WorldWideScience

Sample records for active biogas process

  1. Biogas processing

    Kudláč, Adam

    2010-01-01

    The diploma thesis includes proposals suitable for usage of the technologies for clearing the biogas into a quality of substitute natural gas (SNG). The most suitable technology is chosen for the clearing the biogas out of the septic tanks of the laboratory for biologically decomposable waste treatment at Institute of process and environmental engineering. There is a calculation , a proposal and a realisation of the experimental unit for clearing the biogas performed.

  2. Effect of temperature and active biogas process on passive separation of digested manure

    Kaparaju, Prasad Laxmi-Narasimha; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    outside mechanical or chemical action was used, within the reactor was studied in three vertical settling columns (100 cm deep). Variations in solids and microbial distribution at top, middle and bottom layers of column were assessed over a 15 day settling period. Results showed that best solids...... solids separation was noticed 24 h after settling in column incubated at 55 degrees C, with active biogas process. Microbiological analyses revealed that proportion of Archaea and Bacteria, absent in the autoclaved material, varied with incubation temperature, time and sampling depth. Short rod shaped...... reactor can be used effectively as an operating strategy to optimize biogas production by increasing the solids and biomass retention times. A minimum of 1-2 h "non-stirring" period appears to be optimal time before effluent removal in plants where extraction is batch-wise 2-4 times a day....

  3. Process control in biogas plants

    Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo; Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Efficient monitoring and control of anaerobic digestion (AD) processes are necessary in order to enhance biogas plant performance. The aim of monitoring and controlling the biological processes is to stabilise and optimise the production of biogas. The principles of process analytical technology...

  4. Monitoring and controlling the biogas process

    Ahring, B.K.; Angelidaki, I. [The Technical Univ. of Denmark, Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1997-08-01

    Many modern large-scale biogas plants have been constructed recently, increasing the demand for proper monitoring and control of these large reactor systems. For monitoring the biogas process, an easy to measure and reliable indicator is required, which reflects the metabolic state and the activity of the bacterial populations in the reactor. In this paper, we discuss existing indicators as well as indicators under development which can potentially be used to monitor the state of the biogas process in a reactor. Furthermore, data are presented from two large scale thermophilic biogas plants, subjected to temperature changes and where the concentration of volatile fatty acids was monitored. The results clearly demonstrated that significant changes in the concentration of the individual VFA occurred although the biogas production was not significantly changed. Especially the concentrations of butyrate, isobutyrate and isovalerate showed significant changes. Future improvements of process control could therefore be based on monitoring of the concentration of specific VFA`s together with information about the bacterial populations in the reactor. The last information could be supplied by the use of modern molecular techniques. (au) 51 refs.

  5. A new combined process for biological desulphurisation of biogas; Neue Verfahrenskombination zur biologischen Entschwefelung von Biogas

    Sayder, Bettina; Strauch, Sabine; Krassowski, Joachim; Kabasci, Stephan; Genzowsky, Kristoffer [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Umwelt-, Sicherheits- und Energietechnik UMSICHT, Oberhausen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    A new process developed by Fraunhofer UMSICHT is presented. The process comprises a gas purification stage in which the fermentation residue of the biogas plant is utilized. The fermentation residue is then regenerated in a downstream activation pond.

  6. Processing biogas; Biogas-Aufbereitung. Methanverlust von 1%: technisch moeglich

    Judex, J.

    2009-07-01

    This article takes a look at the results of a study made at the Institute of Bio-technology at the Zurich University of Applied Sciences and the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI. The study was made at the wastewater treatment plant in Emmen, Switzerland, on methane losses in the processing of biogas to give it natural gas quality. The avoidance of methane losses - methane is a greenhouse gas - is discussed and various technologies used in the processing of biogas generated from organic waste digestion are examined. The installations at the wastewater treatment plant in Emmen are commented on and the measurement concept and equipment used are described. The results and observations made are also presented in graphical form.

  7. Influence of temperature and pH value on enzyme activity in the biogas process; Einfluss der Temperatur und des pH-Wertes auf die Aktivitaet von Enzymen im Biogasprozess

    Vintiloiu, Anca; Brule, Mathieu; Lemmer, Andreas; Oechsner, Hans [Hohenheim Univ. (Germany). Landesanstalt fuer Landwirtschaftliches Maschinen- und Bauwesen; Jungbluth, Thomas [Hohenheim Univ. (Germany). Fachgebiet Verfahrenstechnik der Tierhaltungssysteme; Jurcoane, Stefana [Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Microbial Biotechnological Centers; Israel-Roming, Florentina [Center of Research for Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Bucharest (Romania)

    2009-07-01

    Enzyme supplementation is often used in agricultural biogas plants to accelerate degradation of crop fibre (e.g. cellulose and hemi-cellulose) and thus increase biogas yield. However, the efficacy of such enzyme supplementation has been insufficiently tested under laboratory conditions. In order to systematically investigate factors influencing enzyme activity, enzymatic hydrolysis experiments were conducted on maize straw at the University of Hohenheim to test the efficacy of commercial enzyme supplementation under controlled conditions outwith the biogas production process. (orig.)

  8. Biogas desulfurization using autotrophic denitrification process.

    Bayrakdar, Alper; Tilahun, Ebrahim; Calli, Baris

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of an autotrophic denitrification process for desulfurization of biogas produced from a chicken manure digester. A laboratory scale upflow fixed bed reactor (UFBR) was operated for 105 days and fed with sodium sulfide or H2S scrubbed from the biogas and nitrate as electron donor and acceptor, respectively. The S/N ratio (2.5 mol/mol) of the feed solution was kept constant throughout the study. When the UFBR was fed with sodium sulfide solution with an influent pH of 7.7, about 95 % sulfide and 90 % nitrate removal efficiencies were achieved. However, the inlet of the UFBR was clogged several times due to the accumulation of biologically produced elemental sulfur particles and the clogging resulted in operational problems. When the UFBR was fed with the H2S absorbed from the biogas and operated with an influent pH of 8-9, around 98 % sulfide and 97 % nitrate removal efficiencies were obtained. In this way, above 95 % of the H2S in the biogas was removed as elemental sulfur and the reactor effluent was reused as scrubbing liquid without any clogging problem. PMID:26428238

  9. Conversion of Agricultural Wastes to Biogas using as Inoculum Cattle Manure and Activated Sludge

    Simina Neo; Teodor Vintilă; Marian Bura

    2012-01-01

    Agricultural wastes represent a large unexploited energy potential that could be converted into biogas by anaerobic digestion. In the present study there has been analysed the way in which agricultural wastes are converted into biogas by using as inoculum cattle manure as compared with activated sludge. To carry out this experiment on small scale there have been designed 5 batch bottles. For the batch process all substrate was put into the bottles at start. The biogas process was initiated af...

  10. Improvement of the Biogas Production Process : Explorative project (EP1)

    Karlsson, Anna; Björn, Annika; Sepehr, Shakeri Yekta; Svensson, Bo

    2014-01-01

    There are several ways to improve biogas production in anaerobic digestion processes and a number of strategies may be chosen. Increased organic loading in existing plants will in most cases demand the introduction of new substrate types. However, to substantially increase the Swedish biogas production new, large-scale biogas plants digesting new substrate types need to be established. Better utilization of existing digester volumes can be linked to:  Increase of organic loading rates and/or ...

  11. Biogas reforming process investigation for SOFC application

    Highlights: • Mathematical model of fuel processor and experimental validation was made. • Simulations made to find syngas composition varying fuel processor operating conditions. • Experimental tests were carried out on SOFC mono-cell to obtain polarization curves. • The best conditions for SOFC/fuel processor integrated systems were defined. - Abstract: In recent years, research efforts on fuel cells have been addressed on the development of multifuel reformers with particular emphasis toward the potential use of non-traditional fuels. Among these, biogas is considered very promising to be used as syngas source for fuel cell system applications. The interest on this hydrogen source is focused mainly to supply high temperature fuel cells (HTFC). This paper reports a wide experimental research investigation on SOFC device supplied by syngas produced with different biogas reforming processes (steam reforming, autothermal reforming and partial oxidation). Thermodynamic simulations have been performed to determine the reformed gas composition varying process, reaction temperature and steam to carbon – oxygen to carbon ratios. Syngas mixtures obtained were experimentally tested in order to evaluate the performance of a SOFC mono-cell. Furthermore, an analysis of the combination: fuel processor with a SOFC stack has been determined in order to assess the total energy efficiency

  12. biogas

    2015-01-01

    Functions for working with biogas data. Both low- and high-level functions are included for carrying out common tasks for analysis of biogas and related data. Molar mass and calculated oxygen demand (COD') can be determined from a chemical formula. Measured gas volume can be corrected for water...... vapor and to (possibly user-defined) standard temperature and pressure. Gas composition, cumulative production, or other variables can be interpolated to a specified time. Cumulative biogas and methane production (and rates) can be calculated using volumetric, manometric, or gravimetric methods for any...... be summarized in several different ways (e.g., omitting normalization) using the same function. Lastly, biogas and methane production can be predicted from substrate composition and additional, optional data....

  13. Analysis of problems with dry fermentation process for biogas production

    Pilát, Peter; Patsch, Marek; Jandačka, Jozef

    2012-04-01

    The technology of dry anaerobic fermentation is still meeting with some scepticism, and therefore in most biogas plants are used wet fermentation technology. Fermentation process would be not complete without an optimal controlled condition: dry matter content, density, pH, and in particular the reaction temperature. If is distrust of dry fermentation eligible it was on the workplace of the Department of Power Engineering at University of Zilina built an experimental small-scale biogas station that allows analysis of optimal parameters of the dry anaerobic fermentation, in particular, however, affect the reaction temperature on yield and quality of biogas.

  14. Analysis of problems with dry fermentation process for biogas production

    Jandačka Jozef; Patsch Marek; Pilát Peter

    2012-01-01

    The technology of dry anaerobic fermentation is still meeting with some scepticism, and therefore in most biogas plants are used wet fermentation technology. Fermentation process would be not complete without an optimal controlled condition: dry matter content, density, pH, and in particular the reaction temperature. If is distrust of dry fermentation eligible it was on the workplace of the Department of Power Engineering at University of Zilina built an experimental small-scale biogas statio...

  15. Conversion of Agricultural Wastes to Biogas using as Inoculum Cattle Manure and Activated Sludge

    Simina Neo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural wastes represent a large unexploited energy potential that could be converted into biogas by anaerobic digestion. In the present study there has been analysed the way in which agricultural wastes are converted into biogas by using as inoculum cattle manure as compared with activated sludge. To carry out this experiment on small scale there have been designed 5 batch bottles. For the batch process all substrate was put into the bottles at start. The biogas process was initiated after closing the bottles, and the biogas was collected during the process until the biogas production ended. During the 33 days of experiment the batch bottles were held at constant temperature (370C in a water bath. The biomass used in the experiment was wheat straw and corn stalks. Before being used in the experiment the biomass was milled using a kitchen mixer. After that the biomass was subjected to a combination of thermal and chemical pretreatments. The volume of biogas produces was measured every seven days during the experiment period. The biogas production measurements were done by using a BlueSens measuring equipment.

  16. Practical application of the microbial activity analysis on the monitoring of the process biological stability of biogas plants; Praktische Anwendung der mikrobiellen Aktivitaetsanalyse zur Ueberwachung der prozessbiologischen Stabilitaet von Biogasanlagen

    Neumann, Lukas; Tietjen, Carsten [MT-Energie GmbH, Zeven (Germany). Forschung und Entwicklung; Rilling, Norbert [MT-Energie GmbH und Co. KG, Rockstedt (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    As extension for the classical fluorescence microscopic analysis of the microbial population in a biogas fermenter the cell counts and frequency of the different methanogenic organisms was used to generate the plant specific stability indicator called MT-Factor. This factor describes the optimal composition of the microbial population for the current process conditions and could be used for the biological process consulting. A study of the MT-Energie laboratory showed that the combination of the microbial cell counts determination and the plant specific stability factor shifts during a process instability or failure of a biogas fermenter. This analysis of the methane-forming microorganisms as well as their cell count and importance for the entire anaerobic biology of the biogas plant can be used for clearly visualizing and tracking the vitality of the digestion process. The evaluation of the microbial activity of different liquid manure samples could show the influence of inhibitors like disinfectant or cleaning agents directly without time consuming cultivation tests. By determining the MT-Factor and analyzing the activity of the methane formers, an impending influence of inhibitors can be detected in liquid manure before the manure enters the digester. This way, a negative influence on the gas yield can be avoided. (orig.)

  17. Methane losses in biogas processing; Methanverluste bei der Biogasaufbereitung

    Baum, S.; Baier, U. [ZHAW, Zuercher Hochschule fuer Angewandte Wissenschaften, IBT Institut fuer Biotechnologie, Fachgruppe Umweltbiotechnologie, Waedenswil (Switzerland); Judex, J.; Biollaz, S.; Schneebeli, J. [PSI, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2008-11-15

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) by the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI and the Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Switzerland, presents the results of a study made on methane losses that occur during the processing of biogas to provide natural gas quality. Such losses are considered as possibly compromising the environmental advantages offered by the feeding-in of processed biogas into the national gas mains. This processing involves the removal of carbon dioxide from the biogas. The state-of-the-art in this area is discussed, relevant factors and analysis methods are looked at. An overview of methods used to prevent methane losses is presented. The results of investigations made at an installation in Lucerne, Switzerland, are presented and discussed.

  18. Analysis of different substrates for processing into biogas

    B. Mursec

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main target is to produce as much biogas as possible with highest possible biomethane content from crops representing the principal fuel for driving the gas motors and electric generators and, consequently, production of electricity.Design/methodology/approach: The biogas production was measured by a mini digester according to the German standard DIN 38414, Part 8. It was effected in the mesophilic temperature range. The biogas production from six different energy crops and pig slurry was measured in the laboratory of the Faculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences. In six trial fields the monocultures such as maize, sorghum, amaranth, sunflower, Jerusalem artichoke and sugar beet were grown.Findings: The highest biomethane production was achieved with the sunflower substrate (283 Nl/kgVS, followed by the sorghum substrate (188 Nl/kgVS and maize (187 Nl/kgVS. The amaranth substrate produced 225 Nl/kgVS and the Jerusalem artichoke 115 Nl/kgVS. The least amount of biomethane was produced from the sugar beet (95 Nl/kgVS.Research limitations/implications: The basic structure of the laboratory device is welded from stainless steel (inox and is limited by the following dimensions: 2500 mm length, 1000 mm height and 350 mm width. The device consists of twelve units of fermentors ensuring four tests simultaneously with three replications and assuring high accuracy of results.Practical implications: The test fermentors serve to test the biogas production from different energy crops and other materials of organic origin. The results reached serve to plan the electricity production in the biogas production plant.Originality/value: The mini digesters simulated in laboratory the actual state from the biogas production plant. Anaerobic fermentation was introduced and the biogas to be processed into electricity was produced.

  19. Dynamic biogas upgrading based on the Sabatier process

    Jurgensen, Lars; Ehimen, Ehiazesebhor Augustine; Born, Jens;

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of substitute natural gas (SNG) generation using biogas from anaerobic digestion and hydrogen from renewable energy systems. Using thermodynamic equilibrium analysis, kinetic reactor modeling and transient simulation, an integrated approach for the...... operation of a biogas-based Sabatier process was put forward, which was then verified using a lab scale heterogenous methanation reactor. The process simulation using a kinetic reactor model demonstrated the feasibility of the production of SNG at gas grid standards using a single reactor setup. The Wobbe...

  20. Online monitoring and control of the biogas process

    Boe, K.

    2006-07-01

    The demand for online monitoring and control of biogas process is increasing, since better monitoring and control system can improve process stability and enhance process performance for better economy of the biogas plants. A number of parameters in both the liquid and the gas phase have been suggested as process indicators. These include gas production, pH, alkalinity, volatile fatty acids (VFA) and hydrogen. Of these, VFA is the most widely recognised as a direct, relevant measure of stability. The individual, rather than collective VFA concentrations are recognised as providing significantly more information for diagnosis. However, classic on-line measurement is based on filtration, which suffers from fouling, especially in particulate or slurry wastes. In this project, a new online VFA monitoring system has been developed using gas-phase VFA extraction to avoid sample filtration. The liquid sample is pumped into a sampling chamber, acidified, added with salt and heated to extract VFA into the gas phase before analysis by GC-FID. This allows easy application to manure. Sample and analysis time of the system varies from 25-40 min. depending on the washing duration. The sampling frequency is fast enough for the dynamic of a manure digester, which is in the range of several hours. This system has been validated over more than 6 months and had shown good agreement with offline VFA measurement. Response from this sensor was compared with other process parameters such as biogas production, pH and dissolved hydrogen during overload situations in a laboratory-scale digester, to investigate the suitability of each measure as a process indicator. VFA was most reliable for indicating process imbalance, and propionate was most persistent. However, when coupling the online VFA monitoring with a simple control for automatic controlling propionate level in a digester, it was found that propionate decreased so slow that the biogas production fluctuated. Therefore, it is more

  1. Comparative study of stability and half-life of enzymes and enzyme aggregates implemented in anaerobic biogas processes

    Binner, Roman; Schmack, Doris; Reuter, Monika [Research and Development Department, Schmack Biogas GmbH, Schwandorf (Germany); Menath, Veronika; Huber, Harald; Thomm, Michael [University of Regensburg, Department of Microbiology, Regensburg (Germany); Bischof, Franz [University of Applied Sciences Amberg-Weiden, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering/Environmental Engineering, Amberg (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Anaerobic digestion of mainly energy crops gains more and more importance in developing a sustainable energy supply. Therefore, the optimization of gas yield plays a major role in specific research attempts and economical considerations. One possibility to increase natural polymer degradation and concomitantly energy efficiency is the addition of exoenzymes to biogas facilities to enforce the primary degradation steps for biogas production. Therefore, in the present study, the stability and activity of five externally added enzyme mixtures to anaerobic biogas processes were investigated. Protein assays using soluble fractions of different biogas plants incubated together with the enzyme mixtures revealed that, within about 10 min, the externally added enzymes were mostly degraded. This very low stability in biogas reactors makes it unlikely that the addition of enzymes contributes significantly to degradation of macromolecules in the biogas process. Even the addition of protease inhibitors did not protect the added enzyme mixtures from degradation in most experiments. Furthermore, the influence of added enzymes on the viscosity of the biomass was tested. Only a marginal effect was obtained, when applying a tenfold higher concentration of added enzymes as proposed for practical use. The same result was achieved when commercially available enzymes were added to technical-scale fermentations using corn silage as monosubstrate. Therefore, these studies did not provide evidence that the addition of external enzymes into anaerobic degradation systems increases the methane yield in biogas facilities. (orig.)

  2. Energy from whey - comparison of the biogas and bioethanol processes

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a project which investigated how energy could be generated from the whey produced in the cheese-making process. The first part of the project aimed to validate a concept for on-site production and use of biogas at a medium-sized cheese factory. The results of the first step, an experimental study carried out using a down-flow fixed-film bio-reactor, are discussed. This allowed the determination of the optimal working parameters as well as providing an estimate of the performance of the process. The second part of the project aimed to compare the bio-ethanol and biogas production processes. It was carried out in collaboration with AlcoSuisse and the Energy Systems Laboratory at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Lausanne. The results of a life-cycle assessment (LCA) are discussed, which compared the two processes from an environmental point of view. Here, two impacts were considered: fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse effect. The replacement of fuel-oil with biogas for heat production and the replacement of conventional petrol with mixture including 5% bio-ethanol were examined. The results are presented that show that there was no significant difference between the two processes. According to the authors, the treatment of one cubic meter of cheese-whey allows savings of more than 20 litres of oil equivalent and 60 kg of CO2 emissions

  3. Biogas desulfurization with doped activated carbon; Feinentschwefelung von Biogas mit dotierter Aktivkohle

    Rossow, Silvana; Goetze, Toralf [AdFiS systems GmbH, Teterow (Germany); Deerberg, Goerge [Fraunhofer Inst. fuer Umwelt-, Sicherheits- und Energietechnik UMSICHT, Oberhausen (Germany); Kanswohl, Norbert [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Abfall- und Stoffstromwirtschaft; Nelles, Michael [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Technologie und Verfahrenstechniken der umweltgerechten Landbewirtschaftung

    2009-07-01

    Doped activated carbon is a special developed activated carbon for the desulfurization of biogas. Because of its special properties it is able to bond a big amount of hydrogen sulfide. After many laboratory tests it was possible to demonstrate the performance of doped activated carbon for desulfurization in practical use The advantages and the specific functioning of doped activated carbon for desulfurization were here exactly as in previous laboratory studies. Despite fluctuating boundary conditions a continuous complete desulfurization was possible. By using the desulfurization system the concentration of hydrogen sulfide is lowered to less than 1 ppm. The damages or interferences that are often caused by hydrogen sulfide could not be identified. A directly visible positive impact of the full desulfurization is the doubling of oil using time. (orig.)

  4. Gas Permeation Processes in Biogas Upgrading: A Short Review

    Kárászová, M. (Magda); Sedláková, Z.; Izák, P. (Pavel)

    2015-01-01

    Biogas upgrading is a widely studied and discussed topic. Many different technologies have been employed to obtain biomethane from biogas. Methods like water scrubbing or pressure swing adsorption are commonly used and can be declared as well established. Membrane gas permeation found its place among the biogas upgrading methods some years ago. Here, we try to summarize the progress in the implementation of gas permeation in biogas upgrading. Gas permeation has been already accepted as a comm...

  5. Effect of ferrous chloride on biogas production and enzymatic activities during anaerobic fermentation of cow dung and Phragmites straw.

    Zhang, Huayong; Tian, Yonglan; Wang, Lijun; Mi, Xueyue; Chai, Yang

    2016-06-01

    The effect of ferrous (added as FeCl2) on the anaerobic co-digestion of Phragmites straw and cow dung was studied by investigating the biogas properties, pH values, organic matter degradation (COD) and enzyme activities (cellulase, protease and dehydrogenase) at different stages of mesophilic fermentation. The results showed that Fe(2+) addition increased the cumulative biogas yields by 18.1 % by extending the peak period with high daily biogas yields. Meanwhile, the methane (CH4) contents in the Fe(2+) added groups were generally higher than the control group before the 15th day. The pH values were not significantly impacted by Fe(2+) concentrations during the fermentation process. The COD concentrations, cellulase, protease and dehydrogenase activities varied with the added Fe(2+) concentrations and the stages of the fermentation process. At the beginning stage of fermentation (4th day), Fe(2+) addition increased the biogas production by improving the cellulase and dehydrogenase activities which caused a decline in COD. At the peak stage of fermentation (8th day), Fe(2+) addition enhanced the cellulase and protease activities, and resulted in lower COD contents than the control group. When the biogas yields decreased again (13th day), the COD contents varied similar with the protease and dehydrogenase activities, whilst cellulase activities were not sensitive to Fe(2+) concentrations. At the end of fermentation (26th day), Fe(2+) addition decreased the cellulase activities, led to lower COD contents and finally resulted the lower biogas yields than the control group. Taking the whole fermentation process into account, the promoting effect of Fe(2+) addition on biogas yields was mainly attributed to the extension of the gas production peak stage and the improvement of cellulase activities. PMID:26862032

  6. BIOGAS UPGRADING PROCESSES FOR THE PRODUCTION OF NATURAL GAS SUBSTITUTE

    Čekanova, Patricia; Jasminska, Natalia; Brestovič, Tomaš; Schvarzbacherova, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Biogas from anaerobic digestion of biological wastes is a renewable energy resource. It has been used to provide heat, shaft power and electricity. Typical biogas contains 50-65% methane (CH4), 30-45% carbon dioxide (CO2), moisture and traces of hydrogen sulphide (H2S). Presence of CO2 and H2S in biogas affects engine performance adversely. Reducing CO2 and H2S content will significantly improve quality of biogas. In this work, a method for biogas scrubbing and CH4 enrichment is presented. Ch...

  7. EU Agro Biogas Project

    Amon, T.; Mayr, H.; Eder, M.; Hobbs, P.; Rao Ravella, S.; Roth, U.; Niebaum, A.; Doehler, H.; Weiland, P.; Abdoun, E.; Moser, A.; Lyson, M.; Heiermann, M.; Plöchl, M.; Budde, J.; Schattauer, A.; Suarez, T.; Möller, H.; Ward, A.; Hillen, F.; Sulima, P.; Oniszk-Polplawska, A.; Krampe, P.; Pastorek, Z.; Kara, J.; Mazancova, J.; Dooren, van H.J.C.; Wim, C.; Gioelli, F.; Balsari, P.

    2009-01-01

    EU-AGRO-BIOGAS is a European Biogas initiative to improve the yield of agricultural biogas plants in Europe, to optimise biogas technology and processes and to improve the efficiency in all parts of the production chain from feedstock to biogas utilisation. Leading European research institutions and

  8. Mechanism of zeolite activity in biogas co-digestion

    Hansson, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Biogas is a source of renewable energy and is produced at anaerobic conditions. The gas consists mainly of methane (55-70 %) and carbon dioxide (30-45 %). Biogas can be used as vehicle fuel after the gas has been upgraded to a methane content of approximately 97 %. There are several companies in Sweden producing biogas. Svensk biogas AB in Linköping is one of the largest. The company has two biogas production plants; one in Linköping and one in Norrköping. To meet the surge demand for biogas ...

  9. Life cycle assessment of coupling household biogas production to agricultural industry: A case study of biogas-linked persimmon cultivation and processing system

    Biogas plant construction has been boosted in rural China not only due to the immediate merit from biogas production but also the succeeding benefit from by-product utilization in agro-industry, both of which are significant strategies to address energy shortage and global warming issues. However, little work has been done to evaluate the coupling of biogas projects to traditional agrosystems from a life-cycle perspective, which is most important in process and system optimization in different senses. By taking persimmon cultivation and processing with supports from a household biogas plant as a case study, this study conducts a life cycle assessment of coupling biogas production to agro-industry in terms of energy, environmental and economic performance. The results suggest that each production stage following the biogas/digestate utilization chain (biogas operation-persimmon cultivation-product processing) is beneficial across all three aspects. However, a tradeoff only exists in utilizing digestate as top-dressing and employing biogas utilization as engine fuel, while biogas application in fresh-keeping and digestate reuse as base fertilizer fails to increase either energy production or greenhouse gas mitigation. The coupled system can be hopefully optimized through increasing fermentation efficiency and joint operation of biogas digesters. -- Highlights: •Biogas/digestate utilization is overall beneficial in all production stages. •Each bioresource application may not be profitable in all respects. •Tradeoffs in using biogas and digestate vary among different utilization ways. •Multi-user operation and fermentation efficiency elevation optimize system

  10. Analysis of different substrates for processing into biogas

    B. Mursec; P. Vindis; M. Janzekovic; M. Brus; F. Cus

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The main target is to produce as much biogas as possible with highest possible biomethane content from crops representing the principal fuel for driving the gas motors and electric generators and, consequently, production of electricity.Design/methodology/approach: The biogas production was measured by a mini digester according to the German standard DIN 38414, Part 8. It was effected in the mesophilic temperature range. The biogas production from six different energy crops and pig s...

  11. Process optimization of biogas production at Nemščak biogas plant by pre-treatment of the substrate and combining with waste sludge

    Žitek, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to increase the amount of biogas produced by pre-treatment of the substrate and combining with waste sludge. For anaerobic digestion of different substrates, we used a pilot reactor to determine the biogas potential at Nemščak biogas plant. The pilot reactor was built in 2009 for the purpose of testing new substrates in the process of biogas production. The pilot reactor has a working volume of 2000 litres; there is a gas tank above it with the volume of 500 litr...

  12. Life cycle assessment of flexibly fed biogas processes for an improved demand-oriented biogas supply.

    Ertem, Funda Cansu; Martínez-Blanco, Julia; Finkbeiner, Matthias; Neubauer, Peter; Junne, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    This paper analyses concepts to facilitate a demand oriented biogas supply at an agricultural biogas plant of a capacity of 500kWhel, operated with the co-digestion of maize, grass, rye silage and chicken manure. In contrast to previous studies, environmental impacts of flexible and the traditional baseload operation are compared. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) was performed to detect the environmental impacts of: (i) variety of feedstock co-digestion scenarios by substitution of maize and (ii) loading rate scenarios with a focus on flexible feedstock utilization. Demand-driven biogas production is critical for an overall balanced power supply to the electrical grid. It results in lower amounts of emissions; feedstock loading rate scenarios resulted in 48%, 20%, 11% lower global warming (GWP), acidification (AP) and eutrophication potentials, and a 16% higher cumulative energy demand. Substitution of maize with biogenic-waste regarding to feedstock substitution scenarios could create 10% lower GWP and AP. PMID:27522120

  13. EU Agro Biogas Project

    Amon, T.; Mayr, H.; M. Eder; Hobbs, P.; Rao Ravella, S.; Roth, U.; Niebaum, A.; Doehler, H.; Weiland, P.; Abdoun, E.; A. Moser; Lyson, M.; Heiermann, M.; Plöchl, M.; Budde, J.

    2009-01-01

    EU-AGRO-BIOGAS is a European Biogas initiative to improve the yield of agricultural biogas plants in Europe, to optimise biogas technology and processes and to improve the efficiency in all parts of the production chain from feedstock to biogas utilisation. Leading European research institutions and universities are cooperating with key industry partners in order to work towards sustainable biogas production in Europe. Fourteen partners from eight European countries are involved in the EU-AGR...

  14. Biogas utilization

    Moser, M.A. [Resource Conservation Management, Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Options for successfully using biogas depend on project scale. Almost all biogas from anaerobic digesters must first go through a gas handling system that pressurizes, meters, and filters the biogas. Additional treatment, including hydrogen sulfide-mercaptan scrubbing, gas drying, and carbon dioxide removal may be necessary for specialized uses, but these are complex and expensive processes. Thus, they can be justified only for large-scale projects that require high-quality biogas. Small-scale projects (less than 65 cfm) generally use biogas (as produced) as a boiler fuel or for fueling internal combustion engine-generators to produce electricity. If engines or boilers are selected properly, there should be no need to remove hydrogen sulfide. Small-scale combustion turbines, steam turbines, and fuel cells are not used because of their technical complexity and high capital cost. Biogas cleanup to pipeline or transportation fuel specifications is very costly, and energy economics preclude this level of treatment.

  15. Near-infrared spectroscopy for process and substrate supervision of a full-scale biogas plant

    Jacobi, Hans Fabian

    2012-07-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the possible use of near-infrared spectroscopy in the supervision of the biogas production process or parts thereof. It was examined, whether the surveillance of (a) the process and (b) substrate was feasible. The following tasks were accomplished to this end: 1. Development, construction and assembly of suitable NIRS-metrology, development of proper control-software as well as of strategies for data acquisition and data handling, 2. calculation and validation of regression models on the basis of acquired spectra and reference data for (a) suitable parameters of the biogas process, (b) composition and biogas potential of the substrate, 3. calculation of continuous time series of all parameters in order to prove the possibility of continuous surveillance, 4. integrated processing of continuously calculated biogas potentials together with plant data for the prediction of the biogas production behavior of the biogas plant. A near-infrared spectrometer was installed and equipped with NIR-measuring heads of own design and construction on a full-scale agricultural biogas plant. For 500 days spectra were continuously logged at (a) a pipe flowed through by fermenter slurry and (b) the feeding station, where silage passed. Based on regularly withdrawn reference samples and the corresponding spectra regression models were calibrated for the several constituents. Continuously logged spectra were used to calculate time series with the aid of the regression models for each constituent. Models and time series were established for the following parameters: (a) process parameters: volatile fatty acids, acetic acid, propionic acid, dry matter, volatile solids; (b) substrate parameters: dry matter, volatile solids, crude fiber, crude fat, crude protein, nitrogen-free extracts, experimentally assessed biogas potential, theoretically assessed biogas potential. Despite the partially low quality of the models it was possible to follow the course of

  16. Causes for inhibitions of biogas process; Aarsager til haemning af biogasprocessen

    NONE

    2001-11-01

    It is the aim of the project to map reasons to inhibition of the biogas process. Inhibition of Danish common biogas plants in the last 5 years will be investigated in order to try to find the exact reason to the interruption of the process. Scientific literature will be investigated to describe the different reason for inhibition. The results of the project will be published in a report, an article and a popularized paper. (EHS)

  17. Processing biogas plant digestates into value-added products - BIOVIRTA

    Paavola, T. (MTT Agrifood Research Finland, Jokioinen (Finland)), e-mail: teija.paavola@mtt.fi; Torniainen, M. (Finnish Food Safety Authority, EVIRA, Helsinki (Finland)), e-mail: merja.torniainen@evira.fi; Kaparaju, P. (Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland)), e-mail: prasad.kaparaju@jyu.fi (and others)

    2011-11-15

    The objective of BIOVIRTA project is to develop technologies and practices with which digestates, originating from anaerobic digestion of different organic wastes and by-products can be refined to value-added and safe products for various end-uses. It is expected that the operational preconditions for biogas plants will be significantly enhanced when the end-products are proven safe and applicable. Selection of the raw materials for anaerobic co-digestion is the main operational strategy that could influence the nutrient content in the digestate. This has been clearly established in the laboratory and full-scale studies with various digestates originating from different raw materials. The nutrient content in the digestate also affects the opportunities to produce refined digestate products. In this project, the possibilities for several processing technologies, e.g. mechanical separation, stripping, and struvite production have been intensively evaluated for the production of different digestate products. Their mass balances have also been estimated. The feasibility for the use of the digestate products has been assessed based on their chemical and hygienic quality and for various end-uses, including as organic fertiliser and/or soil improver in crop production. The results of these field-experiments showed that the yield of barley fertilised with digestate products was comparable to inorganic fertilisers. (orig.)

  18. Catalytic Effect of Tungsten on Anaerobic Digestion Process for Biogas Production from Fruit and Vegetable Wastes

    Das A; Mondal.C

    2013-01-01

    In the recent years global energy crisis increased at a fast pace. Demand for the use of fossil fuels for cooking and other commercial activities increased along with the increasing population of India. Use of renewable sources of energy viz. biogas for cooking etc can somewhat be an alternative for the excessive demand of fossil fuels like LPG. In this study, the catalytic effect of tungsten for maximizing biogas have been presented. Essentially, anaerobic digesti...

  19. Biogas Production from Sugarcane Waste: Assessment on Kinetic Challenges for Process Designing

    Leandro Janke; Athaydes Leite; Marcell Nikolausz; Thomas Schmidt; Jan Liebetrau; Michael Nelles; Walter Stinner

    2015-01-01

    Biogas production from sugarcane waste has large potential for energy generation, however, to enable the optimization of the anaerobic digestion (AD) process each substrate characteristic should be carefully evaluated. In this study, the kinetic challenges for biogas production from different types of sugarcane waste were assessed. Samples of vinasse, filter cake, bagasse, and straw were analyzed in terms of total and volatile solids, chemical oxygen demand, macronutrients, trace elements, an...

  20. Killing of salmonella in the biogas process; Abtoetung von Salmonellen im Biogasprozess

    Froeschle, Bianca; Lebuhn, Michael

    2012-08-15

    Pathogenic Salmonella are used in ordinances as an indicator for assessing microbial reduction in biogas plants and for the epidemic-hygienic condition of digestate. This brochure presents results of a study that examined the hygienic effect of the biogas process on Salmonella. [German] Krankheitserregende Salmonellen werden in relevanten Rechtsverordnungen als Indikator zur Beurteilung der Keimreduzierung in Biogasanlagen und des seuchenhygienischen Zustands von Gaerresten herangezogen. Die vorliegende Broschuere stellt Ergebnisse einer Studie dar, die die hygienisierende Wirkung des Biogasprozesses auf Salmonellen untersuchte.

  1. The Optimum Mesophilic Temperature of Batch Process Biogas Production from Animal-based Wastes

    Osita Obineche Obiukwu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The optimum mesophilic temperature of biogas production from blends The optimum temperature of biogas production from blends of animal-based wastes was determined under controlled heat supply to the digester in a batch digestion process. Cow Dung (CD and Poultry Droppings (PD were blended in the ratio of CD: PD: 1:3. The digester was operated at average ambient temperature of 30°C as baseline. Biogas production from the waste blends was monitored under the temperatures of 32 to 45°C. Results obtained indicate maximum cumulative gas yield was observed at the temperature of 40°C. The 40°C temperature gave the highest biogas yield of 2685 mL followed by the 35°C temperature with the cumulative yield of 2535 mL. The ambient temperature of 30°C had the least cumulative biogas yield of 185 mL. These results indicate that increased and steady biogas production can be achieved under the optimum mesophilic temperature of 40°C when these animal-based wastes are digested in batch digestion process.

  2. Biogas production from UASB and polyurethane carrier reactors treating sisal processing wastewater

    Rubindamayugi, M.S.T.; Salakana, L.K.P. [Univ. of Dar es Salaam, Faculty of Science, Applied Microbiology Unit (Tanzania, United Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The fundamental benefits which makes anaerobic digestion technology (ADT) attractive to the poor developing include the low cost and energy production potential of the technology. In this study the potential of using UASB reactor and Polyurethane Carrier Reactor (PCR) as pollution control and energy recovery systems from sisal wastewater were investigated in lab-scale reactors. The PCR demonstrated the shortest startup period, whereas the UASB reactor showed the highest COD removal efficiency 79%, biogas production rate (4.5 l biogas/l/day) and process stability than the PCR under similar HRT of 15 hours and OLR of 8.2 g COD/l/day. Both reactor systems became overloaded at HRT of 6 hours and OLR of 15.7 g COD/l/day, biogas production ceased and reactors acidified to pH levels which are inhibiting to methanogenesis. Based on the combined results on reactor performances, the UASB reactor is recommended as the best reactor for high biogas production and treatment efficiency. It was estimated that a large-scale UASB reactor can be designed under the same loading conditions to produce 2.8 m{sup 3} biogas form 1 m{sup 3} of wastewater of 5.16 kg COD/m{sup 3}. Wastewater from one decortication shift can produce 9,446 m{sup 3} og biogas. The energy equivalent of such fuel energy is indicated. (au)

  3. Eliminating methanogenic activity in hydrogen reactor to improve biogas production in a two-stage anaerobic digestion process co-digesting municipal food waste and sewage sludge.

    Zhu, Heguang; Parker, Wayne; Conidi, Daniela; Basnar, Robert; Seto, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Laboratory scale two-stage anaerobic digestion process model was operated for 280 days to investigate the feasibility to produce both hydrogen and methane from a mixture feedstock (1:1 (v/v)) of municipal food waste and sewage sludge. The maximum hydrogen and methane yields obtained in the two stages were 0.93 and 9.5 mL/mL feedstock. To eliminate methanogenic activity and obtain substantial hydrogen production in the hydrogen reactor, both feedstock and mixed liquor required treatment. The heat treatment (100°C, 10 min) for feedstock and a periodical treatment (every 2-5 weeks, either heating, removal of biomass particles or flushing with air) for mixed liquor were effective in different extent. The methane production in the second stage was significantly improved by the hydrogen production in the first stage. The maximum methane production obtained in the period of high hydrogen production was more than 2-fold of that observed in the low hydrogen production period. PMID:21592783

  4. CONTROL PARAMETERS FOR UNDERSTANDING AND PREVENTING PROCESS IMBALANCES IN BIOGAS PLANTS. EMPHAS IS ON VFA DYNAMICS

    Bangsø Nielsen, Henrik

    control and understanding are necessary. The work of present study was directed towards this challenge. Initially, the response of the anaerobic digestion process to various types of process imbalances was investigated with special focus on volatile fatty acid dynamics (VFA), methane production and p...... indication of process imbalances in biogas plants. At Danish full-scale biogas plants the biogas production is normally the only continuously measured parameter. In order to examine the usability of propionate as control parameter a reactor experiment was constructed in which the reactor operation either was...... carried out on the basis of the methane production or on the basis of fluctuations in the concentration of propionate. The experiment confirmed that propionate is a useful parameter for (1) indication of process imbalances and (2) for regulation and optimization of the anaerobic digestion process in CSTRs...

  5. Microbial Consortium with High Cellulolytic Activity (MCHCA for enhanced biogas production.

    Krzysztof ePoszytek

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of lignocellulosic biomass as a substrate in agricultural biogas plants is very popular and yields good results. However, the efficiency of anaerobic digestion, and thus biogas production, is not always satisfactory due to the slow or incomplete degradation (hydrolysis of plant matter. To enhance the solubilization of the lignocellulosic biomass various physical, chemical and biological pretreatment methods are used.The aim of this study was to select and characterize cellulose-degrading bacteria, and to construct a microbial consortium, dedicated for degradation of maize silage and enhancing biogas production from this substrate.Over one hundred strains of cellulose-degrading bacteria were isolated from: sewage sludge, hydrolyzer from an agricultural biogas plant, cattle slurry and manure. After physiological characterization of the isolates, sixteen strains (representatives of Bacillus, Providencia and Ochrobactrum genera were chosen for the construction of a Microbial Consortium with High Cellulolytic Activity, called MCHCA. The selected strains had a high endoglucanase activity (exceeding 0.21 IU/mL CMCase activity and a wide range of tolerance to various physical and chemical conditions. Lab-scale simulation of biogas production using the selected strains for degradation of maize silage was carried out in a two-bioreactor system, similar to those used in agricultural biogas plants.The obtained results showed that the constructed MCHCA consortium is capable of efficient hydrolysis of maize silage, and increases biogas production by even 38%, depending on the inoculum used for methane fermentation. The results in this work indicate that the mesophilic Microbial Consortium with High Cellulolytic Activity has a great potential for application on industrial scale in agricultural biogas plants.

  6. Gas Permeation Processes in Biogas Upgrading: A Short Review

    Kárászová, Magda; Sedláková, Zuzana; Izák, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 10 (2015), s. 1277-1283. ISSN 0366-6352 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14094; GA MŠk LH14006; GA ČR GA14-12695S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : biogas upgrading * memranes * gas permeation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.468, year: 2014

  7. Biogas Production from Sugarcane Waste: Assessment on Kinetic Challenges for Process Designing

    Leandro Janke

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Biogas production from sugarcane waste has large potential for energy generation, however, to enable the optimization of the anaerobic digestion (AD process each substrate characteristic should be carefully evaluated. In this study, the kinetic challenges for biogas production from different types of sugarcane waste were assessed. Samples of vinasse, filter cake, bagasse, and straw were analyzed in terms of total and volatile solids, chemical oxygen demand, macronutrients, trace elements, and nutritional value. Biochemical methane potential assays were performed to evaluate the energy potential of the substrates according to different types of sugarcane plants. Methane yields varied considerably (5–181 Nm3·tonFM−1, mainly due to the different substrate characteristics and sugar and/or ethanol production processes. Therefore, for the optimization of AD on a large-scale, continuous stirred-tank reactor with long hydraulic retention times (>35 days should be used for biogas production from bagasse and straw, coupled with pre-treatment process to enhance the degradation of the fibrous carbohydrates. Biomass immobilization systems are recommended in case vinasse is used as substrate, due to its low solid content, while filter cake could complement the biogas production from vinasse during the sugarcane offseason, providing a higher utilization of the biogas system during the entire year.

  8. Biogas Production from Sugarcane Waste: Assessment on Kinetic Challenges for Process Designing.

    Janke, Leandro; Leite, Athaydes; Nikolausz, Marcell; Schmidt, Thomas; Liebetrau, Jan; Nelles, Michael; Stinner, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Biogas production from sugarcane waste has large potential for energy generation, however, to enable the optimization of the anaerobic digestion (AD) process each substrate characteristic should be carefully evaluated. In this study, the kinetic challenges for biogas production from different types of sugarcane waste were assessed. Samples of vinasse, filter cake, bagasse, and straw were analyzed in terms of total and volatile solids, chemical oxygen demand, macronutrients, trace elements, and nutritional value. Biochemical methane potential assays were performed to evaluate the energy potential of the substrates according to different types of sugarcane plants. Methane yields varied considerably (5-181 Nm³·tonFM(-1)), mainly due to the different substrate characteristics and sugar and/or ethanol production processes. Therefore, for the optimization of AD on a large-scale, continuous stirred-tank reactor with long hydraulic retention times (>35 days) should be used for biogas production from bagasse and straw, coupled with pre-treatment process to enhance the degradation of the fibrous carbohydrates. Biomass immobilization systems are recommended in case vinasse is used as substrate, due to its low solid content, while filter cake could complement the biogas production from vinasse during the sugarcane offseason, providing a higher utilization of the biogas system during the entire year. PMID:26404248

  9. Microbial Consortium with High Cellulolytic Activity (MCHCA) for Enhanced Biogas Production

    Poszytek, Krzysztof; Ciezkowska, Martyna; Sklodowska, Aleksandra; Drewniak, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    The use of lignocellulosic biomass as a substrate in agricultural biogas plants is very popular and yields good results. However, the efficiency of anaerobic digestion, and thus biogas production, is not always satisfactory due to the slow or incomplete degradation (hydrolysis) of plant matter. To enhance the solubilization of the lignocellulosic biomass various physical, chemical and biological pretreatment methods are used. The aim of this study was to select and characterize cellulose-degrading bacteria, and to construct a microbial consortium, dedicated for degradation of maize silage and enhancing biogas production from this substrate. Over 100 strains of cellulose-degrading bacteria were isolated from: sewage sludge, hydrolyzer from an agricultural biogas plant, cattle slurry and manure. After physiological characterization of the isolates, 16 strains (representatives of Bacillus, Providencia, and Ochrobactrum genera) were chosen for the construction of a Microbial Consortium with High Cellulolytic Activity, called MCHCA. The selected strains had a high endoglucanase activity (exceeding 0.21 IU/mL CMCase activity) and a wide range of tolerance to various physical and chemical conditions. Lab-scale simulation of biogas production using the selected strains for degradation of maize silage was carried out in a two-bioreactor system, similar to those used in agricultural biogas plants. The obtained results showed that the constructed MCHCA consortium is capable of efficient hydrolysis of maize silage, and increases biogas production by even 38%, depending on the inoculum used for methane fermentation. The results in this work indicate that the mesophilic MCHCA has a great potential for application on industrial scale in agricultural biogas plants. PMID:27014244

  10. Near-infrared spectroscopic online monitoring of process stability in biogas plants

    Stockl, Andrea; Oechsner, Hans [State Institute of Agricultural Engineering and Bioenergy, University of Hohenheim, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    The conditions laid down in the Renewable Energy Source Act for production of electricity from biogas have led to an enormous expansion of new biogas plants in the recent years in Germany. Through near-infrared reflection spectroscopy (NIRS) process stability of a biogas digester can be monitored online. This study presents the development of NIRS calibrations on acetic acid equivalents, acetic acid, and propionic acid concentrations in the digester substrate. Thereby, differences between thermophilic and mesophilic operations were measured and presented for the first time. Good calibration models were achieved by artificially increasing concentrations of the above-mentioned acids in two 400 L experimental biogas digesters with mesophilic and thermophilic operation and applying support vector regression. The presented values demonstrate that calibration with NIRS is possible. In the thermophilic digester, a calibration model with a ratio of standard deviation and standard error of prediction (RPD) value of 3.21 was achieved for the parameter acetic acid and in the mesophilic digester a RPD of 4.91 for the same acid. For the parameter propionic acid, calibration models with RPD values of 4.23 and 4.78 were achieved for the thermophilic- and mesophilic-operated digesters, respectively. The presented NIRS calibration can be used to develop an early warning system for process stability, which can be used for reliable optimization of biogas production to increase the methane yield. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH 8 Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Investigation of Phasic Process of Biogas Yield by Measuring pH, ORP and Electrical Power Changes

    Mohammad Ali Abdoli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Studying the phasic process of the biogas yieldis required to optimize the design and operations; it also helps to lower energy production costs by decreasing the capital investment and operational costs. Here we determine the biogas process by measuring pH, ORP, electrical power and make compatibility to the biogas production trend. Materials and Methods: In this research, one 1150 ml single chamber reactor is used. Biogas production trend was precisely followed by a probable compatibleness with pH, Oxidation Reduction Potential (ORP, electrical Power at a temperature of 37+ 0.5˚C with the substrate of cattle manure. The experiment was followed for 120 days approximately. Results: As a result, the phases of biogas yield could be determined by the measuring of pH, ORP and its compatibility to gas production. In the reactor, hydrolytic, acetogenic and methanogenic phases were occurred in the days 1-7, 8-16 and 17-104, respectively. Also the electrical power at first showed to be produced at high range but by increasing, the production of biogas decreased and then by decreasing the biogas production gradually, it increased slightly. Conclusion: Our results indicated that the phases of biogas production can be separated  completely and by diffracting the phases, the efficiency of biogas production could be increased.

  12. Preparing investigations for determining the mechanism in the desulfurization of biogas with a biologic laundry process; Vorbereitende Untersuchungen zur Ermittlung der Mechanismen in der Entschwefelung von Biogas mit einem biologischen Waschverfahren

    Genzowsky, Kristoffer

    2010-05-15

    The author of the contribution under consideration examines an innovative desulfurization process of biogas from agricultural biogas plants. For this purpose, an existing pilot plant was operated at a 200-L experimental biogas digester. It is used to record and classify physical and biological processes in the desulfurization process. The degradation efficiency of the biological desulfurization process is determined. Recommendations for an optimized pilot plant will be given.

  13. Process flow model of solid oxide fuel cell system supplied with sewage biogas

    Van herle, Jan; Favrat, Daniel; Maréchal, François; Bucheli, Olivier; Leuenberger, Sacha; Membrez, Yves

    2004-01-01

    A model for a 1000 kW class solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system running on biogas from a sewage sludge digestion plant was implemented in a process flow scheme using external steam reforming. The model stack consisted of planar anode supported cells operated at 800 degreesC displaying state-of- the-art electrochemical performance (0.15 W/cm(2) at 80% fuel utilisation). Real annual data from an existing sewage plant were used as input to the model. From the input of 43 m(3)/h biogas (63% ...

  14. Monitoring and control of the biogas process based on propionate concentration using online VFA measurement

    Boe, Kanokwan; Steyer, J.P.; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    Simple logic control algorithms were tested for automatic control of a lab-scale CSTR manure digester. Using an online VFA monitoring system, propionate concentration in the reactor was used as parameter for control of the biogas process. The propionate concentration was kept below a threshold of...... stress under gradual overload and thus recommended as an alarm in the control algorithm....

  15. Factors affecting process temperature and biogas production in small-scale rural biogas digesters in winter in northern Vietnam

    Cuong, Pham Hung; Vu, C.C.; Sommer, Sven G.;

    2014-01-01

    and 180 cm, biogas production and methane (CH4) concentration in biogas from August to February. In parallel the temperature of the air (100 cm above ground), in the slurry mixing tank and in the soil (10, 100, 140, and 180 cm depth) was measured by thermocouple. The influent amount was measured daily...... and the influent chemical composition was measured monthly during the whole experimental period. Seasonal variations in air temperature significantly affected the temperature in the soil, mixing tank and digester. Consequently, biogas production, which is temperature dependent, was influenced by the...... season. The main factors determining the internal temperature in the digesters were insulation with Styrofoam, air temperature and temperature of slurry in the mixing tank. Biogas production is low due to the cold climate conditions in winter in Northern Vietnam, but the study proved that storing slurry...

  16. Biogas from ley crops

    This report describes the cost of producing biogas from energy crops. Five process systems, sized 0.25-8 MW are studied. The cultivation of biogas-crops is made in three regions in Sweden. Also valued are the positive cultivation effects obtained when cereal dominated crop rotation is broken by biogas crops. 8 refs, 40 figs, 10 tabs

  17. Decomposition of biogas residues in soil and their effects on microbial growth kinetics and enzyme activities

    The rapid development of biogas production will result in increased use of biogas residues as organic fertilizers. However, control of microbial activity by organic fertilizers remains a challenge for modern land use, especially with respect to mitigating greenhouse effects and increasing C sequestration in soil. To address this issue, we compared CO2 emissions, microbial growth and extracellular enzyme activities in agricultural soil amended with biogas residues (BGR) versus maize straw (MST). Over a 21 day incubation period, 6.4% of organic C added was mineralised and evolved as CO2 with BGR and 30% with MST. As shown by the substrate-induced growth respiration approach, BGR and MST significantly decreased the specific microbial growth rate (μ) and increased the microbial biomass C in the soil, indicating a clear shift in the microbial community to slower-growing microorganisms. Because of the reduced availability of C associated with the less labile C and more lignin in biogas residues, observed μ values and microbial biomass C were lower after BGR application than after MST application. After 21 days incubation, BGR had no effect on the activity of three extracellular enzymes: β-glucosidase and cellobiohydrolase, both of which are involved in cellulose decomposition; and xylanase, which is involved in hemicellulose decomposition. In contrast, MST significantly increased the activity of these three enzymes. The application of biogas residues in short-term experiment leads to a 34% increase in soil C content and slower C turnover as compared to common maize residues. -- Highlights: ► Biogas residues (BGR) applied to soil as organic fertilizers were decomposed 2.5 times slower as compared to maize straw. ► BGR application stimulated mainly slow-growing soil microorganisms. ► In contrast to maize straw the BGR did not increase the activity of cellulose-degrading soil enzymes. ► BGR leads to slower C turnover and a 34% increase in C sequestration versus

  18. Enhancing the hydrolysis process of a two-stage biogas technology for the organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    Nasir, Zeeshan; Uellendahl, Hinrich

    2015-01-01

    The Danish company Solum A/S has developed a two-stage dry anaerobic digestion process labelled AIKAN® for the biological conversion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) into biogas and compost. In the AIKAN® process design the methanogenic (2nd) stage is separated from...... the hydrolytic (1st) stage, which enables pump-free feeding of the waste into the 1st stage (processing module), and eliminates the risk for blocking of pumps and pipes by pumping only the percolate from the 1st stage into the 2nd stage (biogas reactor tank). The biogas yield of the AIKAN® two-stage process...... stage showed high efficiency. The current project investigates how the efficiency of the hydrolytic process in the first stage can be enhanced to achieve a higher overall biogas yield by the following means: •The influence of the process conditions in the processing module (temperature, pH, retention...

  19. Regulation and optimization of the biogas process: Propionate as a key parameter

    Bangsø Nielsen, Henrik; Uellendahl, Hinrich; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2007-01-01

    The use of volatile fatty acids (VFA) as process indicators in biogas reactors treating manure together with industrial waste was studied. At a full-scale biogas plant, an online VFA sensor was installed in order to study VFA dynamics during stable and unstable operation. During stable operation...... describe the normalizing of the process. In a lab-scale continuously stirred tank reactor experiment, with manure as main substrate, the prospective of using either propionate concentration or methane production as single process indicators was studied. Propionate was found to be the best indicator. Thus......, a process breakdown caused by organic overloading with meat and bone meal and lipids was indicated by changes in propionate concentration 12-18 days before a decrease in methane production was observed. Furthermore, a more efficient and stable utilization of the substrate was observed when...

  20. Biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community in mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion processes.

    Yu, D; Kurola, J M; Lähde, K; Kymäläinen, M; Sinkkonen, A; Romantschuk, M

    2014-10-01

    Over 258 Mt of solid waste are generated annually in Europe, a large fraction of which is biowaste. Sewage sludge is another major waste fraction. In this study, biowaste and sewage sludge were co-digested in an anaerobic digestion reactor (30% and 70% of total wet weight, respectively). The purpose was to investigate the biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community composition in the anaerobic digestion reactor under meso- (35-37 °C) and thermophilic (55-57 °C) processes and an increasing organic loading rate (OLR, 1-10 kg VS m(-3) d(-1)), and also to find a feasible compromise between waste treatment capacity and biogas production without causing process instability. In summary, more biogas was produced with all OLRs by the thermophilic process. Both processes showed a limited diversity of the methanogenic archaeal community which was dominated by Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales (e.g. Methanosarcina) in both meso- and thermophilic processes. Methanothermobacter was detected as an additional dominant genus in the thermophilic process. In addition to operating temperatures, the OLRs, the acetate concentration, and the presence of key substrates like propionate also affected the methanogenic archaeal community composition. A bacterial cell count 6.25 times higher than archaeal cell count was observed throughout the thermophilic process, while the cell count ratio varied between 0.2 and 8.5 in the mesophilic process. This suggests that the thermophilic process is more stable, but also that the relative abundance between bacteria and archaea can vary without seriously affecting biogas production. PMID:24837280

  1. ZnCl2-activated biochar from biogas residue facilitates aqueous As(III) removal

    Xia, Dong; Tan, Fen; Zhang, Chuanpan; Jiang, Xiuli; Chen, Zheng; Li, Heng; Zheng, Yanmei; Li, Qingbiao; Wang, Yuanpeng

    2016-07-01

    Biochars prepared from biogas residue using different chemical activators were investigated for their As(III) adsorption properties. The results indicated that the original biochars did not exhibit significant As(III) adsorption. However, ZnCl2-activated biochar, which possessed the largest specific surface area, 516.67 cm2/g, and exhibited a perfectly porous texture, showed excellent performance in a 500 μgL-1 solution of As(III). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were utilized to identify the mechanism of As(III) adsorption by ZnCl2-activated biochar. Adsorption was found to occur mainly through ligand exchange of the hydroxyl in Zn-OH to form Zn-O-As(III), as well as through porous adsorption. As a low-cost adsorbent, the adsorption process was well fitted using a pseudo-second-order model, with an R2 > 0.993. The adsorption process was fast, requiring nearly 90 min to reach adsorption equilibrium. Batch adsorption experimental results indicated that ZnCl2-activated biochar has a maximum adsorption capacity of 27.67 mg/g at pH 7.0, and the adsorption process followed the Freundlich isotherm model well, with an R2 > 0.994. In addition, the current work demonstrated the efficiency of using ZnCl2-activated biochar adsorbent to treat As(III)-contaminated water.

  2. Investigation of the effects of co-digesting of biodegradable waste and swine manure on the biogas process

    Ojong, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    Biomass and biomass-derived waste are important renewable energy sources which plays a vital role in greenhouse gas reduction from fossil fuel.  Biomass can be degraded in a process known as anaerobic digestion (AD) to produce biogas. Biogas is a mixture of methane and carbon dioxide which is utilized as a renewable source of energy. This project was based on the investigation of AD process in Nordvästra Skånes Renhållnings AB (NSR) a biogas facility in Helsingborg Sweden. A lab simulation of...

  3. Evaluation of silage-fed biogas process performance using microbiological and kinetic methods

    Jarvis, Aa.

    1996-10-01

    In this study, different kinetic and microbiological methods were used to evaluate the growth and activity of key groups of bacteria degrading ley silage in one-phase and two-phase biogas processes. Emphasis was placed on studying the dynamic behaviour of different trophic groups resulting from the initiation of liquid recirculation in the processes. The microbiological methods included microscopy and most probable number (MPN) counts with different substrates. The kinetic methods included measurements of specific methanogenic activity (SMA) with acetate and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} as substrates, batch assays with trace element additions and measurement of conversion rates of mannitol and lactate in the digesters. In general, the initiation of liquid recirculation at first promoted the growth and/or activity of several trophic groups of bacteria, such as butyrate and propionate degraders and acetotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens in the liquefaction/acidogenesis reactors of the two-phase processes. This was probably mainly due to the increased pH. However, after some time of liquid recirculation, an inhibition of some bacterial groups occurred, such as propionate degraders and methanogens in the methanogenic reactors of two-phase processes. This was probably due to increased concentrations of salts and free ammonia. The batch assays proved to be valuable tools in process optimization by the addition of trace elements. Here, the addition of cobalt significantly increased methane production from acetate. In this study, a more comprehensive understanding of the process behaviour in response to the initiation of liquid recirculation was achieved which could not have been obtained by only monitoring routine parameters such as pH, methane production and concentrations of organic acids and salts. 120 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  4. Mathematic modelling of anaerobic degradation processes in biogas plants; Mathematische Modellierung der anaeroben Abbauprozesse in Biogasanlagen

    Weinrich, Soeren [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Agrar- und Umweltwissenschaftliche Fakultaet; Mauky, Eric [DBFZ - Deutsches BiomasseForschungsZentrum gGmbH, Leipzig (Germany). Fachbereich Biochemische Konversion; Nelles, Michael

    2011-07-01

    In view of the ongoing political discussion on the enhanced utilization of renewable energy sources biogas technologies continue to gain significance. To develop economic plant concepts and guaranty high energy efficiency the knowledge of the dynamic degradation of various substrates at different operating conditions are of crucial importance. Within the field of modelling the dynamic changes in concentration of substantial components (mass balance) are commonly described by known physical laws or empirical observations. On the basis of a dynamic process model by the German Biomass Research Centre (DBFZ) the main functional principles and capabilities of a simulation of a real biogas plant are described exemplarily. Besides the choice of appropriate kinetic and stoichiometric parameters the model output depends significantly on the quality of the (measured) input variables. Thus the implementation of continuous accurate data logging and the development of important process parameters are also major research topics for modelling and parameter identification of the anaerobic digestion process. (orig.)

