIT to measure the size of the far-infrared emitting regions, we determined the SFR surface density (M ☉ yr–1 kpc–2) for our sample, finding that a significant fraction of these sources exceed the threshold for star formation driven winds (0.1 M ☉ yr–1 kpc–2)

  4. Age determination of the nuclear stellar population of Active Galactic Nuclei using Locally Weighted Regression

    Estrada-Piedra, T; Terlevich, R J; Fuentes, O; Terlevich, E; Estrada-Piedra, Trilce; Torres-Papaqui, Juan Pablo; Terlevich, Roberto; Fuentes, Olac; Terlevich, Elena

    2003-01-01

    We present a new technique to segregate old and young stellar populations in galactic spectra using machine learning methods. We used an ensemble of classifiers, each classifier in the ensemble specializes in young or old populations and was trained with locally weighted regression and tested using ten-fold cross-validation. Since the relevant information concentrates in certain regions of the spectra we used the method of sequential floating backward selection offline for feature selection. The application to Seyfert galaxies proved that this technique is very insensitive to the dilution by the Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) continuum. Comparing with exhaustive search we concluded that both methods are similar in terms of accuracy but the machine learning method is faster by about two orders of magnitude.

  5. Active galactic nuclei

    Blandford, RD; Woltjer, L

    1990-01-01

    Starting with this volume, the Lecture Notes of the renowned Advanced Courses of the Swiss Society for Astrophysics and Astronomy will be published annually. In each course, three extensive lectures given by leading experts in their respective fields cover different and essential aspects of the subject. The 20th course, held at Les Diablerets in April 1990, dealt with current research on active galactic nuclei; it represents the most up-to-date views on the subject, presented with particular regard for clarity. The previous courses considered a wide variety of subjects, beginning with ""Theory

  6. A New Perspective of the Radio Bright Zone at The Galactic Center: Feedback from Nuclear Activities

    Zhao, Jun-Hui; Morris, Mark R.; Goss, W. M.

    2016-02-01

    New observations of Sgr A have been carried out with the Jansky VLA in the B and C arrays using the broadband (2 GHz) continuum mode at 5.5 GHz. The field of view covers the central 13‧ (30 pc) region of the radio-bright zone at the Galactic center. Using the multi-scale and multi-frequency-synthesis (MS-MFS) algorithms in CASA, we have imaged Sgr A with a resolution of 1″, achieving an rms noise of 8 μJy beam-1, and a dynamic range of 100,000:1. Both previously known and newly identified radio features in this region are revealed, including numerous filamentary sources. The radio continuum image is compared with Chandra X-ray images, with a CN emission-line image obtained with the Submillimeter Array and with detailed Paschen-α images obtained with Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS. We discuss several prominent features in the radio image. The “Sgr A west Wings” extend 2‧ (5 pc) from the NW and SE tips of the Sgr A west H ii region (the “Mini-spiral”) to positions located 2.9 and 2.4 arcmin to the northwest and southeast of Sgr A*, respectively. The NW wing, along with several other prominent features, including the previously identified “NW Streamers,” form an elongated radio lobe (NW lobe), oriented nearly perpendicular to the Galactic plane. This radio lobe, with a size of 6.‧3 × 3.‧2 (14.4 pc × 7.3 pc), has a known X-ray counterpart. In the outer region of the NW lobe, a row of three thermally emitting rings is observed. A field containing numerous amorphous radio blobs extends for a distance of ˜2 arcmin beyond the tip of the SE wing; these newly recognized features coincide with the SE X-ray lobe. Most of the amorphous radio blobs in the NW and SE lobes have Paschen-α counterparts. We propose that they have been produced by shock interaction of ambient gas concentrations with a collimated nuclear wind or an outflow that originated from within the circumnuclear disk (CND). We also discuss the possibility that the ionized wind or

  7. A New Perspective of the Radio Bright Zone at The Galactic Center: Feedback from Nuclear Activities

    Zhao, Jun-Hui; Goss, W M

    2015-01-01

    New observations of Sgr A have been carried out with the VLA using the broadband (2 GHz) continuum mode at 5.5 GHz, covering the central 30 pc region of the RBZ at the Galactic center. Using the MS-MFS algorithms in CASA, we have imaged Sgr A with a resolution of 1", achieving an rms 8 $\\mu$Jy/beam, and a dynamic range 100,000:1.The radio image is compared with X-ray, CN emission-line and Paschen-$\\alpha$ images obtained using Chandra, SMA and HST/NICMOS, respectively. We discuss several prominent radio features. The "Sgr A West Wings" extend 5 pc from the NW and SE tips of the ionized "Mini-spiral" in Sgr A West to positions located 2.9 and 2.4 arc min to the NW and SE of Sgr A*, respectively. The NW wing, along with several other prominent features, including the "NW Streamers", form an elongated radio lobe (NW lobe), oriented nearly perpendicular to the Galactic plane. This radio lobe, with a size of 14.4 pc x 7.3 pc, has a known X-ray counterpart. A row of three thermally emitting rings is observed in the...

  8. Variability of Active Galactic Nuclei

    Peterson, Bradley M.

    2001-01-01

    Continuum and emission-line variability of active galactic nuclei provides a powerful probe of microarcsecond scale structures in the central regions of these sources. In this contribution, we review basic concepts and methodologies used in analyzing AGN variability. We develop from first principles the basics of reverberation mapping, and pay special attention to emission-line transfer functions. We discuss application of cross-correlation analysis to AGN light curves. Finally, we provide a ...

  9. Active galactic nuclei

    Beckmann, Volker

    2012-01-01

    This AGN textbook includes phenomena based on new results in the X-Ray domain from new telescopes such as Chandra and XMM Newton not mentioned in any other book. Furthermore, it considers also the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope with its revolutionary advances of unprecedented sensitivity, field of view and all-sky monitoring. Those and other new developments as well as simulations of AGN merging events and formations, enabled through latest super-computing capabilities. The book gives an overview on the current knowledge of the Active Galacitc Nuclei phenomenon. The spectral energy d

  10. Evolution of active galactic nuclei

    Merloni, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    [Abriged] Supermassive black holes (SMBH) lurk in the nuclei of most massive galaxies, perhaps in all of them. The tight observed scaling relations between SMBH masses and structural properties of their host spheroids likely indicate that the processes fostering the growth of both components are physically linked, despite the many orders of magnitude difference in their physical size. This chapter discusses how we constrain the evolution of SMBH, probed by their actively growing phases, when they shine as active galactic nuclei (AGN) with luminosities often in excess of that of the entire stellar population of their host galaxies. Following loosely the chronological developments of the field, we begin by discussing early evolutionary studies, when AGN represented beacons of light probing the most distant reaches of the universe and were used as tracers of the large scale structure. This early study turned into AGN "Demography", once it was realized that the strong evolution (in luminosity, number density) of ...

  11. Energy Radiation of the Active Galactic Nuclei

    TANG Zhi-Ming; WANG Yong-Jiu

    2004-01-01

    In the Hellings-Nordtvedt theory, we obtain some expressions of energy radiation and mass defect effect for a kind of the active galactic nuclei, which is meaningful to calculating the energy radiation in the procession of forming this kind of celestial bodies. This calculation can give some interpretation for energy source of the jet from the active galactic nuclei.

  12. Black Hole Demography from Nearby Active Galactic Nuclei

    Ho, Luis C.

    2004-01-01

    A significant fraction of local galaxies show evidence of nuclear activity. I argue that the bulk of this activity, while energetically not remarkable, derives from accretion onto a central massive black hole. The statistics of nearby active galactic nuclei thus provide an effective probe of black hole demography. Consistent with the picture emerging from direct dynamical studies, the local census of nuclear activity strongly suggests that most, perhaps all, galaxies with a significant bulge ...

  13. LINERs as Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei

    Ho, L C

    1998-01-01

    Many nearby galaxies contain optical signatures of nuclear activity in the form of LINER nuclei. LINERs may be the weakest and most common manifestation of the quasar phenomenon. The physical origin of this class of objects, however, has been ambiguous. I draw upon a number of recent observations to argue that a significant fraction of LINERs are low-luminosity active galactic nuclei.

  14. CHANDRA X-RAY AND HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING OF OPTICALLY SELECTED KILOPARSEC-SCALE BINARY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. I. NATURE OF THE NUCLEAR IONIZING SOURCES

    Kiloparsec-scale binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) signal active supermassive black hole (SMBH) pairs in merging galaxies. Despite their significance, unambiguously confirmed cases remain scarce and most have been discovered serendipitously. In a previous systematic search, we optically identified four kpc-scale binary AGNs from candidates selected with double-peaked narrow emission lines at z = 0.1-0.2. Here, we present Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging of these four systems. We critically examine and confirm the binary-AGN scenario for two of the four targets, by combining high angular resolution X-ray imaging spectroscopy with Chandra ACIS-S, better nuclear position constraints from WFC3 F105W imaging, and direct starburst estimates from WFC3 F336W imaging; for the other two targets, the existing data are still consistent with the binary-AGN scenario, but we cannot rule out the possibility of only one AGN ionizing gas in both merging galaxies. We find tentative evidence for a systematically smaller X-ray-to-[O III] luminosity ratio and/or higher Compton-thick fraction in optically selected kpc-scale binary AGNs than in single AGNs, possibly caused by a higher nuclear gas column due to mergers and/or a viewing angle bias related to the double-peak narrow-line selection. While our result lends some further support to the general approach of optically identifying kpc-scale binary AGNs, it also highlights the challenge and ambiguity of X-ray confirmation.

  15. Integral field unit spectroscopy of 10 early type galactic nuclei: I - Principal component analysis Tomography and nuclear activity

    Ricci, T V; Menezes, R B

    2014-01-01

    Most massive galaxies show emission lines that can be characterized as LINERs. To what extent this emission is related to AGNs or to stellar processes is still an open question. In this paper, we analysed a sample of such galaxies to study the central region in terms of nuclear and circumnuclear emission lines, as well as the stellar component properties. For this reason, we selected 10 massive ($\\sigma$ > 200 km/s) nearby (d < 31 Mpc) galaxies and observed them with the IFU/GMOS (integral field unit/Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph) spectrograph on the Gemini South Telescope. The data were analysed with principal component analysis (PCA) Tomography to assess the main properties of the objects. Two spectral regions were analysed: a yellow region (5100-5800 A), adequate to show the properties of the stellar component, and a red region (6250-6800 A), adequate to analyse the gaseous component. We found that all objects previously known to present emission lines have a central AGN-type emitting source. They al...

  16. Power spectra of active galactic nuclei

    2009-01-01

    The power spectral densities(PSDs)for a sample of active galactic nuclei(AGNs)are analyzed in both the frequency domain and the time domain.We find for each object that for broadband noise a character timescale-bifurcation timescale of Fourier and time-domain PSD exists in the 10 3 -10 6 s range, below which the time-domain power spectrum is systematically higher than the corresponding Fourier spectrum.The relationship between bifurcation timescale,AGN mass and luminosity is studied.Compared with the fact that similar phenomena have been found for Galactic black hole candidates(GBHs) with bifurcation timescale~0.1 s but not for accreting neutron stars,our finding indicates that AGNs and GBHs have common intrinsic nature in rapid X-ray variability with a character time parameter scaled with their masses.

  17. Power spectra of active galactic nuclei

    WANG TaiShan; WU YuXiang; LIU Yuan

    2009-01-01

    The power spectral densities (PSDs) for a sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are analyzed in both the frequency domain and the time domain. We find for each object that for broadband noise a character timescale-bifurcation timescale of Fourier and time-domain PSD exists in the 103-106 s range,below which the time-domain power spectrum is systematically higher than the corresponding Fourier spectrum. The relationship between bifurcation timescale, AGN mass and luminosity is studied. Compared with the fact that similar phenomena have been found for Galactic black hole candidates (GBHs)with bifurcation timescale ~0.1 s but not for accreting neutron stars, our finding indicates that AGNs and GBHs have common intrinsic nature in rapid X-ray variability with a character time parameter scaled with their masses.

  18. ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI WITH DOUBLE-PEAKED NARROW LINES: ARE THEY DUAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI?

    Double-peaked [O III] profiles in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) may provide evidence for the existence of dual AGNs, but a good diagnostic for selecting them is currently lacking. Starting from ∼7000 active galaxies in Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7, we assemble a sample of 87 type 2 AGNs with double-peaked [O III] profiles. The nuclear obscuration in the type 2 AGNs allows us to determine redshifts of host galaxies through stellar absorption lines. We typically find that one peak is redshifted and another is blueshifted relative to the host galaxy. We find a strong correlation between the ratios of the shifts and the double peak fluxes. The correlation can be naturally explained by the Keplerian relation predicted by models of co-rotating dual AGNs. The current sample statistically favors that most of the [O III] double-peaked sources are dual AGNs and disfavors other explanations, such as rotating disk and outflows. These dual AGNs have a separation distance at ∼1 kpc scale, showing an intermediate phase of merging systems. The appearance of dual AGNs is about ∼10-2, impacting on the current observational deficit of binary supermassive black holes with a probability of ∼10-4 (Boroson and Lauer).

  19. Stellar transits in active galactic nuclei

    Béky, Bence

    2012-01-01

    Supermassive black holes (SMBH) are typically surrounded by a dense stellar population in galactic nuclei. Stars crossing the line of site in active galactic nuclei (AGN) produce a characteristic transit lightcurve, just like extrasolar planets do when they transit their host star. We examine the possibility of finding such AGN transits in deep optical, UV, and X-ray surveys. We calculate transit lightcurves using the Novikov--Thorne thin accretion disk model, including general relatistic effects. Based on the expected properties of stellar cusps, we find that around 10^6 solar mass SMBHs, transits of red giants are most common for stars on close orbits with transit durations of a few weeks and orbital periods of a few years. We find that detecting AGN transits requires repeated observations of thousands of low mass AGNs to 1% photometric accuracy in optical, or ~ 10% in UV bands or soft X-ray. It may be possible to identify stellar transits in the Pan-STARRS and LSST optical and the eROSITA X-ray surveys. Su...

  20. Stellar Transits in Active Galactic Nuclei

    Béky, Bence; Kocsis, Bence

    2013-01-01

    Supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are typically surrounded by a dense stellar population in galactic nuclei. Stars crossing the line of site in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) produce a characteristic transit light curve, just like extrasolar planets do when they transit their host star. We examine the possibility of finding such AGN transits in deep optical, UV, and X-ray surveys. We calculate transit light curves using the Novikov-Thorne thin accretion disk model, including general relativistic effects. Based on the expected properties of stellar cusps, we find that around 106 solar mass SMBHs, transits of red giants are most common for stars on close orbits with transit durations of a few weeks and orbital periods of a few years. We find that detecting AGN transits requires repeated observations of thousands of low-mass AGNs to 1% photometric accuracy in optical, or ~10% in UV bands or soft X-ray. It may be possible to identify stellar transits in the Pan-STARRS and LSST optical and the eROSITA X-ray surveys. Such observations could be used to constrain black hole mass, spin, inclination, and accretion rate. Transit rates and durations could give valuable information on the circumnuclear stellar clusters as well. Transit light curves could be used to image accretion disks with unprecedented resolution, allowing us to resolve the SMBH silhouette in distant AGNs.

  1. Einstein Observatory results on active galactic nuclei

    Mushotzky, R. F.; Holt, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    The results of Einstein Observatory surveys of active galactic nuclei (AGN) are reviewed. The ubiquity of X-ray emission from AGNs was confirmed. The relations between X-ray and optical luminosities, between X-ray and radio properties, and between X-ray and optical-UV line emission found by the surveys are summarized and briefly discussed. The possible causes of observed X-ray emission from jets in Cen-A, 3C273, and M87 are considered. The active nucleus discovered in the optically 'dull' galaxy NGC 4156 is covered, and a model for NGC 4151 based on detailed spectral studies is briefly discussed. This model establishes the global symmetry of the AGN clouds, their approximate sizes, and their ionization state. Difficulties encountered in attempting to explain the cosmic X-ray background in terms of AGN contributions are addressed.

  2. Active Galactic Nuclei Feedback and Clusters

    Biman B. Nath

    2011-12-01

    The Intracluster Medium (ICM) is believed to have been affected by feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and/or supernovae-driven winds. These sources are supposed to have injected entropy into the ICM gas. The recently determined universal pressure profile of the ICM gas has been used and after comparing with the entropy profile of the gas from gravitational effects of the dark matter halo, the additional entropy injected by non-gravitational sources, as a function of the total cluster mass is determined. The current observational data of red-shift evolution of cluster scaling relation is shown that allow models in which the entropy injection decreases at high red-shift.

  3. Broad iron lines in Active Galactic Nuclei

    Fabian, A C; Reynolds, C S; Young, A J

    2000-01-01

    An intrinsically narrow line emitted by an accretion disk around a black hole appears broadened and skewed as a result of the Doppler effect and gravitational redshift. The fluorescent iron line in the X-ray band at 6.4-6.9keV is the strongest such line and is seen in the X-ray spectrum of many active galactic nuclei and, in particular, Seyfert galaxies. It is an important diagnostic with which to study the geometry and other properties of the accretion flow very close to the central black hole. The broad iron line indicates the presence of a standard thin accretion disk in those objects, often seen at low inclination. The broad iron line has opened up strong gravitational effects around black holes to observational study with wide-reaching consequences for both astrophysics and physics.

  4. Cluster magnetic fields from active galactic nuclei

    Sutter, P M; Yang, H -Y

    2009-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) found at the centers of clusters of galaxies are a possible source for weak cluster-wide magnetic fields. To evaluate this scenario, we present 3D adaptive mesh refinement MHD simulations of a cool-core cluster that include injection of kinetic, thermal, and magnetic energy via an AGN-powered jet. Using the MHD solver in FLASH 2, we compare several sub-resolution approaches that link the estimated accretion rate as measured on the simulation mesh to the accretion rate onto the central black hole and the resulting feedback. We examine the effects of magnetized outflows on the accretion history of the black hole and discuss the ability of these models to magnetize the cluster medium.

  5. Suzaku observations of 'bare' active galactic nuclei

    Walton, D J; Fabian, A C; Gallo, L C; Reis, R C

    2012-01-01

    We present a X-ray spectral analysis of a large sample of 25 'bare' active galactic nuclei, sources with little or no complicating intrinsic absorption, observed with Suzaku. Our work focuses on studying the potential contribution from relativistic disc reflection, and examining the implications of this interpretation for the intrinsic spectral complexities frequently displayed by AGN in the X-ray bandpass. During the analysis, we take the unique approach of attempting to simultaneously undertake a systematic analysis of the whole sample, as well as a detailed treatment of each individual source, and find that disc reflection has the required flexibility to successfully reproduce the broadband spectrum observed for all of the sources considered. Where possible, we use the reflected emission to place constraints on the black hole spin for this sample of sources. Our analysis suggests a general preference for rapidly rotating black holes, which if taken at face value is most consistent with the scenario in whic...

  6. Recurrent Activity in Active Galactic Nuclei

    Saikia, D J

    2010-01-01

    There has been a growing body of evidence to suggest that AGN activity, which is powered by mass accretion on to a supermasive black hole, could be episodic, although the range of time scales involved needs to be explored further. The structure and spectra of radio emission from radio galaxies, whose sizes range up to $\\sim$5 Mpc, contain information on the history of AGN activity in the source. They thus provide a unique opportunity to study the time scales of recurrent AGN activity. The most striking examples of recurrent activity in radio galaxies and quasars are the double-double or triple-double radio sources which contain two or three pairs of distinct lobes on opposite sides of the parent optical object. Spectral and dynamical ages of these lobes could be used to constrain time scales of episodic activity. Inverse-Compton scattered cosmic microwave background radiation could in principle probe lower Lorentz-factor particles than radio observations of synchrotron emission, and thereby reveal an older po...

  7. Multi-phase Nature of a Radiation-Driven Fountain with Nuclear Starburst in a Low-mass Active Galactic Nucleus

    Wada, Keiichi; Meijerink, Rowin

    2016-01-01

    The structures and dynamics of molecular, atomic, and ionized gases are studied around a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) with a small ($2\\times 10^6 M_\\odot$) black hole using 3D radiation hydrodynamic simulations. We studied, for the first time, the non-equilibrium chemistry for the X-ray dominated region in the "radiation-driven fountain" (Wada 2012) with supernova feedback. A double hollow cone structure is naturally formed without postulating a thick "torus" around a central source. The cone is occupied with an inhomogeneous, diffuse ionized gas and surrounded by a geometrically thick ($h/r \\gtrsim 1$) atomic gas. Dense molecular gases are distributed near the equatorial plane, and energy feedback from supernovae enhances their scale height. Molecular hydrogen exists in a hot phase ( > 1000 K) as well as in a cold ( $10^3$ cm$^{-3}$) phase. The velocity dispersion of H$_2$ in the vertical direction is comparable to the rotational velocity, which is consistent with near infrared observations o...

  8. Launching of Active Galactic Nuclei Jets

    Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    As black holes accrete gas, they often produce relativistic, collimated outflows, or jets. Jets are expected to form in the vicinity of a black hole, making them powerful probes of strong-field gravity. However, how jet properties (e.g., jet power) connect to those of the accretion flow (e.g., mass accretion rate) and the black hole (e.g., black hole spin) remains an area of active research. This is because what determines a crucial parameter that controls jet properties—the strength of large-scale magnetic flux threading the black hole—remains largely unknown. First-principles computer simulations show that due to this, even if black hole spin and mass accretion rate are held constant, the simulated jet powers span a wide range, with no clear winner. This limits our ability to use jets as a quantitative diagnostic tool of accreting black holes. Recent advances in computer simulations demonstrated that accretion disks can accumulate large-scale magnetic flux on the black hole, until the magnetic flux becomes so strong that it obstructs gas infall and leads to a magnetically-arrested disk (MAD). Recent evidence suggests that central black holes in jetted active galactic nuclei and tidal disruptions are surrounded by MADs. Since in MADs both the black hole magnetic flux and the jet power are at their maximum, well-defined values, this opens up a new vista in the measurements of black hole masses and spins and quantitative tests of accretion and jet theory.

  9. Warped circumbinary disks in active galactic nuclei

    We study a warping instability of a geometrically thin, non-self-gravitating disk surrounding binary supermassive black holes on a circular orbit. Such a circumbinary disk is subject to not only tidal torques due to the binary gravitational potential but also radiative torques due to radiation emitted from an accretion disk around each black hole. We find that a circumbinary disk initially aligned with the binary orbital plane is unstable to radiation-driven warping beyond the marginally stable warping radius, which is sensitive to both the ratio of vertical to horizontal shear viscosities and the mass-to-energy conversion efficiency. As expected, the tidal torques give no contribution to the growth of warping modes but tend to align the circumbinary disk with the orbital plane. Since the tidal torques can suppress the warping modes in the inner part of circumbinary disk, the circumbinary disk starts to be warped at radii larger than the marginally stable warping radius. If the warping radius is of the order of 0.1 pc, a resultant semi-major axis is estimated to be of the order of 10–2 pc to 10–4 pc for 107 M☉ black hole. We also discuss the possibility that the central objects of observed warped maser disks in active galactic nuclei are binary supermassive black holes with a triple disk: two accretion disks around the individual black holes and one circumbinary disk surrounding them.

  10. Quasi periodic oscillations in active galactic nuclei

    Alston, W.; Fabian, A.; Markevičiutė, J.; Parker, M.; Middleton, M.; Kara, E.

    2016-05-01

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) are coherent peaks of variability power observed in the X-ray power spectra (PSDs) of stellar mass X-ray binaries (XRBs). A scale invariance of the accretion process implies they should be present in the active galactic nuclei. The first robust detection was a ∼ 1 h periodicity in the Seyfert galaxy RE J1034+396 from a ∼ 90 ks XMM-Newton observation; however, subsequent observations failed to detect the QPO in the 0.3-10.0 keV band. In this talk we present the recent detection of the ∼ 1 h periodicity in the 1.0-4.0 keV band of 4 further low-flux/spectrally-harder observations of RE J1034+396 (see Alston et al. 2014). We also present recent work on the discovery of a QPO in the Seyfert galaxy, MS 2254.9-3712, which again is only detected in energy bands associated with the primary power-law continuum emission (Alston et al. 2015). We conclude these features are most likely analogous to the high-frequency QPOs observed in XRBs. In both sources, we also see evidence for X-ray reverberation at the QPO frequency, where soft X-ray bands and Iron Kα emission lag the primary X-ray continuum. These time delays may provide another diagnostic for understanding the underlying QPO mechanism observed in accreting black holes.

  11. TANAMI - Tracking Active Galactic Nuclei with Austral Milliarcsecond Interferometry

    Mueller, Cornelia; Kadler, Matthias; Ojha, Roopesh; De Boeck, M.; Booth, R.; Dutka, M. S.; Edwardsk, P.; Fey, A. L.; Fuhrmann, L.; Hase, H.; Horiuchi, S.; Jauncey, D. L.; Johnston, K.J.; Katz, U.; Lister, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a summary of the observation strategy of TANAMI (Tracking Active Galactic Nuclei with Austral Milliarcsecond Interferometry), a monitoring program to study the parsec-scale structure and dynamics of relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei (AGN) of the Southern Hemisphere with the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA) and the trans-oceanic antennas Hartebeesthoek, TIGO, and O'Higgins. TANAMI is focusing on extragalactic sources south of -30 degrees declination with observations a...

  12. The effects of the local environment on active galactic nuclei

    Manzer, L. H.; De Robertis, M. M., E-mail: liannemanzer@gmail.com, E-mail: mmdr@yorku.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3 (Canada)

    2014-06-20

    There continues to be significant controversy regarding the mechanism(s) responsible for the initiation and maintenance of activity in galactic nuclei. In this paper we will investigate possible environmental triggers of nuclear activity through a statistical analysis of a large sample of galaxy groups. The focus of this paper is to identify active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and other emission-line galaxies in these groups and to compare their frequency with a sample of over 260,000 isolated galaxies from the same catalog. The galaxy groups are taken from the catalog of Yang et al., in which over 20,000 virialized groups of galaxies (2 ≤ N ≤ 20) with redshifts between 0.01 and 0.20 are from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We first investigate the completeness of our data set and find, though biases are a concern particularly at higher redshift, that our data provide a fair representation of the local universe. After correcting emission-line equivalent widths for extinction and underlying Balmer stellar absorption, we classify galaxies in the sample using traditional emission-line ratios, while incorporating measurement uncertainties. We find a significantly higher fraction of AGNs in groups compared with the isolated sample. Likewise, a significantly higher fraction of absorption-line galaxies are found in groups, while a higher fraction of star-forming galaxies prefer isolated environments. Within grouped environments, AGNs and star-forming galaxies are found more frequently in small- to medium-richness groups, while absorption-line galaxies prefer groups with larger richnesses. Groups containing only emission-line galaxies have smaller virial radii, velocity dispersions, and masses compared with those containing only absorption-line galaxies. Furthermore, the AGN fraction increases with decreasing distance to the group centroid, independent of galaxy morphology. Using properties obtained from Galaxy Zoo, there is an increased fraction of AGNs within merging systems

  13. The effects of the local environment on active galactic nuclei

    There continues to be significant controversy regarding the mechanism(s) responsible for the initiation and maintenance of activity in galactic nuclei. In this paper we will investigate possible environmental triggers of nuclear activity through a statistical analysis of a large sample of galaxy groups. The focus of this paper is to identify active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and other emission-line galaxies in these groups and to compare their frequency with a sample of over 260,000 isolated galaxies from the same catalog. The galaxy groups are taken from the catalog of Yang et al., in which over 20,000 virialized groups of galaxies (2 ≤ N ≤ 20) with redshifts between 0.01 and 0.20 are from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We first investigate the completeness of our data set and find, though biases are a concern particularly at higher redshift, that our data provide a fair representation of the local universe. After correcting emission-line equivalent widths for extinction and underlying Balmer stellar absorption, we classify galaxies in the sample using traditional emission-line ratios, while incorporating measurement uncertainties. We find a significantly higher fraction of AGNs in groups compared with the isolated sample. Likewise, a significantly higher fraction of absorption-line galaxies are found in groups, while a higher fraction of star-forming galaxies prefer isolated environments. Within grouped environments, AGNs and star-forming galaxies are found more frequently in small- to medium-richness groups, while absorption-line galaxies prefer groups with larger richnesses. Groups containing only emission-line galaxies have smaller virial radii, velocity dispersions, and masses compared with those containing only absorption-line galaxies. Furthermore, the AGN fraction increases with decreasing distance to the group centroid, independent of galaxy morphology. Using properties obtained from Galaxy Zoo, there is an increased fraction of AGNs within merging systems

  14. The SINS/zC-SINF survey of z ∼ 2 galaxy kinematics: Evidence for powerful active galactic nucleus-driven nuclear outflows in massive star-forming galaxies

    We report the detection of ubiquitous powerful nuclear outflows in massive (≥1011 M ☉) z ∼ 2 star-forming galaxies (SFGs), which are plausibly driven by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). The sample consists of the eight most massive SFGs from our SINS/zC-SINF survey of galaxy kinematics with the imaging spectrometer SINFONI, six of which have sensitive high-resolution adaptive optics-assisted observations. All of the objects are disks hosting a significant stellar bulge. The spectra in their central regions exhibit a broad component in Hα and forbidden [N II] and [S II] line emission, with typical velocity FWHM ∼ 1500 km s–1, [N II]/Hα ratio ≈ 0.6, and intrinsic extent of 2-3 kpc. These properties are consistent with warm ionized gas outflows associated with Type 2 AGN, the presence of which is confirmed via independent diagnostics in half the galaxies. The data imply a median ionized gas mass outflow rate of ∼60 M ☉ yr–1 and mass loading of ∼3. At larger radii, a weaker broad component is detected but with lower FWHM ∼485 km s–1 and [N II]/Hα ≈ 0.35, characteristic for star formation-driven outflows as found in the lower-mass SINS/zC-SINF galaxies. The high inferred mass outflow rates and frequent occurrence suggest that the nuclear outflows efficiently expel gas out of the centers of the galaxies with high duty cycles and may thus contribute to the process of star formation quenching in massive galaxies. Larger samples at high masses will be crucial in confirming the importance and energetics of the nuclear outflow phenomenon and its connection to AGN activity and bulge growth.

