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Sample records for activation loop phosphorylation

  1. Small-Molecule Inhibition and Activation-Loop Trans-Phosphorylation of the IGF1 Receptor

    Wu,J.; Li, W.; Craddock, B.; Foreman, K.; Mulvihill, M.; Ji, Q.; Miller, W.; Hubbard, S.

    2008-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) that has a critical role in mitogenic signalling during embryogenesis and an antiapoptotic role in the survival and progression of many human tumours. Here, we present the crystal structure of the tyrosine kinase domain of IGF1R (IGF1RK), in its unphosphorylated state, in complex with a novel compound, cis-3-[3-(4-methyl-piperazin-l-yl)-cyclobutyl]-1-(2-phenyl-quinolin-7-yl)-imidazo[1, 5-a]pyrazin-8-ylamine (PQIP), which we show is a potent inhibitor of both the unphosphorylated (basal) and phosphorylated (activated) states of the kinase. PQIP interacts with residues in the ATP-binding pocket and in the activation loop, which confers specificity for IGF1RK and the highly related insulin receptor (IR) kinase. In this crystal structure, the IGF1RK active site is occupied by Tyr1135 from the activation loop of an symmetry (two-fold)-related molecule. This dimeric arrangement affords, for the first time, a visualization of the initial trans-phosphorylation event in the activation loop of an RTK, and provides a molecular rationale for a naturally occurring mutation in the activation loop of the IR that causes type II diabetes mellitus.

  2. Phosphorylation or Mutation of the ERK2 Activation Loop Alters Oligonucleotide Binding.

    McReynolds, Andrea C; Karra, Aroon S; Li, Yan; Lopez, Elias Daniel; Turjanski, Adrian G; Dioum, Elhadji; Lorenz, Kristina; Zaganjor, Elma; Stippec, Steve; McGlynn, Kathleen; Earnest, Svetlana; Cobb, Melanie H

    2016-03-29

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK2 is able to elicit a wide range of context-specific responses to distinct stimuli, but the mechanisms underlying this versatility remain in question. Some cellular functions of ERK2 are mediated through regulation of gene expression. In addition to phosphorylating numerous transcriptional regulators, ERK2 is known to associate with chromatin and has been shown to bind oligonucleotides directly. ERK2 is activated by the upstream kinases MEK1/2, which phosphorylate both tyrosine 185 and threonine 183. ERK2 requires phosphorylation on both sites to be fully active. Some additional ERK2 phosphorylation sites have also been reported, including threonine 188. It has been suggested that this phospho form has distinct properties. We detected some ERK2 phosphorylated on T188 in bacterial preparations of ERK2 by mass spectrometry and further demonstrate that phosphomimetic substitution of this ERK2 residue impairs its kinase activity toward well-defined substrates and also affects its DNA binding. We used electrophoretic mobility shift assays with oligonucleotides derived from the insulin gene promoter and other regions to examine effects of phosphorylation and mutations on the binding of ERK2 to DNA. We show that ERK2 can bind oligonucleotides directly. Phosphorylation and mutations alter DNA binding and support the idea that signaling functions may be influenced through an alternate phosphorylation site. PMID:26950759

  3. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-01-01

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser696 and Ser698 in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser886 and/or Ser893 in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser717 in the JM, and at Ser733, Thr752, Ser783, Ser864, Ser911, Ser958 and Thr9...

  4. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity.

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-12-15

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser(696) and Ser(698) in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser(886) and/or Ser(893) in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser(717) in the JM, and at Ser(733), Thr(752), Ser(783), Ser(864), Ser(911), Ser(958) and Thr(998) in the kinase domain. The LC-ESI-MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr(890), Ser(893) and Thr(894)) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr(890), Ser(893), Thr(894) and Thr(899), differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response. PMID:26472115

  5. Activation loop phosphorylation regulates B-Raf in vivo and transformation by B-Raf mutants.

    Köhler, Martin; Röring, Michael; Schorch, Björn; Heilmann, Katharina; Stickel, Natalie; Fiala, Gina J; Schmitt, Lisa C; Braun, Sandra; Ehrenfeld, Sophia; Uhl, Franziska M; Kaltenbacher, Thorsten; Weinberg, Florian; Herzog, Sebastian; Zeiser, Robert; Schamel, Wolfgang W; Jumaa, Hassan; Brummer, Tilman