  5. Learning as the Construction and Re-Mediation of Activity Systems: Environmental Management in Biogas Production

    Pereira Querol, Marco A.; Suutari, Timo; Seppanen, Laura

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present theoretical tools for understanding the dynamics of change and learning during the emergence and development of environmental management activities. The methodology consists of a historical analysis of a case of biogas production that took place in the Southwest region of Finland. The theoretical tools used…

  6. Supplying the energy demand in the chicken meat processing poultry with biogas

    Adriano Henrique Ferrarez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The main use of electrical energy in the chicken meat processing unit is refrigeration. About 70% of the electricity is consumed in the compressors for the refrigeration system. Through this study, the energetic viability of using biogas from poultry litter in supplying the demand for the refrigeration process was found. The meat processing unit studied has the potential to process about a hundred and sixty thousand chickens a day. The potential biogas production from poultry litter is 60,754,298.91 m3.year-1. There will be a surplus of approximately 8,103MWh per month of electric energy generated from biogas. An economic analysis was performed considering a planning horizon of 20 years and the discount rate of 12% per year. The economic analysis was performed considering scenario 1: sale of all electricity generated by the thermoelectric facility, and scenario 2: sale of the surplus electricity generated after complying with the demands of the refrigeration process and all other electrical energy and thermal energy use. Economic indicators obtained for scenarios 1 and 2 were favorable for the project implementation.

  7. Supplying the energy demand in the chicken meat processing poultry with biogas

    A. H. Ferrarez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The main use of electrical energy in the chicken meat processing unit is refrigeration. About 70% of the electricity is consumed in the compressors for the refrigeration system. Through this study, the energetic viability of using biogas from poultry litter in supplying the demand for the refrigeration process was found. The meat processing unit studied has the potential to process about a hundred and sixty thousand chickens a day. The potential biogas production from poultry litter is 60,754,298.91 m3.year-1. There will be a surplus of approximately 8,103MWh per month of electric energy generated from biogas. An economic analysis was performed considering a planning horizon of 20 years and the discount rate of 12% per year. The economic analysis was performed considering scenario 1: sale of all electricity generated by the thermoelectric facility, and scenario 2: sale of the surplus electricity generated after complying with the demands of the refrigeration process and all other electrical energy and thermal energy use. Economic indicators obtained for scenarios 1 and 2 were favorable for the project implementation.

  8. Profiling of the metabolically active community from a production-scale biogas plant by means of high-throughput metatranscriptome sequencing

    Zakrzewski, Martha; Goesmann, Alexander; Jaenicke, Sebastian;

    2012-01-01

    Structural composition and gene content of a biogas-producing microbial community from a production-scale biogas plant fed with renewable primary products was recently analyzed by means of a metagenome sequencing approach. To determine the transcriptionally active part of the same biogas communit...

  9. An Analysis of Biogas Reforming Process on Ni/YSZ and Ni/SDC Catalysts

    Janusz Szmyd

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The conversion of biogas to electricity presents an attractive niche application for fuel cells. Thus attempts have been made to use biogas as a fuel for high temperature fuel cell systems such as SOFC. Biogas can be converted to hydrogen-rich fuel in a reforming process. For hydrocarbon-based fuel, three types of fuel conversion can be considered in reforming reactions: an external reforming system, an indirect internal reforming system and a direct internal reforming system. High-temperature SOFC eliminates the need for an expensive external reforming system. The possibility of using internal reforming is one of the characteristics of high temperature fuel cells like SOFC. However, for high-temperature operation, thermal management of the SOFC system becomes an important issue. To properly carry out thermal management, both detailed modeling and numerical analyses of the phenomena occurring inside the SOFC system is required. In the present work, the process of reforming biogas on a Ni/YSZ and a Ni/SDC catalyst has been numerically and experimentally investigated. Measurements including different thermal boundary conditions, steam-to-carbon ratios and several different fuel compositions were taken. A numerical model containing methane/steam reforming reaction, dry reforming reaction and shift reaction has been proposed to predict the gas mixture composition at the outlet of the reformer. The results of the numerical computation were compared with experimental data and good agreement has been found. The results indicate the importance of combined, numerical and experimental studies in the design of SOFC reformers. The combined approach used leads to the successful prediction of the outlet gas composition for different modelling conditions.

  10. Biogas Tinja Manusia dalam Perspektif Fiqih-Kimia

    Wawan Juandi Muhyiddin Khatib Ummi Khoiriyah

    2014-01-01

    Energy is one of the most important factors to global prosperity. The dependence on fossil fuels as primary energy source has led to global climate change, environmental degradation, and human health problems. In order to reduce dependence on commercial energy, steps have been taken to develop an alternative source, such as biogas. Biogas was a gas produced from biological activities in anaerobic fermentation processes and as a renewable energy. Biogas is one form of the alternative energy. I...

  11. Process flow model of solid oxide fuel cell system supplied with sewage biogas

    Van herle, J.; Maréchal, F.; Leuenberger, S.; Membrez, Y.; Bucheli, O.; Favrat, D.

    A model for a 100 kW class solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system running on biogas from a sewage sludge digestion plant was implemented in a process flow scheme using external steam reforming. The model stack consisted of planar anode supported cells operated at 800 °C displaying state-of-the-art electrochemical performance (0.15 W/cm 2 at 80% fuel utilisation). Real annual data from an existing sewage plant were used as input to the model. From the input of 43 m 3/h biogas (63% CH 4), equivalent to 269 kW (higher heating value, HHV), the SOFC stack was calculated to deliver 131 kW el electricity (48.7%) using a steam-to-carbon ratio of 0.5. This would allow the sewage site to more than cover its own electrical needs, hence to depollute the waste stream at negative energy cost. In its current exploitation using a low efficient gas engine (130 kW), the site is only ≈50% self-sufficient. Special attention was given to the thermal balance of the stack. The stack developed heat (143 kW) could be balanced by endothermal reforming (78 kW) and by cathode excess air λ (=3), allowing a temperature difference between stack inlet and outlet of 200 K. The case was compared to other fuel scenarios. Steam-added biogas behaves basically identically to steam-reformed methane. For partial oxidation of biogas or pure hydrogen feeding, electrical efficiency drops to under 43% while λ needs to be raised to 4.5 to maintain the 200 K thermal gradient over the stack.

  12. New steady-state microbial community compositions and process performances in biogas reactors induced by temperature disturbances

    Luo, Gang; De Francisci, Davide; Kougias, Panagiotis;

    2015-01-01

    . Although three different temperature disturbances were applied to each biogas reactor, the increased methane yields (around 10% higher) and decreased volatile fatty acids (VFAs) concentrations at steady state were found in all three reactors after the temperature disturbances. After the temperature......Background The microbial community in a biogas reactor greatly influences the process performance. However, only the effects of deterministic factors (such as temperature and hydraulic retention time (HRT)) on the microbial community and performance have been investigated in biogas reactors. Little...... is known about the manner in which stochastic factors (for example, stochastic birth, death, colonization, and extinction) and disturbance affect the stable-state microbial community and reactor performances. Results In the present study, three replicate biogas reactors treating cattle manure were...

  13. Enhanced biogas recovery by applying post-digestion in large-scale centralized biogas plants

    Angelidaki, Irini; Hejnfelt, Anette; Ellegaard, L.

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the degradation efficiency of centralized biogas plants and provide guidance for the design of more efficient digester and post-digestion systems. These centralized biogas plants in Denmark digest manure together with organic waste from the food...... industry to generate biogas, which is used for electricity and thermal energy. A total of 20 such plants are currently active in Denmark, most of which were included in the investigation. From the plants, samples were obtained from various steps of the process. Samples were analysed and the residual biogas...... potential determined by batch post-digestion at various temperature levels. Results were correlated with plant characteristics and production statistics in order to judge the efficiency of various digestion concepts. A simplified model based on a two-step biogas production process was developed...

  14. Characterisation and treatment of VOCs in process water from upgrading facilities for compressed biogas (CBG).

    Nilsson Påledal, S; Arrhenius, K; Moestedt, J; Engelbrektsson, J; Stensen, K

    2016-02-01

    Compression and upgrading of biogas to vehicle fuel generates process water, which to varying degrees contains volatile organic compounds (VOCs) originating from the biogas. The compostion of this process water has not yet been studied and scientifically published and there is currently an uncertainty regarding content of VOCs and how the process water should be managed to minimise the impact on health and the environment. The aim of the study was to give an overview about general levels of VOCs in the process water. Characterisation of process water from amine and water scrubbers at plants digesting waste, sewage sludge or agricultural residues showed that both the average concentration and composition of particular VOCs varied depending on the substrate used at the biogas plant, but the divergence was high and the differences for total concentrations from the different substrate groups were only significant for samples from plants using waste compared to residues from agriculture. The characterisation also showed that the content of VOCs varied greatly between different sampling points for same main substrate and between sampling occasions at the same sampling point, indicating that site-specific conditions are important for the results which also indicates that a number of analyses at different times are required in order to make an more exact characterisation with low uncertainty. Inhibition of VOCs in the anaerobic digestion (AD) process was studied in biomethane potential tests, but no inhibition was observed during addition of synthetic process water at concentrations of 11.6 mg and 238 mg VOC/L. PMID:26694791

  15. BIOGAS TECHNOLOGY

    D.B. SALUNKHE

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to scarcity of petroleum and coal it threatens supply of fuel throughout the world also problem of their combustion leads to research in different corners to get access the new sources of energy, like renewable energy resources. Solar energy, wind energy, different thermal and hydro sources of energy, biogas are all renewable energy resources. But, biogas is distinct from other renewable energies because of its characteristics of using, controlling and collecting organic wastes and at the same time producing fertilizer and water for use in agricultural irrigation. Biogas does not have any geographical limitations nor does it require advanced technology for producing energy, also it is very simple to use and apply. Anaerobic digestion is controlled biological degradation process which allows efficient capturing & utilization of biogas (approximately 60% methane and 40% carbon dioxide for energy generation. Anaerobic digestion of food waste is achievable but different types, composition of food waste results in varying degrees of methane yields, and thus the effects of mixing various types of food waste and their proportions should be determined on case by case basis.

  16. Microbiologic handbook for biogas plants; Mikrobiologisk handbok foer biogasanlaeggningar

    Jarvis, Aasa; Schnuerer, Anna

    2009-05-15

    There is today great interest in the biogas process. The reason for interest is that this process offers an opportunity to stabilize and reduce various types of organic waste, while also generating clean renewable energy in the form of biogas. Purified biogas is a good alternative to gasoline and diesel as motor fuel and can also be used for heating and electricity production. Behind efficient biogas production lies a complex microbiological process. For biogas to be formed many different species of microorganisms have to be active. A disturbance of this teamwork leads to a reduction in biogas production or in the worst case that the process stops. In order to operate a biogas process in an efficient manner, it is necessary to have knowledge of the underlying microbiology and how microorganisms function. Today Swedish biogas plants have personnel with great technical knowledge, while the biological knowledge often is more limited. It has been difficult to find appropriate Swedish language literature in the field. This handbook aims to increase the microbiological expertise of staff at the biogas plants and thus to facilitate the stable operation and optimization of gas production

  17. Biogas charging and dissipating process and its accumulation in the Sebei gasfield,Qaidam Basin,China

    2008-01-01

    The Sebei gasfield is the largest biogas accumulation found in China and many reservoirs and seal rocks superposed on a syndepositional anticline in Quaternary.The biogas charging and dissipating process and its distribution have been a research focus for many years.The authors suggest a diffusing and accumulating model for the biogas,as they find that the shallower the gas producer,the more methane in the biogas,and the lighter stable carbon isotope composition of methane.Based on the diffusing model,diffused biogas is quantitatively estimated for each potential sandy reservoir in the gasfield,and the gas charging quantity for the sandy reservoir is also calculated by the diffused gas quantity plus gas reserve in-place.A ratio of diffusing quantity to charging quantity is postulated to describe biogas accumulating state in a sandy reservoir,if the ratio is less than 0.6,the reservoir forms a good gas-pool and high-production layer in the gasfield,which often occurs in the reservoirs deeper than 900 m;if the ratio is greater than 0.6,a few gas accumulated in the reservoir,which frequently exists in the reservoirs shallower than 900 m.Therefore,a biogas accumulation model is built up as lateral direct charging from gas source for the sands deeper than 900 m and indirect charging from lower gas-bearing sands by diffusion at depth shallower than 900 m.With this charging and diffusion quantitative model,the authors conducted re-evaluation on each wildcat in the central area of the Qaidam Basin,and found many commercial biogas layers.

  18. INCREASING ADSORPTION OF ACTIVATED CARBON FROM PALM OIL SHELL FOR ADSORB H2S FROM BIOGAS PRODUCTION BY IMPREGNATION

    Wasan Phooratsamee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogas is the combustible gas produced through a biological process, known as anaerobic digestion which is the process operated at low-temperature and without air. Biogas consists of 55-80% CH4, 20-45% CO2 with trace amount of H2S and other impurities. Common H2S removal technologies from biogas fall into one of adsorption on a solid such as iron oxide based materials, activated carbon or impregnated activated carbon. Conventionally, activated carbon is produced from biomass residues and agricultural residues such as palm oil shell which promising approach for the production of cheap. It is so due to the palm oil shell carries a large amount of carbon content which it is the main composition of activated carbon. Therefore, it is usable as raw material for producing impregnated activated carbon and used as adsorbents. The aim of this study is a produce the activated carbon from palm oil shells by chemical activation using ZnCl2 and optimal conditions after impregnated them with NaOH, KI and K2CO3 for H2S absorption from biogas product. In this research, production of activated carbon involved three stages; (i carbonization of raw material in an inert atmosphere which was carbonized in a muffle furnace at 600°C for 1 h; (ii secondly activation of char product from the first stages at fixed bed reactor (stainless steel with 54.1 mm internal diameter and 320 mm length which was studied to observe the effect of char product: Chemical agent ratio (ZnCl2, 1:1 to 1:3, which there are activated at 700°C activation temperature for 2 h; and (iii finally alkali impregnated activated carbon which were immersed 1:3 ratio in 500 mL of 1 N NaOH, KI and K2CO3 solutions and stirred for 30 min. The result showed that the surface area and the pore volume increased progressively with increasing the char product: Chemical agent ratio. The maximum

  19. Energy recovering and biogas

    In spite of the advantages of the methanation and the biogas valorization, the France is one of the european countries where these energy recovery techniques have less developed. Liquid industrial effluents, sewage sludges, waste waters, oils or vinification residues can be processed to produce biogas. In this innovative context biogas combustion installations will have to anticipate the regulations on CO2 emissions. (A.L.B.)

  20. Methanogenesis in Thermophilic Biogas Reactors

    Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1995-01-01

    Methanogenesis in thermophilic biogas reactors fed with different wastes is examined. The specific methanogenic activity with acetate or hydrogen as substrate reflected the organic loading of the specific reactor examined. Increasing the loading of thermophilic reactors stabilized the process...... as indicated by a lower concentration of volatile fatty acids in the effluent from the reactors. The specific methanogenic activity in a thermophilic pilot-plant biogas reactor fed with a mixture of cow and pig manure reflected the stability of the reactor. The numbers of methanogens counted by the most...... against Methanothrix soehngenii or Methanothrix CALS-I in any of the thermophilic biogas reactors examined. Studies using 2-14C-labeled acetate showed that at high concentrations (more than approx. 1 mM) acetate was metabolized via the aceticlastic pathway, transforming the methyl-group of acetate...

  1. Optimization of the digestion process of Scenedesmus sp. and Opuntia maxima for biogas production

    Highlights: • Scenedesmus biomass showed low biodegradability and biogas production. • Methane yield and kinetics of the batch process were improved by co-digestion. • Scenedesmus and Opuntia maxima were successfully co-digested in CSTR. • High biogas yields were obtained and no inhibition by ammonia was observed. - Abstract: Scenedesmus biomass is not an adequate substrate for anaerobic digestion due to its low biodegradability and low biogas yield. This study aims to evaluate the anaerobic co-digestion of Scenedesmus microalgal biomass and Opuntia maxima cladodes, the latter added in order to improve the digestion process. Batch assays were conducted to evaluate possible synergistic effects in different mixtures of both substrates. Mixture with highest methane yield was digested in semi-continuous mode at different VS concentrations. Feedstock composed of 75% O.maxima and 25% Scenedesmus (VS basis) showed the highest methane yield increasing 66.4% and 63.9% that of Scenedesmus and O.maxima, respectively. In semi-continuous mode, ideal organic loading rate (OLR) with 6%VS feed concentration was 4 gVS L−1 d−1, which yielded 292 ± 39 LCH4 kgVS−1 (15 days HRT). In the case of 8%VS feed concentration ideal OLR was 5.33 gVS L−1 d−1, which yielded 308 ± 22 LCH4 kgVS−1 (15 days HRT). The co-digestion of O.maxima and Scenedesmus biomass enhanced the anaerobic digestion process and avoided inhibition caused by low C/N ratio of microalgae

  2. Biogas production from mono-digestion of maize silage-long-term process stability and requirements.

    Lebuhn, M; Liu, F; Heuwinkel, H; Gronauer, A

    2008-01-01

    Biogas production from mono-digestion of maize silage was studied for more than one year in six continuously stirred, daily fed 36 L fermenters. Chemical and microbiological parameters were analysed concomitantly. The reactors acidified already after 8 months of operation at a low organic loading rate (OLR) of 2 g VS*(L*d)(-1). The TVA/TAC ratio was the most reliable parameter to indicate early process instabilities leading to acidification. A TVA/TAC threshold of 0.5 should not be exceeded. After acidification and recovery of the fermenters, propionic acid was no reliable parameter anymore to indicate process failure, since values far below the threshold of 1 g*L(-1) were obtained although the process had collapsed.The acidified reactors recovered better, showed greatly improved stability and allowed a higher OLR when a trace element (TE) cocktail was supplemented. Hydrolysis was obviously not process-limiting, results indicated that methanogens were affected. The most limiting element in long-term mono-digestion of maize silage turned out to be cobalt, but data obtained suggest that molybdenum and selenium should also be provided. TE supplementation should be designed specifically in order to meet the actual needs. TE availability for the biocenosis appears to be a key issue in biogas production, not only in mono-but also in co-digestion processes. PMID:19001720

  3. Terpenes removal from biogas; Terpenenverwijdering uit biogas

    Schulze, P.; Holstein, J.; De Haan, HR.; Vlap, H. [DNV KEMA, Arnhem (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    Biogas may contain unwanted and harmful components, including aromatic hydrocarbons such as terpenes. These terpenes (organic oils) are mainly present in citrus peel and plant residues; that is why especially raw biogas from organic waste digestion plants contains high concentrations of terpenes. If terpenes end up in the gas grid (with the injected biomethane) there is a risk that plastics (PE pipes) lose their mechanical properties by absorbing liquids or extracting ethereal plasticizers. This can lead to embrittlement greatly lowering the reliability of the piping. In addition, soft components are als o affected (gaskets and rubber O-rings). Besides the impact on the integrity of the gas grid, terpenes also mask the odor of natural gas odorants such as THT. This impedes the detection of gas leaks which is a significant security risk. Furthermore, the presence of terpenes in biogas leads to fouling of equipment used for the drying of biomethane, as well as contamination of adsorption liquids and membranes used in the upgrading process. Currently, terpenes are removed by activated carbon filters. The tool life of such a filter can be relatively short if terpene concentrations are high in the biogas; this results in a significant increase of the operational costs, due to the replacement of the carbon. This study looked at alternative techniques for removing much of the terpenes from biogas in a simple, efficient and cheap way. In a workshop with stakeholders two techniques were chosen to be tested on laboratory scale in order to demonstrate the proof of principle. These techniques are photo-oxydation and a gas scrubbing. Of all investigated techniques for the removal of limonene the application of UV radiation seems to be the most promising option because of the simplicity of the process, the high efficiency (up to 94%), the comparable operational costs with activated carbon (6.7 to 9.5 euro/kg limonene removed, compared to 10 euro/kg limonene removed for activated

  4. Integrated biogas systems

    Amaratunga, M.

    1980-01-01

    Integrated biogas systems as alternatives to fossil fuels in Sri Lanka are considered from standpoints of population growth, land availability, and employment opportunities. Agricultural practices would be improved by use of chemical fertilizers, and health/nutrition problems be alleviated by using biogas systems. Fuel for cooking and rural industries will become more easily available; water weeds, such as water hyacinth and salvinia which pose a threat to waterways and rice paddy lands could be used for the production of biogas and fertilizers. A concept of an integrated biogas system comprising photosynthesis and anaerobic degradation processes to produce food and energy is presented.

  5. What does the hydrolysis perform in the fermentation of biogas? Biogas, hydrolysis, fermenter biology, multistage process operation; Was kann die Hydrolyse bei der Biogasvergaerung leisten? Biogas, Hydrolyse, Fermenterbiologie, mehrphasige Prozessfuehrung

    Oechsner, H.; Lemmer, A. [Landesanstalt fuer Agrartechnik und Bioenergie, Univ. Hohenheim, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Nowadays renewable primary products are normally favored for fermentation in agricultural biogas plants. Since this substrate has to be cultivated for biogas fermentation in particular and hence causes production costs, the energy content of the material should be dissipated in biogas completely. For this the fermentation process has to run as efficient as possible. In case of one-phase process management with high space loading there is a risk of imbalance and maybe even collapse of process biology in the fermenter. In case of high space loading and short retention time the substrate won't be fermented completely. The aim is to create good conditions for microorganism participating in the process by a two-phase process management which integrates a stage of hydrolysis. In the stage of hydrolysis the microorganisms and enzymes metabolize the organic matter into readily biodegradable carbonic acids, which can be supplied targeted in the following methanisation as substrate for methanogenic bacteria. The hydrolysis proceeds under various terms and conditions (aerobic/anaerobic, different pH-value, different temperature level). This necessitates a safe control of operation and process parameters, which is often difficult to ensure in practice. In a malfunctioning hydrolysis also methane can be produced, that causes energy losses and environmental damage when emitted in atmosphere. Hydrogen can be produced in the hydrolysis as well what can involve a safety risk. Urgent need for research exists concerning the two-phase fermentation of renewable primary products. By systematic laboratory analysis the knowledge should be expanded, to improve the planning reliability in this field. (orig.)

  6. Process for increased biogas production and energy efficient hygienisation of sludge; Process foer oekad biogasproduktion och energieffektiv hygienisering av slam

    Rogstrand, Gustav; Olsson, Henrik; Andersson Chan, Anneli; Johansson, Niklas; Edstroem, Mats

    2012-07-01

    In Sweden there is a need to increase biogas production to meet the rising demand for biomethane as vehicle fuel but the amount of domestically available biomass to digest is limited. One way to help meet current and future demand for methane is to enhance the digestion of the substrates that are currently utilized. Vaexjoe municipality in southern Sweden is in the process of upgrading their facilities for biogas production at the Sundet waste water treatment plant. Their aim is to produce more biogas in order to meet the demand from an increasing methane-based local transit fleet. This is the backdrop to a joint project between JTI and Vaexjoe municipality where JTI's mobile pilot plant was used to study the possibility of extracting more biogas from the existing sewage sludge. In the future, Vaexjoe municipality also plans to co-digest source separated municipal organics with the sewage sludge, which will likely result in stricter demands in terms of hygienization of all utilized substrates. The goal of the project at hand was to demonstrate the possibility to produce more than enough additional biogas from existing sewage sludge to yield a net energy profit even with the added energy demand of ensuring the hygienic quality of the digestate through conventional pasteurization. Although the project was focused on the conditions at Sundet waste water treatment plant, the issues dealt with are general and the results are relevant to many waste water treatment plants in Sweden. The research, conducted between June 2011 and January 2012 were divided into two trials. The two trials, described schematically in Figure 1, represented two possible process configurations designed to reach the goal stated above. The key component of both process configurations is the addition of a post-digestion step to the existing single-step digestion process. In trial 1 the additional feature of dewatering between the two digestion steps served to reduce energy demand for

  7. Biogas Production Potential from Waste in Timis County

    Teodor Vintila

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This work is a study of biogas production potential using as substrate the residues generated in the agricultural activities and the organic fraction from municipal wastes collected in Timis County. Data available in regional and national statistics have been reported to Timis County and used to calculate the potential quantity of biogas to be produced by anaerobic fermentation using as fermentable substrate residues generated in various human activities. To estimate the electric and thermal energy potential of the biogas, we considered the productivity of an average biogas plant couplet with a CHP unit with an efficiency of 40% net electric and 40% net thermal output and functioning 7500 hours per year. Processing data for the biogas production potential from livestock manure in Romania, we found that over 500 GWh of energy from biogas can be provided in one year. It is estimated that only half of the theoretical energy potential is technically usable by biogas investments. As for the crops residues, has been shown that the theoretical biogas potential is over 2900 GWh/year. Wastewater sludge can be converted in around 1700MWh/year, and the organic wastes available from municipal wastes can provide over 137 GWh/year. Another potential for renewable energy production in Timis County is the arable land uncultivated yearly, which can be used to cultivate energy crops, as raw material for biogas providing over 2800 GWh/year. All this quantity of biogas can be converted in numerous CHP biogas plants totaling an installed power of over 340 MWel. This potential can contribute to reach the target for 2020 in Romania to build biogas plants totaling at least 195 MWel. installed power, with an output of 950 GW electric power. 

  8. An innovative bioelectrochemical-anaerobic digestion-coupled system for in-situ ammonia recovery and biogas enhancement: process performance and microbial ecology

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    Ammonia (NH4+/NH3) inhibition during anaerobic digestion process is one of the most frequent problems existing in biogas plants, resulting in unstable process and reduced biogas production. In this study, we developed a novel hybrid system, consisted of a submersed microbial resource recovery cell...

  9. Codigestion of manure and industrial organic waste at centralized biogas plants: process imbalances and limitations

    Bangsø Nielsen, Henrik; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    The present study focuses on process imbalances in Danish centralized biogas plants treating manure in combination with industrial waste. Collection of process data from various full-scale plants along with a number of interviews showed that imbalances occur frequently. High concentrations of...... conditions) and high fractions of industrial waste in the feedstock was also observed. The process imbalances and suboptimal conditions are mainly allowed to occur due to 1) inadequate knowledge about the waste composition, 2) inadequate knowledge about the waste degradation characteristics, 3) inadequate...... process surveillance, especially with regard to volatile fatty acids, and 4) insufficient pre-storage capacity causing inexpedient mixing and hindering exact dosing of the different waste products....

  10. Early warning of disturbances in a laboratory-scale MSW biogas process.

    Hansson, M; Nordberg, A; Sundh, I; Mathisen, B

    2002-01-01

    The use of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) to monitorthe dynamics of a biogas process was evaluated using multivariate data analysis. The digester was a completely stirred 8 I tank reactor fed with the organic fraction of source-sorted MSW. Intermittently the digester was overloaded with feed. Before and after overload on-line monitoring of NIR spectra and off-line analysis in the liquid and the gas phase of traditional chemical variables and microbial biomass, determined as total concentration of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA and PLEL), were done. The dynamics that occurred due to overloading could be followed using principal component analysis of the obtained NIR-spectra. In addition, the response to changes in the digester fluid was reproducible and could be detected within five minutes, which can be considered as real-time monitoring. Selected wavelengths in the region 800-2,000 nm were used to make a PLS1 -regression with propionate. The regression resulted in a good correlation for propionate (R= 0.94 and RMSEP of 0.21 g/l in the range of 0.3-3 g/l). The results indicate the possibility to develop an early warning biogas control system based on near-infrared spectroscopy monitoring of propionate. PMID:12188554

  11. Farm Biogas Handbook; Gaardsbiogashandbok

    Christensson, Kjell; Bjoernsson, Lovisa; Dahlgren, Stefan; Eriksson, Peter; Lantz, Mikael; Lindstroem, Johanna; Mickelaaker, Maria

    2009-04-15

    A very large share of the total raw material potential for biogas production will be found within the agriculture. The raw material potential of manure in Sweden amounts to 4 - 6 TWh. Within the agriculture there is moreover a big potential in the form of residues from plant cultivation and non-food crops (approximately 7 TWh) that can to be used for biogas production. The potential for biogas production from only residues and manure is around 8-10 TWh. An increased biogas production within the agriculture would give significant environmental effects. Among other things manure, that today is leaking methane gas to the atmosphere, can be fermented, and trough this process the methane losses will be reduced. When the produced biogas replaces fossil fuel, an overall environmental effect will be reached, that is highly significant. This manual deals with biogas plants for agriculture and such plants that do not have extensive transports of different raw materials, as manure, wastes etc. One of the starting points for this manual's set-up is a course plan that Biogas Syd made for the courses they give to farmers, advisors and others. The manual illustrates important aspects in planning and construction of biogas plants, from raw material and technology to dimensioning of plant, use of biogas and planning of local gas grids. We also think it is important to illustrate the legislation that encompasses construction work and operation of a biogas plant. Investment costs are also illustrated, but the book does not give any extensive economic calculations, since we believe that such calculations need their own manual in the form of calculation examples, based on various conditions. The final section is called 'Biogas on farm - from idea to reality' where the entire process from analysis and pre-planning to monitoring and control of plant during operation is briefly described

  12. Development of a complete bio-NGV production process based on agricultural biogas at farm scale

    Sarperi, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Bio-NGV (bio- Natural Gas for Vehicles) is a bio-fuel based on the biogas in which components such as CO2and H2S are removed. But the economical feasibility of available and commercial technologies to perform these removals is limited to 80 Nm3/h of treated biogas. Regarding farm scale biogas plant, fuel needs of 1 fill-upper day would represent the treatment of only 1 Nm3/hof raw biogas. The aim of our work was to develop a solution economically adapted to farm scale to produce bio-NGV from ...

  13. DEVELOPMENT TRENDS OF BIOGAS

    Mariana DUMITRU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available All over the world, researches are made in order to improve the technologies, the operational and process stability and performance of biogas plants, because the world markets for biogas increased considerably in Europe and all over the world. In this paper we studied the most important parameters related to a biogas plant, starting from the ecologic landfill of Cristian, Sibiu, a landfill which storages industrial and household waste. In this respect, we studied operational parameters, such as organic load and hydraulic retention time, and parameters for evaluation of a biogas plant. Also, we made a case study concerning the evaluation of used waters in the landfill described above under the aspect of pollution sources, way of treatment and evacuation mode of used waters. The existing biomass resources everywhere in the world can give us an idea of the global potential of biogas production, which is not exploited to its capacity, especially in our country.

  14. Analysis of the Value Chain for Biogas in Tanzania Northern Zone (Tanga, Kilimanjaro, Arusha, Manyara)

    Nyagabona, N.T.

    2009-12-15

    This study aimed at exploring weaknesses in the biogas value chain that hinder wider dissemination of the technology in Tanzania. The research included assessment of processes and activities carried out by the players, the influencers and business supporters of the biogas value chain. The methodology used is holistic, combining literature review with focus group discussions and interviews with actors and observations of processes across the value chain in Arusha and Kilimanjaro regions, where biogas has the longest history in Tanzania.

  15. Separation of H2S and NH3 gases from tofu waste water-based biogas using activated carbon adsorption

    Harihastuti, Nani; Purwanto, P.; Istadi, I.

    2015-12-01

    Research on the separation of H2S and NH3 gases from tofu waste water-based biogas has been conducted to improve the content of CH4 of biogas in order to increase calorific value. Biogas from tofu waste water contained many kinds of gases such as: CH4 of 53-64%, CO2 of 36-45%, H2S of 3,724-5,880 mg/Nm3, NH3 of 0.19-70.36 mg/Nm3, and H2O of 33,800-19,770,000 mg/Nm3. In fact, CO2, H2S, NH3, and moisture are impurities that have disturbance to human and environment, so that they are necessary to be separated from biogas. Particularly, H2S and NH3 have high toxicity to people, particularly the workers in the tofu industry. Therefore, separation of H2S and NH3 from biogas to increase calorific value is the focus of this research. The method used in this research is by adsorption of H2S and NH3 gases using activated carbon as adsorbent. It also used condensation as pretreatment to remove moisture content in biogas. Biogas was flowed to adsorption column (70 cm height and 9 cm diameter containing activated carbon as much as 500 g) so that the H2S and NH3 gases were adsorbed. This research was conducted by varying flow rate and flow time of biogas. From this experiment, it was found that the optimum adsorption conditions were flow rate of 3.5 l/min and 4 hours flow time. This condition could reach 99.95% adsorption efficiency of H2S from 5,879.50 mg/Nm3 to 0.67 mg/Nm3, and 74.96% adsorption efficiency of NH3 from 2.93 mg/Nm3 to 0.73 mg/Nm3. The concentration of CH4 increased from 63.88% to 76.24% in the biogas.

  16. Use of the Sabatier Process for Dynamic Biogas Upgrading in Northern Germany

    Jurgensen, Lars; Ehimen, Ehiazesebhor Augustine; Born, Jens; Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo

    Approximately 8000 farm scale biogas plants are present in Germany which produce electricity (mainly using energy crops as substrates) . The potential role of biogas plants in energy systems penetrated by high amounts of fluctuating renewable energy production is discussed in this paper. Today th...... scheme in northernmost four counties of Germany. In these four counties, 529 mostly farm scaled biogas plants could potentially produce up to 100 · 106 m3/a SNG using surplus electricity from wind and solar power generation systems availavble from 1600 h/a.......Approximately 8000 farm scale biogas plants are present in Germany which produce electricity (mainly using energy crops as substrates) . The potential role of biogas plants in energy systems penetrated by high amounts of fluctuating renewable energy production is discussed in this paper. Today the...

  17. Natural attenuation of biogas in landfill covers

    In the risk evaluation of uncontrolled biogas emissions from landfills, the process of natural attenuation in landfill covers assumes a very important role. The capacity of biogas oxidation in the cover soils seems to be the most important control to mitigate the biogas emission during the aftercare period when the biogas collection system might fail. In the present paper laboratory experiences on lab columns to study the biogas oxidation are discussed

  18. Biogas processing procedure in the research and technology; Nachhaltige Entwicklung und Klimaschutz. Ertuechtigung von Biogasanlagen aus Sicht des EEG 2012

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    Within the Hohen Luckow bioenergy workshop at 8th September 2011 in Hohen Luckow (Federal Republic of Germany), the following lectures were held: (1) Sustainability from the view of the amendment of EEG 2012 (H. Ludley); (2) The gas formation rate of culm crops and corn crops in the production of biogas (F. Weissbach); (3) Experiences in the cultivation of sorghum in Germany as well as actual questions on the evaluation of the substrate properties (H.-J. Schleusner); (4) Digestion procedure for the energetic utilization of lignocellulose in the agriculture (D. da Rocha); (5) Practical experiences on the thermo-mechanical digestion with extruder technology (C. Knitter); (6) Biogas processing procedure in the research and technology (G, Mann); (7) Progress report on the supply of biogas into the natural gas distribution system from the view of the producer (R. Boback); (8) Biogas container - mobile plant concept for the decentralized power generation (J. Warncke); (9) Upgrading of biomass conversion plants by means of an optimized management (H. Ludley); (10) The spectrum of fermentation acids as a means for the process control (A. Arndt).

  19. Design and scale-up of an oxidative scrubbing process for the selective removal of hydrogen sulfide from biogas.

    Krischan, J; Makaruk, A; Harasek, M

    2012-05-15

    Reliable and selective removal of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is an essential part of the biogas upgrading procedure in order to obtain a marketable and competitive natural gas substitute for flexible utilization. A promising biogas desulfurization technology has to ensure high separation efficiency regardless of process conditions or H(2)S load without the use or production of toxic or ecologically harmful substances. Alkaline oxidative scrubbing is an interesting alternative to existing desulfurization technologies and is investigated in this work. In experiments on a stirred tank reactor and a continuous scrubbing column in laboratory-scale, H(2)S was absorbed from a gas stream containing large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) into an aqueous solution prepared from sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO(3)) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). The influence of pH, redox potential and solution aging on the absorption efficiency and the consumption of chemicals was investigated. Because of the irreversible oxidation reactions of dissolved H(2)S with H(2)O(2), high H(2)S removal efficiencies were achieved while the CO(2) absorption was kept low. At an existing biogas upgrading plant an industrial-scale pilot scrubber was constructed, which efficiently desulfurizes 180m(3)/h of raw biogas with an average removal efficiency of 97%, even at relatively high and strongly fluctuating H(2)S contents in the crude gas. PMID:22440540

  20. Identical full-scale biogas-lift reactors (Blrs) with anaerobic granular sludge and residual activated sludge for brewery wastewater treatment and kinetic modeling.

    Xu, Fu; Huang, Zhenxing; Miao, Hengfeng; Ren, Hongyan; Zhao, Mingxing; Ruan, Wenquan

    2013-10-01

    Two identical full-scale biogas-lift reactors treating brewery wastewater were inoculated with different types of sludge to compare their operational conditions, sludge characteristics, and kinetic models at a mesophilic temperature. One reactor (R1) started up with anaerobic granular sludge in 12 weeks and obtained a continuously average organic loading rate (OLR) of 7.4 kg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/(m3 x day), COD removal efficiency of 80%, and effluent COD of 450 mg/L. The other reactor (R2) started up with residual activated sludge in 30 weeks and granulation accomplished when the reactor reached an average OLR of 8.3 kg COD/(m3 x day), COD removal efficiency of 90%, and effluent COD of 240 mg/L. Differences in sludge characteristics, biogas compositions, and biogas-lift processes may be accounted for the superior efficiency of the treatment performance of R2 over R1. Grau second-order and modified StoverKincannon models based on influent and effluent concentrations as well as hydraulic retention time were successfully used to develop kinetic parameters of the experimental data with high correlation coefficients (R2 > 0.95), which further showed that R2 had higher treatment performance than R1. These results demonstrated that residual activated sludge could be used effectively instead of anaerobic granular sludge despite the need for a longer time. PMID:24494489

  1. Design and scale-up of an oxidative scrubbing process for the selective removal of hydrogen sulfide from biogas

    Highlights: ► Alkaline oxidative scrubbing proved for biogas desulfurization ► Effect of operating conditions on hydrogen sulfide removal efficiency. ► Minimization of caustic and oxidant consumption. ► Process control via pH, redox potential and conductivity measurement. ► Investigation of long-term behavior of pilot plant operation. - Abstract: Reliable and selective removal of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an essential part of the biogas upgrading procedure in order to obtain a marketable and competitive natural gas substitute for flexible utilization. A promising biogas desulfurization technology has to ensure high separation efficiency regardless of process conditions or H2S load without the use or production of toxic or ecologically harmful substances. Alkaline oxidative scrubbing is an interesting alternative to existing desulfurization technologies and is investigated in this work. In experiments on a stirred tank reactor and a continuous scrubbing column in laboratory-scale, H2S was absorbed from a gas stream containing large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) into an aqueous solution prepared from sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The influence of pH, redox potential and solution aging on the absorption efficiency and the consumption of chemicals was investigated. Because of the irreversible oxidation reactions of dissolved H2S with H2O2, high H2S removal efficiencies were achieved while the CO2 absorption was kept low. At an existing biogas upgrading plant an industrial-scale pilot scrubber was constructed, which efficiently desulfurizes 180 m3/h of raw biogas with an average removal efficiency of 97%, even at relatively high and strongly fluctuating H2S contents in the crude gas.

  2. Biogas barometer

    The energy recovery of biogas has kept on increasing in the European Union in 2013: +10.2%. Almost 13.4 million tep (tonnes of oil equivalent) of biogas primary energy was produced but the growth of the biogas sector is decreasing (it was 16.9% between 2011 and 2012). The growth for the coming years is expected to fall further because of political decisions in some countries to limit the use of land for farming purposes and to manage the biogas sector more efficiently. Germany ranks first for the production of biogas primary energy with 6717 ktep followed by United Kingdom with 1824 ktep. 2 tables give the production of electricity and heat from biogas in the E.U. member states in 2012 and 2013. The total production of electricity and heat from biogas in the E.U. in 2013 reached 53327 GWh and 432 ktep respectively. A list reviews the most significant companies working in Europe in the sector of methanation, 10 companies are listed among which 2 are Italian: AB Energy (Gruppo AB), BTS Italia and 8 are German: MT Energie, Envitec Biogas AG, Biogas Weser-Ems, Planet Biogastechnik, Schmack Biogas GmbH, Weltec Biopower GmbH, UTS Biogastechnik (Anaergia Group), Bioconstruct and BTS Italia. (A.C.)

  3. Influence of Ce-precursor and fuel on structure and catalytic activity of combustion synthesized Ni/CeO{sub 2} catalysts for biogas oxidative steam reforming

    Vita, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.vita@itae.cnr.it; Italiano, Cristina; Fabiano, Concetto; Laganà, Massimo; Pino, Lidia

    2015-08-01

    A series of nanosized Ni/CeO{sub 2} catalysts were prepared by Solution Combustion Synthesis (SCS) varying the fuel (oxalyldihydrazide, urea, carbohydrazide and glycerol), the cerium precursor (cerium nitrate and cerium ammonium nitrate) and the nickel loading (ranging between 3.1 and 15.6 wt%). The obtained powders were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2}-physisorption, CO-chemisorption, Temperature Programmed Reduction (H{sub 2}-TPR) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The catalytic activity towards the Oxy Steam Reforming (OSR) of biogas was assessed. The selected operating variables have a strong influence on the nature of combustion and, in turn, on the morphological and structural properties of the synthesized catalysts. Particularly, the use of urea allows to improve nickel dispersion, surface area, particle size and reducibility of the catalysts, affecting positively the biogas OSR performances. - Highlights: • Synthesis of Ni/CeO{sub 2} nanopowders by quick and easy solution combustion synthesis. • The fuel and precursor drive the structural and morphological properties of the catalysts. • The use of urea as fuel allows to improve nickel dispersion, surface area and particle size. • Ni/CeO{sub 2} (7.8 wt% of Ni loading) powders synthesized by urea route exhibits high performances for the biogas OSR process.

  4. Effects of steam pretreatment and co-production with ethanol on the energy efficiency and process economics of combined biogas, heat and electricity production from industrial hemp

    Barta, Zsolt; Kreuger, Emma; Björnsson, Lovisa

    2013-01-01

    Background The study presented here has used the commercial flow sheeting program Aspen Plus™ to evaluate techno-economic aspects of large-scale hemp-based processes for producing transportation fuels. The co-production of biogas, district heat and power from chopped and steam-pretreated hemp, and the co-production of ethanol, biogas, heat and power from steam-pretreated hemp were analysed. The analyses include assessments of heat demand, energy efficiency and process economics in terms of an...

  5. Drying characteristics and nitrogen loss of biogas digestate during drying process

    Maurer, C.; Muller, J. [Hohenheim Univ., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. of Agricultural Engineering, Tropical and Subtropical Group

    2010-07-01

    The cost of transporting biogas digestate can be decreased by reducing its water content. However, the digestate emits volatile compounds during drying. This study investigated the drying behaviour and the change of digestate composition. Drying took place in a hybrid solar/waste-heat dryer that used solar energy as well as waste heat from a combined heat and power unit (CHP) and the exhaust air of a microturbine. The experiment involved the use of 60 t of liquid digestate. Climatic conditions were measured inside and outside the drying hall. Dry matter (DM) and organic dry matter (ODM) were also measured on a daily basis. In addition, the energy consumption of waste and solar heat were recorded and related to the quantity of dried feedstock. The total nitrogen, ammonium, phosphate, potassium oxide, magnesium oxide and calcium oxide in the digestate were subjected to chemical analysis before and after the drying process. Losses of nitrogen were calculated. Specific energy consumption depended on the climatic condition. Most of the energy consumption was covered by the waste heat of the CHP. A considerable amount of nitrogen was lost during the drying process.

  6. A combined process to treat lemon industry wastewater and produce biogas

    Navarro, A.R.; Rubio, M.C.; Maldonado, M.C. [Quimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, Instituto de Biotecnologia, Facultad de Bioquimica, Ayacucho, Tucuman (Argentina)

    2012-02-15

    We studied a process employed for treating lemon industry effluents, using the macrophyte Eishhornia crassipes (water hyacinth) in a phytoremediation tank with a 6000-L workload. The diluted effluents BOD and COD were reduced to 70 and 61%, respectively, working with a 1.5-h hydraulic residence time (HRT). We investigated the effect of adding every 12 h an inoculum consisting of a consortium of microorganisms isolated from the macrophyte roots and recirculating 30% of the outflow. In this way, we achieved a volumetric removal rate (VRR) of BOD = 354 g/m{sup 3} day. Plants were daily harvested from the tank to maintain growth rate and the density originally planted. We studied their use for biogas production in an anaerobic digester working with 12 and 16 days of hydraulic residence time. The yield obtained was 0.87 L/g and productivity 0.87 L/L day with a loading rate of 5 g/L day. Integrating both processes on an industrial scale would solve the effluent pollution problem and generate an energy source that could be used by the industry itself to lower its production costs. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of biogas quality from home biogas pits installed in central Vietnam

    Štěpánek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Biomass or biogas, they are an essential component of the energy sources used in the conditions of the Vietnamese countryside due to its availability and relatively low investment costs. This thesis is focused on the quality and quantity of biogas produced from home biogas plants installed in Central Vietnam. In this thesis is shown the description of the fermentation process, its final product is biogas. The thesis describes the types of home biogas digesters, which are used ...

  8. Increasing biogas production from sewage sludge anaerobic co-digestion process by adding crude glycerol from biodiesel industry.

    Nartker, Steven; Ammerman, Michelle; Aurandt, Jennifer; Stogsdil, Michael; Hayden, Olivia; Antle, Chad

    2014-12-01

    In an effort to convert waste streams to energy in a green process, glycerol from biodiesel manufacturing has been used to increase the gas production and methane content of biogas within a mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion process using primary sewage sludge. Glycerol was systematically added to the primary digester from 0% to 60% of the organic loading rate (OLR). The optimum glycerol loading range was from 25% to 60% OLR. This resulted in an 82-280% improvement in specific gas production. Following the feeding schedule described, the digesters remained balanced and healthy until inhibition was achieved at 70% glycerol OLR. This suggests that high glycerol loadings are possible if slow additions are upheld in order to allow the bacterial community to adjust properly. Waste water treatment plant operators with anaerobic digesters can use the data to increase loadings and boost biogas production to enhance energy conversion. This process provides a safe, environmentally friendly method to convert a typical waste stream to an energy stream of biogas. PMID:25249492

  9. Biogas Filter Based on Local Natural Zeolite Materials

    Satriyo Krido Wahono; Wahyu Anggo Rizal

    2014-01-01

    UPT BPPTK LIPI has created a biogas filter tool to improve the purity of methane in the biogas. The device shaped cylindrical tube containing absorbent materials which based on local natural zeolite of Indonesia. The absorbent has been activated and modified with other materials. This absorbtion material has multi-adsorption capacity for almost impurities gas of biogas. The biogas  filter increase methane content of biogas for 5-20%. The biogas filter improve the biogas’s performance such as ...

  10. Biogas process parameters--energetics and kinetics of secondary fermentations in methanogenic biomass degradation.

    Montag, Dominik; Schink, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Pool sizes of short-chain fatty acids (formate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate), hydrogen, and carbon monoxide were assayed in digesting sludge from four different methanogenic reactors degrading either sewage sludge or agricultural products and wastes at pH 8.0 and 40 or 47 °C. Free reaction energies were calculated for the respective degradation reactions involved, indicating that acetate, propionate, and butyrate degradation all supplied sufficient energy (-10 to -30 kJ per mol reaction) to sustain the microbial communities involved in the respective processes. Pools of formate and hydrogen were energetically equivalent as electron carriers. In the sewage sludge reactor, homoacetogenic acetate formation from H2 and CO2 was energetically feasible whereas syntrophic acetate oxidation appeared to be possible in two biogas reactors, one operating at enhanced ammonia content (4.5 g NH4 (+)-N per l) and the other one at enhanced temperature (47 °C). Maximum capacities for production of methanogenic substrates did not exceed the consumption capacities by hydrogenotrophic and aceticlastic methanogens. Nonetheless, the capacity for acetate degradation appeared to be a limiting factor especially in the reactor operating at enhanced ammonia concentration. PMID:26515561

  11. Anaerobic digestion of fines from recovered paper processing - Influence of fiber source, lignin and ash content on biogas potential.

    Steffen, Friedrich; Requejo, Ana; Ewald, Christian; Janzon, Ron; Saake, Bodo

    2016-01-01

    Fines concentration harms paper machine runability and output quality in recovered paper processing, hence, their extraction would be fundamentally beneficial. In this study, separated fines from an industrial recycled fiber pulp (RFP) were characterized and evaluated for their potential biogas yields with a focus on understanding the role of varying lignin and ash contents. Further, these results were compared with biogas yields from conventional chemical and mechanical pulps. Overall, methane yields of fines from mechanical pulps (21-28mL/gVS) and RFP (127mL/gVS) are relatively low compared to the high methane yields of 375mL/gVS from the chemical pulp fines. However, it was shown that the high ash content in RFP fines (up to 50%) did not negatively influence overall yield, rather, it was the presence of slowly biodegrading lignin-rich fiber fines. PMID:26520490

  12. Biogas energy development in Slovenia

    Bojnec, Štefan; Papler, Drago

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the development of the biogas energy production and use in Slovenia. The major concern is given to ecological, economic and technical determinants in decision making process for selection among alternative biogas energy production plants and use of energy for heating and electricity. The investments into the biogas plants have reduced ecological problems from large environmental polluters in urban and rural areas. Among them are sewage systems, food wastes, wastes from lar...

  13. Biogas in Burkina Faso. Influential factors of biogas projects in rural areas of Burkina Faso

    Aschaber, Andreas

    2010-07-01

    Full text: Burkina Faso is among the poorest countries in the world. The energy situation in Burkina Faso is among the most critical issues which need to be addressed in the country. The electrical power grid is insufficient and only available in urban centers. Consequently wood and charcoal is used in order to meet the basic needs for heating, cooking, and lightning by the majority of the population. The resulting overuse of natural energy resources in Burkina Faso has been causing massive deforestation and desertification on the one hand and on the other hand scarcity in fuel wood availability. According to a recent feasibility study of the GTZ, biogas is thought to be one of the most sustainable solutions for developing energy self sufficiency in rural areas of Burkina Faso. Biogas is not a new concept in Burkina Faso, as the first biogas plants were already installed in the 70's. Recently a national biogas program and the activity of various NGOs lead to a rejuvenation of attempts to establish biogas in Burkina Faso. Although biogas has a long history in Burkina Faso, no significant breakthrough of this technology has happened so far. None of the biogas plants built during the last 40 years have been operational for a long time. This contribution presents a study aimed to analyze the partial success and failures of the attempts to install biogas plants so far. The study was conducted in May 2009 as part of a project for a model application of the technology in the frame of University cooperation between Austria (University of Innsbruck) and Burkina Faso (Universite Polytechnique du Bobo Dioulasso). During the field study four sites of existing biogas plants were visited, five interviews with experts conducted and two focus groups with potential users in a rural setting were conducted. The systemic approach, including technical as well as socioeconomic aspects, yielded a wealth of factors which can potentially influence the success of biogas projects in

  14. Design and scale-up of an oxidative scrubbing process for the selective removal of hydrogen sulfide from biogas

    Krischan, J., E-mail: jutta_krischan@hotmail.com [Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Chemical Engineering, Getreidemarkt 9/166, 1060 Vienna (Austria); Makaruk, A., E-mail: aleksander.makaruk@tuwien.ac.at [Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Chemical Engineering, Getreidemarkt 9/166, 1060 Vienna (Austria); Harasek, M., E-mail: michael.harasek@tuwien.ac.at [Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Chemical Engineering, Getreidemarkt 9/166, 1060 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alkaline oxidative scrubbing proved for biogas desulfurization Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of operating conditions on hydrogen sulfide removal efficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Minimization of caustic and oxidant consumption. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Process control via pH, redox potential and conductivity measurement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Investigation of long-term behavior of pilot plant operation. - Abstract: Reliable and selective removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is an essential part of the biogas upgrading procedure in order to obtain a marketable and competitive natural gas substitute for flexible utilization. A promising biogas desulfurization technology has to ensure high separation efficiency regardless of process conditions or H{sub 2}S load without the use or production of toxic or ecologically harmful substances. Alkaline oxidative scrubbing is an interesting alternative to existing desulfurization technologies and is investigated in this work. In experiments on a stirred tank reactor and a continuous scrubbing column in laboratory-scale, H{sub 2}S was absorbed from a gas stream containing large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into an aqueous solution prepared from sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}) and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). The influence of pH, redox potential and solution aging on the absorption efficiency and the consumption of chemicals was investigated. Because of the irreversible oxidation reactions of dissolved H{sub 2}S with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, high H{sub 2}S removal efficiencies were achieved while the CO{sub 2} absorption was kept low. At an existing biogas upgrading plant an industrial-scale pilot scrubber was constructed, which efficiently desulfurizes 180 m{sup 3}/h of raw biogas with an average removal efficiency of 97%, even at relatively high and strongly fluctuating H{sub 2}S contents in the crude gas.

  15. Robust on-line monitoring of biogas processes; Robusta maettekniker on-line foer optimerad biogasproduktion

    Nordberg, Aake; Hansson, Mikael; Kanerot, Mija; Krozer, Anatol; Loefving, Bjoern; Sahlin, Eskil

    2010-03-15

    project showed that pH-adjustment with Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} can be a way of compensating for the losses of volatile compounds (up to 20% of VS), which occurs when standardized reference methods are used. This is a fundamental problem and requires further research. Monitoring of a laboratory-scale anaerobic digester with NIR showed that a previously developed multivariate model could predict propionate concentrations (R2= 0,92; RMSEP 0,39 g/L) in the interval 0-5 g/L, which is a relevant interval for inhibition (limit ca 3 g/L). A commercial FT-NIR instrument was subsequently installed at the production plant. However, the organic loading was decreased during the evaluation period due to process disturbances, at which the dynamic of the process was not in the range needed for prediction of e.g. propionate. Measurements and evaluation will continue during normal conditions after the completion of this project. Evaluation of a potentiometric sensor for ammonia with potential for on-line application showed low stability and a need for daily calibration, which therefore did not fulfill the requested demand. The project has demonstrated technologies with significant potential for on-line monitoring at production scale facilities, thus improving the knowledge base for making important decisions. Knowledge about on-line implementation has increased, and important insights into the limitations of standardized reference methods and substrate characteristics have been achieved. Instrument suppliers have in general a limited insight in the conditions at a biogas plant, which suggests that this type of WR-financed project is important for development in the area

  16. Biogas production from food-processing industrial wastes by anaerobic digestion

    Fang, Cheng

    Konfronteret med energikrise og klimaforandringer, har verden brug for grønne, effektive og kulstofneutrale energikilder, som kan erstatte fossile brændstoffer. Biogas, som dannes ved anaerob nedbrydning af organisk materiale, er en bæredygtig, pålidelig og vedvarende energikilde. Der er stor...

  17. Quantification of syntrophic acetate-oxidizing microbial communities in biogas processes.

    Westerholm, Maria; Dolfing, Jan; Sherry, Angela; Gray, Neil D; Head, Ian M; Schnürer, Anna

    2011-08-01

    Changes in communities of syntrophic acetate-oxidizing bacteria (SAOB) and methanogens caused by elevated ammonia levels were quantified in laboratory-scale methanogenic biogas reactors operating at moderate temperature (37°C) using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The experimental reactor was subjected to gradually increasing ammonia levels (0.8-6.9 g NH4 (+) -N l(-1) ), whereas the level of ammonia in the control reactor was kept low (0.65-0.90 g NH4 (+) -N l(-1) ) during the entire period of operation (660 days). Acetate oxidation in the experimental reactor, indicated by increased production of (14) CO2 from acetate labelled in the methyl carbon, occurred when ammonia levels reached 5.5 and 6.9 g NH4 (+) -N l(-1) . Syntrophic acetate oxidizers targeted by newly designed qPCR primers were Thermacetogenium phaeum, Clostridium ultunense, Syntrophaceticus schinkii and Tepidanaerobacter acetatoxydans. The results showed a significant increase in abundance of all these bacteria except T. phaeum in the ammonia-stressed reactor, coincident with the shift to syntrophic acetate oxidation. As the abundance of the bacteria increased, a simultaneous decrease was observed in the abundance of aceticlastic methanogens from the families Methanosaetaceae and Methanosarcinaceae. qPCR analyses of sludge from two additional high ammonia processes, in which methane production from acetate proceeded through syntrophic acetate oxidation (reactor SB) or through aceticlastic degradation (reactor DVX), demonstrated that SAOB were significantly more abundant in the SB reactor than in the DVX reactor. PMID:23761313

  18. Biogas production from a systems analytical perspective

    Berglund, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion and the production of biogas can provide an efficient means of meeting several objectives concerning energy, environmental and waste management policy. Interest in biogas is increasing, and new facilities are being built. There is a wide range of potential raw material, and both the biogas and digestates produced can be used in many different applications. The variation in raw materials and digestion processes contributes to the flexibility of biogas production systems, bu...

  19. BIOGAS-ECONOMICAL SIGNIFICANCE AND GENERATION THEREOF

    Kazimierz Brodowicz

    1983-01-01

    The paper presents a review of worldwide and domestic knowledge in the field of biogas generation techniques. To this there are discussed the basic fermentation processes being resonsible for biogas generation and actually used typical systems therefor presented.Particular attention has been paid to energetic aspects of the biogas. The generalization of biogas production would render possible large scale utilization of the biomass which is useless for other purposes but still renewable as a s...

  20. Utilization of auxiliary means for the enhancement of the efficiency and stability of the biogas process; Einsatz von Hilfsmitteln zur Steigerung der Effizienz und Stabilitaet des Biogasprozesses

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    Within the Guelzow expert discussions at 29th September 2010 in Guelzow (Federal Republic of Germany) the following lectures were held: (1) State of the promotional work of the FNR on the subject auxiliary means - open questions (Petra Schuesseler); (2) Utilization of auxiliary means in the biogas production - Survey and experiences from laboratory and practice (Konrad Koch); (3) ORGA - test: Development of a test procedure for the practical evaluation of the fermentation biology of NaWaRo biogas plants (Nils Engler); (3) Investigations for the utilization of minerals in biogas plants - Significance of minerals for anaerobic microorganisms and causes for concentration differences in biogas fermentation plants (Andreas Lemmer); (4) Quantification of the efficiency of mineral biogas additives at the fermentation of renewable raw materials and their verification in the practice (Dirk Wagner); (5) Optimization of processes by means of enzymes in biogas plants (Monika Heiermann); (6) Utilization of microorganisms for the enhancement of the gas yield (Doris Schmack); (7) Results of the discussion and summary (Petra Schuesseler).

  1. Bioenergy, protein and fibres from grass - biogas process monitoring; Bioenergie, Protein und Fasern aus Gras - Monitoring des Biogasprozesses

    Baier, U.; Delavy, P.