  15. Feedback of Active Galactic Nuclei in Seyfert 2 Galaxies

    En-Peng Zhang; Wei-Hao Bian; Chen Hu; Wei-Ming Mao; ALi Luo; Yong-Heng Zhao

    2008-01-01

    It is well accepted that feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) plays an important role in the coevolution of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) and its host galaxy,but the concrete mechanism of feedback remains unclear.A considerable body of evidence suggests that AGN feedback suppresses star formation in the host galaxy.We assemble a sample of Seyfert 2 galaxies with recent observational data of compact nuclear starbursts and estimate the gas surface density as a function of column density to illuminate the relation between feedback and AGN properties.Although there are some uncertainties,our data still imply the deviation from the star formation law (Kennicutt-Schmidt law).Further,they indicate that:(1) Feedback correlates with the Eddington ratio,rather than with the mass of SMBH,as a result of decreasing star formation efficiency.(2) The SMBH and the torus are probably undergoing coevolution.Conclusions presented here can be refined through future high resolution CO or HCN observations.

  16. Environment and properties of obscured and unobscured active galactic nuclei

    Taormina, M.; Bornancini, C.

    We analyze the properties of obscured and unobscured active galactic nuclei selected using mid-infrared colors in the redshift range 1 < z < 3. We find that obscured objects are located in a denser local galaxy environment compared to the unobscured sample.

  17. Active galactic nuclei shed light on axion-like-particles

    Burrage, Clare [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Davis, Anne-Christine [Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics; Shaw, Douglas J. [London Univ. (United Kingdom). Astronomy Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences

    2009-02-15

    We demonstrate that the scatter in the luminosity relations of astrophysical objects can be used to search for axion-like-particles (ALPs). This analysis is applied to observations of active galactic nuclei, where we find evidence highly suggestive of the existence of a very light ALP. (orig.)

  18. Active Galactic Nuclei as High-Energy Neutrino Sources

    Murase, Kohta

    2015-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are believed to be promising candidates of extragalactic cosmic-ray accelerators and sources, and associated high-energy neutrino and hadronic gamma-ray emission has been studied for many years. We review models of high-energy neutrino production in AGN, and discuss their implications for the latest IceCube observation of the diffuse neutrino intensity.

  19. Active Galactic Nuclei Discovered in the Kepler Mission

    Shaya, Edward J.; Olling, Robert; Mushotzky, Richard

    2015-12-01

    We report on candidate active galactic nuclei (AGNs) discovered during the monitoring of ∼500 bright (r variability over three month periods, as seen in the SFs and power spectral densities (PSDs), can dramatically change for many of these AGN candidates. Four of the candidates have features in their SFs that may indicate quasi-periodic behavior, although other possibilities are discussed.

  20. The Radius-Luminosity Relationship for Active Galactic Nuclei

    Bentz, Misty C.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Pogge, Richard W.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Onken, Christopher A.

    2006-01-01

    We have obtained high resolution images of the central regions of 14 reverberation-mapped active galactic nuclei (AGN) using the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys High Resolution Camera to account for host-galaxy starlight contamination of measured AGN luminosities. We measure the...

  1. Conference Summary: The Central Engine of Active Galactic Nuclei

    Netzer, Hagai; Shields, Joseph C.

    2007-01-01

    The 2006 meeting in Xi'an on the Central Engine of Active Galactic Nuclei covered the enormous and continuously expanding area of AGN research, from theory to the most sophisticated observations and from gamma-ray energies to long radio wavelengths. This short summary gives some, but definitely not all, highlights and new results presented by the participants.

  2. Relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei

    Harris, D E; Krawczynski

    2012-01-01

    Written by a carefully selected consortium of researchers working in the field, this book fills the gap for an up-to-date summary of the observational and theoretical status. As such, this monograph includes all used wavelengths, from radio to gamma, the FERMI telescope, a history and theory refresher, and jets from gamma ray bursts. For astronomers, nuclear physicists, and plasmaphysicists.

  3. The X-ray spectroscopy of active galactic nuclei

    Mushotzky, R.

    1985-01-01

    The scientific goals of X-ray spectroscopy of active galactic nuclei are discussed. The underlying energy source, the regions responsible for the optical emission lines, the different types of active galaxies, and cosmology are considered. The requirements for an X-ray mission of broad band width, large collecting area, modest spatial resolution and good spectral resolution are outlined. It is concluded that the ESA XMM mission meets these requirements.

  4. Ultra Fast Outflows: Galaxy-Scale Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback

    Wagner, A. Y.; Umemura, M; Bicknell, G. V.

    2012-01-01

    We show, using global 3D grid-based hydrodynamical simulations, that Ultra Fast Outflows (UFOs) from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) result in considerable feedback of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. The AGN wind interacts strongly with the inhomogeneous, two-phase ISM consisting of dense clouds embedded in a tenuous hot hydrostatic medium. The outflow floods through the inter-cloud channels, sweeps up the hot ISM, and ablates and disperses the dense cl...

  5. Galactic Center gamma-ray "excess" from an active past of the Galactic Centre?

    Petrovic, Jovana; Zaharijas, Gabrijela

    2014-01-01

    Several groups have recently claimed evidence for unaccounted gamma-ray excesses over diffuse backgrounds at few GeV in Fermi-LAT data in a region around the Galactic Center, consistent with a dark matter annihilation origin. We demonstrate that the main spectral and angular features of this "excess" can be reproduced if they are mostly due to inverse Compton emission from high-energy electrons injected in a burst event of ~ 10^{52}-10^{53} erg roughly O(10^6) years ago. We consider this example as a proof of principle that time-dependent phenomena need to be understood and accounted for---together with detailed diffuse foregrounds and unaccounted "steady state" astrophysical sources---before any robust inference can be made about dark matter signals at the Galactic Center. In addition, we point out that the timescale suggested by our study, which controls both the energy cutoff and the angular extension of the signal, intriguingly matches what is inferred by other forensic evidences suggesting a very active ...

  6. IFU spectroscopy of 10 early-type galactic nuclei - II. Nuclear emission line properties

    Ricci, T. V.; Steiner, J. E.; Menezes, R. B.

    2014-05-01

    Although it is well known that massive galaxies have central black holes, most of them accreting at low Eddington ratios, many important questions still remain open. Among them are the nature of the ionizing source, the characteristics and frequencies of the broad-line region and of the dusty torus. We report observations of 10 early-type galactic nuclei, observed with the Gemini Multi Object Spectrograph in integral field unit mode, installed on the Gemini South telescope, analysed with standard techniques for spectral treatment and compared with results obtained with principal component analysis Tomography (Paper I). We performed spectral synthesis of each spaxel of the data cubes and subtracted the stellar component from the original cube, leaving a data cube with emission lines only. The emission lines were decomposed in multi-Gaussian components. We show here that, for eight galaxies previously known to have emission lines, the narrow-line region can be decomposed in two components with distinct line widths. In addition to this, broad Hα emission was detected in six galaxies. The two galaxies not previously known to have emission lines show weak Hα+[N II] lines. All 10 galaxies may be classified as low-ionization nuclear emission regions in diagnostic diagrams and seven of them have bona fide active galactic nuclei with luminosities between 1040 and 1043 erg s-1. Eddington ratios are always <10-3.

  7. The interaction between feedback from active galactic nuclei and supernovae

    Booth, C. M.; Joop Schaye

    2012-01-01

    Energetic feedback from supernovae (SNe) and from active galactic nuclei (AGN) are both important processes that are thought to control how much gas is able to condense into galaxies and form stars. We show that although both AGN and SNe suppress star formation, they mutually weaken one another's effect by up to an order of magnitude in haloes in the mass range for which both feedback processes are efficient (10^11.25 M_sun < m_200 < 10^12.5 M_sun). These results demonstrate the importance of...

  8. Statistics of Superluminal Motion in Active Galactic Nuclei

    Yong-Wei Zhang; Jun-Hui Fan

    2008-01-01

    We have collected an up-to-date sample of 123 superluminal sources (84 quasars, 27 BL Lac objects and 12 galaxies) and calculated the apparent velocities (βapp) for 224 components in the sources with the A-CDM model. We checked the relationships between their proper motions, redshifts,βapp and 5 GHz flux densities. Our analysis shows that the radio emission is strongly boosted by the Doppler effect. The superluminal motion and the relativistic beaming boosting effect are, to some extent, the same in active galactic nuclei.

  9. Active galactic nucleus feedback in clusters of galaxies.

    Blanton, Elizabeth L; Clarke, T E; Sarazin, Craig L; Randall, Scott W; McNamara, Brian R

    2010-04-20

    Observations made during the last ten years with the Chandra X-ray Observatory have shed much light on the cooling gas in the centers of clusters of galaxies and the role of active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating. Cooling of the hot intracluster medium in cluster centers can feed the supermassive black holes found in the nuclei of the dominant cluster galaxies leading to AGN outbursts which can reheat the gas, suppressing cooling and large amounts of star formation. AGN heating can come in the form of shocks, buoyantly rising bubbles that have been inflated by radio lobes, and the dissipation of sound waves. PMID:20351250

  10. Thermal-nonthermal relationships in active galactic nuclei

    This dissertation reports on optical and radio observations of active galactic nuclei, selected on the basis of the presence of dominant narrow (narrow line radio galaxies, Seyfert II galaxies, QSOs) and/or broad (broad line radio galaxies, Seyfert I galaxies, QSOs) optical emission lines in their spectra. Special attention is drawn to possible relationships and physical links between the two regimes responsible for the optical (thermal) and radio (non-thermal) emission. Several projects, each studying such relationships on different angular (and thus linear) scales and at different observational frequencies were conceived with a variety of detection devices. (Auth.)

  11. Kepler Observations of Rapid Optical Variability in Active Galactic Nuclei

    Mushotzky, R. F.; Edelson, R.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Gandhi, P.

    2012-01-01

    Over three quarters in 2010 - 2011, Kepler monitored optical emission from four active galactic nuclei (AGN) with approx 30 min sampling, > 90% duty cycle and approx AGN optical fluctuation power spectral density functions (PSDs) over a wide range in temporal frequency. Fits to these PSDs yielded power law slopes of -2.6 to -3.3, much steeper than typically seen in the X-rays. We find evidence that individual AGN exhibit intrinsically different PSD slopes. The steep PSD fits are a challenge to recent AGN variability models but seem consistent with first order MRI theoretical calculations of accretion disk fluctuations.

  12. The role of active galactic nuclei in galaxy formation

    Thomas, P A

    2009-01-01

    We use Monte-Carlo Markov chain techniques to constrain acceptable parameter regions for the Munich L-Galaxies semi-analytic galaxy formation model. Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is required to limit star-formation in the most massive galaxies. However, we show that the introduction of tidal stripping of dwarf galaxies as they fall into and merge with their host systems can lead to a reduction in the required degree of AGN feedback. In addition, the new model correctly reproduces both the metallicity of large galaxies and the fraction of intracluster light.

  13. Photon-axion conversion in Active Galactic Nuclei?

    Bassan, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    Axion-Like Particles (ALPs) are the focus of intense current research. We analyze photon-ALP conversion in the context of relativistic jet models of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) for more than 100 sources. Contrary to previous claims, we find that this process cannot occur above 100 GeV regardless of the actual AGN model and the values of ALP parameters. This result rules out a proposed strategy to bypass the cosmic opacity above 100 GeV, as apparently required by observations. We also show that for some AGN an observable effect can show up in the X and soft gamma-ray bands.

  14. Emission line regions of active galactic nuclei and quasars

    The observational constraints on the conditions in the gas which give rise to the emission lines seen in the spectra of quasars and active galactic nuclei are summarized, with particular attention being paid to the region responsible for the broad lines. Some general requirements on the physical conditions and geometry are described, and the emission line region of the quasar 3C273 is used to illustrate the successes, and shortcomings, of photoionization models. Comparisons of the emission line profiles of different ions show that there must be some radial flow, and obscuration, in the region of the emission line material

  15. Nuclear Activity In Isolated Galaxies

    Hernandez-Ibarra, Francisco; Krongold, Yair; Del Olmo, Ascencion; Perea, Jaime; Gonzalez, Jesus

    2012-01-01

    We present a spectroscopic study of the incidence of AGN nuclear activity in two samples of isolated galaxies (Karachentseva, V.E. & Varela, J.). Our results show that the incidence of non-thermal nuclear activity is about 43% and 31% for galaxies with emission lines and for the total sample 40% and 27% respectively. For the first time we have a large number of bona-fide isolated galaxies (513 objects), with statistically significant number of all types. We find a clear relation between bulge mass and the incidence of nuclear activity in the sample with emission lines. This relation becomes flatter when we take into account the complete sample with no emission line galaxies. A large fration ($\\sim$70%) of elliptical galaxies or early type spirals have an active galactic nucleus and $\\sim$70% of them are LINERs. Only 3% of the AGN show the presence of broad lines (a not a single one can be classified as type 1 AGN). This is a remarkable result which is completely at odds with the unified model even if we c...

  16. Magnetic flare model of quasars and active galactic nuclei

    As a model of quasars and active galactic nuclei, we present the magnetic flare model which clarifies the connection between the primary energy source and the non-thermal phenomena. The behavior of the magnetic field generated in the accretion disk around a massive black hole is investigated in terms of the αω-dynamo and the magnetic buoyancy. The magnetic field is responsible not only for the angular momentum transfer but also for the vertical energy transfer owing to the magnetic buoyancy. Magnetic energy thus transferred should be released in the coronal region above the disk surface through its flare-like reconnection as in the solar flare. We expect that it will produce a variety of non-thermal activities characteristic to quasars and active galactic nuclei. We argue that the following scenario is compatible with various observations: A flare generates the relativistic shock behind which electrons are heated up to the relativistic energy. Subsequently, they produce X and γ rays by the inverse Compton scattering of low energy photons as well as emit from radio up to soft X photons by the synchrotron radiation. (author)

  17. Merging of globular clusters within inner galactic regions. II. The Nuclear Star Cluster formation

    Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of two detailed N-body simulations of the interaction of a sample of four massive globular clusters in the inner region of a triaxial galaxy. A full merging of the clusters takes place, leading to a slowly evolving cluster which is quite similar to observed Nuclear Clusters. Actually, both the density and the velocity dispersion profiles match qualitatively, and quantitatively after scaling, with observed features of many nucleated galaxies. In the case of dense initial clusters, the merger remnant shows a density profile more concentrated than that of the progenitors, with a central density higher than the sum of the central progenitors central densities. These findings support the idea that a massive Nuclear Cluster may have formed in early phases of the mother galaxy evolution and lead to the formation of a nucleus, which, in many galaxies, has indeed a luminosity profile similar to that of an extended King model. A correlation with galactic nuclear activity is suggeste...

  18. The Angular Clustering of WISE-selected Active Galactic Nuclei: Different Halos for Obscured and Unobscured Active Galactic Nuclei

    Donoso, E.; Yan, Lin; Stern, D; Assef, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the angular correlation function for a sample of ~170,000 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) extracted from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) catalog, selected to have red mid-IR colors (W1 − W2 > 0.8) and 4.6 μm flux densities brighter than 0.14 mJy). The sample is expected to be >90% reliable at identifying AGNs and to have a mean redshift of 〈z〉 = 1.1. In total, the angular clustering of WISE AGNs is roughly similar to that of optical AGNs. We cross-match these objects...

  19. Active galactic nuclei at gamma-ray energies

    Dermer, Charles Dennison

    2016-01-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei can be copious extragalactic emitters of MeV-GeV-TeV gamma rays, a phenomenon linked to the presence of relativistic jets powered by a super-massive black hole in the center of the host galaxy. Most of gamma-ray emitting active galactic nuclei, with more than 1500 known at GeV energies, and more than 60 at TeV energies, are called "blazars". The standard blazar paradigm features a jet of relativistic magnetized plasma ejected from the neighborhood of a spinning and accreting super-massive black hole, close to the observer direction. Two classes of blazars are distinguished from observations: the flat-spectrum radio-quasar class (FSRQ) is characterized by strong external radiation fields, emission of broad optical lines, and dust tori. The BL Lac class (from the name of one of its members, BL Lacertae) corresponds to weaker advection-dominated flows with gamma-ray spectra dominated by the inverse Compton effect on synchrotron photons. This paradigm has been very successful for modeling t...

  20. TANAMI - Tracking Active Galactic Nuclei with Austral Milliarcsecond Interferometry

    Mueller, Cornelia; Ojha, Roopesh; Boeck, M; Booth, R; Dutka, M S; Edwardsk, P; Fey, A L; Fuhrmann, L; Hase, H; Horiuchi, S; Jauncey, D L; Johnston, K J; Katz, U; Lister, M; Lovell, J E J; Ploetz, C; Quick, J F H; Ros, E; Taylor, G B; Thompson, D J; Tingay, S J; Tosti, G; Tzioumisk, A K; Wilms, J; Zensus, J A

    2009-01-01

    We present a summary of the observation strategy of TANAMI (Tracking Active Galactic Nuclei with Austral Milliarcsecond Interferometry), a monitoring program to study the parsec-scale structure and dynamics of relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei (AGN) of the Southern Hemisphere with the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA) and the trans-oceanic antennas Hartebeesthoek, TIGO, and O'Higgins. TANAMI is focusing on extragalactic sources south of -30 degrees declination with observations at 8.4 GHz and 22 GHz every ~2 months at milliarcsecond resolution. The initial TANAMI sample of 43 sources has been defined before the launch of the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope to include the most promising candidates for bright gamma-ray emission to be detected with its Large Area Telescope (LAT). Since November 2008, we have been adding new sources to the sample, which now includes all known radio- and gamma-ray bright AGN of the Southern Hemisphere. The combination of VLBI and gamma-ray observations is crucial to u...

  1. Spatially Offset Active Galactic Nuclei I: Selection and Spectroscopic Properties

    Barrows, R Scott; Greene, Jenny E; Pooley, David

    2016-01-01

    We present a sample of 18 optically-selected and X-ray detected spatially offset active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). In 9 systems, the X-ray AGN is spatially offset from the galactic stellar core that is located within the 3'' diameter SDSS spectroscopic fiber. In 11 systems, the X-ray AGN is spatially offset from a stellar core that is located outside the fiber, with an overlap of 2. To build the sample, we cross-matched Type II AGN selected from the SDSS galaxy catalogue with archival Chandra imaging and employed our custom astrometric and registration procedure. The projected angular (physical) offsets span a range of 0."6 (0.8 kpc) to 17."4 (19.4 kpc), with a median value of 2."7 (4.6 kpc). The offset nature of an AGN is an unambiguous signature of a galaxy merger, and these systems can be used to study the properties of AGN in galaxy mergers without the biases introduced by morphological merger selection techniques. In this paper (Paper I), we use our sample to assess t...

  2. Accretion and jet power in active galactic nuclei

    Luigi Foschini

    2011-01-01

    The classical diagrams of radio loudness and jet power as a function of mass and accretion rate of the central spacetime singularity in active galactic nuclei are reanalyzed by including the data of the recently discovered powerful relativistic jets in Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies.The results are studied in the light of the known theories of relativistic jets,indicating that,although the Blandford-Znajek mechanism is sufficient to explain the power radiated by BL Lac Objects,it fails to completely account for the power from quasars and Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies.This favors the scenario outlined by Cavaliere & D' Elia of a composite jet,with a magnetospheric core plus a hydromagnetic component emerging when the accretion power increases and the disk becomes radiation-pressure dominated.A comparison with Galactic compact objects is also made,finding some striking similarities,indicating that since neutron stars are low-mass jet systems analogous to black holes,Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies are low-mass counterparts of blazars.

  3. Emission Line Galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei in WINGS clusters

    Marziani, P; Bettoni, D; Poggianti, B M; Moretti, A; Fasano, G; Fritz, J; Cava, A; Varela, J; Omizzolo, A

    2016-01-01

    We present the analysis of the emission line galaxies members of 46 low redshift (0.04 < z < 0.07) clusters observed by WINGS (WIde-field Nearby Galaxy cluster Survey, Fasano et al. 2006). Emission line galaxies were identified following criteria that are meant to minimize biases against non-star forming galaxies and classified employing diagnostic diagrams. We have examined the emission line properties and frequencies of star forming galaxies, transition objects and active galactic nuclei (AGNs: LINERs and Seyferts), unclassified galaxies with emission lines, and quiescent galaxies with no detectable line emission. A deficit of emission line galaxies in the cluster environment is indicated by both a lower frequency with respect to control samples, and by a systematically lower Balmer emission line equivalent width and luminosity (up to one order of magnitude in equivalent width with respect to control samples for transition objects) that implies a lower amount of ionised gas per unit mass and a lower s...

  4. Powerful Outflows and Feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei

    King, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) represent the growth phases of the supermassive black holes in the center of almost every galaxy. Powerful, highly ionized winds, with velocities $\\sim 0.1- 0.2c$ are a common feature in X--ray spectra of luminous AGN, offering a plausible physical origin for the well known connections between the hole and properties of its host. Observability constraints suggest that the winds must be episodic, and detectable only for a few percent of their lifetimes. The most powerful wind feedback, establishing the $M -\\sigma$ relation, is probably not directly observable at all. The $M - \\sigma$ relation signals a global change in the nature of AGN feedback. At black hole masses below $M-\\sigma$ feedback is confined to the immediate vicinity of the hole. At the $M-\\sigma$ mass it becomes much more energetic and widespread, and can drive away much of the bulge gas as a fast molecular outflow.

  5. KEPLER OBSERVATIONS OF RAPID OPTICAL VARIABILITY IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Over three quarters in 2010-2011, Kepler monitored optical emission from four active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with ∼30 minute sampling, >90% duty cycle, and ∼<0.1% repeatability. These data determined the AGN optical fluctuation power spectral density (PSD) functions over a wide range in temporal frequency. Fits to these PSDs yielded power-law slopes of –2.6 to –3.3, much steeper than typically seen in the X-rays. We find evidence that individual AGNs exhibit intrinsically different PSD slopes. The steep PSD fits are a challenge to recent AGN variability models but seem consistent with first-order magnetorotational instability theoretical calculations of accretion disk fluctuations.

  6. Variability in the continuum of active galactic nuclei

    Variability in the continuum of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) is briefly reviewed. Emphasis is put on the importance of systematic, broad band, coordinated monitoring observations to the investigation of the basic structural properties and radiation mechanisms of the continuum source as well as the origins of the observed variations. Two particular problems are discussed in some detail. The first concerns the case for relativistic beaming in BL Lac type objects and the critical observations in the radio and X-ray bands needed to establish the case are pointed out. The second concerns the constraints which follow from variability studies on non-thermal models of the optical-ultraviolet and of the X-ray emission in Seyfert galaxies. (Auth.)

  7. Active Galactic Nuclei: The TeV Challenge

    Blandford, R; Nalewajko, K; Yuan, Y; Zrake, J

    2015-01-01

    Jets associated with Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) have been observed for almost a century, initially at optical and radio wavelengths. They are now widely accepted as "exhausts" produced electromagnetically by the central, spinning, massive black hole and its orbiting, accreting gas. Observations at X-ray and, especially, gamma-ray energies have transformed our understanding of how these jets evolve dynamically, accelerate electrons (and positrons) and radiate throughout the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Some new approaches to modeling the powerful and rapidly variable TeV emission observed from many blazars are sketched. Observations at the highest TeV energies, to which the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory (HAWC) will contribute, promise crucial discrimination between rival models of AGN jets.

  8. The interaction between feedback from active galactic nuclei and supernovae

    Booth, C M

    2012-01-01

    Energetic feedback from supernovae (SNe) and from active galactic nuclei (AGN) are both important processes that are thought to control how much gas is able to condense into galaxies and form stars. We show that although both AGN and SNe suppress star formation, they mutually weaken one another's effect by up to an order of magnitude in haloes in the mass range for which both feedback processes are efficient (10^11.25 M_sun < m_200 < 10^12.5 M_sun). These results demonstrate the importance of the simultaneous, non-independent inclusion of these two processes in models of galaxy formation to estimate the total feedback strength. These results are of particular relevance to semi-analytic models, which implicitly assume the effects of the two feedback processes to be independent, and also to hydrodynamical simulations that model only one of the feedback processes.

  9. Time Delay Evolution of Five Active Galactic Nuclei

    A. Kovačević; L. Č. Popović; A. I. Shapovalova; D. Ilić; A. N. Burenkov; V. H. Chavushyan

    2015-12-01

    Here we investigate light curves of the continuum and emission lines of five type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGN) from our monitoring campaign, to test time-evolution of their time delays. Using both modeled and observed AGN light curves, we apply Gaussian kernel-based estimator to capture variation of local patterns of their time evolving delays. The largest variations of time delays of all objects occur in the period when continuum or emission lines luminosity is the highest. However, Gaussian kernel-based method shows instability in the case of NGC 5548, 3C 390.3, E1821+643 and NGC 4051 possibly due to numerical discrepancies between damped random walk (DRW) time scale of light curves and sliding time windows of the method. The temporal variations of time lags of Arp 102B can correspond to the real nature of the time lag evolution.

  10. Studies of Relativistic Jets in Active Galactic Nuclei with SKA

    Agudo, Ivan; Falcke, Heino; Georganopoulos, Markos; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Giovannini, Gabriele; Giroletti, Marcello; Gomez, Jose L; Gurvits, Leonid; Laing, Robert; Lister, Matthew; Marti, Jose-Maria; Meyer, Eileen T; Mizuno, Yosuke; O'Sullivan, Shane; Padovani, Paolo; Paragi, Zsolt; Perucho, Manel; Schleicher, Dominik; Stawarz, Lukasz; Vlahakis, Nektarios; Wardle, John

    2015-01-01

    Relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei (AGN) are among the most powerful astrophysical objects discovered to date. Indeed, jetted AGN studies have been considered a prominent science case for SKA, and were included in several different chapters of the previous SKA Science Book (Carilli & Rawlings 2004). Most of the fundamental questions about the physics of relativistic jets still remain unanswered, and await high-sensitivity radio instruments such as SKA to solve them. These questions will be addressed specially through analysis of the massive data sets arising from the deep, all-sky surveys (both total and polarimetric flux) from SKA1. Wide-field very-long-baseline-interferometric survey observations involving SKA1 will serve as a unique tool for distinguishing between extragalactic relativistic jets and star forming galaxies via brightness temperature measurements. Subsequent SKA1 studies of relativistic jets at different resolutions will allow for unprecedented cosmological studies of AGN jets up...

  11. DISCOVERY OF 5000 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI BEHIND THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    We show that using mid-IR color selection to find active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is as effective in dense stellar fields such as the Magellanic Clouds as it is in extragalactic fields with low stellar densities using comparisons between the Spitzer Deep Wide Field Survey data for the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey Boeotes region and the SAGE Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud. We use this to build high-purity catalogs of ∼5000 AGN candidates behind the Magellanic Clouds. Once confirmed, these quasars will expand the available astrometric reference sources for the Clouds and the numbers of quasars with densely sampled, long-term (>decade) monitoring light curves by well over an order of magnitude and potentially identify sufficiently bright quasars for absorption line studies of the interstellar medium of the Clouds.

  12. Neutrinos in IceCube from active galactic nuclei

    Kalashev, O., E-mail: kalashev@inr.ac.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Semikoz, D. [Laboratory of AstroParticle and Cosmology (APC) (France); Tkachev, I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Recently, the IceCube collaboration reported first evidence for the astrophysical neutrinos. Observation corresponds to the total astrophysical neutrino flux of the order of 3 × 10{sup −8} GeV cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} sr{sup −1} in a PeV energy range [1]. Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are natural candidate sources for such neutrinos. To model the neutrino creation in AGNs, we study photopion production processes on the radiation field of the Shakura-Sunyaev accretion discs in the black hole vicinity. We show that this model can explain the detected neutrino flux and at the same time avoids the existing constraints from the gamma-ray and cosmic-ray observations.