    2016-01-18

    Despite being mutated in cancer and RASopathies, the role of the activation segment (AS) has not been addressed for B-Raf signaling in vivo. Here, we generated a conditional knock-in mouse allowing the expression of the B-Raf(AVKA) mutant in which the AS phosphoacceptor sites T599 and S602 are replaced by alanine residues. Surprisingly, despite producing a kinase-impaired protein, the Braf(AVKA) allele does not phenocopy the lethality of Braf-knockout or paradoxically acting knock-in alleles. However, Braf(AVKA) mice display abnormalities in the hematopoietic system, a distinct facial morphology, reduced ERK pathway activity in the brain, and an abnormal gait. This phenotype suggests that maximum B-Raf activity is required for the proper development, function, and maintenance of certain cell populations. By establishing conditional murine embryonic fibroblast cultures, we further show that MEK/ERK phosphorylation and the immediate early gene response toward growth factors are impaired in the presence of B-Raf(AVKA). Importantly, alanine substitution of T599/S602 impairs the transformation potential of oncogenic non-V600E B-Raf mutants and a fusion protein, suggesting that blocking their phosphorylation could represent an alternative strategy to ATP-competitive inhibitors. PMID:26657898

  6. Asp295 Stabilizes the Active-Site Loop Structure of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase, Facilitating Phosphorylation of Ser292 by Pyruvate Dehydrogenase-Kinase

    Hirani, Tripty A.; Alejandro Tovar-Méndez; Miernyk, Ján A.; Randall, Douglas D.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an in vitro system for detailed analysis of reversible phosphorylation of the plant mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, comprising recombinant Arabidopsis thalianaα2β2-heterotetrameric pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) plus A. thaliana E1-kinase (AtPDK). Upon addition of MgATP, Ser292, which is located within the active-site loop structure of E1α, is phosphorylated. In addition to Ser292, Asp295 and Gly297 are highly conserved in the E1α active-site loop sequences. Mutat...

  7. An acidic loop and cognate phosphorylation sites define a molecular switch that modulates ubiquitin charging activity in Cdc34-like enzymes.

    Elena Papaleo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes are crucial mediators of protein ubiquitination, which strongly influence the ultimate fate of the target substrates. Recently, it has been shown that the activity of several enzymes of the ubiquitination pathway is finely tuned by phosphorylation, an ubiquitous mechanism for cellular regulation, which modulates protein conformation. In this contribution, we provide the first rationale, at the molecular level, of the regulatory mechanism mediated by casein kinase 2 (CK2 phosphorylation of E2 Cdc34-like enzymes. In particular, we identify two co-evolving signature elements in one of the larger families of E2 enzymes: an acidic insertion in β4α2 loop in the proximity of the catalytic cysteine and two conserved key serine residues within the catalytic domain, which are phosphorylated by CK2. Our investigations, using yeast Cdc34 as a model, through 2.5 µs molecular dynamics simulations and biochemical assays, define these two elements as an important phosphorylation-controlled switch that modulates opening and closing of the catalytic cleft. The mechanism relies on electrostatic repulsions between a conserved serine phosphorylated by CK2 and the acidic residues of the β4α2 loop, promoting E2 ubiquitin charging activity. Our investigation identifies a new and unexpected pivotal role for the acidic loop, providing the first evidence that this loop is crucial not only for downstream events related to ubiquitin chain assembly, but is also mandatory for the modulation of an upstream crucial step of the ubiquitin pathway: the ubiquitin charging in the E2 catalytic cleft.

  8. C-terminal Src kinase-mediated EPIYA phosphorylation of Pragmin creates a feed-forward C-terminal Src kinase activation loop that promotes cell motility.

    Senda, Yoshie; Murata-Kamiya, Naoko; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2016-07-01

    Pragmin is one of the few mammalian proteins containing the Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA) tyrosine-phosphorylation motif that was originally discovered in the Helicobacter pylori CagA oncoprotein. Following delivery into gastric epithelial cells by type IV secretion and subsequent tyrosine phosphorylation at the EPIYA motifs, CagA serves as an oncogenic scaffold/adaptor that promiscuously interacts with SH2 domain-containing mammalian proteins such as the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP2) and the C-terminal Src kinase (Csk), a negative regulator of Src family kinases. Like CagA, Pragmin also forms a physical complex with Csk. In the present study, we found that Pragmin directly binds to Csk by the tyrosine-phosphorylated EPIYA motif. The complex formation potentiates kinase activity of Csk, which in turn phosphorylates Pragmin on tyrosine-238 (Y238), Y343, and Y391. As Y391 of Pragmin comprises the EPIYA motif, Pragmin-Csk interaction creates a feed-forward regulatory loop of Csk activation. Together with the finding that Pragmin and Csk are colocalized to focal adhesions, these observations indicate that the Pragmin-Csk interaction, triggered by Pragmin EPIYA phosphorylation, robustly stimulates the kinase activity of Csk at focal adhesions, which direct cell-matrix adhesion that regulates cell morphology and cell motility. As a consequence, expression of Pragmin and/or Csk in epithelial cells induces an elongated cell shape with elevated cell scattering in a manner that is mutually dependent on Pragmin and Csk. Deregulation of the Pragmin-Csk axis may therefore induce aberrant cell migration that contributes to tumor invasion and metastasis. PMID:27116701

