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Sample records for activator regulates myeloid-cell

  1. Tissue type plasminogen activator regulates myeloid-cell dependent neoangiogenesis during tissue regeneration

    Ohki, Makiko; Ohki, Yuichi; Ishihara, Makoto;

    2010-01-01

    Ischemia of the heart, brain, and limbs is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Treatment with tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA) can dissolve blood clots and can ameliorate the clinical outcome in ischemic diseases. But the underlying mechanism by which tPA improves ischemi...

  2. MerTK Is a Functional Regulator of Myelin Phagocytosis by Human Myeloid Cells.

    Healy, Luke M; Perron, Gabrielle; Won, So-Yoon; Michell-Robinson, Mackenzie A; Rezk, Ayman; Ludwin, Samuel K; Moore, Craig S; Hall, Jeffery A; Bar-Or, Amit; Antel, Jack P

    2016-04-15

    Multifocal inflammatory lesions featuring destruction of lipid-rich myelin are pathologic hallmarks of multiple sclerosis. Lesion activity is assessed by the extent and composition of myelin uptake by myeloid cells present in such lesions. In the inflamed CNS, myeloid cells are comprised of brain-resident microglia, an endogenous cell population, and monocyte-derived macrophages, which infiltrate from the systemic compartment. Using microglia isolated from the adult human brain, we demonstrate that myelin phagocytosis is dependent on the polarization state of the cells. Myelin ingestion is significantly enhanced in cells exposed to TGF-β compared with resting basal conditions and markedly reduced in classically activated polarized cells. Transcriptional analysis indicated that TGF-β-treated microglia closely resembled M0 cells. The tyrosine kinase phagocytic receptor MerTK was one of the most upregulated among a select number of differentially expressed genes in TGF-β-treated microglia. In contrast, MerTK and its known ligands, growth arrest-specific 6 and Protein S, were downregulated in classically activated cells. MerTK expression and myelin phagocytosis were higher in CNS-derived microglia than observed in monocyte-derived macrophages, both basally and under all tested polarization conditions. Specific MerTK inhibitors reduced myelin phagocytosis and the resultant anti-inflammatory biased cytokine responses for both cell types. Defining and modulating the mechanisms that regulate myelin phagocytosis has the potential to impact lesion and disease evolution in multiple sclerosis. Relevant effects would include enhancing myelin clearance, increasing anti-inflammatory molecule production by myeloid cells, and thereby permitting subsequent tissue repair. PMID:26962228

  3. M-CSF from Cancer Cells Induces Fatty Acid Synthase and PPARβ/δ Activation in Tumor Myeloid Cells, Leading to Tumor Progression

    Jonghanne Park

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate crosstalk between cancer cells and stromal myeloid cells. We find that Lewis lung carcinoma cells significantly induce PPARβ/δ activity in myeloid cells in vitro and in vivo. Myeloid cell-specific knockout of PPARβ/δ results in impaired growth of implanted tumors, and this is restored by adoptive transfer of wild-type myeloid cells. We find that IL-10 is a downstream effector of PPARβ/δ and facilitates tumor cell invasion and angiogenesis. This observation is supported by the finding that the CD11blowIL-10+ pro-tumoral myeloid cell is scarcely detected in tumors from myeloid-cell-specific PPARβ/δ knockout mice, where vessel densities are also decreased. Fatty acid synthase (FASN is shown to be an upstream regulator of PPARβ/δ in myeloid cells and is induced by M-CSF secreted from tumor cells. Our study gives insight into how cancer cells influence myeloid stromal cells to get a pro-tumoral phenotype.

  4. An acute myeloid leukemia gene, AML1, regulates hemopoietic myeloid cell differentiation and transcriptional activation antagonistically by two alternative spliced forms.

    T. Tanaka; Tanaka, K; Ogawa, S.; M. Kurokawa; Mitani, K; Nishida, J; Shibata, Y; Yazaki, Y.; Hirai, H

    1995-01-01

    The AML1 gene on chromosome 21 is disrupted in the (8;21)(q22;q22) and (3;21)(q26;q22) translocations associated with myelogenous leukemias and encodes a DNA binding protein. From the AML1 gene, two representative forms of proteins, AML1a and AML1b, are produced by alternative splicing. Both forms have a DNA binding domain but, unlike AML1b, AML1a lacks a putative transcriptional activation domain. Here we demonstrate that overexpressed AML1a totally suppresses granulocytic differentiation an...

  5. Myeloid cell-derived reactive oxygen species externally regulate the proliferation of myeloid progenitors in emergency granulopoiesis

    Kwak, Hyun-Jeong; Liu, Peng; Bajrami, Besnik; Xu, Yuanfu; Park, Shin-Young; Nombela-Arrieta, Cesar; Mondal, Subhanjan; Sun, Yan; Zhu, Haiyan; Chai, Li; Silberstein, Leslie E.; Cheng, Tao; Luo, Hongbo R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The cellular mechanisms controlling infection-induced emergency granulopoiesis are poorly defined. Here we found that reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations in the bone marrow (BM) were elevated during acute infection in a phagocytic NADPH oxidase-dependent manner in myeloid cells. Gr1+ myeloid cells were uniformly distributed in the BM, and all c-Kit+ progenitor cells were adjacent to Gr1+ myeloid cells. Inflammation-induced ROS production in the BM played a critical role in myeloid progenitor expansion during emergency granulopoiesis. ROS elicited oxidation and deactivation of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), resulting in up-regulation of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 signaling in BM myeloid progenitors. We further revealed that BM myeloid cell-produced ROS stimulated proliferation of myeloid progenitors via a paracrine mechanism. Taken together, our results establish that phagocytic NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS production by BM myeloid cells plays a critical role in mediating emergency granulopoiesis during acute infection. PMID:25579427

  6. CD45 Phosphatase Inhibits STAT3 Transcription Factor Activity in Myeloid Cells and Promotes Tumor-Associated Macrophage Differentiation.

    Kumar, Vinit; Cheng, Pingyan; Condamine, Thomas; Mony, Sridevi; Languino, Lucia R; McCaffrey, Judith C; Hockstein, Neil; Guarino, Michael; Masters, Gregory; Penman, Emily; Denstman, Fred; Xu, Xiaowei; Altieri, Dario C; Du, Hong; Yan, Cong; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2016-02-16

    Recruitment of monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and differentiation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are the major factors contributing to tumor progression and metastasis. We demonstrated that differentiation of TAMs in tumor site from monocytic precursors was controlled by downregulation of the activity of the transcription factor STAT3. Decreased STAT3 activity was caused by hypoxia and affected all myeloid cells but was not observed in tumor cells. Upregulation of CD45 tyrosine phosphatase activity in MDSCs exposed to hypoxia in tumor site was responsible for downregulation of STAT3. This effect was mediated by the disruption of CD45 protein dimerization regulated by sialic acid. Thus, STAT3 has a unique function in the tumor environment in controlling the differentiation of MDSC into TAM, and its regulatory pathway could be a potential target for therapy. PMID:26885857

  7. Activated factor X signaling via protease-activated receptor 2 suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokine production from LPS-stimulated myeloid cells.

    Gleeson, Eimear M

    2013-07-19

    -associated protein-sensitive, protease-activated receptor 2-dependent regulator of myeloid cell pro-inflammatory cytokine production.

  8. C-C Chemokine Receptor 2 (CCR2) Regulates the Hepatic Recruitment of Myeloid Cells That Promote Obesity-Induced Hepatic Steatosis

    Obstfeld, Amrom E.; Sugaru, Eiji; Thearle, Marie; Francisco, Anne-Marie; Gayet, Constance; Ginsberg, Henry N; Ables, Eleanore V.; Ferrante, Anthony W.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Obesity induces a program of systemic inflammation that is implicated in the development of many of its clinical sequelae. Hepatic inflammation is a feature of obesity-induced liver disease, and our previous studies demonstrated reduced hepatic steatosis in obese mice deficient in the C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) that regulates myeloid cell recruitment. This suggests that a myeloid cell population is recruited to the liver in obesity and contributes to nonalcoholic fatty liver di...

  9. Ultraviolet Light B-Mediated Inhibition of Skin Catalase Activity Promotes Gr-1+CD11b+ Myeloid Cell Expansion

    Sullivan, Nicholas J.; Tober, Kathleen L.; Burns, Erin M.; Schick, Jonathan S.; Riggenbach, Judith A.; Mace, Thomas A.; Bill, Matthew A.; Gregory S. Young; Oberyszyn, Tatiana M.; Lesinski, Gregory B.

    2011-01-01

    Skin cancer incidence and mortality are higher in men compared to women, but the causes of this sex discrepancy remain largely unknown. Ultraviolet light exposure induces cutaneous inflammation and neutralizes cutaneous antioxidants. Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid cells are heterogeneous bone marrow-derived cells that promote inflammation-associated carcinogenesis. Reduced activity of catalase, an antioxidant present within skin, has been associated with skin carcinogenesis. We utilized the outbred, imm...

  10. Myeloid cell-derived reactive oxygen species externally regulate the proliferation of myeloid progenitors in emergency granulopoiesis

    Kwak, Hyun-Jeong; Liu, Peng; Bajrami, Besnik; Xu, Yuanfu; Park, Shin-Young; Nombela-Arrieta, Cesar; Mondal, Subhanjan; Sun, Yan; Zhu, Haiyan; Chai, Li; Silberstein, Leslie E.; Cheng, Tao; Luo, Hongbo R.

    2015-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms controlling infection-induced emergency granulopoiesis are poorly defined. Here we found that reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations in the bone marrow (BM) were elevated during acute infection in a phagocytic NADPH oxidase-dependent manner in myeloid cells. Gr1+ myeloid cells were uniformly distributed in the BM, and all c-Kit+ progenitor cells were adjacent to Gr1+ myeloid cells. Inflammation-induced ROS production in the BM played a critical role in myeloid pr...

  11. Altered gp130 signalling ameliorates experimental colitis via myeloid cell-specific STAT3 activation and myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    Däbritz, Jan; Judd, Louise M; Chalinor, Heather V; Menheniott, Trevelyan R; Giraud, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    STAT3 regulates the expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) during inflammation, infection and cancer. Hyperactivation of STAT3 in gp130(757F/F) mice is associated with protection from experimental colitis. This study determined mechanisms for this protection and compared this to mice with myeloid-specific STAT3-deficiency (LysMcre/STAT3(flox); gp130(757F/F) LysMcre/STAT3(flox)). Acute and chronic colitis was induced and colons were removed for histological, mRNA and protein analysis. Cell populations from spleen, mesenteric lymph node and colon were analyzed for different myeloid cell populations using flow cytometry. Functions of MDSCs and LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages were further characterized by in vitro and in vivo assays. Here we show that the resistance to experimental colitis in gp130(757F/F) mice is via myeloid-cell specific STAT3 activation, MDSC expansion and increased production of suppressive and protective cytokines. PMID:26848037

  12. Human tumor-released microvesicles promote the differentiation of myeloid cells with transforming growth factor-beta-mediated suppressive activity on T lymphocytes.

    Valenti, Roberta; Huber, Veronica; Filipazzi, Paola; Pilla, Lorenzo; Sovena, Gloria; Villa, Antonello; Corbelli, Alessandro; Fais, Stefano; Parmiani, Giorgio; Rivoltini, Licia

    2006-09-15

    Human tumors constitutively release endosome-derived microvesicles, transporting a broad array of biologically active molecules with potential modulatory effects on different immune cells. Here, we report the first evidence that tumor-released microvesicles alter myeloid cell function by impairing monocyte differentiation into dendritic cells and promoting the generation of a myeloid immunosuppressive cell subset. CD14+ monocytes isolated from healthy donors and differentiated with interleukin (IL)-4 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the presence of tumor-derived microvesicles turned into HLA-DR(-/low) cells, retaining CD14 expression and failing to up-regulate costimulatory molecules, such as CD80 and CD86. These phenotypic changes were paralleled by a significant release of different cytokines, including IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), and a dose-dependent suppressive activity on activated T-cell-proliferation and cytolytic functions, which could be reversed by anti-TGF-beta-neutralizing antibodies. Microvesicles isolated from plasma of advanced melanoma patients, but not from healthy donors, mediated comparable effects on CD14+ monocytes, skewing their differentiation toward CD14+HLA-DR-/low cells with TGF-beta-mediated suppressive activity on T-cell-functions. Interestingly, a subset of TGF-beta-secreting CD14+HLA-DR- cells mediating suppressive activity on T lymphocytes was found to be significantly expanded in peripheral blood of melanoma patients compared with healthy donors. These data suggest the development in cancer patients of an immunosuppressive circuit by which tumors promote the generation of suppressive myeloid cells through the release of circulating microvesicles and without the need for cell-to-cell contact. Therapeutic interventions on the crucial steps of this pathway may contribute to restore tumor/immune system interactions favoring T-cell-mediated control of tumor

  13. Distinct regulation of c-myb gene expression by HoxA9, Meis1 and Pbx proteins in normal hematopoietic progenitors and transformed myeloid cells

    The proto-oncogenic protein c-Myb is an essential regulator of hematopoiesis and is frequently deregulated in hematological diseases such as lymphoma and leukemia. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying the aberrant expression of c-Myb in myeloid leukemia, we analyzed and compared c-myb gene transcriptional regulation using two cell lines modeling normal hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) and transformed myelomonocytic blasts. We report that the transcription factors HoxA9, Meis1, Pbx1 and Pbx2 bind in vivo to the c-myb locus and maintain its expression through different mechanisms in HPCs and leukemic cells. Our analysis also points to a critical role for Pbx2 in deregulating c-myb expression in murine myeloid cells cotransformed by the cooperative activity of HoxA9 and Meis1. This effect is associated with an intronic positioning of epigenetic marks and RNA polymerase II binding in the orthologous region of a previously described alternative promoter for c-myb. Taken together, our results could provide a first hint to explain the abnormal expression of c-myb in leukemic cells

  14. Epigenetic silencing of retinoblastoma gene regulates pathologic differentiation of myeloid cells in cancer

    Youn, Je-in; Kumar, Vinit; Collazo, Michelle; Nefedova, Yulia; Condamine, Thomas; Cheng, Pingyan; Villagra, Alejandro; Antonia, Scott; McCaffrey, Judith C.; Fishman, Mayer; Sarnaik, Amod; Horna, Pedro; Sotomayor, Eduardo; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2013-01-01

    Two major populations of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), monocytic MDSC (M-MDSC) and polymorphonuclear MDSC (PMN-MDSC) regulate immune responses in cancer and other pathologic conditions. Under physiologic conditions, Ly6ChiLy6G− inflammatory monocytes, which are the normal counterpart of M-MDSC, differentiate into macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). PMN-MDSC is the predominant group of MDSC that accumulates in cancer. Here we show that a large proportion of M-MDSC in tumor-bearin...

  15. The role of myeloid cells in the promotion of tumour angiogenesis.

    Murdoch, Craig; Muthana, Munitta; Coffelt, Seth B; Lewis, Claire E

    2008-08-01

    The use of various transgenic mouse models and analysis of human tumour biopsies has shown that bone marrow-derived myeloid cells, such as macrophages, neutrophils, eosinophils, mast cells and dendritic cells, have an important role in regulating the formation and maintenance of blood vessels in tumours. In this Review the evidence for each of these cell types driving tumour angiogenesis is outlined, along with the mechanisms regulating their recruitment and activation by the tumour microenvironment. We also discuss the therapeutic implications of recent findings that specific myeloid cell populations modulate the responses of tumours to agents such as chemotherapy and some anti-angiogenic therapies. PMID:18633355

  16. Elusive identities and overlapping phenotypes of proangiogenic myeloid cells in tumors.

    Coffelt, Seth B; Lewis, Claire E; Naldini, Luigi; Brown, J Martin; Ferrara, Napoleone; De Palma, Michele

    2010-04-01

    It is now established that bone marrow-derived myeloid cells regulate tumor angiogenesis. This was originally inferred from studies of human tumor biopsies in which a positive correlation was seen between the number of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, such as macrophages and neutrophils, and tumor microvessel density. However, unequivocal evidence was only provided once mouse models were used to examine the effects on tumor angiogenesis by genetically or pharmacologically targeting myeloid cells. Since then, identifying the exact myeloid cell types involved in this process has proved challenging because of myeloid cell heterogeneity and the expression of overlapping phenotypic markers in tumors. As a result, investigators often simply refer to them now as "bone marrow-derived myeloid cells." Here we review the findings of various attempts to phenotype the myeloid cells involved and discuss the therapeutic implications of correctly identifying-and thus being able to target-this proangiogenic force in tumors. PMID:20167863

  17. Heterozygous inactivation of the Nf1 gene in myeloid cells enhances neointima formation via a rosuvastatin-sensitive cellular pathway.

    Stansfield, Brian K; Bessler, Waylan K; Mali, Raghuveer; Mund, Julie A; Downing, Brandon; Li, Fang; Sarchet, Kara N; DiStasi, Matthew R; Conway, Simon J; Kapur, Reuben; Ingram, David A

    2013-03-01

    Mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene cause Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Neurofibromin, the protein product of NF1, functions as a negative regulator of Ras activity. Some NF1 patients develop cardiovascular disease, which represents an underrecognized disease complication and contributes to excess morbidity and mortality. Specifically, NF1 patients develop arterial occlusion resulting in tissue ischemia and sudden death. Murine studies demonstrate that heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 (Nf1(+/-)) in bone marrow cells enhances neointima formation following arterial injury. Macrophages infiltrate Nf1(+/-) neointimas, and NF1 patients have increased circulating inflammatory monocytes in their peripheral blood. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 in myeloid cells is sufficient for neointima formation. Specific ablation of a single copy of the Nf1 gene in myeloid cells alone mobilizes a discrete pro-inflammatory murine monocyte population via a cell autonomous and gene-dosage dependent mechanism. Furthermore, lineage-restricted heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 in myeloid cells is sufficient to reproduce the enhanced neointima formation observed in Nf1(+/-) mice when compared with wild-type controls, and homozygous inactivation of Nf1 in myeloid cells amplified the degree of arterial stenosis after arterial injury. Treatment of Nf1(+/-) mice with rosuvastatin, a stain with anti-inflammatory properties, significantly reduced neointima formation when compared with control. These studies identify neurofibromin-deficient myeloid cells as critical cellular effectors of Nf1(+/-) neointima formation and propose a potential therapeutic for NF1 cardiovascular disease. PMID:23197650

  18. A phosphatase activity present in peripheral blood myeloid cells of chronic myelogenous leukemia patients but not normal individuals alters nuclear protein binding to transcriptional enhancers of interferon-inducible genes.

    Seong, D C; Sims, S.; Johnson, E.; Howard, O M; Reiter, B; Hester, J; Talpaz, M; Kantarjian, H; Deisseroth, A

    1990-01-01

    Cytoplasmic protein from peripheral blood myeloid cells of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients altered the electrophoretic mobility of complexes formed between nuclear proteins and interferon-inducible transcriptional enhancers. Immature myeloid marrow cells (blasts and promyelocytes) have a higher level of this activity than do mature myeloid marrow cells (bands and polys). This activity, which is not detectable in the peripheral blood cells of normal individuals, is at least 50-fold...

  19. Inhibition of Myeloid Cell Leukemia 1 and Activation of Caspases Are Critically Involved in Gallotannin-induced Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Park, Eunkyung; Kwon, Hee Young; Jung, Ji Hoon; Jung, Deok-Beom; Jeong, Arong; Cheon, Jinhong; Kim, Bonglee; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2015-08-01

    Although gallotannin contained in several medicinal plants was known to have multi-biological activities, such as antioxidant, antiinflammatory, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, and antitumor effects, the underlying apoptotic mechanism of gallotannin is not fully understood so far. Thus, in the present study, the apoptotic mechanism of gallotannin was elucidated in DU145, PC-3, and M2182 prostate cancer cells in association with myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1) signaling. Gallotannin exerted dose-dependent cytotoxicity in DU145, PC-3, and M2182 prostate cancer cells. Also, gallotannin showed apoptotic morphological features and increased the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling positive cells and sub-G1 accumulation in three prostate cancer cell lines. Consistently, gallotannin cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and attenuated the expression of procaspases 9 and 3 in three prostate cancer cell lines. Furthermore, gallotannin attenuated the expression of survival genes such as Mcl-1, B-cell lymphoma 2, and B-cell lymphoma 2 extra large in three prostate cancer cell lines. Interestingly, overexpression of Mcl-1 reversed the ability of gallotannin to cleave PARP and increase sub-G1 population in three prostate cancer cell lines. Conversely, silencing of Mcl-1 enhanced apoptosis by gallotannin in three prostate cancer cell lines by FACSCalibur (Becton Dickinson, Franklin Lakes, NJ, USA). Taken together, our findings demonstrate that inhibition of Mcl-1 and activation of caspases are critically involved in gallotannin-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. PMID:26014377

  20. The role of myeloid cells in cancer therapies.

    Engblom, Camilla; Pfirschke, Christina; Pittet, Mikael J

    2016-07-01

    Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the ability to durably control cancer in some patients by manipulating T lymphocytes. These immunotherapies are revolutionizing cancer treatment but benefit only a minority of patients. It is thus a crucial time for clinicians, cancer scientists and immunologists to determine the next steps in shifting cancer treatment towards better cancer control. This Review describes recent advances in our understanding of tumour-associated myeloid cells. These cells remain less studied than T lymphocytes but have attracted particular attention because their presence in tumours is often linked to altered patient survival. Also, experimental studies indicate that myeloid cells modulate key cancer-associated activities, including immune evasion, and affect virtually all types of cancer therapy. Consequently, targeting myeloid cells could overcome limitations of current treatment options. PMID:27339708

  1. Neurofibromin Deficient Myeloid Cells are Critical Mediators of Aneurysm Formation In Vivo

    Li, Fang; Downing, Brandon D.; Smiley, Lucy C.; Mund, Julie A.; DiStasi, Matthew R.; Bessler, Waylan K.; Sarchet, Kara N.; Hinds, Daniel M.; Kamendulis, Lisa M.; Hingtgen, Cynthia M.; Case, Jamie; Clapp, D. Wade; Conway, Simon J.; Stansfield, Brian K.; Ingram, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) is a genetic disorder resulting from mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene. Neurofibromin, the protein product of NF1, functions as a negative regulator of Ras activity in circulating hematopoietic and vascular wall cells, which are critical for maintaining vessel wall homeostasis. NF1 patients have evidence of chronic inflammation resulting in development of premature cardiovascular disease, including arterial aneurysms, which may manifest as sudden death. However, the molecular pathogenesis of NF1 aneurysm formation is unknown. Method and Results Utilizing an angiotensin II-induced aneurysm model, we demonstrate that heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 (Nf1+/−) enhanced aneurysm formation with myeloid cell infiltration and increased oxidative stress in the vessel wall. Using lineage-restricted transgenic mice, we show loss of a single Nf1 allele in myeloid cells is sufficient to recapitulate the Nf1+/− aneurysm phenotype in vivo. Finally, oral administration of simvastatin or the antioxidant apocynin, reduced aneurysm formation in Nf1+/− mice. Conclusion These data provide genetic and pharmacologic evidence that Nf1+/− myeloid cells are the cellular triggers for aneurysm formation in a novel model of NF1 vasculopathy and provide a potential therapeutic target. PMID:24370551

  2. Bone marrow derived myeloid cells orchestrate antiangiogenic resistance in glioblastoma through coordinated molecular networks.

    Achyut, B R; Shankar, Adarsh; Iskander, A S M; Ara, Roxan; Angara, Kartik; Zeng, Peng; Knight, Robert A; Scicli, Alfonso G; Arbab, Ali S

    2015-12-28

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a hypervascular and malignant form of brain tumors. Anti-angiogenic therapies (AAT) were used as an adjuvant against VEGF-VEGFR pathway to normalize blood vessels in clinical and preclinical studies, which resulted into marked hypoxia and recruited bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) to the tumor microenvironment (TME). In vivo animal models to track BMDCs and investigate molecular mechanisms in AAT resistance are rare. We exploited recently established chimeric mouse to develop orthotopic U251 tumor, which uses as low as 5 × 10(6) GFP+ BM cells in athymic nude mice and engrafted >70% GFP+ cells within 14 days. Our unpublished data and published studies have indicated the involvement of immunosuppressive myeloid cells in therapeutic resistance in glioma. Similarly, in the present study, vatalanib significantly increased CD68+ myeloid cells, and CD133+, CD34+ and Tie2+ endothelial cell signatures. Therefore, we tested inhibition of CSF1R+ myeloid cells using GW2580 that reduced tumor growth by decreasing myeloid (Gr1+ CD11b+ and F4/80+) and angiogenic (CD202b+ and VEGFR2+) cell signatures in TME. CSF1R blockade significantly decreased inflammatory, proangiogenic and immunosuppressive molecular signatures compared to vehicle, vatalanib or combination. TCK1 or CXCL7, a potent chemoattractant and activator of neutrophils, was observed as most significantly decreased cytokine in CSF1R blockade. ERK MAPK pathway was involved in cytokine network regulation. In conclusion, present study confirmed the contribution of myeloid cells in GBM development and therapeutic resistance using chimeric mouse model. We identified novel molecular networks including CXCL7 chemokine as a promising target for future studies. Nonetheless, survival studies are required to assess the beneficial effect of CSF1R blockade. PMID:26404753

  3. Saturated Fatty Acids Engage an IRE1α-Dependent Pathway to Activate the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Myeloid Cells

    Megan M. Robblee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diets rich in saturated fatty acids (SFAs produce a form of tissue inflammation driven by “metabolically activated” macrophages. We show that SFAs, when in excess, induce a unique transcriptional signature in both mouse and human macrophages that is enriched by a subset of ER stress markers, particularly IRE1α and many adaptive downstream target genes. SFAs also activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages, resulting in IL-1β secretion. We found that IRE1α mediates SFA-induced IL-1β secretion by macrophages and that its activation by SFAs does not rely on unfolded protein sensing. We show instead that the ability of SFAs to stimulate either IRE1α activation or IL-1β secretion can be specifically reduced by preventing their flux into phosphatidylcholine (PC or by increasing unsaturated PC levels. Thus, IRE1α is an unrecognized intracellular PC sensor critical to the process by which SFAs stimulate macrophages to secrete IL-1β, a driver of diet-induced tissue inflammation.

  4. Dectin-2 Recognizes Mannosylated O-antigens of Human Opportunistic Pathogens and Augments Lipopolysaccharide Activation of Myeloid Cells.

    Wittmann, Alexandra; Lamprinaki, Dimitra; Bowles, Kristian M; Katzenellenbogen, Ewa; Knirel, Yuriy A; Whitfield, Chris; Nishimura, Takashi; Matsumoto, Naoki; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Saijo, Shinobu; Kawasaki, Norihito

    2016-08-19

    LPS consists of a relatively conserved region of lipid A and core oligosaccharide and a highly variable region of O-antigen polysaccharide. Whereas lipid A is known to bind to the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD2) complex, the role of the O-antigen remains unclear. Here we report a novel molecular interaction between dendritic cell-associated C-type lectin-2 (Dectin-2) and mannosylated O-antigen found in a human opportunistic pathogen, Hafnia alvei PCM 1223, which has a repeating unit of [-Man-α1,3-Man-α1,2-Man-α1,2-Man-α1,2-Man-α1,3-]. H. alvei LPS induced higher levels of TNFα and IL-10 from mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs), when compared with Salmonella enterica O66 LPS, which has a repeat of [-Gal-α1,6-Gal-α1,4-[Glc-β1,3]GalNAc-α1,3-GalNAc-β1,3-]. In a cell-based reporter assay, Dectin-2 was shown to recognize H. alvei LPS. This binding was inhibited by mannosidase treatment of H. alvei LPS and by mutations in the carbohydrate-binding domain of Dectin-2, demonstrating that H. alvei LPS is a novel glycan ligand of Dectin-2. The enhanced cytokine production by H. alvei LPS was Dectin-2-dependent, because Dectin-2 knock-out BM-DCs failed to do so. This receptor cross-talk between Dectin-2 and TLR4 involved events including spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) activation and receptor juxtaposition. Furthermore, another mannosylated LPS from Escherichia coli O9a also bound to Dectin-2 and augmented TLR4 activation of BM-DCs. Taken together, these data indicate that mannosylated O-antigens from several Gram-negative bacteria augment TLR4 responses through interaction with Dectin-2. PMID:27358401

  5. HIF-α/MIF and NF-κB/IL-6 axes contribute to the recruitment of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells in hypoxic microenvironment of HNSCC.

    Zhu, Guiquan; Tang, Yaling; Geng, Ning; Zheng, Min; Jiang, Jian; Li, Ling; Li, Kaide; Lei, Zhengge; Chen, Wei; Fan, Yunlong; Ma, Xiangrui; Li, Longjiang; Wang, Xiaoyi; Liang, Xinhua

    2014-02-01

    CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells have gained much attention due to their roles in tumor immunity suppression as well as promotion of angiogenesis, invasion, and metastases. However, the mechanisms by which CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells recruit to the tumor site have not been well clarified. In the present study, we showed that hypoxia could stimulate the migration of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells through increased production of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) by head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α)- and HIF-2α-dependent MIF regulated chemotaxis, differentiation, and pro-angiogenic function of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells through binding to CD74/CXCR2, and CD74/CXCR4 complexes, and then activating p38/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K)/AKT signaling pathways. Knockdown (KD) of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in HNSCC cells decreased MIF level but failed to inhibit the CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cell migration, because HIF-1α/2α KD enhanced nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activity that increased IL-6 secretion. Simultaneously blocking NF-κB and HIF-1α/HIF-2α had better inhibitory effect on CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cell recruitment in the hypoxic zone than individually silencing HIF-1α/2α or NF-κB. In conclusion, the interaction between HIF-α/MIF and NF-κB/IL-6 axes plays an important role in the hypoxia-induced accumulation of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells and tumor growth in HNSCC. PMID:24709424

  6. HIF-α/MIF and NF-κB/IL-6 Axes Contribute to the Recruitment of CD11b+Gr-1+ Myeloid Cells in Hypoxic Microenvironment of HNSCC

    Guiquan Zhu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells have gained much attention due to their roles in tumor immunity suppression as well as promotion of angiogenesis, invasion, and metastases. However, the mechanisms by which CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells recruit to the tumor site have not been well clarified. In the present study, we showed that hypoxia could stimulate the migration of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells through increased production of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF and interleukin-6 (IL-6 by head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC cells. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α- and HIF-2α-dependent MIF regulated chemotaxis, differentiation, and pro-angiogenic function of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells through binding to CD74/CXCR2, and CD74/CXCR4 complexes, and then activating p38/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. Knockdown (KD of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in HNSCC cells decreased MIF level but failed to inhibit the CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cell migration, because HIF-1α/2α KD enhanced nuclear factor κB (NF-κB activity that increased IL-6 secretion. Simultaneously blocking NF-κB and HIF-1α/HIF-2α had better inhibitory effect on CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cell recruitment in the hypoxic zone than individually silencing HIF-1α/2α or NF-κB. In conclusion, the interaction between HIF-α/MIF and NF-κB/IL-6 axes plays an important role in the hypoxia-induced accumulation of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells and tumor growth in HNSCC.

  7. Elusive Identities and Overlapping Phenotypes of Proangiogenic Myeloid Cells in Tumors

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Lewis, Claire E.; Naldini, Luigi; Brown, J. Martin; Ferrara, Napoleone; De Palma, Michele

    2010-01-01

    It is now established that bone marrow-derived myeloid cells regulate tumor angiogenesis. This was originally inferred from studies of human tumor biopsies in which a positive correlation was seen between the number of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, such as macrophages and neutrophils, and tumor microvessel density. However, unequivocal evidence was only provided once mouse models were used to examine the effects on tumor angiogenesis by genetically or pharmacologically targeting myeloid c...

  8. Lumbar Myeloid Cell Trafficking into Locomotor Networks after Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury.

    Hansen, Christopher N; Norden, Diana M; Faw, Timothy D; Deibert, Rochelle; Wohleb, Eric S; Sheridan, John F; Godbout, Jonathan P; Basso, D Michele

    2016-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) promotes inflammation along the neuroaxis that jeopardizes plasticity, intrinsic repair and recovery. While inflammation at the injury site is well-established, less is known within remote spinal networks. The presence of bone marrow-derived immune (myeloid) cells in these areas may further impede functional recovery. Previously, high levels of the gelatinase, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) occurred within the lumbar enlargement after thoracic SCI and impeded activity-dependent recovery. Since SCI-induced MMP-9 potentially increases vascular permeability, myeloid cell infiltration may drive inflammatory toxicity in locomotor networks. Therefore, we examined neurovascular reactivity and myeloid cell infiltration in the lumbar cord after thoracic SCI. We show evidence of region-specific recruitment of myeloid cells into the lumbar but not cervical region. Myeloid infiltration occurred with concomitant increases in chemoattractants (CCL2) and cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1) around lumbar vasculature 24h and 7days post injury. Bone marrow GFP chimeric mice established robust infiltration of bone marrow-derived myeloid cells into the lumbar gray matter 24h after SCI. This cell infiltration occurred when the blood-spinal cord barrier was intact, suggesting active recruitment across the endothelium. Myeloid cells persisted as ramified macrophages at 7days post injury in parallel with increased inhibitory GAD67 labeling. Importantly, macrophage infiltration required MMP-9. PMID:27191729

  9. TLR-2/TLR-4 TREM-1 signaling pathway is dispensable in inflammatory myeloid cells during sterile kidney injury.

    Gabriela Campanholle

    Full Text Available Inflammatory macrophages are abundant in kidney disease, stimulating repair, or driving chronic inflammation and fibrosis. Damage associated molecules (DAMPs, released from injured cells engage pattern recognition receptors (PRRs on macrophages, contributing to activation. Understanding mechanisms of macrophage activation during kidney injury may lead to strategies to alleviate chronic disease. We identified Triggering-Receptor-in-Myeloid-cells (TREM-1, a regulator of TLR signaling, as highly upregulated in kidney inflammatory macrophages and tested the roles of these receptors in macrophage activation and kidney disease. Kidney DAMPs activated macrophages in vitro, independently of TREM-1, but partially dependent on TLR-2/-4, MyD88. In two models of progressive interstitial kidney disease, TREM-1 blockade had no impact on disease or macrophage activation in vivo, but TLR-2/-4, or MyD88 deficiency was anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic. When MyD88 was mutated only in the myeloid lineage, however, there was no bearing on macrophage activation or disease progression. Instead, TLR-2/-4 or MyD88 deficiency reduced activation of mesenchyme lineage cells resulting in reduced inflammation and fibrosis, indicating that these pathways play dominant roles in activation of myofibroblasts but not macrophages. To conclude, TREM-1, TLR2/4 and MyD88 signaling pathways are redundant in myeloid cell activation in kidney injury, but the latter appear to regulate activation of mesenchymal cells.

  10. Laquinimod dampens hyperactive cytokine production in Huntington's disease patient myeloid cells.

    Dobson, Lucianne; Träger, Ulrike; Farmer, Ruth; Hayardeny, Liat; Loupe, Pippa; Hayden, Michael R; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2016-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative condition characterized by pathology in the brain and peripheral tissues. Hyperactivity of the innate immune system, due in part to NFκB pathway dysregulation, is an early and active component of HD. Evidence suggests targeting immune disruption may slow disease progression. Laquinimod is an orally active immunomodulator that down-regulates proinflammatory cytokine production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in the brain down-regulates astrocytic and microglial activation by modulating NFκB signalling. Laquinimod had beneficial effects on inflammation, brain atrophy and disease progression in multiple sclerosis (MS) in two phase III clinical trials. This study investigated the effects of laquinimod on hyperactive proinflammatory cytokine release and NFκB signalling in HD patient myeloid cell cultures. Monocytes from manifest (manHD) and pre-manifest (preHD) HD gene carriers and healthy volunteers (HV) were treated with laquinimod and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. After 24 h pre-treatment with 5 μM laquinimod, manHD monocytes released lower levels of IL-1β, IL-5, IL-8, IL-10, IL-13 and TNFα in response to stimulation. PreHD monocytes released lower levels of IL-8, IL-10 and IL-13, with no reduction observed in HV monocytes. The effects of laquinimod on dysfunctional NFκB signalling in HD was assessed by inhibitor of kappa B (IκB) degradation kinetics, nuclear translocation of NFκB and interactions between IκB kinase (IKK) and HTT, in HD myeloid cells. No differences were observed between laquinimod-treated and untreated conditions. These results provide evidence that laquinimod dampens hyper-reactive cytokine release from manHD and preHD monocytes, with a much reduced effect on HV monocytes. Evidence suggests targeting CNS and peripheral immune disruption may slow Huntington's disease (HD) neurodegenerative processes. The effects of laquinimod, an orally active immunomodulator, on

  11. DACH1 regulates cell cycle progression of myeloid cells through the control of cyclin D, Cdk 4/6 and p21Cip1

    Highlights: ► DACH1 increases cyclin D, F and Cdk 1, 4, 6 in mouse myeloid progenitor cells. ► The knockdown of DACH1 blocked the cell cycle progression of HL-60 cells. ► The novel effect of DACH1 related with cell cycle regulation and leukemogenesis. -- Abstract: The cell-fate determination factor Dachshund, a component of the Retinal Determination Gene Network (RDGN), has a role in breast tumor proliferation through the repression of cyclin D1 and several key regulators of embryonic stem cell function, such as Nanog and Sox2. However, little is known about the role of DACH1 in a myeloid lineage as a cell cycle regulator. Here, we identified the differential expression levels of extensive cell cycle regulators controlled by DACH1 in myeloid progenitor cells. The forced expression of DACH1 induced p27Kip1 and repressed p21Cip1, which is a pivotal characteristic of the myeloid progenitor. Furthermore, DACH1 significantly increased the expression of cyclin D1, D3, F, and Cdk 1, 4, and 6 in myeloid progenitor cells. The knockdown of DACH1 blocked the cell cycle progression of HL-60 promyeloblastic cells through the decrease of cyclin D1, D3, F, and Cdk 1, 4, and 6 and increase in p21Cip1, which in turn decreased the phosphorylation of the Rb protein. The expression of Sox2, Oct4, and Klf4 was significantly up-regulated by the forced expression of DACH1 in mouse myeloid progenitor cells.

  12. DACH1 regulates cell cycle progression of myeloid cells through the control of cyclin D, Cdk 4/6 and p21{sup Cip1}

    Lee, Jae-Woong; Kim, Hyeng-Soo; Kim, Seonggon; Hwang, Junmo; Kim, Young Hun; Lim, Ga Young [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Wern-Joo [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, IHBR, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-412 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Suk-Ran [Cell Therapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Young [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, IHBR, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-412 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Tae Sung [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, 1 Hoegi-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-702 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kwon Moo [Department of Anatomy, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Ryoo, Zae Young [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sanggyu, E-mail: slee@knu.ac.kr [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DACH1 increases cyclin D, F and Cdk 1, 4, 6 in mouse myeloid progenitor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The knockdown of DACH1 blocked the cell cycle progression of HL-60 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The novel effect of DACH1 related with cell cycle regulation and leukemogenesis. -- Abstract: The cell-fate determination factor Dachshund, a component of the Retinal Determination Gene Network (RDGN), has a role in breast tumor proliferation through the repression of cyclin D1 and several key regulators of embryonic stem cell function, such as Nanog and Sox2. However, little is known about the role of DACH1 in a myeloid lineage as a cell cycle regulator. Here, we identified the differential expression levels of extensive cell cycle regulators controlled by DACH1 in myeloid progenitor cells. The forced expression of DACH1 induced p27{sup Kip1} and repressed p21{sup Cip1}, which is a pivotal characteristic of the myeloid progenitor. Furthermore, DACH1 significantly increased the expression of cyclin D1, D3, F, and Cdk 1, 4, and 6 in myeloid progenitor cells. The knockdown of DACH1 blocked the cell cycle progression of HL-60 promyeloblastic cells through the decrease of cyclin D1, D3, F, and Cdk 1, 4, and 6 and increase in p21{sup Cip1}, which in turn decreased the phosphorylation of the Rb protein. The expression of Sox2, Oct4, and Klf4 was significantly up-regulated by the forced expression of DACH1 in mouse myeloid progenitor cells.

  13. Tasquinimod modulates tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells and improves the antitumor immune response to PD-L1 blockade in bladder cancer

    Nakhlé, Jessica; Pierron, Valérie; Bauchet, Anne-Laure; Plas, Pascale; Thiongane, Amath; Meyer-Losic, Florence; Schmidlin, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The infiltration of myeloid cells helps tumors to overcome immune surveillance and imparts resistance to cancer immunotherapy. Thus, strategies to modulate the effects of these immune cells may offer a potential therapeutic benefit. We report here that tasquinimod, a novel immunotherapy which targets S100A9 signaling, reduces the immunosuppressive properties of myeloid cells in preclinical models of bladder cancer (BCa). As single anticancer agent, tasquinimod treatment was effective in preventing early stage tumor growth, but did not achieve a clear antitumor effect in advanced tumors. Investigations of this response revealed that tasquinimod induces an increase in the expression of a negative regulator of T cell activation, Programmed-death-ligand 1 (PD-L1). This markedly weakens its antitumor immunity, yet provokes an “inflamed” milieu rendering tumors more prone to T cell-mediated immune attack by PD-L1 blockade. Interestingly, the combination of tasquinimod with an Anti-PD-L1 antibody enhanced the antitumor immune response in bladder tumors. This combination synergistically modulated tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, thereby strongly affecting proliferation and activation of effector T cells. Together, our data provide insight into the rational combination of therapies that activate both innate and adaptive immune system, such as the association of S100A9-targeting agents with immune checkpoints inhibitors, to improve the response to cancer immunotherapeutic agents in BCa.

  14. A GPBAR1 (TGR5 small molecule agonist shows specific inhibitory effects on myeloid cell activation in vitro and reduces experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE in vivo.

    Nuruddeen D Lewis

    Full Text Available GPBAR1 is a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by certain bile acids and plays an important role in the regulation of bile acid synthesis, lipid metabolism, and energy homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that GPBAR1 may also have important effects in reducing the inflammatory response through its expression on monocytes and macrophages. To further understand the role of GPBAR1 in inflammation, we generated a novel, selective, proprietary GPBAR1 agonist and tested its effectiveness at reducing monocyte and macrophage activation in vitro and in vivo. We have used this agonist, together with previously described agonists to study agonism of GPBAR1, and shown that they can all induce cAMP and reduce TLR activation-induced cytokine production in human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro. Additionally, through the usage of RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq, we identified a select set of genes that are regulated by GPBAR1 agonism during LPS activation. To further define the in vivo role of GPBAR1 in inflammation, we assessed GPBAR1 expression and found high levels on circulating mouse monocytes. Agonism of GPBAR1 reduced LPS-induced cytokine production in mouse monocytes ex vivo and serum cytokine levels in vivo. Agonism of GPBAR1 also had profound effects in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE mouse model of multiple sclerosis, where monocytes play an important role. Mice treated with the GPBAR1 agonist exhibited a significant reduction in the EAE clinical score which correlated with reduced monocyte and microglial activation and reduced trafficking of monocytes and T cells into the CNS. These data confirm the importance of GPBAR1 in controlling monocyte and macrophage activation in vivo and support the rationale for selective agonists of GPBAR1 in the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  15. Increased expression of PcG protein YY1 negatively regulates B cell development while allowing accumulation of myeloid cells and LT-HSC cells.

    Pan, Xuan; Jones, Morgan; Jiang, Jie; Zaprazna, Kristina; Yu, Duonan; Pear, Warren; Maillard, Ivan; Atchison, Michael L

    2012-01-01

    Ying Yang 1 (YY1) is a multifunctional Polycomb Group (PcG) transcription factor that binds to multiple enhancer binding sites in the immunoglobulin (Ig) loci and plays vital roles in early B cell development. PcG proteins have important functions in hematopoietic stem cell renewal and YY1 is the only mammalian PcG protein with DNA binding specificity. Conditional knock-out of YY1 in the mouse B cell lineage results in arrest at the pro-B cell stage, and dosage effects have been observed at various YY1 expression levels. To investigate the impact of elevated YY1 expression on hematopoetic development, we utilized a mouse in vivo bone marrow reconstitution system. We found that mouse bone marrow cells expressing elevated levels of YY1 exhibited a selective disadvantage as they progressed from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells to pro-B, pre-B, immature B and re-circulating B cell stages, but no disadvantage of YY1 over-expression was observed in myeloid lineage cells. Furthermore, mouse bone marrow cells expressing elevated levels of YY1 displayed enrichment for cells with surface markers characteristic of long-term hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). YY1 expression induced apoptosis in mouse B cell lines in vitro, and resulted in down-regulated expression of anti-apoptotic genes Bcl-xl and NFκB2, while no impact was observed in a mouse myeloid line. B cell apoptosis and LT-HSC enrichment induced by YY1 suggest that novel strategies to induce YY1 expression could have beneficial effects in the treatment of B lineage malignancies while preserving normal HSCs. PMID:22292011

  16. Retinoic acid promotes the development of Arg1-expressing dendritic cells for the regulation of T-cell differentiation

    Chang, Jinsam; Thangamani, Shankar; Kim, Myung H.; Ulrich, Benjamin; Morris, Sidney M.; Chang H Kim

    2013-01-01

    Arginase I (Arg1), an enzyme expressed by many cell types including myeloid cells, can regulate immune responses. Expression of Arg1 in myeloid cells is regulated by a number of cytokines and tissue factors that influence cell development and activation. Retinoic acid, produced from vitamin A, regulates the homing and differentiation of lymphocytes and plays important roles in the regulation of immunity and immune tolerance. We report here that optimal expression of Arg1 in dendritic cells re...

  17. Myeloid cells - targets of medication in multiple sclerosis.

    Mishra, Manoj K; Yong, V Wee

    2016-09-01

    Discussions of multiple sclerosis (MS) pathophysiology tend to focus on T cells and B cells of the adaptive immune response. The innate immune system is less commonly considered in this context, although dendritic cells, monocytes, macrophages and microglia - collectively referred to as myeloid cells - have prominent roles in MS pathogenesis. These populations of myeloid cells function as antigen-presenting cells and effector cells in neuroinflammation. Furthermore, a vicious cycle of interactions between T cells and myeloid cells exacerbates pathology. Several disease-modifying therapies are now available to treat MS, and insights into their mechanisms of action have largely focused on the adaptive immune system, but these therapies also have important effects on myeloid cells. In this Review, we discuss the evidence for the roles of myeloid cells in MS and the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model of MS, and consider how interactions between myeloid cells and T cells and/or B cells promote MS pathology. Finally, we discuss the direct and indirect effects of existing MS medications on myeloid cells. PMID:27514287

  18. Microbiota modulation of myeloid cells in cancer therapy

    Goldszmid, Romina S.; Dzutsev, Amiran; Viaud, Sophie; Zitvogel, Laurence; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Trinchieri, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid cells represent a major component of the tumor microenvironment where they play divergent dual roles: they can induce antitumor immune responses but mostly they promote immune evasion, tumor progression and metastases formation. Thus, strategies aiming at reprogramming the tumor microenvironment represent a promising immunotherapy approach. Myeloid cells respond to environmental factors including signals derived from commensal microbes. In this Cancer Immunology at the Crossroads overview we discuss recent advances on the effects of the commensal microbiota on myeloid-cell function and how that impacts the response to cancer therapy. PMID:25660553

  19. Proinsulin is encoded by an RNA splice variant in human blood myeloid cells

    Narendran, Parth; Neale, Alana M.; Lee, Bo Han; Ngui, Katrina; Steptoe, Raymond J.; Morahan, Grant; Madsen, Ole,; Dromey, James A.; Jensen, Kent P.; Harrison, Leonard C.

    2006-01-01

    Genes for peripheral tissue-restricted self-antigens are expressed in thymic and hematopoietic cells. In thymic medullary epithelial cells, self-antigen expression imposes selection on developing autoreactive T cells and regulates susceptibility to autoimmune disease in mouse models. Less is known about the role of self-antigen expression by hematopoietic cells. Here we demonstrate that one of the endocrine self-antigens expressed by human blood myeloid cells, proinsulin, is encoded by an RNA...

  20. Microbiota modulation of myeloid cells in cancer therapy

    Goldszmid, Romina S.; Dzutsev, Amiran; Viaud, Sophie; Zitvogel, Laurence; Restifo, Nicholas P; Trinchieri, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid cells represent a major component of the tumor microenvironment where they play divergent dual roles: they can induce antitumor immune responses but mostly they promote immune evasion, tumor progression and metastases formation. Thus, strategies aiming at reprogramming the tumor microenvironment represent a promising immunotherapy approach. Myeloid cells respond to environmental factors including signals derived from commensal microbes. In this Cancer Immunology at the Crossroads over...

  1. CSF1-ETS2-induced microRNA in myeloid cells promote metastatic tumor growth.

    Mathsyaraja, H; Thies, K; Taffany, D A; Deighan, C; Liu, T; Yu, L; Fernandez, S A; Shapiro, C; Otero, J; Timmers, C; Lustberg, M B; Chalmers, J; Leone, G; Ostrowski, M C

    2015-07-01

    Metastasis of solid tumors is associated with poor prognosis and bleak survival rates. Tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells (TIMs) are known to promote metastasis, but the mechanisms underlying their collaboration with tumor cells remain unknown. Here, we report an oncogenic role for microRNA (miR) in driving M2 reprogramming in TIMs, characterized by the acquisition of pro-tumor and pro-angiogenic properties. The expression of miR-21, miR-29a, miR-142-3p and miR-223 increased in myeloid cells during tumor progression in mouse models of breast cancer and melanoma metastasis. Further, we show that these miRs are regulated by the CSF1-ETS2 pathway in macrophages. A loss-of-function approach utilizing selective depletion of the miR-processing enzyme Dicer in mature myeloid cells blocks angiogenesis and metastatic tumor growth. Ectopic expression of miR-21 and miR-29a promotes angiogenesis and tumor cell proliferation through the downregulation of anti-angiogenic genes such as Col4a2, Spry1 and Timp3, whereas knockdown of the miRs impedes these processes. miR-21 and miR-29a are expressed in Csf1r+ myeloid cells associated with human metastatic breast cancer, and levels of these miRs in CD115+ non-classical monocytes correlates with metastatic tumor burden in patients. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-21 and miR-29a are essential for the pro-tumor functions of myeloid cells and the CSF1-ETS2 pathway upstream of the miRs serves as an attractive therapeutic target for the inhibition of M2 remodeling of macrophages during malignancy. In addition, miR-21 and miR-29a in circulating myeloid cells may potentially serve as biomarkers to measure therapeutic efficacy of targeted therapies for CSF1 signaling. PMID:25241894

  2. Role of p21 RAS in p210 bcr-abl transformation of murine myeloid cells.

    Mandanas, R A; Leibowitz, D S; Gharehbaghi, K; Tauchi, T; Burgess, G S; Miyazawa, K; Jayaram, H N; Boswell, H S

    1993-09-15

    The p21 RAS product has been implicated as part of the downstream signaling of certain nonreceptor tyrosine kinase oncogenes and several growth factor receptor-ligand interactions. We have reported that the chronic myelogenous leukemia oncogene p210 bcr-abl transforms a growth-factor-dependent myeloid cell line NFS/N1.H7 to interleukin-3 (IL-3) independence. In these p210 bcr-abl-transformed cells (H7 bcr-abl.A54) and in two other murine myeloid cell lines transformed to IL-3 independence by p210 bcr-abl, endogenous p21 RAS is activated as determined by an elevated ratio of associated guanosine triphosphate (GTP)/guanosine diphosphate (GDP), assayed by thin-layer chromatography of the nucleotides eluted from p21 RAS after immunoprecipitation with the Y13-259 antibody. Treatment of p210 bcr-abl-transformed cells with a specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor herbimycin A resulted in diminished tyrosine phosphorylation of p210 bcr-abl and associated proteins, without major reduction in expression of the p210 bcr-abl protein itself. Inhibition of p210 bcr-abl-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation resulted in a reduction of active p21RAS-GTP complexes in the transformed cells, in diminished expression of the nuclear early response genes c-jun and c-fos, and in lower cellular proliferation rate. To further implicate p21 RAS in these functional events downstream of p210 bcr-abl tyrosine phosphorylation, we targeted G-protein function directly by limiting the availability of GTP with the inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitor, tiazofurin (TR). In p210 bcr-abl-transformed cells treated for 4 hours with TR, in which the levels of GTP were reduced by 50%, but GDP, guanosine monophosphate, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were unaffected, p210 bcr-abl tyrosine phosphorylation was at control levels. However, expression of c-fos and c-jun nuclear proto-oncogenes were strongly inhibited and p21 RAS activity was downregulated. These findings show that p210 bcr-abl transduces

  3. Attenuated Toxoplasma gondii Stimulates Immunity to Pancreatic Cancer by Manipulation of Myeloid Cell Populations.

    Sanders, Kiah L; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J

    2015-08-01

    Suppressive myeloid cells represent a significant barrier to the generation of productive antitumor immune responses to many solid tumors. Eliminating or reprogramming suppressive myeloid cells to abrogate tumor-associated immune suppression is a promising therapeutic approach. We asked whether treatment of established aggressive disseminated pancreatic cancer with the immunotherapeutic attenuated Toxoplasma gondii vaccine strain CPS would trigger tumor-associated myeloid cells to generate therapeutic antitumor immune responses. CPS treatment significantly decreased tumor-associated macrophages and markedly increased dendritic cell infiltration of the pancreatic tumor microenvironment. Tumor-resident macrophages and dendritic cells, particularly cells actively invaded by CPS, increased expression of costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 and concomitantly boosted their production of IL12. CPS treatment increased CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell infiltration into the tumor microenvironment, activated tumor-resident T cells, and increased IFNγ production by T-cell populations. CPS treatment provided a significant therapeutic benefit in pancreatic tumor-bearing mice. This therapeutic benefit depended on IL12 and IFNγ production, MyD88 signaling, and CD8(+) T-cell populations. Although CD4(+) T cells exhibited activated effector phenotypes and produced IFNγ, CD4(+) T cells as well as natural killer cells were not required for the therapeutic benefit. In addition, CD8(+) T cells isolated from CPS-treated tumor-bearing mice produced IFNγ after re-exposure to pancreatic tumor antigen, suggesting this immunotherapeutic treatment stimulated tumor cell antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses. This work highlights the potency and immunotherapeutic efficacy of CPS treatment and demonstrates the significance of targeting tumor-associated myeloid cells as a mechanism to stimulate more effective immunity to pancreatic cancer. PMID:25804437

  4. Cellular analysis of the histamine H4 receptor in human myeloid cells.

    Capelo, Ricardo; Lehmann, Christoph; Ahmad, Khalil; Snodgrass, Ryan; Diehl, Olaf; Ringleb, Julia; Flamand, Nicolas; Weigert, Andreas; Stark, Holger; Steinhilber, Dieter; Kahnt, Astrid S

    2016-03-01

    The human histamine H4 receptor (H4R) is a Gαi/o-coupled receptor which is mainly expressed on hematopoietic cells. Accordingly, the receptor is implicated in the pathology of various diseases such as autoimmune disorders, bronchial asthma and pruritus. Due to complicated receptor pharmacology, the lack of a reliable antibody and limited availability of primary cells expressing the receptor the physiology of this receptor is still poorly understood. Therefore, we aimed to assess absolute receptor mRNA expression and functionality (intracellular Ca(2+) release) in various human myeloid cell types such as granulocytes, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). This was put into context with the expression of the H1R and H2R. In addition, the influence of various inflammatory stimuli on H4R expression was investigated in macrophages and monocyte-derived DCs. We found that classically activated macrophages treated with pro-inflammatory stimuli down-regulated histamine receptor mRNA expression as did LPS and zymosan A matured monocyte-derived DCs. In contrast, alternatively activated macrophages (IL-4 or IL-13) upregulated H2R and H4R expression compared to controls. Consistent with existing literature, we found eosinophils to be the major source of the H4R. Since availability of primary eosinophils is limited, we developed a cell model based on the differentiated eosinophilic cell line EOL-1, in which H4R pharmacology and physiology may be studied. PMID:26774453

  5. Specific Btk inhibition suppresses B cell- and myeloid cell-mediated arthritis

    Di Paolo, Julie A.; Huang, Tao; Balazs, Mercedesz; Barbosa, James; Barck, Kai H.; Bravo, Brandon J.; Carano, Richard A.D.; Darrow, James; Davies, Douglas R.; DeForge, Laura E.; Diehl, Lauri; Ferrando, Ronald; Gallion, Steven L.; Giannetti, Anthony M.; Gribling, Peter; Hurez, Vincent; Hymowitz, Sarah G.; Jones, Randall; Kropf, Jeffrey E.; Lee, Wyne P.; Maciejewski, Patricia M.; Mitchell, Scott A.; Rong, Hong; Staker, Bart L.; Whitney, J. Andrew; Yeh, Sherry; Young, Wendy B.; Yu, Christine; Zhang, Juan; Reif, Karin; Currie, Kevin S. (CGI); (Emerald); (Genentech)

    2011-09-20

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Btk mediates inflammation are poorly understood. Here we describe the discovery of CGI1746, a small-molecule Btk inhibitor chemotype with a new binding mode that stabilizes an inactive nonphosphorylated enzyme conformation. CGI1746 has exquisite selectivity for Btk and inhibits both auto- and transphosphorylation steps necessary for enzyme activation. Using CGI1746, we demonstrate that Btk regulates inflammatory arthritis by two distinct mechanisms. CGI1746 blocks B cell receptor-dependent B cell proliferation and in prophylactic regimens reduces autoantibody levels in collagen-induced arthritis. In macrophages, Btk inhibition abolishes Fc{gamma}RIII-induced TNF{alpha}, IL-1{beta} and IL-6 production. Accordingly, in myeloid- and Fc{gamma}R-dependent autoantibody-induced arthritis, CGI1746 decreases cytokine levels within joints and ameliorates disease. These results provide new understanding of the function of Btk in both B cell- or myeloid cell-driven disease processes and provide a compelling rationale for targeting Btk in rheumatoid arthritis.

  6. Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 fine-tunes inflammatory responses in murine Gram-negative sepsis

    Schmidt Thøgersen, Mariane; Gawish, Riem; Martins, Rui;

    2015-01-01

    During infections, TLR-mediated responses require tight regulation to allow for pathogen removal, while preventing overwhelming inflammation and immunopathology. The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM)-2 negatively regulates inflammation by macrophages and impacts on phagocytosis......(-/-) animals was followed by an accelerated resolution and ultimately improved survival, associated with the induction of the negative regulator A20. Upon infection with Escherichia coli, the otherwise beneficial effect of an exaggerated early immune response in TREM-2(-/-) animals was counteracted by a 50...

  7. CD11b deficiency suppresses intestinal tumor growth by reducing myeloid cell recruitment

    Qian-Qian Zhang; Xi-Wen Hu; Yi-Long Liu; Zhi-Jin Ye; Yi-He Gui; Da-Lei Zhou; Cui-Ling Qi; Xiao-Dong He; Honglin Wang; Li-Jing Wang

    2015-01-01

    Mac-1 (CD11b) is expressed on bone marrow-derived immune cells. CD11b binds to ligands to regulate leukocyte adhesion and migration across the endothelium or epithelium. Here, we employed CD11b knockout mice and an Apc Min/+ spontaneous intestinal adenoma mouse model to clarify the function of CD11b in intestinal tumorigenesis. We showed that CD11b deficiency may contribute to the inhibition of myeloid cell trafficking to the tumor microenvironment and inactivated Wnt/β-catenin pathway to sup...

  8. Motif discovery in promoters of genes co-localized and co-expressed during myeloid cells differentiation

    Coppe, Alessandro; Ferrari, Francesco; Bisognin, Andrea; Danieli, Gian Antonio; Ferrari, Sergio; Bicciato, Silvio; Bortoluzzi, Stefania

    2008-01-01

    Genes co-expressed may be under similar promoter-based and/or position-based regulation. Although data on expression, position and function of human genes are available, their true integration still represents a challenge for computational biology, hampering the identification of regulatory mechanisms. We carried out an integrative analysis of genomic position, functional annotation and promoters of genes expressed in myeloid cells. Promoter analysis was conducted by a novel multi-step method...

  9. Extramedullary Myeloid Cell Tumour Presenting As Leukaemia Cutis

    Thappa Devinder Mohan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We herewith report a case of extramedullary myeloid cell tumour presenting as leukaemia cutis for its rarity. It occurred in a 50 year old male patient who presented to us with a 40 days history of painless raised solid skin swellings over the trunk. Histopathological examination of the skin biopsy and bone marrow biopsy showed features suggestive of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Immunophenotyping on skin biopsy specimens and bone marrow biopsy found tumour cells expressing CD43 and Tdt but were negative for CD3 and CD20. These features were consistent with extramedullary myeloid cell tumour involving skin and subcutis (cutaneous manifestation of acute myeloid leukaemia.

  10. Lymphoid to myeloid cell trans-differentiation is determined by C/EBPβ structure and post-translational modifications.

    Bilyana Stoilova

    Full Text Available The transcription factor C/EBPβ controls differentiation, proliferation, and functionality of many cell types, including innate immune cells. A detailed molecular understanding of how C/EBPβ directs alternative cell fates remains largely elusive. A multitude of signal-dependent post-translational modifications (PTMs differentially affect the protean C/EBPβ functions. In this study we apply an assay that converts primary mouse B lymphoid progenitors into myeloid cells in order to answer the question how C/EBPβ regulates (trans- differentiation and determines myeloid cell fate. We found that structural alterations and various C/EBPβ PTMs determine the outcome of trans-differentiation of lymphoid into myeloid cells, including different types of monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells, and granulocytes. The ability of C/EBPβ to recruit chromatin remodeling complexes is required for the granulocytic trans-differentiation outcome. These novel findings reveal that PTMs and structural plasticity of C/EBPβ are adaptable modular properties that integrate and rewire epigenetic functions to direct differentiation to diverse innate immune system cells, which are crucial for the organism survival.

  11. Pulmonary epithelial cancer cells and their exosomes metabolize myeloid cell-derived leukotriene C4 to leukotriene D4.

    Lukic, Ana; Ji, Jie; Idborg, Helena; Samuelsson, Bengt; Palmberg, Lena; Gabrielsson, Susanne; Rådmark, Olof

    2016-09-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) play major roles in lung immune responses, and LTD4 is the most potent agonist for cysteinyl LT1, leading to bronchoconstriction and tissue remodeling. Here, we studied LT crosstalk between myeloid cells and pulmonary epithelial cells. Monocytic cells (Mono Mac 6 cell line, primary dendritic cells) and eosinophils produced primarily LTC4 In coincubations of these myeloid cells and epithelial cells, LTD4 became a prominent product. LTC4 released from the myeloid cells was further transformed by the epithelial cells in a transcellular manner. Formation of LTD4 was rapid when catalyzed by γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT)1 in the A549 epithelial lung cancer cell line, but considerably slower when catalyzed by GGT5 in primary bronchial epithelial cells. When A549 cells were cultured in the presence of IL-1β, GGT1 expression increased about 2-fold. Also exosomes from A549 cells contained GGT1 and augmented LTD4 formation. Serine-borate complex (SBC), an inhibitor of GGT, inhibited conversion of LTC4 to LTD4 Unexpectedly, SBC also upregulated translocation of 5-lipoxygenase (LO) to the nucleus in Mono Mac 6 cells, and 5-LO activity. Our results demonstrate an active role for epithelial cells in biosynthesis of LTD4, which may be of particular relevance in the lung. PMID:27436590

  12. Primary cerebellar extramedullary myeloid cell tumor mimicking oligodendroglioma.

    Ho, D M; Wong, T T; Guo, W Y; Chang, K P; Yen, S H

    1997-10-01

    Extramedullary myeloid cell tumors (EMCTs) are tumors consisting of immature cells of the myeloid series that occur outside the bone marrow. Most of them are associated with acute myelogenous leukemia or other myeloproliferative disorders, and a small number occur as primary lesions, i.e., are not associated with hematological disorders. Occurrence inside the cranium is rare, and there has been only one case of primary EMCT involving the cerebellum reported in the literature. The case we report here is a blastic EMCT occurring in the cerebellum of a 3-year-old boy who had no signs of leukemia or any hematological disorder throughout the entire course. The cerebellar tumor was at first misdiagnosed as an "oligodendroglioma" because of the uniformity and "fried egg" artifact of the tumor cells. The tumor disappeared during chemotherapy consisting of 12 treatments. However, it recurred and metastasized to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shortly after the therapy was completed. A diagnosis of EMCT was suspected because of the presence of immature myeloid cells in the CSF, and was confirmed by anti-myeloperoxidase and anti-lysozyme immunoreactivity of the cerebellar tumor. The patient succumbed 1 year and 3 months after the first presentation of the disease. PMID:9341943

  13. Autophagy deficiency in myeloid cells increases susceptibility to obesity-induced diabetes and experimental colitis.

    Lee, Hae-Youn; Kim, Jinyoung; Quan, Wenying; Lee, June-Chul; Kim, Min-Soo; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Bae, Jin-Woo; Hur, Kyu Yeon; Lee, Myung-Shik

    2016-08-01

    Autophagy, which is critical for the proper turnover of organelles such as endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, affects diverse aspects of metabolism, and its dysregulation has been incriminated in various metabolic disorders. However, the role of autophagy of myeloid cells in adipose tissue inflammation and type 2 diabetes has not been addressed. We produced mice with myeloid cell-specific deletion of Atg7 (autophagy-related 7), an essential autophagy gene (Atg7 conditional knockout [cKO] mice). While Atg7 cKO mice were metabolically indistinguishable from control mice, they developed diabetes when bred to ob/w mice (Atg7 cKO-ob/ob mice), accompanied by increases in the crown-like structure, inflammatory cytokine expression and inflammasome activation in adipose tissue. Mφs (macrophages) from Atg7 cKO mice showed significantly higher interleukin 1 β release and inflammasome activation in response to a palmitic acid plus lipopolysaccharide combination. Moreover, a decrease in the NAD(+):NADH ratio and increase in intracellular ROS content after treatment with palmitic acid in combination with lipopolysaccharide were more pronounced in Mφs from Atg7 cKO mice, suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction in autophagy-deficient Mφs leads to an increase in lipid-induced inflammasome and metabolic deterioration in Atg7 cKO-ob/ob mice. Atg7 cKO mice were more susceptible to experimental colitis, accompanied by increased colonic cytokine expression, T helper 1 skewing and systemic bacterial invasion. These results suggest that autophagy of Mφs is important for the control of inflammasome activation in response to metabolic or extrinsic stress, and autophagy deficiency in Mφs may contribute to the progression of metabolic syndrome associated with lipid injury and colitis. PMID:27337687

  14. SIK inhibition in human myeloid cells modulates TLR and IL-1R signaling and induces an anti-inflammatory phenotype.

    Lombardi, Maria Stella; Gilliéron, Corine; Dietrich, Damien; Gabay, Cem

    2016-05-01

    Macrophage polarization into a phenotype producing high levels of anti-inflammatory IL-10 and low levels of proinflammatory IL-12 and TNF-α cytokines plays a pivotal role in the resolution of inflammation. Salt-inducible kinases synergize with TLR signaling to restrict the formation of these macrophages. The expression and function of salt-inducible kinase in primary human myeloid cells are poorly characterized. Here, we demonstrated that the differentiation from peripheral blood monocytes to macrophages or dendritic cells induced a marked up-regulation of salt-inducible kinase protein expression. With the use of 2 structurally unrelated, selective salt-inducible kinase inhibitors, HG-9-91-01 and ARN-3236, we showed that salt-inducible kinase inhibition significantly decreased proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-12p40) and increased IL-10 secretion by human myeloid cells stimulated with TLR2 and-4 agonists. Differently than in mouse cells, salt-inducible kinase inhibition did not enhance IL-1Ra production in human macrophages. Salt-inducible kinase inhibition blocked several markers of proinflammatory (LPS + IFN-γ)-polarized macrophages [M(LPS + IFN-γ)] and induced a phenotype characterized by low TNF-α/IL-6/IL-12p70 and high IL-10. The downstream effects observed with salt-inducible kinase inhibitors on cytokine modulation correlated with direct salt-inducible kinase target (CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 3 and histone deacetylase 4) dephosphorylation in these cells. More importantly, we showed for the first time that salt-inducible kinase inhibition decreases proinflammatory cytokines in human myeloid cells upon IL-1R stimulation. Altogether, our results expand the potential therapeutic use of salt-inducible kinase inhibitors in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:26590148

  15. The rate of spontaneous mutations in human myeloid cells

    Araten, David J., E-mail: david.araten@nyumc.org [Division of Hematology, Department of Veterans Affairs New York Harbor Healthcare System (United States); Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine and the NYU Langone Cancer Center (United States); Krejci, Ondrej [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); DiTata, Kimberly [Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine and the NYU Langone Cancer Center (United States); Wunderlich, Mark [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Sanders, Katie J.; Zamechek, Leah [Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine and the NYU Langone Cancer Center (United States); Mulloy, James C. [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • We provide the first measurement of the mutation rate (μ) in human myeloid cells. • μ is measured to be 3.6–23 × 10{sup −7} per cell division. • The AML-ETO and MLL-AF9 fusions do not seem to increase μ. • Cooperating mutations in NRAS, FLT3 and p53 not seem to increase μ. • Hypermutability may be required to explain leukemogenesis. - Abstract: The mutation rate (μ) is likely to be a key parameter in leukemogenesis, but historically, it has been difficult to measure in humans. The PIG-A gene has some advantages for the detection of spontaneous mutations because it is X-linked, and therefore only one mutation is required to disrupt its function. Furthermore, the PIG-A-null phenotype is readily detected by flow cytometry. Using PIG-A, we have now provided the first in vitro measurement of μ in myeloid cells, using cultures of CD34+ cells that are transduced with either the AML-ETO or the MLL-AF9 fusion genes and expanded with cytokines. For the AML-ETO cultures, the median μ value was ∼9.4 × 10{sup −7} (range ∼3.6–23 × 10{sup −7}) per cell division. In contrast, few spontaneous mutations were observed in the MLL-AF9 cultures. Knockdown of p53 or introduction of mutant NRAS or FLT3 alleles did not have much of an effect on μ. Based on these data, we provide a model to predict whether hypermutability must occur in the process of leukemogenesis.

  16. The rate of spontaneous mutations in human myeloid cells

    Highlights: • We provide the first measurement of the mutation rate (μ) in human myeloid cells. • μ is measured to be 3.6–23 × 10−7 per cell division. • The AML-ETO and MLL-AF9 fusions do not seem to increase μ. • Cooperating mutations in NRAS, FLT3 and p53 not seem to increase μ. • Hypermutability may be required to explain leukemogenesis. - Abstract: The mutation rate (μ) is likely to be a key parameter in leukemogenesis, but historically, it has been difficult to measure in humans. The PIG-A gene has some advantages for the detection of spontaneous mutations because it is X-linked, and therefore only one mutation is required to disrupt its function. Furthermore, the PIG-A-null phenotype is readily detected by flow cytometry. Using PIG-A, we have now provided the first in vitro measurement of μ in myeloid cells, using cultures of CD34+ cells that are transduced with either the AML-ETO or the MLL-AF9 fusion genes and expanded with cytokines. For the AML-ETO cultures, the median μ value was ∼9.4 × 10−7 (range ∼3.6–23 × 10−7) per cell division. In contrast, few spontaneous mutations were observed in the MLL-AF9 cultures. Knockdown of p53 or introduction of mutant NRAS or FLT3 alleles did not have much of an effect on μ. Based on these data, we provide a model to predict whether hypermutability must occur in the process of leukemogenesis

  17. c-Maf Interacts with c-Myb To Regulate Transcription of an Early Myeloid Gene during Differentiation

    Hegde, Shrikanth P.; Kumar, Alok; Kurschner, Cornelia; Shapiro, Linda H.

    1998-01-01

    The MafB transcriptional activator plays a pivotal role in regulating lineage-specific gene expression during hematopoiesis by repressing Ets-1-mediated transcription of key erythroid-specific genes in myeloid cells. To determine the effects of Maf family proteins on the transactivation of myeloid-specific genes in myeloid cells, we tested the ability of c-Maf to influence Ets-1- and c-Myb-dependent CD13/APN transcription. Expression of c-Maf in human immature myeloblastic cells inhibited CD1...

  18. Motif discovery in promoters of genes co-localized and co-expressed during myeloid cells differentiation

    Coppe, Alessandro; Ferrari, Francesco; Bisognin, Andrea; Danieli, Gian Antonio; Ferrari, Sergio; Bicciato, Silvio; Bortoluzzi, Stefania

    2009-01-01

    Genes co-expressed may be under similar promoter-based and/or position-based regulation. Although data on expression, position and function of human genes are available, their true integration still represents a challenge for computational biology, hampering the identification of regulatory mechanisms. We carried out an integrative analysis of genomic position, functional annotation and promoters of genes expressed in myeloid cells. Promoter analysis was conducted by a novel multi-step method for discovering putative regulatory elements, i.e. over-represented motifs, in a selected set of promoters, as compared with a background model. The combination of transcriptional, structural and functional data allowed the identification of sets of promoters pertaining to groups of genes co-expressed and co-localized in regions of the human genome. The application of motif discovery to 26 groups of genes co-expressed in myeloid cells differentiation and co-localized in the genome showed that there are more over-represented motifs in promoters of co-expressed and co-localized genes than in promoters of simply co-expressed genes (CEG). Motifs, which are similar to the binding sequences of known transcription factors, non-uniformly distributed along promoter sequences and/or occurring in highly co-expressed subset of genes were identified. Co-expressed and co-localized gene sets were grouped in two co-expressed genomic meta-regions, putatively representing functional domains of a high-level expression regulation. PMID:19059999

  19. Is The CD200/CD200 Receptor Interaction More Than Just a Myeloid Cell Inhibitory Signal?

    Minas, Konstantinos; Liversidge, Janet

    2006-01-01

    The membrane glycoprotein CD200, which has a widespread but defined distribution and a structurally similar receptor (CD200R) that transmits an inhibitory signal to cells of the hematopoetic lineage, especially myeloid cells, has been characterized. CD200R expression is restricted predominantly to cells of the myeloid lineage indicating that this ligand/receptor pair has a specific role in controlling myeloid cell function. In addition to CD200R, several related genes have been identified. Wh...

  20. Retinoic acid-induced gene expression in normal and leukemic myeloid cells

    1986-01-01

    Retinoic acid has been shown to induce large accumulations of tissue transglutaminase in cultured myeloid cells. Addition of retinoic acid to mouse resident peritoneal macrophages increased the level of tissue transglutaminase mRNA within 30-60 min. Retinoic acid also increased tissue transglutaminase mRNA levels in human promyelocytic leukemia (HL- 60) cells. These studies show that retinoic acid can induce acute alterations in specific gene expression in both normal and leukemic myeloid cells.

  1. Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells in Cutaneous Melanoma.

    Nguyen, Austin Huy; Koenck, Carleigh; Quirk, Shannon K; Lim, Victoria M; Mitkov, Mario V; Trowbridge, Ryan M; Hunter, William J; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2015-10-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays an important role in the progression of melanoma, the prototypical immunologic cutaneous malignancy. The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM) family of innate immune receptors modulates inflammatory and innate immune signaling. It has been investigated in various neoplastic diseases, but not in melanoma. This study examines the expression of TREM-1 (a proinflammatory amplifier) and TREM-2 (an anti-inflammatory modulator and phagocytic promoter) in human cutaneous melanoma and surrounding tissue. Indirect immunofluorescence staining was performed on skin biopsies from 10 melanoma patients and staining intensity was semiquantitatively scored. Expression of TREM-1 and TREM-2 was higher in keratinocytes than melanoma tissue (TREM-1: p < 0.01; TREM-2: p < 0.01). Whereas TREM-2 was the dominant isoform expressed in normal keratinocytes, TREM-1 expression predominated in melanoma tissue (TREM-1 to TREM-2 ratio: keratinocytes = 0.78; melanoma = 2.08; p < 0.01). The increased TREM ratio in melanoma tissue could give rise to a proinflammatory and protumor state of the microenvironment. This evidence may be suggestive of a TREM-1/TREM-2 paradigm in which relative levels dictate inflammatory and immune states, rather than absolute expression of one or the other. Further investigation regarding this paradigm is warranted and could carry prognostic or therapeutic value in treatment for melanoma. PMID:26184544

  2. Myeloid cells expressing VEGF and arginase-1 following uptake of damaged retinal pigment epithelium suggests potential mechanism that drives the onset of choroidal angiogenesis in mice.

    Jian Liu

    Full Text Available Whilst data recognise both myeloid cell accumulation during choroidal neovascularisation (CNV as well as complement activation, none of the data has presented a clear explanation for the angiogenic drive that promotes pathological angiogenesis. One possibility that is a pre-eminent drive is a specific and early conditioning and activation of the myeloid cell infiltrate. Using a laser-induced CNV murine model, we have identified that disruption of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE and Bruch's membrane resulted in an early recruitment of macrophages derived from monocytes and microglia, prior to angiogenesis and contemporaneous with lesional complement activation. Early recruited CD11b(+ cells expressed a definitive gene signature of selective inflammatory mediators particularly a pronounced Arg-1 expression. Accumulating macrophages from retina and peripheral blood were activated at the site of injury, displaying enhanced VEGF expression, and notably prior to exaggerated VEGF expression from RPE, or earliest stages of angiogenesis. All of these initial events, including distinct VEGF (+ Arg-1(+ myeloid cells, subsided when CNV was established and at the time RPE-VEGF expression was maximal. Depletion of inflammatory CCR2-positive monocytes confirmed origin of infiltrating monocyte Arg-1 expression, as following depletion Arg-1 signal was lost and CNV suppressed. Furthermore, our in vitro data supported a myeloid cell uptake of damaged RPE or its derivatives as a mechanism generating VEGF (+ Arg-1(+ phenotype in vivo. Our results reveal a potential early driver initiating angiogenesis via myeloid-derived VEGF drive following uptake of damaged RPE and deliver an explanation of why CNV develops during any of the stages of macular degeneration and can be explored further for therapeutic gain.

  3. Control of Both Myeloid Cell Infiltration and Angiogenesis by CCR1 Promotes Liver Cancer Metastasis Development in Mice

    Mathieu Paul Rodero

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Expression of the CC chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1 by tumor cells has been associated with protumoral activity; however, its role in nontumoral cells during tumor development remains elusive. Here, we investigated the role of CCR1 deletion on stromal and hematopoietic cells in a liver metastasis tumor model. Metastasis development was strongly impaired in CCR1-deficient mice compared to control mice and was associated with reduced liver monocyte infiltration. To decipher the role of myeloid cells, sublethally irradiated mice were reconstituted with CCR1-deficient bone marrow (BM and showed better survival rates than the control reconstituted mice. These results point toward the involvement of CCR1 myeloid cell infiltration in the promotion of tumor burden. In addition, survival rates were extended in CCR1-deficient mice receiving either control or CCR1-deficient BM, indicating that host CCR1 expression on nonhematopoietic cells also supports tumor growth. Finally, we found defective tumor-induced neoangiogenesis (in vitro and in vivo in CCR1-deficient mice. Overall, our results indicate that CCR1 expression by both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells favors tumor aggressiveness. We propose CCR1 as a potential therapeutical target for liver metastasis therapy.

  4. Myeloid-Cell-Derived VEGF Maintains Brain Glucose Uptake and Limits Cognitive Impairment in Obesity.

    Jais, Alexander; Solas, Maite; Backes, Heiko; Chaurasia, Bhagirath; Kleinridders, André; Theurich, Sebastian; Mauer, Jan; Steculorum, Sophie M; Hampel, Brigitte; Goldau, Julia; Alber, Jens; Förster, Carola Y; Eming, Sabine A; Schwaninger, Markus; Ferrara, Napoleone; Karsenty, Gerard; Brüning, Jens C

    2016-05-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) feeding induces rapid reprogramming of systemic metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that HFD feeding of mice downregulates glucose transporter (GLUT)-1 expression in blood-brain barrier (BBB) vascular endothelial cells (BECs) and reduces brain glucose uptake. Upon prolonged HFD feeding, GLUT1 expression is restored, which is paralleled by increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in macrophages at the BBB. In turn, inducible reduction of GLUT1 expression specifically in BECs reduces brain glucose uptake and increases VEGF serum concentrations in lean mice. Conversely, myeloid-cell-specific deletion of VEGF in VEGF(Δmyel) mice impairs BBB-GLUT1 expression, brain glucose uptake, and memory formation in obese, but not in lean mice. Moreover, obese VEGF(Δmyel) mice exhibit exaggerated progression of cognitive decline and neuroinflammation on an Alzheimer's disease background. These experiments reveal that transient, HFD-elicited reduction of brain glucose uptake initiates a compensatory increase of VEGF production and assign obesity-associated macrophage activation a homeostatic role to restore cerebral glucose metabolism, preserve cognitive function, and limit neurodegeneration in obesity. PMID:27133169

  5. Peripherally administered nanoparticles target monocytic myeloid cells, secondary lymphoid organs and tumors in mice.

    Iraklis C Kourtis

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles have been extensively developed for therapeutic and diagnostic applications. While the focus of nanoparticle trafficking in vivo has traditionally been on drug delivery and organ-level biodistribution and clearance, recent work in cancer biology and infectious disease suggests that targeting different cells within a given organ can substantially affect the quality of the immunological response. Here, we examine the cell-level biodistribution kinetics after administering ultrasmall Pluronic-stabilized poly(propylene sulfide nanoparticles in the mouse. These nanoparticles depend on lymphatic drainage to reach the lymph nodes and blood, and then enter the spleen rather than the liver, where they interact with monocytes, macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells. They were more readily taken up into lymphatics after intradermal (i.d. compared to intramuscular administration, leading to ∼50% increased bioavailability in blood. When administered i.d., their distribution favored antigen-presenting cells, with especially strong targeting to myeloid cells. In tumor-bearing mice, the monocytic and the polymorphonuclear myeloid-derived suppressor cell compartments were efficiently and preferentially targeted, rendering this nanoparticulate formulation potentially useful for reversing the highly suppressive activity of these cells in the tumor stroma.

  6. Human telomerase activity regulation

    Wojtyla, Aneta; Gladych, Marta; Rubis, Blazej

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase has been recognized as a relevant factor distinguishing cancer cells from normal cells. Thus, it has become a very promising target for anticancer therapy. The cell proliferative potential can be limited by replication end problem, due to telomeres shortening, which is overcome in cancer cells by telomerase activity or by alternative telomeres lengthening (ALT) mechanism. However, this multisubunit enzymatic complex can be regulated at various levels, including expression control b...

  7. Myeloid cell signatures in tumor microenvironment predicts therapeutic response in cancer

    Achyut BR

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bhagelu R Achyut, Ali S Arbab Tumor Angiogenesis Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Cancer Center, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA, USA Abstract: Tumor microenvironment (TME consists of several immune and nonimmune cell populations including tumor cells. For many decades, experimental studies have depicted profound contribution of TME toward cancer progression and metastasis development. Several therapeutic strategies have been tested against TME through preclinical studies and clinical trials. Unfortunately, most of them have shown transient effect, and have largely failed due to aggressive tumor growth and without improving survival. Solid tumors are known to have a strong myeloid component (eg, tumor-associated macrophages in tumor development. Recent data suggest that therapeutic responses in tumor are characterized by alterations in immune cell signatures, including tumor-associated myeloid cells. Polarized tumor-associated myeloid cells (M1–M2 are critical in impairing therapeutic effect and promoting tumor growth. The present review is intended to compile all the literatures related to the emerging contribution of different populations of myeloid cells in the development of tumor and therapeutic failures. Finally, we have discussed targeting of myeloid cell populations as a combination therapy with chemo-, targeted-, or radiation therapies. Keywords: tumor microenvironment, tumor-associated macrophage, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, therapies, macrophage polarization, radiation, antiangiogenic therapy

  8. Making Ends Meet: Myeloid Cells Catalyze Blood Vessel Repair in the Brain.

    Deczkowska, Aleksandra; Schwartz, Michal

    2016-05-17

    Hemorrhagic stroke, primarily caused by rupture of blood vessels in the brain, is a leading cause of death and disability in adults. In this issue of Immunity, Liu et al. (2016) demonstrate that repair of cerebrovascular ruptures can be directly mediated by myeloid cells. PMID:27192572

  9. Soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1: a biomarker for bacterial meningitis

    R.M. Determann; M. Weisfelt; J. de Gans; A. van der Ende; M.J. Schultz; D. van de Beek

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (sTREM-1) in CSF can serve as a biomarker for the presence of bacterial meningitis and outcome in patients with this disease. Design: Retrospective study of diagnostic accuracy. Setting and patients: CSF was coll

  10. Arginase-1 is expressed exclusively by infiltrating myeloid cells in CNS injury and disease.

    Greenhalgh, Andrew D; Passos Dos Santos, Rosmarini; Zarruk, Juan Guillermo; Salmon, Christopher K; Kroner, Antje; David, Samuel

    2016-08-01

    Resident microglia and infiltrating myeloid cells play important roles in the onset, propagation, and resolution of inflammation in central nervous system (CNS) injury and disease. Identifying cell type-specific mechanisms will help to appropriately target interventions for tissue repair. Arginase-1 (Arg-1) is a well characterised modulator of tissue repair and its expression correlates with recovery after CNS injury. Here we assessed the cellular localisation of Arg-1 in two models of CNS damage. Using microglia specific antibodies, P2ry12 and Fc receptor-like S (FCRLS), we show the LysM-EGFP reporter mouse is an excellent model to distinguish infiltrating myeloid cells from resident microglia. We show that Arg-1 is expressed exclusively in infiltrating myeloid cells but not microglia in models of spinal cord injury (SCI) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Our in vitro studies suggest that factors in the CNS environment prevent expression of Arg-1 in microglia in vivo. This work suggests different functional roles for these cells in CNS injury and repair and shows that such repair pathways can be switched on in infiltrating myeloid cells in pro-inflammatory environments. PMID:27126514

  11. Myeloid cell-based therapies in neurological disorders: How far have we come?

    Böttcher, Chotima; Priller, Josef

    2016-03-01

    The pathogenesis of neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) is multifactorial and incompletely understood. The development of therapies for these disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) is thus far very challenging. Neuroinflammation is one of the processes that contribute to the pathogenesis of CNS diseases, and therefore represents an important therapeutic target. Myeloid cells derived from the bone marrow are ideal candidates for cell therapy in the CNS as they are capable of targeting the brain and providing neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects. In this review, experimental and clinical evidence for the therapeutic potential of myeloid cells in neurological disorders will be discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuro Inflammation edited by Helga E. de Vries and Markus Schwaninger. PMID:26455341

  12. Reduction of ARNT in myeloid cells causes immune suppression and delayed wound healing

    Scott, Christopher; Bonner, James; Min, Danqing; Boughton, Philip; Stokes, Rebecca; Cha, Kuan Minn; Walters, Stacey N.; Maslowski, Kendle; Sierro, Frederic; Grey, Shane T.; Twigg, Stephen; McLennan, Susan; Gunton, Jenny E.

    2014-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) is a transcription factor that binds to partners to mediate responses to environmental signals. To investigate its role in the innate immune system, floxed ARNT mice were bred with lysozyme M-Cre recombinase animals to generate lysozyme M-ARNT (LAR) mice with reduced ARNT expression. Myeloid cells of LAR mice had altered mRNA expression and delayed wound healing. Interestingly, when the animals were rendered diabetic, the difference in wou...

  13. TLR4-dependent hepcidin expression by myeloid cells in response to bacterial pathogens

    Peyssonnaux, Carole; Zinkernagel, Annelies S.; Datta, Vivekanand; Lauth, Xavier; Johnson, Randall S; Nizet, Victor

    2006-01-01

    Hepcidin is an antimicrobial peptide secreted by the liver during inflammation that plays a central role in mammalian iron homeostasis. Here we demonstrate the endogenous expression of hepcidin by macrophages and neutrophils in vitro and in vivo. These myeloid cell types produced hepcidin in response to bacterial pathogens in a toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent fashion. Conversely, bacterial stimulation of macrophages triggered a TLR4-dependent reduction in the iron exporter ferroportin. ...

  14. SAMHD1: a new insight into HIV-1 restriction in myeloid cells

    Wu Li; St Gelais Corine

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Human myeloid-lineage cells are refractory to HIV-1 infection. The Vpx proteins from HIV-2 and sooty mangabey SIV render these cells permissive to HIV-1 infection through proteasomal degradation of a putative restriction factor. Two recent studies discovered the cellular protein SAMHD1 to be this restriction factor, demonstrating that Vpx induces proteasomal degradation of SAMHD1 and enhances HIV-1 infection in myeloid-lineage cells. SAMHD1 functions as a myeloid-cell-specific HIV-1 ...

  15. Conditional overexpression of Stat3alpha in differentiating myeloid cells results in neutrophil expansion and induces a distinct, antiapoptotic and pro-oncogenic gene expression pattern.

    Redell, Michele S; Tsimelzon, Anna; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Tweardy, David J

    2007-10-01

    Normal neutrophil development requires G-CSF signaling, which includes activation of Stat3. Studies of G-CSF-mediated Stat3 signaling in cell culture and transgenic mice have yielded conflicting data regarding the role of Stat3 in myelopoiesis. The specific functions of Stat3 remain unclear, in part, because two isoforms, Stat3alpha and Stat3beta, are expressed in myeloid cells. To understand the contribution of each Stat3 isoform to myelopoiesis, we conditionally overexpressed Stat3alpha or Stat3beta in the murine myeloid cell line 32Dcl3 (32D) and examined the consequences of overexpression on cell survival and differentiation. 32D cells induced to overexpress Stat3alpha, but not Stat3beta, generated a markedly higher number of neutrophils in response to G-CSF. This effect was a result of decreased apoptosis but not of increased proliferation. Comparison of gene expression profiles of G-CSF-stimulated, Stat3alpha-overexpressing 32D cells with those of cells with normal Stat3alpha expression revealed novel Stat3 gene targets, which may contribute to neutrophil expansion and improved survival, most notably Slc28a2, a purine nucleoside transporter, which is critical for maintenance of intracellular nucleotide levels and prevention of apoptosis, and Gpr65, an acid-sensing, G protein-coupled receptor with pro-oncogenic and antiapoptotic functions. PMID:17634277

  16. The farnesoid-X-receptor in myeloid cells controls CNS autoimmunity in an IL-10-dependent fashion.

    Hucke, Stephanie; Herold, Martin; Liebmann, Marie; Freise, Nicole; Lindner, Maren; Fleck, Ann-Katrin; Zenker, Stefanie; Thiebes, Stephanie; Fernandez-Orth, Juncal; Buck, Dorothea; Luessi, Felix; Meuth, Sven G; Zipp, Frauke; Hemmer, Bernhard; Engel, Daniel Robert; Roth, Johannes; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Wiendl, Heinz; Klotz, Luisa

    2016-09-01

    Innate immune responses by myeloid cells decisively contribute to perpetuation of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity and their pharmacologic modulation represents a promising strategy to prevent disease progression in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Based on our observation that peripheral immune cells from relapsing-remitting and primary progressive MS patients exhibited strongly decreased levels of the bile acid receptor FXR (farnesoid-X-receptor, NR1H4), we evaluated its potential relevance as therapeutic target for control of established CNS autoimmunity. Pharmacological FXR activation promoted generation of anti-inflammatory macrophages characterized by arginase-1, increased IL-10 production, and suppression of T cell responses. In mice, FXR activation ameliorated CNS autoimmunity in an IL-10-dependent fashion and even suppressed advanced clinical disease upon therapeutic administration. In analogy to rodents, pharmacological FXR activation in human monocytes from healthy controls and MS patients induced an anti-inflammatory phenotype with suppressive properties including control of effector T cell proliferation. We therefore, propose an important role of FXR in control of T cell-mediated autoimmunity by promoting anti-inflammatory macrophage responses. PMID:27383204

  17. TREM-like transcript 2 is stored in human neutrophil primary granules and is up-regulated in response to inflammatory mediators.

    Thomas, Kimberly A; King, R Glenn; Sestero, Christine M; Justement, Louis B

    2016-07-01

    The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell locus encodes a family of receptors that is emerging as an important class of molecules involved in modulating the innate immune response and inflammation. Of the 4 conserved members, including triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 and 2 and triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell-like transcripts 1 and 2, relatively little is known about triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell-like transcript 2 expression and function, particularly in humans. In this study, experiments were performed to determine if triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell-like transcript 2 expression is conserved between mouse and human, demonstrating that human triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell-like transcript 2 is expressed on cells of the lymphoid, as well as myeloid/granuloid lineages, similar to murine triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell-like transcript 2. Consistent with studies in the mouse, triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell-like transcript 2 expression is up-regulated in response to inflammatory mediators on human neutrophils. Importantly, it was shown that triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell-like transcript 2, in resting human neutrophils, is predominantly localized to intracellular vesicles, including secretory vesicles and primary granules; with the majority of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell-like transcript 2 stored in primary granules. In contrast to other primary granule proteins, triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell-like transcript 2 is not expelled on neutrophil extracellular traps but is retained in the plasma membrane following primary granule exocytosis. In summary, these findings establish that triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell-like transcript 2 expression is conserved between species and is likely to be important in regulating neutrophil antimicrobial function following primary granule exocytosis. PMID:26753760

  18. Regulating prefrontal cortex activation

    Aznar, Susana; Klein, Anders Bue

    2013-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is involved in mediating important higher-order cognitive processes such as decision making, prompting thereby our actions. At the same time, PFC activation is strongly influenced by emotional reactions through its functional interaction with the amygdala and the stria...

  19. Diminished immune response to vaccinations in obesity: role of myeloid-derived suppressor and other myeloid cells.

    Chen, Shiyi; Akbar, Sheikh Mohammad Fazle; Miyake, Teruki; Abe, Masanori; Al-Mahtab, Mamun; Furukawa, Shinya; Bunzo, Matsuura; Hiasa, Yoichi; Onji, Morikazu

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic inflammatory condition associated with an increased production of cytokines and exacerbated immune response. However, obese subjects are susceptible to infections and respond poorly to vaccines. This study evaluated the immune responses of obese mice and the underlying mechanisms by exploring the roles of myeloid cells. Diet-induced obese (DIO) mice were prepared from C57BL/6J mice fed a high-calorie and high-fat diet for 12 weeks. Humoral and cellular immune responses of DIO mice to a hepatitis B vaccine containing the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) were assessed in sera and via a lymphoproliferative assay, respectively. The effects of CD11b(+)GR1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and CD11b(+)GR1(-) non-MDSC on T cell proliferation and cytokine production were compared via a cell culture system. The production of cytokines, expression of activation and exhaustion markers, and proportions of apoptotic T cells were estimated with flow cytometry. Increased T and B lymphocyte proliferation and higher interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were detected in spleen cells and liver non-parenchymal cell cultures of DIO mice compared to controls (pproduction, decrease in T cell activation, and increase in T cell exhaustion and apoptosis (p<0.05). MDSC play an important role in mediating impaired antigen-specific immunity. PMID:25660173

  20. CD13 is dispensable for normal hematopoiesis and myeloid cell functions in the mouse

    Winnicka, Beata; O'Conor, Catherine; Schacke, Wolfgang; Vernier, Kaitlyn; Grant, Christina L.; Fenteany, Fiona Hall; Pereira, Flavia E.; Liang, Brannen; Kaur, Anupinder; Zhao, Ran; Montrose, David C.; Rosenberg, Daniel W; Aguila, Hector L.; Shapiro, Linda H.

    2010-01-01

    The robust and consistent expression of the CD13 cell surface marker on very early as well as differentiated myeloid hematopoietic cells has prompted numerous investigations seeking to define roles for CD13 in myeloid cells. To address the function of myeloid CD13 directly, we created a CD13 null mouse and assessed the responses of purified primary macrophages or DCs from WT and CD13 null animals in cell assays and inflammatory disease models, where CD13 has been implicated previously. We fin...

  1. Expression of myeloid differentiation antigens on normal and malignant myeloid cells.

    Griffin, J D; Ritz, J; Nadler, L M; Schlossman, S F

    1981-01-01

    A series of monoclonal antibodies have been characterized that define four surface antigens (MY3, MY4, MY7, and MY8) of human myeloid cells. They were derived from a fusion of the NS-1 plasmacytoma cell line with splenocytes from a mouse immunized with human acute myelomonocytic leukemia cells. MY3 and MY4 are expressed by normal monocytes and by greater than 90% of patients with acute monocytic leukemia or acute myelomonocytic leukemia, but are detected much less often on other types of myel...

  2. Molecular regulation of osteoclast activity.

    Bruzzaniti, Angela; Baron, Roland

    2006-06-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells derived from hematopoietic precursors that are primarily responsible for the degradation of mineralized bone during bone development, homeostasis and repair. In various skeletal disorders such as osteoporosis, hypercalcemia of malignancy, tumor metastases and Paget's disease, bone resorption by osteoclasts exceeds bone formation by osteoblasts leading to decreased bone mass, skeletal fragility and bone fracture. The overall rate of osteoclastic bone resorption is regulated either at the level of differentiation of osteoclasts from their monocytic/macrophage precursor pool or through the regulation of key functional proteins whose specific activities in the mature osteoclast control its attachment, migration and resorption. Thus, reducing osteoclast numbers and/or decreasing the bone resorbing activity of osteoclasts are two common therapeutic approaches for the treatment of hyper-resorptive skeletal diseases. In this review, several of the key functional players involved in the regulation of osteoclast activity will be discussed. PMID:16951988

  3. Specific Inhibition of the VEGFR-3 Tyrosine Kinase by SAR131675 Reduces Peripheral and Tumor Associated Immunosuppressive Myeloid Cells

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) represent prominent components in cancer progression. We previously showed that inhibition of the VEGFR-3 pathway by SAR131675 leads to reduction of TAM infiltration and tumor growth. Here, we found that treatment with SAR131675 prevents the accumulation of immunosuppressive blood and splenic MDSCs which express VEGFR-3, in 4T1 tumor bearing mice. Moreover we showed that soluble factors secreted by tumor cells promote MDSCs proliferation and differentiation into M2 polarized F4/80+ macrophages. In addition, cell sorting and transcriptomic analysis of tumor infiltrating myeloid cells revealed the presence of a heterogeneous population that could be divided into 3 subpopulations: (i) immature cells with a MDSC phenotype (GR1+/CD11b+/F4/80−); (ii) “immuno-incompetent” macrophages (F4/80high/CD86neg/MHCIILow) strongly expressing M2 markers such as Legumain, CD206 and Mgl1/2 and (iii) “immuno-competent”-M1 like macrophages (F4/80Low/CD86+/MHCIIHigh). SAR131675 treatment reduced MDSCs in lymphoid organs as well as F4/80High populations in tumors. Interestingly, in the tumor SAR131675 was able to increase the immunocompetent M1 like population (F4/80low). Altogether these results demonstrate that the specific VEGFR-3 inhibitor SAR131675 exerts its anti tumoral activity by acting on different players that orchestrate immunosuppression and cancer progression in a tumoral context: MDSCs in peripheral lymphoid organs and TAMs infiltrating the tumor

  4. Multiple helminth infection of the skin causes lymphocyte hypo-responsiveness mediated by Th2 conditioning of dermal myeloid cells.

    Peter C Cook

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the mammalian host by schistosome larvae occurs via the skin, although nothing is known about the development of immune responses to multiple exposures of schistosome larvae, and/or their excretory/secretory (E/S products. Here, we show that multiple (4x exposures, prior to the onset of egg laying by adult worms, modulate the skin immune response and induce CD4(+ cell hypo-responsiveness in the draining lymph node, and even modulate the formation of hepatic egg-induced granulomas. Compared to mice exposed to a single infection (1x, dermal cells from multiply infected mice (4x, were less able to support lymph node cell proliferation. Analysis of dermal cells showed that the most abundant in 4x mice were eosinophils (F4/80(+MHC-II(-, but they did not impact the ability of antigen presenting cells (APC to support lymphocyte proliferation to parasite antigen in vitro. However, two other cell populations from the dermal site of infection appear to have a critical role. The first comprises arginase-1(+, Ym-1(+ alternatively activated macrophage-like cells, and the second are functionally compromised MHC-II(hi cells. Through the administration of exogenous IL-12 to multiply infected mice, we show that these suppressive myeloid cell phenotypes form as a consequence of events in the skin, most notably an enrichment of IL-4 and IL-13, likely resulting from an influx of RELMα-expressing eosinophils. We further illustrate that the development of these suppressive dermal cells is dependent upon IL-4Rα signalling. The development of immune hypo-responsiveness to schistosome larvae and their effect on the subsequent response to the immunopathogenic egg is important in appreciating how immune responses to helminth infections are modulated by repeated exposure to the infective early stages of development.

  5. Specific Inhibition of the VEGFR-3 Tyrosine Kinase by SAR131675 Reduces Peripheral and Tumor Associated Immunosuppressive Myeloid Cells

    Nicolas Espagnolle

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs represent prominent components in cancer progression. We previously showed that inhibition of the VEGFR-3 pathway by SAR131675 leads to reduction of TAM infiltration and tumor growth. Here, we found that treatment with SAR131675 prevents the accumulation of immunosuppressive blood and splenic MDSCs which express VEGFR-3, in 4T1 tumor bearing mice. Moreover we showed that soluble factors secreted by tumor cells promote MDSCs proliferation and differentiation into M2 polarized F4/80+ macrophages. In addition, cell sorting and transcriptomic analysis of tumor infiltrating myeloid cells revealed the presence of a heterogeneous population that could be divided into 3 subpopulations: (i immature cells with a MDSC phenotype (GR1+/CD11b+/F4/80−; (ii “immuno-incompetent” macrophages (F4/80high/CD86neg/MHCIILow strongly expressing M2 markers such as Legumain, CD206 and Mgl1/2 and (iii “immuno-competent”-M1 like macrophages (F4/80Low/CD86+/MHCIIHigh. SAR131675 treatment reduced MDSCs in lymphoid organs as well as F4/80High populations in tumors. Interestingly, in the tumor SAR131675 was able to increase the immunocompetent M1 like population (F4/80low. Altogether these results demonstrate that the specific VEGFR-3 inhibitor SAR131675 exerts its anti tumoral activity by acting on different players that orchestrate immunosuppression and cancer progression in a tumoral context: MDSCs in peripheral lymphoid organs and TAMs infiltrating the tumor.

  6. Specific Inhibition of the VEGFR-3 Tyrosine Kinase by SAR131675 Reduces Peripheral and Tumor Associated Immunosuppressive Myeloid Cells

    Espagnolle, Nicolas [UMR5273 INSERM U1031/CNRS/EFS StromaLab, Toulouse 31432 (France); Barron, Pauline; Mandron, Marie; Blanc, Isabelle; Bonnin, Jacques [Sanofi Recherche et Développement, Early to Candidate DPU, Toulouse 31036 (France); Agnel, Magali; Kerbelec, Erwan [Molecular Biology Unit, Biologics Department, Sanofi, Vitry-sur-Seine 94400 (France); Herault, Jean Pascal; Savi, Pierre; Bono, Françoise; Alam, Antoine, E-mail: antoine.alam@sanofi.com [Sanofi Recherche et Développement, Early to Candidate DPU, Toulouse 31036 (France)

    2014-02-28

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) represent prominent components in cancer progression. We previously showed that inhibition of the VEGFR-3 pathway by SAR131675 leads to reduction of TAM infiltration and tumor growth. Here, we found that treatment with SAR131675 prevents the accumulation of immunosuppressive blood and splenic MDSCs which express VEGFR-3, in 4T1 tumor bearing mice. Moreover we showed that soluble factors secreted by tumor cells promote MDSCs proliferation and differentiation into M2 polarized F4/80+ macrophages. In addition, cell sorting and transcriptomic analysis of tumor infiltrating myeloid cells revealed the presence of a heterogeneous population that could be divided into 3 subpopulations: (i) immature cells with a MDSC phenotype (GR1+/CD11b+/F4/80{sup −}); (ii) “immuno-incompetent” macrophages (F4/80{sup high}/CD86{sup neg}/MHCII{sup Low}) strongly expressing M2 markers such as Legumain, CD206 and Mgl1/2 and (iii) “immuno-competent”-M1 like macrophages (F4/80{sup Low}/CD86{sup +}/MHCII{sup High}). SAR131675 treatment reduced MDSCs in lymphoid organs as well as F4/80{sup High} populations in tumors. Interestingly, in the tumor SAR131675 was able to increase the immunocompetent M1 like population (F4/80{sup low}). Altogether these results demonstrate that the specific VEGFR-3 inhibitor SAR131675 exerts its anti tumoral activity by acting on different players that orchestrate immunosuppression and cancer progression in a tumoral context: MDSCs in peripheral lymphoid organs and TAMs infiltrating the tumor.

  7. Myeloid cell transmigration across the CNS vasculature triggers IL-1β-driven neuroinflammation during autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice.

    Lévesque, Sébastien A; Paré, Alexandre; Mailhot, Benoit; Bellver-Landete, Victor; Kébir, Hania; Lécuyer, Marc-André; Alvarez, Jorge Ivan; Prat, Alexandre; de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Keane, Robert W; Lacroix, Steve

    2016-05-30

    Growing evidence supports a role for IL-1 in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), but how it impacts neuroinflammation is poorly understood. We show that susceptibility to EAE requires activation of IL-1R1 on radiation-resistant cells via IL-1β secreted by bone marrow-derived cells. Neutrophils and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) are the main source of IL-1β and produce this cytokine as a result of their transmigration across the inflamed blood-spinal cord barrier. IL-1R1 expression in the spinal cord is found in endothelial cells (ECs) of the pial venous plexus. Accordingly, leukocyte infiltration at EAE onset is restricted to IL-1R1(+) subpial and subarachnoid vessels. In response to IL-1β, primary cultures of central nervous system ECs produce GM-CSF, G-CSF, IL-6, Cxcl1, and Cxcl2. Initiation of EAE or subdural injection of IL-1β induces a similar cytokine/chemokine signature in spinal cord vessels. Furthermore, the transfer of Gr1(+) cells on the spinal cord is sufficient to induce illness in EAE-resistant IL-1β knockout (KO) mice. Notably, transfer of Gr1(+) cells isolated from C57BL/6 mice induce massive recruitment of recipient myeloid cells compared with cells from IL-1β KO donors, and this recruitment translates into more severe paralysis. These findings suggest that an IL-1β-dependent paracrine loop between infiltrated neutrophils/MDMs and ECs drives neuroinflammation. PMID:27139491

  8. Regulation of alveolar procoagulant activity and permeability in direct acute lung injury by lung epithelial tissue factor.

    Shaver, Ciara M; Grove, Brandon S; Putz, Nathan D; Clune, Jennifer K; Lawson, William E; Carnahan, Robert H; Mackman, Nigel; Ware, Lorraine B; Bastarache, Julie A

    2015-11-01

    Tissue factor (TF) initiates the extrinsic coagulation cascade in response to tissue injury, leading to local fibrin deposition. Low levels of TF in mice are associated with increased severity of acute lung injury (ALI) after intratracheal LPS administration. However, the cellular sources of the TF required for protection from LPS-induced ALI remain unknown. In the current study, transgenic mice with cell-specific deletions of TF in the lung epithelium or myeloid cells were treated with intratracheal LPS to determine the cellular sources of TF important in direct ALI. Cell-specific deletion of TF in the lung epithelium reduced total lung TF expression to 39% of wild-type (WT) levels at baseline and to 29% of WT levels after intratracheal LPS. In contrast, there was no reduction of TF with myeloid cell TF deletion. Mice lacking myeloid cell TF did not differ from WT mice in coagulation, inflammation, permeability, or hemorrhage. However, mice lacking lung epithelial TF had increased tissue injury, impaired activation of coagulation in the airspace, disrupted alveolar permeability, and increased alveolar hemorrhage after intratracheal LPS. Deletion of epithelial TF did not affect alveolar permeability in an indirect model of ALI caused by systemic LPS infusion. These studies demonstrate that the lung epithelium is the primary source of TF in the lung, contributing 60-70% of total lung TF, and that lung epithelial, but not myeloid, TF may be protective in direct ALI. PMID:25884207

  9. Lymphoid to myeloid cell trans-differentiation is determined by C/EBP{beta} structure and post-translational modifications

    Stoilova, B; Kowenz-Leutz, E; Scheller, M.; Leutz, A

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor C/EBP{beta} controls differentiation, proliferation, and functionality of many cell types, including innate immune cells. A detailed molecular understanding of how C/EBP{beta} directs alternative cell fates remains largely elusive. A multitude of signal-dependent post-translational modifications (PTMs) differentially affect the protean C/EBP{beta} functions. In this study we apply an assay that converts primary mouse B lymphoid progenitors into myeloid cells in order ...

  10. Proteinase activity regulation by glycosaminoglycans

    Tersariol I.L.S.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available There are few reports concerning the biological role and the mechanisms of interaction between proteinases and carbohydrates other than those involved in clotting. It has been shown that the interplay of enzymes and glycosaminoglycans is able to modulate the activity of different proteases and also to affect their structures. From the large number of proteases belonging to the well-known protease families and also the variety of carbohydrates described as widely distributed, only few events have been analyzed more deeply. The term "family" is used to describe a group of proteases in which every member shows an evolutionary relationship to at least one other protease. This relationship may be evident throughout the entire sequence, or at least in that part of the sequence responsible for catalytic activity. The majority of proteases belong to the serine, cysteine, aspartic or metalloprotease families. By considering the existing limited proteolysis process, in addition to the initial idea that the proteinases participate only in digestive processes, it is possible to conclude that the function of the enzymes is strictly limited to the cleavage of intended substrates since the destruction of functional proteins would result in normal tissue damage. In addition, the location as well as the eventual regulation of protease activity promoted by glycosaminoglycans can play an essential role in the development of several physiopathological conditions.

  11. Platelets actively sequester angiogenesis regulators

    Lakka Klement, Giannoula; Yip, Tai-Tung; Cassiola, Flavia; Kikuchi, Lena; Cervi, David; Podust, Vladimir; Italiano, Joseph E.; Wheatley, Erin; Abou-Slaybi, Abdo; Bender, Elise; Almog, Nava; Kieran, Mark W.; Folkman, Judah

    2009-01-01

    Clinical trials with antiangiogenic agents have not been able to validate plasma or serum levels of angiogenesis regulators as reliable markers of cancer presence or therapeutic response. We recently reported that platelets contain numerous proteins that regulate angiogenesis. We now show that accumulation of angiogenesis regulators in platelets of animals bearing malignant tumors exceeds significantly their concentration in plasma or serum, as well as their levels in platelets from non–tumor...

  12. Triptolide induces apoptotic cell death of human cholangiocarcinoma cells through inhibition of myeloid cell leukemia-1

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), a devastating neoplasm, is highly resistant to current chemotherapies. CCA cells frequently overexpress the antiapoptotic protein myeloid cell leukemia-1(Mcl-1), which is responsible for its extraordinary ability to evade cell death. Triptolide, a bioactive ingredient extracted from Chinese medicinal plant, has been shown to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in several cancers. CCK-8 assay was performed to detect cell survival rate in vitro. DAPI staining and Flow cytometry were used to analyze apoptosis. Western blot was performed to determine the expression levels of caspase-3, caspase-7, caspase-9, PARP, and Mcl-1. Quantitative real-time PCR and immunofluorescence were used to detect the expression levels of Mcl-1. The nude mice xenograft model was used to evaluate the antitumor effect of triptolide in vivo. Triptolide reduced cell viability in cholangiocarcinoma cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with IC50 values of 12.6 ± 0.6 nM, 20.5 ± 4.2 nM, and 18.5 ± 0.7 nM at 48 h for HuCCT1, QBC939, and FRH0201 respectively. Triptolide induced apoptosis in CCA cell lines in part through mitochondrial pathway. Using quantitative real-time PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence, we have shown that triptolide downregulates Mcl-1 mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, triptolide inhibited the CCA growth in vivo. Triptolide has profound antitumor effect on CCA, probably by inducing apoptosis through inhibition of Mcl-1. Triptolide would be a promising therapeutic agent for CCA

  13. Infiltration of myeloid cells into decidua is a critical early event in the labour cascade and post-partum uterine remodelling.

    Shynlova, Oksana; Nedd-Roderique, Tamara; Li, Yunqing; Dorogin, Anna; Nguyen, Tina; Lye, Stephen J

    2013-02-01

    Leucocyte infiltration in the decidua (maternal-foetal interface) before, during and after term (TL) and preterm labour (PTL) was studied in mouse. We also investigated the mechanism of peripheral leucocyte recruitment into decidua by analysing the tissue cytokine profiles. Decidual tissues were collected during late gestation, TL and post-partum (PP). PTL was initiated on gestational day 15 by intrauterine injection of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 125 μg) or progesterone signalling antagonism by RU486. Animals were killed during PTL or PP. Decidua basalis was analysed using FACS and immunohistochemistry. Markers of myeloid cell differentiation (Gr1, Ly6G, Neu7/4, F4/80) were assessed to define tissue monocytes (M), neutrophils (N) and macrophages (Macs). Flow cytometry revealed a significant (P decidual Macs prior to TL; M and N numbers increased during TL and further increased during PP, which correlated with immunohistochemistry data. Massive influx of N, but not Macs and M, was detected by FACS during LPS-PTL (P Decidual infiltration during TL and RU486-PTL was accompanied by an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL1b and IL6) and CCL2 chemokine; LPS-PTL showed increases in multiple cytokines. PP period following TL and PTL was associated with further up-regulation of multiple cytokines/chemokines (P decidual involution. PMID:23379349

  14. Cardiac-Restricted IGF-1Ea Overexpression Reduces the Early Accumulation of Inflammatory Myeloid Cells and Mediates Expression of Extracellular Matrix Remodelling Genes after Myocardial Infarction

    Enrique Gallego-Colon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Strategies to limit damage and improve repair after myocardial infarct remain a major therapeutic goal in cardiology. Our previous studies have shown that constitutive expression of a locally acting insulin-like growth factor-1 Ea (IGF-1Ea propeptide promotes functional restoration after cardiac injury associated with decreased scar formation. In the current study, we investigated the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms behind the enhanced functional recovery. We observed improved cardiac function in mice overexpressing cardiac-specific IGF-1Ea as early as day 7 after myocardial infarction. Analysis of gene transcription revealed that supplemental IGF-1Ea regulated expression of key metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9, their inhibitors (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2, and collagen types (Col 1α1 and Col 1α3 in the first week after injury. Infiltration of inflammatory cells, which direct the remodelling process, was also altered; in particular there was a notable reduction in inflammatory Ly6C+ monocytes at day 3 and an increase in anti-inflammatory CD206+ macrophages at day 7. Taken together, these results indicate that the IGF-1Ea transgene shifts the balance of innate immune cell populations early after infarction, favouring a reduction in inflammatory myeloid cells. This correlates with reduced extracellular matrix remodelling and changes in collagen composition that may confer enhanced scar elasticity and improved cardiac function.

  15. Hepatic ischemia and reperfusion injury in the absence of myeloid cell-derived COX-2 in mice.

    Sergio Duarte

    Full Text Available Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 is a mediator of hepatic ischemia and reperfusion injury (IRI. While both global COX-2 deletion and pharmacologic COX-2 inhibition ameliorate liver IRI, the clinical use of COX-2 inhibitors has been linked to increased risks of heart attack and stroke. Therefore, a better understanding of the role of COX-2 in different cell types may lead to improved therapeutic strategies for hepatic IRI. Macrophages of myeloid origin are currently considered to be important sources of the COX-2 in damaged livers. Here, we used a Cox-2flox conditional knockout mouse (COX-2-M/-M to examine the function of COX-2 expression in myeloid cells during liver IRI. COX-2-M/-M mice and their WT control littermates were subjected to partial liver ischemia followed by reperfusion. COX-2-M/-M macrophages did not express COX-2 upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation and COX-2-M/-M livers showed reduced levels of COX-2 protein post-IRI. Nevertheless, selective deletion of myeloid cell-derived COX-2 failed to ameliorate liver IRI; serum transaminases and histology were comparable in both COX-2-M/-M and WT mice. COX-2-M/-M livers, like WT livers, developed extensive necrosis, vascular congestion, leukocyte infiltration and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 expression post-reperfusion. In addition, myeloid COX-2 deletion led to a transient increase in IL-6 levels after hepatic reperfusion, when compared to controls. Administration of celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, resulted in significantly improved liver function and histology in both COX-2-M/-M and WT mice post-reperfusion, providing evidence that COX-2-mediated liver IRI is caused by COX-2 derived from a source(s other than myeloid cells. In conclusion, these results support the view that myeloid COX-2, including myeloid-macrophage COX-2, is not responsible for the hepatic IRI phenotype.

  16. Mac-1low early myeloid cells in the bone marrow-derived SP fraction migrate into injured skeletal muscle and participate in muscle regeneration

    Recent studies have shown that bone marrow (BM) cells, including the BM side population (BM-SP) cells that enrich hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), are incorporated into skeletal muscle during regeneration, but it is not clear how and what kinds of BM cells contribute to muscle fiber regeneration. We found that a large number of SP cells migrated from BM to muscles following injury in BM-transplanted mice. These BM-derived SP cells in regenerating muscles expressed different surface markers from those of HSCs and could not reconstitute the mouse blood system. BM-derived SP/Mac-1low cells increased in number in regenerating muscles following injury. Importantly, our co-culture studies with activated satellite cells revealed that this fraction carried significant potential for myogenic differentiation. By contrast, mature inflammatory (Mac-1high) cells showed negligible myogenic activities. Further, these BM-derived SP/Mac-1low cells gave rise to mononucleate myocytes, indicating that their myogenesis was not caused by stochastic fusion with host myogenic cells, although they required cell-to-cell contact with myogenic cells for muscle differentiation. Taken together, our data suggest that neither HSCs nor mature inflammatory cells, but Mac-1low early myeloid cells in the BM-derived SP fraction, play an important role in regenerating skeletal muscles

  17. Regulation of nuclear and radiological activities

    The paper presents a review of the Moldovan regulatory framework regarding nuclear and radiological activities and of the competence of state regulatory authority - the National Agency for the Regulation of Nuclear and Radiological Activities.

  18. GITR Activation Positively Regulates Immune Responses against Toxoplasma gondii

    Costa, Frederico R. C.; Mota, Caroline M.; Santiago, Fernanda M.; Silva, Murilo V.; Ferreira, Marcela D.; Fonseca, Denise M.; Silva, João S.; Mineo, José R.; Mineo, Tiago W. P.

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a widespread parasite responsible for causing clinical diseases especially in pregnant and immunosuppressed individuals. Glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor (GITR), which is also known as TNFRS18 and belongs to the TNF receptor superfamily, is found to be expressed in various cell types of the immune system and provides an important costimulatory signal for T cells and myeloid cells. However, the precise role of this receptor in the context of T. gondii infection remains elusive. Therefore, the current study investigated the role of GITR activation in the immunoregulation mechanisms induced during the experimental infection of mice with T. gondii. Our data show that T. gondii infection slightly upregulates GITR expression in Treg cells and B cells, but the most robust increment in expression was observed in macrophages and dendritic cells. Interestingly, mice infected and treated with an agonistic antibody anti-GITR (DTA-1) presented a robust increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine production at preferential sites of parasite replication, which was associated with the decrease in latent brain parasitism of mice under treatment with DTA-1. Several in vivo and in vitro analysis were performed to identify the cellular mechanisms involved in GITR activation upon infection, however no clear alterations were detected in the phenotype/function of macrophages, Tregs and B cells under treatment with DTA-1. Therefore, GITR appears as a potential target for intervention during infection by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, even though further studies are still necessary to better characterize the immune response triggered by GITR activation during T. gondii infection. PMID:27027302

  19. Development in research on triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 signal transduction%髓样细胞表达的触发受体-1与炎症信号转导的研究进展

    苏龙翔; 解立新

    2012-01-01

    The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) is a recently identified molecule involved in the cascade amplification of inflammatory response.Several microbial components can up-regulate the surface expression of TREM-1 and synergizes with the ligand of TREM-1 in activating this receptor.Activation via TREM-1 induces production of pro-inflammatory cytokices and related inflammatory responses because TREM-1 can noticeably amplify the inflammatory response in endotoxemia arisen from lipopolysaccharide (LPS).There are lots of investigations about the TREM-1 activation signal pathway that have been done and have shown some progress.Otherwise,TREM-1 synergizes with the Toll-like receptors signaling pathway in amplifying the inflammatory response mediated by LPS,but the specific mechanism is not clear enough.In this review,we will focus on the mechanism of TREM-1 signal transduction,clarifying the function of some relative signal moleculars such as TLR,DAP-12,MAPKs,NTAL,CARD9,NLRs.TREM-1 signal transduction mechanism in-depth study will further clarify the pathogenesis of sepsis and to find new therapeutic targets.%研究表明髓样细胞表达的触发受体-1(TREM-1)参与了炎性反应的级联放大过程.细菌的某些成分可以上调细胞表面TREM-1的表达,并且能和TREM-1配体协同激活TREM-1受体向下游传递信号.TREM-1被激活后会诱导前炎性因子的产生并引起相关的炎症反应.由于TREM-1是明显放大内毒素脂多糖(LPS)所引起的炎性反应的关键介质,因此对于TREM-1激活炎症信号通路的研究取得了一定的进展.然而,TREM-1在协同Toll样受体激活炎性反应的信号通路的具体机制尚未完全明晰.专注于TREM-1的信号转导,阐明与此通路相关的信号分子,如TLR、DAP-12、MAPKs、NTAL、CARD9、NLRs的作用,为进一步揭示脓毒症的发病机制并寻找新的治疗靶点.

  20. BSAP Can Repress Enhancer Activity by Targeting PU.1 Function

    Maitra, Shanak; Atchison, Michael

    2000-01-01

    PU.1 and BSAP are transcription factors crucial for proper B-cell development. Absence of PU.1 results in loss of B, T, and myeloid cells, while absence of BSAP results in an early block in B-cell differentiation. Both of these proteins bind to the immunoglobulin κ chain 3′ enhancer, which is developmentally regulated during B-cell differentiation. We find here that BSAP can repress 3′ enhancer activity. This repression can occur in plasmacytoma lines or in a non-B-cell line in which the enha...

  1. Macrophage activation and differentiation signals regulate schlafen-4 gene expression: evidence for Schlafen-4 as a modulator of myelopoiesis.

    Wendy J van Zuylen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ten mouse and six human members of the Schlafen (Slfn gene family all contain an AAA domain. Little is known of their function, but previous studies suggest roles in immune cell development. In this report, we assessed Slfn regulation and function in macrophages, which are key cellular regulators of innate immunity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Multiple members of the Slfn family were up-regulated in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM by the Toll-like Receptor (TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS, the TLR3 agonist Poly(I∶C, and in disease-affected joints in the collagen-induced model of rheumatoid arthritis. Of these, the most inducible was Slfn4. TLR agonists that signal exclusively through the MyD88 adaptor protein had more modest effects on Slfn4 mRNA levels, thus implicating MyD88-independent signalling and autocrine interferon (IFN-β in inducible expression. This was supported by the substantial reduction in basal and LPS-induced Slfn4 mRNA expression in IFNAR-1⁻/⁻ BMM. LPS causes growth arrest in macrophages, and other Slfn family genes have been implicated in growth control. Slfn4 mRNA levels were repressed during macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF-1-mediated differentiation of bone marrow progenitors into BMM. To determine the role of Slfn4 in vivo, we over-expressed the gene specifically in macrophages in mice using a csf1r promoter-driven binary expression system. Transgenic over-expression of Slfn4 in myeloid cells did not alter macrophage colony formation or proliferation in vitro. Monocyte numbers, as well as inflammatory macrophages recruited to the peritoneal cavity, were reduced in transgenic mice that specifically over-expressed Slfn4, while macrophage numbers and hematopoietic activity were increased in the livers and spleens. CONCLUSIONS: Slfn4 mRNA levels were up-regulated during macrophage activation but down-regulated during differentiation. Constitutive Slfn4 expression in the

  2. Regulation of ROCK Activity in Cancer

    Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Wewer, Ulla M; Yoneda, Atsuko

    2013-01-01

    , these findings demonstrate additional modes to regulate ROCK activity. This review describes the molecular mechanisms of ROCK activity regulation in cancer, with emphasis on ROCK isoform-specific regulation and interaction partners, and discusses the potential of ROCKs as therapeutic targets in cancer.......Cancer-associated changes in cellular behavior, such as modified cell-cell contact, increased migratory potential, and generation of cellular force, all require alteration of the cytoskeleton. Two homologous mammalian serine/threonine kinases, Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK I and II), are key...... regulators of the actin cytoskeleton acting downstream of the small GTPase Rho. ROCK is associated with cancer progression, and ROCK protein expression is elevated in several types of cancer. ROCKs exist in a closed, inactive conformation under quiescent conditions, which is changed to an open, active...

  3. Melanoma cell expression of CD200 inhibits tumor formation and lung metastasis via inhibition of myeloid cell functions.

    Fatemeh Talebian

    Full Text Available CD200 is a cell surface glycoprotein that functions through engaging CD200 receptor on cells of the myeloid lineage and inhibits their functions. Expression of CD200 has been implicated in a variety of human cancer cells including melanoma cells and has been thought to play a protumor role. To investigate the role of cancer cell expression of CD200 in tumor formation and metastasis, we generated CD200-positive and CD200-negative B16 melanoma cells. Subcutaneous injection of CD200-positive B16 melanoma cells inhibited tumor formation and growth in C57BL/6 mice but not in Rag1⁻/⁻C57BL/6 mice. However, i.v. injection of CD200-positive B16 melanoma cells dramatically inhibited tumor foci formation in the lungs of both C57BL/6 and Rag1⁻/⁻C57BL6 mice. Flow cytometry analysis revealed higher expression of CD200R in Gr1⁺ myeloid cells in the lung than in peripheral myeloid cells. Depletion of Gr1⁺ cells or stimulation of CD200R with an agonistic antibody in vivo dramatically inhibited tumor foci formation in the lungs. In addition, treatment with tumor antigen specific CD4 or CD8 T cells or their combination yielded a survival advantage for CD200 positive tumor bearing mice over mice bearing CD200-negative tumors. Taken together, we have revealed a novel role for CD200-CD200R interaction in inhibiting tumor formation and metastasis. Targeting CD200R may represent a novel approach for cancer immunotherapy.

  4. HIF-α/MIF and NF-κB/IL-6 Axes Contribute to the Recruitment of CD11b+Gr-1+ Myeloid Cells in Hypoxic Microenvironment of HNSCC

    Guiquan Zhu; Yaling Tang; Ning Geng; Min Zheng; Jian Jiang; Ling Li; Kaide Li; Zhengge Lei; Wei Chen; Yunlong Fan; Xiangrui Ma; Longjiang Li; Xiaoyi Wang; Xinhua Liang

    2014-01-01

    CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells have gained much attention due to their roles in tumor immunity suppression as well as promotion of angiogenesis, invasion, and metastases. However, the mechanisms by which CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells recruit to the tumor site have not been well clarified. In the present study, we showed that hypoxia could stimulate the migration of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells through increased production of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) by head an...

  5. Dendritic Cells Expressing Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 Correlate with Plaque Stability in Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Patients with Carotid Stenosis

    Shao, Zhifei; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease with atherosclerotic plaques containing inflammatory cells, including T-lymphocytes, dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages that are responsible for progression and destabilization of atherosclerotic plaques. Stressed cells undergoing necrosis release molecules that act as endogenous danger signals to alert and activate innate immune cells. In atherosclerotic tissue the number of DCs increases with the progression of the lesion and produce several inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM)-1 plays a crucial role in inflammation. However, relationship of DCs and the role of TREM-1 with the stability of atherosclerotic plaques have not been examined. In this study, we investigated the heterogeneity of the plaque DCs, myeloid (mDC1 and mDC2) and plasmacytoid (pDCs), and examined the expression of TREM-1 and their co-localization with DCs in the plaques from symptomatic (S) and asymptomatic (AS) patients with carotid stenosis. We found increased expression of HLA-DR, fascin, and TREM-1 and decreased expression of TREM-2 and α-smooth muscle actin in S compared to AS atherosclerotic carotid plaques. Both TREM-1 and fascin were co-localized suggesting increased expression of TREM-1 in plaque DCs of S compared to AS patients. These data were supported by increased mRNA transcripts of TREM-1 and decreased mRNA transcripts of TREM-2 in carotid plaques of S compared to AS patients. There was higher density of both CD1c+ mDC1 and CD141+ mDC2 in the carotid plaques from AS compared to S patients, where as the density of CD303+ pDCs were higher in the carotid plaques of S compared to AS patients. These findings suggest a potential role of pDCs and TREM-1 in atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability. Thus, newer therapies could be developed to selectively block TREM-1 for stabilizing atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27148736

  6. Molecular regulation of telomerase activity in aging

    Craig Nicholls; He Li; Jian-Qiu Wang; Jun-Ping Liu

    2011-01-01

    The process of aging is mitigated by the maintenance and repair of chromosome ends (telomeres),resulting in extended lifespan.This review examines the molecular mechanisms underlying the actions and regulation of the enzyme telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT),which functions as the primary mechanism of telomere maintenance and regulates cellular life expectancy.Underpinning increased cell proliferation,telomerase is also a key factor in facilitating cancer cell immortalization.The review focuses on aspects of hormonal regulations of telomerase,and the intraceilular pathways that converge to regulate telomerase activity with an emphasis on molecular interactions at protein and gene levels.In addition,the basic structure and function of two key telomerase enzyme components-the catalytic subunit TERT and the template RNA (TERC) are discussed briefly.

  7. Regulating the regulators: modulators of transcription factor activity.

    Everett, Logan; Hansen, Matthew; Hannenhalli, Sridhar

    2010-01-01

    Gene transcription is largely regulated by DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs). However, the TF activity itself is modulated via, among other things, post-translational modifications (PTMs) by specific modification enzymes in response to cellular stimuli. TF-PTMs thus serve as "molecular switchboards" that map upstream signaling events to the downstream transcriptional events. An important long-term goal is to obtain a genome-wide map of "regulatory triplets" consisting of a TF, target gene, and a modulator gene that specifically modulates the regulation of the target gene by the TF. A variety of genome-wide data sets can be exploited by computational methods to obtain a rough map of regulatory triplets, which can guide directed experiments. However, a prerequisite to developing such computational tools is a systematic catalog of known instances of regulatory triplets. We first describe PTM-Switchboard, a recent database that stores triplets of genes such that the ability of one gene (the TF) to regulate a target gene is dependent on one or more PTMs catalyzed by a third gene, the modifying enzyme. We also review current computational approaches to infer regulatory triplets from genome-wide data sets and conclude with a discussion of potential future research. PTM-Switchboard is accessible at http://cagr.pcbi.upenn.edu/PTMswitchboard / PMID:20827600

  8. Specific Btk inhibition suppresses B cell- and myeloid cell-mediated arthritis

    Di Paolo, Julie A; Huang, Tao; Balazs, Mercedesz; Barbosa, James; Barck, Kai H; Bravo, Brandon J; Carano, Richard A.D.; Darrow, James; Davies, Douglas R; DeForge, Laura E; Diehl, Lauri; Ferrando, Ronald; Gallion, Steven L; Giannetti, Anthony M; Gribling, Peter; Hurez, Vincent; Hymowitz, Sarah G; Jones, Randall; Kropf, Jeffrey E; Lee, Wyne P; Maciejewski, Patricia M; Mitchell, Scott A; Rong, Hong; Staker, Bart L; Whitney, J Andrew; Yeh, Sherry; Young, Wendy B; Yu, Christine; Zhang, Juan; Reif, Karin; Currie, Kevin S [CGI; (Emerald); (Genentech)

    2011-08-29

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Btk mediates inflammation are poorly understood. Here we describe the discovery of CGI1746, a small-molecule Btk inhibitor chemotype with a new binding mode that stabilizes an inactive nonphosphorylated enzyme conformation. CGI1746 has exquisite selectivity for Btk and inhibits both auto- and transphosphorylation steps necessary for enzyme activation. Using CGI1746, we demonstrate that Btk regulates inflammatory arthritis by two distinct mechanisms. CGI1746 blocks B cell receptor–dependent B cell proliferation and in prophylactic regimens reduces autoantibody levels in collagen-induced arthritis. In macrophages, Btk inhibition abolishes FcγRIII-induced TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6 production. Accordingly, in myeloid- and FcγR-dependent autoantibody-induced arthritis, CGI1746 decreases cytokine levels within joints and ameliorates disease. These results provide new understanding of the function of Btk in both B cell– or myeloid cell–driven disease processes and provide a compelling rationale for targeting Btk in rheumatoid arthritis.

  9. Reciprocal Regulation between Enterovirus 71 and the NLRP3 Inflammasome

    Hongbin Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is the major etiological agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD. Early studies showed that EV71-infected patients with severe complications exhibited elevated plasma levels of IL-1β, indicating that EV71 may activate inflammasomes. Our current study demonstrates that the NLRP3 inflammasome plays a protective role against EV71 infection of mice in vivo. EV71 replication in myeloid cells results in the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and secretion of IL-1β. Conversely, EV71 counteracts inflammasome activation through cleavage of NLRP3 by viral proteases 2A and 3C, which cleave NLRP3 protein at the G493-L494 or Q225-G226 junction, respectively. Moreover, EV71 3C interacts with NLRP3 and inhibits IL-1β secretion when expressed in mammalian cells. These results thus reveal a set of reciprocal regulations between enterovirus 71 and the NLRP3 inflammasome.

  10. Commission of energy regulation. 2004 activity report

    The commission of energy regulation (CRE) is an independent administrative authority in charge of the control of the operation of gas and electricity markets. This document is the fifth activity report of CRE and covers the July 1, 2003 - June 30, 2004 period, which corresponds to the era of opening of energy markets as a consequence of the enforcement of the June 26, 2003 European directive. In the framework of the stakes made by energy markets liberalization, this document presents the situation of the gas and electricity markets during this period (European framework, regulation of both markets, public utility mission..) and describes CRE's means for the monitoring of these markets. (J.S.)

  11. Pathologic and Protective Roles for Microglial Subsets and Bone Marrow- and Blood-Derived Myeloid Cells in Central Nervous System Inflammation

    Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Cédile, Oriane; Jensen, Kirstine Nolling;

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a series of processes designed for eventual clearance of pathogens and repair of damaged tissue. In the context of autoimmune recognition, inflammatory processes are usually considered to be pathological. This is also true for inflammatory responses in the central nervous system...... (CNS). However, as in other tissues, neuroinflammation can have beneficial as well as pathological outcomes. The complex role of encephalitogenic T cells in multiple sclerosis and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) may derive from heterogeneity of the myeloid cells with...... three populations of myeloid cells: CD11c(+) microglia, CD11c(-) microglia, and CD11c(+) blood-derived cells in terms of their pathological versus protective functions in the CNS of mice with EAE. Our data show that CNS-resident microglia include functionally distinct subsets that can be distinguished...

  12. Src regulates the activity of SIRT2

    Choi, You Hee [College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Drug Development, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hangun [College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Life and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sunchon National University, Sunchon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Ho [College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Drug Development, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Yun-Hye, E-mail: jinyune@hanmail.net [College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Drug Development, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwang Youl, E-mail: kwanglee@chonnam.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Drug Development, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Src decreases the protein levels of Sirt2. • Src inhibitor and knockdown of Src increase the protein levels of Sirt2. • Src interacts with and phosphorylates Sirt2. • Src regulate the activity of Sirt2. - Abstract: SIRT2 is a mammalian member of the Sirtuin family of NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylases. The tyrosine kinase Src is involved in a variety of cellular signaling pathways, leading to the induction of DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, and cytoskeletal reorganization. The function of SIRT2 is modulated by post-translational modifications; however, the precise molecular signaling mechanism of SIRT2 through interactions with c-Src has not yet been established. In this study, we investigated the potential regulation of SIRT2 function by c-Src. We found that the protein levels of SIRT2 were decreased by c-Src, and subsequently rescued by the addition of a Src specific inhibitor, SU6656, or by siRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Src. The c-Src interacts with and phosphorylates SIRT2 at Tyr104. c-Src also showed the ability to regulate the deacetylation activity of SIRT2. Investigation on the phosphorylation of SIRT2 suggested that this was the method of c-Src-mediated SIRT2 regulation.

  13. Anthrax toxin targeting of myeloid cells through the CMG2 receptor is essential for establishment of Bacillus anthracis infections in mice

    Liu, Shihui; Miller-Randolph, Sharmina; Crown, Devorah; Moayeri, Mahtab; Sastalla, Inka; Okugawa, Shu; Leppla, Stephen H.

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis kills through a combination of bacterial infection and toxemia. Anthrax toxin working via the CMG2 receptor mediates lethality late in infection, but its roles early in infection remain unclear. We generated myeloid-lineage specific CMG2-deficient mice to examine the roles of macrophages, neutrophils, and other myeloid cells in anthrax pathogenesis. Macrophages and neutrophils isolated from these mice were resistant to anthrax toxin. However, the myeloid-specific CMG2-defic...

  14. Prospective Evaluation of Procalcitonin, Soluble Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 and C-Reactive Protein in Febrile Patients with Autoimmune Diseases

    Lin, Chou-Han; Hsieh, Song-Chou; Keng, Li-Ta; Lee, Ho-Sheng; Chang, Hou-Tai; Liao, Wei-Yu; Ho, Chao-Chi; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Background Both procalcitonin (PCT) and soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1) have been investigated separately as indicators of infection in patients with autoimmune diseases. Our study simultaneously evaluated both PCT and sTREM-1 along with C-reactive protein (CRP) in febrile patients with autoimmune diseases. Methods Fifty-nine patients were enrolled in the study. The patients were categorized into the infection group (n = 24) or the disease flare group (n = 3...

  15. Regulation of nuclear activity in Kazakhstan

    Major factors, by which the radiation situation in Kazakhstan is formed, are: enterprises of nuclear fuel cycle, including uranium mining and milling activity and geological exploration of uranium; nuclear power plant and research reactors; residues of atmospheric and underground nuclear explosions, which were conducted for military and peaceful purposes at the different test sites; mining and milling of commercial minerals accompanied by radioactive substances; using of radioactive sources in industry, medicine, agriculture and scientific research. Since 1991, after getting of sovereignty there was started creation of own legislative basis of the country for the field of atomic energy use. It includes laws, regulation and standards for nuclear and radiation safety of nuclear installations, personnel, involved in the activity with using of atomic energy, population and environment. Applicable system of state regulation in this area, including the regulatory body in the field of atomic energy use and various ministries, was created. As a result of these reforms, regulatory activities were improved in the country. This paper presents the current matters of nuclear and radiation safety regulation in Kazakhstan. (author)

  16. Regulators of Slc4 bicarbonate transporter activity

    Ian M. Thornell

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Slc4 family of transporters is comprised of anion exchangers (AE1-4, Na-coupled bicarbonate transporters (NCBTs including electrogenic Na/bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCe1 and NBCe2, electroneutral Na/bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCn1 and NBCn2, and the electroneutral Na-driven Cl-bicarbonate exchanger (NDCBE, as well as a borate transporter (BTR1. These transporters regulate intracellular pH (pHi and contribute to steady-state pHi, but are also involved in other physiological processes including CO2 carriage by red blood cells and solute secretion/reabsorption across epithelia. Acid-base transporters function as either acid extruders or acid loaders, with the Slc4 proteins moving HCO3– either into or out of cells. According to results from both molecular and functional studies, multiple Slc4 proteins and/or associated splice variants with similar expected effects on pHi are often found in the same tissue or cell. Such apparent redundancy is likely to be physiologically important. In addition to regulating pHi, a HCO3– transporter contributes to a cell’s ability to fine tune the intracellular regulation of the cotransported/exchanged ion(s (e.g., Na+ or Cl–. In addition, functionally similar transporters or splice variants with different regulatory profiles will optimize pH physiology and solute transport under various conditions or within subcellular domains. Such optimization will depend on activated signaling pathways and transporter expression profiles. In this review, we will summarize and discuss both classical and more recently identified regulators of the Slc4 proteins. Some of these regulators include traditional second messengers, lipids, binding proteins, autoregulatory domains, and less conventional regulators. The material presented will provide insight into the diversity and physiological significance of multiple members within the Slc4 gene family.

  17. Myeloid-specific Fos-related antigen-1 regulates cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation, not emphysema, in mice.

    Vaz, Michelle; Rajasekaran, Subbiah; Potteti, Haranatha R; Reddy, Sekhar P

    2015-07-01

    Heightened lung inflammation is a cardinal feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Cigarette smoke (CS)-induced macrophage recruitment and activation, accompanied by abnormal secretion of a number of inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases, play a major role in the pathophysiology of COPD. The Fos-related antigen-1 (Fra-1) transcription factor differentially regulates several cellular processes that are implicated in COPD, such as inflammation and immune responses, cell proliferation and death, and extracellular remodeling. Although CS stimulates Fra-1 expression in the lung, the precise role of this transcription factor in the regulation of CS-induced lung inflammation in vivo is poorly understood. Here, we report that myeloid-specific Fra-1 signaling is important for CS-induced lung macrophagic inflammatory response. In response to chronic CS exposure, mice with Fra-1 specifically deleted in myeloid cells showed reduced levels of CS-induced lung macrophagic inflammation, accompanied by decreased expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines compared with their wild-type counterparts. Consistent with this result, bone marrow-derived Fra-1-null macrophages treated with CS showed decreased levels of proinflammatory mediators and matrix metalloproteinases. Interestingly, deletion of Fra-1 in myeloid cells did not affect the severity of emphysema. We propose that Fra-1 plays a key role in promoting chronic CS-induced lung macrophagic inflammation in vivo, and that targeting this transcription factor may be useful in dampening persistent lung inflammation in patients with COPD. PMID:25489966

  18. Myeloid Cell Nuclear Differentiation Antigen (MNDA) Expression Distinguishes Extramedullary Presentations of Myeloid Leukemia From Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm.

    Johnson, Ryan C; Kim, Jinah; Natkunam, Yasodha; Sundram, Uma; Freud, Aharon G; Gammon, Bryan; Cascio, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Myeloid neoplasms constitute one of the most common malignancies in adults. In most cases these proliferations initially manifest in the blood and marrow; however, extramedullary involvement may precede blood or marrow involvement in a subset of cases, making a definitive diagnosis challenging by morphologic and immunohistochemical assessment alone. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare, aggressive entity that frequently presents in extramedullary sites and can show morphologic and immunophenotypic overlap with myeloid neoplasms. Given that BPDCN and myeloid neoplasms may both initially present in extramedullary sites and that novel targeted therapies may be developed that exploit the unique molecular signature of BPDCN, new immunophenotypic markers that can reliably separate myeloid neoplasms from BPDCN are desirable. We evaluated the utility of myeloid cell nuclear differentiation antigen (MNDA) expression in a series of extramedullary myeloid leukemias (EMLs) and BPDCN. Forty biopsies containing EML and 19 biopsies containing BPDCN were studied by MNDA immunohistochemistry. The majority of myeloid neoplasms showed nuclear expression of MNDA (65%). In contrast, all cases of BPDCN lacked MNDA expression. These findings show that MNDA is expressed in the majority of EMLs and support the inclusion of MNDA immunohistochemistry in the diagnostic evaluation of blastic hematopoietic infiltrates, particularly when the differential diagnosis is between myeloid leukemia and BPDCN. PMID:26796502

  19. Discovery of Potent Myeloid Cell Leukemia 1 (Mcl-1) Inhibitors Using Fragment-Based Methods and Structure-Based Design

    Friberg, Anders [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Vigil, Dominico [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Zhao, Bin [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Daniels, R. Nathan [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Burke, Jason P. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Garcia-Barrantes, Pedro M. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Camper, DeMarco [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Chauder, Brian A. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Lee, Taekyu [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Olejniczak, Edward T. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Fesik, Stephen W. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2012-12-17

    Myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1), a member of the Bcl-2 family of proteins, is overexpressed and amplified in various cancers and promotes the aberrant survival of tumor cells that otherwise would undergo apoptosis. Here we describe the discovery of potent and selective Mcl-1 inhibitors using fragment-based methods and structure-based design. NMR-based screening of a large fragment library identified two chemically distinct hit series that bind to different sites on Mcl-1. Members of the two fragment classes were merged together to produce lead compounds that bind to Mcl-1 with a dissociation constant of <100 nM with selectivity for Mcl-1 over Bcl-xL and Bcl-2. Structures of merged compounds when complexed to Mcl-1 were obtained by X-ray crystallography and provide detailed information about the molecular recognition of small-molecule ligands binding Mcl-1. The compounds represent starting points for the discovery of clinically useful Mcl-1 inhibitors for the treatment of a wide variety of cancers.

  20. Regulation of pokemon 1 activity by sumoylation.

    Roh, Hee-Eun; Lee, Min-Nyung; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Choi, Won-Il; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Yu, Mi-Young; Hur, Man-Wook

    2007-01-01

    Pokemon 1 is a proto-oncogenic transcriptional regulator that contains a POZ domain at the N-terminus and four Kruppel-like zinc fingers at the C-terminus. Pokemon 1 plays an important role in adipogenesis, osteogenesis, oncogenesis, and transcription of NF-kB responsive genes. Recent reports have shown that biological activities of transcription factors are regulated by sumolylation. We investigated whether Pokemon 1 is post-translationally modified by sumoylation and whether the modification affects Pokemon 1's transcriptional properties. We found that Pokemon 1 is sumoylated in vitro and in vivo. Upon careful analysis of the amino acid sequence of Pokemon 1, we found ten potential sumoylation sites located at lysines 61, 354, 371, 379, 383, 396, 486, 487, 536 and 539. We mutated each of these amino acids into arginine and tested whether the mutation could affect the transcriptional properties of Pokemon 1 on the Pokemon 1 responsive genes, such as ADH5/FDH and pG5-FRE-Luc. Wild-type Pokemon 1 potently represses transcription of ADH5/FDH. Most of the mutants, however, were weaker transcription repressors and repressed transcription 1.3-3.3 fold less effective. Although potential sumoylation sites were located close to the DNA binding domain or the nuclear localization sequence, the mutations did not alter nuclear localization or DNA binding activity. In addition, on the pG5-FRE-Luc test promoter construct, ectopic SUMO-1 repressed transcription in the presence of Pokemon 1. The sumoylation target lysine residue at amino acid 61, which is located in the middle of the POZ-domain, is important because K61R mutation resulted in a much weaker molecular interaction with corepressors. Our data suggest that Pokemon 1's activity as a transcription factor may involve sumoylation, and that sumoylation might be important in the regulation of transcription by Pokemon 1. PMID:17595526

  1. Regulation of polymorphonuclear cell activation by thrombopoietin.

    Brizzi, M F; Battaglia, E.; Rosso, A.; Strippoli, P; Montrucchio, G; Camussi, G.; Pegoraro, L

    1997-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) regulates early and late stages of platelet formation as well as platelet activation. TPO exerts its effects by binding to the receptor, encoded by the protooncogene c-mpl, that is expressed in a large number of cells of hematopoietic origin. In this study, we evaluated the expression of c-Mpl and the effects of TPO on human polymorphonuclear cells (PMN). We demonstrate that PMN express the TPO receptor c-Mpl and that TPO induces STAT1 tyrosine phosphorylation and the for...

  2. Therapeutic Effects of Myeloid Cell Leukemia-1 siRNA on Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Hadi Karami

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Up-regulation of Mcl-1, a known anti-apoptotic protein, is associated with the survival and progression of various malignancies including leukemia. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Mcl-1 small interference RNA (siRNA on the proliferation and apoptosis of HL-60 acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. Methods: siRNA transfection was performed using Lipofectamine™2000 reagent. Relative mRNA and protein expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Trypan blue assay was performed to assess tumor cell proliferation after siRNA transfection. The cytotoxic effect of Mcl-1 siRNA on leukemic cells was measured using MTT assay. Apoptosis was detected using ELISA cell death assay. Results: Mcl-1 siRNA clearly lowered both Mcl-1 mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent manner, leading to marked inhibition of cell survival and proliferation. Furthermore, Mcl-1 down-regulation significantly enhanced the extent of HL-60 apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the down-regulation of Mcl-1 by siRNA can effectively trigger apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of leukemic cells. Therefore, Mcl-1 siRNA may be a potent adjuvant in AML therapy.

  3. Regulation of Aicda expression and AID activity.

    Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2013-03-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is expressed in a B cell differentiation stage-specific fashion and is essential for immunoglobulin (Ig) gene class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). CSR and SHM play a central role in the maturation of antibody and autoantibody responses. AID displays a mutagenic activity by catalyzing targeted deamination of deoxycytidine (dC) residues in DNA resulting in dU:dG mismatches, which are processed into point-mutations in SHM or double-strand breaks (DSBs) in CSR. Although AID specifically targets the Ig gene loci (IgH, Igκ and Igλ), it can also home into a wide array of non-Ig genes in B-and non-B-cell backgrounds. Aberrant expression of AID is associated with multiple diseases such as allergy, inflammation, autoimmunity and cancer. In autoimmune systemic lupus erythematosus, dysregulated AID expression underpins increased CSR, SHM and autoantibody production. As a potent mutator, AID is under stringent transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation. AID is also regulated in its targeting and enzymatic function. In resting naïve or memory B cells, AID transcripts and protein are undetectable. These, however, are readily and significantly up-regulated in B cells induced to undergo CSR and/or SHM. Transcription factors, such as HoxC4 and NF-κB, which are up-regulated in a B cell lineage-and/or differentiation stage-specific manner, regulate the induction of AID. HoxC4 induces AID expression by directly binding to the AID gene promoter through an evolutionarily conserved 5'-ATTT-3' motif. HoxC4 is induced by the same stimuli that induce AID and CSR. It is further up-regulated by estrogen through three estrogen responsive elements in its promoter region. The targeting of AID to switch (S) regions is mediated by 14-3-3 adaptor proteins, which specifically bind to 5'-AGCT-3' repeats that are exist at high frequency in S region cores. Like HoxC4, 14-3-3 adaptors are induced

  4. Hepatopoietin Cn suppresses apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by up-regulating myeloid cell leukemia-1

    Chu-Tse; Wu

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the role of hepatopoietin Cn(HPPCn) in apoptosis of hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC)cells and its mechanism. METHODS:Two human HCC cell lines,SMMC7721 and HepG2,were used in this study.Immunostaining, Western blotting and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay were conducted to identify the expression of HPPCn and the existence of an autocrine loop of HPPCn/ HPPCn receptor in SMMC7721 and HepG2.Apoptotic cells were detected using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated Annexin V and propidiu...

  5. Phosphorylation regulates coilin activity and RNA association

    Hanna J. Broome

    2013-02-01

    The Cajal body (CB is a domain of concentrated components found within the nucleus of cells in an array of species that is functionally important for the biogenesis of telomerase and small nuclear ribonucleoproteins. The CB is a dynamic structure whose number and size change during the cell cycle and is associated with other nuclear structures and gene loci. Coilin, also known as the marker protein for the CB, is a phosphoprotein widely accepted for its role in maintaining CB integrity. Recent studies have been done to further elucidate functional activities of coilin apart from its structural role in the CB in an attempt to explore the rationale for coilin expression in cells that have few CBs or lack them altogether. Here we show that the RNA association profile of coilin changes in mitosis with respect to that during interphase. We provide evidence of transcriptional and/or processing dysregulation of several CB-related RNA transcripts as a result of ectopic expression of both wild-type and phosphomutant coilin proteins. We also show apparent changes in transcription and/or processing of these transcripts upon coilin knockdown in both transformed and primary cell lines. Additionally, we provide evidence of specific coilin RNase activity regulation, on both U2 and hTR transcripts, by phosphorylation of a single residue, serine 489. Collectively, these results point to additional functions for coilin that are regulated by phosphorylation.

  6. Interferon regulatory factor-8 modulates the development of tumour-induced CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells.

    Stewart, Trina J; Greeneltch, Kristy M; Reid, Julia E; Liewehr, David J; Steinberg, Seth M; Liu, Kebin; Abrams, Scott I

    2009-09-01

    Tumour-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) promote immune suppression and mediate tumour progression. However, the molecular basis for the generation of MDSC, which in mice co-express the CD11b(+) and Gr-1(+) cell surface markers remains unclear. Because CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells expand during progressive tumour growth, this suggests that tumour-induced events alter signalling pathways that affect normal myeloid cell development. Interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF-8), a member of the IFN-gamma regulatory factor family, is essential for normal myelopoiesis. We therefore examined whether IRF-8 modulated tumour-induced CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cell development or accumulation using both implantable (4T1) and transgenic (MMTV-PyMT) mouse models of mammary tumour growth. In the 4T1 model, both splenic and bone marrow-derived CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells of tumour-bearing mice displayed a marked reduction in IRF-8 expression compared to control populations. A causal link between IRF-8 expression and the emergence of tumour-induced CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells was explored in vivo using a double transgenic (dTg) mouse model designed to express transgenes for both IRF-8 and mammary carcinoma development. Despite the fact that tumour growth was unaffected, splenomegaly, as well as the frequencies and absolute numbers of CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells were significantly lower in dTg mice when compared with single transgenic tumour-bearing mice. Overall, these data reveal that IRF-8 plays an important role in tumour-induced development and/or accumulation of CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells, and establishes a molecular basis for the potential manipulation of these myeloid populations for cancer therapy. PMID:20196788

  7. Endoglin regulates cyclooxygenase-2 expression and activity.

    Jerkic, Mirjana; Rivas-Elena, Juan V; Santibanez, Juan F; Prieto, Marta; Rodríguez-Barbero, Alicia; Perez-Barriocanal, Fernando; Pericacho, Miguel; Arévalo, Miguel; Vary, Calvin P H; Letarte, Michelle; Bernabeu, Carmelo; López-Novoa, Jose M

    2006-08-01

    The endoglin heterozygous (Eng(+/-)) mouse, which serves as a model of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), was shown to express reduced levels of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) with impaired activity. Because of intricate changes in vasomotor function in the Eng(+/-) mice and the potential interactions between the NO- and prostaglandin-producing pathways, we assessed the expression and function of cyclooxygenase (COX) isoforms. A specific upregulation of COX-2 in the vascular endothelium and increased urinary excretion of prostaglandin E(2) were observed in the Eng(+/-) mice. Specific COX-2 inhibition with parecoxib transiently increased arterial pressure in Eng(+/-) but not in Eng(+/+) mice. Transfection of endoglin in L6E9 myoblasts, shown previously to stimulate eNOS expression, led to downregulation of COX-2 with no change in COX-1. In addition, COX-2 promoter activity and protein levels were inversely correlated with endoglin levels, in doxycyclin-inducible endothelial cells. Chronic NO synthesis inhibition with N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester induced a marked increase in COX-2 only in the normal Eng(+/+) mice. N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester also increased COX-2 expression and promoter activity in doxycyclin-inducible endoglin expressing endothelial cells, but not in control cells. The level of COX-2 expression following transforming growth factor-beta1 treatment was less in endoglin than in mock transfected L6E9 myoblasts and was higher in human endothelial cells silenced for endoglin expression. Our results indicate that endoglin is involved in the regulation of COX-2 activity. Furthermore, reduced endoglin levels and associated impaired NO production may be responsible, at least in part, for augmented COX-2 expression and activity in the Eng(+/-) mice. PMID:16840721

  8. Structural Basis for Plexin Activation and Regulation.

    Kong, Youxin; Janssen, Bert J C; Malinauskas, Tomas; Vangoor, Vamshidhar R; Coles, Charlotte H; Kaufmann, Rainer; Ni, Tao; Gilbert, Robert J C; Padilla-Parra, Sergi; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen; Jones, E Yvonne

    2016-08-01

    Class A plexins (PlxnAs) act as semaphorin receptors and control diverse aspects of nervous system development and plasticity, ranging from axon guidance and neuron migration to synaptic organization. PlxnA signaling requires cytoplasmic domain dimerization, but extracellular regulation and activation mechanisms remain unclear. Here we present crystal structures of PlxnA (PlxnA1, PlxnA2, and PlxnA4) full ectodomains. Domains 1-9 form a ring-like conformation from which the C-terminal domain 10 points away. All our PlxnA ectodomain structures show autoinhibitory, intermolecular "head-to-stalk" (domain 1 to domain 4-5) interactions, which are confirmed by biophysical assays, live cell fluorescence microscopy, and cell-based and neuronal growth cone collapse assays. This work reveals a 2-fold role of the PlxnA ectodomains: imposing a pre-signaling autoinhibitory separation for the cytoplasmic domains via intermolecular head-to-stalk interactions and supporting dimerization-based PlxnA activation upon ligand binding. More generally, our data identify a novel molecular mechanism for preventing premature activation of axon guidance receptors. PMID:27397516

  9. Basic principles for regulating nuclear activities

    The AECB has developed as its mission statement: 'To ensure that the use of nuclear energy in Canada does not pose undue risk to health, safety, security and the environment'. This report proposes eleven qualitative principles for regulating nuclear activities whose achievement would satisfy the broad policy enunciated in the statement. They would further provide a basis for the specific regulatory requirements expressed by the AECB in its Regulations and other documents. They would thus represent a connecting link between the policy enunciated in the mission statement and the requirements. The proposed principles are largely concerned with how the allowable risk should be set for members of the public, for industry workers, for society as a whole, and for the environment. In making these recommendations the risks from normal operation of the licensed facility and those from a possible serious accident are considered separately. The distribution of risk between geographic communities and between generations is also addressed in the proposed principles. These are listed in the final section of the report. 23 refs

  10. Neuropilin-1 mediates myeloid cell chemoattraction and influences retinal neuroimmune crosstalk

    Dejda, Agnieszka; Mawambo, Gaelle; Cerani, Agustin; Miloudi, Khalil; Shao, Zhuo; Daudelin, Jean-Francois; Boulet, Salix; Oubaha, Malika; Beaudoin, Felix; Akla, Naoufal; Henriques, Sullivan; Menard, Catherine; Stahl, Andreas; Delisle, Jean-Sébastien; Rezende, Flavio A.; Labrecque, Nathalie; Sapieha, Przemyslaw

    2014-01-01

    Immunological activity in the CNS is largely dependent on an innate immune response and is heightened in diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease. The molecular dynamics governing immune cell recruitment to sites of injury and disease in the CNS during sterile inflammation remain poorly defined. Here, we identified a subset of mononuclear phagocytes (MPs) that responds to local chemotactic cues that are conserved among central neurons, vessels, and immune cells. Patients suffering from late-stage proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) had elevated vitreous semaphorin 3A (SEMA3A). Using a murine model, we found that SEMA3A acts as a potent attractant for neuropilin-1–positive (NRP-1–positive) MPs. These proangiogenic MPs were selectively recruited to sites of pathological neovascularization in response to locally produced SEMA3A as well as VEGF. NRP-1–positive MPs were essential for disease progression, as NRP-1–deficient MPs failed to enter the retina in a murine model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR), a proxy for PDR. OIR mice with NRP-1–deficient MPs exhibited decreased vascular degeneration and diminished pathological preretinal neovascularization. Intravitreal administration of a NRP-1–derived trap effectively mimicked the therapeutic benefits observed in mice lacking NRP-1–expressing MPs. Our findings indicate that NRP-1 is an obligate receptor for MP chemotaxis, bridging neural ischemia to an innate immune response in neovascular retinal disease. PMID:25271625

  11. Expression of triggering receptor on myeloid cell 1 and histocompatibility complex molecules in sepsis and major abdominal surgery

    Nestor González-Roldán; Constantino López-Macías; Armando Isibasi; Eduardo Ferat-Osorio; Rosalía Aduna-Vicente; Isabel Wong-Baeza; Noemí Esquivel-Callejas; Horacio Astudillo-de la Vega; Patricio Sánchez-Fernández; Lourdes Arriaga-Pizano; Miguel Angel Villasís Keever

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the surface expression of triggering receptor on myeloid cell 1 (TREM-1), class Ⅱ major histocompatibility complex molecules (HLA-DR), andthe expression of the splicing variant (svTREM-1) ofTREM-1 in septic patients and those subjected to major abdominal surgery.METHODS: Using flow cytometry, we examined the surface expression of TREM-1 and HLA-DR in peripheral blood monocytes from 11 septic patients, 7 elective gastrointestinal surgical patients, and 10 healthy volunteers. svTREM-1 levels were analyzed by RT-PCR. RESULTS: Basal expression of TREM-1 and HLA-DR in healthy volunteers was 35.91±14.75 MFI and75.8±18.3%, respectively. In septic patients, TREM-1 expression was 59.9±23.9 MFI and HLA-DR expression was 44.39±20.25%, with a significant differencebetween healthy and septic groups (P<0.05) for bothmolecules. In the surgical patients, TREM-1 and HLA-DR expressions were 56.8±20.85 MFI and 71±13.8% before surgery and 72.65±29.92 MlFI and 72.82±22.55% after surgery. TREM-1 expression was significantly different(P = 0.0087) between the samples before and aftersurgery and svTREM-1 expression was 0.8590±0.1451 MF1, 0.8820±0.1460 MF1, and 2.210±0.7873MF1 in the healthy, surgical (after surgery) and septic groups, respectively. There was a significant difference (P = 0.048) in svTREM-1 expression between the healthy and surgical groups and the septic group.CONCLUSION: TREM-1 expression is increased during systemic inflammatory conditions such as sepsis and the postoperative phase. Simultaneous low expression of HLA-DR molecules correlates with the severity of illness and increases susceptibility to infection. Additionally, TREM-1 expression is distinctly different in surgical patients at different stages of the inflammatory response before and after surgery. Thus, surface TREM-1 appears to be an endogenous signal during the course of the inflammatory response. svTREM-1 expression is significantly increased during sepsis, appearing to be

  12. Bcl-xL and Myeloid cell leukaemia-1 contribute to apoptosis resistance of colorectal cancer cells

    Henning Schulze-Bergkamen; Steffen Heeger; Peter R Galle; Markus Moehler; Roland Ehrenberg; Lothar Hickmann; Binje Vick; Toni Urbanik; Christoph C Schimanski; Martin R Berger; Arno Schad; Achim Weber

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To explore the role of Bd-x,and Myeloid cell leukaemia (Mcl)-1 for the apoptosis resistance of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) cells towards current treatment modalities.METHODS: BCl-XL and Mcl-1 mRNA and protein expression were analyzed in CRC cell lines as well as human CRC tissue by Western blot,quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry.Bcl-x,and Mcl-1 protein expression was knocked down or increased in CRC cell lines by applying specific siRNAs or expression plasmids,respectively.After modulation of protein expression,CRC cells were treated with chemotherapeutic agents,an antagonistic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR1) antibody,an EGFR1 tyrosine kinase inhibitor,or with the death receptor ligand TRAIL.Apoptosis induction and cell viability were analyzed.RESULTS: Here we show that in human CRC tissue and various CRC cell lines both Bcl-x,and Mcl-1 are expressed.Bcl-x,expression was higher in CRC tissue than in surrounding non-malignant tissue,both on protein and mRNA level.Mcl-1 mRNA expression was significantly lower in malignant tissues.However,protein expression was slightly higher.Viability rates of CRC cells were significantly decreased after knock down of Bcl-XL expression,and,to a lower extent,after knock down of Mcl-1 expression.Furthermore,cells with reduced Bcl-xL or Mcl-1 expression was more sensitive towards oxaliplatin- and irinotecan-induced apoptosis,and in the case of Bcl-xL also towards 5-FU-induced apoptosis.On the other hand,upregulation of Bcl-XL by transfection of an expression plasmid decreased chemotherapeutic drug-induced apoptosis.EGF treatment clearly induced Bcl-xL and Mcl-1 expression in CRC cells.Apoptosis induction upon EGFR1 blockage by cetuximab or PD168393 was increased by inhibiting Hcl-1 and Bcl-xL expression.More strikingly,CD95- and TRAIL-induced apoptosis was increased by Bcl-xL knock down.CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that Bcl-xL and,to a lower extent,Mcl-1,are important anti-apoptotic factors in CRC

  13. 76 FR 12364 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse Regulations

    2011-03-07

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse... Bonded Warehouse Regulations. This request for comment is being made pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction... concerning the following information collection: Title: Bonded Warehouse Regulations. OMB Number:...

  14. Transforming Growth Factor-Beta and Matrix Metalloproteinases: Functional Interactions in Tumor Stroma-Infiltrating Myeloid Cells

    Jelena Krstic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β is a pleiotropic factor with several different roles in health and disease. In tumorigenesis, it may act as a protumorigenic factor and have a profound impact on the regulation of the immune system response. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are a family that comprises more than 25 members, which have recently been proposed as important regulators acting in tumor stroma by regulating the response of noncellular and cellular microenvironment. Tumor stroma consists of several types of resident cells and infiltrating cells derived from bone marrow, which together play crucial roles in the promotion of tumor growth and metastasis. In cancer cells, TGF-β regulates MMPs expression, while MMPs, produced by either cancer cells or residents’ stroma cells, activate latent TGF-β in the extracellular matrix, together facilitating the enhancement of tumor progression. In this review we will focus on the compartment of myeloid stroma cells, such as tumor-associated macrophages, neutrophils, and dendritic and mast cells, which are potently regulated by TGF-β and produce large amounts of MMPs. Their interplay and mutual implications in the generation of pro-tumorigenic cancer microenvironment will be analyzed.

  15. Runx1 Regulates Myeloid Precursor Differentiation Into Osteoclasts Without Affecting Differentiation Into Antigen Presenting or Phagocytic Cells in Both Males and Females.

    Paglia, David N; Yang, Xiaochuan; Kalinowski, Judith; Jastrzebski, Sandra; Drissi, Hicham; Lorenzo, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Runt-related transcription factor 1 (Runx1), a master regulator of hematopoiesis, is expressed in preosteoclasts. Previously we evaluated the bone phenotype of CD11b-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice and demonstrated enhanced osteoclasts and decreased bone mass in males. However, an assessment of the effects of Runx1 deletion in female osteoclast precursors was impossible with this model. Moreover, the role of Runx1 in myeloid cell differentiation into other lineages is unknown. Therefore, we generated LysM-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice, which delete Runx1 equally (∼80% deletion) in myeloid precursor cells from both sexes and examined the capacity of these cells to differentiate into osteoclasts and phagocytic and antigen-presenting cells. Both female and male LysM-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice had decreased trabecular bone mass (72% decrease in bone volume fraction) and increased osteoclast number (2-3 times) (P nuclear factor-κB ligand to stimulate osteoclast formation and fusion in female and male mice without affecting other myeloid cell fates. In turn, increased osteoclast activity in LysM-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice likely contributed to a decrease in bone mass. These dramatic effects were not due to increased osteoclast precursors in the deleted mutants and argue that inhibition of Runx1 in multipotential myeloid precursor cells is important for osteoclast formation and function. PMID:27267711

  16. Legislation on and regulation of nuclear activities

    This work is a compilation of legislative texts and regulations published by the Atomic Energy Commission's Legal Affairs Department (CEA). It provides a comprehensive source of knowledge and information on nuclear energy law. Legislative texts published over the last forty years, are collected and analytically indexed. The publication covers both French regulations and regulations of international organisations such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and Euratom. It is divided into eight different chapters, dealing with regulations relevant to international and national institutions, nuclear installations, third party liability, protection of persons and the environment, etc. A chronological table of the texts of international and national laws is also included in this work. (NEA)

  17. Myeloid Cells and Lymphangiogenesis

    Zumsteg, A; Christofori, G

    2012-01-01

    The lymphatic vascular system and the hematopoietic system are intimately connected in ontogeny and in physiology. During embryonic development, mammalian species derive a first lymphatic vascular plexus from the previously formed anterior cardinal vein, whereas birds and amphibians have a lymphatic vascular system of dual origin, composed of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) of venous origin combined with LECs derived from mesenchymal lymphangioblasts. The contribution of hematopoietic cell...

  18. Activation and Regulation of Cellular Eicosanoid Biosynthesis

    Thomas G. Brock

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing appreciation for the wide variety of physiological responses that are regulated by lipid messengers. One particular group of lipid messengers, the eicosanoids, plays a central role in regulating immune and inflammatory responses in a receptor-mediated fashion. These mediators are related in that they are all derived from one polyunsaturated fatty acid, arachidonic acid. However, the various eicosanoids are synthesized by a wide variety of cell types by distinct enzymatic pathways, and have diverse roles in immunity and inflammation. In this review, the major pathways involved in the synthesis of eicosanoids, as well as key points of regulation, are presented.

  19. Regulation of myostatin activity and muscle growth

    Lee, Se-Jin; McPherron, Alexandra C.

    2001-01-01

    Myostatin is a transforming growth factor-β family member that acts as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. To identify possible myostatin inhibitors that may have applications for promoting muscle growth, we investigated the regulation of myostatin signaling. Myostatin protein purified from mammalian cells consisted of a noncovalently held complex of the N-terminal propeptide and a disulfide-linked dimer of C-terminal fragments. The purified C-terminal myostatin dimer was capable of...

  20. Changes in polysialic acid expression on myeloid cells during differentiation and recruitment to sites of inflammation: role in phagocytosis.

    Stamatos, Nicholas M; Zhang, Lei; Jokilammi, Anne; Finne, Jukka; Chen, Wilbur H; El-Maarouf, Abderrahman; Cross, Alan S; Hankey, Kim G

    2014-09-01

    Polysialic acid (polySia) is a unique linear homopolymer of α2,8-linked sialic acid that has been studied extensively as a posttranslational modification of neural cell adhesion molecule in the central nervous system. Only two proteins are known to be polysialylated in cells of the immune system: CD56 on human natural killer cells and murine bone marrow (BM) leukocytes, and neuropilin-2 (NRP-2) on dendritic cells (DCs). We tested the hypothesis that polySia expression is regulated during maturation and migration of leukocytes and plays a role in functional activity. Using wild-type and NCAM(-/-) mice, we show that BM neutrophils express only polysialylated CD56, whereas a subset of BM monocytes expresses polysialylated CD56 and/or another polysialylated protein(s). We demonstrate that polysialylated CD56 expression is progressively down-regulated in wild-type monocytes and monocyte-derived cells during migration from BM through peripheral blood to pulmonary and peritoneal sites of inflammation. Freshly isolated monocyte-derived peritoneal macrophages are devoid of polySia yet re-express polySia on NRP-2 and an additional protein(s) after maintenance in culture. Removal of polySia from these cells enhances phagocytosis of Klebsiella pneumoniae, suggesting that down-regulation of polySia on macrophages facilitates bacterial clearance. Using wild-type and NRP-2(-/-) mice, we demonstrate that NRP-2 and an additional protein(s) are polysialylated by ST8 SiaIV in BM-derived DCs. We conclude that polySia expression in monocyte-derived cells is dynamically regulated by ST8 SiaIV activity and by expression of carrier proteins during recruitment to sites of inflammation and influences cellular interactions with microbes, contributing to innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:24865221

  1. Pleural fluid soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 as a marker of bacterial infection: a meta-analysis

    Jiang Hong-Ni

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pleural infection is a common clinical problem. Its successful treatment depends on rapid diagnosis and early initiation of antibiotics. The measurement of soluble triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1 level in pleural effusions has proven to be a valuable diagnostic tool for differentiating bacterial effusions from effusions of other etiologies. Herein, we performed a meta-analysis to assess the accuracy of pleural fluid sTREM-1 in the diagnosis of bacterial infection. Methods We searched Web of Knowledge and Medline from 1990 through March 2011 for studies reporting diagnostic accuracy data regarding the use of sTREM-1 in the diagnosis of bacterial pleural effusions. Pooled sensitivity and specificity and summary measures of accuracy and Q* were calculated. Results Overall, the sensitivity of sTREM-1was 78% (95% CI: 72%-83%; the specificity was 84% (95% CI: 80%-87%; the positive likelihood ratio was 6.0 (95% CI: 3.3-10.7; and the negative likelihood ratio was 0.22 (95% CI: 0.12-0.40. The area under the SROC curve for sTREM-1 was 0.92. Statistical heterogeneity and inconsistency were found for sensitivity (p = 0.015, χ2 = 15.73, I2 = 61.9%, specificity (p = 0.000, χ2 = 29.90, I2 = 79.9%, positive likelihood ratio (p = 0.000, χ2 = 33.09, I2 = 81.9%, negative likelihood ratio (p = 0.008, χ2 = 17.25, I2 = 65.2%, and diagnostic odds ratio (p = 0.000, χ2 = 28.49, I2 = 78.9%. A meta-regression analysis performed showed that the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies score (p = 0.3245; RDOR, 4.34; 95% CI, 0.11 to 164.01, the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy score (p = 0.3331; RDOR, 1.70; 95% CI, 0.44 to 6.52, lack of blinding (p = 0.7439; RDOR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.01 to 33.80, and whether the studies were prospective or retrospective studies (p = 0.2068; RDOR, 7.44; 95% CI, 0.18 to 301.17 did not affect the test accuracy. A funnel plot for publication bias suggested a remarkable trend

  2. THE EUROPEAN MODEL OF STATE REGULATION OF TOURISM ACTIVITIES

    О. Davydova

    2013-01-01

    In the article the existing model of state regulation of the development of tourism. Expediency of the European model of state regulation of tourism development in Ukraine. It is noted that the European model of state regulation of tourism activities based on the coordination of marketing activities and the development of cooperation between the public and private sectors. The basic forms of public-private partnerships and the advantages of using cluster model of development of tourism, namel...

  3. Sex Hormones' Regulation of Rodent Physical Activity: A Review

    J. Timothy Lightfoot

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a large body of emerging literature suggesting that physical activity is regulated to a varying extent by biological factors. Available animal data strongly suggests that there is a differential regulation of physical activity by sex and that the majority of this differential regulation is mediated by estrogen/testosterone pathways with females in many animal species having higher daily activity levels than males. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the mechanisms by which estrogen and testosterone affect the regulation of daily activity. This review lays the foundation for future investigations in humans as well as discussions about relative disease risk mediated by differential biological regulation of physical activity by sex.

  4. Regulation of higher-activity NARM wastes by EPA

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently developing standards for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). As part of this Standard, EPA is including regulations for the disposal of naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive material (NARM) wastes not covered under the Atomic Energy Act (AEA). The regulations will cover only higher-activity NARM wastes, defined as NARM waste with specific activity exceeding two nanocuries per gram. The proposed regulations will specify that NARM wastes exceeding the above limits, except for specific exempted items, must be disposed of in regulated radioactive waste disposal facilities. The proposed EPA regulations for NARM wastes will be discussed, as well as the costs and benefits of the regulation, how it will be implemented by EPA, and the rationale for covering only higher-activity NARM wastes exceeding two nanocuries per gram

  5. Aging, Physical Activity, and Energy Intake Regulation

    Van Walleghen, Emily Lynn

    2006-01-01

    More than seventy percent of Americans over the age of sixty are classified as overweight or obese, and the future incidence of these conditions is expected to rise. Although it is unclear why older adults are predisposed to weight gain, decreased total energy expenditure may contribute to positive energy balance. It is also possible that age-related impairments in energy intake regulation result in the inability to appropriately adjust food intake to meet energy requirements with advancing a...

  6. Myeloid cell sirtuin-1 expression does not alter host immune responses to Gram-negative endotoxemia or Gram-positive bacterial infection.

    Laura E Crotty Alexander

    Full Text Available The role of sirtuin-1 (SIRT1 in innate immunity, and in particular the influence of SIRT1 on antimicrobial defense against infection, has yet to be reported but is important to define since SIRT1 inhibitors are being investigated as therapeutic agents in the treatment of cancer, Huntington's disease, and autoimmune diseases. Given the therapeutic potential of SIRT1 suppression, we sought to characterize the role of SIRT1 in host defense. Utilizing both pharmacologic methods and a genetic knockout, we demonstrate that SIRT1 expression has little influence on macrophage and neutrophil antimicrobial functions. Myeloid SIRT1 expression does not change mortality in gram-negative toxin-induced shock or gram-positive bacteremia, suggesting that therapeutic suppression of SIRT1 may be done safely without suppression of myeloid cell-specific immune responses to severe bacterial infections.

  7. Modern aspects of tax regulation of investment activity

    E.S. Podakov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the tax regulation of investment activity in modern conditions. Scientists studied different views about the impact of tax regulations on the investment activity in the country. The author determines that the tax regulation of investment activity involves the use of state mechanisms taxation of certain measures to improve investment conditions. The subject is the state tax regulations, and the object is the investment activity of individual and institutional investors of any form of ownership including organizational and legal forms. Such regulation is performed by using complex special tools. The possible methods of tax stimulation of investment processes are described. The article deals with the current results of tax reform in Ukraine and predicts its possible consequences for agricultural producers. The rating positions of Ukraine according to international organizations are showed. The systematic analysis has been carried out and the impact of differential tax rates, tax exemption for a specified period, reducing the tax base, elimination of double taxation on investment activity in certain areas have been researched. The special instruments of investment activity tax regulation are considered. The options for improving investment activity by introducing effective tax regulation are determined.

  8. Activity Dependent Regulation of Inhibitory Circuitry

    Sharma, Nikhil

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition controls information flow through a neural circuit by modulating synaptic integration, restricting action potentials, and coordinating the activity of ensembles of neurons. These functions are mediated by a diverse array of inhibitory neuron subtypes that synapse on defined domains of a postsynaptic neuron. Activity-dependent transcription controls inhibitory synapse number and function, but how this transcription program affects the inhibitory inputs that form on di...

  9. Commission for energy regulation - 2012 Activity Report

    After a presentation of the organisation, role and missions of the French Commission for Energy Regulation (CRE), and of its relationship with other institutional actors, this report describes and comments the action of the CRE in the fields of dialogue and transparency. It presents and comments key figures regarding the electricity and gas retail markets. It reports and comments the European reaction to the cold peak of February 2012 (historical peak for consumption and prices, inquiry on the causes of these price peaks, need of a European market). The next part addresses the relationship between electricity grids and territories (solidarity between electricity grids as the basis of the Europe of energy, evolution of French grids to face new needs and to take regional and local dimensions into account). Another part addresses gas infrastructures which are considered as the cornerstone of a good operation for the French market and for the integration of the European energy market (gas world market in 2012, definition of a target model for the gas market by European regulators, evolution of the French market in compliance with the European target model, new tariffs for the use of natural gas transport networks). The report then addresses the development of renewable energies: actions of CRE (bidding, opinion of tariffs), influence of renewable energy development on electricity prices on gross markets, needed evolution of electricity grids. A last part addresses the issues of energy cost, demand management, and struggle against energy poverty

  10. Histone deacetylase 11: A novel epigenetic regulator of myeloid derived suppressor cell expansion and function.

    Sahakian, Eva; Powers, John J; Chen, Jie; Deng, Susan L; Cheng, Fengdong; Distler, Allison; Woods, David M; Rock-Klotz, Jennifer; Sodre, Andressa L; Youn, Je-In; Woan, Karrune V; Villagra, Alejandro; Gabrilovich, Dmitry; Sotomayor, Eduardo M; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier

    2015-02-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a heterogeneous population of cells capable of suppressing anti-tumor T cell function in the tumor microenvironment, represent an imposing obstacle in the development of cancer immunotherapeutics. Thus, identifying elements essential to the development and perpetuation of these cells will undoubtedly improve our ability to circumvent their suppressive impact. HDAC11 has emerged as a key regulator of IL-10 gene expression in myeloid cells, suggesting that this may represent an important targetable axis through which to dampen MDSC formation. Using a murine transgenic reporter model system where eGFP expression is controlled by the HDAC11 promoter (Tg-HDAC11-eGFP), we provide evidence that HDAC11 appears to function as a negative regulator of MDSC expansion/function in vivo. MDSCs isolated from EL4 tumor-bearing Tg-HDAC11-eGFP display high expression of eGFP, indicative of HDAC11 transcriptional activation at steady state. In striking contrast, immature myeloid cells in tumor-bearing mice display a diminished eGFP expression, implying that the transition of IMC to MDSC's require a decrease in the expression of HDAC11, where we postulate that it acts as a gate-keeper of myeloid differentiation. Indeed, tumor-bearing HDAC11-knockout mice (HDAC11-KO) demonstrate a more suppressive MDSC population as compared to wild-type (WT) tumor-bearing control. Notably, the HDAC11-KO tumor-bearing mice exhibit enhanced tumor growth kinetics when compare to the WT control mice. Thus, through a better understanding of this previously unknown role of HDAC11 in MDSC expansion and function, rational development of targeted epigenetic modifiers may allow us to thwart a powerful barrier to efficacious immunotherapies. PMID:25155994

  11. How is AMPK activity regulated in skeletal muscles during exercise?

    Jørgensen, Sebastian Beck; Rose, Adam John

    2008-01-01

    AMPK is a metabolic "master" controller activated in skeletal muscle by exercise in a time and intensity dependent manner, and has been implicated in regulating metabolic pathways in muscle during physical exercise. AMPK signaling in skeletal muscle is regulated by several systemic...... and intracellular factors and the regulation of skeletal muscle AMPK in response to exercise is the focus of this review. Specifically, the role of LKB1 and phosphatase PP2C in nucleotide-dependent activation of AMPK, and ionized calcium in CaMKK-dependent activation of AMPK in working muscle is discussed. We also...

  12. Dietary methanol regulates human gene activity.

    Anastasia V Shindyapina

    Full Text Available Methanol (MeOH is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA, which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling.

  13. Regulation of nuclear activities in Canada

    This review was initiated by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency for its series of analytical studies on nuclear legislation. It looks at the historic background and general overview of the use and handling of nuclear energy; the governmental framework controlling nuclear activities; and the agencies involved in its research and industrial applications. The regulatory power and structure of the Atomic Energy Control Board are highlighted

  14. Hormonal Regulation of Hepatic Drug Metabolizing Enzyme Activity During Adolescence

    Kennedy, M J

    2008-01-01

    Activities of drug metabolizing enzymes (DME) are known to change throughout the course of physical and sexual maturation with the greatest variability noted during infancy and adolescence. The mechanisms responsible for developmental regulation of DME are currently unknown. However, the hormonal changes of puberty/adolescence provide a theoretical framework for understanding biochemical regulation of DME activity during growth and maturation. Important information regarding potential influen...

  15. IL-4 regulates specific Arg-1(+) macrophage sFlt-1-mediated inhibition of angiogenesis.

    Wu, Wei-Kang; Georgiadis, Anastasios; Copland, David A; Liyanage, Sidath; Luhmann, Ulrich F O; Robbie, Scott J; Liu, Jian; Wu, Jiahui; Bainbridge, James W; Bates, David O; Ali, Robin R; Nicholson, Lindsay B; Dick, Andrew D

    2015-08-01

    One of the main drivers for neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration is activation of innate immunity in the presence of macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that T helper cell type 2 cytokines and, in particular, IL-4 condition human and murine monocyte phenotype toward Arg-1(+), and their subsequent behavior limits angiogenesis by increasing soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt-1) gene expression. We document that T helper cell type 2 cytokine-conditioned murine macrophages neutralize vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated endothelial cell proliferation (human umbilical vein endothelial cell and choroidal vasculature) in a sFlt-1-dependent manner. We demonstrate that in vivo intravitreal administration of IL-4 attenuates laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (L-CNV) due to specific IL-4 conditioning of macrophages. IL-4 induces the expression of sFlt-1 by resident CD11b(+) retinal microglia and infiltrating myeloid cells but not from retinal pigment epithelium. IL-4-induced suppression of L-CNV is not prevented when sFlt-1 expression is attenuated in retinal pigment epithelium. IL-4-mediated suppression of L-CNV was abrogated in IL-4R-deficient mice and in bone marrow chimeras reconstituted with myeloid cells that had undergone lentiviral-mediated shRNA silencing of sFlt-1, demonstrating the critical role of this cell population. Together, these data establish how lL-4 directly drives macrophage sFlt-1 production expressing an Arg-1(+) phenotype and support the therapeutic potential of targeted IL-4 conditioning within the tissue to regulate disease conditions such as neovascular age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26079814

  16. Developmental regulation of aromatase activity in the rat hypothalamus

    The brain of all mammalian species studied thus far contain an enzymatic activity (aromatase) that catalyzes the conversion of androgens to estrogens. The activity is highest during prenatal development and contributes to the establishment of sex differences which determine adult gonadotropin secretion patterns and reproductive behavior. The studies presented in this dissertation represent a systematic effort to elucidate the mechanism(s) that control the initiation of and contribute to maintaining rat hypothalamic aromatase activity during pre- and postnatal development. Aromatase enzyme activity was measured by the 3H2O release assay or by traditional estrogen product isolation. Brain aromatase mRNA was detected by hybridization to a cDNA encoding rat aromatase cytochrome P-450. In both males and females the time of puberty was associated with a decline in hypothalamic aromatase activity. This decline may represent a factor underlying the peri-pubertal decrease in the sensitivity to gonadal steroid feedback that accompanies completion of puberty. The results also indicate that androgens regulate brain aromatase levels during both the prepubertal and peri-pubertal stages of sexual development and that this regulation is transiently lost in young adults. Utilizing a hypothalamic organotypic culture system, aromatase activity in vitro was maintained for as long as two days. The results of studies of a variety of hormonal and metabolic regulators suggest that prenatal aromatase activity is regulated by factor(s) that function independently from the classical cyclic AMP and protein kinase C trans-membrane signaling pathways

  17. Physiological roles of mitogen-activated-protein-kinase-activated p38-regulated/activated protein kinase

    Sergiy; Kostenko; Gianina; Dumitriu; Kari; Jenssen; Lgreid; Ugo; Moens

    2011-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases(MAPKs)are a family of proteins that constitute signaling pathways involved in processes that control gene expression,cell division, cell survival,apoptosis,metabolism,differentiation and motility.The MAPK pathways can be divided into conventional and atypical MAPK pathways.The first group converts a signal into a cellular response through a relay of three consecutive phosphorylation events exerted by MAPK kinase kinases,MAPK kinase,and MAPK.Atypical MAPK pathways are not organized into this three-tiered cascade.MAPK that belongs to both conventional and atypical MAPK pathways can phosphorylate both non-protein kinase substrates and other protein kinases.The latter are referred to as MAPK-activated protein kinases.This review focuses on one such MAPK-activated protein kinase,MAPK-activated protein kinase 5(MK5)or p38-regulated/activated protein kinase(PRAK).This protein is highly conserved throughout the animal kingdom and seems to be the target of both conventional and atypical MAPK pathways.Recent findings on the regulation of the activity and subcellular localization,bona fide interaction partners and physiological roles of MK5/PRAK are discussed.

  18. Post-translational regulation of Oct4 transcriptional activity.

    Jonathan P Saxe

    Full Text Available Oct4 is a key component of the molecular circuitry which regulates embryonic stem cell proliferation and differentiation. It is essential for maintenance of undifferentiated, pluripotent cell populations, and accomplishes these tasks by binding DNA in multiple heterodimer and homodimer configurations. Very little is known about how formation of these complexes is regulated, or the mechanisms through which Oct4 proteins respond to complex extracellular stimuli which regulate pluripotency. Here, we provide evidence for a phosphorylation-based mechanism which regulates specific Oct4 homodimer conformations. Point mutations of a putative phosphorylation site can specifically abrogate transcriptional activity of a specific homodimer assembly, with little effect on other configurations. Moreover, we performed bioinformatic predictions to identify a subset of Oct4 target genes which may be regulated by this specific assembly, and show that altering Oct4 protein levels affects transcription of Oct4 target genes which are regulated by this assembly but not others. Finally, we identified several signaling pathways which may mediate this phosphorylation and act in combination to regulate Oct4 transcriptional activity and protein stability. These results provide a mechanism for rapid and reversible alteration of Oct4 transactivation potential in response to extracellular signals.

  19. Regulation of Mining and Mineral Processing Activities in South Africa

    In South Africa, the regulation of mining and mineral processing activities involving radioactive ores commenced in 1990. The paper provides an overview of the regulation of mining and mineral processing activities and the evolution of the authorization process from 1990 until recent times. Key developments in respect of controlling public exposure, occupational exposure, and environmental protection are provided. Future and present challenges are also identified with the resurgence of activities related to nuclear power generation linked to uranium mining. The centrality of nuclear and radiation safety requirements in the context of introducing improvements for effectively regulating mining are also cited and put forward. Reference is made to the role of the South African nuclear regulatory system and the impact of the nuclear safety and security regime. (author)

  20. REGULATION OF NITRATE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN RICE (ORYZA SATIVA L. BY GROWTH REGULATORS

    S HEMALATHA

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of three growth regulators, namely kinetin, 6 benzyl adenine, 2 chloro ethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride at three concentrations (10-6 M, 5 x 10-5 M 10-4 M was studied on the catalytic activity of nitrate reductase in green and etiolated seedlings. A concentration of 5 x 10-5 M was optimal for all the growth regulators treatments. All the growth regulators stimulated nitrate reductase activity effectively at 5 x 10-5M concentration in both etiolated and green seedlings and had an additive effect when supplemented by NO-3 up to 140% to 160%. The 99.2% and 93.4% inhibition of nitrate reductase activity resulted in development of etiolated and green seedlings, respectively when treated with eukaryotic 80S ribosome protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Prokaryotic 70S inhibitor chloromphenicol did not have any effect on measured parameters. Actinomycin D, a RNA synthesis inhibitor also inhibited the enzyme activity as 80s inhibitors (Green 80%, etiolated 98%. One may suggest from this that both DNA and protein synthesis are involved in the induction of nitrate reductase activity. The differential effect of aminoacids was observed on enzyme activity in combination with growth regulators.

  1. Primary cilia regulate Gli/Hedgehog activation in pancreas

    Cervantes, Sara; Lau, Janet; Cano, David A.; Borromeo-Austin, Cecilia; Hebrok, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that defects in pancreatic epithelium caused by activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway are secondary to changes in the differentiation state of the surrounding mesenchyme. However, recent results describe a role of the pathway in pancreatic epithelium, both during development and in adult tissue during neoplastic transformation. To determine the consequences of epithelial Hh activation during pancreas development, we employed a transgenic mouse model in which an activated version of GLI2, a transcriptional mediator of the pathway, is overexpressed specifically in the pancreatic epithelium. Surprisingly, efficient Hh activation was not observed in these transgenic mice, indicating the presence of physiological mechanisms within pancreas epithelium that prevent full Hh activation. Additional studies revealed that primary cilia regulate the level of Hh activation, and that ablation of these cellular organelles is sufficient to cause significant up-regulation of the Hh pathway in pancreata of mice overexpressing GLI2. As a consequence of overt Hh activation, we observe profound morphological changes in both the exocrine and endocrine pancreas. Increased Hh activity also induced the expansion of an undifferentiated cell population expressing progenitor markers. Thus, our findings suggest that Hh signaling plays a critical role in regulating pancreatic epithelial plasticity. PMID:20479231

  2. Primary cilia regulate Gli/Hedgehog activation in pancreas.

    Cervantes, Sara; Lau, Janet; Cano, David A; Borromeo-Austin, Cecilia; Hebrok, Matthias

    2010-06-01

    Previous studies have suggested that defects in pancreatic epithelium caused by activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway are secondary to changes in the differentiation state of the surrounding mesenchyme. However, recent results describe a role of the pathway in pancreatic epithelium, both during development and in adult tissue during neoplastic transformation. To determine the consequences of epithelial Hh activation during pancreas development, we employed a transgenic mouse model in which an activated version of GLI2, a transcriptional mediator of the pathway, is overexpressed specifically in the pancreatic epithelium. Surprisingly, efficient Hh activation was not observed in these transgenic mice, indicating the presence of physiological mechanisms within pancreas epithelium that prevent full Hh activation. Additional studies revealed that primary cilia regulate the level of Hh activation, and that ablation of these cellular organelles is sufficient to cause significant up-regulation of the Hh pathway in pancreata of mice overexpressing GLI2. As a consequence of overt Hh activation, we observe profound morphological changes in both the exocrine and endocrine pancreas. Increased Hh activity also induced the expansion of an undifferentiated cell population expressing progenitor markers. Thus, our findings suggest that Hh signaling plays a critical role in regulating pancreatic epithelial plasticity. PMID:20479231

  3. Epigenetic regulator Lid maintains germline stem cells through regulating JAK-STAT signaling pathway activity

    Lama Tarayrah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Signaling pathways and epigenetic mechanisms have both been shown to play essential roles in regulating stem cell activity. While the role of either mechanism in this regulation is well established in multiple stem cell lineages, how the two mechanisms interact to regulate stem cell activity is not as well understood. Here we report that in the Drosophila testis, an H3K4me3-specific histone demethylase encoded by little imaginal discs (lid maintains germline stem cell (GSC mitotic index and prevents GSC premature differentiation. Lid is required in germ cells for proper expression of the Stat92E transcription factor, the downstream effector of the Janus kinase signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT signaling pathway. Our findings support a germ cell autonomous role for the JAK-STAT pathway in maintaining GSCs and place Lid as an upstream regulator of this pathway. Our study provides new insights into the biological functions of a histone demethylase in vivo and sheds light on the interaction between epigenetic mechanisms and signaling pathways in regulating stem cell activities.

  4. Activation of ion transport systems during cell volume regulation

    This review discusses the activation of transport pathways during volume regulation, including their characteristics, the possible biochemical pathways that may mediate the activation of transport pathways, and the relations between volume regulation and transepithelial transport in renal cells. Many cells regulate their volume when exposed to an anisotonic medium. The changes in cell volume are caused by activation of ion transport pathways, plus the accompanying osmotically driven water movement such that cell volume returns toward normal levels. The swelling of hypertonically shrunken cells is termed regulatory volume increase (RVI) and involves an influx of NaCl into the cell via either activation of Na-Cl, Na-K-2Cl cotransport systems, or Na+-H+ and Cl--HCO3- exchangers. The reshrinking of hypotonically swollen cells is termed regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and involves an efflux of KCl and water from the cell by activation of either separate K+ and Cl- conductances, a K-Cl cotransport system, or parallel K+-H+ and Cl--HCO3- exchangers. The biochemical mechanisms involved in the activation of transport systems are largely unknown, however, the phosphoinositide pathway may be implicated in RVI; phorbol esters, cGMP, and Ca2+ affect the process of volume regulation. Renal tubular cells, as well as the blood cells that transverse the medulla, are subjected to increasing osmotic gradients from the corticomedullary junction to the papillary tip, as well as changing interstitial and tubule fluid osmolarity, depending on the diuretic state of the animal. Medullary cells from the loop of Henle and the papilla can volume regulate by activating Na-K-2Cl cotransport or Na+-H+ and Cl--HCO3- exchange systems

  5. Myeloid cell kinetics in mice treated with recombinant interleukin-3, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (CSF), or granulocyte-macrophage CSF in vivo

    Myeloid cell kinetics in mice treated with pure hematopoietic growth factors have been investigated using tritiated thymidine labeling and autoradiography. Mice were injected subcutaneously with 125 micrograms/kg granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) (in some cases 5 micrograms/kg), or 10 micrograms/kg of granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF), or interleukin-3 (IL-3) every 12 hours for 84 hours. 3HTdR labeling was performed in vivo after 3 days of treatment. G-CSF increased the peripheral neutrophil count 14-fold and increased the proportion and proliferation rate of neutrophilic cells in the marrow, suppressing erythropoiesis at the same time. Newly produced mature cells were released into the circulation within 24 hours of labeling, compared with a normal appearance time of about 96 hours. By contrast, GM-CSF and IL-3 had little effect on either marrow cell kinetics or on the rate of release of mature cells, although GM-CSF did stimulate a 50% increase in peripheral neutrophils. Monocyte production was also increased about eightfold by G-CSF and 1.5-fold by GM-CSF, but their peak release was only slightly accelerated. While the peripheral half-lives of the neutrophilic granulocytes were normal, those of the monocytes were dramatically reduced, perhaps due to sequestration in the tissues for functional purposes. The stimulated monocyte production in the case of G-CSF required an additional five cell cycles, a level that might have repercussions on the progenitor compartments

  6. Metformin induces apoptosis by microRNA-26a-mediated downregulation of myeloid cell leukaemia-1 in human oral cancer cells.

    Wang, Fang; Xu, Jincheng; Liu, Hao; Liu, Zhe; Xia, Fei

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, population-based studies and retrospective analyses of clinical studies have shown that metformin treatment is associated with reduced cancer incidence and a decrease in cancer‑associated mortality. However, its mechanism of action remains to be fully understood. The present study demonstrates the effects of metformin on KB human oral cancer cells and explores the role of myeloid cell leukaemia‑1 (Mcl‑1) in metformin‑induced mitochondria‑dependent cellular apoptosis. It was demonstrated that metformin exposure caused significant suppression of KB cell proliferation and induced cell death. Furthermore, metformin induced apoptosis through the downregulation of Mcl‑1 in KB human oral cancer cells, and the overexpression of Mcl‑1 in metformin‑treated KB cells significantly increased cell viability. Consistently, Bax and Bim were upregulated in metformin‑treated cells. The results also reveal that microRNA (miR)‑26a expression was markedly increased by metformin. Subsequent to enforced miR‑26a expression in KB cells using miR‑26a mimics, cell viability and the level of Mcl‑1 decreased. These results suggest that the anti‑proliferative effects of metformin in KB cells may result partly from induction of apoptosis by miR-26a-induced downregulation of Mcl-1. PMID:27082123

  7. Extracellular Matrix Stiffness Regulates Osteogenic Differentiation through MAPK Activation.

    Jun-Ha Hwang

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC differentiation is regulated by the extracellular matrix (ECM through activation of intracellular signaling mediators. The stiffness of the ECM was shown to be an important regulatory factor for MSC differentiation, and transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ was identified as an effector protein for MSC differentiation. However, the detailed underlying mechanism regarding the role of ECM stiffness and TAZ in MSC differentiation is not yet fully understood. In this report, we showed that ECM stiffness regulates MSC fate through ERK or JNK activation. Specifically, a stiff hydrogel matrix stimulates osteogenic differentiation concomitant with increased nuclear localization of TAZ, but inhibits adipogenic differentiation. ERK and JNK activity was significantly increased in cells cultured on a stiff hydrogel. TAZ activation was induced by ERK or JNK activation on a stiff hydrogel because exposure to an ERK or JNK inhibitor significantly decreased the nuclear localization of TAZ, indicating that ECM stiffness-induced ERK or JNK activation is important for TAZ-driven osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that ECM stiffness regulates MSC differentiation through ERK or JNK activation.

  8. Energy Regulation Commission. Activity report. 1 July - 31 December 2008

    After a description of the scope of activities, organisation and operation of the CRE (Commission de Regulation de l'Energie, Energy regulation commission) and of the CorDIS (Comite de reglement des differents et des sanctions de la CRE, CRE's Committee for settlements of controversies and sanctions), this report outlines the importance of the grid manager independence and of the regulation reinforcement for the building up of a domestic energy market. It discusses the role of the regulation authority in the interconnection of European grids, their operation security and supply security, but also in pricing and in investments. It highlights the relationship between the reduction of carbon emission, energy demand management, strengthening of electric grids, financial incentives, and advanced metering systems. It describes how the CRE ensures a good operation of electricity and natural gas markets

  9. Active Inference, homeostatic regulation and adaptive behavioural control.

    Pezzulo, Giovanni; Rigoli, Francesco; Friston, Karl

    2015-11-01

    We review a theory of homeostatic regulation and adaptive behavioural control within the Active Inference framework. Our aim is to connect two research streams that are usually considered independently; namely, Active Inference and associative learning theories of animal behaviour. The former uses a probabilistic (Bayesian) formulation of perception and action, while the latter calls on multiple (Pavlovian, habitual, goal-directed) processes for homeostatic and behavioural control. We offer a synthesis these classical processes and cast them as successive hierarchical contextualisations of sensorimotor constructs, using the generative models that underpin Active Inference. This dissolves any apparent mechanistic distinction between the optimization processes that mediate classical control or learning. Furthermore, we generalize the scope of Active Inference by emphasizing interoceptive inference and homeostatic regulation. The ensuing homeostatic (or allostatic) perspective provides an intuitive explanation for how priors act as drives or goals to enslave action, and emphasises the embodied nature of inference. PMID:26365173

  10. THE EUROPEAN MODEL OF STATE REGULATION OF TOURISM ACTIVITIES

    О. Davydova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the article the existing model of state regulation of the development of tourism. Expediency of the European model of state regulation of tourism development in Ukraine. It is noted that the European model of state regulation of tourism activities based on the coordination of marketing activities and the development of cooperation between the public and private sectors. The basic forms of public-private partnerships and the advantages of using cluster model of development of tourism, namely, contracts, production sharing agreement, lease, joint venture. Promising areas of application of the PPP identified the transport sector, housing and utilities, energy and tourism sector. The features of cluster formations in the country and the prospects for tourism clusters.

  11. Regulation of eNOS Enzyme Activity by Posttranslational Modification

    Heiss, Elke H.; Dirsch, Verena M.

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) employs multiple different cellular control mechanisms impinging on level and activity of the enzyme. This review aims at summarizing the current knowledge on the posttranslational modifications of eNOS, including acylation, nitrosylation, phosphorylation, acetylation, glycosylation and glutathionylation. Sites, mediators and impact on enzyme localization and activity of the single modifications will be discussed. Moreover, interdependence, coo...

  12. Myostatin negatively regulates satellite cell activation and self-renewal

    McCroskery, Seumas; Thomas, Mark; Maxwell, Linda; Sharma, Mridula; Kambadur, Ravi

    2003-01-01

    Satellite cells are quiescent muscle stem cells that promote postnatal muscle growth and repair. Here we show that myostatin, a TGF-β member, signals satellite cell quiescence and also negatively regulates satellite cell self-renewal. BrdU labeling in vivo revealed that, among the Myostatin-deficient satellite cells, higher numbers of satellite cells are activated as compared with wild type. In contrast, addition of Myostatin to myofiber explant cultures inhibits satellite cell activation. Ce...

  13. Active Inference, homeostatic regulation and adaptive behavioural control

    Pezzulo, G; Rigoli, F.; Friston, K.

    2015-01-01

    We review a theory of homeostatic regulation and adaptive behavioural control within the Active Inference framework. Our aim is to connect two research streams that are usually considered independently; namely, Active Inference and associative learning theories of animal behaviour. The former uses a probabilistic (Bayesian) formulation of perception and action, while the latter calls on multiple (Pavlovian, habitual, goal-directed) processes for homeostatic and behavioural control. We offer a...

  14. The Immune System as a Regulator of Thyroid Hormone Activity

    Klein, John R.

    2006-01-01

    It has been known for decades that the neuroendocrine system can both directly and indirectly influence the developmental and functional activity of the immune system. In contrast, far less is known about the extent to which the immune system collaborates in the regulation of endocrine activity. This is particularly true for immune-endocrine interactions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. Although thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) can be produced by many types of extra-pituitary cell...

  15. Regulation of Enzyme Activity through Interactions with Nanoparticles

    Bin Zhang; Bing Yan; Zhaochun Wu

    2009-01-01

    The structure and function of an enzyme can be altered by nanoparticles (NPs). The interaction between enzyme and NPs is governed by the key properties of NPs, such as structure, size, surface chemistry, charge and surface shape. Recent representative studies on the NP-enzyme interactions and the regulation of enzyme activity by NPs with different size, composition and surface modification are reviewed.

  16. 76 FR 28801 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse Regulations

    2011-05-18

    ... Federal Register (76 FR 11254) on March 1, 2011, allowing for a 60-day comment period. This notice allows... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse... approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Bonded Warehouse Regulations. This is a...

  17. Commission for Energy regulation (CRE) - Activity report June 2004

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    CRE is the French commission for energy regulation. CRE's remit is to assist in ensuring the proper operation of the electricity and natural gas markets for the benefit of the end-user. In particular, CRE ensures that the conditions of access to electricity and natural gas transmission and distribution systems do not hinder the development of competition. It monitors, for the electricity and natural gas sectors, all transactions made between suppliers, traders and producers, all transactions made on the organised markets and cross-border trading. It ensures that suppliers, traders and producers propose offers that are consistent with their financial and technical constraints. It monitors the implementation of and compliance with regulations giving consumers the right to choose their supplier in a competitive market, and allowing new suppliers to enter the market. This document is the 2004 activity report of CRE. Content: A - Opening of the gas and electricity markets for professional customers on 1 July 2004; B - Regulation of the gas market: Gas markets and players (The European environment, The French gas market); Regulation of the gas market (Implementing regulation, Works planned for the coming year; C - Regulation of the electricity market: The electricity markets and players (The European electricity markets, The French electricity market, Monitoring the electricity market); Regulation of the French electricity market (Access to public grid, Cross-border exchanges, Un-bundled accounting principles); The public electricity service in the regulated market (Content of the public service, Public service charges, Electricity production public service financing, Electricity sales tariffs) D - The working of CRE: How CRE exercises its jurisdiction, Tools; E - Appendices: Glossary, Units and conversions, Council of European Energy Regulators, Index of tables and figures.

  18. Commission for Energy regulation (CRE) - Activity report June 2004

    CRE is the French commission for energy regulation. CRE's remit is to assist in ensuring the proper operation of the electricity and natural gas markets for the benefit of the end-user. In particular, CRE ensures that the conditions of access to electricity and natural gas transmission and distribution systems do not hinder the development of competition. It monitors, for the electricity and natural gas sectors, all transactions made between suppliers, traders and producers, all transactions made on the organised markets and cross-border trading. It ensures that suppliers, traders and producers propose offers that are consistent with their financial and technical constraints. It monitors the implementation of and compliance with regulations giving consumers the right to choose their supplier in a competitive market, and allowing new suppliers to enter the market. This document is the 2004 activity report of CRE. Content: A - Opening of the gas and electricity markets for professional customers on 1 July 2004; B - Regulation of the gas market: Gas markets and players (The European environment, The French gas market); Regulation of the gas market (Implementing regulation, Works planned for the coming year; C - Regulation of the electricity market: The electricity markets and players (The European electricity markets, The French electricity market, Monitoring the electricity market); Regulation of the French electricity market (Access to public grid, Cross-border exchanges, Un-bundled accounting principles); The public electricity service in the regulated market (Content of the public service, Public service charges, Electricity production public service financing, Electricity sales tariffs) D - The working of CRE: How CRE exercises its jurisdiction, Tools; E - Appendices: Glossary, Units and conversions, Council of European Energy Regulators, Index of tables and figures

  19. Commission for Energy regulation (CRE) - Activity report june 2008

    CRE is the French commission for energy regulation. CRE's remit is to assist in ensuring the proper operation of the electricity and natural gas markets for the benefit of the end-user. In particular, CRE ensures that the conditions of access to electricity and natural gas transmission and distribution systems do not hinder the development of competition. It monitors, for the electricity and natural gas sectors, all transactions made between suppliers, traders and producers, all transactions made on the organised markets and cross-border trading. It ensures that suppliers, traders and producers propose offers that are consistent with their financial and technical constraints. It monitors the implementation of and compliance with regulations giving consumers the right to choose their supplier in a competitive market, and allowing new suppliers to enter the market. This document is the 2008 activity report of CRE. Content: A - How CRE works: CRE regulatory authority and organisation: Powers, Organisation; Budget resources; Personnel; B - The Standing Committee for Dispute Settlement and Sanctions (CoRDiS) activity: Admissibility, Authority; C - Building a single European energy market: Overview; Organisation and coordination of the main European regulators (Work carried out collectively by European regulators, Regulator organisation and development, CRE's relations with European Community institutions, Development of CEER activities outside the European Union); CRE's European activities (The contribution of European regulators to the Third Energy Package, Integration of gas markets, Integration of electricity markets, Operation of the European interconnected electricity grid and security of supply, Opening up markets to benefit consumers); European Community activities (The European Commission's proposals for the internal energy market: the Third Energy Package, The European Commission's proposals for fighting climate change: the Climate Package, Infringement

  20. Complement system part I - molecular mechanisms of activation and regulation

    Nicolas eMerle

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in defense against pathogens and in host homeostasis. The complement system is initiated by conformational changes in recognition molecular complexes upon sensing danger signals. The subsequent cascade of enzymatic reactions is tightly regulated to assure that complement is activated only at specific locations requiring defense against pathogens, thus avoiding host tissue damage. Here we discuss the recent advances describing the molecular and structural basis of activation and regulation of the complement pathways and their implication on physiology and pathology. This article will review the mechanisms of activation of alternative, classical and lectin pathways, the formation of C3 and C5 convertases, the action of anaphylatoxins and the membrane attack complex. We will also discuss the importance of structure-function relationships using the example of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Lastly we will discuss the development and benefits of therapies using complement inhibitors.

  1. Diabetes induces stable intrinsic changes to myeloid cells that contribute to chronic inflammation during wound healing in mice

    Pauline Bannon; Sally Wood; Terry Restivo; Laura Campbell; Hardman, Matthew J.; Mace, Kimberly A

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute inflammation in response to injury is a tightly regulated process by which subsets of leukocytes are recruited to the injured tissue and undergo behavioural changes that are essential for effective tissue repair and regeneration. The diabetic wound environment is characterised by excessive and prolonged inflammation that is linked to poor progression of healing and, in humans, the development of diabetic foot ulcers. However, the underlying mechanisms contributing to excessive i...

  2. Multilineage Priming of Enhancer Repertoires Precedes Commitment to the B and Myeloid Cell Lineages in Hematopoeitic Progenitors

    Mercer, Elinore M.; Lin, Yin C; Benner, Christopher; Jhunjhunwala, Suchit; Dutkowski, Janusz; Flores, Martha; Sigvardsson, Mikael; Ideker, Trey; Glass, Christopher K.; Murre, Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have documented genome-wide binding patterns of transcriptional regulators and their associated epigenetic marks in hematopoietic cell lineages. In order to determine how epigenetic marks are established and maintained during developmental progression, we have generated long-term cultures of hematopoietic progenitors by enforcing the expression of the E-protein antagonist Id2. Hematopoietic progenitors that express Id2 are multipotent and readily differentiate upon withdrawal o...

  3. Tetraspanin CD9 regulates osteoclastogenesis via regulation of p44/42 MAPK activity

    Tetraspanin CD9 has been shown to regulate cell-cell fusion in sperm-egg fusion and myotube formation. However, the role of CD9 in osteoclast, another multinucleated cell type, is not still clear. Therefore, we investigated the role of CD9 in osteoclast differentiation. CD9 was expressed in osteoclast lineage cells and its expression level increased during the progression of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. KMC8, a neutralizing antibody specific to CD9, significantly suppressed RANKL-induced multinucleated osteoclast formation and the mRNA expression of osteoclast differentiation marker genes. To define CD9-regulated osteoclastogenic signaling pathway, MAPK pathways were examined. KMC8 induced long-term phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK, but not of p38 MAPK. Constitutive activation of p44/42 MAPK by overexpressing constitutive-active mutant of MEK1 almost completely blocked osteoclast differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that CD9 expressed on osteoclast lineage cells might positively regulate osteoclastogenesis via the regulation of p44/42 MAPK activity

  4. Highly glycosylated alpha1-acid glycoprotein is synthesized in myelocytes, stored in secondary granules, and released by activated neutrophils

    Theilgaard-Mönch, Kim; Jacobsen, Lars C; Rasmussen, Thomas;

    2005-01-01

    expression in myeloid cells, like in hepatocytes, is partially regulated by members of the C/EBP family. Overall, these findings define AGP as a genuine secondary granule protein of neutrophils. Hence, neutrophils, which constitute the first line of defense, are likely to serve as the primary local source of...

  5. Commission for Energy regulation (CRE) - Activity report June 2007

    CRE is the French commission for energy regulation. CRE's remit is to assist in ensuring the proper operation of the electricity and natural gas markets for the benefit of the end-user. In particular, CRE ensures that the conditions of access to electricity and natural gas transmission and distribution systems do not hinder the development of competition. It monitors, for the electricity and natural gas sectors, all transactions made between suppliers, traders and producers, all transactions made on the organised markets and cross-border trading. It ensures that suppliers, traders and producers propose offers that are consistent with their financial and technical constraints. It monitors the implementation of and compliance with regulations giving consumers the right to choose their supplier in a competitive market, and allowing new suppliers to enter the market. This document is the 2007 activity report of CRE. Content: A - Towards a single European energy market: Birth of a single European energy market (Origins of Europe of Energy, Emergence of a European energy policy); Main European Community guiding lines (European governance as regards energy, Guiding principles for the internal energy market); European Community activities (European Commission reports, Electricity and gas Regional Initiatives); Organisation and coordination of European regulators (Joint organisation of European regulators, CRE's relations with European Community institutions); CRE's European activities (Regional integration of gas markets, Regional integration of electricity markets, Operation of the European interconnected electricity grid and security of supply, CRE's other European activities); B - CRE action at national level: Grids/networks and infrastructures (General information, Electricity grids, Regulation of gas networks and infrastructures); Markets (Changes in the regulatory and legislative contexts of electricity and natural gas markets, Electricity markets, Natural gas

  6. Commission for Energy regulation (CRE) - Activity report June 2007

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    CRE is the French commission for energy regulation. CRE's remit is to assist in ensuring the proper operation of the electricity and natural gas markets for the benefit of the end-user. In particular, CRE ensures that the conditions of access to electricity and natural gas transmission and distribution systems do not hinder the development of competition. It monitors, for the electricity and natural gas sectors, all transactions made between suppliers, traders and producers, all transactions made on the organised markets and cross-border trading. It ensures that suppliers, traders and producers propose offers that are consistent with their financial and technical constraints. It monitors the implementation of and compliance with regulations giving consumers the right to choose their supplier in a competitive market, and allowing new suppliers to enter the market. This document is the 2007 activity report of CRE. Content: A - Towards a single European energy market: Birth of a single European energy market (Origins of Europe of Energy, Emergence of a European energy policy); Main European Community guiding lines (European governance as regards energy, Guiding principles for the internal energy market); European Community activities (European Commission reports, Electricity and gas Regional Initiatives); Organisation and coordination of European regulators (Joint organisation of European regulators, CRE's relations with European Community institutions); CRE's European activities (Regional integration of gas markets, Regional integration of electricity markets, Operation of the European interconnected electricity grid and security of supply, CRE's other European activities); B - CRE action at national level: Grids/networks and infrastructures (General information, Electricity grids, Regulation of gas networks and infrastructures); Markets (Changes in the regulatory and legislative contexts of electricity and natural gas markets, Electricity markets

  7. Centromeric Transcription Regulates Aurora-B Localization and Activation

    Michael D. Blower

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Centromeric transcription is widely conserved; however, it is not clear what role centromere transcription plays during mitosis. Here, I find that centromeres are transcribed in Xenopus egg extracts into a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA; cen-RNA that localizes to mitotic centromeres, chromatin, and spindles. cen-RNAs bind to the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC in vitro and in vivo. Blocking transcription or antisense inhibition of cen-RNA leads to a reduction of CPC localization to the inner centromere and misregulation of CPC component Aurora-B activation independently of known centromere recruitment pathways. Additionally, transcription is required for normal bipolar attachment of kinetochores to the mitotic spindle, consistent with a role for cen-RNA in CPC regulation. This work demonstrates that cen-RNAs promote normal kinetochore function through regulation of the localization and activation of the CPC and confirm that lncRNAs are components of the centromere.

  8. Regulation of burstiness by network-driven activation

    García-Pérez, Guillermo; Serrano, M Ángeles

    2014-01-01

    We prove that complex networks of interactions have the capacity to regulate and buffer unpredictable fluctuations in production events. We show that non-bursty network-driven activation dynamics can effectively regulate the level of burstiness in the production of nodes, which can be enhanced or reduced. Burstiness can be induced even when the endogenous inter-event time distribution of nodes' production is non-bursty. We found that hubs tend to be less controllable than low degree nodes, which are more susceptible to the networked regulatory effects. Our results have important implications for the analysis and engineering of bursty activity in a range of systems, from telecommunication networks to transcription and translation of genes into proteins in cells.

  9. Shape regulation generates elastic interaction between active force dipoles

    Golkov, Roman

    2016-01-01

    The organization of live cells to tissues is associated with the mechanical interaction between cells, which is mediated through their mechanical environment. We model live cells as spherical active force dipoles surrounded by an infinite elastic matrix, and analytically evaluate their elastic interaction energy for different scenarios of their regulatory behavior. For purely dilational eigenstrains the elastic interaction energy between any two bodies vanishes. We identify mechanical interactions between active cells applying non isotropic displacements with a regulation mechanism designed so that they will preserve their spherical shape. We express the resultant non-isotropic deformation field by a multipole expansion in terms of spherical harmonics. Mechanical self-regulation of live cells is not fully understood, and we compare homeostatic (set point) force applied by the cells on their environment versus homeostatic displacements on their surface. By including or excluding the first term of the expansion...

  10. Serum Soluble Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 and Procalcitonin Can Reflect Sepsis Severity and Predict Prognosis: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Zhenyu Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the prognostic significance of serum soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1, procalcitonin (PCT, N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP, C-reactive protein (CRP, cytokines, and clinical severity scores in patients with sepsis. Methods. A total of 102 patients with sepsis were divided into survival group (n=60 and nonsurvival group (n=42 based on 28-day mortality. Serum levels of biomarkers and cytokines were measured on days 1, 3, and 5 after admission to an ICU, meanwhile the acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA scores were calculated. Results. Serum sTREM-1, PCT, and IL-6 levels of patients in the nonsurvival group were significantly higher than those in the survival group on day 1 (P<0.01. The area under a ROC curve for the prediction of 28 day mortality was 0.792 for PCT, 0.856 for sTREM-1, 0.953 for SOFA score, and 0.923 for APACHE II score. Multivariate logistic analysis showed that serum baseline sTREM-1 PCT levels and SOFA score were the independent predictors of 28-day mortality. Serum PCT, sTREM-1, and IL-6 levels showed a decrease trend over time in the survival group (P<0.05. Serum NT-pro-BNP levels showed the predictive utility from days 3 and 5 (P<0.05. Conclusion. In summary, elevated serum sTREM-1 and PCT levels provide superior prognostic accuracy to other biomarkers. Combination of serum sTREM-1 and PCT levels and SOFA score can offer the best powerful prognostic utility for sepsis mortality.

  11. Prospective Evaluation of Procalcitonin, Soluble Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 and C-Reactive Protein in Febrile Patients with Autoimmune Diseases

    Lin, Chou-Han; Hsieh, Song-Chou; Keng, Li-Ta; Lee, Ho-Sheng; Chang, Hou-Tai; Liao, Wei-Yu; Ho, Chao-Chi; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Background Both procalcitonin (PCT) and soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1) have been investigated separately as indicators of infection in patients with autoimmune diseases. Our study simultaneously evaluated both PCT and sTREM-1 along with C-reactive protein (CRP) in febrile patients with autoimmune diseases. Methods Fifty-nine patients were enrolled in the study. The patients were categorized into the infection group (n = 24) or the disease flare group (n = 35). sTREM-1, PCT and CRP concentrations at fever onset were compared between the two groups of patients. Results sTREM-1 and CRP did not differ between the two groups. PCT [median (range), ng/ml] was higher in the infection group than in the disease flare group [0.53 (0.02–12.85) vs. 0.12 (0.02–19.23), p = 0.001]. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) for diagnosis of infection was 0.75 for PCT (p = 0.001), 0.63 for CRP (p = 0.09) and 0.52 for sTREM-1 (p = 0.79). Using 0.2 ng/ml as the cutoff value for PCT, sensitivity was 0.75 and specificity was 0.77. Negative predictive values for PCT were 92%, 87% and 82% for a prevalence of infection of 20%, 30%, and 40%, respectively. Neither immunosuppressants nor biomodulators affected the level of the three biomarkers. However, in patients treated with corticosteroids, the levels of sTREM-1 and CRP were significantly decreased compared with the untreated patients. Conclusions Setting PCT at a lower cutoff value could provide useful information on excluding infection in febrile patients with autoimmune diseases. The possible effect of corticosteroids on the level of sTREM-1 as an infection marker deserves further study. PMID:27096761

  12. Epigenetic regulation of satellite cell activation during muscle regeneration

    Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Blais, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    Satellite cells are a population of adult muscle stem cells that play a key role in mediating muscle regeneration. Activation of these quiescent stem cells in response to muscle injury involves modulating expression of multiple developmentally regulated genes, including mediators of the muscle-specific transcription program: Pax7, Myf5, MyoD and myogenin. Here we present evidence suggesting an essential role for the antagonistic Polycomb group and Trithorax group proteins in the epigenetic ma...

  13. Activation and Regulation of DNA-Driven Immune Responses

    Paludan, Søren R

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system provides early defense against infections and also plays a key role in monitoring alterations of homeostasis in the body. DNA is highly immunostimulatory, and recent advances in this field have led to the identification of the innate immune sensors responsible for the recognition of DNA as well as the downstream pathways that are activated. Moreover, information on how cells regulate DNA-driven immune responses to avoid excessive inflammation is now emerging. Finally,...

  14. Molecular regulation of vascular cambium identity and activity

    Kucukoglu, Melis

    2015-01-01

    In plants, secondary development and wood formation originates from the cell divisions within the vascular meristem, where the vascular stem cells are located. This thesis work presents my results on the molecular regulation of vascular cambium stem cell identity and activity. I have investigated the role of the receptor-like kinase PXC1 during vascular development in Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutant analysis revealed that in the absence of PXC1, plants display a pendant phenotype and reduced...

  15. Summary of regulation applicable to the gamma-graphy activities

    The regulations relative to the gamma radiography activities concerns in one hand the radioactive sources, and on the other hand the radiation protection of the workers. The necessity of having a person competent in radiation protection and the tasks he or she has to do are described. The training of operators, the medical surveillance, the dosimetry are such obligations. The maintenance of equipment is an other obligation. The last point concerns the transport of radioactive materials. (N.C.)

  16. Commission for Energy regulation (CRE) - Activity report June 2005

    CRE is the French commission for energy regulation. CRE's remit is to assist in ensuring the proper operation of the electricity and natural gas markets for the benefit of the end-user. In particular, CRE ensures that the conditions of access to electricity and natural gas transmission and distribution systems do not hinder the development of competition. It monitors, for the electricity and natural gas sectors, all transactions made between suppliers, traders and producers, all transactions made on the organised markets and cross-border trading. It ensures that suppliers, traders and producers propose offers that are consistent with their financial and technical constraints. It monitors the implementation of and compliance with regulations giving consumers the right to choose their supplier in a competitive market, and allowing new suppliers to enter the market. This document is the 2005 activity report of CRE. Content: A - The opening of the markets in France and in Europe: The opening of the markets one year after 1 July 2004 (An especially important step, Electricity and gas: a common framework with structural differences, The coexistence of market prices and regulated tariffs); The European texts of 26 June 2003 (Texts to give new impetus, Texts to harmonize the role and powers of national regulators, Texts to guarantee the independence of system operators, Texts to ensure transparent and non-discriminatory access to networks, Texts providing for strengthening of interconnections); The outlook for 2007, a fully open market (1 July 2007: a date set by the directives, Priority given to informing and protecting consumers); B - Regulation of the natural gas market: The gas market in the European context (Europe's dependency on imports is increasing, Gas prices increased considerably across the whole of Europe in 2004, The European gas scene continues to be dominated by a small number of players, Gas infrastructures need to be developed in Europe, The new European

  17. Regulation of Natural Killer Cell Function by STAT3

    Nicholas eCacalano

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells, key members of a distinct hempatopoietic lineage, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs, are critical effectors that mediate cytotoxicity toward tumor and virally-infected cells but also regulate inflammation, antigen presentation and the adaptive immune response. It has been shown that NK cells can regulate the development and activation of many other components of the immune response such as dendritic cells, which in turn, modulate the function of NK cells in multiple synergistic feed back loops driven by cell-cell contact and the secretion of cytokines and chemokines that control effector function and migration of cells to sites of immune activation. The Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT-3 is involved in driving almost all of the pathways that control NK cytolytic activity as well as the reciprocal regulatory interactions between NK cells and other components of the immune system. In the context of tumor immunology, NK cells are a first line of defense that eliminates pre-cancerous and transformed cells early in the process of carcinogenesis, through a mechanism of immune surveillance. Even after tumors become established, NK cells are critical components of anti-cancer immunity: dysfunctional NK cells are often found in the peripheral blood of cancer patients and the lack of NK cells in the tumor microenvironment often correlates with poor prognosis. The pathways and soluble factors activated in tumor-associated NK cells, cancer cells, and regulatory myeloid cells which determine the outcome of cancer immunity are all critically regulated by STAT3. Using the tumor microenvironment as a paradigm, we present here an overview of the research that has revealed fundamental mechanisms through which STAT3 regulates all aspects of natural killer cell biology, including NK development, activation, target cell killing, and fine tuning of the innate and adaptive immune responses.

  18. Regulation of Natural Killer Cell Function by STAT3

    Cacalano, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, key members of a distinct hematopoietic lineage, innate lymphoid cells, are not only critical effectors that mediate cytotoxicity toward tumor and virally infected cells but also regulate inflammation, antigen presentation, and the adaptive immune response. It has been shown that NK cells can regulate the development and activation of many other components of the immune response, such as dendritic cells, which in turn, modulate the function of NK cells in multiple synergistic feed back loops driven by cell–cell contact, and the secretion of cytokines and chemokines that control effector function and migration of cells to sites of immune activation. The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 is involved in driving almost all of the pathways that control NK cytolytic activity as well as the reciprocal regulatory interactions between NK cells and other components of the immune system. In the context of tumor immunology, NK cells are a first line of defense that eliminates pre-cancerous and transformed cells early in the process of carcinogenesis, through a mechanism of “immune surveillance.” Even after tumors become established, NK cells are critical components of anticancer immunity: dysfunctional NK cells are often found in the peripheral blood of cancer patients, and the lack of NK cells in the tumor microenvironment often correlates to poor prognosis. The pathways and soluble factors activated in tumor-associated NK cells, cancer cells, and regulatory myeloid cells, which determine the outcome of cancer immunity, are all critically regulated by STAT3. Using the tumor microenvironment as a paradigm, we present here an overview of the research that has revealed fundamental mechanisms through which STAT3 regulates all aspects of NK cell biology, including NK development, activation, target cell killing, and fine tuning of the innate and adaptive immune responses.

  19. Disorders of regulation of cognitive activity in autistic children.

    Adrien, J L; Martineau, J; Barthélémy, C; Bruneau, N; Garreau, B; Sauvage, D

    1995-06-01

    Infantile autism is a pervasive developmental disorder characterized by disturbances concerning not only the areas of socialization and communication ("aloneness") but also the ability to modify and change behavior ("need for sameness"). In most recent studies, various abnormal and deviant cognitive activities, such as the ability to regulate one's behavior, were considered as accounting for these signs. In this report, we examined the regulation of cognitive activity, from a developmental perspective in comparing autistic with mentally retarded children matched in a pairwise manner by global, verbal, and nonverbal developmental ages. All children were tested with tasks adapted from the Object Permanence Test which corresponds to Piaget's sensorimotor development Stages IV to VI. Results showed that autistic children had a pervasive difficulty in maintenance set, made more perseverative errors when the abstraction degree of task was higher, and were more variable in their behavioral strategies. Discussion is focused on the interests and limits of these tasks for the examination of regulation activity from diagnostic and developmental perspectives. Finally, interpretations about recent neuropsychological and neurophysiological works, and additional interdisciplinary studies are suggested. PMID:7559291

  20. p53 regulation and activity in mouse embryonic stem cells

    Solozobova, Valeriya

    2010-01-01

    P53 is a tumour development p53. The aim of this work was to study the regulation of p53 in embryonic stem cells and its activation in response to DNA damage. p53 was found that p53 becomes transcriptionally active in ES cells after DNA damage. Embryonic stem cells contain a relatively high amount of p53 protein and p53 RNA. After differentiation p53 level is rapidly downregulated. The high abundance of p53 in undifferentiated ES cells is a result of enhanced translation.

  1. After the Slippery Slope: Dutch Experiences on Regulating Active Euthanasia

    Boer, Th.A.

    2003-01-01

    “When a country legalizes active euthanasia, it puts itself on a slippery slope from where it may well go further downward.” If true, this is a forceful argument in the battle of those who try to prevent euthanasia from becoming legal. The force of any slippery-slope argument, however, is by definition limited by its reference to future developments which cannot empirically be sustained. Experience in the Netherlands—where a law regulating active euthanasia was accepted in April 2001—may shed...

  2. The Regulation of Pulmonary Inflammation by the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor–Hydroxylase Oxygen-Sensing Pathway

    Moira K B Whyte; Walmsley, Sarah R.

    2014-01-01

    Although the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)–hydroxylase oxygen-sensing pathway has been extensively reviewed in the context of cellular responses to hypoxia and cancer biology, its importance in regulating innate immune biology is less well described. In this review, we focus on the role of the HIF-hydroxylase pathway in regulating myeloid cell responses and its relevance to inflammatory lung disease. The more specific roles of individual HIF/ prolyl hydroxylase pathway members in vivo are di...

  3. Maitake beta-glucan promotes recovery of leukocytes and myeloid cell function in peripheral blood from paclitaxel hematotoxicity

    Lin, Hong; de Stanchina, Elisa; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Hong, Feng; Seidman, Andrew; Fornier, Monica; Xiao, Wei-Lie; Kennelly, Edward J.; Wesa, Kathleen; Cassileth, Barrie R; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow myelotoxicity is a major limitation of chemotherapy. While granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment is effective, alternative approaches to support hematopoietic recovery are sought. We previously found that a beta-glucan extract from maitake mushroom Grifola frondosa (MBG) enhanced colony forming unit-granulocyte monocyte (CFU-GM) activity of mouse bone marrow and human hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC), stimulated G-CSF production and spared HPC from doxorubici...

  4. The molecular regulation of Janus kinase (JAK) activation.

    Babon, Jeffrey J; Lucet, Isabelle S; Murphy, James M; Nicola, Nicos A; Varghese, Leila N

    2014-08-15

    The JAK (Janus kinase) family members serve essential roles as the intracellular signalling effectors of cytokine receptors. This family, comprising JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and TYK2 (tyrosine kinase 2), was first described more than 20 years ago, but the complexities underlying their activation, regulation and pleiotropic signalling functions are still being explored. Here, we review the current knowledge of their physiological functions and the causative role of activating and inactivating JAK mutations in human diseases, including haemopoietic malignancies, immunodeficiency and inflammatory diseases. At the molecular level, recent studies have greatly advanced our knowledge of the structures and organization of the component FERM (4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin)-SH2 (Src homology 2), pseudokinase and kinase domains within the JAKs, the mechanism of JAK activation and, in particular, the role of the pseudokinase domain as a suppressor of the adjacent tyrosine kinase domain's catalytic activity. We also review recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of negative regulation exerted by the SH2 domain-containing proteins, SOCS (suppressors of cytokine signalling) proteins and LNK. These recent studies highlight the diversity of regulatory mechanisms utilized by the JAK family to maintain signalling fidelity, and suggest alternative therapeutic strategies to complement existing ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors. PMID:25057888

  5. Cooperative activation of transcription by autoimmune regulator AIRE and CBP

    Autoimmune regulator (AIRE) is a transcriptional regulator that is believed to control the expression of tissue-specific genes in the thymus. Mutated AIRE is responsible for onset of the hereditary autoimmune disease APECED. AIRE is able to form nuclear bodies (NBs) and interacts with the ubiquitous transcriptional coactivator CBP. In this paper, we show that CBP and AIRE synergistically activate transcription on different promoter reporters whereas AIRE gene mutation R257X, found in APECED patients, interferes with this coactivation effect. Furthermore, the overexpression of AIRE and CBP collaboratively enhance endogenous IFNβ mRNA expression. The immunohistochemical studies suggest that CBP, depending on the balance of nuclear proteins, is a component of AIRE NBs. We also show that AIRE NBs are devoid of active chromatin and, therefore, not sites of transcription. In addition, we demonstrate by 3D analyses that AIRE and CBP, when colocalizing, are located spatially differently within AIRE NBs. In conclusion, our data suggest that AIRE activates transcription of the target genes, i.e., autoantigens in collaboration with CBP and that this activation occurs outside of AIRE NBs

  6. Calcium and cargoes as regulators of myosin 5a activity

    Myosin 5a is a two-headed actin-dependent motor that transports various cargoes in cells. Its enzymology and mechanochemistry have been extensively studied in vitro. It is a processive motor that takes multiple 36 nm steps on actin. The enzymatic activity of myosin 5 is regulated by an intramolecular folding mechanism whereby its lever arms fold back against the coiled-coil tail such that the motor domains directly bind the globular tail domains. We show that the structure seen in individual folded molecules is consistent with electron density map of two-dimensional crystals of the molecule. In this compact state, the actin-activated MgATPase activity of the molecule is markedly inhibited and the molecule cannot move processively on surface bound actin filaments. The actin-activated MgATPase activity of myosin 5a is activated by increasing the calcium concentration or by binding of a cargo-receptor molecule, melanophilin, in vitro. However, calcium binding to the calmodulin light chains results in dissociation of some of the calmodulin which disrupts the ability of myosin 5a to move on actin filaments in vitro. Thus we propose that the physiologically relevant activation pathway in vivo involves binding of cargo-receptor proteins

  7. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation regulates in vitro bone formation and bone mass

    Shah, M; Kola, B; Bataveljic, A.; Arnett, T. R.; Viollet, B.; Saxon, L.; Korbonits, M.; C. Chenu

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine 5′-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a regulator of energy homeostasis, has a central role in mediating the appetite-modulating and metabolic effects of many hormones and antidiabetic drugs metformin and glitazones. The objective of this study was to determine if AMPK can be activated in osteoblasts by known AMPK modulators and if AMPK activity is involved in osteoblast function in vitro and regulation of bone mass in vivo. ROS 17/2.8 rat osteoblast-like cells were cult...

  8. Commission for Energy regulation (CRE) - Activity report june 2006

    CRE is the French commission for energy regulation. CRE's remit is to assist in ensuring the proper operation of the electricity and natural gas markets for the benefit of the end-user. In particular, CRE ensures that the conditions of access to electricity and natural gas transmission and distribution systems do not hinder the development of competition. It monitors, for the electricity and natural gas sectors, all transactions made between suppliers, traders and producers, all transactions made on the organised markets and cross-border trading. It ensures that suppliers, traders and producers propose offers that are consistent with their financial and technical constraints. It monitors the implementation of and compliance with regulations giving consumers the right to choose their supplier in a competitive market, and allowing new suppliers to enter the market. This document is the 2006 activity report of CRE. Content: A - Opening of the electricity and natural gas markets to household consumers on 1 July 2007: CRE at the service of eligible customers (Information for eligible customers, Improved knowledge of non-household customers); Monitoring of the non-discrimination, transparency and independence of system operators (Drafting and distribution of codes of good conduct for system operators, The necessary improvement of system operator independence); Preparing the practical methods of opening: GTE 2007 and GTG 2007 (The necessary simplification of relations between operators and customers, Achieving a greater level of consumer information and protection, The clearly defined stages of the 'customer pathway', Profiling and settlement mechanisms: turning experience feedback from 2004 to good account); Persisting uncertainties and hurdles (The need for a suitable regulatory and legislative platform, Hurdles to the opening of the household market); B - Regulation of the natural gas market: The gas market in the European context (Increasing weight of imports in gas

  9. Commission for Energy regulation (CRE) - Activity report june 2006

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    CRE is the French commission for energy regulation. CRE's remit is to assist in ensuring the proper operation of the electricity and natural gas markets for the benefit of the end-user. In particular, CRE ensures that the conditions of access to electricity and natural gas transmission and distribution systems do not hinder the development of competition. It monitors, for the electricity and natural gas sectors, all transactions made between suppliers, traders and producers, all transactions made on the organised markets and cross-border trading. It ensures that suppliers, traders and producers propose offers that are consistent with their financial and technical constraints. It monitors the implementation of and compliance with regulations giving consumers the right to choose their supplier in a competitive market, and allowing new suppliers to enter the market. This document is the 2006 activity report of CRE. Content: A - Opening of the electricity and natural gas markets to household consumers on 1 July 2007: CRE at the service of eligible customers (Information for eligible customers, Improved knowledge of non-household customers); Monitoring of the non-discrimination, transparency and independence of system operators (Drafting and distribution of codes of good conduct for system operators, The necessary improvement of system operator independence); Preparing the practical methods of opening: GTE 2007 and GTG 2007 (The necessary simplification of relations between operators and customers, Achieving a greater level of consumer information and protection, The clearly defined stages of the 'customer pathway', Profiling and settlement mechanisms: turning experience feedback from 2004 to good account); Persisting uncertainties and hurdles (The need for a suitable regulatory and legislative platform, Hurdles to the opening of the household market); B - Regulation of the natural gas market: The gas market in the European context (Increasing weight of

  10. Inhibitory neurotransmission regulates vagal efferent activity and gastric motility.

    McMenamin, Caitlin A; Travagli, R Alberto; Browning, Kirsteen N

    2016-06-01

    The gastrointestinal tract receives extrinsic innervation from both the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, which regulate and modulate the function of the intrinsic (enteric) nervous system. The stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract in particular are heavily influenced by the parasympathetic nervous system, supplied by the vagus nerve, and disruption of vagal sensory or motor functions results in disorganized motility patterns, disrupted receptive relaxation and accommodation, and delayed gastric emptying, amongst others. Studies from several laboratories have shown that the activity of vagal efferent motoneurons innervating the upper GI tract is inhibited tonically by GABAergic synaptic inputs from the adjacent nucleus tractus solitarius. Disruption of this influential central GABA input impacts vagal efferent output, hence gastric functions, significantly. The purpose of this review is to describe the development, physiology, and pathophysiology of this functionally dominant inhibitory synapse and its role in regulating vagally determined gastric functions. PMID:27302177

  11. [Polymethoxylated flavonoids activate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel].

    Cao, Huan-Huan; Fang, Fang; Yu, Bo; Luan, Jian; Jiang, Yu; Yang, Hong

    2015-04-25

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-dependent chloride channel, plays key roles in fluid secretion in serous epithelial cells. Previously, we identified two polymethoxylated flavonoids, 3',4',5,5',6,7-hexamethoxyflavone (HMF) and 5-hydroxy-6,7,3',4'-tetramethoxyflavone (HTF) which could potentiate CFTR chloride channel activities. The present study was aimed to investigate the potentiation effects of HMF and HTF on CFTR Cl(-) channel activities by using a cell-based fluorescence assay and the short circuit Ussing chamber assay. The results of cell-based fluorescence assay showed that both HMF and HTF could dose-dependently potentiate CFTR Cl(-) channel activities in rapid and reversible ways, and the activations could be reversed by the CFTR blocker CFTRinh-172. Notably, HMF showed the highest affinity (EC50 = 2 μmol/L) to CFTR protein among the flavonoid CFTR activators identified so far. The activation of CFTR by HMF or HTF was forskolin (FSK) dependent. Both compounds showed additive effect with FSK and 3-Isobutyl-1-methylx (IBMX) in the activation of CFTR, while had no additive effect with genistein (GEN). In ex vivo studies, HMF and HTF could stimulate transepithelial Cl(-) secretion in rat colonic mucosa and enhance fluid secretion in mouse trachea submucosal glands. These results suggest that HMF and HTF may potentiate CFTR Cl(-) channel activities through both elevation of cAMP level and binding to CFTR protein pathways. The results provide new clues in elucidating structure and activity relationship of flavonoid CFTR activators. HMF might be developed as a new drug in the therapy of CFTR-related diseases such as bronchiectasis and habitual constipation. PMID:25896054

  12. Cancer-induced Expansion and Activation of CD11b+Gr-1+ Cells Predispose Mice to Adenoviral-triggered Anaphylactoid-type Reactions

    Pande, Kalyan; Ueda, Roanna; Machemer, Todd; Sathe, Manjiri; Tsai,, J.F.; Brin, Elena; Delano, Matthew J; van Rooijen, Nico; McClanahan, Terrill K.; Talmadge, James E.; Moldawer, Lyle L; Phillips, Joseph H; Laface, Drake M.

    2009-01-01

    Intravascular delivery (1.5 × 109 particles and higher) of recombinant adenovirus (rAd) induces myeloid cell mediated, self-limiting hemodynamic responses in normal mice. However, we observed anaphylactoid-type reactions and exacerbated hemodynamic events following rAd injection in mice bearing malignant 4T1 mammary carcinoma. Because 4T1 tumors induce significant CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cell expansion and activation, we set to determine whether this causes rAd-induced exaggerated responses. When...

  13. Recent development in safety regulation of nuclear fuel cycle activities

    Through the effort of deliberation and legislation over five years, Japanese government structure was reformed this January, with the aim of realizing simple, efficient and transparent administration. Under the reform, the Agency for Nuclear and Industrial Safety (ANIS) was founded in the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) to be responsible for safety regulation of energy-related nuclear activities, including nuclear fuel cycle activities, and industrial activities, including explosives, high-pressure gasses and mining. As one of the lessons learned from the JCO criticality accident of September 1999, it was pointed out that government's inspection function was not enough for fuel fabrication facilities. Accordingly, new statutory regulatory activities were introduced, namely, inspection of observance of safety rules and procedures for all kinds of nuclear operators and periodic inspection of fuel fabrication facilities. In addition, in order to cope with insufficient safety education and training of workers in nuclear facilities, licensees of nuclear facilities are required by law to specify safety education and training for their workers. ANIS is committed to enforce these new regulatory activities effectively and efficiently. In addition, it is going to be prepared for, in its capacity of safety regulatory authority, future development of Japanese fuel cycle activities, including commissioning of JNFL Rokkasho reprocessing plant and possible application for licenses for JNFL MOX fabrication plant and for spent fuel interim storage facilities. (author)

  14. Recent development in safety regulation of nuclear fuel cycle activities

    Through the effort of deliberation and legislation over five years, Japanese government structure was reformed this January, with the aim of realizing simple, efficient and transparent administration. Under the reform, the Agency for Nuclear and Industrial Safety (ANIS) was founded in the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) to be responsible for safety regulation of energy-related nuclear activities, including nuclear fuel cycle activities, and industrial activities, including explosives, high-pressure gasses and mining. As one of the lessons learned from the JCO criticality accident of September 1999, it was pointed out that the government's inspection function was not enough for fuel fabrication facilities. Accordingly, new statutory regulatory activities were introduced, namely, inspection of observance of safety rules and procedures for all kinds of nuclear operators and periodic inspection of fuel fabrication facilities. In addition, in order to cope with insufficient safety education and training of workers in nuclear facilities, licensees of nuclear facilities are required by law to specify safety education and training for their workers. ANIS is committed to enforce these new regulatory activities effectively and efficiently. In addition, it is going to be prepared, in its capacity as safety regulatory authority, for future development of Japanese fuel cycle activities, including commissioning of JNFL Rokkasho reprocessing plant and possible application for licenses for JNFL MOX fabrication plant and for spent fuel interim storage facilities. (author)

  15. Increased Expression of PcG Protein YY1 Negatively Regulates B Cell Development while Allowing Accumulation of Myeloid Cells and LT-HSC Cells

    Pan, Xuan; Jones, Morgan; Jiang, Jie; Zaprazna, Kristina; Yu, Duonan; Pear, Warren; Maillard, Ivan; Atchison, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Ying Yang 1 (YY1) is a multifunctional Polycomb Group (PcG) transcription factor that binds to multiple enhancer binding sites in the immunoglobulin (Ig) loci and plays vital roles in early B cell development. PcG proteins have important functions in hematopoietic stem cell renewal and YY1 is the only mammalian PcG protein with DNA binding specificity. Conditional knock-out of YY1 in the mouse B cell lineage results in arrest at the pro-B cell stage, and dosage effects have been observed at v...

  16. Histone deacetylase 11: A novel epigenetic regulator of myeloid derived suppressor cell expansion and function

    Sahakian, Eva; Powers, John J.; Chen, Jie; Deng, Susan L.; Cheng, Fengdong; Distler, Allison; Woods, David M.; Rock-Klotz, Jennifer; Laino, Andressa Sodre'; Youn, Je-In; Woan, Karrune V.; Villagra, Alejandro; Gabrilovich, Dmitry,; Sotomayor, Eduardo M.; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC's), a heterogeneous population of cells capable of suppressing anti-tumor T cell function in the tumor microenvironment, represent an imposing obstacle in the development of cancer immunotherapeutics. Thus, identifying elements essential to the development and perpetuation of these cells will undoubtedly improve our ability to circumvent their suppressive impact. HDAC11 has emerged as a key regulator of IL-10 gene expression in myeloid cells, suggesting ...

  17. How Phosphorylation and ATPase Activity Regulate Anion Flux though the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR).

    Zwick, Matthias; Esposito, Cinzia; Hellstern, Manuel; Seelig, Anna

    2016-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, ABCC7), mutations of which cause cystic fibrosis, belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family and works as a channel for small anions, such as chloride and bicarbonate. Anion channel activity is known to depend on phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and CFTR-ATPase activity. Whereas anion channel activity has been extensively investigated, phosphorylation and CFTR-ATPase activity are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the two processes can be measured in a label-free and non-invasive manner in real time in live cells, stably transfected with CFTR. This study reveals three key findings. (i) The major contribution (≥90%) to the total CFTR-related ATP hydrolysis rate is due to phosphorylation by PKA and the minor contribution (≤10%) to CFTR-ATPase activity. (ii) The mutant CFTR-E1371S that is still conductive, but defective in ATP hydrolysis, is not phosphorylated, suggesting that phosphorylation requires a functional nucleotide binding domain and occurs in the post-hydrolysis transition state. (iii) CFTR-ATPase activity is inversely related to CFTR anion flux. The present data are consistent with a model in which CFTR is in a closed conformation with two ATPs bound. The open conformation is induced by ATP hydrolysis and corresponds to the post-hydrolysis transition state that is stabilized by phosphorylation and binding of chloride channel potentiators. PMID:27226582

  18. Microglia recapitulate a hematopoietic master regulator network in the aging human frontal cortex.

    Wehrspaun, Claudia C; Haerty, Wilfried; Ponting, Chris P

    2015-08-01

    Microglia form the immune system of the brain. Previous studies in cell cultures and animal models suggest altered activation states and cellular senescence in the aged brain. Instead, we analyzed 3 transcriptome data sets from the postmortem frontal cortex of 381 control individuals to show that microglia gene markers assemble into a transcriptional module in a gene coexpression network. These markers predominantly represented M1 and M1/M2b activation phenotypes. Expression of genes in this module generally declines over the adult life span. This decrease was more pronounced in microglia surface receptors for microglia and/or neuron crosstalk than in markers for activation state phenotypes. In addition to these receptors for exogenous signals, microglia are controlled by brain-expressed regulatory factors. We identified a subnetwork of transcription factors, including RUNX1, IRF8, PU.1, and TAL1, which are master regulators (MRs) for the age-dependent microglia module. The causal contributions of these MRs on the microglia module were verified using publicly available ChIP-Seq data. Interactions of these key MRs were preserved in a protein-protein interaction network. Importantly, these MRs appear to be essential for regulating microglia homeostasis in the adult human frontal cortex in addition to their crucial roles in hematopoiesis and myeloid cell-fate decisions during embryogenesis. PMID:26002684

  19. Active Use of the Natural Environment for Emotion Regulation

    Svein Åge Kjøs Johnsen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Two studies on the use of nature for emotion regulation were conducted. Study 1 (N = 35 ran over two weeks and was an experimental investigation. Participants in the experimental condition were asked to use a picture of nature actively as environmental stimuli for emotion regulation in their everyday life, while two control groups simply looked at a picture of nature or a picture of balloons each evening. A significant effect of the manipulation was found on positive mood, but the effect was complex with an initial increase and then a decrease. There were no findings on negative mood. Study 2 (N = 473 explored the motivational tendency to seek out nature when the participants were happy or sad. A novel concept (expectancy construct was introduced to measure the perception of the emotion regulatory potential of different environments. The classical natural environment was rated highest on emotional potential of all environments tested here. Perceiving a higher emotional potential in nature was related to a higher intention to seek out nature when happy or sad. Personality and mood were also related to these concepts. Higher positive mood was related to the intention to seek out nature when happy. Conscientiousness was related to a more positive perception of nature. The studies support the notion that using nature may be an effective strategy for regulating one’s emotions.

  20. Erk1 positively regulates osteoclast differentiation and bone resorptive activity.

    Yongzheng He

    Full Text Available The extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1 and 2 are widely-expressed and they modulate proliferation, survival, differentiation, and protein synthesis in multiple cell lineages. Altered ERK1/2 signaling is found in several genetic diseases with skeletal phenotypes, including Noonan syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type 1, and Cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome, suggesting that MEK-ERK signals regulate human skeletal development. Here, we examine the consequence of Erk1 and Erk2 disruption in multiple functions of osteoclasts, specialized macrophage/monocyte lineage-derived cells that resorb bone. We demonstrate that Erk1 positively regulates osteoclast development and bone resorptive activity, as genetic disruption of Erk1 reduced osteoclast progenitor cell numbers, compromised pit formation, and diminished M-CSF-mediated adhesion and migration. Moreover, WT mice reconstituted long-term with Erk1(-/- bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs demonstrated increased bone mineral density as compared to recipients transplanted with WT and Erk2(-/- BMMNCs, implicating marrow autonomous, Erk1-dependent osteoclast function. These data demonstrate Erk1 plays an important role in osteoclast functions while providing rationale for the development of Erk1-specific inhibitors for experimental investigation and/or therapeutic modulation of aberrant osteoclast function.

  1. Regulation of dopamine transporter activity by carboxypeptidase E

    Zhang Heping

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dopamine transporter (DAT plays a critical role in terminating the action of dopamine by rapid reuptake into the presynaptic neuron. Previous studies have revealed that the DAT carboxyl terminus (DAT-CT can directly interact with other cellular proteins and regulate DAT function and trafficking. Results Here, we have identified that carboxypeptidase E (CPE, a prohormone processing exopeptidase and sorting receptor for the regulated secretory pathway, interacts with the DAT-CT and affects DAT function. Mammalian cell lines coexpressing CPE and DAT exhibited increased DAT-mediated dopamine uptake activity compared to cells expressing DAT alone. Moreover, coexpression of an interfering DAT-CT minigene inhibited the effects of CPE on DAT. Functional changes caused by CPE could be attributed to enhanced DAT expression and subsequent increase in DAT cell surface localization, due to decreased DAT degradation. In addition, CPE association could reduce the phosphorylation state of DAT on serine residues, potentially leading to reduced internalization, thus stabilizing plasmalemmal DAT localization. Conclusion Taken together, our results reveal a novel role for CPE in the regulation of DAT trafficking and DAT-mediated DA uptake, which may provide a novel target in the treatment of dopamine-governed diseases such as drug addiction and obesity.

  2. Activity and regulation of the centrosome-associated proteasome.

    Fabunmi, R P; Wigley, W C; Thomas, P J; DeMartino, G N

    2000-01-01

    Regulated proteolysis is important for maintaining appropriate cellular levels of many proteins. The bulk of intracellular protein degradation is catalyzed by the proteasome. Recently, the centrosome was identified as a novel site for concentration of the proteasome and associated regulatory proteins (Wigley, W. C., Fabunmi, R. P., Lee, M. G., Marino, C. R., Muallem, S., DeMartino, G. N., and Thomas, P. J. (1999) J. Cell Biol. 145, 481-490). Here we provide evidence that centrosomes contain the active 26 S proteasome that degrades ubiquitinated-protein and proteasome-specific peptide substrates. Moreover, the centrosomes contain an ubiquitin isopeptidase activity. The proteolytic activity is ATP-dependent and is inhibited by proteasome inhibitors. Notably, treatment of cells with inhibitors of proteasome activity promotes redistribution of the proteasome and associated regulatory proteins to the centrosome independent of an intact microtubule system. These data provide biochemical evidence for active proteasomal complexes at the centrosome, highlighting a novel function for this organizing structure. PMID:10617632

  3. Dynamic changes of serum soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1) reflect sepsis severity and can predict prognosis: a prospective study

    2011-01-01

    Background We examined the utility of serum levels of soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1) for the diagnoses, severity assessments, and predicting the prognoses of patients with sepsis and compared sTREM-1 values with those of C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT). Methods Fifty-two patients with sepsis were included: 15 sepsis cases and 37 severe sepsis cases (severe sepsis + septic shock). Serum levels of sTREM-1, CRP, and PCT were determined on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14 after admission to an ICU. Results Serum sTREM-1 levels of patients with severe sepsis were significantly higher than for those with sepsis on day 1 (240.6 pg/ml vs. 118.3 pg/ml; P < 0.01), but CRP and PCT levels were not significantly different between the two groups. The area under an ROC curve for sTREM-1 for severe sepsis patients was 0.823 (95% confidence interval: 0.690-0.957). Using 222.5 pg/ml of sTREM-1 as the cut-off value, the sensitivity was 59.5%, the specificity was 93.3%, the positive predictive value was 95.6%, the negative predictive value was 48.3%, the positive likelihood ratio was 8.92, and the negative likelihood ratio was 0.434. Based on 28-day survivals, sTREM-1 levels in the surviving group showed a tendency to decrease over time, while they tended to gradually increase in the non-surviving group. sTREM-1 levels in the non-surviving group were higher than those in the surviving group at all time points, whereas CRP and PCT levels showed a tendency to decrease over time in both groups. sTREM-1 levels and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores were positively correlated (r = 0.443; P < 0.001), and this correlation coefficient was greater than the correlation coefficients for both CRP and PCT. Conclusions Serum sTREM-1 levels reflected the severity of sepsis more accurately than those of CRP and PCT and were more sensitive for dynamic evaluations of sepsis prognosis. Trial Registration Current controlled trials Chi

  4. Regulation of seasonal reproduction by hypothalamic activation of thyroid hormone

    TakashiYoshimura

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Organisms living outside the tropics measure the changes in the length of the day to adapt to seasonal changes in the environment. Animals that breed during spring and summer are called long-day breeders, while those that breed during fall are called short-day breeders. Although the influence of thyroid hormone in the regulation of seasonal reproduction has been known for several decades, its precise mechanism remained unknown. Recent studies revealed that the activation of thyroid hormone within the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH plays a key role in this phenomenon. This localized activation of the thyroid hormone is controlled by thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH secreted from the pars tuberalis of the pituitary gland. Although seasonal reproduction is a rate-limiting factor in animal production, genes involved in photoperiodic signal transduction pathway could emerge as potential targets to facilitate domestication.

  5. Osteoblast differentiation and migration are regulated by dynamin GTPase activity.

    Eleniste, Pierre P; Huang, Su; Wayakanon, Kornchanok; Largura, Heather W; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Bone formation is controlled by osteoblasts, but the signaling proteins that control osteoblast differentiation and function are still unclear. We examined if the dynamin GTPase, which is associated with actin remodeling and migration in other cells, plays a role in osteoblast differentiation and migration. Dynamin mRNA was expressed in primary osteoblasts throughout differentiation (0-21 days). However, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, a marker of osteoblast differentiation, was decreased in osteoblasts over-expressing dynamin. Conversely, ALP activity was increased following shRNA-mediated knockdown of dynamin and in osteoblasts treated with the dynamin inhibitor, dynasore. Dynasore also reduced c-fos and osterix expression, markers of early osteoblasts, suggesting a role for dynamin in pre-osteoblast to osteoblast differentiation. Since dynamin GTPase activity is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation, we examined the mechanism of dynamin dephosphorylation in osteoblasts. Dynamin formed a protein complex with the tyrosine phosphatase PTP-PEST and inhibition of phosphatase activity increased the level of phosphorylated dynamin. Further, PTP-PEST blocked the Src-mediated increase in the phosphorylation and GTPase activity of wild-type dynamin but not the phosphorylation mutant dynY231F/Y597F. Although ALP activity was increased in osteoblasts expressing GTPase-defective dynK44A, and to a lesser extent dynY231F/Y597F, osteoblast migration was significantly inhibited by dynK44A and dynY231F/Y597F. These studies demonstrate a novel role for dynamin GTPase activity and phosphorylation in osteoblast differentiation and migration, which may be important for bone formation. PMID:24387844

  6. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase regulates mast cell ion channel activity.

    Lam, Rebecca S; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Matzner, Nicole; Zemtsova, Irina M; Sobiesiak, Malgorzata; Lang, Camelia; Felder, Edward; Dietl, Paul; Huber, Stephan M; Lang, Florian

    2008-01-01

    Stimulation of the mast cell IgE-receptor (FcepsilonRI) by antigen leads to stimulation of Ca(2+) entry with subsequent mast cell degranulation and release of inflammatory mediators. Ca(2+) further activates Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, which in turn provide the electrical driving force for Ca(2+) entry. Since phosphatidylinositol (PI)-3-kinase has previously been shown to be required for mast cell activation and degranulation, we explored, whether mast cell Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels may be sensitive to PI3-kinase activity. Whole-cell patch clamp experiments and Fura-2 fluorescence measurements for determination of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration were performed in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells either treated or untreated with the PI3-kinase inhibitors LY-294002 (10 muM) and wortmannin (100 nM). Antigen-stimulated Ca(2+) entry but not Ca(2+) release from the intracellular stores was dramatically reduced upon PI3-kinase inhibition. Ca(2+) entry was further inhibited by TRPV blocker ruthenium red (10 muM). Ca(2+) entry following readdition after Ca(+)-store depletion with thapsigargin was again decreased by LY-294002, pointing to inhibition of store-operated channels (SOCs). Moreover, inhibition of PI3-kinase abrogated IgE-stimulated, but not ionomycin-induced stimulation of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. These observations disclose PI3-kinase-dependent regulation of Ca(2+) entry and Ca(2+)-activated K(+)-channels, which in turn participate in triggering mast cell degranulation. PMID:18769043

  7. DMPD: Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Full Text Available 14726496 Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. Cor...(.csml) Show Receptor tyrosine kinases and the regulation of macrophage activation. PubmedID 14726496 Title Receptor tyrosine kinases

  8. Regulation of TLR3 Activation by S100A9.

    Tsai, Su-Yu; Segovia, Jesus A; Chang, Te-Hung; Shil, Niraj K; Pokharel, Swechha M; Kannan, T R; Baseman, Joel B; Defrêne, Joan; Pagé, Nathalie; Cesaro, Annabelle; Tessier, Philippe A; Bose, Santanu

    2015-11-01

    Recognition of viral dsRNA by endosomal TLR3 activates innate immune response during virus infection. Trafficking of TLR3 to the endolysosomal compartment arising from fusion of late endosome (LE) with lysosome is required for recognition and detection of pathogen associated molecular patterns, which results in activation of the TLR3-dependent signaling cascade. Existing knowledge about the mechanism(s) and cellular factor(s) governing TLR3 trafficking is limited. In the current study, we identified intracellular S100A9 protein as a critical regulator of TLR3 trafficking. S100A9 was required for maturation of TLR3 containing early endosome (EE) into LE, the compartment that fuses with lysosome to form the endolysosomal compartment. A drastic reduction in cytokine production was observed in S100A9-knockout (KO) primary macrophages following RNA virus infection and treatment of cells with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (polyIC; a dsRNA mimetic that acts as a TLR3 agonist). Mechanistic studies revealed colocalization and interaction of S100A9 with TLR3 following polyIC treatment. S100A9-TLR3 interaction was critical for maturation of TLR3 containing EE into LE because TLR3 could not be detected in the LE of polyIC-treated S100A9-KO macrophages. Subsequently, TLR3 failed to colocalize with its agonist (i.e., biotin-labeled polyIC) in S100A9-deficient macrophages. The in vivo physiological role of S100A9 was evident from loss of cytokine production in polyIC-treated S100A9-KO mice. Thus, we identified intracellular S100A9 as a regulator of TLR3 signaling and demonstrated that S100A9 functions during pre-TLR3 activation stages by facilitating maturation of TLR3 containing EE into LE. PMID:26385519

  9. Murine gammaherpesvirus-68 expands, but does not activate, CD11b+ gr-1+ splenocytes in vivo

    Nelson Daniel A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (HV-68 is an efficient pathogen, capable of infecting and establishing lifelong latency in rodents. While many studies have demonstrated the ability of this viral infection to modulate immune responses, a unifying mechanism for HV-68-induced subversion of a protective host response remains elusive. We questioned whether infection with HV-68 could expand a population of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC as one mechanism for altering protective immunity. Methods Mice were infected with HV-68, with viral latency being established in these animals. At varying times post-infection, cells were isolated for detection of viral genomes, phenotyping of myeloid cell populations, and ex vivo analysis of suppressor activity of myeloid cells. Results CD11b + Gr-1+ myeloid cells accumulated in the spleens, but not the bone marrow, of HV-68 infected mice. These cells were predominantly Gr-1+ Ly-6 G+, and could be found to contain viral genomes. Increased levels of serum S100A8/A9 produced during viral infection were consistent with the expansion of these CD11b + Gr-1+ myeloid cells. Despite their expansion, these cells exhibited no increased arginase 1 or iNOS activity, and did not have the ability to suppress anti-CD3 antibody activated T lymphocyte responses. Conclusions We concluded that HV-68 infection was capable of expanding a population of myeloid cells which were phenotypically similar to MDSC. However these cells were not sufficiently activated during the establishment of viral latency to actively suppress T cell responses.

  10. Vimentin regulates activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome

    Dos Santos, Gimena; Rogel, Micah R.; Baker, Margaret A.; Troken, James R.; Urich, Daniela; Morales-Nebreda, Luisa; Sennello, Joseph A.; Kutuzov, Mikhail A.; Sitikov, Albert; Davis, Jennifer M.; Lam, Anna P.; Cheresh, Paul; Kamp, David; Shumaker, Dale K.; Budinger, G. R. Scott; Ridge, Karen M.

    2015-03-01

    Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and subsequent maturation of IL-1β have been implicated in acute lung injury (ALI), resulting in inflammation and fibrosis. We investigated the role of vimentin, a type III intermediate filament, in this process using three well-characterized murine models of ALI known to require NLRP3 inflammasome activation. We demonstrate that central pathophysiologic events in ALI (inflammation, IL-1β levels, endothelial and alveolar epithelial barrier permeability, remodelling and fibrosis) are attenuated in the lungs of Vim-/- mice challenged with LPS, bleomycin and asbestos. Bone marrow chimeric mice lacking vimentin have reduced IL-1β levels and attenuated lung injury and fibrosis following bleomycin exposure. Furthermore, decreased active caspase-1 and IL-1β levels are observed in vitro in Vim-/- and vimentin-knockdown macrophages. Importantly, we show direct protein-protein interaction between NLRP3 and vimentin. This study provides insights into lung inflammation and fibrosis and suggests that vimentin may be a key regulator of the NLRP3 inflammasome.

  11. Substrate regulation of ascorbate transport activity in astrocytes

    Astrocytes possess a concentrative L-ascorbate (vitamin C) uptake mechanism involving a Na(+)-dependent L-ascorbate transporter located in the plasma membrane. The present experiments examined the effects of deprivation and supplementation of extracellular L-ascorbate on the activity of this transport system. Initial rates of L-ascorbate uptake were measured by incubating primary cultures of rat astrocytes with L-[14C]ascorbate for 1 min at 37 degrees C. We observed that the apparent maximal rate of uptake (Vmax) increased rapidly (less than 1 h) when cultured cells were deprived of L-ascorbate. In contrast, there was no change in the apparent affinity of the transport system for L-[14C]ascorbate. The increase in Vmax was reversed by addition of L-ascorbate, but not D-isoascorbate, to the medium. The effects of external ascorbate on ascorbate transport activity were specific in that preincubation of cultures with L-ascorbate did not affect uptake of 2-deoxy-D-[3H(G)]glucose. We conclude that the astroglial ascorbate transport system is modulated by changes in substrate availability. Regulation of transport activity may play a role in intracellular ascorbate homeostasis by compensating for regional differences and temporal fluctuations in external ascorbate levels

  12. Transcriptional and nontranscriptional regulation of NIS activity and radioiodide transport

    Jung, Kyung Ho; Lee, Kyung Han [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    Radioiodide transport has been extensively and successfully used in the evaluation and management of thyroid disease. The molecular characterization of the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) and cloning of the NIS gene has led to the recent expansion of the use of radioiodide to cancers of the breast and other nonthyroidal tissues exogenously transduced with the NIS gene. More recently, discoveries regarding the functional analysis and regulatory processes of the NIS molecule are opening up exciting opportunities for new research and applications for NIS and radioiodide. The success of NIS based cancer therapy is dependent on achievement of maximal radioiodide transport sufficient to allow delivery of effective radiation doses. This in turn relies on high transcription rates of the NIS gene. However, newer discoveries indicate that nontranscriptional processes that regulate NIS trafficking to cell membrane are also critical determinants of radioiodide uptake. In this review, molecular mechanisms that underlie regulation of NIS transcription and stimuli that augment membrane trafficking and functional activation of NIS molecules will be discussed. A better understanding of how the expression and cell surface targeting of NIS proteins is controlled will hopefully aid in optimizing NIS gene based cancer treatment as well as NIS based reporter-gene imaging strategies.

  13. Parkin Regulates the Activity of Pyruvate Kinase M2.

    Liu, Kun; Li, Fanzhou; Han, Haichao; Chen, Yue; Mao, Zebin; Luo, Jianyuan; Zhao, Yingming; Zheng, Bin; Gu, Wei; Zhao, Wenhui

    2016-05-01

    Parkin, a ubiquitin E3 ligase, is mutated in most cases of autosomal recessive early onset Parkinson disease. It was discovered that Parkin is also mutated in glioblastoma and other human malignancies and that it inhibits tumor cell growth. Here, we identified pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) as a unique substrate for parkin through biochemical purification. We found that parkin interacts with PKM2 both in vitro and in vivo, and this interaction dramatically increases during glucose starvation. Ubiquitylation of PKM2 by parkin does not affect its stability but decreases its enzymatic activity. Parkin regulates the glycolysis pathway and affects the cell metabolism. Our studies revealed the novel important roles of parkin in tumor cell metabolism and provided new insight for therapy of Parkinson disease. PMID:26975375

  14. Regulation of sucrose metabolism in higher plants: localization and regulation of activity of key enzymes

    Winter, H.; Huber, S. C.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Sucrose (Suc) plays a central role in plant growth and development. It is a major end product of photosynthesis and functions as a primary transport sugar and in some cases as a direct or indirect regulator of gene expression. Research during the last 2 decades has identified the pathways involved and which enzymes contribute to the control of flux. Availability of metabolites for Suc synthesis and 'demand' for products of sucrose degradation are important factors, but this review specifically focuses on the biosynthetic enzyme sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS), and the degradative enzymes, sucrose synthase (SuSy), and the invertases. Recent progress has included the cloning of genes encoding these enzymes and the elucidation of posttranslational regulatory mechanisms. Protein phosphorylation is emerging as an important mechanism controlling SPS activity in response to various environmental and endogenous signals. In terms of Suc degradation, invertase-catalyzed hydrolysis generally has been associated with cell expansion, whereas SuSy-catalyzed metabolism has been linked with biosynthetic processes (e.g., cell wall or storage products). Recent results indicate that SuSy may be localized in multiple cellular compartments: (1) as a soluble enzyme in the cytosol (as traditionally assumed); (2) associated with the plasma membrane; and (3) associated with the actin cytoskeleton. Phosphorylation of SuSy has been shown to occur and may be one of the factors controlling localization of the enzyme. The purpose of this review is to summarize some of the recent developments relating to regulation of activity and localization of key enzymes involved in sucrose metabolism in plants.

  15. Regulation of ALF promoter activity in Xenopus oocytes.

    Dan Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In this report we evaluate the use of Xenopus laevis oocytes as a matched germ cell system for characterizing the organization and transcriptional activity of a germ cell-specific X. laevis promoter. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The promoter from the ALF transcription factor gene was cloned from X. laevis genomic DNA using a PCR-based genomic walking approach. The endogenous ALF gene was characterized by RACE and RT-PCR for transcription start site usage, and by sodium bisulfite sequencing to determine its methylation status in somatic and oocyte tissues. Homology between the X. laevis ALF promoter sequence and those from human, chimpanzee, macaque, mouse, rat, cow, pig, horse, dog, chicken and X. tropicalis was relatively low, making it difficult to use such comparisons to identify putative regulatory elements. However, microinjected promoter constructs were very active in oocytes and the minimal promoter could be narrowed by PCR-mediated deletion to a region as short as 63 base pairs. Additional experiments using a series of site-specific promoter mutants identified two cis-elements within the 63 base pair minimal promoter that were critical for activity. Both elements (A and B were specifically recognized by proteins present in crude oocyte extracts based on oligonucleotide competition assays. The activity of promoter constructs in oocytes and in transfected somatic Xenopus XLK-WG kidney epithelial cells was quite different, indicating that the two cell types are not functionally equivalent and are not interchangeable as assay systems. CONCLUSIONS: Overall the results provide the first detailed characterization of the organization of a germ cell-specific Xenopus promoter and demonstrate the feasibility of using immature frog oocytes as an assay system for dissecting the biochemistry of germ cell gene regulation.

  16. Enzymatic Regulation of Steroidogenesis and Nuclear Receptor Activation : Special Focus on Vitamin D and Sex Hormones

    LUNDQVIST, JOHAN

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme-catalyzed reactions are important to regulate steroidogenesis and nuclear receptor activation. The present investigation examines the role of steroid metabolism catalyzed by CYP7B1 for regulation of hormone receptor activation and the effects of vitamin D on enzymatic regulation of steroidogenesis. The study reports data indicating that CYP7B1 can regulate estrogenic signaling by converting estrogens into inactive or less active metabolites. Similar results were obtained for CYP7B1-med...

  17. Notch1 regulated autophagy controls survival and suppressor activity of activated murine T-regulatory cells

    Marcel, Nimi; Sarin, Apurva

    2016-01-01

    Cell survival is one of several processes regulated by the Notch pathway in mammalian cells. Here we report functional outcomes of non-nuclear Notch signaling to activate autophagy, a conserved cellular response to nutrient stress, regulating survival in murine natural T-regulatory cells (Tregs), an immune subset controlling tolerance and inflammation. Induction of autophagy required ligand-dependent, Notch intracellular domain (NIC) activity, which controlled mitochondrial organization and survival of activated Tregs. Consistently, NIC immune-precipitated Beclin and Atg14, constituents of the autophagy initiation complex. Further, ectopic expression of an effector of autophagy (Atg3) or recombinant NIC tagged to a nuclear export signal (NIC-NES), restored autophagy and suppressor function in Notch1-/- Tregs. Furthermore, Notch1 deficiency in the Treg lineage resulted in immune hyperactivity, implicating Notch activity in Treg homeostasis. Notch1 integration with autophagy, revealed in these experiments, holds implications for Notch regulated cell-fate decisions governing differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14023.001 PMID:27267497

  18. Regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by natural and synthetic activators.

    Grahame Hardie, David

    2016-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a sensor of cellular energy status that is almost universally expressed in eukaryotic cells. While it appears to have evolved in single-celled eukaryotes to regulate energy balance in a cell-autonomous manner, during the evolution of multicellular animals its role has become adapted so that it also regulates energy balance at the whole body level, by responding to hormones that act primarily on the hypothalamus. AMPK monitors energy balance at the cellular level by sensing the ratios of AMP/ATP and ADP/ATP, and recent structural analyses of the AMPK heterotrimer that have provided insight into the complex mechanisms for these effects will be discussed. Given the central importance of energy balance in diseases that are major causes of morbidity or death in humans, such as type 2 diabetes, cancer and inflammatory disorders, there has been a major drive to develop pharmacological activators of AMPK. Many such activators have been described, and the various mechanisms by which these activate AMPK will be discussed. A particularly large class of AMPK activators are natural products of plants derived from traditional herbal medicines. While the mechanism by which most of these activate AMPK has not yet been addressed, I will argue that many of them may be defensive compounds produced by plants to deter infection by pathogens or grazing by insects or herbivores, and that many of them will turn out to be inhibitors of mitochondrial function. PMID:26904394

  19. Regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by natural and synthetic activators

    David Grahame Hardie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is a sensor of cellular energy status that is almost universally expressed in eukaryotic cells. While it appears to have evolved in single-celled eukaryotes to regulate energy balance in a cell-autonomous manner, during the evolution of multicellular animals its role has become adapted so that it also regulates energy balance at the whole body level, by responding to hormones that act primarily on the hypothalamus. AMPK monitors energy balance at the cellular level by sensing the ratios of AMP/ATP and ADP/ATP, and recent structural analyses of the AMPK heterotrimer that have provided insight into the complex mechanisms for these effects will be discussed. Given the central importance of energy balance in diseases that are major causes of morbidity or death in humans, such as type 2 diabetes, cancer and inflammatory disorders, there has been a major drive to develop pharmacological activators of AMPK. Many such activators have been described, and the various mechanisms by which these activate AMPK will be discussed. A particularly large class of AMPK activators are natural products of plants derived from traditional herbal medicines. While the mechanism by which most of these activate AMPK has not yet been addressed, I will argue that many of them may be defensive compounds produced by plants to deter infection by pathogens or grazing by insects or herbivores, and that many of them will turn out to be inhibitors of mitochondrial function.

  20. Angiopoietin-2 regulates gene expression in TIE2-expressing monocytes and augments their inherent proangiogenic functions

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Tal, Andrea O.; Scholz, Alexander; De Palma, Michele; Patel, Sunil; Urbich, Carmen; Biswas, Subhra K.; Murdoch, Craig; Plate, Karl H; Reiss, Yvonne; Lewis, Claire E.

    2010-01-01

    TIE2-expressing monocytes/macrophages (TEM) are a highly proangiogenic subset of myeloid cells in tumors. Here, we show that circulating human TEMs are already preprogrammed in the circulation to be more angiogenic and express higher levels of such proangiogenic genes as matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), VEGFA, COX-2, and WNT5A than TIE2(-) monocytes. Additionally, angiopoietin-2 (ANG-2) markedly enhanced the proangiogenic activity of TEMs and increased their expression of two proangiogenic...

  1. Citrullination regulates pluripotency and histone H1 binding to chromatin

    Christophorou, Maria A.; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo; Halley-Stott, Richard P.; Oliveira, Clara Slade; Loos, Remco; Radzisheuskaya, Aliaksandra; Mowen, Kerri A.; Bertone, Paul; Silva, José C. R.; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Nielsen, Michael L.; Gurdon, John B.; Kouzarides, Tony

    2014-03-01

    Citrullination is the post-translational conversion of an arginine residue within a protein to the non-coded amino acid citrulline. This modification leads to the loss of a positive charge and reduction in hydrogen-bonding ability. It is carried out by a small family of tissue-specific vertebrate enzymes called peptidylarginine deiminases (PADIs) and is associated with the development of diverse pathological states such as autoimmunity, cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, prion diseases and thrombosis. Nevertheless, the physiological functions of citrullination remain ill-defined, although citrullination of core histones has been linked to transcriptional regulation and the DNA damage response. PADI4 (also called PAD4 or PADV), the only PADI with a nuclear localization signal, was previously shown to act in myeloid cells where it mediates profound chromatin decondensation during the innate immune response to infection. Here we show that the expression and enzymatic activity of Padi4 are also induced under conditions of ground-state pluripotency and during reprogramming in mouse. Padi4 is part of the pluripotency transcriptional network, binding to regulatory elements of key stem-cell genes and activating their expression. Its inhibition lowers the percentage of pluripotent cells in the early mouse embryo and significantly reduces reprogramming efficiency. Using an unbiased proteomic approach we identify linker histone H1 variants, which are involved in the generation of compact chromatin, as novel PADI4 substrates. Citrullination of a single arginine residue within the DNA-binding site of H1 results in its displacement from chromatin and global chromatin decondensation. Together, these results uncover a role for citrullination in the regulation of pluripotency and provide new mechanistic insights into how citrullination regulates chromatin compaction.

  2. Regulation of platelet activating factor receptor coupled phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C activity

    Morrison, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    The major objectives of this study were two-fold. The first was to establish whether binding of platelet activating factor (PAF) to its receptor was integral to the stimulation of polyphosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) in rabbit platelets. The second was to determine regulatory features of this receptor-coupled mechanism. ({sup 3}H)PAF binding demonstrated two binding sites, a high affinity site with a inhibitory constant (Ki) of 2.65 nM and a low affinity site with a Ki of 0.80 {mu}M. PAF receptor coupled activation of phosphoinositide-specific PLC was studied in platelets which were made refractory, by short term pretreatments, to either PAF or thrombin. Saponin-permeabilized rabbit platelets continue to regulate the mechanism(s) coupling PAF receptors to PLC stimulation. However, TRP{gamma}S and GDP{beta}S, which affect guanine nucleotide regulatory protein functions, were unable to modulate the PLC activity to any appreciable extent as compared to PAF. The possible involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) activation in regulating PAF-stimulated PLC activity was studied in rabbit platelets pretreated with staurosporine followed by pretreatments with PAF or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA).

  3. German National Galileo Public Regulated Service (PRS) Testing Activities

    Habrich, Heinz; Söhne, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    The European Global Navigation System (GNSS) Galileo is going to be established in the near future. Currently, four satellites are in place forming the In-Orbit-Testing (IOT) phase. Within the next years, the constellation will be filled. Full Operational Capability (FOC) will be reached 2019. Beside the Open Service (OS) which is comparable to other OS of existing GNSS, e.g., GPS C/A, there is a so-called Public Regulated Service (PRS) included in the IOT satellites already. The PRS will have improved robustness, i.e. robust signals which will be resistant against involuntary interferences, jamming and spoofing. The PRS signal is encrypted and there will be a restricted access to authorized users, e.g. safety and emergency services, authorities with security task, critical infrastructure organizations etc. The access to the PRS which will be controlled through a special key management will be managed and supervised within the European Union (EU) Member States (MS) by national authorities, the Competent PRS Authority (CPA). But a set of Common Minimum Standards (CMS) will define the minimum requirements applicable to each PRS participant. Nevertheless, each MS is responsible for its national key management. This presentation will inform about the testing activities for Galileo PRS in Germany. The coarse concept for the testing is explained, the schedule is outlined. Finally, the paper will formulate some expectations to the Galileo PRS, e.g. for international cooperation.

  4. The interplay between the master transcription factor PU.1 and miR-424 regulates human monocyte/macrophage differentiation.

    Rosa, A; Ballarino, M; Sorrentino, A; Sthandier, O; De Angelis, F G; Marchioni, M; Masella, B; Guarini, A; Fatica, A; Peschle, C; Bozzoni, I

    2007-12-11

    We describe a pathway by which the master transcription factor PU.1 regulates human monocyte/macrophage differentiation. This includes miR-424 and the transcriptional factor NFI-A. We show that PU.1 and these two components are interlinked in a finely tuned temporal and regulatory circuitry: PU.1 activates the transcription of miR-424, and this up-regulation is involved in stimulating monocyte differentiation through miR-424-dependent translational repression of NFI-A. In turn, the decrease in NFI-A levels is important for the activation of differentiation-specific genes such as M-CSFr. In line with these data, both RNAi against NFI-A and ectopic expression of miR-424 in precursor cells enhance monocytic differentiation, whereas the ectopic expression of NFI-A has an opposite effect. The interplay among these three components was demonstrated in myeloid cell lines as well as in human CD34+ differentiation. These data point to the important role of miR-424 and NFI-A in controlling the monocyte/macrophage differentiation program. PMID:18056638

  5. Collagen I-induced dendritic cells activation is regulated by TNF- production through down-regulation of IRF4

    Barun Poudel; Hyeon-Hui Ki; Young-Mi Lee; Dae-Ki Kim

    2015-03-01

    Previously we have shown that collagen I enhances the maturation and function of dendritic cells (DCs). Inflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-, interleukin (IL)-1 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are also known to activate DCs. Here we investigated the involvement of TNF- on the collagen I-induced DCs activation. TNF-a neutralization inhibited collagen I-induced IL-12 secretions by DCs. Additionally, we observed suppression of collagen I-induced costimulatory molecules expression along with down-regulation of genes involved in DCs activation pathway. Furthermore, TNF- inhibition upon collagen Istimulation up-regulated the expression of interferon regulatory transcription factor IRF4, when compared to collagen I only treated cells. Collectively, our data demonstrate that collagen I induce TNF- production, which is crucial for the activation and function of DCs, through down-regulation of IRF4, and implicates the importance in development of anti- TNF- therapeutics for several inflammatory diseases.

  6. Dickkopf-related protein 1 (Dkk1) regulates the accumulation and function of myeloid derived suppressor cells in cancer.

    D'Amico, Lucia; Mahajan, Sahil; Capietto, Aude-Hélène; Yang, Zhengfeng; Zamani, Ali; Ricci, Biancamaria; Bumpass, David B; Meyer, Melissa; Su, Xinming; Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Weilbaecher, Katherine; Stewart, Sheila A; DeNardo, David G; Faccio, Roberta

    2016-05-01

    Tumor-stroma interactions contribute to tumorigenesis. Tumor cells can educate the stroma at primary and distant sites to facilitate the recruitment of heterogeneous populations of immature myeloid cells, known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs suppress T cell responses and promote tumor proliferation. One outstanding question is how the local and distant stroma modulate MDSCs during tumor progression. Down-regulation of β-catenin is critical for MDSC accumulation and immune suppressive functions in mice and humans. Here, we demonstrate that stroma-derived Dickkopf-1 (Dkk1) targets β-catenin in MDSCs, thus exerting immune suppressive effects during tumor progression. Mice bearing extraskeletal tumors show significantly elevated levels of Dkk1 in bone microenvironment relative to tumor site. Strikingly, Dkk1 neutralization decreases tumor growth and MDSC numbers by rescuing β-catenin in these cells and restores T cell recruitment at the tumor site. Recombinant Dkk1 suppresses β-catenin target genes in MDSCs from mice and humans and anti-Dkk1 loses its antitumor effects in mice lacking β-catenin in myeloid cells or after depletion of MDSCs, demonstrating that Dkk1 directly targets MDSCs. Furthermore, we find a correlation between CD15(+) myeloid cells and Dkk1 in pancreatic cancer patients. We establish a novel immunomodulatory role for Dkk1 in regulating tumor-induced immune suppression via targeting β-catenin in MDSCs. PMID:27045006

  7. Adoption Activities on the Internet: A Call for Regulation

    Roby, Jini L.; White, Holly

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing practice of adoption services on the Internet with varying degrees of regulation, depending on whether it is domestic infant adoption, public foster care adoption, or international adoption. Regulation is particularly lacking in domestic infant adoptions, with Web sites connecting prospective birth and adoptive parents,…

  8. Cutting Edge: MicroRNA-223 Regulates Myeloid Dendritic Cell-Driven Th17 Responses in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Ifergan, Igal; Chen, Siqi; Zhang, Bin; Miller, Stephen D

    2016-02-15

    Myeloid cells play a crucial role in the induction and sustained inflammation in neuroinflammatory disorders, such as multiple sclerosis. miR-223, a myeloid cell-specific microRNA, is one of the most upregulated microRNAs in multiple sclerosis patients. We demonstrate that miR-223-knockout mice display significantly reduced active and adoptive-transfer experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis that is characterized by reduced numbers of myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) and Th17 cells in the CNS. Knockout mDCs have increased PD-L1 and decreased IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-23 expression, as well as a reduced capacity to drive Th17, but not Th1, cell differentiation. Thus, miR-223 controls mDC-induced activation of pathologic Th17 responses during autoimmune inflammation. PMID:26783338

  9. Cutaneous Human Papillomaviruses Down-regulate AKT1, whereas AKT2 Up-regulation and Activation Associates with Tumors

    O'Shaughnessy, Ryan F L; Akgũl, Baki; Storey, Alan; Pfister, Herbert; Harwood, Catherine A; Byrne, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    Epithelial tumorigenesis has been linked to AKT up-regulation. Human papillomaviruses (HPV) cause anogenital cancers and anogenital HPV infection up-regulates AKT activity. Mounting evidence points to a role for cutaneous HPVs as etiologic factors in skin tumorigenesis. High-risk cutaneous β HPVs have been linked to carcinogenesis in immunosuppressed patients, and high-risk cutaneous HPV8 genes enhance tumorigenesis in transgenic mice. We find that, in contrast to anogenital HPVs, cutaneous H...

  10. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation regulates in vitro bone formation and bone mass.

    Shah, M; Kola, B; Bataveljic, A; Arnett, T R; Viollet, B; Saxon, L; Korbonits, M; Chenu, C

    2010-08-01

    Adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a regulator of energy homeostasis, has a central role in mediating the appetite-modulating and metabolic effects of many hormones and antidiabetic drugs metformin and glitazones. The objective of this study was to determine if AMPK can be activated in osteoblasts by known AMPK modulators and if AMPK activity is involved in osteoblast function in vitro and regulation of bone mass in vivo. ROS 17/2.8 rat osteoblast-like cells were cultured in the presence of AMPK activators (AICAR and metformin), AMPK inhibitor (compound C), the gastric peptide hormone ghrelin and the beta-adrenergic blocker propranolol. AMPK activity was measured in cell lysates by a functional kinase assay and AMPK protein phosphorylation was studied by Western Blotting using an antibody recognizing AMPK Thr-172 residue. We demonstrated that treatment of ROS 17/2.8 cells with AICAR and metformin stimulates Thr-172 phosphorylation of AMPK and dose-dependently increases its activity. In contrast, treatment of ROS 17/2.8 cells with compound C inhibited AMPK phosphorylation. Ghrelin and propranolol dose-dependently increased AMPK phosphorylation and activity. Cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity were not affected by metformin treatment while AICAR significantly inhibited ROS 17/2.8 cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity at high concentrations. To study the effect of AMPK activation on bone formation in vitro, primary osteoblasts obtained from rat calvaria were cultured for 14-17days in the presence of AICAR, metformin and compound C. Formation of 'trabecular-shaped' bone nodules was evaluated following alizarin red staining. We demonstrated that both AICAR and metformin dose-dependently increase trabecular bone nodule formation, while compound C inhibits bone formation. When primary osteoblasts were co-treated with AICAR and compound C, compound C suppressed the stimulatory effect of AICAR on bone nodule formation