  13. Photon losses in cosmic ray acceleration in active galactic nuclei

    Colgate, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    The usual assumption of the acceleration of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays, greater than or equal to 10/sup 18/ eV in quasars, Seyfert galaxies, and other active galactic nuclei is challenged on the basis of the photon interactions with the accelerated nucleons. This is similar to the effect of the black body radiation on particles > 10/sup 20/ eV for times of the age of the universe except that the photon spectrum is harder and the energy density greater by approx. = 10/sup 13/. Hence, a single traversal, radial or circumferential, of radiation whose energy density is no greater than the emitted flux will damp an ultrahigh energy cosmic ray 10/sup 20/ eV by greater than 10/sup 4/ times its energy. Hence, it is unlikely that any reasonable configuration of acceleration can avoid disastrous photon energy loss. A different site for ultrahigh energy cosmic ray acceleration must be found.

  14. Variability Analysis and the Structure of Active Galactic Nuclei

    Krolik, Julian H.

    1998-01-01

    This five-year Long-Term Space Astrophysics grant provided the support for several major steps in advancing our knowledge of the internal structure of active galactic nuclei. The single largest portion of this program had to do with the development and application of techniques for 'reverberation mapping, the use of spectral monitoring of several different bands related by radiation reprocessing to infer the internal geometry of sources. Major steps were taken in d-ds regard, particularly in establishing the distribution in radius of emission line material, and in relating the apparent reprocessing of continuum bands to the underlying structure of the accretion disk. Another major effort built directly upon these results. Once the case for continuum reprocessing was made by the monitoring, it next behooved us to understand the spectral output of AGN as a result of this reprocessing. As a result, our view of continuum production in AGN is now much better focussed on the key problems. A third focus of effort had to do with the nature of X-ray variability in AGN, and what it can tell us about the dynamics of extremely hot material in the immediate outskirts of the supermassive black holes that form the central engines of active galactic nuclei. In addition to these primary efforts, this grant also supported many other, smaller projects. Several of these were demonstrations of how the material spewed out of AGN in relativistic jets generate the radiation by which we observe them. Finally, the portion of this study that had to do with continuum production by accretion disks in AGN led naturally to several papers in which new developments were presented having to do with 'advection-dominated accretion disks', those disks in which accretion appears to proceed at a substantial rate, but in which radiation processes are weak.

  15. Unwrapping the X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei

    Reynolds, C. S.

    2016-05-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are complex phenomena. At the heart of an AGN is a relativistic accretion disk around a spinning supermassive black hole (SMBH) with an X-ray emitting corona and, sometimes, a relativistic jet. On larger scales, the outer accretion disk and molecular torus act as the reservoirs of gas for the continuing AGN activity. And on all scales from the black hole outwards, powerful winds are seen that probably affect the evolution of the host galaxy as well as regulate the feeding of the AGN itself. In this review article, we discuss how X-ray spectroscopy can be used to study each of these components. We highlight how recent measurements of the high-energy cutoff in the X-ray continuum by NuSTAR are pushing us to conclude that X-ray coronae are radiatively-compact and have electron temperatures regulated by electron-positron pair production. We show that the predominance of rapidly-rotating objects in current surveys of SMBH spin is entirely unsurprising once one accounts for the observational selection bias resulting from the spin-dependence of the radiative efficiency. We review recent progress in our understanding of fast (v˜ (0.1-0.3)c, highly-ionized (mainly visible in Fe XXV and Fe XXVI lines), high-column density winds that may dominate quasar-mode galactic feedback. Finally, we end with a brief look forward to the promise of Astro-H and future X-ray spectropolarimeters.

  16. Molecular Abundances in the Disk of AN Active Galactic Nucleus

    Harada, N.; Thompson, T. A.; Herbst, E.

    2011-06-01

    There are galactic nuclei that emit high luminosities L˜1044-46 erg S-1 including luminosity produced by X-rays from high mass accretion onto the central black holes. These nuclei are called active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and they are accompanied by molecular disks. Observations show high abundances of CN and HCN in the disks; the molecules are proposed to be probes of X-ray dominated regions (XDRs) created by the X-rays from AGNs. We have constructed a spatially-dependent chemical-abundance model of the molecular disk in NGC 1068, a typical AGN-dominated galaxy. Recently, new observations of CN and HCN have been made at much higher spatial resolution, and there are also detections of polyatomic molecules such as HC3N, c-C3H2, and C2H. We discuss how these observations and our simulations can help us to better understand the physical conditions, the disk structure, and conditions for star formation within molecular disks, which are still uncertain. We also include a comparison with other types of galaxies such as (ultra-) luminous infrared galaxies. Usero et al.Astronomy and Astrophysics. 419 (897), 2004. Initial results were presented at the International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy 2010, RF05 Garcia-Burillo et al. Astronomy and Astrophysics. 519 (2), 2010. Garcia-Burillo et al. Journal of Physics Conference Series, 131 (12031), 2008. Costagliola et al. ArXiv e-print arXiv:1101.2122, 2011. Nakajima et al. Astrophysical Journal Letters 728 (L38), 2008.

  17. MAGNETIC FLUX PARADIGM FOR RADIO LOUDNESS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    We argue that the magnetic flux threading the black hole (BH), rather than BH spin or Eddington ratio, is the dominant factor in launching powerful jets and thus determining the radio loudness of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Most AGNs are radio quiet because the thin accretion disks that feed them are inefficient in depositing magnetic flux close to the BH. Flux accumulation is more likely to occur during a hot accretion (or thick disk) phase, and we argue that radio-loud quasars and strong emission-line radio galaxies occur only when a massive, cold accretion event follows an episode of hot accretion. Such an event might be triggered by the merger of a giant elliptical galaxy with a disk galaxy. This picture supports the idea that flux accumulation can lead to the formation of a so-called magnetically choked accretion flow. The large observed range in radio loudness reflects not only the magnitude of the flux pressed against the BH, but also the decrease in UV flux from the disk, due to its disruption by the ''magnetosphere'' associated with the accumulated flux. While the strongest jets result from the secular accumulation of flux, moderate jet activity can also be triggered by fluctuations in the magnetic flux deposited by turbulent, hot inner regions of otherwise thin accretion disks, or by the dissipation of turbulent fields in accretion disk coronae. These processes could be responsible for jet production in Seyferts and low-luminosity AGNs, as well as jets associated with X-ray binaries.

  18. Unwrapping the X-ray Spectra of Active Galactic Nuclei

    Reynolds, Christopher S

    2015-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are complex phenomena. At the heart of an AGN is a relativistic accretion disk around a spinning supermassive black hole (SMBH) with an X-ray emitting corona and, sometimes, a relativistic jet. On larger scales, the outer accretion disk and molecular torus act as the reservoirs of gas for the continuing AGN activity. And on all scales from the black hole outwards, powerful winds are seen that probably affect the evolution of the host galaxy as well as regulate the feeding of the AGN itself. In this review article, we discuss how X-ray spectroscopy can be used to study each of these components. We highlight how recent measurements of the high-energy cutoff in the X-ray continuum by NuSTAR are pushing us to conclude that X-ray coronae are radiatively-compact and have electron temperatures regulated by electron-positron pair production. We show that the predominance of rapidly-rotating objects in current surveys of SMBH spin is entirely unsurprising once one accounts for the observat...

  19. Order and chaos in a galactic model with a strong nuclear bar

    Euaggelos E. Zotos

    2012-01-01

    We use a composite gravitational galactic model consisting of a disk,a halo,a massive nucleus and a strong nuclear bar,in order to study the connections between global and local parameters in a realistic dynamical system.The local model is constructed from a two-dimensional perturbed harmonic oscillator and can be derived by expanding the global model in the vicinity of the central stable Lagrange equilibrium point.The frequencies of oscillations are not arbitrary,but they are connected with all the parameters involved with the global model.Moreover,the value of the local energy is also connected with the value of the global energy.Low and high energy stars in the global model display chaotic motion.Comparison with previous research reveals that the presence of the massive nucleus is responsible for the chaotic motion of the low energy stars.In the local motion,the low energy stars show interesting resonance phenomena,but the chaotic motion,if any,is negligible.On the contrary,the high energy stars do not show bounded motion in the local model.This is an indication of particular activity near the center of galaxies possessing massive nuclei.

  20. ULTRAFAST OUTFLOWS: GALAXY-SCALE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK

    We show, using global three-dimensional grid-based hydrodynamical simulations, that ultrafast outflows (UFOs) from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) result in considerable feedback of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. The AGN wind interacts strongly with the inhomogeneous, two-phase ISM consisting of dense clouds embedded in a tenuous, hot, hydrostatic medium. The outflow floods through the intercloud channels, sweeps up the hot ISM, and ablates and disperses the dense clouds. The momentum of the UFO is primarily transferred to the dense clouds via the ram pressure in the channel flow, and the wind-blown bubble evolves in the energy-driven regime. Any dependence on UFO opening angle disappears after the first interaction with obstructing clouds. On kpc scales, therefore, feedback by UFOs operates similarly to feedback by relativistic AGN jets. Negative feedback is significantly stronger if clouds are distributed spherically rather than in a disk. In the latter case, the turbulent backflow of the wind drives mass inflow toward the central black hole. Considering the common occurrence of UFOs in AGNs, they are likely to be important in the cosmological feedback cycles of galaxy formation.

  1. The dust covering factor in active galactic nuclei

    Stalevski, Marko; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Lira, Paulina; Fritz, Jacopo; Baes, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    The primary source of emission of active galactic nuclei (AGN), the accretion disk, is surrounded by an optically and geometrically thick dusty structure ("the so-called dusty torus"). The infrared radiation emitted by the dust is nothing but a reprocessed fraction of the accretion disk emission, so the ratio of the torus to the AGN luminosity ($L_{\\text{torus}}/L_{\\text{AGN}}$) should correspond to the fraction of the sky obscured by dust, i.e. the covering factor. We undertook a critical investigation of the $L_{\\text{torus}}/L_{\\text{AGN}}$ as the dust covering factor proxy. Using state-of-the-art 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code, we calculated a grid of SEDs emitted by the clumpy two-phase dusty structure. With this grid of SEDs, we studied the relation between $L_{\\text{torus}}/L_{\\text{AGN}}$ and the dust covering factor for different parameters of the torus. We found that in case of type 1 AGNs the torus anisotropy makes $L_{\\text{torus}}/L_{\\text{AGN}}$ underestimate low covering factors and ove...

  2. Penetrating the Deep Cover of Compton Thick Active Galactic Nuclei

    Levenson, N A; Krolik, J H; Weaver, K A; Zycki, P T

    2006-01-01

    We analyze observations obtained with the Chandra X-ray Observatory of bright Compton thick active galactic nuclei (AGNs), those with column densities in excess of 1.5 x 10^{24} cm^{-2} along the lines of sight. We therefore view the powerful central engines only indirectly, even at X-ray energies. Using high spatial resolution and considering only galaxies that do not contain circumnuclear starbursts, we reveal the variety of emission AGNs alone may produce. Approximately 1% of the continuum's intrinsic flux is detected in reflection in each case. The only hard X-ray feature is the prominent Fe K alpha fluorescence line, with equivalent width greater than 1 keV in all sources. The Fe line luminosity provides the best X-ray indicator of the unseen intrinsic AGN luminosity. In detail, the morphologies of the extended soft X-ray emission and optical line emission are similar, and line emission dominates the soft X-ray spectra. Thus, we attribute the soft X-ray emission to material that the central engines photo...

  3. Ultrafast Outflows: Galaxy-scale Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback

    Wagner, A. Y.; Umemura, M.; Bicknell, G. V.

    2013-01-01

    We show, using global three-dimensional grid-based hydrodynamical simulations, that ultrafast outflows (UFOs) from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) result in considerable feedback of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. The AGN wind interacts strongly with the inhomogeneous, two-phase ISM consisting of dense clouds embedded in a tenuous, hot, hydrostatic medium. The outflow floods through the intercloud channels, sweeps up the hot ISM, and ablates and disperses the dense clouds. The momentum of the UFO is primarily transferred to the dense clouds via the ram pressure in the channel flow, and the wind-blown bubble evolves in the energy-driven regime. Any dependence on UFO opening angle disappears after the first interaction with obstructing clouds. On kpc scales, therefore, feedback by UFOs operates similarly to feedback by relativistic AGN jets. Negative feedback is significantly stronger if clouds are distributed spherically rather than in a disk. In the latter case, the turbulent backflow of the wind drives mass inflow toward the central black hole. Considering the common occurrence of UFOs in AGNs, they are likely to be important in the cosmological feedback cycles of galaxy formation.

  4. Ultra Fast Outflows: Galaxy-Scale Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback

    Wagner, A Y; Bicknell, G V

    2012-01-01

    We show, using global 3D grid-based hydrodynamical simulations, that Ultra Fast Outflows (UFOs) from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) result in considerable feedback of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. The AGN wind interacts strongly with the inhomogeneous, two-phase ISM consisting of dense clouds embedded in a tenuous hot hydrostatic medium. The outflow floods through the inter-cloud channels, sweeps up the hot ISM, and ablates and disperses the dense clouds. The momentum of the UFO is primarily transferred to the dense clouds via the ram pressure in the channel flow, and the wind-blown bubble evolves in the energy-driven regime. Any dependence on UFO opening angle disappears after the first interaction with obstructing clouds. On kpc scales, therefore, feedback by UFOs operates similarly to feedback by relativistic AGN jets. Negative feedback is significantly stronger if clouds are distributed spherically, rather than in a disc. In the latter case the turbulent backflow...

  5. ULTRAFAST OUTFLOWS: GALAXY-SCALE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK

    Wagner, A. Y.; Umemura, M. [Center for Computational Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8577 (Japan); Bicknell, G. V., E-mail: ayw@ccs.tsukuba.ac.jp [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2013-01-20

    We show, using global three-dimensional grid-based hydrodynamical simulations, that ultrafast outflows (UFOs) from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) result in considerable feedback of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. The AGN wind interacts strongly with the inhomogeneous, two-phase ISM consisting of dense clouds embedded in a tenuous, hot, hydrostatic medium. The outflow floods through the intercloud channels, sweeps up the hot ISM, and ablates and disperses the dense clouds. The momentum of the UFO is primarily transferred to the dense clouds via the ram pressure in the channel flow, and the wind-blown bubble evolves in the energy-driven regime. Any dependence on UFO opening angle disappears after the first interaction with obstructing clouds. On kpc scales, therefore, feedback by UFOs operates similarly to feedback by relativistic AGN jets. Negative feedback is significantly stronger if clouds are distributed spherically rather than in a disk. In the latter case, the turbulent backflow of the wind drives mass inflow toward the central black hole. Considering the common occurrence of UFOs in AGNs, they are likely to be important in the cosmological feedback cycles of galaxy formation.

  6. Broad-line Balmer Decrements in Blue Active Galactic Nuclei

    Dong, Xiaobo; Wang, Jianguo; Yuan, Weimin; Zhou, Hongyan; Dai, Haifeng; Zhang, Kai

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the broad-line Balmer decrements (Halpha/Hbeta) for a large, homogeneous sample of Seyfert 1 galaxies and QSOs using spectroscopic data obtained in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The sample, drawn from the Fourth Data Release, comprises 446 low redshift (z < 0.35) active galactic nuclei (AGN) that have blue optical continua as indicated by the spectral slopes in order to minimize the effect of dust extinction. We find that (i) the distribution of the intrinsic broad-line Halpha/Hbeta ratio can be well described by log-Gaussian, with a peak at Halpha/Hbeta=3.06 and a standard deviation of about 0.03 dex only; (ii) the Balmer decrement does not correlate with AGN properties such as luminosity, accretion rate, and continuum slope, etc.; (iii) on average, the Balmer decrements are found to be only slightly larger in radio-loud sources (3.37) and sources having double-peaked emission-line profiles (3.27) compared to the rest of the sample. We therefore suggest that the broad-line Halpha/Hbet...

  7. On the Evolution of High-Redshift Active Galactic Nuclei

    Mao, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    We build a simple physical model to study the high-redshift active galactic Nucleus (AGN) evolution within the co-evolution framework of central black holes (BHs) and their host galaxies. The correlation between the circular velocity of a dark halo $V_c$ and the velocity dispersion of a galaxy $\\sigma$ is used to link the dark matter halo mass and BH mass. The dark matter halo mass function is converted to the BH mass function for any given redshift. The high-redshift optical AGN luminosity functions (LFs) are constructed. At $z\\sim 4$, the flattening feature is not shown at the faint end of the optical AGN LF. This is consistent with observational results. If the optical AGN LF at $z\\sim 6$ can be reproduced in the case in which central BHs have the Eddington-limited accretion, it is possible for the AGN lifetime to have a small value of $2\\times 10^5$ yrs. The X-ray AGN LFs and X-ray AGN number counts are also calculated at $2.03$, respectively, using the same parameters adopted in the calculation for the o...

  8. FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF TeV-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    We report on observations of TeV-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) made during the first 5.5 months of observations with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi). In total, 96 AGNs were selected for study, each being either (1) a source detected at TeV energies (28 sources) or (2) an object that has been studied with TeV instruments and for which an upper limit has been reported (68 objects). The Fermi observations show clear detections of 38 of these TeV-selected objects, of which 21 are joint GeV-TeV sources, and 29 were not in the third EGRET catalog. For each of the 38 Fermi-detected sources, spectra and light curves are presented. Most can be described with a power law of spectral index harder than 2.0, with a spectral break generally required to accommodate the TeV measurements. Based on an extrapolation of the Fermi spectrum, we identify sources, not previously detected at TeV energies, which are promising targets for TeV instruments. Evidence for systematic evolution of the γ-ray spectrum with redshift is presented and discussed in the context of interaction with the extragalactic background light.

  9. The suppression of star formation by powerful active galactic nuclei.

    Page, M J; Symeonidis, M; Vieira, J D; Altieri, B; Amblard, A; Arumugam, V; Aussel, H; Babbedge, T; Blain, A; Bock, J; Boselli, A; Buat, V; Castro-Rodríguez, N; Cava, A; Chanial, P; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Conversi, L; Cooray, A; Dowell, C D; Dubois, E N; Dunlop, J S; Dwek, E; Dye, S; Eales, S; Elbaz, D; Farrah, D; Fox, M; Franceschini, A; Gear, W; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Halpern, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Ibar, E; Isaak, K; Ivison, R J; Lagache, G; Levenson, L; Lu, N; Madden, S; Maffei, B; Mainetti, G; Marchetti, L; Nguyen, H T; O'Halloran, B; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Pérez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rawlings, J I; Rigopoulou, D; Riguccini, L; Rizzo, D; Rodighiero, G; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Sánchez Portal, M; Schulz, B; Scott, D; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Stevens, J A; Trichas, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valtchanov, I; Viero, M; Vigroux, L; Wang, L; Ward, R; Wright, G; Xu, C K; Zemcov, M

    2012-05-10

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight correlation between the mass of the black hole and the mass of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming galaxies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimetre wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expelling the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time. PMID:22575961

  10. Optical spectral properties of active galactic nuclei and quasars

    Four separate investigations dealing with the properties of optical continuum and emission-lines of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and quasars are presented. Multichannel scans of 3CR radio galaxies are decomposed by using a two-component model-an elliptical galaxy and a power-law nonthermal component. It is found that there is a strong correlation between the luminosity of the power-law component and the strength of the Balmer emission-lines. In most cases, by extrapolating to the Lyman continuum, the power-law models derived provide enough ionizing radiation to account for the Balmer line strengths. Extending the study of radio galaxies to include Seyfert galaxies and quasars, it is found that there is a strong continuity between broad-line AGN's and quasars in terms of similarities in the correlations between line luminosities and nonthermal continuum luminosity. Next, a study of the variability of absolute optical energy distribution and emission-lines of the N-galaxies 3C382 and 3C390.3 is made. Lastly, a preliminary study of surface photometry of Markarian Seyfert galaxies are presented. It is found that the properties of the underlying galaxies such as scale-length and surface brightness of the disk, color, and total brightness, do not depart systematically from those of luminous normal spiral galaxies

  11. The suppression of star formation by powerful active galactic nuclei

    Page, M J; Vieira, J D; Altieri, B; Amblard, A; Arumugam, V; Aussel, H; Babbedge, T; Blain, A; Bock, J; Boselli, A; Buat, V; Castro-Rodr'iguez, N; Cava, A; Chanial, P; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Conversi, L; Cooray, A; Dowell, C D; Dubois, E N; Dunlop, J S; Dwek, E; Dye, S; Eales, S; Elbaz, D; Farrah, D; Fox, M; Franceschini, A; Gear, W; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Halpern, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Ibar, E; Isaak, K; Ivison, R J; Lagache, G; Levenson, L; Lu, N; Madden, S; Maffei, B; Mainetti, G; Marchetti, L; Nguyen, H T; O'Halloran, B; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Perez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rawlings, J I; Rigopoulou, D; Riguccini, L; Rizzo, D; Rodighiero, G; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Portal, M Sanchez; Schulz, B; Scott, Douglas; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Stevens, J A; Trichas, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valtchanov, I; Viero, M; Vigroux, L; Wang, L; Ward, R; Wright, G; Xu, C K; Zemcov, M

    2013-01-01

    The old, red stars which constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly from accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproven, that the tight correlation in mass of the black hole and stellar components results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, while powerful star-forming galaxies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared to submillimetre wavelengths. Here we report observations in the submillimetre and X-ray which show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 Gyrs old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10^44 erg/s. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxies of powerful AGN ...

  12. Active Galactic Nuclei under the scrutiny of CTA

    Sol, H; Boisson, C; de Almeida, U Barres; Biteau, J; Contreras, J -L; Giebels, B; Hassan, T; Inoue, Y; Katarzynski, K; Krawczynski, H; Mirabal, N; Poutanen, J; Rieger, F; Totani, T; Benbow, W; Cerruti, M; Errando, M; Fallon, L; Pino, E de Gouveia Dal; Hinton, J -A; Inoue, S; Lenain, J -P; Neronov, A; Takahashi, K; Takami, H; White, R

    2013-01-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei (hereafter AGN) produce powerful outflows which offer excellent conditions for efficient particle acceleration in internal and external shocks, turbulence, and magnetic reconnection events. The jets as well as particle accelerating regions close to the supermassive black holes (hereafter SMBH) at the intersection of plasma inflows and outflows, can produce readily detectable very high energy gamma-ray emission. As of now, more than 45 AGN including 41 blazars and 4 radiogalaxies have been detected by the present ground-based gamma-ray telescopes, which represents more than one third of the cosmic sources detected so far in the VHE gamma-ray regime. The future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) should boost the sample of AGN detected in the VHE range by about one order of magnitude, shedding new light on AGN population studies, and AGN classification and unification schemes. CTA will be a unique tool to scrutinize the extreme high-energy tail of accelerated particles in SMBH environments, t...

  13. The star formation rates of active galactic nuclei host galaxies

    Ellison, Sara L.; Teimoorinia, Hossen; Rosario, David J.; Mendel, J. Trevor

    2016-05-01

    Using artificial neural network predictions of total infrared luminosities (LIR), we compare the host galaxy star formation rates (SFRs) of ˜21 000 optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGN), 466 low-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) and 721 mid-IR-selected AGN. SFR offsets (ΔSFR) relative to a sample of star-forming `main-sequence' galaxies (matched in M⋆, z and local environment) are computed for the AGN hosts. Optically selected AGN exhibit a wide range of ΔSFR, with a distribution skewed to low SFRs and a median ΔSFR = -0.06 dex. The LERGs have SFRs that are shifted to even lower values with a median ΔSFR = -0.5 dex. In contrast, mid-IR-selected AGN have, on average, SFRs enhanced by a factor of ˜1.5. We interpret the different distributions of ΔSFR amongst the different AGN classes in the context of the relative contribution of triggering by galaxy mergers. Whereas the LERGs are predominantly fuelled through low accretion rate secular processes which are not accompanied by enhancements in SFR, mergers, which can simultaneously boost SFRs, most frequently lead to powerful, obscured AGN.

  14. The star formation rates of active galactic nuclei host galaxies

    Ellison, Sara L; Rosario, David J; Mendel, J Trevor

    2016-01-01

    Using artificial neural network (ANN) predictions of total infra-red luminosities (LIR), we compare the host galaxy star formation rates (SFRs) of ~21,000 optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGN), 466 low excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) and 721 mid-IR selected AGN. SFR offsets (Delta SFR) relative to a sample of star-forming `main sequence' galaxies (matched in M*, z and local environment) are computed for the AGN hosts. Optically selected AGN exhibit a wide range of Delta SFR, with a distribution skewed to low SFRs and a median Delta SFR = -0.06 dex. The LERGs have SFRs that are shifted to even lower values with a median Delta SFR = -0.5 dex. In contrast, mid-IR selected AGN have, on average, SFRs enhanced by a factor ~1.5. We interpret the different distributions of Delta SFR amongst the different AGN classes in the context of the relative contribution of triggering by galaxy mergers. Whereas the LERGs are predominantly fuelled through low accretion rate secular processes which are not accompanied ...

  15. On the efficient acceleration of clouds in active galactic nuclei

    Waters, Tim; Proga, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    In the broad line region of active galactic nuclei (AGN), acceleration occurs naturally when a cloud condenses out of the hot confining medium due to the increase in line opacity as the cloud cools. However, acceleration by radiation pressure is not very efficient when the flux is time-independent, unless the flow is 1D. Here, we explore how acceleration is affected by a time-varying flux, as AGN are known to be highly variable. If the period of flux oscillations is longer than the thermal time-scale, we expect the gas to cool during the low flux state, and therefore line opacity should quickly increase. The cloud will receive a small kick due to the increased radiation force. We perform hydrodynamical simulations using ATHENA to confirm this effect and quantify its importance. We find that despite the flow becoming turbulent in 2D due to hydrodynamic instabilities, a 20 per cent modulation of the flux leads to a net increase in acceleration - by more than a factor of 2 - in both 1D and 2D. We show that this acceleration is sufficient to produce the observed line widths, although we only consider optically thin clouds. We discuss the implications of our results for photoionization modelling and reverberation mapping.

  16. Variability in Active Galactic Nuclei from Propagating Turbulent Relativistic Jets

    Pollack, Maxwell; Wiita, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    We use the Athena hydrodynamics code to model propagating two-dimensional relativistic jets as approximations to the growth of radio-loud active galactic nuclei for various input jet velocities and jet-to-ambient matter density ratios. Using results from these simulations we estimate the changing synchrotron emission by summing the fluxes from a vertical strip of zones behind the reconfinement shock, which is nearly stationary, and from which a substantial portion of the flux variability should arise. We explore a wide range of time scales by considering two light curves from each simulation; one uses a relativistic turbulence code with bulk velocities taken from our simulations as input, while the other uses the bulk velocity data to compute fluctuations caused by variations in the Doppler boosting due to changes in the direction and the speed of the flow through all zones in the strip. We then calculate power spectral densities (PSDs) from the light curves for both turbulent and bulk velocity origins for va...

  17. Rapid and Bright Stellar-mass Binary Black Hole Mergers in Active Galactic Nuclei

    Bartos, Imre; Haiman, Zoltán; Márka, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, LIGO, found direct evidence of double black hole binaries emitting gravitational waves. Galactic nuclei are expected to harbor the densest population of stellar-mass black holes, accounting for as much as ~2% of the mass of the nuclear stellar cluster. A significant fraction (~30%) of these black holes can reside in binaries. We examine the fate of the black hole binaries in active galactic nuclei, which get trapped in the inner region of the accretion disk around the central supermassive black hole. We show that binary black holes can migrate into and then rapidly merge within the disk well within a Salpeter time. The binaries may also accrete a significant amount of gas from the disk, well above the Eddington rate. This could lead to detectable X-ray or gamma-ray emission, but would require hyper-Eddington accretion with a few % radiative efficiency, comparable to thin disks. We discuss implications for gravitational wave observations and black hole popul...

  18. Linking the fate of massive black hole binaries to the active galactic nuclei luminosity function

    Dotti, Massimo; Montuori, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Massive black hole binaries are naturally predicted in the context of the hierarchical model of structure formation. The binaries that manage to lose most of their angular momentum can coalesce to form a single remnant. In the last stages of this process, the holes undergo an extremely loud phase of gravitational wave emission, possibly detectable by current and future probes. The theoretical effort towards obtaining a coherent physical picture of the binary path down to coalescence is still underway. In this paper, for the first time, we take advantage of observational studies of active galactic nuclei evolution to constrain the efficiency of gas-driven binary decay. Under conservative assumptions we find that gas accretion toward the nuclear black holes can efficiently lead binaries of any mass forming at high redshift (> 2) to coalescence within the current time. The observed "downsizing" trend of the accreting black hole luminosity function further implies that the gas inflow is sufficient to drive light ...