  9. An acidic loop and cognate phosphorylation sites define a molecular switch that modulates ubiquitin charging activity in Cdc34-like enzymes

    Papaleo, Elena; Ranzani, Valeria; Tripodi, Farida; Vitriolo, Alessandro; Cirulli, Claudia; Fantucci, Piercarlo; Alberghina, Lilia; Vanoni, Marco; De Gioia, Luca; Coccetti, Paola

    2011-01-01

    mechanism for cellular regulation, which modulates protein conformation. In this contribution, we provide the first rationale, at the molecular level, of the regulatory mechanism mediated by casein kinase 2 (CK2) phosphorylation of E2 Cdc34-like enzymes. In particular, we identify two co-evolving signature...... elements in one of the larger families of E2 enzymes: an acidic insertion in β4α2 loop in the proximity of the catalytic cysteine and two conserved key serine residues within the catalytic domain, which are phosphorylated by CK2. Our investigations, using yeast Cdc34 as a model, through 2.5 µs molecular...

  10. An Acidic Loop and Cognate Phosphorylation Sites Define a Molecular Switch That Modulates Ubiquitin Charging Activity in Cdc34-Like Enzymes

    Papaleo, Elena; Ranzani, Valeria; Tripodi, Farida; Vitriolo, Alessandro; Cirulli, Claudia; Fantucci, Piercarlo; Alberghina, Lilia; Vanoni, Marco; De Gioia, Luca; Coccetti, Paola

    2011-01-01

    E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes are crucial mediators of protein ubiquitination, which strongly influence the ultimate fate of the target substrates. Recently, it has been shown that the activity of several enzymes of the ubiquitination pathway is finely tuned by phosphorylation, an ubiquitous mechanism for cellular regulation, which modulates protein conformation. In this contribution, we provide the first rationale, at the molecular level, of the regulatory mechanism mediated by casein kin...

  11. Mechanism of APC/CCDC20 activation by mitotic phosphorylation.

    Qiao, Renping; Weissmann, Florian; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Brown, Nicholas G; VanderLinden, Ryan; Imre, Richard; Jarvis, Marc A; Brunner, Michael R; Davidson, Iain F; Litos, Gabriele; Haselbach, David; Mechtler, Karl; Stark, Holger; Schulman, Brenda A; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2016-05-10

    Chromosome segregation and mitotic exit are initiated by the 1.2-MDa ubiquitin ligase APC/C (anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome) and its coactivator CDC20 (cell division cycle 20). To avoid chromosome missegregation, APC/C(CDC20) activation is tightly controlled. CDC20 only associates with APC/C in mitosis when APC/C has become phosphorylated and is further inhibited by a mitotic checkpoint complex until all chromosomes are bioriented on the spindle. APC/C contains 14 different types of subunits, most of which are phosphorylated in mitosis on multiple sites. However, it is unknown which of these phospho-sites enable APC/C(CDC20) activation and by which mechanism. Here we have identified 68 evolutionarily conserved mitotic phospho-sites on human APC/C bound to CDC20 and have used the biGBac technique to generate 47 APC/C mutants in which either all 68 sites or subsets of them were replaced by nonphosphorylatable or phospho-mimicking residues. The characterization of these complexes in substrate ubiquitination and degradation assays indicates that phosphorylation of an N-terminal loop region in APC1 is sufficient for binding and activation of APC/C by CDC20. Deletion of the N-terminal APC1 loop enables APC/C(CDC20) activation in the absence of mitotic phosphorylation or phospho-mimicking mutations. These results indicate that binding of CDC20 to APC/C is normally prevented by an autoinhibitory loop in APC1 and that its mitotic phosphorylation relieves this inhibition. The predicted location of the N-terminal APC1 loop implies that this loop controls interactions between the N-terminal domain of CDC20 and APC1 and APC8. These results reveal how APC/C phosphorylation enables CDC20 to bind and activate the APC/C in mitosis. PMID:27114510

  12. Structural basis for Mep2 ammonium transceptor activation by phosphorylation

    van den Berg, Bert; Chembath, Anupama; Jefferies, Damien; Basle, Arnaud; Khalid, Syma; Rutherford, Julian C.