    2003-07-01

    Starting in Summer 2001 the first full scale Swiss Bio-refinery for grass processing took up operation in Schaffhausen. Grass processing covers the production of technical fibres and protein concentrate as well as anaerobic digestion of residual slops for the production of biogas and 'green' electricity. The refinery is operated by the company Bioenergie Schaffhausen as a P+D (pilot + demonstration) project of the Swiss Federal Office of Energy. Under full load it will deliver 2,000 MWh of 'green' electricity (10% own needs) and 3,000 MWh heat (50% own needs). Prior to start up the Swiss technology holder 2B Biorefineries AG mandated the University of Applied Sciences HSW with lab scale testing of the mesophilic biogas potential and anaerobic degradability of residual grass processing slops. Nutrient limitations and possible inhibition risks were evaluated. During the initial 8 months of full scale operation of the refinery in Schaffhausen an intensive monitoring of the anaerobic digester's performance was carried out. Carbon and nitrogen mass balances have been set up and the development of the granular EGSB sludge was characterised. From operational data a set of performance values was elaborated. The first year of operation was characterised by only partial exploitation of the refinery's grass processing capacity. Furthermore the protein separation and production unit has not yet been incorporated. Consequently, the EGSB biogas reactor showed a significant hydraulic underload when compared to dimensioning basics. Raw residuals were characterised by a higher particulate protein fraction. Operational conditions for the EGSB reactor were worked out to allow stable operation at elevated load conditions and with protein separation in operation. (author)

  2. Biogas : Animal Waste That Can be Alternative Energy Source

    Tuti Haryati

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Biogas is a renewable energy which can be used as alternative fuel to replace fossil fuel such as oil and natural gas . Recently, diversification on the use of energy has increasingly become an important issue because the oil sources are depleting . Utilization of agricultural wastes for biogas production can minimize the consumption of commercial energy source such as kerosene as well as the use of firewood . Biogas is generated by the process of organic material digestion by certain anaerobe bacteria activity in aerobic digester . Anaerobic digestion process is basically carried out in three steps i.e. hydrolysis, acidogenic and metanogenic . Digestion process needs certain condition such as C : N ratio, temperature, acidity and also digester design . Most anaerobic digestions perform best at 32 - 35°C or at 50 - 55°C, and pH 6 .8 - 8 . At these temperatures, the digestion process essentially converts organic matter in the present of water into gaseous energy . Generally, biogas consists of methane about 60 - 70% and yield about 1,000 British Thermal Unit/ft 3 or 252 Kcal/0.028 m3 when burned . In several developing countries, as well as in Europe and the United States, biogas has been commonly used as a subtitute environmental friendly energy . Meanwhile, potentially Indonesia has abundant potential of biomass waste, however biogas has not been used maximally .

  3. Lab-scale demonstration of recuperative thickening technology for enhanced biogas production and dewaterability in anaerobic digestion processes.

    Cobbledick, Jeffrey; Aubry, Nicholas; Zhang, Victor; Rollings-Scattergood, Sasha; Latulippe, David R

    2016-05-15

    There is growing interest in the use of high performance anaerobic digestion (AD) processes for the production of biogas at wastewater treatment facilities to offset the energy demands associated with wastewater treatment. Recuperative thickening (RT) is a promising technique which involves recycling a portion of the digested solids back to the incoming feed. In general there exists a significant number of knowledge gaps in the field of RT because the studies that have been conducted to date have almost exclusively occurred in pilot plant or full scale trials; this approach greatly limits the amount of process optimization that can be done in a given trial. In this work, a detailed and comprehensive study of RT was conducted at the lab scale; two custom designed digesters (capacity = 1.5 L) were operated in parallel with one acting as a 'control' digester and the other operating under a semi-batch RT mode. There was no significant change in biogas methane composition for the two digesters, however the RT digester had an average biogas productivity over two times higher than the control one. It was found that the recycling of the polymer flocculant back into the RT digester resulted in a significant improvement in dewatering performance. At the highest polymer concentration tested, the capillary suction time (CST) values for flocculated samples for the RT digester were over 6 times lower than the corresponding values for the control digester. Thus, there exists an opportunity to decrease the overall consumption of polymer flocculants through judicious selection of the dose of polymer flocculant that is used both for the thickening and end-stage dewatering steps in RT processes. PMID:26986495

  4. BIOGAS PROCTION FROM ANAEROBIC CO-DIGESTION OF COW DUNG AND ORGANIC WASTES (NAPIER PAK CHONG I AND FOOD WASTE IN THAILAND: TEMPERATURE EFFECT ON BIOGAS PRODUCT

    Lertluck Saitawee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogas production has been attracting increasing attention as a biofuel of the future because biogas technology not only constitutes a biofuel source, but also can be applied in the various environmental pollutants. Anaerobic digestion of high solid slurries (such as food waste and cow dung is typically performed in continuously reactor (by force substrate flow to avoid problems with a thick floating layer or large amounts of sediments. Temperature also seems to have profound influence on the biogas production. The objective of the study was to identify the optimum biogas production for anaerobic co-digestion of cow dung and organic wastes (napierpakchong I and food waste. Influence of temperature (psyhrophilic temperature 25°C and thermoplilic temperature 45°C and active biogas process on single substrate (food waste feed and co-digestion of cow dung and organic wastes (napierpakchong I and food waste was used, within the reactor was studies in 1.80 cm high over a 45 day. Results showed that best digestion was achieved when digested of cow dung, napierpakchong I and food waste on 1:1:1 and thermoplilic temperature. Maximum biogas production (R4, biogas yield, methane content and %VS reduction was found that 70 L/day, 70 L/VS feed, 65 and 80%, respectively. The result showed that the biogas production increased progressively withhigher temperature.The increased in biogas production in thermophilic temperature and psyhrophilic temperature could be up 28.01 and 26%, respectively. The biogas yield increased 12.5% of co-digestion system, which compared to thermophilic temperature and psyhrophilic temperature (R4 and R2. This behavior might be due to the higher degradability. Therefore, temperature of digester can be used effectively as an operating strategy to optimize biogas production.

  5. Experimental validation of hydrogen sulphide removal from biogas using biotrickling process at pilot plant level

    Mesa Garcia, Cristian

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of sustainable development, and ever-increasing energy costs, wastewater treatment operators focus on developing on-site energy production: the main approach today is via sewage biogas. In most cases, H2S removal is necessary to meet the requirements of the energy conversion equipment inlet requirements (for cogeneration motors around 300 – 500 ppm, but for fuel cells around 1ppm or below). Therefore to optimise the overall energy and economic balance, it i...

  6. Biogas technology in Pakistan

    Although biomethanation is a mature technology its implementation is paradoxically only partly a success in Pakistan. Biogas plants on family farms can be economical but seldom are so in Pakistan. Either the investment cost has been high or satisfactory performance of the process could not be maintained or in some case for a short period of time only. It is, however, concluded that biogas plants, if correctly operated and maintained, may prove to be appropriate to the technical abilities and economic capacity of Pakistani farmers. It can get a change to be disseminated in rural areas. Biogas technology is appropriate to the ecological and economic demands of the future. With the potential from existing cattle population only, 3 to 4 million family size biogas plants may be installed in Pakistan which can substitute of considerable part of rural fuel wood demand for their daily household energy requirements. A large amount of dung is burnt every year by households which if put in the biogas plant, may provide a considerable amount of energy along with organic fertilizer could be saved from being burned at the same time. On the basis of available data from the livestock excluding agriculture residue (50% collectivity-1991), in terms of fuel substitution, this would be equivalent to 1200 million litres of kerosene at worth economic value of 9021 million rupees saving in the form of gas and 821 million rupees as additional fertilizer value annually. (LN)

  7. Dynamic experiment of biogas desulfurization by activated carbon%活性炭脱除模拟沼气中H2S的动态试验

    史风梅; 裴占江; 王粟; 高亚冰; 孙彬; 刘杰

    2016-01-01

    The world suffers the fossil energy crisis, and biogas gains more and more attention for it is a kind of reproducible, clean and environmental-friendly energy. Biogas comes from the anaerobic fermentation of organic materials in agriculture, industry and household waste at certain temperature and pressure. The concentration of H2S in biogas varies from 10 to 2 000 ×10-6 or even more, which is different with the type, concentration of organic materials and the operation of anaerobic digestion process. In order to use biogas safely, the H2S in biogas which is hazardous to the equipment or human health should be removed from the biogas. Purification methods of H2S vary from simple physical or chemical technology to complex process including chemical, physical or biological treatment units, which depended on the use purpose of biogas. Activated carbon is a highly porous material, and known as an efficient media for low-concentration H2S removal by adsorption process. Moreover, activated carbon is easily available and cheap in price, because it is produced from biomass such as agricultural waste, wood, bamboo, coconut shells, and almond shells, which is abundant in China. Currently, most efforts are made in the study on H2S adsorption by modified activated carbon such as impregnated activated carbon with alkali or heavy metal salts. The modified active carbon has the better performances in most cases, but it is proved to have negative effects on the removal of H2S. For example, active carbon’s absorption capacity of H2S will decrease when the crystals of alkali or metal salts block the pores which act as adsorption site. The price of impregnated active carbon is higher than unmodified activated carbon and the corrosion often occurs inevitably. It is necessary to study the most efficient way to improve the performance of unmodified active carbon. Thus, the effects of the inflow rate, the concentration of H2S, the size of unmodified activated carbon and the length of

  8. Microbial community dynamics linked to enhanced substrate availability and biogas production of electrokinetically pre-treated waste activated sludge.

    Westerholm, Maria; Crauwels, Sam; Houtmeyers, Sofie; Meerbergen, Ken; Van Geel, Maarten; Lievens, Bart; Appels, Lise

    2016-10-01

    The restricted hydrolytic degradation rate of complex organic matter presents a considerable challenge in anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS). Within this context, application of pre-treatment of digester substrate has potential for improved waste management and enhanced biogas production. Anaerobic degradation of untreated or electrokinetically pre-treated WAS was performed in two pilot-scale digesters for 132days. WAS electrokinetically pre-treated with energy input 0.066kJ/kg sludge was used in a first phase of operation and WAS pre-treated with energy input 0.091kJ/kg sludge was used in a second phase (each phase lasted at least three hydraulic retention times). Substrate characteristics before and after pre-treatment and effects on biogas digester performance were comprehensively analysed. To gain insights into influences of altered substrate characteristics on microbial communities, the dynamics within the bacterial and archaeal communities in the two digesters were investigated using 16S rRNA gene sequencing (pyrosequencing) and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Specific primers targeting dominant operation taxonomic units (OTUs) and members of the candidate phylum Cloacimonetes were designed to further evaluate their abundance and dynamics in the digesters. Electrokinetic pre-treatment significantly improved chemical oxygen demand (COD) and carbohydrate solubility and increased biogas production by 10-11% compared with untreated sludge. Compositional similarity of the bacterial community during initial operation and diversification during later operation indicated gradual adaptation of the community to the higher solubility of organic material in the pre-treated substrate. Further analyses revealed positive correlations between gene abundance of dominant OTUs related to Clostridia and Cloacimonetes and increased substrate availability and biogas production. Among the methanogens, the genus Methanosaeta dominated in both digesters. Overall, the

  9. The Development of Biogas Technology in Denmark: Achievements & Obstacles

    Sannaa, Mohamed Najib

    2004-01-01

    Denmark is one of the most advanced countries in biogas technology. This country added several improvements to the biogas process in order to increase the biogas yield and thereby improve the economical profitability. Consequently, this project studied the developments of biogas technology in Denmark. The study includes a historical progress of biogas plants since 1970s; the different problems interrupted the expansion of this technology and the actions taken to overcome these obstacles. This...

  10. Anaerobic Digestion and Biogas Potential: Simulation of Lab and Industrial-Scale Processes

    Ihsan Hamawand

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a simulation was carried out using BioWin 3.1 to test the capability of the software to predict the biogas potential for two different anaerobic systems. The two scenarios included: (1 a laboratory-scale batch reactor; and (2 an industrial-scale anaerobic continuous lagoon digester. The measured data related to the operating conditions, the reactor design parameters and the chemical properties of influent wastewater were entered into BioWin. A sensitivity analysis was carried out to identify the sensitivity of the most important default parameters in the software’s models. BioWin was then calibrated by matching the predicted data with measured data and used to simulate other parameters that were unmeasured or deemed uncertain. In addition, statistical analyses were carried out using evaluation indices, such as the coefficient of determination (R-squared, the correlation coefficient (r and its significance (p-value, the general standard deviation (SD and the Willmott index of agreement, to evaluate the agreement between the software prediction and the measured data. The results have shown that after calibration, BioWin can be used reliably to simulate both small-scale batch reactors and industrial-scale digesters with a mean absolute percentage error (MAPE of less than 10% and very good values of the indexes. Furthermore, by changing the default parameters in BioWin, which is a way of calibrating the models in the software, as well, this may provide information about the performance of the digester. Furthermore, the results of this study showed there may be an over estimation for biogas generated from industrial-scale digesters. More sophisticated analytical devices may be required for reliable measurements of biogas quality and quantity.

  11. Quantification of syntrophic acetate-oxidizing microbial communities in biogas processes

    Westerholm, Maria; Dolfing, Jan; Sherry, Angela; Gray, Neil D.; Head, Ian M; Schnürer, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Changes in communities of syntrophic acetate-oxidizing bacteria (SAOB) and methanogens caused by elevated ammonia levels were quantified in laboratory-scale methanogenic biogas reactors operating at moderate temperature (37°C) using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The experimental reactor was subjected to gradually increasing ammonia levels (0.8–6.9 g NH4 +-N l−1), whereas the level of ammonia in the control reactor was kept low (0.65–0.90 g NH4 +-N l−1) during the entire perio...

  12. Biogas document; Dossier Biogaz

    Verchin, J.C.; Servais, C. [Club BIOGAZ, 94 - Arcueil (France)

    2002-06-01

    In this document concerning the biogas, the author presents this renewable energy situation in 2001-2002, the concerned actors, the accounting of the industrial methanization installations in France, the three main chains of process for industrial wastes and two examples of methanization implementation in a paper industry and in a dairy. (A.L.B.)

  13. Theoretical analysis of a biogas-fed PEMFC system with different hydrogen purifications: Conventional and membrane-based water gas shift processes

    Highlights: • Thermodynamic analysis of the biogas-fed PEMFC system is performed. • Conventional and membrane-based WGS processes for H2 purification are studied. • A flowsheet model of the PEMFC system is developed. • Effect of key parameters on yields of H2 and carbon in the biogas reformer is shown. • Performance of PEMFC systems with different H2 purification processes is analyzed. - Abstract: This study presents a thermodynamic analysis of biogas reforming and proton electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) integrated process with different hydrogen purifications: conventional and membrane-based water gas shift processes. The aim is to determine the optimal reforming process for hydrogen production from biogas in the PEMFC system. The formation of carbon is concerned in the hydrogen production. The simulation results show that increases in the steam-to-methane ratio and reformer temperature can improve the hydrogen yield and reduce the carbon formation. From the performance analysis, it is found that when the PEMFC is operated at high temperature and fuel utilization, the overall system efficiency enhances. The performance of the PEMFC system with the installation of a water gas shift membrane unit in the hydrogen purification step is slightly increased, compared with a conventional process

  14. Trace elements in NaWaRo biogas plants for balancing substrate limited deficiency symptoms and stabilizing the fermentation process; Spurenelemente in NawaRo-Biogasanlagen zum Ausgleich substratbedingter Mangelerscheinungen und zur Stabilisierung des Gaerprozesses

    Oechsner, Hans; Lemmer, Andreas [Hohenheim Univ., Stuttgart (Germany). Landesanstalt fuer Agrartechnik und Bioenergie; Preissler, Daniel

    2011-07-01

    The authors of the contribution under consideration report on trace elements in renewable resource biogas plants in order to compensate for substrate induced deficiency symptoms and to stabilize the fermentation process. The analysis of biological connections in biogas processes showed, that an optimal supply of the microorganisms with trace elements is essential for the course of the four stages of decomposition of the biogas process. Trace elements significantly are involved in the structure of coenzymes or cofactors, reduce the sulfide toxicity and stimulate the growth of methanogens. If the individual items are missing, the biogas process can be disrupted. This can result in a cut-off of the fermenter and in a stopping of the biogas production.

  15. Modeling the water scrubbing process and energy requirements for CO2 capture to upgrade biogas to biomethane

    Nock, William James; Walker, Mark; Kapoor, Rimika; Heaven, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Water scrubbing is the most widely used technology for removing CO2 from biogas and landfill gas. This work developed a rate-based mass transfer model of the CO2–water system for upgrading biogas in a packed bed absorption column. The simulated results showed good agreement with both a pilot-scale plant operating at 10 bar, and a large-scale biogas upgrading plant operating at atmospheric pressure. The calculated energy requirement for the absorption column to upgrade biogas to 98% CH4 (0.23 ...

  16. Enhancing biogas production from vinasse in sugarcane biorefineries: Effects of urea and trace elements supplementation on process performance and stability.

    Janke, Leandro; Leite, Athaydes F; Batista, Karla; Silva, Witan; Nikolausz, Marcell; Nelles, Michael; Stinner, Walter

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the effects of nitrogen, phosphate and trace elements supplementation were investigated in a semi-continuously operated upflow anaerobic sludge blanket system to enhance process stability and biogas production from sugarcane vinasse. Phosphate in form of KH2PO4 induced volatile fatty acids accumulation possibly due to potassium inhibition of the methanogenesis. Although nitrogen in form of urea increased the reactor's alkalinity, the process was overloaded with an organic loading rate of 6.1gCODL(-1)d(-1) and a hydraulic retention time of 3.6days. However, by supplementing urea and trace elements a stable operation even at an organic loading rate of 9.6gCODL(-1)d(-1) and a hydraulic retention time of 2.5days was possible, resulting in 79% higher methane production rate with a stable specific methane production of 239mLgCOD(-1). PMID:26873284

  17. A membrane based process for the upgrading of biogas to substituted natural gas (SNG) and recovery of carbondioxide for industrial use

    Norddahl, Birgir; dePreez, Jan

    2007-01-01

    A low pressure carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membrane based process to upgrade biogas from anaerobic digestion of agricultural waste to a substitute natural gas (SNG) has been tested on a pilot scale. The data extracted from the pilot plant was used to estimate membrane permeance and ideal selecti...

  18. Monitoring of biogas test plants

    Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo; Esbensen, Kim H.

    2011-01-01

    Most studies reported in the literature have investigated near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) in laboratory-scale or minor pilot biogas plants only; practically no other studies have examined the potential for meso-scale/full-scale on-line process monitoring. The focus of this study is on a meso......-scale biogas test plant implementation of process analytical technologies (PAT) to develop multivariate calibration/prediction models for anaerobic digestion (AD) processes. A 150 L bioreactor was fitted with a recurrent loop at which NIR spectroscopy and attendant reference sampling were carried out. In all...... realistic bioreactor scales, it is necessary to obtain a fairly constant level of volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration, which furthers a stable biogas production. Uncontrolled VFA contents have a significant negative impact on biogas production; VFA concentrations should not exceed 5–6000 mg/L lest...

  19. Performance of a biogas upgrading process based on alkali absorption with regeneration using air pollution control residues.

    Baciocchi, Renato; Carnevale, Ennio; Costa, Giulia; Gavasci, Renato; Lombardi, Lidia; Olivieri, Tommaso; Zanchi, Laura; Zingaretti, Daniela

    2013-12-01

    This work analyzes the performance of an innovative biogas upgrading method, Alkali absorption with Regeneration (AwR) that employs industrial residues and allows to permanently store the separated CO2. This process consists in a first stage in which CO2 is removed from the biogas by means of chemical absorption with KOH or NaOH solutions followed by a second stage in which the spent absorption solution is contacted with waste incineration Air Pollution Control (APC) residues. The latter reaction leads to the regeneration of the alkali reagent in the solution and to the precipitation of calcium carbonate and hence allows to reuse the regenerated solution in the absorption process and to permanently store the separated CO2 in solid form. In addition, the final solid product is characterized by an improved environmental behavior compared to the untreated residues. In this paper the results obtained by AwR tests carried out in purposely designed demonstrative units installed in a landfill site are presented and discussed with the aim of verifying the feasibility of this process at pilot-scale and of identifying the conditions that allow to achieve all of the goals targeted by the proposed treatment. Specifically, the CO2 removal efficiency achieved in the absorption stage, the yield of alkali regeneration and CO2 uptake resulting for the regeneration stage, as well as the leaching behavior of the solid product are analyzed as a function of the type and concentration of the alkali reagent employed for the absorption reaction. PMID:24045173

  20. Comparison of VFA titration procedures used for monitoring the biogas process

    Lützhøft, Hans-Christian Holten; Boe, Kanokwan; Fang, Cheng;

    2014-01-01

    titration procedures. Currently, no standardized procedure is used and it is therefore difficult to compare the performance among plants. The aim of this study was to evaluate four titration procedures (for determination of VFA-levels of digested manure samples) and compare results with gas chromatographic...... (GC) analysis. Two of the procedures are commonly used in biogas plants and two are discussed in literature. The results showed that the optimal titration results were obtained when 40mL of four times diluted digested manure was gently stirred (200rpm). Results from samples with different VFA...... concentrations (1-11g/L) showed linear correlation between titration results and GC measurements. However, determination of VFA by titration generally overestimated the VFA contents compared with GC measurements when samples had low VFA concentrations, i.e. around 1g/L. The accuracy of titration increased when...

  1. Research on Anaerobic Digestion: Optimization and Scalability of Mixed High-strength Food Processing Wastes for Renewable Biogas Energy

    Yu, Zhongtang [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Hitzhusen, Fredrick [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2012-12-27

    This research project developed and improved anaerobic digestion technologies, created a comprehensive Inventory of Ohio Biomass and a database of microorganisms of anaerobic digesters, and advanced knowledge and understanding of the underpinning microbiology of the anaerobic digestion process. The results and finding of this research project may be useful for future development and implementation of anaerobic digesters, especially at livestock farms. Policy makers and investors may also find the information on the biomass availability in Ohio and valuation of energy projects useful in policy making and making of investment decisions. The public may benefit from the information on biogas as an energy source and the potential impact of anaerobic digester projects on their neighborhoods.

  2. The effect of anaerobic fermentation processing of cattle waste for biogas as a renewable energy resources on the number of contaminant microorganism

    Kurnani, Tb. Benito A.; Hidayati, Yuli Astuti; Marlina, Eulis Tanti; Harlia, Ellin

    2016-02-01

    Beef cattle waste has a positive potential that can be exploited, as well as a negative potential that must be controlled so as not to pollute the environment. Beef cattle waste can be processed into an alternative energy, namely biogas. Anaerobic treatment of livestock waste to produce gas can be a solution in providing optional energy, while the resulted sludge as the fermentation residue can be used as organic fertilizer for crops. However, this sludge may containt patogenic microorganism that will damage human and environmet healt. Therefor, this study was aimed to know the potency of beef cattle waste to produce biogas and the decrease of the microorganism's number by using fixed dome digester. Beef cattle waste was processed into biogas using fixed dome digester with a capacity of 12 m3. Biogas composition was measured using Gas Cromatografi, will microorganism species was identified using Total plate Count Methode. The result of this study shows that the produced biogas contains of 75.77% Mol (CH4), 13.28% Mol (N), and 6.96% Mol (CO2). Furthermor, this study show that the anaerobic fermrntation process is capable of reducing microorganisms that could potentially pollute the environment. The number of Escherichia coli and Samonella sp. were protozoa can be reduced in order of 94.73%. Protozoa that can be identified in cattle waste before, and after anaerobic fermentation was merely Eimeria sp.. The process also reduced the yeast of 86.11%. The remaining yeast after fermentation was Candida sp. Finally, about 93.7% of endoparasites was reduced by this process. In this case, every trematode and cestoda were 100% reduced, while the nematode only 75%. Reducing some microorganisms that have the potential to pollute the environment signifies sludge anaerobic fermentation residue is safe to be applied as organic fertilizer for crops.

  3. The effect of anaerobic fermentation processing of cattle waste for biogas as a renewable energy resources on the number of contaminant microorganism

    Kurnani, Tb. Benito A.; Hidayati, Yuli Astuti; Marlina, Eulis Tanti; Harlia, Ellin

    2016-02-01

    Beef cattle waste has a positive potential that can be exploited, as well as a negative potential that must be controlled so as not to pollute the environment. Beef cattle waste can be processed into an alternative energy, namely biogas. Anaerobic treatment of livestock waste to produce gas can be a solution in providing optional energy, while the resulted sludge as the fermentation residue can be used as organic fertilizer for crops. However, this sludge may containt patogenic microorganism that will damage human and environmet healt. Therefor, this study was aimed to know the potency of beef cattle waste to produce biogas and the decrease of the microorganism's number by using fixed dome digester. Beef cattle waste was processed into biogas using fixed dome digester with a capacity of 12 m3. Biogas composition was measured using Gas Cromatografi, will microorganism species was identified using Total plate Count Methode. The result of this study shows that the produced biogas contains of 75.77% Mol (CH4), 13.28% Mol (N), and 6.96% Mol (CO2). Furthermor, this study show that the anaerobic fermrntation process is capable of reducing microorganisms that could potentially pollute the environment. The number of Escherichia coli and Samonella sp. were waste before, and after anaerobic fermentation was merely Eimeria sp.. The process also reduced the yeast of 86.11%. The remaining yeast after fermentation was Candida sp. Finally, about 93.7% of endoparasites was reduced by this process. In this case, every trematode and cestoda were 100% reduced, while the nematode only 75%. Reducing some microorganisms that have the potential to pollute the environment signifies sludge anaerobic fermentation residue is safe to be applied as organic fertilizer for crops.

  4. Biogas recovery from waste organic materials: a comparative experimental study

    Full text: Biogas production from organic waste is already traditional method for treatment of agricultural waste with simultaneous energy recovery in the form of biogas. However, biogas can also be produced efficiently treating organic waste from beverage industries and biodiesel production. In the latter case, huge amounts of crude glycerol are released posing severe problems with their treatment. The main obstacle to the efficient waste treatment by anaerobic digestion is the sensitivity of the methanogenic bacteria toward pH variations. When the digester is overloaded, high concentrations of organic acids are produced damping the activity of methanogenes. This problem can be overcome by separating the digester into different compartments, enabling the development of the consecutive processes of hydrolysis, acidogenesis and methanogenesis in different spaces.; In the present study results of biogas production from poultry litter, stillage from ethanol production, and crude glycerol from biodiesel manufacturing are presented. The experiments were carried out in a continuous baffled anaerobic reactor. It was established that the process with glycerol utilization was too sensitive toward the loading because of intensive acid formation as intermediates. The process with stillage as substrate was stable and well steered for months with very high biogas yield (350 I/kg COD) at high production rate, i.e. up to 4 wd'. The microbial profiles, the pH values and the intermediate concentrations along the reactor were determined and correlated with the biogas yield. Different microbial strains and profiles for the different substrates were observed. In the case of glycerol digestion, almost one bacterial genus, i.e. Klebsiella sp., was detected besides the methanogenes, which enables to make speculations about the pathway of competitive intermediate, biogas, and final products formation

  5. Economic assessment of biogas-to-electricity generation system with H2S removal by activated carbon in small pig farm

    This study was conducted to assess the economic feasibility of electricity generation from biogas in small pig farms with and without the H2S removal prior to biogas utilisation. The 2% potassium iodide (KI) impregnated activated carbon selected as H2S adsorbent was introduced to a biogas-to-electricity generation system in a small pig farm in Thailand as a case study. With the average inlet H2S concentration of about 2400 ppm to the adsorption unit, the H2S removal efficiency could reach 100% with the adsorption capacity of 0.062 kg of H2S/kg of adsorbent. Under the reference scenario (i.e., 45% subsidy on digester installation and fixed electricity price at 0.06 Euro/kWh) and based on an assumption that the biogas was fully utilised for electricity generation in the system, the payback period for the system without H2S removal was about 4 years. With H2S removal, the payback period was within the economic life of digester but almost twice that of the case without H2S removal. The impact of electricity price could be clearly seen for the case of treated biogas. At the electricity price fixed at 0.07 Euro/kWh, the payback period for the case of treated biogas was reduced to about 5.5 years, with a trend to decrease at higher electricity prices. For both treated and untreated biogas, the governmental subsidy was the important factor determining the economics of the biogas-to-electricity systems. Without subsidy, the payback period increased to almost 7 years and about 11 years for the case of untreated and treated biogas, respectively, at the reference electricity price. Although the H2S removal added high operation cost to the system, it is still highly recommended not only for preventing engine corrosion but also for the environment benefit in which air pollution by H2S/SO2 emission and impact on human health could be potentially reduced. (author)

  6. Promotion and marketing of the biogas way

    The biological process of anaerobic digestion is used primarily as a tool for waste treatment. It also produces energy in the form of biogas - a feature by which it is often called the biogas technology. This paper outlines special features of this process, together with other advantages and disadvantages of applying the AD or the biogas technology, to satisfy ever increasing regulatory requirements and public concerns over pollution at both global and local levels. The paper then gives suggestions which could be implemented at the Commission, national and regional levels to propagate the implementation of the biogas technology. (au)

  7. Cavitation for improved sludge conversion into biogas

    Stoop, A.H.; Bakker, T.W.; Kramer, H.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    In several studies the beneficial influence of pre-treatment of waste activated sludge with cavitation on the biogas production was demonstrated. It is however, still not fully certain whether this effect should be mainly contributed to an increase in conversion rate of organics into biogas by anaerobic bacteria, and how much cavitation increases the total biogas yield. An increase in yield is only the case if cavitation can further disrupt otherwise inaccessible cell membrane structures and ...

  8. Appraisal of domestic biogas plants in Bangladesh

    Kabir, H.; Palash, M S; Bauer, S

    2012-01-01

    Bangladesh. Biogas activities in Bangladesh have been expanding to meet the needs of alternative energy sources and reduce of the country dependence on biomass energy. Biogas is viewed an innovative and most promising option toward a partial mitigation of the existing energy problems in Bangladesh. This study examined the cost-capacity relationships of biogas plant use while considering the financial and economic feasibility with several decision making tools. Data were collected from 150 sma...

  9. Biogas Filter Based on Local Natural Zeolite Materials

    Satriyo Krido Wahono

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available UPT BPPTK LIPI has created a biogas filter tool to improve the purity of methane in the biogas. The device shaped cylindrical tube containing absorbent materials which based on local natural zeolite of Indonesia. The absorbent has been activated and modified with other materials. This absorbtion material has multi-adsorption capacity for almost impurities gas of biogas. The biogas  filter increase methane content of biogas for 5-20%. The biogas filter improve the biogas’s performance such as increasing methane contents, increasing heating value, reduction of odors, reduction of corrosion potential, increasing the efficiency and stability of the generator.

  10. Dry-Wet Fermentation for Biogas Production

    Ahlhaus, M; Barz, M; Vogel, T.

    2008-01-01

    At present biogas plants produce biogas mainly from slurry by liquid fermentation. But the low substrate digestation of herbaceous biomass by liquid fermentation permits to use only a low amount of herbaceous biomass. Since April 2007 the collaborative project entitled “Development of a combined dry-wet fermentation process to produce biogas from herbaceous biomass substrates” is conducted at the Laboratory for Integrated Energy Systems of the University of Applied Sciences in ...

  11. ORGANIC WASTE USED IN AGRICULTURAL BIOGAS PLANTS

    Joanna Kazimierowicz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of organic waste is an ecological and economical problem. Searching method for disposal of these wastes, interest is methane fermentation. The use of this process in agricultural biogas plants allows disposal of hazardous waste, obtaining valuable fertilizer, while the production of ecologically clean fuel – biogas. The article presents the characteristics of organic waste from various industries, which make them suitable for use as substrates in agricultural biogas plants.

  12. ORGANIC WASTE USED IN AGRICULTURAL BIOGAS PLANTS

    Joanna Kazimierowicz

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of organic waste is an ecological and economical problem. Searching method for disposal of these wastes, interest is methane fermentation. The use of this process in agricultural biogas plants allows disposal of hazardous waste, obtaining valuable fertilizer, while the production of ecologically clean fuel – biogas. The article presents the characteristics of organic waste from various industries, which make them suitable for use as substrates in agricultural biogas plants.

  13. Risk assessment of biogas in kitchens

    Leroux, Carole; Modelon, Hugues; Rousselle, Christophe; Bellenfant, Gaël; Ramalho, Olivier; Jaeg, Jean-Paul; Zdanevitch, Isabelle; Naja, Ghinwa M.

    2009-01-01

    The health risk associated with human exposure to pollutants while using biogas for cooking was assessed following the methodology described by the US - National Research Council. Information of hazardous compounds and compositions of several biogas types were extracted from scientific literature. Compositions were dependent on the biogas origin (production process). First, a quantitative approach was conducted to identify substances with a high health risk based on their Human Toxicity Value...

  14. Comparative Studies on Methane Upgradation of Biogas by Removing of Contaminant Gases Using Combined Chemical Methods

    Muhammad Rashed Al Mamun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Biogas, which generated from renewable sources can be used as a sustainable energy to achieve resourceful targets of biofuel for internal combustion engines. This process can be achieved in combined absorption and adsorption chemical way. This method can be employed by aqueous solutions of calcium hydroxide, activated carbon, iron(II chloride, silica gel and sodium sulfate respectively. The presence of CO2, H2S and H2O in the biogas has lowering the calorific value and detrimental corrosion effects on the metal components. Removal of these contaminants from the biogas can therefore significantly improve the gas quality. A comparison study was investigated using combined chemical methods of improving the calorific value of biogas. Experiment results revealed that the aqueous solution used effectively in reacting with CO2 in biogas (over 85-90% removal efficiency, creating CH4 enriched biogas. The removal efficiency was the highest in method 1, where efficiency results were 91.5%, 97.1% and 91.8%, for CO2, H2S, and H2O, respectively. The corresponding CH4 enrichment was 97.5%. These results indicate that the method 1 is more suitable compare to method 2. However, both methane enrichment processes might be useful for cleaning and upgrading methane quality in biogas.

  15. Biogas production from cattle manure by anaerobic digestion

    Full text: In order to deal with the energy shortage problem, we are searching for more alternative energy resources especially renewable or sustainable. Biogas is one of the solutions in dealing with the energy shortage problem. Biogas is a type of energy resources derives from organic matter during the process called anaerobic digestion. The biogas produced is mainly consisting of methane and carbon dioxide. In this research, diluted cattle manure (1:1 ration with water) was inoculated with palm oil mill (POME) activated sludge at the ratio of 1:5 and placed in a 10 liter bioreactor. The temperature and pH in the bioreactor was regulated at 6.95 and 53 degree Celsius, respectively to enhance the anaerobic digestion process. Parameters such as chemical oxygen demand, biochemical oxygen demand, total solid, volatile solid, ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N), methane (CH4) and the volume of biogas generated was monitored for effectiveness of the treatment of cattle manure via anaerobic digestion. The total volume of biogas produced in this study is 80.25 liter in 29 days while being able to treat the COD content up to 52 %. (author)

  16. Biogas from farms will be tomorrow's fuel

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy presents the results of a preliminary study on the technical, logistical and economic possibilities of agricultural biogas production for use as motor fuel. The study was made for a geographically limited region in the Swiss Canton of Lucerne. The reason for the choice of this area - which exhibits a high density of cattle and fowl - and its high potential for the production of biogas from animal excrements are discussed. The economic viability of three possible variants of biogas usage are discussed - its use as a fuel for electricity generation, the processing of the biogas and its injection into the natural gas mains and storage of the biogas in compressed-gas cylinders. Also, the relevance of biogas production in terms of environmental protection is emphasised - ammonia emissions from liquid manure poses a serious problem for the region. Further, political and market development aspects are discussed

  17. The commercialization of biogas production

    Currently there are ten large collective biogas plants and ten smaller farm plants operating in Denmark. During the last five years, biogas technology has undergone extensive technological development. The developmental process is supported by a public R and D programme and a follow-up programme for full-scale demonstration plants. Most plants still need considerable income increases before a final conclusion can be reached as to whether it is possible to achieve a profit from a corporate economic viewpoint. All plants have received investment grants. Gas production is in most cases reliable, especially due to the admixture of easily convertible organic waste as a supplement to the slurry supplies. Profitable collective biogas plants are within reach, even without investment grants. The total intake of biomass must be supplemented by 10 to 25 per cent easily convertible organic waste so that the minimum gas production reaches 30 to 35 m3 per m3 of biomass. Plants based solely on animal manure are not profitable. Energy from the biogas has to be sold at prices corresponding to consumer prices, which include Danish energy taxes. Collective biogas plants in Denmark appear to be approaching a commercial breakthrough. The concept of a collective biogas plant has been developed to address the energy-related, environmentally-related and agricultural problems. (AB)

  18. Energy from whey - comparison of the biogas and bioethanol processes; Energie a partir de petit-lait : comparaison des filieres biogaz et bioethanol

    Fruteau de Laclos, H.; Membrez, Y. [Erep SA, Aclens (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a project which investigated how energy could be generated from the whey produced in the cheese-making process. The first part of the project aimed to validate a concept for on-site production and use of biogas at a medium-sized cheese factory. The results of the first step, an experimental study carried out using a down-flow fixed-film bio-reactor, are discussed. This allowed the determination of the optimal working parameters as well as providing an estimate of the performance of the process. The second part of the project aimed to compare the bio-ethanol and biogas production processes. It was carried out in collaboration with AlcoSuisse and the Energy Systems Laboratory at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Lausanne. The results of a life-cycle assessment (LCA) are discussed, which compared the two processes from an environmental point of view. Here, two impacts were considered: fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse effect. The replacement of fuel-oil with biogas for heat production and the replacement of conventional petrol with mixture including 5% bio-ethanol were examined. The results are presented that show that there was no significant difference between the two processes. According to the authors, the treatment of one cubic meter of cheese-whey allows savings of more than 20 litres of oil equivalent and 60 kg of CO{sub 2} emissions.

  19. Effects of various LED light wavelengths and intensities on microalgae-based simultaneous biogas upgrading and digestate nutrient reduction process.

    Zhao, Yongjun; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Hui; Yan, Cheng; Zhang, Yuejin

    2013-05-01

    Biogas is a well-known, primary renewable energy source, but its utilizations are possible only after upgrading. The microalgae-based bag photo-bioreactor utilized in this research could effectively upgrade biogas and simultaneously reduce the nutrient content in digestate. Red light was determined as the optimal light wavelength for microalgae growth, biogas upgrading, and digestate nutrient reduction. In the range of moderate light intensities (i.e., 800, 1200, 1600, and 2000 μmol m(-2) s(-1)), higher light intensities achieved higher biogas upgrade and larger digestate nutrient reduction. Methane content attained the highest value of 92.74±3.56% (v/v). The highest chemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus reduction efficiency of digestate were 85.35±1.04%, 77.98±1.84%, and 73.03±2.14%, respectively. Considering the reduction and economic efficiencies of the carbon dioxide content of biogas and digestate nutrient as well as the biogas upgrading standard, the optimal light intensity range was determined to be from 1200 to 1600 μmol m(-2) s(-1). PMID:23567717

  20. Biogas barometer; barometre biogaz

    Anon.

    2010-11-15

    The biogas sector has never before aroused so much attention as it does today. Elected officers and investors' interest has been fired by the gradual introduction of regulatory restrictions on the treatment of organic waste and the renewable energy commitments recently made by the European Union Member States. The biogas sector is gradually deserting its core activities of waste cleanup and treatment and getting involved in energy production, with so much enthusiasm that in some countries its scope of action has extended to using energy crops. Across the European Union, the sector's progress is as clear as daylight, as in 2009, primary energy growth leapt by a further 4.3 per cent. (author)

  1. Start-up strategies in manure-fed biogas reactors: Process parameters and methanogenic communities

    Four start-up strategies were assayed in 75 dm3 continuous stirred-tank reactors to select the optimal conditions for the start-up of the demonstration BIO4GAS® plant. Two reactors were completely filled with manure and their temperature increased from 20 to 37 °C at either a slow or fast rate. The other two reactors were started at 37 °C with a seed sludge from a stably operating plant and their load (cattle manure) increased at a low or high rate. Reactor performance was monitored for 35 days. The composition and abundance of the methanogenic communities was determined using a phylogenetic microarray and quantitative PCR. All reactors performed successfully in terms of biogas production and experienced a steady start-up, with pH values above 7.3 and VFA/alkalinity ratios below 0.3, denoting stability. Similar methanogenic loads (averaging 5 × 107 g-1 of 16S rRNA gene copies) were detected in the cattle manure and seed sludge, however the methanogenic diversity was higher in the manure with dominance of Methanosarcina and subdominance of Methanocorpusculum and Methanobrevibacter. Starting-up the reactors with an initial full load of manure and progressively increasing the temperature entailed less changes in the sludge chemical environment and in the dynamics of the dominant methanogens. Using a rate of temperature increase of 0.61 K d−1 proved better than1.21 K d−1 with a methane yield of 103.8 dm3 kg−1 VS and a COD mass removal efficiency of 28.3%. The diverse methanogenic community in the manure easily adapted to reactor upsets due to forced overload conditions. - Highlights: • Cattle manure holds abundant and diverse methanogenic communities. • CSTRs can be started up without seed, but manure and a slow temperature rise. • This warrants a smooth start-up in terms of performance and community dynamics. • Methanogenic communities in such reactors withstand upsets due to overload conditions

  2. Yield and Quality of Biogas from Anaerobic Fermentation of Grass

    Poláček, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Biogas is generally considered as a renewable source of energy. In fact, however, it is biodegradable organic material, that makes this source of energy renewable. Biogas is, then, the final product of anaerobic fermentation of these materials. Because energetically the most valuable component of biogas is methane (CH4) its relative volume stands as the measure of biogas quality. The process of anaerobic fermentation was characterized in the first part of this thesis. Organic materials ar...

  3. The progress and prospects of rural biogas production in China

    Biogas production is an important aspect of China's energy strategy. After decades’ application and research, China biogas has achieved considerable accomplishments. This study presents the progress and prospect of biogas technologies and industry in China. Two biogas patterns exist in China, that is, household-scaled digester for scattered farmers and biogas plant for centralized biogas production. Household-scaled digester which is simple and practical has been widely used and fully developed. Biogas plants have being sprung up with different materials, process and biogas utilization technologies. By the end of 2010, 38.51 million household-scaled digesters, and 27,436 large- and medium-scaled biogas plants for agricultural wastes were built. The calculation result of biogas potential from agricultural wastes shows that those used raw materials account for only 1.90% of the total availability. Chinese government promulgated several laws and policies, and gave financial supports to promote the development of biogas. However, some problems such as inferior equipment technology, imperfect policy incentive hamper its wide application and promotion. With the rapid development of economy and the improvement of rural living condition, China biogas industry is expected to advance toward orientation of scalization, industrialization and commercialization. - Highlights: ► Developing progress of biogas production in China is evaluated comprehensively. ► Status of biogas industrialization is estimated. ► New problems which occurred during rural biogas construction were analyzed. ► Biogas production potentials from agricultural wastes in China were calculated. ► Prospect of China rural biogas is expected.

  4. Biogas plant in Järna

    Schäfer, Winfried; Granstedt, Artur; Evers, Lars

    2005-01-01

    The Biodynamic Research Institute in Järna developed an on-farm biogas plant integrated within the highly self-supporting farm organism, Skilleby-Yttereneby, one of the farms studied in the BERAS project. The biogas plant digests dairy cattle manure and organic residues originating from the farm and the surrounding food processing units.

  5. Parameter estimation and long-term process simulation of a biogas reactor operated under trace elements limitation

    Highlights: • Estimation of ADM1 parameter uncertainty by nonlinear, correlated parameter analysis. • Unbounded confidence regions were obtained for single hydrolysis rate constants. • ADM1 carbohydrates were divided into a slowly and readily degradable part. • Bioavailability of trace metals explained discrepancies between modeled and measured data. - Abstract: The Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) was modified to describe the long-term process stability of a two-stage agricultural biogas system operated for 494 days with a mono-substrate. The ADM1 model fraction for carbohydrates was divided into a slowly and readily degradable part. Significant different hydrolysis rate constants were found for proteins and single fractions of carbohydrates in batch experiments. Degradation of starch, xylan (hemicellulose), cellulose and zein (protein) were modeled with first order hydrolysis rate coefficients of 1.20 d−1, 0.70 d−1, 0.18 d−1 and 0.30 d−1, respectively. While the hydrolysis rate coefficients found in batch experiments could be used for predicting continuous process data, the statistically calculated confidence regions (nonlinear parameter estimation) showed that the upper limits were unbounded. Single discrepancies between measured and modeled process data of the two-stage pilot system could be explained by the lack of bioavailability of trace elements. Addition of iron, as Fe(III)Cl3, allowed stable process conditions for an organic loading rate (OLR) up to 2.5 gVS L−1 d−1. Additional supplement of trace elements was necessary for process operation at OLRs above 2.5 gVS L−1 d−1

  6. Informing international UNFCCC technology mechanisms from the ground up: Using biogas technology in South Africa as a case study to evaluate the usefulness of potential elements of an international technology agreement in the UNFCCC negotiations process

    Transfer of low carbon technologies to developing countries is 1 approach for tackling rising global emissions. An international technology transfer mechanism has been proposed under the UNFCCC; however, it remains unclear how this international mechanism would translate into local level technology implementation. This study uses biogas technology in South Africa to obtain empirical data inductively related to technology transfer. Observations and activities specific to the biogas sector in South Africa are put forward based on site visits and stakeholder discussions in South Africa, the UK, Germany and Sweden. This paper presents empirical findings on technology transfer in the biogas sector in South Africa and analyses the role of an international technology mechanism in supporting the uptake of biogas. Many of the barriers to biogas technology in South Africa are national level constraints such as lack of supportive policy environment, financial incentives and information sharing. This case study supports the argument that it will be unrealistic for international technology mechanisms to capture the necessary specificities of individual technologies at a country level. Therefore, as demonstrated through the example of biogas technology in South Africa, there is a need for both effective national and international engagement to support technology implementation. - Highlights: ► The UNFCCC technology mechanism aims to increase low carbon technology deployment. ► The interface of global technology frameworks and national implementation is unclear. ► Biogas is a widely used technology yet its uptake in South Africa (SA) is minimal. ► Empirical data is gathered from biogas sites in SA, UK, Germany and Sweden. ► Findings show biogas uptake in SA requires national and international support

  7. The control of H2S in biogas using iron ores as in situ desulfurizers during anaerobic digestion process.

    Zhou, Qiying; Jiang, Xia; Li, Xi; Jiang, Wenju

    2016-09-01

    In this study, five kinds of iron ores, limonite, hematite, manganese ore, magnetite and lava rock, were used as the in situ desulfurizers in the anaerobic digestion reactors to investigate their effects on controlling H2S in biogas. The results show that the addition of the five iron ores could significantly control the content of H2S in biogas, with the best performance for limonite. As limonite dosages increase (10-60 g/L), the contents of H2S in biogas were evidently decreased in the digesters with different initial sulfate concentrations (0-1000 mg/L). After the anaerobic digestion, the removed sulfur was mostly deposited on the surface of limonite. A possible mechanism of H2S control in biogas by limonite was proposed preliminarily, including adsorption, FeS precipitation, and Fe (III) oxidation. The results demonstrated that limonite was a promising in situ desulfurizer for controlling H2S in biogas with low cost and high efficiency. PMID:27209038

  8. Technical improvements with biogas plants

    Perwanger, A.

    In theory and practice, science aims at smooth operation of biogas plants at a good cost/benefit ratio by improving plant design and introducing more effective process techniques. For several years now, experience gained with the construction and operation of over 40 biogas plants are evaluated at the Landtechnik Weihenstephan in co-operation with manufacturing companies and committed farmers. By means of elementary drawings, 10 differently designed biogas plants are explained in greater detail concerning their technical features (structure, efficiency, function) which comprise, too, a through-flow facility, separate gasometer, mechanical stirrer, construction and refitting of such plants by the user, a rotary reactor floating in a water tank, a small-sized gas cupola and a flexible foil hood. With optimum process technology, there are still some issues left unanswered like e.g. suitable process temperature and intensity of stirrer.

  9. Biogas from by-products; Biogas aus Nebenprodukten

    Mack, Andreas [Eisenmann Anlagenbau GmbH und Co. KG, Boeblingen (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    The Italian sugar producer Co.Pro.B. (Minerbio, Italy) looked for an industrially experienced plant engineer for the biogas process in order to utilize energetically the by-products from the processing of sugar beets. Co.Pro.B. found the German environmental technology specialist Eisenmann Anlagenbau GmbH and Co. KG (Boeblingen, Federal Republic of Germany). After a planning and building period of only six months, even three biogas plants with plug-flow fermentation were brought on line in the provinces Bologna and Padua in autumn 2012.

  10. Biogas desulfurization with a new developed doped activated carbon. 20 month pilot test; Biogasfeinentschwefelung mittels neu entwickelter dotierter Aktivkohle. 20-monatiger Praxistest

    Rossow, Silvana; Deerberg, Goerge; Goetze, Toralf; Kanswohl, Norbert; Nelles, Michael [Univ. Rostock (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Abfall- und Stoffstromwirtschaft

    2009-05-15

    Doped activated carbon is a special developed activated carbon for the desulfurization of technical gases. Based on its special adsorption properties, it is able to bond a large amount of hydrogen sulfide. By the special manufacturing method it was possible to optimize further the performance for the desulfurization of gases. In a biogas plant with an installed electric capacity of 2 MW the functionality of the doped activated carbon was proofed in a real biogas stream in a 20 month pilot test. The activated carbon was used in a special adsorption system that was tunes on the requirement of the activated carbon and on the site of installation. Because the biogas plant was in the starting period, all the time there were variable operation conditions. In spite of the variable conditions the doped activated carbon shows a permanent complete desulfurization, as in the executed laboratory experiments. By the use of the desulfurization system the concentration of hydrogen sulfide is decreased less than 1 ppm. The prejudices with are often caused by hydrogen sulphide could not identify until now. A positive evidence of the excellent desulfurization is the doubling of the oil lifetime of the block heating station. (orig.)

  11. Biogas upgrading to biomethane. Proceedings; Biogasaufbereitung zu Biomethan. Tagungsband

    NONE

    2008-12-05

    Within the 6th Hanauer Dialogue 'Biogas upgrading to biomethane' at 21st February, 2008, the following lectures were held: (a) Processing of biogas - an introduction (Michael Beil); (b) The climate protecting targets of the Federal Republic of Germany: Which role will play the upgrading of biogas, and which legal boundary conditions are created by the Federal Government? (Uwe Holzhammer); (c) Future strategy: CH{sub 4} grids (Juergen Schmid); (d) Biogas upgrading and biomethane utilization in Sweden (Anneli Petersson); (e) Biogas upgrading and utilization of bio methane in Switzerland (Arthur Wellinger); (f) Biogas upgrading by means of pressure swing adsorption (Alfons Schulte-Schulze Berndt); (g) Biogas upgrading by means of pressurized water washing (Ulf Richter); (h) Biogas upgrading for feeding in public grids. The case of biogas plant Bruck a.d. Leitha (Michael Harasek); (i) Biogas upgrading by means of chemical absorption according to the LP Cooab process (Jerome van Beek); (j) Practical experiences in unpressurized amine washing MT bio methane (Karsten Wuensche); (k) Biogas upgrading by means of organic physical washing with HAASE biogas amplifiers (Roland Kahn); (l) Upgrading using cryogenic technology; the GPP registered -system (Jeroen de Pater); (m) Micro Gas Distribution Systems: Alternatives to biogas upgrading and grid injection (Michael Beil, Bernd Krautkremer); (n) Feeding of exchange gas. The case of project Straelen and Kerpen (Frank Schaefer); (o) Feeding of biogas from the view of grid operators (Norbert Nordmeyer); BIOGASMAX: Biogas as Vehicle Fuel - Market Expansion to 2020 Air Quality (Michael Beil, Uwe Hoffstede); (p) Study: Feeding of biogas into the natural gas distribution system (Fachagentur Nachwachsende Rohstoffe).

  12. Evaluation of biogas of waste from poultry

    Most of the farms, the waste of agricultural production do not receive adequate treatment for the stabilization of organic matter and reduce its pollution potential. The anaerobic digestion is an alternative for the treatment of waste, as well as allowing the reduction of pollution potential and the health risks of waste to a minimum, promotes the generation of biogas used as a heat source for various uses on the farm. Thus, the aim of this work was to evaluate the biogas production efficiency from the chicken waste. For the supply of biodigesters, adopted the total solids content of 8% and discontinuous supply system. The biogas potential was determined on the basis of their daily production and explosive rate. It was observed that the biogas production started 24 hours after the start of supplying the digesters. The maximum biogas production was approximately 0.87 L after the ninth and the 54th day starting the digestion process. The average daily production of biogas generated from bird manure was 0.022 L, while the cumulative 0.91 L after 72 days of digestion. The explosive rate of biogas generated by poultry origin residues peaked at 51% after 32 days of the start of the digestion process. In this analysis, we found the presence of methane in the biogas produced in all substrates tested after 24 h of digestion, because it’s burning in the presence of an ignition source (Fire). (full text)

  13. Critical evaluation of substitution of natural gas by biogas

    Biogas use in Germany's distribution grid is regulated by the federal integrated energy and climate program. The key measures that influence the biogas feed-in include core regulation; changes to the act grating feed-in preference for electricity generated from renewable energies; regulation for heat supply from renewable energies; and regulations regarding biofuels. A critical evaluation of substitution of natural gas by biogas was presented. Specific topics that were discussed included aims and measures; potential; usage pathways for biogas; efficiency criteria of usage pathways; and location analysis. The presentation also discussed the parameters of raw biogas and regular distribution grid; a process chain for biogas upgrading; and criteria for process evaluation. It was concluded that costs and environmental relevance of biogas-processing can be compared over the complete life cycle for various pathways and configurations. This represented an excellent and very flexible planning tool. Subsidies and related measures could be focussed on the most efficient pathways. tabs., figs.

  14. New Networks for Biogas

    Eekelen, R. van [Kiwa Gas Technology B. V., Apeldoorn (Netherlands)

    2012-06-15

    The study of 'New Networks for Biogas' main goal is to reduce the uncertainties associated with the design choices for biogas network configurations. Supplementary to the objective an overview of the state-of-the-art on the design, operations and maintenance of biogas networks in Europe is given.

  15. Integrated rural industrialization through biogas

    Role of biogas in rural industrialization in India is explained. The Khadi and Village Industries Commission has installed over 2 lakhs (0.2 million) biogas plants during the last 30 years. A 15 cu.m. capacity plant costs Rs. 35,000/-. It produces 65 tons bio-manure worth Rs. 13,000/- in a year and fuel gas equivalent to 3,285 litres of kerosene worth Rs. 9855/-. It provides employment to 300 man days. In addition to serving as a source of energy and manure, it reduces deforestation, solves rural sanitation problem and maintain environmental equilibrium. Industrial activities suitable for rural areas and which can use biogas as a source of power are indicated. (M.G.B.)

  16. Geodetic works in the process of planning and constructing a biogas plant

    Hajdenek, Lidija

    2011-01-01

    Land surveying plays an important role in the process of building constructions. Apart from providing geodetic plans, land surveying also manages procedures that are necessary for the real estate data recording. At the same time the legislation of land survey services needs to be followed, because the changes of legislation consequently play the role in land surveying in the process of building construction. The land surveying works must be carried out with high quality, because they present ...

  17. Study of the Process of Hydraulic Mixing in Anaerobic Digester of Biogas Plant

    Karaeva Julia V.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Two systems of hydraulic mixing in a vertical cylindrical anaerobic digester: standard and modernised are discussed in the paper. Numerical investigations that were carried out are focused on a study of hydrodynamic processes in an aerobic digester using two various systems of hydraulic mixing as well as on analysis of the efficiency of methane fermentation process accomplished under different geometric parameters of an anaerobic digester and systems of hydraulic mixing.

  18. Biogas from lignocellulosic biomass

    Berglund Odhner, Peter; Schabbauer, Anna [Grontmij AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Sarvari Horvath, Ilona; Mohseni Kabir, Maryam [Hoegskolan i Boraas, Boraas (Sweden)

    2012-01-15

    Grontmij AB has cooperated with the University of Boraas to evaluate the technological and economical possibilities for biogas production from substrates containing lignocellulose, such as forest residues, straw and paper. The state of knowledge regarding biogas production from cellulosic biomass has been summarized. The research in the field has been described, especially focusing on pretreatment methods and their results on increased gas yields. An investigation concerning commercially available pretreatment methods and the cost of these technologies has been performed. An economic evaluation of biogas production from lignocellulosic materials has provided answers to questions regarding the profitability of these processes. Pretreatment with steam explosion was economically evaluated for three feedstocks - wood, straw and paper - and a combination of steam explosion and addition of NaOH for paper. The presented costs pertain to costs for the pretreatment step as it, in this study, was assumed that the pretreatment would be added to an existing plant and the lignocellulosic substrates would be part of a co-digestion process. The results of the investigation indicate that it is difficult to provide a positive net result when comparing the cost of pretreatment versus the gas yield (value) for two of the feedstocks - forest residues and straw. This is mainly due to the high cost of the raw material. For forest residues the steam pretreatment cost exceeded the gas yield by over 50 %, mainly due to the high cost of the raw material. For straw, the production cost was similar to the value of the gas. Paper showed the best economic result. The gas yield (value) for paper exceeded the pretreatment cost by 15 %, which makes it interesting to study paper further.

  19. A review of chemical absorption of carbon dioxide for biogas upgrading

    Fouad RH Abdeen; Maizirwan Mel; Mohammed Saedi Jami; Sany Izan Ihsan; Ahmad Faris Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Significant attention has been given to biogas production, purification and upgrading as a renewable and clean fuel supplement. Biogas is a product of an anaerobic digestion process comprising methane, carbon dioxide, and trace amounts of other gases. Biogas purification removes trace gases in biogas for safe utilisation. Biogas upgrading produces methane-rich biogas by removing bulk carbon dioxide from the gas mixture. Several carbon dioxide removal techniques can be applied for biogas upgrading. However, chemical absorption of carbon dioxide for biogas upgrading is of special significance due to its operation at ambient or near ambient temperature and pressure, thus reducing energy consumption. This paper reviews the chemical absorption of carbon dioxide using amine scrubbing, caustic solvent scrubbing, and amino acid salt solution scrubbing. Each of these tech-niques for biogas upgrading is discussed. The paper concludes that an optimised implementation of the chemical absorption techniques for biogas upgrading requires further research.

  20. Investigation of thermal integration between biogas production and upgrading

    Highlights: • Identify thermal characteristics of amine-based biogas upgrading for waste heat recovery. • Identify thermal characteristics of AD biogas production as sink for heat recovery. • Evaluation of thermal integration between biogas production and upgrading to improve overall energy efficiency. • Cost analysis applied for the economic feasibility of the thermal integration. • Using the principles of target design and system integration for connected thermal processes. - Abstract: Thermal integration of anaerobic digestion (AD) biogas production with amine-based chemical absorption biogas upgrading has been studied to improve the overall efficiency of the intergraded system. The thermal characteristics have been investigated for industrial AD raw biogas production and amine-based chemical absorption biogas upgrading. The investigation provides a basic understanding for the possibilities of energy saving through thermal integration. The thermal integration is carried out through well-defined cases based on the thermal characteristics of the biogas production and the biogas upgrading. The following factors are taken into account in the case study: thermal conditions of sub-systems, material and energy balances, cost issues and main benefits. The potential of heat recovery has been evaluated to utilise the waste heat from amine-based upgrading process for the use in the AD biogas production. The results show that the thermal integration has positive effects on improving the overall energy efficiency of the integrated biogas plant. Cost analysis shows that the thermal integration is economically feasible

  1. Integrated extraction and anaerobic digestion process for recovery of nutraceuticals and biogas from pomegranate marcs

    Pomegranate marc (PM), a by-product from pomegranate juice processing, has not been effectively utilized. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine the yields and properties of antioxidants (henceforth referring to total phenolics in terms of tannic acid equivalent) and oil extracted from v...