  19. MAGNETIC FLUX PARADIGM FOR RADIO LOUDNESS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Sikora, Marek [Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); Begelman, Mitchell C., E-mail: sikora@camk.edu.pl, E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    We argue that the magnetic flux threading the black hole (BH), rather than BH spin or Eddington ratio, is the dominant factor in launching powerful jets and thus determining the radio loudness of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Most AGNs are radio quiet because the thin accretion disks that feed them are inefficient in depositing magnetic flux close to the BH. Flux accumulation is more likely to occur during a hot accretion (or thick disk) phase, and we argue that radio-loud quasars and strong emission-line radio galaxies occur only when a massive, cold accretion event follows an episode of hot accretion. Such an event might be triggered by the merger of a giant elliptical galaxy with a disk galaxy. This picture supports the idea that flux accumulation can lead to the formation of a so-called magnetically choked accretion flow. The large observed range in radio loudness reflects not only the magnitude of the flux pressed against the BH, but also the decrease in UV flux from the disk, due to its disruption by the ''magnetosphere'' associated with the accumulated flux. While the strongest jets result from the secular accumulation of flux, moderate jet activity can also be triggered by fluctuations in the magnetic flux deposited by turbulent, hot inner regions of otherwise thin accretion disks, or by the dissipation of turbulent fields in accretion disk coronae. These processes could be responsible for jet production in Seyferts and low-luminosity AGNs, as well as jets associated with X-ray binaries.

  20. The dust covering factor in active galactic nuclei

    Stalevski, Marko; Ricci, Claudio; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Lira, Paulina; Fritz, Jacopo; Baes, Maarten

    2016-05-01

    The primary source of emission of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), the accretion disc, is surrounded by an optically and geometrically thick dusty structure (`the so-called dusty torus'). The infrared radiation emitted by the dust is nothing but a reprocessed fraction of the accretion disc emission, so the ratio of the torus to the AGN luminosity (Ltorus/LAGN) should corresponds to the fraction of the sky obscured by dust, i.e. the covering factor. We undertook a critical investigation of the Ltorus/LAGN as the dust covering factor proxy. Using state-of-the-art 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code, we calculated a grid of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) emitted by the clumpy two-phase dusty structure. With this grid of SEDs, we studied the relation between Ltorus/LAGN and the dust covering factor for different parameters of the torus. We found that in the case of type 1 AGNs the torus anisotropy makes Ltorus/LAGN underestimate low covering factors and overestimate high covering factors. In type 2 AGNs Ltorus/LAGN always underestimates covering factors. Our results provide a novel easy-to-use method to account for anisotropy and obtain correct covering factors. Using two samples from the literature, we demonstrated the importance of our result for inferring the obscured AGN fraction. We found that after the anisotropy is properly accounted for, the dust covering factors show very weak dependence on LAGN, with values in the range of ≈0.6-0.7. Our results also suggest a higher fraction of obscured AGNs at high luminosities than those found by X-ray surveys, in part owing to the presence of a Compton-thick AGN population predicted by population synthesis models.

  1. Ultrafast outflows in radio-loud active galactic nuclei

    Tombesi, F.; Tazaki, F.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Ueda, Y.; Cappi, M.; Gofford, J.; Reeves, J. N.; Guainazzi, M.

    2014-09-01

    Recent X-ray observations show absorbing winds with velocities up to mildly relativistic values of the order of ˜0.1c in a limited sample of six broad-line radio galaxies. They are observed as blueshifted Fe XXV-XXVI K-shell absorption lines, similarly to the ultrafast outflows (UFOs) reported in Seyferts and quasars. In this work we extend the search for such Fe K absorption lines to a larger sample of 26 radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) observed with XMM-Newton and Suzaku. The sample is drawn from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope 58-month catalogue and blazars are excluded. X-ray bright Fanaroff-Riley Class II radio galaxies constitute the majority of the sources. Combining the results of this analysis with those in the literature we find that UFOs are detected in >27 per cent of the sources. However, correcting for the number of spectra with insufficient signal-to-noise ratio, we can estimate that the incidence of UFOs is this sample of radio-loud AGN is likely in the range f ≃ (50 ± 20) per cent. A photoionization modelling of the absorption lines with XSTAR allows us to estimate the distribution of their main parameters. The observed outflow velocities are broadly distributed between vout ≲ 1000 km s-1 and vout ≃ 0.4c, with mean and median values of vout ≃ 0.133c and vout ≃ 0.117c, respectively. The material is highly ionized, with an average ionization parameter of logξ ≃ 4.5 erg s-1 cm, and the column densities are larger than NH > 1022 cm-2. Overall, these characteristics are consistent with the presence of complex accretion disc winds in a significant fraction of radio-loud AGN and demonstrate that the presence of relativistic jets does not preclude the existence of winds, in accordance with several theoretical models.

  2. Spectropolarimetry, variability, and the taxonomy of active galactic nuclei

    Two subclasses of active galactic nuclei (AGN) are studied using spectropolarimetry, with the intent of defining the relationships of the subclasses to other classes of AGNs, and to study the physics of the objects themselves. In the Seyfert 1.8/1.9 class there is good evidence for dust just outside of the broad-line regions in two objects, IRAS 1958-183 and NGC 2622. Spectropolarimetry of the latter object reveals the presence of dust moving at ∼ -800 s-1 along the our line-of-sight, and causing much of the polarization in the object. In addition, three of these objects have undergone extreme variability. Combining IDS data from Osterbrock and collaborators with the more recent CCD data it is shown that in all three cases the changes in both broad emission line fluxes and featureless continuum are consistent with changes in the line-of-sight reddening to the broad-line region. Together with the polarimetric evidence for dust and IRAS photometry this strongly suggests that the Seyfert 1.8/1.9 character is caused by dust and the consequent reddening and extinction. Variability occurs when dust clouds evaporate or move out of line-of-sight, and the extinction then changes. In the so-called narrow line Seyfert 1s spectropolarimetry reveals seven highly-polarized objects. In Mrk 1239 there is evidence for at least two components of polarization, one probably due to dust reflection. In two other objects, Mrk 766 and IRAS 1509-211, the polarization also appears to indicate dust reflection as the polarigenic mechanism. There is a weak circumstantial evidence for an association of the low-density region and the polarizing source, provided by comparison of the radio axes and polarization position angles in Mrk 766 and Mrk 1126

  3. Spitzer and JCMT Observations of the Active Galactic Nucleus in the Sombrero Galaxy (NGC 4594)

    Bendo, G J; Calzetti, D; Cannon, J M; Dale, D A; Draine, B T; Engelbracht, C W; Gordon, K D; Helou, G; Hollenbach, D; Joseph, R D; Kennicutt, R C; Murphy, E J; Roussel, H; Sheth, K; Smith, J D T; Walter, F

    2006-01-01

    We present Spitzer 3.6-160 micron images, Spitzer mid-infrared spectra, and JCMT SCUBA 850 micron images of the Sombrero Galaxy (NGC 4594), an Sa galaxy with a 10^9 M_solar low luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN). The brightest infrared sources in the galaxy are the nucleus and the dust ring. The spectral energy distribution of the AGN demonstrates that, while the environment around the AGN is a prominent source of mid-infrared emission, it is a relatively weak source of far-infrared emission, as had been inferred for AGN in previous research. The weak nuclear 160 micron emission and the negligible polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission from the nucleus also implies that the nucleus is a site of only weak star formation activity and the nucleus contains relatively little cool interstellar gas needed to fuel such activity. We propose that this galaxy may be representative of a subset of low ionization nuclear emission region galaxies that are in a quiescent AGN phase because of the lack of gas needed to...

  4. The role of galactic cold gas in low-level supermassive black hole activity

    Alfvin, Erik D; Haynes, Martha P; Gallo, Elena; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Koopmann, Rebecca A; Hodges-Kluck, Edmund; Cannon, John M

    2016-01-01

    The nature of the relationship between low-level supermassive black hole (SMBH) activity and galactic cold gas, if any, is currently unclear. Here, we test whether central black holes may feed at higher rates in gas-rich galaxies, probing SMBH activity well below the active regime down to Eddington ratios of ~1e-7. We use a combination of radio data from the ALFALFA survey and from the literature, along with archival X-ray flux measurements from the Chandra X-ray observatory, to investigate this potential relationship. We construct a sample of 129 late-type galaxies, with MB<-18 out to 50 Mpc, that have both HI masses and sensitive X-ray coverage. Of these, 75 host a nuclear X-ray source, a 58% detection fraction. There is a highly significant correlation between nuclear X-ray luminosity LX and galaxy stellar mass Mstar with a slope of 1.7+/-0.3, and a tentative correlation (significant at the 2.8 sigma level) between LX and HI gas mass MHI. However, a joint fit to LX as a function of both Mstar and MHI fi...

  5. Study and modeling of the most energetic Active Galactic Nuclei with the Fermi satellite

    The Fermi satellite was launched in June 2008. The onboard LAT detector is dedicated to the study of galactic and extra-galactic gamma sources with an energy comprised between 200 MeV and 300 GeV. 1451 sources have been detected in less than 11 months. This document is divided into 6 chapters: 1) gamma astronomy, 2) the Fermi satellite, 3) the active galactic nuclei (NAG), 4) the observation of several blazars (PKS-2155-304 and PG-1553+113) and its simulation, 5) the observation of PKS-2155-304 with both RXTE and Fermi, and 6) conclusion

  6. The angular clustering of WISE-selected active galactic nuclei: Different halos for obscured and unobscured active galactic nuclei

    Donoso, E. [Instituto de Ciencias Astronómicas, de la Tierra, y del Espacio (ICATE), 5400 San Juan (Argentina); Yan, Lin [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stern, D.; Assef, R. J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    We calculate the angular correlation function for a sample of ∼170,000 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) extracted from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) catalog, selected to have red mid-IR colors (W1 – W2 > 0.8) and 4.6 μm flux densities brighter than 0.14 mJy). The sample is expected to be >90% reliable at identifying AGNs and to have a mean redshift of (z) = 1.1. In total, the angular clustering of WISE AGNs is roughly similar to that of optical AGNs. We cross-match these objects with the photometric Sloan Digital Sky Survey catalog and distinguish obscured sources with r – W2 > 6 from bluer, unobscured AGNs. Obscured sources present a higher clustering signal than unobscured sources. Since the host galaxy morphologies of obscured AGNs are not typical red sequence elliptical galaxies and show disks in many cases, it is unlikely that the increased clustering strength of the obscured population is driven by a host galaxy segregation bias. By using relatively complete redshift distributions from the COSMOS survey, we find that obscured sources at (z) ∼ 0.9 have a bias of b = 2.9 ± 0.6 and are hosted in dark matter halos with a typical mass of log (M/M {sub ☉} h {sup –1}) ∼ 13.5. In contrast, unobscured AGNs at (z) ∼ 1.1 have a bias of b = 1.6 ± 0.6 and inhabit halos of log (M/M {sub ☉} h {sup –1}) ∼ 12.4. These findings suggest that obscured AGNs inhabit denser environments than unobscured AGNs, and they are difficult to reconcile with the simplest AGN unification models, where obscuration is driven solely by orientation.

  7. STEPS TOWARD UNVEILING THE TRUE POPULATION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: PHOTOMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN COSMOS

    Using a physically motivated, model-based active galactic nucleus (AGN) characterization technique, we fit a large sample of X-ray-selected AGNs with known spectroscopic redshifts from the Cosmic Evolution Survey field. We identify accretion disks in the spectral energy distributions of broad- and narrow-line AGNs, and infer the presence or absence of host galaxy light in the SEDs. Based on infrared and UV excess AGN selection techniques, our method involves fitting a given SED with a model consisting of three components: infrared power-law emission, optical-UV accretion disk emission, and host galaxy emission. Each component can be varied in relative contribution, and a reduced chi-square minimization routine is used to determine the optimum parameters for each object. Using this technique, both broad- and narrow-line AGNs fall within well-defined and plausible bounds on the physical parameters of the model, allowing trends with luminosity and redshift to be determined. In particular, based on our sample of spectroscopically confirmed AGNs, we find that approximately 95% of the broad-line AGNs and 50% of the narrow-line AGNs in our sample show evidence of an accretion disk, with maximum disk temperatures ranging from 1 to 10 eV. Because this fitting technique relies only on photometry, we hope to apply it in future work to the characterization and eventually the selection of fainter AGNs than are accessible in wide-field spectroscopic surveys, and thus probe a population of less luminous and/or higher redshift objects without prior redshift or X-ray data. With the abundant availability of photometric data from large surveys, the ultimate goal is to use this technique to create large samples that will complement and complete AGN catalogs selected by X-ray emission alone.

  8. On the metal abundance of low-activity galactic nuclei

    The characteristics of the nuclear spectrum of six Seyfert 2 and LINER nuclei with low activity and strong lines of ionized nitrogen are investigated. From the equivalent widths of the absorption lines, the age and metallicity of the stellar population are derived. A comparison of the observed emission-line intensities with photoionization and shock model calculations leads to the conclusion that these nuclei are photoionized by a power-law continuum, and that the only way to reproduce the large forbidden line N II/H-alpha ratio for at least four of them is with an overabundance of nitrogen relative to the other heavy elements. 30 refs

  9. COLA. III. RADIO DETECTION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS IN COMPACT MODERATE LUMINOSITY INFRARED GALAXIES

    We present results from 4.8 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) and global very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of the northern half of the moderate FIR luminosity (median LIR = 1011.01 Lsun) COLA sample of star-forming galaxies. VLBI sources are detected in a high fraction (20/90) of the galaxies observed. The radio luminosities of these cores (∼1021 W Hz-1) are too large to be explained by radio supernovae or supernova remnants and we argue that they are instead powered by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These sub-parsec scale radio cores are preferentially detected toward galaxies whose VLA maps show bright 100-500 parsec scale nuclear radio components. Since these latter structures tightly follow the FIR to radio-continuum correlation for star formation, we conclude that the AGN-powered VLBI sources are associated with compact nuclear starburst environments. The implications for possible starburst-AGN connections are discussed. The detected VLBI sources have a relatively narrow range of radio luminosity consistent with models in which intense compact Eddington-limited starbursts regulate the gas supply onto a central supermassive black hole. The high incidence of AGN radio cores in compact starbursts suggests little or no delay between the starburst phase and the onset of AGN activity.

  10. The Galactic Center compared with nuclei of nearby galaxies

    Combes, F

    2016-01-01

    Understanding our Galactic Center is easier with insights from nearby galactic nuclei. Both the star formation activity in nuclear gas disks, driven by bars and nuclear bars, and the fueling of low-luminosity AGN, followed by feedback of jets, driving molecular outflows, were certainly present in our Galactic Center, which appears now quenched. Comparisons and diagnostics are reviewed, in particular of m=2 and m=1 modes, lopsidedness, different disk orientations, and fossil evidences of activity and feedback.

  11. Deep Chandra observations of HCG 16. I. Active nuclei, star formation, and galactic winds

    We present new, deep Chandra X-ray and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope 610 MHz observations of the spiral-galaxy-rich compact group HCG 16, which we use to examine nuclear activity, star formation, and high-luminosity X-ray binary populations in the major galaxies. We confirm the presence of obscured active nuclei in NGC 833 and NGC 835, and identify a previously unrecognized nuclear source in NGC 838. All three nuclei are variable on timescales of months to years, and for NGC 833 and NGC 835 this is most likely caused by changes in accretion rate. The deep Chandra observations allow us to detect for the first time an Fe Kα emission line in the spectrum of the Seyfert 2 nucleus of NGC 835. We find that NGC 838 and NGC 839 are both starburst-dominated systems, with only weak nuclear activity, in agreement with previous optical studies. We estimate the star formation rates in the two galaxies from their X-ray and radio emission, and compare these results with estimates from the infrared and ultraviolet bands to confirm that star formation in both galaxies is probably declining after galaxy-wide starbursts were triggered ∼400-500 Myr ago. We examine the physical properties of their galactic superwinds, and find that both have temperatures of ∼0.8 keV. We also examine the X-ray and radio properties of NGC 848, the fifth largest galaxy in the group, and show that it is dominated by emission from its starburst.

  12. Deep Chandra observations of HCG 16. I. Active nuclei, star formation, and galactic winds

    O' Sullivan, E.; Zezas, A.; Vrtilek, J. M.; David, L. P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Giacintucci, S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Trevisan, M. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Av. dos Astronautas 1758, 12227-010, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Ponman, T. J.; Raychaudhury, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Mamon, G. A., E-mail: eosullivan@cfa.harvard.edu [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris (UMR 7095 CNRS and UMPC), 98 bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2014-10-01

    We present new, deep Chandra X-ray and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope 610 MHz observations of the spiral-galaxy-rich compact group HCG 16, which we use to examine nuclear activity, star formation, and high-luminosity X-ray binary populations in the major galaxies. We confirm the presence of obscured active nuclei in NGC 833 and NGC 835, and identify a previously unrecognized nuclear source in NGC 838. All three nuclei are variable on timescales of months to years, and for NGC 833 and NGC 835 this is most likely caused by changes in accretion rate. The deep Chandra observations allow us to detect for the first time an Fe Kα emission line in the spectrum of the Seyfert 2 nucleus of NGC 835. We find that NGC 838 and NGC 839 are both starburst-dominated systems, with only weak nuclear activity, in agreement with previous optical studies. We estimate the star formation rates in the two galaxies from their X-ray and radio emission, and compare these results with estimates from the infrared and ultraviolet bands to confirm that star formation in both galaxies is probably declining after galaxy-wide starbursts were triggered ∼400-500 Myr ago. We examine the physical properties of their galactic superwinds, and find that both have temperatures of ∼0.8 keV. We also examine the X-ray and radio properties of NGC 848, the fifth largest galaxy in the group, and show that it is dominated by emission from its starburst.

  13. IAEA's activities on nuclear security

    Main activities of the IAEA are focused on three items; (1) promotion of peaceful uses of nuclear energy; technical cooperation, (2) nuclear safety and (3) safeguards. Since September 11, 2001 terrorist attack, IAEA's activities on nuclear security has been strengthened. Here nuclear security can be defined as the prevention and detection of and response to, theft, sabotage, unauthorized access, illegal transfer or other malicious acts involving nuclear material, other radioactive substance or their associated facilities. Nuclear security has made a remarkable change and gained great importance. Recent trend of nuclear security was introduced and future perspective of IAEA's verification activities through the inspection including safeguards was described. (T. Tanaka)

  14. The Near-Infrared Coronal Line Spectrum of 54 Nearby Active Galactic Nuclei

    Rodríguez-Ardila, A; Portilla, J G; Tejeiro, J M

    2011-01-01

    (Abridge) The relationship between coronal line (CL) emission and nuclear activity in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is analyzed, for the first time, based on NIR spectra. The 8 CLs studied, of Si, S, Fe, Al and Ca elements and corresponding to ionization potentials (IP) in the range 125-450 eV, are detected in 67% (36 AGNs) of the sample. The four most frequent CLs - [SiVI] 19630\\AA, [SVIII] 9913\\AA, [SIX] 12520\\AA\\ and [SiX] 14320\\AA, - display a narrow range in luminosity, with most lines located in the interval logL 39-40 erg/s. We found that the non-detection is largely associated with either a lost of spatial resolution or increasing object distance. Yet, there are AGNs where the lack of CLs may be genuine and reflect an AGN ionising continuum lacking photons below a few keV. The FWHM of the lines profiles increases with increasing IP up to energies around 300 eV, where a maximum in the FWHM is reached. For higher IP lines, the FWHM remains nearly constant or decreases with increasing IP. We ascribe this...

  15. Active Galactic Nuclei with Double-peaked Narrow Lines: Are They Dual AGNs?

    Wang, J -M; Hu, C; Mao, W -M; Zhang, S; Bian, W -H

    2009-01-01

    Double-peaked [O III]5007, profiles in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) may provide evidence for the existence of dual AGNs, but a good diagnostic for selecting them is currently lacking. Starting from $\\sim$ 7000 active galaxies in SDSS DR7, we assemble a sample of 87 type 2 AGNs with double-peaked [O III]5007, profiles. The nuclear obscuration in the type 2 AGNs allows us to determine redshifts of host galaxies through stellar absorption lines. We typically find that one peak is redshifted and another is blueshifted relative to the host galaxy. We find a strong correlation between the ratios of the shifts and the double peak fluxes. The correlation can be naturally explained by the Keplerian relation predicted by models of co-rotating dual AGNs. The current sample statistically favors that most of the [O III] double-peaked sources are dual AGNs and disfavors other explanations, such as rotating disk and outflows. These dual AGNs have a separation distance at $\\sim 1$ kpc scale, showing an intermediate phase of...

  16. On the Scatter in the Radius - Luminosity Relationship for Active Galactic Nuclei

    Eser, E Kilerci; Peterson, B M; Denney, K D; Bentz, M C

    2014-01-01

    We investigate and quantify the observed scatter in the empirical relationship between the broad line region size R and the luminosity of the active galactic nucleus (AGN), in order to better understand its origin. This study is motivated by the indispensable role of this relationship in the mass estimation of cosmologically distant black holes, but may also be relevant to the recently proposed application of this relationship for measuring cosmic distances. We study six nearby reverberation-mapped AGN for which simultaneous UV and optical monitoring data exist. We also examine the long-term optical luminosity variations of Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 and employ Monte Carlo simulations to study the effects of the intrinsic variability of individual objects on the scatter in the global relationship for a sample of ~40 AGN. We find the scatter in this relationship has a correctable dependence on color. For individual AGN, the size of the Hbeta emitting region has a steeper dependence on the nuclear optical lumino...

  17. Light element nucleosynthesis from jet-cloud interactions in active galactic nuclei

    The production of light nuclei via the interactions of jets from the central engines of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and the surrounding medium are studied. Several environments ranging from hot, dense knots of gas near the central engine to the cold broad line region clouds are simulated by a nuclear reaction network that couples the thermonuclear processes in the cloud to the reactions between the jet particles and the cloud. Reaction products from the jet-cloud interactions are followed until they react or are thermalized, which may involve several subsequent reactions. Enhanced production of light nuclei well above their primordial abundances is possible even, under some conditions, of CNO nuclei. In these scenarios, the jets can enhance abundances of CNO nuclei by first producing excess amounts of nuclei with A<8, then by increasing the cloud density to the point at which the thermonuclear reaction rates become important. The comparison to observed abundances in quasars (QSOs) leads to the conclusion that the interactions of ejected matter from AGNs may be responsible for large observed abundances of light nuclei in addition to significant abundances of nuclei in the CNO region

  18. Type 1 Active Galactic Nucleus Fraction in SDSS/FIRST Survey

    Lu, Yu; Dong, Xiao-Bo; Zhou, Hong-Yan

    2010-01-01

    In the unification scheme, narrow-lined (type 2) active galactic nuclei (AGN) are intrinsically similar to broad-lined (type 1) AGN with the exception that the line of sight to the broad emission line region and accretion disk is blocked by a dusty torus. The fraction of type 1 AGN measures the average covering factor of the torus. In this paper, we explore the dependence of this fraction on nuclear properties for a sample of low redshift (z 10^{23}W/Hz) AGN selected by matching the spectroscopic catalog of Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the radio source catalog of Faint Image of Radio Sky at Twenty cm. After correcting for several selection effects, we find that : (1) type 1 fraction $f_1$ keeps at a constant of ~20 per cent in the [O III] 5007 luminosity range of 40.7< log(L_{[O III]}/ erg/s) <43.5 . This result is significantly different from previous studies, and the difference can be explained by extinction correction and different treatment of selection effects. (2) $f_1$ rises with black hole mass ...

  19. The Nature of Active Galactic Nuclei with Velocity Offset Emission Lines

    Müller-Sánchez, Francisco; Stern, Daniel; Harrison, Fiona A

    2016-01-01

    We obtained Keck/OSIRIS near-IR adaptive optics-assisted integral-field spectroscopy to probe the morphology and kinematics of the ionized gas in four velocity-offset active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. These objects possess optical emission lines that are offset in velocity from systemic as measured from stellar absorption features. At a resolution of ~0.18", OSIRIS allows us to distinguish which velocity offset emission lines are produced by the motion of an AGN in a dual supermassive black hole system, and which are produced by outflows or other kinematic structures. In three galaxies, J1018+2941, J1055+1520 and J1346+5228, the spectral offset of the emission lines is caused by AGN-driven outflows. In the remaining galaxy, J1117+6140, a counterrotating nuclear disk is observed that contains the peak of Pa$\\alpha$ emission 0.2" from the center of the galaxy. The most plausible explanation for the origin of this spatially and kinematically offset peak is that it is a region of en...

  20. The Third Catalog of Active Galactic Nuclei Detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Ackermann, Markus; Ajello, M.; Blandford, R. D.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Ojha, R.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paggi, A.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Bloom, E. D.; Pesce-Rollins, M.

    2015-01-01

    The third catalog of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected by the Fermi-LAT (3LAC) is presented. It is based on the third Fermi-LAT catalog (3FGL) of sources detected between 100 MeV and 300 GeV with a Test Statistic (TS) greater than 25, between 2008 August 4 and 2012 July 31. The 3LAC includes 1591 AGNs located at high Galactic latitudes (|b|>10{\\\\deg}), a 71% increase over the second catalog based on 2 years of data. There are 28 duplicate associations, thus 1563 of the 2192 high-latitude...

  1. Warped accretion disks and the unification of Active Galactic Nuclei

    Nayakshin, S

    2004-01-01

    Orientation of parsec-scale accretion disks in AGN is likely to be nearly random for different black hole feeding episodes. Since AGN accretion disks are unstable to self-gravity on parsec scales, star formation in these disks will create young stellar disks, similar to those recently discovered in our Galactic Center. The disks blend into the quasi-spherical star cluster enveloping the AGN on time scales much longer than a likely AGN lifetime. Therefore, the gravitational potential within the radius of the black hole influence is at best axi-symmetric rather than spherically symmetric. Here we show that as a result, a newly formed accretion disk will be warped. For the simplest case of a potential resulting from a thin stellar ring, we calculate the disk precession rates, and the time dependent shape. We find that, for a realistic parameter range, the disk becomes strongly warped in few hundred orbital times. We suggest that this, and possibly other mechanisms of accretion disk warping, have a direct relevan...

  2. X-Ray Properties Expected from Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback in Elliptical Galaxies

    Pellegrini, Silvia; Ciotti, Luca; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2012-01-01

    Detailed hydrodynamic simulations of active galactic nucleus feedback have been performed including the effects of radiative and mechanical momentum and energy input on the interstellar medium (ISM) of typical elliptical galaxies. We focus on the observational properties of the models in the soft and hard X-ray bands: nuclear X-ray luminosity; global X-ray luminosity and temperature of the hot ISM; and temperature and X-ray brightness profiles before, during, and after outbursts. After ~10 Gyr, the bolometric nuclear emission L BH is very sub-Eddington (l = L BH/L Edd ~ 10-4), and within the range observed, though larger than typical values. Outbursts last for ≈107 yr, and the duty cycle of nuclear activity is a few × (10-3 to 10-2), over the last 6 Gyr. The ISM thermal luminosity L X oscillates in phase with the nuclear luminosity, with broader peaks. This behavior helps statistically reproduce the observed large L X variation. The average gas temperature is within the observed range, in the upper half of those observed. In quiescence, the temperature profile has a negative gradient; thanks to past outbursts, the brightness profile lacks the steep shape of cooling flow models. After outbursts, disturbances are predicted in the temperature and brightness profiles (analyzed by unsharp masking). Most significantly, during major accretion episodes, a hot bubble of shocked gas is inflated at the galaxy center (within ≈100 pc) the bubble would be conical in shape in real galaxies and would be radio-loud. Its detection in X-rays is within current capabilities, though it would likely remain unresolved. The ISM resumes its smooth appearance on a timescale of ≈200 Myr the duty cycle of perturbations in the ISM is of the order of 5%-10%. While showing general agreement between the models and real galaxies, this analysis indicates that additional physical input may still be required including moving to two-dimensional or three-dimensional simulations, input of

  3. Constraints on active galactic nucleus accretion disc viscosity derived from continuum variability

    R.L.C. Starling; A. Siemiginowska; P. Uttley; R. Soria

    2004-01-01

    We estimate a value of the viscosity parameter in active galactic nucleus (AGN) accretion discs for the Palomar-Green quasar sample. We assume that optical variability on time-scales of months to years is caused by local instabilities in the inner accretion disc. Comparing the observed variability t

  4. PeV Neutrinos Observed by IceCube from Cores of Active Galactic Nuclei

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2013-01-01

    I show that the high energy neutrino flux predicted to arise from active galactic nuclei cores can explain the PeV neutrinos detected by IceCube without conflicting with the constraints from the observed extragalactic cosmic-ray and gamma-ray backgrounds.

  5. Present and future of high resolution radio observations of active galactic nuclei

    Using Cygnus A and 3C273 as examples, an introduction to radio interferometric observations of active galactic nuclei is made. Some aspects of present day research in extended and compact radio sources are presented. New instruments which are being presently built or planned and their possible scientific impact are discussed

  6. Host galaxies and environment of active galactic nuclei : a study of the XMM large scale structure survey

    Tasse, Cyril

    2008-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) result from the infall of matter onto the super-massive black holes that are situated at the centres of galaxies. This process releases an enormous amount of energy into the inter-stellar and inter-galactic medium. Hence, the study of AGN becomes essential in the context

  7. Supermassive Black Holes in Active Galactic Nuclei. II. Calibration of the Black Hole Mass-Velocity Dispersion Relationship for Active Galactic Nuclei

    Onken, Christopher A.; Ferrarese, Laura; Merritt, David;

    2004-01-01

    We calibrate reverberation-based black hole masses in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by using the correlation between black hole mass, M, and bulge/spheroid stellar velocity dispersion, sigma. We use new measurements of sigma for 6 AGNs and published velocity dispersions for 10 others......, in conjunction with improved reverberation mapping results, to determine the scaling factor required to bring reverberation-based black hole masses into agreement with the quiescent galaxy M-sigma relationship. The scatter in the AGN black hole masses is found to be less than a factor of 3. The current...

  8. Nuclear fuel activities in Canada

    Nuclear fuel activities in Canada are considered in the presentation on the following directions: Canadian utility fuel performance; CANDU owner's group fuel programs; AECL advanced fuel program (high burnup fuel behaviour and development); Pu dispositioning (MOX) activities. 1 tab

  9. Modeling the Polarization of Dusty Scattering Cones in Active Galactic Nuclei

    Goosmann, René; Gaskell, C. M.; Shoji, M.

    San Francisco : Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 2007 - (Ho, L.; Wang, J.), s. 485-486 ISBN 978-1-58381-307-2. - (ASP Conference Series. 373). [The Central Engine of Active Galactic Nuclei. Xi'an (CN), 16.10.2006-21.10.2006] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : galaxies: active * polarization * dust Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  10. A Dynamical Model for Gas Flows, Star Formation, and Nuclear Winds in Galactic Centres

    Krumholz., Mark R; Crocker, Roland M

    2016-01-01

    We present a dynamical model for gas transport, star formation, and winds in the nuclear regions of galaxies, focusing on the Milky Way's Central Molecular Zone (CMZ). In our model angular momentum and mass are transported by a combination of gravitational and bar-driven acoustic instabilities. In gravitationally-unstable regions the gas can form stars, and the resulting feedback drives both turbulence and a wind that ejects mass from the CMZ. We show that the CMZ is in a quasi-steady state where mass deposited at large radii by the bar is transported inward to a star-forming, ring-shaped region at $\\sim 100$ pc from the Galactic Centre, where the shear reaches a minimum. This ring undergoes episodic starbursts, with bursts lasting $\\sim 5-10$ Myr occurring at $\\sim 20-40$ Myr intervals. During quiescence the gas in the ring is not fully cleared, but is driven out of a self-gravitating state by the momentum injected by expanding supernova remnants. Starbursts also drive a wind off the star-forming ring, with ...

  11. Effects of Nuclear Cross Sections at Different Energies on Space Radiation Exposure from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    Li, Zi-Wei; Adams, James H., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Space radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a major hazard to space crews, especially in long duration human space explorations. For this reason, they will be protected by radiation shielding that fragments the GCR heavy ions. Here we investigate how sensitive the crew's radiation exposure is to nuclear fragmentation cross sections at different energies. We find that in deep space cross sections between about 0.2 and 1.2 GeV/u have the strongest effect on dose equivalent behind shielding in solar minimum GCR environments, and cross sections between about 0.6 and 1.7 GeV/u are the most important at solar maximum'. On the other hand, at the location of the International Space Station, cross sections at_higher -energies, between about 0.6 and 1.7 GeV /u at solar minimum and between about 1.7 and 3.4 GeV/u'at,solar maximum, are the most important This is. due-to the average geomagnetic cutoff for the ISS orbit. We also show the effect of uncertainties in the fragmentation cross sections on the elemental energy spectra behind shielding. These results help to focus the studies of fragmentation cross sections on the proper energy range in order to improve our predictions of crew exposures.

  12. On the variable nature of low luminosity active galactic nuclei

    Hernández-García, Lorena

    2015-01-01

    Los núcleos activos de galaxias (AGN, de sus siglas en inglés) emiten energías del orden de 1044 erg/s en regiones muy compactas, siendo uno de los fenómenos más energéticos de todo el Universo. Hoy en día, la teoría más aceptada es que este fenómeno es consecuencia de la acreción de materia sobre un agujero negro supermasivo. Esta tesis está centrada en el estudio de la variabilidad del extremo de los AGN de más baja luminosidad (LLAGN), los LINERs (low ionization nuclear emi...

  13. The hadronic origin of multi-TeV gamma rays from low-luminosity active galactic nuclei: implications of past activities of the Galactic center

    Fujita, Yutaka; Murase, Kohta

    2015-01-01

    Radiatively inefficient accretion flows (RIAFs) in low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs) have been suggested as cosmic-ray and neutrino sources, which may largely contribute to the observed diffuse neutrino intensity. We show that this scenario naturally predicts hadronic multi-TeV gamma-ray excesses around galactic centers. The protons accelerated in the RIAF in Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) escape and interact with dense molecular gas surrounding Sgr A*, which is known as the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), and produce gamma rays as well as neutrinos. Based on a theoretical model that is compatible with the IceCube data, we calculate gamma-ray spectra of the CMZ and find that the gamma rays with $\\gtrsim 1$~TeV may have already been detected with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS), if Sgr A* was more active in the past than it is today as indicated by various observations. Our model predicts that neutrinos should come from the CMZ with a spectrum similar to the gamma-ray spectrum. We also show that...

  14. Public acceptance in nuclear activities

    All over the world the most part of population considers nuclear power as the energy of the future. To reinforce this opinion some fundamental requirements should be met, namely: - nuclear facilities and power plants should be safe and competitive in point of costs; - nuclear activity should record no severe accidents; - to make actual progress in the field of radwaste management and disposal; - to actually witness and increase of electric power demands. In Romania the activities related to the nuclear research and power sum-up about 40 years of experience and these can be structured as per the following directions: - nuclear power and related activities (industrial, mining, processing, storage); - research reactors; - nuclear sciences and techniques and their applications. Public opinion information is aimed at assisting such activities and make the public familiar with the concepts typical for the nuclear field. Generally, there is a feeling of fear on the part of the officials in supporting the nuclear. The basic cause would be application of on incomplete and obsolete model when educating the public opinion. That model leads to the conclusion that the open expression of one's support in favour of nuclear is a political risk. A new, more, comprehensive model leading to different conclusions was conceived and finalized lately. The two models are different from each other by 3 characteristic elements: - influence of perception; - approach of the opinion; - definition of the support. The paper describes the actions undertaken in Romania in order to fulfill these requirements

  15. Interferometric Monitoring of Gamma-ray Bright Active Galactic Nuclei II: Frequency Phase Transfer

    Algaba, Juan-Carlos; Lee, Sang-Sung; Byun, Do-Young; Kang, Sin-Cheol; Kim, Dae-Won; Kim, Jae-Young; Kim, Jeong-Sook; Kim, Soon-Wook; Kino, Motoki; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Park, Jong-Ho; Trippe, Sascha; Wajima, Kiyoaki

    2015-01-01

    The Interferometric Monitoring of Gamma-ray Bright Active galactic nuclei (iMOGABA) program provides not only simultaneous multifrequency observations of bright gamma-ray detected active galactic nuclei (AGN), but also covers the highest Very Large Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) frequencies ever being systematically monitored, up to 129 GHz. However, observation and imaging of weak sources at the highest observed frequencies is very challenging. In the second paper in this series, we evaluate the viability of the frequency phase transfer technique to iMOGABA in order to obtain larger coherence time at the higher frequencies of this program (86 and 129 GHz) and image additional sources that were not detected using standard techniques. We find that this method is applicable to the iMOGABA program even under non-optimal weather conditions.

  16. Modeling the X-ray Fractional Variability Spectrum of Active Galactic Nuclei Using Multiple Flares

    Goosmann, René; Dovčiak, Michal; Karas, Vladimír; Czerny, B.; Mouchet, M.; Ponti, G.

    San Francisco : Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 2007 - (Ho, L.; Wang, J.), s. 167-168 ISBN 978-1-58381-307-2. - (ASP Conference Series. 373). [The Central Engine of Active Galactic Nuclei. Xi'an (CN), 16.10.2006-21.10.2006] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : X-rays: galaxies * variability * flares Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  17. On the deceleration of relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei I: Radiation drag

    Beskin, V S

    2016-01-01

    Deceleration of relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected recently by MOJAVE team is discussed in connection with the interaction of the jet material with the external photon field. Appropriate energy density of the isotropic photon field which is necessary to decelerate jets is determined. It is shown that the disturbances of the electric potential and magnetic surfaces play important role in general dynamics of particle deceleration.

  18. Variability-selected active galactic nuclei from supernova search in the Chandra deep field south

    Trevese, D.; Boutsia, K.; Vagnetti, F.; Cappellaro, E.; Puccetti, S.

    2008-01-01

    Variability is a property shared by virtually all active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and was adopted as a criterion for their selection using data from multi epoch surveys. Low Luminosity AGNs (LLAGNs) are contaminated by the light of their host galaxies, and cannot therefore be detected by the usual colour techniques. For this reason, their evolution in cosmic time is poorly known. Consistency with the evolution derived from X-ray detected samples has not been clearly established so far, also be...

  19. Modeling the X-ray fractional variability spectrum of Active Galactic Nuclei using multiple flares

    Goosmann, R. W.; Dovciak, M.; Karas, V.; Czerny, B.; Mouchet, M.; Ponti, G.

    2007-01-01

    Using Monte-Carlo simulations of X-ray flare distributions across the accretion disk of active galactic nuclei (AGN), we obtain modeling results for the energy-dependent fractional variability amplitude. Referring to previous results of this model, we illustrate the relation between the shape of the point-to-point fractional variability spectrum, F_pp, and the time-integrated spectral energy distribution, F_E. The results confirm that the spectral shape and variability of the iron Kalpha line...

  20. The VSOP 5 GHz active galactic nucleus survey. V. Imaging results for the remaining 140 sources

    Dodson, R.; Fomalont, E. B.; Wiik, K.; Horiuchi, S.; Hirabayashi, H.; Edwards, P. G.; Murata, Y.; Asaki, Y.; Moellenbrock, G. A.; Scott, W. K.; Taylor, A. R.; Gurvits, L. I.; Paragi, Z.; Frey, S.; Shen, Z. Q.

    2008-01-01

    In 1997 February, the Japanese radio astronomy satellite HALCA was launched to provide the space-bourne element for the VLBI Space Observatory Program (VSOP) mission. Approximately 25% of the mission time was dedicated to the VSOP survey of bright compact active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at 5 GHz. This paper, the fifth in the series, presents images and models for the remaining 140 sources not included in the third p...

  1. Active Galactic Nuclei and Quasars: Why Still a Puzzle after 50 years?

    Antonucci, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The first part of this article is a historical and physical introduction to quasars and their close cousins, called Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). In the second part, I argue that our progress in understanding them has been unsatisfactory and in fact somewhat illusory since their discovery fifty years ago, and that much of the reason is a pervasive lack of critical thinking in the research community. It would be very surprising if other fields do not suffer similar failings.

  2. Monitoring of bright, nearby Active Galactic Nuclei with the MAGIC telescopes

    R. Wagner; Backes, M.; Satalecka, K.; Bonnoli, G.; M. Doert(); B. Steinke(Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, D-80805 München, Germany); Strah, N.; Terzic, T.; Tescaro, D.; Uellenbeck, M.; The MAGIC Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Observations and detections of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) by Cherenkov telescopes are often triggered by information about high flux states in other wavelength bands. To overcome this bias, the VHE gamma-ray telescope MAGIC has conducted dedicated monitoring observations of nearby AGN since 2006. Three well established, TeV-bright blazars were selected to be observed regularly: Mrk 421, Mrk 501, and 1ES1959+650. The goals of these observations are to obtain an unbiased distribution of flux ...

  3. Accessing the innermost regions of Active Galactic Nuclei

    Ros, E

    2006-01-01

    Very-long-baseline interferometry can image the parsec-scale structure of radio jets, but the accretion disk close to the black hole remains invisible. One way to probe this accretion flow is provided by X-ray flux density monitoring and spectroscopy. Here we report on preliminary results of a multi-band campaign on NGC1052 with the goal of combining both approaches to access to the innermost regions of this active galaxy and to establish a connection between the relativistic jets and the accretion region.

  4. Nuclear energy activities in Mexico

    A brief description of the nuclear energy activities in Mexico is presented. The most important of these are related to the operation of Unit-1 of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant and the construction of Unit-2, both 654MWe (net) boiling water reactors (GE, Mark II). The research and development activities as well as the local specialized technical services capacity are described. Participation in the design of simplified light water reactors and the activities related to siting studies for future nuclear power plants and engineering for installation of low and medium level radioactive waste are also presented. Application of radioisotopes in industry and medicine is described the research and development activities related to them as well as the future plans for the utilization of nuclear energy in power generation are briefly discussed. 1 tab., 2 figs

  5. JRC activities in nuclear safety

    Manna Giustino

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear energy is today the largest single source of carbon free and base-load electricity in Europe. While highlighting its important role in the overall energy mix, it is necessary to address sustainability, safety, and security concerns, in particular nuclear safety and nuclear waste management issues, which influence the public acceptance of nuclear energy. The present paper describes the Joint Research Centre activities in support to the EU nuclear safety policy. It describes the Joint Research Centre role in the EU institutional context, identifies the various customers to which the Joint Research Centre delivers its services, and provides some results of the Joint Research Centre scientific work inherent to nuclear safety.

  6. Military nuclear activities. Strategic prospects

    This special dossier aims at providing some key articles about France's deterrence doctrine. It provides a comprehensive overview of the challenges and questions about military nuclear activities and opens up some future prospects about this question. The dossier comprises 37 papers dealing with: 1 - Military nuclear activities: yesterday, today, tomorrow (Coldefy, A.); 2 - Deterrence according to French President Francois Hollande: continuation, precision and inflexions (Tertrais, B.); 3 - French deterrence warrantor of our independence in the 21. century (Rouillard, G.); 4 - The deterrence concept prior to the nuclear weapon era (Widemann, T.); 5 - France: the strategic marine force in operation (Guillaume, L.M.); 6 - Relevance of the airborne component in the nuclear deterrence strategy (Steininger, P.); 7 - Deterrence stakes for the Directorate General of Armaments (Guillemette, A.); 8 - The Charles-de-Gaulle aircraft carrier: the deterrence voice from the sea (Wodka-Gallien, P.); 9 - Deterrence: missions of the army's radiation protection department (Amabile, J.C.; Granger-Veyron, N.; Carbonnieres, H. de); 10 - The French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and the French defense strategy (Roche, N.); 11 - DCNS, general contractor in the service of deterrence (Guillou, H.); 12 - The airborne nuclear component for MBDA (Bouvier, A.); 13 - Ballistic missile of the marine nuclear component: industrial stakes (Pastre, B.); 14 - Beyond defense against missiles: a US anti-deterrence strategy (Baconnet, A.); 15 - Deterrence dynamics in South Asia (Monsonis, G.); 16 - Military nuclear activities in East Asia (Brisset, J.V.); 17 - North Korea would own nuclear weapons, so what? (Hemez, R.); 18 - About the risk of nuclear warfare in Europe (Tchernega, V.); 19 - Present day nuclear activities: deterrence and gesticulation (Wedin, L.); 20 - Belgian F-16 replacement: nuclear dimension (Dumoulin, A.); 21 - Israel and nuclear deterrence (Razoux, P.); 22 - Nuclear

  7. Unification of Active Galactic Nuclei at X-rays and soft gamma-rays

    This HDR (accreditation to supervise research) report contains presentations of teaching activities in stellar astrophysics and extragalactic astronomy and cosmology, of student supervision activities in different academic places, and of various publications and participations to conferences and meetings. After a brief text highlighting the relevance and originality of his research works, the author proposes a large overview of his research works which dealt with different aspects of active galactic nuclei and related issues. Future projects are evoked. The report also contains numerous publications (press articles, conference proceedings, and so on)

  8. Active star formation at intermediate Galactic latitude: the case of IRAS 06345-3023

    Yun, J L

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of a small aggregate of young stars seen in high-resolution, deep near-infrared ($JHK_S$) images towards IRAS 06345-3023 in the outer Galaxy and well below the mid-plane of the Galactic disc. The group of young stars is likely to be composed of low-mass stars, mostly Class I young stellar objects. The stars are seen towards a molecular cloud whose CO map peaks at the location of the IRAS source. The near-infrared images reveal, additionally, the presence of nebular emission with rich morphological features, including arcs in the vicinity of embedded stars, wisps and bright rims of a butterfly-shaped dark cloud. The location of this molecular cloud as a new star formation site well below the Galactic plane in the outer Galaxy indicates that active star formation is taking place at vertical distances larger than those typical of the (thin) disc.

  9. The NuSTAR Extragalactic Survey: First Direct Measurements of the Greater Than Or Similar To 10 Kev X-Ray Luminosity Function For Active Galactic Nuclei At z > 0.1

    Aird, J.; Alexander, D. M.; Ballantyne, D. R.;

    2015-01-01

    We present the first direct measurements of the rest-frame 10-40 keV X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) based on a sample of 94 sources at 0.1 Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) extragalactic survey...

  10. From starburst to quiescence: testing active galactic nucleus feedback in rapidly quenching post-starburst galaxies

    Yesuf, Hassen M.; Faber, S. M.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Koo, David C.; Fang, Jerome J.; Liu, F. S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Wild, Vivienne [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Hayward, Christopher C. [Heidelberger Institut für Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-09-10

    Post-starbursts are galaxies in transition from the blue cloud to the red sequence. Although they are rare today, integrated over time they may be an important pathway to the red sequence. This work uses Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer observations to identify the evolutionary sequence from starbursts to fully quenched post-starbursts (QPSBs) in the narrow mass range log M(M {sub ☉}) = 10.3-10.7, and identifies 'transiting' post-starbursts (TPSBs) which are intermediate between these two populations. In this mass range, ∼0.3% of galaxies are starbursts, ∼0.1% are QPSBs, and ∼0.5% are the transiting types in between. The TPSBs have stellar properties that are predicted for fast-quenching starbursts and morphological characteristics that are already typical of early-type galaxies. The active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction, as estimated from optical line ratios, of these post-starbursts is about three times higher (≳ 36% ± 8%) than that of normal star forming galaxies of the same mass, but there is a significant delay between the starburst phase and the peak of nuclear optical AGN activity (median age difference of ≳ 200 ± 100 Myr), in agreement with previous studies. The time delay is inferred by comparing the broadband near-NUV-to-optical photometry with stellar population synthesis models. We also find that starbursts and post-starbursts are significantly more dust obscured than normal star forming galaxies in the same mass range. About 20% of the starbursts and 15% of the TPSBs can be classified as 'dust-obscured galaxies' (DOGs), with a near-UV-to-mid-IR flux ratio of ≳ 900, while only 0.8% of normal galaxies are DOGs. The time delay between the starburst phase and AGN activity suggests that AGNs do not play a primary role in the original quenching of starbursts but may be responsible for quenching later low-level star formation by removing gas and dust during

  11. From Starburst to Quiescence: Testing Active Galactic Nucleus feedback in Rapidly Quenching Post-starburst Galaxies

    Yesuf, Hassen M.; Faber, S. M.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Koo, David C.; Fang, Jerome J.; Liu, F. S.; Wild, Vivienne; Hayward, Christopher C.

    2014-09-01

    Post-starbursts are galaxies in transition from the blue cloud to the red sequence. Although they are rare today, integrated over time they may be an important pathway to the red sequence. This work uses Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer observations to identify the evolutionary sequence from starbursts to fully quenched post-starbursts (QPSBs) in the narrow mass range log M(M ⊙) = 10.3-10.7, and identifies "transiting" post-starbursts (TPSBs) which are intermediate between these two populations. In this mass range, ~0.3% of galaxies are starbursts, ~0.1% are QPSBs, and ~0.5% are the transiting types in between. The TPSBs have stellar properties that are predicted for fast-quenching starbursts and morphological characteristics that are already typical of early-type galaxies. The active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction, as estimated from optical line ratios, of these post-starbursts is about three times higher (gsim 36% ± 8%) than that of normal star forming galaxies of the same mass, but there is a significant delay between the starburst phase and the peak of nuclear optical AGN activity (median age difference of >~ 200 ± 100 Myr), in agreement with previous studies. The time delay is inferred by comparing the broadband near-NUV-to-optical photometry with stellar population synthesis models. We also find that starbursts and post-starbursts are significantly more dust obscured than normal star forming galaxies in the same mass range. About 20% of the starbursts and 15% of the TPSBs can be classified as "dust-obscured galaxies" (DOGs), with a near-UV-to-mid-IR flux ratio of >~ 900, while only 0.8% of normal galaxies are DOGs. The time delay between the starburst phase and AGN activity suggests that AGNs do not play a primary role in the original quenching of starbursts but may be responsible for quenching later low-level star formation by removing gas and dust during the post-starburst phase.

  12. Detection of hard X-ray emission from the Galactic nuclear region with INTEGRAL

    Belanger, G.; Goldwurm, A.; Goldoni, P.; Paul, Joachim; Terrier, R.; Falanga, M.; Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; Del Santo, M.; Winkler, C.; Parmar, A.N.; Kuulkers, E.; Ebisawa, K.; Roques, J.P.; Lund, Niels; Melia, F.

    2004-01-01

    This Letter presents the first results of an observational campaign to study the Galactic center with INTEGRAL, the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory. Mosaicked images were constructed using data obtained with ISGRI, the soft gamma-ray instrument of the coded aperture IBIS imager, in...... the first report of significant hard X-ray emission from within the inner 10' of the Galaxy and a contribution from the Galactic supermassive black hole itself cannot be excluded....

  13. Handbook on nuclear activation data

    This Handbook is being issued for the particular benefit of scientists working in the fields of education and industrial applications using nuclear activation methods, as well as in basic research. The content of the report is divided into four parts: standard reference data, neutron activation data, charged particle activation data and photonuclear activation data. The emphasis is on evaluated or recommended values rather than on an exhaustive presentation of all experimental results

  14. A Statistical Method to Search for Recoiling Supermassive Black Holes in Active Galactic Nuclei

    Raffai, Peter; Frei, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    We propose an observational test for gravitationally recoiling supermassive black holes (BHs) in active galactic nuclei, based on a correlation between the velocities of BHs relative to their host galaxies, |\\Delta v|, and their obscuring dust column densities, \\Sigma_{dust} (both measured along the line of sight). Proxies for both quantities can be derived from spectral features of individual quasars. We use toy models for the distribution of recoil velocities, BH trajectories, and the geometry of obscuring dust tori in galactic centres, to simulate 2.5x10^5 random observations of recoiling quasars. BHs with recoil velocities comparable to the escape velocity from the galactic centre remain bound to the nucleus, and do not fully settle back to the centre of the torus due to dynamical friction in a typical quasar lifetime. We find that |\\Delta v| and \\Sigma_ {dust} for these BHs are positively correlated. For obscured (\\Sigma_{dust}>0) and for partially obscured (0=45 km/s, the sample correlation coefficient ...

  15. A High Fraction of Double-peaked Narrow Emission Lines in Powerful Active Galactic Nuclei

    Lyu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    One percent of redshift z~0.1 Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) show velocity splitting of a few hundred km/s in the narrow emission lines in spatially integrated spectra. Such line profiles have been found to arise from the bulk motion of ionized gas clouds associated with galactic-scale outflows, merging pairs of galaxies each harboring a supermassive black hole (SMBH), and/or galactic-scale disk rotation. It remains unclear, however, how the frequency of narrow-line velocity splitting may depend on AGN luminosity. Here we study the correlation between the fraction of Type 2 AGNs with double-peaked narrow emission lines and AGN luminosity as indicated by [O III]5007 emission-line luminosity L_[O III]. We combine the sample of Liu et al. (2010) at z~0.1 with a new sample of 178 Type 2 AGNs with double-peaked [O III] emission lines at z~0.5. We select the new sample from a parent sample of 2089 Type 2 AGNs from the SDSS-III/Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We find a statistically significant (~4.2\\sigma) ...

  16. A statistical method to search for recoiling supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei

    Raffai, P.; Haiman, Z.; Frei, Z.

    2016-01-01

    We propose an observational test for gravitationally recoiling supermassive black holes (BHs) in active galactic nuclei, based on a correlation between the velocities of BHs relative to their host galaxies, |Δv|, and their obscuring dust column densities, Σdust (both measured along the line of sight). We use toy models for the distribution of recoil velocities, BH trajectories, and the geometry of obscuring dust tori in galactic centres, to simulate 2.5 × 105 random observations of recoiling quasars. BHs with recoil velocities comparable to the escape velocity from the galactic centre remain bound to the nucleus, and do not fully settle back to the centre of the torus due to dynamical friction in a typical quasar lifetime. We find that |Δv| and Σdust for these BHs are positively correlated. For obscured (Σdust > 0) and for partially obscured (0 103 km s-1) ≲ 0.4. This predicted trend can be compared to the observed fraction of type II quasars, and can further test combinations of recoil, trajectory, and dust torus models.

  17. Galactic mergers, starburst galaxies, quasar activity and massive binary black holes

    Many quasar-like objects show evidence for massive binary black holes. The recent discovery of a massive (5 X 106 Msolar mass) object in the centre of the local group dwarf elliptical M 32 greatly raises the probability of forming such binaries through galactic mergers. The author argues that the enhancement of all kinds of activity (quasar-like activity and star formation) in galaxies with companions is not so much a consequence of tidal interaction between the massive galaxies as the result of collisions with their dwarf satellites. (author)

  18. A High Fraction of Double-peaked Narrow Emission Lines in Powerful Active Galactic Nuclei

    Lyu, Yang; Liu, Xin

    2016-08-01

    One percent of redshift z ˜ 0.1 Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) show velocity splitting of a few hundred km s-1 in the narrow emission lines in spatially integrated spectra. Such line profiles have been found to arise from the bulk motion of ionized gas clouds associated with galactic-scale outflows, merging pairs of galaxies each harboring a supermassive black hole (SMBH), and/or galactic-scale disk rotation. It remains unclear, however, how the frequency of narrow-line velocity splitting may depend on AGN luminosity. Here we study the correlation between the fraction of Type 2 AGNs with double-peaked narrow emission lines and AGN luminosity as indicated by [O III]λ5007 emission-line luminosity L[O III]. We combine the sample of Liu et al. (2010a) at z ˜ 0.1 with a new sample of 178 Type 2 AGNs with double-peaked [O III] emission lines at z ˜ 0.5. We select the new sample from a parent sample of 2089 Type 2 AGNs from the SDSS-III/Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We find a statistically significant (˜4.2σ) correlation between L[O III] and the fraction of objects that exhibit double-peaked narrow emission lines among all Type 2 AGNs, corrected for selection bias and incompleteness due to [O III] line width, equivalent width, splitting velocity, and/or equivalent width ratio between the two velocity components. Our result suggests that galactic-scale outflows and/or merging pairs of SMBHs are more prevalent in more powerful AGNs, although spatially resolved follow up observations are needed to resolve the origin(s) for the narrow-line velocity splitting for individual AGNs.

  19. Transparency of nuclear regulatory activities

    One of the main missions of nuclear regulators is to protect the public, and this cannot be completely achieved without public confidence. The more a regulatory process is transparent, the more such confidence will grow. Despite important cultural differences across countries, a number of common features characterise media and public expectations regarding any activity with an associated risk. A common understanding of transparency and main stakeholders' expectations in the field of nuclear safety were identified during this workshop, together with a number of conditions and practices aimed at improving the transparency of nuclear regulatory activities. These conditions and practices are described herein, and will be of particular interest to all those working in the nuclear regulatory field. Their implementation may, however, differ from one country to another depending on national context. (authors)

  20. EVIDENCE FOR WIDESPREAD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY AMONG MASSIVE QUIESCENT GALAXIES AT z ∼ 2

    We quantify the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in a mass-complete (M * > 5 × 1010 M ☉) sample of 123 star-forming and quiescent galaxies at 1.5 ≤ z ≤ 2.5, using X-ray data from the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) survey. 41% ± 7% of the galaxies are detected directly in X-rays, 22% ± 5% with rest-frame 0.5-8 keV luminosities consistent with hosting luminous AGNs (L 0.5-8keV > 3 × 1042 erg s–1). The latter fraction is similar for star-forming and quiescent galaxies, and does not depend on galaxy stellar mass, suggesting that perhaps luminous AGNs are triggered by external effects such as mergers. We detect significant mean X-ray signals in stacked images for both the individually non-detected star-forming and quiescent galaxies, with spectra consistent with star formation only and/or a low-luminosity AGN in both cases. Comparing star formation rates inferred from the 2-10 keV luminosities to those from rest-frame IR+UV emission, we find evidence for an X-ray excess indicative of low-luminosity AGNs. Among the quiescent galaxies, the excess suggests that as many as 70%-100% of these contain low- or high-luminosity AGNs, while the corresponding fraction is lower among star-forming galaxies (43%-65%). Our discovery of the ubiquity of AGNs in massive, quiescent z ∼ 2 galaxies provides observational support for the importance of AGNs in impeding star formation during galaxy evolution.

  1. Nuclear enhancement factor in calculation of Galactic diffuse gamma-rays: A new estimate with DPMJET-3

    Mori, Masaki

    2009-01-01

    A new calculation of nuclear enhancement factor, used in estimation of Galactic diffuse gamma-ray flux from proton-proton interaction in order to take account of heavy nuclei included in cosmic-rays and interstellar matter, is presented by use of a Monte Carlo simulator, DPMJET-3. A new value of 1.8-2.0 in the energy range of 6-1000 GeV/nucleon, slightly increasing with kinetic energy of projectile cosmic rays, is about 20% larger than previous estimates.

  2. Search for emission of ultra high energy radiation from active galactic nuclei

    A search for emission of ultra-high energy gamma radiation from 13 active galactic nuclei that were detected by EGRET, using the CYGNUS extensive air-shower array, is described. The data set has been searched for continuous emission, emission on the time scale of one week, and for on the time scale of out day. No evidence for emission from any of the AGN on any of the time scales examined was found. The 90% C.L. upper limit to the continuous flux from Mrk 421 above 50 TeV is 7.5 x 10-14 cm-2s-1

  3. Optical spectra of radio-loud and radio-quiet active galactic nuclei

    Many radio galaxies have strong emission lines in their optical spectra. The fraction with such lines is much larger than in ''normal'' galaxies. Radio galaxies generally also have very bright nuclei; thus those with strong emission lines are similar in both respects to Seyfert galaxies. Hence radio and Seyfert galaxies are both generally considered to be similar physical objects: active galactic nuclei. Their observational properties show they are closely related to quasars (quasi-stellar radio sources) and (radio-quiet) QSOs. A short table of the space density of these objects is presented and their optical spectra are discussed. (Auth.)

  4. Does dichotomy of active galactic nuclei only depend on black hole spins?

    Ye, Yong-Chun; Wang, Ding-Xiong

    2004-01-01

    A toy model for jet powers and radio loudness of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is proposed based on the coexistence of the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) and magnetic coupling (MC) processes (CEBZMC) in black hole (BH) accretion disc. It turns out that both the jet powers and radio-loudness of AGNs are controlled by more than one physical parameter besides the BH spin. The observed dichotomy between radio-loud and radio-quiet AGNs is well interpreted by the two parameters, the BH spin and the power-la...

  5. A Heuristic Model for the Active Galactic Nucleus Based on the Planck Vacuum Theory

    Daywitt W. C.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The standard explanation for an active galactic nucleus (AGN is a "central engine" consisting of a hot accretion disk surrounding a supermassive black hole. Energy is generated by the gravitational infall of material which is heated to high temperatures in this dissipative accretion disk. What follows is an alternative model for the AGN based on the Planck vacuum (PV theory, where both the energy of the AGN and its variable luminosity are explained in terms of a variable photon flux emanating from the PV.

  6. Search for emission of ultra high energy radiation from active galactic nuclei

    1993-01-01

    A search for emission of ultra-high energy gamma radiation from 13 active galactic nuclei that were detected by EGRET, using the CYGNUS extensive air-shower array, is described. The data set has been searched for continuous emission, emission on the time scale of one week, and for on the time scale of out day. No evidence for emission from any of the AGN on any of the time scales examined was found. The 90% C.L. upper limit to the continuous flux from Mrk 421 above 50 TeV is 7.5 [times] 10[sup [minus]14] cm[sup [minus]2]s[sup [minus]1].

  7. Search for emission of ultra high energy radiation from active galactic nuclei

    The CYGNUS Collaboration

    1993-05-01

    A search for emission of ultra-high energy gamma radiation from 13 active galactic nuclei that were detected by EGRET, using the CYGNUS extensive air-shower array, is described. The data set has been searched for continuous emission, emission on the time scale of one week, and for on the time scale of out day. No evidence for emission from any of the AGN on any of the time scales examined was found. The 90% C.L. upper limit to the continuous flux from Mrk 421 above 50 TeV is 7.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}14} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}.

  8. An Axisymmetric, Hydrodynamical Model for the Torus Wind in Active Galactic Nuclei

    Dorodnitsyn, A.; Kallman, T.; Proga, D.

    2008-01-01

    We report on time-dependent axisymmetric simulations of an X-ray-excited flow from a parsec-scale, rotating, cold torus around an active galactic nucleus. Our simulations account for radiative heating and cooling and radiation pressure force. The simulations follow the development of a broad biconical outflow induced mainly by X-ray heating. We compute synthetic spectra predicted by our simulations. The wind characteristics and the spectra support the hypothesis that a rotationally supported torus can serve as the source of a wind which is responsible for the warm absorber gas observed in the X-ray spectra of many Seyfert galaxies.

  9. Invisible Active Galactic Nuclei. II Radio Morphologies & Five New HI 21 cm Absorption Line Detections

    Yan, Ting; Stocke, John T.; Darling, Jeremy; Momjian, Emmanuel; Sharma, Soniya; Kanekar, Nissim

    2015-01-01

    We have selected a sample of 80 candidates for obscured radio-loud active galactic nuclei and presented their basic optical/near-infrared (NIR) properties in Paper 1. In this paper, we present both high-resolution radio continuum images for all of these sources and HI 21cm absorption spectroscopy for a few selected sources in this sample. A-configuration 4.9 and 8.5 GHz VLA continuum observations find that 52 sources are compact or have substantial compact components with size

  10. Discovery of Millimeter-Wave Excess Emission in Radio-Quiet Active Galactic Nuclei

    Behar, Ehud; Baldi, Ranieri D.; Laor, Ari; Horesh, Assaf; Stevens, Jamie; Tzioumis, Tasso

    2015-01-01

    The physical origin of radio emission in Radio Quiet Active Galactic Nuclei (RQ AGN) remains unclear, whether it is a downscaled version of the relativistic jets typical of Radio Loud (RL) AGN, or whether it originates from the accretion disk. The correlation between 5 GHz and X-ray luminosities of RQ AGN, which follows $L_R = 10^{-5}L_X$ observed also in stellar coronae, suggests an association of both X-ray and radio sources with the accretion disk corona. Observing RQ AGN at higher (mm-wav...

  11. The Size of the Radio-Emitting Region in Low-luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei

    Anderson, James M.; Ulvestad, James S.

    2005-01-01

    We have used the VLA to study radio variability among a sample of 18 low luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs), on time scales of a few hours to 10 days. The goal was to measure or limit the sizes of the LLAGN radio-emitting regions, in order to use the size measurements as input to models of the radio emission mechanisms in LLAGNs. We detect variability on typical time scales of a few days, at a confidence level of 99%, in half of the target galaxies. Either variability that is intrinsi...

  12. Hard X-ray photon index as an indicator of bolometric correction in active galactic nuclei

    Zhou, Xin-Lin; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2010-01-01

    We propose the rest-frame 2-10 keV photon index, \\ga, acting as an indicator of the bolometric correction, \\lb/$L_{\\rm 2-10keV}$ (where \\lb~ is the bolometric luminosity and $L_{\\rm 2-10keV}$ is the rest-frame 2-10 keV luminosity), in radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Correlations between \\ga~ and both bolometric correction and Eddington ratio are presented, based on simultaneous X-ray, UV, and optical observations of reverberation -mapped AGNs. These correlations can be compared wit...

  13. Theoretical hydrogen-line ratios for the narrow-line regions of active galactic nuclei

    H-alpha/H-beta (Ha/Hb) and other hydrogen line ratios for narrow line regions (NLR) of active galactic nuclei (AGN) were calculated, and their sensitivity to model parameters was investigated. The computations were performed with the photoionization code CLOUDY, with hydrogen treated as a seven-level plus continuum atom. Ha/Hb was sensitive to the ionization parameter and only weakly dependent on the electron density. Metallicity and the shape of the UV to X-ray continuum had the greatest impacts. It is recommended that Ha/Hb with a value of 3.0 be used as a reddening indicator for NLR of AGN. 21 references

  14. Evidence for Infrared-faint Radio Sources as z > 1 Radio-loud Active Galactic Nuclei

    Huynh, Minh T.; Norris, Ray P.; Siana, Brian; Middelberg, Enno

    2010-02-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of radio objects found in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey which have no observable mid-infrared counterpart in the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) survey. The extended Chandra Deep Field South now has even deeper Spitzer imaging (3.6-70 μm) from a number of Legacy surveys. We report the detections of two IFRS sources in IRAC images. The non-detection of two other IFRSs allows us to constrain the source type. Detailed modeling of the spectral energy distribution of these objects shows that they are consistent with high-redshift (z >~ 1) active galactic nuclei.

  15. Scientific Highlights from Observations of Active Galactic Nuclei with the MAGIC Telescope

    Wagner, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Since 2004, the MAGIC gamma-ray telescope has newly discovered 6 TeV blazars. The total set of 13 MAGIC-detected active galactic nuclei includes well-studied objects at other wavelengths like Markarian 501 and the giant radio galaxy M 87, but also the distant the flat-spectrum radio quasar 3C 279, and the newly discovered TeV gamma-ray emitter S5 0716+71. In addition, also long-term and multi-wavelength studies on well-known TeV blazars and systematic searches for new TeV blazars have been...

  16. Scientific Highlights from Observations of Active Galactic Nuclei with the MAGIC Telescope

    Wagner, Robert; Collaboration, for the MAGIC

    2008-01-01

    Since 2004, the MAGIC gamma-ray telescope has newly discovered 6 TeV blazars. The total set of 13 MAGIC-detected active galactic nuclei includes well-studied objects at other wavelengths like Markarian 501 and the giant radio galaxy M87, but also the distant the flat-spectrum radio quasar 3C 279, and the newly discovered TeV gamma-ray emitter S5 0716+71. In addition, also long-term and multi-wavelength studies on well-known TeV blazars and systematic searches for new TeV blazars have been car...

  17. A Heuristic Model for the Active Galactic Nucleus Based on the Planck Vacuum Theory

    Daywitt W. C.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The standard explanation for an active galactic nucleus (AGN is a “central engine” consisting of a hot accretion disk surrounding a supermassive black hole [1, p. 32]. Energy is generated by the gravitational infall of material which is heated to high tem- peratures in this dissipative accretion disk. What follows is an alternative model for the AGN based on the Planck vacuum (PV theory [2, Appendix], where both the energy of the AGN and its variable luminosity are explained in terms of a variable photon flux emanating from the PV.

  18. Spectrophotometric monitoring of high luminosity active galactic nuclei. Pt. 1. The methods and data

    Perez, E. (Inst. de Astrofisica de Canarias, Tenerife (Spain)); Penston, M.V. (Royal Greenwich Observatory, Cambridge (UK)); Moles, M. (Inst. de Astrofisica de Andulucia, Granada (Spain))

    1989-07-01

    We report on a spectrophotometric monitoring programme of high luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGN) using the 2.5-m Issac Newton telescope. Data acquisition and analysis are explained, with emphasis on the care to be taken when comparing data from different epochs. The data are presented for individual objects. A comparison of the L{alpha}, CIV and CIII profiles shows that, contrary to what has previously been supposed, the profiles of different lines in a single object are not always the same as each other. (author).

  19. Organization of nuclear regulatory activities

    The paper presents the structure, missions and organizational aspects of the CNCAN, the National Commission for the control of nuclear activities in Romania. The paper addresses the following main issues: 1.General aspects; 2.Organizational structure of the NRA in Romania; 3.General description of the Division for Nuclear Safety Assessments; 4.Specific activities; 5.Regulatory approaches and practices. Under the title of 'General aspects' the following three basic statements are highlighted: 1.CNCAN is a governmental organization responsible for the development of the regulatory framework, the control of its implementation and the licensing of nuclear facilities; 2.CNCAN is the national authority competent in exercising the regulatory activity, authorization and control in the nuclear field provided by the law No. 111/ 1996 republished in 1998; 3.The Commission exercises its functions independently of the ministries and other authorities of the public control administration being subordinated to the Romanian Government. The organizational structure is as follows: - President, the Managerial Council and the Advisory Council coordinating the four General Divisions that are responsible for: - Nuclear Safety with Division of Nuclear Safety Assessment and Division of Nuclear Objectives Surveillance; - Radiological Safety with Division of Radiological Safety Assessment and Division of Operational Radiation Protection; - Surveillance of Environmental Radioactivity with Division of Assessment and Analysis and Division of National Network; - Development and Resource with the Division of Economy and Division of Human Resources. In addition under direct coordination of the President operate the Division of Radiation Protection, Transport and Radioactive Waste and the Division of International Cooperation and Communication. Specific activities are listed describing among others the issues of: - Safety of nuclear installation; - Evaluation relating to licensing of nuclear

  20. Detection of hard X-ray emission from the Galactic nuclear region with INTEGRAL

    Belanger, G.; Goldwurm, A.; Goldoni, P.;

    2004-01-01

    This Letter presents the first results of an observational campaign to study the Galactic center with INTEGRAL, the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory. Mosaicked images were constructed using data obtained with ISGRI, the soft gamma-ray instrument of the coded aperture IBIS imager, i...

  1. The Fossil Nuclear Outflow in the Central 30 pc of the Galactic Center

    Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Hwang, Chorng-Yuan; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Matsushita, Satoki; Koch, Patrick M; Iono, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    We report a new 1-pc (30") resolution CS($J=2-1$) line map of the central 30 pc of the Galactic Center (GC), made with the Nobeyama 45m telescope. We revisit our previous study of the extraplanar feature called polar arc (PA), which is a molecular cloud located above SgrA* with a velocity gradient perpendicular to the Galactic plane. We find that the PA can be traced back to the Galactic disk. This provides clues of the launching point of the PA , roughly $6\\times10^{6}$ years ago. Implications of the dynamical time scale of the PA might be related to the Galactic Center Lobe (GCL) at parsec scale. Our results suggest that in the central 30 pc of the GC, the feedback from past explosions could alter the orbital path of the molecular gas down to the central tenth of parsec. In the follow-up work of our new CS($J=2-1$) map, we also find that near the systemic velocity, the molecular gas shows an extraplanar hourglass-shaped feature (HG-feature) with a size of $\\sim$13 pc. The latitude-velocity diagrams show tha...

  2. On the difference of torus geometry between hidden and non-hidden broad line active galactic nuclei

    Ichikawa, Kohei; Almeida, Cristina Ramos; Ramos, Andres Asensio; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Gonzalez-Martin, Omaira; Lopez-Rodriguez, Enrique; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Diaz-Santos, Tanio; Elitzur, Moshe; Hoenig, Sebastian F; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Levenson, Nancy A; Mason, Rachel E; Perlman, Eric S; Alsip, Crystal D

    2015-01-01

    We present results from the fitting of infrared (IR) spectral energy distributions of 21 active galactic nuclei (AGN) with clumpy torus models. We compiled high spatial resolution ($\\sim 0.3$--$0.7$ arcsec) mid-IR $N$-band spectroscopy, $Q$-band imaging and nuclear near- and mid-IR photometry from the literature. Combining these nuclear near- and mid-IR observations, far-IR photometry and clumpy torus models, enables us to put constraints on the torus properties and geometry. We divide the sample into three types according to the broad line region (BLR) properties; type-1s, type-2s with scattered or hidden broad line region (HBLR) previously observed, and type-2s without any published HBLR signature (NHBLR). Comparing the torus model parameters gives us the first quantitative torus geometrical view for each subgroup. We find that NHBLR AGN have smaller torus opening angles and larger covering factors than those of HBLR AGN. This suggests that the chance to observe scattered (polarized) flux from the BLR in NH...

  3. The subarcsecond mid-infrared view of local active galactic nuclei: I. The N- and Q-band imaging atlas

    Asmus, D; Gandhi, P; Smette, A; Duschl, W J

    2013-01-01

    We present the first subarcsecond-resolution mid-infrared (MIR) atlas of local active galactic nuclei (AGN) containing 253 objects with a median redshift of z = 0.016. It comprises all available MIR imaging observations performed to date with ground-based 8-meter class telescopes and includes in total 895 independent photometric measurements, of which more than 60% are previously unpublished.We detect extended nuclear emission in at least 21% of the objects, while another 19% appear clearly point-like, and the remaining objects cannot be constrained. Subarcsecond resolution allows us to isolate the emission of the AGN on scales of a few tens of parsecs for the bulk of the sample and obtain nuclear photometry in multiple filters for the objects. The photometry is used to construct median spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the different optical AGN types and estimate the individual MIR 12 and 18 um continuum luminosities, which range over more than six orders of magnitude. We also analyse the arcsecond-sc...

  4. Civil liability on nuclear activities

    The civil liability theory in the actual context is shown in the first and second part of this thesis, including some considerations about concepts and types of liability in dangerous and not dangerous activities. In the third part, the legal aspects of civil liability for the nuclear activities are analyzed, with a brief description of the history evolution, standard systems, inspection corporation and juridical regulation. (C.G.C.). 239 refs

  5. Japan Nuclear Technology Institute activities

    Full text: 1. Introduction of JANTI Japan Nuclear Technology Institute (JANTI) was established in April, 2005 by consent of Japanese nuclear industries such as electric utilities, manufacturers, subcontractors etc., and its members consist of 114 companies. JANTI has two major purposes. One is to support industrial initiatives for safety operation on the model of INPO. The other is to improve regulatory practices to agree with the state of the art nuclear technology based on operation data. JANTI promotes three core stones such as Operating Experience Analysis, Nuclear Safety Network and Codes and Standards. Our activities are based on knowledge management by gathering, evaluating the operation experiences from domestic and overseas nuclear power plants, promoting safety culture and industrial standards for safety operation by reflecting on lessons learned from operation experiences. 2. The out line of activities JANTI took over and enhanced information-gathering / delivery / utilization operations of the Nuclear Information Center, which was established in 1983 under the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry to incorporate lessons learned from the TMI (Three Mile Island) nuclear accident. The following items are implemented: (1) Sharing operational experiences from nuclear energy facilities (nuclear power plants, fuel cycle facilities of Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited) to issue recommendations based on event analysis. (2) Conducting trend analysis of operation information to provide feedback on plant operation and maintenance work by exploring a database to counter issues associated with facility aging. (3) Utilizing operation information and equipment reliability data, data for probabilistic safety assessment and drawing up the guidelines for reliability centered maintenance / condition-based maintenance. 2.2 Promoting safety culture JANTI took over and evolved the rules of Nuclear Safety Net, which was established to incorporate lessons learned from

  6. A Census of Broad-Line Active Galactic Nuclei in Nearby Galaxies: Coeval Star Formation and Rapid Black Hole Growth

    Trump, Jonathan R; Fang, Jerome J; Faber, S M; Koo, David C; Kocevski, Dale D

    2012-01-01

    We present the first quantified, statistical map of broad-line active galactic nucleus (AGN) frequency with host galaxy color and stellar mass in nearby (0.01 < z < 0.11) galaxies. Aperture photometry and z-band concentration measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are used to dis- entangle AGN and galaxy emission, resulting in estimates of uncontaminated galaxy rest-frame color, luminosity, and stellar mass. Broad-line AGNs are distributed throughout the blue cloud and green valley at a given stellar mass, and are much rarer in quiescent (red sequence) galaxies. This is in contrast to the published host galaxy properties of weaker narrow-line AGNs, indicating that broad-line AGNs occur during a different phase in galaxy evolution. More luminous broad-line AGNs have bluer host galaxies, even at fixed mass, suggesting that the same processes that fuel nuclear activity also efficiently form stars. The data favor processes that simultaneously fuel both star formation activity and rapid superm...

  7. A CENSUS OF BROAD-LINE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN NEARBY GALAXIES: COEVAL STAR FORMATION AND RAPID BLACK HOLE GROWTH

    We present the first quantified, statistical map of broad-line active galactic nucleus (AGN) frequency with host galaxy color and stellar mass in nearby (0.01 < z < 0.11) galaxies. Aperture photometry and z-band concentration measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are used to disentangle AGN and galaxy emission, resulting in estimates of uncontaminated galaxy rest-frame color, luminosity, and stellar mass. Broad-line AGNs are distributed throughout the blue cloud and green valley at a given stellar mass, and are much rarer in quiescent (red sequence) galaxies. This is in contrast to the published host galaxy properties of weaker narrow-line AGNs, indicating that broad-line AGNs occur during a different phase in galaxy evolution. More luminous broad-line AGNs have bluer host galaxies, even at fixed mass, suggesting that the same processes that fuel nuclear activity also efficiently form stars. The data favor processes that simultaneously fuel both star formation activity and rapid supermassive black hole accretion. If AGNs cause feedback on their host galaxies in the nearby universe, the evidence of galaxy-wide quenching must be delayed until after the broad-line AGN phase.

  8. X-ray and infrared diagnostics of nearby active galactic nuclei with MAXI and AKARI

    Isobe, Naoki; Oyabu, Shinki; Nakagawa, Takao; Baba, Shunsuke; Yano, Kenichi; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Toba, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Nearby active galactic nuclei were diagnosed in the X-ray and mid-to-far infrared wavelengths, with Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) and the Japanese infrared observatory AKARI, respectively. Among the X-ray sources listed in the second release of the MAXI all-sky X-ray source catalog, 100 ones are currently identified as a non-blazar-type active galactic nucleus. These include 95 Seyfert galaxies and 5 quasars, and they are composed of 73 type-1 and 27 type-2 objects. The AKARI all-sky survey point source catalog was searched for their mid- and far-infrared counterparts at 9, 18, and 90 $\\mu$m. As a result, 69 Seyfert galaxies in the MAXI catalog (48 type-1 and 21 type-2 ones) were found to be detected with AKARI. The X-ray (3-4 keV and 4-10 keV) and infrared luminosities of these objects were investigated, together with their color information. Adopting the canonical photon index, $\\Gamma = 1.9$, of the intrinsic X-ray spectrum of the Seyfert galaxies, the X-ray hardness ratio between the 3-4 and 4-10 ...

  9. Ensemble spectral variability study of Active Galactic Nuclei from the XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalogue

    Serafinelli, Roberto; Middei, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    The variability of the X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGN) usually includes a change of the spectral slope. This has been investigated for a small sample of local AGNs by Sobolewska and Papadakis, who found that slope variations are well correlated with flux variations, and that spectra are typically steeper in the bright phase (softer when brighter behaviour). Not much information is available for the spectral variability of high-luminosity AGNs and quasars. In order to investigate this phenomenon, we use data from the XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalogue, Data Release 5, which contains X-ray observations for a large number of active galactic nuclei in a wide luminosity and redshift range, for several different epochs. This allows to perform an ensemble analysis of the spectral variability for a large sample of quasars. We quantify the spectral variability through the spectral variability parameter $\\beta$, defined as the ratio between the change in spectral slope and the corresponding logarit...

  10. Ensemble spectral variability study of Active Galactic Nuclei from the XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalogue

    Serafinelli, R.; Vagnetti, F.; Middei, R.

    2016-02-01

    The variability of the X-Ray spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGN) usually includes a change of the spectral slope. This has been investigated for a small sample of local AGNs by Sobolewska and Papadakis [1], who found that slope variations are well correlated with flux variations, and that the spectra are typically steeper in the bright phase (softer when brighter behaviour). Not much information is available for the spectral variability of high-luminosity AGNs and quasars. In order to investigate this phenomenon, we use data from the XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalogue, Data Release 5, which contains X- Ray observations for a large number of active galactic nuclei in a wide luminosity and redshift range, for several different epochs. This allows to perform an ensemble analysis of the spectral variability for a large sample of quasars. We quantify the spectral variability through the spectral variability parameter β, defined by Trevese and Vagnetti [2] as the ratio between the change in spectral slope and the corresponding logarithmic flux variation. We find that the spectral variability of quasars has a softer when brighter behaviour, similarly to local AGNs.

  11. Analysis of nearly simultaneous x-ray and optical observations of active galactic nuclei

    Rosemary Hill optical and EINSTEIN X-ray observations of a sample of 36 galactic nuclei (AGN) were reduced and analyzed. Seventy-two x-ray observations of these sources were reduced, nineteen of which yielded spectral information. Of these spectra observations, significant hydrogen column densities above the galactic value were required for nine of the active galactic nuclei. X-ray variability was detected in eight of the eleven sources which were observed more than once by EINSTEIN. Correlations between the x-ray and optical luminosities were investigated using the Jefferys method of least squares. This method allows for errors in both variables. The results indicate a strong correlation between the x-ray and optical luminosities for the entire sample. Division of the sample into groups with similar optical variability characteristics show that the less violently violent variable AGN are more highly correlated than the violently variable blazars. Infrared and radio observations were combined with the x-ray and optical observations of six AGN. These sources were modelled in terms of the synchrotron-self-Compton model. The turnover frequency falls between the infrared and radio data and reliable estimates of this parameter are difficult to estimate. Therefore the results were found as a function of the turnover frequency. Four sources required relativistic bulk motion or beaming. Multifrequency spectra made at different times for one individual source, 0235+164, required different amounts of beaming to satisfy the x-ray observations. Sizes of the emitting regions for the sources modelled ranged from 0.5 parsec to 1.0 parsec

  12. Galactic Winds

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    Galactic winds have become arguably one of the hottest topics in extragalactic astronomy. This enthusiasm for galactic winds is due in part to the detection of winds in many, if not most, high-redshift galaxies. Galactic winds have also been invoked by theorists to (1) suppress the number of visible dwarf galaxies and avoid the "cooling catastrophe" at high redshift that results in the overproduction of massive luminous galaxies, (2) remove material with low specific angular momentum early on and help enlarge gas disks in CDM + baryons simulations, (3) reduce the dark mass concentrations in galaxies, (4) explain the mass-metallicity relation of galaxies from selective loss of metal-enriched gas from smaller galaxies, (5) enrich and "preheat" the ICM, (6) enrich the IGM without disturbing the Lyαforest significantly, and (7) inhibit cooling flows in galaxy clusters with active cD galaxies. The present paper highlights a few key aspects of galactic winds taken from a recent ARAA review by Veilleux, Cecil, &Bland-Hawthorn (2005; herafter VCBH). Readers interested in a more detailed discussion of this topic are encouraged to refer to the original ARAA article.

  13. X-Ray bright active galactic nuclei in massive galaxy clusters - II. The fraction of galaxies hosting active nuclei

    Ehlert, S.; von der Linden, A.; Allen, S. W.;

    2013-01-01

    We present a measurement of the fraction of cluster galaxies hosting X-ray bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a function of clustercentric distance scaled in units of r500. Our analysis employs high-quality Chandra X-ray and Subaru optical imaging for 42 massive X-ray-selected galaxy cluster...... fields spanning the redshift range 0.2 z ..., both of which are also suppressed near cluster centres to a comparable extent. These results strongly support the idea that X-ray AGN activity and strong star formation are linked through their common dependence on available reservoirs of cold gas. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Oxford University...

  14. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES, STAR FORMATION, AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY IN BALMER BREAK GALAXIES AT 0 < z < 1

    Diaz Tello, J.; Donzelli, C. [IATE, Observatorio Astronomico de Cordoba, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba (Argentina); Padilla, N. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile (Chile); Fujishiro, N.; Yoshikawa, T. [Koyama Astronomical Observatory, Kyoto Sangyo University (Japan); Hanami, H. [Physics Section, Iwate University (Japan); Hatsukade, B., E-mail: jdiazt@oac.uncor.edu [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    We present a spectroscopic study with the derivation of the physical properties of 37 Balmer break galaxies, which have the necessary lines to locate them in star-forming-active galactic nuclei (AGNs) diagnostic diagrams. These galaxies span a redshift range from 0.045 to 0.93 and are somewhat less massive than similar samples of previous works. The studied sample has multiwavelength photometric data coverage from the ultraviolet to mid-infrared (MIR) Spitzer bands. We investigate the connection between star formation and AGN activity via optical, mass-excitation (MEx), and MIR diagnostic diagrams. Through optical diagrams, 31 (84%) star-forming galaxies, two (5%) composite galaxies, and three (8%) AGNs were classified, whereas from the MEx diagram only one galaxy was classified as AGN. A total of 19 galaxies have photometry available in all the IRAC/Spitzer bands. Of these, three AGN candidates were not classified as AGN in the optical diagrams, suggesting they are dusty/obscured AGNs, or that nuclear star formation has diluted their contributions. By fitting the spectral energy distribution of the galaxies, we derived the stellar masses, dust reddening E(B - V), ages, and UV star formation rates (SFRs). Furthermore, the relationship between SFR surface density ({Sigma}{sub SFR}) and stellar mass surface density per time unit ({Sigma}{sub M{sub */{tau}}}) as a function of redshift was investigated using the [O II] {lambda}3727, 3729, H{alpha} {lambda}6563 luminosities, which revealed that both quantities are larger for higher redshift galaxies. We also studied the SFR and specific SFR (SSFR) versus stellar mass and color relations, with the more massive galaxies having higher SFR values but lower SSFR values than less massive galaxies. These results are consistent with previous ones showing that, at a given mass, high-redshift galaxies have on average larger SFR and SSFR values than low-redshift galaxies. Finally, bluer galaxies have larger SSFR values than redder

  15. THE SUZAKU VIEW OF THE SWIFT/BAT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. II. TIME VARIABILITY AND SPECTRA OF FIVE 'HIDDEN' ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    The fraction of Compton-thick sources is one of the main uncertainties left in understanding the active galactic nucleus (AGN) population. The Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) all-sky survey for the first time gives us an unbiased sample of AGNs for all but the most heavily absorbed sources N H > 1025 cm-2). Still, the BAT spectra (14-195 keV) are time averaged over months of observations and therefore hard to compare with softer spectra from the Swift XRT or other missions. This makes it difficult to distinguish between Compton-thin and Compton-thick models. With Suzaku, we have obtained simultaneous hard (>15 keV) and soft (0.3-10 keV) X-ray spectra for five Compton-thick candidate sources. We report on the spectra and a comparison with the BAT and earlier XMM observations. Based on both flux variability and spectral shape, we conclude that these hidden sources are not Compton thick. We also report on a possible correlation between excess variance and Swift BAT luminosity from the 16 day binned light curves, which holds true for a sample of both absorbed (four sources), unabsorbed (eight sources), and Compton-thick (Circinus) AGNs, but is weak in the 64 day binned BAT light curves.

  16. MID-INFRARED SELECTION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI WITH THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER. I. CHARACTERIZING WISE-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN COSMOS

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) is an extremely capable and efficient black hole finder. We present a simple mid-infrared color criterion, W1 – W2 ≥ 0.8 (i.e., [3.4]–[4.6] ≥0.8, Vega), which identifies 61.9 ± 5.4 active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates per deg2 to a depth of W2 ∼ 15.0. This implies a much larger census of luminous AGNs than found by typical wide-area surveys, attributable to the fact that mid-infrared selection identifies both unobscured (type 1) and obscured (type 2) AGNs. Optical and soft X-ray surveys alone are highly biased toward only unobscured AGNs, while this simple WISE selection likely identifies even heavily obscured, Compton-thick AGNs. Using deep, public data in the COSMOS field, we explore the properties of WISE-selected AGN candidates. At the mid-infrared depth considered, 160 μJy at 4.6 μm, this simple criterion identifies 78% of Spitzer mid-infrared AGN candidates according to the criteria of Stern et al. and the reliability is 95%. We explore the demographics, multiwavelength properties and redshift distribution of WISE-selected AGN candidates in the COSMOS field.

  17. Black hole variability and the star formation-active galactic nucleus connection: Do all star-forming galaxies host an active galactic nucleus?

    We investigate the effect of active galactic nucleus (AGN) variability on the observed connection between star formation and black hole accretion in extragalactic surveys. Recent studies have reported relatively weak correlations between observed AGN luminosities and the properties of AGN hosts, which has been interpreted to imply that there is no direct connection between AGN activity and star formation. However, AGNs may be expected to vary significantly on a wide range of timescales (from hours to Myr) that are far shorter than the typical timescale for star formation (≳100 Myr). This variability can have important consequences for observed correlations. We present a simple model in which all star-forming galaxies host an AGN when averaged over ∼100 Myr timescales, with long-term average AGN accretion rates that are perfectly correlated with the star formation rate (SFR). We show that reasonable prescriptions for AGN variability reproduce the observed weak correlations between SFR and L AGN in typical AGN host galaxies, as well as the general trends in the observed AGN luminosity functions, merger fractions, and measurements of the average AGN luminosity as a function of SFR. These results imply that there may be a tight connection between AGN activity and SFR over galaxy evolution timescales, and that the apparent similarities in rest-frame colors, merger rates, and clustering of AGNs compared to 'inactive' galaxies may be due primarily to AGN variability. The results provide motivation for future deep, wide extragalactic surveys that can measure the distribution of AGN accretion rates as a function of SFR.

  18. Black hole variability and the star formation-active galactic nucleus connection: Do all star-forming galaxies host an active galactic nucleus?

    Hickox, Ryan C.; Chen, Chien-Ting J.; Civano, Francesca M.; Hainline, Kevin N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Mullaney, James R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Alexander, David M. [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Goulding, Andy D., E-mail: ryan.c.hickox@dartmouth.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-02-10

    We investigate the effect of active galactic nucleus (AGN) variability on the observed connection between star formation and black hole accretion in extragalactic surveys. Recent studies have reported relatively weak correlations between observed AGN luminosities and the properties of AGN hosts, which has been interpreted to imply that there is no direct connection between AGN activity and star formation. However, AGNs may be expected to vary significantly on a wide range of timescales (from hours to Myr) that are far shorter than the typical timescale for star formation (≳100 Myr). This variability can have important consequences for observed correlations. We present a simple model in which all star-forming galaxies host an AGN when averaged over ∼100 Myr timescales, with long-term average AGN accretion rates that are perfectly correlated with the star formation rate (SFR). We show that reasonable prescriptions for AGN variability reproduce the observed weak correlations between SFR and L {sub AGN} in typical AGN host galaxies, as well as the general trends in the observed AGN luminosity functions, merger fractions, and measurements of the average AGN luminosity as a function of SFR. These results imply that there may be a tight connection between AGN activity and SFR over galaxy evolution timescales, and that the apparent similarities in rest-frame colors, merger rates, and clustering of AGNs compared to 'inactive' galaxies may be due primarily to AGN variability. The results provide motivation for future deep, wide extragalactic surveys that can measure the distribution of AGN accretion rates as a function of SFR.

  19. Origin and properties of dual and offset active galactic nuclei in a cosmological simulation at z=2

    Steinborn, Lisa K.; Dolag, Klaus; Comerford, Julia M.; Hirschmann, Michaela; Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Teklu, Adelheid F.

    2016-05-01

    In the last few years, it became possible to observationally resolve galaxies with two distinct nuclei in their centre. For separations smaller than 10 kpc, dual and offset active galactic nuclei (AGN) are distinguished: in dual AGN, both nuclei are active, whereas in offset AGN only one nucleus is active. To study the origin of such AGN pairs, we employ a cosmological, hydrodynamic simulation with a large volume of (182 Mpc)3 from the set of Magneticum Pathfinder Simulations. The simulation self-consistently produces 35 resolved black hole (BH) pairs at redshift z = 2, with a comoving distance smaller than 10 kpc. 14 of them are offset AGN and nine are dual AGN, resulting in a fraction of (1.2 ± 0.3) per cent AGN pairs with respect to the total number of AGN. In this paper, we discuss fundamental differences between the BH and galaxy properties of dual AGN, offset AGN and inactive BH pairs and investigate their different triggering mechanisms. We find that in dual AGN the BHs have similar masses and the corresponding BH from the less massive progenitor galaxy always accretes with a higher Eddington ratio. In contrast, in offset AGN the active BH is typically more massive than its non-active counterpart. Furthermore, dual AGN in general accrete more gas from the intergalactic medium than offset AGN and non-active BH pairs. This highlights that merger events, particularly minor mergers, do not necessarily lead to strong gas inflows and thus, do not always drive strong nuclear activity.

  20. A SCALING RELATION BETWEEN MEGAMASER DISK RADIUS AND BLACK HOLE MASS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Wardle, Mark [Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics Research Centre and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad, E-mail: mark.wardle@mq.edu.au, E-mail: zadeh@northwestern.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2012-05-10

    Several thin, Keplerian, sub-parsec megamaser disks have been discovered in the nuclei of active galaxies and used to precisely determine the mass of their host black holes. We show that there is an empirical linear correlation between the disk radius and the black hole mass. We demonstrate that such disks are naturally formed by the partial capture of molecular clouds passing through the galactic nucleus and temporarily engulfing the central supermassive black hole. Imperfect cancellation of the angular momenta of the cloud material colliding after passing on opposite sides of the hole leads to the formation of a compact disk. The radial extent of the disk is determined by the efficiency of this process and the Bondi-Hoyle capture radius of the black hole, and naturally produces the empirical linear correlation of the radial extent of the maser distribution with black hole mass. The disk has sufficient column density to allow X-ray irradiation from the central source to generate physical and chemical conditions conducive to the formation of 22 GHz H{sub 2}O masers. For initial cloud column densities {approx}< 10{sup 23.5} cm{sup -2} the disk is non-self-gravitating, consistent with the ordered kinematics of the edge-on megamaser disks; for higher cloud columns the disk would fragment and produce a compact stellar disk similar to that observed around Sgr A* at the galactic center.

  1. A SCALING RELATION BETWEEN MEGAMASER DISK RADIUS AND BLACK HOLE MASS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Several thin, Keplerian, sub-parsec megamaser disks have been discovered in the nuclei of active galaxies and used to precisely determine the mass of their host black holes. We show that there is an empirical linear correlation between the disk radius and the black hole mass. We demonstrate that such disks are naturally formed by the partial capture of molecular clouds passing through the galactic nucleus and temporarily engulfing the central supermassive black hole. Imperfect cancellation of the angular momenta of the cloud material colliding after passing on opposite sides of the hole leads to the formation of a compact disk. The radial extent of the disk is determined by the efficiency of this process and the Bondi-Hoyle capture radius of the black hole, and naturally produces the empirical linear correlation of the radial extent of the maser distribution with black hole mass. The disk has sufficient column density to allow X-ray irradiation from the central source to generate physical and chemical conditions conducive to the formation of 22 GHz H2O masers. For initial cloud column densities ∼23.5 cm–2 the disk is non-self-gravitating, consistent with the ordered kinematics of the edge-on megamaser disks; for higher cloud columns the disk would fragment and produce a compact stellar disk similar to that observed around Sgr A* at the galactic center.

  2. THE FIRST CATALOG OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI DETECTED BY THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    We present the first catalog of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), corresponding to 11 months of data collected in scientific operation mode. The First LAT AGN Catalog (1LAC) includes 671 γ-ray sources located at high Galactic latitudes (|b|>100) that are detected with a test statistic greater than 25 and associated statistically with AGNs. Some LAT sources are associated with multiple AGNs, and consequently, the catalog includes 709 AGNs, comprising 300 BL Lacertae objects, 296 flat-spectrum radio quasars, 41 AGNs of other types, and 72 AGNs of unknown type. We also classify the blazars based on their spectral energy distributions as archival radio, optical, and X-ray data permit. In addition to the formal 1LAC sample, we provide AGN associations for 51 low-latitude LAT sources and AGN 'affiliations' (unquantified counterpart candidates) for 104 high-latitude LAT sources without AGN associations. The overlap of the 1LAC with existing γ-ray AGN catalogs (LBAS, EGRET, AGILE, Swift, INTEGRAL, TeVCat) is briefly discussed. Various properties-such as γ-ray fluxes and photon power-law spectral indices, redshifts, γ-ray luminosities, variability, and archival radio luminosities-and their correlations are presented and discussed for the different blazar classes. We compare the 1LAC results with predictions regarding the γ-ray AGN populations, and we comment on the power of the sample to address the question of the blazar sequence.

  3. Correlation of the highest-energy cosmic rays with the positions of nearby active galactic nuclei

    Collaboration, The Pierre auger

    2007-12-01

    Data collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory provide evidence for anisotropy in the arrival directions of the cosmic rays with the highest energies, which are correlated with the positions of relatively nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN) [1]. The correlation has maximum significance for cosmic rays with energy greater than {approx} 6 x 10{sup 19} eV and AGN at a distance less than {approx} 75 Mpc. We have confirmed the anisotropy at a confidence level of more than 99% through a test with parameters specified a priori, using an independent data set. The observed correlation is compatible with the hypothesis that cosmic rays with the highest energies originate from extra-galactic sources close enough so that their flux is not significantly attenuated by interaction with the cosmic background radiation (the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin effect). The angular scale of the correlation observed is a few degrees, which suggests a predominantly light composition unless the magnetic fields are very weak outside the thin disk of our galaxy. Our present data do not identify AGN as the sources of cosmic rays unambiguously, and other candidate sources which are distributed as nearby AGN are not ruled out. We discuss the prospect of unequivocal identification of individual sources of the highest-energy cosmic rays within a few years of continued operation of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  4. THE FIRST HARD X-RAY POWER SPECTRAL DENSITY FUNCTIONS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS

    We present results of our power spectral density (PSD) analysis of 30 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using the 58 month light curves from Swift's Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) in the 14-150 keV band. PSDs were fit using a Monte Carlo based algorithm to take into account windowing effects and measurement error. All but one source were found to be fit very well using an unbroken power law with a slope of ∼ – 1, consistent at low frequencies with previous studies in the 2-10 keV band, with no evidence of a break in the PSD. For five of the highest signal-to-noise ratio sources, we tested the energy dependence of the PSD and found no significant difference in the PSD at different energies. Unlike previous studies of X-ray variability in AGNs, we do not find any significant correlations between the hard X-ray variability and different properties of the AGN including luminosity and black hole mass. The lack of break frequencies and correlations seem to indicate that AGNs are similar to the high state of Galactic black holes.

  5. Ion-heated thermal Comptonization models and x-ray spectral correlations in active galactic nuclei

    Recent Ginga observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxies NGC 4051 and MCG 6-30-15 show a positive correlation between the 2-10 keV luminosity and photon spectral index α. Similar behavior has also been reported in Exosat and Einstein observations of other active galactic nuclei, and is suggested in hard x-ray low-state data of the galactic black-hole candidate Cygnus X-1. A two-temperature thermal Comptonization model with internal soft-photon production provides a simple explanation for this correlation. The electron temperature, determined by a balance between ion heating and radiative cooling, decreases in response to an enhancement of the soft photon flux, resulting in a softening of the spectrum and an increase in the soft x-ray luminosity. The bulk of the soft photons are produced through pion production in collisions between the hot ions. Pivoting of the spectrum at photon energies var-epsilon > 50 keV is a consequence of variations in the ion temperature. An important test of the model would be time correlations between soft and hard x-ray bands. 17 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  6. Correlation of the highest-energy cosmic rays with the positions of nearby active galactic nuclei

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Contreras, F; Coppens, J; Cordier, A; Cotti, U; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Criss, A; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Donato, C; De Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; de Mello Junior, W J M; De Mello-Neto, J R T; De Mitri, I; De Souza, V; Del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Della Selva, A; Delle Fratte, C; Dembinski, H; Di Giulio, C; Diaz, J C; Dobrigkeit, C; D'Olivo, J C; Dornic, D; Dorofeev, A; dos Anjos, J C; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Dutan, I; Duvernois, M A; Engel, R; Epele, L; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Etchegoyen, A; Facal San Luis, P; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Fernández, A; Ferrer, F; Ferry, S; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipi, A; Fleck, ccI; Fonte, R; Fracchiolla, C E; Fulgione, W; Garca, B; Garca Gamez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garrido, X; Geenen, H; Gelmini, i G; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giller, M; Glass, H; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Gomez Albarracin, F; Gomez Berisso, M; Gmez Herrero, R; Gonalves, P; Goncalvesdo Amaral, M; González, D; Gonzalez, J G; González, M; Gora, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Grassi, V; Grillo, A F; Grunfeld, C; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Gutirrez, J; Hague, J D; Hamilton, J C; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Hauschildt, T; Healy, M D; Hebbeker, T; Hebrero, G; Heck, D; Hojvat, C; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Horandel, J; Horneffer, A; Horvat, M; Hrabovsky, M; Huege, T; Hussain, M; Iarlori, M; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Kaducak, M; Kampert, K H; Karova, T; Kgl, B; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapik, R; Knapp, J; Koang, D H; Krieger, A; Krömer, O; Kuempel, D; Kunka, N; Kusenko, A; La Rosa, G; Lachaud, C; Lago, B L; Lebrun, D; Le Brun, P; Lee, J; Leiguide Oliveira, M A; Letessier-Selvon, A A; Leuthold, M; Lhenry-Yvon, I; López, R; López-Aguera, A; LozanoBahilo, J; Luna Garca, R; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Mancarella, G; Mancenido, M E; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Maris, I C; Marquez Falcon, H R; Martello, D; Martínez, J; Martinez Bravo, O; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, ii J A J; Matthiae, Giorgio; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; McCauley, T; McEwen, M; McNeil, R R; Medina, M C; Medina-Tanco, G; Meli, A; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menschikov, A; Meurer, Chr; Meyhandan, R; Micheletti, M I; Miele, G; Miller, W; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Monnier Ragaigne, D; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, E; Moreno, J C; Morris, C; Mostaf, M; Muller, M A; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navarro, J L; Navas, a S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Newman-Holmes, C; Newton, D; Nguyen Thi, T; Nierstenhoefer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Noka, L; Oehlschläger, J; Ohnuki, T; Olinto, A; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Ortolani, F; Ostapchenko, S; Otero, L; Pacheco, N; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parlati, S; Pastor, S; Patel, M; Paul, T; Pavlidou, V; Payet, K; Pech, M; Pkala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrov, Y; Diep Pham Ngoc Dong Pham Ngoc; Pham Thi, T N; Pichel, A; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pimenta, M; Pinto, T; Pirronello, V; Pisanti, O; Platino, M; Pochon, J; Porter, T A; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Rautenberg, J; Redondo, A; Reucroft, S; Revenu, B; Rezende, F A S; Rídky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Rivi`re, C; Rizi, V; Roberts, M; Robledo, C; Rodríguez, G; Rodrguez Fras, D; Rodríguez-Martino, J; RodrigueziiRojo, J; Rodriguez-Cabo, I; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Roth, M; Rouill-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santander, M; Santo, C E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, F; Schmidt, T; Scholten, O; Schovnek, P; Schussler, F; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Segreto, A; Semikoz, D; Settimo, M; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Siffert, B B; Sigl, i G; Smetniansky De Grande, N; Smialkowski, A; Smda, R; Smith, A G K; Smith, B E; Snow, G R; Sokolsky, P; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Spinka, H; Squartini, R; Strazzeri, E; Stutz, A; Suárez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Takahashi, J; Tamashiro, A; Tamburro, A; Tacu, O; Tcaciuc, R; Thomas, D; Ticona, R; Tiffenberg, J; Timmermans, C; Tkaczyk, W; Todero Peixoto, C J; Tom, B; Tonachini, A; Torres, I; Torresi, D; Travnicek, P; Tripathi, A; Tristram, G; Tscherniakhovski, D; Tueros, M; Tunnicliffe, V; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Valds Galicia, J F; Valino, I; Valore, e L; vanden Berg, A M; van Elewyck, V; Vázquez, R A; Veberi, D; Veiga, A; Velarde, A; Venters, T; Verzi, V; Videla, cM; Villaseñor, L; Vorobiov, S; Voyvodic, L; Wahlberg, H; Wainberg, O; Walker, P; Warner, D; Watson, A A; Westerhoff, S; Wieczorek, G; Wiencke, L; Wilczynska, B; Wilczynski, H; Wileman, C; Winnick, M G; Wu, H; Wundheiler, B; Yamamoto, T; Younk, P; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zech, A; Zepeda, A; Ziolkowski, M

    2007-01-01

    Data collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory provide evidence for anisotropy in the arrival directions of the cosmic rays with the highest energies, which are correlated with the positions of relatively nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN) \\cite{science}. The correlation has maximum significance for cosmic rays with energy greater than ~ 6x10^{19}$ eV and AGN at a distance less than ~ 75 Mpc. We have confirmed the anisotropy at a confidence level of more than 99% through a test with parameters specified {\\em a priori}, using an independent data set. The observed correlation is compatible with the hypothesis that cosmic rays with the highest energies originate from extra-galactic sources close enough so that their flux is not significantly attenuated by interaction with the cosmic background radiation (the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min effect). The angular scale of the correlation observed is a few degrees, which suggests a predominantly light composition unless the magnetic fields are very weak outside the thin d...

  7. The Third Catalog of Active Galactic Nuclei Detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Ackermann, M; Atwood, W; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Gonzalez, J; Bellazzini, R; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R; Bloom, E; Bonino, R; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T; Bregeon, J; Britto, R; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G; Cameron, R; Caragiulo, M; Caraveo, P; Casandjian, J; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; D'Abrusco, R; D'Ammando, F; Angelis, A; Desiante, R; Digel, S; Venere, L; Drell, P; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S; Ferrara, E; Finke, J; Focke, W; Franckowiak, A; Fuhrmann, L; Furniss, A; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I; Grove, J; Guiriec, S; Hewitt, J W; Hill, A; Horan, D; J'ohannesson, G; Johnson, A; Johnson, W; Kataoka, J; Kuss, M; Mura, G; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Leto, C; Li, J; Li, L; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M; McEnery, J; Michelson, P; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A; Monzani, M; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I; Murgia, S; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Ojha, R; Omodei, N; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Paggi, A; Paneque, D; Perkins, J; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T; Rain`o, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Romani, R; Salvetti, D; Schaal, M; Schinzel, F; Schulz, A; Sgr`o, C; Siskind, E; Sokolovsky, K; Spada, F; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stawarz, L; Suson, D; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, Y; Thayer, J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D; Torresi, E; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Vianello, G; Winer, B; Wood, K; Zimmer, S

    2015-01-01

    The third catalog of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected by the Fermi-LAT (3LAC) is presented. It is based on the third Fermi-LAT catalog (3FGL) of sources detected with a test statistic (TS) greater than 25, using the first 4 years of data. The 3LAC includes 1591 AGNs located at high Galactic latitudes (|b|>10{\\deg}), which is a 71% increase over the second catalog that was based on 2 years of data. There are 28 duplicate associations (two counterparts to the same gamma-ray source), thus 1563 of the 2192 high-latitude gamma-ray sources of the 3FGL catalog are AGNs. A very large majority of these AGNs (98%) are blazars. About half of the newly detected blazars are of unknown type, i.e., they lack spectroscopic information of sufficient quality to determine the strength of their emission lines. Based on their spectral properties, these sources are evenly split between FSRQs and BL~Lacs. The general properties of the 3LAC sample confirm previous findings from earlier catalogs, but some new subclasses (e.g., ...

  8. Atomic hydrogen properties of active galactic nuclei host galaxies: H I in 16 nuclei of galaxies (NUGA) sources

    We present a comprehensive spectroscopic imaging survey of the distribution and kinematics of atomic hydrogen (H I) in 16 nearby spiral galaxies hosting low luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGN), observed with high spectral and spatial resolution (resolution: ∼20'', ∼5 km s–1) using the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA). The sample contains a range of nuclear types ranging from Seyfert to star-forming nuclei, and was originally selected for the NUclei of GAlaxies project (NUGA)—a spectrally and spatially resolved interferometric survey of gas dynamics in nearby galaxies designed to identify the fueling mechanisms of AGN and the relation to host galaxy evolution. Here we investigate the relationship between the H I properties of these galaxies, their environment, their stellar distribution, and their AGN type. The large-scale H I morphology of each galaxy is classified as ringed, spiral, or centrally concentrated; comparison of the resulting morphological classification with the AGN type reveals that ring structures are significantly more common in low-ionization narrow emission-line regions (LINER) than in Seyfert host galaxies, suggesting a time evolution of the AGN activity together with the redistribution of the neutral gas. Dynamically disturbed H I disks are also more prevalent in LINER host galaxies than in Seyfert host galaxies. While several galaxies are surrounded by companions (some with associated H I emission), there is no correlation between the presence of companions and the AGN type (Seyfert/LINER).

  9. Gravitational Wave Recoil Oscillations of Black Holes: Implications for Unified Models of Active Galactic Nuclei

    Komossa, S

    2008-01-01

    We consider the consequences of gravitational wave recoil for unified models of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Spatial oscillations of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) around the cores of galaxies following gravitational wave (GW) recoil imply that the SMBHs spend a significant fraction of time off-nucleus, at scales beyond that of the molecular obscuring torus. Assuming reasonable distributions of recoil velocities, we compute the off-core timescale of (intrinsically type-2) quasars. We find that roughly one-half of major mergers result in a SMBH being displaced beyond the torus for a time of 30 Myr or more, comparable to quasar activity timescales. Since major mergers are most strongly affected by GW recoil, our results imply a deficiency of type 2 quasars in comparison to Seyfert 2 galaxies. Other consequences of the recoil oscillations for the observable properties of AGNs are also discussed.

  10. Stability of Cloud Orbits in the Broad Line Region of Active Galactic Nuclei

    schartmann, Martin Krause Andreas Burkert Marc

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the global dynamic stability of spherical clouds in the Broad Line Region (BLR) of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), exposed to radial radiation pressure, gravity of the central black hole (BH), and centrifugal forces assuming the clouds adapt their size according to the local pressure. We consider both, isotropic and anisotropic light sources. In both cases, stable orbits exist also for very sub-Keplerian rotation for which the radiation pressure contributes substantially to the force budget. We demonstrate that highly excentric, very sub-Keplerian stable orbits may be found that also agree with the recent finding by spectropolarimetry that the BLR is disk-like. This gives further support for the model of Marconi et al. 2008, which is designed to improve the agreement between black hole masses derived in certain active galaxies based on BLR dynamics, and black hole masses derived by other means in other galaxies by inclusion of a luminosity dependent term. For anisotropic illumination, the foresho...

  11. Dynamo activities driven by magneto-rotational instability and Parker instability in galactic gaseous disk

    Machida, Mami; Kudoh, Takahiro; Akahori, Takuya; Yoshiaki, Sofue; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2013-01-01

    We carried out global three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of dynamo activities in galactic gaseous disks without assuming equatorial symmetry. Numerical results indicate the growth of azimuthal magnetic fields non-symmetric to the equatorial plane. As magneto-rotational instability (MRI) grows, the mean strength of magnetic fields is amplified until the magnetic pressure becomes as large as 10% of the gas pressure. When the local plasma $\\beta$ ($ = p_{\\rm gas}/p_{\\rm mag}$) becomes less than 5 near the disk surface, magnetic flux escapes from the disk by Parker instability within one rotation period of the disk. The buoyant escape of coherent magnetic fields drives dynamo activities by generating disk magnetic fields with opposite polarity to satisfy the magnetic flux conservation. The flotation of the azimuthal magnetic flux from the disk and the subsequent amplification of disk magnetic field by MRI drive quasi-periodic reversal of azimuthal magnetic fields in timescale of 10 rotation period...

  12. Status of nuclear data activities in Korea

    Lee, Young-Ouk; Chang, Jonghwa [Nuclear Data Evaluation Lab., Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Yusung, Taejon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-01

    Although nuclear data activities in Korea are still in the early stage, considerable demands for more accurate and wide-range nuclear data from nuclear R and D fields activated a new nuclear data project titled as `Development of Nuclear Data System`. It was launched this year as one of nation-wide long-term nuclear R and D programs in Korea for the next decade. Its main goals are (1) to establish nuclear data system, (2) to build up the infra-structure for utilization of nuclear data and (3) to develop highly reliable nuclear data system. To achieve these goals, international cooperation and cultivation of human resource as well as construction of measurement facilities will be indispensable. This report briefly describes the demands of nuclear data from the nuclear R and D programs, current nuclear data activities and future plan with its strategy. (author)

  13. Activity of Armenian Nuclear Authority

    The activities of the Armenian regulatory body (ANRA) during 2000 includes: development of normative documents in the field of the peaceful use of atomic energy; supervision for nuclear and radiation safety; personnel training and international co-operation. In the field of nuclear legislation a project of a decree of RA Government 'About making scientific and technical center on nuclear and radiation safety' and 'Requirements to a format and content of the safety analysis report for the unit 2 of ANPP' are prepared. During the year 13 inspections have been carried out in the following direction: modernization, performance of measures re-apprising of seismic safety; performance of the operational control of metal of equipment and tubes, observation of radiation safety, safety control of radioactive waste, emergency preparedness. A statistics of the incidents after the starting-up with INES rating (1995) is presented. In 2000 3 events (2 of level 0 and 1 of level 1) took place. The training activities include the set-up of a new multifunctional simulator, personnel training and examinations. The international co-operation activities connected with IAEA, NRC, European Commission and other countries are presented

  14. Regulation of nuclear and radiological activities

    The paper presents a review of the Moldovan regulatory framework regarding nuclear and radiological activities and of the competence of state regulatory authority - the National Agency for the Regulation of Nuclear and Radiological Activities.

  15. Activities report in nuclear physics

    Jansen, J. F. W.; Scholten, O.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental studies of giant resonances, nuclear structure, light mass systems, and heavy mass systems are summarized. Theoretical studies of nuclear structure, and dynamics are described. Electroweak interactions; atomic and surface physics; applied nuclear physics; and nuclear medicine are discus

  16. International activities in nuclear documentation

    The Japanese activities in nuclear documentation has been developed in line with the national policy. Concerning the International Nuclear Information System (INIS), the INIS National Center for Japan has submitted steadily secondary information in English on nuclear literature to the IAEA since the beginning of the operation in 1970. The Japanese input redords occupy about 6% of the whole INIS database. The Center has paid effort to maintain high quality and to shorten time lag of the input. Information networks have been prepared for use of the INIS database in Japan. The International Energy Agency (IEA) established a new project of the Energy Technology Data Exchange (IEA/ETDE) in collaboration with its Member States in January 1987. The Japanese contracting parties contributed to this multinational cooperation during the initial phase of operation with implementation of regular input. Publication of a new periodical was started in January 1987. It is named 'Nuclear Science Information of Japan-Oral Presentation' and contains bibliographic information on presentation at main conferences, symposia and other formal meetings. Copies are distributed to oversea's countries as a kind of 'research in progress' information for inclusion of the latest research topics. (author)

  17. EVIDENCE FOR INFRARED-FAINT RADIO SOURCES AS z > 1 RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of radio objects found in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey which have no observable mid-infrared counterpart in the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) survey. The extended Chandra Deep Field South now has even deeper Spitzer imaging (3.6-70 μm) from a number of Legacy surveys. We report the detections of two IFRS sources in IRAC images. The non-detection of two other IFRSs allows us to constrain the source type. Detailed modeling of the spectral energy distribution of these objects shows that they are consistent with high-redshift (z ∼> 1) active galactic nuclei.

  18. RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS: IS THERE A LINK BETWEEN LUMINOSITY AND CLUSTER ENVIRONMENT?

    We present here the first results from the Chandra ERA (Environments of Radio-loud AGN) Large Project, characterizing the cluster environments of a sample of 26 radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z ∼ 0.5 that covers three decades of radio luminosity. This is the first systematic X-ray environmental study at a single epoch, and has allowed us to examine the relationship between radio luminosity and cluster environment without the problems of Malmquist bias. We have found a weak correlation between radio luminosity and host cluster X-ray luminosity, as well as tentative evidence that this correlation is driven by the subpopulation of low-excitation radio galaxies, with high-excitation radio galaxies showing no significant correlation. The considerable scatter in the environments may be indicative of complex relationships not currently included in feedback models.

  19. A note on periodicity of long-term variations of optical continuum in active galactic nuclei

    Lu, Kai-Xing; Bi, Shao-Lan; Wang, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    Graham et al. found a sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and quasars from the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS) that have long-term periodic variations in optical continuum, the nature of the periodicity remains uncertain. We investigate the periodic variability characteristics of the sample by testing the relations of the observed variability periods with AGN optical luminosity, black hole mass and accretion rates, and find no significant correlations. We also test the observed periods in several different aspects related to accretion disks surrounding single black holes, such as the Keplerian rotational periods of 5100~\\AA\\ photon-emission regions and self-gravity dominated regions and the precessing period of warped disks. These tests shed new lights on understanding AGN variability in general. Under the assumption that the periodic behavior is associated with SMBHB systems in particular, we compare the separations ($\\mathscr{D}_{\\bullet}$) against characteristic radii of broad-line regions (...

  20. The optical polarization signatures of fragmented equatorial dusty structures in Active Galactic Nuclei

    Marin, F

    2015-01-01

    If the existence of an obscuring circumnuclear region around the innermost regions of active galactic nuclei (AGN) has been observationally proven, its geometry remains highly uncertain. The morphology usually adopted for this region is a toroidal structure, but other alternatives, such as flared disks, can be a good representative of equatorial outflows. Those two geometries usually provide very similar spectroscopic signatures, even when they are modeled under the assumption of fragmentation. In this lecture note, we show that the resulting polarization signatures of the two models, either a torus or a flared disk, are quite different from each other. We use a radiative transfer code that computes the 2000 - 8000 angstrom polarization of the two morphologies in a clumpy environment, and show that varying the sizes of a toroidal region has deep impacts onto the resulting polarization, while the polarization of flared disks is independent of the outer radius. Clumpy flared disks also produce higher polarizati...

  1. Photon damping in cosmic-ray acceleration in active galactic nuclei

    Colgate, S.A.

    1983-04-07

    The usual assumption of the acceleration of ultra high energy cosmic rays, greater than or equal to 10/sup 18/ eV in quasars, Seyfert galaxies and other active galactic nuclei is challenged on the basis of the photon interactions with the accelerated nucleons. This is similar to the effect of the black body radiation on particles > 10/sup 20/ eV for times of the age of the universe except that the photon spectrum is harder and the energy density greater by approx. = 10/sup 15/. Hence, a single traversal, radial or circumferential, of radiation whose energy density is no greater than the emitted flux will damp an ultra high energy. Hence, it is unlikely that any reasonable configuration of acceleration can void disastrous photon energy loss. A different site for ultra high energy cosmic ray acceleration must be found.

  2. EDDINGTON RATIO GOVERNS THE EQUIVALENT WIDTH OF Mg II EMISSION LINE IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    We have investigated the ensemble regularities of the equivalent widths (EWs) of Mg II λ2800 emission line of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), using a uniformly selected sample of 2092 Seyfert 1 galaxies and quasars at 0.45 ≤ z ≤ 0.8 in the spectroscopic data set of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Fourth Data Release. We find a strong correlation between the EW of Mg II and the AGN Eddington ratio (L/LEdd): EW(Mg II) ∝ (L/L Edd)-0.4. Furthermore, for AGNs with the same L/LEdd, their EWs of Mg II show no correlation with luminosity, black hole mass, or line width, and the Mg II line luminosity is proportional to continuum luminosity, as expected by photoionization theory. Our result shows that Mg II EW is not dependent on luminosity, but is solely governed by L/LEdd.

  3. X-ray spectra and time variability of active galactic nuclei

    X ray measurements taken with the HEAO-1 and -2 satellites are examined for clues to the source of emissions from active galactic nuclei (AGN). The data covered the energy range 2-100 keV and 0.5-4.5 keV and encompassed quasars, BL Lac objects, Seyfert I galaxies and broadline radio galaxies. The broadline spectra were best fit with a power law with a slope of about 0.68. The continua displayed roughly equivalent energy at all wavelengths except for radio bands. Spectral variability was detected in the BL Lac objects, which may emit optical, UV and soft X ray radiation from optically thin synchrotron emission with a hard X ray tail from inverse Compton scattering. No strong variability was evidenced with other AGN, suggesting that the emitting regions are below the Eddington luminosity and thus exhibit stable flow characteristics. 42 references

  4. Search of high energy neutrino flares from active galactic nuclei with the IceCube detector

    Cruz Silva, Angel Humberto; Bernardini, Elisa [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Gora, Dariusz [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, ul. Radzikowskiego 152,31-342 Cracow, Krakow (Poland); Collaboration: IceCube-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are among the best candidates for sources of high energy cosmic rays. One of their properties is the extreme variability in their electromagnetic emission at different wavelengths with flare durations ranging from minutes, in some cases, to several weeks. This photon flares may be correlated with neutrinos emitted from the same source if protons are also accelerated in the AGN relativistic jet. Here we present a new statistical test method to look for neutrino flares from selected AGNs. The method takes into account a list of possible neutrino sources from different categories (FSRQs and BL-Lacs) in a so called stacking approach. The performance and results of the method using IceCube data in its 79 string configuration are presented.

  5. A new approach to the variability characterization of active galactic nuclei

    Middei, R.; Vagnetti, F.; Antonucci, M.; Serafinelli, R.

    2016-02-01

    The normalized excess variance is a popular method used by many authors to estimate the variability of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), especially in the X-ray band. We show that this estimator is affected by the cosmological time dilation, so that it should be appropriately corrected when applied to AGN samples distributed in wide redshift intervals. We propose a formula to modify this estimator, based on the use of the structure function. To verify the presence of the cosmological effect and the reliability of the proposed correction, we use data extracted from the XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalogue, data release 5 (XMMSSC-DR5), and cross-matched with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalogue, of data release 7 and 12.

  6. A mid-to far-infrared variability study of eight active galactic nuclei

    In this paper a mid-to far-infrared (MFIR) variability study of a heterogeneous sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) is presented using data from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS). The data have been taken from the IRAS Additional Observation (AO) archives. The source list comprises eight AGN; one Seyfert type 2 galaxy (NGC 1275), three Seyfert type 1 galaxies (NGC 4151, IIIZw2 and AKN 374), two quasars (PG 1351+64 and 1156+295) and two BL Lacertae objects (OJ287 and MKN 501). The observations cover a variety of time-scales from days to months. In only one case, that of the BL Lac object OJ 287, was significant evidence found for variability within the IRAS waveband, although the OVV quasar 1156+295 shows evidence for variability by comparison with archival ground-based data. (author)

  7. Optimal strategies for observation of active galactic nuclei variability with Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes

    Giomi, Matteo; Maier, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    Variable emission is one of the defining characteristic of active galactic nuclei (AGN). While providing precious information on the nature and physics of the sources, variability is often challenging to observe with time- and field-of-view-limited astronomical observatories such as Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs). In this work, we address two questions relevant for the observation of sources characterized by AGN-like variability: what is the most time-efficient way to detect such sources, and what is the observational bias that can be introduced by the choice of the observing strategy when conducting blind surveys of the sky. Different observing strategies are evaluated using simulated light curves and realistic instrument response functions of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), a future gamma-ray observatory. We show that strategies that makes use of very small observing windows, spread over large periods of time, allows for a faster detection of the source, and are less influenced by the...

  8. Radius-luminosity and mass-luminosity relationships for active galactic nuclei

    Broad-line region (BLR) sizes derived from spectral variability and BLR line widths are used to directly derive the mass (M) of the central objects of ten active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in a uniform manner. It is shown that the luminosity-weighted C IV 1549-emitting BLR radius (R) correlates with the bolometric luminosity L(Bol) and is consistent with R about sq rt L(Bol). The measurements also permit a verification of the Dibai mass-luminosity (M-L) relationship (previously derived indirectly). It is found that L(Bol) is proportional to M exp (1.1 + or - 0.3). It is found that the efficiency factor epsilon, defined as the ratio of L(Bol) to the Eddington luminosity increases from 0.03 in the low-luminosity Seyferts up to 0.06 in the most luminous objects in the sample. 19 refs

  9. The VSOP 5 GHz Active Galactic Nucleus Survey: V. Imaging Results for the Remaining 140 sources

    Dodson, R; Wiik, K; Horiuchi, S; Hirabayashi, H; Edwards, P G; Murata, Y; Asaki, Y; Moellenbrock, G A; Scott, W K; Taylor, A R; Gurvits, L I; Paragi, Z; Frey, S; Shen, Z -Q; Lovell, J E J; Tingay, S J; Rioja, M J; Fodor, S; Lister, M L; Mosoni, L; Coldwell, G; Piner, B G; Yang, J

    2007-01-01

    In February 1997, the Japanese radio astronomy satellite HALCA was launched to provide the space-bourne element for the VLBI Space Observatory Programme (VSOP) mission. Approximately twenty-five percent of the mission time was dedicated to the VSOP Survey of bright compact Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) at 5 GHz. This paper, the fifth in the series, presents images and models for the remaining 140 sources not included in Paper III, which contained 102 sources. For most sources, the plots of the uv-coverage, the visibility amplitude versus uv-distance, and the high resolution image are presented. Model fit parameters to the major radio components are determined, and the brightness temperature of the core component for each source is calculated. The brightness temperature distributions for all of the sources in the VSOP AGN survey are discussed.

  10. Axisymmetric nonstationary model of the central engine in an active galactic nucleus. I. Black hole electrodynamics

    In a previous paper the authors analyzed an axisymmetric, nonstationary model of the central engine of an active galactic nucleus, consisting of a supermassive black hole surrounded by a magnetized accretion disk. The equations used were the equations of power output and angular momentum loss given by Macdonald and Thorne (1982), in which an axisymmetric, stationary model is described. In this paper, all the fundamental equations in a fully time-dependent manner and the electrodynamics of a black hole and its magnetosphere is investigated. Under the assumption that the mass accretion is confined to the equatorial plane of the black hole, the results suggest that, at the equatorial zone of the black hole, the angular velocity of the magnetic field lines anchored on the accreting matter must be close to that of the black hole. 21 references

  11. Time domain studies of Active Galactic Nuclei with the Square Kilometre Array

    Bignall, Hayley; Hovatta, Talvikki; Koay, Jun Yi; Lazio, Joseph; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Reynolds, Cormac

    2015-01-01

    Variability of radio-emitting active galactic nuclei can be used to probe both intrinsic variations arising from shocks, flares, and other changes in emission from regions surrounding the central supermassive black hole, as well as extrinsic variations due to scattering by structures in our own Galaxy. Such interstellar scattering also probes the structure of the emitting regions, with microarcsecond resolution. Current studies have necessarily been limited to either small numbers of objects monitored over long periods of time, or large numbers of objects but with poor time sampling. The dramatic increase in survey speed engendered by the Square Kilometre Array will enable precision synoptic monitoring studies of hundreds of thousands of sources with a cadence of days or less. Statistics of variability, in particular concurrent observations at multiple radio frequencies and in other bands of the electromagnetic spectrum, will probe accretion physics over a wide range of AGN classes, luminosities, and orientat...

  12. A Polarimetric Method for Measuring Black Hole Masses in Active Galactic Nuclei

    Piotrovich, M Yu; Silant'ev, N A; Natsvlishvili, T M; Buliga, S D

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the broad emission line region (BLR) in active galactic nuclei (AGN) remains unclear. We test in this paper a flattened configuration model for BLR. The virial theorem, by taking into account the disc shape of BLR, allows us to get a direct connection between the mass of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) and the inclination angle of the accretion flow. The inclination angle itself is derived from the spectropolarimetric data on broad emission lines using the theory for the generation of polarized radiation developed by Sobolev and Chandrasekhar. As the result, the new estimates of SMBH masses in AGN with measured polarization of BLR are presented. It is crucial that the polarimetric data allow also to determine the value of the virial coefficient that is essential for determining SMBH masses.

  13. A polarimetric method for measuring black hole masses in Active Galactic Nuclei

    Piotrovich, M. Yu.; Gnedin, Yu. N.; Silant'ev, N. A.; Natsvlishvili, T. M.; Buliga, S. D.

    2015-11-01

    The structure of the broad emission line region (BLR) in active galactic nuclei (AGN) remains unclear. We test in this paper a flattened configuration model for BLR. The virial theorem, by taking into account the disc shape of BLR, allows us to get a direct connection between the mass of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) and the inclination angle of the accretion flow. The inclination angle itself is derived from the spectropolarimetric data on broad emission lines using the theory for the generation of polarized radiation developed by Sobolev and Chandrasekhar. As the result, the new estimates of SMBH masses in AGN with measured polarization of BLR are presented. It is crucial that the polarimetric data allow also to determine the value of the virial coefficient that is essential for determining SMBH masses.

  14. Monitoring the activity variations of galactic X-ray sources with WATCH on EURECA

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.

    1995-01-01

    its 11 month operational life, EURECA tracked the Sun, and WATCH gradually scanned across the entire sky. The signals from more than two dozen known galactic X-ray sources have been identified in the data, and the activity state of each source has been recorded as a function of time. For several......Among the many instruments carried on the first EURECA mission was also one aimed at doing astrophysical research. This instrument, WATCH, (Wide Angle Telescope for Cosmic Hard X-rays) is sensitive in the 6 to 150 keV energy range and has a total field of view covering a quarter of the sky. During...... special “offset pointing” program was initiated on request from the WATCH PI. This program proved very successful and allowed WATCH to scan more than 80% of the sky in the course of only two weeks....

  15. X-ray spectroscopy of AGN with the AXAF 'Microcalorimeter'. [Active Galactic Nuclei

    Holt, Stephen S.

    1987-01-01

    A novel technique for X-ray spectroscopy has been configured as part of the definition payload of the AXAF Observatory. It is basically a calorimeter which, operating at 0.1 K, senses the total conversion of single photoelectrically absorbed X-rays via the differential temperature rise of the absorber. The technique promises to achieve less than 10 eV FWHM with near-unit efficiency simultaneously over the entire AXAF bandpass. This combination of high resolution and high efficiency allows for the possibility of investigating thermal, fluorescent and absorption X-ray line features in many types of X-ray source, including a large sample of active galactic nuclei.

  16. Accretion disk winds in active galactic nuclei: X-ray observations, models, and feedback

    Tombesi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Powerful winds driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are often invoked to play a fundamental role in the evolution of both supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies, quenching star formation and explaining the tight SMBH-galaxy relations. A strong support of this "quasar mode" feedback came from the recent X-ray observation of a mildly relativistic accretion disk wind in a ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) and its connection with a large-scale molecular outflow, providing a direct link between the SMBH and the gas out of which stars form. Spectroscopic observations, especially in the X-ray band, show that such accretion disk winds may be common in local AGN and quasars. However, their origin and characteristics are still not fully understood. Detailed theoretical models and simulations focused on radiation, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) or a combination of these two processes to investigate the possible acceleration mechanisms and the dynamics of these winds. Some of these models have been dir...

  17. Relativistic particles and gamma-rays in quasars and active galactic nuclei

    Protheroe, R. J.; Kazanas, D.

    1983-01-01

    A model for a class of quasars and active galactic nuclei is described in which a shock around a massive black hole randomizes the infall kinetic energy of spherically accreting matter producing a nonthermal spectrum of high energy protons. These protons may be responsible for the secondary production (via tau + or - decay) of the radio emitting high energy electrons and also of high energy gamma rays (via Pi decay and inverse Compton interactions of the electrons). The correlation between radio and gamma ray emission implied by the model is in good agreement with observations of 3C273. Observation of the flux of high energy neutrinos from quasars may provide a test for the model.

  18. Relativistic particles and gamma-rays in quasars and active galactic nuclei

    A model for a class of quasars and active galactic nuclei is described in which a shock around a massive black hole randomizes the infall kinetic energy of spherically accreting matter producing a non-thermal spectrum of high energy protons. These protons may be responsible for the secondary production (via πsup(+-) decay) of the radio emitting high energy electrons and also of high energy γ-rays (via π0 decay and inverse Compton interactions of the electrons). The correlation between radio and γ-ray emission implied by the model is in good agreement with observations of 3C273. Observations of the flux of high energy neutrinos from quasars may provide a test for the model. (orig.)

  19. Relativistic particles and gamma-ray in quasars and active galactic nuclei

    A model for a class of quasars and active galactic nuclei is described in which a shock around a massive black hole randomizes the infall kinetic energy of spherically accreting matter producing a nonthermal spectrum of high energy protons. These protons may be responsible for the secondary production (via tau + or - decay) of the radio emitting high energy electrons and also of high energy gamma rays (via pi decay and inverse Compton interactions of the electrons). The correlation between radio and gamma ray emission implied by the model is in good agreement with observations of 3C273. Observation of the flux of high energy neutrinos from quasars may provide a test for the model

  20. Relativistic particles and gamma-ray in quasars and active galactic nuclei

    Protheroe, R. J.; Kazanas, D.

    1982-01-01

    A model for a class of quasars and active galactic nuclei is described in which a shock around a massive black hole randomizes the infall kinetic energy of spherically accreting matter producing a nonthermal spectrum of high energy protons. These protons may be responsible for the secondary production (via tau + or - decay) of the radio emitting high energy electrons and also of high energy gamma rays (via pi decay and inverse Compton interactions of the electrons). The correlation between radio and gamma ray emission implied by the model is in good agreement with observations of 3C273. Observation of the flux of high energy neutrinos from quasars may provide a test for the model.

  1. Relativistic particles and gamma-ray in quasars and active galactic nuclei

    Protheroe, R.J.; Kazanas, D.

    1982-07-01

    A model for a class of quasars and active galactic nuclei is described in which a shock around a massive black hole randomizes the infall kinetic energy of spherically accreting matter producing a nonthermal spectrum of high energy protons. These protons may be responsible for the secondary production (via tau + or - decay) of the radio emitting high energy electrons and also of high energy gamma rays (via pi decay and inverse Compton interactions of the electrons). The correlation between radio and gamma ray emission implied by the model is in good agreement with observations of 3C273. Observation of the flux of high energy neutrinos from quasars may provide a test for the model.

  2. AEGIS: DEMOGRAPHICS OF X-RAY AND OPTICALLY SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    We develop a new diagnostic method to classify galaxies into active galactic nucleus (AGN) hosts, star-forming galaxies, and absorption-dominated galaxies by combining the [O III]/Hβ ratio with rest-frame U - B color. This can be used to robustly select AGNs in galaxy samples at intermediate redshifts (z AB bol > 1044 erg s-1 in our sample are not detected in our 200 ks Chandra images, most likely due to moderate or heavy absorption by gas near the AGN. The 2-7 keV detection rate of Seyfert 2s at z ∼ 0.6 suggests that their column density distribution and Compton-thick fraction are similar to that of local Seyferts. Multiple sample selection techniques are needed to obtain as complete a sample as possible.

  3. A new approach to the variability characterization of active galactic nuclei

    Middei, Riccardo; Antonucci, Marco; Serafinelli, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The normalized excess variance is a popular method used by many authors to estimate the variability of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), especially in the X-ray band. We show that this estimator is affected by the cosmological time dilation, so that it should be appropriately corrected when applied to AGN samples distributed in wide redshift intervals. We propose a formula to modify this estimator, based on the use of the structure function. To verify the presence of the cosmological effect and the reliability of the proposed correction, we use data extracted from the XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalogue, data release 5 (XMMSSC-DR5), and cross-matched with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalogue, of data release 7 and 12.

  4. Search for Correlations between HiRes Stereo Events and Active Galactic Nuclei

    Abbasi, R U; Allen, M; Amman, J F; Archbold, G; Belov, K; Belz, J W; BenZvi, S Y; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Boyer, J H; Brusova, O A; Burt, G W; Cannon, C; Cao, Z; Deng, W; Fedorova, Y; Findlay, J; Finley, C B; Gray, R C; Hanlon, W F; Hoffman, C M; Holzscheiter, M H; Hughes, G; Hüntemeyer, P; Ivanov, D; Jones, B F; Jui, C C H; Kim, K; Kirn, M A; Knapp, B C; Loh, E C; Maestas, M M; Manago, N; Mannel, E J; Marek, L J; Martens, K; Matthews, J N; Moore, S A; O'Neill, A; Painter, C A; Perera, L; Reil, K; Riehle, R; Roberts, M D; Sasaki, D Rodriguez N; Schnetzer, S R; Scott, L M; Seman, M; Sinnis, G; Smith, J D; Snow, R; Sokolsky, P; Song, C; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Thomas, J R; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tupa, D; Wiencke, L R; Zech, A; Zhang, X

    2008-01-01

    We have searched for correlations between the pointing directions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays observed by the High Resolution Fly's Eye experiment and Active Galactic Nuclei visible from its northern hemisphere location. No correlations, other than random correlations, have been found. We report our results using search parameters prescribed by the Pierre Auger collaboration. Using these parameters, the Auger collaboration concludes that a positive correlation exists for sources visible to their southern hemisphere location. We also describe results using two methods for determining the chance probability of correlations: one in which a hypothesis is formed from scanning one half of the data and tested on the second half, and another which involves a scan over the entire data set. The most significant correlation found occurred with a chance probability of 24%.

  5. MOJAVE: MONITORING OF JETS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI WITH VLBA EXPERIMENTS. VII. BLAZAR JET ACCELERATION

    We discuss acceleration measurements for a large sample of extragalactic radio jets from the Monitoring Of Jets in Active Galactic Nuclei with VLBA Experiments (MOJAVE) program, which studies the parsec-scale jet structure and kinematics of a complete, flux-density-limited sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Accelerations are measured from the apparent motion of individual jet features or 'components' which may represent patterns in the jet flow. We find that significant accelerations are common both parallel and perpendicular to the observed component velocities. Parallel accelerations, representing changes in apparent speed, are generally larger than perpendicular acceleration that represent changes in apparent direction. The trend for larger parallel accelerations indicates that a significant fraction of these changes in apparent speed are due to changes in intrinsic speed of the component rather than changes in direction to the line of sight. We find an overall tendency for components with increasing apparent speed to be closer to the base of their jets than components with decreasing apparent speed. This suggests a link between the observed pattern motions and the underlying flow which, in some cases, may increase in speed close to the base and decrease in speed further out; however, common hydrodynamical processes for propagating shocks may also play a role. About half of the components show 'non-radial' motion, or a misalignment between the component's structural position angle and its velocity direction, and these misalignments generally better align the component motion with the downstream emission. Perpendicular accelerations are closely linked with non-radial motion. When observed together, perpendicular accelerations are usually in the correct direction to have caused the observed misalignment.

  6. A deep Chandra observation of the active galactic nucleus outburst and merger in Hickson compact group 62

    D.A. Rafferty; L. Bîrzan; P.E.J. Nulsen; B.R. McNamara; W.N. Brandt; M.W. Wise; H.J.A. Röttgering

    2013-01-01

    We report on an analysis of new Chandra data of the galaxy group HCG 62, well known for possessing cavities in its intragroup medium (IGM) that were inflated by the radio lobes of its central active galactic nucleus (AGN). With the new data, a factor of 3 deeper than previous Chandra data, we re-exa

  7. IAEA activities on nuclear fuel cycle 1997

    The presentation discussing the IAEA activities on nuclear fuel cycle reviews the following issues: organizational charts of IAEA, division of nuclear power and the fuel cycle, nuclear fuel cycle and materials section; 1997 budget estimates; budget trends; the nuclear fuel cycle programme

  8. Grain physics and infrared dust emission in active galactic nucleus environments

    We study the effects of a detailed dust treatment on the properties and evolution of early-type galaxies containing central black holes, as determined by active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback. We find that during cooling flow episodes, radiation pressure on the dust in and interior to infalling shells of cold gas can greatly impact the amount of gas able to be accreted and therefore the frequency of AGN bursts. However, the overall hydrodynamic evolution of all models, including mass budget, is relatively robust to the assumptions on dust. We find that IR re-emission from hot dust can dominate the bolometric luminosity of the galaxy during the early stages of an AGN burst, reaching values in excess of 1046 erg s–1. The AGN-emitted UV is largely absorbed, but the optical depth in the IR does not exceed unity, so the radiation momentum input never exceeds L BH/c. We constrain the viability of our models by comparing the AGN duty cycle, broadband luminosities, dust mass, black hole mass, and other model predictions to current observations. These constraints force us towards models wherein the dust to metals ratios are ≅ 1% of the Galactic value, and only models with a dynamic dust to gas ratio are able to produce both quiescent galaxies consistent with observations and high obscured fractions during AGN 'on' phases. During AGN outbursts, we predict that a large fraction of the FIR luminosity can be attributed to warm dust emission (≅ 100 K) from dense dusty gas within ≤1 kpc reradiating the AGN UV emission.

  9. Optical Counterparts of Undetermined Type -Ray Active Galactic Nuclei with Blazar-Like Spectral Energy Distributions

    Giovanni La Mura; Graziano Chiaro; Stefano Ciroi; Piero Rafanelli; David Salvetti; Marco Berton; Valentina Cracco; Fermi-LAT collaboration

    2015-12-01

    During its first four years of scientific observations, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) detected 3033 -ray sources above a 4 significance level. Although most of the extra-galactic sources are active galactic nuclei (AGN) of the blazar class, other families of AGNs are observed too, while a still high fraction of detections (∼30%) remains with uncertain association or classification. According to the currently accepted interpretation, the AGN -ray emission arises from inverse Compton (IC) scattering of low energy photons by relativistic particles confined in a jet, which, in the case of blazars, is oriented very close to our line-of-sight. Taking advantage of data from radio and X-ray wavelengths, which we expect to be produced together with -rays, providing a much better source localization potential, we focused our attention on a sample of -ray Blazar Candidates of Undetermined type (BCUs), starting a campaign of optical spectroscopic observations. The main aims of our investigation include a census of the AGN families that contribute to -ray emission and a study of their redshift distribution, with the subsequent implications on the intrinsic source power. We furthermore analyze which -ray properties can better constrain the nature of the source, thus helping in the study of objects not yet associated with a reliable low frequency counterpart. Here we report on the instruments and techniques used to identify the optical counterparts of -ray sources, we give an overview on the status of our work, and we discuss the implications of a large scale study of -ray emitting AGNs.

  10. Ionized Absorbers in Active Galactic Nuclei and Very Steap Soft X-Ray Quasars

    Fiore, Fabrizio; White, Nicholas (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Steep soft X-ray (0.1-2 keV) quasars share several unusual properties: narrow Balmer lines, strong Fe II emission, large and fast X-ray variability, and a rather steep 2-10 keV spectrum. These intriguing objects have been suggested to be the analogues of Galactic black hole candidates in the high, soft state. We present here results from ASCA observations for two of these quasars: NAB 0205 + 024 and PG 1244 + 026. Both objects show similar variations (factor of approximately 2 in 10 ks), despite a factor of approximately 10 difference in the 0.5-10 keV luminosity (7.3 x 10(exp 43) erg/s for PG 1244 + 026 and 6.4 x 10(exp 44) erg/s for NAB 0205 + 024, assuming isotropic emission, H(sub 0) = 50.0 and q(sub 0) = 0.0). The X-ray continuum of the two quasars flattens by 0.5-1 going from the 0.1-2 keV band towards higher energies, strengthening recent results on another half-dozen steep soft X-ray active galactic nuclei. PG 1244 + 026 shows a significant feature in the '1-keV' region, which can be described either as a broad emission line centered at 0.95 keV (quasar frame) or as edge or line absorption at 1.17 (1.22) keV. The line emission could be a result of reflection from a highly ionized accretion disc, in line with the view that steep soft X-ray quasars are emitting close to the Eddington luminosity. Photoelectric edge absorption or resonant line absorption could be produced by gas outflowing at a large velocity (0.3-0.6 c).