    2016-01-01

    Mep2 proteins are fungal transceptors that play an important role as ammonium sensors in fungal development. Mep2 activity is tightly regulated by phosphorylation, but how this is achieved at the molecular level is not clear. Here we report X-ray crystal structures of the Mep2 orthologues from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans and show that under nitrogen-sufficient conditions the transporters are not phosphorylated and present in closed, inactive conformations. Relative to the open bacterial ammonium transporters, non-phosphorylated Mep2 exhibits shifts in cytoplasmic loops and the C-terminal region (CTR) to occlude the cytoplasmic exit of the channel and to interact with His2 of the twin-His motif. The phosphorylation site in the CTR is solvent accessible and located in a negatively charged pocket ∼30 Å away from the channel exit. The crystal structure of phosphorylation-mimicking Mep2 variants from C. albicans show large conformational changes in a conserved and functionally important region of the CTR. The results allow us to propose a model for regulation of eukaryotic ammonium transport by phosphorylation. PMID:27088325

  13. Mechanism for activation of the growth factor-activated AGC kinases by turn motif phosphorylation

    Hauge, Camilla; Antal, Torben L; Hirschberg, Daniel; Doehn, Ulrik; Thorup, Katrine; Idrissova, Leila; Hansen, Klaus; Jensen, Ole N; Jørgensen, Thomas J; Biondi, Ricardo M; Frödin, Morten

    2007-01-01

    The growth factor/insulin-stimulated AGC kinases share an activation mechanism based on three phosphorylation sites. Of these, only the role of the activation loop phosphate in the kinase domain and the hydrophobic motif (HM) phosphate in a C-terminal tail region are well characterized. We invest...

  14. High-LET Patterns of DSBs in DNA Loops, the HPRT Gene and Phosphorylation Foci

    Ponomarev, Artem L.; Huff, Janice L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    We present new results obtained with our model based on the track structure and chromatin geometry that predicts the DSB spatial and genomic distributions in a cell nucleus with the full genome represented. The model generates stochastic patterns of DSBs in the physical space of the nucleus filled with the realistic configuration of human chromosomes. The model was re-used to find the distribution of DSBs in a physical volume corresponding to a visible phosphorylation focus believed to be associated with a DSB. The data shows whether there must more than one DSB per foci due to finite size of the visible focus, even if a single DSB is radiochemically responsible for the phosphorylation of DNA in its vicinity. The same model can predict patterns of closely located DSBs in a given gene, or in a DNA loop, one of the large-scale chromatin structures. We demonstrated for the example of the HPRT gene, how different sorts of radiation lead to proximity effect in DSB locations, which is important for modeling gene deletions. The spectrum of intron deletions and total gene deletions was simulated for the HPRT gene. The same proximity effect of DSBs in a loop can hinder DSB restitutions, as parts of the loop between DSBs is deleted with a higher likelihood. The distributions of DSBs and deletions of DNA in a loop are presented.

  15. Phosphorylation regulates coilin activity and RNA association

    Hanna J. Broome

    2013-02-01

    The Cajal body (CB is a domain of concentrated components found within the nucleus of cells in an array of species that is functionally important for the biogenesis of telomerase and small nuclear ribonucleoproteins. The CB is a dynamic structure whose number and size change during the cell cycle and is associated with other nuclear structures and gene loci. Coilin, also known as the marker protein for the CB, is a phosphoprotein widely accepted for its role in maintaining CB integrity. Recent studies have been done to further elucidate functional activities of coilin apart from its structural role in the CB in an attempt to explore the rationale for coilin expression in cells that have few CBs or lack them altogether. Here we show that the RNA association profile of coilin changes in mitosis with respect to that during interphase. We provide evidence of transcriptional and/or processing dysregulation of several CB-related RNA transcripts as a result of ectopic expression of both wild-type and phosphomutant coilin proteins. We also show apparent changes in transcription and/or processing of these transcripts upon coilin knockdown in both transformed and primary cell lines. Additionally, we provide evidence of specific coilin RNase activity regulation, on both U2 and hTR transcripts, by phosphorylation of a single residue, serine 489. Collectively, these results point to additional functions for coilin that are regulated by phosphorylation.

  16. An Allosteric Cross-Talk Between the Activation Loop and the ATP Binding Site Regulates the Activation of Src Kinase

    Pucheta-Martínez, Encarna; Saladino, Giorgio; Morando, Maria Agnese; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge; Lelli, Moreno; Sutto, Ludovico; D’Amelio, Nicola; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorylation of the activation loop is a fundamental step in the activation of most protein kinases. In the case of the Src tyrosine kinase, a prototypical kinase due to its role in cancer and its historic importance, phosphorylation of tyrosine 416 in the activation loop is known to rigidify the structure and contribute to the switch from the inactive to a fully active form. However, whether or not phosphorylation is able per-se to induce a fully active conformation, that efficiently binds ATP and phosphorylates the substrate, is less clear. Here we employ a combination of solution NMR and enhanced-sampling molecular dynamics simulations to fully map the effects of phosphorylation and ATP/ADP cofactor loading on the conformational landscape of Src tyrosine kinase. We find that both phosphorylation and cofactor binding are needed to induce a fully active conformation. What is more, we find a complex interplay between the A-loop and the hinge motion where the phosphorylation of the activation-loop has a significant allosteric effect on the dynamics of the C-lobe.

  17. Bypassing AMPK Phosphorylation

    Viollet, Benoit; Foretz, Marc; Schlattner, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) functions as a signaling hub to balance energy supply with demand. Phosphorylation of activation loop Thr172 has been considered as an essential step in AMPK activation. In this issue of Chemistry & Biology, Scott and colleagues show that the small molecule direct AMPK activator, A-769662, bypasses this phosphorylation event, and acts synergistically with AMP on naive AMPK.

  18. Activating PER repressor through a DBT-directed phosphorylation switch.

    Saul Kivimäe

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphorylation plays an essential role in the generation of circadian rhythms, regulating the stability, activity, and subcellular localization of certain proteins that constitute the biological clock. This study examines the role of the protein kinase Doubletime (DBT, a Drosophila ortholog of human casein kinase I (CKIepsilon/delta. An enzymatically active DBT protein is shown to directly phosphorylate the Drosophila clock protein Period (PER. DBT-dependent phosphorylation sites are identified within PER, and their functional significance is assessed in a cultured cell system and in vivo. The per(S mutation, which is associated with short-period (19-h circadian rhythms, alters a key phosphorylation target within PER. Inspection of this and neighboring sequence variants indicates that several DBT-directed phosphorylations regulate PER activity in an integrated fashion: Alternative phosphorylations of two adjoining sequence motifs appear to be associated with switch-like changes in PER stability and repressor function.

  19. Sonic Hedgehog dependent phosphorylation by CK1α and GRK2 is required for ciliary accumulation and activation of smoothened.

    Yongbin Chen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh signaling regulates embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis through the GPCR-like protein Smoothened (Smo, but how vertebrate Smo is activated remains poorly understood. In Drosophila, Hh dependent phosphorylation activates Smo. Whether this is also the case in vertebrates is unclear, owing to the marked sequence divergence between vertebrate and Drosophila Smo (dSmo and the involvement of primary cilia in vertebrate Hh signaling. Here we demonstrate that mammalian Smo (mSmo is activated through multi-site phosphorylation of its carboxyl-terminal tail by CK1α and GRK2. Phosphorylation of mSmo induces its active conformation and simultaneously promotes its ciliary accumulation. We demonstrate that graded Hh signals induce increasing levels of mSmo phosphorylation that fine-tune its ciliary localization, conformation, and activity. We show that mSmo phosphorylation is induced by its agonists and oncogenic mutations but is blocked by its antagonist cyclopamine, and efficient mSmo phosphorylation depends on the kinesin-II ciliary motor. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Hh signaling recruits CK1α to initiate mSmo phosphorylation, and phosphorylation further increases the binding of CK1α and GRK2 to mSmo, forming a positive feedback loop that amplifies and/or sustains mSmo phosphorylation. Hence, despite divergence in their primary sequences and their subcellular trafficking, mSmo and dSmo employ analogous mechanisms for their activation.

  20. Open-Loop Control of Oxidative Phosphorylation in Skeletal and Cardiac Muscle Mitochondria by Ca(2.).

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Singhal, Abhishek; Van den Bergh, Françoise; Bagher-Oskouei, Masoumeh; Wiseman, Robert W; Beard, Daniel A

    2016-02-23

    In cardiac muscle, mitochondrial ATP synthesis is driven by demand for ATP through feedback from the products of ATP hydrolysis. However, in skeletal muscle at higher workloads there is an apparent contribution of open-loop stimulation of ATP synthesis. Open-loop control is defined as modulation of flux through a biochemical pathway by a moiety, which is not a reactant or a product of the biochemical reactions in the pathway. The role of calcium, which is known to stimulate the activity of mitochondrial dehydrogenases, as an open-loop controller, was investigated in isolated cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondria. The kinetics of NADH synthesis and respiration, feedback from ATP hydrolysis products, and stimulation by calcium were characterized in isolated mitochondria to test the hypothesis that calcium has a stimulatory role in skeletal muscle mitochondria not apparent in cardiac mitochondria. A range of respiratory states were obtained in cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondria utilizing physiologically relevant concentrations of pyruvate and malate, and flux of respiration, NAD(P)H fluorescence, and rhodamine 123 fluorescence were measured over a range of extra mitochondrial calcium concentrations. We found that under these conditions calcium stimulates NADH synthesis in skeletal muscle mitochondria but not in cardiac mitochondria. PMID:26910432

  1. Molecular Profiling of Activated Neurons by Phosphorylated Ribosome Capture

    Knight, Zachary A.; Tan, Keith; Birsoy, Kivanc; Schmidt, Sarah; Garrison, Jennifer L.; Wysocki, Robert W.; Emiliano, Ana; Ekstrand, Mats I.; Friedman, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian brain is composed of thousands of interacting neural cell types. Systematic approaches to establish the molecular identity of functional populations of neurons would advance our understanding of neural mechanisms controlling behavior. Here, we show that ribosomal protein S6, a structural component of the ribosome, becomes phosphorylated in neurons activated by a wide range of stimuli. We show that these phosphorylated ribosomes can be captured from mouse brain homogenates, there...

  2. Hierarchical curiosity loops and active sensing.

    Gordon, Goren; Ahissar, Ehud

    2012-08-01

    A curious agent acts so as to optimize its learning about itself and its environment, without external supervision. We present a model of hierarchical curiosity loops for such an autonomous active learning agent, whereby each loop selects the optimal action that maximizes the agent's learning of sensory-motor correlations. The model is based on rewarding the learner's prediction errors in an actor-critic reinforcement learning (RL) paradigm. Hierarchy is achieved by utilizing previously learned motor-sensory mapping, which enables the learning of other mappings, thus increasing the extent and diversity of knowledge and skills. We demonstrate the relevance of this architecture to active sensing using the well-studied vibrissae (whiskers) system, where rodents acquire sensory information by virtue of repeated whisker movements. We show that hierarchical curiosity loops starting from optimally learning the internal models of whisker motion and then extending to object localization result in free-air whisking and object palpation, respectively. PMID:22386787

  3. Phosphorylation of Ubc9 by Cdk1 enhances SUMOylation activity.

    Yee-Fun Su

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence has pointed to an important role of SUMOylation in cell cycle regulation, especially for M phase. In the current studies, we have obtained evidence through in vitro studies that the master M phase regulator CDK1/cyclin B kinase phosphorylates the SUMOylation machinery component Ubc9, leading to its enhanced SUMOylation activity. First, we show that CDK1/cyclin B, but not many other cell cycle kinases such as CDK2/cyclin E, ERK1, ERK2, PKA and JNK2/SAPK1, specifically enhances SUMOylation activity. Second, CDK1/cyclin B phosphorylates the SUMOylation machinery component Ubc9, but not SAE1/SAE2 or SUMO1. Third, CDK1/cyclin B-phosphorylated Ubc9 exhibits increased SUMOylation activity and elevated accumulation of the Ubc9-SUMO1 thioester conjugate. Fourth, CDK1/cyclin B enhances SUMOylation activity through phosphorylation of Ubc9 at serine 71. These studies demonstrate for the first time that the cell cycle-specific kinase CDK1/cyclin B phosphorylates a SUMOylation machinery component to increase its overall SUMOylation activity, suggesting that SUMOylation is part of the cell cycle program orchestrated by CDK1 through Ubc9.

  4. A molecular model of phosphorylation-based activation and potentiation of tarantula muscle thick filaments

    Brito, Reicy; Alamo, Lorenzo; Lundberg, Ulf; Guerrero, José R.; Pinto, Antonio; Sulbarán, Guidenn; Gawinowicz, Mary Ann; Craig, Roger; Padrón, Raúl

    2011-01-01

    Myosin filaments from many muscles are activated by phosphorylation of their regulatory light chains (RLCs). To elucidate the structural mechanism of activation, we have studied RLC phosphorylation in tarantula thick filaments, whose high resolution structure is known. In the relaxed state, tarantula RLCs are ~50% non- and 50% mono-phosphorylated, while on activation mono-phosphorylation increases and some RLCs become bi-phosphorylated. Mass spectrometry shows that relaxed-state mono-phosphor...

  5. Activation of purified calcium channels by stoichiometric protein phosphorylation

    Purified dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels from rabbit skeletal muscle were reconstituted into phosphatidylcholine vesicles to evaluate the effect of phosphorylation by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PK-A) on their function. Both the rate and extent of 45Ca2+ uptake into vesicles containing reconstituted calcium channels were increased severalfold after incubation with ATP and PK-A. The degree of stimulation of 45Ca2+ uptake was linearly proportional to the extent of phosphorylation of the alpha 1 and beta subunits of the calcium channel up to a stoichiometry of approximately 1 mol of phosphate incorporated into each subunit. The calcium channels activated by phosphorylation were determined to be incorporated into the reconstituted vesicles in the inside-out orientation and were completely inhibited by low concentrations of dihydropyridines, phenylalkylamines, Cd2+, Ni2+, and Mg2+. The results demonstrate a direct relationship between PK-A-catalyzed phosphorylation of the alpha 1 and beta subunits of the purified calcium channel and activation of the ion conductance activity of the dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels

  6. Molecular profiling of activated neurons by phosphorylated ribosome capture.

    Knight, Zachary A; Tan, Keith; Birsoy, Kivanc; Schmidt, Sarah; Garrison, Jennifer L; Wysocki, Robert W; Emiliano, Ana; Ekstrand, Mats I; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2012-11-21

    The mammalian brain is composed of thousands of interacting neural cell types. Systematic approaches to establish the molecular identity of functional populations of neurons would advance our understanding of neural mechanisms controlling behavior. Here, we show that ribosomal protein S6, a structural component of the ribosome, becomes phosphorylated in neurons activated by a wide range of stimuli. We show that these phosphorylated ribosomes can be captured from mouse brain homogenates, thereby enriching directly for the mRNAs expressed in discrete subpopulations of activated cells. We use this approach to identify neurons in the hypothalamus regulated by changes in salt balance or food availability. We show that galanin neurons are activated by fasting and that prodynorphin neurons restrain food intake during scheduled feeding. These studies identify elements of the neural circuit that controls food intake and illustrate how the activity-dependent capture of cell-type-specific transcripts can elucidate the functional organization of a complex tissue. PMID:23178128

  7. Mechanism of influence of phosphorylation on serine 124 on a decrease of catalytic activity of human thymidylate synthase.

    Jarmuła, Adam; Fraczyk, Tomasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Rode, Wojciech

    2010-05-15

    Regulation by phosphorylation is a well-established mechanism for controlling biological activity of proteins. Recently, phosphorylation of serine 124 in human thymidylate synthase (hTS) has been shown to lower the catalytic activity of the enzyme. To clarify a possible mechanism of the observed influence, molecular dynamics (MD), essential dynamics (ED) and MM-GBSA studies were undertaken. Structures derived from the MD trajectories reveal incorrect binding alignment between the pyrimidine ring of the substrate, dUMP, and the pterine ring of the cofactor analogue, THF, in the active site of the phosphorylated enzyme. The ED analysis indicates changes in the behavior of collective motions in the phosphorylated enzyme, suggesting that the formation of the closed ternary complex is hindered. Computed free energies, in agreement with structural analysis, predict that the binding of dUMP and THF to hTS is favored in the native compared to phosphorylated state of the enzyme. The paper describes at the structural level how phosphorylation at the distant site influences the ligand binding. We propose that the 'phosphorylation effect' is transmitted from the outside loop of Ser 124 into the active site via a subtle mechanism initiated by the long-range electrostatic repulsion between the phosphate groups of dUMP and Ser124. The mechanism can be described in terms of the interplay between the two groups of amino acids: the link (residues 125-134) and the patch (residues 189-192), resulting in the change of orientation of the pyrimidine ring of dUMP, which, in turn, prevents the correct alignment between the latter ring and the pterin ring of THF. PMID:20430630

  8. Time-resolved in silico modeling of fine-tuned cAMP signaling in platelets: feedback loops, titrated phosphorylations and pharmacological modulation

    Dandekar Thomas

    2011-10-01

    . Downstream cyclic nucleotide signaling events target different phosphorylation sites for cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases (PKA, PKG in the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP. VASP phosphorylation as well as cAMP levels resulting from different drug strengths and combined stimulants were quantitatively modeled. These predictions were again experimentally validated. High sensitivity of the signaling pathway at low concentrations is involved in a fine-tuned balance as well as stable activation of this inhibitory cyclic nucleotide pathway. Conclusions On the basis of experimental data, literature mining and database screening we established a dynamic in silico model of cyclic nucleotide signaling and probed its signaling sensitivity. Thoroughly validated, it successfully predicts drug combination effects on platelet function, including synergism, antagonism and regulatory loops.

  9. Cooling Active Region Loops Observed With SXT and TRACE

    Winebarger, A R; Winebarger, Amy R.; Warren, Harry P.

    2005-01-01

    An Impulsive Heating Multiple Strand (IHMS) Model is able to reproduce the observational characteristics of EUV (~ 1 MK) active region loops. This model implies that some of the loops must reach temperatures where X-ray filters are sensitive (> 2.5 MK) before they cool to EUV temperatures. Hence, some bright EUV loops must be preceded by bright X-ray loops. Previous analysis of X-ray and EUV active region observations, however, have concluded that EUV loops are not preceded by X-ray loops. In this paper, we examine two active regions observed in both X-ray and EUV filters and analyze the evolution of five loops over several hours. These loops first appear bright in the X-ray images and later appear bright in the EUV images. The delay between the appearance of the loops in the X-ray and EUV filters is as little as 1 hour and as much as 3 hours. All five loops appear as single ``monolithic'' structures in the X-ray images, but are resolved into many smaller structures in the (higher resolution) EUV images. The ...

  10. Kindlin-2 phosphorylation by Src at Y193 enhances Src activity and is involved in Migfilin recruitment to the focal adhesions.

    Liu, Zhaoli; Lu, Danyu; Wang, Xiang; Wan, Junhu; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Hongquan

    2015-07-01

    Kindlin-2 regulates external to internal cell signaling by interaction with integrins in a process that involves the tyrosine kinase, Src. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here we report that Src binds to and phosphorylates Kindlin-2 at Y193. Reciprocally, Kindlin-2-Y193 phosphorylation activates and maintains Src kinase activity. Kindlin-2-Y193 phosphorylation is also involved in its binding capacity with Migfilin and the recruitment of Migfilin to the focal adhesions. Functionally, we demonstrate that Kindlin-2-Y193 phosphorylation regulates Kindlin-2-mediated cell spreading and migration. These findings suggest that Src, Kindlin-2 and Migfilin together constitute a positive feedback loop that controls Src activity and regulates integrin-mediated cellular functions. PMID:26037143

  11. Altered myoelectric activity in the experimental blind loop syndrome.

    Justus, P G; Fernandez, A; Martin, J.L.; King, C E; Toskes, P P; Mathias, J R

    1983-01-01

    Nutrient malabsorption and diarrhea are characteristic of the blind loop syndrome. Alterations in motility have been implicated as a cause of bacterial overgrowth, but the possibility that altered motility may result from alterations in the flora has not been explored. The purpose of this study was to characterize the myoelectric activity of the small intestine in the blind loop rat model. Eight groups of rats were studied: rats with self-filling blind loops, which develop bacterial overgrowt...

  12. Central Role of the Threonine Residue within the p+1 Loop of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase in STAT3 Constitutive Phosphorylation in Metastatic Cancer Cells

    Yuan, Zheng-long; Guan, Ying-jie; Wang, Lijuan; Wei, Wenyi; Kane, Agnes B.; Chin, Y. Eugene

    2004-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) RET, MET, and RON all carry the Metp+1loop→Thr point mutation (i.e., 2B mutation), leading to the formation of tumors with high metastatic potential. Utilizing a novel antibody array, we identified constitutive phosphorylation of STAT3 in cells expressing the 2B mutation but not wild-type RET. MET or RON with the 2B mutation also constitutively phosphorylated STAT3. Members of the EPH, the only group of wild-type RTK that carry Thrp+1loop residue, are ofte...

  13. Structural Mimicry of A-Loop Tyrosine Phosphorylation by a Pathogenic FGF Receptor 3 Mutation

    Huang, Zhifeng; Chen, Huaibin; Blais, Steven; Neubert, Thomas A.; Li, Xiaokun; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2013-01-01

    The K650E gain-of-function mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain of FGF receptor 3 (FGFR3) causes Thanatophoric Dysplasia type II, a neonatal lethal congenital dwarfism syndrome, and when acquired somatically, it contributes to carcinogenesis. In this report, we determine the crystal structure of the FGFR3 kinase domain harboring this pathogenic mutation and show that the mutation introduces a network of intramolecular hydrogen bonds to stabilize the active-state conformation. In the crystal...

  14. The M3 phosphorylation motif has been functionally conserved for intracellular trafficking of long-looped PIN-FORMEDs in the Arabidopsis root hair cell

    Sasayama, Daisuke; Ganguly, Anindya; Park, Minho; Cho, Hyung-Taeg

    2013-01-01

    Background PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux carriers contribute to polar auxin transport and plant development by exhibiting dynamic and diverse asymmetrical localization patterns in the plasma membrane (PM). Phosphorylation of the central hydrophilic loop (HL) of PINs has been implicated in the regulation of PIN trafficking. Recently, we reported that a phosphorylatable motif (M3) in the PIN3-HL is necessary for the polarity, intracellular trafficking, and biological functions of PIN3. In this study,...

  15. The double-loop feedback for active learning with understanding

    Christensen, Hans Peter

    2004-01-01

    Learning is an active process, and in engineering education authentic projects is often used to activate the students and promote learning. However, it is not all activity that leads to deep learning; and in a rapid changing society deep understanding is necessary for life-long learning. Empirical...... findings at DTU question the direct link between high activity and a deep approach to learning. Active learning is important to obtain engineering competencies, but active learning requires more than activity. Feedback and reflection is crucial to the learning process, since new knowledge is built on the...... student’s existing understanding. A model for an active learning process with a double-loop feedback is suggested - the first loop gives the student experience through experimentation, the second conceptual understanding through reflection. Students often miss the second loop, so it is important that...

  16. Flagellin-induced NLRC4 phosphorylation primes the inflammasome for activation by NAIP5.

    Matusiak, Magdalena; