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Sample records for activation steels welding

  1. Steel welding.

    Kučera, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Topic of the thesis concerns the problem of steel welding. The aim was to give acomprehensive overview on the topic, describe the known methods, advantages and disadvantages of welding technology. The introductory part is focused on introducing the basics of the process required to produce high-quality connections. Chapter three offers an overview of known and used welding methods with thein brief description of the method. The next chapter describes steel as material suitable for welding....

  2. Activating Flux Design for Laser Welding of Ferritic Stainless Steel

    马立; 胡绳荪; 胡宝; 申俊琦; 王勇慧

    2014-01-01

    The behaviors of YAG laser welding process of ferritic stainless steel with activating fluxes were investi-gated in this study. Some conventional oxides, halides and carbonates were applied in laser welding. The results showed that the effect of oxides on the penetration depth was more remarkable. Most activating fluxes improved the penetration more effectively at low power than that at high power. The uniform design was adopted to arrange the formula of multicomponent activating fluxes, showing that the optimal formula can make the penetration depth up to 2.23 times as large as that without flux, including 50%ZrO2, 12.09%CaCO3, 10.43%CaO and 27.48%MgO. Through the high-speed photographs of welding process, CaF2 can minimize the plasma volume but slightly improve the pene-tration capability.

  3. Structural and mechanical properties of welded joints of reduced activation martensitic steels

    Filacchioni, G.; Montanari, R.; Tata, M. E.; Pilloni, L.

    2002-12-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding and electron beam welding methods were used to realise welding pools on plates of reduced activation martensitic steels. Structural and mechanical features of these simulated joints have been investigated in as-welded and post-welding heat-treated conditions. The research allowed to assess how each welding technique affects the original mechanical properties of materials and to find suitable post-welding heat treatments. This paper reports results from experimental activities on BATMAN II and F82H mod. steels carried out in the frame of the European Blanket Project - Structural Materials Program.

  4. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS

    Tang, Wei [ORNL; Chen, Gaoqiang [ORNL; Chen, Jian [ORNL; Yu, Xinghua [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed in recent years because of their improved irradiation resistance. However, they can suffer from welding induced property degradations. In this paper, a solid phase joining technology friction stir welding (FSW) was adopted to join a RAFM steel Eurofer 97 and different FSW parameters/heat input were chosen to produce welds. FSW response parameters, joint microstructures and microhardness were investigated to reveal relationships among welding heat input, weld structure characterization and mechanical properties. In general, FSW heat input results in high hardness inside the stir zone mostly due to a martensitic transformation. It is possible to produce friction stir welds similar to but not with exactly the same base metal hardness when using low power input because of other hardening mechanisms. Further, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is a very effective way to reduce FSW stir zone hardness values.

  5. Delta ferrite in the weld metal of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    Sam, Shiju, E-mail: shiju@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India); Das, C.R.; Ramasubbu, V.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Jayakumar, T. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Rajendra Kumar, E. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India)

    2014-12-15

    Formation of delta(δ)-ferrite in the weld metal, during autogenous bead-on-plate welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, has been studied. Composition of the alloy is such that delta-ferrite is not expected in the alloy; but examination of the weld metal revealed presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. Volume fraction of delta-ferrite is found to be higher in the weld interface than in the rest of the fusion zone. Decrease in the volume fraction of delta-ferrite, with an increase in preheat temperature or with an increase in heat input, is observed. Results indicate that the cooling rate experienced during welding affects the volume fraction of delta-ferrite retained in the weld metal and variation in the delta-ferrite content with cooling rate is explained with variation in the time that the weld metal spends in various temperature regimes in which delta-ferrite is stable for the alloy during its cooling from the liquid metal to the ambient temperature. This manuscript will discuss the effect of welding parameters on formation of delta-ferrite and its retention in the weld metal of RAFM steel.

  6. Delta ferrite in the weld metal of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    Formation of delta(δ)-ferrite in the weld metal, during autogenous bead-on-plate welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, has been studied. Composition of the alloy is such that delta-ferrite is not expected in the alloy; but examination of the weld metal revealed presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. Volume fraction of delta-ferrite is found to be higher in the weld interface than in the rest of the fusion zone. Decrease in the volume fraction of delta-ferrite, with an increase in preheat temperature or with an increase in heat input, is observed. Results indicate that the cooling rate experienced during welding affects the volume fraction of delta-ferrite retained in the weld metal and variation in the delta-ferrite content with cooling rate is explained with variation in the time that the weld metal spends in various temperature regimes in which delta-ferrite is stable for the alloy during its cooling from the liquid metal to the ambient temperature. This manuscript will discuss the effect of welding parameters on formation of delta-ferrite and its retention in the weld metal of RAFM steel

  7. Welding irradiated stainless steel

    Conventional welding processes produced severe underbead cracking in irradiated stainless steel containing 1 to 33 appm helium from n,a reactions. A shallow penetration overlay technique was successfully demonstrated for welding irradiated stainless steel. The technique was applied to irradiated 304 stainless steel that contained 10 appm helium. Surface cracking, present in conventional welds made on the same steel at the same and lower helium concentrations, was eliminated. Underbead cracking was minimal compared to conventional welding methods. However, cracking in the irradiated material was greater than in tritium charged and aged material at the same helium concentrations. The overlay technique provides a potential method for repair or modification of irradiated reactor materials

  8. Effects of activating fluxes on the weld penetration and corrosion resistant property of laser welded joint of ferritic stainless steel

    Wang, Yonghui; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi

    2015-10-01

    This study was based on the ferritic stainless steel SUS430. Under the parallel welding conditions, the critical penetration power values (CPPV) of 3mm steel plates with different surface-coating activating fluxes were tested. Results showed that, after coating with activating fluxes, such as ZrO2, CaCO3, CaF2 and CaO, the CPPV could reduce 100~250 W, which indicating the increases of the weld penetrations (WP). Nevertheless, the variation range of WP with or without activating fluxes was less than 16.7%. Compared with single-component ones, a multi-component activating flux composed of 50% ZrO2, 12.09% CaCO3, 10.43% CaO, and 27.49% MgO was testified to be much more efficient, the WP of which was about 2.3-fold of that without any activating fluxes. Furthermore, a FeCl3 spot corrosion experiment was carried out with samples cut from weld zone to test the effects of different activating fluxes on the corrosion resistant (CR) property of the laser welded joints. It was found that all kinds of activating fluxes could improve the CR of the welded joints. And, it was interesting to find that the effect of the mixed activating fluxes was inferior to those single-component ones. Among all the activating fluxes, the single-component of CaCO3 seemed to be the best in resisting corrosion. By means of Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) testing, it was found that the use of activating fluxes could effectively restrain the loss of Cr element of weld zone in the process of laser welding, thus greatly improving the CR of welded joints.

  9. Study on the activated laser welding of ferritic stainless steel with rare earth elements yttrium

    Wang, Yonghui; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi

    2015-10-01

    The ferritic stainless steel SUS430 was used in this work. Based on a multi-component activating flux, composed of 50% ZrO2, 12.09 % CaCO3, 10.43 % CaO, and 27.49 % MgO, a series of modified activating fluxes with 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% of rare earth (RE) element yttrium (Y) respectively were produced, and their effects on the weld penetration (WP) and corrosion resistant (CR) property were studied. Results showed that RE element Y hardly had any effects on increasing the WP. In the FeCl3 spot corrosion experiment, the corrosion rates of almost all the samples cut from welded joints turned out to be greater than the parent metal (23.51 g/m2 h). However, there was an exception that the corrosion rate of the sample with 5% Y was only 21.96 g/m2 h, which was even better than parent metal. The further Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) test showed the existence of elements Zr, Ca, O, and Y in the molten slag near the weld seam while none of them were found in the weld metal, indicating the direct transition of element from activating fluxes to the welding seam did not exist. It was known that certain composition of activating fluxes effectively restrain the loss of Cr element in the process of laser welding, and as a result, the CR of welded joints was improved.

  10. Underwater explosive welding of tungsten to reduced-activation ferritic steel F82H

    Mori, Daichi [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta, E-mail: r-kasada@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Konishi, Satoshi [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Morizono, Yasuhiro [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Hokamoto, Kazuyuki [Institute of Pulsed Power Science, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The underwater explosive welding was successfully applied in the joining of tungsten to F82H reduced activation ferritic steel. • Microstructure of the interface showed the formation of a wave-like interface with a thin mixed layer of tungsten and F82H. • Nanoindentation hardness results exhibited a gradual change away from the welded interface without hardened layer. • Small punch tests on the welded specimens resulted in the cracking at a center of tungsten followed by the interfacial cracking. - Abstract: The present study reports the underwater explosive welding of commercially pure tungsten onto the surface of a reduced-activation ferritic steel F82H plate. Cross-sectional observation revealed the formation of a wave-like interface, consisting of a thin mixed layer of W and F82H. The results of nanoindentation hardness testing identified a gradual progressive change in the interface, with no hardened or brittle layer being observed. Small punch tests on the welded specimens resulted in cracking at the center of the tungsten, followed by crack propagation toward both the tungsten surface and the tungsten/steel interface.

  11. Laser, tungsten inert gas, and metal active gas welding of DP780 steel: Comparison of hardness, tensile properties and fatigue resistance

    Highlights: • We report the mechanical properties of DP780 steel welded by three methods. • The size of the welded zone increases with heat input (MAG > TIG > laser). • The hardness of the welded zone increases with cooling rate (laser > TIG > MAG). • Tensile and fatigue properties are strongly dependent on welding method. • Crack initiation sites depend on the microstructural features of the welded zone. - Abstract: The microstructural characteristics, tensile properties and low-cycle fatigue properties of a dual-phase steel (DP780) were investigated following its joining by three methods: laser welding, tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, and metal active gas (MAG) welding. Through this, it was found that the size of the welded zone increases with greater heat input (MAG > TIG > laser), whereas the hardness of the weld metal (WM) and heat-affected zone (HAZ) increases with cooling rate (laser > TIG > MAG). Consequently, laser- and TIG-welded steels exhibit higher yield strength than the base metal due to a substantially harder WM. In contrast, the strength of MAG-welded steel is reduced by a broad and soft WM and HAZ. The fatigue life of laser-and TIG-welded steel was similar, with both being greater than that of MAG-welded steel; however, the fatigue resistance of all welds was inferior to that of the non-welded base metal. Finally, crack initiation sites were found to differ depending on the microstructural characteristics of the welded zone, as well as the tensile and cyclic loading

  12. Weldability of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel under ultra power density fiber laser welding

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFMs) are recognized as the primary candidate structural materials for fusion blanket systems as it has been developed based on massive industrial experience of ferritic/martensitic steel replacing Mo and Nb of high chromium heat resistant martensitic steels (such as modified 9Cr-1Mo) with W and Ta, respectively. As one of RAFMS, F82H, which has been developed and studied in Japan, is designed with emphasis on high temperature property and weldablility, and was provided and evaluated in various countries as a part of the collaboration of IEA fusion materials development. Although F82H is the well perceived RAFM as ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM) structural material, the weldability was proved though TIG, EB and YAG laser weld tests using only 15 and 25 mm thickness plate. In order to reduce the welding distortion, the residual stress and the area of the heat affected zone, it is necessary to decrease the total heat input under the welding. Recently, as a result of R and D efforts about the sources of laser beam, a high-power fiber laser beam has been developed as one of the desirable heat sources for high-speed and deep-penetration welding. Since the power density of the fiber laser beam is very large, it is possible to increase the welding speed more than 10 m/min. So, in this study, the weldability of 1.5 mm thickness F82H plate and pipe was examined by using a ultra power density fiber laser, in order to reveal the excellent weldability of F82H. As a basic study of the butt welding between 1.5 mm plate and 1.5 mm thickness pipe with 11 mm outer diameter, the focus position, the beam position and the laser power were varied using 25 mm square plate and 25 mm length pipe. Then, by using the fiber laser with 1.1 MW/mm2 peak power density under the appropriate welding condition obtained from the basic study, a full penetrated weld bead with narrow width was formed in the butt welding

  13. Effect of Multipass TIG and Activated TIG Welding Process on the Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of 316LN Stainless Steel Weld Joints

    Ganesh, K. C.; Balasubramanian, K. R.; Vasudevan, M.; Vasantharaja, P.; Chandrasekhar, N.

    2016-04-01

    The primary objective of this work was to develop a finite element model to predict the thermo-mechanical behavior of an activated tungsten inert gas (ATIG)-welded joint. The ATIG-welded joint was fabricated using 10 mm thickness of 316LN stainless steel plates in a single pass. To distinguish the merits of ATIG welding process, it was compared with manual multipass tungsten inert gas (MPTIG)-welded joint. The ATIG-welded joint was fabricated with square butt edge configuration using an activating flux developed in-house. The MPTIG-welded joint was fabricated in thirteen passes with V-groove edge configuration. The finite element model was developed to predict the transient temperature, residual stress, and distortion of the welded joints. Also, microhardness, impact toughness, tensile strength, ferrite measurement, and microstructure were characterized. Since most of the recent publications of ATIG-welded joint was focused on the molten weld pool dynamics, this research work gives an insight on the thermo-mechanical behavior of ATIG-welded joint over MPTIG-welded joint.

  14. Role of arc mode in laser-metal active gas arc hybrid welding of mild steel

    Highlights: • Pulsed arc is more effective to improve the stability of laser-arc hybrid welding. • LCHW has the highest fraction of acicular ferrite and high-angle grain boundaries. • Grain refinement depends on effective current of the arc. • LSHW has the most apparent vestige of texture components. • The microstructure and microtexture formation mechanisms were summarized. - Abstract: Arc mode plays an important role in joint characterizations of arc welding, but it has been seldom considered in laser-arc hybrid welding. This paper investigated the role of arc mode on laser-metal active gas (MAG) arc hybrid welding of mild steel. Three arc modes were employed, which were cold metal transfer (CMT), pulsed spray arc and standard short circuiting arc. Microtexture of the joints were observed and measured via electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD) system to reveal the effect of arc mode on microstructure. Mechanical properties of the joints were evaluated by tensile and Charpy V-notch impact tests. It was found that both the stability and mechanical properties of laser-CMT hybrid welding (LCHW) is the best, while those of laser-standard short circuiting arc welding (LSHW) is the worst. OM and EBSD results showed that the fraction of acicular ferrite and high-angle grain boundaries in fusion zone decreases gradually in the sequence of LCHW, laser-pulsed spray arc welding and LSHW, while the mean grain size increases gradually. Finally, the microstructure formation mechanisms and the relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties were summarized by the loss of alloying element and the stirring effect in molten pool

  15. Microstructural characterization of weld joints of 9Cr reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel fabricated by different joining methods

    Thomas Paul, V.; Saroja, S.; Albert, S.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E., E-mail: vtp@igcar.gov.in

    2014-10-15

    This paper presents a detailed electron microscopy study on the microstructure of various regions of weldment fabricated by three welding methods namely tungsten inert gas welding, electron beam welding and laser beam welding in an indigenously developed 9Cr reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. Electron back scatter diffraction studies showed a random micro-texture in all the three welds. Microstructural changes during thermal exposures were studied and corroborated with hardness and optimized conditions for the post weld heat treatment have been identified for this steel. Hollomon–Jaffe parameter has been used to estimate the extent of tempering. The activation energy for the tempering process has been evaluated and found to be corresponding to interstitial diffusion of carbon in ferrite matrix. The type and microchemistry of secondary phases in different regions of the weldment have been identified by analytical transmission electron microscopy. - Highlights: • Comparison of microstructural parameters in TIG, electron beam and laser welds of RAFM steel • EBSD studies to illustrate the absence of preferred orientation and identification of prior austenite grain size using phase identification map • Optimization of PWHT conditions for indigenous RAFM steel • Study of kinetics of tempering and estimation of apparent activation energy of the process.

  16. Mechanical properties of 9Cr–1W reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel weldment prepared by electron beam welding process

    Highlights: • Width of HAZ is smaller in the 9Cr–1W RAFM weldment prepared by EB process compared to that reported for TIG weldments in literature. • Weld joint is stronger than that of the base metal. • Toughness of weld metal prepared by EB welding process is comparable to that (in PWHT condition) prepared by TIG process. • DBTT of as-welded 9Cr–1W RAFM weldment prepared by EB process is comparable to that reported for TIG weld metal in PWHT condition. - Abstract: Microstructure and mechanical properties of the weldments prepared from 9Cr–1W reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steel using electron beam welding (EBW) process were studied. Microstructure consists of tempered lath martensite where precipitates decorating the boundaries in post weld heat treated (PWHT) condition. Lath and precipitate sizes were found to be finer in the weld metal than in base metal. Accordingly, hardness of the weld metal was found to be higher than the base metal. Tensile strength of the cross weldment specimen was 684 MPa, which was comparable with the base metal tensile strength of 670 MPa. On the other hand, DBTT of 9Cr–1W weld metal in as-welded condition is similar to that reported for TIG weld metal in PWHT condition

  17. Steels and welding nuclear

    This ENEA Data-Base regards mechanical properties, chemical composition and heat treatments of nuclear pressure vessel materials: type A533-B, A302-B, A508 steel plates and forgings, submerged arc welds and HAZ before and after nuclear irradiation. Irradiation experiments were generally performed in high flux material test reactors. Data were collected from international available literature about water nuclear reactors pressure vessel materials embrittlement

  18. Low activation steels welding with PWHT and coating for tritium blanket module (ITER and DEMO reactors)

    Full text: Eurofer weldability is established for data base assessment and TBM manufacturing support. Electron Beam, Hybrid (Laser combined with MIG/MAG), Laser and Narrow Gap TIG processes have been carried out on Eurofer Low activation steel. Electron Beam produces very narrow fusion zone width, in the range of 3 to 4 mm, and too strong enhanced weld shape with brittle joints with δ-ferrite and pores. This process is considered only for low penetration depth (cooling plates). The other processes produce 2 families of similar results: one for Hybrid (MIG + Laser) and Laser processes, and a second one for TIG and Narrow Gap TIG processes. The first one procures less distortion and coarsened fusion zone, due to higher cooling rate. For all the welding processes, high hardness values, increasing brittleness and softening effects in the Heat Affected Zone are observed for each welding configuration that could signal creep problems. The Fusion Zones are typically composed of martensite laths, with small grain sizes. In the Heat Affected Zones, martensite grains are observed with carbide precipitation. Eurofer filler wire with optimized chemical composition is developed for producing welds with good properties and high joint coefficient value. To restore mechanical properties after welding, PWHT have been developed: single step for the first family and 2 steps for the second one. Distortions of different mock-ups with and without PWHT have been managed to assess manufacturing rules and clamping devices. Welding data base has thus been established. W coating on the TBM structure has shown no strong effect on the TBM structure. (author)

  19. Low activation steels welding with PWHT and coating for ITER Test Blanket Modules and DEMO

    Eurofer weldability is established for data base assessment and TBM manufacturing support. Electron Beam, Hybrid (Laser combined with MIG/MAG), Laser and Narrow Gap TIG processes have been carried out on Eurofer Low activation steel. Electron Beam produces very narrow fusion zone width, in the range of 3 to 4 mm, and too strong enhanced weld shape with brittle joints with δ-ferrite and pores. This process is considered only for low penetration depth (cooling plates). The other processes produce 2 families of similar results: one for Hybrid (MIG + Laser) and Laser processes, and a second one for TIG and Narrow Gap TIG processes. The first one procures less distortion and coarsened fusion zone, due to higher cooling rate. For all the welding processes, high hardness values, increasing brittleness and softening effects in the Heat Affected Zone are observed for each welding configuration that could signal creep problems. The Fusion Zones are typically composed of martensite laths, with small grain sizes. In the Heat Affected Zones, martensite grains are observed with carbide precipitation. Eurofer filler wire with optimized chemical composition is developed for producing welds with good properties and high joint coefficient value. To restore mechanical properties after welding, PWHT have been developed: single step for the first family and 2 steps for the second one. Distortions of different mock-ups with and without PWHT have been managed to assess manufacturing rules and clamping devices. Welding data base has thus been established. W coating on the TBM structure has shown no strong effect on the TBM structure. (author)

  20. Low activation steels welding with PWHT and coating for ITER test blanket modules and DEMO

    Aubert, P.; Tavassoli, F.; Rieth, M.; Diegele, E.; Poitevin, Y.

    2011-02-01

    EUROFER weldability is investigated in support of the European material properties database and TBM manufacturing. Electron Beam, Hybrid, laser and narrow gap TIG processes have been carried out on the EUROFER-97 steel (thickness up to 40 mm), a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel developed in Europe. These welding processes produce similar welding results with high joint coefficients and are well adapted for minimizing residual distortions. The fusion zones are typically composed of martensite laths, with small grain sizes. In the heat-affected zones, martensite grains contain carbide precipitates. High hardness values are measured in all these zones that if not tempered would degrade toughness and creep resistance. PWHT developments have driven to a one-step PWHT (750 °C/3 h), successfully applied to joints restoring good material performances. It will produce less distortion levels than a full austenitization PWHT process, not really applicable to a complex welded structure such as the TBM. Different tungsten coatings have been successfully processed on EUROFER material. It has shown no really effect on the EUROFER base material microstructure.

  1. Overlay welding irradiated stainless steel

    An overlay technique developed for welding irradiated stainless steel may be important for repair or modification of fusion reactor materials. Helium, present due to n,α reactions, is known to cause cracking using conventional welding methods. Stainless steel impregnated with 3 to 220 appm helium by decay of tritium was used to develop a welding process that could be used for repair. The result was a gas metal arc weld overlay technique with low-heat input and low-penetration into the helium-containing material. Extensive metallurgical and mechanical testing of this technique demonstrated substantial reduction of helium embrittlement damage. The overlay technique was applied to irradiated 304 stainless steel containing 10 appm helium. Surface cracking, present in conventional welds made on the same steel at lower helium concentrations, was eliminated. Underbead cracking, although greater than for tritium charged and aged material, was minimal compared to conventional welding methods

  2. Electron Beam Welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic ODS-EUROFER Steel for Application in Helium Cooled Modular Divertor Concepts

    For specific blanket and divertor applications in future fusion power reactors a replacement of presently considered Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steels as structural material by suitable oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic martensitic or ferritic steels would allow a substantial increase of the operating temperature from ∼ 550 oC to about 650 oC. In all cases appropriate joining technologies have to be developed. Diffusion welding techniques to perform similar and dissimilar joints have been studied successfully. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has shown a good potential but application is limited due to geometrical restrictions and needs further development. For the advanced helium-cooled modular divertor concept various joining techniques are required for joining the complex structural parts made of different materials. First attempts have been made for joining the divertor structures of ODS EUROFER by means of the Electron beam welding process with its highly concentrated energy input. This welding is widely used to produce high quality-high integrity welded similar and dissimilar joints of a large variety of materials. For this purpose, samples of ODS-EUROFER steel were welded using a PTR 150 kV/15 kW EB welding facility. Two different post-weld heat treatments (PWHT) were applied to investigate their influence on the mechanical and microstructural properties of the welded joints. Miniaturised tensile specimens were used to determine the tensile behaviour in the temperature range between RT and 700 oC. KLST specimens were used for Charpy impact tests. The microstructure of the weld and heat affected zone was examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Transmission electron microscopical methods were applied to investigate the size and spatial distribution of the dispersed oxides and potential segregation phenomena. (author)

  3. Corrosion of carbon steel welds

    This report assesses the factors which cause preferential attack to occur in carbon steel fusion welds. It was concluded that the main factors were: the inclusion content of the weld metal, the potential of the weld metal being less noble than that of the parent, and the presence of low-temperature transformation products in the heat-affected zone of the weld. These factors should be minimized or eliminated as appropriate so that the corrosion allowances determined for carbon steel waste drums is also adequate for the welds. An experimental/theoretical approach is recommended to evaluate the relative corrosion resistance of welds prepared from BS 4360 grade 43A steel to that of the parent material. (author)

  4. Differences between Laser and Arc Welding of HSS Steels

    Němeček, Stanislav; Mužík, Tomáš; Míšek, Michal

    Conventional welding processes often fail to provide adequate joints in high strength steels with multiphase microstructures. One of the promising techniques is laser beam welding: working without filler metal and with sufficient capacity for automotive and transportation industry (where the amount of AHSS steels increases each year, as well as the length of laser welds). The paper compares microstructures and properties of HSS (high strength steel) joints made by MAG (Metal Active Gas) and laser welding. The effects of main welding parameters (heat input, welding speed and others) are studied on multiphase TRIP 900 steel tubes and martensitic sheets DOCOL 1200, advanced materials for seat frames and other automotive components. Whereas the strength of conventional welds is significantly impaired, laser welding leaves strength of the base material nearly unaffected. As the nature of fracture changes during loading and depending on the welding method, failure mechanisms upon cross tension tests have been studied as well.

  5. Horizontal electron beam welding for stainless steels

    Stainless steel samples have been realized by local vacuum apparatus for electron beam welding applications to reactor core shell realizations. The best welding parameters have been determined by a systematic study. The welds have been characterized by mechanical tests

  6. Weld bonding of stainless steel

    Santos, I. O.; Zhang, Wenqi; Goncalves, V.M.;

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation of the weld bonding process with the purpose of evaluating its relative performance in case of joining stainless steel parts, against alternative solutions based on structural adhesives or conventional spot-welding. The...... overall assessment of the weld bonding process is made using several commercial adhesives with varying working times under different surface conditions. The quality of the resulting joints is evaluated by means of macroetching observations, tension-shear tests and peel tests. The theoretical investigation...

  7. Research on low carbon steel activating flux CMT welding%活性剂CMT焊接的研究

    周方明; 宋辉

    2013-01-01

    The CO2 gas shielded welding has big spatter,and this will pollute the environment and affect the staff health.In this paper, we will study the activating flux CMT welding under the CO2 gas protection, to research a green and efficient welding technology.Through the active agent of low carbon steel CMT welding test,the results show that,CMT welding with active agent,you can make a higher degree of penetration increases, increasing 20% or more proportion.With the different active agent ingredients, the degree of weld penetration increases in different.In activating flux CMT welding,the active agent has an important impact on both the physical process of the arc electrode gas ionization and electron emission, and the active substance reduces the accession of ionization voltage to make the arc stability .The activating flux CMT welding make the penetration increase result of arc compression and surface tension.Especially, the B2O3 and SiO2 make the weld penetration increasing significantly, because of the two elements of B and Si have large resistively.%CO2气体保护焊飞溅较大,污染环境,影响人员健康.研究了CO2气体保护下的活性剂CMT焊接,旨在研究一种绿色高效的焊接技术.通过进行低碳钢的活性剂CMT焊接试验,研究结果表明:CMT焊接采用活性剂后,可以较大程度增加熔深,增加比例在20%以上.活性剂成分不同,焊缝熔深增加程度也不同.在活性剂CMT焊接中,活性剂对电弧气体电离和电极发射电子都产生重要影响,活性物质的加入使得电离电压降低,电弧稳定.活性剂CMT焊接使熔深增加是电弧压缩和表面张力共同作用的结果.其中B2O3和SiO2使焊缝熔深增加明显,与B和Si两元素具有较大的的电阻率有关.

  8. Thermal treatment of dissimilar steels' welded joints

    Nikulina, A. A.; Denisova, A. S.; Gradusov, I. N.; Ryabinkina, P. A.; Rushkovets, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper combinations of chrome-nickel steel and high-carbon steel, produced by flash butt welding after heat treatment, are investigated. Light and electron microscopic studies show that the welded joints after heat treatment have a complex structure consisting of several phases as initial welded joints. A martensite structure in welded joints after thermal treatment at 300... 800 °C has been found.

  9. Laser welding of advanced high strength steels

    Ahmed, Essam Ahmed Ali

    2011-01-01

    This research work focuses on characterization of CO2 laser beam welding (LBW) of dual phase (DP) and transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steel sheets based on experimental, numerical simulation and statistical modeling approaches. The experimental work aimed to investigate the welding induced-microstructures, hardness, tensile properties and formability limit of laser welding butt joints of DP/DP, TRIP/TRIP and DP/TRIP steel sheets under different welding speeds. The effects of shieldin...

  10. Welding of high manganese- and carbon steels

    Technology and conditions of welding of high manganese and carbon steel by a resistance welding technique using an intermediate part are developed. Austenitic chromium-nickel 12Kh18N10T steel is chosen as a material of the intermediate part. The recommended welding conditions insure a high quality of the weld joint in terms of metal structure and its mechanical properties. It is the basic metal of the joint that fractures under mechanical testing

  11. A new welding technique for stainless steel pipe butt welds

    A modified TIG welding process which uses an accurately machined consumable weld socket ring for aligning pipes and providing filler material has been developed by British Nuclear Fuels and used successfully at Windscale Site Construction. The technique and its practical application at Windscale for automatic orbital TIG welding of stainless steel pipe is described. (author)

  12. Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels

    Plasma spot wedding of ferritic stainless steels studied. The study was focused on welding parameters, plasma and shieldings and the optimum welding equipment. Plasma-spot welded overlap joints on a 0.8 mm thick ferritic stainless steel sheet were subjected to a visual examination and mechanical testing in terms of tension-shear strength. Several macro specimens were prepared Plasma spot welding is suitable to use the same gas as shielding gas and as plasma gas , i. e. a 98% Ar/2% H2 gas mixture. Tension-shear strength of plasma-spot welded joint was compared to that of resistance sport welded joints. It was found that the resistance welded joints withstand a somewhat stronger load than the plasma welded joints due to a large weld sport diameter of the former. Strength of both types of welded joints is approximately the same. (Author) 32 refs

  13. Microstructure and mechanical properties in the weld heat affected zone of 9Cr-2W-VTa reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel for fusion

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel demonstrated excellent resistance to the neutron irradiation and mechanical properties. The investigation of weldability in company with the development of RAFM steel is essential for construction of the fusion reactor. Generally, the superior mechanical properties of the RAFM steel can be upset during welding process due to microstructural change by rapid heating and cooling in the weld heat affected zone (HAZ). The phase transformation and mechanical properties in the weld HAZ of RAFM steel were investigated. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite and two carbides. During rapid welding thermal cycle, the microstructure of the base steel was transformed into martensite and δ-ferrite. In addition, the volume fraction of δ-ferrite and grain size increased with increase in the peak temperature and heat input. The strength of the HAZs was higher than that of the base steel due to the formation of martensite, whereas the impact properties of the HAZs deteriorated as compared with the base steel due to the formation of δ-ferrite. The PWHT improved the impact properties of the HAZs, resulting from the formation of tempered martensite

  14. Microstructure and mechanical properties in the weld heat affected zone of 9Cr-2W-VTa reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel for fusion

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Changhoon; Lee, Taeho; Jang, Minho; Park, Mingu [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung Chan [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel demonstrated excellent resistance to the neutron irradiation and mechanical properties. The investigation of weldability in company with the development of RAFM steel is essential for construction of the fusion reactor. Generally, the superior mechanical properties of the RAFM steel can be upset during welding process due to microstructural change by rapid heating and cooling in the weld heat affected zone (HAZ). The phase transformation and mechanical properties in the weld HAZ of RAFM steel were investigated. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite and two carbides. During rapid welding thermal cycle, the microstructure of the base steel was transformed into martensite and δ-ferrite. In addition, the volume fraction of δ-ferrite and grain size increased with increase in the peak temperature and heat input. The strength of the HAZs was higher than that of the base steel due to the formation of martensite, whereas the impact properties of the HAZs deteriorated as compared with the base steel due to the formation of δ-ferrite. The PWHT improved the impact properties of the HAZs, resulting from the formation of tempered martensite.

  15. Corrosion Characteristics of Welding Zones by Laser and TIG Welding of 304 Stainless Steel

    Two types of welding methods were performed on austenitic 304 stainless steel: laser welding and TIG welding. The differences of the corrosion characteristics of the welded zones from the two welding methods were investigated with electrochemical methods, such as measurement of the corrosion potential, polarization curves, cyclic voltammogram, etc. The vickers hardness of all laser-welded zones (WM: weld Metal, HAZ: Heat Affected Zone, BM: Base Metal) was relatively higher while their corrosion current densities exhibited a comparatively lower value than those which were TIG welded. In particular, the corrosion current density of the TIG-welded HAZ had the highest value among all other welding zones, which suggests that chromium depletion due to the formation of chromium carbide occurs in the HAZ, which is in the sensitization temperature range, thus it can easily be corroded with an active anode. Intergrenular corrosion was also observed at the TIG-welded HAZ and WM zones. Consequently, we can see that corrosion resistance of all austenitic 304 stainless steel welding zones can be improved via the use of laser welding

  16. Corrosion Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    Weldingh, Jakob; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the corrosion properties of laser welded AISI 316L stainless steel are examined. A number of different welds has been performed to test the influence of the weld parameters of the resulting corrosion properties. It has been chosen to use the potential independent critical pitting...

  17. Laser Welding of High Strength Steels

    Guo, Wei

    2016-01-01

    S960 and S700 are two types of high strength low alloy steels (minimum yield strengths at 960 MPa and 700 MPa, respectively) developed recently by Tata Steel. These steels are typically used in heavy lifting equipment. This research examines the feasibility and characteristics of single pass autogenous laser welding (ALW), multi-pass ultra-narrow gap laser welding (NGLW) of 8 mm thick S960 and 13 mm thick S700 high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels and compared the characteristics of the welds...

  18. Electron beam welding of austenitic stainless steel

    Austenitic stainless steel is used for liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactors with operating temperature of about 550 deg C, because its elevated temperature properties are excellent and the results of use are abundant. The welded joints in LMFBRs require high degree of safety, and the application of electron beam welding is studied to make welding joints of high quality. When the inelastic deformation in a certain limit is allowed as prescribed in the ASME Code, Case 1592, the elevated temperature properties of the welded joints of structures are particularly important. The materials tested were 10 mm thick plates of SUS 304, SUS 316 and SUS 321 steels, and 150 kV - 40 mA electron beam welder was employed. The method of welding was one side, one pass Uranami welding, and first, the appropriate welding conditions were decided. Elevated temperature tensile test was carried out on the parent materials and welded joints by electron beam welding and coated arc welding. Creep rupture test and elevated temperature fatigue test were also carried out. In EB-welded austenitic stainless steel, delta ferrite is scattered finely in austenite, and its quantity is very small and less than 1.5%. The tensile strength and 0.2% proof stress of EB-welded joints are almost same as those of parent materials. The creep rupture and fatigue properties of the joints are also close to those of parent materials. (Kako, I.)

  19. Microstructural Variations Across a Dissimilar 316L Austenitic: 9Cr Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel Weld Joint

    Thomas Paul, V.; Karthikeyan, T.; Dasgupta, Arup; Sudha, C.; Hajra, R. N.; Albert, S. K.; Saroja, S.; Jayakumar, T.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discuss the microstructural variations across a dissimilar weld joint between SS316 and 9Cr-RAFM steel and its modifications on post weld heat treatments (PWHT). Detailed characterization showed a mixed microstructure of austenite and martensite in the weld which is in agreement with the phases predicted using Schaeffler diagram based on composition measurements. The presence of very low volume fraction of δ-ferrite in SS316L has been identified employing state of the art electron back-scattered diffraction technique. PWHT of the ferritic steel did not reduce the hardness in the weld metal. Thermal exposure at 973 K (700 °C) showed a progressive reduction in hardness of weld joint with duration of treatment except in austenitic base metal. However, diffusion annealing at 1073 K (800 °C) for 100 hours resulted in an unexpected increase in hardness of weld metal, which is a manifestation of the dilution effects and enrichment of Ni on the transformation characteristics of the weld zone. Migration of carbon from ferritic steel aided the precipitation of fine carbides in the austenitic base metal on annealing at 973 K (700 °C); but enhanced diffusion at 1073 K (880 °C) resulted in coarsening of carbides and thereby reduction of hardness.

  20. Microstructures in laser welded high strength steels

    Rizzi, P.; Bellingeri, S.; Massimino, F.; Baldissin, D.; Battezzati, L.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the effect of laser welding on the microstructure was studied for three Advanced High Strength Steels: transformation induced plasticity steel (TRIP), dual phase steel (DP) and martensitic steel. Two sheets of the same steel were laser welded and a microstructural study was performed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. For all samples the welded zone was constituted by martensite and the heat affected zone shows a continuous change in microstructure depending on temperatures reached and on the different cooling rates. The change in mechanical properties in the welded area was followed by Vickers micro-hardness measurements. Quasi binary phase diagrams were calculated and, according to position of T0 lines, it was deduced that austenite is the primary phase forming during rapid solidification for all steels.

  1. Microstructures in laser welded high strength steels

    In this work, the effect of laser welding on the microstructure was studied for three Advanced High Strength Steels: transformation induced plasticity steel (TRIP), dual phase steel (DP) and martensitic steel. Two sheets of the same steel were laser welded and a microstructural study was performed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. For all samples the welded zone was constituted by martensite and the heat affected zone shows a continuous change in microstructure depending on temperatures reached and on the different cooling rates. The change in mechanical properties in the welded area was followed by Vickers micro-hardness measurements. Quasi binary phase diagrams were calculated and, according to position of T0 lines, it was deduced that austenite is the primary phase forming during rapid solidification for all steels.

  2. Experimental study and numerical modelling of weld pool during GTA welding of steels

    The high quality of the weld bead makes GTA welding one of the most used welding processes in the nuclear industry. During this work, a physical model is proposed to simulate the weld pool during the GTA welding of stainless steels with different concentrations of surface active elements. This model aims to predict the weld bead shape, its geometrical characteristics and the thermal field induced by the process according to the operating parameters but also as a function of the surface active elements concentrations of welded metals. Based on the 'electric' module of Code Saturne, the set of solved equations includes both fluid dynamics equations and electromagnetic ones. Before applying the model to the simulation of welding of stainless steels with different concentrations of surface active elements, this model has been studied through configurations of homogenous materials welding. Experiments are carried out and are compared to the corresponding simulations. In the approach used in this study, the thermo-capillary effects are studied separately from electromagnetic ones using conduction mode laser beam welding. The agreement obtained from comparative analysis between experimental results and numerical ones shows good reproduction of the process physics by the model developed. The modeling limitations and the phenomena identified by this study are discussed and orientations for future development are defined. (author)

  3. Some mettallurgical aspect of steel slabs welding

    Thick plates (i.e. more than 50mm thick) are used mainly in the energy production field. These fabrications concern mainly pressure vessels. A high reliability is obtained by the quality of the fabrication especially for welding. Steel slabs welding is a difficult operation because of technical and metallurgical problems associated. This article shows the metallurgical aspect of welding and the difference of behaviour between thin and thick parts of the same composition

  4. Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds

    Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds has been considered difficult because of the high noise level and remarkable attenuation of ultrasonic waves. To improve flaw detectability in this kind of steel, various inspection techniques have been studied. A series of tests indicated: (1) The longitudinal angle beam transducers newly developed during this study can detect 4.8 mm dia. side drilled holes in dissimilar metal welds (refraction angle: 550 from SUS side, 450 from CS side) and in cast stainless steel welds (refraction angle: 450, inspection frequency: 1 MHz). (2) Cracks more than 5% t in depth in the heat affected zones of fine-grain stainless steel pipe welds can be detected by the 450 shear wave angle beam method (inspection frequency: 2 MHz). (3) The pattern recognition method using frequency analysis technology was presumed useful for discriminating crack signals from spurious echoes. (author)

  5. Creep Deformation and Rupture Behavior of Single- and Dual-Pass 316LN Stainless-Steel-Activated TIG Weld Joints

    Vijayanand, V. D.; Vasudevan, M.; Ganesan, V.; Parameswaran, P.; Laha, K.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    Creep deformation and rupture behavior of single-pass and dual-pass 316LN stainless steel (SS) weld joints fabricated by an autogenous activated tungsten inert gas welding process have been assessed by performing metallography, hardness, and conventional and impression creep tests. The fusion zone of the single-pass joint consisted of columnar zones adjacent to base metals with a central equiaxed zone, which have been modified extensively by the thermal cycle of the second pass in the dual-pass joint. The equiaxed zone in the single-pass joint, as well as in the second pass of the dual-pass joint, displayed the lowest hardness in the joints. In the dual-pass joint, the equiaxed zone of the first pass had hardness comparable to the columnar zone. The hardness variations in the joints influenced the creep deformation. The equiaxed and columnar zone in the first pass of the dual-pass joint was more creep resistant than that of the second pass. Both joints possessed lower creep rupture life than the base metal. However, the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint was about twofolds more than that of the single-pass joint. Creep failure in the single-pass joint occurred in the central equiaxed fusion zone, whereas creep cavitation that originated in the second pass was blocked at the weld pass interface. The additional interface and strength variation between two passes in the dual-pass joint provides more restraint to creep deformation and crack propagation in the fusion zone, resulting in an increase in the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint. Furthermore, the differences in content, morphology, and distribution of delta ferrite in the fusion zone of the joints favors more creep cavitation resistance in the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint with the enhancement of creep rupture life.

  6. Creep Deformation and Rupture Behavior of Single- and Dual-Pass 316LN Stainless-Steel-Activated TIG Weld Joints

    Vijayanand, V. D.; Vasudevan, M.; Ganesan, V.; Parameswaran, P.; Laha, K.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2016-03-01

    Creep deformation and rupture behavior of single-pass and dual-pass 316LN stainless steel (SS) weld joints fabricated by an autogenous activated tungsten inert gas welding process have been assessed by performing metallography, hardness, and conventional and impression creep tests. The fusion zone of the single-pass joint consisted of columnar zones adjacent to base metals with a central equiaxed zone, which have been modified extensively by the thermal cycle of the second pass in the dual-pass joint. The equiaxed zone in the single-pass joint, as well as in the second pass of the dual-pass joint, displayed the lowest hardness in the joints. In the dual-pass joint, the equiaxed zone of the first pass had hardness comparable to the columnar zone. The hardness variations in the joints influenced the creep deformation. The equiaxed and columnar zone in the first pass of the dual-pass joint was more creep resistant than that of the second pass. Both joints possessed lower creep rupture life than the base metal. However, the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint was about twofolds more than that of the single-pass joint. Creep failure in the single-pass joint occurred in the central equiaxed fusion zone, whereas creep cavitation that originated in the second pass was blocked at the weld pass interface. The additional interface and strength variation between two passes in the dual-pass joint provides more restraint to creep deformation and crack propagation in the fusion zone, resulting in an increase in the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint. Furthermore, the differences in content, morphology, and distribution of delta ferrite in the fusion zone of the joints favors more creep cavitation resistance in the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint with the enhancement of creep rupture life.

  7. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    2015-09-01

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this work, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW on grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.

  8. Phase transformations in welded supermartensitic stainless steels

    Carrouge, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steels have recently been introduced in the oil and gas industries to substitute more expensive duplex stainless steels for onshore and offshore tubing applications. Although easily joined by arc welding processes, the service life of the supermartensitic welded joint in corrosive environments relies to a large extent on the behaviour of the heat-affected zone (HAZ). The microstructure of the HAZ in these new materials has, until now, received little ...

  9. Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding Tanks Steels

    Turichin, G.; Tsibulskiy, I.; Kuznetsov, M.; Akhmetov, A.; Klimova-Korsmik, O.

    2016-04-01

    The results investigate hybrid laser-arc welding of high strength steels using design responsible metallic construction and the highest strength body of vehicles. Welds from modern high strength steels grade Hardox 400, Hardox 450, Armox 600T and AB were created. High power fiber laser LS-15 with output 15 kW and arc rectifier VDU - 1500 DC were used in the experiment. Results of the metallographic research and mechanical tests are presented.

  10. Microstructural Development during Welding of TRIP steels

    Amirthalingam, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are promising solutions for the production of lighter automobiles which reduce fuel consumption and increase passenger safety by improving crash-worthiness. Transformation Induced Plasticity Steel (TRIP) are part of the advanced high strength steels which offers a high strength and toughness combination with excellent uniform elongation. However, the higher alloying content of these steel limits their weldability and the thermal cycle of a welding proc...

  11. Fracture toughness of stainless steel welds

    The effects of temperature, composition and weld-process variations on the fracture toughness behavior for Types 308 and 16-8-2 stainless steel (SS) welds were examined using the multiple-specimen J/sub R/-curve procedure. Fracture characteristics were found to be dependent on temperature and weld process but not on filler material. Gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welds exhibited the highest fracture toughness, a shielded metal-arc (SMA) weld exhibited an intermediate toughness and submerged-arc (SA) welds yielded the lowest toughness. Minimum-expected fracture properties were defined from lower-bound J/sub c/ and tearing modulus values generated here and in previous studies. Fractographic examination revealed that microvoid coalescence was the operative fracture mechanism for all welds. Second phase particles of manganese silicide were found to be detrimental to the ductile fracture behavior because they separated from the matrix during the initial stages of plastic straining. In SA welds, the high density of inclusions resulting from silicon pickup from the flux promoted premature dimple rupture. The weld produced by the SMA process contained substantially less manganese silicide, while GTA welds contained no silicide inclusions. Delta ferrite particles present in all welds were substantially more resistant to local failure than the silicide phase. In welds containing little or no manganese silicide, delta ferrite particles initiated microvoid coalescence but only after extensive plastic straining

  12. Effect of activating fluxes on weld mechanical properties in TIG welding

    2001-01-01

    Activating TIG (A-TIG) welding has received many attentions worldwide since the end of 1990s. Compared with conventional TIG welding A-TIG welding can greatly improve the welding productivity and reduce the welding cost without altering the equipments under the same welding procedures and is considered as a innovative variant of conventional TIG welding. The materials applied by A-TIG welding have ranged from original titanium alloy to stainless steel, carbon steel, high temperature alloy steel and so forth. The effects of activating fluxes with single component on weld mechanical properties such as tensile strength, hardness and elastics during A-TIG welding of stainless steel are discussed in this paper. The experimental results show that different fluxes have different effects on the weld mechanical properties. Among these fluxes the flux SiO2 is the best in the performance of tensile strength and ductility, while flux Cr2O3 is the best in the performance of weld hardness compared with conventional TIG welding. These experiments provide the foundation for selecting the most suitable fluxes for stainless steel in practical welding production.

  13. Embrittlement of austenitic stainless steel welds

    To prevent hot-cracking, austenitic stainless steel welds generally contain a small percent of delta ferrite. Although ferrite has been found to effectively prevent hot-cracking, it can lead to embrittlement of welds when exposed to elevated temperatures. The aging behavior of type-308 stainless steel weld has been examined over a range of temperatures 475--850 C for times up to 10,000 hrs. Upon aging, and depending on the temperature range, the unstable ferrite may undergo a variety of solid state transformations. These phase changes creep-rupture and Charpy impact properties

  14. Friction Stir Welding of austenitic stainless steels

    C. Meran

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Friction Stir Welding (FSW was applied austenitic stainless steels that is difficult to weld using FSW technique. Proper weld can be obtained by using appropriate welding parameter. In this paper, the effect of different tool rotational speeds, traverse speeds, compressive tool forces, and tool angles was investigated.Design/methodology/approach: The dimension of 3 mm x 75 mm x 150 mm two stainless steel plates were used and butt welded by FSW method using 7.5 kW vertical head milling machine. All welded test specimens were prepared perpendicular to the weld line in order to determine the mechanical properties and tested with 12 MPa/sec stress rate under stress control using a servo-hydraulic Instron 8801. Microstructure of the welding zone and macrograph of the heat affected zone was investigated by SEM.Findings: The average grain size in the SZ was between 3 and 7 μm, which is smaller than that in the BM. The average grain size in the HAZ was about 20 μm, which is half of that in the BM.Fine-grained microstructures are present the welded area. The dark bands observed in the weld zone were also detected the microstructure of the transition zone. Dark and narrow bands do not consist of pores or cavities. It was determined that these bands do not process an ultra fine-grained microstructure. They are Cr2O3 oxide layers which over the surface of stainless steels may have been ruptured during friction stir welding and may form bands inside the welding bead due to stirring.Research limitations/implications: The proper cooling system helps to prevent the stirrer tool from the deformation.Practical implications: The strength of the welded zone of AISI 304 stainless steel can be easily found by implementing welding design parameters and high quality joints can be obtained.Originality/value: This study was performed in the frame of the TUBITAK project no 106M504, „Friction Stir Weldability of Stainless Steels and Investigation of the

  15. Fracture behavior of various welded steels

    In this study, P295GH (17Mn4) pressure vessel steel and AISI 304 stainless steel were joined by using ER 309L electrodes. Welded specimens were fatigued by four point bending experiments. Cracks occurred on the stainless steel side of the weldment during the fatigue tests. Finite element (FE) analyses were conducted by fixing 2-D precracked model for welded 17Mn4 pressure vessel steel and AISI 304 stainless steel by using ER 309L electrodes. True stress and true strain values of the AISI 304, 17Mn4 steels and ER 309L electrodes were determined by tensile tests. Stress analyses were conducted after entering the linear and nonlinear properties of the materials into software manually. Eventually, fracture mechanics analyses were conducted for the model, and J integral fracture toughness values of the crack on the weldment were calculated.

  16. Fracture behavior of various welded steels

    Ozdemir, Tevfik Ertugrul; Cetinel, Hakan [Celal Bayar Univ., Manisa (Turkey). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Uyulgan, Bahadir [Dokuz Eyluel Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

    2016-02-01

    In this study, P295GH (17Mn4) pressure vessel steel and AISI 304 stainless steel were joined by using ER 309L electrodes. Welded specimens were fatigued by four point bending experiments. Cracks occurred on the stainless steel side of the weldment during the fatigue tests. Finite element (FE) analyses were conducted by fixing 2-D precracked model for welded 17Mn4 pressure vessel steel and AISI 304 stainless steel by using ER 309L electrodes. True stress and true strain values of the AISI 304, 17Mn4 steels and ER 309L electrodes were determined by tensile tests. Stress analyses were conducted after entering the linear and nonlinear properties of the materials into software manually. Eventually, fracture mechanics analyses were conducted for the model, and J integral fracture toughness values of the crack on the weldment were calculated.

  17. Welding of carbon steel vessels without post weld heat treatment

    The methods available for the repair welding of carbon steel vessels without post weld heat treatment and with particular reference to service in a sour environment have been reviewed. All the available techniques have the common aim of providing adequate properties in the weld metal and heat affected zone without the need for a full post weld stress relief. The heat that is required to provide the necessary metallurgical changes comes, therefore, from an alternate source. The two sources used are heat from suitably placed subsequent weld passes or from localized external heat sources. The technique presently being used by Ontario Hydro to repair vessels subject to sour service utilizes both a high preheat and a welding technique which is designed to temper the heat affected zone formed in the base material by the first weld pass. This technique is an improvement over the 'half bead' techniques given in the ASME X1 code and has been shown to be capable of reducing the hardness of the heat affected zone to an acceptable level. Certain recommendations have been made which could improve control of the technique presently used by Ontario Hydro and provide measurable parameters between procedural tests and the actual weld repairs

  18. Optimization of process parameters of the activated tungsten inert gas welding for aspect ratio of UNS S32205 duplex stainless steel welds

    G. Magudeeswaran

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The activated TIG (ATIG welding process mainly focuses on increasing the depth of penetration and the reduction in the width of weld bead has not been paid much attention. The shape of a weld in terms of its width-to-depth ratio known as aspect ratio has a marked influence on its solidification cracking tendency. The major influencing ATIG welding parameters, such as electrode gap, travel speed, current and voltage, that aid in controlling the aspect ratio of DSS joints, must be optimized to obtain desirable aspect ratio for DSS joints. Hence in this study, the above parameters of ATIG welding for aspect ratio of ASTM/UNS S32205 DSS welds are optimized by using Taguchi orthogonal array (OA experimental design and other statistical tools such as Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and Pooled ANOVA techniques. The optimum process parameters are found to be 1 mm electrode gap, 130 mm/min travel speed, 140 A current and 12 V voltage. The aspect ratio and the ferrite content for the DSS joints fabricated using the optimized ATIG parameters are found to be well within the acceptable range and there is no macroscopically evident solidification cracking.

  19. Optimization of process parameters of the activated tungsten inert gas welding for aspect ratio of UNS S32205 duplex stainless steel welds

    G. MAGUDEESWARAN; Sreehari R. NAIR; L. SUNDAR; N. HARIKANNAN

    2014-01-01

    The activated TIG (ATIG) welding process mainly focuses on increasing the depth of penetration and the reduction in the width of weld bead has not been paid much attention. The shape of a weld in terms of its width-to-depth ratio known as aspect ratio has a marked influence on its solidification cracking tendency. The major influencing ATIG welding parameters, such as electrode gap, travel speed, current and voltage, that aid in controlling the aspect ratio of DSS joints, must be optimized to obtain desirable aspect ratio for DSS joints. Hence in this study, the above parameters of ATIG welding for aspect ratio of ASTM/UNS S32205 DSS welds are optimized by using Taguchi orthogonal array (OA) experimental design and other statistical tools such as Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Pooled ANOVA techniques. The optimum process parameters are found to be 1 mm electrode gap, 130 mm/min travel speed, 140 A current and 12 V voltage. The aspect ratio and the ferrite content for the DSS joints fabricated using the optimized ATIG parameters are found to be well within the acceptable range and there is no macroscopically evident solidification cracking.

  20. Mechanized welding of austenitic precision stainless steel tubes

    Austenitic stainless steel tubes of material no. 1,4541 and 1,4550 are used for the tube systems to transport active and inactive gases in reactor experiments. A fully mechanical method was developed for the joining of these tubes by welding which makes use of an electrode holder with surrounding W electrode. This method, whose application is described here, enables the joining of the tubes in all welding positions. A pulsating direct current is used as welding current. Breaking tests on the welded samples gave values corresponding to the strength of the materials mentioned. The welded seams are subjected to the helium leak test and to the X-ray test. (GSCH/LH)

  1. Corrosion of an austenite and ferrite stainless steel weld

    BRANIMIR N. GRGUR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilar metal connections are prone to frequent failures. These failures are attributed to the difference in the mechanical properties across the weld, the coefficients of thermal expansion of the two types of steels and the resulting creep at the interface. For the weld analyzed in this research, it was shown that corrosion measurements can be used for a proper evaluation of the quality of weld material and for the prediction of whether or not the material, after the applied welding process, can be in service without failures. It was found that the corrosion of the weld analyzed in this research resulted from the simultaneous activity of different types of corrosion. In this study, electrochemical techniques including polarization and metallographic analysis were used to analyze the corrosion of a weld material of ferrite and austenitic stainless steels. Based on surface, chemical and electrochemical analyses, it was concluded that corrosion occurrence was the result of the simultaneous activity of contact corrosion (ferrite and austenitic material conjuction, stress corrosion (originating from deformed ferrite structure and inter-granular corrosion (due to chromium carbide precipitation. The value of corrosion potential of –0.53 V shows that this weld, after the thermal treatment, is not able to repassivate a protective oxide film.

  2. Numerical modelling of steel arc welding

    Welding is a highly used assembly technique. Welding simulation software would give access to residual stresses and information about the weld's microstructure, in order to evaluate the mechanical resistance of a weld. It would also permit to evaluate the process feasibility when complex geometrical components are to be made, and to optimize the welding sequences in order to minimize defects. This work deals with the numerical modelling of arc welding process of steels. After describing the industrial context and the state of art, the models implemented in TransWeld (software developed at CEMEF) are presented. The set of macroscopic equations is followed by a discussion on their numerical implementation. Then, the theory of re-meshing and our adaptive anisotropic re-meshing strategy are explained. Two welding metal addition techniques are investigated and are compared in terms of the joint size and transient temperature and stresses. The accuracy of the finite element model is evaluated based on experimental results and the results of the analytical solution. Comparative analysis between experimental and numerical results allows the assessment of the ability of the numerical code to predict the thermomechanical and metallurgical response of the welded structure. The models limitations and the phenomena identified during this study are finally discussed and permit to define interesting orientations for future developments. (author)

  3. The Structure and Mechanical Properties of Bridge Steel Weldings With Glass-Steel Liners

    Muzalev, V. N.; Semukhin, B. S.; Danilov, V. I.

    2016-04-01

    A new technology is developed for welding multi-span bridge constructions. The mechanical properties and structure of the low-carbon bridge steel welds have been studied. The welding parameters and application of steel-glass liners provide for long-term service of steel constructions in conformity with the welding industry specifications.

  4. Creep property measurements of welded joint of reduced-activation ferritic steel by the small-punch creep test

    The small-punch (SP) test and the SP creep test were carried out by using a further miniaturized plate-type specimen (3 mm diameter x 0.25 mm thick). Those tests were applied to the electron-beam welded joint of reduced-activation ferritic steel for evaluating the distribution of high-temperature strength in the joint. The experimental results revealed that the distribution of the maximum load measured by the SP test at 873 K was very similar to that obtained from Vickers hardness, and the fusion zone was relatively devoid of high-temperature ductility. In addition, the ratio of the load of SP creep test to the stress of standard uniaxial creep test was calculated so that both the creep rupture curves were overlapped to convert the results of SP creep test into those of standard test. As a result, the ratio was determined to be 0.43 for the base metal and this load-stress conversion coefficient is in good agreement with that obtained from finite element analysis.

  5. Interaction of niobium and nitrogen dissolved in a molten steel on the plasma welding

    Aimed at the investigation of mechanism of nitride formation during plasma welding of austenitic steels thermodynamic analysis for the processes proceeding in microvolume of welding bath has been performed. The experiments have been carried out with steel type 08Kh18N10T as a base metal and welding were of steel type 04Kh20N10G2B. It has been established that drops of liquid metal of welding wire are saturated with nitrogen and transfer it to the welding bath. In welding bath niobium-nitrogen interaction occurs with niobium nitride formation. The protection of welding bath from environment is recommended as the only way to prevent nitride formation in steels alloyed with such active elements as niobium

  6. An overview of the welding technologies of CLAM steels for fusion application

    Highlights: ► Welding technologies of China Low Activation Martensitic steel is overviewed. ► Most welding technologies in use are discussed and suggestions are given. ► Proper welding technologies could ensure weld properties but more detailed work are necessary. - Abstract: China Low Activation Martensitic steel (CLAMs), a kind of RAFM steel with Chinese intellectual property rights, is considered as the primary structural material for the China-designed ITER test blanket module (TBM). As one of the key issues in the fabrication of the fusion reactor, the welding technologies of CLAMs are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the weldability of CLAMs by different welding methods, and on the properties of as-welded and post-weld heat-treated joints. Recent highlights in research and development for the welding of CLAMs show that proper welding procedure could provide welds with adequate tensile strength but the welds exhibit lower impact toughness compared with the base metal. Post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) and the application of ultrasonic energy during TIG welding could dramatically improve impact toughness. Research also shows that welds in CLAMs have sufficient resistance to swelling under irradiation as well as suitable compatibility with liquid LiPb. The microstructure, mechanical and other physical properties of welds are significantly different from those of the base metal due to the complicated welding thermal cycle. The weld joint is the area most likely to fail one or more of the design requirements within the fusion reactor. Therefore significant additional research is necessary to ensure safe application of welded CLAM steel for fusion reactor construction.

  7. Weld process study for 316L stainless steel weld metal for liquid helium service

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of welding process choice on the cryogenic properties of 316L stainless steel welds. Six weldments were impact tested down to 77 K and tensile and fracture toughness tested down to 4 K. The best properties obtained were from a GTA weld, followed by GMA welds; SA welds had the poorest properties. This variation in properties was attributed to the cleanliness of the weld metal, which is dependent on the welding process and parameters selected

  8. Welding technology trend of austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic services

    At present, the large use of stainless steel in cryogenic field is the storage and transport system for liquefied gas represented by LNG and the nuclear fusion reactors utilizing superconductivity. Most of the stainless steel used for the LNG system is austenitic stainless steel SUS 304. The main use of stainless steel for fusion reactors is the support structures for superconductive magnets, and the thick plates over 150 mm are used. In the experiment, SUS 304L and 316L were used, but the development of a new high strength stainless steel is actively advanced. The target specification of the cryogenic structural material for the fusion experimental reactor (FER) was proposed in 1982. The proof stress is not lower than 1200 MPa, and the fracture toughness value is not lower than 200 MPa √m at 4 K. Six kinds of nitrogen-strengthened austenitic stainless steels and high manganese austenitic steels are developed. As the problems of the welded parts, the toughness and strength at extremely low temperature, the susceptibility to high temperature cracking, the material quality design of the welded metals and so on are examined. The welding methods are GTAW and GMAW. (K.I.)

  9. Phase transformation and impact properties in the experimentally simulated weld heat-affected zone of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    In this work, the phase transformation and impact properties in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel are investigated. The HAZs were experimentally simulated using a Gleeble simulator. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite through normalizing at 1000 °C and tempering at 750 °C, while the HAZs consisted of martensite, δ-ferrite and a small volume of autotempered martensite. The impact properties using a Charpy V-notch impact test revealed that the HAZs showed poor impact properties due to the formation of martensite and δ-ferrite as compared with the base steel. In addition, the impact properties of the HAZs further deteriorated with an increase in the δ-ferrite fraction caused by increasing the peak temperature. The impact properties of the HAZs could be improved through the formation of tempered martensite after post weld heat treatment (PWHT), but they remained lower than that of the base steel because the δ-ferrite remained in the tempered HAZs

  10. Microstructure and properties of steel weld metals

    The major impetus for developments in welding consumables for high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) stells have been provided by the need for improved toughness and ductility to produce weld metal deposits with mechanical properties essentially equivalent to the base plate. From the large volume of literature dealing with HSLA steel filler metals, it appears that the bulk of weld metal research over the past decade has been concentrated on the achievement of a maximum toughness and ductility for a given strength level by control of the weld metal microstructure. Based on the following review, there seems to be general agreement that microstructures primarily consisting of acicular ferrite provide optimum weld metal mechanical properties, both from a strength and toughness point of view, by virtue of its small grain size (typically 1-3 μm) and high angle grain boundaries. The formation of large proportions of upper bainite, Widmanstaetten ferrite, or grain boundary ferrite, on the other hand, are considered detrimental to toughness, since these structures provide preferential crack propagation paths, especially when continuous films of carbides are present between the ferrite laths or plates. Attempts to control the weld metal acicular ferrite content have led to the introduction of welding consumables containing complex deoxidizers (Si, Mn, Al, Ti) and balanced additions of various alloying elements (Nb, V, Ni, Cr, Mo, B). (orig.)

  11. Calculation of AF transformation kinetics in HSLA steel weld

    张国栋; 潘春旭; 黄安国; 李志远; 余圣甫; 市川和利

    2004-01-01

    It is of great importance for obtaining the perfect welding properties to control the acicular ferrite (AF) transformation behavior reasonably in steel weld. AF continuous transformation kinetics in the HSLA steel weld was calculated and modeled based on the direct growth on the inclusions inert interface. The simulation results are coincident with the experimental value well.

  12. Microgalvanic corrosion of laser-welded HSLA steels

    Looi, Y.-M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser welding of galvanized high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels leads to the evaporation of zinc at the weld and the formation of a heat-affected-zone (HAZ). High heat input due to welding generates macro galvanic coupling between the weld and the parent metal as well as micro galvanic corrosion a

  13. Influence of the impurities on the depth of penetration with carbon steel weldings

    O. Savytsky

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the results of the research about the influence of the impurities on the depth of penetration with carbon steels weldings of different chemical composition are presented. These data suggest that presence of those impurities, such as sulphure and oxygen, in the steel, increases the depth of penetration to 1,3 - 1,5 times compared to welding refined steels. Applying activating fluxes for welding high tensile steels, provides an increase in the depth of penetration of 2 - 3 times.

  14. Effect of weld reinforcement on axial plastic buckling of welded steel cylindrical shells

    Chu-lin YU; Zhi-ping CHEN; Ji WANG; Shun-juan YAN; Li-cai YANG

    2012-01-01

    The effect of weld reinforcement on axial plastic buckling of welded steel cylindrical shells is investigated through experimental and numerical buckling analysis using six welded steel cylindrical shell specimens.The relationship between the amplitude of weld reinforcement and the axial plastic buckling critical load is explored.The effect of the material yield strength and the number of circumferential welds on the axial plastic buckling is studied.Results show that circumferential weld reinforcement represents a severe imperfect form of axially compressed welded steel cylindrical shells and the axial plastic buckling critical load decreases with the increment of the mean amplitude of circumferential weld reinforcement.The material yield strength and the number of circumferential welds are found to have no significant effect on buckling waveforms; however,the axial plastic buckling critical load can be decreased to some extent with the increase of the number of circumferential welds.

  15. He blisters on welded austenitic stainless steel

    Surface blisters of single-crystal and polycrystalline metals induced by He-ion irradiation have been investigated by many researchers and several blister-formation mechanisms have been proposed. But there is no report on what blister densities and blister sizes are to be expected on a welded 316 austenitic stainless steel in use as a fusion reactor material. An experiment was carried out, and details are given. The exfoliation of blisters was almost not observed until the total dose of 2 x 1022 ions m-2 was reached. A figure shows the blister densities for every increment in blister diameter of 0.5 μm on the base and weld metals. A second figure shows the corresponding blister densities on the base and weld metals annealed at 653 K for 4.5 ksec after He-ion irradiation. The total blister densities of the base metals decrease to 4.3 to 5.5 x 1010 blisters m-2 and the average blister sizes increase to 2.8 to 3.2 μm. This phenomenon indicates that the implanted He ions diffuse in the weld and base metals. The blister sizes on the weld metals are smaller than those on the base metals and the densities on the weld metals are greater than those on the base metals. (author)

  16. Laser droplet welding of zinc coated steel sheets

    Jerič, Anže; Grabec, Igor; Govekar, Edvard

    2015-01-01

    The weldability of zinc coated steel sheets is often compromised by weld seam defects caused by rapid zinc vaporisation and burned-off zinc. Owing to this, welded seams usually remain unprotected from corrosion and are accompanied by undesirable porosity. In this paper, the laser droplet generation process and its application to laser droplet welding of zinc coated steel sheets are described. The influences of laser droplet generation and welding process control parameters on the properties o...

  17. Material Flow during Friction Stir Welding of HSLA 65 Steel

    Young, John; Field, David; Nelson, Tracy

    2013-07-01

    Material flow during friction stir welding of HSLA-65 steel was investigated by crystallographic texture analysis. During the welding process, the steel deforms primarily by local shear deformation in the austenite phase and then transforms upon cooling. Texture data from three weld specimens were compared to theoretical textures calculated using ideal Euler angles for shear in face centered cubic (FCC) structures transformed by the Kurdjumov-Sacks (KS) relationship. These theoretical textures show similarities to the experimental textures. Texture data from the weld specimens revealed a rotation of the shear direction corresponding to the tangent of the weld tool on both the area directly under the weld tool shoulder and weld cross sections. In addition, texture data showed that while the shear plane of the area under the weld tool shoulder remained constant, the shear plane of the weld cross sections is influenced by the weld tool pin.

  18. The filler powders laser welding of ODS ferritic steels

    Liang, Shenyong, E-mail: s_y_liang@126.com; Lei, Yucheng; Zhu, Qiang

    2015-01-15

    Laser welding was performed on Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with the self-designed filler powders. The filler powders were added to weld metal to produce nano-particles (Y–M–O and TiC), submicron particles (Y–M–O) and dislocation rings. The generated particles were evenly distributed in the weld metal and their forming mechanism and behavior were analyzed. The results of the tests showed that the nano-particles, submicron particles and dislocation rings were able to improve the micro-hardness and tensile strength of welded joint, and the filler powders laser welding was an effective welding method of ODS ferritic steel.

  19. Hyperbaric welding of duplex stainless steel pipelines offshore.

    Farrell, J.

    1996-01-01

    Three duplex stainless steels (Avesta 2205, Sandvik SAF2507 and Zeron 100) were successfully welded automatically at a range of pressures from 1 to 32bar. The gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process was chosen as it allows a high degree of control to be exercised during welding. Initial autogenous bead on plate welds established the effects of pressure on the welding process and allowed the process parameters to be determined for subsequent experiments. Analysis of the eff...

  20. Microgalvanic corrosion of laser-welded HSLA steels

    Looi, Y.-M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser welding of galvanized high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels leads to the evaporation of zinc at the weld and the formation of a heat-affected-zone (HAZ). High heat input due to welding generates macro galvanic coupling between the weld and the parent metal as well as micro galvanic corrosion at different microstructures of the weld, HAZ and the parent metal. Different microstructural substructures exhibit different electrochemical characteristics, potentially leading to microgalvanic co...

  1. Corrosion of Welded X100 Pipeline Steel in a Near-Neutral pH Solution

    Zhang, C.; Cheng, Y. F.

    2010-08-01

    In this work, electrochemical corrosion behavior of a welded X100 pipeline steel was studied in a near-neutral pH solution by electrochemical scanning vibrating electrode technique combined with metallographic and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray analysis. Results demonstrated that a softening phenomenon occurs around the weld, and there is the high micro-hardness in base steel adjacent to weld. In particular, there is the highest micro-hardness in base steel containing acicular ferrite and bainite. Therefore, welding and the associated post-treatment on X100 steel alter dramatically the microstructure and mechanical property around weld, resulting in an enhanced micro-hardness in base steel. There are high and low local dissolution current densities at base steel and the welded zones, respectively. The difference between the maximum and minimum dissolution current densities decreases with time, and the distribution of dissolution current density tends to be uniform. Hydrogen-charging changes the local dissolution activity of the welded steel. Different from the hydrogen-free steel, there is the highest dissolution current density at heat-affected zone. It is reasonable to assume that the charged hydrogen would accumulate at heat-affected zone, and the synergism of hydrogen and local stress results in a high anodic dissolution rate.

  2. Welded, sandblasted, stainless steel corrugated bars in non-carbonated and carbonated mortars: A 9-year corrosion study

    Bautista, A.; Paredes, E. C.; Álvarez, S. M.; Velasco, F.

    2016-01-01

    Three different stainless steel corrugated grades (UNS S20430, S30403 and S32205) were similar welded to stainless steel bars with the same composition and dissimilar welded to carbon steel (CS). After cleaning the welding oxides by sandblasting, the reinforcements were embedded in mortar with chlorides and some of the samples were carbonated. Corrosion activity was monitored using corrosion potential (Ecorr) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). After 8 years of exposure, the sam...

  3. Pulsed Magnetic Welding for Advanced Core and Cladding Steel

    Cao, Guoping [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Yang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2013-12-19

    To investigate a solid-state joining method, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW), for welding the advanced core and cladding steels to be used in Generation IV systems, with a specific application for fuel pin end-plug welding. As another alternative solid state welding technique, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW) has not been extensively explored on the advanced steels. The resultant weld can be free from microstructure defects (pores, non-metallic inclusions, segregation of alloying elements). More specifically, the following objectives are to be achieved: 1. To design a suitable welding apparatus fixture, and optimize welding parameters for repeatable and acceptable joining of the fuel pin end-plug. The welding will be evaluated using tensile tests for lap joint weldments and helium leak tests for the fuel pin end-plug; 2 Investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties changes in PMW weldments of proposed advanced core and cladding alloys; 3. Simulate the irradiation effects on the PWM weldments using ion irradiation.

  4. Characterization of duplex stainless steel weld metals obtained by hybrid plasma-gas metal arc welding

    Koray Yurtisik; Suha Tirkes; Igor Dykhno; C. Hakan Gur; Riza Gurbuz

    2013-01-01

    Despite its high efficiency, autogenous keyhole welding is not well-accepted for duplex stainless steels because it causes excessive ferrite in as-welded duplex microstructure, which leads to a degradation in toughness and corrosion properties of the material. Combining the deep penetration characteristics of plasma arc welding in keyhole mode and metal deposition capability of gas metal arc welding, hybrid plasma - gas metal arc welding process has considered for providing a proper duplex mi...

  5. Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.

    Xu, Z. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-04-03

    Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

  6. CO2 laser welding of AISI 321stainless steel

    CO2 laser welding of AISI 321austenitic stainless steel has been carried out. Bead on plate welds on 2 mm thick steel were performed with 450W CO2 laser at speeds ranging from 200 to 900 mm/min. It was observed that weld depth and width was decreased with increasing the speed at constant laser power. Butt welds on different sheet thickness of 1, 2 and 2.5 mm were performed with laser power of 450 W and at speed 750, 275 and 175 mm/min, respectively. The microstructures of the welded joints and the heat affected zones (HAZ) were examined by optical microscopy and SEM. The austenite/delta ferrite microstructure was reported in the welded zone. The microhardness and tensile strength of the welded joints were measured and found almost similar to base metal due to austenitic nature of steel

  7. Microstructure characterization of Friction Stir Spot Welded TRIP steel

    Lomholt, Trine Colding; Adachi, Yoshitaka; Peterson, Jeremy;

    2012-01-01

    Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels have not yet been successfully joined by any welding technique. It is desirable to search for a suitable welding technique that opens up for full usability of TRIP steels. In this study, the potential of joining TRIP steel with Friction Stir Spot...... Welding (FSSW) is investigated. The aim of the study is to investigate whether acceptable welds can be produced, and additionally, to obtain an understanding of the microstructural changes during welding. The microstructure was investigated with a combination of microscopical techniques with the aim of...... identifying the transformations occurring during welding. Reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron backscatter diffraction were among the methods applied for detailed investigations. The microstructure adjacent to the welds can generally be subdivided in two thermo...

  8. Aging of maraging steel welds during aluminium alloy die casting

    Klobčar, Damjan; Pleterski, Matej; Taljat, Boštjan; Kosec, Ladislav; Tušek, Janez

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate precipitation annealing of 18% Ni maraging steel repair welds during aluminium die casting and to predict the prolonged in-service tool life. The emphasis of this study is the influence ofpost-weld precipitation annealing heat treatment and aluminium die casting thermal cycling on metallurgical and mechanical properties. A series of specimens of 1.2344 tool steel is prepared to which 1.6356 maraging steel is GTA weld cladded. Analysis of weld microstructur...

  9. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of dissimilar stainless steels welded joints

    J. Łabanowski

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the current study is to reveal the influence of welding conditions on structure and stresscorrosion cracking resistance of dissimilar stainless steels butt welded joints.Design/methodology/approach: Butt joints between duplex 2205 and austenitic 316L steels were performedwith the use of submerged arc welding (SAW) method. The plates 15 mm in thickness were welded with heatinput in the range of 1.15 – 3.2 kJ/mm using duplex steel filler metal. Microstructure examinations an...

  10. Laser Welding of Ultra-Fine Grained Steel SS400

    PENG Yun; TIAN Zhi-ling; CHEN Wu-zhu; WANG Cheng; BAO Gang

    2003-01-01

    The effects of laser welding on microstructure and mechanical properties of ultra-fine grained steel SS400 were studied. The plasma arc welding and MAG welding were conducted to make a comparison between these weldings and laser welding. The coarse grain heat-affected zone (HAZ) of laser welding was simulated using thermomechanical simulation machine, and the impact toughness was tested. The deep penetration laser welding produces weld of large depth and narrow width. The weld metal and HAZ of laser welding was heated and then cooled rapidly. The prior austenite grain size of coarse grain HAZ is 1/10 of that for arc welding. For laser welding, the toughness of weld metal is higher than that of base metal, and the toughness of the coarse grain HAZ of laser welding is on a level with that of base metal. Matching lower laser power with lower welding speed, the hardening tendency of the weld metal and the coarse grain HAZ can be decreased. There is no softened zone. The tensile strength of welded joint formed by laser is higher than that of base metal. The joint has good bending ductility.

  11. The fracture toughness of Type 316 steel and weld metal

    This paper describes the results of fracture toughness tests on Type 316 steel and Manual Metal Arc (MMA) weld metal over a range of temperatures from 20 deg. C to 550 deg. C, and includes the effects on toughness of specimen size, post weld heat treatment and thermal ageing. The conclusions reached are that Type 316 steel possesses a superior toughness to the weld metal in the as-welded or stress relieved conditions but the toughness of the steel is degraded to a level similar to that of the weld metal following thermal ageing at temperatures over 600 deg. C. Relatively short term thermal ageing in the temperature range 370 deg. C to 450 deg. C does not appear to affect the toughness of either Type 316 steel or weld metal. (author)

  12. Cracking in electron beam welding of low alloy steels

    The study of the cracking in electron beam welding of low alloy steel plates (steel ASTM-A387 gr 22) of high thickness shows that the welding speed to be the essential parameter. A low speed improves the resistance to cracking. The low segregation obtained with this process minimizes the effect of impurities

  13. Stainless steel weld metal designed to mitigate residual stresses

    Shirzadi, A. A.; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.; Karlsson, L.; Withers, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    There have been considerable efforts to create welding consumables which on solid state phase transformation partly compensate for the stresses which develop when a constrained weld cools to ambient temperatures. All of these efforts have focused on structural steels which are ferritic. In the present work, alloy design methods have been used to create a stainless steel welding consumable which solidifies as δ ferrite, transforms almost entirely into austenite which then undergoes martensitic...

  14. Feasibility of underwater friction stir welding of hardenable alloy steel

    Overfield, Norman E.

    2010-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The objective of this thesis is to determine whether friction stir welding (FSW) is a feasible welding process for steels in an underwater environment. Specific benefits would be underwater weld repairs on steel alloy piping systems and/or structures, and crack repairs on control surfaces of submarines without the need for strict environment controls or in the submarine's case, for drydocking. A single tool made of polycrystaline cub...

  15. HIGH FREQUENCY INDUCTION WELDING OF HIGH SILICON STEEL TUBES

    Ricardo Miranda Alé

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available High-Si steel is a low cost alternative for the fabrication of tubular structures resistant to atmospheric corrosion. However, the literature has often pointed out that steels presenting a higher Si content and/or a lower Mn/Si ratio have higher susceptibility to defects at the weld bond line during HFIW (High Frequency Induction Welding process, which has been widely used for manufacturing small diameter tubes. In this study the effect of the HFIW conditions on the quality of steel tubes with high-Si content and low Mn/Si ratio is investigated. The quality of welded tubes was determined by flare test and the defects in the bond line were identified by SEM. It has been found that higher welding speeds, V-convergence angles and power input should be applied in welding of high-Si steel, when compared to similar strength C-Mn steel.

  16. Chemical reactivity of thermo-hardenable steel weld joints investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    The chemical reactivity of oxide-free weld joints made of thermo-hardened carbon steel in different electrolytes was investigated by chronopotentiometry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The objective was to identify the role of different electrolyte constituents on the electrochemical behaviour of the different materials constituting the weld joint, namely the weld material, the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the base carbon steel. Hardness measurements by Vickers and nano-indentation techniques indicated that the weld material is harder than the heat affected zone and the base carbon steel due to a Widmanstaetten ferrite-type structure of the weld. Electrochemical measurements were performed on polished cross-sections on these weld joints in four electrolytes containing different additives. The weld joints are active in all tested electrolytes and the composition of the electrolytes dictates the dissolution even though the main chemical reactivity mechanism remains unaffected. A balanced presence of oxidative agent, inhibitor and HF in the electrolyte is necessary to obtain a homogeneous chemical attack on weld joint and Si-rich inclusion removal in weld material, while avoiding excessive attack roughening and/or pitting of the carbon steel

  17. Corrosion of an austenite and ferrite stainless steel weld

    BRANIMIR N. GRGUR; VLADANA N. RAJAKOVIĆ-OGNJANOVIĆ

    2011-01-01

    Dissimilar metal connections are prone to frequent failures. These failures are attributed to the difference in the mechanical properties across the weld, the coefficients of thermal expansion of the two types of steels and the resulting creep at the interface. For the weld analyzed in this research, it was shown that corrosion measurements can be used for a proper evaluation of the quality of weld material and for the prediction of whether or not the material, after the applied welding proce...

  18. The welding of oxide coated steel using the MIG process

    The penetration of an oxidised steel surface during metal inert gas (MIG) welding, for reactor repairs, is discussed. Using simple models, the effect of deoxidation practice on the penetrating capability of the welding process is estimated, and it is shown that the addition of aluminium to the welding wire can increase the fusion of the oxidised surface. Other modifications to the MIG welding process to influence penetration characteristics are discussed briefly, including shielding gas changes and cored wires. (author)

  19. Comparative study on CO2 laser overlap welding and resistance spot welding for galvanized steel

    Highlights: ► Laser welding and resistance welding are respectively researched on galvanized steel. ► The characteristics of the two kinds of welding methods are systematically analyzed. ► Laser welding joint have much more compact structures and smaller heat-affected zones. ► The tensile-shear performance of laser weld joint is superior under certain condition. ► Laser welding test pieces has greater resistance to deformation and corrosion. -- Abstract: The CO2 laser overlap welding and the resistance spot welding are respectively investigated on DC56D galvanized steel used for auto body. The characteristics of the two types of welding methods are systematically analyzed in terms of the weld molding, tensile-shear performance, microstructure, hardness, and corrosion resistance of welding joint. The results show that, the fusion widths of the upper and lower surface are almost the same for the resistance welding joint, and the weld nugget is surrounded by the heat-affected zone. While the laser welding joint belongs to deep penetration welding, the weld fusion width presents wide at the top and narrow at the bottom, and the heat-affected zone is situated on both sides of the weld pool. Compared with resistance spot welding joint, laser welding joints have much more ultrafine microstructures, much smaller heat-affected zones, as well as greater resistance to deformation and corrosion. In addition, the tensile-shear performance of laser weld joints is superior to that of resistance welding joints under certain conditions.

  20. NARROW GAP LASER WELDING OF THICK SECTION STAINLESS STEEL

    2012-01-01

    Laser welding of metals typically has a weld penetration of 1-2 mm/kW laser power. Therefore laser welding of thick section materials would require very high power lasers. In this paper we report an investigation into multi-pass laser welding of 316L stainless steel sheets of 5-10 mm thickness, based on narrow gap (1.5 mm) approach using a 1 kW single mode fibre laser. A filler wire of 316L with a 0.8 mm diameter was used in the welding process. The integrity of the weld, microstructure and h...

  1. Hybrid Friction Stir Welding of High-carbon Steel

    Don-Hyun Choi; Seung-Boo Jung; Chang-Yong Lee; Byung-Wook Ahn; Jung-Hyun Choi; Yun-Mo Yeon; Keun Song; Seung-Gab Hong; Won-Bae Lee; Ki-Bong Kang

    2011-01-01

    A high-carbon steel joint, SK5 (0.84 wt% C), was successfully welded by friction stir welding (FSW), both without and with a gas torch, in order to control the cooling rate during welding. After welding, the weld zone comprised gray and black regions, corresponding to microstructural variation: a martensite structure and a duplex structure of ferrite and cementite, respectively. The volume fraction of the martensite structure and the Vickers hardness in the welds were decreased with the using of the gas torch, which was related with the lower cooling rate.

  2. EFFECT OF MIG WELDING INPUT PROCESS PARAMETERS ON WELD BEAD GEOMETRY ON HSLA STEEL

    MOHD. SHOEB; Prof. Mohd. Parvez; Prof. Pratibha Kumari

    2013-01-01

    The various welding parameters such as welding speed, voltage and gas flow rate were varied on HSLA steel and the effects of these parameters on weld bead geometry such as penetration, width & height have been studied. Mathematical equations have been developed using factorial technique. And the result of various effects are shown in tables. (Numerical Values).

  3. EFFECT OF MIG WELDING INPUT PROCESS PARAMETERS ON WELD BEAD GEOMETRY ON HSLA STEEL

    MOHD. SHOEB

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The various welding parameters such as welding speed, voltage and gas flow rate were varied on HSLA steel and the effects of these parameters on weld bead geometry such as penetration, width & height have been studied. Mathematical equations have been developed using factorial technique. And the result of various effects are shown in tables. (Numerical Values.

  4. The ultrasonic testing of the spot welded different steel sheets

    M. Vural

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Purpose of this paper is to investigate the applicability of spot welded different steel sheets toultrasonic testing, because resistance spot welding of the steel sheets is widely used in the car bodies andtransport fields and ultrasonic testing is a good way to evaluate the fatique life of the spot welds.Design/methodology/approach: Methodology of this paper is that two different steel sheets (AISI 304 typeaustenitic stainless steel sheet and Galvanized steel sheet were welded to each other by using resistance spotwelding. Some pre-welding tests were made to obtain suitable and optimum weld nugget diameter; and thewelding current vs. nugget diameter curve were obtained. By using this curve and kepting constant weldingparameters such as current, electrode pressure, weld time, etch., fully identical four spot welded specimenshaving 5 mm (±0.2 nugget diameter were obtained. The specimens and nugget diameters were tested by usinga special ultrasonic test apparatus which is designed for spot welded joints.Findings: Findings are that after the first ultrasonic tests, the four identical spot welded sheets which have AISI304 – Galvanized steel sheet combination were subjected to the fatigue test in four different number of cycles.There is no any rupture or fracture in spot welded joints after fatigue tests. The spot welded specimens subjectedto fatigue test were tested in ultrasonic test apparatus to observe the variation in the weld nugget and joint. Theultrasonic test results before fatigue and after fatigue were compared with each other; and the decreasing of theweld nugget diameter were observed while increasing the number of cycles. The results were shown in figuresand discussed.Research limitations/implications: Spot welding of different steel sheets forms different microstructures whichrespond different values to ultrasonic testing. Evaluation of these responses are quiet difficult.Practical implications: Only a few spot welds can be

  5. UNS S31603 Stainless Steel Tungsten Inert Gas Welds Made with Microparticle and Nanoparticle Oxides

    Kuang-Hung Tseng; Po-Yu Lin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of austenitic stainless steel assisted by microparticle oxides and that assisted by nanoparticle oxides. SiO2 and Al2O3 were used to investigate the effects of the thermal stability and the particle size of the activated compounds on the surface appearance, geometric shape, angular distortion, delta ferrite content and Vickers hardness of the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG weld. The results sh...

  6. Carbide-Free Bainitic Weld Metal: A New Concept in Welding of Armor Steels

    Krishna Murthy, N.; Janaki Ram, G. D.; Murty, B. S.; Reddy, G. M.; Rao, T. J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Carbide-free bainite, a fine mixture of bainitic ferrite and austenite, is a relatively recent development in steel microstructures. Apart from being very strong and tough, the microstructure is hydrogen-tolerant. These characteristics make it well-suited for weld metals. In the current work, an armor-grade quenched and tempered steel was welded such that the fusion zone developed a carbide-free bainitic microstructure. These welds showed very high joint efficiency and ballistic performance compared to those produced, as per the current industrial practice, using austenitic stainless steel fillers. Importantly, these welds showed no vulnerability to cold cracking, as verified using oblique Y-groove tests. The concept of carbide-free bainitic weld metal thus promises many useful new developments in welding of high-strength steels.

  7. Comparison between the electron beam welding and laser welding of steel 15CDV6

    The first experiments to determine the conditions under which a CO2 laser could be used for welding were with high limit elasticity steel presenting good weldability, the 15CDV6 steel. The principal parameters of welding have been examined and sample results have been obtained. The melted zones have been compared with those formerly obtained using electron beams

  8. 75 FR 32911 - Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review: Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes...

    2010-06-10

    ... Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan... circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan. See Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel...

  9. 76 FR 33210 - Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review: Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes...

    2011-06-08

    ... Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan... circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan. See Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel...

  10. Development of welding consumables for wet underwater welding of high-alloy corrosion-resistant steel

    Kakhovskyi, Yurij; Kakhovskyi, Mykola

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses a technology of mechanized wet underwater welding of high-alloy corrosion-resistance steel. The main aim of the investigation is development of self-shielded flux-cored wire for wet underwater welding for the first time in the world practice. A mathematical method of experiment design was used for determination of quantity and quality characteristics. Besides, quantitive and qualitative indices of welding-technological characteristics such as weld metal gas saturation, st...

  11. Friction stir welding of nuclear grade dissimilar steels

    SA508 Class 3 low alloy Mn-Mo-Ni steel is a reactor pressure vessel material, widely used in the world. In the reactors, fuel is arranged in a row of fuel pins and linked with portable control rods. The fuel is in a SA 508 steel container through which water is pumped at a high pressure into reactor vessel via cold lag pipeline. The water to act as both a coolant and a moderator. After absorbing the heat from the core of reactor, pressurised water is passed on a steam generator, via hot lag pipeline. Both hot lag and cold lag pipe lines are made of SS 304 LN steel. These both steels are generally welded by common arc welding process which may causes carbon migration, thermal stress, metallurgical deterioration, residual stress, etc. Friction stir welding (FSW) is a new solid state welding process develop by TWI in 1991 (UK) which generally removed all type of solidification problem. In this study Friction stir welding is performed for welding of SA 508 and SS 304 LN dissimilar steels. Defect free sound weld were produced having strength more than the SS 304 LN steel and toughness more than the SA 508. Microstructure and hardness represents the formation of martensite formation in weld nugget. (author)

  12. Inhibition of the formation of intermetallic compounds in aluminum-steel welded joints by friction stir welding

    Torres López, Edwar A.; Ramirez, Antonio J.

    2015-01-01

    Formation of deleterious phases during welding of aluminum and steel is a challenge of the welding processes, for decades. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has been used in an attempt to reduce formation of intermetallic compounds trough reducing the heat input. In this research, dissimilar joint of 6063-T5 aluminum alloy and AISI-SAE 1020 steel were welded using this technique. The temperature of welded joints was measured during the process. The interface of the welded joints was characterized u...

  13. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of dissimilar stainless steels welded joints

    J. Łabanowski

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the current study is to reveal the influence of welding conditions on structure and stresscorrosion cracking resistance of dissimilar stainless steels butt welded joints.Design/methodology/approach: Butt joints between duplex 2205 and austenitic 316L steels were performedwith the use of submerged arc welding (SAW method. The plates 15 mm in thickness were welded with heatinput in the range of 1.15 – 3.2 kJ/mm using duplex steel filler metal. Microstructure examinations and corrosiontests were carried out. Slow strain rate tests (SSRT were performed in inert (glycerin and aggressive (boiling35% MgCl2 solution environments.Findings: It was shown that place of the lowest resistance to stress corrosion cracking is heat affected zone atduplex steel side of dissimilar joins. That phenomenon was connected with undesirable structure of that zoneconsisted of great amount of coarse ferrite grains and acicular austenite precipitates. High welding inputs do notdeteriorate stress corrosion cracking resistance of welds.Research limitations/implications: High welding heat inputs should enhance the precipitation process ofintermetallic phases in the HAZ. It is necessary to continue the research to determine the relationship betweenwelding parameters, obtained structures, and corrosion resistance of dissimilar stainless steels welded joints.Practical implications: Application of more productive joining process for dissimilar welds like submerged arcwelding instead of currently employed gas metal arc welding (GMAW method will be profitable in terms ofreduction the welding costs.Originality/value: The stress corrosion cracking resistance of dissimilar stainless steel welded joints wasdetermined. The zone of the weaker resistance to stress corrosion cracking was pointed out.

  14. Investigation of aluminum-steel joint formed by explosion welding

    Kovacs-Coskun, T.; Volgyi, B.; Sikari-Nagl, I.

    2015-04-01

    Explosion welding is a solid state welding process that is used for the metallurgical joining of metals. Explosion cladding can be used to join a wide variety of dissimilar or similar metals [1]. This process uses the controlled detonation of explosives to accelerate one or both of the constituent metals into each other in such a manner as to cause the collision to fuse them together [2]. In this study, bonding ability of aluminum and steel with explosion welding was investigated. Experimental studies, microscopy, microhardness, tensile and bend test showed out that, aluminum and steel could be bonded with a good quality of bonding properties with explosion welding.

  15. Characterization of laser weld joints in ASTM A387 grade 91 steel

    Laser welding is a high power - density joining process; well known for its deep penetration, narrow heat affected zone and negligible joint distortion and therefore, it facilitates fabrication of complex structures. ASTM A387 Grade 91 steel is a ferritic/martensitic steel (FMS), which is widely used in super critical thermal power plants as steam generator material. This is also a potential candidate for fast breeder reactor clad material and also forms the basis for development of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (RAFMS), which is an accepted material for fabrication of Test Blanket Material (TBM) for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Joining of this material for fabrication of steam generator is routinely done using conventional welding techniques like TIG, SMAW etc. However, there are many limitations associated with conventional welding techniques due to martensitic transformation of this material while cooling, multiple pass requirements, higher heat input, distortion and soft inter-critical microstructure. Besides, there are geometrical constraints associated with conventional welding processes when it comes to fabricate complex structures with limited access to the joint line. Laser welding is a potential solution to overcome most of these limitations; however, not much work has been reported on laser welding of this material. This paper presents detailed analysis and discussion of the microstructural evolution during laser welding and PWHT of the weld joint and also correlates the same with the experimentally measured mechanical properties of the weld joints

  16. A study on laser welding deformation of 304 stainless steel

    In heavy industries, 304 austenitic stainless steel is the most popular material which is used for nuclear equipment, chemical vessels, vacuum vessels and so on. On the fabrication, not only a joint quality but also severe dimensional accuracy is required. To keep dimensional accuracy, considerable cost and efforts are requested, because the welding deformation of austenitic stainless steel is deeply depended on the physical properties of material itself. To decrease welding deformation, big jigs or water cooling method are commonly used which lead to the high cost. In general, the fusion welding by high energy density heat source results in less distortion. Today, laser welding technology has grown up to the stage that enables to weld thick plate with small deformation. The researches of welding deformation have been conducted intensively, but they are mainly concerned for arc welding, and studies for laser welding are very few. In this report, the authors will show the test results of deformation behavior in laser welding of 304 stainless steel. Also, they will discuss the deformation behavior comparing to that in arc welding. The main results of this study are as follows. 1. The angular distortion of laser welding can be unified by heat input parameter (Hp) which is used for arc welding deformation. 2. The angular distortion are same under the condition of Hp3 in spite of different welding method, however under the condition of Hp>6-9 J/mm3 the angular distortion is quite different depending on the power density of welding method. 3. Pure angular distortion seemed to complete just after welding, but following longitudinal distortion took place for long period. 4. The critical value of longitudinal distortion can be estimated from heat input parameter. The transverse deformation can be also estimated by heat input parameter. (author)

  17. Effect of heat treatment on carbon steel pipe welds

    The heat treatment to improve the altered properties of carbon steel pipe welds is described. Pipe critical components in oil, gasification and nuclear reactor plants require adequate room temperature toughness and high strength at both room and moderately elevated temperatures. Microstructure and microhardness across the welds were changed markedly by the welding process and heat treatment. The presentation of hardness fluctuation in the welds can produce premature failure. A number of heat treatments are suggested to improve the properties of the welds. (author) 8 figs., 5 refs

  18. Weld failure analysis of 2205 duplex stainless steel nozzle

    Jingqiang Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Failure analyses of weld joint between the nozzle and the head of the reactor made of 2205 duplex stainless steel was performed by optical microscopy (OM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Cracks were found in HAZ of the weld. The depth of the cracks is equal to the thickness of the inner weld. Localized uneven distribution of ferrite/austenite with 80–90% ferrite in weld is found. Results show that the cracks occurred along columnar granular with cleavage fracture. Poor weld process probably results in these cracks.

  19. Weld failure analysis of 2205 duplex stainless steel nozzle

    Jingqiang Yang; Qiongqi Wang; Zhongkun Wei; Kaishu Guan

    2014-01-01

    Failure analyses of weld joint between the nozzle and the head of the reactor made of 2205 duplex stainless steel was performed by optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Cracks were found in HAZ of the weld. The depth of the cracks is equal to the thickness of the inner weld. Localized uneven distribution of ferrite/austenite with 80–90% ferrite in weld is found. Results show that the cracks occurred along columnar granular with cleavage fracture. Poor weld process pr...

  20. Evaluation of Stress Intensity Factor of Welded Structural Steel Component

    Sathish T R

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This project work is dedicated to study the influence of welding process on mechanical properties (such as ultimate tensile strength, hardness, and impact toughness of welded structural steel component. In this work three grades of welded structural steel have been developed by using three different grades of electrodes such as E7016, E7018 and E7024. Comparative study has been made between the three grades ofwelded structural steel work pieces. Nondestructive test methods are used to find the quality of the weld. There after mechanical properties have been evaluated experimentally by preparing all specimens as per the ASTM standards. Based on the results of the tests carried out on the welded specimen using the three different grades of electrodes it is observed that the structural steel welded using E7016 grade exhibits better mechanical properties and hence crack resisting capability or fracture toughness. The stress intensity factor for the structural steel welded using E7016 has been evaluated by using the data obtained from the fracture toughness test. The stress intensity factor thus obtained is validated by using FEM.Finally, mini hydraulic excavator bucket has been taken for the static stress analysis in the welded region.

  1. UNS S31603 Stainless Steel Tungsten Inert Gas Welds Made with Microparticle and Nanoparticle Oxides

    Kuang-Hung Tseng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between tungsten inert gas (TIG welding of austenitic stainless steel assisted by microparticle oxides and that assisted by nanoparticle oxides. SiO2 and Al2O3 were used to investigate the effects of the thermal stability and the particle size of the activated compounds on the surface appearance, geometric shape, angular distortion, delta ferrite content and Vickers hardness of the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG weld. The results show that the use of SiO2 leads to a satisfactory surface appearance compared to that of the TIG weld made with Al2O3. The surface appearance of the TIG weld made with nanoparticle oxide has less flux slag compared with the one made with microparticle oxide of the same type. Compared with microparticle SiO2, the TIG welding with nanoparticle SiO2 has the potential benefits of high joint penetration and less angular distortion in the resulting weldment. The TIG welding with nanoparticle Al2O3 does not result in a significant increase in the penetration or reduction of distortion. The TIG welding with microparticle or nanoparticle SiO2 uses a heat source with higher power density, resulting in a higher ferrite content and hardness of the stainless steel weld metal. In contrast, microparticle or nanoparticle Al2O3 results in no significant difference in metallurgical properties compared to that of the C-TIG weld metal. Compared with oxide particle size, the thermal stability of the oxide plays a significant role in enhancing the joint penetration capability of the weld, for the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG welds made with activated oxides.

  2. Influence of shielding gas composition on weld profile in pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of low carbon steel

    Jokar, M.; F MalekGhaini; M J Torkamany; Sheikhi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Weld area and weld depth/width ratio can be considered to be of the most important geometrical factors in pulsed laser welding. The effects of carbon dioxide and oxygen additions to the argon shielding gas on the weld properties in pulsed laser welding of low carbon steel is investigated. Presence of carbon dioxide and oxygen up to 10 and 15 percent respectively decreases the weld geometrical factors. But, at higher levels of additions, the weld geometrical factors will increase. It is observ...

  3. Finite element thermal analysis of the fusion welding of a P92 steel pipe

    A. H. Yaghi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Fusion welding is common in steel pipeline construction in fossil-fuel power generation plants. Steel pipes in service carry steam at high temperature and pressure, undergoing creep during years of service; their integrity is critical for the safe operation of a plant. The high-grade martensitic P92 steel is suitable for plant pipes for its enhanced creep strength. P92 steel pipes are usually joined together with a similar weld metal. Martensitic pipes are sometimes joined to austenitic steel pipes using nickel based weld consumables. Welding involves severe thermal cycles, inducing residual stresses in the welded structure, which, without post weld heat treatment (PWHT, can be detrimental to the integrity of the pipes. Welding residual stresses can be numerically simulated by applying the finite element (FE method in Abaqus. The simulation consists of a thermal analysis, determining the temperature history of the FE model, followed by a sequentially-coupled structural analysis, predicting residual stresses from the temperature history.

    In this paper, the FE thermal analysis of the arc welding of a typical P92 pipe is presented. The two parts of the P92 steel pipe are joined together using a dissimilar material, made of Inconel weld consumables, producing a multi-pass butt weld from 36 circumferential weld beads. Following the generation of the FE model, the FE mesh is controlled using Model Change in Abaqus to activate the weld elements for each bead at a time corresponding to weld deposition. The thermal analysis is simulated by applying a distributed heat flux to the model, the accuracy of which is judged by considering the fusion zones in both the parent pipe as well as the deposited weld metal. For realistic fusion zones, the heat flux must be prescribed in the deposited weld pass and also the adjacent pipe elements. The FE thermal results are validated by comparing experimental temperatures measured by five thermocouples on the

  4. Active weld control

    Powell, Bradley W.; Burroughs, Ivan A.

    1994-01-01

    Through the two phases of this contract, sensors for welding applications and parameter extraction algorithms have been developed. These sensors form the foundation of a weld control system which can provide action weld control through the monitoring of the weld pool and keyhole in a VPPA welding process. Systems of this type offer the potential of quality enhancement and cost reduction (minimization of rework on faulty welds) for high-integrity welding applications. Sensors for preweld and postweld inspection, weld pool monitoring, keyhole/weld wire entry monitoring, and seam tracking were developed. Algorithms for signal extraction were also developed and analyzed to determine their application to an adaptive weld control system. The following sections discuss findings for each of the three sensors developed under this contract: (1) weld profiling sensor; (2) weld pool sensor; and (3) stereo seam tracker/keyhole imaging sensor. Hardened versions of these sensors were designed and built under this contract. A control system, described later, was developed on a multiprocessing/multitasking operating system for maximum power and flexibility. Documentation for sensor mechanical and electrical design is also included as appendices in this report.

  5. Fiber laser welding of AISI 304 stainless steel plates

    Compared with conventional lasers, fiber laser welding is characterized by high melting efficiency, deferent keyhole modes and power density characteristics, which could affect the heat and melt flow of the molten pool during welding. The objective of the present work was to study the fiber laser weldability of 5 mm thick AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel plates; therefore, bead-on-plate welding was exploited on AISI 304 stainless steel plates with different laser powers, welding speeds, defocused distances with different types of shielding gas and their effects on the weld zone geometry and properties and final solidification microstructure at room temperature. Laser power, welding speed and defocused distance have a great effect on the bead appearance and weld zone shape while almost no significant effect on both the type of microstructure and mechanical properties of welds. The microstructure of all laser welds was always austenitic including about 3-5 % ferrite. However, the lower the laser power and/or the higher the welding speed, the finer solidification structure, primary ferrite or mixed-mode solidification resulted in crack-free welds. (author)

  6. Manufacture and characterization of austenitic steel welded joints

    This paper describes the results of the first phase of the project, i.e. manufacturing and characterization of welded austenitic steel and the test matrix adopted to test the mechanical resistance of the welding. Five different welding methods have been tested and characterized in comparison to the parent material. The reference material was an AISI 316 L type steel close to the French Superphenix composition. The results of the mechanical testing and the relative comparison of the five welding methods are described in separate papers of the same session. As a general conclusion, the vacuum electron-beam welding proved to have better properties than the other weld methods and to attain in most cases the properties of the parent material. (author)

  7. Fiber-laser welding for ultra-high tensile strength steel and stainless steel

    Ultra-high tensile strength steel of 980 or 1150 MPa class has been often used for a large scale construction machine with lightweight parts because of transport weight limit. This steel needs its pre-processing before welding and has a tendency of delayed cracking, that requests a high welding technique with qualified welders. Austenitic stainless steel frequency used for nuclear energy related equipments has much strains caused by welding because of a large coefficient of thermal expansion. As a welding with small amount of its heat input and without a large size facility like a vacuum chamber, a fiber-laser welding was chosen to apply to equipments made of ultra-high tensile strength steel and stainless steel. Tensile and bending tests for I-butt and around 2mm root gap welded joints of high strength steel of 980 MPa showed their mechanical properties were similar to those of base metal. I-butt welded joints of high strength steel of 1150 MPa showed similar mechanical properties of base metal but as for root gap welded joint, a filler metal was not available. With filler metal of 980 MPa instead, the welded joints showed similar tensile strength of base metal but a crack occurred at the bending test according to the JIS welding procedure qualification specification. Application of fiber laser welding to stainless steel had been conducted successfully for I-butt welded joints of good penetration up to the plate thickness of 8mm. As an example, T-joint of mercury target vessel for J-PARC was produced by fiber laser welding, that became to apply to other nuclear equipments. (T. Tanaka)

  8. 78 FR 34340 - Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube Products From Turkey: Preliminary Results of...

    2013-06-07

    ... Order; Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube Products from Turkey, 51 FR 17784 (May 15, 1986). The... International Trade Administration Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube Products From Turkey: Preliminary... antidumping duty order on welded carbon steel standard pipe and tube products (welded pipe and tube)...

  9. Properties of bainitic T/P24 steel welded joints

    Examination results of T/P24 steel tube and pipe welded joints are presented, which find their application in conventional power installations for water-walls, headers and superheater tubes. Welded test joints without post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) and after stress relieving have been subjected to examinations and tests. The examination results proof, that PWHT is not necessary for thin-walled tubes made of T24 steel. In the case of thick elements, as the tested P24 steel pipes (φ 406 x 32 mm), PWHT is mandatory, but their application not always ensures the required impact strength 41 J. The decisive influence on the impact strength of welded joints, made in P24 steel pipes, has the bead deposition technique. (author)

  10. Laser welding of stainless steel and manufacturing industrial components

    Both conduction and key-hole laser welding processes are used for industrial manufacturing of stainless steel components, however laser is highly competitive against arc or plasma welding methods only in key-hole processes. The advantages of using laser in conduction model are only limited to the very low thickness sheets. (author)

  11. Characterization of duplex stainless steel weld metals obtained by hybrid plasma-gas metal arc welding

    Koray Yurtisik

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite its high efficiency, autogenous keyhole welding is not well-accepted for duplex stainless steels because it causes excessive ferrite in as-welded duplex microstructure, which leads to a degradation in toughness and corrosion properties of the material. Combining the deep penetration characteristics of plasma arc welding in keyhole mode and metal deposition capability of gas metal arc welding, hybrid plasma - gas metal arc welding process has considered for providing a proper duplex microstructure without compromising the welding efficiency. 11.1 mm-thick standard duplex stainless steel plates were joined in a single-pass using this novel technique. Same plates were also subjected to conventional gas metal arc and plasma arc welding processes, providing benchmarks for the investigation of the weldability of the material. In the first place, the hybrid welding process enabled us to achieve less heat input compared to gas metal arc welding. Consequently, the precipitation of secondary phases, which are known to be detrimental to the toughness and corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels, was significantly suppressed in both fusion and heat affected zones. Secondly, contrary to other keyhole techniques, proper cooling time and weld metal chemistry were achieved during the process, facilitating sufficient reconstructive transformation of austenite in the ferrite phase.

  12. Linear friction welding of AISI 316L stainless steel

    Research highlights: → Linear friction welding is a feasible process for joining AISI316L. → Most welds had tensile strengths superior to the parent material. → Welding parameters had a significant impact on weld microstructure. → Control of microstructure by controlling welding parameters is a process benefit. - Abstract: Linear friction welding is a solid state joining process established as a niche technology for the joining of aeroengine bladed disks. However, the process is not limited to this application, and therefore the feasibility of joining a common engineering austenitic steel, AISI 316L, has been explored. It was found that mechanically sound linear friction welds could be produced in 316L, with tensile properties in most welds exceeding those of the parent material. The mechanical properties of the welds were also found to be insensitive to relatively large changes in welding parameters. Texture was investigated in one weld using high energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Results showed a strong {1 1 1} type texture at the centre of the weld, which is a typical shear texture in face centre cubic materials. Variations in welding parameters were seen to have a significant impact on the microstructures of welds. This was particularly evident in the variation of the fraction of delta ferrite, in the thermo-mechanically affected zone of the welds, with different process parameters. Analysis of the variation in delta ferrite, with different welding parameters, has produced some interesting insights into heat generation and dissipation during the process. It is hoped that a greater understanding of the process could help to make the parameter optimisation process, when welding 316L as well as other materials, more efficient.

  13. Evaluation of cold crack susceptibility on HSLA steel welded joints

    Silverio-Freire Júnior, R. C.; Moura-Maciel, T.; Guedes da Silva, P.

    2003-01-01

    The present study addresses an evaluation of the effect of several welding parameters on cold cracking formation in welded joints of High Strength and Low Alloy steels, as well as the resulting microstructures and hardness values. The main parameters studied include the variation of the preheating temperature, drying time of the electrode, chemical composition and thickness of the base metal. The presence of cold cracking in the joints was analyzed from Tekken tests using steel plates made of...

  14. Challenges in Resistance Welding of Ultra High Strength Steels

    Tolf, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the use of Ultra High Strength Steels (UHSS) in vehicle bodystructures is important for reducing weight and cutting CO2 emissions. This thesis investigates challenges in resistance welding that can be a barrier to implementing UHSS as a replacement for low strength steels in vehicle structures. Empirical research has been performed to offer new approaches for improved joint strength and to increase knowledge on cracking mechanisms in resistance projection welding and resistance spo...

  15. The Effect of Welding Current and Composition of Stainless steel on the Panetration in GTAW

    Ramazan Yılmaz; Turgay Tehçi

    2012-01-01

    In this study, welding was performed on the plates of two different types of AISI 316 and AISI 316Ti austenitic stainless steels by GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) without using welding consumable in flat position. Automatic GTAW welding machine was used to control and obtain the exact values. The effects of welding currents used in welding process and the compositions of the stainless steels materials on the penetration were investigated. Weld bead size and shape such as bead width and dept ...

  16. Microstructure Evolution during Friction Stir Spot Welding of TRIP Steel

    Lomholt, Trine Colding; Pantleon, Karen; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the feasibility of friction stir spot welding of TRIP steel is investigated. In addition to manufacturing successful welds, the present study aims at a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms occurring at the (sub)micron scale during friction stir spot welding. As one of the main...... parameters to control friction stir welding, the influence of the rotational speed of the tool was investigated. Three different rotational speeds (500 rpm, 1000 rpm and 1500 rpm, respectively) were applied. The microstructure of the welded samples was investigated with reflected light microscopy, scanning...... electron microscopy, and electron backscatter diffraction. Microhardness measurements and lap-shear tensile tests completed the investigations of the welded samples and allow evaluation of the quality of the welds....

  17. Low temperature friction stir welding of P91 steel

    Prasad Rao Kalvala

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bead-on-plate friction stir welds were made on P91 alloy with low and high rotational speeds (100 and 1000 RPM to study their effects on weld microstructural changes and impression creep behavior. Temperatures experienced by the stir zone were recorded at the weld tool tip. Different zones of welds were characterized for their microstructural changes, hardness and creep behavior (by impression creep tests. The results were compared with submerged arc fusion weld. Studies revealed that the stir zone temperature with 100 RPM was well below Ac1 temperature of P91 steel while it was above Ac3 with 1000 RPM. The results suggest that the microstructural degradation in P91 welds can be controlled by low temperature friction stir welding technique.

  18. Comparison of Post Weld Treatment of High Strength Steel Welded Joints in Medium Cycle Fatigue

    Pedersen, Mikkel Melters; Mouritsen, Ole Ø.; Hansen, Michael Rygaard;

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of three post-weld treatments for fatigue life improvement of welded joints. The objective is to determine the most suitable post-weld treatment for implementation in mass production of certain crane components manufactured from very high-strength steel. The...... the stress range can exceed the yield-strength of ordinary structural steel, especially when considering positive stress ratios (R > 0). Fatigue experiments and qualitative evaluation of the different post-weld treatments leads to the selection of TIG dressing. The process of implementing TIG dressing...... in mass production and some inherent initial problems are discussed. The treatment of a few critical welds leads to a significant increase in fatigue performance of the entire structure and the possibility for better utilization of very high-strength steel....

  19. Microstructural characterization in dissimilar friction stir welding between 304 stainless steel and st37 steel

    Jafarzadegan, M. [Department of Materials Eng., Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, School of Materials Science and Eng., Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box: 150001, Harbin (China); Feng, A.H. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, School of Materials Science and Eng., Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box: 150001, Harbin (China); Abdollah-zadeh, A., E-mail: zadeh@modares.ac.ir [Department of Materials Eng., Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saeid, T. [Advanced Materials Research Center, Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box: 51335-1996, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shen, J. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, School of Materials Science and Eng., Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box: 150001, Harbin (China); Assadi, H. [Department of Materials Eng., Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    In the present study, 3 mm-thick plates of 304 stainless steel and st37 steel were welded together by friction stir welding at a welding speed of 50 mm/min and tool rotational speed of 400 and 800 rpm. X-ray diffraction test was carried out to study the phases which might be formed in the welds. Metallographic examinations, and tensile and microhardness tests were used to analyze the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joint. Four different zones were found in the weld area except the base metals. In the stir zone of the 304 stainless steel, a refined grain structure with some features of dynamic recrystallization was evidenced. A thermomechanically-affected zone was characterized on the 304 steel side with features of dynamic recovery. In the other side of the stir zone, the hot deformation of the st37 steel in the austenite region produced small austenite grains and these grains transformed to fine ferrite and pearlite and some products of displacive transformations such as Widmanstatten ferrite and martensite by cooling the material after friction stir welding. The heat-affected zone in the st37 steel side showed partially and fully refined microstructures like fusion welding processes. The recrystallization in the 304 steel and the transformations in the st37 steel enhanced the hardness of the weld area and therefore, improved the tensile properties of the joint. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FSW produced sound welds between st37 low carbon steel and 304 stainless steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SZ of the st37 steel contained some products of allotropic transformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The material in the SZ of the 304 steel showed features of dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The finer microstructure in the SZ increased the hardness and tensile strength.

  20. Influence of weld discontinuities on strain controlled fatigue behavior of 308 stainless steel weld metal

    Detailed investigations have been performed for assessing the importance of weld discontinuities in strain controlled low cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of 308 stainless steel (SS) welds. The LCF behavior of 308 SS welds containing defects was compared with that of type 304 SS base material and 308 SS sound weld metal. Weld pads were prepared by shielded metal arc welding process. Porosity and slag inclusions were introduced deliberately into the weld metal by grossly exaggerating the conditions normally causing such defects. Total axial strain controlled LCF tests have been conducted in air at 823 K on type 304 SS base and 308 SS sound weld metal employing strain amplitudes in the range from ±0.25 to ±0.8 percent. A single strain amplitude of ±0.25 percent was used for all the tests conducted on weld samples containing defects. The results indicated that the base material undergoes cyclic hardening whereas sound and defective welds experience cyclic softening. Base metal showed higher fatigue life than sound weld metal at all strain amplitudes. The presence of porosity and slag inclusions in the weld metal led to significant reduction in life. Porosity on the specimen surface has been found to be particularly harmful and caused a reduction in life by a factor of seven relative to sound weld metal

  1. Investigation on fracture toughness of laser beam welded steels

    Laser beam welding is currently used in the welding of a variety of structural materials including hot and cold rolled steels, high strength low alloy and stainless steels, aluminium and titanium alloys, refractory and high temperature alloys and dissimilar materials. This high power density welding process has unique advantages of cost effectiveness, low distortion, high welding speed, easy automation, deep penetration, narrow bead width, and narrow HAZ compared to the conventional fusion welding processes. However, there is a need to understand the deformation and fracture properties of laser beam weld joints in order to use this cost effective process for fabrication of structural components fully. In the present study, an austenitic stainless steel, X5CrNi18 10 (1.4301) and a ferritic structural steel, RSt37-2 (1.0038), with a thickness of 4 mm were welded by 5 kW CO2 laser process. Microhardness measurements were conducted to determine the hardness profiles of the joints. Flat micro-tensile specimens were extracted from the base metal, fusion zone, and heat affected zone of ferritic joint to determine the mechanical property variation across the joint and the strength mismatch ratio between the base metal and the fusion zone. Moreover, fracture mechanics specimens were extracted from the joints and tested at room temperature to determine fracture toughness, Crack Tip Opening Displacement (CTOD), of the laser beam welded specimens. The effect of the weld region strength mis-matching on the fracture toughness of the joints have been evaluated. Crack initiation, crack growth and crack deviation processes have also been examined. These results were used to explain the influence of mechanical heterogeneity of the weld region on fracture behaviour. This work is a part of the ongoing Brite-Euram project Assessment of Quality of Power Beam Weld Joints (ASPOW). (orig.)

  2. Weld bead center line shift during laser welding of austenitic stainless steels with different sulfur content

    The magnitude of the shift in position of the maximum depth of penetration, the center line shift (CLS), for a laser weld produced between two heats of austenitic stainless steels with large differences in S content was smaller relative to gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds made with both higher and lower heat inputs. The results of this study suggest that both surface tension driven fluid (Marangoni) flow effects and arc shift effects may contribute to the CLS in GTA welding

  3. THE INFLUENCE OF POSTHEAT TREATMENT ON FERRITE REDISTRIBUTION IN DUPLEX STEELS ELECTRON BEAM WELDS

    Zita Iždinská; František Kolenič

    2009-01-01

    The duplex stainless steel is two-phase steel with the structure composed of austenite and ferrite with optimum austenite/ferrite proportion 50%. At present, classical arc processes for welding duplex steels are generally regarded as acceptable. On the other hand electron and laser beam welding is up to now considered less suitable for welding duplex steels. The submitted work presents the results of testing various thermal conditions at welding duplex stainless steel with electron beam. It w...

  4. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    Hovanski, Yuri; Santella, M. L.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2009-12-28

    Friction stir spot welding was used to join two advanced high-strength steels using polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tooling. Numerous tool designs were employed to study the influence of tool geometry on weld joints produced in both DP780 and a hot-stamp boron steel. Tool designs included conventional, concave shouldered pin tools with several pin configurations; a number of shoulderless designs; and a convex, scrolled shoulder tool. Weld quality was assessed based on lap shear strength, microstructure, microhardness, and bonded area. Mechanical properties were functionally related to bonded area and joint microstructure, demonstrating the necessity to characterize processing windows based on tool geometry.

  5. Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of dissimilar stainless steel welds

    J. Łabanowski

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine the influence of welding on microstructure, mechanical properties, and stress corrosion cracking resistance of dissimilar stainless steels butt welded joints.Design/methodology/approach: Duplex 2205 and austenitic 316L steels were used. Butt joints of plates 15 mm in thickness were performed with the use of submerged arc welding (SAW) method. The heat input was in the range of 1.15 – 3.2 kJ/mm. Various plates’ edge preparation...

  6. ATOM PROBE MICROANALYSIS OF WELD METAL IN A SUBMERGED ARC WELDED CHROMIUM-MOLYBDENUM STEEL

    Josefsson, B.; Kvist, A.; Andrén, H.

    1987-01-01

    A submerged arc welded 2.25Cr - 1Mo steel has been investigated using electron microscopy and atom probe field ion microscopy. The bainitic microstructure of the as-welded steel consisted of ferrite and martensite. During heat treatment at 690°C the martensite transformed to ferrite and cementite and needle-shaped (Cr,Mo)2C carbides precipitated. Together with a substantial decrease in dislocation density, this resulted in an improvement of the toughness.

  7. Inclusions in steel coated electrodes welds of car body

    Tomasz WĘGRZYN; Michał MIROS

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this project (BK-284/RT1/2007) is to chose the proper method of car body welding. SMAW could be treated as the main method used in the transport industry. Properties of metal weld deposits depend on many conditions. This paper attempts to study first of all the role of oxide inclusion sites on the transformation austenite->acicular ferrite in steel weld metal deposits and their toughness. Properties of metal weld deposits depend on the amount of acicular ferrite in them. For good ...

  8. Welding of duplex and super-duplex stainless steels

    After a recall of the commercial designation of duplex or super-duplex steels (22-27% Cr, 4-8% Ni, 0.1-0.3% N with or without Mo (1.5-4%)) and of some metallurgical properties (phase diagrams, microstructure, ferrite determination, heat treatment and aging), welding technologies are synthetically presented (advantages-disadvantages of each process, metals filler, parameters of the welding processes, heat treatments after welding, cleaning, passivation, properties (mechanical, corrosion resistance) of the welded pieces). (A.B.). 28 refs. 5 figs., 15 tabs., 1 annexe

  9. Study of Mechanical Properties and Characterization of Pipe Steel welded by Hybrid (Friction Stir Weld + Root Arc Weld) Approach

    Lim, Yong Chae [ORNL; Sanderson, Samuel [MegaStir Technologies LLC; Mahoney, Murray [Consultant; Wasson, Andrew J [ExxonMobil, Upstream Research Company (URC); Fairchild, Doug P [ExxonMobil, Upstream Research Company (URC); Wang, Yanli [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has recently attracted attention as an alternative construction process for gas/oil transportation applications due to advantages compared to fusion welding techniques. A significant advantage is the ability of FSW to weld the entire or nearly the entire wall thickness in a single pass, while fusion welding requires multiple passes. However, when FSW is applied to a pipe or tube geometry, an internal back support anvil is required to resist the plunging forces exerted during FSW. Unfortunately, it may not be convenient or economical to use internal backing support due to limited access for some applications. To overcome this issue, ExxonMobil recently developed a new concept, combining root arc welding and FSW. That is, a root arc weld is made prior to FSW that supports the normal loads associated with FSW. In the present work, mechanical properties of a FSW + root arc welded pipe steel are reported including microstructure and microhardness.

  10. Field welding of hydraulic turbines made of martensitic stainless steels

    Akhtar, A.

    1982-06-15

    Field welding of hydraulic turbines made of 13 Cr-Ni martensitic stainless steels was investigated. Two shielded metal arc welding electrodes, one containing 15 Cr-25 Ni and the other with 50% cobalt, were studied with respect to the criteria of weldability, structural integrity and cavitation erosion resistance. The cavitation erosion resistance of the 15 Cr-25 Ni material, evaluated with an ultrasonic vibratory test method, was found to be poor, being comparable to that of mild steel. Although the 50% cobalt alloy possesses excellent cavitation erosion properties, its cost is ca 10 times higher than that of austenitic stainless steels. Under certain welding conditions, the 50% cobalt alloy produces a hard interface with the martensitic stainless steel base material. These interfaces were systematically investigated using microhardness measurement and scanning electron microscopy. The interfaces between the base metal and the weld deposits as well as that between the two weld metals were subjected to measurements of Charpy impact energy, corrosion fatigue tests and an elastoplastic fracture mechanics analysis. It is concluded that the presence of the hard zone is not detrimental to structural integrity. A field welding procedure is proposed on the basis of these findings. The shallow cavitation damaged areas may be repaired with the 50% cobalt containing material. The cheaper 15 Cr-25 Ni material may be used for the filling of deep cavitation damaged areas and for the repair of cracks followed by an overlay of 50% cobalt weld metal. 20 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Effect of welding parameters on the mechanical properties of GMA-welded HY-80 steels

    In this publication, investigations of HY-80 steels joined by gas metal arc welding by using different welding parameters are described. Different samples obtained from the welded joints were subjected to mechanical testing by means of tensile, hardness and impact toughness tests. The tensile test results showed that the strength of weld metal and heat affected zone were higher than of base metal. Similar Charpy impact toughness test results were obtained for weld metal and heat affected zone. Weld metal hardness was almost similar to the base metal hardness, nevertheless, the heat affected zone indicated higher values. The base metal has ferritic-perlitic structure with fine grains. Martensite needles and bainite are seen in the heat affected zone. Weld metal has martensite needles, partial bainite and residual austenite.

  12. Assessment of Hot Crack Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2003-01-01

    given. Results from the solidification rate measurements had high variations. They do not show an expected correlation between the crack resistance and the solidification rate. The employment of pulsed seam welds is assessed not to be usable in the present measurement method. From evaluation of several......Crack testing concerning small and fast solidifying laser welds in austenitic stainless steel has been studied. A set of methods has been applied to investigate alloy properties, including (1) Application of known information to predict solidification phases, (2) Weld metal solidification rate...... crack tests, the Weeter spot weld test has been chosen to form a basis for the development of a practicable method to select specific alloys for welding applications. A new test, the Groove weld test was developed, which has reduced the time consumption and lightened the analysis effort considerably...

  13. Property of laser welded bake-hardening steel in tailored blanks for automobile

    Matsui, F.; Shibao, M.; Yoshida, N.; Hirose, A.; Kobayashi, K.F. [Dept. of Mfg. Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan); Shibata, K.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, H. [Material Research Lab. Nissan Research Center, Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. 1, Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    The behavior of bake-hardening of the laser weldment was investigated. The bake-hardening steel(BH steel) was welded with Nd:YAG laser followed by plastic deformation and subsequent heat-treatment. Then the influence of laser welding on the behavior of bake-hardening was investigated. The hardness of the laser weld metal significantly increased after welding. After the plastic deformation, both the base metal and weld metal became harder by work-hardening. The heat treatment resulted in more increment of hardness in both the base metal and weld metal by bake-hardening. The amount of bake-hardening reached a maximum value at the plastic strain of 5% or more. We modified a kinetic equation proposed for predicting the strength of a low-carbon bake-hardening steel and applied to the estimation of hardness of the base metal and weld metal. The calculated hardness values agree with the experimental data. The calculated activation energy for bake-hardening was that for diffusion of carbon and nitrogen atoms in {alpha}-Fe. Thus the hardening is thought to be governed by diffusion of these solute atoms. (orig.)

  14. Friction stir welding of F82H steel for fusion applications

    Noh, Sanghoon; Ando, Masami; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Fujii, Hidetoshi; Kimura, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, friction stir welding was employed to join F82H steels and develop a potential joining technique for a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. The microstructures and mechanical properties on the joint region were investigated to evaluate the applicability of friction stir welding. F82H steel sheets were successfully butt-joined with various welding parameters. In welding conditions, 100 rpm and 100 mm/min, the stirred zone represented a comparable hardness distribution with a base metal. Stirred zone induced by 100 rpm reserved uniformly distributed precipitates and very fine ferritic grains, whereas the base metal showed a typical tempered martensite with precipitates on the prior austenite grain boundary and lath boundary. Although the tensile strength was decreased at 550 °C, the stirred zone treated at 100 rpm showed comparable tensile behavior with base metal up to 500 °C. Therefore, friction stir welding is considered a potential welding method to preserve the precipitates of F82H steel.

  15. EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH OF THE DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL WELDS IN SHIPBUILDING

    Juraga, Ivan; Stojanović, Ivan; Ljubenkov, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Duplex stainless steel is used in shipbuilding increasingly because of its good mechanical properties and marked corrosion resistance. This steel has a two phase structure (austenite-ferrite) which is sensitive on heat input during welding because of the possible ferritisation appearance, that is, increase in ferrite content in the area of heat effected zone (HAZ) which can lead to loss of mechanical and corrosion properties. Work with duplex stainless steel requires special attention in ever...

  16. The welding technique of thick-walled stainless steel pipes in Qinshan Ii expansion project

    The paper introduces the welding techniques of thick-walled stainless steel pipes in Qinshan II Expansion Project, which also analyses the main factors affected the weld quality in installation process, and introduces the control methods in preparation period before welding, welding products as well as welding distortion and welding stress. The article proposes solutions to quality problems of welding deformation, dislocating distortion, and lack of groove uniformity. By adopting rational welding sequence, witness point management technique, welding simulation technique, and stress distribution promotion by local patching, the welding quality can be warranted, so as to promote the development of thick-walled pipe welding technique. (authors)

  17. Research on the properties of laser welded joints of aluminum killed cold rolled steel

    阎启; 曹能; 俞宁峰

    2002-01-01

    Aluminum killed cold rolled steel used for automobiles was welded shows that high quality of welding can be realized at welding speed of laser welded joints for aluminum killed cold rolled steel increased compared to those of the base metal while the formability decreased. Forming limit diagram of joint material indicated that the laser weld seam should avoid the maximum deformation area of automobile parts during the designing period for the position of weld seam.

  18. YAG laser welding of neutron irradiated stainless steels

    Type 304L stainless steel plates of 8 mm thickness irradiated in a boiling water reactor (BWR) to 1.2 x 025 n/m2 (E > 1.0 MeV) containing 9 appm helium from transmutation have been successfully welded using a high power Nd-YAG laser under conditions of both continuous wave (CW) and pulse modes. Unirradiated type 316L stainless steel plate was lap welded to the irradiated type 304L stainless steel plate under heat inputs ranging from 240 to 540 J/cm. Bead on plate welding was carried out under the same welding conditions as lap welding. Tensile tests of lap welded joints were conducted at room temperature. All joints fractured not in the irradiated materials but in the unirradiated materials and showed good mechanical properties. Based on these results it does not appear that helium affects the mechanical properties of joints. Small grain boundary cracks were observed in HAZ of the weld made by the CW YAG laser with heat inputs of 480 and 540 J/cm and crack length decreased with decreasing heat input. (orig.)

  19. Residual stress relief in MAG welded joints of dissimilar steels

    This paper addresses the relief of residual stress in welded joints between austenitic and non-alloyed ferritic-pearlitic steels. A series of similar and dissimilar steel joints based on the 18G2A (ferritic-pearlitic) and 1H18N10T (austenitic) steels were produced, some of which were stress relieved by annealing and some by mechanical prestressing. For the as-welded and stress relieved test joints the residual stresses were measured by trepanning. To aid the interpretation of these results, 2D plane stress finite element analysis has been performed to simulate the residual stress relieving methods. Analysis of the results has shown that thermal stress relieving of welded joints between dissimilar steels is not effective and may even increase residual stresses, due to the considerable difference in thermal expansion of the joined steels. It was found that, for the loads imposed, the effectiveness of the mechanical stress relieving of dissimilar steel welded joints was much lower than that of similar steel joints

  20. Effect of welding process on the microstructure and properties of dissimilar weld joints between low alloy steel and duplex stainless steel

    Wang, Jing; Lu, Min-xu; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Wei; Xu, Li-ning; Hu, Li-hua

    2012-06-01

    To obtain high-quality dissimilar weld joints, the processes of metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding for duplex stainless steel (DSS) and low alloy steel were compared in this paper. The microstructure and corrosion morphology of dissimilar weld joints were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM); the chemical compositions in different zones were detected by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS); the mechanical properties were measured by microhardness test, tensile test, and impact test; the corrosion behavior was evaluated by polarization curves. Obvious concentration gradients of Ni and Cr exist between the fusion boundary and the type II boundary, where the hardness is much higher. The impact toughness of weld metal by MIG welding is higher than that by TIG welding. The corrosion current density of TIG weld metal is higher than that of MIG weld metal in a 3.5wt% NaCl solution. Galvanic corrosion happens between low alloy steel and weld metal, revealing the weakness of low alloy steel in industrial service. The quality of joints produced by MIG welding is better than that by TIG welding in mechanical performance and corrosion resistance. MIG welding with the filler metal ER2009 is the suitable welding process for dissimilar metals jointing between UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel and low alloy steel in practical application.

  1. Optimisation of welding procedures for duplex and superduplex stainless steels

    Austenitic stainless steels are increasingly being replaced by duplex grades that can offer similar corrosion resistance with far higher strength. This increased strength makes it possible to reduce material consumption whilst also decreasing transport and construction costs. Although established welding methods used for austenitic steels can be used for duplex steels, modification of the procedures can lead to improved results. This paper reviews the welding of duplex stainless steel and examines precautions that may be required. The advantages and disadvantages of different welding methods are highlighted and some high productivity solutions are presented. The application of a more efficient process with a high deposition rate (e.g. flux- cored arc welding) can decrease labour costs. Further close control of heat input and interpass temperature can result in more favourable microstructures and final properties. Although welding adversely affects the corrosion resistance of austenitic and duplex stainless steels, particularly the pitting resistance, relative to the parent material, this problem can be minimised by proper backing gas protection and subsequent pickling.

  2. Welding of stainless steel clad fuel rods for nuclear reactors

    This work describes the obtainment of austenitic stainless steel clad fuel rods for nuclear reactors. Two aspects have been emphasized: (a) obtainment and qualification of AISI 304 and 304 L stainless steel tubes; b) the circumferential welding of pipe ends to end plugs of the same alloy followed by qualification of the welds. Tubes with special and characteristic dimensions were obtained by set mandrel drawing. Both, seamed and seamless tubes of 304 and 304 L were obtained.The dimensional accuracy, surface roughness, mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of the tubes were found to be adequate. The differences in the properties of the tubes with and without seams were found to be insignificant. The TIG process of welding was used. The influence of various welding parameters were studied: shielding gas (argon and helium), welding current, tube rotation speed, arc length, electrode position and gas flow. An inert gas welding chamber was developed and constructed with the aim of reducing surface oxidation and the heat affected zone. The welds were evaluated with the aid of destructive tests (burst-test, microhardness profile determination and metallographic analysis) and non destructive tests (visual inspection, dimensional examination, radiography and helium leak detection). As a function of the results obtained, two different welding cycles have been suggested; one for argon and another for helium. The changes in the microstructure caused by welding have been studied in greater detail. The utilization of work hardened tubes, permitted the identification by optical microscopy and microhardness measurements, of the different zones: weld zone; heat affected zone (region of grain growth, region of total and partial recrystallization) and finally, the zone not affected by heat. Some correlations between the welding parameters and metallurgical phenomena such as: solidification, recovery, recrystallization, grain growth and precipitation that occurred

  3. Intergranular corrosion resistance of 304 stainless steel welded junctions for BWR piping

    Intergranular corrosion of stainless steel pipings has been noticed in welded areas in almost every boiling water nuclear power plants so as to attract the attention of safety authorities. The research activity developed during more than one decade allowed to apply and qualify a series of provisions aiming at assuring the tensio-corrosion resistence and satisfying the strigent limitations imposed by control authorities. Results achieved by ENEL in cooperation with CISE concerning the study of origin materials, made on mockups of 4'' to 8'' welded tubings and weldings of BWR plants

  4. Microstructure Evolution during Friction Stir Spot Welding of TRIP steel

    Lomholt, Trine Colding

    Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels have been developed for automotive applications due to the excellent high strength and formability. The microstructure of TRIP steels is a complex mixture of various microstructural constituents; ferrite, bainite, martensite and retained austenite...... deteriorating the uniform elongation. The unique deformation properties can be exploited in automotive applications for crash resistant parts due to the high energy absorption, thus improving passenger safety. Furthermore, the high strength and good formability permits the application of thinner sheet material...... Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) is investigated. The aim of the study is to assess whether high quality welds can be produced and, in particular, to obtain an understanding of the microstructural changes during welding. The microstructure of the welded samples was investigated by means of reflected light...

  5. Characterization of fiber laser welds in X100 pipeline steel

    Recent developments in steel grades for pipeline applications have lead to new high strength grades, such as API5L-X100. Higher strength enables the use of thinner walled pipe, with greater operating pressures and reduced overall costs. The base material presents good toughness values; however there are still limitations regarding the weldability of this material. Research is needed to develop appropriate welding procedures, avoiding typical problems like: cold cracking and toughness reduction in the weld area, and to achieve high productivity and economical feasibility. In the present paper an X100 steel grade welded by high power fiber lasers and TIG is studied and the microstructures developed are analysed aiming to contribute to a better understanding of the transformations induced in this material by the thermal cycle associated with fusion welding.

  6. PRESS FORMABILITY OF YAG LASER WELDED TRIP STEEL SHEETS

    A.Nagasaka

    2002-01-01

    The effects of YAG laser welding conditions on mechanical properties and pressformability (bendability, stretch-formability and deep drawability) of high-strengthtransformation-induced plasticity-aided dual-phase (TDP) steel were investigated.Tensile tests and press forming tests have been conducted for laser butt welded jointsbetween two pieces of the same steel. The tensile property and press formability wereaffected by the welding speed of 100 to 1100mm/min and the energy of 6 to 9J/pulse.Excellent press formability was obtained with the energy of 6J/pulse and the weldingspeed of 300mm/min. It was concluded that the excellent weldability of the TDP steelcan be ascribed to the weld joint formation.

  7. 75 FR 53714 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan

    2010-09-01

    ... imports of stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan (53 FR 9787). On February 23, 1993, Commerce issued an antidumping duty order on imports of stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Korea (58 FR... on imports of stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, Korea, and Taiwan (65 FR...

  8. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    2012-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. Revision 4 updates...

  9. Effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel

    Han, Wentuo, E-mail: hanwentuo@hotmail.com [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kimura, Akihiko [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Tsuda, Naoto [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Serizawa, Hisashi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Chen, Dongsheng [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Je, Hwanil [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Fujii, Hidetoshi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Ha, Yoosung [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Morisada, Yoshiaki [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Noto, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    The weldability of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels is a critical obstructive in the development and use of these steels. Friction stir welding has been considered to be a promising way to solve this problem. The main purpose of this work was to reveal the effects of mechanical force on grain structures of friction stir welded ODS ferritic steel. The grain appearances and the misorientation angles of grain boundaries in different welded zones were investigated by the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Results showed that the mechanical force imposed by the stir tool can activate and promote the recrystallization characterized by the transformation of boundaries from LABs to HABs, and contribute to the grain refinement. The type of recrystallization in the stir zone can be classified as the continuous dynamic recrystallization (CDRX)

  10. First results of laser welding of neutron irradiated stainless steel

    First results of experimental investigations on the laser reweldability of neutron irradiated material are reported. These experiments include the manufacture of 'heterogeneous' joints, which means joining of irradiated stainless steel of type AISI 316L-SPH to 'fresh' unirradiated material. The newly developed laser welding facility in the ECN Hot Cell Laboratory and experimental procedures are described. Visual inspections of welded joints are reported as well as results of electron microscopy and preliminary metallographic examinations. (orig.)

  11. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Copper and Mild Steel

    Daniel T; Timotius P; Maziar R

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, copper and mild steel were welded using a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. To determine the weldablity factor, tests are needed to provide information on mechanical strength, potential defects in structure, and nature of failure. Mechanical testing included transverse tensile tests, micro hardness tests, and bend tests. The results for the transverse tensile test revealed failure occurred at the copper heat affected zone (HAZ) with an ultimate tensile strength of 220MPa...

  12. Through penetration laser welding of steels of different classes

    Peculiarities of laser welding with through melting of 09G2S, 10GN2MFA, 22K and 08Kh18N10T steels have been studied. It is established that increased content of nonmetal inclusions and gases in base metal promotes the void formation in welded joints. It is shown, that during increase of radiation power density by 15-30% as compared with a value necessary for through melting, the number of voids decreases

  13. Feasibility of underwater friction stir welding of HY-80 steel

    Stewart, William Chad

    2011-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The purpose of this thesis is to determine the feasibility of underwater friction stir welding (FSW) of high-strength; quench and temper low carbon steels that are susceptible to hydrogen-assisted cracking (HAC). The specific benefits of underwater FSW would be weld repairs of ship and submarine control surfaces and hulls without the need for drydocking and extensive environmental control procedures. A single tool of polycrystallin...

  14. Experimental evaluation of mechanical properties of friction welded AISI steels

    Amit Handa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an experimental setup was designed and fabricated in order to accomplish friction welded joints between austenitic stainless steel and low-alloy steel. Thereafter, the effect of axial pressures on the mechanical properties of friction welded AISI 304 with AISI 1021 steels, produced by mechanical joining, have been investigated. Samples were welded under different axial pressures ranging from 75 to 135 MPa, at constant speed of 1250 rpm. The tensile strength, impact strength, and micro-hardness values of the weldments were determined and evaluated. Simultaneously, the fractrography of the tensile-tested specimens were carried out, so as to understand the failure analysis.

  15. Weld oxide formation on lean duplex stainless steel

    Westin, E.M. [Outokumpu Stainless, Avesta Research Centre, P.O. Box 74, SE-774 22 Avesta (Sweden)], E-mail: elin.westin@outokumpu.com; Olsson, C.-O.A. [Outokumpu Stainless, Avesta Research Centre, P.O. Box 74, SE-774 22 Avesta (Sweden); Hertzman, S. [Outokumpu Stainless Research Foundation, Brinellvaegen 23, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2008-09-15

    Weld oxides have a strong influence on corrosion resistance, but have hitherto only been studied to a limited extent for duplex stainless steels. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has here been used to study heat tint formed on gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds on the commercial duplex grades LDX 2101 (EN 1.4162/UNS S32101) and 2304 (EN 1.4362/UNS S32304) welded with and without nitrogen additions to the shielding gas. The process of heat tint formation is discussed in terms of transport phenomena to explain the effect of atmosphere, temperature and composition. The oxides formed were found to be enriched in manganese and corrosion testing shows that nitrogen has a strong influence on the weld oxide. A mechanism is proposed including evaporation from the weld pool and subsequent redeposition.

  16. Weld oxide formation on lean duplex stainless steel

    Weld oxides have a strong influence on corrosion resistance, but have hitherto only been studied to a limited extent for duplex stainless steels. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has here been used to study heat tint formed on gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds on the commercial duplex grades LDX 2101 (EN 1.4162/UNS S32101) and 2304 (EN 1.4362/UNS S32304) welded with and without nitrogen additions to the shielding gas. The process of heat tint formation is discussed in terms of transport phenomena to explain the effect of atmosphere, temperature and composition. The oxides formed were found to be enriched in manganese and corrosion testing shows that nitrogen has a strong influence on the weld oxide. A mechanism is proposed including evaporation from the weld pool and subsequent redeposition

  17. Stainless steel welding and semen quality

    Jelnes, J E; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.

    1988-01-01

    mutagenic activity and metal concentration; blood for metal concentrations, immunoglobulin G, total protein, and measures of genotoxicity in lymphocytes; and semen was evaluated by standard semen analysis. Results of the semen evaluation, presented here, showed no difference in semen quality between welders......Questionnaire studies of patients from fertility clinics suggest that welders may have an increased risk of reduced semen quality. In this study, welders and nonwelders from the same plants were asked to provide blood, urine, and semen samples. Urine was analyzed for chromium and nickel, and for...... and nonwelders. Because the metal dust exposure of nonwelders in the plant may be higher than that in the general population, welders were also compared to referents not working in the metal industry. Again, no decrease in semen quality associated with welding was demonstrated....

  18. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    Patterson, Erin E.; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2016-06-01

    This work focuses on the microstructural characterization of aluminum to steel friction stir welded joints. Lap weld configuration coupled with scribe technology used for the weld tool have produced joints of adequate quality, despite the significant differences in hardness and melting temperatures of the alloys. Common to friction stir processes, especially those of dissimilar alloys, are microstructural gradients including grain size, crystallographic texture, and precipitation of intermetallic compounds. Because of the significant influence that intermetallic compound formation has on mechanical and ballistic behavior, the characterization of the specific intermetallic phases and the degree to which they are formed in the weld microstructure is critical to predicting weld performance. This study used electron backscatter diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Vickers micro-hardness indentation to explore and characterize the microstructures of lap friction stir welds between an applique 6061-T6 aluminum armor plate alloy and a RHA homogeneous armor plate steel alloy. Macroscopic defects such as micro-cracks were observed in the cross-sectional samples, and binary intermetallic compound layers were found to exist at the aluminum-steel interfaces of the steel particles stirred into the aluminum weld matrix and across the interfaces of the weld joints. Energy dispersive spectroscopy chemical analysis identified the intermetallic layer as monoclinic Al3Fe. Dramatic decreases in grain size in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and weld zones that evidenced grain refinement through plastic deformation and recrystallization. Crystallographic grain orientation and texture were examined using electron backscatter diffraction. Striated regions in the orientations of the aluminum alloy were determined to be the result of the severe deformation induced by the complex weld tool geometry. Many of the textures observed in the weld

  19. Residual stresses associated with welds in austenitic steel

    Two exploratory welds have been made with AISI 316 austenitic steel and Armex GT electrodes by the manual metal-arc process, and residual stress measurements made in the as-welded condition and after various periods of stress relief. The results show that substantial stress relief occurs at temperatures of 8500 and 7500C after 1 hr, but is not complete. The stress distributions are compared with those obtained from ferritic welds and the effect of differences in thermal expansion coefficients is examined using finite element analysis. (author)

  20. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    Patterson, Erin E.; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2016-03-01

    This work focuses on the microstructural characterization of aluminum to steel friction stir welded joints. Lap weld configuration coupled with scribe technology used for the weld tool have produced joints of adequate quality, despite the significant differences in hardness and melting temperatures of the alloys. Common to friction stir processes, especially those of dissimilar alloys, are microstructural gradients including grain size, crystallographic texture, and precipitation of intermetallic compounds. Because of the significant influence that intermetallic compound formation has on mechanical and ballistic behavior, the characterization of the specific intermetallic phases and the degree to which they are formed in the weld microstructure is critical to predicting weld performance. This study used electron backscatter diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Vickers micro-hardness indentation to explore and characterize the microstructures of lap friction stir welds between an applique 6061-T6 aluminum armor plate alloy and a RHA homogeneous armor plate steel alloy. Macroscopic defects such as micro-cracks were observed in the cross-sectional samples, and binary intermetallic compound layers were found to exist at the aluminum-steel interfaces of the steel particles stirred into the aluminum weld matrix and across the interfaces of the weld joints. Energy dispersive spectroscopy chemical analysis identified the intermetallic layer as monoclinic Al3Fe. Dramatic decreases in grain size in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and weld zones that evidenced grain refinement through plastic deformation and recrystallization. Crystallographic grain orientation and texture were examined using electron backscatter diffraction. Striated regions in the orientations of the aluminum alloy were determined to be the result of the severe deformation induced by the complex weld tool geometry. Many of the textures observed in the weld

  1. Reliability assessment of welded steel details in bridges using inspection

    Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Yalamas, T.;

    2014-01-01

    membrane stresses are estimated using a generic bridge structure and traffic measurements. The optimal reliability level for a welded detail in a bridge subjected to fatigue are estimated by cost benefit-analysis taking into account the risk of human lives through the Life Quality Index. Since the optimal......This paper presents a bilinear two-dimensional probabilistic fracture mechanics model for fatigue crack growth in welded steel details. The model takes besides membrane stresses also the influence of misalignments and bending stresses in the welded detail into account. The distribution of the...

  2. Solidification cracking in austenitic stainless steel welds

    V Shankar; T P S Gill; S L Mannan; S Sundaresan

    2003-06-01

    Solidification cracking is a significant problem during the welding of austenitic stainless steels, particularly in fully austenitic and stabilized compositions. Hot cracking in stainless steel welds is caused by low-melting eutectics containing impurities such as S, P and alloy elements such as Ti, Nb. The WRC-92 diagram can be used as a general guide to maintain a desirable solidification mode during welding. Nitrogen has complex effects on weld-metal microstructure and cracking. In stabilized stainless steels, Ti and Nb react with S, N and C to form low-melting eutectics. Nitrogen picked up during welding significantly enhances cracking, which is reduced by minimizing the ratio of Ti or Nb to that of C and N present. The metallurgical propensity to solidification cracking is determined by elemental segregation, which manifests itself as a brittleness temperature range or BTR, that can be determined using the varestraint test. Total crack length (TCL), used extensively in hot cracking assessment, exhibits greater variability due to extraneous factors as compared to BTR. In austenitic stainless steels, segregation plays an overwhelming role in determining cracking susceptibility.

  3. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel core internal weld

    Microstructural analyses by several advanced metallographic techniques were conducted on austenitic stainless steel mockup and core shroud welds that cracked in boiling water reactors. Contrary to previous beliefs, heat-affected zones of the cracked Type 304L as well as 304 SS core shroud welds and mockup shielded-metal-arc welds were free of grain-boundary carbides, which shows that core shroud failure cannot be explained by classical intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Neither martensite nor delta-ferrite films were present on grain boundaries. However, as a result of exposure to weld fumes, the heat-affected zones of the core shroud welds were significantly contaminated by oxygen and fluorine which migrate to grain boundaries. Significant oxygen contamination seems to promote fluorine contamination and suppress thermal sensitization. Results of slow-strain-rate tensile tests indicate also that fluorine exacerbate the susceptibility of irradiated steels to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. These observations, combined with previous reports on the strong influence of weld flux, indicate that oxygen and fluorine contamination and fluorine-catalyzed stress corrosion play a major role in cracking of core shroud welds

  4. Cold cracks in the welding of alloy-treated steels

    Cold shortness is one of the most frequent causes of failure when alloy-treated steels are welded. It occurs in different forms, but distinguishes itself by the fact that its appearance is directly associated with the welding process and exhibits predominantly an intercrystalline form which shows a typical formation especially under a raster electron microscope. The purpose of this paper is to describe experience of the subject of cold shortness of alloy-treated steels, to explain the appearances of these cold cracks in their various forms, to elucidate the causes of the occurrence of such cracks and to postulate possible remedial measures. (orig.)

  5. Cold cracks in the welding of alloy-treated steels

    Cerjak, H.; Breckwoldt, E.; Loehberg, R.; Schmidt, J.; Papouschek, F.

    1982-04-01

    Cold shortness is one of the most frequent causes of failure when alloy-treated steels are welded. It occurs in different forms, but distinguishes itself by the fact that its appearance is directly associated with the welding process and exhibits predominantly an intercrystalline form which shows a typical formation especially under a raster electron microscope. The purpose of this paper is to describe experience of the subject of cold shortness of alloy-treated steels, to explain the appearances of these cold cracks in their various forms, to elucidate the causes of the occurrence of such cracks and to postulate possible remedial measures.

  6. Effect on spot welding variables on nugget size and bond strength of 304 austenitic stainless steel

    Resistance spot welding (RSW) has revolutionized mechanical assembly in the automotive industry since its introduction in the early 1970s. Currently, one mechanical assembly in five is welded using spot welding technology, with welding of stainless steel sheet becoming increasingly common. Consequently, this research paper examines the spot welding of 2 mm thick 304 austenitic stainless steel sheet. The size of a spot weld nugget is primarily determined by the welding parameters: welding current, welding time, electrode force and electrode tip diameter However, other factors such as electrode deformation, corrosion, dissimilar materials and material properties also affect the nugget size and shape. This paper analyzes only the effects of current, weld time and force variations with unchanged electrode tip diameter. A pneumatically driven 75kVA spot welder was used to accomplish the welding process and the welded samples were subjected to tensile, hardness and metallurgical testing to characterize the size and shape of the weld nugget and the bond strength.

  7. Toughness of welded stainless steels sheets for automotive industry

    E. Bayraktar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In the automotive industry, more and more it is compulsory to develop new grades of stainless steels, such as high resistant Martensitic Stainless Steels (MA-SS and Ferritic Stainless Steels (FSS in order to realise certain or many complex deep drawn pieces. For these grades, resistance spot welding (RSW is the most widespread process used largely for many parts of the car body in the automotive industry. This paper aims to characterise mechanical behaviour (toughness of the different steel grades under dynamic test conditions.Design/methodology/approach: A special crash test device is used in different temperatures and the simulated crash tests are performed at a constant speed of 5.52 m/s.Findings: The specimen is submitted to impact tensile test at different temperatures. According to testing temperature, fracture mode varies: At low temperatures, brittle fracture occurs: due to stress concentration, fracture always occurs in the notched section. At high temperatures, the specimen fails by ductile fracture. Toughness of the steel sheets (base metals, BM or welded parts is well compared at different materials and test conditions.Research limitations/implications: Evaluation of welded thin sheets submitted to the dynamic loading in order to correlate in real service conditions in order to realize a useful correlation between the transition temperature and deep drawability can be used for evaluating of the welding conditions and also of the material characteristics. For detail study, this type of the test needs a standard formulation.Practical implications: This is a new conception of specimen and of the impact/crash machine. It is widely used in automotive industry for practical and economic reason to give rapid answers to designer and also steel makers for ranking the materials.Originality/value: New developed test called impact crash test for evaluating the toughness of thin welded joints (tailored blanks / mechanical assemblies in

  8. Evaluation of welding by MIG in martensitic stainless steel; Avaliacao da soldagem pelo processo MIG em aco inoxidavel martensitico

    Fernandes, M.A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil); Mariano, N.A.; Marinho, D.H.C. Marinho, E-mail: neideaparecidamariano@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Alfenas (UNIFAL), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    This work evaluated structure's characterization and mechanical properties after the welding process of the stainless steel CA6NM. The employed welding process was the metal active gas with tubular wire. The control of the thermal cycle in the welding process has fundamental importance regarding the properties of the welded joint, particularly in the thermally affected zone. The mechanical properties were appraised through impact resistance tests and the hardness and microstructure through metallographic characterization and Ray-X diffraction. The parameters and the process of welding used promoted the hardness and toughness appropriate to the applications of the steel. Welding energy's control becomes an essential factor that can affect the temperature of carbide precipitation and the nucleation of the retained austenite in the in the region of the in the thermally affected zone. (author)

  9. The lean duplex stainless steel welded joint after isothermal aging heat treatment

    Z. Brytan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is the microstructural evaluation of the lean duplex stainless steel UNS S32101 (EN 1.4162 welded joints after isothermal aging heat treatment at 650°C. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD was applied in the microstructural analysis.Design/methodology/approach: The welding joints were produced using the metal active gas (MAG method where the filler metal was in wire form grade Avesta LDX 2101. During the process a shielding gas mixture of Ar + 2.5% CO2 was applied and as a forming gas pure technical argon was used.Findings: The welded joint in the as-welded condition shows Cr2N nitride precipitation in the HAZ, while isothermal aging at 650°C for 15 min causes further precipitation of nitrides, both in the parent metal, as well as in the HAZ and the weld area. Increasing the aging time at this temperature to 90 min causes the formation of numerous nitrides at the grain boundaries of austenite and ferrite and nitride precipitation inside ferritic grains in each zone of the welded joint.Research limitations/implications: The electron backscatter diffraction of particular zones of the welded joints considered only austenite and ferrite and their character was evaluated, while small precipitates like chromium nitrides were omitted in this study and will be evaluated in the further work.Originality/value: Sometimes the production cycle involves the heat treatment of welded components made of lean duplex stainless steel. In such situations the additional heating of the welds and heat affected zone can produce carbides, nitrides or sigma phase precipitation - the extent of which depends on the temperature and time of heat treatment. These issues are widely reported in relation to the base material but not when considering welded joints, which may behave differently

  10. Overlaid and rolled clad steel using high efficiency welding technique

    Stainless steel clad steel plates have been used widely as the economical material with excellent corrosion resistance, but since the environment of their use has become severe, the higher reliability of joining has been demanded. In these clad steel plates, generally the thickness of coating more than 2 mm is used, but in the structures subjected to mild corrosion, the plates with coating thinner than 1 mm are demanded. The overlaying and rolling method reported in this paper was developed to meet such demand, and by the use of super-wide electrodes, the process is efficient and economical. The thickness of coating can be controlled freely to 10 μm or more. The coating and parent materials are fused perfectly by overlaying welding, accordingly, the reliability of joining is very high. In this method, the coating material is overlaid by Maglay welding method on the surface of a slab, then it is hot-rolled. The features and principle of the Maglay welding method, and the properties of welded metal are reported. SUS 309 L was overlaid on a SM 41A slab of 90 mm thickness by two layers of 5 mm, and the slab was rolled to 18 mm. As the result, the mechanical properties and microstructure were satisfactory. This method can be applied to more complex forms other than plates. The mechanical properties of the welded joints of this clad plates were also examined. (Kako, I.)

  11. Alloying element vaporization during laser spot welding of stainless steel

    Alloying element loss from the weld pool during laser spot welding of stainless steel was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experimental work involved determination of work-piece weight loss and metal vapour composition for various welding conditions. The transient temperature and velocity fields in the weld pool were numerically simulated. The vaporization rates of the alloying elements were modelled using the computed temperature profiles. The fusion zone geometry could be predicted from the transient heat transfer and fluid flow model for various welding conditions. The laser power and the pulse duration were the most important variables in determining the transient temperature profiles. The velocity of the liquid metal in the weld pool increased with time during heating and convection played an increasingly important role in the heat transfer. The peak temperature and velocity increased significantly with laser power density and pulse duration. At very high power densities, the computed temperatures were higher than the boiling point of 304 stainless steel. As a result, evaporation of alloying elements was caused by both the total pressure and the concentration gradients. The calculations showed that the vaporization occurred mainly from a small region under the laser beam where the temperatures were very high. The computed vapour loss was found to be lower than the measured mass loss because of the ejection of tiny metal droplets owing to the recoil force exerted by the metal vapours. The ejection of metal droplets has been predicted by computations and verified by experiments

  12. Optimizing resistance spot welding parameters for vibration damping steel sheets

    Oberle, H. [Centre de Recherches et Developpements Metallurgiques, Sollac (France); Commaret, C.; Minier, C. [Automobiles Citroeen PSA (France); Magnaud, R. [Direction des Methodes Carrosserie, Renault (France); Pradere, G. [Materials Engineering Dept., Renault (France)

    1998-01-01

    In order to meet the growing demand for functionality and comfort in vehicles, weight and quietness are major concerns for carmakers and materials suppliers. Noise reduction by damping vibrations can meet both aspects. Therefore, steelmakers have developed vibration damping steel sheets (VDSS), which are a three-layer composite material composed of two steel sheets sandwiching a viscoelastic resin core. Industrial use of VDSS in automobiles usually implies the product can be resistance welded. The intent of this investigation is to set up rules to optimize resistance spot welding of VDSS. Two phenomena are the focus of this research: the reduction of blistering and gas expulsion holes. Different aspects are studied, such as the effect of polymer presence and of electrode shape on welding domain and the evaluation of the influence of a welding schedule on blistering and expulsion holes. It appears that polymer presence has no effect on domain width, but does on its position. Higher frequency of expulsion holes with truncated electrodes can be explained with mechanical considerations. From the influence of short circuit voltage, current delay angle and welding schedule on the frequency of gas expulsion holes, a mechanism responsible for expulsion holes is proposed and optimal welding parameters are given.

  13. Numerical simulation and experimental investigation of laser dissimilar welding of carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel

    Nekouie Esfahani, M. R.; Coupland, J.; Marimuthu, S.

    2015-07-01

    This study reports an experimental and numerical investigation on controlling the microstructure and brittle phase formation during laser dissimilar welding of carbon steel to austenitic stainless steel. The significance of alloying composition and cooling rate were experimentally investigated. The investigation revealed that above a certain specific point energy the material within the melt pool is well mixed and the laser beam position can be used to control the mechanical properties of the joint. The heat-affected zone within the high-carbon steel has significantly higher hardness than the weld area, which severely undermines the weld quality. A sequentially coupled thermo-metallurgical model was developed to investigate various heat-treatment methodology and subsequently control the microstructure of the HAZ. Strategies to control the composition leading to dramatic changes in hardness, microstructure and service performance of the dissimilar laser welded fusion zone are discussed.

  14. YAG laser welding with surface activating flux

    樊丁; 张瑞华; 田中学; 中田一博; 牛尾诚夫

    2003-01-01

    YAG laser welding with surface activating flux has been investigated, and the influencing factors and mechanism are discussed. The results show that both surface activating flux and surface active element S have fantastic effects on the YAG laser weld shape, that is to obviously increase the weld penetration and D/W ratio in various welding conditions. The mechanism is thought to be the change of weld pool surface tension temperature coefficient, thus, the change of fluid flow pattern in weld pool due to the flux.

  15. A Study of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Grade 91 Steel A-TIG Weld Joint

    Arivazhagan, B.; Vasudevan, M.

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, A-TIG welding was carried out on grade 91 steel plates of size 220 × 110 × 10 mm using the in-house developed activated flux to produce butt-joints. The room-temperature impact toughness of the A-TIG as-welded joint was low due to the presence of untempered martensite matrix despite the low microinclusion density caused by activated flux and also low δ-ferrite (Toughness after postweld heat treatment (PWHT) at 760 °C-2 h was 20 J as against the required value of 47 J as per the specification EN: 1557:1997. However, there was a significant improvement in impact toughness after PWHT at 760 °C for 3 h. The improvement in toughness was attributed to softening of martensite matrix caused by precipitation of carbides due to tempering reactions. The precipitates are of type M23C6, and they are observed at grain boundary as well as within the grains. The A-TIG-processed grade 91 steel weld joint was found to meet the toughness requirements after PWHT at 760 °C-3 h. Observations of fracture surfaces using SEM revealed that the as-welded joint failed by brittle fracture, whereas post-weld heat-treated weld joints failed by decohesive rupture mode.

  16. Tensile Strength of Welded Steel Tubes : First Series of Experiments

    Rechtlich, A

    1928-01-01

    The purpose of the experiments was to determine the difference in the strength of steel tubes welded by different methods, as compared with one another and also with unwelded, unannealed tubes, including; moreover, a comparison of the results obtained by experienced and inexperienced welders.

  17. Microstructure and fatigue properties of Mg-to-steel dissimilar resistance spot welds

    Highlights: ► Mg/steel dissimilar spot weld had the same fatigue strength as Mg/Mg similar weld. ► Crack propagation path of Mg/Mg and Mg/steel welds was the same. ► Penetration of Zn into the Mg base metal led to crack initiation of Mg/steel weld. ► HAZ weakening and stress concentration led to crack initiation of Mg/Mg weld. -- Abstract: The structural application of lightweight magnesium alloys in the automotive industry inevitably involves dissimilar welding with steels and the related durability issues. This study was aimed at evaluating the microstructural change and fatigue resistance of Mg/steel resistance spot welds, in comparison with Mg/Mg welds. The microstructure of Mg/Mg spot welds can be divided into: base metal, heat affected zone and fusion zone (nugget). However, the microstructure of Mg/steel dissimilar spot welds had three different regions along the joined interface: weld brazing, solid-state joining and soldering. The horizontal and vertical Mg hardness profiles of Mg/steel and Mg/Mg welds were similar. Both Mg/steel and Mg/Mg welds were observed to have an equivalent fatigue resistance due to similar crack propagation characteristics and failure mode. Both Mg/steel and Mg/Mg welds failed through thickness in the magnesium sheet under stress-controlled cyclic loading, but fatigue crack initiation of the two types of welds was different. The crack initiation of Mg/Mg welds was occurred due to a combined effect of stress concentration, grain growth in the heat affected zone (HAZ), and the presence of Al-rich phases at HAZ grain boundaries, while the penetration of small amounts of Zn coating into the Mg base metal stemming from the liquid metal induced embrittlement led to crack initiation in the Mg/steel welds.

  18. Laser beam welding of new ultra-high strength and supra-ductile steels

    Dahmen, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Ultra-high strength and supra-ductile are entering fields of new applications. Those materials are excellent candidates for modern light-weight construction and functional integration. As ultra-high strength steels the stainless martensitic grade 1.4034 and the bainitic steel UNS 53835 are investigated. For the supra-ductile steels stand two high austenitic steels with 18 and 28 % manganese. As there are no processing windows an approach from the metallurgical base on is required. Adjusting the weld microstructure the Q+P and the QT steels require weld heat treatment. The HSD steel is weldable without. Due to their applications the ultra-high strength steels are welded in as-rolled and strengthened condition. Also the reaction of the weld on hot stamping is reflected for the martensitic grades. The supra-ductile steels are welded as solution annealed and work hardened by 50%. The results show the general suitability for laser beam welding.

  19. Hydrogen effects in duplex stainless steel welded joints - electrochemical studies

    Michalska, J.; Łabanowski, J.; Ćwiek, J.

    2012-05-01

    In this work results on the influence of hydrogen on passivity and corrosion resistance of 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) welded joints are described. The results were discussed by taking into account three different areas on the welded joint: weld metal (WM), heat-affected zone (HAZ) and parent metal. The corrosion resistance was qualified with the polarization curves registered in a synthetic sea water. The conclusion is that, hydrogen may seriously deteriorate the passive film stability and corrosion resistance to pitting of 2205 DSS welded joints. The presence of hydrogen in passive films increases corrosion current density and decreases the potential of the film breakdown. It was also found that degree of susceptibility to hydrogen degradation was dependent on the hydrogen charging conditions. WM region has been revealed as the most sensitive to hydrogen action.

  20. Effect of Pulsed Nd: YAG Laser Powers On 304 Stainless Steel Welding

    In this study, optimum welding parameters are obtained for 1mm thickness type 304 stainless steel welding using the Lumonics JK760TR pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The influences of laser welding parameters such as pulse duration, focal position, frequency, laser power, welding speed, and shielding gas (N2) pressure on penetration defining welding quality are investigated. Also comparisons of overlap ratios are presented between theory and experiment for pulse duration, frequency and welding speed

  1. Fracture toughness of a welded super duplex stainless steel

    Pilhagen, Johan, E-mail: pilhagen@kth.se [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Sieurin, Henrik [Scania CV AB, Södertälje (Sweden); Sandström, Rolf [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-06-01

    Fracture toughness testing was conducted on standard single-edge notched bend bar specimens of base and weld metal. The material was the SAF 2906 super duplex stainless steel. The aim was to evaluate the susceptibility for brittle failure at sub-zero temperatures for the base and weld metal. The base metal was tested between −103 and −60 °C and was evaluated according to the crack-tip opening displacement method. The fracture event at and below −80 °C can be described as ductile until critical cleavage initiation occurs, which caused unstable failure of the specimen. The welding method used was submerged arc welding with a 7 wt% nickel filler metal. The welded specimens were post-weld heat treated (PWHT) at 1100 °C for 20 min and then quenched. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis showed that during PWHT substitutional element partitioning occurred which resulted in decreased nickel content in the ferrite. The PWHT weld metal specimens were tested at −72 °C. The fracture sequence was critical cleavage fracture initiation after minor crack-tip blunting and ductile fracture.

  2. Inclusions in steel coated electrodes welds of car body

    Tomasz WĘGRZYN

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this project (BK-284/RT1/2007 is to chose the proper method of car body welding. SMAW could be treated as the main method used in the transport industry. Properties of metal weld deposits depend on many conditions. This paper attempts to study first of all the role of oxide inclusion sites on the transformation austenite->acicular ferrite in steel weld metal deposits and their toughness. Properties of metal weld deposits depend on the amount of acicular ferrite in them. For good toughness over a range of temperatures, metal weld deposits should have a high amount of acicularferrite. Different basic and rutile electrodes were used in order to obtain different asdeposited weld compositions. Impact toughness tests of various deposits were carried out. The microstructure of the welds with different oxygen levels, the inclusion size distribution and approximate chemical composition of inclusions are characterized. Mostobservations and measurements were done with a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The result of the present study implies that it is advantageous to keep oxygen contents in basic and rutile deposits as low as possiblewhen well-developed microstructures of acicular ferrite are desired.

  3. Fracture toughness of a welded super duplex stainless steel

    Fracture toughness testing was conducted on standard single-edge notched bend bar specimens of base and weld metal. The material was the SAF 2906 super duplex stainless steel. The aim was to evaluate the susceptibility for brittle failure at sub-zero temperatures for the base and weld metal. The base metal was tested between −103 and −60 °C and was evaluated according to the crack-tip opening displacement method. The fracture event at and below −80 °C can be described as ductile until critical cleavage initiation occurs, which caused unstable failure of the specimen. The welding method used was submerged arc welding with a 7 wt% nickel filler metal. The welded specimens were post-weld heat treated (PWHT) at 1100 °C for 20 min and then quenched. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis showed that during PWHT substitutional element partitioning occurred which resulted in decreased nickel content in the ferrite. The PWHT weld metal specimens were tested at −72 °C. The fracture sequence was critical cleavage fracture initiation after minor crack-tip blunting and ductile fracture

  4. Welding stainless steels for structures operating at liquid helium temperature

    Superconducting magnets for fusion energy reactors require massive monolithic stainless steel weldments which must operate at extremely low temperatures under stresses approaching 100 ksi (700 MPa). A three-year study was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing heavy-section welds having usable levels of strength and toughness at 4.20K for fabrication of these structures in Type 304LN plate. Seven welding processes were evaluated. Test weldments in full-thickness plate were made under severe restraint to simulate that of actual structures. Type 316L filler metal was used for most welds. Welds deposited under some conditions and which solidify as primary austenite have exhibited intergranular embrittlement at 4.20K. This is believed to be associated with grain boundary metal carbides or carbonitrides precipitated during reheating of already deposited beads by subsequent passes. Weld deposits which solidify as primary delta ferrite appear immune. Through use of fully austenitic filler metals of low nitrogen content under controlled shielded metal arc welding conditions, and through use of filler metals solidifying as primary delta ferrite where only minimum residuals remain to room temperature, welds of Type 316L composition have been made with 4.2K yield strength matching that of Type 304LN plate and acceptable levels of soundness, ductility and toughness

  5. Inhibition of the formation of intermetallic compounds in aluminum-steel welded joints by friction stir welding

    Formation of deleterious phases during welding of aluminum and steel is a challenge of the welding processes, for decades. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has been used in an attempt to reduce formation of intermetallic compounds trough reducing the heat input. In this research, dissimilar joint of 6063-T5 aluminum alloy and AISI-SAE 1020 steel were welded using this technique. The temperature of welded joints was measured during the process. The interface of the welded joints was characterized using optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Additionally, composition measurements were carried out by X-EDS and DRX. The experimental results revealed that the maximum temperature on the joint studied is less than 360 degree centigrade. The microstructural characterization in the aluminum-steel interface showed the absence of intermetallic compounds, which is a condition attributed to the use of welding with low thermal input parameters. (Author)

  6. Research on Welding Test of Grey Cast Iron and Low-Carbon Steel

    2002-01-01

    Grey cast iron's welding itself is a complex proble m.So proper welding materials must be selected,complex welding techniques such as preheating before weldingslow cooling after welding etc,should be taken. However the carbon component in low-carbon steel is comparatively low,the carbo n of welded joint will diffuse to the low-carbon steel when it is welded with gr ey cast iron,which will cause the component of carbon greatly increased at the low-carbon steel side in HAZ,high carbon martensite and cracks ...

  7. The Investigation of Laser Lap Welding Process on High-Strength Galvanized Steel Sheets

    Shiquan Zhou; Yi Zhao; Zhenguo Peng; Fangjie Ren

    2011-01-01

    The development of automobile steel was analyzed in this paper; it is pointed out that high-strength galvanized steel will be widely used in the car body structure. By analyzing welding problems about the dual phase (DP) series of high-strength galvanized steel, the importance of laser welding was concerned. Finally, laser lap welding process technology of high-strength galvanized steel was studied; the results show that the lap weld with welding process smooth and spatter-free as well as bea...

  8. Cold Cracking Of Underwater Wet Welded S355G10+N High Strength Steel

    Fydrych D.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Water as the welding environment determines some essential problems influencing steel weldability. Underwater welding of high strength steel joints causes increase susceptibility to cold cracking, which is an effect of much faster heat transfer from the weld area and presence of diffusible hydrogen causing increased metal fragility. The paper evaluates the susceptibility to cold cracking of the high strength S355G10+N steel used, among others, for ocean engineering and hydrotechnical structures, which require underwater welding. It has been found from the CTS test results that the investigated steel is susceptible to cold cracking in the wet welding process.

  9. Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of dissimilar stainless steel welds

    J. Łabanowski

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine the influence of welding on microstructure, mechanical properties, and stress corrosion cracking resistance of dissimilar stainless steels butt welded joints.Design/methodology/approach: Duplex 2205 and austenitic 316L steels were used. Butt joints of plates 15 mm in thickness were performed with the use of submerged arc welding (SAW method. The heat input was in the range of 1.15 – 3.2 kJ/mm. Various plates’ edge preparations were applied. Microstructure examinations were carried out. Mechanical properties were evaluated in tensile tests, bending tests and Charpy-V toughness tests. Susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking was determined with the use of slow strain rate tests (SSRT performed in inert (glycerin and aggressive (boiling 35% MgCl2 solution environments.Findings: All tested joints showed acceptable mechanical properties. Metallographic examinations did not indicate the excessive ferrite contents in heat affected zones (HAZ of the welds. It was shown that area of the lowest resistance to stress corrosion cracking is heat affected zone at duplex steel side of dissimilar joins. That phenomenon is connected with undesirable structure of that zone consisted of greater amounts of coarse ferrite grains and acicular austenite precipitates. High heat inputs do not deteriorate mechanical properties as well as stress corrosion cracking resistance of welds.Practical implications: All tested joints showed acceptable mechanical properties. Metallographic examinations did not indicate the excessive ferrite contents in heat affected zones (HAZ of the welds. It was shown that area of the lowest resistance to stress corrosion cracking is heat affected zone at duplex steel side of dissimilar joins. That phenomenon is connected with undesirable structure of that zone consisted of greater amounts of coarse ferrite grains and acicular austenite precipitates. High heat inputs do not deteriorate

  10. The effect of activating fluxes in TIG welding by using Anova for SS 321

    Akash.B.Patel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gas tungsten arc welding is fundamental in those industries where it is important to control the weld bead shape and its metallurgical characteristics. However, compared to the other arc welding process, the shallow penetration of the TIG welding restricts its ability to weld thick structures in a single pass (~ 2 mm for stainless steels, thus its productivity is relativity low. This is why there have been several trials to improve the productivity of the TIG welding. The use of activating flux in TIG welding process is one of such attempts. In this study, first, the effect of each TIG welding parameters on the weld’s joint strength was shown and then, the optimal parameters were determined using the Taguchi method with L9 (9 orthogonal array. SiO2 and TiO2 oxide powders were used to investigate the effect of activating flux on the TIG weld mechanical properties of 321austenitic stainless steel. The experimental results showed that activating flux aided TIG welding has increased the weld penetration, tending to reduce the width of the weld bead. The SiO2 flux produced the most noticeable effect. Furthermore, the welded joint presented better tensile strength and hardness.

  11. Application of the crack tip opening displacement method (COD) to the study of steel welded joints

    The C.O.D. method was applied to steel welded plates (steel 15 MDV-4-05 intended for pressure vessels). In order to select a welding technique, the impact strength of various welded joints at different temperatures was compared with the respective value of C.O.D. for notches located in the melted zone or in the heat affected zone

  12. Weldability prediction of high strength steel S960QL after weld thermal cycle simulation

    M. Dunđer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents weld thermal cycle simulation of high strength steel S960QL, and describes influence of cooling time t8/5 on hardness and impact toughness of weld thermal cycle simulated specimens. Furthermore, it presents analysis of characteristic fractions done by electron scanning microscope which can contribute to determination of welding parameters for S960QL steel.

  13. 46 CFR 54.25-25 - Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82).

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements of 46 CFR 57.03-1(d) apply to welded pressure vessels and non-pressure vessel type tanks of... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-25 Welding...

  14. Brittle failure resistance of steels and weld metals for pressure vessels

    The effects of hydrogen introduced into a welded joint particularly from moisture of filler material used during welding of heavy gage steels are followed. The results are compared with the effects of hydrogen introduced by controlled electrolytic hydrogenization as a simulation of the hydrogen diffusion from cooling water into welded joints during the reactor operation. The quality of welded joints is shown to be unfavourably influenced by combined effects of hydrogen embrittlement and phosphorus segregation along grain boundaries. The optimum annealing for regeneration can be effectively performed at temperatures about 500 deg C, when the intergranular concentration of phosphorus and sulphur is minimum and the hydrogen content decreases depending on the temperature and activity of surrounding environment. (author)

  15. Superplastic solid state welding steel and copper alloy based on laser quenching of steel surface

    ZHANG Ke-ke; HAN Cai-xia; QUAN Shu-li; CHENG Guang-hui; YANG Jie; YANG Yun-lin

    2005-01-01

    Based on the feasibility of isothermal superplastic solid state welding of steel and copper alloy, the welded surface of steel surface was ultra-fined through laser quenching, and then the welding process tests between different base metals of 40Cr and QCr0.5 were made under the condition of non vacuum and non shield gas. The experimental results show that, with the sample surface of steel after laser quenching and that of copper alloy carefully cleaned, and under the pre-pressed stress of 56.6 -84.9 MPa, at the welding temperature of 750 -800 ℃ and at initial strain rate of (2.5 - 7.5) × 10-4 s-1 , the solid state welding can be finished in 120 - 180 s so that the strength of the joint is up to that of QCr0.5 base metal and the expansion rate of the joint does not exceed 6%. The plastic deformation of the joint was further analysed. The superplastic deformation of the copper alloy occurs in welding process and the deformation of steel are little.

  16. Weld pool development during GTA and laser beam welding of Type 304 stainless steel

    In part I of the paper, the results of the heat flow and the fluid flow analysis were presented. Here, in Part II of the paper, predictions of the computational model are verified by comparing the numerically predicted and experimentally observed fusion zone size and shape. Stationary gas tungsten arc and laser beam welds were made on Type 304 stainless steel for different times to provide a variety of solidification conditions such as cooling rate and temperature gradient. Calculated temperatures and cooling rates are correlated with the experimentally observed fusion zone structure. In addition, the effect of sulfur on GTA weld penetration was quantitatively evaluated by considering two heats of 304 stainless steel containing 90 and 240 ppm sulfur. Sulfur, as expected, increased the depth/width ratio by altering the surface tension gradient driven flow in the weld pool

  17. Microstructure of welded and weld-simulated modified 9Cr-1Mo (P 91) ferritic steel

    Within the last 30 years significant advances in materials development have been made which have enhanced the operation temperature of thermal power plants led to an improvement in efficiency. Currently, a great deal of work relating to the modified 9% Cr-1/5 Mo steel (P 91) is in progress. This type of steel was originally considered to be an appropriate candidate for Fast Breeder Applications, and it was designed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Up to the present, several modifications of 9% chromium steels have been developed in several labs all over the globe containing different portions of tungsten and molybdenum. This report focuses on the microstructural characterization of a heavy section multi pass weld done on a tube composed of P 91 steel. Weld simulations, using the Gleeble 1500 technology, were successfully applied to aid the microstructural study of the heat affected zone (HAZ). As revealed by the investigations, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) results in a softening of the heat affected zone in an area close to the uninfluenced base metal. According to the observed microstructure and Gleeble simulations, the peak temperature of the soft zone during welding falls within a temperature range between AC1 (= 810 C) and slightly above AC3 typically 900--930 C which was discovered for the first time in a previous investigation

  18. Microstructure of welded and weld-simulated modified 9Cr-1Mo (P 91) ferritic steel

    Prader, R.; Cerjak, H. [Graz Univ. of Technology (Austria); David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Within the last 30 years significant advances in materials development have been made which have enhanced the operation temperature of thermal power plants led to an improvement in efficiency. Currently, a great deal of work relating to the modified 9% Cr-1/5 Mo steel (P 91) is in progress. This type of steel was originally considered to be an appropriate candidate for Fast Breeder Applications, and it was designed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Up to the present, several modifications of 9% chromium steels have been developed in several labs all over the globe containing different portions of tungsten and molybdenum. This report focuses on the microstructural characterization of a heavy section multi pass weld done on a tube composed of P 91 steel. Weld simulations, using the Gleeble 1500 technology, were successfully applied to aid the microstructural study of the heat affected zone (HAZ). As revealed by the investigations, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) results in a softening of the heat affected zone in an area close to the uninfluenced base metal. According to the observed microstructure and Gleeble simulations, the peak temperature of the soft zone during welding falls within a temperature range between A{sub C1} (= 810 C) and slightly above A{sub C3} typically 900--930 C which was discovered for the first time in a previous investigation.

  19. Exploring the electrodes alignment and mushrooming effects on weld geometry of dissimilar steels during the spot welding process

    Nachimani Charde

    2014-12-01

    The class two of RWMA electrode caps has very common applicationpurpose for the welding of steels and withstand for high thermal application on wrought cast. It has been experimentally used to weld carbon and stainless steels up to 900 weld attempts using AC waveform, C-type JPC 75 kVA, Japanese made spot welder. So the electrode alignments and resulting mushrooming effects are finally analysed in this research as well as the weld geometry of dissimilar (carbon and stainless) steels. When considering such weld joints, the heat imbalances are very interesting factors on spot welding research and therefore I have simulated the dissimilar weld joints using Ansys 14. Initially, it was simulated and later those results are compared with real welded samples. The common welded regions such as: fusion zones, heat affected zones, heat extended zones and base metals are all well-noticed for carbon steel sides but not for stainless steel sides. Besides, the electrode mushrooming effect on both sides of electrodes are not parallel deterioration and it has some demerits on internal structure indeed. Some of the dissimilar welded samples and electrode caps are eventually underwent metallurgical test to identify the improper alignment.

  20. Gas saturation of weld metal in underwater welding of the 12H18N10T stainless steel

    Kakhovskyi, Mykola Yu.; Maksimov, Serhii Yu.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of water environment on the physical and metallurgical processes of the underwater welding is being considered. The aim of the performed studies was to identify the influence of water environment on the gas content in the weld metal made with the flux-cored wire in wet underwater welding of the high-alloy 12H18N10T steels . The oxidation potential of water, the gas saturation of the weld metal and the mechanical properties of a welded joint obtained in wet underwater welding is ...

  1. Features of the thermal cycle when underwater welds are made in mild steel

    Mel' nik, Yu.P.; Savich, I.M.; Glukhova, E.V.

    1977-11-01

    Special features of the temperature fields when underwater welds are made in mild steel, or when welds are made in the air, using cored electrode wire, with a wide range of welding rates (0.12 to 0.47 cm/sec) are described, and the temperature fields are calculated. The structures and properties of the welds are given.

  2. Nd-YAG laser welding of bare and galvanised steels

    Until recently, one of the problems that has held back the introduction of lasers into car body fabrication has been the difficulty of integrating the lasers with robots. Nd-YAG laser beams can be transmitted through fibre optics which, as well as being considerably easier to manipulate than a mirror system, can be mounted on more lightweight accurate robots. Although previously only available at low powers, recent developments in Nd-YAG laser technology mean that lasers of up to 1kW average power will soon be available, coupled to a fibre optic beam delivery system. The increasing usage of zinc coated steels in vehicle bodies has led to welding problems using conventional resistance welding as well as CO2 laser welding. The use of Nd-YAG lasers may be able to overcome these problems. This paper outlines work carried out at The Welding Institute on a prototype Lumonics 800W pulsed Nd-YAG laser to investigate its welding characteristics on bare and zinc coated car body steels

  3. Electron beam welding technology for butt weld in stainless steel tubes

    This paper presents an EBW (Electron Beam Welding) technology for butt weld in stainless steel (00Cr17Ni14Mo2) tubes used in an electro-thermal component, which size is Φ22mm x 2.5mm. By carrying out the EBW technology with a low current and a near-focusing manner, the inner convex of the weld is accurately controlled, the problem of external collapse is solved, and the One Side Welding Both Sides Formation technology is implemented. The specimen has passed all the tests required in Code RCC-M, including visual examination, liquid penetrate examination, X-ray inspection, tensile test, bending test, metallography detection, ferrite determination, and inter-granular corrosion test. Each quality above has reached the technological index grade I. (authors)

  4. Hydrogen permeability over the joint weld of the steel parts of fusion reactor with magnet confinement of plasma

    Hydrogen and its isotopes diffusion and permeability over the laser joint weld of low-activation 10Cr9WVA ferritic steels have been studied. Welding of steel sheets were produced with the help of Russian gas laser TL-5M type (l=10.6 mm, P=2.5 kW) in He atmosphere with the rate of 66 mm/s. Hydrogen diffusion over the joint welds was detected by the conventional method of electrical resistance measurement. By this way, the kinetics of resistance changes during hydrogenation of specimens engraved from weld metal, neighboring zone of thermal effect as well as basic metal have been determined. Coefficients of hydrogen diffusion were measured in the temperature range from 773 to 1073 K. So, for 10Cr9WVA steel at 873 K it was established that the hydrogen diffusion coefficient in the weld metal is approximately 10 times higher than in the basic metal, and three times higher than that in the zone of thermal effect. Hydrogen permeability over the joint weld specimens was measured by the Dines-Barrer method on the volummetric setup. It was established that the hydrogen flux over the laser joint weld is significantly (up to two orders) more than that over the basic metal. Using the data on the hydrogen permeability and diffusion coefficient, the hydrogen solubility in the weld metal was estimated, which is several ten times higher than that in the basic metal of the steel investigated. As a result, it was concluded that welding the steel parts of the first wall of thermonuclear reactors with magnet confinement of plasma is undesirable due to possible tritium leaking into the environment. A possible way of decreasing the joint welds hydrogen permeability, including application of protective impermeable for hydrogen coatings, is considered

  5. Research on CMT welding of nickel-based alloy with stainless steel

    2007-01-01

    Cold Metal Transfer (CMT) welding technique is a new welding technique introduced by Fronius company. CMT welding of nickel-based alloy with stainless steel was carried out using CuSi3 filler wire in this paper. Effects of welding parameters, including welding current, welding speed, etc, on weld surface appearance were tested. Microstructure and mechanical properties of CMT weld were studied. The results show that the thickness of interface reaction layer of the nickel-based alloy is 14.3μm, which is only 4.33% of base material. The weld is made up of two phases,α-copper and iron-based solid solution. Rupture occurs initially at the welded seam near the edge of stainless steel in shear test. The maximum shear strength of the CuSi3 welded joint is 184.9MPa.

  6. Appropriate welding conditions of temper bead weld repair for SQV2A pressure vessel steel

    Temper bead welding technique is one of the most important repair welding methods for large structures for which it is difficult to perform the specified post weld heat treatment. In this study, appropriate temper bead welding conditions to improve the characteristics of heat affected zone (HAZ) are studied using pressure vessel steel SQV2A corresponding to ASTM A533 Type B Class 1. Thermal/mechanical simulator is employed to give specimens welding thermal cycles from single to quadruple cycle. Charpy absorbed energy and hardness of simulated CGHAZ by first cycle were degraded as compared with base metal. Improvability of these degradations by subsequent cycles is discussed and appropriate temper bead thermal cycles are clarified. When the peak temperature lower than Ac1 and near Ac1 in the second thermal cycle is applied to CGAHZ by first thermal cycle, the characteristics of CGHAZ improve enough. When the other peak temperatures (that is, higher than Ac1) in the second thermal cycle are applied to the CGHAZ, third or more thermal cycle temper bead process should be applied to improve the properties. Appropriate weld condition ranges are selected based on the above results. The validity of the selected ranges is verified by the temper bead welding test. (orig.)

  7. 77 FR 64471 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Final Negative...

    2012-10-22

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the Socialist Republic of... welded carbon-quality steel pipe (``circular welded pipe'') from the Socialist Republic of Vietnam... Preliminary Determination.\\1\\ \\1\\ See Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe from the Socialist Republic...

  8. Quantitative characterization of porosity in laser welds of stainless steel

    Standing-edge joints made by a continuous-wave Nd:YAG laser are examined in 304L stainless steel to advance understanding of the linkage between processing and microstructure in high-rate solidification events. Microcomputed tomography combined with traditional metallography has provided qualitative and quantitative characterization of welds in this material system of broad use and applicability. Pore presence and variability have been examined three-dimensionally for average values, spatial distributions and morphology, and related to processing parameters such as weld speed, delivered power and focal lens.

  9. Studies of Hot Crack Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    Juhl, Thomas Winther

    investigated and recommendations are given. From studies of literature it is found that the austenitic stainless steels have lowest crack susceptibility by a solidification course leaving approximately 15% rest ferrite in the weld metal. The alloys properties and the solidification rate determines the amount...... compared to the crack behaviour, but do not show an expected correlation between the crack resistance and the solidification rate. The employment of pulsed seams is therefore assessed not to be usable in the present selection methods. From evaluation of several crack tests, the Weeter spot weld test has...

  10. Through the optical combiner monitoring in remote fiber laser welding of zinc coated steels

    Colombo, Daniele; Colosimo, Bianca M.; Previtali, Barbara; Bassan, Daniele; Lai, Manuel; Masotti, Giovanni

    2012-03-01

    Thanks to the recent affirmation of the active fiber lasers, remote laser welding of zinc coated steels is under investigation with a particular emphasis on the overlap joint geometry. Due to the high power and high beam quality offered by these lasers, the remote laser welding process has become more practicable. However laser welding of lap zinc coated steels is still problematic because of the violent vaporisation of zinc. The presence of a gap between the plates allowing vapour degassing has been proven to avoid defects due to zinc vaporization. On the other hand variation in the gap value can lead to the welding defect formation. Therefore constant gap values should be ensured and deviation from the reference gap value has to be monitored during the execution of the welding process. Furthermore, the on-line monitoring of the gap values between the plates can be helpful for the on-line quality control of the welding process. The paper proposes a new monitoring solution for the measurement of the gap in remote fiber laser welding of overlapped zinc coated steels. In this solution, referred as Through the Optical Combiner Monitoring (TOCM) , the optical emissions from the welding process are directly observed through the optical combiner of the fiber laser source with spectroscopic equipment. The TOCM solution presented in the paper is integrated in an IPG YLS 3000 fiber laser source whose beam is deflected and focused by means of an El.En. ScanFiber scanning system with an equivalent focal length of 300 mm. After the definition of the right welding process conditions, spectroscopic tests are exploited to evaluate the optical emission from the welding plasma/plume. Acquired spectra are then analysed with multivariate data analysis approach in order to ensure gap monitoring. Results showed that with the proposed method it is possible to evaluate not only the gap between the plates but also the location inside the weld at which the variation occurs. Furthermore

  11. Measured and predicted residual stresses in thick section electron beam welded steels

    Four steel thick-section components, created by electron beam (EB) welding, were measured to obtain their residual stress distributions. Two components were made from ferritic steel and two components manufactured from stainless steel. All four components were measured in the as-welded state, with one ferritic steel component then subjected to post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) and measured. Distributions of the principal residual stresses were measured, across the EB welds and through the weld centrelines. Finite element models simulated the welding processes and the predicted residual stresses were compared to the measurements. In the ferritic steel components it was found that the peak residual stresses occur either side of the weld outside of the heat affected zone, with magnitudes corresponding to parent material yield strengths. After PWHT the measured peak stresses reduced from about 600 MPa to 90 MPa. Compressive residual stresses were found at the EB weld entrance and exit positions of the ferritic steel. This was not observed in the stainless steel EB welds, where tensile stresses were measured in the as-welded state. Overall the profiles of the residual stresses predicted by FE analyses replicated the measurements, but the FE analyses always predicted higher peak values. It was found that the measured distribution of residual stresses across the ferritic steel components are very similar irrespective of component thickness and weld speed, with the tensile stresses confined to distances of about 40% of the component thickness. In contrast in a stainless steel component the tensile stresses are much more broadly distributed about the weld centreline. - Highlights: • Electron beam welding thick section steel plates and cylinders were created. • Through thickness residual stress distributions were measured and predicted. • There is reasonable agreement between measurement and prediction but not in all cases. • Significant differences in stresses occur

  12. Residual stress measurement in 304 stainless steel weld overlay pipes

    Welding overlay repair (WOR) is commonly employed to rebuild piping systems suffering from intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). To understand the effects of this repair, it is necessary to investigate the distribution of residual stresses in the welding pipe. The overlay welding technique must induce compressive residual stress at the inner surface of the welded pipe to prevent IGSCC. To understand the bulk residual stress distribution, the stress profile as a function of location within wall is examined. In this study the full destructive residual stress measurement technique -- a cutting and sectioning method -- is used to determine the residual stress distribution. The sample is type 304 stainless steel weld overlay pipe with an outside diameter of 267 mm. A pipe segment is cut from the circular pipe; then a thin layer is removed axially from the inner to the outer surfaces until further sectioning is impractical. The total residual stress is calculated by adding the stress relieved by cutting the section away to the stress relieved by axially sectioning. The axial and hoop residual stresses are compressive at the inner surface of the weld overlay pipe. Compressive stress exists not only at the surface but is also distributed over most of the pipe's cross section. On the one hand, the maximum compressive hoop residual stress appears at the pipe's inner surface. The thermal-mechanical induced crack closure from significant compressive residual stress is discussed. This crack closure can thus prevent IGSCC very effectively

  13. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Copper and Mild Steel

    Daniel T

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, copper and mild steel were welded using a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process. To determine the weldablity factor, tests are needed to provide information on mechanical strength, potential defects in structure, and nature of failure. Mechanical testing included transverse tensile tests, micro hardness tests, and bend tests. The results for the transverse tensile test revealed failure occurred at the copper heat affected zone (HAZ with an ultimate tensile strength of 220MPa. The weld metal produced the highest average hardness value of 173HV. The bend tests revealed small cracks on the surfaces of each bend and the nature of the bend, bent around the copper HAZ. Metallography revealed ferrite (α and copper (ε cellular and dendritic shaped microstructure in the weld metal. Post weld heat treatment (PWHT was attempted to observe if any improvements on strength could be achieved. Tensile and micro hardness tests revealed the copper base metal increased in ductility significantly and in the weld metal slightly increased in ductility

  14. Corrosion Behavior of Aluminum-Steel Weld-Brazing Joint

    Shi, Yu; Li, Jie; Zhang, Gang; Huang, Jiankang; Gu, Yufen

    2016-05-01

    Dissimilar metals of 1060 aluminum and galvanized steel were joined with a lap joint by pulsed double-electrode gas metal arc weld brazing with aluminum-magnesium and aluminum-silicon filler metals. The corrosion behavior of the weld joints was investigated with immersion corrosion and electrochemical corrosion tests, and the corrosion morphology of the joints was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Galvanic corrosion was found to occur when the samples were immersed in corrosive media, and the corrosion rate of joints was increased with increased heat input of the workpiece. Comparison of the corrosion properties of weld joints with different filler wires indicated that the corrosion rate of weld joints with aluminum-silicon filler wire was larger than that of weld joints with aluminum-magnesium filler wire. Results also showed that the zinc-rich zone of weld joints was prone to corrosion. The corrosion behavior of zinc-rich zone was analyzed with SEM equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis system based on the test results.

  15. Corrosion Behavior of Aluminum-Steel Weld-Brazing Joint

    Shi, Yu; Li, Jie; Zhang, Gang; Huang, Jiankang; Gu, Yufen

    2016-03-01

    Dissimilar metals of 1060 aluminum and galvanized steel were joined with a lap joint by pulsed double-electrode gas metal arc weld brazing with aluminum-magnesium and aluminum-silicon filler metals. The corrosion behavior of the weld joints was investigated with immersion corrosion and electrochemical corrosion tests, and the corrosion morphology of the joints was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Galvanic corrosion was found to occur when the samples were immersed in corrosive media, and the corrosion rate of joints was increased with increased heat input of the workpiece. Comparison of the corrosion properties of weld joints with different filler wires indicated that the corrosion rate of weld joints with aluminum-silicon filler wire was larger than that of weld joints with aluminum-magnesium filler wire. Results also showed that the zinc-rich zone of weld joints was prone to corrosion. The corrosion behavior of zinc-rich zone was analyzed with SEM equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis system based on the test results.

  16. Cold Cracking of Flux Cored Arc Welded Armour Grade High Strength Steel Weldments

    G.Magudeeswaran; V.Balasubramanian; G.Madhusudhan Reddy

    2009-01-01

    In this investigation, an attempt has been made to study the influence of welding consumables on the factors that influence cold cracking of armour grade quenched and tempered (Q&T) steel welds. Flux cored arc welding (FCAW) process were used making welds using austenitic stainless steel (ASS) and low hydrogen ferritic steel (LHF) consumables. The diffusible hydrogen levels in the weld metal of the ASS and LHF consumables were determined by mercury method. Residual stresses were evaluated using X-ray stress analyzer and implant test was carried out to study the cold cracking of the welds. Results indicate that ASS welds offer a greater resistance to cold cracking of armour grade Q&T steel welds.

  17. 75 FR 973 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of...

    2010-01-07

    ... Welded Stainless Steel Pipes from Korea, 57 FR 62301 (Dec. 30, 1992), as amended in Notice of Amended... Sales at Less than Fair Value: Certain Cut-to-Length Carbon Steel Plate from South Africa, 62 FR 61731... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea:...

  18. 75 FR 16439 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe From Turkey: Preliminary Results of Countervailing Duty...

    2010-04-01

    ... Steel Pipe and Tube Products from Turkey, 51 FR 7984 (March 7, 1986). On March 2, 2009, the Department... Administrative Review: Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe from Turkey, 72 FR 62837, 62838 (November 7...: Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe from Turkey, 73 FR 12080 (March 6, 2008). To calculate the...

  19. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 204L stainless steel

    Hochanadel, Patrick W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jesse N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Matthew Q [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-09-15

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found.This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GTAW showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  20. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 304L stainless steel

    Hochanadel, Patrick W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jesse N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Raymond J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Matthew Q [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found. This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GT A W showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  1. 钢筋焊接质量的控制%Steel welding quality control

    徐丽华

    2016-01-01

    at present, the highway construction steel bar welded by artificial completed, only improve welding level, strict implementation of the welding process, strengthen management, solve the quality of welded steel.%目前,公路施工中钢筋焊接由人工完成,只有提高焊接的水平,执行严格的焊接工艺,加强管理,解决钢筋焊接质量。

  2. The welding of austenitic-ferritic Mo-alloyed Cr-Ni-Steel

    This paper provides general information and guidance on the welding of austenitic-ferritic Mo-alloyed Cr-Ni stainless steel. Information is given on the various chemical compositions and on resistance to corrosion and on the mechanical and physical properties of commercially available steels. The effect of welding on the base metal and the selection of welding processes and welding consumables are described

  3. INVESTIGATIONS INTO EFFECT OF RESIDUAL STRESSES ON MECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL WELD JOINT

    Jamal Jalal Dawood; Charudatta Subhash Pathak; Atul Sitarm Padalkar

    2014-01-01

    Duplex stainless steel alloy is widely used in the manufacture of pressure vessels, nuclear plant, chemical refineries and paper mill. Welding is the most preferred fabrication method in these structural applications; however during welding the work piece is subjected to thermal cycle as a result residual stresses are developed in the weld. Residual stresses have significant effect on performance of the weld joint subjected to tensile loading. In addition to this duplex stainless steel is wel...

  4. Finite element thermal analysis of the fusion welding of a P92 steel pipe

    Yaghi, A. H.; Tanner, D. W. J.; Hyde, T.H.; A. A. Becker; Sun, W.

    2012-01-01

    Fusion welding is common in steel pipeline construction in fossil-fuel power generation plants. Steel pipes in service carry steam at high temperature and pressure, undergoing creep during years of service; their integrity is critical for the safe operation of a plant. The high-grade martensitic P92 steel is suitable for plant pipes for its enhanced creep strength. P92 steel pipes are usually joined together with a similar weld metal. Martensitic pipes are sometimes joined to austenitic steel...

  5. Friction Welding of Aluminium and Aluminium Alloys with Steel

    Andrzej Ambroziak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents our actual knowledge and experience in joining dissimilar materials with the use of friction welding method. The joints of aluminium and aluminium alloys with the different types of steel were studied. The structural effects occurring during the welding process were described. The mechanical properties using, for example, (i microhardness measurements, (ii tensile tests, (iii bending tests, and (iv shearing tests were determined. In order to obtain high-quality joints the influence of different configurations of the process such as (i changing the geometry of bonding surface, (ii using the interlayer, or (iii heat treatment was analyzed. Finally, the issues related to the selection of optimal parameters of friction welding process were also investigated.

  6. Technology of Welding Joints Mixed with Duplex Steel

    Słania J.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Results of the examinations of sample plates of mixed joints with the duplex steel were discussed. Examinations were taken on the sample plates of mixed joints of sheet plates type P355NL1 and X2CrNiMoN22-5-3 welded by the flux-cored wire DW-329A by the Kobelco company of the following category T 22 9 3 NL RC/M3 in the gas shroud M21 (Ar+18%CO2 (plate no.1, and nickel covered electrodes E Ni 6082 by the Böhler company (plate no. 2. Results of the side bend test of welded joint, transverse tensile test, stretching of the weld metal, impact strength, micro and macroscopic metallographic examinations, and measurements of the delta ferrite content were presented.

  7. Laser Welding Of Finned Tubes Made Of Austenitic Steels

    Stolecki M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the technology of welding of finned tubes made of the X5CrNi1810 (1.4301 austenitic steel, developed at Energoinstal SA, allowing one to get high quality joints that meet the requirements of the classification societies (PN-EN 15614, and at the same time to significantly reduce the manufacturing costs. The authors described an automatic technological line equipped with a Trumph disc laser and a tube production technological process. To assess the quality of the joints, one performed metallographic examinations, hardness measurements and a technological attempt to rupture the fin. Analysis of the results proved that the laser-welded finned tubes were performed correctly and that the welded joints had shown no imperfections.

  8. Phase analysis of fume during arc weld brazing of steel sheets with protective coatings

    J. Matusiak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research of the phase identification and of the quantitative phase analysis of fume generated during Cold Metal Transfer (CMT, ColdArc and Metal Inert Gas / Metal Active Gas (MIG / MAG weld brazing. Investigations were conducted for hot - dip coated steel sheets with zinc (Zn and zinc-iron (Zn - Fe alloy coatings. Arc shielding gases applied during the research-related tests were Ar + O2, Ar + CO2, Ar + H2 and Ar + CO2 + H2 gas mixtures. The analysis of the results covers the influence of the chemical composition of shielding gas on the chemical composition of welding fume.

  9. LASER NET SHAPE WELDING OF STEELS

    Eghlio, Ramadan Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    Laser technologies have made distinguished contributions to modern industry. These have typically been realised through the important role played by lasers in the advancement of manufacturing technology in many areas such as welding, which has become an important joining technique and thus promoted the use of lasers in a wide variety of applications in the oil, gas, aerospace, aircraft, automotive, electronics and medical industries.A detailed review of previous work in the use of lasers for ...

  10. Laser welding of the 12Kh18N10T steel

    A possibility of laser welding of 5 and 6 mm thick butt joints of the 12Kh18N10T stainless steel has been studied. The laser beam power constituted 5 and 23 kW and rates-75 and 250 m/h, respectively. Both two-sided air blasting of the molten pool by helium and the AN-60 flux were used for the weld metal protection from oxidation. The quality of welding was assessed on the basis of the results metallographic and X-ray structural analyses of welds and mechanical tests. The effect of welding parameters and weld metal protection technique on the quality of welded joints has been shown. The mechanical properties of welded joints are satisfactory. It has been made the conclusion on the possibility of laser welding of the above steel for the weld metal protection from oxidation using fluxes and inert gases

  11. Finite element analysis of residual stress in the welded zone of a high strength steel

    Li Yajiang; Wang Juan; Chen Maoai; Shen Xiaoqin

    2004-04-01

    The distribution of the residual stress in the weld joint of HQ130 grade high strength steel was investigated by means of finite element method (FEM) using ANSYS software. Welding was carried out using gas shielded arc welding with a heat input of 16 kJ/cm. The FEM analysis on the weld joint reveals that there is a stress gradient around the fusion zone of weld joint. The instantaneous residual stress on the weld surface goes up to 800 ∼ 1000 MPa and it is 500 ∼ 600 MPa, below the weld. The stress gradient near the fusion zone is higher than any other location in the surrounding area. This is attributed as one of the significant reasons for the development of cold cracks at the fusion zone in the high strength steel. In order to avoid such welding cracks, the thermal stress in the weld joint has to be minimized by controlling the weld heat input.

  12. Risk of lung cancer according to mild steel and stainless steel welding

    Sørensen, Anita Rath; Thulstrup, Ane Marie; Hansen, Johnni;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Whether the elevated risk of lung cancer observed among welders is caused by welding emissions or by confounding from smoking or asbestos exposure is still not resolved. This question was addressed in a cohort with a long follow-up and quantified estimates of individual exposure to......) 1.06-1.70)]. Among the stainless steel welders, the risk increased significantly with increasing accumulative welding particulate exposure, while no exposure-response relation was found for mild steel welders, even after adjustment for tobacco smoking and asbestos exposure. CONCLUSIONS: The study...

  13. Investigation of Strength Recovery in Welds of NUCu-140 Steel Through Multipass Welding and Isothermal Post-Weld Heat Treatments

    Bono, Jason T.; DuPont, John N.; Jain, Divya; Baik, Sung-Il; Seidman, David N.

    2015-11-01

    NUCu-140 is a ferritic copper precipitation-strengthened steel that is a candidate material for use in many naval and structural applications. Previous work has shown that the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and fusion zone (FZ) of NUCu-140 exhibit softening that is due to dissolution of the copper-rich precipitates. This study aims to recover the FZ and HAZ strength by re-precipitation of the copper-rich precipitates through either multiple weld passes or an isothermal post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). The potential use of multiple thermal cycles was investigated with HAZ simulations using a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulator. The HAZ simulations represented two weld thermal cycles with different combinations of peak temperatures during the initial and secondary weld passes. To investigate the potential for a PWHT for strength recovery, gas tungsten arc weld samples were isothermally heated for various times and temperatures. Microhardness measurements revealed no strength recovery in the multipass HAZ samples. The time-dependent precipitate characteristics were modeled under the HAZ thermal cycle conditions, and the results showed that the lack of strength recovery could be attributed to insufficient time for re-precipitation during the secondary weld pass. Conversely, full strength recovery in the HAZ was observed in the isothermally heat treated samples. Atom probe tomography analysis correlated this strength recovery to re-precipitation of the copper-rich precipitates during the isothermal PWHT.

  14. Effects of surface treatments of galvanized steels on projection welding procedure

    王敏; 王宸煜

    2003-01-01

    A group of projection welding experiments and joints tension-shear tests are carried out for cold-rolled steel sheets, galvanized steel sheets (GSS) without treatment, GSS with phosphating and GSS with surface greasing, respectively. The experimental results are regressively analyzed on the computers, then the projection welded joint tension-shear strength curve and the perfect welding currents range of each material are obtained. The results show that surface treatments of galvanized steels have effects on their spot weldabilities. Among the four kinds of materials, GSS with surface greasing have the worst spot weldability, for they need higher welding current and have a narrow welding current range.

  15. Dissimilar Joining of ODS and F/M Steel Tube by Friction Stir Welding

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Jun Hwan; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Oxide Dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels, it is well known that uniform nano-oxide dispersoids act as pinning points to obstruct dislocation and grain boundary motion, however, those advantages will be disappeared while the material is subjected to the high temperature of conventional fusion welding. Rotary friction welding, also referred to as friction stir welding (FSW), has shown great promise as a method for welding traditionally difficult to weld materials such as aluminum alloys. This relatively new technology has more recently been applied to higher melting temperature alloys such as steels, nickel-based and titanium alloys. Friction stir processing (FSP) is a method of changing the properties of a metal through intense, localized plastic deformation. FSW is the precursor of the FSP technique. When ideally implemented, this process mixes the material without changing the phase and creates a microstructure with fine, equiaxed grains. This homogeneous grain structure, separated by high-angle boundaries, allows some alloys to take on superplastic properties. In this study, FSW is used as a substitutive welding process between FMS tube and ODS parts. The dimension of tube is 7.0 OD, 0.5 T. During the FSW, dynamic-recrystallized grains are developed; the uniform oxides Dispersion is preserved in the metal matrix. The microstructure and microtexture of the material near the stir zone is found to be influenced by the rotational behavior of the tool. The additive effect from FSP on sample surface is considered. Since the mechanical alloying (MA) and FSP commonly apply extreme shear deformation on materials, the Dispersion of oxide particle in ODS steels is very active during both processes. Friction stir welding appears to be a very promising technique for the welding of FMS and ODS steels in the form of sheet and tube. FSW could successfully produce defect-free welds on FMS tubes and ODS ring assembly. FSW produces a fine grain structure consisting of ferrite and

  16. Dissimilar Joining of ODS and F/M Steel Tube by Friction Stir Welding

    Oxide Dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels, it is well known that uniform nano-oxide dispersoids act as pinning points to obstruct dislocation and grain boundary motion, however, those advantages will be disappeared while the material is subjected to the high temperature of conventional fusion welding. Rotary friction welding, also referred to as friction stir welding (FSW), has shown great promise as a method for welding traditionally difficult to weld materials such as aluminum alloys. This relatively new technology has more recently been applied to higher melting temperature alloys such as steels, nickel-based and titanium alloys. Friction stir processing (FSP) is a method of changing the properties of a metal through intense, localized plastic deformation. FSW is the precursor of the FSP technique. When ideally implemented, this process mixes the material without changing the phase and creates a microstructure with fine, equiaxed grains. This homogeneous grain structure, separated by high-angle boundaries, allows some alloys to take on superplastic properties. In this study, FSW is used as a substitutive welding process between FMS tube and ODS parts. The dimension of tube is 7.0 OD, 0.5 T. During the FSW, dynamic-recrystallized grains are developed; the uniform oxides Dispersion is preserved in the metal matrix. The microstructure and microtexture of the material near the stir zone is found to be influenced by the rotational behavior of the tool. The additive effect from FSP on sample surface is considered. Since the mechanical alloying (MA) and FSP commonly apply extreme shear deformation on materials, the Dispersion of oxide particle in ODS steels is very active during both processes. Friction stir welding appears to be a very promising technique for the welding of FMS and ODS steels in the form of sheet and tube. FSW could successfully produce defect-free welds on FMS tubes and ODS ring assembly. FSW produces a fine grain structure consisting of ferrite and

  17. Microstructures and Toughness of Weld Metal of Ultrafine Grained Ferritic Steel by Laser Welding

    Xudong ZHANG; Wuzhu CHEN; Cheng WANG; Lin ZHAO; Yun PENG; Zhiling TIAN

    2004-01-01

    3 mm thick 400 MPa grade ultrafine grained ferritic steel plates were bead-on-plate welded by CO2 laser with heat input of 120~480 J/mm. The microstructures of the weld metal mainly consist of bainite, which form is lower bainite plates or polygonal ferrite containing quantities of dispersed cementite particles, mixed with a few of low carbon martensite laths or ferrite, depending on the heat input. The hardness and the tensile strength of the weld metal are higher than those of the base metal, and monotonously increase as the heat input decreases. No softened zone exists inheat affected zone (HAZ). Compared with the base metal, although the grains of laser weld are much larger, the toughness of the weld metal is higher within a large range of heat input. Furthermore, as the heat input increases, the toughness of the weld metal rises to a maximum value, at which point the percentage of lower bainite is the highest, and then drops.

  18. Cold Cracking Of Underwater Wet Welded S355G10+N High Strength Steel

    Fydrych D.; Łabanowski J.; Tomków J.; Rogalski G.

    2015-01-01

    Water as the welding environment determines some essential problems influencing steel weldability. Underwater welding of high strength steel joints causes increase susceptibility to cold cracking, which is an effect of much faster heat transfer from the weld area and presence of diffusible hydrogen causing increased metal fragility. The paper evaluates the susceptibility to cold cracking of the high strength S355G10+N steel used, among others, for ocean engineering and hydrotechnical structur...

  19. The properties and weldability of low activation ferritic steels

    A series of ferritic steels patterned on the chromium-molybdenum alloys, 2 1/4Cr--1Mo, 9Cr--1MoVNb and 12Cr--1MoVW, were tested for weldability. These steels are being developed as candidates for the first wall and blanket structures of fusion reactors. Use of these materials will minimize the long term radioactive hazards associated with disposal after service. In these low activation alloys, elements which become activated during irradiation with long half lives (Mo and Nb) are replaced. The major changes include the replacement of molybdenum with tungsten, the addition of vanadium in 2 1/4% Cr steels, and the replacement of niobium in the 9% Cr steel with tantalum. These replacement elements radically modify both the mechanical properties and weldability of the alloys. In this study, the effect of the alloy modifications on the microstructure and the mechanical properties of the welds are presented. Bainitic steels (2 1/4 Cr%) usually exhibit good weldability, while the martensitic steels (5, 9 and 12 Cr%) are suspectable to embrittlement in the heat affected zone (HAZ). The objective of this study was to characterize the welded microstructure and mechanical properties of these low activation alloys. Autogeneous bead-on-plate welds were produced using the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. Microstructure, microhardness, weld bend and tensile test results are reported for the base metal, heat affected zone and fusion zone of the weld. 46 refs., 36 figs., 14 tabs

  20. Ferrite stability in duplex austenitic stainless steel welds

    The presence of ferrite in austenitic stainless steel welds is known to be beneficial in avoiding hot cracking problems. In particular, the primary delta ferrite mode of solidification is important. For alloy compositions in which primary ferrite forms, it has been shown that up to approximately 40% ferrite may exist in the as-solidified structures. With further cooling, the ferrite becomes unstable, transforming to austenite. However, under typical welding conditions, the cooling rate is sufficiently high to suppress the complete transformation of ferrite and some residual ferrite is retained. For example, for Type 308 austenitic stainless steel filler metal, gas-tungsten arc welds contain 6 to 10% ferrite, although under equilibrium conditions at elevated temperatures, this same alloy can be homogenized into a fully austenitic structure. Thus, it is clear the retained ferrite in such duplex structure welds is unstable and transforms during elevated temperature applications. The stability of ferrite was investigated by measuring its composition after several different thermal treatments. The composition was measured by means of analytical electron microscopy of thinned foils, and only the major constituents, iron, chromium, and nickel, were analyzed. The composition of ferrite was measured as a function of aging time and temperature. It was found that, during aging, the ferrite composition changes and approaches a metastable equilibrium limit before eventually transforming to sigma phase or austenite. This limiting composition was determined as a function of temperature

  1. Fatigue behavior of welded austenitic stainless steel in different environments

    D. S. Yawas; S.Y. Aku; S.O. Aluko

    2014-01-01

    The fatigue behavior of welded austenitic stainless steel in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid and wet steam corrosive media has been investigated. The immersion time in the corrosive media was 30 days to simulate the effect on stainless steel structures/equipment in offshore and food processing applications and thereafter annealing heat treatment was carried out on the samples. The findings from the fatigue tests show that seawater specimens have a lower fatigue stress of 0.5 × 10−5 N/mm2 for the heat...

  2. Advanced Functions of a Modern Power Source for GMAW Welding of Steel

    Ladislav Kolařík; Marie Kolaříková; Karel Kovanda; Marek Pantůček; Petr Vondrouš

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the use of a modern welding power source equipped with advanced arc control functions. At the Laboratory of Welding Technologies of CTU in Prague we have focused on GMAW welding of steel using Sigma Galaxy, a modern welding power source produced by Migatronic. Sigma Galaxy is equipped with functions called Intelligent Arc Control and Sequence Repeat. According to the manufacturer, controlling an arc by these functions should significantly stabilize the welding process, lo...

  3. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of shielded metal arc-welded dissimilar joints comprising duplex stainless steel and low alloy steel

    Srinivasan, P. Bala; Muthupandi, V.; Sivan, V.; Srinivasan, P. Bala; Dietzel, W.

    2006-12-01

    This work describes the results of an investigation on a dissimilar weld joint comprising a boiler-grade low alloy steel and duplex stainless steel (DSS). Welds produced by shielded metal arc-welding with two different electrodes (an austenitic and a duplex grade) were examined for their microstructural features and properties. The welds were found to have overmatching mechanical properties. Although the general corrosion resistance of the weld metals was good, their pitting resistance was found to be inferior when compared with the DSS base material.

  4. Low temperature thermal aging of austenitic stainless steel welds: Kinetics and effects on mechanical properties

    Highlights: ► Embrittlement of 304L and 316L welds after aging up to 20,000 h. ► Spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation in ferrite at 400 °C. Only spinodal decomposition at 335 and 365 °C. ► Charpy impact, microhardness and tensile tests for evaluation of aging embrittlement and its kinetics determined. - Abstract: Austenitic stainless steel welds in components used in light water reactors are susceptible to thermal aging embrittlement at reactor operating temperature of around 300 °C after a long service life. In this study, low temperature aging embrittlement of types 304L and 316L stainless steel welds with 10% ferrite was investigated on the basis of changes in mechanical properties and microstructure after aging up to 20,000 h at 335, 365 and 400 °C. Spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation in the ferrite was observed after aging which lead to embrittlement in the material. In contrast to the small effect on tensile properties, the impact toughness was significantly degraded after aging. Charpy impact test of the aged samples showed decrease in upper-shelf and lower-shelf energy and increase in ductile brittle transition temperature. Large increase in the microhardness of ferrite phase was observed with no change in austenite hardness. The embrittlement in 316L weld was higher compared to 304L weld for similar aging condition. The kinetics of aging embrittlement was established based on Arrhenius relationship. A constant activation energy was determined for 304L weld in the temperature range 335–400 °C, however, 316L weld showed different activation energy values in each temperature range.

  5. Low temperature thermal aging of austenitic stainless steel welds: Kinetics and effects on mechanical properties

    Chandra, K., E-mail: kchandra@barc.gov.in [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kain, Vivekanand [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Bhutani, Vikas [Punjab Engineering College, Chandigarh 160 012 (India); Raja, V.S. [Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Tewari, R.; Dey, G.K. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Chakravartty, J.K. [Mechanical Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2012-02-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Embrittlement of 304L and 316L welds after aging up to 20,000 h. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation in ferrite at 400 Degree-Sign C. Only spinodal decomposition at 335 and 365 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Charpy impact, microhardness and tensile tests for evaluation of aging embrittlement and its kinetics determined. - Abstract: Austenitic stainless steel welds in components used in light water reactors are susceptible to thermal aging embrittlement at reactor operating temperature of around 300 Degree-Sign C after a long service life. In this study, low temperature aging embrittlement of types 304L and 316L stainless steel welds with 10% ferrite was investigated on the basis of changes in mechanical properties and microstructure after aging up to 20,000 h at 335, 365 and 400 Degree-Sign C. Spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation in the ferrite was observed after aging which lead to embrittlement in the material. In contrast to the small effect on tensile properties, the impact toughness was significantly degraded after aging. Charpy impact test of the aged samples showed decrease in upper-shelf and lower-shelf energy and increase in ductile brittle transition temperature. Large increase in the microhardness of ferrite phase was observed with no change in austenite hardness. The embrittlement in 316L weld was higher compared to 304L weld for similar aging condition. The kinetics of aging embrittlement was established based on Arrhenius relationship. A constant activation energy was determined for 304L weld in the temperature range 335-400 Degree-Sign C, however, 316L weld showed different activation energy values in each temperature range.

  6. Hydrogen-enhanced cracking of 2205 duplex stainless steel welds

    Slow-displacement rate tensile tests were carried out to investigate the effect of hydrogen embrittlement on notched tensile strength (NTS) and fracture characteristics of 2205 duplex stainless steel weld. The hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of the specimens was correlated with microstructures of the fusion zone. The results indicated that all the specimens were susceptible to gaseous hydrogen embrittlement but to different degrees. The susceptibility decreased with increasing austenite content in the weld metal. The orientation with respect to the rolling direction had a great influence on the impact toughness of the base plate. Preheating before welding or changing the plasma-assisted gas from He to N2 could raise the γ content of the fusion zone and improve the impact toughness. In case of the post-weld heat-treated weld (PW), the presence of randomly oriented acicular and blocky γ in the fusion zone led to the highest impact energy and NTS among the specimens being tested. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) fractographs revealed that all specimens underwent a significant change in fracture mode from ductile in air to quasi-cleavage fracture in H2

  7. Influence of shielding gas composition on weld profile in pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of low carbon steel

    M Jokar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Weld area and weld depth/width ratio can be considered to be of the most important geometrical factors in pulsed laser welding. The effects of carbon dioxide and oxygen additions to the argon shielding gas on the weld properties in pulsed laser welding of low carbon steel is investigated. Presence of carbon dioxide and oxygen up to 10 and 15 percent respectively decreases the weld geometrical factors. But, at higher levels of additions, the weld geometrical factors will increase. It is observed that the plasma plume temperature decreases from 6000K to 5500K with the addition of 15% carbon dioxide but increases to 7700K with 25% carbon dioxide addition. Increase in laser absorption coefficient, laser energy absorption, formation of oxide layer on the work-piece surface, exothermic reactions and their competitive effects can be considered as the competing phenomena involved in such a behavior in the weld profile

  8. Laser welding of stainless steel tubes

    Chmelíčková, Hana; Lapšanská, Hana; Hiklová, Helena; Havelková, Martina

    Olomouc: Palacky University, 2010 - (Šmíd, P.; Horváth, P.; Hrabovský, M.), s. 107-114 ISBN 978-80-244-2533-7. [International Scientific Conference Experimental Stress Analysis 2010 /48./. Velké Losiny (CZ), 31.05.2010-03.06.2010] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN301370701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : laser * welding * tubes * process parameters Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers http://ean2010.upol.cz/site_cs/

  9. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Testing of Superplastic Solid-State Welding Joint for Different Steels

    2002-01-01

    Based on quantitative microscopic examinations of welds and welding rate for different steels (40Cr and T10A) joint, which possess the ultra-fine microstructure after high frequency hardening (HFH) and salt-bath cyclic quenching (SCQ), the suitable defect grey scale threshold value was determined, and the welding rate of superplastic solid-state welding of different steels (40Cr and T10A steel) was systematically inspected and analyzed by means of self-made ultrasonic imaging inspection system. The experimental results showed that the superplastic solid-state weld of different steels can be inspected more accurately, reliably and quickly by this system, and the results were in good accordance with that of metallographic observation. The welding rate of superplastic welding is in linear relation with tensile strength of joint.

  10. Optimization of Fiber Laser Welding of DP980 Steels Using RSM to Improve Weld Properties for Formability

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Panda, S. K.; Saha, P.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of laser parameters on weld quality is a critical laboratory study before implementation of newly developed high-strength dual-phase steels in fabrication of auto-bodies. In present work, dual-phase steels having tensile strength of 980 MPa (DP980) were welded using different welding speeds by Yb-fiber laser source to fabricate similar material combinations laser-welded blanks (LWBs). The weld zone microhardness, microstructure, and formability of DP980 LWBs were compared with those of the DP600 and micro-alloyed interstitial free high-strength steel (IFHS) LWBs. It was found that the formation of soft zone at the outer side of the HAZ was responsible for significant reduction in formability of DP980 LWBs due to strain localization and premature failure. Hence, response surface methodology based on Box-Behnken design was implemented to establish a mathematical model which could correlate the influence of laser process parameters such as power, welding speed, and focal position on weld quality in terms of aspect ratio of fusion zone, width of the soft zone, and surface roughness of weld to improve formability. The model was successfully implemented to optimize the laser parameters, and approximately 13.58% improvement in Erichsen cup height was achieved due to complete weld penetration with simultaneous 67% reduction in soft zone width and 55% reduction in softening. However, the failure was still observed to occur in the soft zone propagating parallel to weld in radial direction.

  11. Strength analysis of laser welded lap joint for ultra high strength steel

    Jeong, Young Cheol; Kim, Cheol Hee; Cho, Young Tae; Jung, Yoon Gyo

    2013-12-01

    Several industries including the automotive industry have recently applied the process of welding high strength steel. High strength steel is steel that is harder than normal high strength steel, making it much stronger and stiffer. HSS can be formed in pieces that can be up to 10 to 15 percent thinner than normal steel without sacrificing strength, which enables weight reduction and improved fuel economy. Furthermore, HSS can be formed into complex shapes that can be welded into structural areas. This study is based on previous experiments and is aimed at establishing the stress distribution for laser welded high strength steel. Research on the stress distribution for laser welded high strength steel is conducted by using Solid Works, a program that analyzes the stress of a virtual model. In conclusion, we found that the stress distribution is changed depending on the shape of welded lap joint. In addition, the Influence of the stress distribution on welded high strength steel can be used to standard for high energy welding of high strength steel, and we can also predict the region in welded high strength steel that may cracked.

  12. Experimental study on activating welding for aluminum alloys

    Huang Yong; Fan Ding

    2005-01-01

    TIG welding and EB welding for aluminum alloy 3003 were carried out to study the effects of activating flux on weld penetration of activating welding for aluminum alloys. SiO2 was used as the activating flux. It is found that, SiO2 can increase the weld penetration and decrease the weld width of FBTIG when the flux gap is small. For A-TIG welding and EB welding with focused mode, the weld penetrations and the weld widths increase simultaneously. SiO2 has little effect on the weld penetration and weld width of EB welding with defocused mode. It is believed that, change of surface tension temperature gradient is not the main mechanism of SiO2 improving weld penetration of activating welding for aluminum alloys.

  13. Optimization of welding variables for duplex stainless steel by GTAW and SMAW

    The main problems faced during the welding of duplex stainless steels are cleanliness and slag inclusions. In the present work the methods to eliminate these problems were studied during the welding of duplex stainless steel by Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) and Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW). Since the duplex stainless steel is an expensive material, the initial experiments for optimization of welding variables were. carried out on low carbon steel (CS) plates with duplex consumables. Welding of butt groove joints on CS plates was carried with various sets of welding variables i.e. current, voltage and arc energy using duplex consumables. The. radiographic inspection, micro-structural observations and hardness testing of the welds suggested the welding variables that will produce a sound weld on CS plate. These optimized variables were then used for the welding of edge groove joint and T -joint on duplex stainless steel by GTAW and SMAW processes. The hardness and micro-structural study of the joints produced on duplex stainless steel by GTAW and SMAW with duplex consumables were also studied. No slag inclusions and porosity were observed in the microstructure of these weldments and their properties were found similar to the parent metal. (author)

  14. Role of surface-active elements during keyhole-mode laser welding

    During high power density laser welding of mild steel, the keyhole depth, liquid metal flow, weld geometry and weld integrity are affected by base-metal sulfur content and oxygen (O2) present in the atmosphere or shielding gas. The role of these surface-active elements during keyhole-mode laser welding of steels is not well understood. In order to better understand their effects, welding of mild steel specimens containing various concentrations of oxygen and sulfur are examined. In addition, a numerical model is used to evaluate the influence of the surface-active elements on heat transfer and fluid flow in keyhole-mode laser welding. Increase in base-metal sulfur concentration or O2 content of shielding gas results in decreased weld widths. Sulfur results in a negligible increase in penetration depth whereas the presence of O2 in shielding gas significantly affects the weld penetration. It has earlier been proposed that oxygen, if present in the shielding gas, can get introduced into the weld pool resulting in formation of carbon monoxide (CO) at the keyhole surface and additional pressure from CO can result in increased penetration. Numerical modelling has been used in this work to understand the effects of formation of CO on the keyhole and weld geometries. (paper)

  15. Role of surface-active elements during keyhole-mode laser welding

    Ribic, B.; Tsukamoto, S.; Rai, R.; DebRoy, T.

    2011-12-01

    During high power density laser welding of mild steel, the keyhole depth, liquid metal flow, weld geometry and weld integrity are affected by base-metal sulfur content and oxygen (O2) present in the atmosphere or shielding gas. The role of these surface-active elements during keyhole-mode laser welding of steels is not well understood. In order to better understand their effects, welding of mild steel specimens containing various concentrations of oxygen and sulfur are examined. In addition, a numerical model is used to evaluate the influence of the surface-active elements on heat transfer and fluid flow in keyhole-mode laser welding. Increase in base-metal sulfur concentration or O2 content of shielding gas results in decreased weld widths. Sulfur results in a negligible increase in penetration depth whereas the presence of O2 in shielding gas significantly affects the weld penetration. It has earlier been proposed that oxygen, if present in the shielding gas, can get introduced into the weld pool resulting in formation of carbon monoxide (CO) at the keyhole surface and additional pressure from CO can result in increased penetration. Numerical modelling has been used in this work to understand the effects of formation of CO on the keyhole and weld geometries.

  16. Electron beam welding of flanges with tubular shafts of steel 40KhNMA

    The results are presented of elaborating the technological process for the electron beam welding of flanges with a tube of the 40KhNMA steel and of investigation into the quality of the welded joints. A welded piece has been fabricated conforming to the technology suggested observing the parameters worked-out in the following sequence: assembling the piece; pre-welding of the edges in some points; welding; high tempering; welds quality control; removal of the seam reinforcement inside of the tube and the weld root to the depth of 2 mm; quenching; tempering; welds quality control; finishing. The welds quality control consists in visual inspection, ultrasonic testing, magnetic flaw detection, as well as X-ray and metallographic analyses. The mechanical properties are studied on notched samples cut out of the welded joints. The test results have shown that the mechanical properties of the welded joints meet the requirements on the same level with the base metal

  17. Research on overall assembling and welding process of steel box girder tuyere blocks of Taizhou Bridge

    Yan Shiguang; Li Hongtao; Wang Chao

    2012-01-01

    This article presents in detail the assembling and welding process technique of the steel box girder tuyere blocks of Taizhou Bridge. The application of this process technique effectively solves the problem of welding stress release in tuyere block assembling and welding without increasing the number of turns of the blocks and overhead welding, thus avoiding possible structural deformation due to excessive accumulation of internal welding stress, greatly reducing the repeated deformation and correction work during assembling and welding, and ensuring the weld seam quality and overall dimensions of tuvere blocks of Taizhou Bridze.

  18. Microstructure and microhardness of fiber laser butt welded joint of stainless steel plates

    Highlights: ► Narrow and fully penetrated welded joint without marco-defects is obtained by fiber laser. ► Weld microstructures in fusion zone are mainly columnar dendrites and equiaxed dendrites. ► There are no obvious composition changes and segregation in the fusion zone. ► The welded joint shows higher microhardness than the stainless steel substrate. - Abstract: The butt welding of 304 stainless steel plates with thickness of 3 mm and 6 mm were achieved by YLR-6000 fiber laser under Ar protective gas. The weld appearance, microstructure, composition distribution and microhardness of welded joint were emphatically investigated. The results showed that the narrow and fully penetrated welded joint without marco-defects can be obtained with tightly focused 2 kW fiber laser power and 20 mm/s welding speed. The weld bead was smooth, and various microstructures typically formed at different zones of the welded joint. The fine columnar and equiaxed crystals existed in the edge and center of weld bead, respectively. Both were different with the microstructure of the stainless steel substrate. However, the composition distribution of the welded joint had no obvious changes. Furthermore, the superior microhardness of welded joint over the stainless steel substrate was mainly attributed to its finer microstructure

  19. Effects of microstructure and residual stress on fatigue crack growth of stainless steel narrow gap welds

    The effects of weld microstructure and residual stress distribution on the fatigue crack growth rate of stainless steel narrow gap welds were investigated. Stainless steel pipes were joined by the automated narrow gap welding process typical to nuclear piping systems. The weld fusion zone showed cellular-dendritic structures with ferrite islands in an austenitic matrix. Residual stress analysis showed large tensile stress in the inner-weld region and compressive stress in the middle of the weld. Tensile properties and the fatigue crack growth rate were measured along and across the weld thickness direction. Tensile tests showed higher strength in the weld fusion zone and the heat affected zone compared to the base metal. Within the weld fusion zone, strength was greater in the inner weld than outer weld region. Fatigue crack growth rates were several times greater in the inner weld than the outer weld region. The spatial variation of the mechanical properties is discussed in view of weld microstructure, especially dendrite orientation, and in view of the residual stress variation within the weld fusion zone. It is thought that the higher crack growth rate in the inner-weld region could be related to the large tensile residual stress despite the tortuous fatigue crack growth path.

  20. High Power Laser Welding. [of stainless steel and titanium alloy structures

    Banas, C. M.

    1972-01-01

    A review of recent developments in high power, carbon dixoide laser welding is presented. Deep penetration welding in stainless steel to 0.5-in. thick, high speed welding in thin gage rimmed steel and gas shielded welding in Ti-6Al-4V alloy are described. The effects of laser power, power density, focusing optics, gas-shielding techniques, material properties and weld speed on weld quality and penetration are discussed. It is shown that laser welding performance in thin materials is comparable to that of electron beams. It is further shown that high quality welds, as evidenced by NDT, mechanical and metal-lographic tests, can be achieved. The potential of the laser for industrial welding applications is indicated.

  1. Weldability of dissimilar joint between PNC-FMS and Type 316 steel under electron beam welding

    The dissimilar butt welding joint of 11Cr-ferritic/martensitic steel (PNC-FMS) and Type 316 austenitic stainless steel (SUS316) produced by electron beam (EB) welding was studied. This study was carried out to investigate optimization of EB welding and postweld heat treatment (PWHT) for the wrapper tube materials. Optimum EB welding conditions were a focus position of 30–40 mm and a welding speed of 1750–2000 mm/min, and optimum PWHT was performed after welding at 690°C for 60 min. As a result, no formation of δ-ferrite was observed adjacent to the fusion zone, and the mechanical properties of the welds were similar to those of the base material. In this regard, EB welding is a proper fusion welding process for dissimilar PNC-FMS and SUS316. (author)

  2. Fatigue behavior of welded austenitic stainless steel in different environments

    D.S. Yawas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue behavior of welded austenitic stainless steel in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid and wet steam corrosive media has been investigated. The immersion time in the corrosive media was 30 days to simulate the effect on stainless steel structures/equipment in offshore and food processing applications and thereafter annealing heat treatment was carried out on the samples. The findings from the fatigue tests show that seawater specimens have a lower fatigue stress of 0.5 × 10−5 N/mm2 for the heat treated sample and 0.1 × 10−5 N/mm2 for the unheat-treated sample compared to the corresponding hydrochloric acid and steam samples. The post-welding heat treatment was found to increase the mechanical properties of the austenitic stainless steel especially tensile strength but it reduces the transformation and thermal stresses of the samples. These findings were further corroborated by the microstructural examination of the stainless steel specimen.

  3. Mechanical properties of duplex steel welded joints in large-size constructions

    J. Nowacki

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: On the basis of sources and own experiments, the analysis of mechanical properties, applications as well as material and technological problems of ferritic-austenitic steel welding were carried out. It was shown the area of welding applications, particularly welding of large-size structures, on the basis of example of the FCAW method of welding of the UNS S3 1803 duplex steel in construction of chemical cargo ships.Design/methodology/approach: Welding tests were carried out for duplex UNS S31803 steel plates, 9.5, 14.5 and 18.5 mm thick, with flux-cored wire The effect of welding with increased threshold space on mechanical properties of welded joints was determined when compared to those obtained in result of welding with 6 mm threshold space as well as to recommendations of DNV regulations and rulesFindings: It was shown that widening of threshold space tolerance and wide-gap welding of duplex steel is possible, i.e. completion of welded joints by one-side vertical bottom-top welding (PF with no need for applying the process of edge pad welding in case of weld groove geometry with the threshold space ranging 6 to 10 mm, from the point of view of meeting requirements with respect to mechanical properties by welded jointsResearch limitations/implications: The welding heat input exceeding the recommended values might influence the precipitation processes in the HAZ, what need further experiments.Practical implications: Application of high value of the welding heat input will be profitable in terms of the welding costs.Originality/value: An original value of the paper is to prove that a usage of high value welding heat input provides the best joints quality

  4. Selected problems connected with execution of mixed welded joints of creep resistant steels

    Some problems of the Polish energetics were presented as well as new creep resistant steels used in power plant installations. The welding technology of mixed joints of the P91 steel with 10H2M, 13HMF and X20CrMoV 12.1 steels were discussed. Properties of welded joints made of the above mentioned steels were given and some problems connected with the execution of this joints were high-lighted. (author)

  5. FEM analyses of creep in welded modified 9Cr-1Mo steel considering constraint effects induced by anisotropic microstructures

    Modified 9Cr-Mo steel is a candidate structural steel for demonstration fast breeder reactor (FBR's). Due to low thermal activation, the steel can maintain steady-state deformation during long-term creep. The creep strength of its weldment is lower than that of the base metal. Because of different creep strain rate in the solidified weld metal and heat-affected zone (HAZ), creep deformation in HAZ can be lowered but maximum principal stress augmented in fine-grained HAZ to cause detrimental Type IV cracks in this zone. In this study, FEM analyses were made on long-term creep of over 60 years in double U groove welded modified 9Cr-Mo steel plates with typical microstructures in the welded region of the steel plates taken into consideration. The typical welded region of the plates consists of solidified weld, coarse grain HAZ, fine grain HAZ, interfacial HAZ and base metal. These microstructures were modeled as polycrystal structures having slip systems approximated by orthotropic deformation properties. The results obtained were compared with existing experimental results and those obtained by the authors and found to agree with the experimental results. The results were also compared with computational results obtained by a model having hexagonal crystal grains having the same size and a model having two isotropic materials. The results revealed that the equisized-grain model gives conservative creep life prediction whereas the isotropic model unconservative predictions. (author)

  6. High temperature fatigue experiments on welded stainless steel tubular elements

    A test rig has been designed to perform high temperature fatigue experiments on AISI 304 stainless steel tubular elements of 500 mm length, 60.3 mm outer diameter and 2 mm thickness; they are composed by two butt welded tubular elements with welded end flanges. During the experiments it is possible to control the axial strain range, the strain rate and the hold time; the specimen temperature is obtained by an inner heating device, controlled by a series of measuring thermocouples; until now the imposed temperature is 6500C. A preliminary series of experiments has been carried out, with the aim at getting informations for a proper development of the main experimental program, while in the meantime the adjustment of the specimen manufacturing process and its characterization have been performed. Each specimen is welded on the same TIG welding rig, which accounts both for a uniformly reliable welding process and for a proper alignment of the tubular elements. The specimens are then marked by a high precision grid which allows a measurement of the residual localized plastic strain along some generatrix of the specimen and on its thickness. The basic fatigue data have to be measured through a series of standard tests carried out on small size specimens obtained either from the base material and around the welded, heat affected zone. It is also planned to carry out a detailed study on the crack surfaces and to use acoustical emission techniques to properly assess the initial crack propagation. The first results show a marked reduction of the number of cycles at failure, if compared with existing data about small size specimens; the measurement of residual plastic strains shows clearly non-uniform distribution of the plastic zones

  7. Vacuum pressure welding of commercial titanium with 2Kh13 and 12Kh18N10T steels

    The method of commercial titanium welding with steels of different classes without an application of intermediate layers is described. Welding operation conditions providing preparation of welded joints with high strength and satisfactory plasticity are found out. It is established that welded joints of titanium with steel are not very sensitive to durable heating at temperatures up to 400 deg C

  8. Residual stress distributions in a P91 steel-pipe girth weld before and after post weld heat treatment

    Paddea, S., E-mail: s.paddea@open.ac.uk [Materials Engineering, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Francis, J.A. [School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Paradowska, A.M. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX, Oxon (United Kingdom); Bouchard, P.J. [Materials Engineering, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Shibli, I.A. [European Technology Development Ltd., Leatherhead KT22 7RD, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residual stresses in a pipe girth weld in P91 steel have been measured in both the as-welded and PWHT conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The highest tensile residual stresses coincided with the HAZ boundary and the microstructural region that is prone to type IV cracking. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compressive residual stresses were measured in the weld metal, in a location corresponding to the final weld pass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The location of the peak compressive stresses can be explained by the effect of solid-state phase transformation. - Abstract: In this study the residual stresses in a pipe girth weld in a ferritic-martensitic power plant steel were measured by neutron diffraction and compared with the corresponding metallurgical zones in the weld region. It was found that, in both the as-welded and post-weld heat treated condition, the highest tensile stresses resided near the outer boundary of the heat-affected zone (HAZ), and towards the weld root region. Substantial tensile direct and hydrostatic stresses existed across the HAZ, including the fine-grained and intercritically annealed regions, where premature type IV creep failures manifest in 9-12 Cr steel welds. Compressive stresses were found in the weld metal coinciding with the last weld bead to be deposited. Constrained cooling tests on test coupons illustrated that these compressive stresses can be explained in terms of the influence that solid-state phase transformations have on the accumulation of stress in welds.

  9. Evaluation of cold crack susceptibility on HSLA steel welded joints

    Silverio-Freire Júnior, R. C.

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study addresses an evaluation of the effect of several welding parameters on cold cracking formation in welded joints of High Strength and Low Alloy steels, as well as the resulting microstructures and hardness values. The main parameters studied include the variation of the preheating temperature, drying time of the electrode, chemical composition and thickness of the base metal. The presence of cold cracking in the joints was analyzed from Tekken tests using steel plates made of SAR 80 T, 100 T and 120 T with of various thickness. The plates were welded by Shielded Metal Arc Welding either with or without pre-heating. Different preheating temperatures were studied, i.e., 375, 455 and 525 K. AWS E 12018 G and 11018 G electrodes were used under different conditions, i.e., not dried or dried up to 2, 3 and 4 h at 515 K. The results indicated the presence of cracks in the welded metals with the combination of hardness values above 230 HV and the formation of high contents of acicular ferrite (above 93 % in the welds without preheating. Higher crack susceptibility was also observed in the thick welded metal plates.

    Este trabajo evalúa la influencia de la variación de temperatura de precalentamiento, del tiempo de secado del electrodo, de la composición química y del espesor del metal base sobre la formación de fisuras en frío, inducidas por el hidrógeno en juntas soldadas de aceros de alta resistencia y baja aleación y su relación con la microestructura y dureza resultante. Para esto, se analizó la presencia de fisuras en frío en probetas para ensayos Tekken, fabricadas a partir de chapas de aceros SAR 80 T, 100 T y 120 T, con diferentes espesores y soldados por proceso de arco eléctrico con electrodo revestido, sin precalentamiento y con precalentamiento, a 375, 455 y 525 K, empleando electrodos AWS E 12018 G y 11018 G no secados y secados durante 2, 3 y 4 h. Los resultados obtenidos indicaron la presencia de fisuras

  10. Predicting weld creep strength reduction for 9% Cr steels

    In design standards and in post-service life assessment, the cross-weld (CW) creep strength of ferritic steels is nearly universally assumed to be 80% of the corresponding value for the parent material (PH). However, CW data assessment of some 9% Cr steels such as E911 and P91 suggests that this would not hold at least at the high temperature end of the testing range. The resulting weld creep strength factor (WSF) is then attaining values well below 0.8 when extrapolated to typical design life of 100,000 h or more. Under such conditions the conventional value of 0.8 would result in non-conservative (too long) predicted life for structures subjected to CW loading in the creep regime. To accommodate the CW strength data for realistic values of WSF requires appropriate correction based on actual data. For this purpose, an alternative assessment approach, rigidity parameter correction (RPC), is proposed. This approach can be used to predict CW rupture strength from the PM master curves, with any PM rupture model optimized to correspond to the welded materials data

  11. Truck frame welding reparation by steel covered electrodes with varied amount of Ni and Mo

    Tomasz WĘGRZYN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to study safety and exploitation conditions of weld steel structure reparation of car body truck frames. Car (auto body is the name given to the portion of an automobile which gives it shape. The work is a theoretical investigation and concentrates on structural integrity and vehicle safety after the reparation welding of truck frames. To study the effects of the frame flexibility and resistance, the truck frame has been welded by steel electrodes with varied amount of Ni and Mo. The most significant of factors influencing that conditions are connected with material choice, welding technology, state of stress and temperature. Because of that a good selection of steel and welding method is crucial to obtain proper steel structure. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW is a very popular method of welding used for car body reparation. Car body elements of higher durability are made of low carbon and low alloy steel, very often with small amount of carbon and the amount of alloy elements such as Ni, Mn, Mo, Cr, Ti, Al, V in low alloy steel and their welds. In the paper only the influence of the variable amounts of nickel, molybdenum on impact and fatigue properties of low alloy metal weld deposit was tested. The results show that there is good agreement between proper chemical composition of weld metal deposit (WMD and truck structure properties.

  12. Thermal and metallurgical aspects of electron beam welding of thick steel plates

    The electron-beam welding of thick carbon-manganese steel plates has been assessed. The thermal cycles in the heat affected zone (H.A.Z.) have been related to welding parameters. The weld metal composition hardness and toughness were evaluated with respect to the H.A.Z. properties

  13. A Plasma Control and Gas Protection System for Laser Welding of Stainless Steel

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1997-01-01

    A prototype shield gas box with different plasma control nozzles have been investigated for laser welding of stainless steel (AISI 316). Different gases for plasma control and gas protection of the weld seam have been used. The gas types, welding speed and gas flows show the impact on process...

  14. Plasma Control and Gas Protection System for Laser Welding of Stainless Steel

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Petersen, Kaj

    1997-01-01

    An integrated plasma nozzle and a shield gas box have been investigated for laser welding of 2 mm stainless steel sheets. Different gases for plasma control and gas protection of the weld seam have been used. The gas types, welding speed and coaxial and plasma flow show the impact on process...

  15. Possibility of Inducing Compressive Residual Stresses in Welded Joints of SS400 Steels

    2001-01-01

    Since the welded constructions produce easily stress corrosion cracking (SCC) or fatigue disruption in corrosive medium or under ripple load, two methods inducing compressive stress on structural surfaces by anti-welding-heating treatment (AWHT) and explosion treatment (ET) are presented. The results show that they are good ways to resisting SCC on the welded SS400 steel or other components.

  16. Systematic investigation of the fatigue performance of a friction stir welded low alloy steel

    Highlights: • The fatigue behaviour of a friction stir welded low alloy steel has been assessed. • The welds’ fatigue lives outperform the International Institute of Welding’s recommendations for fusion welds. • The slow weld exhibits the best fatigue performance of the investigated welds. • Fracture surface analysis shows that minor embedded flaws do not offer crack initiation sites. • Process-related surface breaking flaws have a significant effect on the fatigue life. - Abstract: A comprehensive fatigue performance assessment of friction stir welded DH36 steel has been undertaken to address the relevant knowledge gap for this process on low alloy steel. A detailed set of experimental procedures specific to friction stir welding has been put forward, and the consequent study extensively examined the weld microstructure and hardness in support of the tensile and fatigue testing. The effect of varying welding parameters was also investigated. Microstructural observations have been correlated to the weldments’ fatigue behaviour. The typical fatigue performance of friction stir welded steel plates has been established, exhibiting fatigue lives well above the weld detail class of the International Institute of Welding even for tests at 90% of yield strength, irrespective of minor instances of surface breaking flaws which have been identified. An understanding of the manner in which these flaws impact on the fatigue performance has been established, concluding that surface breaking irregularities such as these produced by the tool shoulder’s features on the weld top surface can be the dominant factor for crack initiation under fatigue loading

  17. Laser power coupling efficiency in conduction and keyhole welding of austenitic stainless steel

    A K Nath; R Sridhar; P Ganesh; R Kaul

    2002-06-01

    Laser welding of thin sheets of AISI 304 stainless steel was carried out with high power CW CO2 laser. The laser power utilized in the welding process was estimated using the experimental results and the dimensionless parameter model for laser welding; and also the energy balance equation model. Variation of laser welding efficiency with welding speed and mode of welding was studied. Welding efficiency was high for high-speed conduction welding of thin sheets and also in keyhole welding process at high laser powers. Effect of pre-oxidization of the surface and powder as filler material on laser power coupling is also reported. The paper also discusses effect of microstructure on the cracking susceptibility of laser welds.

  18. Parametric optimization of seam welding of stainless steel (SS 304) sheets

    Krishnan, Muthuraman Pandi; Sait, Abdullah Naveen; Ravichandran, Manickam [Chendhuran College of Engineering and Technology, Pudukkottai, Tamilnadu (India)

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, seam welding process parameters were optimized for joining 306 stainless steel plates. Welding pressure, welding speed and welding temperature combinations were carefully selected with the objective of producing a weld joint with maximum impact strength and hardness. Taguchi technique was applied for optimizing the selected welding parameters. The factors used in this study consisted of pressure, welding speed and welding temperature, each of which had three levels in the study. L{sub 27} orthogonal array and corresponding levels were selected according to the aforementioned factors and experimental tests were performed. Signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio was used to evaluate the experimental results. The results indicate that the welding speed has the greatest influence on impact strength, followed by welding pressure and temperature. Experiments have also been conducted to validate the optimized parameters.

  19. On-line evaluating on quality of mild steel joints in resistance spot welding

    2008-01-01

    A method was developed to realize quality evaluation on every weld-spot in resistance spot welding based on information processing of artificial intelligent. Firstly, the signals of welding current and welding voltage, as information source, were synchronously collected. Input power and dynamic resistance were selected as monitoring waveforms. Eight characteristic parameters relating to weld quality were extracted from the monitoring waveforms. Secondly, tensile-shear strength of the spot-welded joint was employed as evaluating target of weld quality. Through correlation analysis between every two parameters of characteristic vector, five characteristic parameters were reasonably selected to found a mapping model of weld quality estimation. At last, the model was realized by means of the algorithms of Radial Basic Function neural network and sample matrixes. The results showed validations by a satisfaction in evaluating weld quality of mild steel joint on-line in spot welding process.

  20. Effect of beam oscillation on borated stainless steel electron beam welds

    Borated stainless steels are used in nuclear power plants to control neutron criticality in reactors as control rods, shielding material, spent fuel storage racks and transportation casks. In this study, bead on plate welds were made using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and electron beam welding (EBW) processes. Electron beam welds made using beam oscillation technique exhibited higher tensile strength values compared to that of GTA welds. Electron beam welds were found to show fine dendritic microstructure while GTA welds exhibited larger dendrites. While both processes produced defect free welds, GTA welds are marked by partially melted zone (PMZ) where the hardness is low. EBW obviate the PMZ failure due to low heat input and in case of high heat input GTA welding process failure occurs in the PMZ.

  1. Suitability of maraging steel weld cladding for repair of die casting tooling Part II

    Taljat, Boštjan; Klobčar, Damjan; Muhič, Mitja; Tušek, Janez; Kosec, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    This study was done to evaluate precipitation annealing of 18% Ni maraging steel repair welds during aluminium alloy die casting and to predict the prolonged in-service tool life. The emphasis of this study was the influence of post-weld precipitation annealing heat treatment and aluminium die casting thermal cycling on metallurgical and mechanical properties. A series of specimens of 1.2344 tool steel was prepared to which 1.6356 maraging steel wasgas tungsten arc weld clad. Analysis of weld...

  2. Electron beam welding of 180 MM thick 15 CD 9 10 steel

    In the context of heavy component welding for the nuclear industry, an electron beam weldability study was undertaken on 180 mn thick 15 CD 9 10 (21/4 Cr-1-1 Mo) steel plates. The purpose of this study, performed using the CEA/STA 100 kW electron beam welding facilities, was to determine the welding parameters assuring sound weld beads during nominal conditions and to assess the electron beam weldability of this grade of steel in the event of very thick plates. This paper describes the procedure adopted to determine the welding parameters and gives an initial metallurgical characterization of the welds obtained for as-welded and stress-relieved states. The study confirms the operating feasibility of electron beam welding on 180 mn thick 15 CD 9.10 steel plates, during nominal conditions. However, problems related to beam start and extinction are disregarded, as are those concerning magnetic remanence. The effects on weld beam compactness of variations in the welding parameters were analyzed. Acceptable latitudes amply suffice in most cases to ensure satisfactory result reproducibility. The beam circular vibratory amplitude would appear to be a highly sensitive welding parameter. The HAZ cooling rate, the microstructure obtained consisting mainly of martensite and the hardness values measured in both heat-affected and fusion zones (high for as-welded states and leveled after stress-relieving) lead us to expect satisfactory mechanical properties for these welds. (authors). 4 refs., 6 figs

  3. Double-Sided Single-Pass Submerged Arc Welding for 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    Luo, Jian; Yuan, Yi; Wang, Xiaoming; Yao, Zongxiang

    2013-09-01

    The duplex stainless steel (DSS), which combines the characteristics of ferritic steel and austenitic steel, is used widely. The submerged arc welding (SAW) method is usually applied to join thick plates of DSS. However, an effective welding procedure is needed in order to obtain ideal DSS welds with an appropriate proportion of ferrite (δ) and austenite (γ) in the weld zone, particularly in the melted zone and heat-affected zone. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a high efficiency double-sided single-pass (DSSP) SAW joining method for thick DSS plates. The effectiveness of the converse welding procedure, characterizations of weld zone, and mechanical properties of welded joint are analyzed. The results show an increasing appearance and continuous distribution feature of the σ phase in the fusion zone of the leading welded seam. The converse welding procedure promotes the σ phase to precipitate in the fusion zone of leading welded side. The microhardness appears to significantly increase in the center of leading welded side. Ductile fracture mode is observed in the weld zone. A mixture fracture feature appears with a shear lip and tears in the fusion zone near the fusion line. The ductility, plasticity, and microhardness of the joints have a significant relationship with σ phase and heat treatment effect influenced by the converse welding step. An available heat input controlling technology of the DSSP formation method is discussed for SAW of thick DSS plates.

  4. 77 FR 24459 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    2012-04-24

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy: Final Results of... stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings (SSBW pipe fittings) from Italy.\\1\\ This review covers two... results remain unchanged from the preliminary results of review. \\1\\ See Stainless Steel Butt-Weld...

  5. 76 FR 64106 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan; Scheduling of Expedited Five-Year...

    2011-10-17

    ... COMMISSION Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan; Scheduling of Expedited Five-Year Reviews Concerning the Antidumping Duty Orders on Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and... duty orders on certain welded stainless steel pipe (specifically ASTM A-312 pipe) from Korea and...

  6. 75 FR 27987 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of Antidumping...

    2010-05-19

    ... Antidumping Duty Order: Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea, 60 FR 10064, 10065... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea: Final... welded stainless steel pipes (WSSP) from the Republic of Korea (Korea). This review covers one...

  7. 78 FR 33108 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From China; Institution of Five-Year Reviews

    2013-06-03

    ... countervailing duty orders on imports of circular welded carbon-quality steel pipe from China (73 FR 42545-42549... COMMISSION Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From China; Institution of Five-Year Reviews AGENCY... welded carbon-quality steel pipe from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence...

  8. 77 FR 73674 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, The United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam

    2012-12-11

    ... countervailing duty determination with respect to circular welded carbon-quality steel pipe from Vietnam (77 FR... COMMISSION Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, The United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam... determinations by Commerce that imports of circular welded carbon- quality steel pipe from India, Oman,...

  9. 78 FR 72863 - Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Pipe From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of...

    2013-12-04

    ...'') Review, 78 FR 33063 (June 3, 2013). \\2\\ See Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Pipe From the People's... FR 60849 (October 2, 2013). \\3\\ See Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe from China, 78 FR 70069... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Pipe From the People's Republic of...

  10. 77 FR 64478 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India: Final Determination of Sales at Less Than...

    2012-10-22

    ... Preliminary Determination, 77 FR at 32562-63. \\3\\ See Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India...; Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes From India, 51 FR 17384 (May 12, 1986). Therefore... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India: Final Determination...

  11. 78 FR 72114 - Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Line Pipe From China; Institution of Five-Year Reviews

    2013-12-02

    ... circular welded carbon quality steel line pipe from China (74 FR 4136). On May 13, 2009, the Department of... COMMISSION Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Line Pipe From China; Institution of Five-Year Reviews AGENCY... welded carbon quality steel line pipe from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence...

  12. 77 FR 42697 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines: Continuation...

    2012-07-20

    ... Orders: Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines, 66 FR 11257... Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines, 77 FR 39735 (July 5, 2012), and... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and...

  13. 76 FR 66893 - Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From India, Thailand, and Turkey; Final...

    2011-10-28

    ..., 75 FR 69626, 69627 (November 15, 2010). Thailand--Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube (A-549-502) The.... See Scope Rulings, 58 FR 27542, (May 10, 1993). Turkey--Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube (A-489-501... Tubes from India, 51 FR 17384 (May 12, 1986); Antidumping Duty Order; Circular Welded Carbon Steel...

  14. 76 FR 64900 - Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Final Results of Expedited Sunset Review of...

    2011-10-19

    ... International Trade Administration Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Final Results of Expedited...) initiated a sunset review of the countervailing duty order (CVD) on welded carbon steel pipe and tube from... CVD order on welded carbon steel pipe and tube from Turkey was published in the Federal Register...

  15. 76 FR 36086 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    2011-06-21

    ... Review: Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe and Tube from Mexico, 74 FR 41681 (August 18, 2009... Antidumping Duty Changed Circumstances Review: Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from Mexico, 75 FR... Less Than Fair Value: Circular Welded Non- Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico, 57 FR 42953 (September...

  16. 76 FR 76939 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Notice of Final Results of Antidumping...

    2011-12-09

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Notice of Final... welded carbon steel pipe and tube from Turkey. The administrative review covers the Borusan Group \\1\\ and... preliminary results of the antidumping duty administrative view of certain welded carbon steel pipe and...

  17. 78 FR 79665 - Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube Products From Turkey: Final Results of Antidumping...

    2013-12-31

    ... Antidumping Duty Order; Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube Products From Turkey, 51 FR 17784, 17784... International Trade Administration Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube Products From Turkey: Final... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on welded carbon steel standard pipe and tube...

  18. 75 FR 76025 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan

    2010-12-07

    ... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan AGENCY: United States... stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, Korea, and Taiwan would be likely to lead to... party responded to the sunset review notice of initiation by the applicable deadline * * *'' (75...

  19. Occupational asthma due to gas metal arc welding on mild steel.

    Vandenplas, O.; Dargent, F.; Auverdin, J. J.; Boulanger, J; Bossiroy, J. M.; Roosels, D.; Vande Weyer, R.

    1995-01-01

    Occupational asthma has been documented in electric arc welders exposed to manual metal arc welding on stainless steel. A subject is described who developed late and dual asthmatic reactions after occupational-type challenge exposure to gas metal arc welding on uncoated mild steel.

  20. 77 FR 65712 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From Vietnam; Termination of Investigation

    2012-10-30

    ... COMMISSION Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From Vietnam; Termination of Investigation AGENCY... subsidies in connection with the subject investigation (77 FR 64471). Accordingly, pursuant to section 207... investigation concerning circular welded carbon-quality steel pipe from Vietnam (investigation No....

  1. 78 FR 45271 - Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam

    2013-07-26

    ... Commission, Washington, DC, and by publishing the notice in the Federal Register of May 24, 2013 (78 FR 31574... COMMISSION Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam Determination On the... injured by reason of imports from Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam of welded stainless steel pressure...

  2. 78 FR 63517 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    2013-10-24

    ... Information The NRC published DG-1279 in the Federal Register on October 3, 2012 (77 FR 60479), for a 60-day... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... revision to Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.31, ``Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.''...

  3. 78 FR 31574 - Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam; Institution of...

    2013-05-24

    ... COMMISSION Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam; Institution of... materially retarded, by reason of imports from Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam of welded stainless steel... the Commission's Handbook on Filing Procedures, 76 FR 62092 (Oct. 6, 2011), available on...

  4. 75 FR 44766 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe from Turkey: Final Results of Countervailing Duty...

    2010-07-29

    ...: Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube Products From Turkey, 51 FR 7984 (March 7, 1986). On April 1...: Preliminary Results of Countervailing Duty Administrative Review, 75 FR 16439 (April 1, 2010) (Preliminary...) was rescinded. See Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube from Turkey: Notice of Rescission...

  5. 77 FR 19623 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe from Turkey: Preliminary Results of Countervailing Duty...

    2012-04-02

    ... Pipe and Tube Products from Turkey, 51 FR 7984 (March 7, 1986). \\2\\ See Antidumping or Countervailing... Administrative Review, in Part, 76 FR 78886 (December 20, 2011). \\12\\ See Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standare...: Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe from Turkey, 72 FR 62837, 62838 (November 7, 2007) (Turkey...

  6. 78 FR 49255 - Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Partial Rescission of...

    2013-08-13

    ... Request for Revocation in Part, 78 FR 38924 (June 28, 2013). On July 25, 2013, Petitioner withdrew its... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Partial... certain circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan. The period of review (POR) is May...

  7. Structural response of superaustenitic stainless steel to friction stir welding

    Highlights: → Grain structure evolution was mainly governed by discontinuous recrystallization. → The recrystallization was static in nature and occurred during weld cooling cycle. → Material flow was mainly induced by the tool shoulder. → The texture was a superposition of {1 1 1} and {h k l} partial simple-shear fibers. - Abstract: Electron backscattering diffraction was employed to study grain structure development and texture evolution during friction stir welding (FSW) of a low stacking fault energy material, S31254 superaustenitic stainless steel. Formation of the final stir zone (SZ) microstructure was deduced to be primarily governed by discontinuous recrystallization occurring during the FSW cooling cycle. The textural pattern formed in the SZ was interpreted in the terms of {1 1 1} and {h k l} partial simple shear fiber textures.

  8. The Influence of Shielding Gas and Heat Input on the Mechanical Properties of Laser Welds in Ferritic Stainless Steel

    Keskitalo, M.; Sundqvist, J.; Mäntyjärvi, K.; Powell, J.; Kaplan, A. F. H.

    Laser welding of ferritic steel in normal atmosphere gives rise to weld embrittlement and poor formability. This paper demonstrates that the addition of an argon gas shield to the welding process results in tough, formable welds. Post weld heat treatment and microscopic analysis has suggested that the poor ductility of welds produced without a gas shield is, to some extent, the result of the presence of oxides in the weld metal.

  9. Experimental study of mechanical properties of friction welded AISI 1021 steels

    Amit Handa; Vikas Chawla

    2013-12-01

    Friction welding is widely used as a mass production method in various industries. In the present study, an experimental set-up was designed in order to achieve friction welding of plastically deformed AISI 1021 steels. In this study, low alloy steel (AISI 1021) was welded under different welding parameters and afterwards the mechanical properties such as tensile strength, impact strength and hardness were experimentally determined. On the basis of the results obtained from the experimentation, the graphs were plotted. It is the strength of welded joints, which is fundamental property to the service reliability of the weldments and hence present work was undertaken to study the influence of axial pressure and rotational speed in friction welded joints. Axial pressure and rotational speed are the two major parameters which can influence the strength and hence the mechanical properties of the friction welded joints. Thus the axial pressure and rotational speed were taken as welding parameters, which reflect the mechanical properties.

  10. Welding characteristics of austenitic 304 stainless steel using a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser beam

    Laser beam welding is increasingly being used in welding of structural steels. The laser welding process is one of the most advanced manufacturing technologies owing to its high speed and deep penetration. The thermal cycles associated with laser welding are generally much faster than those involved in conventional welding processes, leading to a rather small weld zone. Experiments are performed for 304 stainless steel plates changing several process parameter such as laser power, welding speed, shielding gas flow rate, presence of surface pollution, with fixed or variable gap and misalignment between the similar and dissimilar and plates, etc. The follow conclusions can be drawn that laser power and welding speed have a pronounced effect on size and shape of the fusion zone

  11. Interfacial microstructure and properties of copper clad steel produced using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding

    Shen, Z.; Chen, Y. [Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada); Haghshenas, M., E-mail: mhaghshe@uwaterloo.ca [Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada); Nguyen, T. [Mechanical Systems Engineering, Conestoga College, Kitchener (Canada); Galloway, J. [Welding Engineering Technology, Conestoga College, Kitchener (Canada); Gerlich, A.P. [Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    A preliminary study compares the feasibility and microstructures of pure copper claddings produced on a pressure vessel A516 Gr. 70 steel plate, using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding. A combination of optical and scanning electron microscopy is used to characterize the grain structures in both the copper cladding and heat affected zone in the steel near the fusion line. The friction stir welding technique produces copper cladding with a grain size of around 25 μm, and no evidence of liquid copper penetration into the steel. The gas metal arc welding of copper cladding exhibits grain sizes over 1 mm, and with surface microcracks as well as penetration of liquid copper up to 50 μm into the steel substrate. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that metallurgical bonding is produced in both processes. Increased diffusion of Mn and Si into the copper cladding occurs when using gas metal arc welding, although some nano-pores were detected in the FSW joint interface. - Highlights: • Cladding of steel with pure copper is possible using either FSW or GMAW. • The FSW yielded a finer grain structure in the copper, with no evidence of cracking. • The FSW joint contains some evidence of nano-pores at the interface of the steel/copper. • Copper cladding by GMAW contained surface cracks attributed to high thermal stresses. • The steel adjacent to the fusion line maintained a hardness value below 248 HV.

  12. Interfacial microstructure and properties of copper clad steel produced using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding

    A preliminary study compares the feasibility and microstructures of pure copper claddings produced on a pressure vessel A516 Gr. 70 steel plate, using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding. A combination of optical and scanning electron microscopy is used to characterize the grain structures in both the copper cladding and heat affected zone in the steel near the fusion line. The friction stir welding technique produces copper cladding with a grain size of around 25 μm, and no evidence of liquid copper penetration into the steel. The gas metal arc welding of copper cladding exhibits grain sizes over 1 mm, and with surface microcracks as well as penetration of liquid copper up to 50 μm into the steel substrate. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that metallurgical bonding is produced in both processes. Increased diffusion of Mn and Si into the copper cladding occurs when using gas metal arc welding, although some nano-pores were detected in the FSW joint interface. - Highlights: • Cladding of steel with pure copper is possible using either FSW or GMAW. • The FSW yielded a finer grain structure in the copper, with no evidence of cracking. • The FSW joint contains some evidence of nano-pores at the interface of the steel/copper. • Copper cladding by GMAW contained surface cracks attributed to high thermal stresses. • The steel adjacent to the fusion line maintained a hardness value below 248 HV

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Microstructural Constituents in Welded Transformation-Induced-Plasticity Steels

    Amirthalingam, M.; Hermans, M.J.M.; Zhao, L.; Richardson, I.M.

    2009-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of retained austenite and nonmetallic inclusions in gas tungsten arc (GTA)–welded aluminum-containing transformation-induced-plasticity (TRIP) steels is presented. The amount of retained austenite in the heat-affected and fusion zones of welded aluminum-containing TRIP steel with different base metal austenite fractions has been measured by magnetic saturation measurements, to study the effect of weld thermal cycles on the stabilization of austenite. It is found that f...

  14. Truck frame welding reparation by steel covered electrodes with varied amount of Ni and Mo

    Tomasz WĘGRZYN; Michał MIROS; Damian HADRYŚ; Abilio Manuel Pereira da SILVA

    2010-01-01

    This paper attempts to study safety and exploitation conditions of weld steel structure reparation of car body truck frames. Car (auto) body is the name given to the portion of an automobile which gives it shape. The work is a theoretical investigation and concentrates on structural integrity and vehicle safety after the reparation welding of truck frames. To study the effects of the frame flexibility and resistance, the truck frame has been welded by steel electrodes with varied amount of Ni...

  15. Explosive welding of transition pipes joint with zirconium alloy-stainless steel

    The explosive welding technology of two kinds of transition pipes joints with Zr-2 + stainless steel and Zr2.5Nb + stainless steel is researched. The mechanical properties and micro-structure in the bonding zone of the transition pipes joint produced by this welding technology are checked. It is seen that there are some micro-characteristics concerning the strength bonding between the welding metals in the bonding zone of transition pipes joint

  16. Occupational asthma due to manual metal-arc welding of special stainless steels.

    Hannu, T; Piipari, R; Kasurinen, H; Keskinen, H; Tuppurainen, M; Tuomi, T

    2005-10-01

    Occupational asthma (OA) can be induced by fumes of manual metal-arc welding on stainless steel. In recent years, the use of special stainless steels (SSS) with high chromium content has increased. This study presents two cases of OA caused by manual metal-arc welding on SSS. In both cases, the diagnosis of OA was based on respiratory symptoms, occupational exposure and positive findings in the specific challenge tests. In the first case, a 46-yr-old welder had experienced severe dyspnoea while welding SSS (SMO steel), but not in other situations. Challenge tests with both mild steel and stainless steel using a common electrode were negative. Welding SSS with a special electrode caused a delayed 37% drop in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). In the second case, a 34-yr-old male had started to experience dyspnoea during the past few years, while welding especially SSS (Duplex steel). The workplace peak expiratory flow monitoring was suggestive of OA. Challenge tests with both mild steel and stainless steel using a common electrode did not cause bronchial obstruction. Welding SSS with a special electrode caused a delayed 31% drop in FEV1. In conclusion, exposure to manual metal-arc welding fumes of special stainless steel should be considered as a new cause of occupational asthma. PMID:16204606

  17. Evaluation of welding damage in welded tubular steel structures using guided waves and a probability-based imaging approach

    Welded tubular steel structures (WTSSs) are widely used in various engineering sectors, serving as major frameworks for many mechanical systems. There has been increasing awareness of introducing effective damage identification and up-to-the-minute health surveillance to WTSSs, so as to enhance structural reliability and integrity. In this study, propagation of guided waves (GWs) in a WTSS of rectangular cross-section, a true-scale model of a train bogie frame segment, was investigated using the finite element method (FEM) and experimental analysis with the purpose of evaluating welding damage in the WTSS. An active piezoelectric sensor network was designed and surface-bonded on the WTSS, to activate and collect GWs. Characteristics of GWs at different excitation frequencies were explored. A signal feature, termed 'time of maximal difference' (ToMD) in this study, was extracted from captured GW signals, based on which a concept, damage presence probability (DPP), was established. With ToMD and DPP, a probability-based damage imaging approach was developed. To enhance robustness of the approach to measurement noise and uncertainties, a two-level image fusion scheme was further proposed. As validation, the approach was employed to predict presence and location of slot-like damage in the welding zone of a WTSS. Identification results have demonstrated the effectiveness of the developed approach for identifying damage in WTSSs and its large potential for real-time health monitoring of WTSSs

  18. Evaluation of welding damage in welded tubular steel structures using guided waves and a probability-based imaging approach

    Lu, Xi; Lu, Mingyu; Zhou, Li-Min; Su, Zhongqing; Cheng, Li; Ye, Lin; Meng, Guang

    2011-01-01

    Welded tubular steel structures (WTSSs) are widely used in various engineering sectors, serving as major frameworks for many mechanical systems. There has been increasing awareness of introducing effective damage identification and up-to-the-minute health surveillance to WTSSs, so as to enhance structural reliability and integrity. In this study, propagation of guided waves (GWs) in a WTSS of rectangular cross-section, a true-scale model of a train bogie frame segment, was investigated using the finite element method (FEM) and experimental analysis with the purpose of evaluating welding damage in the WTSS. An active piezoelectric sensor network was designed and surface-bonded on the WTSS, to activate and collect GWs. Characteristics of GWs at different excitation frequencies were explored. A signal feature, termed 'time of maximal difference' (ToMD) in this study, was extracted from captured GW signals, based on which a concept, damage presence probability (DPP), was established. With ToMD and DPP, a probability-based damage imaging approach was developed. To enhance robustness of the approach to measurement noise and uncertainties, a two-level image fusion scheme was further proposed. As validation, the approach was employed to predict presence and location of slot-like damage in the welding zone of a WTSS. Identification results have demonstrated the effectiveness of the developed approach for identifying damage in WTSSs and its large potential for real-time health monitoring of WTSSs.

  19. Effect of weld toe treatments on the fatigue resistance of structural steel welds

    Toe grinding is effective in being able to improve the fatigue resistance of structural steel welds, but it can also lead to eye injuries if not done correctly and presents a health and safety hazard. In this project, the effects of seven toe treatments on the fatigue resistance structural steel welded plates were investigated to determine whether alternative toe treatments were as effective in improving fatigue resistance as toe grinding. S-N curves were developed for each of the toe treatments by testing samples in bending at three different load levels using a replication of 70% and a load ratio R = 0.1. It was found that the best performing treatments were toe grinding, hammer peening and ultrasonic impact treatments (UIT) and there was no statistical difference etween these three treatments. Thermal stress relieving did not improve the fatigue resistance of the samples significantly and the stress levels for failure were approximately 60% of the toe ground samples. Some improvement in fatigue resistance was found in samples where the weld toes were TIG dressed and where the toes were polished with a sanding disc but the results were inferior to those found for the toe ground samples and the peened samples.

  20. Influence of PWHT on Toughness of High Chromium and Nickel Containing Martensitic Stainless Steel Weld Metals

    Divya, M.; Das, Chitta Ranjan; Mahadevan, S.; Albert, S. K.; Pandian, R.; Kar, Sujoy Kumar; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2015-06-01

    Commonly used 12.5Cr-5Ni consumable specified for welding of martensitic stainless steels is compared with newly designed 14.5Cr-5Ni consumable in terms of their suitability for repair welding of 410 and 414 stainless steels by gas tungsten arc welding process. Changes in microstructure and austenite evolution were investigated using optical, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction techniques and Thermo-Calc studies. Microstructure of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed only lath martensite, whereas as-welded 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed delta-ferrite, retained austenite, and lath martensite. Toughness value of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal is found to be significantly higher (216 J) than that of the 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal (15 J). The welds were subjected to different PWHTs: one at 923 K (650 °C) for 1, 2, 4 hours (single-stage PWHT) and another one at 923 K (650 °C)/4 h followed by 873 K (600 °C)/2 h or 873 K (600 °C)/4 h (two-stage heat treatment). Hardness and impact toughness of the weld metals were measured for these weld metals and correlated with the microstructure. The study demonstrates the importance of avoiding formation of delta-ferrite in the weld metal.

  1. Material properties of a dissimilar metal weld Inconel 600/ Inconel 82 weld filler/ Carbon Steel (Gr.106 B)

    Inconel 600 pipes welded to Carbon-Steel are used in CANDU nuclear reactors. Fracture of these welded pipes has important consequences in term of safety, and therefore their mechanical properties need to be better understood. In this study, the weld region was analyzed at various length-scales using optical microscopy, micro hardness testing, small and large scale tensile testing, and Digital Image Correlation (DIC). Micro-hardness profiles showed variations across the weld and through thickness and were justified in terms of residual stresses. Local stress-strain curves were built using DIC and showed good agreement with stress-strain curves obtained from miniature tensile samples. (author)

  2. Effect of Electrode Types on the Solidification Cracking Susceptibility of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    J. U. Anaele; O. O. ONYEMAOBI; Nwobodo, C. S.; C. C. Ugwuegbu

    2015-01-01

    The effect of electrode types on the solidification cracking susceptibility of austenitic stainless steel weld metal was studied. Manual metal arc welding method was used to produce the joints with the tungsten inert gas welding serving as the control. Metallographic and chemical analyses of the fusion zones of the joints were conducted. Results indicate that weldments produced from E 308-16 (rutile coated), E 308-16(lime-titania coated) electrodes, and TIG welded joints fall within the range...

  3. Raziskave varjenja orodnega jekla: An investigation of welding of tool-steel:

    Celin, Roman; Kmetič, Dimitrij; Tušek, Janez; Vojvodič-Tuma, Jelena

    2001-01-01

    An analysis and comparison of different welded samples of tool steel is presented. The goal was to find an optimum procedure for repair-welding die-casting tools for non-ferrous metals. Three series of samples with different welding parameters, different heat treatments and ageing were prepared: 48 samples all together. Metallographic examination was carried out and the microhardness in the weld metal and the heat-affected and unaffected zones of the parent metal was measured. The results sho...

  4. Multi-response optimization of CO2 laser welding process of austenitic stainless steel

    Benyounis, Khaled; Olabi, Abdul-Ghani; Hashmi, Saleem

    2008-01-01

    Recently, laser welding of austenitic stainless steel has received great attention in industry, due to its wide spread application in petroleum refinement stations, power plant, pharmaceutical industry and households. Therefore, mechanical properties should be controlled to obtain good welded joints. The welding process should be optimized by the proper mathematical models. In this research, the tensile strength and impact strength along with the joint operating cost of laser welded butt join...

  5. Study of Laser Welding of HCT600X Dual Phase Steels

    Švec Pavol

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of beam power and welding speed on microstructure, microhardnes and tensile strength of HCT600X laser welded steel sheets were evaluated. The welding parameters influenced both the width and the microstructure of the fusion zone and heat affected zone. The welding process has no effect on tensile strength of joints which achieved the strength of base metal and all joints fractured in the base metal.

  6. Influence of electrical Field on Pulsed Laser beam welding of Stainless Steel (304)

    FAWZİ, Salah A. H.; ARİF, RAZ N.

    1999-01-01

    Pulsed laser beam welding experiment were carried out on stainless steel (SUS 304), using vertical and horizontal electric fields of different intensities to study its effectiveness on the welding process, regarding depth and weld quality. Pulsed Nd: YAG laser emitting 10 ms pulses in the TEM00 mode at 1.06 m m wave length was employed, microstructure of welded zone and defect were investigated using optical and scanning electron microscopes. Tensile test and microhardness measuremen...

  7. Fracture toughness of welded joints of a high strength low alloy steel

    The fracture toughness of the different regions of welded joints of a high strength low alloy steel, Niocor 2, was evaluated at different temperatures and compared with the toughness of the base metal. The studied regions were: the weld metal, fusion boundary and heat affected zone. The welding process used was the manual metal arc. It is shown that the weld metal region has the highest toughness values. (Author)

  8. Factors affecting the strength and toughness of ultra-low carbon steel weld metal

    Van Slyke, Jonathon J.

    1999-01-01

    The factors that affect strength and toughness often ultra-low carbon steel weld samples (HSLA-80 and HSLA-100), welded using the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process and new ultra-low carbon consumable electrodes, were studied. The analysis was confined only to the weld metal, and the base metal was not considered. Analysis methods included optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Energy dispersive x- ray analysis was performed in the transmissi...

  9. Porosity decrease in laser welds of stainless steel using plasma control

    High-energy laser welding incorporating plasma control has been studied and reported by numerous investigators. These investigators demonstrated significant increases in laser weld penetration by use of plasma control. This report shows, in addition to variations in weld penetration, drastic decrease in porosity and variation in weld bead shapes resulting from laser welds incorporating plasma control. In particular, deep laser welds (greater than 6 mm) have been produced in 304L stainless steel that show no root porosity and only very few, if any, detectable micropores

  10. X-Ray Structural Study of 09Nn2Si Steel Welded Joints

    Golikov, N. I.; Platonov, A. A.; Saraev, Y. N.

    2015-09-01

    The article is devoted to handling a vital scientific and technical problem of improving operational reliability and safety of critical constructions, exploited in Siberia and Far North, by developing of new technological approaches to welding. In the article results of X-ray diffraction examinations of 09Mn2Si steel welded joints are given, produced by different welding operations. Resulting from researches, the authors have concluded that pulse-arc welding is the most preferred welding process as compared with direct current welding.

  11. CO2 laser-micro plasma arc hybrid welding for galvanized steel sheets

    C. H. KIM; Y. N. AHN; J. H. KIM

    2011-01-01

    A laser lap welding process for zinc-coated steel has a well-known unsolved problem-porosity formation. The boiling temperature of coated zinc is lower than the melting temperature of the base metal. which is steel. In the autogenous laser welding,the zinc vapor generates from the lapped surfaces expels the molten pool and the expulsion causes numerous weld defects, such as spatters and blow holes on the weld surface and porosity inside the welds. The laser-arc hybrid welding was suggested as an alternative method for the laser lap welding because the arc can preheat or post-heat the weldment according to the arrangement of the laser beam and the arc. CO2 laser-micro plasma hybrid welding was applied to the lap welding of zinc-coated steel with zero-gap.The relationships among the weld quality and process parameters of the laser-arc arrangement, and the laser-arc interspacing distance and arc current were investigated using a full-factorial experimental design. The effect of laser-arc arrangement is dominant because the leading plasma arc partially melts the upper steel sheets and vaporizes or oxidizes the coated zinc on the lapped surfaces.Compared with the result from the laser-TIG hybrid welding, the heat input from arc can be reduced by 40%.

  12. Numerical analysis on the distrubution of welding residual stresses in 2.25Cr-1Mo steel welds by welding heat sources

    The continuous studies for the material properties of Cr-Mo steel being used for the high pressure vessel at medium high temperature condition in electric power generation facilities are being conducted, because of the excellent thermal, pressure and corrosion resistance. But the only verified welding processes have been applied mainly so far, due to the specific reasons in electric power industries. But when it comes to the development of various welding heat sources and their application for the high quality welds and the productivity, the various researches have been being conducted recently in developed countries. And, in this study, in order to verify the application possibility of the laser welding process to the 2.25Cr-1Mo steel, it is intended to compare with and inquire into the characteristics of residual stresses distribution in welds by arc and laser welding using the finite element method. As the result of numerical analysis, the fact that the laser welding process has a benefit in respect to the residual stress distribution has been found out, and the application possibility of the laser welding process to the 2.25Cr-1Mo steel has been found out as well in respect to the mechanical characteristics in welds

  13. Laser Welding Of Finned Tubes Made Of Austenitic Steels

    Stolecki M.; Bijok H.; Kowal Ł.; Adamiec J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the technology of welding of finned tubes made of the X5CrNi1810 (1.4301) austenitic steel, developed at Energoinstal SA, allowing one to get high quality joints that meet the requirements of the classification societies (PN-EN 15614), and at the same time to significantly reduce the manufacturing costs. The authors described an automatic technological line equipped with a Trumph disc laser and a tube production technological process. To assess the quality of the joints, ...

  14. Effect of welding heat input on HAZ character in ultra-fine grain steel welding

    张富巨; 许卫刚; 王玉涛; 王燕; 张学刚; 廖永平

    2003-01-01

    In this essay, we studied how heat input affected the microstructure, hardness, grain size and heat-affected zone(HAZ) dimension of WCX355 ultra-fine grain steel which was welded respectively by the ultra narrow-gap welding (UNGW) process and the overlaying process with CO2 as protective atmosphere and laser welding process. The experimental results show when the heat input changed from 1.65kJ/cm to 5.93kJ/cm, the width of its HAZ ranged from 0.6mm to 2.1mm.The average grain size grew up from 2~5μm of base metal to 20~70μm and found no obvious soften phenomenon in overheated zone. The width of normalized zone was generally wide as 2/3 as that of the whole HAZ, and the grain size in this zone is smaller than that in base metal. Under the circumstance of equal heat input, the HAZ width of UNGW is narrower than that of the laser welding.

  15. Elucidation of high-power fibre laser welding phenomena of stainless steel and effect of factors on weld geometry

    Kawahito, Yousuke; Mizutani, Masami; Katayama, Seiji

    2007-10-01

    The fibre laser has been receiving great attention due to its advantages of high efficiency, high power and high beam quality, and is expected to be one of the most desirable heat sources for high-speed and deep-penetration welding. In this study, therefore, in bead-on-plate welding of Type 304 stainless steel plates with 6 kW fibre laser, the effects of laser power, power density and welding speed on the formation of sound welds were investigated with four laser beams of 130, 200, 360 and 560 µm in spot diameter, and their welding phenomena were clarified with high-speed video cameras and an x-ray transmission real-time imaging system. The weld beads showed a keyhole type of penetration at any diameter, and the maximum penetration of 11 mm in depth was obtained at 130 µm spot diameter and 0.6 m min-1 welding speed. It was found that the laser power density exerted a remarkable effect on the increase in weld penetration at higher welding speeds, and sound partially penetrated welds without welding defects such as porosity, underfilling or humping could be produced at wide process windows of welding speeds between 4.5 and 10 m min-1 with fibre laser beams of 360 µm or 560 µm in spot diameter. The high-speed video observation pictures and the x-ray images of the welding phenomena at 6 m min-1 welding speed and 360 µm spot diameter show that a sound weld bead was formed owing to a long molten pool suppressing and accommodating spattering and a stable keyhole generating no bubbles from the tip, respectively.

  16. Elucidation of high-power fibre laser welding phenomena of stainless steel and effect of factors on weld geometry

    Kawahito, Yousuke; Mizutani, Masami; Katayama, Seiji [Joining and Welding Research Institute (JWRI), Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2007-10-07

    The fibre laser has been receiving great attention due to its advantages of high efficiency, high power and high beam quality, and is expected to be one of the most desirable heat sources for high-speed and deep-penetration welding. In this study, therefore, in bead-on-plate welding of Type 304 stainless steel plates with 6 kW fibre laser, the effects of laser power, power density and welding speed on the formation of sound welds were investigated with four laser beams of 130, 200, 360 and 560 {mu}m in spot diameter, and their welding phenomena were clarified with high-speed video cameras and an x-ray transmission real-time imaging system. The weld beads showed a keyhole type of penetration at any diameter, and the maximum penetration of 11 mm in depth was obtained at 130 {mu}m spot diameter and 0.6 m min{sup -1} welding speed. It was found that the laser power density exerted a remarkable effect on the increase in weld penetration at higher welding speeds, and sound partially penetrated welds without welding defects such as porosity, underfilling or humping could be produced at wide process windows of welding speeds between 4.5 and 10 m min{sup -1} with fibre laser beams of 360 {mu}m or 560 {mu}m in spot diameter. The high-speed video observation pictures and the x-ray images of the welding phenomena at 6 m min{sup -1} welding speed and 360 {mu}m spot diameter show that a sound weld bead was formed owing to a long molten pool suppressing and accommodating spattering and a stable keyhole generating no bubbles from the tip, respectively.

  17. Elucidation of high-power fibre laser welding phenomena of stainless steel and effect of factors on weld geometry

    The fibre laser has been receiving great attention due to its advantages of high efficiency, high power and high beam quality, and is expected to be one of the most desirable heat sources for high-speed and deep-penetration welding. In this study, therefore, in bead-on-plate welding of Type 304 stainless steel plates with 6 kW fibre laser, the effects of laser power, power density and welding speed on the formation of sound welds were investigated with four laser beams of 130, 200, 360 and 560 μm in spot diameter, and their welding phenomena were clarified with high-speed video cameras and an x-ray transmission real-time imaging system. The weld beads showed a keyhole type of penetration at any diameter, and the maximum penetration of 11 mm in depth was obtained at 130 μm spot diameter and 0.6 m min-1 welding speed. It was found that the laser power density exerted a remarkable effect on the increase in weld penetration at higher welding speeds, and sound partially penetrated welds without welding defects such as porosity, underfilling or humping could be produced at wide process windows of welding speeds between 4.5 and 10 m min-1 with fibre laser beams of 360 μm or 560 μm in spot diameter. The high-speed video observation pictures and the x-ray images of the welding phenomena at 6 m min-1 welding speed and 360 μm spot diameter show that a sound weld bead was formed owing to a long molten pool suppressing and accommodating spattering and a stable keyhole generating no bubbles from the tip, respectively

  18. Effect of Structural Heterogeneity on In Situ Deformation of Dissimilar Weld Between Ferritic and Austenitic Steel

    Ghosh, M.; Santosh, R.; Das, S. K.; Das, G.; Mahato, B.; Korody, J.; Kumar, S.; Singh, P. K.

    2015-08-01

    Low-alloy steel and 304LN austenitic stainless steel were welded using two types of buttering material, namely 309L stainless steel and IN 182. Weld metals were 308L stainless steel and IN 182, respectively, for two different joints. Cross-sectional microstructure of welded assemblies was investigated. Microhardness profile was determined perpendicular to fusion boundary. In situ tensile test was performed in scanning electron microscope keeping low-alloy steel-buttering material interface at the center of gage length. Adjacent to fusion boundary, low-alloy steel exhibited carbon-depleted region and coarsening of matrix grains. Between coarse grain and base material structure, low-alloy steel contained fine grain ferrite-pearlite aggregate. Adjacent to fusion boundary, buttering material consisted of Type-I and Type-II boundaries. Within buttering material close to fusion boundary, thin cluster of martensite was formed. Fusion boundary between buttering material-weld metal and weld metal-304LN stainless steel revealed unmixed zone. All joints failed within buttering material during in situ tensile testing. The fracture location was different for various joints with respect to fusion boundary, depending on variation in local microstructure. Highest bond strength with adequate ductility was obtained for the joint produced with 309L stainless steel-buttering material. High strength of this weld might be attributed to better extent of solid solution strengthening by alloying elements, diffused from low-alloy steel to buttering material.

  19. Laser welding of butt joints of austenitic stainless steel AISI 321

    A. Klimpel

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of this paper: A study of an automated laser autogenous welding process of butt joints of austenitic stainless steel AISI 321 sheets 0.5 [mm] and 1.0 [mm] thick using a high power diode laser HPDL has been carried out.Design/methodology/approach: Influence of basic parameters of laser welding on shape and quality of the butt joints and the range of optimal parameters of welding were determined.Findings: It was showed that there is a wide range of laser autogenous welding parameters which ensures high quality joints of mechanical strength not lower than the strength of the base material (BM. The butt joints of austenitic steel AISI 321 sheets welded by the HPDL diode laser at optimal parameters are very high quality, without any internal imperfections and the structure and grain size of weld metal and HAZ is very small and also the HAZ is very narrow and the fusion zone is very regular.Research limitations/implications: Studies of the weldability of stainless steels indicate that the basic influence on the quality of welded joints and reduction of thermal distortions has the heat input of welding, moreover the highest quality of welded joints of austenitic stainless steel sheets are ensured only by laser welding.Practical implications: The technology of laser welding can be directly applied for welding of butt joints of austenitic steel AISI 321 sheets 0.5 and 1.0 [mm] thick.Originality/value: Application of high power diode laser for welding of austenitic stainless steel AISI 321.

  20. Experimental investigation of laser beam welding of explosion-welded steel/aluminum structural transition joints

    The steel/aluminum structural transition joints are widely used in shipbuilding industry due to the advantages of joining these two materials with important weight savings while exploiting their best properties. The use of laser welding to strongly connect components made of Fe and Al alloys as base materials with Fe/Al structural transition joints is very attractive. The authors report results achieved during the laser welding of these particular joints with the scope to evaluate effects of the laser-induced thermal loads on the integrity of the Fe/Al bond interface, from metallurgical and mechanical points of view. The increase of both inter-metallic film thickness and extension were detected as a result of the laser beam induced heat on the Fe/Al bond interface. These increases did not cause severe reductions of the mechanical resistance of the investigated structural transition joint.

  1. Microstructure and corrosion behaviour of gas tungsten arc welds of maraging steel

    G. Madhusudhan Reddy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Superior properties of maraging steels make them suitable for the fabrication of components used for military applications like missile covering, rocket motor casing and ship hulls. Welding is the main process for fabrication of these components, while the maraging steels can be fusion welded using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process. All these fabricated components require longer storage life and a major problem in welds is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC. The present study is aimed at studying the SCC behaviour of MDN 250 (18% Ni steel and its welds with respect to microstructural changes. In the present study, 5.2 mm thick sheets made of MDN 250 steel in the solution annealed condition was welded using GTAW process. Post-weld heat treatments of direct ageing (480 °C for 3 h, solutionizing (815 °C for 1 h followed by ageing and homogenizing (1150 °C for 1 h followed by ageing were carried out. A mixture of martensite and austenite was observed in the microstructure of the fusion zone of solutionized and direct aged welds and only martensite in as-welded condition. Homogenization and ageing treatment have eliminated reverted austenite and elemental segregation. Homogenized welds also exhibited a marginal improvement in the corrosion resistance compared to those in the as-welded, solutionized and aged condition. Constant load SCC test data clearly revealed that the failure time of homogenized weld is much longer compared to other post weld treatments, and the homogenization treatment is recommended to improve the SCC life of GTA welds of MDN 250 Maraging steel.

  2. Effects on the efficiency of activated carbon on exposure to welding fumes

    Ghosh, D. [Southern Company Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1995-02-01

    It is the intention of this paper to document that certain types of welding fumes have little or no effect on the effectiveness of the carbon filter air filtration efficiency when directly exposed to a controlled amount of welding fumes for a short-term period. The welding processes studied were restricted to shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), flux cored arc welding (FCAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. Contrary to the SMAW and FCAW processes, the GTAW (or TIG) and the GMAW (or MIG) welding processes do not require the use of flux as part of the overall process. Credit was taken for these processes occurring in inert gas environments and producing minimal amount of smoke. It was concluded that a study involving the SMAW process would also envelop the effects of the TIG and MIG welding processes. The quantity of welding fumes generated during the arc welding process is a function of the particular process, the size and type of electrode, welding machine amperage, and operator proficiency. For this study, the amount of welding for specific testing was equated to the amount of welding normally conducted during plant unit outages. Different welding electrodes were also evaluated, and the subsequent testing was limited to an E7018 electrode which was judged to be representative of all carbon and stainless steel electrodes commonly used at the site. The effect of welding fumes on activated charcoal was tested using a filtration unit complete with prefilters, upstream and downstream high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, and a carbon adsorber section. The complete system was field tested in accordance with ANSI N510 standards prior to exposing the filters and the adsorber bed to welding fumes. The carbon samples were tested at an established laboratory using ASTM D3803-1989 standards.

  3. Mechanical properties and fatigue strength of high manganese non-magnetic steel/carbon steel welded joints

    The dissimilar materials welded joints of high manganese non-magnetic steel/carbon steel (hereafter referred to as DMW joints), in which weld defects such as hot crack or blowhole are not found, were the good quality. Tensile strength of DMW joints was 10% higher than that of the base metal of carbon steel. In the bend tests, the DMW joints showed the good ductility without crack. Charpy absorbed energy at 0(degC) of the DMW joints was over 120(J) in the bond where it seems to be the lowest. Large hardening or softening was not detected in the heat affected zone. Fatigue strength of the DMW joints is almost the same with that of the welded joints of carbon steel/carbon steel. As the fatigue strength of the DMW joints exceeds the fatigue design standard curve of JSSC for carbon steel welded joints, the DMW joints can be treated the same as the welded joints of carbon steel/carbon steel of which strength is lower than that of high manganese non-magnetic steel, from the viewpoint of the fatigue design. (author)

  4. Experimental study of dual-beam laser welding of AISI 4140 steel

    Liu, Y.N.; Kannatey-Asibu, E. Jr. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

    1997-09-01

    Experiments were conducted to assess the impact of dual-beam laser welding on the cooling rates, and thus microstructure and hardness, of weldments. Temperature measurements were continuously recorded using K-type thermocouples. The results indicate that dual-beam laser welding reduces the hardness of a weldment when compared to the case of single-beam laser welding. For example, the hardness of the hot-rolled AISI 4140 steel used was about 283 HB before laser welding. After laser welding with a power of 800 W and a welding speed of 10 mm/s, the hardness became 552 HB; but with a preheating power of 800 W and an interbeam spacing of 10 mm, the hardness reduced to 477 HB for the same welding speed. The impacts of minor heat source power, welding speed and interbeam spacing on weldment hardness and weld shape for both preheating and postheating cases are discussed.

  5. Effect of continuous and pulsed currents on microstructural evolution of stainless steel joined by TIG welding

    In this study, AISI 316L series austenitic stainless steel sheets were joined by tungsten inert gas welding method in continuous and pulsed currents. Regarding microstructural investigation and hardness values of weld metal, samples were welded to investigate the effect of current type on grain structures of weld metal. Results showed that samples welded by using pulsed current had considerable different properties compared to the samples welded by using continuous current. While the weld metals of joinings obtained by using continuous current displayed a coarse-grained and columnar structure, weld metals obtained by using pulsed current had a finer-grained structure. It was also found that hardness values of samples, which were welded with continuous and pulsed current, were quite different.

  6. Effect of post-weld heat treatment on the mechanical properties of electron beam welded joints for CLAM steel

    Wu, Qingsheng, E-mail: chunjing.li@fds.org.cn; Zheng, Shuhui; Liu, Shaojun; Li, Chunjing; Huang, Qunying

    2013-11-15

    In this paper the microstructure and mechanical properties of electron beam weld (EBW) joints for China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel, which underwent a series of different post weld heat treatments (PWHTs) were studied. The aim of the study was to identify suitable PWHTs that give a good balance between strength and toughness of the EBW joints. The microstructural analyses were performed by means of optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The mechanical properties were determined via tensile tests and Charpy impact tests. The results showed that the tensile strength of the as-weld joint (i.e. without any PWHT) were close to that of the base metal, but the impact toughness was only 13% of that of the base metal due to the existence of a delta-ferrite microstructure. To achieve a significant improvement in toughness a PWHT needs to be performed. If a one-step PWHT is applied tempering at 760 °C for 2 h gives EBW joints with high strength at a still acceptable toughness level. If a two-step PWHT is applied, a process involving quenching at 980 °C for 0.5 h followed by tempering at 740 °C or 760 °C for 2 h gives EBW joints with high strength and toughness properties. Whenever possible a two-step PWHT should be applied in favor of a one-step process, because of higher resulting strength and toughness properties.

  7. Effect of post-weld heat treatment on the mechanical properties of electron beam welded joints for CLAM steel

    Wu, Qingsheng; Zheng, Shuhui; Liu, Shaojun; Li, Chunjing; Huang, Qunying

    2013-11-01

    In this paper the microstructure and mechanical properties of electron beam weld (EBW) joints for China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel, which underwent a series of different post weld heat treatments (PWHTs) were studied. The aim of the study was to identify suitable PWHTs that give a good balance between strength and toughness of the EBW joints. The microstructural analyses were performed by means of optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The mechanical properties were determined via tensile tests and Charpy impact tests. The results showed that the tensile strength of the as-weld joint (i.e. without any PWHT) were close to that of the base metal, but the impact toughness was only 13% of that of the base metal due to the existence of a delta-ferrite microstructure. To achieve a significant improvement in toughness a PWHT needs to be performed. If a one-step PWHT is applied tempering at 760 °C for 2 h gives EBW joints with high strength at a still acceptable toughness level. If a two-step PWHT is applied, a process involving quenching at 980 °C for 0.5 h followed by tempering at 740 °C or 760 °C for 2 h gives EBW joints with high strength and toughness properties. Whenever possible a two-step PWHT should be applied in favor of a one-step process, because of higher resulting strength and toughness properties.

  8. Electrical-thermal interaction simulation for resistance spot welding nugget process of mild steel and stainless steel

    王春生; 韩凤武; 陆培德; 赵熹华; 陈勇; 邱冬生

    2002-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite difference electrical-thermal model for resistance spot welding nugget process of mild steel and stainless steel is introduced. A simulation method of the interaction of electrical and thermal factors is presented. Meanwhile, calculation method of contact resistance and treatment method of heater structure is provided. The influence of the temperature dependent material properties and various cooling boundary conditions on welding process was also taken into account in the model. A method for improving the mild steel and stainless steel joint was analyzed in numerical simulation process. Experimental verification shows that the model prediction agrees well with the practice. The model provides a useful theoretic tool for the analysis of the process of resistance spot welding of mild steel and stainless steel.

  9. Numerical analysis of thermal stresses in welded joint smade of steels X20 and X22

    Mladenović Saša M.; Šijački-Zeravčić Vera M.; Bakić Gordana M.; Lozanović-Šajić Jasmina V.; Rakin Marko P.; Đurđević Andrijana A.; Đukić Miloš B.

    2014-01-01

    Stress calculation of steam pipeline is presented, focused on the welded joint. Numerical calculation was performed using the finite element method to obtain stress distribution in the welded joint made while replacing the valve chamber. Dissimilar materials were used, namely steel 10CrMoV9-10 according to EN 10216-2 for the valve chamber, the rest of steam pipeline was steel X20, whereas the transition piece material was steel X22. Residual stresses were c...

  10. Exposure to stainless steel welding fumes and lung cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Sjögren, B; Hansen, K S; Kjuus, H; Persson, P G

    1994-01-01

    Stainless steel welding is associated with exposure to metals including hexavalent chromium and nickel. This study is a meta-analysis of five studies of stainless steel welders and the occurrence of lung cancer. Asbestos exposure and smoking habits have been taken into account. The calculated pooled relative risk estimate was 1.94 with a 95% confidence interval of 1.28-2.93. This result suggests a causal relation between exposure to stainless steel welding and lung cancer.

  11. Mechanism of hydrogen enhanced-cracking of high-strength steel welded joints

    J. Ćwiek; A. Zieliński

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Purpose of this paper is evaluation of susceptibility of high-strength steel welded joints to hydrogendegradation and establishing of applicable mechanism of their hydrogen-enhanced cracking.Design/methodology/approach: High-strength quenched and tempered steel grade S690Q and its weldedjoints have been used. Susceptibility to hydrogen degradation of steel and welded joints has been evaluatedusing monotonically increasing load. Slow strain rate test (SSRT) was carried out on round sm...

  12. Acceptance criteria for corroded carbon steel piping containing weld defects

    Acceptance criteria for corroded low temperature, low pressure carbon steel piping containing weld defects is presented along with a typical application of these criteria. They are intended to preclude gross rupture or rapidly propagating failure due to uniform wall thinning, local wall thinning, pitting corrosion and weld defects. The minimum allowable uniform wail thickness is based on the code-of-record allowable stress and fracture criteria. Weld defects are postulated as potential sites for fracture initiation. CEGB/R6 failure assessment diagram is used as the fracture criteria to determine the minimum allowable wall thickness. Design of a large portion of the low temperature, low pressure piping is dominated by axial stresses. Existing local wall thinning acceptance criteria address high pressure piping where hoop stress dominates the design. The existing criteria is over conservative, in some cases, when used on low pressure piping. Local wall thinning criteria is developed to limit the axial stress on the locally thinned section, based on a reduced average thickness. Limits on pit density are also developed to provide acceptance criteria for pitted piping

  13. Type IV creep cavity accumulation and failure in steel welds

    One region of concern for creep damage accumulation in steel welds is a narrow region adjacent to the parent material. This narrow region, called Type IV, consists of partially transformed material having a relatively small grain size. In this region creep arises from crack growth and creep cavitation. The conditions where one mechanism dominates failure are not clear. In this paper, results are presented from an extensive experimental programme using both cross-weld and simulated Type IV specimens, first to determine the mechanisms of strain accumulation in the narrow region, and second to determine creep crack growth characteristics. Creep cavitation occurred across the net section, and the numbers of cavities per unit area were quantified as a function of fractions of rupture life. When sufficient constraint was provided by cross-weld specimens, creep crack growth was promoted in the Type IV region. When constraint was low, the presence of a crack did not promote localised cavity accumulation and creep crack growth. It is suggested that cavitation is a consequence of grain boundary sliding leading to relaxation of constraint and multiaxial rupture governed by the von Mises stress

  14. Mechanism of laser welding on dissimilar metals between stainless steel and W-Cu alloy

    Kai Chen; Zhiyong Wang; Rongshi Xiao; Tiechuan Zuo

    2006-01-01

    @@ CO2 laser is employed to join a piece of powder metallurgical material (PMM) to a stainless steel in butt joint welding mode. The powder Ni35, as a filler powder, is used. The weld metal comes from three parts of stainless steel, powder Ni35, and Cu in W-Cu PMM. It is indicated that some parts of the W-Cu base metal are heated by laser and the metal Cu at the width of 0.06-0.12 mm from the edge is melted into the melting pool in the laser welding process. The formation of firm weld joint is just because that the melting liquid metal could fill the position occupied by metal Cu and surround the metal W granules fully. The analysis results indicate that the mechanism of the laser welding for stainless steel and W-Cu alloy is a special mode of fusion-brazing welding.

  15. Effect of welding processes on mechanical and microstructural characteristics of high strength low alloy naval grade steel joints

    S. Ragu Nathan; V. Balasubramanian; S. Malarvizhi; Rao, A G

    2015-01-01

    Naval grade high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels can be easily welded by all types of fusion welding processes. However, fusion welding of these steels leads to the problems such as cold cracking, residual stress, distortion and fatigue damage. These problems can be eliminated by solid state welding process such as friction stir welding (FSW). In this investigation, a comparative evaluation of mechanical (tensile, impact, hardness) properties and microstructural features of shielded metal ar...

  16. Fracture toughness of steel--aluminum deformation welds

    A study of the fracture toughness (in this case, G/sub Ic/) of steel--aluminum deformation welds using a specially developed double cantilever beam fracture toughness specimen is presented. Welds made at 3500C were heat treated at 360, 380, 400, 420, and 4400C. An intermetallic reaction product layer of Fe2Al5 is formed at the steel--aluminum interface with increasing heat treating temperature and time by a process of nucleation and growth of discrete particles. A transition in toughness from a higher average G/sub Ic/ value (6097 N/m) to a very low average G/sub Ic/ value (525 N/m) is observed. The decrease in toughness is accompanied by an increase in Fe2Al5 particle diameter from 4 to 8 μm. Failure at the higher toughness values is characterized by ductile rupture through the aluminum. At the lower toughness values, failure occurs between the aluminum and the Fe2Al5 reaction product layer. A void layer forming by a vacancy condensation mechanism in the aluminum adjacent to the Fe2Al5 is shown to cause the embrittlement

  17. Effect of welding processes on corrosion resistance of UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel

    An attractive combination of corrosion resistance and mechanical properties in the temperature range -50 to 250 .deg. C is offered by duplex stainless steel. However, undesirable secondary precipitation phase such as σ, γ2 and Cr2N may taken place at the cooling stage from the welding processes. Therefore, this paper describes the influence of different welding procedures such as manual metal arc welding (MMA), tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) and vacuum brazing on corrosion resistance of the welded joint for UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel. Microstructure and chemical compositions of the welded joint were examined. The weight loss of specimens immersed in 6% FeCl3 solution at 47.5 .deg. C for 24-hours was determined and used to evaluate the pitting resistance of duplex stainless steel and their welds. The region of heat-affected zone of specimen obtained by the MMA is much wider than that resulted from TIG, therefore, the weight loss of welds by MMA was larger than that of weld by TIG. The weight loss of brazed specimens cooled from slow cooling rate was larger than those of specimens cooled from high cooling rate, because the precipitation of σ phase. Beside that, the weight loss of brazed specimen is greater than those of the welded specimens. The galvanic corrosion was observed in brazed duplex stainless steel joints in the chloride solution

  18. Effect of welding processes and consumables on fatigue crack growth behaviour of armour grade quenched and tempered steel joints

    G. MAGUDEESWARAN; V. BALASUBRAMANIAN; G. MADHUSUDHAN REDDY

    2014-01-01

    Quenched and Tempered (Q&T) steels are widely used in the construction of military vehicles due to its high strength to weight ratio and high hardness. These steels are prone to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) in the heat affected zone (HAZ) after welding. The use of austenitic stainless steel (ASS) consumables to weld the above steel was the only available remedy because of higher solubility for hydrogen in austenitic phase. The use of stainless steel consumables for a non-stainless steel base metal is not economical. Hence, alternate consumables for welding Q&T steels and their vulnerability to HIC need to be explored. Recent studies proved that low hydrogen ferritic steel (LHF) consumables can be used to weld Q&T steels, which can give very low hydrogen levels in the weld deposits. The use of ASS and LHF consumables will lead to distinct microstructures in their respective welds. This microstructural heterogeneity will have a drastic influence in the fatigue crack growth resistance of armour grade Q&T steel welds. Hence, in this investigation an attempt has been made to study the influence of welding con-sumables and welding processes on fatigue crack growth behaviour of armour grade Q&T Steel joints. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and Flux cored arc welding (FCAW) were used for fabrication of joints using ASS and LHF consumables. The joints fabricated by SMAW process using LHF consumable exhibited superior fatigue crack growth resistance than all other joints.

  19. Eddy current testing of longitudinal welds in austenitic steel pipes

    The existing steel-iron test sheet 1914 'Nondestructive Testing of Fusion Welded Joints in Tubes of Stainless Steels' (SEP 1914) had to be revised. The physical correlation between test frequency, phase position, amplitude and defect size for different pipe dimensions were pointed out and discussed on the basis of numerous measurement series. The influence of coil-specific parameters, filtration and electromagnetic magnetization on the eddy current signal were clarified. Additionally, the transferability of the amplitude and phase behaviour of simulated defects on naturally occurring defects was investigated in order to guarantee that the determined test parameters for the revision of existing test regulations are practice-oriented. As the most important result, it is stated that the definition of the test sensitivity in the steel-iron test sheet 1914 is too insensitive for a great number of pipe dimensions. Therefore, the existing steel-iron test sheet 1914 was revised with regard to the definition of the test sensitivity on the basis of the required detection sensitivity of a 20% internal groove. (orig./HP)

  20. Vpliv popravil na mikrostrukturo zvarov jekla Niomol 490K: Influence of repairs on microstructure of steel Niomol 490K welds:

    Celin, Roman; Tušek, Janez

    2000-01-01

    During the erection of steel assemblies, repairs of not allowable defects in welds are necessary. Very demanding for welding are the HSLA steels. Investigations were performed to establish the influence of repairs of welds on the microstructure and the heat affected zone on the steel Niomol 490K. The microstructure of six joints prepared using different welding parameters was investigated in SEM. Results are presented in this paper. Pri varjenju jeklenih konstrukcij so pogosta popravila zv...

  1. Characterization of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Resistance Spot Welded DP600 Steel

    Ali Ramazani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Resistance spot welding (RSW as a predominant welding technique used for joining steels in automotive applications needs to be studied carefully in order to improve the mechanical properties of the spot welds. The objectives of the present work are to characterize the resistance spot weldment of DP600 sheet steels. The mechanical properties of the welded joints were evaluated using tensile-shear and cross-tensile tests. The time-temperature evolution during the welding cycle was measured. The microstructures observed in different sites of the welds were correlated to thermal history recorded by thermocouples in the corresponding areas. It was found that cracks initiated in the periphery region of weld nuggets with a martensitic microstructure and a pull-out failure mode was observed. It was also concluded that tempering during RSW was the main reason for hardness decrease in HAZ.

  2. Friction Stir Welding in HSLA-65 Steel: Part I. Influence of Weld Speed and Tool Material on Microstructural Development

    Barnes, S. J.; Bhatti, A. R.; Steuwer, A.; Johnson, R.; Altenkirch, J.; Withers, P. J.

    2012-07-01

    A systematic set of single-pass full penetration friction stir bead-on-plate and butt-welds in HSLA-65 steel were produced using a range of different traverse speeds (50 to 500 mm/min) and two tool materials (W-Re and PCBN). Microstructural analysis of the welds was carried out using optical microscopy, and hardness variations were also mapped across the weld-plate cross sections. The maximum and minimum hardnesses were found to be dependent upon both welding traverse speed and tool material. A maximum hardness of 323 Hv(10) was observed in the mixed martensite/bainite/ferrite microstructure of the weld nugget for a welding traverse speed of 200 mm/min using a PCBN tool. A minimum hardness of 179 Hv(10) was found in the outer heat-affected zone (OHAZ) for welding traverse speed of 50 mm/min using a PCBN tool. The distance from the weld centerline to the OHAZ increased with decreasing weld speed due to the greater heat input into the weld. Likewise for similar energy inputs, the size of the transformed zone and the OHAZ increased on moving from a W-Re tool to a PCBN tool probably due to the poorer thermal conductivity of the PCBN tool. The associated residual stresses are reported in Part II of this series of articles.

  3. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Laser Welding Joint of a CLAM Steel with Revised Chemical Compositions

    Chen, Shuhai; Huang, Jihua; Lu, Qi; Zhao, Xingke

    2016-05-01

    To suppress the tendency to form delta ferrite in weld metal (WM) of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel joint, a CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions was designed. Laser welding of the CLAM steel was investigated. The microstructures of the WM and heat-affected zone were analyzed. The impact toughness of the WM was evaluated by a Charpy impact test method with three V notches. The influence of temper temperature on mechanical properties was analyzed. It was found that the delta ferrite was eliminated almost completely in laser WM of CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions which has lower tendency to form delta ferrite than original chemical compositions. The joint has higher tensile strength than the parent metal. With increasing the heat input, the impact toughness of the joint is approximatively equal with that of parent metal first and then decreases obviously. Temper treatment could effectively improve mechanical property of the joint. When the temper temperature exceeds 600 °C, the impact toughness of the joint is higher than that of the parent metal.

  4. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Laser Welding Joint of a CLAM Steel with Revised Chemical Compositions

    Chen, Shuhai; Huang, Jihua; Lu, Qi; Zhao, Xingke

    2016-03-01

    To suppress the tendency to form delta ferrite in weld metal (WM) of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel joint, a CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions was designed. Laser welding of the CLAM steel was investigated. The microstructures of the WM and heat-affected zone were analyzed. The impact toughness of the WM was evaluated by a Charpy impact test method with three V notches. The influence of temper temperature on mechanical properties was analyzed. It was found that the delta ferrite was eliminated almost completely in laser WM of CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions which has lower tendency to form delta ferrite than original chemical compositions. The joint has higher tensile strength than the parent metal. With increasing the heat input, the impact toughness of the joint is approximatively equal with that of parent metal first and then decreases obviously. Temper treatment could effectively improve mechanical property of the joint. When the temper temperature exceeds 600 °C, the impact toughness of the joint is higher than that of the parent metal.

  5. Effect of Heat Input During Disk Laser Bead-On-Plate Welding of Thermomechanically Rolled Steel on Penetration Characteristics and Porosity Formation in the Weld Metal

    Lisiecki A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a detailed analysis of the influence of heat input during laser bead-on-plate welding of 5.0 mm thick plates of S700MC steel by modern Disk laser on the mechanism of steel penetration, shape and depth of penetration, and also on tendency to weld porosity formation. Based on the investigations performed in a wide range of laser welding parameters the relationship between laser power and welding speed, thus heat input, required for full penetration was determined. Additionally the relationship between the laser welding parameters and weld quality was determined.

  6. Heat sink welding of austenitic stainless steel pipes to control distortion and residual stress

    Kumar, H.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K. [Materials Technology Div., Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2007-07-01

    Construction of India's Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) involves extensive welding of austenitic stainless steels pipes of different dimensions. Due to high thermal expansion coefficient and poor thermal conductivity of this class of steels, welding can result in significant distortion of these pipes. Attempts to arrest this distortion can lead to high levels of residual stresses in the welded parts. Heat sink welding is one of the techniques often employed to minimize distortion and residual stress in austenitic stainless steel pipe welding. This technique has also been employed to repair welding of the piping of the Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) subjected to radiation induced intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). In the present study, a comparison of the distortion in two pipe welds, one made with heat sink welding and another a normal welds. Pipes of dimensions 350{phi} x 250(L) x 8(t) mm was fabricated from 316LN plates of dimensions 1100 x 250 x 8 mm by bending and long seam (L-seam) welding by SMAW process. Two fit ups with a root gap of 2 mm, land height of 1mm and a groove angle of 70 were prepared using these pipes for circumferential seam (C-seam) welding. Dimensions at predetermined points in the fit up were made before and after welding to check the variation in radius, circumference and and ovality of the pipes. Root pass for both the pipe fit up were carried out using conventional GTAW process with 1.6 mm AWS ER 16-8-2 as consumables. Welding of one of the pipe fit ups were completed using conventions GTAW process while the other was completed using heat sink welding. For second and subsequent layers of welding using this process, water was sprayed at the root side of the joint while welding was in progress. Flow rate of the water was {proportional_to}6 1/minute. Welding parameters employed were same as those used for the other pipe weld. Results of the dimensional measurements showed that there is no circumferential shrinkage in

  7. Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Gas Metal Arc Welded AISI 409 Grade Ferritic Stainless Steel Joints

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Shanmugam, K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2009-10-01

    The effect of filler metals such as austenitic stainless steel, ferritic stainless steel, and duplex stainless steel on fatigue crack growth behavior of the gas metal arc welded ferritic stainless steel joints was investigated. Rolled plates of 4 mm thickness were used as the base material for preparing single ‘V’ butt welded joints. Center cracked tensile specimens were prepared to evaluate fatigue crack growth behavior. Servo hydraulic controlled fatigue testing machine with a capacity of 100 kN was used to evaluate the fatigue crack growth behavior of the welded joints. From this investigation, it was found that the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal showed superior fatigue crack growth resistance compared to the joints fabricated by austenitic and ferritic stainless steel filler metals. Higher yield strength and relatively higher toughness may be the reasons for superior fatigue performance of the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal.

  8. Microstructural Characteristic of Dissimilar Welded Components (AISI 430 Ferritic-AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steels) by CO2 Laser Beam Welding (LBW)

    Caligulu, Ugur; Dikbas, Halil; Taskin, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    In this study, microstructural characteristic of dissimilar welded components (AISI 430 ferritic-AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels) by CO2 laser beam welding (LBW) was investigated. Laser beam welding experiments were carried out under argon and helium atmospheres at 2000 and 2500 W heat inputs and 100-200-300 cm/min. welding speeds. The microstructures of the welded joints and the heat affected zones (HAZ) were examined by optical microscopy, SEM, EDS and XRD analysis. The tensile strengt...

  9. A comparison of residual stresses in multi pass narrow gap laser welds and gas-tungsten arc welds in AISI 316L stainless steel

    Elmesalamy, Ahmed; Francis, John Anthony; LI, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Thick-section austenitic stainless steels have widespread industrial applications, especially in nuclear power plants. The joining methods used in the nuclear industry are primarily based on arc welding processes. However, it has recently been shown that narrow gap laser welding (NGLW) can weld ma- terials with thicknesses that are well beyond the capabilities of single pass autogenous laser welding. The heat input for NGLW is much lower than for arc welding, as are the expected levels of res...

  10. Construction appraisal team inspection results on welding and nondestructive examination activities

    This report summarizes data and findings on deficiencies and discrepancies in welding and nondestructive examination (NDE) activities identified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Construction Appraisal Team (CAT) during its inspection of 11 plants. The CAT reviewed selected welds and NDE packages in its inspection of the following plant areas: piping and pipe supports and/or restraints; modification and installation of reactor internals; electrical installations and electrical supports; instrumentation tubing and supports; heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and supports; fabrication and erection of structural steel; fabrication of refueling cavity and spent fuel pool liner; containment liner and containment penetrations; and fire protection systems. The CAT inspected both structural welds and pressure-retaining welds and reviewed welder qualification test records and welding procedure documents for code compliance. The NDE activities that were evaluated included visual examination, magnetic particle examination, liquid penetrant examination, ultrasonic examination, and radiographic examination of welds. 4 refs., 14 figs., 15 tabs

  11. Selection of arc welding parameters of micro alloyed HSLA steel

    M. Dunđer; Ž. Ivandić; Samardžić, I.

    2008-01-01

    In order to ensure performance reliability of a welded product, its quality has to be ensured by proper setting of welding parameters and welding cycle. A quality weld – a weld with no manufacturing, structural or geometric flaws, i.e. with necessary mechanical properties - is achieved only by correct parameter definition and adherence. The knowledge of various effects and relations between welding parameters and their repetition enable an optimal choice of welding parameters.

  12. Selection of arc welding parameters of micro alloyed HSLA steel

    M. Dunđer

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to ensure performance reliability of a welded product, its quality has to be ensured by proper setting of welding parameters and welding cycle. A quality weld – a weld with no manufacturing, structural or geometric flaws, i.e. with necessary mechanical properties - is achieved only by correct parameter definition and adherence. The knowledge of various effects and relations between welding parameters and their repetition enable an optimal choice of welding parameters.

  13. Effect of Interfacial Reaction on the Mechanical Performance of Steel to Aluminum Dissimilar Ultrasonic Spot Welds

    Xu, Lei; Wang, Li; Chen, Ying-Chun; Robson, Joe D.; Prangnell, Philip B.

    2016-01-01

    The early stages of formation of intermetallic compounds (IMC) have been investigated in dissimilar aluminum to steel welds, manufactured by high power (2.5 kW) ultrasonic spot welding (USW). To better understand the influence of alloy composition, welds were produced between a low-carbon steel (DC04) and two different aluminum alloys (6111 and 7055). The joint strengths were measured in lap shear tests and the formation and growth behavior of IMCs at the weld interface were characterized by electron microscopy, for welding times from 0.2 to 2.4 seconds. With the material combinations studied, the η (Fe2Al5) intermetallic phase was found to form first, very rapidly in the initial stage of welding, with a discontinuous island morphology. Continuous layers of η and then θ (FeAl3) phase were subsequently seen to develop on extending the welding time to greater than 0.7 second. The IMC layer formed in the DC04-AA7055 combination grew thicker than for the DC04-AA6111 welds, despite both weld sets having near identical thermal histories. Zinc was also found to be dissolved in the IMC phases when welding with the AA7055 alloy. After post-weld aging of the aluminum alloy, fracture in the lap shear tests always occurred along the joint interface; however, the DC04-AA6111 welds had higher fracture energy than the DC04-AA7055 combination.

  14. Yb:YAG laser welding of TRIP780 steel with dual phase and mild steels for use in tailor welded blanks

    Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are essential to meet the demands of safety and fuel efficiency in vehicles. In this paper, we present the results of laser welding of two AHSS steels, TRIP780 and DP980. A 2 kW Trumpf TRUDISK 6002® Yb:YAG laser beam was utilized to join 1 mm thick TRIP780 with 1.5 mm thick DP980 and 1 mm thick mild steel. Optical metallography was used to characterize the weld profile and microstructures. Microhardness, tensile and fatigue tests were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties. Results indicate that the laser welds exhibit excellent strength and hardness with minimal defects which are attributed to the high beam quality, disk type of laser. In addition, there is a distinct effect of pre-straining of TRIP780 steels on the energy absorption.

  15. Welding of AA1050 aluminum with AISI 304 stainless steel by rotary friction welding process

    Chen Ying An

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to assess the development of solid state joints of dissimilar material AA1050 aluminum and AISI 304 stainless steel, which can be used in pipes of tanks of liquid propellants and other components of the Satellite Launch Vehicle. The joints were obtained by rotary friction welding process (RFW, which combines the heat generated from friction between two surfaces and plastic deformation. Tests were conducted with different welding process parameters. The results were analyzed by means of tensile tests, Vickers microhardness, metallographic tests and SEM-EDX. The strength of the joints varied with increasing friction time and the use of different pressure values. Joints were obtained with superior mechanical properties of the AA1050 aluminum, with fracture occurring in the aluminum away from the bonding interface. The analysis by EDX at the interface of the junction showed that interdiffusion occurs between the main chemical components of the materials involved. The RFW proves to be a great method for obtaining joints between dissimilar materials, which is not possible by fusion welding processes.

  16. Thermomechanical history measurements on Type 304L stainless steel pipe girth welds

    Thermal and strain histories were recorded for three 40-cm-diameter (16 inch), Type 304L stainless steel (SS), schedule 40 (1.27 cm thickness) pipe girth welds. Two weld groove preparations were standard V grooves while the third was a narrow groove configuration. The welding parameters for the three pipe welds simulated expected field practice as closely as possible. The narrow gap weld was completed in four continuous passes while the other two welds required six and nine (discontinuous) passes, due to the use of different weld wire diameters. Thermomechanical history measurements were taken on the inner counterbore surface, encompassing the weld centerline and heat-affected zone (HAZ), as well as 10 cm of inner counterbore surface on either side of the weld centerline; a total of 47 data acquisition instruments were used for each weld. These instruments monitored: (1) weld shrinkages parallel to the pipe axis; (2) surface temperatures; (3) surface strains parallel to weld centerline; and (4) radial deformations. Results show that the weld and HAZ experienced cyclic deformation in the radial direction during welding, indicating that the final residual stress distribution in multi-pass pipe weldments is not axisymmetric. Measured radial and axial deformations were smaller for the narrow gap groove than for the standard V grooves, suggesting that the narrow gap groove weldment may have lower residual stress levels than the standard V groove weldments. This study provides the experimental database and a guideline for further computational modeling work

  17. 77 FR 64468 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India: Final Affirmative Countervailing Duty...

    2012-10-22

    ...; Countervailing Duties, 62 FR 27296, 27323 (May 19, 1997), and Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From... Countervailing Duty Determination: Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From Argentina, 66 FR 37007... Concrete Steel Wire Strand From India, 68 FR 68356 (December 8, 2003). We determine the...

  18. Numerical analysis of thermal stresses in welded joint smade of steels X20 and X22

    Mladenović Saša M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress calculation of steam pipeline is presented, focused on the welded joint. Numerical calculation was performed using the finite element method to obtain stress distribution in the welded joint made while replacing the valve chamber. Dissimilar materials were used, namely steel 10CrMoV9-10 according to EN 10216-2 for the valve chamber, the rest of steam pipeline was steel X20, whereas the transition piece material was steel X22. Residual stresses were calculated, in addition to design stresses, indicating critical regions and necessity for post-weld heat treatment.

  19. Influence of zirconium on microstructure and toughness of low-alloy steel weld metals

    Trindade, V. B.; Mello, R. S. T.; Payão, J. C.; Paranhos, R. P. R.

    2006-06-01

    The influence of zirconium on microstructure and toughness of low-alloy steel weld metal was studied. Weld metals with different zirconium contents were obtained adding iron-zirconium alloy in the welding flux formulation. Weld metal chemical composition proved that zirconium was able to be transferred from the flux to the weld metal. The addition of zirconium refined the weld metal microstructure, increasing the acicular ferrite content. Weld metal toughness, determined by means of impact Charpy-V tests, showed that the zirconium addition is beneficial up to a content of 0.005 wt.%. Above this level, zirconium was not able to produce further microstructure refinement, although the toughness was reduced, possibly due to the formation of microconstituent such as the martensite-austenite constituent (M-A), which is considered to be deleterious to the weld metal toughness.

  20. Thin-Sheet zinc-coated and carbon steels laser welding

    This paper describes the results of a research on CO2 laser welding of thin-sheet carbon steels (Zinc-coated and uncoated), at several thicknesses combinations. Laser welding has an high potential to be applied on sub-assemblies welding before forming to the automotive industry-tailored blanks. The welding process is studied through the analysis of parameters optimization, metallurgical quality and induced distortions by the welding process. The clamping system and the gas protection system developed are fully described. These systems allow the minimization of common thin-sheet laser welding defects like misalignment, and zinc-coated laser welding defects like porous and zinc ventilation. The laser welding quality is accessed by DIN 8563 standard, and by tensile, microhardness and corrosion test. (Author) 8 refs

  1. Study of residual stresses in welded joints of dual phase HSLA steel used in automotive industry

    One way of weight reduction in automotive vehicles is through the use of high strength and low alloy (HSLA) steels, which enables the use of small thickness plates. Whereas the appearance of residual stresses is intrinsic to the welding process, this study evaluates the residual stresses generated in welded joints obtained by TIG and LASER welding processes and comparing them. Residual stresses were measured by X-rays diffraction technique, using a portable device with Crκα radiation applying the double exposure method. It also evaluates the influence of shot peening treatment applied after welding, in the bend tests conducted for both welding conditions and TIG welded joints showed higher stability of compressive stresses after welding. The metallographic analysis by optical microscopy complemented the welded joints characterization. (author)

  2. 75 FR 60814 - Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Brazil, China, Japan, Taiwan, and Thailand

    2010-10-01

    ... Investigation No. F.R. cite 12/17/86 Carbon steel butt- 731-TA-308 51 FR 45152. weld pipe fittings/ Brazil. 12/17/86 Carbon steel butt- 731-TA-310 51 FR 45152. weld pipe fittings/ Taiwan. 2/10/87 Carbon steel butt- 731-TA-309 52 FR 4167. weld pipe fittings/ Japan. 7/6/92 Carbon steel butt- 731-TA-520 57...

  3. Oxide induced corrosion on the welded stainless steels SS 2352 and 2353

    The pitting corrosion properties have been investigated in welded and unwelded condition by polarization tests in sodium chloride solutions. The two steels were TIG welded without adding welding material and as shielding on the bottom side argon gas containing 2, 26 or 99 ppm oxygen was used. In some tests low breakthrough potentials were received, without discovering any pitting corrosion in the specimen surfaces. The unwelded SS 2352 steel had a critical (lowest) pitting temperature (CPT) of 5 degrees C in the more concentrated solution. For the same steel with weld pitting corrosion was obtained at 5 degrees C, which was the lowest temperature for the tests. Thus the CPT value was lower than 5 degrees C, but by looking at the pitting corrosion potentials the following conclusion could be drawn: Welding with higher oxygen content in the shielding gas implied lower pitting corrosion resistance. For the SS 2353 steel the CPT values were 25 and 27.5 degrees C for material without weld, in contact with the more concentrated and the more dilute solution respectively. Welded material was all through more sensitive to pitting corrosion, and the CPT values were 15-17.5, 15 and 5-10 degrees C for welded areas which had been gas shielded with argon containing 2, 26 and 99 ppm oxygen respectively. The result thus showed that welding with shielding gas containing maximum about 30 ppm oxygen does not substantially affect the pitting corrosion properties. Post treatment of the welding areas increased the pitting corrosion resistance. Acid pickling implied the highest pitting corrosion resistance with 15 degrees C as CPT value for the 2353 steel in the more concentrated solution. Steel brushing implied an obvious increase to the pitting corrosion resistance compared to untreated weld areas and the same statement could be done for sand blasted surfaces. (10 refs., 16 tabs., 11 figs.)

  4. Problems in repair-welding of duplex-treated tool steels

    T. Muhič

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper addresses problems in laser welding of die-cast tools used for aluminum pressure die-castings and plastic moulds. To extend life cycle of tools various surface improvements are used. These surface improvements significantly reduce weldability of the material. This paper presents development of defects in repair welding of duplex-treated tool steel. The procedure is aimed at reduction of defects by the newly developed repair laser welding techniques. Effects of different repair welding process parameters and techniques are considered. A microstructural analysis is conducted to detect defect formation and reveal the best laser welding method for duplex-treated tools.

  5. Application of high-power YAG laser welding to stainless steel tanks

    Laser beam welding is used where high quality and efficiency are required for precision parts such as core internal parts in nuclear power plant. To weld large-scale and thick-wall products, high-power laser beam must be transferred and welding be capable of deep penetration. In this paper the authors transferred a 7 kW-class high power YAG laser via optical fiber and developed pulsed laser welding to obtain deep penetration. We have applied this procedure to the welding of stainless steel tanks for nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. (author)

  6. Investigation and application of intense magnetic fields to welding of stainless steel tubes

    Conventional welding techniques are not always suitable for stainless steels and for a number of other alloys with highly interesting properties, so that new methods must be developed. The purpose of this work was to experiment with a high velocity impact welding method using intense magnetic fields produced in a coil supplied by an electric pulse generator. Nondestructive and destructive tests demonstrated the quality of the resulting weld. Metallurgical analysis of the weld zone confirmed the properties characterizing a satisfactory weld in the solid state with interdiffusion. Potential industrial applications of this technique may be considered after upgrading the pulse generator utilized and in particular for joints of fuel pins for fast reactors

  7. Ultrasonic examination of stainless steel EB welds by an immersion technique

    The authors report the development of an ultrasonic examination method of austenitic stainless steel electron beam (EB) welds. This method is based on an automatic immersion technique employing focused transducers and is aimed at detecting both the weld soundness and penetration. The authors describe the examination procedure with a calibration of the ultrasonic equipment, a complete weld scanning, and a repetition of the calibration for matters of verification. They also describe how results are interpreted in terms of wave soundness (attenuation) and weld penetration. They discuss the reliability of the examination procedure. They comment results obtained for EB butt welds in a AISI 304 pipe

  8. Microstructures and mechanical properties of magnesium alloy and stainless steel weld-joint made by friction stir lap welding

    Highlights: → Friction stir lap welding technology with cutting pin was successfully employed to form lap joint of magnesium and steel. → The cutting pin made the lower steel participate in deformation and the interface was no longer flat. → A saw-toothed structure formed due to a mechanical mixing of the magnesium and steel was found at the interface. → A high-strength joint was produced which fractured in the magnesium side. -- Abstract: Friction stir lap welding was conducted on soft/hard metals. A welding tool was designed with a cutting pin of rotary burr made of tungsten carbide, which makes the stirring pin possible to penetrate and cut the surface layer of the hard metal. Magnesium alloy AZ31 and stainless steel SUS302 were chosen as soft/hard base metals. The structures of the joining interface were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The joining strength was evaluated by tensile shear test. The results showed that flower-like interfacial morphologies were presented with steel flashes and scraps, which formed bonding mechanisms of nail effect by long steel flashes, zipper effect by saw-tooth structure and metallurgical bonding. The shear strength of the lap joint falls around the shear strength of butt joint of friction stir welded magnesium alloy.

  9. Deformation behaviour of spot-welded high strength steels for automotive applications

    Research highlights: → Phase transformation of TRIP steels. → Deformation behaviour of spot welds. → Fatigue of spot welds. - Abstract: Numerical simulation of component and assembly behaviour under different loading conditions is a main tool for safety design in automobile body shell mass production. Knowledge of local material behaviour is fundamental to such simulation tests. As a contribution to the verification of simulation results, the local deformation properties of spot-welded similar and dissimilar material joints in shear tension tests were investigated in this study for a TRIP steel (HCT690T) and a micro-alloyed steel (HX340LAD). For this reason, the local strain distribution was calculated by the digital image correlation technique (DIC). On the basis of the hardness values and microstructure of the spot welds, the differences in local strain between the selected material combinations are discussed. Additionally, the retained austenite content in the TRIP steel was analysed to explain the local strain values. Results obtained in this study regarding similar material welds suggest significant lower local strain values of the TRIP steel HCT690T compared to HX340LAD. One reason could be the decrease of retained austenite in the welded area. Furthermore, it has been ascertained that the local strain in dissimilar material welds decreases for each component compared with the corresponding similar material weld.

  10. Quenching microstructure and properties of 300M ultra-high strength steel electron beam welded joints

    Highlights: ► Electron beam welding is applied in 300M steel. ► The welded joint tensile strength can reach 1900 MPa and 97% of base metal strength. ► The microstructures of 300M steel welded joints are tempered martensite. -- Abstract: The 300M steel was welded by electron beam welding (EBW) with optimized welding parameters in the annealed state. As-welded, for comparison, and as-quenched (oil quenching at 870 °C × 1 h and tempering at 315 °C × 2 h) welded joints were investigated in this paper. The microstructure and fracture morphology were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscope. X-ray energy spectrum analysis was used to determine chemical composition of phases formed at the joint. The microhardness and tensile strength were evaluated. Results indicate that the weld metal microstructures of the as-welded joint are lower bainite, retained austenite and pro-eutectoid ferrite; the heat affected zone microstructure is sorbite with undissolved particles. The microstructure of as-quenched joint is tempered martensite. The tensile strength of the joints after quenching reached 1900 MPa.

  11. Repair welding of cracked steam turbine blades using austenitic and martensitic stainless-steel consumables

    The procedure for repair welding of cracked steam turbine blades made of martensitic stainless steels has been developed using the gas tungsten arc welding process. Weld repair procedures were developed using both ER 316L austenitic and ER 410 martensitic stainless-steel filler wire. The overall development of the repair welding procedure included selection of welding consumables (for austenitic filler metal), optimisation of post-weld heat treatment parameters, selection of suitable method for local pre-heating and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) of the blades, determination of mechanical properties of weldments in as-welded and PWHT conditions, and microsturctural examination. After various trials using different procedures, the procedure of local PWHT (and preheating when using martensitic stainless-steel filler wire) using electrical resistance heating on the top surface of the weldment and monitoring the temperature by placing a thermocouple at the bottom of the weld was found to give the most satisfactory results. These procedures have been developed and/or applied for repair welding of cracked blades in steam turbines

  12. Repair welding of cracked steam turbine blades using austenitic and martensitic stainless-steel consumables

    Bhaduri, A.K. E-mail: bhaduri@igcar.ernet.in; Gill, T.P.S.; Albert, S.K.; Shanmugam, K.; Iyer, D.R

    2001-06-01

    The procedure for repair welding of cracked steam turbine blades made of martensitic stainless steels has been developed using the gas tungsten arc welding process. Weld repair procedures were developed using both ER 316L austenitic and ER 410 martensitic stainless-steel filler wire. The overall development of the repair welding procedure included selection of welding consumables (for austenitic filler metal), optimisation of post-weld heat treatment parameters, selection of suitable method for local pre-heating and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) of the blades, determination of mechanical properties of weldments in as-welded and PWHT conditions, and microsturctural examination. After various trials using different procedures, the procedure of local PWHT (and preheating when using martensitic stainless-steel filler wire) using electrical resistance heating on the top surface of the weldment and monitoring the temperature by placing a thermocouple at the bottom of the weld was found to give the most satisfactory results. These procedures have been developed and/or applied for repair welding of cracked blades in steam turbines.

  13. Qualification of electron-beam welded joints between copper and stainless steel for cryogenic application

    Lusch, C.; Borsch, M.; Heidt, C.; Magginetti, N.; Sas, J.; Weiss, K.-P.; Grohmann, S.

    2015-12-01

    Joints between copper and stainless steel are commonly applied in cryogenic systems. A relatively new and increasingly important method to combine these materials is electron-beam (EB) welding. Typically, welds in cryogenic applications need to withstand a temperature range from 300K down to 4K, and pressures of several MPa. However, few data are available for classifying EB welds between OFHC copper and 316L stainless steel. A broad test program was conducted in order to qualify this kind of weld. The experiments started with the measurement of the hardness in the weld area. To verify the leak-tightness of the joints, integral helium leak tests at operating pressures of 16 MPa were carried out at room- and at liquid nitrogen temperature. The tests were followed by destructive tensile tests at room temperature, at liquid nitrogen and at liquid helium temperatures, yielding information on the yield strength and the ultimate tensile strength of the welds at these temperatures. Moreover, nondestructive tensile tests up to the yield strength, i.e. the range in which the weld can be stressed during operation, were performed. Also, the behavior of the weld upon temperature fluctuations between room- and liquid nitrogen temperature was tested. The results of the qualification indicate that EB welded joints between OFHC copper and 316L stainless steel are reliable and present an interesting alternative to other technologies such as vacuum brazing or friction welding.

  14. 77 FR 14002 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines: Final Results...

    2012-03-08

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the... duty orders on stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings (butt-weld pipe fittings) from Italy, Malaysia...'' section of this notice. \\1\\ See Initiation of Five-Year (``Sunset'') Review, 76 FR 67412 (November 1,...

  15. Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS)

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Pan, Tsung-Yu

    2012-04-16

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is applied to join advanced high strength steels (AHSS): galvannealed dual phase 780 MPa steel (DP780GA), transformation induced plasticity 780 MPa steel (TRIP780), and hot-stamped boron steel (HSBS). A low-cost Si3N4 ceramic tool was developed and used for making welds in this study instead of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) material used in earlier studies. FSSW has the advantages of solid-state, low-temperature process, and the ability of joining dissimilar grade of steels and thicknesses. Two different tool shoulder geometries, concave with smooth surface and convex with spiral pattern, were used in the study. Welds were made by a 2-step displacement control process with weld time of 4, 6, and 10 seconds. Static tensile lap-shear strength achieved 16.4 kN for DP780GA-HSBS and 13.2kN for TRIP780-HSBS, above the spot weld strength requirements by AWS. Nugget pull-out was the failure mode of the joint. The joining mechanism was illustrated from the cross-section micrographs. Microhardness measurement showed hardening in the upper sheet steel (DP780GA or TRIP780) in the weld, but softening of HSBS in the heat-affect zone (HAZ). The study demonstrated the feasibility of making high-strength AHSS spot welds with low-cost tools.

  16. Microstructural characterization of welded unions of cast refractory steels

    This work presents a microstructural study of welded unions of cast heat resistant (refractory) steels, type HC (29Cr-2Ni-0,4C) and HD (28Cr-5Ni-0,4C) using quantitative metallography and X-ray diffraction. Two series of alloys were prepared in an induction furnace and cast in sand molds with phenolic resin, in the classic 'Y' shape, with thicknesses of 12, 25 and 50 mm, following ASTM A395. These samples were chemically and micro structurally characterized, in order to verify their chemical composition and the presence and distribution of phases in the material. Test pieces were then cut from the test section of the 'Y' samples to produce the welded unions, which were done with a single and double bevel (X) butt, using a manual arc and one with electrodes AWS E 309 and AWS E 410. These unions were also submitted to thermal treatments of 780oC, in order to study the forced precipitation of the sigma phase, simulating service conditions in a production environment. The presence and distribution of phases in the fusion zone (welding cord) and in the thermally affected zones (TAZ) next to both sides of the cord were studied. They displayed a relatively low dilution compared to the composition of the electrodes. The presence of austenite in a ferritic matrix, with relatively small amounts of Cr23C6 and Cr7C3 carbides was shown together with an incipient presence of sigma phase. The annealing of the test pieces at temperatures close to those for the use of these materials, resulted in a new sigma precipitation, in different relative amounts, depending on the time of exposure to these temperatures. Sigma phase precipitates in low relative amounts simply from welding, but this event deserves more attention when the material is submitted to post-welding thermal treatments, or more intensely, to prolonged exposures to higher working temperatures. Quantitative metallographic techniques with contrast and coloring of phases can be used to quantify the micro-constituents; the

  17. The influence of electric ARC activation on the speed of heating and the structure of metal in welds

    Savytsky Oleksandr M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a research related to the impact of electric arc activation onto drive welding energy and metal weld heating speed. It is confirmed that ATIG and AMIG methods, depending on metal thickness, single pass weldability and chemical composition of activating flux, enable the reduction of welding energy by 2-6 times when compared to conventional welding methods. Additionally, these procedures create conditions to increase metal weld heating speed up to 1,500-5,500°C/s-1. Steel which can be rapidly heated, allows for a hardened structure to form (with carbon content up to 0.4%, together with a released martensitic structure or a mixture of bainitic-martensitic structures. Results of the research of effectiveness of ATIG and AMIG welding showed that increase in the penetration capability of electric arc, which increases welding productivity, is the visible side of ATIG and AMIG welding capabilities.

  18. Microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of laser welded dissimilar joints between ferritic stainless steel and carbon steel

    Highlights: • Laser welding of ferritic stainless steel to carbon steel joints was made. • The microstructure of this dissimilar joint is lath martensite and ferrite. • Decarburized layer and type II grain boundary was observed in joints. • The hardness distribution of two heat input joints across interface were analyzed. • Ecorr of dissimilar joint is between two base metals and joint has greatest icorr. - Abstract: The joint of dissimilar metals between ferritic stainless steel (FSS) and low carbon steel (CS) are welded by laser beam with two different welding speeds: 12 mm/s and 24 mm/s. Microstructure of dissimilar joint were investigated using optical microscope, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope. The results show that the microstructure of this dissimilar joint is lath martensite and few ferrite, upper bainite and widmanstatten ferrite formed in heat-affected zone (HAZ) of CS. An increase of welding speed leads to narrower HAZ of CS and higher hardness of weld bead close to FSS side. The joints with different welding speed have similar ultimate tensile strength but superior elongation is obtained of high welding speed joint. Electrochemical corrosion test indicates the corrosion potential of dissimilar joint falls in between FSS and CS. And dissimilar joint has greatest corrosion current density which is attributed to the effect of galvanic corrosion

  19. Recent progress in the field of automated welding applied to maintenance activities

    Automated and robot welding has 5 advantages compared to manual welding: -) under some conditions the automated circular welding does not require requalification testing as manual welding does, -) welding heads in robots have a reduced size compared to manual gears so they can enter and treat complex piping, -) by using an adequate viewing system the operator can be more than 10 meters away from the welding site which means that the radiation doses he receives is cut by a factor 1.5 to 2, -) whatever the configuration is, the deposition rate in automated welding stays high, the quality standard is steady and the risk of repairing is low, -) a gain in productivity if adequate equipment is used. In general, automated welding requires a TIG welding process and is applied in maintenance activities to: -) the main primary system and other circuits in stainless austenitic steels, -) the main secondary system and other circuits in low-percentage carbon steels, and -) the closure of spent fuel canisters. An application to the repairing of BWR's pipes is shown. (A.C.)

  20. Structural modifications which appear in the area of welds of welded structures made of ST 52.3 steel

    D. Dobrotă

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Using metal construction made of St 52.3 steel is very large and in these conditions an area of interest to use them is represented by the equipments which work in difficult conditions. Due to the heavy conditions of such welded structures, and also the working environment action on these welded structures, in practice it is necessary to know any structural modification that is produced in both the base material and the filler material. Research has followed in the main the analyze of structural modifications of the materials in the area of welded joints by corner, and also in the heat affected zone.

  1. Microstructure and Property Relationships in Resistance Spot Weld between 7114 Interstitial Free Steel and 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Ahmet Hasanba(s)o(g)lu; Ramazan Ka(c)ar

    2006-01-01

    Due to the differences in physical, chemical and mechanical properties of the base metals, the resistance spot welding of dissimilar materials is generally more challenging than that of similar materials. The influence of the primary welding parameters affecting the heat input such as peak current on the morphology, microhardness,and tensile shear load bearing capacity of dissimilar welds between 304 grades austenitic and 7114 grade interstitial free steel has been investigated in this study. The optimum welding parameters producing maximum joint strength were established at a peak current of 9 kA, where the electrode force is kept 6×10-5 Pa and weld time is kept constant 17 cycles, respectively. The primary cause of weakening the weldment is identified as the excessive grain growing region of heat affected zone (HAZ) in case of 7114 grade interstitial free steel.

  2. Laser welding of TiNi shape memory alloy and stainless steel using Ni interlayer

    Highlights: ► Laser welding was achieved using Ni interlayer between TiNi SMA and stainless steel. ► Ni interlayer thickness has great effects on joint microstructure and properties. ► Increasing Ni interlayer thickness results in increasing γ-Fe phase in weld metals. ► Excessive addition of Ni results in forming more TiNi3 and pores in the weld metals. ► Suitable Ni interlayer thickness improves the joint quality. -- Abstract: Laser welding of TiNi shape memory alloy wire to stainless steel wire using Ni interlayer was investigated. The results indicated that the Ni interlayer thickness had great effects on the chemical composition, microstructure, gas-pore susceptibility and mechanical properties of laser-welded joints. With an increase of Ni interlayer thickness, the weld Ni content increased and the joint properties increased due to decreasing brittle intermetallic compounds (TiFe2 and TiCr2). The joint fracture occurred in the fusion zone with a brittle intermetallic compound layer. The tensile strength and elongation of the joints reached the maximum values (372 MPa and 4.4%) when weld Ni content was 47.25 wt.%. Further increasing weld Ni content resulted in decreasing the joint properties because of forming more TiNi3 phase, gas-pores and shrinkage cavities in the weld metals. It is necessary to select suitable Ni interlayer thickness (weld composition) for improving the mechanical properties of laser-welded joints.

  3. Effect of joint design on ballistic performance of quenched and tempered steel welded joints

    Highlights: • Traditional usage of austenitic stainless steel filler for armour steel welding shows poor ballistic performance. • Earlier efforts show dubious success on ballistic resistance of armour steel joints. • Comparative evaluation of equal/unequal joint design on ballistic performance. • Effect of joint design covers the main aspects of successful bullet stoppage. - Abstract: A study was carried out to evaluate the effect of joint design on ballistic performance of armour grade quenched and tempered steel welded joints. Equal double Vee and unequal double Vee joint configuration were considered in this study. Targets were fabricated using 4 mm thick tungsten carbide hardfaced middle layer; above and below which austenitic stainless steel layers were deposited on both sides of the hardfaced interlayer in both joint configurations. Shielded metal arc welding process was used to deposit for all layers. The fabricated targets were evaluated for its ballistic performance and the results were compared in terms of depth of penetration on weld metal. From the ballistic test results, it was observed that both the targets successfully stopped the bullet penetration at weld center line. Of the two targets, the target made with unequal double Vee joint configuration offered maximum resistance to the bullet penetration at weld metal location without any bulge at the rear side. The higher volume of austenitic stainless steel front layer and the presence of hardfaced interlayer after some depth of soft austenitic stainless steel front layer is the primary reason for the superior ballistic performance of this joint

  4. MODELING OF AUSTENITE GRAIN SIZE IN LOW-ALLOY STEEL WELD METAL

    A.G.Huang; Y.S.Wang; Z.Y.Li; J.G.Xiong; Q.Hu

    2004-01-01

    The size of austenite grain hassignificant effects on components and proportions of various ferrites in low-alloy steel weld metal.Therefore,it is important to determine the size of austenite grain in the weld metal.In this paper,a model based upon the carbon diffusion rate is developed for computing austenite grain size in low-alloy steel weld metal during continuous cooling.The model takes into account the effects of the weld thermal cycles,inclusion particles and various alloy elements on the austenite grain growth.The calculating results agree reasonably with those reported experimental observations.The model demonstrates a significant promise to understand the weld microstructure and properties based on the welding science.

  5. Investigation of defect rate of lap laser welding of stainless steel railway vehicles car body

    Wang, Hongxiao

    2015-02-01

    In order to resolve the disadvantages such as poor appearance quality, poor tightness, low efficiency of resistance spot welding of stainless steel rail vehicles, partial penetration lap laser welding process was investigated widely. But due to the limitation of processing technology, there will be local incomplete fusion in the lap laser welding seam. Defect rate is the ratio of the local incomplete fusion length to the weld seam length. The tensile shear strength under different defect rate and its effect on the car body static strength are not clear. It is necessary to find the biggest defect rate by numerical analysis of effects of different defect rates on the laser welding stainless steel rail vehicle body structure strength ,and tests of laser welding shear tensile strength.

  6. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of various austenitic stainless steel pipe welds in high temperature oxygenated water

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of various austenitic stainless steel pipe welds has been studied by means of constant load tensile tests and pipe tests in 2880C water containing 26 ppm dissolved oxygen. The results obtained are summarized as follows: (1) SCC susceptibility of SUS 304 pipe welds is comparatively low under the condition of as-welded. It becomes, however, high remarkably by grinder operation and/or low temperature sensitization heat treatment. The distribution of time of failure on SUS 304 pipe welds can be expressed as a log-normal or Weibull distribution. (2) SUS 304L, 304NG, 316NG, and 347 stainless steel pipe welds have a good SCC resistance and sensitization resistance. Furthermore, the life estimation on alternate pipe welds was conducted statistically. (author)

  7. Nondestructive Image Evaluation of Welded Zone of Steel Plate using Photoacoustic Microscope

    Ohtaki, Naoki; Hatake-yama, Mika; Suzuki, Mamoru; Endoh, Haruo; Hoshimiya, Tsutomu; Kawakami, Masaru; Muraki, Yutaka; Nakajima, Takeshi; Tominaga, Akihide; Takeshi, Masami

    2007-07-01

    The nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of welded steel plates was performed using photoacoustic microscope (PAM). Specimens were prepared by changing the maximum welding current to 5, 6.5, and 8 kA. A noncontact inspection without having to assemble a transducer was performed, and the results were compared with those of destructive inspection using an optical microscope. The agreement of NDE using a PAM and results from an actual shear fracture destructive test was good. The large fluctuation in the PA signal measured for the steel plates welded at the small current suggests the inhomogeneity of the inside welded region. Furthermore, visualization of the welded region suggests the feasibility of obtaining information on the status or uniformity of the inner welded region, which is difficult to measure by the other methods.

  8. Macrostructural and microstructural features of 1 000 MPa grade TRIP steel joint by CO2 laser welding

    Wang Wenquan; Sun Daqian; Kang Chungyun

    2008-01-01

    Bead-on-plate CO2 laser welding of 1 000 MPa grade transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steel was conducted under different welding powers, welding speeds and shield gases. The macrostructural and microstructural features of the welded joint were investigated. The increase of welding speed reduced the width of the weld bead and the porosities in the weld bead resulting from the different flow mode of melted metal in weld pool. The decrease of welding power or use of shield gas of helium also contributed to the reduction of porosity in the weld bead due to the alleviation of induced plasma formation, thus stabilizing the keyhole. The porosity formation intimately correlated with the evaporation of alloy element Mn in the base metal. The laser welded metal had same martensite microstructure as that of water-quenched base metal. The welding parameters which increased cooling rate all led to fine microstructures of the weld bead.

  9. Mechanical Properties of Thermally Aged Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds and Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Conventional test methods for tensile and J-R properties of such weld require large size specimens. Meanwhile, small punch (SP) test has advantages of using small size samples at specific location. In this study, the mechanical property changes caused by the thermal aging were evaluated for the stainless steel welds and CASSs using tensile, J-R, and SP test. Based on the results, correlations were developed to estimate the fracture toughness using the load-displacement curve of SP tests. Finally, the fracture surfaces of compact tension (CT) and SP test specimens are compared and discussed in view of the effect of thermal aging on microstructure. Stainless steel welds of ER316L and ER347 as well as CASS (CF8M) were thermally aged at 400 .deg. C for 5,000 h. So far, tensile properties and fracture toughness of un-aged materials were carried out at room temperature and 320 .deg. C as a reference data. In order to evaluate the effect of thermal aging on mechanical properties, aged specimens are being tested and the changes in these properties will be discussed. In addition, correlations will be developed to estimate the fracture toughness in between J-R curve and SP curve

  10. A comparative study of the microstructure and mechanical properties of HTLA steel welds obtained by the tungsten arc welding and resistance spot welding

    Highlights: ► Hardness mapping is a novel method to identify different phases. ► Surface hardness mapping, tabulates the hardness of a large area of weld. ► Hardness maps can be used to depict the strength map through the specimen. ► Hardness mapping is an easy way to identify the phase fractions within the specimen. - Abstract: Hardness tests are routinely employed as simple and efficient methods to investigate the microstructure and mechanical properties of steels. Each microstructural phase in steel has its own hardness level. Therefore, using surface hardness mapping data over a large area of weld zone would be a reasonable method to identify the present phases in steel. The microstructure distribution and mechanical properties variation through welded structures is inhomogeneous and not suitable for certain applications. So, studying the microstructure of weld zone has a significant importance. 4130 steel is classified in HTLA steels and it is widely used in marine industry due to its superior hardenability, good corrosion resistance and high strength. Gas tungsten arc and resistance spot welding are the most usable processes in joining of 4130 sheets. In this work a series of welds have been fabricated in 4130 steel tube by gas tungsten arc and resistance spot welding. The tube was subjected to quench-tempered heat treatment. Slices from the welds before and after heat treatment were polished and etched and the macrostructure and microstructure were observed. Hardness maps were then determined over the large area of weld zone, including the heat affected zone and base plate. Results show good relations between the various microstructures, strength and hardness values. It is also proved that this method is precise and applicable to estimate phase fraction of each phase in various regions of weld. In the current study some equations were proposed to calculate the ultimate tensile stress and yield stress from the weld. The calculated data were compared

  11. Stainless steel submerged arc weld fusion line toughness

    This effort evaluated the fracture toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines. The incentive was to explain why cracks grow into the fusion line in many pipe tests conducted with cracks initially centered in SAWS. The concern was that the fusion line may have a lower toughness than the SAW. It was found that the fusion line, Ji. was greater than the SAW toughness but much less than the base metal. Of greater importance may be that the crack growth resistance (JD-R) of the fusion line appeared to reach a steady-state value, while the SAW had a continually increasing JD-R curve. This explains why the cracks eventually turn to the fusion line in the pipe experiments. A method of incorporating these results would be to use the weld metal J-R curve up to the fusion-line steady-state J value. These results may be more important to LBB analyses than the ASME flaw evaluation procedures, since there is more crack growth with through-wall cracks in LBB analyses than for surface cracks in pipe flaw evaluations

  12. Stainless steel submerged arc weld fusion line toughness

    Rosenfield, A.R.; Held, P.R.; Wilkowski, G.M. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-04-01

    This effort evaluated the fracture toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines. The incentive was to explain why cracks grow into the fusion line in many pipe tests conducted with cracks initially centered in SAWS. The concern was that the fusion line may have a lower toughness than the SAW. It was found that the fusion line, Ji. was greater than the SAW toughness but much less than the base metal. Of greater importance may be that the crack growth resistance (JD-R) of the fusion line appeared to reach a steady-state value, while the SAW had a continually increasing JD-R curve. This explains why the cracks eventually turn to the fusion line in the pipe experiments. A method of incorporating these results would be to use the weld metal J-R curve up to the fusion-line steady-state J value. These results may be more important to LBB analyses than the ASME flaw evaluation procedures, since there is more crack growth with through-wall cracks in LBB analyses than for surface cracks in pipe flaw evaluations.

  13. High temperature fatigue experiments on welded stainless steel tubular elements

    One of the most important problems concerning the design of advanced type reactors regards the high temperature low-cycle fatigue behaviour of structural elements. Design Guides and Codes report reference data, mainly based on strain range versus failure cycles results, which have been determined by various researchers. The data have been obtained through different test techniques applied to different types of specimens. As a consequence such data are not easily correlated; moreover at present an exhaustive series of results about high temperature low-cycle fatigue behaviour of structures is not available. A test rig has been designed to perform high temperature fatigue experiments on AISI 304 stainless steel tubular elements of 500 mm length, 60.3 mm outer diameter and 2 mm thickness, they are composed of two butt welded tubular elements with welded end flanges. During the experiments it is possible to control the axial strain range, the strain rate and the hold time; the specimen temperature is obtained by an inner heating device, controlled by a series of measuring thermocouples; until now the imposed temperature is 6500C. The first results show a marked reduction of the number of cycles at failure, if compared with existing data about small size specimens; the measurement of residual plastic strains shows clearly non-uniform distribution of the plastic zones. (Auth.)

  14. Problems in repair-welding of duplex-treated tool steels

    T. Muhič; J. Tušek; M. Pleterski; D. Bombač

    2009-01-01

    The present paper addresses problems in laser welding of die-cast tools used for aluminum pressure die-castings and plastic moulds. To extend life cycle of tools various surface improvements are used. These surface improvements significantly reduce weldability of the material. This paper presents development of defects in repair welding of duplex-treated tool steel. The procedure is aimed at reduction of defects by the newly developed repair laser welding techniques. Effects of different repa...

  15. Microstructure and properties of welds in the lean duplex stainless steel LDX 2101

    Westin, Elin M.

    2010-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels can be very attractive alternatives to austenitic grades due to their almost double strength at equal pitting corrosion resistance. When welding, the duplex alloys normally require addition of filler metal, while the commodity austenitic grades can often be welded autogenously. Over-alloyed consumables are used to counteract segregation of important alloying elements and to balance the two phases, ferrite and austenite, in the duplex weld metal. This work focuses on th...

  16. Welding of cold worked austenitic steels - comparison of TIG, EB and laser processes

    Effect of welding on cold worked components is a local falling of their properties. Modifications induced by such an operation depend on the thermal cycle and consequently on the welding process. An experimental study aim of which is to compare respective effects of different welding processes (TIG, EB, laser) has been realized. This publication presents results related to 316L and 316Ti steels. (author). 2 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  17. Welding stresses between a thin tube and a thick part both in austenitic steel

    Welding difficulties are enhanced by assymetrical thermal inertia of the 2 parts in steel 316. This is confirmed by first results shown on a complete map of stresses on one side of the joint in three different regions: the weld seam, the heat affected zone and the tube. Stress analysis is obtained by X-ray diffraction. The accurate knowledge of induced residual stress will determine the definitive welding process

  18. Hydrogen distribution and redistribution in the weld zone of constructional steels

    Smith, Richard Dominic

    1999-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. The invention of electric arc welding revolutionized the steel construction industry, but also brought some problems when the welded region has inferior properties compared to the plate metal. A major cause of brittle failure was identi ed as hydrogen embrittlement of the weld zone, although a comprehensive understanding of this phenomenon is not, even now, available. Hydrogen in solution ...

  19. Comparative analysis of weld properties of titanium-niobium, titanium molybdenum and stainless steel archwires

    Vinod Pattabiraman; V Shashikala Kumari; Sarala Upadhya; Nausheer Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Ability to achieve sound weld joints is a desirable characteristic for orthodontic archwires. Titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA) has been the only truly weldable orthodontic archwire alloy until now. Titanium-niobium (Ti-Nb) alloy archwires exhibit similar mechanical properties as TMA. Whether sound weld joints can be produced in these wires has not been evaluated thus far. In this study Ti-Nb alloy archwires were compared with TMA and stainless steel (SS) for weld quality, with SS wi...

  20. Durability of welded joints of heat resistant steels with crack-similar defects

    Estimation of the effect of cracks and crack-similar defects on supporting power of welded joints is important for estimation of workability and substantiation of control periodicity of welded joints of responsible elements of power equipment operating under creep. High-temperature welded joints of heat resistant steels of Cr-Mo-V system are shown to be characterized by low sensitivity to stress concentration

  1. The effect of travel speed and CTWD on the bead profile and microstructure of tandem GMA steel welds

    Automated tandem gas metal arc welding (T-GMAW) has been identified as a welding system potentially capable of increas¬ing productivity and minimising distortion in the fabrication of ship panels. The T-GMAW process was used in pulse-pulse mode on 6 mm plain carbon steel plate to determine the effect of welding travel speed (WTS) (1.0-2.0 m/min) and contact¬tip-to-workpiece distance (CTWD) (20-35 mm) on weld metal microstructure and bead profile. In this mode, the leading and trailing welding wires transfer metal alternately into a single molten weld pool at welding travel speeds much greater than those used in conventional single-wire gas metal arc welding (GMAW). The bead-on-plate (BOP) welding of 6 mm plain carbon steel plate resulted in adequate weld pool mixing and an acceptable level of micro structural homogeneity in the solidified weld metal for the welding conditions investigated. BOP welding tests were also undertaken on 20 mm plain carbon steel plate which results in a greater weld cooling rate compared with the thin 6 mm plate. In the 20 mm plate, a relatively homogenous weld metal microstructure was also present, but there was evidence of limited weld pool mixing. Also, in-situ analysis of the arcs during welding and post-test characterisation of the BOP samples showed that arc stability and bead profile are sensitive to both CTWD and WTS.

  2. Diffusion processes in vacuum pressure welding of titanium with stainless steel

    The role of diffusion processes in formation of mechanical titanium welded joint of the VT1-0 type with stainless steels of ferrite (2Kh13 steel) and austenite (12Kh18N10T) types is studied. The properties of titanium welded joints with steel are shown to depend essentially on diffusion processes in the zone of a contact, which are, in its turn, determined by welding temperature and time. It is established that reactive diffusion, leading to carbide and intermetallide phase formation, prevents a qualitative joint from preparing. Atomic heterodiffusion of titanium to a steel and iron to titanium to insignificant depth (approximately 2 μm) occurs during welding at T=650 deg C, tau=1...3 min., P=400 MPa in the zone of a contact; features of reactive diffusion are absent and specimens are failed viscously (σsub(v)=490 MPa)

  3. Welding of stainless steel pool of pressurized water reactor nuclear power station

    The construction of stainless steel lining of million kilowatt grade pressurized water reactor nuclear power station is a new technology. The author introduces its welding method, parameter verification measure and key factors of construction quality control and so on

  4. 49 CFR 178.47 - Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    2010-10-01

    ... either a welded stainless steel sphere (two seamless hemispheres) or circumferentially welded cylinder... inches; d = Inside diameter in inches. (g) Heat treatment. The seamless hemispheres and cylinders may be... length not less than as specified for American Standard taper pipe threads. (iii) Straight threads...

  5. Welding of super austenitic stainless steels with very high nitrogen contents

    Results of studies performed on the weld of different super austenitic stainless steels show that nitrogen additions as high as 0.5% does not deteriorate the weldability but on the contrary improves the mechanical and corrosion properties of the weld. (A.B.). 5 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs

  6. Three-Sheet Spot Welding of Advanced High-Strength Steels

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Friis, Kasper Storgaard; Zhang, W.;

    2011-01-01

    The automotive industry has introduced the three-layer weld configuration, which represents new challenges compared to normal two-sheet lap welds. The process is further complicated by introducing high-strength steels in the joint. The present article investigates the weldability of thin, low...

  7. 75 FR 18788 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Thailand: Preliminary Results and Rescission...

    2010-04-13

    ...: Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Thailand, 51 FR 8341 (March 11, 1986). On March 2, 2009... Shipper Review Final Results, 75 FR at 4529-4530 (January 28, 2010). Allied Tube responded to Pacific Pipe... Review, 73 FR 61019 (October 15, 2008) (2006-2007 AR Final Results); see Circular Welded Carbon...

  8. Microstructure and tensile properties of friction welded SUS 304HCu austenitic stainless steel tubes

    Austenitic stainless steels are used in superheater/reheater tubing for their oxidation resistance and fireside corrosion resistance, in addition to their creep strength. The addition of 3 wt. % Cu to SUS 304HCu austenitic stainless steel to reduce the corrosion, has found to increase the creep performance in temperature range of 650°–750 °C. The addition of Cu to steels can have adverse effects on the mechanical properties of the fusion welded joints. During fusion welding, Cu can form low temperature eutectic phases that preferentially segregate to the grain boundaries and embrittle the alloy. There is a need for a better welding procedure/technique to fabricate this alloy. Friction welding is a solid state welding process which nullifies the adverse effects of low temperature eutectics segregation. Hence, in this investigation an attempt has been made to study the microstructural and tensile properties of the friction welded SUS 304HCu austenitic stainless steel tube joints fabricated using optimized parameters. -- Highlights: • Friction welding of SUS 304HCu tubes is reported. • Microstructures of friction welded SUS 304HCu tubes were reported. • Fracture surface of the tensile samples is characterized using SEM. • XRD analysis of the SUS 304HCu tube is reported

  9. Cyclic corrosion crack resistance of anticorrosion cladding - vessel steel welded joint

    Cyclic corrosion crack resistance of welded joint (vessel steel 15Kh2MFA - anticorrosion cladding of steel Sv - 07Kh25N13 - anticorrosion cladding of steel Sv - 04Kh20N10G2B) in reactor water of boric regulation at 80 deg C is investigated. The diagram of welded joint fatigue fracture is plotted. It is ascertained that Sv - 04Kh20N10G2B austenitic cladding has the lowest cyclic crack resistance. It is pointed out that in the crack the vertex of which is located in steel 15Kh2MFA conditions for hydrogen formation, which is able to cause embrittlement, are created

  10. Investigation on dissimilar laser welding of advanced high strength steel sheets for the automotive industry

    Rossini, M., E-mail: matteo.rossini@unibz.it [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Spena, P. Russo, E-mail: pasquale.russospena@unibz.it [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Cortese, L., E-mail: luca.cortese@unibz.it [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Matteis, P., E-mail: paolo.matteis@polito.it [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Firrao, D., E-mail: donato.firrao@polito.it [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2015-03-25

    To support the use of advanced high strength steels in car body design and fabrication, an investigation was carried out on dissimilar butt laser welding between TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) steels, Dual Phase (DP) steels, hot stamping boron (22MnB5) steels, and TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels. The base materials and the weldments were fully characterized by means of metallography, microhardness, and tensile tests. Digital image analysis was also used to provide additional information on the local strain field in the joint during the tensile tests. Fractographic examination was finally performed on the fracture surfaces of the tensile samples. The dissimilar joints between the DP, 22MnB5, and TRIP steels exhibit good resistance properties. On the contrary, the dissimilar joints encompassing the TWIP steel exhibit poor mechanical strength and fail along the weld seam by intergranular fracture, probably due to presence of Mn segregations. Therefore, the laser welding of TWIP steel with other advanced high strength steels is not recommended without the use of proper metal fillers. Dissimilar laser welding of DP, TRIP and 22MnB5 combinations, on the contrary, can be a solution to assemble car body parts made of these steel grades.

  11. Investigation on dissimilar laser welding of advanced high strength steel sheets for the automotive industry

    To support the use of advanced high strength steels in car body design and fabrication, an investigation was carried out on dissimilar butt laser welding between TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) steels, Dual Phase (DP) steels, hot stamping boron (22MnB5) steels, and TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels. The base materials and the weldments were fully characterized by means of metallography, microhardness, and tensile tests. Digital image analysis was also used to provide additional information on the local strain field in the joint during the tensile tests. Fractographic examination was finally performed on the fracture surfaces of the tensile samples. The dissimilar joints between the DP, 22MnB5, and TRIP steels exhibit good resistance properties. On the contrary, the dissimilar joints encompassing the TWIP steel exhibit poor mechanical strength and fail along the weld seam by intergranular fracture, probably due to presence of Mn segregations. Therefore, the laser welding of TWIP steel with other advanced high strength steels is not recommended without the use of proper metal fillers. Dissimilar laser welding of DP, TRIP and 22MnB5 combinations, on the contrary, can be a solution to assemble car body parts made of these steel grades

  12. Effect of Groove Design and Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of P91 Steel Weld

    Pandey, C.; Mahapatra, M. M.

    2016-07-01

    The martensitic creep-resistant steel designated as ASTM A335 for plate and as P91 for pipe is primarily used for high-temperature and high-pressure applications in steam power plants due to its excellent high-temperature properties such as high creep strength, high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, and so on. However, in the case of welded joints of such steels, the presence of an inter-critical heat-affected zone (IC-HAZ) can cause the joint to have lower creep strength than the base metal. In the present study, the effect of post-welding heat treatment (PWHT) and weld groove designs on the overall microstructure and mechanical properties of P91 steel pipe welds produced by the gas tungsten arc welding process was studied. Various regions of welded joints were characterized in detail for hardness and metallographic and tensile properties. Sub-size tensile samples were also tested to evaluate the mechanical properties of the weld metal and heat-affected zone (HAZ) with respect to PWHT. After PWHT, a homogenous microstructure was observed in the HAZ and tensile test fracture samples revealed shifting of the fracture location from the IC-HAZ to the fine-grained heat-affected zone. Before PWHT, the conventional V-grooved welded joints exhibited higher tensile strength compared to the narrow-grooved joints. However, after PWHT, both narrow- and V-grooved joints exhibited similar strength. Fractography of the samples indicates the presence of carbide precipitates such as Cr23C6, VC, and NbC on the fracture surface.

  13. Simulated weld HAZ of vanadium modified 2.25 Cr-1Mo steel

    The effect of the weld heat affected zone (HAZ) on microstructure, mechanical properties and hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of vanadium modified 2.25Cr-1Mo steel (V-Mod Steel) has been studied to examine the viability of using V-Mod steel for reactor applications. The weld HAZ was simulated on the assumption that the submerged arc welding was made for the V-Mod steel with input heat of about 40 kJ/cm. When the weld HAZ was heated to 1123 K, the strength was somewhat decreased, while the 0.2% proof strength exceeded considerably the critical value (415 MPa) established for reactors. Heating the weld HAZ in the region of 1173 to 1473 K had a beneficial effect on the strength and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. Compared to the base metal, the weld HAZ heated in the region of 1123 to 1673 K exhibited equal or superior hydrogen charged and initial mechanical properties. The results illustrate that the weld HAZ for the V-Mod steel has not only sufficient mechanical properties which could withstand the operation under severely stressed conditions but also beneficial effects on hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. (orig.)

  14. Microstructure and fatigue performance of butt-welded joints in advanced high-strength steels

    This study presents a comparative analysis of the high-cycle fatigue behaviors of butt weld joints in advanced high-strength steels with different strength levels and weld bead geometry. Welded joints were made using a gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process on dual-phase steels (DP440 and DP590) and martensitic steel (MS) with tensile strengths of 440, 590, and 1500 MPa, respectively. The microstructures with the lowest hardness were found at the base metal, the sub-critical heat-affected zone (HAZ), and the fusion zone for DP440, DP590, and MS weldments, respectively. Fatigue failure of specimens without weld beads occurred at the points of lowest hardness, and fatigue life exhibited the order MS>DP590>DP440, similar to the order of lowest hardness values in each weldment. However, the introduction of high weld beads resulted in very short, similar fatigue lives for all welded joints and fracture occurred at weld toe due to the overwhelming stress concentration effect. A transition from geometry-governed fracture toward microstructure-governed fracture was investigated by varying weld bead heights

  15. Welding of thin sheets of high strength zinc alloy coated steels

    Zinc alloy coated, high strength (G550) sheet steels are important materials in automobile manufacture, building and construction. Spot or arc welding is typically required in the component manufacturing process, but these processes result in localised softening because of the weld thermal cycle. As a consequence, the strength is normally downgraded significantly for design purposes to values typical of the annealed Zn or Zn alloy grades (G250 or G300). The investigation described in this paper involved the examination of the effect of the welding process and welding variables on butt welding on 1mm thick Zn-coated and Zn-Al-coated sheet steels. It has been demonstrated that these sheet steels can be successfully welded by both FCAW and GMAW methods using appropriately low welding heat inputs. However, strength loss below the minimum specified 5.50 MPa tensile strength did occur because of transformation and recrystallisation of the recovery annealed base metal structure as a result of the heat input of the welding process. The extent of the strength loss increased with increasing nominal weld heat input due to an increased width of the softened heat affected zone (HAZ) regions and grain growth in the grain refined and recrystallised regions. The maximum loss in yield strength at the highest heat input of 130 J/mm was about 150 MPa, suggesting that a minimum yield stress of 400 MPa can be safely used for structural design calculations.

  16. Review on the possible tool materials for friction stir welding of steel plates

    Sierens, A; Vanvooren, J; Deplus, K; Faes, K; De Waele, Wim

    2014-01-01

    The friction stir welding (FSW) process is mainly used in industrial applications for joining low melting temperature materials such as aluminium and magnesium. FSW has many advantages in comparison with conventional fusion arc welding. Therefore the interest to use this technique for joining steel plates has grown. However such usage is still limited because of the lack of adequate tool materials. This review gives an overview of possible tool materials for FSW of steels focussing on tungste...

  17. Use of LMA-1 laser microanalyzer for investigation of joint welds of high-alloy steels

    A method for quantitative local analysis of steels with the use of LMA-1 laser microanalyzer has been developed. The method has been used for investigation of the distribution of Cr, Ni, Mn, Si, and Ti elements in welded joints of 10Kh20N7T steel. It is shown that the chemical composition of the microareas of the joint is inhomogeneous, which may cause cracking in the welds

  18. Effect of in service weld repair on the performance of CrMo steel steam pipelines

    Alfonso Rafael Fernández Fuentes; Nelson Guedes de Alcântara; Sergio Haro Rodríguez; Alejandro López Ibarra

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a literature overview and discusses a practical case involving the effect of in service weld repair on the performance - behavior under creep conditions and remanent life - of low alloy CrMo steel steam pipelines with longstanding use. According to the specialized literature, several authors argue that the in service weld repair of low alloy CrMo steel steam pipes can be done successfully, while others disagree, reporting a reduction of up to 30% or more in the remanent ...

  19. Cold weld cracking susceptibility of high strength low alloyed (HSLA) steel NIONIKRAL 70

    Tawengi, A. S.; A. Sedmak; Grabulov, V.

    2014-01-01

    In view of the importance of high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels, particularly for critical applications such as offshore plat forms, pipeline and pressure vessels, this paper reports on an investigation of how to weld this type of steel without cold cracking. Using manual metal arc welding process and Tekken test (Y - Grove test) has been carried out both to observe the cold cracking phenome non, and to investigate the influencing factors, such as preheating temperature and energy input, a...

  20. Tension fracture behaviors of welded joints in X70 steel pipeline

    2011-01-01

    The surface of welded joints in X70 steel pipeline was processed by laser shock wave, its mechanical behaviors of tension fracture were analyzed with tension test,and the fracture morphologies and the distributions of chemical element were observed with scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectrum,respectively.The experimental results show that the phenomenon of grain refinement occurs in the surface of welded joints in X70 steel pipeline after the laser shock processing,and compressive re...

  1. X-Ray diffraction technique applied to study of residual stresses after welding of duplex stainless steel plates

    Monin, Vladimir Ivanovitch; Assis, Joaquim Teixeira de [Instituto Politecnico do Rio e Janeiro (IPRJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil); Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Turibus, Sergio Noleto; Payao Filho, Joao C., E-mail: sturibus@nuclear.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Duplex stainless steel is an example of composite material with approximately equal amounts of austenite and ferrite phases. Difference of physical and mechanical properties of component is additional factor that contributes appearance of residual stresses after welding of duplex steel plates. Measurements of stress distributions in weld region were made by X-ray diffraction method both in ferrite and austenite phases. Duplex Steel plates were joined by GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) technology. There were studied longitudinal and transverse stress components in welded butt joint, in heat affected zone (HAZ) and in points of base metal 10 mm from the weld. Residual stresses measured in duplex steel plates jointed by welding are caused by temperature gradients between weld zone and base metal and by difference of thermal expansion coefficients of ferrite and austenite phases. Proposed analytical model allows evaluating of residual stress distribution over the cross section in the weld region. (author)

  2. X-Ray diffraction technique applied to study of residual stresses after welding of duplex stainless steel plates

    Duplex stainless steel is an example of composite material with approximately equal amounts of austenite and ferrite phases. Difference of physical and mechanical properties of component is additional factor that contributes appearance of residual stresses after welding of duplex steel plates. Measurements of stress distributions in weld region were made by X-ray diffraction method both in ferrite and austenite phases. Duplex Steel plates were joined by GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) technology. There were studied longitudinal and transverse stress components in welded butt joint, in heat affected zone (HAZ) and in points of base metal 10 mm from the weld. Residual stresses measured in duplex steel plates jointed by welding are caused by temperature gradients between weld zone and base metal and by difference of thermal expansion coefficients of ferrite and austenite phases. Proposed analytical model allows evaluating of residual stress distribution over the cross section in the weld region. (author)

  3. Welding hot cracking in an austenitic stainless steel

    The occurrence of hot cracking is linked to several conditions, in particular, the composition of the material and the local strains due to clambering. The aim of this study is to better analyse the implied mechanisms and to lead to a local thermomechanical criterion for hot cracking. The example studied is an AISI 321-type stainless steel (X10CrNiTi18-12) strongly prone to cracking. Two weldability tests are studied: - the first one consists in carrying out a fusion line by the TIG process on a thin sheet. In the case of the defect occurrence, the crack is longitudinal and follows the back of the molten bath. The influence of the operating conditions welding (speed, welding heat input, width test sample) is studied. - the second one is the Varestraint test. It is widely used to evaluate the sensitivity of a material to hot cracking. It consists in loading the material by bending during a fusion line by the TIG process and in characterising the defects quantity (length, number). Various thermal and mechanical instrumentation methods were used. The possibilities of a local instrumentation instrumentation being limited because of the melting, the experimental results were complemented by a numerical modelling whose aim is to simulate the thermomechanical evolution of the loading thanks to the finite element analysis code ABAQUS. First, the heat input for thermal simulation is set by the use of an inverse method in order to optimise the energy deposit mode during welding in the calculation. Then, the mechanical simulation needs the input of a constitutive law that fits the mechanical behaviour over a wide temperature range from ambient to melting temperature. Thus, a mechanical characterization is performed by selecting strain values and strain rates representative of what the material undergoes during the tests. The results come from tensile and compressive tests and allow to settle an elasto-visco-plastic constitutive law over temperatures up to liquidus. Once

  4. Welded joint properties of 08Cr2.25Mo1NiNb type steel

    The results are given of a study into the effect of the chemical composition on the mechanical and structural properties of welded joint of steel 08Cr2.25Mo1NiNb. The welded joints were obtained by manual arc welding using coated electrodes. For assessing short-term strength and plastic properties, tensile tests at normal temperature, notch toughness tests, hardness measurements and bending tests were conducted. The welded joint microstructure was also analysed. The minimal values of the yield point can be obtained in welded joints of melts with the Nb content at a level of the stabilization ratio. The highest hardness values were obtained in the welding metal ranges, which, however, does not negatively affect the plastic properties of the joint. Lower values of notch toughness were found for welding metals with higher carbon content. (M.S.)

  5. Statistical modeling of laser welding of DP/TRIP steel sheets

    Reisgen, U.; Schleser, M.; Mokrov, O.; Ahmed, E.

    2012-02-01

    In this research work, a statistical analysis of the CO 2 laser beam welding of dual phase (DP600)/transformation induced plasticity (TRIP700) steel sheets was done using response surface methodology. The analysis considered the effect of laser power (2-2.2 kW), welding speed (40-50 mm/s) and focus position (-1 to 0 mm) on the heat input, the weld bead geometry, uniaxial tensile strength, formability limited dome height and welding operation cost. The experimental design was based on Box-Behnken design using linear and quadratic polynomial equations for predicting the mathematical models. The results indicate that the proposed models predict the responses adequately within the limits of welding parameters being used and the welding speed is the most significant parameter during the welding process.

  6. Keyhole depth instability in case of CW CO2 laser beam welding of mild steel

    N Kumar; S Dash; A K Tyagi; Baldev Raj

    2010-10-01

    The study of keyhole (KH) instability in deep penetration laser beam welding (LBW) is essential to understand welding process and appearance of weld seam defects. The main cause of keyhole collapse is the instability in KH dynamics during the LBW process. This is mainly due to the surface tension forces associated with the KH collapse and the stabilizing action of vapour pressure. A deep penetration high power CW CO2 laser was used to generate KH in mild steel (MS) in two different welding conditions i.e. ambient atmospheric welding (AAW) and under water welding (UWW). KH, formed in case of under water welding, was deeper and narrower than keyhole formed in ambient and atmospheric condition. The number and dimensions of irregular humps increased in case of ambient and under water condition due to larger and rapid keyhole collapse also studied. The thermocapillary convection is considered to explain KH instability, which in turn gives rise to irregular humps.

  7. 78 FR 72863 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of...

    2013-12-04

    ...). \\3\\ See Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From China, 78 FR 70069 (November 22, 2013). Scope... Carbon Quality Steel Pipe From the People's Republic of China, 73 FR 42547 (July 22, 2008). Continuation... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the People's Republic of...

  8. 75 FR 2487 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Thailand: Court Decision Not in Harmony with...

    2010-01-15

    ... Steel Pipes and Tubes from Thailand: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 73 FR... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Thailand: Court Decision... results of the administrative review of the antidumping order on circular welded carbon steel pipes...

  9. 76 FR 33204 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey; Notice of Preliminary Results of...

    2011-06-08

    ... Order; Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube Products From Turkey, 51 FR 17784 (May 15, 1986... Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube from Turkey, 71 FR 26043 (May 3, 2006), unchanged in Notice of Final Results of Antidumping Duty New Shipper Review: Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey, 71...

  10. Influence of Welding Current and Joint Design on the Tensile Properties of SMAW Welded Mild Steel Joints Prof. Rohit Jha1 , Dr. A.K. Jha

    Prof. Rohit Jha

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Present study includes welding characteristics of weldment with respect to different types of weld design and welding current. Mild steel plates of 6mm were welded using different joint designs. Single V, Double V and Flat surfaces were joined by Shielded Metal Arc Welding process. Welding current was varied in all the cases. Mechanical properties such as ultimate tensile strength, yield strength and percentage elongation were evaluated. Results indicated that the single V joint design depict maximum UTS in comparison to other welding joints and also weld properties of joints (weldment increases to some extent up-to a particular current level, after which the strength decreases. Welding current also affect the welding speed.

  11. Effect of post-weld heat treatment and electrolytic plasma processing on tungsten inert gas welded AISI 4140 alloy steel

    Highlights: • The effects of PWHT and EPP were explored on TIG welded AISI4140 alloy steel. • All welded samples were checked with PAUT and ensured defect-free before testing. • Residual stresses, hardness, and tensile properties were measured experimentally. • PWHT resulted higher ductility but lower tensile strength for grain refinement. • EPP-treated samples showed higher tensile strength but lower ductility. - Abstract: Post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) is commonly adopted on welded joints and structures to relieve post-weld residual stresses; and restore the mechanical properties and structural integrity. An electrolytic plasma process (EPP) has been developed to improve corrosion behavior and wear resistance of structural materials; and can be employed in other applications and surface modifications aspects. In this study the effects of PWHT and EPP on the residual stresses, micro-hardness, microstructures, and uniaxial tensile properties are explored on tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded AISI-4140 alloys steel with SAE-4130 chromium–molybdenum alloy welding filler rod. For rational comparison all of the welded samples are checked with nondestructive Phased Array Ultrasonic Testing (PAUT) and to ensure defect-free samples before testing. Residual stresses are assessed with ultrasonic testing at different distances from weld center line. PWHT resulted in relief of tensile residual stress due to grain refinement. As a consequence higher ductility but lower strength existed in PWHT samples. In comparison, EPP-treated samples revealed lower residual stresses, but no significant variation on the grain refinement. Consequently, EPP-treated specimens exhibited higher tensile strength but lower ductility and toughness for the martensitic formation due to the rapid heating and quenching effects. EPP was also applied on PWHT samples, but which did not reveal any substantial effect on the tensile properties after PWHT at 650 °C. Finally the microstructures and

  12. Fracture toughness and crack growth resistance of pressure vessel plate and weld metal steels

    Compact tension specimens were used to measure the initiation fracture toughness and crack growth resistance of pressure vessel steel plates and submerged arc weld metal. Plate test specimens were manufactured from four different casts of steel comprising: aluminium killed C-Mn-Mo-Cu and C-Mn steel and two silicon killed C-Mn steels. Unionmelt No. 2 weld metal test specimens were extracted from welds of double V butt geometry having either the C-Mn-Mo-Cu steel (three weld joints) or one particular silicon killed C-Mn steel (two weld joints) as parent plate. A multiple specimen test technique was used to obtain crack growth data which were analysed by simple linear regression to determine the crack growth resistance lines and to derive the initiation fracture toughness values for each test temperature. These regression lines were highly scattered with respect to temperature and it was very difficult to determine precisely the temperature dependence of the initiation fracture toughness and crack growth resistance. The data were re-analysed, using a multiple linear regression method, to obtain a relationship between the materials' crack growth resistance and toughness, and the principal independent variables (temperature, crack growth, weld joint code and strain ageing). (author)

  13. The Influence of Post Weld Heat Treatment in Alloy 82/182 Dissimilar Metal Weld between Low Alloy Steel and 316L Stainless Steel

    Dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) using an Alloy 82/182 are widely used to join low alloy steel components and stainless steel pipes in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It has been reported that tensile residual stress would be generated within DMWs during the welding processes. It is thought as main reason for primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) resulting in deterioration of long-term integrity. The application of post weld heat treatment (PWHT) has been considered to reduce the tensile residual stress after welding process. Meanwhile, the PWHT could affect the changes in microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance. Therefore, in this study, the effects of PWHT on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviors of base metals of low alloy steel and stainless steel and welding materials of Alloy 82/182 are evaluated. The influence of PWHT in DMW has been investigated. SA 508 and 316L SS exhibited tempered bainite and austenitic grains with a few residual stringer type ferrite. Grain boundary carbides are not precipitated owing to low carbon and insufficient exposure time in 316L SS. The change of mechanicals properties in base metals is not observed. In case of Alloy 182, after PWHT, grain boundaries are covered with film-like continuous Cr-rich carbides

  14. Toughness investigation on simulated weld HAZs of SQV-2A pressure vessel steel

    In order to get detailed information about weld HAZs toughness of SQV-2A steel and determine the optimum welding and heat treatment parameters, the toughness of simulated CGHAZs (coarse grained heat affected zone) and CGHAZs (intercritically reheated CGHAZ) were systematically investigated. The influence of tempering thermal cycles on weld ICCGHAZs toughness was clarified. The effect of post weld heat treatments (PWHT) on weld CGHAZs toughness was also determined. The results showed that high toughness (absorbed energy >200 J) of weld HAZs could be achieved by selecting the optimum welding and PWHT parameters (cooling time Δt8/5: 6-40 s. PWHT: 893 K, 3.6-7.2 ks). Tempering thermal cycles with peak temperature of above 573 K could remarkably improve the toughness of deteriorated ICCGHAZs and reduce the hardness, when cooling time Δt8/5(2) of the reheating thermal cycle was 6 s, which implies that welding of SQV-2A without PWHT is possible, provided that low heat input welding is adopted and welding procedure is correctly arranged. Metallography and fractography revealed that M-A constituents in weld HAZs played an important role in controlling weld HAZ toughness. (orig.)

  15. Submerged arc narrow gap welding of the steel DIN 20MnMoNi55

    The methodology for submerged arc narrow gap welding for high thickness rolled steel DIN 20MnMoNi55 was developed, using din S3NiMo1 04 mm and 05 mm wires, and DIN 8B435 flux. For this purpose, submerged arc narrow gap welded joints with 50 mm and 120 mm thickness were made aiming the welding parameters optimization and the study of the influence of welding voltage, wire diameter and wire to groove face distance on the operational performance and on the welded joint quality, specially on the ISO-V impact toughness. These welded joints were checked by non-destructive mechanical and metallographic tests. Results were compared with those obtained by one 120 mm thickness submerged arc conventional gap welded joint, using the same base metal and consumables (05 mm wire). The analysis of the results shows that the increasing of the wire to groove face distance and the welding voltage increases the hardness and the ISO-V impact toughness of the weld metal. It shows that the reduction of the gap angle is the main cause for the obtained of a heat affected zone free from coarse grains, the reduction of the welding voltage, the increasing of the wire to groove face distance, and the grounding optimization also contribute for that. It was also concluded that the quality and the execution complexity level of a narrow gap welded joint are identical to a conventional gap welded joint. (author)

  16. Hydrogen effect on properties of welded joints of pipes made of nickel-free corrosion resistant steels

    The dependence between hydrogen saturation of 08Kh18T1 steel welded joints and metal ductility has been found. It is shown that one of the main reasons of cracks formation in welded joints of 08Kh18T1 steel pipes is hydrogen embrittlement. Facilities for improved protection of welding pool and cooled off joint of gas saturation from atmosphere in manufacturing welded pipes of small diameter are developed

  17. INVESTIGATING SPOT WELD GROWTH ON 304 AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL (2 mm SHEETS

    NACHIMANI CHARDE

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Resistance spot welding (RSW has revolutionized automotive industries since early 1970s for its mechanical assemblies. To date one mechanical assembly out five is welded using spot welding technology in various industries and stainless steel became very popular among common materials. As such this research paper analyses the spot weld growth on 304 austenitic stainless steels with 2mm sample sheets. The growth of a spot weld is primarily determined by its parameters such as current, weld time, electrode tip and force. However other factors such as electrode deformations, corrosions, dissimilar materials and material properties are also affect the weld growth. This paper is intended to analyze only the effects of nuggets growth due to the current and weld time increment with constant force and unchanged electrode tips. A JPC 75kVA spot welder was used to accomplish it and the welded samples were undergone tensile test, hardness test and metallurgical test to characterize the formation of weld nuggets.

  18. Electron microscopy and microanalysis of steel weld joints after long time exposures at high temperatures

    Jandová, D.; Kasl, J.; Rek, A.

    2010-02-01

    The structural changes of three trial weld joints of creep resistant modified 9Cr-1Mo steels and low alloyed chromium steel after post-weld heat treatment and long-term creep tests were investigated. Smooth cross-weld specimens ruptured in different zones of the weld joints as a result of different structural changes taking place during creep exposures. The microstructure of the weld joint is heterogeneous and consequently microstructural development can be different in the weld metal, the heat affected zone, and the base material. Precipitation reactions, nucleation and growth of some particles and dissolution of others, affect the strengthening of the matrix, recovery at high temperatures, and the resulting creep resistance. Therefore, a detailed study of secondary phase's development in individual zones of weld joints can elucidate mechanism of cracks propagation in specific regions and the causes of creep failure. Type I and II fractures in the weld metal and Type IV fractures in the fine prior austenite grain heat affected zones occurred after creep tests at temperatures ranging from 525 to 625 °C and under stresses from 40 to 240 MPa. An extended metallographic study of the weld joints was carried out using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive and wave-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Carbon extraction replicas and thin foils were prepared from individual weld joint regions and quantitative evaluation of dislocation substructure and particles of secondary phases has been performed.

  19. Compressive Strength of Steel Frames after Welding with Micro-Jet Cooling

    Hadryś D.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Low carbon steel weld structures generally exhibit a very linear stress-strain relationship. In the study of strength of materials, the compressive strength is the capacity of a material or structure to withstand loads tending to reduce size of structure. It is mainly measured by plotting applied force against deformation in a testing machine. Compressive strength is a main key value for design of welded structures.The main goal of that paper was analysing of plastic properties of frame welds which were made with various parameters of micro-jet cooling. New technology of micro-jet welding could be regarded as a new way to improve plastic properties of welds. It allows to obtain welds with better mechanical properties in comparison to ordinary welding method. Furthermore it is possible to steering of weld structure and properties of the weld. There were given main information about influence of various micro-jet gases on metallographic and properties of structure steel welds.

  20. Effects of δ-ferrite and welding structure on high-cycle fatigue properties of austenitic stainless steels weld metals

    We studied the effects of δ-ferrite and welding structure on high-cycle fatigue properties for austenitic stainless steel weld metals at cryogenic temperatures. SUS304L and SUS316L weld metals contained 0% δ-ferrite (0% material) and 10% δ-ferrite (10% material) were prepared. High-cycle fatigue tests were carried out at 293, 77 and 4 K. The S-N curves of those weld metals shifted towards higher stress levels, i.e., the longer life side, with decreasing test temperature. The ratios of 106-cycles fatigue strength (FS) to tensile strength (TS) of 0% material decreased from 0.8 to 0.45 and those of 10% material decreased between 0.35 to 0.65 with decreasing test temperature. Fatigue crack initiation sites of SUS304L 10% material were almost at blowholes, and those of SUS316L 10% material were at weld pass interface boundaries. On the other hand, those of 0% materials were considered to be due to the interface of the solidification structure. Although δ-ferrite reduces toughness at cryogenic temperatures in austenitic stainless steel weld metals, the effects of δ-ferrite on high-cycle fatigue properties are not significant

  1. Residual Stress Analysis and Fatigue Assessment of Welded Steel Structures

    Barsoum, Zuheir

    2008-01-01

    This doctoral thesis is concerned with fatigue life of welded structures. Several topics related to fatigue of welded structures are treated such as; weld defects and their influence on fatigue performance of welded structures, fatigue life prediction using LEFM (Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics), fatigue testing, welding simulation, residual stress prediction and measurement and their influence on fatigue life. The work that is reported in this doctoral thesis is part results of the Nordic ...

  2. Butt welding characteristics of austenitic 304 stainless steel using a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser beam

    Laser beam welding is increasingly being used in welding of structural steels. The laser welding process is one of the most advanced manufacturing technologies owing to its high speed and deep penetration. The thermal cycles associated with laser welding are generally much faster than those involved in conventional arc welding processes, leading to a rather small weld zone. Experiments are performed for 304 stainless steel plates changing several process parameters such as laser power, welding speed, shielding gas flow rate, presence of surface pollution, with fixed or variable gap and misalignment between the similar and dissimilar plates, etc. The following conclusions can be drawn that laser power and welding speed have a pronounced effect on size and shape of the fusion zone. Increase in welding speed resulted in an increase in weld depth/ aspect ratio and hence a decease in the fusion zone size. The penetration depth increased with the increase in laser power

  3. Prediction of microcracking in laser overly welds of alloy 690 to type 316L stainless steel

    The occurrence of ductility-dip crack in the laser overlay welds of alloy 690 to type 316L stainless steel was predicted by the mechanical and metallurgical approaches. Ductility-dip temperature ranges (DTRs) of alloy 690 laser overlay welds were estimated by Varestraint test during GTA welding. The grain boundary segregation of impurity elements such as P and S was numerically analyzed based on the non-equilibrium cosegregation theory when the welding speed and the amounts of P and S in the weld metal were varied. In accordance with the repression approximation between the DTR and the calculated grain boundary concentrations of P and S, the DTRs of alloy 690 were computed in laser overlay welding. The estimated DTR in laser overlay welds was reduced with an increase in welding speed and with a decrease in the amounts of P and S in the weld metal. Ductility-dip cracking in laser overlay welds was predicted by the plastic strain-temperature curve intersected the DTR. The plastic strain in laser overlay welding was numerically analyzed using the thermo elasto-plastic finite element method. The plastic strain-temperature curve in laser overlay welds intersected the DTR at decreased welding speed and increased (P+S) content in the weld metal. The predicted results of ductility-dip cracking in laser overlay welds were approximately consistent with experiment results. It follows that ductility-dip cracking in laser overlay welds could be successfully predicted based on the estimated DTR from grain boundary segregation analysis combined with the computed plastic strain by FEM analysis. (author)

  4. Development of a process envelope for friction stir welding of DH36 steel – A step change

    Highlights: • The friction stir welding speed on DH36 steel has been substantially increased. • Excellent quality welds offering potential economic advantages are obtained. • Friction stir welding of steel generates a very complex metallurgical system. • Slow and intermediate welding speed tensile samples fractured in the parent material. • Increasing traverse speed is seen to improve the impact toughness of the weld. - Abstract: Friction stir welding of steel presents an array of advantages across many industrial sectors compared to conventional fusion welding techniques. However, the fundamental knowledge of the friction stir welding process in relation to steel remains relatively limited. A microstructure and property evaluation of friction stir welded low alloy steel grade DH36 plate, commonly used in ship and marine applications has been undertaken. In this comprehensive study, plates of 2000 × 200 × 6 mm were butt welded together at varying rotational and traverse speeds. Samples were examined microscopically and by transverse tensile tests. In addition, the work was complemented by Charpy impact testing and micro-hardness testing in various regions of the weld. The study examined a wide range of process parameters; from this, a preliminary process parameter envelope has been developed and initial process parameter sets established that produce commercially attractive excellent quality welds through a substantial increase in the conventionally recognised weld traverse speed

  5. Creep Strength of Dissimilar Welded Joints Using High B-9Cr Steel for Advanced USC Boiler

    Tabuchi, Masaaki; Hongo, Hiromichi; Abe, Fujio

    2014-10-01

    The commercialization of a 973 K (700 °C) class pulverized coal power system, advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) pressure power generation, is the target of an ongoing research project initiated in Japan in 2008. In the A-USC boiler, Ni or Ni-Fe base alloys are used for high-temperature parts at 923 K to 973 K (650 °C to 700 °C), and advanced high-Cr ferritic steels are planned to be used at temperatures lower than 923 K (650 °C). In the dissimilar welds between Ni base alloys and high-Cr ferritic steels, Type IV failure in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) is a concern. Thus, the high B-9Cr steel developed at the National Institute for Materials Science, which has improved creep strength in weldments, is a candidate material for the Japanese A-USC boiler. In the present study, creep tests were conducted on the dissimilar welded joints between Ni base alloys and high B-9Cr steels. Microstructures and creep damage in the dissimilar welded joints were investigated. In the HAZ of the high B-9Cr steels, fine-grained microstructures were not formed and the grain size of the base metal was retained. Consequently, the creep rupture life of the dissimilar welded joints using high B-9Cr steel was 5 to 10 times longer than that of the conventional 9Cr steel welded joints at 923 K (650 °C).

  6. Evaluation of weld defects in stainless steel 316L pipe using guided wave

    Stainless steel is a popular structural materials for liquid-hydrogen storage containers and piping components for transporting high-temperature fluids because of its superior material properties such as high strength and high corrosion resistance at elevated temperatures. In general, tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welding is used for bonding stainless steel. However, it is often reported that the thermal fatigue cracks or initial defects in stainless steel after welding decreases the reliability of the material. The objective of this paper is to clarify the characteristics of ultrasonic guided wave propagation in relation to a change in the initial crack length in the welding zone of stainless steel. For this purpose, three specimens with different artificial defects of 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm in stainless steel welds were prepared. By considering the thickness of s stainless steel pipe, special attention was given to both the L(0,1) mode and L(0,2) mode in this study. It was clearly found that the L(0,2) mode was more sensitive to defects than the L(0,1) mode. Based on the results of the L(0,1) and L(0,2) mode analyses, the magnitude ratio of the two modes was more effective than studying each mode when evaluating defects near the welded zone of stainless steel because of its linear relationship with the length of the artificial defect.

  7. Evaluation of weld defects in stainless steel 316L pipe using guided wave

    Lee, Joon Hyun [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Kyung [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Dongeui University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Stainless steel is a popular structural materials for liquid-hydrogen storage containers and piping components for transporting high-temperature fluids because of its superior material properties such as high strength and high corrosion resistance at elevated temperatures. In general, tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welding is used for bonding stainless steel. However, it is often reported that the thermal fatigue cracks or initial defects in stainless steel after welding decreases the reliability of the material. The objective of this paper is to clarify the characteristics of ultrasonic guided wave propagation in relation to a change in the initial crack length in the welding zone of stainless steel. For this purpose, three specimens with different artificial defects of 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm in stainless steel welds were prepared. By considering the thickness of s stainless steel pipe, special attention was given to both the L(0,1) mode and L(0,2) mode in this study. It was clearly found that the L(0,2) mode was more sensitive to defects than the L(0,1) mode. Based on the results of the L(0,1) and L(0,2) mode analyses, the magnitude ratio of the two modes was more effective than studying each mode when evaluating defects near the welded zone of stainless steel because of its linear relationship with the length of the artificial defect.

  8. Laser-welded Dissimilar Steel-aluminum Seams for Automotive Lightweight Construction

    Schimek, M.; Springer, A.; Kaierle, S.; Kracht, D.; Wesling, V.

    By reducing vehicle weight, a significant increase in fuel efficiency and consequently a reduction in CO 2 emissions can be achieved. Currently a high interest in the production of hybrid weld seams between steel and aluminum exists. Previous methods as laser brazing are possible only by using fluxes and additional materials. Laser welding can be used to join steel and aluminum without the use of additives. With a low penetration depth increases in tensile strength can be achieved. Recent results from laser welded overlap seams show that there is no compromise in strength by decreasing penetration depth in the aluminum.

  9. Damage mechanism of piping welded joints made from austenitic Steel for the type RBMK reactor

    In the process of operation of RBMK reactors the damages were taking place on welded piping, produced from austenitic stainless steel of the type 08X18H10T. The inspection of damaged sections in piping has shown that in most cases crack-like defects are of corrosion and mechanical character. The paper considers in details the reasons of damages appearance and their development for this type of welded joints of downcomers 325xl6 mm, which were fabricated from austenitic stainless steel using TlG and MAW welding methods. (author)

  10. Non-destructive evaluation of weld discontinuity in steel tubes by gamma ray CT

    Weld discontinuity in steel tubes was investigated and dimensioned in a data analysis sequence. The correlation matrix, cosine distance and hierarchical cluster were applied as multivariate data processing in this analysis. Welded rings of 9236 mm3 were scanned in gamma ray CT in test tubes and compared with steel base and references. The discontinuity volume detected in the welded rings was assessed based on the pixel volume in data sampling. By modeling gamma ray trajectories and rotation angles in CT scanning, a discontinuity of 0.3 mm was determined and a limit detection of 23 mm3 was obtained

  11. Non-destructive evaluation of weld discontinuity in steel tubes by gamma ray CT

    Moura, A. E.; Dantas, C. C.; Nery, M. S.; Barbosa, J. M.; Rolim, T. L.; Lima, E. A. O.; Melo, S. B.; Dos Santos, V. A.

    2015-04-01

    Weld discontinuity in steel tubes was investigated and dimensioned in a data analysis sequence. The correlation matrix, cosine distance and hierarchical cluster were applied as multivariate data processing in this analysis. Welded rings of 9236 mm3 were scanned in gamma ray CT in test tubes and compared with steel base and references. The discontinuity volume detected in the welded rings was assessed based on the pixel volume in data sampling. By modeling gamma ray trajectories and rotation angles in CT scanning, a discontinuity of 0.3 mm was determined and a limit detection of 23 mm3 was obtained.

  12. The Ductile to Brittle Transition Behavior of the Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel and Its Laser Welds

    H.C.Wu; R.K.Shiue; C.Chen

    2004-01-01

    The ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel and its laser welds was studied. The increase in grain size of the weld structure ascended the DBTT of the steel significantly. The transformation of retained austenite at martensite interlath boundaries into untempered and/or twinned martensite could also contribute to increased DBTTs of the steel and its welds tempered at 540℃.

  13. Study Regarding the Behavior of 12Cr 130 (W 4006) Steel for Hydro-Energetic Applications During Welding

    Tudorel Ene; Carmen Maria Ene; Dorel Spiru Dumitriu

    2006-01-01

    The topic of the work consists in the research of the W4006 (12Cr 130) steel behavior during welding in order to establish the welding technology for a runner chamber of the hydraulic turbine following: testing the base material of the runner chamber, choice of welding procedure and filler materials, determination of the welded joint chemical composition, determination of the pre-heating temperature, thermal treatment applied after welding, experiments and results.

  14. Orbital plasma keyhole welding of 12--13% Cr low carbon martensitic line pipe steels and weld joint corrosion properties

    Hoffmeister, H.; Dietrich, S. [Univ. der Bundeswehr Hamburg (Germany); Tystad, M.; Knagenhjelm, H.O.; Andersen, T.R. [Norsk Hydro A/S Porsgrunn (Norway). Forskningssenteret

    1995-10-01

    Based on requirements for more economical pipe laying procedures in the oil and gas industry, the potential of the orbital plasma keyhole process for welding of 12--13% Cr martensitic low carbon steels together with resulting hardness and corrosion properties is investigated. As a result, downhill orbital welding speeds up to 6--7 mm/s at 6--10 mm wall thickness are achieved. For hardness reduction, local postweld heating of 600--700 C at up to 10 min was required. Pitting corrosion resistance of the weld joints was reduced by welding but could be restored by postweld heating above 750--800 C, which, however, might produce hardness levels not satisfying NACE requirements due to formation of untempered martensite.

  15. Tensile properties and transition behaviour of RAFM steel plate and welds irradiated up to 10 dpa at 300 deg. C

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels have been irradiated in a large irradiation campaign in the high flux reactor at a target temperature of 300 deg. C up to target dose levels of 2.5, 5, and 10 dpa. Tensile and impact properties have been determined of RAFM plate, tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds and Electron beam (EB) welds. The dose level dependence of both properties is evaluated. In addition, impact properties of F82H powder hot isostatic pressing after 2.5 dpa and transition fracture toughness of F82H-mod. plate after 5 dpa have been measured. The tensile properties at irradiation temperature of F82H-mod. plate and welds show an increase in yield and ultimate strength up to about 5 dpa, after which saturation seems to set in. The elongation data show evidence of increasing localisation of deformation at higher doses. Impact properties of untempered EB welds and not sufficiently tempered NF616 show the need for good tempering treatment. Impact properties of various zones of irradiated TIG welds further illustrate the influence of the microstructural state of 8-9Cr steels on the irradiation response

  16. Laser welding of butt joints of austenitic stainless steel AISI 321

    A. Klimpel; A. Lisiecki

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: of this paper: A study of an automated laser autogenous welding process of butt joints of austenitic stainless steel AISI 321 sheets 0.5 [mm] and 1.0 [mm] thick using a high power diode laser HPDL has been carried out.Design/methodology/approach: Influence of basic parameters of laser welding on shape and quality of the butt joints and the range of optimal parameters of welding were determined.Findings: It was showed that there is a wide range of laser autogenous welding parameters w...

  17. A parametric study of residual stresses in multipass butt-welded stainless steel pipes

    Brickstad, B. [SAQ Inspection Ltd., Stockholm (Sweden); Josefson, L. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Div. of Solid Mechanics

    1996-06-01

    Multipass circumferential butt-welding of stainless steel pipes is simulated numerically in a non-linear thermo-mechanical FE-analysis. In particular, the through-thickness variation at the weld and heat affected zone, of the axial and hoop stresses and their sensitivity to variation in weld parameters are studied. Recommendations are given for the through thickness variation of the axial and hoop stresses to be used when assessing the growth of surface flaws at circumferential butt welds in nuclear piping system. 31 refs, 12 tabs, 54 figs.

  18. A parametric study of residual stresses in multipass butt-welded stainless steel pipes

    Multipass circumferential butt-welding of stainless steel pipes is simulated numerically in a non-linear thermo-mechanical FE-analysis. In particular, the through-thickness variation at the weld and heat affected zone, of the axial and hoop stresses and their sensitivity to variation in weld parameters are studied. Recommendations are given for the through thickness variation of the axial and hoop stresses to be used when assessing the growth of surface flaws at circumferential butt welds in nuclear piping system. 31 refs, 12 tabs, 54 figs

  19. Embrittlement of welded joints of low-carbon maraging high-alloyed steels

    The causes of crack formation in the multilayer maraging welded joints of the 08Kh15N5D2T steel after thermal recycle of argon-arc welding are investigated. It was determined that brittle delayed damage is observed to occur in places of extended residual welded stresses as a result of the increase of hydrogen content in the metaljoint. In the heat affected zone hydrogen redistribution takes place under the effect of welded thermal cycle and after full joint cooling as well

  20. Creep properties of a type 308 stainless steel pressure vessel weld with controlled residual elements

    A SMA Type 308 stainless steel pressure vessel test weld with the CRE (controlled residual elements) boron (O.007 per cent), titanium (0.06 per cent), and phosphorus (0.04 per cent) has been tested in creep between 482 and 6500C (900 and 12000F). Improved ductility compared to that of standard welds in tests lasting several thousands of hours is observed. Systematic variations of creep properties through the weld are due to thermal and mechanical cycling during the welding process. Anisotropic deformation related to local substructure and preferred crystallographic orientation occurs. Creep strengths are acceptable by present design rules. (author)