  2. Process model for ammonia volatilization from anaerobic swine lagoons incorporating varying wind speeds and biogas bubbling

    Ammonia volatilization from treatment lagoons varies widely with the total ammonia concentration, pH, temperature, suspended solids, atmospheric ammonia concentration above the water surface, and wind speed. Ammonia emissions were estimated with a process-based mechanistic model integrating ammonia ...

  3. Numerical investigation of biogas flameless combustion

    Highlights: • Fuel consumption decreases from 3.24 g/s in biogas conventional combustion to 1.07 g/s in flameless mode. • The differences between reactants and products temperature intensifies irreversibility in traditional combustion. • The temperature inside the chamber is uniform in biogas flameless mode and exergy loss decreases in this technique. • Low O2 concentration in the flameless mode confirms a complete and quick combustion process in flameless regime. - Abstract: The purpose of this investigation is to analyze combustion characteristics of biogas flameless mode based on clean technology development strategies. A three dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) study has been performed to illustrate various priorities of biogas flameless combustion compared to the conventional mode. The effects of preheated temperature and wall temperature, reaction zone and pollutant formation are observed and the impacts of combustion and turbulence models on numerical results are discussed. Although preheated conventional combustion could be effective in terms of fuel consumption reduction, NOx formation increases. It has been found that biogas is not eligible to be applied in furnace heat up due to its low calorific value (LCV) and it is necessary to utilize a high calorific value fuel to preheat the furnace. The required enthalpy for biogas auto-ignition temperature is supplied by enthalpy of preheated oxidizer. In biogas flameless combustion, the mean temperature of the furnace is lower than traditional combustion throughout the chamber. Compared to the biogas flameless combustion with uniform temperature, very high and fluctuated temperatures are recorded in conventional combustion. Since high entropy generation intensifies irreversibility, exergy loss is higher in biogas conventional combustion compared to the biogas flameless regime. Entropy generation minimization in flameless mode is attributed to the uniform temperature inside the chamber

  4. Energy use of biogas hampered by the presence of siloxanes

    Siloxanes are widely used in industrial processes and consumer products. Some of them reach the wastewater. Siloxanes are not decomposed in the activated sludge process and partly concentrate in the sludge. During anaerobic digestion of the sludge, they volatilise into the formed biogas. Combustion of silicon containing gases, e.g., when producing electricity, produces, however, the abrasive microcrystalline silica that has chemical and physical properties similar to those of glass and causes serious damage to gas engines, heat exchangers and catalytic exhaust gas treatment systems. The growing consumption of silicones and siloxanes and the subsequent increased concentration in wastewater, together with the increasing interest in the production of biogas and 'green energy' in sewage treatment plants, has created significant concern about the presence of siloxanes and the related damage (fouling etc.) in the biogas beneficiation equipment. The present paper, therefore, reviews the fundamentals of siloxanes and the current problems of the associated fouling. Moreover, it summarizes the useable methods for siloxane abatement from biogas and makes some recommendations towards preventive actions

  5. Co-digestion of manure and whey for in situ biogas upgrading by the addition of H2: process performance and microbial insights

    Luo, Gang; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-01-01

    the biogas composition. The best biogas composition (75:6.6:18.4) was obtained at stirring speed 150 rpmand using ceramic diffuser, while the biogas in the control reactor consisted of CH4 and CO2 at a ratio of 55:45. The consumed hydrogen was almost completely converted to CH4, and there was no...

  6. Diffusion of the technology of the biogas in Colombia: Documentation of the Project. Cali (CO)

    The manual shows the general limits and considerations that should be kept in mind to implement the systems of biogas production in the Colombian rural zones. In this project they participated the Regional Autonomous Corporation of the Cauca C.V.C., the German Society of Technical Cooperation GTZ and the consultant German signature Dekotup; society for Adapted Technologies in Areas in Development Ltda. The importance of the biogas systems like technology adapted by the advantages is shown: they Reduce the danger and the contamination of the residuals payees of germs pathogens, they eliminate the unpleasant scent of the waste, they don't produce imbalance in the ecosystem and eat non by-product an effluent it is obtained with high properties bio fertilizing. Initially it is described the phases of the process of fermentation: hydrolysis, acidification and methanization, the types of biogas plants are described used floating bell, fixed dome and the ball plant; the methods for the planning and the design of the plants as well as the dimensions. It is presented a classic example of the design and construction of a plant. It is included the composition of the biogas and their use forms. The different biogas plants are shown that were built and those that were in project; the use of effluents of gas like bio-fertilizer, the form of determining the activities for the popularization of the biogas technology

  7. Replacing Natural Gas by Biogas — Determining the Bacterial Contamination of Biogas by PCR

    Jiřina Čermáková

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A promising way of using biogas is to upgrade it to natural gas, which is referred to as Substitute Natural Gas (SNG or biomethane. Biomethane, or biogas, is produced by biological processes of harnessing the ability of microorganisms to degrade organic material to methane. Some of the microorganisms are aerosolized from the digester into the biogas; afterwards a bio-film is formed that attaches to the surfaces of the distribution pipes, and can find it was to the place where the end use of biogas takes place. This paper deals with the detection of microbial species in biogas, their influenceon corrosion and the potential risk that diseases can be spread via biogas using molecular techniques. Using molecular methods, we found that raw biogas contains about 8 million microorganisms per m3, which is most likely the result of microbial transmission from the anaerobic digestion process. Some bacterial species may contribute to the corrosion of pipelines and equipment; others are opportunistic pathogens that can cause toxic reactions. However, most bacterial species, more than 40 % in biogas, are still unknown, as is their influence on the digestion process and on human health. Further studies are needed to better understand the behavior of microorganisms in anaerobic digestion and to preventmicrobial-influenced corrosion and microbial dissemination.

  8. ANAEROBIC DIGESTION MODEL ANALYSIS OF THE FERMENTATION PROCESS IN PSYCHROPHILIC AND MESOPHILIC CHAMBER IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMOUNT OF BIOGAS SOURCED

    Dariusz Zdebik

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents problems concerning the modelling of anaerobic sludge stabilization, with the additional substrate (waste transported, dairy butchery sewage in psychrophilic fermentation conditions in the range 10–20 °C and mesophilic at 35 °C. Simulation test was conducted in the two digesters. Results of the study allowed to evaluate the effectiveness of conducting these processes in separate chambers, i.e. the psychrophilic and mesophilic chamber. During the simulations, terms of obtaining volatile fatty acids and biogas in conjunction with the operating conditions of the chambers indicated.

  9. Mathematical modelization of physical process of biogas migration in sanitary landfills of urban solid wastes; Modelizacion matematica del proceso fisico de migracion del biogas en vertederos controlados de R.S.U

    Maranon Maison, E.; Sastre Andres, H.; Martin Gonzalez, S.

    1997-09-01

    An analysis of the laws that govern the biogas movements inside the landfill is carried out. The mathematical equations needed to resolve the problem are studied. Then, a model is defined and used to calculate the biogas movements in several situations. The results obtained are contrasted with data from the bibliography and with tests carried out at the La Zoreda, Landfill (Asturias Spain). (Author) 11 refs.

  10. Bioelectrochemical treatment of table olive brine processing wastewater for biogas production and phenolic compounds removal.

    Marone, A; Carmona-Martínez, A A; Sire, Y; Meudec, E; Steyer, J P; Bernet, N; Trably, E

    2016-09-01

    Industry of table olives is widely distributed over the Mediterranean countries and generates large volumes of processing wastewaters (TOPWs). TOPWs contain high levels of organic matter, salt, and phenolic compounds that are recalcitrant to microbial degradation. This work aims to evaluate the potential of bioelectrochemical systems to simultaneously treat real TOPWs and recover energy. The experiments were performed in potentiostatically-controlled single-chamber systems fed with real TOPW and using a moderate halophilic consortium as biocatalyst. In conventional anaerobic digestion (AD) treatment, ie. where no potential was applied, no CH4 was produced. In comparison, Bio-Electrochemical Systems (BES) showed a maximum CH4 yield of 701 ± 13 NmL CH4·LTOPW(-1) under a current density of 7.1 ± 0.4 A m(-2) and with a coulombic efficiency of 30%. Interestingly, up to 80% of the phenolic compounds found in the raw TOPW (i.e. hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol) were removed. A new theoretical degradation pathway was proposed after identification of the metabolic by-products. Consistently, microbial community analysis at the anode revealed a clear and specific enrichment in anode-respiring bacteria (ARB) from the genera Desulfuromonas and Geoalkalibacter, supporting the key role of these electroactive microorganisms. As a conclusion, bioelectrochemical systems represent a promising bioprocess alternative for the treatment and energy recovery of recalcitrant TOPWs. PMID:27208920

  11. Biogas from algae, seaweed and seagrass?; Biogas aus Algen, Tang und Seegras?

    Schneider, Holger [Fachhochschule Flensburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Algae, seaweed and sea grass are discussed again and again as alternative sources for raw materials for agricultural biogas plants. The author of the contribution under consideration reports on the identification and optimization of the biogas potential of microalgae, macroalgae and flotsam (mixture of seaweed, seaweed, and so on). Algae, seaweed and sea grass can be fermented into biogas by means of an anaerobic process. The specific yield of biogas is small. The processing of these substrates requires a technical adjustment of the biogas plants. Thus, the effective use of these substrates will continue to fall. The achievable benefit highly depends on the location of the facilities and on the available substrates with the corresponding specific gas yields. The economic efficiency of these substrates in agricultural systems must be examined in each case.

  12. Energy Efficiency Evaluation of two Biogas Plants

    Nordlander, Eva; Holgersson, Jenny; Thorin, Eva; Thomassen, Martin; Yan, Jinyue

    2011-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion for biogas production is a promising renewable energy technology whichcan be used to achieve environmental goals set in the European Union and other regions. Thereare however many improvements that can still be made to the process. Furthermore, there arealternative energy conversion processes that compete for some of the substrates used inanaerobic digestion. Energy efficiency could therefore be a tool for measuring and comparingthe performance of biogas plants. This study...

  13. Influence of trace substances on methanation catalysts used in dynamic biogas upgrading.

    Jürgensen, Lars; Ehimen, Ehiaze Augustine; Born, Jens; Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo; Rooney, David

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this work was to study the possible deactivation effects of biogas trace ammonia concentrations on methanation catalysts. It was found that small amounts of ammonia led to a slight decrease in the catalyst activity. A decrease in the catalyst deactivation by carbon formation was also observed, with ammonia absorbed on the active catalyst sites. This was via a suppression of the carbon formation and deposition on the catalyst, since it requires a higher number of active sites than for the methanation of carbon oxides. From the paper findings, no special pretreatment for ammonia removal from the biogas fed to a methanation process is required. PMID:25316193

  14. Influence of trace substances on methanation catalysts used in dynamic biogas upgrading

    Jurgensen, Lars; Ehimen, Ehiazesebhor Augustine; Born, Jens;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the possible deactivation effects of biogas trace ammonia concentrations on methanation catalysts. It was found that small amounts of ammonia led to a slight decrease in the catalyst activity. A decrease in the catalyst deactivation by carbon formation was also...... observed, with ammonia absorbed on the active catalyst sites. This was via a suppression of the carbon formation and deposition on the catalyst, since it requires a higher number of active sites than for the methanation of carbon oxides. From the paper findings, no special pretreatment for ammonia removal...... from the biogas fed to a methanation process is required....

  15. BIOGAS STATIONS AND THEIR ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS

    Vladimir Lapčik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes the authors’ experience with environmental impact assessment in branch of biogas plants. The introductory part of the paper describes legislative obligations of the Czech Republic concerning the fulfilment of the European Union’s limits as for utilization of renewable energy resources. The next parts of the paper deal with an impact analysis of biogas plants on the environment. The final part of the paper deals with experience with implementation of the environmental impact assessment process in the field of biogas plants in the Czech Republic.

  16. Biogas, the renewable energy of territories

    A set of articles outlines the essential role of 'green gas' in energy transition, discusses the emergence of a European bio-methane sector with a standard harmonisation, proposes an interview of the person in charge of strategy and territories for GrDF who addresses the building up of operation rules for the biogas sector, comments various aspects of biogas financing, comments the relationships between heat, electricity and fuel within a rural project in Brittany, describes a project of extraction and use of methane from waste waters, and presents a process of liquefaction developed by Cryostar as a possible valorisation of biogas

  17. Analytical investigation of the thermal optimization of biogas plants

    The economic efficiency of biogas plants is more difficult to display with recent legal regulations than with bonus tariff systems of previous EEG amendments. To enhance efficiency there are different options, often linked with further investments. Direct technical innovations with fast economic yields need exact evaluation of limiting conditions. Within this article the heat sector of agricultural biogas plants is studied. So far scarcely considered, especially the improvement of on-site thermal energy consumption promises a high optimisation. Data basis are feeding protocols and temperature measurements of input substrates, biogas, environment etc., also documentations of on-site thermal consumption over 10 years. Analyzing first results of measurements and primary equilibrations shows, that maintenance of biogas process temperature consumes most thermal energy and therefore has the greatest potential of improvement. Passive and active insulation of feed systems and heat recovery from secondary fermenter liquids are identified as first optimization measures. Depending on amount and temperature raise of input substrates, saving potentials of more than hundred megawatt hours per year were calculated.

  18. Wood ash amendment to biogas reactors as an alternative to landfilling? A preliminary study on changes in process chemistry and biology.

    Podmirseg, Sabine M; Seewald, Martin S A; Knapp, Brigitte A; Bouzid, Ourdia; Biderre-Petit, Corinne; Peyret, Pierre; Insam, Heribert

    2013-08-01

    Wood ash addition to biogas plants represents an alternative to commonly used landfilling by improving the reactor performance, raising the pH and alleviating potential limits of trace elements. This study is the first on the effects of wood ash on reactor conditions and microbial communities in cattle slurry-based biogas reactors. General process parameters [temperature, pH, electrical conductivity, ammonia, volatile fatty acids, carbon/nitrogen (C/N), total solids (TS), volatile solids, and gas quantity and quality] were monitored along with molecular analyses of methanogens by polymerase chain reaction- denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and modern microarrays (archaea and bacteria). A prompt pH rise was observed, as was an increase in C/N ratio and volatile fatty acids. Biogas production was inhibited, but recovered to even higher production rates and methane concentration after single amendment. High sulphur levels in the wood ash generated hydrogen sulphide and potentially hampered methanogenesis. Methanosarcina was the most dominant methanogen in all reactors; however, diversity was higher in ash-amended reactors. Bacterial groups like Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria were favoured, which could improve the hydrolytic efficiency of the reactors. We recommend constant monitoring of the chemical composition of the used wood ash and suggest that ash amendment is adequate if added to the substrate at a rate low enough to allow adaptation of the microbiota (e.g. 0.25 g g(-1) TS). It could further help to enrich digestate with important nutrients, for example phosphorus, calcium and magnesium, but further experiments are required for the evaluation of wood ash concentrations that are tolerable for anaerobic digestion. PMID:23831776

  19. Progress in biogas. Biogas production from agricultural biomass and organic residues. Pt. 1 and 2. Proceedings (oral presentations and poster presentations); Fortschritt beim Biogas. Biogas aus landwirtschaftlicher Biomasse and organischen Reststoffen. T. 1 und 2. Tagungsband. Vortraege and Poster

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    Within the International Conference ''Progress in Biogas - Biogas production from agricultural biomass and organic residues'' at the University Hohenheim (Stuttgart, Federal Republic of Germany) from 18th to 21st September, 2007, the following lectures were held: (1) Global relevance and potential of bioenergy for regional development; (2) Biogas electricity for France feed-in tariff and some other things to know before entering French market; (3) Policy drivers and future prospects for on-farm anaerobic digestion in Northern Ireland; (4) Biogas in Belgium, a swot analysis; (5) Status and prospects of biogas energy use in Ukraine; (6) Recent developments in Chinese agricultural biogas production; (7) Opportunities for agricultural based biogas systems in the province of Ontario, Canada; (8) Pre-treatment and digestion of separated collected household waste in Sweden; (9) To the problem of monitoring measures and prophylaxis measures with the utilization of organic residual substances in biological gas facilities from hygienic view; (10) Fermenting residues from biological gas facilities - nutrients and pollutants, possibilities of application in the agriculture; (11) Treatment and utilization of fermentation residues; (12) Potential of residual gas of NaWaRo feeded biogas plants in Baden-Wuerttemberg; (13) Operating analytics of biogas plants to improve efficiency and to ensure process stability; (14) The potential of biogas and electric power production from subproducts in the sugar and alcohol industries by the application of anaerobic digestion; (15) Co-digestion plant in dairy cattle farm in Emilia Romagna region (Italy); (16) Facing operational problems in a biodigeser in Yuvientsa - Amazonian Region of Ecuador; (17) Biogas plant instead of milk cow - payment and occupation with the use of grassilage; (18) Biogas in ecologic agriculture - experiences from 3 years of fermentation of grass-clover ley; (19) Combined solar-biogas basis for the

  20. Improvement of Biogas Production by Bioaugmentation

    K. L. Kovács

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogas production technologies commonly involve the use of natural anaerobic consortia of microbes. The objective of this study was to elucidate the importance of hydrogen in this complex microbial food chain. Novel laboratory biogas reactor prototypes were designed and constructed. The fates of pure hydrogen-producing cultures of Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus and Enterobacter cloacae were followed in time in thermophilic and mesophilic natural biogas-producing communities, respectively. Molecular biological techniques were applied to study the altered ecosystems. A systematic study in 5-litre CSTR digesters revealed that a key fermentation parameter in the maintenance of an altered population balance is the loading rate of total organic solids. Intensification of the biogas production was observed and the results corroborate that the enhanced biogas productivity is associated with the increased abundance of the hydrogen producers. Fermentation parameters did not indicate signs of failure in the biogas production process. Rational construction of more efficient and sustainable biogas-producing microbial consortia is proposed.

  1. Energy efficiency and sustainability of complex biogas systems: A 3-level emergetic evaluation

    Highlights: • The metabolism of complex biogas system increased from 2000 to 2008. • System renewability has been increased due to biogas utilization. • Electricity, diesels and infrastructure were the most efficient supplies. • All processes were challenged by high transformity and low sustainability. - Abstract: Biogas engineering and the biogas-linked agricultural industries as a whole has been used as both a developmental strategy for rural new emergy and an important part of renewable agriculture revolution in China. In this paper, we proposed a 3-level emergetic evaluation framework to investigate the energy efficiency and sustainability of a complex biogas system (CBS) in South China, comprising agro-industries such as planting, aquaculture, breeding and biogas. The framework is capable of tracking dynamical behaviors of the whole complex system (Level I), transformation processes (Level II) and resource components (Level III) simultaneously. Two new indicators, emergy contribution rate (ECR) and emergy supply efficiency (ESE) were developed to address the contribution and efficiency of resource components within each agro-industrial process. Our findings suggested the metabolism of the CBS were increased from 2000 to 2008, in which planting production was the biggest process in terms of total emergy input, while breeding was the most productive one with its highest total emergy yield. The CBS was under an industry transaction process stimulated by biogas construction, while the traditional agricultural activities still play an important role. For economic input, a trend towards a more renewable regime was found behind the total increase over time. With different preferences for renewable or non-renewable resources, planting and aquaculture production were proved natural donation-reliant, while breeding and biogas were economic input-dependent. Among all the economic inputs, electricity, diesels and infrastructure were the most efficient components

  2. Biogas production for the environment and the economy: Results and experiences of biogas actions of climate investment programmes (Klimp); Biogasproduktion foer miljoe och ekonomi: Resultat och erfarenheter av biogasaatgaerderna inom Klimatinvesteringsprogrammen (Klimp)

    Tamm, Daniel; Fransson, Martin

    2011-07-01

    It has proved difficult to make an economic assessment of the biogas projects. With municipal projects, there is often not a clear demarcation to other activities and financial performance is allocated to different activities within the organization. Private companies are today acting in a competitive market which means that very few are willing to share financial data. So instead of an economic evaluation the report presents some qualitative factors shown important to the success or failure of biogas projects in Sweden: - Identify and understand the value chain for the biogas system - Create a consensus on the value of biogas and clear incentives for all actors in the system - Involve the public actors - Long-term and thoroughly analyzed business concepts - Knowledge of the permit processes and regulations - Work in parallel with several development stages - Choose the relevant technical solutions, depending of the substrate and local conditions - Create a market for the produced bio-fertilizer - Work actively and continuously with quality and process development The report also gives a few general recommendations to policy makers at national, regional and local level, and to plant operators of how the development of the biogas sector in Sweden can be promoted. Overall the evaluation showed that Klimp not only serves as a financial support for biogas projects but also as a 'moral' support that signals that biogas is seen as a desired and preferred technique at a national level. It also shows that Klimp has played an important role in the development of the biogas sector in Sweden

  3. Biogas and biofuels barometer

    European union countries are becoming more and more interested by the characteristics of biogas in terms of environment and energy production and are developing their proper channels of valorization according to their potential. In this way, biogas production reached nearly 5,3 million tons oil equivalent in 2006, representing a 13,6% increase with respect to 2005. Statistical data are provided on the primary energy production of biogas, the electricity production from biogas, gross heat production from biogas, and the representative firms of the biogas sector. In a second part the biofuels barometer is presented. The agricultural environment and landscape of the European Union countries is redefined a little more each year by energy crops for biofuel production. According to the first estimates for 2006, biofuel consumption reached 5,38 Mtoe last year in the EU, corresponding to a 1,8% share of the total consumption of fuels devoted to transport. (A.L.B.)

  4. Methods and apparatus for hydrogen based biogas upgrading

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an anaerobic process for biogas upgrading and hydrogen utilization comprising the use of acidic waste as co-substrate.In this process,H2 and CO2 will be converted to CH4, which will result in lower CO2 content in the biogas. The invention relates to both in situ a...... ex situ methods of biogas upgrading. The invention further relates to a bioreactor comprising hollow fibre membranes....

  5. Testing and optimising biogas plants

    Perwanger, A.

    1984-01-01

    The long-term output of biogas systems studied in practice of an average just under 1 cbm gross of biogas per GV and day is below the forecast levels. Only very few plants showed higher output in the long term. This makes it even more important to show ways of improving process control and reducing building costs for the system. As a result of comparative practical studies in connection with corresponding experiments in the laboratory, it has already been possible to find a number of proposals for improvements. For instance, raising substrate performance with substrate dilution, cost-reducing and functionally safe construction of systems with a gas-dome mounted on top and the possibility of simple biogas production in the final storage unit with low-cost voluminous gas storage at the same time. The latter solution has the advantage of allowing the fermentation substrate to be anaerobically treated all year round, the N-losses would be lower by contrast with open slurry storage, and that any ecologically relevant regulations about odeur control and slurry storage at the farm could be complied with absolutely safely and with the additional use of biogas.

  6. Trace compounds affecting biogas energy utilisation - A review

    Rasi, S., E-mail: saija.rasi@gmail.com [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Biological and Environmental Science, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland); Laentelae, J.; Rintala, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Biological and Environmental Science, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} In regards to trace compounds, landfill gases are the most studied biogases. {yields} More strict requirements are set for biogas purity with new biogas applications. {yields} With traditional applications, small variations in biogas quality are acceptable. {yields} New requirements set challenges on raw material control and biogas quality. {yields} In this study, variations in analysing methods and biogas quality are discussed. - Abstract: This paper investigates the trace compounds affecting energy utilisation in biogas that come from different production sites. With biogas being more widely used in different energy applications more interest has arisen for the specific composition of biogas. In traditional energy applications, methane and hydrogen sulphide contents have had the most influence when energy utilisation application has been considered. With more advanced processes also the quantity and quality of trace compounds is more important. In regards to trace compounds, it was found that the concentrations and the variations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can be high in different landfills, especially, with compounds originating from the biological degradation process (like aromatics and terpenes) as seasonal variations affect the biological degradation. Trace compounds produced by direct volatilisation (halogenated and silicon compounds) show a smaller seasonal variation. Halogenated compounds are rarely present in high concentrations in waste water treatment plant (WWTP) biogas, but the concentrations of organic silicon compounds and their variation is high. Organic silicon compounds are usually detected only in low concentrations in co-digestion plant biogas, when no WWTP sludge is used as a raw material.

  7. Trace compounds affecting biogas energy utilisation - A review

    Highlights: → In regards to trace compounds, landfill gases are the most studied biogases. → More strict requirements are set for biogas purity with new biogas applications. → With traditional applications, small variations in biogas quality are acceptable. → New requirements set challenges on raw material control and biogas quality. → In this study, variations in analysing methods and biogas quality are discussed. - Abstract: This paper investigates the trace compounds affecting energy utilisation in biogas that come from different production sites. With biogas being more widely used in different energy applications more interest has arisen for the specific composition of biogas. In traditional energy applications, methane and hydrogen sulphide contents have had the most influence when energy utilisation application has been considered. With more advanced processes also the quantity and quality of trace compounds is more important. In regards to trace compounds, it was found that the concentrations and the variations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can be high in different landfills, especially, with compounds originating from the biological degradation process (like aromatics and terpenes) as seasonal variations affect the biological degradation. Trace compounds produced by direct volatilisation (halogenated and silicon compounds) show a smaller seasonal variation. Halogenated compounds are rarely present in high concentrations in waste water treatment plant (WWTP) biogas, but the concentrations of organic silicon compounds and their variation is high. Organic silicon compounds are usually detected only in low concentrations in co-digestion plant biogas, when no WWTP sludge is used as a raw material.

  8. Basic Data on Biogas

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    Renewable gases such as biogas and biomethane are considered as key energy carrier when the society is replacing fossil fuels with renewable alternatives. In Sweden, almost 80 % of the fossil fuels are used in the transport sector. Therefore, the focus in Sweden has been to use the produced biogas in this sector as vehicle gas. Basic Data on Biogas contains an overview of production, utilisation, climate effects etc. of biogas from a Swedish perspective. The purpose is to give an easy overview of the current situation in Sweden for politicians, decision makers and interested public. 1.4 TWh of biogas is produced annually in Sweden at approximately 230 facilities. The 135 wastewater treatment plants that produce biogas contribute with around half of the production. In order to reduce the sludge volume, biogas has been produced at wastewater treatment plants for decades. New biogas plants are mainly co-digestion plants and farm plants. The land filling of organic waste has been banned since 2005, thus the biogas produced in landfills is decreasing.

  9. Solanum Tuberosum Supplementation for Biogas Production

    Pradip B. Acharya; Prateek Shilpkar

    2015-01-01

    Production of biogas using animal dung is well documented. Nutritional supplement enhances microbial activity and ultimately results in increase biogas production. Solanum tuberosum (potato) is a vegetable crop grown in most parts of world. It is a rich source of carbohydrate starch and many minerals. Present experiment was conducted in 5L capacity glass digester bottles filled with mixture of buffalo dung and water at 5.3% total solids. A total of six sets were prepared, three as control and...

  10. Increase of Bio-Gas Power Potential

    V. Sednin; О. Kraetskaya; I. Prokoрenia

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a review of industrial technologies for obtaining gas-synthesis which is applicable for bio-gas enrichment process. Comparative characteristics are given in the paper. The paper thoroughly considers a technology of dry methane conversion as the most expedient variant recommended for the application in this case. The bio-gas enrichment carried out during its production expands possibilities and efficiency of its application.

  11. Biodeterioration of cementitious materials in biogas digester

    Voegel, C.; Bertron, A.; Erable, B

    2015-01-01

    In biogas production plants, concrete structures suffer chemical and biological attacks during the anaerobic digestion process. The attack on concrete may be linked to the effects of (i) organic acids; (ii) ammonium and CO2 co-produced by the microorganisms’ metabolisms; and (iii) the bacteria’s ability to form biofilms on the concrete surface. In a context of biogas industry expansion, the mechanisms of concrete deterioration need to be better understood in order to propose innovative, effic...

  12. Techno-Economic Feasibility of Selective CO 2 Capture Processes from Biogas Streams Using Ionic Liquids as Physical Absorbents

    García-Gutiérrez, P.; Jacquemin, J.; McCrellis, C.; Dimitriou, I; Taylor, S.F.R.; Hardacre, C.; Allen, R. W. K.

    2016-01-01

    Biogas from anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge is a renewable resource with high energy content, which is composed mainly of CH4 (40−75 vol %) and CO2 (15−60 vol %). Other components, such as water (H2O, 5−10 vol %) and trace amounts of hydrogen sulfide and siloxanes, can also be present. A CH4-rich stream can be produced by removing the CO2 and other impurities so that the upgraded biomethane can be injected into the natural gas grid or used as a vehicle fuel. The main objectiv...

  13. Techno-Economic Feasibility of Selective CO2 Capture Processes from Biogas Streams Using Ionic Liquids as Physical Absorbents

    García-Gutiérrez, P.; Jacquemin, J.; McCrellis, C.; Dimitriou, I; Taylor, S.F.R.; Hardacre, C.; R. W. Allen

    2016-01-01

    Biogas from anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge is a renewable resource with high energy content, which is composed mainly of CH4 (40–75 vol %) and CO2 (15–60 vol %). Other components, such as water (H2O, 5–10 vol %) and trace amounts of hydrogen sulfide and siloxanes, can also be present. A CH4-rich stream can be produced by removing the CO2 and other impurities so that the upgraded biomethane can be injected into the natural gas grid or used as a vehicle fuel. The main objective of this pa...

  14. Application of a qualitative image analysis on the evaluation of microbial process parameters of biogas plants; Einsatz einer quantitativen Bildanalyse zur Beurteilung mikrobieller Prozessparameter von Biogasanlagen

    Kim, Yong Sung; Scherer, Paul [Hamburg Univ. of Applied Sciences, Hamburg-Bergedorf (Germany). Faculty of Life Sciences

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate efficiency and microbial activity of biogas or anaerobic waste water treatment plants, the number of microorganisms per gram or per milliliter is supposed to be a crucial factor. Since some years ago our research group at HAW-Hamburg has struggled to develop a simple and rapid technique for quantification and classification of environmental microbes with a semi-automatic digital image analysis. For detection of methanogens, the methanogenic fluorescence coenzyme F420 was used, which represents the vitality of methanogens. Furthermore this technique has been supplemented with morphological classification resulting in a Quantitative Microscopic Fingerprinting (QMF). The technique facilitates to find out microbial reasons for some problems of reactor performances. In addition QMF allows differentiating between H{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} and acetate consuming methanogens according to their morphology. At the moment, this study focusses on some relationships between QMF and plant operation parameters. As an example, a thermophilic biogas plant fed by 65% liquid cow manure, maize silage, grass silage and solid cow manure was analyzed for more than 22 weeks. Here some basic background and methodical procedures were presented as well as validation of this technique. (orig.)

  15. Anaerobic co-digestion of vegetal oil and thickened waste-activated sludge: Effects on biogas production and microbial community structure

    Lauwers, Joost; Appels, Lise; Ruyters, Stefan; Busschaert, Pieter; Lievens, Bart; Van Impe, Jan; Dewil, Raf

    2013-01-01

    Thickened waste-activated sludge (tWAS) was co-digested with vegetal oil in a continuous 50 L digester. Compared to a digester fed with only tWAS, the biogas production increased as expected due to the addition of oil: about 60 % for an oil load of 10-15 % of the volatile solids (VS) load and a triplication for an oil load of 37-44%. Using 454 pyrosequencing, the microbial community structure was analyzed and visualised in a non-metric multidimensional scaling. The community of the Bacte...

  16. Cavitation for improved sludge conversion into biogas

    Stoop, A. H.; Bakker, T. W.; Kramer, H. J. M.

    2015-12-01

    In several studies the beneficial influence of pre-treatment of waste activated sludge with cavitation on the biogas production was demonstrated. It is however, still not fully certain whether this effect should be mainly contributed to an increase in conversion rate of organics into biogas by anaerobic bacteria, and how much cavitation increases the total biogas yield. An increase in yield is only the case if cavitation can further disrupt otherwise inaccessible cell membrane structures and long chain organic molecules. In this study the influence of hydrodynamic cavitation on sludge that was already digested for 30 days was investigated. The total biogas yield could indeed be increased. The effect of the backpressure behind the venturi tube on the yield could not yet be established.

  17. Storage of catch crops to produce biogas

    Molinuevo-Salces, Beatriz; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Uellendahl, Hinrich

    2014-01-01

    Catch crop biomass is a promising co-substrate for manure-based biogas plants in Denmark since the cultivation of catch crops is mandatory to retain nutrients in the soil, contributing to protect the aquatic environment. In general, the growth period for catch crops is from harvest of the previous...... crop in July-August to the end of the growing season and harvest in late October. Hence, for use of the biomass in biogas production there is a need for storage of the biomass. Storage as silage would guarantee the availability of the feedstock for biogas production during the whole year. A proper...... ensiling process determines the storage loss and the quality of the final silage and, thus, the possible use of it as a substrate for biogas production. Moreover, silage has been considered as a pre-treatment since it partially hydrolyses organic matter improving cellulose convertibility. Since a large...

  18. Socio-economic Analysis of Centralised Biogas Plants

    Nielsen, L.H.; Hjort-Gregersen, K.

    2002-01-01

    The development of biogas technology in Denmark has been widely encouraged by the government over the last 15 years. The overall reasons for the government concern has been the increasing awareness that centralised biogas plants make a significant contribution to solve a range of problems in the fields of energy, agriculture and environment. This has been documented through related monitoring and R & D activities. To achieve a satisfactory evaluation of centralised biogas plants, a thorough s...

  19. Biogas : Animal Waste That Can be Alternative Energy Source

    Tuti Haryati

    2006-01-01

    Biogas is a renewable energy which can be used as alternative fuel to replace fossil fuel such as oil and natural gas . Recently, diversification on the use of energy has increasingly become an important issue because the oil sources are depleting . Utilization of agricultural wastes for biogas production can minimize the consumption of commercial energy source such as kerosene as well as the use of firewood . Biogas is generated by the process of organic material digestion by certain anaerob...

  20. Comparative microbial analysis before and after foaming incidents in biogas reactors

    Kougias, Panagiotis; De Francisci, Davide; Treu, Laura;

    2014-01-01

    /or in the pre-storage feeding tank, resulting in 30-50% biogas production loss (Kougias et al., 2014). In activated sludge systems and in wastewater treatment plants the major causes of foaming are organic overload, the presence of surface active agents, operational parameters (e.g. digester’s shape......Foaming is one of the major problems that occasionally occurring in biogas plants affecting negatively the overall anaerobic digestion (AD) process. According to a recent survey, 15 out of 16 full-scale biogas plants, which were surveyed in Denmark, faced foaming incidents in the main reactor and...... extraction and metagenomic analysis. After sampling, the feedstock composition of each reactor was changed by the addition of gelatine or Na-Oleate or glucose (second experimental period). As a consequence, foam formation was observed in all reactors approximately after one HRT period. Once the daily volume...

  1. Electricity from biogas

    Biogas is a medium-Btu methane and carbon dioxide mix produced by bacterial decomposition of organic matter. Its sources include landfills, waste water sludges, and animal wastes. It can fuel energy applications, of which electricity generation is a frequently-preferred option. The greatest current U.S. biogas recovery and energy use is at landfills, where biogas at about 80 landfill sites fuels a total of approximately 300 MWe. Wastewater treatment plants and confined animal waste management systems support additional electric power production. Generation of electricity from biogas can present difficulties due to the generally small scale of the generating facility, variable energy content of the gas, fluctuating availability, contaminant problems, and often-demanding control needs. However, such difficulties are being successfully addressed and economics for electricity generation are often favorable as biogas can be essentially open-quotes freeclose quotes fuel. Biogas recovery and use has the additional advantage of mitigating a potent greenhouse gas. Biogas from U.S. landfills alone could fuel about 1% of U.S. electrical generation while giving climate change benefit equivalent to reducing CO2 emissions in the electricity sector by more than 10%. Growth in landfill gas use will be facilitated by recent regulations, advances in equipment, and improved management techniques such as open-quotes controlled landfillingclose quotes. The potential for biogas recovery and electricity production from sewage sludges, animal wastes and other organic resources such as agricultural residues is uncertain but probably exceeds the estimate for landfills

  2. Biogas in agriculture. Status and prospects. Proceedings; Biogas in der Landwirtschaft. Stand und Perspektiven. Tagungsband

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    Within the congress of the Agency for Renewable Resources (Guelzow, Federal Republic of Germany) and the Association for Technology and Structures in Agriculture (Darmstadt, Federal Republic of Germany) at 20th-21st September, 2011 in Goettingen (Federal Republic of Germany) the following lectures and posters were presented: (1) Perspectives of using biogas as a part of the German power supply (Stefan Rauh); (2) Development of biogas in Europe (Marc Fleureck); (3) Biology of methanogenic archaea and its significance for the microbial process control in biogas plants (Helmut Koenig); (4) Efficiency and behaviour of enzymes in the biogas process (Monika Heiermann); (5) Trace elements in NaWaRo biogas plants for balancing substrate limited deficiency symptoms and stabilizing the fermentation process (Hans Oechsner); (6) EEG - Actual developments for biogas (Ulrich Keymer); (7) Utilization of thermal energy from cogeneration in the practice - Experiences from the view of an environmental expert (Michael Hub); (8) Innovations in the legal aspects of the production and utilization of biogas (Hartwig von Bredow); (9) Damages and deficiencies at biogas plants (Waldemar Gruber); (10) Learning from accidents, damages and their causes as well as their correctives in the operation of biogas plants - Reports from the practice (Wolfgang Horst Stachowitz); (11) Causes and avoidance of container damages by means of biocorrosion (Jan Kuever); (12) Anaerobic degradation of cellulosic substrates - Bionic implementation of the forestomach sysem of a ruminant (Dirk Weichgrebe); (13) Fermentation of renewable raw materials in the up flow procedure (Jan Mumme); (14) Two-phase pressure fermentation for feeding into natural gas grids (Andreas Lemmer); (15) Requirements and potential of sugar beets for fermentation (Christa Hoffmann); (16) Innovation in the area of power beets (Andreas von Felde); (17) Optimization of manuring with fermentation residues in order to reduce the nitrogen

  3. Biogas Production from Thin Stillage on an Industrial Scale—Experience and Optimisation

    Anna Schnürer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing demand for renewable energy and sustainable waste treatment, biogas production is expanding. Approximately four billion litres of bio-ethanol are produced annually for vehicle fuel in Europe, resulting in the production of large amounts of stillage residues. This stillage is energy-rich and can be used for biogas production, but is a challenging substrate due to its high levels of nitrogen and sulphate. At the full-scale biogas production plant in Norrköping, Sweden (Svensk Biogas i Linköping AB, thin grain stillage is used as a biogas substrate. This paper describes the plant operation and strategies that have been implemented to digest thin stillage successfully. High ammonia concentrations in the digester have resulted in syntrophic acetate oxidation (SAO becoming the major pathway for acetate degradation. Therefore, a long hydraulic retention time (HRT (40–60 days is used to allow the syntrophic acetate-oxidising bacteria time to grow. The high sulphate levels in thin stillage result in high levels of hydrogen sulphide following degradation of protein and the activity of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB, the presence of which has been confirmed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR analysis. To optimise biogas production and maintain a stable process, the substrate is diluted with tap water and co-digested with grain residues and glycerine to keep the ammonium nitrogen (NH4-N concentration below 6 g L−1. Combined addition of iron, hydrochloric acid and cobalt successfully precipitates sulphides, reduces ammonia toxicity and supplies microorganisms with trace element. Mesophilic temperature (38 °C is employed to further avoid ammonia toxicity. Together, these measures and doubling the digester volume have made it possible to increase annual biogas production from 27.7 TJ to 69.1 TJ.

  4. Improving the biogas production performance of municipal waste activated sludge via disperser induced microwave disintegration.

    Kavitha, S; Rajesh Banu, J; Vinoth Kumar, J; Rajkumar, M

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the influence of disperser induced microwave pretreatment was investigated to analyze the proficiency of floc disruption on subsequent disintegration and biodegradability process. Initially, the flocs in the sludge was disrupted through disperser at a specific energy input of 25.3kJ/kgTS. The upshot of the microwave disintegration presents that the solids reduction and solubilization of floc disrupted (disperser induced microwave pretreated) sludge was found to be 17.33% and 22% relatively greater than that achieved in microwave pretreated (9.3% and 16%) sludge alone. The biodegradability analysis, affords an evaluation of parameter confidence and correlation determination. The eventual biodegradability of microwave pretreated, and floc disrupted sludges were computed to be 0.15(gCOD/gCOD) and 0.28(gCOD/gCOD), respectively. An economic assessment of this study offers a positive net profit of about 104.8USD/ton of sludge in floc disrupted sample. PMID:26897472

  5. BiogasMotor; BiogasMotor

    Roubaud, A.; Favrat, D.

    2002-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of tests made at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne with an unscavenged prechamber ignition system on a 150 kW co-generation engine fuelled with biogas. The engine's performance in terms of fuel conversion efficiency was observed and the reduction potential for exhaust emissions to a level below the Swiss limits was verified. The tests made, which used natural gas mixed with CO{sub 2} as simulated biogas fuel, are described. The results of the tests, including figures on NO{sub x}, CO and HC emissions, are presented and discussed. The authors conclude that biogas engines with unscavenged prechamber ignition could provide a significant boost in energy conversion efficiency whilst keeping emissions within the tough Swiss limits.

  6. Safety and nutritional evaluation of biogas residue left after the production of biogas from wastewater

    Baoguo Bian; Lvmu Li; Xiongyuan Si; Bin Li; Wenjie Guo; Hua Mu; Xiaoling Ding; Fazhi Xu

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the safety and nutritional value of biogas residue left after the production of biogas from wastewater. In Exp. 1, ninety- six female mice were selected for acute oral toxicity testing and randomly allocated to 4 treatment groups, which received distilled water (control) or the biogas residue solution at 1 g/mL, 5 g/mL, or 15 g/mL. Activity levels and serum biochemical parameters were measured after 24 hours. In Exp. 2, eighty mice were divided into 2 treatment groups for suba...

  7. Solanum Tuberosum Supplementation for Biogas Production

    Pradip B. Acharya

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Production of biogas using animal dung is well documented. Nutritional supplement enhances microbial activity and ultimately results in increase biogas production. Solanum tuberosum (potato is a vegetable crop grown in most parts of world. It is a rich source of carbohydrate starch and many minerals. Present experiment was conducted in 5L capacity glass digester bottles filled with mixture of buffalo dung and water at 5.3% total solids. A total of six sets were prepared, three as control and three as test. Control sets were fed daily with buffalo dung water mixture throughout the period of experimentation, i.e. 80 days, whereas in test, from 51st day onward digesters were filled with mixture of dung and boiled potato with water. Feed was added daily in the amount of 120mL upto 80 days from beginning. On first day 12 mL fresh digested biogas slurry from running biogas plant was also added in all the digesters as inoculum. From 41th day onward biogas production was recorded by water displacement method and compared. Results reveal that in test digesters addition of potato shows an immediate and long lasting effect and increases biogas production between 90.48 and 192.86% higher than control sets.

  8. Energy systems analysis of biogas systems; Energianalys av biogassystem

    Berglund, Maria; Boerjesson, Paal

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this study was to calculate the net energy output and energy efficiency, from a life-cycle perspective and for Swedish conditions, in anaerobic digestion of various raw materials. Our calculations are based on literature reviews concerning the total primary energy input required for the production of biogas (i.e. direct and indirect energy inputs, e.g. when producing and distributing diesel fuels, electricity, fertilisers) as well as the biogas yield from various raw materials. Our analyses include handling and transportation of raw materials, operation of the biogas plants, and transportation and spreading of digested residues, as well as the biogas yield from manure, ley crops, tops and leaves of sugar beets, straw, municipal organic waste, slaughter waste, and grease separator sludge. All calculations concern individual raw materials. The net energy input required to run a biogas system (i.e. centralised biogas plant) typically corresponds to approximately 20-40% of the energy content in the produced biogas. Theoretically, the raw materials could be transported for some 200 km (manure) up to 700 km (slaughter waste) before the net energy output becomes negative. The variations in energy efficiency between studied biogas systems depend mainly on the type of raw material studied and the calculation methods used. Raw materials with high water content and low biogas yield (e.g. manure) require rather large energy inputs compared to the amount of biogas produced. Energy demanding handling of the raw materials, such as ley crops, could correspond to as much as approximately 40% of the net energy input. Varying energy efficiency in different parts of the biogas system, but most of all, changes in the biogas yield, could considerably affect the total net energy output. In general, operation of the biogas plant is the most energy demanding process in the biogas systems, corresponding to some 40-80% of the net energy input in the biogas systems. This implies

  9. Distribution forms for biogas and natural gas in Sweden

    Since biogas and natural gas basically have the same characteristics, they can be distributed in the same system. In the parts of the country where there is an extensive natural gas distribution network, the infrastructure for natural gas can be used for distribution of biogas. In order to increase the use of renewable energy, it is a political ambition to increase the share of biogas in the natural gas network, and, in the long run, entirely replace natural gas with biogas. Much of biogas production in the country is, however, not reached by the existing natural gas network, and this is also the case for a large part of the potential for future biogas production. In these areas the gas is transported in more or less extensive local gas distribution networks and by truck in compressed or liquid form. Transport of compressed and liquefied gas is efficient in some cases and development of these systems is an ongoing process. A number of facilities are planned for production of large quantities of biogas, several hundred GWh/year, through digestion and gasification processes. These plants will be located either in conjunction with major gas consumers or in the vicinity of the existing natural gas grid. The potential for biogas production is, however, present throughout the country and in order to meet market demand biogas requires efficient distribution systems

  10. Purification of anaerobic digestion biogas from a wastewater treatment plant for its use as bio fuel

    The first phase of the investigation whose results are presented in this article, consists on the optimization of the biogas desulphurization. In our case this process was made by chemical way. Besides the scrubbing towers, the pilot plant used included filters of activated carbon at the end of the line. The H2S inflow concentrations were quite high. After the carried out rehearsals, the effluent biogas from the scrubbing towers presents a H2S concentration less than 1 ppm and zero or undetectable values of up to fifty eight analyzed trace elements. (Author) 12 refs

  11. Use of biogas in agriculture

    Hejný, František

    2012-01-01

    Biogas results from anaerobic fermentation of organic substances either in oxygen atmosphere or non-oxygen atmosphere, depending on decomposition stage. Composition of Biogas is different, depends mainly on development of fermentation and additional important factors. The most important for Biogas is the maximum contents of methane. Biogas stations exploit Biogas for production of electric energy and heat energy by means of congregational units and there is also possibility to generate c...

  12. Simultaneous enhancement of methane production and methane content in biogas from waste activated sludge and perennial ryegrass anaerobic co-digestion: The effects of pH and C/N ratio.

    Dai, Xiaohu; Li, Xiaoshuai; Zhang, Dong; Chen, Yinguang; Dai, Lingling

    2016-09-01

    It is necessary to find an appropriate strategy to simultaneously enhance the methane production and methane content in biogas from waste activated sludge (WAS) and grass co-digestion. In this study an efficient strategy, i.e., adjusting the initial pH 12 and C/N ratio 17/1, for simultaneous enhancement of methane production and methane content in biogas from WAS and perennial ryegrass co-digestion was reported. Experimental results indicated that the maximal methane production was 310mL/gVSadd at the optimum conditions after 30-d anaerobic digestion, which was, respectively, about 1.5- and 3.8-fold of the sole WAS and sole perennial ryegrass anaerobic digestion. Meanwhile, the methane content in biogas was about 74%, which was much higher than that of sole WAS (64%) or sole perennial ryegrass (54%) anaerobic digestion. PMID:27259187

  13. Effect of thermal pretreatment on the biogas production and microbial communities balance during anaerobic digestion of urban and industrial waste activated sludge.

    Ennouri, Hajer; Miladi, Baligh; Diaz, Soraya Zahedi; Güelfo, Luis Alberto Fernández; Solera, Rosario; Hamdi, Moktar; Bouallagui, Hassib

    2016-08-01

    The effect of thermal pre-treatment on the microbial populations balance and biogas production was studied during anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) coming from urban (US: urban sludge) and industrial (IS: industrial sludge) wastewater treatment plants (WWTP). The highest biogas yields of 0.42l/gvolatile solid (VS) removed and 0.37l/gVS removed were obtained with urban and industrial sludge pre-treated at 120°C, respectively. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to quantify the major Bacteria and Archaea groups. Compared to control trails without pretreatment, Archaea content increased from 34% to 86% and from 46% to 83% for pretreated IS and US, respectively. In fact, the thermal pre-treatment of WAS enhanced the growth of hydrogen-using methanogens (HUMs), which consume rapidly the H2 generated to allow the acetogenesis. Therefore, the stable and better performance of digesters was observed involving the balance and syntrophic associations between the different microbial populations. PMID:27132226

  14. Mini digester and biogas production from plant biomass

    P. Vindis

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the paper is to present the construction of a mini digester for biogas production from different agriculture plant biomass and other organic wastes. The amount of biogas production (methane is observed by the mini digester.Design/methodology/approach: The mini digester consisting of twelve units was built and some measurements with agriculture plant biomass were performed according to DIN 38414 part 8. Four tests simultaneously with three repetitions can be performed.Findings: With the mini digester the amount of biogas production is observed. The parameters such as biogas production and biogas composition from maize and sugar beet silage in certain ratio were measured and calculated. The highest biogas and methane yield was 493 NI kg VS-1 or 289 NI CH4 kg VS-1.Research limitations/implications: The scope of substrates for the anaerobic digestion process is on the increase so the interest in the use of the biogas as a source of a renewable energy is very high. With mini digester it is possible to observe the amount of biogas (methane production and so the most suitable plant giving the maximum methane yield, can be determined.Practical implications: The aim of biogas as renewable source of energy is to replace fossil fuels with sustainable energy production systems and to fulfil the requirements of the Kyoto Protocol. On big farms the liquid manure and different energy crops can be used for biogas production. That can improve the economical efficiency of the farm and reduce the CO2 emissions.Originality/value: Mini digester for biogas production was built as special equipment. The quality of produced biogas is determined with a gas analyser GA 45.

  15. Biogas purification from anaerobic digestion in a wastewater treatment plant for biofuel production

    Osorio, F. [MITA Research Group, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Granada, Campus de Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain); Torres, J.C. [EMUASA (Murcia Water Works), Pza. Circular, 9, 30008 Murcia (Spain)

    2009-10-15

    The main objective of this investigation consists in the biogas purification coming from the anaerobic digestion of sludges in a wastewater treatment plant, in order to be used later as biofuel for vehicles. This article consists of the optimization of the biogas desulphurization. In our case, this process was achieved in a chemical way. Besides the scrubbing towers, the pilot plant used included filters of activated carbon at the end of the line. The H{sub 2}S inflow concentrations were quite high. The effluent biogas from the scrubbing towers presented an H{sub 2}S concentration less than 1 ppm and zero or undetectable values were obtained for up to 58 analyzed trace elements. (author)

  16. Biologische Entschwefelung von Biogas

    Schneider, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    Ziel dieser Arbeit ist die Erhöhung von Abbauleistung und Stabilität des biologischen Abbaus von Schwefelwasserstoff (H2S) in Biotropfkörpern zur Entschwefelung von Biogas. Für die Nutzung von Biogas ist häufig eine Reduktion des H2S-Gehalts erforderlich. Üblicherweise wird H2S von aeroben Mikroorganismen bei Zugabe von Luft zum Biogas entweder direkt im Biogasreaktor oder in nachgeschalteten Biotropfkörpern zu Schwefel und Schwefelsäure oxidiert. In der Praxis auftretende Schwankungen der H2...

  17. Multifeed biogas reactor for coffee waste water and biomass wastes : performance under highly fluctuating operating conditions

    Chanakya, H.N.; Deepa, G.B.; Vinutha, D. [Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India). Centre for Sustainable Technologies; Modak, J.M. [Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2004-07-01

    This study compared different operating conditions used in anaerobic digestion processes that convert coffee effluents into biogas. The effluent from wet coffee processing is rich in saccharide. In India, coffee processing is carried out at small to medium sized plantations which do not have the adequate facilities to treat the effluent for biogas recovery. Rather, the wastewater is treated in anaerobic-aerobic lagoons, but this process releases large quantities of methane to the atmosphere. More efficient alternatives are needed to stabilize the operating conditions, concentrations of wastewater and ambient operating temperatures. This study tested a newly developed multi-feed anaerobic reactor that can covert herbaceous biomass and coffee effluent to biogas and compost. The reactor is fed herbaceous biomass feedstock during the 8 month period when there is no coffee processing. Coffee effluent is fed to the reactor during the 4 month coffee processing season. The effluent flows through partially decomposed biomass beds where methanogenic activities yield a biofilm to facilitate conversion to biogas. The seasonal operation can be transformed into a year round advantage. The method can be applied to similar agro-processing units. 6 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs.

  18. Biogas Production from Household Wastes : A Quantitative Feasibility Study for Student Apartments in Albano

    Önder, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Biogas is an environmentally friendly energy source with great importance for sustainable development. The purpose of this study is to determine the feasibility of setting up a biogas plant at the student housing area planned at Albano in Stockholm. The possibility of attaining self-sustainability in Albano is also investigated. After compiling the processes for converting household waste into biogas through a literature study, a quantitative feasibility study of setting up a biogas plant is ...

  19. COMPARISON BETWEEN BIOGAS PRODUCTION FROM MANURE OF LAYING HENERS AND BROILERS

    Srećko Kukić; Branimir Bračun; Davor Kralik; Robert T. Burns; Slavko Rupčić; Daria Jovičić

    2010-01-01

    Biogas plants that process raw materials from agriculture, such as poultry manure,are one of the most significant applications of anaerobic fermentation. In Asiancountries, particularly in China, India, Nepal and Vietnam, there are several millionvery simple, small biogas plants that produce gas for household cooking and lighting.In Europe and North America a number of agricultural biogas plants now, areincreasing daily, a few thousand biogas plants exist, most of which use moderntechnologies...

  20. The contribution of Slovenian biogas plants to the reduction of agricultural sector green house emissions

    Romana MARINŠEK LOGAR; Neža NOVAK; Vodovnik, Maša

    2015-01-01

    Agriculture is a source of emissions of the greenhouse gas methane into the environment. These emissions can be reduced by appropriate storage of animal slurry and manure, with proper fertilization and processing of organic agricultural waste into biogas, where methane is captured and used as an energy source. Biogas is a renewable source of energy that is produced by microbial anaerobic digestion in biogas plants. As a substrate in biogas plants using different types of organic biomass such ...

  1. Anaerobic digestion foaming in full-scale biogas plants: A survey on causes and solutions

    Kougias, Panagiotis; Boe, Kanokwan; O-Thong, Sompong;

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion foaming is a common operation problem in biogas plants with negative impacts on the biogas plants economy and environment. A survey of 16 Danish full-scale biogas plants on foaming problems revealed that most of them had experienced foaming in their processes up to three times...

  2. Optimization of biogas production from manure

    Kaparaju, Prasad Laxmi-Narasimha; Boe, Kanokwan; Buendia, Inmaculada M.;

    The main objective of the project was to improve biogas production from manures. This objective was addressed by investigating 1) the effect of different reactor configurations, 2) operational procedures, aiming to selectively retain/return degradable material in the reactor and 3) different...... process at 90/10, 80/20, 70/30, 50/50 or 30/70% volume distribution could produce 11-17.8% more biogas compared to single CSTR process under similar operating conditions. The increased biogas production was mainly from the second reactor of the serial process, which accounted for 16-18% of the total...... biogas production. At 13/87 ratio, no significant increase in biogas production was noticed. Both single and serial CSTR processes were stable when operated 90/10, 80/20, 70/30 or 50/50% volume distributions and also during an organic pulse load (19.6 to 65.3 g/l reactor volume). Results from pilot...

  3. Biogas. Present situation and future potential; Biogas. Nulaege och framtida potential

    Nordberg, Ulf [Swedish Inst. of Agricultural and Environmental Engineering, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2006-12-15

    owners need to be improved increase the understanding of the whole management chain, agricultural production, transport, treatment and handling of biofertilizer. The number of production sites for biogas from landfills is decreasing and the amount of biogas from these is diminishing. The number of biogas plants for agricultural crops is likely to increase. Combination processes will increasingly develop towards extracting several different energy products and towards maximising the energy extraction from substrates.

  4. Biogas Upgrading Using SOEC with a Ni-ScYSZ Electrode

    Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Bøgild Hansen, John; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    Biogas consists mainly of CH4, CO2 and small amounts of H2S. The value of biogas will increase significantly if it is upgraded to pipeline quality by converting CO2 and H2O in the biogas to CO and H2 using a Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cell (SOEC) followed by methanation. The Ni-ScYSZ-cermet electrode...... is, however, active for steam reforming of CH4, but sulphur traces in the biogas reduce the steam reforming activity. It is proven that sulphur stops steam reforming activity whereas the electrochemistry is only affected to a limited degree, showing that up-grading of biogas using SOEC with Ni...

  5. Combustion of Biogas Released from Palm Oil Mill Effluent and the Effects of Hydrogen Enrichment on the Characteristics of the Biogas Flame

    Seyed Ehsan Hosseini; Ghobad Bagheri; Mostafa Khaleghi; Mazlan Abdul Wahid

    2015-01-01

    Biogas released from palm oil mill effluent (POME) could be a source of air pollution, which has illustrated negative effects on the global warming. To protect the environment from toxic emissions and use the energy of POME biogas, POME is conducted to the closed digestion systems and released biogas is captured. Since POME biogas upgrading is a complicated process, it is not economical and thus new combustion techniques should be examined. In this paper, POME biogas (40% CO2 and 60% CH4) has...

  6. Biogas barometer 2011

    Biogas energy recovery for both electricity and heat application has increased in the European Union in 2011 (compared to 2010): +18% for gross electricity production from biogas and +16% for the gross heat production from biogas. The magnitude of the reduction (-7%) in the primary energy figures between 2010 and 2011 can be played down as it can be explained by a change in reporting method of the main producer country, Germany. Germany has taken the lead by far in the E.U. for the production of primary energy of biogas and its uses for heat or electricity production. Among the 13 most representative firms in the anaerobic digestion (methanization) sector in Europe, 8 are German. New markets are starting to emerge but the economic crisis and regulatory restrictions do not augur well of their expansion

  7. Classification of Commercial Biogas Digester and Comparison with Traditional Process%商品化沼气池分类及与传统沼气池比较分析

    冉毅; 彭德全; 王超; 丁自立; 李晋梅; 陈子爱; 席江; 贺莉; 蒋鸿涛

    2012-01-01

    Commercial biogas digester is classified into five categories according to the material properties, marketing, and combining with the characteristics of rural household biogas construction, i. e. glass liber reinforced plastic, hard plastic, flexible plastic (FBR) , glass fiber reinforced cement (GRC) and steel tank. Advantages and disadvantages were expatiated in this paper. The analysis results showed that traditional process biogas digester is the main process in our country. Commercial biogas digester is of important supplement. Glass fiber reinforced plastic type is relatively appropriate material for the biogas digester, followed by PVC (polyvinyl chloride) , PP (polypropylene) and PE (polyethylene). Commercial biogas digester has advantage of better air tightness, short construction period. And construction quality, standard and the cost are easier to control. Therefore, commercial biogas digester could be developed suiting ones measures to local conditions.%文章根据商品化沼气池材料特性与市场行情,结合农村户用沼气池建设特点,将户用商品化沼气池划分为:玻璃钢,塑料硬体,塑料软体(FBR),增强水泥(GRC)和钢制5大类沼气池,分别阐述其优势和劣势,并将玻璃钢沼气池与传统沼气池比较分析得出:传统水泥沼气池是我国沼气建设的主力军,商品化沼气池可作为重要补充;玻璃钢是相对适宜的建池材料,其次是PVC(聚氯乙烯),PP(聚丙烯)和PE(聚乙烯)塑料;商品化沼气池具有气密性好、建设周期短、建池成本较低,建设质量、标准、成本易于统一控制等优势,但塑料材料抗老化性能有待提高,应因地制宜、循序渐进地推广.

  8. Progress in biogas. Biogas production from agricultural biomass and organic residues. Pt. 1 and 2. Proceedings (oral presentations and poster presentations); Fortschritt beim Biogas. Biogas aus landwirtschaftlicher Biomasse and organischen Reststoffen. T. 1 und 2. Tagungsband. Vortraege and Poster

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    Within the International Conference ''Progress in Biogas - Biogas production from agricultural biomass and organic residues'' at the University Hohenheim (Stuttgart, Federal Republic of Germany) from 18th to 21st September, 2007, the following lectures were held: (1) Global relevance and potential of bioenergy for regional development; (2) Biogas electricity for France feed-in tariff and some other things to know before entering French market; (3) Policy drivers and future prospects for on-farm anaerobic digestion in Northern Ireland; (4) Biogas in Belgium, a swot analysis; (5) Status and prospects of biogas energy use in Ukraine; (6) Recent developments in Chinese agricultural biogas production; (7) Opportunities for agricultural based biogas systems in the province of Ontario, Canada; (8) Pre-treatment and digestion of separated collected household waste in Sweden; (9) To the problem of monitoring measures and prophylaxis measures with the utilization of organic residual substances in biological gas facilities from hygienic view; (10) Fermenting residues from biological gas facilities - nutrients and pollutants, possibilities of application in the agriculture; (11) Treatment and utilization of fermentation residues; (12) Potential of residual gas of NaWaRo feeded biogas plants in Baden-Wuerttemberg; (13) Operating analytics of biogas plants to improve efficiency and to ensure process stability; (14) The potential of biogas and electric power production from subproducts in the sugar and alcohol industries by the application of anaerobic digestion; (15) Co-digestion plant in dairy cattle farm in Emilia Romagna region (Italy); (16) Facing operational problems in a biodigeser in Yuvientsa - Amazonian Region of Ecuador; (17) Biogas plant instead of milk cow - payment and occupation with the use of grassilage; (18) Biogas in ecologic agriculture - experiences from 3 years of fermentation of grass-clover ley; (19) Combined solar-biogas basis for the

  9. Energy crops for biogas

    This investigation aims at describing the effects on cropping systems, containing a.o. leguminosae plant leys for biogas production. Problems treated are effects on soil physics, circulation of crop nutrients, use of chemical pesticides, preceding crop effects, and the possibility of utilizing catch crops for methane production. It is observed that the studied biogas-crop sequences gives positive effects on soil structure, reduced need for artificial fertilizers and chemical pesticides. 26 refs, 28 tabs

  10. Methods for preparing biogas in fuel quality; Verfahren zur Aufbereitung von Biogas in Kraftstoffqualitaet

    Prehn, Sascha [Forschungszentrum Verbrennungsmotoren Thermodynamik Rostock GmbH, Rostock (Germany); Wichmann, Volker; Harndorf, Horst

    2012-07-01

    Biogas is obtained from renewable raw materials. Due to its high methane concentration it is suitable as an alternative fuel. In order to provide biogas as a fuel equivalent to natural gas it must be converted into bio-methane. The quality of bio-methane is subject to high demands which are defined in the paper of DVGW G260 and G262 for feeding it into the public gas grid. Criteria for the use of bio-methane as a fuel in combustion engines are defined in DIN 51621. In addition to the separation of carbondioxide and water, biogas has to comply limited values of hydrogen sulfide and other trace gases. This paper gives an overview of various process steps of biogas treatment considering technical and economical aspects. (orig.)

  11. 15. Annual Meeting on biogas and bioenergy in agriculture. Proceedings; 15. Jahrestagung Biogas und Bioenergie in der Landwirtschaft. Tagungsband

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The volume contains besides the general statements on environmental protection and energy savings in the future and biogas as great potential for the rural development the following contributions in four parts: 1. political enveloping conditions: biogas usage within the frame of the the new EEG; state of biogas usage in Baden-Wuerttemberg; practical experiences end perspectives for the biogas development; renewable raw materials from the view of environmenmental protection; 2. gas utilization: the bioenergy village Mauenheim - model for the rural area; compression ignition gas engines with biogenic ignition oils; realization and economic performance of gas engines with biogas; microgasturbines - engineering and chances, gas processing and feeding into the gas network; 3. substrate: influence of the energy plant agriculture on the regional structures; biogas plants: substrate control by TS sensing; fermentation of fusaria contaminated corn; substrate contracts in the view of revenue and contract legacy; energy plants agriculture in Baden-Wuerttemberg; 4. process biology: comparison of dry and wet fermentation; fundamentals, process stability analytical possibilities; start-up of a biogas plant; biogas process with external hydrolysis; problems in the fermenter - inhibitors and auxiliaries.

  12. Performance optimization of the Växtkraft biogas production plant

    Highlights: ► Pre-treatment of ley crop can increase the biogas plant performance. ► Membrane filtration can increase the capacity of the biogas plant. ► Mechanical pre-treatment of the ley crop shows the highest energy efficiency. ► Using a distributor to spread the residues as fertilizer show promising results. -- Abstract: All over the world there is a strong interest and also potential for biogas production from organic residues as well as from different crops. However, to be commercially competitive with other types of fuels, efficiency improvements of the biogas production process are needed. In this paper, results of improvements studies done on a full scale co-digestion plant are presented. In the plant organic wastes from households and restaurants are mixed and digested with crops from pasture land. The areas for improvement of the plant addressed in this paper are treatment of the feed material to enhance the digestion rate, limitation of the ballast of organics in the water stream recirculated in the process, and use of the biogas plant residues at farms. Results from previous studies on pre-treatment and membrane filtration of recirculated process water are combined for an estimation of the total improvement potential. Further, the possibility of using neural networks to predict biogas production using historical data from the full-scale biogas plant was investigated. Results from an investigation using the process residues as fertilizer are also presented. The results indicate a potential to increase the biogas yield from the process with up to over 30% with pre-treatment of the feed and including membrane filtration in the process. Neural networks have the potential to be used for prediction of biogas production. Further, it is shown that the residues from biogas production can be used as fertilizers but that the emission of N2O from the fertilized soil is dependent on the soil type and spreading technology.

  13. Influence of different practices on biogas sustainability

    Biogas production and use are generally regarded as a sustainable practice that can guarantee high greenhouse gas (GHG) savings. However, the actual carbon footprint of biogas is strongly influenced by several factors. The aim of this study is to analyse the environmental performance of different biogas to electricity scenarios. Two criticalities are identified as important: the choice of feedstock and the operational practice concerning the digestate. Maize, manure and co-digestion of them are the different feedstocks chosen. Maize has higher yields, but its cultivation has to be accounted for, which consists of 28–42% of the GHG emissions of the whole process of producing electricity. Manure is considered a residue and as a result benefits from no production stage, but also from avoided emissions from the normal agricultural practice of storing it in the farm and spreading it as fertiliser, but has lower methane yields. Co-digestion combines the benefits and disadvantages of the two different feedstocks. Digestate storage in open or closed tanks and further use as fertiliser is analysed. The environmental impact analysis shows that a substantial reduction of GHG emissions can be achieved with closed digestate storage. The GHG emissions savings vary from about 3% in the maize pathways with open storage up to 330% in the manure pathway with closed storage. The biogas pathways, though, have worse environmental performances in all other environmental impacts considered but ozone depletion potential when compared to the European electricity average mix. -- Highlights: ► Biogas sustainability depends on the feedstock and the digestate management. ► Closed storage is strongly recommended. ► Taking into consideration credits is recommended. ► The biogas pathways GHG emissions can be lower than the ones of the reference system. ► Biogas pathways have higher impact in eutrophication, ecotoxicity and PM potentials

  14. Biogas utilization as flammable for internal combustion engine

    In this work the energetic potential stored in form of generated biogas of organic industrial wastes treatment is analyzed. Biogas utilization as flammable at internal combustion engine coupled to electrical energy generating is studied in the Wastewater Treatment Plant of Bucaramanga city (Colombia). This Plant was designed for 160.000 habitants treatment capacity, 1300 m3/h wealth, 170 BDO/m3 residues concentration and 87% process efficiency. The plant generate 2.000 m3/d of biogas. In laboratory trials was worked with biogas originating from Treatment Plant, both without purifying and purified, and the obtained results were compared with both yields determined with 86-octanes gasoline and natural gas. The analysis of pollutant by-products generated in combustion process as leak gases, present corrosive compounds and not desirable. elements in biogas composition are included

  15. Effect of microwave pre-treatment of thickened waste activated sludge on biogas production from co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste, thickened waste activated sludge and municipal sludge.

    Ara, E; Sartaj, M; Kennedy, K

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste, with thickened waste activated sludge and primary sludge has the potential to enhance biodegradation of solid waste, increase longevity of existing landfills and lead to more sustainable development by improving waste to energy production. This study reports on mesophilic batch and continuous studies using different concentrations and combinations (ratios) of organic fraction of municipal solid waste, thickened waste activated sludge (microwave pre-treated and untreated) and primary sludge to assess the potential for improved biodegradability and specific biogas production. Improvements in specific biogas production for batch assays, with concomitant improvements in total chemical oxygen demand and volatile solid removal, were obtained with organic fraction of municipal solid waste:thickened waste activated sludge:primary sludge mixtures at a ratio of 50:25:25 (with and without thickened waste activated sludge microwave pre-treatment). This combination was used for continuous digester studies. At 15 d hydraulic retention times, the co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste:organic fraction of municipal solid waste:primary sludge and organic fraction of municipal solid waste:thickened waste activated sludge microwave:primary sludge resulted in a 1.38- and 1.46-fold increase in biogas production and concomitant waste stabilisation when compared with thickened waste activated sludge:primary sludge (50:50) and thickened waste activated sludge microwave:primary sludge (50:50) digestion at the same hydraulic retention times and volumetric volatile solid loading rate, respectively. The digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste with primary sludge and thickened waste activated sludge provides beneficial effects that could be implemented at municipal wastewater treatment plants that are operating at loading rates of less than design capacity. PMID:25398411

  16. BIOGAS PRODUCTION FROM TOFU LIQUID WASTE ON TREATED AGRICULTURAL WASTES

    Budy Rahmat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Tofu Liquid Waste (TLW as a pollution might be processed into biogas which was environmentally friendly and had potential to replace burning wood or oil. However, the waste could not directly be employed as the biogas substrate due to the high nitrogen content which was not suitable to the methanogen microorganism on the biogas digester and did not produce biogas. It was therefore necessary to adapt the carbon-nitrogen ratio in TLW with the addition of other organic materials that had a lower nitrogen content so it would be a suitable substrate for generating biogas. The research was aimed to evaluate the addition of the other organic material on the TLW to increase the biogas production. The results showed that TLW combined with sheep dung, cabbage waste, bamboo leaves and paddy straw respectively produced biogas as much as 14,183, 7,250, 2,400, 895 cm3 in 20 days. The 4 treatments gave the same quality of biogas, which was determined using the water boiling test. The pH fluctuation during the process was in the right pH for anaerobic digestion, thus it was not the limiting factor.

  17. Progress in biogas II - Biogas production from agricultural biomass and organic residues. Pt. 1. Proceedings; Progress in Biogas II - Biogasproduktion aus landwirtschaftlicher Biomasse und organischen Reststoffen. T. 1. Tagungsband

    NONE

    2011-08-12

    biogas production - Methabe yield and energy balance (R. Bolduan); (19) Evaluation of a pre-treatment process for improved methane production from grass silage (A. Orozco); (20) Anaerobic fungi and biogas production (J. Prochazka); (21) Preservation of sugar beets for biogas production (A. Wagner); (22) Fibre, biogas and compost from banana agro-residues (leaves, pseudostem and rachis) by anaerobic digestion in plug flow type digester (H. Chanakya); (23) Extraction of biogas from waste products of he sugarcane industry (J. Rietzler); (24) Practical experiences with the digestion of straw in 2-stage AD plants - Extension of the value chain (W. Danner); (25) Improving biogas production on wastewater treatment plants by co-digestion of grass (D. Klein); (26) Generation of algal biomass for biogas production: energetic and environmental from a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) perspective (F. Romagnoli); (27) Risk reduction in spreading plant pathogens by anaerobic digestion? First results from laboratory experiments (M. Heiermann); (28) Demand-oriented biogas production for the generation of peak load (R. Wallmann); (29) Investigation of mesophilic and thermophilic bioleaching method in a two-phase anaerobic digestion process (M. Schoenberg): (30) Efficient hydrogen fermentation for 2-stage anaerobic digestion processes: Conversion of sucrose containing substrates (S. Noebauer); (31) Process development of two-phase pressure formation - Influence of gas solubilities (A.-M. Wonneberger); (32) Benefits and limitations when treating liquid pig manure in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (P. Messerl); (33) Experiences with continuous high-rate thermophilic dry anaerobic digestion of energy crops (L. De Baere); (34) The Sauter-biogas-system: spraying instead of stirring (S. Sauter); (35) Biogas production from raw palm oil mill effluent using a pilot-scale anaerobic hybrid reactor (C. Wangnai); (36) Eta max - the biogas power plant with high biological efficiency (M. Niederbacher); (37

  18. Production of liquid biogas at the biowaste treatment plant Amtzell; Gewinnung von fluessigem Biogas an der Bioabfallbehandlungsanlage Amtzell

    Bojahr, Armin [Gesellschaft fuer Umwelttechnik Bojahr mbH und Co. KG, Berg (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    The fermentation plant in Amtzell will be extended to increase the throughput of bio waste. In this context an extension of the gas utilization plant is also required. The produced biogas will be partly transferred to the existing combined heat and power plant. The remaining part of biogas will be used in an proposed GPP-Plus {sup registered} --plant to produce liquid bio methane (LBG). In the LBG gaining process the raw biogas will have to be dried in several steps, de-sulphured, compressed and cooled. Following this process and due to different physical characteristics of the ingredients, the contaminants will be removed from the biogas and the main ingredients, carbon dioxide and methane, separated from each other. Carbon dioxide as well as the methane are then available in liquid form and can be put onto the market. This method of using biogas can utilize almost 100% of its energy potential. (orig.)

  19. On the role of volatile fatty acids in the anaerobic fermentation of liquid manure and the way in which its properties are affected by the process of biogas production. Zur Bedeutung der fluechtigen Fettsaeuren bei der anaeroben Fermentation von Guelle und der Veraenderung der Guelleeigenschaften durch den Prozess der Biogaserzeugung

    Reinhold, G.; Breitschuh, G. (Forschungszentrum fuer Bodenfruchtbarkeit Muencheberg, Jena (German Democratric Republic))

    1989-01-01

    After mathematical-statistical evaluations of production data collected over five years at the Vippachedelhausen biogas station for large-scale experiments it was possible to quantify the effects of volatile fatty acids on the anaerobic fermentation of liquid manure and to analyse the ways in which the properties and constituents of liquid manure are changed by biogas production and storage of the putrefaction products. The study essentially led to the following conclusions: - Apart from the fact that the quantity of volatile fatty acids in liquid manure varies from case to case, it is further determined by two main factors, which are storage temperature on the one hand and dry solids content on the other hand. - The content of propionic acid has a substantial bearing on the process of fermentation. The relationship between certain parameters of biogas formation and the content of propionic acid or the degree to which it is degraded in the biogas reactor could be confirmed on a statistical basis. - As long as the content of fatty acids remained below 6 g l{sup -1}, biogas formation did not appear to be adversely affected by industrial-scale operating conditions. - 20-60% of the biogas produced are solely attributable to the degradation of volatile acids and this quantity varies according to load factors. - The degradation of dry solids through the process of biogas formation averaged 16.7% and thus remained considerably below the values frequently given in the relevant literature (30%). (orig.).

  20. Responses of the biogas process to pulses of oleate in reactors treating mixtures of cattle and pig manure

    Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2006-01-01

    had been exposed to oleate both reactors showed a lower VFA concentration along with a higher methane production than before the pulses. This indicates that oleate had a stimulating effect on the overall process. The improved acetogenic and methanogenic activity in the reactors was confirmed in batch......The effect of oleate on the anaerobic digestion process was investigated. Two thermophilic continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTR) were fed with mixtures of cattle and pig manure with different total solid (TS) and volatile solid (VS) content. The reactors were subjected to increasing pulses of...... oleate. Following pulses of 0.5 and 1.0 g oleate/L, the most distinct increase in volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations were observed in the reactor with the lowest TS/VS content. This suggests a higher adsorption of oleate on the surfaces of biofibers in the reactor with the highest TS/VS and a less...

  1. Experiences with biogas in Denmark

    Bundgaard, Sirid Sif; Kofoed-Wiuff, Anders

    2014-01-01

    This report is primarily based on the work of the Danish biogas task force, which was established as a result of the Energy Agreement of 22 March 2012. The purpose of the taskforce is to examine and support concrete biogas projects in order to facilitate the projected biogas development up to 2020.The focus of the task force was on the practical integration of the new biogas production in energy system, including the utilization of gas, the necessary infrastructure and contractual relationshi...

  2. The social organization of agricultural biogas production and use

    While for wind, solar energy or hydropower, energy supply happens directly from the source to the wind wheels, hydropower turbines or solar panels, in the case of biogas, energy production cannot directly take from the energy source, organic matter, but depends on the institutional structures and farmers′ practices involved for making energy available. With the production of bioenergy in rural areas, practices within agriculture are transformed, requiring new ways of organizing production processes. Research has left the question largely unanswered of how agricultural biogas production and use are – and can best be – organized within rural society. Which kinds of social organization exist, how are these embedded in existing agricultural institutions and practices, and how do these systems function? Under which conditions may the different kinds of social organization of biogas production and use work sustainably? This introduction article to the Special Issue “The social organization of agricultural biogas production and use” presents a framework for analysing the different kinds of social organization of biogas production and use presented hereafter. Analysis parameters are the supply network, distribution network, distribution of benefits, social boundaries of the system (accessibility) and scale. Using these parameters, the Special Issue articles are outlined. - Highlights: • Through agricultural institutions and farmers′ practices, biogas is made available. • Scale, supply and delivery network distinguish biogas infrastructural systems. • Access and benefit distribution are key for a biogas system′s sustainability

  3. Biogas building directions

    Eggeling, G.; Guldager, R.; Hilliges, G.; Tietjen, C.; Werner, U.; Guldager, H.; Sasse, L.

    The purpose of this book is to approach the people living and working in the rural regions of developing countries with a technology enabling them to use their resources by their proper means in a way that they dispose of a cheap and inexhaustible source of energy and fertilizer. These building directives for biogas plants shall concretely give the fundamental information for the use of this technology and be a practical support in do-it-yourself construction of biogas plants by its intelligible way of description owing to designs and popular language. These directives are part of a work performed by German and Indian experts during two years working up the biogas technology in countries of the Third World and in industrial countries. The regulations have been discussed at an international workshop in Bremen with more than 60 experts from countries of all continents meeting to discuss the application of biogas plants. The result has been documented in the ''Report on the International Biogas-Workshop Bremen''.

  4. On-line near infrared monitoring of ammonium and dry matter in biosturry for robust biogas production

    Madsen, Michael; Ihunegbo, Felicia N.; Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo;

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous substrates fed into agricultural biogas plants originate from many sources with resulting quality fluctuations potentially inhibiting the process. Biogas yield can be substantially increased by optimisation of the organic dry matter load. In this study, near infrared spectroscopy was...

  5. Biogas production from potato-juice, a by-product from potato-starch processing, in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactors

    Fang, Cheng; Boe, Kanokwan; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the utilization of potato-juice, the organic by-product from potato-starch processing, for biogas production was investigated in batch assay and in high rate anaerobic reactors. The maximum methane potential of the potato-juice determined by batch assay was 470mL-CH4/g......VS-added. Anaerobic digestion of potato-juice in an EGSB reactor could obtain a methane yield of 380mL-CH4/gVS-added at the organic loading rate of 3.2gCOD/(L-reactor.d). In a UASB reactor, higher organic loading rate of 5.1gCOD/(L-reactor.d) could be tolerated, however, it resulted in a lower methane yield of 240m......L-CH4/gVS-added. The treatment of reactor effluent was also investigated. By acidification with sulfuric acid to pH lower than 5, almost 100% of the ammonia content in the effluent could be retained during the successive up-concentration process step. The reactor effluent could be up...

  6. Ultrasound-Enhanced Biogas Production from Different Substrates

    González-Fernández, Cristina; Timmers, Rudolphus Antonius; Ruiz, Begona;

    2015-01-01

    Among the biofuel production processes using different substrates, the biogas generation process is one of the simplest. Compared with bioethanol or biodiesel production processes, anaerobic digestion is a process where all the organic matter (carbohydrates, lipids and proteins) can be biologically...... production. The present chapter is dedicated to providing a review of ultrasound pretreatment applied to different substrates (lignocelullosic materials, manures, sludge and microalgae). The advantages and constraints, that ultrasound pretreatment exhibit towards biogas production, are discussed and compared...

  7. Sulphur binding in biogas plants using ferric salts; Schwefelbindung in Biogasanlagen mittels Eisensalzen

    Preissler, Daniel; Lemmer, Andreas [Hohenheim Univ., Stuttgart (Germany). Landesanstalt fuer Agrartechnik und Bioenergie; Drochner, Ulrich; Oechsner, Hans; Jungbluth, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Almost all biogas utilization methods aim for a preferably low hydrogen sulphide content of the biogas, to avoid corrosive damages to the biogas plant components. The studies presented here show that in the biogas process hydrogen sulphide can be released not only during the conversion of organic bonded sulphur, but also through the conversion of elemental sulphur, which was previously formed during the biological desulphurisation. In the second section of the experiment, through the insertion of iron salts in the fermentation substrate, it was possible to clearly reduce the hydrogen sulphide content of the biogas by basic stoichiometric dosage. Iron sulphate however was proved to be inappropriate. (orig.)

  8. Agro-ecological aspects when applying the remaining products from agricultural biogas processes as fertilizer in crop production

    Bermejo Dominguez, Gabriela

    2012-06-11

    With the increase of biogas production in recent years, the amount of digestates or the remaining residues increased accordingly. Every year in Germany more than 50 million tons of digestates are produced, which are used as fertilizer. Thus nutrients return into the circulation of agricultural ecosystems. However, the agro-ecological effects have not been deeply researched until now. For this reason, the following parameters were quantified: the influence of dry and liquid fermentation products on the yield of three selected crops in comparison to or in combination with mineral-N-fertilizers in on-farm experiments; the growth, development and yield of two selected crops in comparison to mineral-N-fertilizer, liquid manure and farmyard manure in a randomized complete block design; selected soil organisms as compared to mineral-N-fertilizer, liquid manure and farmyard manure in a randomized complete block design. In addition, the mineralization of dry and wet digestates in comparison with liquid manure and farmyard manure was investigated in order to evaluate the effects of different fertilizers on the humus formation under controlled conditions. The 2-year results of on-farm experiments showed that for a sandy soil, the combination of digestates in autumn and mineral-N-fertilizer in spring for winter crops (wheat, rye and rape) brought the highest yields. The wet digestate achieved the highest dry-matter yield as the only fertilizer for maize in spring. In a clayey soil, the use of 150 kg ha{sup -1} N mineral-N-fertilizer brought the highest grain yield. These results were similar to the ones obtained by the application of dry digestates, if they were applied in two doses. Maize showed no signif-icant differences between the dry-matter yields of the different treatments. The results in the field experiments from 2009 to 2011 showed that the effect of digestates on the yield of winter wheat and Sorghum sudanense was up to 15 % lower than the effect of the mineral

  9. Which chances are offered by contracting models in the biogas sector?; Welche Chancen bieten Contracting Modelle im Biogassektor?

    Hiller, W.; Baumgaertner, D. [Bayerische Elektrizitaetswerke GmbH, Augsburg (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Climatic change, climatic protection, energy conservation, energy efficiency and careful treatment of resources control the public discussion and formation of an opinion. Under the various methods of alternative power production the employment of biogas proves as particularly meaningful. Under this aspect, within the scope of the 3rd symposium ''Processes and materials for energy technologies'', held between 20th and 21st June, 2007, at the ATZ Entwicklungszentrum in Sulzbach-Rosenberg (Federal Republic of Germany), the authors report on biogas plants under economic aspects. Typical aspects in the realisation of biogas projects are: (a) plant safety and industrial safety; (b) compliances with legal regulations according to construction and operation; (c) contract design and insurance protection; (d) monitoring and insurance coverage; (e) optimization of the composition of substrates; (f) sizing of plants and optimisation of technical components. Furthermore, the authors report on possibilities of cooperation regarding companies which use biogas plants. Contracting is an interesting possibility of partnership co-operation. The partners are active in their original jurisdiction and are not restricted to one another in the solution of problems. The choice of co-operation partners in the area of biogas considers companies which are competent in the range of energy process engineering as well as of bioengineering.

  10. Biogas production from thin stillage

    Moestedt, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The biogas plant in Norrköping (Tekniska verken i Linköping AB, publ.), Sweden, operates with thin stillage, a residue from bio-ethanol fermentation, as the main feedstock. Thin stillage is energy-rich due to its high protein content, but due to its high nitrogen and sulphate content is a somewhat complicated feedstock. The high nitrogen concentration results in inhibition of the microbial process and also selects for nitrogen-tolerant, but slow-growing, syntrophic acetate-oxidising bacteria ...

  11. Study of Processing Equipment for the Household Biogas Digester Tanks%关于滚塑式户用沼气池罐体加工装备的研究

    韩大明; 王福全; 储江伟

    2012-01-01

    通过对滚塑式户用沼气池罐体在世界以及我国的发展状况的研究,对滚塑式户用沼气池罐体加工装备进行设计,对滚塑式户用沼气池罐体加工过程中的温度进行优化和控制,并根据沼气的成分,选择适合储存沼气的具有高强度、耐腐蚀性质的材料作为加工装备的罐体材料。%By reviewing the development of rotational moulding-type household biogas digesters tank in China as well as other countries in the world, the authors designed the processing equipment for the rotational moulding-type household digesters tanks and optimized and controlled the processing temperature. In consideration of the composition of the biogas, the suitable materials with high strength and corrosion resistance for biogas storage was chosen as tank material of processing equipment.

  12. Basic data biogas Germany. Solid fuels, biofuels, biogas; Basisdaten Bioenergie Deutschland. Festbrennstoffe - Biokraftstoffe - Biogas

    NONE

    2012-08-15

    The brochure ''Basic data biogas Germany'' gives statistical information about (a) renewable energies: primary energy consumption, power generation, energy supply, avoidance of greenhouse gases; (b) Solid fuels: energetic utilization, wood pellets, energy consumption, comparison to heating oil; (c) Biofuels: consumption, bioethanol, biodiesel, vegetable oils; (d) Biogas: biogas power plants, energy content, production, legal aspects.

  13. Basic data biogas Germany. Solid fuels, biofuels, biogas; Basisdaten Bioenergie Deutschland. Festbrennstoffe, Biokraftstoffe, Biogas

    NONE

    2011-09-15

    The brochure ''Basic data biogas Germany'' gives statistical information about (a) renewable energies: primary energy consumption, power generation, energy supply, avoidance of greenhouse gases; (b) Solid fuels: energetic utilization, wood pellets, energy consumption, comparison to heating oil; (c) Biofuels: consumption, bioethanol, biodiesel, vegetable oils; (d) Biogas: biogas power plants, energy content, production, legal aspects.

  14. Biogas in the agriculture. State of the art. Proceedings; Biogas in der Landwirtschaft. Stand und Perspektiven. Tagungsband

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    Within the meeting of the Association for Technology and Structures in Agriculture (Darmstadt, Federal Republic of Germany) and the Agency for Renewable Resources (Guelzow, Federal Republic of Germany) between 15th and 16th September, 2009, in Weimar the following lectures were held: (1) Results of the actual biogas measurement II (Peter Weiland); (2) Agitators in biogas plants - Technology with central significance (Kay Rostalski); (3) How much energy is needed by a biogas fermenter? (Ludwig Heinloth); (4) The fermentation concept of Rueckert NatUrgas GmbH (Claus Rueckert, Dominique Pfeufer); (5) Experiences from the construction for the practice of the company MT-Energie GmbH (Bodo Drescher); (6) Fermenter/technology concept of Schmack Biogas AG (Thomas Moeeslinger); (7) Transport of biomass - How much does the logistics of Guelle and Co. cost? (Thore Toews); (8) Which factors determine the efficiency of biogas plants? (Gerd Reinhold); (9) Microbial diversity in biogas reactors in the fermentation of renewable raw materials (Michael Klocke et al.); (10) What do additives and ingredients contribute to the optimisation of the production of biogas? (Udo Hoelker); (11) Process optimisation - An interaction between technology and microbiology (Andreas Gronauer et al.); (12) Emissions at the production of biogas - an analysis if the environmental relevance (Joachim Clemens et al.); (13) Support systems for energy plants - Consequences to soil and environment (Matthias Willms et al.); (14) How ecological is biogas? (Sven Gaertner); (15) Biogas plant - Analysis of construction and operation from licensing view (Hans-Walter Schneichel); (16) Biogas plants - Analysis of construction and operation from contractual legal view (Florian Valentin); (17) Biogasplants - Analysis of construction and operation from remuneration legal view (Helmut Loibl); (18) Process and costs of treatment of residues of fermentation (Sebastian Wulf, Helmut Doehler); (19) How do residues of

  15. PENGARUH KONSENTRASI BUAH CABAI MERAH (Capsicum annum L. DAN BUAH CABAI RAWIT (Capsicum frutescens L. DALAM PRODUKSI BIOGAS DARI SAMPAH ORGANIK

    Khamdan Cahyari

    2014-10-01

      35 dan 12 ml/g VS (cabai rawit. Persentase reduksi VS relatif cukup tinggi mencapai 75%.The rising of Indonesian welfare has a positive impact towards the number of traditional market and its commodity. However, the problem of waste as a result of the market activity still not handled properly. Moreover, the waste of traditional market which remains in the landfill resulted in pollution such as groundwater contamination, green house emission and also health problems.The waste of traditional market has a big potential to be processed as biogas through anaerobic digestion method. With the presence of microorganism, this process is capable of degrading organic waste into stable organic material and biogas (methane and carbon dioxyde. One of the factor which affecting the process are the antibiotic components contained by the waste. Capsaicinoid which found in chili is the component which responsible to provide the spicy taste, has a negative effect towards the microorganism in degrading the waste into biogas. The effect of chili towards biogas production is not widely known that needs to be investigated, therefore a research needs to be conducted to determine the minimum concentration which resulted in inhibition process. The research result shows the influence of the concentration of chili (capsaicinoid towards biogas production. Traditional market waste with 8g VS/litre which exposed to microorganism without the existence of chili reulted in higher amount of biogas than the one which mixed with chili. The bigger the concentration of chili, the bigger the inhibition. This is demonstrated by the the decreasing number of the yield of the biogas. The concentration of chili which can resulted in optimal yield production obtained at concentration value of 5 and 8 g VS/ litre for red chili and cayenne pepper respectively. The highest yield of biogas and methane are 35 and 12 ml/g VS (cayenne pepper. The VS reduction percentage is relatively high to 75%.

  16. Purification of anaerobic digestion biogas from a wastewater treatment plant for its use as bio fuel; Purificacion del biogas de digestion anaerobia de una depuradora de aguas residuales para uso como biocombustible

    Osorio Robles, F.; Torres Rojo, J. C.; Sanchez Bas, M.; Moya Sanchez, N.

    2009-07-01

    The first phase of the investigation whose results are presented in this article, consists on the optimization of the biogas desulphurization. In our case this process was made by chemical way. Besides the scrubbing towers, the pilot plant used included filters of activated carbon at the end of the line. The H{sub 2}S inflow concentrations were quite high. After the carried out rehearsals, the effluent biogas from the scrubbing towers presents a H{sub 2}S concentration less than 1 ppm and zero or undetectable values of up to fifty eight analyzed trace elements. (Author) 12 refs.

  17. Biogas Plant in MUAS

    Varapnickaite, Ernesta

    2015-01-01

    The first and the most important aim is to find out if it is profitable to build a biogas plant in MUAS. Biogas plant has already proved that it is efficient way to use waste and make additional energy for heating and electricity. However in MUAS we have limited amount of biowaste so I will investigate how much energy would ir be possible to get. The second aim is to learn what is the best way to use the energy from the plant – if it should be used in all buildings for electricity and heating...

  18. Biogas: quo vadis?

    This article takes a look at the situation in Switzerland with respect to the use of biogas and the potential available for its increased use. The sharp increase of biogas production in Switzerland and its use for the production of heat, electrical power and methane for the gas mains is reviewed. The large potential for additional biomass is discussed. The political will to increase the use of renewable forms of energy in Switzerland, security of supply and regional added value are discussed. The article discusses the current situation as well as trends concerning substrates, systems and products

  19. Biogas Digester with Simple Solar Heater

    Kh S Karimov

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: In this research work, the design, fabrication and investigation of a biogas digester with simple solar heater are presented. For the solar heater, a built-in reverse absorber type heater was used. The maximum temperature (50°C inside the methane tank was taken as a main parameter for the design of the digester. Then, the energy balance equation for the case of a static mass of fluid being heated was used to model the process. The parameters of thermal insulation of the methane tank were also included in the calculations. The biogas digester consisted of a methane tank with built-in solar reverse absorber heater to harness the radiant solar energy for heating the slurry comprising of different organic wastes (dung, sewage, food wastes etc.. The methane tank was initially filled to 70% of its volume with organic wastes from the GIK institute’s sewage. The remaining volume was filled with sewage and cow dung from other sources. During a three month period (October-December, 2009 and another two month period (February-March, 2010, the digester was investigated. The effects of solar radiation on the absorber, the slurry’s temperature, and the ambient temperature were all measured during these investigations. It was found that using sewage only and sewage with cow dung in the slurry resulted in retention times of four and two weeks, respectively. The corresponding biogas produced was 0.4 m3 and 8.0 m3, respectively. Finally, this paper also elaborates on the upgradation of biogas through the removal of carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulphide and water vapour, and also the process of conversion of biogas energy into electric powerABSTRAK: Kajian ini membentangkan rekabentuk, fabrikasi dan penyelidikan tentang pencerna biogas dengan pemanas solar ringkas. Sebagai pemanas solar, ia dilengkapkan dengan penyerap pemanas beralik. Suhu maksimum(50oC di dalam tangki metana telah diambil sebagai parameter utama rekabentuk pencerna. Dengan menggunakan

  20. The contribution of Slovenian biogas plants to the reduction of agricultural sector green house emissions

    Romana MARINŠEK LOGAR

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture is a source of emissions of the greenhouse gas methane into the environment. These emissions can be reduced by appropriate storage of animal slurry and manure, with proper fertilization and processing of organic agricultural waste into biogas, where methane is captured and used as an energy source. Biogas is a renewable source of energy that is produced by microbial anaerobic digestion in biogas plants. As a substrate in biogas plants using different types of organic biomass such as animal manure and slurry, crop residues, spoilt silage, waste from food processing industry and biodegradable industrial and municipal waste. Biogas can be used to produce heat and electricity or purified to biomethane as a fuel for vehicles. Digestate can be used as a high-quality fertilizer. Biogas as a renewable energy source represents a replacement for fossil fuels, thus reducing greenhouse gas emissions from fossil sources. The system of financial supports for electricity produced from biogas is applied in Slovenia. There were 24 operating biogas plants in Slovenia in year 2014. Slovenian biogas plants currently produce the majority of biogas from energy crops. As only the minority of biogas is produced from animal excrements we will primarily support the development of agricultural microbiogas plants that will use animal excrements and organic waste biomass from agri-food sector as substrates.

  1. Inline microwave sensorics for the determination of the portion of organic dry matter in process media of biogas plants; Inline-Mikrowellensensorik zur Bestimmung des organischen Trockenmasseanteils in Prozessmedien von Biogassanlagen

    Nacke, T.; Barthel, A.; Haendly, D.; Beckmann, D. [iba e.V., Heilbad Heiligenstadt (Germany); Goeller, A. [hf sensor GmbH Leipzig (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The efficient operation of biogas plants requires robust on-line measuring techniques corresponding to real market conditions. For the determination of important process variables, efficiencies and the possible yields of biogas the instrumental consideration of organic dry matter of the input material and in the fermenter plays an important role. So far the dry matter and the organic amount only could be determined time-consuming by means of the drying furnace method with subsequent determination of the annealing loss (DIN 38414-S2/3). This lack is repaired by means of a new instrumentation approach based on a measurement principle using microwaves. The microwave engineering enables adaptations at different places of work and for the measuring range from 2 to 90 % dry matter for liquid and granulate containing materials.

  2. Progress in biogas II - Biogas production from agricultural biomass and organic residues. Pt. 1. Proceedings; Progress in Biogas II - Biogasproduktion aus landwirtschaftlicher Biomasse und organischen Reststoffen. T. 1. Tagungsband

    NONE

    2011-08-12

    biogas production - Methabe yield and energy balance (R. Bolduan); (19) Evaluation of a pre-treatment process for improved methane production from grass silage (A. Orozco); (20) Anaerobic fungi and biogas production (J. Prochazka); (21) Preservation of sugar beets for biogas production (A. Wagner); (22) Fibre, biogas and compost from banana agro-residues (leaves, pseudostem and rachis) by anaerobic digestion in plug flow type digester (H. Chanakya); (23) Extraction of biogas from waste products of he sugarcane industry (J. Rietzler); (24) Practical experiences with the digestion of straw in 2-stage AD plants - Extension of the value chain (W. Danner); (25) Improving biogas production on wastewater treatment plants by co-digestion of grass (D. Klein); (26) Generation of algal biomass for biogas production: energetic and environmental from a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) perspective (F. Romagnoli); (27) Risk reduction in spreading plant pathogens by anaerobic digestion? First results from laboratory experiments (M. Heiermann); (28) Demand-oriented biogas production for the generation of peak load (R. Wallmann); (29) Investigation of mesophilic and thermophilic bioleaching method in a two-phase anaerobic digestion process (M. Schoenberg): (30) Efficient hydrogen fermentation for 2-stage anaerobic digestion processes: Conversion of sucrose containing substrates (S. Noebauer); (31) Process development of two-phase pressure formation - Influence of gas solubilities (A.-M. Wonneberger); (32) Benefits and limitations when treating liquid pig manure in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (P. Messerl); (33) Experiences with continuous high-rate thermophilic dry anaerobic digestion of energy crops (L. De Baere); (34) The Sauter-biogas-system: spraying instead of stirring (S. Sauter); (35) Biogas production from raw palm oil mill effluent using a pilot-scale anaerobic hybrid reactor (C. Wangnai); (36) Eta max - the biogas power plant with high biological efficiency (M. Niederbacher); (37

  3. Biogas Purification up to Final Product

    Yu. Losiuk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers main technological methods for biogas purification from impurities that permit to increase energy value of the product and decrease its corrosion activity.  While evaluating economic efficiency due to introduction of the corresponding purification technology, in addition, it is necessary to take into account an ecological factor.

  4. Biogas performance from co-digestion of Taihu algae and kitchen wastes

    Highlights: • Co-digestion mode improves the biogas yield of Taihu algae and kitchen wastes. • Neutral protease enzyme reached maximum in algae only group. • The activity of dehydrogenase enzyme in mixed substrate groups was higher than that of algae and kitchen wastes only group. - Abstract: Co-digestion of Taihu algae with high carbon content substrate can balance the nutrients in the fermentation process. In this study, optimal mixing ratio for co-digestion of Taihu algae and kitchen wastes were investigated in order to improve biogas production potential. The results indicated that the biogas yield reached 388.6 mL/gTS at C/N15:1 group, which was 1.29 and 1.18 times of algae and kitchen wastes only. The maximum concentration of VFA reached 4239 mg/L on 8th day in kitchen wastes group, which was 1.21 times of algae group. Neutral protease enzyme activity in algae group reached maximum of 904.2 μg/(gTS h), while dehydrogenase enzyme at C/N 15:1 group reached maximum of 3402.2 μgTF/(gTS h). The feasibility of adjusting the C/N with co-digestion of Taihu algae and kitchen wastes to increase biogas production was demonstrated. Remarkably, the C/N of 15:1 was found to be the most appropriate ratio

  5. Experiences with biogas in Denmark

    Bundgaard, Sirid Sif; Kofoed-Wiuff, Anders

    This report is primarily based on the work of the Danish biogas task force, which was established as a result of the Energy Agreement of 22 March 2012. The purpose of the task force is to examine and support concrete biogas projects in order to facilitate the projected biogas development up to 2020....... The focus of the task force was on the practical integration of the new biogas production in energy system, including the utilization of gas, the necessary infrastructure and contractual relationships. The aim was to ensure effective and appropriate integration of biogas in the Danish energy supply, which...... was consistent with the policy objectives, both in regards to current challenges for specific biogas plants and the role of biogas flexible renewable energy form on longer term. The task force's final report was published in 2014....

  6. Ultrasound assisted biogas production from landfill leachate

    Highlights: • Effect of low frequency ultrasound pretreatment on leachate was investigated. • Three different ultrasound energy inputs (200, 400 and 600 W/l) was applied. • Low-frequency ultrasound treatment increased soluble COD in landfill leachate. • Application of ultrasound to leachate increased biogas production about 40%. • Application of ultrasound to leachate increased total methane production rate about 20%. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to increase biogas production and methane yield from landfill leachate in anaerobic batch reactors by using low frequency ultrasound as a pretreatment step. In the first part of the study, optimum conditions for solubilization of organic matter in leachate samples were investigated using various sonication durations at an ultrasound frequency of 20 kHz. The level of organic matter solubilization during ultrasonic pretreatment experiments was determined by calculating the ratio of soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD) to total chemical oxygen demand (tCOD). The sCOD/tCOD ratio was increased from 47% in raw leachate to 63% after 45 min sonication at 600 W/l. Non-parametric Friedman’s test indicated that ultrasonic pretreatment has a significant effect on sCOD parameter for leachate (p < 0.05). In the second part of the study, anaerobic batch reactors were operated for both ultrasonically pretreated and untreated landfill leachate samples in order to assess the effect of sonication on biogas and methane production rate. In anaerobic batch reactor feed with ultrasonically pretreated leachate, 40% more biogas was obtained compared to the control reactor. For statistical analysis, Mann–Whitney U test was performed to compare biogas and methane production rates for raw and pretreated leachate samples and it has been found that ultrasonic pretreatment significantly enhanced biogas and methane production rates from leachate (p < 0.05) in anaerobic batch reactors. The overall results showed that low frequency

  7. Ultrasound assisted biogas production from landfill leachate

    Oz, Nilgün Ayman, E-mail: nilgunayman@comu.edu.tr; Yarimtepe, Canan Can

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Effect of low frequency ultrasound pretreatment on leachate was investigated. • Three different ultrasound energy inputs (200, 400 and 600 W/l) was applied. • Low-frequency ultrasound treatment increased soluble COD in landfill leachate. • Application of ultrasound to leachate increased biogas production about 40%. • Application of ultrasound to leachate increased total methane production rate about 20%. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to increase biogas production and methane yield from landfill leachate in anaerobic batch reactors by using low frequency ultrasound as a pretreatment step. In the first part of the study, optimum conditions for solubilization of organic matter in leachate samples were investigated using various sonication durations at an ultrasound frequency of 20 kHz. The level of organic matter solubilization during ultrasonic pretreatment experiments was determined by calculating the ratio of soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD) to total chemical oxygen demand (tCOD). The sCOD/tCOD ratio was increased from 47% in raw leachate to 63% after 45 min sonication at 600 W/l. Non-parametric Friedman’s test indicated that ultrasonic pretreatment has a significant effect on sCOD parameter for leachate (p < 0.05). In the second part of the study, anaerobic batch reactors were operated for both ultrasonically pretreated and untreated landfill leachate samples in order to assess the effect of sonication on biogas and methane production rate. In anaerobic batch reactor feed with ultrasonically pretreated leachate, 40% more biogas was obtained compared to the control reactor. For statistical analysis, Mann–Whitney U test was performed to compare biogas and methane production rates for raw and pretreated leachate samples and it has been found that ultrasonic pretreatment significantly enhanced biogas and methane production rates from leachate (p < 0.05) in anaerobic batch reactors. The overall results showed that low frequency

  8. The conversion of renewable biogas source into energy; A conversao da fonte renovavel biogas em energia

    Coelho, Suani Teixeira; Velazquez, Silvia Maria Stortini Gonzalez; Martins, Osvaldo Stella; Abreu, Fernando Castro de [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Eletrotecnica e Energia]|[Centro Nacional de Referencia em Biomassa (CENBIO), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: suani@iee.usp.br; sgvelaz@iee.sup.br; omartins@iee.usp.br; fcabreu@iee.usp.br

    2006-07-01

    This article intend to present some considerations directed to electricity generation with small systems (micro turbine and conventional engines ), using biogas generated by sewage treatment process in SABESP (Basic Sanitation Company of Sao Paulo State), located at Barueri, Brazil. This project, pioneer in Latin America, is being accomplished together with BUN - Biomass Users Network of Brazil (proponent), in association with CENBIO - Biomass Reference National Center (executer), with patronage of FINEP / CT-ENERG (financial backer), by means of Convention No: 23.01.0653.00, regarding to ENERG-BIOG Project - Installation and Tests of an Electric Energy Generation Demonstration Unit from Biogas Sewage Treatment. The study is being done at Barueri Sewage Treatment Plant.This plant operate with anaerobic digestion process, which has as mainly products biogas (composed mainly by methane) and sludge. Part of the methane produced at the anaerobic process is burnt in a boiler being used to increase digesters temperature. The rest of the methane is burnt in flare to reduce the impacts caused by gases emissions. This article presents some technical, financial and environmental project results, related to the exploitation of sewer biogas for power generation, as well as bigger details about generation systems (biogas micro turbine), used in the facility. (author)

  9. Recent updates on biogas production - a review

    Ilona Sárvári Horváth

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the greatest challenges facing the societies now and in the future is the reduction of green house gas emissions and thus preventing the climate change. It is therefore important to replace fossil fuels with renewable sources, such as biogas. Biogas can be produced from various organic waste streams or as a byproduct from industrial processes. Beside energy production, the degradation of organic waste through anaerobic digestion offers other advantages, such as the prevention of odor release and the decrease of pathogens. Moreover, the nutrient rich digested residues can be utilized as fertilizer for recycling the nutrients back to the fields. However, the amount of organic materials currently available for biogas production is limited and new substrates as well as new effective technologies are therefore needed to facilitate the growth of the biogas industry all over the world. Hence, major developments have been made during the last decades regarding the utilization of lignocellulosic biomass, the development of high rate systems, and the application of membrane technologies within the anaerobic digestion process in order to overcome the shortcomings encountered. The degradation of organic material requires a synchronized action of different groups of microorganisms with different metabolic capacities. Recent developments in molecular biology techniques have provided the research community with a valuable tool for improved understanding of this complex microbiological system, which in turn could help optimize and control the process in an effective way in the future.

  10. COMPARISON BETWEEN BIOGAS PRODUCTION FROM MANURE OF LAYING HENERS AND BROILERS

    Srećko Kukić

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Biogas plants that process raw materials from agriculture, such as poultry manure,are one of the most significant applications of anaerobic fermentation. In Asiancountries, particularly in China, India, Nepal and Vietnam, there are several millionvery simple, small biogas plants that produce gas for household cooking and lighting.In Europe and North America a number of agricultural biogas plants now, areincreasing daily, a few thousand biogas plants exist, most of which use moderntechnologies, anaerobic fermentation. The aim of this paper is to determine thepossibility of biogas production from poultry manure with 10% of total solids andthrough the segments of the quality and quantity, determine the content of totalsolids (DM, volatile solids (OM, and the amount and composition of biogas. Theaim was also to justify the use of poultry manure in biogas production and itsapplication for specific purposes Laboratory research showed that 1 kg of poultrymanure produced 25 l of biogas, and pig slurry in combination with 10% of poultrymanure produced 47.01 l of biogas during the 40 days of anaerobic fermentationunder mezofilic conditions. Production of biogas has a good potential for developmentin Croatia, especially in the continental part. Usages of this technology aremultiple because of the fact that the Republic of Croatia imports most of the energy.Usage of biogas would reduce the import of certain energy and thus reduce energydependence; it would increase the number of employers and ease the obligation ofCroatia toward EU in replacing some fossil fuels with renewable ones.

  11. Dynamic Biogas Upgrading for Integration of Renewable Energy from Wind, Biomass and Solar

    Jurgensen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The Sabatier process is investigated as a storage scheme for renewable energy. Hydrogen derived from fluctuating renewable energy sources like wind and solar is converted to methane by the hydrogenation/methanation of carbon oxides. Biogas from anaerobic digestion is considered in this study as a high concentrated source of carbon dioxide. By using the Sabatier process, the CO2 content of the biogas is converted to CH4, which is a new upgrading process for biogas. By switching between (i) thi...

  12. Biogas Production Potential from Waste in Timis County

    Teodor Vintila; Simina Neo; Cornelia Vintilă

    2012-01-01

    This work is a study of biogas production potential using as substrate the residues generated in the agricultural activities and the organic fraction from municipal wastes collected in Timis County. Data available in regional and national statistics have been reported to Timis County and used to calculate the potential quantity of biogas to be produced by anaerobic fermentation using as fermentable substrate residues generated in various human activities. To estimate the electric and thermal ...

  13. Utilization of CO2 fixating bacterium Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z for simultaneous biogas upgrading and bio-succinic acid production

    Gunnarsson, Ingólfur Bragi; Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-01-01

    Biogas is an attractive renewable energy carrier. However, it contains CO2 which limits certain applications of biogas. Here we report a novel approach for removing CO2 from biogas and capturing it as a biochemical through a biological process. This approach entails converting CO2 into bio-succin...

  14. Biogas Production from Energy Crops and Agriculture Residues

    Wang, Guangtao

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis, the feasibility of utilizing energy crops (willow and miscanthus) and agriculture residues (wheat straw and corn stalker) in an anaerobic digestion process for biogas production was evaluated. Potential energy crops and agriculture residues were screened according to their suitability for biogas production. Moreover, pretreatment of these biomasses by using wet explosion method was studied and the effect of the wet explosion process was evaluated based on the increase of (a) s...

  15. Agricultural Potential for Biogas Production in Croatia

    Biljana Kulišić

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Biogas is renewable energy source with strong local character as its production depends on availability and type of feedstock at a certain location. Utilisation of slurry, manure and beddings from cattle, pig, horse, poultry and other animal breeding together with energy rich substrates such as crops and other organic materials as biogas substrates creates an interesting option both from technical and economic perspective. Other materials suitable for anaerobic digestion are comprised of various residues from agriculture (crops and vegetables, residues from food processing industry and energy crops (maize silage, grass and similar.Primary reason for biogas production is economic gain from energy production and/or organic waste management that adds value to agriculture and food processing residues that would otherwise be treated as waste.The purpose of the paper is to provide an overview of biogas production potential of Croatia at the level of statistical administrative units NUTS1 and NUTS2, excluding energy crops growing and agro-food imports but including the seasonality of substrate availability.

  16. Biogas Production on Demand Regulated by Butyric Acid Addition

    Kasper, K.; Schiffels, J.; Krafft, S.; Kuperjans, I.; Elbers, G.; Selmer, T.

    2016-03-01

    Investigating effects of volatile fatty acids on the biogas process it was observed that butyric acid can be used for transient stimulation of the methane production in biogas plants operating with low energy substrates like cattle manure. Upon addition of butyrate the methane output of the reactors doubled within 24 h and reached almost 3-times higher methane yields within 3-4 days. Butyrate was quantitatively eliminated and the reactors returned to the original productivity state within 3 days when application of butyrate was stopped. The opportunity to use butyrate feeding for increased biogas production on demand is discussed.

  17. Analytical investigation of the thermal optimization of biogas plants; Analytische Untersuchung der thermischen Optimierung von Biogasanlagen

    Knauer, Thomas [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl Abfall- und Stoffstromwirtschaft; Ing. Buero Energietechnik, Niebuell (Germany); Scholwin, Frank [Institut fuer Biogas, Kreislaufwirtschaft und Energie, Weimar (Germany); Nelles, Michael [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl Abfall- und Stoffstromwirtschaft; DBFZ Deutsches Biomasseforschungszentrum gemeinnuetzige GmbH, Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The economic efficiency of biogas plants is more difficult to display with recent legal regulations than with bonus tariff systems of previous EEG amendments. To enhance efficiency there are different options, often linked with further investments. Direct technical innovations with fast economic yields need exact evaluation of limiting conditions. Within this article the heat sector of agricultural biogas plants is studied. So far scarcely considered, especially the improvement of on-site thermal energy consumption promises a high optimisation. Data basis are feeding protocols and temperature measurements of input substrates, biogas, environment etc., also documentations of on-site thermal consumption over 10 years. Analyzing first results of measurements and primary equilibrations shows, that maintenance of biogas process temperature consumes most thermal energy and therefore has the greatest potential of improvement. Passive and active insulation of feed systems and heat recovery from secondary fermenter liquids are identified as first optimization measures. Depending on amount and temperature raise of input substrates, saving potentials of more than hundred megawatt hours per year were calculated.

  18. Energetic utilization of biogas arising of sanitary landfills

    The biogas is the gaseous product that is obtained from the fermentation of biodegradable organic matter; this process is known as anaerobic digestion. In this exposition, the formation process of biogas is described in its three continuos phases: 1. Hydrolysis phase, 2. Phase of acid generation and the acetic acid generation and 3. Phase of methane generation. Also, the biogas composition (methane, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and traces) is present. Different types of anaerobic digestion as discontinuous digestion, continuo digestion, digestion with suspended biomass, digestion with adhered biomass, and digestion of two phases are shown. Finally, the process that occur in a landfill and its different phases of aerobic and anaerobic decomposition, are describe from its initial stage until the biogas generation

  19. Biogas Production From Cassava Starch Effluent Using Microalgae As Biostabilisator

    B. Budiyono

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The rapid growing of Indonesian population is emerging several critical national issues i.e. energy, food, environmental, water, transportation, as well as law and human right. As an agricultural country, Indonesia has abundant of biomass wastes such as agricultural wastes include the cassava starch wastes. The problem is that the effluent from cassava starch factories is released directly into the river before properly treatment. It has been a great source of pollution and has caused environmental problems to the nearby rural population. The possible alternative to solve the problem is by converting waste to energy biogas in the biodigester. The main problem of the biogas production of cassava starch effluent is acid forming-bacteria quickly produced acid resulting significantly in declining pH below the neutral pH and diminishing growth of methane bacteria. Hence, the only one of the method to cover this problem is by adding microalgae as biostabilisator of pH. Microalgae can also be used as purifier agent to absorb CO2.The general objective of this research project was to develop an integrated process of biogas production and purification from cassava starch effluent by using biostabilisator agent microalgae. This study has been focused on the used of urea, ruminant, yeast, microalgae, the treatment of gelled and ungelled feed for biogas production, pH control during biogas production using buffer Na2CO3, and feeding management in the semi-continuous process of biogas production. The result can be concluded as follows: i The biogas production increased after cassava starch effluent and yeast was added, ii Biogas production with microalgae and cassava starch effluent, yeast, ruminant bacteria, and urea were 726.43 ml/g total solid, iii Biogas production without  microalgae was 189 ml/g total solid.

  20. Biogas in the natural gas distribution network; Biogas til nettet

    Kvist Jensen, T.

    2009-05-15

    With the Danish 'Thorsoe Biogas Plant' as reference case, an assessment of the possibility of using the existing natural gas distribution network for distributing biogas was carried out. Technologies for and cost of upgrading biogas to natural gas quality are presented. Furthermore, a socio-economic analysis has been performed, including the Danish financial conditions, the market models, and the role of the natural gas distribution companies.

  1. Biogas in Vietnam : a proposed business model in biogas sector

    Phan, Thi Thanh Thao

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to discover a biogas opportunity in the Mekong Delta area in Vietnam. The discussed biogas production is derived from organic waste and targeted to fullfill the demand for gas for cooking in condition of non-pipeline system. However, different products from this production were introduced to maximize the technology profitability. Another aim was to propose a business model to foreign investors who own advanced technologies in biogas production. Qualitative r...

  2. Life cycle analysis of biogas from residues; Livscykelanalys av biogas fraan restprodukter

    Tufvesson, Linda; Lantz, Mikael [Dep. for Miljoe- och Energisystem, Lunds Tekniska Hoegskola, Lund (Sweden)

    2012-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to carry out life cycle assessments for different biogas systems where biogas is produced from different residues. The investigated residues are distiller's waste, rapeseed cake, whey permeate, concentrated whey permeate, fodder milk, fish residues, bakery residues and glycerol. The environmental impact categories included are climate change, eutrophication, acidification, photochemical ozone creation potential, particles and energy balance. The calculations include emissions from technical systems, especially the energy input in various operations and processes. A general conclusion is that all studied residues are very well suited for production of biogas if there is no demand for them as animal feed today. All biogas systems also reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases compared to petrol and diesel and meet the requirements presented in the EU renewable energy directive (RED). The results of the study also show that the investigated biogas systems are complex and many different parameters affect the result. These parameters are both integrated in the life cycle assessment method, but also in the inventory data used.

  3. Investigations on the efficiency of the Bavarian biogas pilot plants using Data Envelopment Analysis; Untersuchungen zur Effizienz der Bayerischen Biogas-Pilotanlagen mittels Data Envelopment Analysis

    Djatkov, D.; Effenberger, M.; Lehner, A.; Gronauer, A. [Bayerische Landesanstalt fuer Landwirtschaft (LfL), Freising (Germany). Inst. fuer Landtechnik und Tierhaltung

    2009-07-01

    In the course of the present study it was possible to show that Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) is in principle a suitable means of assessing the relative efficiency of biogas plants. The results were plausible in most cases from an expert viewpoint. Efficiency indicators resulting from DEA can be used to create a ranking of the biogas plants under study. However, the absolute efficiency values are not directly comparable, i.e. they cannot be interpreted on a cardinal scale. In order to arrive at a comprehensive assessment of the energy efficiency and environmental effects of a biogas plant it is necessary to include one more important parameter, namely methane yield. However this would mean splitting the DEA procedure into at least two parts: an analysis of the processes of biogas production and an analysis of biogas utilisation. Performing a complete and comprehensive assessment of the efficiency of biogas plants on the basis of one single parameter is therefore not possible.

  4. Empirical Study on Factors Affecting Biogas Production

    Prasad, Ravita D.

    2012-01-01

    In Fiji, biogas has a huge potential to be one of the energy providers for cooking in rural areas but currently its use is very minimal. Main component of biogas is methane which releases energy when combusted. This paper mainly presents the factors that affect biogas production using experimental study. The first section presents an overview on what is biogas, types of biogas digesters present, and some background on the current use of biogas in Fiji. The second section of the paper describe...

  5. Use of biogas in PEM fuel cells; Einsatz von Biogas in PEM-Brennstoffzellen

    Scholz, Volkhard; Schmersahl, Ralf; Ellner, Janine (comps.)

    2009-06-15

    This research project was dedicated to two problems: 1. What demands must biogas meet in order to conform to the specifications of PEM fuel cell systems and permit safe operation? 2. How must a fuel cell system be designed and operated in order to be well-adapted to the special features of biogas as opposed to natural gas? For this purpose biogas samples were taken from laboratory-scale and commercial plants and analysed by gas chromatography using various substrates and methods. By combining this with the use of a mass spectroscopy detector (GC-MS system) it was possible to perform a qualitative and quantitative analysis of sulphurious trace gases in the biogas which might cause damage to the fuel cell system. Investigations were performed on an experimental reformer using either modelled or native biogas of different compositions, the intent being to obtain information for the design of the individual process stages. The two operating parameters steam-methane ratio (or S/C ratio) and reforming temperature were varied to optimise parameter settings in terms of energy efficiency. By linking the reformer to a 500 W fuel cell it was possible confirm the suitability of the reformed biogas for use in fuel cells. [German] In diesm Forschungsvorhaben werden zwei Fragestellungen bearbeitet: 1. Welche Anforderungen ergeben sich an das Biogas, um den Spezifikationen von PEM-Brennstoffzellensystemen zu genuegen und eine sicheren Betrieb zu ermoeglichen? 2. Wie muss das Brennstoffzellensystem ausgelegt und gefuehrt werden, um den Besonderheiten von Biogas im Vergleich zu Erdgas Rechnung zu tragen? Dazu wurden Biogasproben aus Labor- und Praxisanlagen unter Beruecksichtigung unterschiedlicher Substrate und Verfahren gaschromatisch analysiert. Die Kopplung mit einem massenspektroskopischen Detektor (GC-MS System) ermoeglicht dabei die Qualifizierung und Quantifizierung der vorhandenen schwefelhaltigen Spurengase, die eine Schaedigung von Brennstoffzellenanlagen verursachen. Die

  6. Activated Sludge Process Overview

    B. Ahansazan; H. Afrashteh; N. Ahansazan; Z. Ahansazan

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the waste water ministerial regulations have led to a constant ascend in the purification performance demanded of waste water treatment plants. Because of this, the number of waste water treatment plants has been maturing, and technical complexity has also been growing. In order to hold the connected rising costs of capital expenditure and operation within bounds, sagacious process technology solutions have to be found. Besides having a deeper understanding of the individual p...

  7. Biogas production: current state and perspectives.

    Weiland, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of energy crops, residues, and wastes is of increasing interest in order to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions and to facilitate a sustainable development of energy supply. Production of biogas provides a versatile carrier of renewable energy, as methane can be used for replacement of fossil fuels in both heat and power generation and as a vehicle fuel. For biogas production, various process types are applied which can be classified in wet and dry fermentation systems. Most often applied are wet digester systems using vertical stirred tank digester with different stirrer types dependent on the origin of the feedstock. Biogas is mainly utilized in engine-based combined heat and power plants, whereas microgas turbines and fuel cells are expensive alternatives which need further development work for reducing the costs and increasing their reliability. Gas upgrading and utilization as renewable vehicle fuel or injection into the natural gas grid is of increasing interest because the gas can be used in a more efficient way. The digestate from anaerobic fermentation is a valuable fertilizer due to the increased availability of nitrogen and the better short-term fertilization effect. Anaerobic treatment minimizes the survival of pathogens which is important for using the digested residue as fertilizer. This paper reviews the current state and perspectives of biogas production, including the biochemical parameters and feedstocks which influence the efficiency and reliability of the microbial conversion and gas yield. PMID:19777226

  8. Socio-economic evaluation of selected biogas technologies

    Moeller, F.; Martinsen, L.

    2013-05-15

    Financial and welfare economic analyses are conducted of 15 different biogas production scenarios that vary in terms of plant size and type of input. All considered scenarios lead to welfare economic losses. Overall welfare economic GHG reduction costs seem to increase with increasing crop/crop material share of input, and although the costs vary significantly across scenarios they are quite high for all scenarios. The financial analyses suggest that biogas production generally will be financially profitable for the agricultural sector and local CHP facilities but unprofitable for the biogas plants and the State. Seen from a policy perspective the results highlights the importance of designing regulatory instruments in a way that create incentives for private actors to engage in welfare economically desirable biogas production activities while discouraging the expansion of welfare economically undesirable activities. (Author)

  9. Production of metahnol from biogas; Herstellung von Methanol aus Biogas

    Marquard-Moellenstedt, T.; Baumgart, F.; Specht, M. [Zentrum fuer Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung Baden-Wuerttemberg, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    An experimental facility for production of methanol from biogas was designed, constructed and operated at the author's institution, the ZSW. Apart from demonstrating the process and reducing the plant's complexity, the investigations focused on an analysis of the energy and mass flow in order to obtain information on the efficiency of decentralized methanol production systems. The process comprises essentially two stages: Biogas reforming and methanol synthesis. In the reforming concept chosen, the reaction enthalpy for steam reforming is provided by flameles oxidation of the fuel gas. Efficiencies of more than 70% were achieved in the small-scale reformers for synthesis gas production. Owing to the reduced complexity of the plant, methanol synthesis was designed as a ''one-through' process with power generation from the remainder of the synthesis gas. Efficiencies of 25% were achieved for methanol production and about 60% for combined methanol and residual synthesis gas. An efficiency of 33% was achieved for cogeneration of methanol and electric power. [German] Der Einsatz von Biomasse zur Herstellung synthetischer Kraftstoffe erfordert neue Technologien fuer dezentrale Kleinanlagen, da aus logistischen Gruenden die Biomassennutzung auf das lokale Aufkommen begrenzt ist. Am ZSW wurde erstmals eine Versuchsanlage zur Herstellung von Methanol aus Biogas konzipiert, aufgebaut und betrieben. Neben der Demonstration des Gesamtprozesses und der Reduzierung der Anlagenkomplexitaet ist die Analyse der Stoff- und Energiestroeme ein wesentliches Ziel des Projektes und ermoeglicht Aussagen ueber die Effizienz dezentraler Methanolanlagen. Das Verfahren besteht im Wesentlichen aus den zwei Prozessschritten Biogasreformierung und Methanolsynthese. Bei dem gewaehlten neuen Reformierungskonzept wird die Reaktionsenthalpie fuer die Dampfreformierung durch flammenlose Oxidation des Brenngases bereitgestellt. Bezogen auf das erzeugte Synthesegas wurden fuer

  10. Biological pretreatment of non-flocculated sludge augments the biogas production in the anaerobic digestion of the pretreated waste activated sludge.

    Merrylin, J; Kumar, S Adish; Kaliappan, S; Yeom, Ick-Tae; Banu, J Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    High-efficiency resource recovery from municipal solid waste (MSW) has been a focus of attention. The objective of this research is to develop a bio-pretreatment process for application prior to the anaerobic digestion of MSW to improve methane productivity. Bacillus licheniformis was used for pretreating MSW (non-flocculated with 0.07% citric acid), followed by anaerobic digestion. Laboratory-scale experiments were carried out in semi-continuous bioreactors, with a total volume of 5 L and working volume of 3 L. Among the nine organic loading rates (OLRs) investigated, the OLR of 0.84 kg SS m(-3) reactor day(-1) was found to be the most appropriate for economic operation of the reactor. Pretreatment of MSW prior to anaerobic digestion led to 55% and 64% increase of suspended solids (SS) and volatile solids reduction, respectively, with an improvement of 57% in biogas production. The results indicate that the pretreatment of non-flocculated sludge with Bacillus licheniformis which consumes less energy compared to other pretreatment techniques could be a cost-effective and environmentally sound method for producing methane from MSW. PMID:24350465

  11. Biogas Opportunities Roadmap Progress Report

    None, None

    2015-12-01

    In support of the Obama Administration's Climate Action Plan, the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and U.S. Department of Agriculture jointly released the Biogas Opportunities Roadmap Progress Report, updating the federal government's progress to reduce methane emissions through biogas systems since the Biogas Opportunities Roadmap was completed by the three agencies in July 2014. The report highlights actions taken, outlines challenges and opportunities, and identifies next steps to the growth of a robust biogas industry.

  12. Prospects for expanded utilization of biogas in Germany

    The prospects for expanded utilization of biogas systems in German was analysed, by identifying the operational and policy factors affecting the complete chain of processes from implementation process for biogas plants, through to biogas production and utilization. It was found that the Renewable Energies Act (EEG) and energy tax reliefs provide bases for the support of expanded utilization. Upgrading of biogas to natural gas quality for utilization in the transportation sector was arguably the most promising technology that could support rapid utilization expansion. Sustainable deployment of biogas systems in light of the unstable feedstock prices and availability, and the need for subsidy-free operation in the long term requires; enhancement of feedstock flexibility and quality characteristics to maximise gas yield, and optimisation of the anaerobic digestion process management. Assessment of energy balance and potential environmental impacts of the integrated process chain provides a holistic assessment of sustainability. The results also support the development and foster of policies and framework for development of biogas as environmentally friendly energy resource, among a mix of renewable energy sources, hence, compete favourably with fossil fuels to enhance the prospects for expanded utilization. (author)

  13. Comparative review of foam formation in biogas plants and ruminant bloat

    Moeller, Lucie; Goersch, Kati; Zehnsdorf, Andreas; Mueller, Roland Arno [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig (Germany). Environmental and Biotechnology Centre; Neuhaus, Juergen [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Bacteriology and Mycology

    2012-12-15

    This review gives an overview of the current knowledge concerning the problem of foam formation in the process of anaerobic digestion in biogas plants that utilize renewable resources or biogenic waste material for biogas production. Process upsets in biogas production induced by foam formation can have a negative impact on the efficiency of biogas plants. The foam can block gas pipes and cause severe damage to the bioreactor equipment, ranging from a failure of the feeders to a damage of the roof of the biogas plant. The most common foam removal methods - stirring in the foam, adding anti-foaming agents, diminishing substrate feeding, and altering the biogas reactor management - are not always successful. However, the reasons for the excessive foam formation during the biogas production process have not yet been elucidated in detail. In contrast, foam building in the rumen of ruminants as a cause for bloat has been studied thoroughly. In general, the interaction between proteins, polysaccharides (mucilage), and small plant particles is assumed to be the crucial factor. As the fermentation process in the rumen has many similarities with the biogas production process, the current research results on bloat in ruminants are summarized and compared with the process of foaming in biogas plants. (orig.)

  14. Profile and perceptions of biogas as automobile fuel : A study of Svensk Biogas

    Larsson, Anneli

    2008-01-01

    From an environmental- and health perspective, biogas and other biomass-based fuels have several advantages; nevertheless the majority of motorists fill their cars with petroleum-based fuels. This thesis is designed to explore the profile of biogas in relation to its perceptions. It is a study concerning the communication between the biogas producing company Svensk Biogas and their biogas users and non biogas users. To obtain a thorough understanding of the profile and perceptions of biogas a...

  15. Bacterial Contamination of Biogas

    Mrázek, Jakub; Čermáková, J.; Tenkrát, D.; Kopečný, Jan; Fliegerová, Kateřina

    Smolenice : IAP, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Košice, 2011. s. 11-11. ISBN 978-80-968618-6-6. [7th International Symposium on Anaerobic Microbiology. 15.6.2011-18.6.2011, Smolenice] R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP503/10/P394; GA MZe QI92A286 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : biogas * bacterium Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  16. Performance optimization of the Växtkraft biogas production plant

    Thorin, Eva; Lindmark, Johan; Nordlander, Eva; Odlare, Monica; Dahlquist, Erik; Kastensson, Jan; Leksell, Niklas; Pettersson, Carl-Magnus

    2012-01-01

    All over the world there is a strong interest and also potential for biogas production from organic residues as well as from different crops. However, to be commercially competitive with other types of fuels, efficiency improvements of the biogas production process are needed. In this paper, results of improvements studies done on a full scale co-digestion plant are presented   In the plant organic wastes from households and restaurants are mixed and digested with crops from graze land. The a...

  17. Swiss Farmer Power - Biogas from farms will be the fuel for tomorrow; Biogas vom Bauer wird zum Treibstoff von morgen - SwissFarmerPower

    Bruecker, U. [ITZ InnovationsTransfer Zentralschweiz, Horw (Switzerland); Limacher, R. [bapGROUP AG, Lucerne (Switzerland); Engeli, H. [Engeli Engineering, Neerach (Switzerland); Henggeler, H. [Fenaco Alternativ Energie, Winterthur (Switzerland)

    2005-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a project that involves the building of a joint biogas plant serving 60 farmers and industrial companies with an annual processing capacity of 45,000 tons. The plant is to produce biogas to be fed into the gas mains and will not only reduce nutrient loading in a region with an extensive livestock industry but also reduce carbon dioxide emissions by using the gas as a motor fuel. The importance of the project with respect to both the environment and energy policy-making is discussed and the costs involved are examined. Details are presented on the technology used and on the material flows involved. Figures are quoted on energy production. The various biogenic substrates used, such as food wastes, waste oils, cereal wastes and used mushroom substrates, are discussed, as is the use of the solid and liquid outputs of the digester in farming activities.

  18. Operational experinece with large scale biogas production at the promest manure processing plant in Helmond, the Netherlands

    In The Netherlands a surplus of 15 million tons of liquid pig manure is produced yearly on intensive pig breeding farms. The dutch government has set a three-way policy to reduce this excess of manure: 1. conversion of animal fodder into a product with less and better ingestible nutrients; 2. distribution of the surplus to regions with a shortage of animal manure; 3. processing of the remainder of the surplus in large scale processing plants. The first large scale plant for the processing of liquid pig manure was put in operation in 1988 as a demonstration plant at Promest in Helmond. The design capacity of this plant is 100,000 tons of pig manure per year. The plant was initiated by the Manure Steering Committee of the province Noord-Brabant in order to prove at short notice whether large scale manure processing might contribute to the solution of the problem of the manure surplus in The Netherlands. This steering committee is a corporation of the national and provincial government and the agricultural industrial life. (au)

  19. Responses of the biogas process to pulses of oleate in reactors treating mixtures of cattle and pig manure

    Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2006-01-01

    The effect of oleate on the anaerobic digestion process was investigated. Two thermophilic continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTR) were fed with mixtures of cattle and pig manure with different total solid (TS) and volatile solid (VS) content. The reactors were subjected to increasing pulses of...

  20. Purification of Biogas by Means of Membranes

    Poloncarzová, Magda; Vejražka, Jiří; Izák, Pavel

    Praha : Process Engineering Publisher, 2010, s. 563. ISBN 978-80-02-02247-3. [International Congress of Chemical and Process Engineering CHISA 2010 and 7th European Congress of Chemical Engineering ECCE-7 /19./. Prague (CZ), 28.08.2010-01.09.2010] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : biogas * membranes * permeability Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering www.chisa.cz/2010, www.ecce7.com

  1. Energy efficiency and climate efficiency of biogas plants with processing and supply of biogas utilizing silage maize. Investigations at the biogas plant of HSE AG in Darmstadt-Wixhausen; Energie- und Klimaeffizienz von Biogasanlagen mit Biogasaufbereitung und -einspeisung unter Nutzung von Silomais. Untersuchungen am Beispiel der Biogasanlage der HSE AG in Darmstadt-Wixhausen

    Hundt, Baerbel

    2010-07-12

    After the introduction of the German Renewable Energies Act (EEG), a real boom in the biogas sector in Germany took place. As most biogas plants have, until now, been an integrated part of a farm, the biogas produced is converted directly on site. This often leads to an insufficient use of the heat produced due to the isolated location of farms. However, if the biogas is upgraded, fed into a nearby natural gas grid and transported to a location with an existing heat sink, the heat produced can be used in an optimal way. Using the example of the biogas plant in Darmstadt-Wixhausen, the present study analyses how energy and climate efficient biogas plants are, which factors have the greatest influence on the results of energy and greenhouse-gas balances and finally how uncertain the results of life cycle assessments can be. As a result of its sophisticated heat utilization concept, the Darmstadt-Wixhausen biogas plant comes off very well from the point of view of the energy balance. The net energy gain is 4.5, the specific cumulative energy demand amounts to 1.68 MJ/MJ{sub end} {sub energie} and the energetic amortization time is 4.46 years. Regarding the greenhouse gas balance, this plant comes off rather badly due to greenhouse gas savings of only 46.8 % and due to specific greenhouse gas emissions of 72.51 g CO{sub 2eq}/MJ{sub end} {sub energie}, which range in scales similar to those of natural gas fired block heat and power plants. Amongst the most sensitive parameters related to the energy balance is the electricity consumed by the plant itself, especially the electricity demand of the upgrading technology, the silage losses and the methane yield of the used substrate. The greenhouse gas balance is additionally strongly influenced by the parameters ''methane losses'', ''nitrous oxide-emissions'' and ''grassland ploughing''. If the methane losses are reduced to a minimum by closing the digistate storage

  2. Assessment of energy performance in the life-cycle of biogas production

    Energy balances are analysed from a life-cycle perspective for biogas systems based on 8 different raw materials. The analysis is based on published data and relates to Swedish conditions. The results show that the energy input into biogas systems (i.e. large-scale biogas plants) overall corresponds to 20-40% (on average approximately 30%) of the energy content in the biogas produced. The net energy output turns negative when transport distances exceed approximately 200 km (manure), or up to 700 km (slaughterhouse waste). Large variations exist in energy efficiency among the biogas systems studied. These variations depend both on the properties of the raw materials studied and on the system design and allocation methods chosen. The net energy output from biogas systems based on raw materials that have high water content and low biogas yield (e.g. manure) is relatively low. When energy-demanding handling of the raw materials is required, the energy input increases significantly. For instance, in a ley crop-based biogas system, the ley cropping alone corresponds to approximately 40% of the energy input. Overall, operation of the biogas plant is the most energy-demanding process, corresponding to 40-80% of the energy input into the systems. Thus, the results are substantially affected by the assumptions made about the allocation of a plant's entire energy demand among raw materials, e.g. regarding biogas yield or need of additional water for dilution

  3. Biogas - the calculable energy

    Kith, Károly; Nagy, Orsolya; Balla, Zoltán; Tamás, András

    2015-04-01

    EU actions against climate change are rising energy prices, both have emphasized the use of renewable energy,increase investments and energy efficiency. A number of objectives formulated in the EC decree no. 29/2009 by 2020. This document is based on the share of renewable energies in energy consumption should be increased to 20% (EC, 2009). The EU average is 20% but the share of renewables vary from one member state to another. In Hungary in 2020, 14.65% renewable energy share is planned to be achieved. According to the latest Eurostat data, the share of renewable energy in energy consumption of the EU average was 14.1%, while in Hungary, this share was 9.6% in 2012. (EUROSTAT, 2014). The use of renewable energy plant level is influenced by several factors. The most important of these is the cost savings and efficiency gains. Hungarian investments in renewable energy production usually have high associated costs and the payback period is substantially more than five years, depending on the support rate. For example, the payback period is also influenced by the green electricity generated feed prices, which is one of the lowest in Hungary compared the Member States of the European Union. Consequently, it is important to increase the production of green energy. Nowadays, predictable biogas energy is an outstanding type of decentralized energy production. It follows directly that agricultural by-products can be used to produce energy and they also create jobs by the construction of a biogas plant. It is important to dispose of and destroy hazardous and noxious substances in energy production. It follows from this that the construction of biogas plants have a positive impact, in addition to green energy which is prepared to reduce the load on the environment. The production of biogas and green electricity is one of the most environment friendly forms of energy production. Biogas production also has other important ecological effects, such as the substitution of

  4. Life cycle assessment of agricultural biogas production systems

    Lansche, J.; Muller, J. [Hohenheim Univ., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. of Agricultural Engineering, Tropical and Subtropical Group

    2010-07-01

    Agricultural activities are large contributors to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. This paper discussed the effectiveness of reducing agricultural emissions by using liquid manure to produce biogas. When using this technique, greenhouse gas emissions from manure storage are avoided and renewable energy is generated as heat and electricity in combined heat and power plants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the environmental impacts of biogas production systems based on the methods of life cycle assessment. The traditional use of agricultural manures was compared with conventional energy production. The Gabi 4.3 software was used to create a model to evaluate the biogas production systems according to their environmental impact. In addition to the global warming potential, other impact categories were also used to evaluate the effects of the systems in eutrophication and acidification. It was concluded that environmental benefits can be obtained in terms of greenhouse gas emissions compared to electricity production from biogas with the typical German marginal electricity mix.

  5. Biogas industry, multi-faceted and essential for the future

    In France, biogas industry will play a key role is the coming energy transition, both in terms of activity and employment. According to the white book of the Biogas Club of the Energy-Environment Technical Association (ATEE), which synthesizes the present-day situation and the recommendations of professionals concerning the future of projects - in particular the methanation ones, this role is going to occupy a strategic position. Projects will have various sizes and several studies have analysed the conditions of their technical optimization and profitability. Whatever biogas origin, a proper exploitation is of prime importance to reach efficiency. This dossier presents in 10 articles an overview of the development of biogas industry in France, from the regulatory aspects to some examples of methanation facilities and the use of methane in cogeneration units and transportation systems

  6. Life cycle assessment of agricultural biogas production systems

    Agricultural activities are large contributors to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. This paper discussed the effectiveness of reducing agricultural emissions by using liquid manure to produce biogas. When using this technique, greenhouse gas emissions from manure storage are avoided and renewable energy is generated as heat and electricity in combined heat and power plants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the environmental impacts of biogas production systems based on the methods of life cycle assessment. The traditional use of agricultural manures was compared with conventional energy production. The Gabi 4.3 software was used to create a model to evaluate the biogas production systems according to their environmental impact. In addition to the global warming potential, other impact categories were also used to evaluate the effects of the systems in eutrophication and acidification. It was concluded that environmental benefits can be obtained in terms of greenhouse gas emissions compared to electricity production from biogas with the typical German marginal electricity mix.

  7. Orthogonal Test About Biogas Upgrading by Pressured Water Scrubbing

    HUANG Li; JIAO Youzhou; LEI Tingzhou; ZHANG Quanguo

    2010-01-01

    Biogas is a kind of regenerable energy which is inexpensive and friendly to the environment, but the potential of biogas is difficult to develop fully in China, for most biogas have badly qualities and the utilization of it is monotonous. The suitable operation term about biogas upgrading by pressurized water scrubbing was researched through the orthogonal test in this study. Two sorts of scrubber packing included the random multidimensional hollow sphere packing and the structured screen packing were also used, and the effects of experiment factors included packing, water temperature, gas flow speed, water flow speed and washing pressure were studied. The results showed that better effect was got when the screen structured packing was used; all the five test factors affected the processing significantly in the arrange as before and had better and better significant effects.

  8. Biogas Production Modelling: A Control System Engineering Approach

    Stollenwerk, D.; Rieke, C.; Dahmen, M.; Pieper, M.

    2016-03-01

    Due to the Renewable Energy Act, in Germany it is planned to increase the amount of renewable energy carriers up to 60%. One of the main problems is the fluctuating supply of wind and solar energy. Here biogas plants provide a solution, because a demand-driven supply is possible. Before running such a plant, it is necessary to simulate and optimize the process feeding strategy. Current simulation models are either very detailed like the ADM 1, which leads to very long optimization runtimes or not accurate enough to handle the biogas production kinetics. Therefore this paper provides a new model of a biogas plant, which is easy to parametrize but also has the needed accuracy for the output prediction. It is based on the control system approach of system identification and validated with laboratory results of a real biogas production testing facility.

  9. The biogas value chains in the Swedish region of Skåne

    Ericsson, Karin; Nikoleris, Alexandra; Nilsson, Lars J

    2013-01-01

    Biogas systems are complex in the sense that they cut across several sectors, mainly agriculture, waste management and energy. Cooperation between actors in these sectors must work for biogas projects to be realised and successful. The aim of this report is to describe the biogas systems in Skåne from a value chain perspective, including important development pathways. The different segments in the value chain are mapped with regard to actors, actors in supporting activities, technologies ...

  10. Effects of changes in Italian bioenergy promotion schemes for agricultural biogas projects: Insights from a regional optimization model

    Italy has witnessed an extraordinary growth in biogas generation from livestock effluents and agricultural activities in the last few years as well as a severe isomorphic process, leading to a market dominance of 999 kW power plants owned by “entrepreneurial farms”. Under the pressure of the economic crisis in the country, the Italian government has restructured renewable energy support schemes, introducing a new program in 2013. In this paper, the effects of the previous and current support schemes on the optimal plant size, feedstock mix and profitability were investigated by introducing a spatially explicit biogas supply chain optimization model, which accounts for different incentive structures. By applying the model to a regional case study, homogenization observed to date is recognized as a result of former incentive structures. Considerable reductions in local economic potentials for agricultural biogas power plants without external heat use, are estimated. New plants are likely to be manure-based and due to the lower energy density of such feedstock, wider supply chains are expected although optimal plant size will be smaller. The new support scheme will therefore most likely eliminate past distortions but also slow down investments in agricultural biogas plants. - Highlights: • We review the evolution of agricultural biogas support schemes in Italy over last 20 years. • A biogas supply chain optimization model which accounts for feed-in-tariffs is introduced. • The model is applied to a regional case study under the two most recent support schemes. • Incentives in force until 2013 caused homogenization towards maize based 999 kWel plants. • Wider, manure based supply chains feeding smaller plants are expected with future incentives

  11. Least cost energy planning in Thailand:A case of biogas upgrading in palm oil industry

    Artite Pattanapongchai; Bundit Limmeechokchai

    2011-01-01

    Thailand is currently the world’s fourth largest producer of crude palm oil. The palm oil mill effluent is proposed to beused for biogas production. A value added option is then proposed by increasing thermal efficiency of the biogas by removingCO2 content and increasing the percentage of methane, consequently turning the biogas in to green gas. In this study, thebiogas and upgrading process for electricity generation with the subsidy or adder in the long term planning is presented. Thisanaly...

  12. Biogas: A renewable energy source

    Biogas refers to a gas produced by the biological breakdown of organic matter in the absence of oxygen. Biogas can be used as a fuel in any country for any heating purpose such as cooking. By means of digesters, the energy in the gas can be converted to electricity and heat. Biogas like natural gas can also be used to power motor vehicle. Biogas is a renewable fuel which qualifies it for a renewable energy subsidy. It is non-toxic, environment-friendly and serve as a means of combating global warming. Biogas is presently being used in U.S.A, U.K, China, Sweden, Brazil, and India amongst others for domestic purposes, transportation and power generation. In this regard, this paper discusses biogas production. It also presents a model design of domestic biogas plant suitable for Nigerian households. The paper recommends that Nigerian Government should intensify efforts in educating the masses on this novel technology for a sustainable global development. A biogas plant designed for Nigerian household discussed in this paper is also recommended.

  13. Guide biogas. From production to utilization. 5. compl. rev. ed.; Leitfaden Biogas. Von der Gewinnung zur Nutzung

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    The book under consideration is a guide for biogas and consists of the following contributions: (a) Targets of the guide (M. Kaltschmitt); (b) Fundamentals of anaerobic fermentation (J. Friehe); (c) Systems engineering for supplying biogas (J. Postel); (d) Description of selected substrates (J. Friehe); (e) Operation of biogas plants (J. Liebetrau); (f) Gas processing and possibilities of utilization (M. Wetthaeuser); (g) Legal and administrative framework conditions (H. von Bredow); (g) Economy (S. Hartmann); (h) Company organisation (G. Reinhold); (i) Quality and utilization of fermentation residues (H. Doehler); (j) Implementation of a project (E. Fischer); (k) Position and significance of biogas as a renewable energy resource in Germany (M. Kaltschmitt); (l) Project examples (J. Friehe).

  14. Renewable energies. Vol. 2. Surrogate fuels, biomass and biogas, solar and wind energy; Erneuerbare Energien. Bd. 2. Ersatzbrennstoffe, Biomasse und Biogas, Solar- und Windenergie

    Thome-Kozmiensky, Karl J.; Beckmann, Michael

    2009-07-01

    The book on renewable energies, vol.2, surrogate fuels, biomass and biogas, solar and wind energy, covers the following chapters: analytics and sampling concerning the biogenic carbon content of surrogate fuels; processing of surrogate fuels for the energetic utilization; energetic utilization of surrogate fuels; energetic utilization of biomass; fermentation and biogas; solar energy (solar thermal power plant, photovoltaics); wind energy.

  15. Electric power generation potential from the biogas in sewer treatment stations; Potencial de geracao eletrica a partir do biogas em estacoes de tratamento de esgotos (ETE)

    Albuquerque, Viriatus de; Magrini, Alessandra; Szklo, Alexandre Salem [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Planejamento Energetico

    2004-07-01

    This paper evaluates the brazilian potential of electric power generation from the biogas originated in the home sewage treatment process, applying anaerobic digesters. The energy utilization of the biogas generated in sewage treatment stations (STS) contributes to the viabilization the sanitation and improve the sanitation sector in Brazil.

  16. The Effect of Ionic Liquid Pretreatment on the Bioconversion of Tomato Processing Waste to Fermentable Sugars and Biogas.

    Allison, Brittany J; Cádiz, Juan Canales; Karuna, Nardrapee; Jeoh, Tina; Simmons, Christopher W

    2016-08-01

    Tomato pomace is an abundant lignocellulosic waste stream from industrial tomato processing and therefore a potential feedstock for production of renewable biofuels. However, little research has been conducted to determine if pretreatment can enhance release of fermentable sugars from tomato pomace. Ionic liquids (ILs) are an emerging pretreatment technology for lignocellulosic biomass to increase enzymatic digestibility and biofuel yield while utilizing recyclable chemicals with low toxicity. In this study, pretreatment of tomato pomace with the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim][OAc]) was investigated. Changes in pomace enzymatic digestibility were affected by pretreatment time and temperature. Certain pretreatment conditions significantly improved reducing sugar yield and hydrolysis time compared to untreated pomace. Compositional analyses suggested that pretreatment primarily removed water-soluble compounds and enriched for lignocellulose in pomace, with only subtle changes to the composition of the lignocellulose. While tomato pomace was effectively pretreated with [C2mim][OAc] to improve enzymatic digestibility, as of yet, unknown factors in the pomace caused ionic liquid pretreatment to negatively affect anaerobic digestion of pretreated material. This result, which is unique compared to similar studies on IL pretreatment of grasses and woody biomass, highlights the need for additional research to determine how the unique chemical composition of tomato pomace and other lignocellulosic fruit residues may interact with ionic liquids to generate inhibitors for downstream fermentation to biofuels. PMID:27039400

  17. Successfull operation of biogas plants. Data acquisition as a basis of successful optimization measures; Erfolgreicher Betrieb von Biogasanlagen. Datenerfassung als Grundlage erfolgreicher Optimierungsmassnahmen

    NONE

    2012-09-19

    Within the 2nd Bayreuth expert meeting on biomass at 6th June, 2012 in Bayreuth (Federal Republic of Germany), the following lectures were held: (1) Presentation of the activities in the bio energy sector of the Landwirtschaftliche Lehranstalt Bayreuth (Rainer Prischenk); (2) State of the art of utilizing biogas in Oberfranken from the view of FVB e.V. (Wolfgang Holland Goetz); (3) Optimization of the plant operation by means of an intelligent control (Christian Seier); (4) Process optimization by means of identification of losses of biogas and evaluation of the load behaviour and emission behaviour of gas engines (Wolfgang Schreier); (5) Data acquisition and implementation of optimization measures from the point of view of an environmental verifier (Thorsten Grantner); (6) Economic analysis and optimization by means of the Lfl program BZA Biogas (Josef Winkler); (7) Detailed data acquisition as a necessary basis of the process optimization (Timo Herfter); (8) Case examples of the biologic support of biogas plants and their correct evaluation (Birgit Pfeifer); (9) A systematic acquisition of operational data as a basis for the increase of efficiency using the Praxisforschungsbiogasanlage of the University Hohenheim (Hans-Joachim Naegele); (10) Practical report: The biogas plant Sochenberg towards 100% utilization of energy (Uli Bader).

  18. Hydrogen sulfide removal from livestock biogas by a farm-scale bio-filter desulfurization system.

    Su, J-J; Chang, Y-C; Chen, Y-J; Chang, K-C; Lee, S-Y

    2013-01-01

    A farm-scale biogas desulfurization system was designed and tested for H2S removal efficiency from livestock biogas. This work assesses the H2S removal efficiency of a novel farm-scale biogas bio-desulfurization system (BBS) operated for 350 days on a 1,000-head pig farm. Experimental data demonstrated that suitable humidity and temperature can help sulfur-oxidizing bacteria to form active bio-films on the bio-carriers. The daily average removal rate increased to 879.16 from 337.75 g-H2S/d with an average inlet H2S concentration of 4,691 ± 1,532 mg/m(3) in biogas. Thus, the overall (0-350 days) average H2S removal efficiency exceeded 93%. The proposed BBS overcomes limitations of H2S in biogas when utilizing pig farm biogas for power generation and other applications. PMID:23508153

  19. The potential of biogas energy

    Biogas technology has been known about for a long time, but in recent years the interest in it has significantly increased, especially due to the higher costs and the rapid depletion of fossil fuels as well as their environmental considerations. The main objective of the present study is to investigate the potential of biogas energy in the 15 European Union (EU) countries and in Turkey, which is seeking admission to the EU and is trying to meet EU environmental standards. Biogas energy potential of the 15 EU countries is estimated to be about 800 PJ. Besides this, Turkey's annual animal waste potential is obtained to be about 11.81 million tons with a biogas energy equivalent of 53.6 PJ. It is expected that this study will be helpful in developing highly applicable and productive planning for energy policies towards the optimum utilization of biogas energy. (author)

  20. Membrane-based removal of volatile methylsiloxanes from biogas

    Ajhar, Marc

    2011-12-16

    This work investigates the removal of volatile methylsiloxanes (VMS) from biogas using dense, rubbery membranes. It consists of the following: a) thorough overview of already established and still developing siloxane removal technologies, b) detailed investigation of a viable sampling and analytical method, c) screening of different elastomers to identify siloxane-selective membrane materials, d) design of a suitable membrane structure, i.e. theoretical considerations about the thicknesses of the active separation layer and the porous support layer, e) assessment of the siloxane separation performance of a silicone membrane module using both synthetic gas under laboratory conditions and real landfill gas, f) comparison between the state-of-the-art technology (adsorption on activated carbon) and membrane-based processes. Suitable polymers for siloxane removal from biogas exist, however, they are not commercially available as membranes. Among the elastomers studied, Pebax registered 2533 is particularly promising. The use of a membrane made of this material could potentially become new state-of-the-art technology.

  1. Analysis or evaluation of parameters having an influence on the optimization of the production of raw biogas biogas in terms of the constancy of quality and quantity of biogas; Analyse und Bewertung der Einflussgroessen auf die Optimierung der Rohbiogasproduktion hinsichtilich der Konstanz von Biogasqualitaet und -menge

    Sutter, Ralph

    2013-04-01

    The expansion of renewable energies is an important contribution to the reduction of energy-related environmental impacts and sustainable development of the energy supply. The author of the contribution under consideration reports on the modification parameter in order to increase the efficiency of the biogas process and to optimize the production of raw biogas in terms of the constancy of quality and quantity of biogas. Thus, at first crucial factors influencing the optimization are examined in the laboratory and subsequently verified on a large-scale biogas plant. Finally, this method is applied to other, future biogas projects.

  2. Influence of hydraulic retention time on indigenous microalgae and activated sludge process.

    Anbalagan, Anbarasan; Schwede, Sebastian; Lindberg, Carl-Fredrik; Nehrenheim, Emma

    2016-03-15

    Integration of the microalgae and activated sludge (MAAS) process in municipal wastewater treatment and biogas production from recovered MAAS was investigated by studying the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of semi-continuous photo-bioreactors. An average total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency (RE) of maximum 81.5 ± 5.1 and 64.6 ± 16.2% was achieved at 6 and 4 days HRT. RE of total phosphorous (TP) increased slightly at 6 days (80 ± 12%) HRT and stabilized at 4 days (56 ± 5%) and 2 days (55.5 ± 5.5%) HRT due to the fluctuations in COD and N/P mass ratio of the periodic wastewater. COD and organic carbon were removed efficiently and a rapidly settleable MAAS with a sludge volume index (SVI_10) of less than 117 mL g(-1) was observed at all HRTs. The anaerobic digestion of the untreated MAAS showed a higher biogas yield of 349 ± 10 mL g VS(-1) with 2 days HRT due to a low solids retention time (SRT). Thermal pretreatment of the MAAS (120 °C, 120 min) did not show any improvement with biogas production at 6 days (269 ± 3 (untreated) and 266 ± 16 (treated) mL gVS(-1)), 4 days (258 ± 11(untreated) and 263 ± 10 (treated) mL gVS(-1)) and 2 days (308 ± 19 mL (treated) gVS(-1)) HRT. Hence, the biogas potential tests showed that the untreated MAAS was a feasible substrate for biogas production. Results from this proof of concept support the application of MAAS in wastewater treatment for Swedish conditions to reduce aeration, precipitation chemicals and CO2 emissions. PMID:26803263

  3. Muligheder for biogas i Odsherred Kommune

    Nielsen, Simone Grüner Veber

    2014-01-01

    The project is based on the following problem statement “Which resources can be included in the planning process for implementation of a biogas plant in Odsherred Kommune and how can the barriers of the implementation be overcome?”. I have based the project on nine supplementary biomasses to manure. I have prioritised the biomass based on the five listed sustainability criteria: quantity, gas potential, economy, technology and environment. The comparison of the biomasses is shown in a resourc...

  4. Biogas production from mediterranean crop silages

    Carvalho, L.; Di Berardino, Santino; Duarte, E.

    2011-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion has proven to be an efficient way for the production of a renewable fuel. The aim of this work was to study the potential use of two crop silages, yellow lupine (Lupinus luteus L.) and oilseed radish (Raphanus sativus var. oleifera cv. Pegletta), for the production of biogas through the process of anaerobic digestion. The use of yellow lupine was due to its capacity for nitrogen fixation, reducing the fertilization needs for the succeeding crop cycle and reducing also the ...

  5. Using of digestate of agricultural biogas stations

    VERNER, Dušan

    2010-01-01

    This work deals with problems of agricultural biogas stations with the focus on using of final product of anaerobic fermentation, digestate, on agricultural soil. It evaluates its fertilizing effect in comparison to industrial fertilizers. The results showed that the fertilizing effect can improve economy of growing plants, however it depends on quality of digestate, constitution of base input material and technology of processing. It is not possible to use digestate anytime, it depends on gr...

  6. Special file: biogas

    With some graphs indicating the number and types of existing and projected biogas production units, a first article outlines that the development rate is presently too low to be able to reach objectives defined for 2020. A second article comments the results of a benchmark study performed by the ADEME on the biogas sector status in European countries (a map indicates the levels of production and electricity purchase tariffs, the evolution of development conditions, and the types of financial support). In an interview, a GrDF manager in charge of strategy discusses the GrDF strategy on biomethane, the future management of gas networks, the operation of existing biomethane injection sites, future projects, the management of consumption variations, and the issue of biomethane injection tariff. An article then presents an experiment made by farmers in western France who gathered about a methanization site with a unit of injection of biomethane into the natural gas network. The assessment of another experiment (a Methanea methanization unit operated by two farmers in the Ain district) is then presented. The next article gives an overview of the various possibilities proposed by the legal framework for the contract between input providers and the methanization unit operator. Different assessment tools are then presented: Flash BMP (a fast and affordable method of measurement of the biochemical methane potential or BMP to perform feasibility studies), and a software for the precise assessment of the profitability of a methanization unit. In an interview, a member of Weltec Biopower proposes a brief overview of services and products proposed by this company which installs biogas and bio-methanization every where in the world. A last article addresses the recent evolutions and progress of certification of French digestates

  7. Catalytic and electrochemical behaviour of solid oxide fuel cell operated with simulated-biogas mixtures

    Dang-Long, T.; Quang-Tuyen, T.; Shiratori, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Being produced from organic matters of wastes (bio-wastes) through a fermentation process, biogas mainly composed of CH4 and CO2 and can be considered as a secondary energy carrier derived from solar energy. To generate electricity from biogas through the electrochemical process in fuel cells is a state-of-the-art technology possessing higher energy conversion efficiency without harmful emissions compared to combustion process in heat engines. Getting benefits from high operating temperature such as direct internal reforming ability and activation of electrochemical reactions to increase overall system efficiency, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system operated with biogas becomes a promising candidate for distributed power generator for rural applications leading to reductions of environmental issues caused by greenhouse effects and bio-wastes. CO2 reforming of CH4 and electrochemical oxidation of the produced syngas (H2-CO mixture) are two main reaction processes within porous anode material of SOFC. Here catalytic and electrochemical behavior of Ni-ScSZ (scandia stabilized-zirconia) anode in the feed of CH4-CO2 mixtures as simulated-biogas at 800 °C were evaluated. The results showed that CO2 had strong influences on both reaction processes. The increase in CO2 partial pressure resulted in the decrease in anode overvoltage, although open-circuit voltage was dropped. Besides that, the simulation result based on a power-law model for equimolar CH4-CO2 mixture revealed that coking hazard could be suppressed along the fuel flow channel in both open-circuit and closed-circuit conditions.

  8. Biogas fra halm og husdyrgødning - En teknisk-økonomisk analyse

    Palsberg, Aske

    2014-01-01

    A pivotal challenge for the future expansion of biogas in Denmark is the rise in use of agricultural by-products. This challenge is the baseline of the thesis ”Biogas from straw and animal manure – a feasibility study” in which the possibility of using straw in the biogas process is analyzed. In the thesis a field-to-field perspective in the value chain is applied and the possibility of adding value for the agricultural industry and for manure based biogas plants. The analyses conducted in th...

  9. Biogas as a fuel source for SOFC co-generators

    Van herle, Jan; Membrez, Yves; Bucheli, Olivier

    This study reports on the combination of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) generators fueled with biogas as renewable energy source, recoverable from wastes but at present underexploited. From a mobilisable near-future potential in the European Union (EU-15) of 17 million tonnes oil equivalent (Mtoe), under 15% appears to be converted today into useful heat and power (2 Mtoe). SOFCs could improve and promote the exploitation of biogas on manifold generation sites as small combined heat and power (5-50 kW el), especially for farm and sewage installations, raising the electrical conversion efficiency on such reduced and variable power level. Larger module packs of the high temperature ceramic converter would also be capable of operating on contaminated fuel of low heating value (less than 40% that of natural gas) which can emanate from landfill sites (MW-size). Landfill gas delivers 80% of current world biogas production. This document compiles and estimates biogas data on actual production and future potential and presents the thermodynamics of the biogas reforming and electrochemical conversion processes. A case study is reported of the energy balance of a small SOFC co-generator operated with agricultural biogas, the largest potential source.

  10. Realtime control of biogas reactors. Technical report

    Poulsen, Allan K.

    2010-12-15

    In this project several online methods were connected to a biogas pilot plant designed and built by Xergi A/S (Foulum, Denmark). The pilot plant was composed of two stainless steel tanks used as substrate storage and as digester, respectively. The total volume of the reactor tank was 300 L, the working volume 200 L and the headspace volume 100 L. The process temperature in the biogas reactor was maintained at 52 {+-} 0.5 deg. C during normal operating conditions. The biogas production was measured with a flow meter and a controller was used for automatic control of temperature, effluent removal, feeding and for data logging. A NIRS (near infrared spectrometer) was connected to a recurrent loop measuring on the slurry while a {mu}-GC (micro gas chromatograph) and a MIMS (membrane inlet mass spectrometer) enabled online measurements of the gas phase composition. During the project period three monitoring campaigns were accomplished. The loading rate of the biogas reactor was increased stepwise during the periods while the process was monitored. In the first two campaigns the load was increased by increasing the mass of organic material added to the reactor each day. However, this increasing amount changed the retention time in the reactor and in order to keep the retention time constant an increasing amount of inhibitor of the microbial process was instead added in the third campaign and as such maintaining a constant organic load mass added to the reactor. The effect is similar to an increase in process load, while keeping the load of organic material and hence retention time constant. Methods have been developed for the following online technologies and each technology has been evaluated with regard to future use as a tool for biogas process monitoring: 1) {mu}-GC was able to quantitative monitor important gas phase parameters in a reliable, fast and low-maintenance way. 2) MIMS was able to quantitative monitor gas phase composition in a reliable and fast manner

  11. Treatment of Biogas for Use as Energy

    Koller, J.

    2010-01-01

    The biogas generated in biogas plants offers significant potential for the production of energy from renewable energy sources. The number biogas plants in the Czech Republic is expected to exceed one hundred in the near future. Substrates from agriculture, industry and municipal wastes are used for biogas production. Biogas plants usually use co-generation units to generate electricity and heat. Increased effectiveness can be achieved by using heat as a source of energy for producing renewabl...

  12. A case study for biogas generation from covered anaerobic ponds treating abattoir wastewater: Investigation of pond performance and potential biogas production

    Highlights: • We report on the performance of a novel covered anaerobic pond system. • Potential biogas production was estimated using BioWin modelling software. • Ponds maintained stable operation; however, accumulation of crust was an issue. • Modelling indicated that biogas yield can be influenced by decomposition efficiency. • Configuration and operation of ponds can also impact potential biogas production. - Abstract: Covered anaerobic ponds offer significant advantages to the red meat processing industry by capturing methane rich gas as a fuel source for bioenergy while reducing greenhouse gas emissions (GHG). This paper presents the results of a novel-designed anaerobic pond system at an Australian abattoir in relation to pond performance and potential biogas production. Key findings in assessing the effectiveness of the system revealed that the covered ponds are capable of efficient wastewater decomposition and biogas production. The primary issue with the covered ponds at the abattoir was the build-up of fat/crust that prevented the accurate measurement of biogas and effective use of the cover. In the absence of field biogas data the novel application of the computer modelling software BioWin® was carried out to simulate chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rates and subsequent biogas yield. The unique parameter used to fit field data was the fraction of the inlet COD due to a superficial crust which did not follow anaerobic digestion. Field data effluent COD removal rates were matched to simulated rates predicted by BioWin when measured influent COD was reduced to 30%. Biogas modelling results suggest significant variation in the economic benefit of biogas energy, with the quantity of biogas potentially varying tenfold (from 328 m3/d to 3284 m3/d) depending on site factors such as pond efficiency, pond configuration and operational practices

  13. Nitrogen in the Process of Waste Activated Sludge Anaerobic Digestion

    Suschka Jan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary or secondary sewage sludge in medium and large WWTP are most often processed by anaerobic digestion, as a method of conditioning, sludge quantity minimization and biogas production. With the aim to achieve the best results of sludge processing several modifications of technologies were suggested, investigated and introduced in the full technical scale. Various sludge pretreatment technologies before anaerobic treatment have been widely investigated and partially introduced. Obviously, there are always some limitations and some negative side effects. Selected aspects have been presented and discussed. The problem of nitrogen has been highlighted on the basis of the carried out investigations. The single and two step - mesophilic and thermophilic - anaerobic waste activated sludge digestion processes, preceded by preliminary hydrolysis were investigated. The aim of lab-scale experiments was pre-treatment of the sludge by means of low intensive alkaline and hydrodynamic disintegration. Depending on the pretreatment technologies and the digestion temperature large ammonia concentrations, up to 1800 mg NH4/dm3 have been measured. Return of the sludge liquor to the main sewage treatment line means additional nitrogen removal costs. Possible solutions are discussed.

  14. 2nd generation biogas. BioSNG

    The substitution of natural gas by a renewable equivalent is an interesting option to reduce the use of fossil fuels and the accompanying greenhouse gas emissions, as well as from the point of view of security of supply. The renewable alternative for natural gas is green natural gas, i.e. gaseous energy carriers produced from biomass comprising both biogas and Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG). Via this route can be benefited from all the advantages of natural gas, like the existing dense infrastructure, trade and supply network, and natural gas applications. In this presentation attention is paid to the differences between first generation biogas and second generation bioSNG; the market for bioSNG: grid injection vs. transportation fuel; latest update on the lab- and pilot-scale bioSNG development at ECN; and an overview is given of ongoing bioSNG activities worldwide

  15. Biogas. The oldest form of renewable energy

    Biomass is the oldest form of renewable energy known and human kind have been making good use of it since fire was discovered. Using biomass as economically viable source of energy presents rather difficult challenge, but one that is increasingly seen as having real potential as an alternative to fossil fuels. Typical biomass sources are wood, agricultural residues, cultivated energy crops, industry and municipal organic waste and animal manure. Converting biomass to energy can be done in several ways: direct combustion, gasification, anaerobic digestion, steam reforming etc. Biogas is a product of anaerobic digestion and it consists mostly of methane (60%). For this process, the most commonly used source is animal manure, which is digested under special conditions in anaerobic digesters. Biogas can be used for electricity production, hot water needs, spatial heating, cooking, etc. (Original)

  16. PRELIMINARY STUDY ON BIOGAS PRODUCTION OF BIOGAS FROM MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW LEACHATE

    WAN AZLINA WAN AB KARIM GHANI

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory-scale digesters were operated to study the effect of leachate chemical oxygen demand strength on biogas (methane production. Three sets of experiment were performed using municipal solid waste leachate slurry with two different chemical oxygen demand strength strengths namely 3000 and 21000 mg/L (referred as low and high strength, respectively. The experiments were conducted at a controlled temperature of 35°C and pH ranging from 6.8 to 7.3 over 20 days period. The process performance was evaluated based on the biogas production and pollutants removal efficiencies. Results showed that the high and low strength samples performed quite similarly but with different biogas production rate observed. The biochemical oxygen demand in the effluent removed up to 80%, but the performance of other parameters such as chemical oxygen demand, total suspended solid and volatile suspended solid was slightly decreased which contributes 33 to 46%, 21 to 37% and 20 to 35%, respectively. From this study, it can be concluded that this method not only contributed to renewable biogas production but also improved the effluent quality.

  17. Biogas - Austrian experiences and Croatian needs

    Organic rest after processing within the biogas plan operation do not pollute the environment and may be used as a first class fertilizers; and additionally they can be used as biogas in cogeneration operation of head and current, in which case one head of cattle would provide at least 1.7 kWh of electrical energy and 3.4 kWh of heat each day. In such cases that the pig's manure is being released unprocessed from a farm operation into the ecological environment; and for the heating generation on the farm one of the standard unrenewable fuels is being consumed, a double harm has been effected - one that can be measured and the other which can not even be estimated: pollution of fresh air, water and flora life supply. In a careful estimate Austria provides premises for 40000 biogas processing plants which would generate 3.6 Billion kWh of electric energy within the cogeneration operations. What about Croatia? (author)

  18. Advanced Conversion of Organic Waste into Biogas

    Offenbacher, Elmar [BDI-BioEnergy International AG, Grambach/Graz (Austria)

    2012-11-01

    Day by day, every human generates significant amounts of organic waste that most of the time ends on landfills. Disposing of organic residues is not just a waste of energy resources but also a burden to the environment as anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases are produced. In contrast to waste combustion that can't generate any energy out of organic waste but the contrary, anaerobic digestion is the most suitable technology for the sustainable and efficient conversion of all kind of organic waste into valuable biogas. Biogas generated from organic waste typically consists of 55-60% methane (CH{sub 4}) and provides an energy content of more than 20 MJ/Nm{sup 3}. The average biogas yield is around 150 Nm{sup 3} per ton of organic waste that can be converted into 350 kW of electricity plus the same amount of process heat. In other words a typical household could recover about one twentieth of its power consumption just out of the organic waste it is producing. Anaerobic digestion significantly reduces the amount of waste going to landfill as well as the uncontrolled emissions of methane. The BDI High Load Hybrid Reactor merges the core concepts of CSTR and UASB fermenters while providing a two phase anaerobic digestion system. The first process step accommodates hydrolysis and acidification to break down the complex organic molecules into simple sugars, amino acids, and fatty acids under acid conditions. In the second stage acetic acids are finally converted into methane (CH{sub 4}), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and water. This two-phase concept ensures maximum yield of biogas generated, paired with high loading rates and feedstock flexibility.

  19. The effect of storage conditions on microbial community composition and biomethane potential in a biogas starter culture.

    Hagen, Live Heldal; Vivekanand, Vivekanand; Pope, Phillip B; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Horn, Svein J

    2015-07-01

    A new biogas process is initiated by adding a microbial community, typically in the form of a sample collected from a functional biogas plant. This inoculum has considerable impact on the initial performance of a biogas reactor, affecting parameters such as stability, biogas production yields and the overall efficiency of the anaerobic digestion process. In this study, we have analyzed changes in the microbial composition and performance of an inoculum during storage using barcoded pyrosequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, and determination of the biomethane potential, respectively. The inoculum was stored at room temperature, 4 and -20 °C for up to 11 months and cellulose was used as a standard substrate to test the biomethane potential. Storage up to 1 month resulted in similar final methane yields, but the rate of methane production was reduced by storage at -20 °C. Longer storage times resulted in reduced methane yields and slower production kinetics for all storage conditions, with room temperature and frozen samples consistently giving the best and worst performance, respectively. Both storage time and temperature affected the microbial community composition and methanogenic activity. In particular, fluctuations in the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes were observed. Interestingly, a shift from hydrogenotrophic methanogens to methanogens with the capacity to perform acetoclastic methanogensis was observed upon prolonged storage. In conclusion, this study suggests that biogas inocula may be stored up to 1 month with low loss of methanogenic activity, and identifies bacterial and archaeal species that are affected by the storage. PMID:25947246

  20. Biogas production from different grass

    Liubarskij, Vladimir; Mahnert, Pia; Heiermann, Monika; Linke, Bernd

    2006-01-01

    The importance of forage as a feed supply for dairy and beef cattle stocks is decreasing. Therefore, interest is rising in alternative use of grasslands. An ecologically sound option is the anaerobic digestion of the biomass as co-substrates in biogas plants. Three fresh and ensiled grass species were investigated in lab-scale batch experiments at 35 °C to determine their maximum biogas production potential. The volatile solid-based biogas and methane yield were observed to be in the range...

  1. Performance of the biogas project in Ziyang sugar factory

    Dezhao He [Chengdu Biogas Research Inst., Chengdu (China)

    2000-07-01

    Located in Houjiaping town, Ziyang county, Ziyang Sugar Factory was installed in 1958 as a state enterprise, which mainly processes sugar cane to produce sugar. Sideline products include alcohol and paper. Nowadays, its daily capacity of sugar cane extraction is 1,000 tons and potable alcohol production is 15 - 20 tons. Its annual output value is 25 million Yuan. This plant is one of the backbones in Sichuan sugar cane processing enterprises. The biogas project of the Ziyang Sugar Factory was one of the large biogas installations in China, completed during the Seventh Five-year Plan. The distillery wastewater (slops) from the alcoholic fermentation process of starch (fresh potato, dry potato, kernel and Chinese sorghum) and sugar molasses as substrates is disposed of. The slop has a low pH, a high organic concentration, a high content of suspended solids, a dark colour and a high temperature. Its daily discharge quantity is 200 tons corresponding to 2/3 of total wastewater in that plant. It is a serious source of water pollution when it is directly discharged into Tuojiang River. Therefore, due to its high concentration of polluting substances, anaerobic treatment of distillery wastewater has been decided. This is the first case of wastewater treatment in Nudging city. The construction of this biogas installation started in July 1987. On November 25, 1988, the digester began to produce biogas. Up to now, the digesters have properly operated for more than one year. Besides its use as daily household fuel for the 810 employees, biogas is also supplied to the plant cafeteria as cooking fuel and to some production purposes within the plant, which has achieved obvious economic benefits. The designed capacity of daily biogas production for this biogas plant is 3,000 - 4,000 m{sup 3}. (orig.)

  2. Biogas production and biogas as vehicle fuel - Swedish experiences

    Lindberg, A.E. [VBB Viak AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-08-01

    In Sweden there are totally about 220 biogas plants in operation. The major part of these plants (134) are represented by sewage sludge treatment facilities at waste water treatment plants. At 60 sites the biogas is generated from landfills or cell digesters at landfills. In 1996, the amount produced had a total energy content of about 1,35 TWh (or 4 900 PJ). (EG)

  3. Foam suppression in overloaded manure-based biogas reactors using antifoaming agents

    Kougias, Panagiotis; Boe, Kanokwan; Tsapekos, Panagiotis;

    2014-01-01

    Foam control is an imperative need in biogas plants, as foaming is a major operational problem. In the present study, the effect of oils (rapeseed oil, oleic acid, and octanoic acid) and tributylphosphate on foam reduction and process performance in batch and continuous manure-based biogas reactors...

  4. A New and Sound Technology for Biogas from Solid Waste and Biomass

    Organic waste, as a main constituent of municipal solid waste, has as well as solid biomass a high potential for biogas generation. Despite the importance of biogas generation from these materials, the availability of large-scale biogas processes lacks behind the demand. A newly developed double-stage solid-liquid biogas process, consisting of an open hydrolysis stage and a fixed-bed methane reactor, allows the biogas production from almost all biodegradable solid waste and renewable resources like maize, grass, sugar cane, etc. Furthermore, residues from industrial processes, like the glycerine waste water from biodiesel production, can also be converted into biogas successfully. Due to the strong separation of hydrolysis and methanation, the process is extremely stable. No malfunction has been detected so far. The open hydrolysis releases CO2 and allows oxidation of sulfur. Consequently, the biogas has a high methane (>72%) and low H2S concentration (<100 ppm). Stirrers or other agitation equipment are not necessary; only liquids are pumped. The biogas generation becomes controllable for the first time; thus, the actual generation can be easily adapted to the consumption

  5. Anaerobic Digestion of Saline Creeping Wild Ryegrass for Biogas Production and Pretreatment of Particleboard Material

    The objective of this research was to develop an integrated process to produce biogas and high-quality particleboard using saline creeping wild ryegrass (CWR), Leymus triticoides through anaerobic digestion (AD). Besides producing biogas, AD also serves as a pretreatment method to remove the wax la...

  6. Development of biogas reforming Ni-La-Al catalysts for fuel cells

    Benito, M.; García, S.; Ferreira-Aparicio, P.; Serrano, L. García; Daza, L.

    In this work, the results obtained for Ni-La-Al catalysts developed in our laboratory for biogas reforming are presented. The catalyst 5% Ni/5% La 2O 3-γ-Al 2O 3 has operated under kinetic control conditions for more than 40 h at 700 °C and feeding CH 4/CO 2 ratio 1/1, similar to the composition presented in biogas streams, being observed a stable behaviour. Reaction parameters studied to evaluate the catalyst activity were H 2/CO and CH 4/CO 2 conversion ratio obtained. On the basis of a CH 4 conversion of 6.5%, CH 4/CO 2 conversion ratio achieved 0.48 and H 2/CO ratio obtained was 0.43. By comparison of experimental results to equilibrium prediction for such conditions, is detectable a lower progress of reverse water gas shift reaction. This fact increases the H 2/CO ratio obtained and therefore the hydrogen production. The higher H 2/CO and a CH 4/CO 2 conversion ratio in comparison to CH 4 one close to equilibrium is due to the carbon deposits gasification which avoids catalyst deactivation. A thermodynamic analysis about the application of dry and combined methane reforming to hydrogen production for fuel cells application is presented. Data obtained by process simulation considering a Peng-Robinson thermodynamic model, allows optimizing process conditions depending on biogas composition.

  7. Climate balance of biogas upgrading systems

    One of the numerous applications of renewable energy is represented by the use of upgraded biogas where needed by feeding into the gas grid. The aim of the present study was to identify an upgrading scenario featuring minimum overall GHG emissions. The study was based on a life-cycle approach taking into account also GHG emissions resulting from plant cultivation to the process of energy conversion. For anaerobic digestion two substrates have been taken into account: (1) agricultural resources and (2) municipal organic waste. The study provides results for four different upgrading technologies including the BABIU (Bottom Ash for Biogas Upgrading) method. As the transport of bottom ash is a critical factor implicated in the BABIU-method, different transport distances and means of conveyance (lorry, train) have been considered. Furthermore, aspects including biogas compression and energy conversion in a combined heat and power plant were assessed. GHG emissions from a conventional energy supply system (natural gas) have been estimated as reference scenario. The main findings obtained underlined how the overall reduction of GHG emissions may be rather limited, for example for an agricultural context in which PSA-scenarios emit only 10% less greenhouse gases than the reference scenario. The BABIU-method constitutes an efficient upgrading method capable of attaining a high reduction of GHG emission by sequestration of CO2.

  8. Enhancement and Optimization Mechanisms of Biogas Production for Rural Household Energy in Developing Countries: A review

    Yitayal Addis Alemayehu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion is common but vital process used for biogas and fertilizer production as well as one method for waste treatment. The process is currently used in developing countries primarily for biogas production in the household level of rural people. The aim of this review is to indicate possible ways of including rural households who own less than four heads of cattle for the biogas programs in developing countries. The review provides different research out puts on using biogas substrates other than cow dung or its mix through different enhancement and optimization mechanisms. Many biodegradable materials have been studied for alternative methane production. Therefore, these substrates could be used for production by addressing the optimum conditions for each factor and each processes for enhanced and optimized biogas production.

  9. Nitrogen availability of biogas residues

    El-Sayed Fouda, Sara

    2011-09-07

    The objectives of this study were to characterize biogas residues either unseparated or separated into a liquid and a solid phase from the fermentation of different substrates with respect to their N and C content. In addition, short and long term effects of the application of these biogas residues on the N availability and N utilization by ryegrass was investigated. It is concluded that unseparated or liquid separated biogas residues provide N at least corresponding to their ammonium content and that after the first fertilizer application the C{sub org}:N{sub org} ratio of the biogas residues was a crucial factor for the N availability. After long term application, the organic N accumulated in the soil leads to an increased release of N.

  10. BIOGAS PRODUCTION FROM CATCH CROPS

    Molinuevo-Salces, Beatriz; Larsen, Søren U.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær;

    2014-01-01

    Catch crop cultivation combined with its use for biogas production would increase renewable energy production in the form of methane, without interfering with the production of food and fodder crops. The low biomass yield of catch crops is the main limiting factor for using these crops as co......-substrate in manure-based biogas plants and the profit obtained from the sale of biogas barely compensates for the harvest costs. A new agricultural strategy to harvest catch crops together with the residual straw of the main crop was investigated to increase the biomass and thereby the methane yield per hectare...... biomass. Leaving the straw on the field until harvest of the catch crop in the autumn could benefit biogas production due to the organic matter degradation of the straw taking place on the field during the autumn months. This new agricultural strategy may be a good alternative to achieve economically...

  11. Biogas plasticization coupled anaerobic digestion: batch test results.

    Schimel, Keith A

    2007-06-01

    Biogas has unique properties for improving the biodegradability of biomass solids during anaerobic digestion (AD). This report presents batch test results of the first investigation into utilizing biogas plasticization to "condition" organic polymers during active digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS). Preliminary design calculations based on polymer diffusion rate limitation are presented. Analysis of the 20 degrees C batch test data determined the first order (k(1)) COD conversion coefficient to be 0.167 day(-1) with a maximum COD utilization rate of 11.25 g L(-1) day(-1). Comparison of these batch test results to typical conventional AD performance parameters showed orders of magnitude improvement. These results show that biogas plasticization during active AD could greatly improve renewable energy yields from biomass waste materials such as MSW RDF, STP sludges, food wastes, animal manure, green wastes, and agricultural crop residuals. PMID:17054122

  12. Biogas production from lignocellulosic materials

    Li SUN

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulosic materials such as agricultural plant residues are widely available in large amounts and can be used for production of biogas without the risk of competition for arable land. However, the intricate structure of lignocellulose, a major component of the plant cell wall, limits microbial degradation and consequently results in low degradation rate and low biogas yield. The aim of this thesis was to investigate microbial communities engaged in the degradation of lignocellulose and ...

  13. Decentralized power generation from biogas

    Areva Bioenergies proposes ready-to-use biogas production and valorization units that use industrial effluents (liquid effluents, spent water, solid wastes). Biogas valorization is performed through cogeneration plants with an output power of 500 kW to 10 MW. This brochure presents Areva's global offer in methanation projects (support, engineering, optimization). Areva Bioenergies counts 20 dual-purpose power plants in operation or under construction in the world which represent an installed power of 220 MW

  14. Collective biogas plants

    Papers contributed to the European seminar on collective biogas plants held at Herning, Denmark on October 22-23 under the auspices of the Commission of the European Communities, Directorate-General for Energy (DG XVII) are presented. Within the framework of the THERMIE programme, a network of OPETs (Organizations for the Promotion of Energy Technologies) was set up in order to disseminate information on new energy technologies throughout the European communities. The potential for further implementation of centralized capacity for the conversion of animal manures and other organic wastes to bio-fuels, not only in central and eastern Europe but also in the developing countries, is discussed in addition to the relevant technologies. Actual biomass conversion plants are described and details are given on operational experience and plant management. Agricultural, economic and policy aspects are also dealt with. (AB)

  15. Enrichment and cultivation of a sulfide-oxidizing bacteria consortium for its deploying in full-scale biogas desulfurization

    Operational experiences and strategies to get suitable chemolithoautotrophic sulfide-oxidizing biomass from activated sludge wastewater treatment plant for its deploying in a full-scale biogas desulfurization plant are described. An economic nutrient source was applied to foster microbial selection and rapid growth. Respirometry was implemented on full-scale installations to monitor the ability of the specialized bacteria consortium to oxidize reduced sulfur i.e. H2S. During the deployment in the full-scale desulfurization reactor, intermittent sulfide feed from biogas scrubbing was performed to accelerate the startup the desulfurization process. - Highlights: • A simple method for reaching high amounts of specialized sulfide-oxidizing bacterial consortium from activated sludge was developed. • The full-scale desulfurization process can be continuously monitored by respirometry allowing fast decision making if problems arise. • The dissolved sulfide concentration was estimated with an empirical correlation between measurements of ORP, dissolved oxygen and pH

  16. Combined utilization of biogas and natural gas

    The Danish natural gas network has been established during the past 10 years. Running parallel with this a small but growing production of biogas from centralized biogas plants and landfills has been developed. The annual biogas production is expected to keep growing and increase tenfold in the next 25 year period with a reduction of green house gas emissions as one of the important incentives. The last years' development and expansion of the Danish biogas sector has shown a need for combined utilization of biogas and natural gas. If larger volumes of biogas are present, upgrading and distribution by the natural gas network may be an alternative to combined utilization. (au) 12 refs

  17. Produksi biogas dari pencerna anaerob serasah dan eceng gondok (Eichhornia crassipes) dengan sumber inokulum kotoran sapi dan kotoran ayam

    REVOLUSI PRAJANINGRAT SAKTIYUDHA

    2014-01-01

    Saktiyudha RP. 2014. Biogas production from anaerobic digesters of leaf litter and water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) with a source of inoculum cattle and chicken manures. Bioteknologi 11: 23-27. Biogas is a renewable alternative energy source also has the added value, which is in the processing of waste biomass is environmentally friendly. This study aims to examine the production of biogas in anaerobic reform process based on a mixture of biomass litter substrate and water hyacinth (Eich...

  18. Environmental and economic analysis of application of water hyacinth for eutrophic water treatment coupled with biogas production.

    Wang, Zanxin; Calderon, Margaret M

    2012-11-15

    The proliferation of water hyacinth is currently controlled by removing it from a water body and disposing it by landfill in China. Using water hyacinth to remove nutrients from water bodies and to produce biogas is another technically feasible option for the control of water hyacinth, but its environmental and economic performances are not well understood. This study collected data from an experimental biogas plant to develop a lifecycle analysis and a cost benefit analysis for the control of water hyacinth proliferation in a eutrophic lake in China. Comparison was made between the alternative option of using water hyacinth for biogas production and the current practice of disposing it in landfills. The results reveal that the biogas option is economically feasible with a positive energy balance. The removal of water hyacinth to produce biogas can contribute to water quality improvement and GHG emission reduction whose values, however, depend on the processing scale of the biogas plant. Since both the current approach and the biogas option can remove nutrients from water bodies, the additional value of water quality improvement resulting from the biogas option is only possible when the processing scale of the biogas plant is greater than the amount of water hyacinth disposed by landfill. The emission of methane deserves attention when water hyacinth is disposed by landfill. The biogas option can respond to China's policies on water pollution control, renewable energy development, and energy saving and emission reduction. PMID:22813757

  19. Experimental and economical evaluation of a novel biogas digester

    Highlights: • Textile biogas digester was tested with synthetic nutrients and MSW. • Economical evaluation was made with replacement of LPG and kerosene. • The investment is positive until the price of fuel goes down. • Sensitivity analysis was performed to check the stability of the digester. - Abstract: Many developing countries face an energy demand to satisfy the daily needs of the people. Household biogas digesters are among the interesting solutions to meet the energy demands for cooking and lighting, and at the same time taking care of the kitchen wastes. In this study, a novel textile-based biogas digester was developed. The digester was evaluated for biogas production from a synthetic nutrient and an organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) as substrates for more than a year. The obtained biogas productivity in both experiments was 570 L/kgVS/day, which indicates that the digester is as efficient in handling of OFMSW as the synthetic nutrients. Based on the obtained biogas production data, the techno-economic evaluation and sensitivity analysis for the process were performed, replacing LPG and kerosene consumption with biogas in households. A 2-m3 digester can supply the fuel needed for cooking for a family of 4–6 people. The sum of investment and 15-years operational costs of this digester was 656 USD, which can be compared with 1455 USD for subsidized-LPG and 975 USD for kerosene, respectively. The results from the sensitivity analysis show that it was a positive investment, unless the price of kerosene goes down to less than 0.18 USD/L

  20. GlidArc-assisted production of synthesis gas from biogas

    We present an emerging biogas reformer based on a direct use of high-voltage discharges (called GlidArc) that strike in the flow of such widely available and renewable feedstock without any gas separation or purification. A poor biogas (containing only 35 - 50 vol.% of methane) is partially converted into hydrogen and carbon monoxide (SynGas). Such enhanced biogas can, for example, be used as gaseous fuel in Internal Combustion Engines, be considered as source of Hydrogen for PEM fuel cells or be directly consumed in some specific Fuel Cells. Any level of impurities is accepted for our reformer where the discharges provide all energy and catalytic assistance for endothermic process of so-called 'dry' reforming of CH4 + CO2 into H2 + CO. Our tests with simulated biogas are performed in a 1.4-L reactor working at atmospheric pressure at up to 0.6 kW electric power. Such input is fully sufficient to process a flow of a poor biogas carrying up to 7 kW of thermal power. (author)

  1. Does the addition of proteases affect the biogas yield from organic material in anaerobic digestion?

    Müller, Liane; Kretzschmar, Jörg; Pröter, Jürgen; Liebetrau, Jan; Nelles, Michael; Scholwin, Frank

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the biochemical disintegration effect of hydrolytic enzymes in lab scale experiments. Influences of enzyme addition on the biogas yield as well as effects on the process stability were examined. The addition of proteases occurred with low and high dosages in batch and semi-continuous biogas tests. The feed mixture consisted of maize silage, chicken dung and cow manure. Only very high concentrated enzymes caused an increase in biogas production in batch experiments. In semi-continuous biogas tests no positive long-term effects (100 days) were observed. Higher enzyme-dosage led to a reduced biogas-yield (13% and 36% lower than the reference). Phenylacetate and -propionate increased (up to 372 mgl(-1)) before the other volatile fatty acids did. Volatile organic acids rose up to 6.8 gl(-1). The anaerobic digestion process was inhibited. PMID:26741852

  2. ASSESSMENT OF THE BIODIVERSITY OF SAMPLES USED FOR ISOLATION OF MICROBIAL STRAINS CAPABLE OF CONVERTING STRAW DESTINED AS A SUBSTRATE FOR BIOGAS PLANT

    Krystyna Cybulska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In biogas plants, almost any type of organic matter can be used as a substrate to produce biogas. To make the process of methane fermentation more effective, these materials are pretreated. This applies in particular to a group of difficult substrates. Straw, due to its hemicellulose structure and saturation, is hardly fermented by biogas reactor microorganisms. The methods of post-harvest residue preparation for anaerobic digestion being applied so far are expensive, while their application has a negative effect on methanoegenic bacteria. Therefore, the microorganisms being able to degrade straw hemicellulose structure, utilisation of which could precede the proper fermentation process, have been searched for. This paper presents the results of microbial biodiversity analysis in the environmental samples being lupin, cereal, rape and maize straw as well as hay and haylage at different degradation stages. The analysis of biodiversity will help at a further stage of study to isolate active microbial strains showing cellulolytic, hemicellulolytic or ligninolytic activity which are desirable in the process of straw biodegradation. Analysis of the microbial count was performed by the method of deep inoculation on different microbiological culture media. The conducted tests include determination of the number of fungi, bacteria and actinomycetes. The results obtained confirm the usefulness of the analysed samples for isolation of microbial strains capable of converting straw preceding the biogas production.

  3. Biogas - And energy gushes forth from wastes. In Montpellier, everything is good to produce biogas

    As Germany is a European leader in the production of biogas (two thirds of the European production), France is third with 10 per cent of the European total. This production represents 190 MW of electric power produced in 200 installations. In 2020 this production should reach 625 MW with 1500 production units. Now, these units are being developed in cattle breeding effluent processing installations. Since November 2011, it is possible to inject biogas in natural gas networks. Many projects are also present in the industrial sector. Regional productions and some main actors are indicated. But the equipment is generally imported and projects often face resistance from the population. A second article presents the French greatest site of organic waste processing (Ametyst) and evokes some negative reactions of the neighbourhood

  4. PURIFICATION AND ENRICHMENT OF BIOGAS IN ASH-WATER MIXTURE

    Andrzej Brudniak

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Biogas, produced in an aerobic digestion process, is a mixture of gases, and that is why its inexpensive and effective valorisation is essential. Research on this process is necessary in order to use biogas as a renewable energy source. The aim of this thesis is to present methods of biogas purification and enrichment in the fly ash - water mixture, that is generated on the base of fly ash produced during burning coal in power industry. Experience presented that the fly ash absorbs CO2 and H2S, even in conventional conditions. The absorption efficiency depends not only on the chemical composition of the ash but also on its physical properties. There was also a strong neutralization of alkaline waste combustion.

  5. Efficient Heat Use from Biogas CHP Plants. Case Studies from Biogas Plants in Latvia

    Dzene, Ilze; Slotiņa, Lāsma

    2013-01-01

    This paper is focusing on efficient heat use from biogas plants. It gives an overview about various biogas heat use options and specifically addresses biogas heat use market in Latvia. In the end three examples from typical agricultural biogas plants in Latvia and their heat use plans are described.

  6. Biodigestion of the aquatics plants mixtures and biogas production; Biodigestao de misturas de plantas aquaticas e producao de biogas

    Pereira, Roberto Guimaraes; Abreu, Fernando Luiz Barbuda de; Fernandes Filho, Jorge; Pereira, Maria Cristina Duarte Eiras [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mail: temrobe@vm.uff.br; Melo, Ricardo Bichara de [Light Servicos de Eletricidade S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Gerencia de Estudos e Gestao de Geracao]. E-mail: rbmelo@light.com.br

    2004-07-01

    Several systems of generating electricity using water storage reservoirs. One problem that occurs constantly in these reservoirs is the accumulation of aquatic plants, such as Eichhornia crassipes, Eichhornia azurea, Pistia stratiotes and Salvinia that may cause serious problems for the system. Periodically, the biomass must be removed and disposed of appropriate form, so that does not cause contamination of soil, groundwater or allowing the proliferation of vectors. One possible destination is the use of biomass in a process of biodigestion, resulting in biogas. The bench of biodigester used in the experiment of biodigestion of aquatic plants is composed of a reactor containing the biomass, where the biogas is produced and a reservoir for the monitoring the production of biogas. The reactor is located inside a container containing water that can be heated by an electrical resistance, with the aim of maintaining the temperature inside the reactor around 35 deg C. The results of analysis of gas of the reactor was obtained using a gas chromatograph to CG MASTER of double ionization detector with a flame and thermal conductivity. These results show a percentage of 50% of methane in the biogas. Also, were analyzed the biomass in the biodigester for determination of humidity, total organic matter, waste mineral and organic carbon. The process of biodigestion of the mixture of aquatic plants: Eichhornia crassipes, Eichhornia azurea and Pistia stratiotes and Salvinia shows potential for obtaining biogas, with considerable levels of methane, in order to facilitate its recovery.

  7. Environmental Sustainability and Economic Benefits of Dairy Farm Biogas Energy Production: A Case Study in Umbria

    Biancamaria Torquati

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Accelerating demand to reduce the environmental impact of fossil fuels has been driving widespread attention to renewable fuels, such as biogas. In fact, in the last decade numerous policy guidelines and laws regarding energy, the environment and agriculture have been issued to encourage the use of animal sewage as a raw material for the production of biogas. The production of energy from biogas in a dairy farm can provide a good opportunity for sustainable rural development, augmenting the farm’s income from traditional sources and helping to reduce the overall environmental impact of the energy sector. This paper investigates the trade-off between the environmental and economic benefits of an agro-energy farm in the Umbria region of Italy that employs livestock sewage and manure, dedicated energy crops (corn and triticale silage and olive waste. The environmental analysis was performed using the LCA methodology, while the economic investigation was carried out by reconstructing the economic balance of the agro-energetic supply chain based on the budgets of each activity performed. The LCA results show, on the one hand, the predominant weight of producing dedicated crops compared to all other processes in the supply chain and, on the other hand, a significant reduction in environmental impact compared to that caused by energy production from fossil fuels. Economic analysis revealed that the results depend significantly on what rate per kWh the government incentives guarantee to agricultural producers of renewable energy.

  8. Evaluation of energy efficiency of various biogas production and utilization pathways

    The energy efficiency of different biogas systems, including single and co-digestion of multiple feedstock, different biogas utilization pathways, and waste-stream management strategies was evaluated. The input data were derived from assessment of existing biogas systems, present knowledge on anaerobic digestion process management and technologies for biogas system operating conditions in Germany. The energy balance was evaluated as Primary Energy Input to Output (PEIO) ratio, to assess the process energy efficiency, hence, the potential sustainability. Results indicate that the PEIO correspond to 10.5-64.0% and 34.1-55.0% for single feedstock digestion and feedstock co-digestion, respectively. Energy balance was assessed to be negative for feedstock transportation distances in excess of 22 km and 425 km for cattle manure and for Municipal Solid Waste, respectively, which defines the operational limits for respective feedstock transportation. Energy input was highly influenced by the characteristics of feedstock used. For example, agricultural waste, in most part, did not require pre-treatment. Energy crop feedstock required the respect cultivation energy inputs, and processing of industrial waste streams included energy-demanding pre-treatment processes to meet stipulated hygiene standards. Energy balance depended on biogas yield, the utilization efficiency, and energy value of intended fossil fuel substitution. For example, obtained results suggests that, whereas the upgrading of biogas to biomethane for injection into natural gas network potentially increased the primary energy input for biogas utilization by up to 100%; the energy efficiency of the biogas system improved by up to 65% when natural gas was substituted instead of electricity. It was also found that, system energy efficiency could be further enhanced by 5.1-6.1% through recovery of residual biogas from enclosed digestate storage units. Overall, this study provides bases for more detailed assessment

  9. Evaluation of energy efficiency of various biogas production and utilization pathways

    Poeschl, Martina; Ward, Shane [Charles Parsons Energy Research Programme, Bioresources Research Centre, School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Owende, Philip [Charles Parsons Energy Research Programme, Bioresources Research Centre, School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); School of Informatics and Engineering, Institute of Technology Blanchardstown, Blanchardstown Road North, Dublin 15 (Ireland)

    2010-11-15

    The energy efficiency of different biogas systems, including single and co-digestion of multiple feedstock, different biogas utilization pathways, and waste-stream management strategies was evaluated. The input data were derived from assessment of existing biogas systems, present knowledge on anaerobic digestion process management and technologies for biogas system operating conditions in Germany. The energy balance was evaluated as Primary Energy Input to Output (PEIO) ratio, to assess the process energy efficiency, hence, the potential sustainability. Results indicate that the PEIO correspond to 10.5-64.0% and 34.1-55.0% for single feedstock digestion and feedstock co-digestion, respectively. Energy balance was assessed to be negative for feedstock transportation distances in excess of 22 km and 425 km for cattle manure and for Municipal Solid Waste, respectively, which defines the operational limits for respective feedstock transportation. Energy input was highly influenced by the characteristics of feedstock used. For example, agricultural waste, in most part, did not require pre-treatment. Energy crop feedstock required the respect cultivation energy inputs, and processing of industrial waste streams included energy-demanding pre-treatment processes to meet stipulated hygiene standards. Energy balance depended on biogas yield, the utilization efficiency, and energy value of intended fossil fuel substitution. For example, obtained results suggests that, whereas the upgrading of biogas to biomethane for injection into natural gas network potentially increased the primary energy input for biogas utilization by up to 100%; the energy efficiency of the biogas system improved by up to 65% when natural gas was substituted instead of electricity. It was also found that, system energy efficiency could be further enhanced by 5.1-6.1% through recovery of residual biogas from enclosed digestate storage units. Overall, this study provides bases for more detailed assessment

  10. Novel Sorbent to Clean Up Biogas for CHPs

    Alptekin, Gökhan O. [TDA Research, Incorporated, Wheat Ridge, CO (United States); Jayataman, Ambalavanan [TDA Research, Incorporated, Wheat Ridge, CO (United States); Schaefer, Matthew [TDA Research, Incorporated, Wheat Ridge, CO (United States); Ware, Michael [TDA Research, Incorporated, Wheat Ridge, CO (United States); Hunt, Jennifer [FuelCell Energy, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States); Dobek, Frank [FuelCell Energy, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)

    2015-05-30

    In this project, TDA Research Inc. (TDA) has developed low-cost (on a per unit volume of gas processed basis), high-capacity expendable sorbents that can remove both the H2S and organic sulfur species in biogas to the ppb levels. The proposed sorbents will operate downstream of a bulk desulfurization system as a polishing bed to provide an essentially sulfur-free gas to a fuel cell (or any other application that needs a completely sulfur-free feed). Our sorbents use a highly dispersed mixed metal oxides active phase with desired modifiers prepared over on a mesoporous support. The support structure allows the large organic sulfur compounds (such as the diethyl sulfide and dipropyl sulfide phases with a large kinetic diameter) to enter the sorbent pores so that they can be adsorbed and removed from the gas stream.

  11. Magnetohydrodynamic process in solar activity

    Jingxiu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetohydrodynamics is one of the major disciplines in solar physics. Vigorous magnetohydrodynamic process is taking place in the solar convection zone and atmosphere. It controls the generating and structuring of the solar magnetic fields, causes the accumulation of magnetic non-potential energy in the solar atmosphere and triggers the explosive magnetic energy release, manifested as violent solar flares and coronal mass ejections. Nowadays detailed observations in solar astrophysics from space and on the ground urge a great need for the studies of magnetohydrodynamics and plasma physics to achieve better understanding of the mechanism or mechanisms of solar activity. On the other hand, the spectacular solar activity always serves as a great laboratory of magnetohydrodynamics. In this article, we reviewed a few key unresolved problems in solar activity studies and discussed the relevant issues in solar magnetohydrodynamics.

  12. Biogas Koczala. Biogas project in Koczala. Feasibility study. Technical report

    The present production of district heating in Koczala is based on coal. The district heating system is worn out technically and economically and according to the 2001 Energy Plan of Koczala the district heating plant shall be converted to a combination of a biogas fired CHP and a wood chip boiler. The overall objective of this project is to access the feasibility and viability construction an operation of a biogas plant owned by the co-operative agricultural company, Poldanor S.A. The feasibility study includes: 1) Availability of organic waste in the Koczala area, 2) Possibilities of using energy crops in the biogas plant, 3) Possibilities of receiving grants from the Polish National Fund for Environmental Protection, the new EU regional funds and through the joint implementation market (CO2 quotas), 4) Alternative locations of the biogas plant and the CHP unit, 5) Alternative strategies for selling electricity and heat, 6) Organisational issues (ownership). This report concludes that implementing the biogas project is environmentally and financially feasible and viable. If organic waste and/or maize silage can be provided and gasified without problems, the plant can supply as well the Koczala farm as the fodder mill with steam and heat, and also supply Koczala district heating system with approx. 75% of yearly heat consumption. Furthermore, electricity is supplied to the fodder mill and the public grid. (BA)

  13. Bioaugmentation with an anaerobic fungus in a two-stage process for biohydrogen and biogas production using corn silage and cattail.

    Nkemka, Valentine Nkongndem; Gilroyed, Brandon; Yanke, Jay; Gruninger, Robert; Vedres, Darrell; McAllister, Tim; Hao, Xiying

    2015-06-01

    Bioaugmentation with an anaerobic fungus, Piromyces rhizinflata YM600, was evaluated in an anaerobic two-stage system digesting corn silage and cattail. Comparable methane yields of 328.8±16.8mLg(-1)VS and 295.4±14.5mLg(-1)VS and hydrogen yields of 59.4±4.1mLg(-1)VS and 55.6±6.7mLg(-1)VS were obtained for unaugmented and bioaugmented corn silage, respectively. Similar CH4 yields of 101.0±4.8mLg(-1)VS and 104±19.1mLg(-1)VS and a low H2 yield (anaerobic fungus for improving the digestibility of lignocellulose substrates for biogas and biohydrogen production. PMID:25755016

  14. Biogas and methanation; Biogaz et methanisation

    Vachey, C.

    2000-05-01

    This paper recalls the methanation principle, biochemical phenomenon which occurs in closed wall, where the organic matter is transformed in biogas. It presents the biogas valorization channels and their advantages. (A.L.B.)

  15. Barriers to the development of the biogas industry

    Barriers to the development of Canada's biogas industry were explored with the aim of resolving conflicting regulatory issues related to biogas. Four biogas farm systems are currently operating in Ontario, and funding for a further 20 systems is available. However, most projects have been blocked before construction, and other projects continue to be delayed by grid connection and power purchase issues. Planning permission, zoning, environmental regulations, and property taxation issues are also currently challenging the development of the industry. The use of off-farm waste for the plants has also caused planning problems and delays. Land used to transform or manufacture electricity will soon be included in the industrial tax class. The installation of generation capacity may also alter property values. The use of fats, oils, and greases also requires complicated monitoring and processing procedures. Obtaining certificates for waste handling is difficult and time-consuming. Biogas plants also face significant transmission constraints. Prospective generators are required to determine if their local sub-stations have spare capacity. Generators are also required to pay for all the costs associated with their connection to the grid. Connection to Hydro One is more expensive than connections to other distribution companies in Canada, and there are no existing connection standards. Biogas system operators also face difficulties with rural connections. The cost of anti-islanding protection is high. It was concluded that grid access is the key to renewable energy development in Ontario. tabs., figs

  16. Energy balance model of a SOFC cogenerator operated with biogas

    Van herle, Jan; Maréchal, F.; Leuenberger, S.; Favrat, D.

    A small cogeneration system based on a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) fed on the renewable energy source biogas is presented. An existing farm biogas production site (35 m 3 per day), currently equipped with a SOFC demonstration stack, is taken for reference. A process flow diagram was defined in a software package allowing to vary system operating parameters like the fuel inlet composition, reforming technology, stack temperature and stack current (or fuel conversion). For system reforming simplicity, a base case parameter set was defined as the fuel inlet of 60% CH 4:40% CO 2 mixed with air in a 1:1 ratio, together with 800 °C operating temperature and 80% fuel conversion. A model stack, consisting of 100 series elements of anode supported electrolyte cells of 100 cm 2 each, was calculated to deliver 3.1 kW el and 5.16 kW th from an input of 1.5 N m 3/h of biogas (8.95 kW LHV), corresponding to 33.8 and 57.6% electrical and thermal efficiencies (Lower Heating Values (LHVs)), respectively. The incidence on the efficiencies of the model system was examined by the variation of a number of parameters such as the CO 2 content in the biogas, the amount of air addition to the biogas stream, the addition of steam to the fuel inlet, the air excess ratio λ and the stack operating temperature, and the results discussed.

  17. The biogas; Le biogaz se detend

    Rigaud, Ch.; Laffargue, C.; Zebboud, I

    2007-05-15

    Mixed of methane and carbon dioxide the biogas can be produced by many sources for the heat or the electricity production and the fuel production. This document aims to better understand the biogas, its characteristics, its valorization, the plants concerned, the installations and the regulation. It provides also an example of a biogas power plant and the biogas use in the farms. (A.L.B.)

  18. Biogas everywhere; Biogaz a tous les etages

    Couturier, Ch. [SOLAGRO, 31 - Toulouse (France); Pegret-Rosa, A.S.; Leca, Ch. [CLERC, 93 - Montreuil (France); Adlec, E. [Club Biogaz, 94 - Arcueil (France)

    2009-01-15

    Since the publication in July 2006 of the new purchase tariff of electricity produced by biogas, the methanation channel is increasing. In the past ten years the number of biogas plants from domestic wastes, passed from 1 to 20. This document presents an economic analysis of the different sources of biogas, the performances and the injection of biogas in the public network of the gas utilities. (A.L.B.)

  19. Biogas utilization: Experimental investigation on biogas flameless combustion in lab-scale furnace

    Highlights: • High costs of biogas purification and low calorific value of biogas are the main obstacles of biogas utilization. • The energy of biogas can be extracted by flameless combustion without any modification in burner or combustion system. • The efficiency of biogas flameless combustion and conventional combustion were 53% and 32% respectively. • The temperature inside the biogas flameless chamber is uniform. • In biogas flameless combustion, NOx and CO2 formation decrease drastically in comparison with traditional combustion. - Abstract: Biogas generated in the anaerobic digestion of biomass and organic wastes by micro-organisms can be applied for heating, transportation and power generation as a renewable energy source. However, low calorific value (LCV) of biogas is one the most important bottlenecks of biogas conversion into electrical or thermal energy. Indeed, the presence of corrosive gases such as H2S and water vapor in biogas components makes some dilemmas in biogas purification and utilization. In order to obtain the efficient biogas utilization method, different biogas resources, physical and chemical properties of biogas and biogas combustion characteristics should be considered. In this paper biogas was utilized in lab-scale flameless combustion furnace and the performance of flameless combustion chamber fueled by biogas has been presented. Results demonstrated that flameless combustion is one of the best feasible strategies for biogas utilization. Uniformity of temperature in the flameless furnace increases the durability of refractory and related equipment. Simplicity of the flameless burner, pollutant formation reduction and fuel consumption decreases are the main causes of biogas flameless combustion supremacy

  20. A concise biogas plant construction suitable for Ghana and other tropical countries

    Gbagbo, J.K.N.

    1997-04-01

    This report is intended to be used by people in the field of biogas for workshops, technicians, teachers to educate as well as to carry out hands on constructions in Ghana and other tropical countries. Chapter 1, discusses the biogas technology, what a biogas plant is, and how it functions. Chapter 2, describes the entire process. Chapter 3, discusses the necessary conditions for fermentation. Chapter 4, the measuring parameters for monitoring the system. Chapter 5, describes the various types of biogas plants suitable for tropical countries. Chapter 6, describes a planning guide for Ghana and other tropical countries. Chapter 7, discusses digester sizing and finally, Chapter 8, describes a concise biogas plant construction suitable for the rural areas of Ghana and other tropical countries. (au)

  1. The prospects for an expansion of biogas systems in Sweden-Incentives, barriers and potentials

    Biogas is a renewable, high-quality fuel, currently produced at more than 200 locations in Sweden. The present production is some 5 PJ/year but the potential is approximately 10 times higher. Biogas can be produced from a wide range of raw materials, from organic waste to dedicated energy crops, and can be utilised for various energy services such as heat, combined heat and power or as a vehicle fuel. Biogas systems are therefore affected by a number of different incentives and barriers, including energy-, waste treatment- and agricultural policies. In this paper, different policies and policy instruments, as well as other factors, which influence a potential expansion of Swedish biogas systems, are identified and evaluated. Existing incentives and barriers can be divided into those affecting the production of biogas, and those affecting the utilisation of the biogas. Only a few types of biogas systems are competitive in Sweden today, while the majority needs increased incentives of different kinds to reach profitability. Such incentives are often motivated from an energy and environmental point of view. Due to the complexity of the biogas systems and the many actors involved, all with different interests, the process of implementing adequate policy instruments will require concerted efforts

  2. Biogas and Hydrogen Systems Market Assessment

    Milbrandt, Anelia [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bush, Brian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Melaina, Marc [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-31

    This analysis provides an overview of the market for biogas-derived hydrogen and its use in transportation applications. It examines the current hydrogen production technologies from biogas, capacity and production, infrastructure, potential and demand, as well as key market areas. It also estimates the production cost of hydrogen from biogas and provides supply curves at a national level and at point source.

  3. Biogas recirculation for simultaneous calcium removal and biogas purification within an expanded granular sludge bed system treating leachate.

    Luo, Jinghuan; Lu, Xueqin; Liu, Jianyong; Qian, Guangren; Lu, Yongsheng

    2014-12-01

    Biogas, generated from an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor treating municipal solid waste (MSW) leachate, was recirculated for calcium removal from the leachate via a carbonation process with simultaneous biogas purification. Batch trials were performed to optimize the solution pH and imported biogas (CO2) for CaCO3 precipitation. With applicable pH of 10-11 obtained, continuous trials achieved final calcium concentrations of 181-375 mg/L (removal efficiencies≈92.8-96.5%) in the leachate and methane contents of 87.1-91.4% (purification efficiencies≈65.4-82.2%) in the biogas. Calcium-balance study indicates that 23-986 mg Ca/d was released from the bio-system under the carbonized condition where CaCO3 precipitating was moved outside the bioreactor, whereas 7918-9517 mg Ca/d was trapped into the system for the controlled one. These findings demonstrate that carbonation removal of calcium by biogas recirculation could be a promising alternative to pretreat calcium-rich MSW leachate and synergistically to improve methane content. PMID:25310868

  4. Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Summary Report: Proceedings from the Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop, Golden, Colorado, June 11-13, 2012

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) held a Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop June 11-13, 2012, in Golden, Colorado, to discuss biogas and waste-to-energy technologies for fuel cell applications. The overall objective was to identify opportunities for coupling renewable biomethane with highly efficient fuel cells to produce electricity; heat; combined heat and power (CHP); or combined heat, hydrogen and power (CHHP) for stationary or motive applications. The workshop focused on biogas sourced from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), landfills, and industrial facilities that generate or process large amounts of organic waste, including large biofuel production facilities (biorefineries).

  5. Microalgal Cultivation in Treating Liquid Digestate from Biogas Systems.

    Xia, Ao; Murphy, Jerry D

    2016-04-01

    Biogas production via anaerobic digestion (AD) has rapidly developed in recent years. In addition to biogas, digestate is an important byproduct. Liquid digestate is the major fraction of digestate and may contain high levels of ammonia nitrogen. Traditional processing technologies (such as land application) require significant energy inputs and raise environmental risks (such as eutrophication). Alternatively, microalgae can efficiently remove the nutrients from digestate while producing high-value biomass that can be used for the production of biochemicals and biofuels. Both inorganic and organic carbon sources derived from biogas production can significantly improve microalgal production. Land requirement for microalgal cultivation is estimated as 3% of traditional direct land application of digestate. PMID:26776247

  6. Market research on biogas valorizations and methanization. Final report

    This market research aims at giving an overview of the existing methanization installations and of their dynamics in France, at assessing biogas production and use, at analyzing the methanization market, and at defining development perspectives for this sector by 2020. Based on a survey of methanization installations, on interviews with many actors of this sector, and on a seminar organized on this topic, this report presents and comments market data for biogas valorization and methanization in different sectors: household, agricultural, and industrial and waste water processing plants. It comments evolution trends by 2020 for these sectors, and the role that the emerging sector of centralized methanization could have in the years to come

  7. Microbial analysis in biogas reactors suffering by foaming incidents

    Kougias, Panagiotis; De Francisci, Davide; Treu, Laura;

    2014-01-01

    Foam formation can lead to total failure of digestion process in biogas plants. In the present study, possible correlation between foaming and the presence of specific microorganisms in biogas reactors was elucidated. The microbial ecology of continuous fed digesters overloaded with proteins......, or decrease the surface tension of the media, increased their relative abundance after foam formation. Finally, a microorganism similar to widely known foaming bacteria (Nocardia and Desulfotomaculum) was found to increase its relative abundance in all reactors once foam was observed, regardless of the used...

  8. Biogas recovery from microwave heated sludge by anaerobic digestion

    2010-01-01

    Biogas generated from sewage sludge,livestock waste,and food waste by anaerobic digestion is a valuable renewable energy resource.However,conventional anaerobic digestion is not an efficient process.A long hydraulic retention time and low biogas recovery rate hinder the applications of those resources.An effective pretreatment method to destroy sludge microbial cells has been one of the major concerns regarding improvement of the biogas production.This article focuses on the effects of microwave heating on sludge anaerobic digestion.Volatile suspended solid(VSS) and chemical organic demand solubilization of heated sludge were investigated.Microwave heating was found to be a rapid and efficient process for releasing organic substrates from sludge.The increase of organic dissolution ratio was not obvious when holding time was over 5 min with microwave heating.The effect of the VSS solubilization was primarily dependent on heating temperature.The highest value of VSS dissolving ratio,36.4%,was obtained at 170°C for 30 min.The COD dissolving ratio was about 25% at 170°C.Total organic carbon of treated sludge liquor was 1.98 and 2.73 g/L at 150°C and 170°C for 5 min,respectively.A biochemical methane potential(BMP) test of excess sludge and a mixture of primary and excess sludge demonstrated an increase in biogas production.The total biogas from microwave treated mixture sludge increased by 12.9% to 20.2% over control after 30 days of digestion.Biogas production was 11.1% to 25.9% higher for excess sludge than for untreated sludge.The VS removal ratios of mixture sludge and excess sludge were 12% and 11% higher,respectively,compared to the untreated sludge.

  9. Biogas production from catch crops

    Molinuevo-Salces, Beatriz; Larsen, Søren U.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær;

    2013-01-01

    Manure-based biogas plants in Denmark are dependent on high yielding biomass feedstock in order to secure economically feasible operation. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of ten different catch crop species or mixtures as feedstock for biogas production in co......, being in the ranges of 1.4–3.0 t ha−1 and 0.3–1.7 t ha−1 for Holstebro and Aabenraa, respectively. Specific methane yields were in the range of 229–450 m3 t−1 of VS. Methane yields per hectare of up to 800 m3 ha−1 were obtained, making catch crops a promising source of feedstock for manure-based biogas...

  10. Membrane Separation for Biogas Purification

    Morávková, Lenka; Kárászová, Magda; Sedláková, Zuzana; Šimčík, Miroslav; Vejražka, Jiří; Izák, Pavel

    Praha : Česká společnost průmyslové chemie, 2015, s. 28 /p65./. ISBN 978-80-86238-73-9. [mezinárodní chemicko-technologická konference (ICCT 2015) /3./. Mikulov (CZ), 13.04.2015-15.04.2015] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE01020080; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13018 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : membrane separation * biogas purification * biogas purification Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  11. Biogas upgrading by injection of hydrogen in a two-stage Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactor system

    Bassani, Ilaria; Kougias, Panagiotis; Treu, Laura;

    methanogens. In this study, a novel serial biogas reactor system is presented, in which the produced biogas from the first stage reactor was introduced in the second stage, where also H2 was injected. The effects of the H2 addition on the process performance and on the microbial community were investigated......An innovative method for biogas upgrading (i.e. CH4 content more than 90%) combines the coupling of H2, which could be produced by water electrolysis using surplus renewable electricity produced from wind mills, with the CO2 of the biogas. CO2 is biologically converted to CH4 by hydrogenotrophic...

  12. Biogas production supported by excess heat – A systems analysis within the food industry

    Highlights: • A systems analysis when moving from external to internal production and use of biogas at an industry. • The aim is to study the impacts on greenhouse gas emissions and economics from this switch. • The study compares the choice of using biogas or industrial excess heat to heat the digester. • Internal biogas production supported by excess heat has environmental and economic benefits. - Abstract: The aim of this paper was to study the effects on greenhouse gases and economics when a change is made in the use of industrial organic waste from external production and use of biogas (A) to internal production and use (B). The two different system solutions are studied through a systems analysis based on an industrial case. The baseline system (A) and a modified system (B) were compared and analysed. Studies show that industrial processes considered as integrated systems, including the exchange of resources between industries, can result in competitive advantages. This study focuses on the integration of internally produced biogas from food industry waste produced by a food company and the use of excess heat. Two alternative scenarios were studied: (1) the use of available excess heat to heat the biogas digester and (2) the use of a part of the biogas produced to heat the biogas digester. This study showed that the system solution, whereby excess heat rather than biogas is used to heat the biogas digester, was both environmentally and economically advantageous. However, the valuation of biomass affects the magnitude of the emissions reduction. Implementing this synergistic concept will contribute to the reaching of European Union climate targets

  13. Ecological analysis of a typical farm-scale biogas plant in China

    Duan, Na; Lin, Cong; Wang, Pingzhi; Meng, Jing; Chen, Hui; Li, Xue

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this work was to present the common anaerobic digestion technologies in a typical farm-scale biogas plant in China. The comprehensive benefits of most biogas plants in China have not been fully assessed in past decades due to the limited information of the anaerobic digestion processes in biogas plants. This paper analyzed four key aspects (i.e., operational performance, nonrenewable energy (NE) savings, CO2 emission reduction (CER) and economic benefits (EBs)) of a typical farm-scale biogas plant, where beef cattle manure was used as feedstock. Owing to the monitoring system, stable operation was achieved with a hydraulic retention time of 18-22 days and a production of 876,000 m3 of biogas and 37,960 t of digestate fertilizer annually. This could substantially substitute for the nonrenewable energy and chemical fertilizer. The total amount of NE savings and CER derived from biogas and digestate fertilizer was 2.10×107 MJ (equivalent to 749.7 tce) and 9.71×105 kg, respectively. The EBs of the biogas plant was 6.84×105 CNY·yr-1 with an outputs-to-inputs ratio of 2.37. As a result, the monitoring system was proved to contribute significantly to the sound management and quantitative assessment of the biogas plant. Biogas plants could produce biogas which could be used to substitute fossil fuels and reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases, and digestate fertilizer is also an important bio-product.

  14. Perry's bio-gas experience 1995 ASME/EPRI radwaste workshop

    The Perry Power Plant has been in commercial operation for about ten years. Although we didn't know it at the time, we now believe our bio-gas problem may have started about seven years ago. Barnwell discovered we had a bio-gas problem about a year and a half ago. We found out we had a bio-gas problem a few hours later. The history associated with this process at Perry is outlined, and past as well as present efforts to monitor this process are also discussed

  15. Development, Operation, and Future Prospects for Implementing Biogas Plants

    Lybæk, Rikke

    2014-01-01

    technology are emphasized: its capacity as a renewable energy and GHG-avoiding technology, and as a waste processing and environmental technology. It is argued that biogas can provide a future platform for the use of household waste and other types of organic materials (gas boosters) to enhance gas yield...

  16. Biogas production from spent rose hips (Rosa canina L.): fraction separation, organic loading and co-digestion with N-rich microbial biomass.

    Osojnik Črnivec, Ilja Gasan; Muri, Petra; Djinović, Petar; Pintar, Albin

    2014-11-01

    Complex waste streams originating from extraction processes containing residual organic solvents and increased C/N ratios have not yet been considered as feedstock for biogas production to a great extent. In this study, spent rosehip (Rosa canina L.) solid residue (64%VS, 22 MJ/kg HHV, 30C/1N) was obtained from an industrial ethanol aided extraction process, and extensively examined in an automated batch bioreactor system for biogas production. Fraction separation of the compact lignocellulosic seeds increased the available sugar and ethanol content, resulting in high biogas potential of the sieved residue (516 NL/kg VS'). In co-digestion of spent rosehip substrate with non-deactivated nitrogen rich microbial co-substrates, methanogenesis was favored (Y(m) > 68%(CH4)). In individual digestion of microbial co-substrates, this was not the case, as biogas with 28 vol.% N2 was produced from activated sludge supplement. Therefore, effective inhibition of exogenous microbiota was achieved in the presence of carbonaceous spent rose hip. PMID:25218210

  17. Carbon adsorbents for CO2 capture from bio-hydrogen and biogas streams: Breakthrough adsorption study

    Gil Matellanes, María Victoria; Álvarez Gutiérrez, Noelia; Martínez, M.; Rubiera González, Fernando; Pevida García, Covadonga; Morán, A

    2015-01-01

    The biological production of H2 by dark fermentation is being extensively investigated due to the great potential of the two-phase hydrogen/methane fermentation process for recovering energy from carbohydrate-rich wastes. However, the purification of the bio-hydrogen and biogas obtained is needed to produce high-purity H2 and CH4 streams appropriate for industrial application. In this study, the performance of three activated carbons (No1KCla-600, No1KClb-1000 and No2OS-1000), synthesized fro...

  18. Building a Laboratory-Scale Biogas Plant and Verifying its Functionality

    Boleman, Tomáš; Fiala, Jozef; Blinová, Lenka; Gerulová, Kristína

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with the process of building a laboratory-scale biogas plant and verifying its functionality. The laboratory-scale prototype was constructed in the Department of Safety and Environmental Engineering at the Faculty of Materials Science and Technology in Trnava, of the Slovak University of Technology. The Department has already built a solar laboratory to promote and utilise solar energy, and designed SETUR hydro engine. The laboratory is the next step in the Department's activities in the field of renewable energy sources and biomass. The Department is also involved in the European Union project, where the goal is to upgrade all existed renewable energy sources used in the Department.

  19. Radiation processing activities at OGFL

    CONCAST group of Industries has set up the first Radiation Processing Plant in Eastern India as 'VIKIRAN' named as Organic Green Foods Ltd., situated at Dankuni (Durgapur Highway Express) 25 km away from central Kolkata on August 21, 2004. Shri Sanjay Sureka, Managing Director of Organic Green Foods Ltd., Kolkata belongs to the famous CONCAST Group of Industries operates the largest plant of West Bengal engaged in manufacturing of Steel Industry. The facility was aimed at improving the quality of healthcare products and devices as well as Laboratory, Spice, Herbal and Ayurvedic Products of large volumes on an industrial scale. The operation of VIKIRAN for the last ten years, has unambiguously proved that both the above objectives have been fully met and now radiation sterilization has emerged as an efficient and effective industrial process. The irradiator is a panoramic wet storage class-IV type. This Facility is designed for 1000 KCi activity of source and is suitable in medium and high dose range application. VIKIRAN offers radiation sterilization service to more than 100 manufacturers

  20. Economic analysis and energy balance of biogas at swine farms; Analise economica e balanco energetico do biogas em granja de suinos

    Lira, Joao Carlos U.; Marra, Enes G. [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil); Domingues, Elder G. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Goias (IFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil)

    2010-06-15

    This paper presents the analyse of a case taking advantage of biogas generated from the swine dejects. Performed in a farm at southeast of the state of Goias, Brazil, it evaluates the viability of utilization of biogas for generation of electric energy, for heating, or both. The process presents environmental and economic benefits as the carbon emissions are reduced and their credits can be negotiated. (author)

  1. 17. Annual meeting on biogas and bioenergy in agriculture. Lectures; 17. Jahrestagung Biogas und Bioenergie in der Landwirtschaft. Vortraege

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    Within the 17th annual meeting at 9th to 10th December, 2008, at the energy centre Wolpertshausen (Federal Republic of Germany), the following lectures were held: (1) Energy - But how? Biogas and bioenergy in the agriculture (Winfried Binder); (2) Models for ecologically useful concepts at agricultural biogas plants (Dr. Manfred Dederer); (3) Innovative and deserving promotion concepts of utilization of heat at fermentation plants in Baden-Wuerttemberg (Konrad Raab); (4) Utilization of heat and strengthening of the regional value-added chain from the view of a franconian plant operator (Christian Endress); (5) Perspectives of an energetic utilization of materials for landscape conservation (Christof Thoss); (6) Meadow grass steps on the accelerator (Peter Stiegler); (7) Biogas from grass: Experiences from northern Germany (Jens Geveke); (8) Experience report of an agricultural biogas plant - Fermentation of grass and effective utilization (Thomas Rott); (9) State of the art of the fermentation of bio waste in a batch process (Jakovos Theodoridis); (10) Integration of a continuous dry fermentation plant into an existing compost heap - an experience report (Michael Buchheit): (11) Coldness from heat: Providing coldness with ammonia / water refrigerating absorbers (Sebastian Zuerich); (12) Current state the Renewable Energy Resources Act 2009 (Otto K. Koerner); (13) The eco-auditor in the Renewable Energy Resources Act 2009 (Peter Vassen); (14) Greenhouse-gas emissions from biogas plants (Carsten Cuhls); (15) Management of crashes and crisis at biogas plants (Anton-Rupert Baumann); (16) SINNRGIE brilliantly simple (Sauter); (17) Fermentation of grass-clover ley in ecological agriculture (Hans Holland).

  2. Energy plants increasingly important. Scientific results and practical experiences on the production of biogas plants and short rotation coppices. Symposium; Energiepflanzen im Aufwind. Wissenschaftliche Ergebnisse und praktische Erfahrungen zur Produktion von Biogaspflanzen und Feldholz. Fachtagung

    Heiermann, M.; Scholz, V.; Foltan, H. (comps.)

    2007-05-15

    The conference proceedings contain 15 contributions on energy plants: energy plant production in Germany - developments and research activities; potentials and constraints of cultivating energy crops; environmental aspects of production and utilization of energy plants; costs of energy crop supply; crops for the biogas production in the territory of Brandenburg; mixed cropping systems on sandy soils - alternative cropping strategies; impact of ensiling process on biogas production - recent research results; solid state anaerobic digestion of renewable biomass sources - state of research and development; energy crops as feedstock in a biogas plant; proffer and demand of wood fuel in the State of Brandenburg; regulatory framework of growing short rotation coppice; mechanization of SRC production; 20 years of short rotation coppice; willow production and marketing in Denmark; short rotation coppice production in Italy.

  3. Increasing the biogas yield of manure by wet explosion of the digested fiber fraction

    Biswas, Rajib; Uellendahl, Hinrich; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    Increasing the biodegradability of the lignocellulosic fiber fraction of manure can ensure higher methane productivity in biogas plants, leading to process profitability and thus larger production of renewable energy. A new pretreatment method, wet explosion (WEx), was investigated to treat...

  4. Liquid Membranes for Biogas Upgrading

    Poloncarzová, Magda; Vejražka, Jiří; Izák, Pavel

    Toruň: Nicolaus Copernicus University, 2010 - (Kujawski, W.), s. 78 ISBN N. [International Scientific Conference on Pervaporation and Vapor Permeation. Toruň (PL), 18.04.2010-21.04.2010] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : biogas * biomass * ecological fuel Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry http://www.pv.chem.umk.pl

  5. Technical improvements of biogas plants

    Perwanger, A.

    1983-01-01

    Experience in the construction and operation of more than 40 new biogas plants in Bavaria has shown that gas-tightness, corrosion resistance and prevention of obstruction are the most important points. Gas-tightness was a problem especially in brick or concrete fermenters.

  6. Modelling the Kinetics of Biogas Production from Mesophilic Anaerobic Co-Digestion of Cow Dung with Plantain Peels

    Ganiyu Kayode Latinwo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This work investigated the effect of plantain peels as co-substrate in the anaerobic digestion of cow dung for efficient and high biogas production. The biogas experiments were carried out in two different 5 L anaerobic digesters and incubated for 40 days at ambient mesophilic temperatures (28 oC to 34 °C. The results showed that co-digestion of cow dung with plantain peels as co-substrate reduced start-up time for biogas generation and increased biogas yield by 18% as compared to cow dung alone. Peak biogas production was obtained for both digesters at pH of 6.7 and 6.9 as well as temperature of 29 and 30oC, respectively. Modelling study revealed that exponential plot simulated better in both ascending and descending limb than the linear plot the biogas production rates in biogas production from cow dung co-digested with plantain peels and cow dung alone, respectively. Logistic growth model and modified Gompertz plot showed better correlation of cumulative biogas production than exponential rise to maximum plot. These results show that biogas production can be enhanced efficiently through co-digestion process.

  7. Hydrothermal catalytic gasification of fermentation residues from a biogas plant

    Biogas plants, increasing in number, produce a stream of fermentation residue with high organic content, providing an energy source which is by now mostly unused. We tested this biomass as a potential feedstock for catalytic gasification in supercritical water (T ≥ 374 °C, p ≥ 22 MPa) for methane production using a batch reactor system. The coke formation tendency during the heat-up phase was evaluated as well as the cleavage of biomass-bound sulfur with respect to its removal from the process as a salt. We found that sulfur is not sufficiently released from the biomass during heating up to a temperature of 410 °C. Addition of alkali salts improved the liquefaction of fermentation residues with a low content of minerals, probably by buffering the pH. We found a deactivation of the carbon-supported ruthenium catalyst at low catalyst-to-biomass loadings, which we attribute to sulfur poisoning and fouling in accordance with the composition of the fermentation residue. A temperature of 400 °C was found to maximize the methane yield. A residence time dependent biomass to catalyst ratio of 0.45 g g−1 h−1 was found to result in nearly full conversion with the Ru/C catalyst. A Ru/ZrO2 catalyst, tested under similar conditions, was less active. -- Highlights: ► Fermentation residue of a biogas plant could be successfully liquefied with a low rate of coke formation. ► Liquefaction resulted in an incomplete removal of biomass-bound sulfur. ► Low catalyst loadings result in incomplete conversion, implicating catalyst deactivation. ► At 400 °C the observed conversion to methane was highest. ► A residence time dependent biomass to catalyst ratio of 0.45 g g−1 h−1 was determined to yield nearly complete conversion

  8. Economic and technical viability of the biogas generation from vinaceus in an ethanol plant; Viabilidade tecnica, economica, da geracao de biogas a partir de vinhaca em uma usina de etanol

    Vianna, Luiz Felipe Peres; Almeida, Silvio Carlos Anibal de [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (DEM/EP/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica; Pinto, Marcio Schittini; Pereira, Luiz Felipe Herrmann Telles [Acesa Bioenergia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], Emails: maschittini@acesabioenergia.com; lfpereira@acesabioenergia.com

    2010-07-01

    This paper analyses the technical viability of use of vinaceus for biogas production. This paper developed by the Mechanical Engineering Department of UFRJ and the ACESA Bioenergy enterprise, analyses the generation and processing of biogas produced from bio digestion of the vinaceus. The chosen place for the study was the Mandu ethanol plant, located at Guaira, Sao Paulo, Brazil.

  9. Experimental Investigation of Biogas Reforming in Gliding Arc Plasma Reactors

    P. Thanompongchart

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogas is an important renewable energy source. Its utilization is restricted to vicinity of farm areas, unless pipeline networks or compression facilities are established. Alternatively, biogas may be upgraded into synthetic gas via reforming reaction. In this work, plasma assisted reforming of biogas was investigated. A laboratory gliding arc plasma setup was developed. Effects of CH4/CO2 ratio (1, 2.33, 9, feed flow rate (16.67–83.33 cm3/s, power input (100–600 W, number of reactor, and air addition (0–60% v/v on process performances in terms of yield, selectivity, conversion, and energy consumption were investigated. High power inputs and long reaction time from low flow rates, or use of two cascade reactors were found to promote dry reforming of biogas. High H2 and CO yields can be obtained at low energy consumption. Presence of air enabled partial oxidation reforming that produced higher CH4 conversion, compared to purely dry CO2 reforming process.

  10. Biogas generation in anaerobic wastewater treatment under tetracycline antibiotic pressure

    Lu, Meiqing; Niu, Xiaojun; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jie; Yang, Jia; Wang, Wenqi; Yang, Zhiquan

    2016-06-01

    The effect of tetracycline (TC) antibiotic on biogas generation in anaerobic wastewater treatment was studied. A lab-scale Anaerobic Baffled Reactor (ABR) with three compartments was used. The reactor was operated with synthetic wastewater in the absence of TC and in the presence of 250 μg/L TC for 90 days, respectively. The removal rate of TC, volatile fatty acids (VFAs), biogas compositions (hydrogen (H2), methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2)), and total biogas production in each compartment were monitored in the two operational conditions. Results showed that the removal rate of TC was 14.97–67.97% in the reactor. The presence of TC had a large negative effect on CH4 and CO2 generation, but appeared to have a positive effect on H2 production and VFAs accumulation. This response indicated that the methanogenesis process was sensitive to TC presence, but the acidogenesis process was insensitive. This suggested that the presence of TC had less influence on the degradation of organic matter but had a strong influence on biogas generation. Additionally, the decrease of CH4 and CO2 generation and the increase of H2 and VFAs accumulation suggest a promising strategy to help alleviate global warming and improve resource recovery in an environmentally friendly approach.

  11. Quality Assessment of solid waste used for obtaining biogas

    The solid residuals are in our days an important factor in the processes of recycling of materials, composting and obtaining of biogas, however, sometimes doesn't keep in mind the quality of these for their productive acting. Therefore the present work has as objective, in the peculiar case of the biogas production, to propose a method to evaluate the quality of the solid residuals used in the biogas process starting from the biodegradable organic fraction contained in these. For the investigative development of the work theoretical methods were used as the hypothetical-deductive method, the systemic one, the structural-functional one and empiric methods as the scientific observation and the mensuration. The results of their application, although discreet still, have been evidenced in the evaluation of the quality of the solid residuals in the plant of recycling -composting of the City of Holguin in the compost production. The main conclusion to which you can arrive with the carried out investigation is that the evaluation of the quality of the solid residuals is important to make studies of feasibility in the design and implementation of new projects of recycling units, composting and biogas. (author)

  12. Production of biogas from municipal solid waste with domestic sewage.

    Elango, D; Pulikesi, M; Baskaralingam, P; Ramamurthi, V; Sivanesan, S

    2007-03-01

    In this study, experiments were conducted to investigate the production of biogas from municipal solid waste (MSW) and domestic sewage by using anaerobic digestion process. The batch type of reactor was operated at room temperature varying from 26 to 36 degrees C with a fixed hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 25 days. The digester was operated at different organic feeding rates of 0.5, 1.0, 2.3, 2.9, 3.5 and 4.3kg of volatile solids (VS)/m(3) of digester slurry per day. Biogas generation was enhanced by the addition of domestic sewage to MSW. The maximum biogas production of 0.36m(3)/kg of VS added per day occurred at the optimum organic feeding rate of 2.9kg of VS/m(3)/day. The maximum reduction of total solids (TS) (87.6%), VS (88.1%) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) (89.3%) occurred at the optimum organic loading rate of 2.9kg of VS/m(3)/day. The quality of biogas produced during anaerobic digestion process was 68-72%. PMID:16914265

  13. Optimization of the methanation process by the implementation of a physical-chemical co-process: application to the biogas resource made by waste water sewage sludges; Optimisation du procede de methanisation par mise en place d'un co-traitement physico-chimique: application au gisement de biogaz represente par les boues d'epuration des eaux usees

    Bougrier, C.

    2005-10-15

    This work deals with the coupling of physico-chemical processes with the anaerobic digestion. This coupling aims at reducing the generation of sewage sludges and, at the same time, at improving biogas generation. In a first step, 3 cellular lysis techniques have been applied with the aim of improving the anaerobic digestion efficiency: sonication, ozonization and thermal lysis. For each technique used, the effects of pre-processing have been analyzed in terms of matter solubilization and biogas generation in discontinuous reactors. This has permitted to determine the optimum conditions of operation of each technique. In a second step, these different pre-treatments have been compared on a same sludge in order to determine the most efficient treatment. While thermal treatments lead to the highest solubilization levels, the improvements of biodegradability are of the same order of importance for the 3 techniques. The thermal treatment, with its sanitizing aptitude and the possibility to use biogas for its energy supply, seems to be the most promising. The effects of thermal lysis on the solubilization of the different sludge compounds (glucides, proteins, lipids), on the physical-chemical properties of sludges and on their anaerobic biodegradability in discontinuous and semi-continuous reactors have been studied. All sludges seem to have a similar behaviour with respect to solubilization, decantation and filtration properties with a threshold temperature of 150 deg. C. On the other hand, the impact on biodegradability is more dependent on the nature of the sludge. The most important parameter for the evaluation of the relevance of a thermal pre-processing seems to be the initial sludges biodegradability. (J.S.)

  14. Preliminary design and economical study of a biogas production-plant using cow manure

    Juan Miguel Mantilla González

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents considerations and results from designing a large- scale biogas production-plant using cow manure. The so designed plant capacity allowed processing the dung from 1,300 cows, producing 500 kW of electrical energy from operating a generator which works on a mixture of diesel and biogas fuel. The design included sizing the cowsheds, the manure-collecting systems, transporting the dung, the digester, the effluent tank and the biogas treatment system. An economic study was also done, concluding that project was viable and the importance of the cost of diesel evolving for determining return on investment time.

  15. An experimental evaluation of energy economics of biogas production at mesophilic and thermophilic temperatures

    Process economy, with regard to and energy content predicts the potentialities of biogas production options. Experimental study reveal from the kinetic data of daily biogas production that biomethanation reaction is faster in thermophilic digestion, with a higher yield of gas per reactor volume per day. Energy calculations show that it will take 3.55*105 kWh to produce 1 m3 of methane from our feedstock with biogas energy equivalent of 1.25 kWh. The cost implication of this is enormous amounting to US $2,641.95 for the production of 1 m3 of methane using brewers spent grins

  16. Optimised biogas production from the co-digestion of sugar beet with pig slurry: Integrating energy, GHG and economic accounting

    Boldrin, Alessio; Baral, Khagendra Raj; Fitamo, Temesgen Mathewos;

    2016-01-01

    , utilising SB negatively affects the profitability of biogas production, because of the increased costs involved in feedstock supply. The scale of the processing plant is neutral in terms of profitability when SB is added. The results indicate that medium-to large-sized biogas plants, using low shares of SB...

  17. Sustainable operation of submerged Anammox membrane bioreactor with recycling biogas sparging for alleviating membrane fouling.

    Li, Ziyin; Xu, Xindi; Xu, Xiaochen; Yang, FengLin; Zhang, ShuShen

    2015-12-01

    A submerged anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (Anammox) membrane bioreactor with recycling biogas sparging for alleviating membrane fouling has been successfully operated for 100d. Based on the batch tests, a recycling biogas sparging rate at 0.2m(3)h(-1) was fixed as an ultimate value for the sustainable operation. The mixed liquor volatile suspended solid (VSS) of the inoculum for the long operation was around 3000mgL(-1). With recycling biogas sparging rate increasing stepwise from 0 to 0.2m(3)h(-1), the reactor reached an influent total nitrogen (TN) up to 1.7gL(-1), a stable TN removal efficiency of 83% and a maximum specific Anammox activity (SAA) of 0.56kg TNkg(-1) VSSd(-1). With recycling biogas sparging rate at 0.2 m(3) h(-1) (corresponding to an aeration intensity of 118m(3)m(-2)h(-1)), the membrane operation circle could prolong by around 20 times compared to that without gas sparging. Furthermore, mechanism of membrane fouling was proposed. And with recycling biogas sparging, the VSS and EPS content increasing rate in cake layer were far less than the ones without biogas sparging. The TN removal performance and sustainable membrane operation of this system showed the appealing potential of the submerged Anammox MBR with recycling biogas sparging in treating high-strength nitrogen-containing wastewaters. PMID:25311769

  18. Innovative test method for the estimation of the foaming tendency of substrates for biogas plants

    Moeller, Lucie, E-mail: lucie.moeller@ufz.de [UFZ – Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Centre for Environmental Biotechnology, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Eismann, Frank, E-mail: info@antoc.de [Eismann & Stöbe GbR, GeoPark, Geb. A12, Bautzner Strasse 67, 04347 Leipzig (Germany); Wißmann, Daniel, E-mail: d.s.wissmann@gmx.de [University of Hohenheim, State Institute of Agricultural Engineering and Bioenergy (LA740), Garbenstrasse 9, 70599 Stuttgart (Germany); Nägele, Hans-Joachim, E-mail: hajo.naegele@uni-hohenheim.de [University of Hohenheim, State Institute of Agricultural Engineering and Bioenergy (LA740), Garbenstrasse 9, 70599 Stuttgart (Germany); Zielonka, Simon, E-mail: simon.zielonka@uni-hohenheim.de [University of Hohenheim, State Institute of Agricultural Engineering and Bioenergy (LA740), Garbenstrasse 9, 70599 Stuttgart (Germany); Müller, Roland A., E-mail: roland.mueller@ufz.de [UFZ – Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Centre for Environmental Biotechnology, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Zehnsdorf, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.zehnsdorf@ufz.de [UFZ – Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Centre for Environmental Biotechnology, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Foaming in biogas plants depends on the interactions between substrate and digestate. • Foaming tests enable the evaluation of substrate foaming tendency in biogas plants. • Leipzig foam tester enables foaming tests of substrates prior to use. - Abstract: Excessive foaming in anaerobic digestion occurs at many biogas plants and can cause problems including plugged gas pipes. Unfortunately, the majority of biogas plant operators are unable to identify the causes of foaming in their biogas reactor. The occurrence of foaming is often related to the chemical composition of substrates fed to the reactor. The consistency of the digestate itself is also a crucial part of the foam formation process. Thus, no specific recommendations concerning substrates can be given in order to prevent foam formation in biogas plants. The safest way to avoid foaming is to test the foaming tendency of substrates on-site. A possible solution is offered by an innovative foaming test. With the help of this tool, biogas plant operators can evaluate the foaming disposition of new substrates prior to use in order to adjust the composition of substrate mixes.

  19. Biogas and methane yield in response to co- and separate digestion of biomass wastes.

    Adelard, Laetitia; Poulsen, Tjalfe G; Rakotoniaina, Volana

    2015-01-01

    The impact of co-digestion as opposed to separate digestion, on biogas and methane yield (apparent synergetic effects) was investigated for three biomass materials (pig manure, cow manure and food waste) under mesophilic conditions over a 36 day period. In addition to the three biomass materials (digested separately), 13 biomass mixtures (co-digested) were used. Two approaches for modelling biogas and methane yield during co-digestion, based on volatile solids concentration and ultimate gas and methane potentials, were evaluated. The dependency of apparent synergetic effects on digestion time and biomass mixture composition was further assessed using measured cumulative biogas and methane yields and specific biogas and methane generation rates. Results indicated that it is possible, based on known volatile solids concentration and ultimate biogas or methane yields for a set of biomass materials digested separately, to accurately estimate gas yields for biomass mixtures made from these materials using calibrated models. For the biomass materials considered here, modelling indicated that the addition of pig manure is the main cause of synergetic effects. Co-digestion generally resulted in improved ultimate biogas and methane yields compared to separate digestion. Biogas and methane production was furthermore significantly higher early (0-7 days) and to some degree also late (above 20 days) in the digestion process during co-digestion. PMID:25492719

  20. Innovative test method for the estimation of the foaming tendency of substrates for biogas plants

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Foaming in biogas plants depends on the interactions between substrate and digestate. • Foaming tests enable the evaluation of substrate foaming tendency in biogas plants. • Leipzig foam tester enables foaming tests of substrates prior to use. - Abstract: Excessive foaming in anaerobic digestion occurs at many biogas plants and can cause problems including plugged gas pipes. Unfortunately, the majority of biogas plant operators are unable to identify the causes of foaming in their biogas reactor. The occurrence of foaming is often related to the chemical composition of substrates fed to the reactor. The consistency of the digestate itself is also a crucial part of the foam formation process. Thus, no specific recommendations concerning substrates can be given in order to prevent foam formation in biogas plants. The safest way to avoid foaming is to test the foaming tendency of substrates on-site. A possible solution is offered by an innovative foaming test. With the help of this tool, biogas plant operators can evaluate the foaming disposition of new substrates prior to use in order to adjust the composition of substrate mixes

  1. Reduction of H{sub 2}S from biogas by using environmental air

    Sahu, S.N.

    1997-04-01

    First a general description is given about environmental aspects of producing biogas from manures, the anaerobic digestion process, and inhibition by ammonia. Two experiment were carried out to determine the effect of air on reducing H{sub 2}S from biogas. In both the experiments the same amount of degassed manure (1.5 lit) collected from Boddam Biogas Plant is initially used. Everyday feed the digester (3 lit of total volume) was fed by 500 ml of pig liquid manure, when the rate or Volatile Fatty Acid production in the experimental tanks goes down. First experiment was for trial and the biogas produced were measured only qualitatively. In this experiment 5% of air was used in the experimental tank. It was found that the biogas production was increased, though negligibly, in the experimental tank. In this experiment the amount of gas production was more in experimental tank, as well as, less H{sub 2}S concentration. The following biochemical parameters was measured of the manure used for biogas production. TS (Total Solid), VFA (Volatile Fatty Acid), Analysis of biogas. (LN) 30 refs.

  2. Model based optimization of biogas production at SNJ plant

    Popov, Jovan

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of this thesis is the acquisition of knowledge and familiarization with the SNJ biogas plant and effects of codigestion. Plant operation and performance was monitored in order to understand and evaluate the factors affecting the efficiency of the sludge treatment process. The thesis also presents an overview of anaerobic digestion process, modelling of anaerobic codigestion process, and a general presentation of the Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant of Nord‐J...

  3. Biogas infrastructures from farm to regional scale, prospects of biogas transport grids

    Hengeveld, E.J.; Bekkering, J.; Gemert, W.J.T. van; Broekhuis, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    The volume of biogas produced in agricultural areas is expected to increase in coming years. An increasing number of local and regional initiatives show a growing interest in decentralized energy production, wherein biogas can play a role. Biogas transport from production sites to user, i.e. a CHP, boiler or an upgrading installation, induces a scale advantage and an efficiency increase. Therefore the exploration of the costs and energy use of biogas transport using a dedicated infrastructure...

  4. Energy efficient model for biogas production in farm scale

    Huopana, Tuomas

    2011-01-01

    Energy efficient solutions for six farm biogas production was found by calculating mass and energy balance in different scenarios. Raw materials in biogas production were cow manure and grass silage that were produced in these farms. There were calculated mass and energy balances on average for one year biogas prouduction that consisted of grass silage production, raw material transportation and biogas production in the biogas plant. In addition, direct greenhouse gases from biogas production...

  5. Biogas upgrading technologies:Energetic analysis and environmental impact assessment

    Yajing Xu; Ying Huang; Bin Wu; Xiangping Zhang; Suojiang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Biogas upgrading for removing CO2 and other trace components from raw biogas is a necessary step before the biogas to be used as a vehicle fuel or supplied to the natural gas grid. In this work, three technologies for biogas upgrading, i.e., pressured water scrubbing (PWS), monoethanolamine aqueous scrubbing (MAS) and ionic liquid scrubbing (ILS), are studied and assessed in terms of their energy consumption and environmental impacts with the process simulation and green degree method. A non-random-two-liquid and Henry's law property method for a CO2 separation system with ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([bmim][Tf2N]) is established and verified with experimental data. The assessment results indicate that the specific energy consumption of ILS and PWS is almost the same and much less than that of MAS. High purity CO2 product can be obtained by MAS and ILS methods, whereas no pure CO2 is recovered with the PWS. For the environmental aspect, ILS has the highest green degree production value, while MAS and PWS produce serious environmental impacts.

  6. Biogas infrastructures from farm to regional scale, prospects of biogas transport grids

    Hengeveld, E.J.; Bekkering, J.; Gemert, W.J.T. van; Broekhuis, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    The volume of biogas produced in agricultural areas is expected to increase in coming years. An increasing number of local and regional initiatives show a growing interest in decentralized energy production, wherein biogas can play a role. Biogas transport from production sites to user, i.e. a CHP,

  7. Fertiliser products from biogas plants; Biokaasulaitosten lopputuotteet lannoitevalmisteina

    Marttinen, S.; Paavola, T.; Ervasti, S. [and others

    2013-02-01

    limitations, a balancing period of five years is required resulting in the same amount of fertiliser used as with the organic fertiliser as the sole nitrogen source. Liquid fertilisers with high concentration of ammonium nitrogen should be applied by injection and solid fertilisers should be mulched immediately after surface application in order to minimise nitrogen losses via ammonia evaporation. The use of end-products from biogas plants in plant nutrition do not significantly increase the microbiological activity of field soils. Thus, the measurement of stability is not necessary in agricultural use. No significant phytotoxicity was detected, either. The products are not toxic in the concentrations used in plant nutrition. The substrates of biogas plants may contain pathogens and organic compounds originating from humans, animals and plants. In order to ensure high quality of the products the following should be considered; choice of substrates, efficient pre-treatment (e.g. particle size), optimisation of the digestion process (esp. temperature and time) and prevention of bypass and cross-contamination. Based on the results of this study, properly treated end-products from biogas plants may be considered safe fertiliser products. (orig.)

  8. Biogas upgrading - Review of commercial technologies; Biogasuppgradering - Granskning av kommersiella tekniker

    Bauer, Fredric; Hulteberg, Christian; Persson, Tobias; Tamm, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Biogas production is growing and there is an increasing demand for upgraded biogas, to be used as vehicle fuel or injected to the natural gas grid. To enable the efficient use of biogas in these applications the gas must be upgraded, i.e. the carbon dioxide, which constitutes a large part of the raw biogas from the digester, must be separated from the methane. This report aims to evaluate the biogas upgrading technologies that are commercially available and in operation today: amine scrubbers, water scrubbers, PSA units, organic scrubbers and membrane units. The technologies are described in detail by presenting the theory behind the separation mechanism, the upgrading process as a complete system, operational issues and how these are solved, and finally the most important financial data. Furthermore, the best developed cryogenic technologies, which today are being used to purify landfill gas and biogas from some specific components and to liquefy biogas, are presented. Cryogenic upgrading is an interesting possibility, but as this report shows, the technology still has some important operational issues to resolve. Technologies which are especially focused on small-scale applications are finally presented, however not in as much detail as the other, more common technologies. The report shows that for mid-scale applications, the most common options are all viable. The scrubbing technologies all perform well and have similar costs of investment and operation. The simplicity and reliability of the water scrubber has made this the preferred choice in many applications, but the high purity and very low methane slip from amine scrubbers are important characteristics. Regarding PSA and membrane units, the investment cost for these are about the same as for scrubbers. Furthermore, recent developments of the membrane units have also made it possible to reach low methane slips with this technology. Biogas production is increasing, in Sweden and globally, and the interest for

  9. Biogas in Romanian Agriculture, Present and Perspectives

    Teodor Vintila

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work we have made a review of data available concerning the potential and technologies available to be applied in Romania to produce biogas in agricultural sector. Biogas application is especially interesting for medium and large farms, concentrated on specific surfaces, where a proper substrate collection can be organized. Reviewing data presenting the theoretical potential for livestock manure in Romania, we found that over 17 mil. MWh of energy from biogas can be provided in one year. It is estimated that only half of the theoretical energy potential is technically usable by biogas investments. As for the crops residues, has been shown that the theoretical biogas potential is 76,7 mil. MWh/year. However, there is a long way to be done in Romania to reach this potential, as in the present, the entire production of biogas is from industrial and municipal landfill and slurries - there are no operational on-farm biogas plants. Despite the high potential in terms of biogas production from agricultural sources, Romania has among the lowest biogas production in Europe. Although currently there are several biogas plants (not in agricultural sector totaling an installed capacity of only 4 MW, and producing in 2010 only 19 GWh electric power, the target for 2020 in Romania is 195 MWel. installed power, with an output of 950 GW electric power. The main cause of the actual situation is the lack of economic incentives similar to those offered by countries as Germany. Without a review of relevant legislation, the progress of the biogas sector in Romania will be limited. Furthermore, the development of low-cost technologies available to Romanian farmers will contribute to the development of production of renewable energy from biogas and other biofuels.

  10. Improvement of Biogas Production by Bioaugmentation

    Kovács, K. L.; Ács, N.; E. Kovács; Wirth, R.; Rákhely, G.; Orsolya Strang; Zsófia Herbel; Bagi, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Biogas production technologies commonly involve the use of natural anaerobic consortia of microbes. The objective of this study was to elucidate the importance of hydrogen in this complex microbial food chain. Novel laboratory biogas reactor prototypes were designed and constructed. The fates of pure hydrogen-producing cultures of Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus and Enterobacter cloacae were followed in time in thermophilic and mesophilic natural biogas-producing communities, respective...

  11. Dissemination and Problems of African Biogas Technology

    Cyimana Mulinda; Qichun Hu; Ke Pan

    2013-01-01

    The present status of biogas technology in Africa was briefly reviewed focusing on biogas market potential, stake-holders, investments and bottlenecks. Africa is endowed with important biomass reserve considered as a potential for anaerobic digestion. However, the over reliance on wood and fossil fuels remains significantly overwhelming. This is due to the number of challenges in the field which led to underestimate at some extent the benefits of biogas technology. Unreliable and ineffic...

  12. Biogas in Romanian Agriculture, Present and Perspectives

    Teodor Vintila; Simina Neo

    2011-01-01

    In this work we have made a review of data available concerning the potential and technologies available to be applied in Romania to produce biogas in agricultural sector. Biogas application is especially interesting for medium and large farms, concentrated on specific surfaces, where a proper substrate collection can be organized. Reviewing data presenting the theoretical potential for livestock manure in Romania, we found that over 17 mil. MWh of energy from biogas can be provided in one ye...

  13. 城市沼渣堆肥工艺及其施肥技术的优化%Studies on Composting Process of Municipal Biogas Residues and Optimization of Fertilizer Practice

    许文江; 章明清; 洪翠云; 李夏兰

    2016-01-01

    To study how to shorten the composting time and enhance the composting efficiency and fertilizer practice of municipal biogas residues,fertilizer test of soybean planting was carried out on aerobic composting process to advance pi-lot test of material ratio by two-step method.The results showed that adding mushroom soils,rice husk and sawdust as conditioners could improve the composting efficiency.Compare with the control group,the temperature increased by 8, 5,3 ℃ ,the water ratio of product decreased by 45%,38%,34%,the seed germination index increased by 10%,8%, 7%,and the particle size reduced by 54%,34%,20% respectively in the initial 24 h.The output of green soybean in-creased by 9 .4% than the control group when using biogas residues as organic fertilizer,and the concentrations of nitrate nitrogen and total phosphorus in soil percolating water decreased by 13.4%and 21.6% respectively.It can be clearly seen that fertilizing biogas residues as organic fertilizer is beneficial to increasing the yield of green soybean and reducing the loss of nitrogen and phosphorus in the vegetable fields.%为探讨缩短城市沼渣堆肥时间,提高堆肥效率和沼渣施肥技术,采用二步法对好氧堆肥工艺进行物料配比中试试验,开展毛豆种植的沼渣施肥试验.研究结果表明:调理剂菇土、稻壳、木屑可以促进堆肥效率;堆体初期24 h,它们比对照组的温度分别提高8,5,3℃,产品水的质量分数分别减少45%,38%,14%,种子发芽率指数分别提高10%,8%,7%,产品粒度分别减少54%,34%,20%;毛豆种植配施沼渣有机肥与对照施肥比较,产量增加9.4%,土壤渗漏水硝态氮、总磷质量浓度分别减少13.4%,21.6%,配施沼渣有机肥有利于毛豆增产和降低菜田氮磷淋失.

  14. Ecological and economic evaluation of biogas from intercrops

    Niemetz, Nora; Kettl, Karl-Heinz [Graz Univ. of Technology (Austria). Inst. for Process and Particle Engineering

    2012-12-01

    Biogas made from main crops (e.g., corn) is commonly used for producing electricity and heat. Nevertheless, the production of energy from monocultures is highly unsustainable and not truly renewable. Since neither monocultures nor food competition are desirable, intercrops can be used to increase the yield per hectare instead of leaving agricultural fields unplanted for soil regeneration. The extra biomass can be used for biogas production. In a case study, the economic as well as the ecological feasibility of biogas production using intercrops, cattle manure, grass and corn silage as feedstocks for fermenters was analyzed. The set-up for the case study included different feedstock combinations as well as spatial distributions of substrate supply and heat demand for modeling and optimization. Using the process network synthesis, an optimum structure was generated representing the most economical technology constellation which included transport of substrates, heat and biogas (when applicable). The ecological evaluation was carried out by using the sustainable process index method. The application of both methodologies to different scenarios allowed a constellation to be found which is economically feasible while entailing low ecological pressure. It is demonstrated that the production of intercrops for producing biogas has so far not been regarded as a viable option by the farmers due to a variety of barriers. Sensitization is needed to emphasize that planting intercrops holds many advantages like positive effects on soil regeneration and raised nitrogen fixation, as well as increased biomass output per hectare and, last but not least, it allows the production of energy without conflicts between food and energy production. (orig.)

  15. Anticipated Activities in Maritime Work, Process Control, and Business Processes

    Andersen, Peter Bøgh

    2004-01-01

    Most activities are anticipated before they are executed. The paper presents methods for describing this anticipated state and the processes that may lead to a new state where the activities are executed. The method builds on linguistic case-theory....

  16. Life cycle assessment of biogas upgrading technologies.

    Starr, Katherine; Gabarrell, Xavier; Villalba, Gara; Talens, Laura; Lombardi, Lidia

    2012-05-01

    This article evaluates the life cycle assessment (LCA) of three biogas upgrading technologies. An in-depth study and evaluation was conducted on high pressure water scrubbing (HPWS), as well as alkaline with regeneration (AwR) and bottom ash upgrading (BABIU), which additionally offer carbon storage. AwR and BABIU are two novel technologies that utilize waste from municipal solid waste incinerators - namely bottom ash (BA) and air pollution control residues (APC) - and are able to store CO(2) from biogas through accelerated carbonation processes. These are compared to high pressure water scrubbing (HPWS) which is a widely used technology in Europe. The AwR uses an alkaline solution to remove the CO(2) and then the solution - rich in carbonate and bicarbonate ions - is regenerated through carbonation of APC. The BABIU process directly exposes the gas to the BA to remove and immediately store the CO(2), again by carbonation. It was determined that the AwR process had an 84% higher impact in all LCA categories largely due to the energy intensive production of the alkaline reactants. The BABIU process had the lowest impact in most categories even when compared to five other CO(2) capture technologies on the market. AwR and BABIU have a particularly low impact in the global warming potential category as a result of the immediate storage of the CO(2). For AwR, it was determined that using NaOH instead of KOH improves its environmental performance by 34%. For the BABIU process the use of renewable energies would improve its impact since accounts for 55% of the impact. PMID:22230660

  17. Distributed power generation using biogas fuelled microturbines

    This research sought to analyse the market for small scale biogas fuelled distributed power generation, to demonstrate the concept of a biogas fuelled microturbine using the Capstone microturbine in conjunction with an anaerobic digester, and undertake a technico-economic evaluation of the biogas fuelled microturbine concept. Details are given of the experimental trials using continuous and batch digesters, and feedstocks ranging from cow and pig slurries to vegetable wastes and municipal solid waste. The yields of methane are discussed along with the successful operation of the microturbine with biogas fuels, and anaerobic digestion projects

  18. Distributed power generation using biogas fuelled microturbines

    Pointon, K.; Langan, M.

    2002-07-01

    This research sought to analyse the market for small scale biogas fuelled distributed power generation, to demonstrate the concept of a biogas fuelled microturbine using the Capstone microturbine in conjunction with an anaerobic digester, and undertake a technico-economic evaluation of the biogas fuelled microturbine concept. Details are given of the experimental trials using continuous and batch digesters, and feedstocks ranging from cow and pig slurries to vegetable wastes and municipal solid waste. The yields of methane are discussed along with the successful operation of the microturbine with biogas fuels, and anaerobic digestion projects.

  19. Biogas for heat, power and motor fuel

    This article examines the use of biogas in Switzerland and reviews the Swiss statistics for 2008 on the use of biogas for heat, power and motor fuel. The use of biogas for these purposes is quoted as having substantially increased in the last few years. The author expects this trend to continue as prices for fossil fuels rise and as a result of various government incentives. Several sources of biogas are briefly reviewed and figures are quoted on their potentials. The statistics are reviewed in detail and figures are presented in graphical and tabular form

  20. PRELIMINARY STUDY ON BIOGAS PRODUCTION OF BIOGAS FROM MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW) LEACHATE

    WAN AZLINA WAN AB KARIM GHANI; AZNI IDRIS

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory-scale digesters were operated to study the effect of leachate chemical oxygen demand strength on biogas (methane) production. Three sets of experiment were performed using municipal solid waste leachate slurry with two different chemical oxygen demand strength strengths namely 3000 and 21000 mg/L (referred as low and high strength, respectively). The experiments were conducted at a controlled temperature of 35°C and pH ranging from 6.8 to 7.3 over 20 days period. The process perfor...

  1. Electricity and heat from biogas

    In this paper author deals with utilisation of biological wastes for heat and electricity production. Total quantity of dung in Slovakia in calculation on production of dry mass is 120.000 t yearly, what corresponds to yearly production of biogas 43,530 ths. cubic meters yearly. Energetic equivalent of utilizable excrements of economic animals is 972.5 TJ yearly. Some cogeneration units in the Slovak Republic are described

  2. Thin Film Composite Membrane for Effective Raw Biogas Upgrading to Pipeline Quality Methane

    Kárászová, Magda

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution we propose a method to upgrade biogas to the same quality of fuel standard natural gas. The latter contains more than 95 vol. % of methane. Using traditional membranes, such concentration of methane in the retentate could only be achieved using a multistep process. A recently proposed method for raw biogas purification from impurities and carbon dioxide by condensing water on swollen thin film composite membranes was found to be highly effective. The hydrophilic reverse ...

  3. Two-Stage Conversion of Land and Marine Biomass for Biogas and Biohydrogen Production

    Nkemka, Valentine

    2012-01-01

    The replacement of fossil fuels by renewable fuels such as biogas and biohydrogen will require efficient and economically competitive process technologies together with new kinds of biomass. A two-stage system for biogas production has several advantages over the widely used one-stage continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). However, it has not yet been widely implemented on a large scale. Biohydrogen can be produced in the anaerobic two-stage system. It is considered to be a useful fuel for t...

  4. Exploring the adoption of renewable energy: the case of biogas plants in Greek agriculture

    With a focus on renewable energy, an evaluation of the current literature on the adoption of new technologies is given and a review of biogas options in Greece presented. A preliminary test of the significance of some factors that influence the acceptance of biogas technology by Greek hog farmers is constructed. Although the evidence appears to support a model which emphasises individual characteristics in the adoption process, the overall data qualify the position which stresses the institutional role to that end. (author)

  5. Lean-Burn Cogeneration Biogas Engine with Unscavenged Combustion Prechamber: Comparison with Natural Gas

    Roger Röthlisberger; Anne Roubaud; Daniel Favrat

    2002-01-01

    Gaseous fuels produced, for example, by waste or agricultural by-products fermentation (biogas) can be burned in-situ by cogeneration systems like spark-ignition internal combustion engines. However, the more and more stringent legislation for exhaust gas emissions requires improvement of the combustion process particularly when catalytic after treatment is not reliable as in the case of sewage or landfill biogas. The system proposed in this paper is the use of an unscavenged combustion prech...

  6. Organic silicon compounds anf hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas by mineral and adsorbent

    Choi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Biogas utilized for energy production needs to be free from organic silicon compounds and hydrogen sulfide , as their burning has damaging effects on utilities and humans; organic silicon compounds and hydrogen sulfide can be found in biogas produced from biomass wastes, due to their massive industrial use in synthetic product,such as cosmetics, detergents and paints.Siloxanes and hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas can be carried out by various methods (Ajhar et al., 2010); aim of the present work is to find a single practical andeconomic way to drastically and simultaneously reduce both hydrogen sulfide and the siloxanes concentration to less than 1 ppm. Some commercial activated carbons previously selected (Monteleoneet al., 2011) as being effective in hydrogen sulfide up taking have been tested in an adsorption measurement apparatus, by flowing both hydrogen sulphide and volatile siloxane (Decamethycyclopentasiloxane or D5) in a nitrogen stream,typically 25-300 ppm D5 over N2, through an clay minerals, Fe oxides and Silica; the adsorption process was analyzed by varying some experimental parameters (concentration, grain size, bed height). The best silica shows an adsorption capacity of 0.2 g D5 per gram of silica. The next thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) confirms the capacity data obtained experimentally by the breakthrough curve tests.The capacity results depend on D5 and hydrogen sulphide concentrations. A regenerative silica process is then carried out byheating the silica bed up to 200 ° C and flushing out the adsorbed D5 and hydrogen sulphide samples in a nitrogen stream in athree step heating procedure up to 200 ° C. The adsorption capacity is observed to degrade after cyclingthe samples through several adsorption-desorption cycles.

  7. Swine lagoon biogas utilization system

    Gettier, S.W.; Roberts, M. [Carroll`s Foods of Va., Inc., Waverly, VA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A project was conceived to design and build a system to recover methane from pig manure with covered anaerobic lagoon technology. Covered lagoon technology lends itself both to new lagoon construction and to retrofit designs on existing anaerobic lagoons. A two cell passive in-ground digester/lagoon system was designed for a 600 sow feeder pig farm. The digester was covered with a flexible fabric cover made of 30 mil XR-5. The biogas has 1,100 ppm hydrogen sulfide. For the first month of operation 473 cubic feet of biogas per hour has been recovered from the digester 24 hours per day. At this gas flow the engine turns an induction generator to produce 17.1 KW per hour. A little over 80% of the farm`s electrical needs are generated with methane from swine manure. On an annual basis there will be 150,000 KWh of electricity produced from 4.3 million cubic feet of biogas.

  8. RESEARCHES ON THE DIGESTERS AND REACTORS WHICH CAN BE USED IN A FARM SCALE BIOGAS PLANT

    Mariana DUMITRU

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the general context of searching integrated system of renewable energy production, this paper present some researches on the reactors and the digesters, as a main part of a biogas plant at a farm scale. After we present the most used types of digesters, we also concentrated over the processes which take place into a digester, one of them being the removal of H2S from biogas (desulphurisation, which can be made by various methods, either biological or chemical, taking place inside or outside the digester. In the case of biological desulphurization outside the digester, we concentrate on the types of reactors which can be used in this case. Beside the well known types of reactors, we present the possibility of using an original self pressure membrane bioreactor. In this type of bioreactor, the metabolic activity of gas producing microorganisms, especially yeast, could obtain high pressure from gas produced in closed medium on the one hand, and separation of other products of metabolism through membrane on the other hand, using gas pressure as driving force. It is known that several strains of yeast resist on very high hydrostatic pressure heaving good activity. This fact give the possibility to use their energy for other purposes, such as producing mechanical work. Combination of both, gas pressure and alchool burning, increase the process efficiency.

  9. Radiochemical processing of activated targets

    The selection or development of an ''appropriate'' radiochemical processing scheme can be a complex and relatively difficult task. A variety of illustrative and alternative approaches to the various steps involved have been outlined. A few representative processing schemes have been examined in some detail. While these examples may serve to highlight the skills and versatility of the radiochemist, the most difficult aspect of radiochemical processing is frequently found in reconciling trade-offs. If the proper facilities are available, and the intended application and the limitations which that application impose on product quality are understood, a safe and reliable ''appropriate'' radiochemical processing scheme can almost always be developed. In the absence of such an understanding, even the best of facilities and technical skills are no guarantee of success

  10. Small-scale upgrading and refinement of biogas; Smaaskalig uppgradering och foeraedling av biogas

    Blom, Helena; Mccann, Michael; Westman, Johan (Poeyry SwedPower AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2012-02-15

    Small-scale upgrading and refinement of biogas is a report which aims to compile the state of knowledge in small-scale biogas upgrading. The project have been a collaboration with Agrovaest and Energy Farm and was funded by the Foundation for Agricultural Research, Western Goetaland and the Agriculture Department. The technology available for small scale upgrade has been examined from the technical and economic standpoint. An economic comparison has been made and the production of upgraded biogas has been estimated for different raw gas flows. The work also contains information related to biogas production, upgrading and a comparison of liquid biogas, DME and Ecopar-diesel

  11. Enhanced biogas production from rice straw with various pretreatment : a review

    Fahriya Puspita Sari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rice straw is one of organic material that can be used for sustainable production of bioenergy and biofuels such as biogas (about 50-75% CH4 and 25-50% CO2. Out of all bioconversion technologies for biogas production, anaerobic digestion (AD is a most cost-effective bioconversion technology that has been implemented worldwide for commercial production of electricity, heat, and compressed natural gas (CNG from organic materials. However, the utilization of rice straw for biogas production via anaerobic digestion has not been widely adopted because the complicated structure of the plant cell wall makes it resistant to microbial attack. Pretreatment of recalcitrant rice straw is essential to achieve high biogas yield in the AD process. A number of different pretreatment techniques involving using physical pretreatment (hydrothermal and freeze, chemical pretreatment (sodium carbonate – sodium sulfite, hydrogen peroxide, NMMO, alkaline, and dilute acid and biological pretreatment (fungal pretreatment also combined pretretment (microwave irradiation and chemical approaches have been investigated, but there is no report that systematically compares the performance of these pretreatment methods for application on rice straw for biogas production. This paper reviews the methods that have been studied for pretreatment of rice straw for delignification, reducing sugar, and conversion to biogas. It describes the AD process, structural and compositional properties of rice straw, and various pretreatment techniques, including the pretreatment process, parameters, performance, and advantages vs. drawbacks.

  12. Control and regulation of biomass conversion plants. Sub-project 4: Online determination of fatty acids with reference to adaptive regulation of the biogas process. Final report. Delprojekt 4: On-line bestemmelse af fede syrer med henblik paa adaptiv regulering af biogasprocessen. Slutrapport; Styring og regulering af biogasanlaeg

    Eriksen, C.; Eriksen, S.; Bennetsen, J.; Norddahl, B.

    1993-10-01

    Equipment for on-line sample-taking from biogas reactors controlled by automatic titration was tested. The titration automatic control device was mounted and programmed so that it could determine the concentration of volatile fatty acids (VFA) in the reactor fluid. The results of the analysis were compared with the results gained from manual titration control methods. External control of the sample- taking equipment was developed. This was controlled via the titration automatism as a stand-alone system. A control algorithm was set up on the basis of adaptive regulation so that it was adapted to the substrate. The algorithm was tested in a simulation where the input to the regulation is generated by a simulation model for the biogas process and the output influences the biogas process simulation so that the control and regulation convergence can be tested. Based on this a spread sheet program was set up to calculate the regulation parameters in the adaptive regulation so that it could be used for manual regulation. Input parameters for regulation are estimates of the convertible biomass expressed in VHA equivalents, the actual VHA concentration in the biogas reactor and the resulting production of methane. A simulation model was developed to calculate the concentration of hydrolyzed polymeric substances, VHA concentration at a given time and the resulting methane production. It was found that the adaptive regulation is very robust in the face of variations and can be used to maintain a stable production of methane at a high level with a heavy loading of the system. At the same time the VFA level is kept low, so reducing risks of instability of production. (AB)

  13. Waste to energy: Exploitation of biogas from organic waste in a 500 Wel solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack

    Organic waste collection from local municipal areas with subsequent energy valorization through CHP systems allows for a reduction of waste disposal in landfill. Pollutant emissions released into the atmosphere are also reduced in this way. Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems are among the most promising energy generators, due to their high electrical efficiency (>50%), even at part loads. In this work, the local organic fraction of municipal solid waste has been digested in a dry anaerobic digester pilot plant and a biogas stream with methane and carbon dioxide concentrations ranging from 60–70 and 30–40% vol., respectively, has been obtained. Trace compounds from the digester and after the gas clean-up section have been detected by means of a new technique that exploits the protonation reactions between the volatile compounds of interest and the ion source. Sulfur, chlorine and siloxane compounds have been removed from as-produced biogas through the use of commercial sorbent materials, such as activated carbons impregnated with metals. A buffer gas cylinder tank has been inserted downstream from the filtering section to compensate for the biogas fluctuations from the digester. The technical feasibility of the dry anaerobic process of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste, coupled with a gas cleaning section and an SOFC system, has been proved experimentally with an electrical efficiency ranging from 32 to 36% for 400 h under POx conditions. - Highlights: • Biogas trace compounds were monitored with the innovative PTR-MS technique. • VOCs removal of a filter section was investigated with PTR-MS. • The treated biogas fed a SOFC stack with stable performance for more than 400 h

  14. An evaluation of a farm scale biogas plant with a micro turbine for combined heat and power production; Utvaerdering av gaardsbiogasanlaeggning med mikroturbin foer kraftvaermeproduktion

    Brown, Nils; Edstroem, Mats; Hansson, Mikael (Swedish Inst. of Agricultural and Environmental Engineering, Uppsala (Sweden)); Algerbo, Per-Anders (HIR Malmoehus, Bjaerred (Sweden))

    2010-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to: To evaluate a farm scale biogas plant digesting energy and nutrient rich substrates at a high organic loading rate and biogas production using the biogas for combined heat and power production with a micro turbine. Put together technical, biological and economical documentation which can help farmers to investigate presumption to invest in a farm scale biogas plant for heat and power production. The farm scale biogas plant has an active digester volume of 450 m3 and the process temperature is ca 37 deg C. A micro turbine with 105 kW electrical and 160 kW thermal power is used for heat and power production. The produced electricity is sold to the grid and the heat is used on the farm for drying grain and heating two houses. The plant is digesting poultry manure and 2 substrates from the agriculture industry. All together the plant is digesting 3140 metric tons of substrates/yr and the substrates costs 160 k SEK/yr. Total investment for the plant is 4.7 M SEK. Produced head reduces the oil consumption at the farm with 15 m3 (value 100 k SEK/yr). There is a surplus of heat production of 600 MWh/yr. The production cost for the electricity is close to 0,66 SEK/kWh based on a value of the digestate of 100 SEK/ton together with an investment subsidy of 30 %. The production cost for the electricity is strongly depending on the value of the digestate. Hagavik is a crop production farm based on organic farming. If the valuation of the digestate is reduced to 50 SEK/ton, the production cost for the electricity increases to approx. 0.84 SEK/kWh (1 SEK is about 0.14 USD)

  15. Observation of temperature and pH during biogas production from water hyacinth and cow manure

    Nurfitri Astuti

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Biogas is generated from biological process of organic material by bacterial engaged. Biogas can be derived from manure, municipal waste, agricultural waste and other biomass resources. In addition to the use of cow manure as raw material for biogas production, it can also be derived from biomass containing cellulose which one is water hyacinth as an organic material that contains quite large cellulose. The abundance of water hyacinth found in Rawapening causing several negative impacts. The purpose of this study is to observe  temperature and pH on the biogas production generated from water hyacinth of Rawapening and cow manure. Biogas production process begins by chopping the leaves and stems of water hyacinth, and then mixed with cow manure and water. The results of substrate variation of water hyacinth, cow manure and water reaches optimally at 40:80:480 respectively, which produce the highest point of  biogas amounted 176.33 ml on the day 20 in 1L sized digester, the temperature of the biogas production is at 32°C.  At the initial fermentation, digester temperature of 30°C has increased over the course of the fermentation process, a peak at day 20 and then decreased to 27°C at the end of fermentation. There is a decrease in pH starting from initial fermentation at pH 6-7 and then the pH began to decline until the end of fermentation as amount of pH 5.Doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.12777/wastech.1.1.22-25Citation:  Nurfitri Astuti, N., Tri Retnaningsih Soeprobowati, T.R., and  Budiyono. 2013. Observation of temperature and pH during biogas production from water hyacinth and cow manure. Waste Technology 1(1:1-5. Doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.12777/wastech.1.1.22-25

  16. [Biodegradation of Cellulose-Containing Substrates by Micromycetes Followed by Bioconversion into Biogas].

    Prokudina, L I; Osmolovskii, A A; Egorova, M A; Malakhova, D V; Netrusov, A I; Tsavkelova, E A

    2016-01-01

    The ability of micromycetes Trichoderma viride and Aspergillus terreus to decompose the cellulose-containing substrates was studied. Office paper and cardboard, as well as a paper mixture, were found to be the most hydrolyzable. The cellulolytic activity of T. viride was 2-3 times higher than that of A. terreus; the highest values of 0.80 and 0.73 U/mLwere obtained from office paper and the paper mixture, respectively. The micromycete cultivation conditions (composition of culture medium, sucrose cosubstrate addition, seeding method) and the conditions of the fungus biomass treatment for its subsequent bioconversion into biogas by anaerobic microbial communities were optimized. It was shown that pretreatment improves the efficiency of biogas production from lignocellulosic materials under seeding with microbial community of bovine animal manure. After pretreatment of the Jerusalem artichoke phytomass (stems and leaves) and its subsequent bioconversion into biogas by methanogenic community, the biogas yield was increased by 1.5 times. PMID:27266249

  17. Establishment of a biogas grid and interaction between a biogas grid and a natural gas grid

    Kvist, T.

    2011-01-15

    The project has aimed to clarify the advantages and disadvantages of a large biogas net in Ringkoebing Skjern municipality in Denmark, which wants to become self-sufficient in renewable energy by 2020. It is estimated that the biogas potential in the municipality is about. 60 mill. m3 methane gas a year. Half of the methane will be generated by digesting 80 % of the area's slurry, while the other half will be produced from energy crops. It will require an area equivalent to 5 % of the municipality's farmland. The idea is to establish decentralized 60-80 and 1-3 large centralized biogas plants, and that the produced biogas is distributed to natural gas-fired decentralized power plants. Based on this framework, a number of issues for the establishment of a biogas net have been investigated. These are: - the relation between biogas production and demand; - biogas compared to the overall energy system, - purification and measurement of biogas; - conversion of natural gas-fired power plants to biogas; - the value of biogas for cogeneration plants; - design of a biogas distribution net; - ownership and accountability; - potential business models. (LN)

  18. Biogas Production from Energy Crops and Agriculture Residues

    Wang, Guangtao

    suitability for biogas production. Moreover, pretreatment of these biomasses by using wet explosion method was studied and the effect of the wet explosion process was evaluated based on the increase of (a) sugar release and (b) methane potential when comparing the pretreated biomass and raw biomass. Ensiling......In this thesis, the feasibility of utilizing energy crops (willow and miscanthus) and agriculture residues (wheat straw and corn stalker) in an anaerobic digestion process for biogas production was evaluated. Potential energy crops and agriculture residues were screened according to their...... of perennial crops was tested as a storage method and pretreatment method for enhancement of the biodegradability of the crops. The efficiency of the silage process was evaluated based on (a) the amount of biomass loss during storage and (b) the effect of the silage on methane potential. Co...

  19. Integration of energy, GHG and economic accounting to optimize biogas production based on co-digestion

    Fitamo, Temesgen Mathewos; Boldrin, Alessio; Baral, Khagendra Raj;

    Several countries have set a number of targets to boost energy production from renewable sources. Biogas production is expected to increase significantly over the next few decades and to play an important role in future energy systems. To achieve these ambitious targets, the biogas production has...... energy crops. In this study, we integrated three types of analysis - energetic, GHG and economic – in order to optimise biogas production from the co-digestion of pig slurry (PS) and sugar beet pulp silage (SB). We found that the energy and GHG balances are improved when utilising SB as a co......-substrate, mainly because of increased energy production. However, the profitability of biogas production is negatively affected when utilising SB, because of the increased costs involved in feedstock supply. The scale of the processing plant is neutral in terms of profitability when SB is added. The results...

  20. Integration of energy, GHG and economic accounting to optimize biogas production based on co-digestion

    Fitamo, Temesgen Mathewos; Boldrin, Alessio; Baral, Khagendra Raj;

    2015-01-01

    Several countries have set a number of targets to boost energy production from renewable sources. Biogas production is expected to increase significantly over the next few decades and to play an important role in future energy systems. To achieve these ambitious targets, the biogas production has...... energy crops. In this study, we integrated three types of analysis - energetic, GHG and economic – in order to optimise biogas production from the co-digestion of pig slurry (PS) and sugar beet pulp silage (SB). We found that the energy and GHG balances are improved when utilising SB as a co......-substrate, mainly because of increased energy production. However, the profitability of biogas production is negatively affected when utilising SB, because of the increased costs involved in feedstock supply. The scale of the processing plant is neutral in terms of profitability when SB is added. The results...

  1. Stirring and biomass starter influences the anaerobic digestion of different substrates for biogas production

    Rojas, Christian; Fang, Sheng; Uhlenhut, Frank; Borchert, Axel; Stein, Ingo; Schlaak, Michael [Institut fuer Umwelttechnik EUTEC, Fachbereich Technik, Fachhochschule Emden/Leer, Emden (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Here, we present the results of lab-scale experiments conducted in a batch mode to determine the biogas yield of lipid-rich waste and corn silage under the effect of stirring. Further semi-continuous experiments were carried out for the lipid-rich waste with/without stirring. Additionally, it was analyzed how the starter used for the batch experiment influences the digestion process. The results showed a significant stirring effect on the anaerobic digestion only when seed sludge from a biogas plant was used as a starter. In this case, the experiments without stirring yielded only about 50% of the expected biogas for the investigated substrates. The addition of manure slurry to the batch reactor as part of the starter improved the biogas production. The more diluted media in the reactor allowed a better contact between the bacteria and the substrates making stirring not necessary. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. Biogas desulfurization and biogas upgrading using a hybrid membrane system--modeling study.

    Makaruk, A; Miltner, M; Harasek, M

    2013-01-01

    Membrane gas permeation using glassy membranes proved to be a suitable method for biogas upgrading and natural gas substitute production on account of low energy consumption and high compactness. Glassy membranes are very effective in the separation of bulk carbon dioxide and water from a methane-containing stream. However, the content of hydrogen sulfide can be lowered only partially. This work employs process modeling based upon the finite difference method to evaluate a hybrid membrane system built of a combination of rubbery and glassy membranes. The former are responsible for the separation of hydrogen sulfide and the latter separate carbon dioxide to produce standard-conform natural gas substitute. The evaluation focuses on the most critical upgrading parameters like achievable gas purity, methane recovery and specific energy consumption. The obtained results indicate that the evaluated hybrid membrane configuration is a potentially efficient system for the biogas processing tasks that do not require high methane recoveries, and allows effective desulfurization for medium and high hydrogen sulfide concentrations without additional process steps. PMID:23168631

  3. Ecological and economic optimisation of existing and future biogas plants. First project results; Oekologische und oekonomische Optimierung von bestehenden und zukuenftigen Biogasanlagen. Erste Projektergebnisse

    Vogt, Regine [ifeu-Institut fuer Energie- und Umweltforschung GmbH, Heidelberg (Germany); Graweloh, Katharina; Buecker, Christin; Bruegging, Elmar; Wetter, Christof [Fachhochschule Muenster, Steinfurt (Germany). Fachbereich Energie - Gebaeude - Umwelt; Sonnleitner, Matthias; Haering, Georg; Zoerner, Wilfried [Hochschule Ingolstadt (Germany). Kompetenzfeld Erneuerbare Energien

    2009-07-01

    First analyses of biogas plants shows that even economically sound biogas plants have substantial potential for improvement in many respects. Conspicuous deficits begging improvement are to be seen in the area of measuring and control technology and thus in the control and optimisation of the entire process, and further in the general control of the plant. From an ecological viewpoint a reduction in the number of methane emission sources is needed. This would automatically increase biogas yield.

  4. ASSESSMENT OF THE BIODIVERSITY OF SAMPLES USED FOR ISOLATION OF MICROBIAL STRAINS CAPABLE OF CONVERTING STRAW DESTINED AS A SUBSTRATE FOR BIOGAS PLANT

    Krystyna Cybulska; Paweł Kołosowski; Ilona Wrońska; Tomasz Dobek

    2016-01-01

    In biogas plants, almost any type of organic matter can be used as a substrate to produce biogas. To make the process of methane fermentation more effective, these materials are pretreated. This applies in particular to a group of difficult substrates. Straw, due to its hemicellulose structure and saturation, is hardly fermented by biogas reactor microorganisms. The methods of post-harvest residue preparation for anaerobic digestion being applied so far are expensive, while their application ...

  5. Signal Processing under Active Monitoring

    Mostovyi, Oleksii

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a method of signal preprocessing under active monitoring. Suppose we want to solve the inverse problem of getting the response of a medium to one powerful signal, which is equivalent to obtaining the transmission function of the medium, but do not have an opportunity to conduct such an experiment (it might be too expensive or harmful for the environment). Practically the problem can be reduced to obtaining the transmission function of the medium. In this case ...

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic process in solar activity

    Jingxiu Wang; Jie Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics is one of the major disciplines in solar physics. Vigorous magnetohydrodynamic process is taking place in the solar convection zone and atmosphere. It controls the generating and structuring of the solar magnetic fields, causes the accumulation of magnetic non-potential energy in the solar atmosphere and triggers the explosive magnetic energy release, manifested as violent solar flares and coronal mass ejections. Nowadays detailed observations in solar astrophysics from s...

  7. A case for biogas energy application for rural industries in India

    Rural India has a vast potential of biogas generation and application. During the past two decades, biogas has been promoted mostly as a cooking fuel in the rural areas. According to the prevailing practices in these areas, fuel for cooking is not being purchased but collected by the users from the farm fields and surrounding areas. Majority of rural population feels that biogas generation does not offer them direct/monetary benefits, and therefore many of them are reluctant to accept it. However biogas, when used for production activities, say in small scale rural industries, may be able to fill the gap in energy availability and demand in the rural areas. Being a renewable source, biogas, when utilised properly, can replace the commercial and nonrenewable energy sources to a considerable extent in a variety of production activities. Biogas application in the above context has been found to be self sustaining, while fulfilling the rural energy demand. Other important aspects such as employment generation, socio economic and environmental impacts are also examined. (Author)

  8. Vitreous membranes used in the biogas purification

    In the present work 10 vitreous membranes with different masses of zinc oxide (ZnO(s)) and particle diameters charcoal (DPC) are used in the purification of biogas. The porosity and tortuosity of the membranes is obtained, showing the variation with respect to the composition thereof. From these structural features specific flow of H2S(g) is obtained which is transferred using the Fick's diffusion equation in the membranes and its value increases with increasing mass of ZnO(s). By X-ray diffraction membrane made with 3.16 g of ZnO(s) forming zinc sulfide it is shown, so we can say that the removal of H2S(g) occurs by a process of absorption with chemical reaction in the membranes. (Author)

  9. Biogas and bioethanol production in organic farming

    Oleskowicz-Popiel, P.

    2010-08-15

    The consumer demand for environmentally friendly, chemical free and healthy products, as well as concern regarding industrial agriculture's effect on the environment has led to a significant growth of organic farming. On the other hand, organic farmers are becoming interested in direct on-farm energy production which would lead them to independency from fossil fuels and decrease the greenhouse gas emissions from the farm. In the presented work, the idea of biogas and bioenergy production at the organic farm is investigated. This thesis is devoted to evaluate such a possibility, starting from the characterization of raw materials, through optimizing new processes and solutions and finally evaluating the whole on-farm biorefinery concept with the help of a simulation software. (LN)

  10. Biogas i økologisk jordbrug

    Østergård, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    Klumme: Hvilke faktorer har størst betydning for udbredelse af biogas-teknologien? Offentlige tilskud er svaret fra en rundspørge.......Klumme: Hvilke faktorer har størst betydning for udbredelse af biogas-teknologien? Offentlige tilskud er svaret fra en rundspørge....

  11. Forecasting the potential of Danish biogas production

    Bojesen, Mikkel; Skov-Petersen, Hans; Gylling, Morten

    , except for those farms which are in the largest state class. Regional differences in development trends were documented. The strategic objective of the model is to provide data for the spatial assessment of the potential of biogas production which can form the basis for a location analysis for future...... biogas plants....

  12. Biogas production from water hyacinth (eichhornia crassipes)

    The formation of biogas by anaerobic digestion of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) has been investigated in simple laboratory digesters. Seed material was obtained from the rumen contents of a goat. Under conditions where the mass of seed material exceeded the water hyacinth feed, the maximum rate of biogas production was obtained within one to two days of each addition of feed material. The maximum amount of biogas produced, 0.33 m3kg-1 dry matter was obtained at 40 deg. C with a slight decrease in total production at 35 deg. C. The total biogas produced at 45 deg. C (0.12 m3kg-1 dry matter) was less than that at 30 deg. C (0.16 m3kg-1). Regular additions of small amounts of feed material produced a more uniform rate of biogas production (author)

  13. Biogas plant and pollution: a research study

    The present condition of 24,501 biogas plants out of the existing plants in Madhya Pradesh, has been surveyed. In this survey, 1500 biogas plants in 432 village in 168 development blocks of all 45 districts in the state were inspected and discussions were held with the beneficiaries. From this study it was found that due to popular belief in pollution from biogas plants, there were obstacles in many places for construction and operation of such plants. With the objective to find the extent of pollution from such plants, animal dung in the same quantity was treated in compost pits and biogas plants and observations were made as to which give out more polluting gases to the atmosphere. The study indicated that compost pits emit 6.2 fold more polluting gases to the atmosphere. This indicates that there should be no bar on construction of biogas plants on the basis of pollution. (author). 9 refs., 5 tabs., 9 figs

  14. Mechanisms and biochemistry of methano genesis in biogas production

    Alternative energy sources should be developed to replace fast depleting fossil fuels. The global energy crisis has generated interest in the use of animal waste as a substitute for fossil fuel. The production of biogas which is a mixture of methane, carbon dioxide and traces of other gases, is a biogical process through which wastes are converted to fuels. Through this process, an energy resource that can be stored and used efficiently is produced and an excellent residue that retains the fertiliser value of the original waste is created. This article discusses the biochemistry involved in the production of biogas by anaerobic fermentation of organic waste materials and also the mechanisms of methano genesis involved

  15. Biogas production from Jatropha curcas press-cake

    Staubmann, R.; Guebitz, G.M.; Lafferty, R.M. [Graz Technical Univ. (Austria)] [and others

    1997-12-31

    Seeds of the tropical plant Jatropha curcas (purge nut, physic nut) are used for the production of oil. Several methods for oil extraction have been developed. In all processes, about 50% of the weight of the seeds remain as a press cake containing mainly protein and carbohydrates. Investigations have shown that this residue contains toxic compounds and cannot be used as animal feed without further processing. Preliminary experiments have shown that the residue is a good substrate for biogas production. Biogas formation was studied using a semicontinous upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor; a contact-process and an anaerobic filter each reactor having a total volume of 110 L. A maximum production rate of 3.5 m{sup 3} m{sup -3} d{sup -1} was obtained in the anaerobic filter with a loading rate of 13 kg COD m{sup -3} d{sup -1}. However, the UAS reactor and the contact-process were not suitable for using this substrate. When using an anaerobic filter with Jatropha curcas seed cake as a substrate, 76% of the COD was degraded and 1 kg degraded COD yielded 355 L of biogas containing 70% methane. 28 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Dynamic Biogas Upgrading for Integration of Renewable Energy from Wind, Biomass and Solar

    Jurgensen, Lars

    The Sabatier process is investigated as a storage scheme for renewable energy. Hydrogen derived from fluctuating renewable energy sources like wind and solar is converted to methane by the hydrogenation/methanation of carbon oxides. Biogas from anaerobic digestion is considered in this study as a...... a sustainable process for electricity storage and system integration in Northern Germany, i. e. the state of Schleswig-Holstein. A feasibility study was conducted to analyze the energy system in this region and the potential for this process. Process simulation tools were used to prove the product...... high concentrated source of carbon dioxide. By using the Sabatier process, the CO2 content of the biogas is converted to CH4, which is a new upgrading process for biogas. By switching between (i) this upgrading process during periods of extensive electricity production from wind and solar, and (ii...

  17. Utilization of Biodiesel By-Products for Biogas Production

    Nina Kolesárová; Miroslav Hutňan; Igor Bodík; Viera Špalková

    2011-01-01

    This contribution reviews the possibility of using the by-products from biodiesel production as substrates for anaerobic digestion and production of biogas. The process of biodiesel production is predominantly carried out by catalyzed transesterification. Besides desired methylesters, this reaction provides also few other products, including crude glycerol, oil-pressed cakes, and washing water. Crude glycerol or g-phase is heavier separate liquid phase, composed mainly by glycerol. A couple o...

  18. Thermochemical treatment of biogas digestate solids to produce organic fertilisers

    Pantelopoulos, Athanasios

    Anaerobic digestion of animal manures has been proposed as a process with twofold advantage. The production of biogas, a renewable source of energy, and the treatment of animal manures to increase their agronomic value and reduce their environmental impact. However, the residual of anaerobic dige...... with known manure stabilizing treatments i.e. composting. Finally, the energy cost associated with thermal drying of bio-wastes is expected to largely determine the degree implementation in different areas...

  19. Liquid membrane purification of biogas

    Majumdar, S.; Guha, A.K.; Lee, Y.T.; Papadopoulos, T.; Khare, S. (Stevens Inst. of Tech., Hoboken, NJ (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering)

    1991-03-01

    Conventional gas purification technologies are highly energy intensive. They are not suitable for economic removal of CO{sub 2} from methane obtained in biogas due to the small scale of gas production. Membrane separation techniques on the other hand are ideally suited for low gas production rate applications due to their modular nature. Although liquid membranes possess a high species permeability and selectivity, they have not been used for industrial applications due to the problems of membrane stability, membrane flooding and poor operational flexibility, etc. A new hollow-fiber-contained liquid membrane (HFCLM) technique has been developed recently. This technique overcomes the shortcomings of the traditional immobilized liquid membrane technology. A new technique uses two sets of hydrophobic, microporous hollow fine fibers, packed tightly in a permeator shell. The inter-fiber space is filled with an aqueous liquid acting as the membrane. The feed gas mixture is separated by selective permeation of a species through the liquid from one fiber set to the other. The second fiber set carries a sweep stream, gas or liquid, or simply the permeated gas stream. The objectives (which were met) of the present investigation were as follows. To study the selective removal of CO{sub 2} from a model biogas mixture containing 40% CO{sub 2} (the rest being N{sub 2} or CH{sub 4}) using a HFCLM permeator under various operating modes that include sweep gas, sweep liquid, vacuum and conventional permeation; to develop a mathematical model for each mode of operation; to build a large-scale purification loop and large-scale permeators for model biogas separation and to show stable performance over a period of one month.

  20. Biogas and mineral fertiliser production from plant residues of phytoremediation

    Chu, Thi Thu Ha

    2011-07-01

    The former uranium mining site in Ronneburg, Thuringia, Germany was known as a big source of uranium with more than 113,000 tons of uranium mined from 1946 to 1990. This area has been remediated since the nineties of the last century. However, nowadays the site in Ronneburg is still specially considered because of the heterogeneous contamination by many heavy metals and the vegetation can be affected. Three plant species including Indian mustard - Brassica juncea L., triticale - x. Triticosecale Wittmaek and sunflower - Helianthus annuus L. were seeded as accumulators of heavy metals and radionuclides in the phytoremediation process in 2009 and 2010 in Ronneburg. The subsequent utilization of the plant residues after phytoremediation is of special consideration. Batch fermentation of harvested plant materials under the mesophilic condition showed that all of the investigated plant materials had much higher biogas production than liquid cow manure except triticale root, of which biogas yield per volatile solid was not significantly higher than the one of sludge. The highest biogas yields (311 L{sub N}/kg FM and 807 L{sub N}/kg VS) were achieved from the spica of triticale after 42 days of retention of anaerobic digestion. Triticale shoot residues generated higher biogas and methane yields than the previously reported triticale materials that were harvested from the uncontaminated soil Triticale was considered as the highest potential species in biogas production, beside the best growth ability on the acidic soil at the test field site with highest biomass production. Biogas yield of Indian mustard shoot was also high but dramatically varied from 2009 to 2010. Digestates after anaerobic digestion of plant residues contained various macronutrients such as nitrogen, potassium, phosphorus and sulphur, and various micronutrients such as iron, manganes, zinc, etc. The accumulation levels of heavy metals in the investigated plant materials were not the hindrance factors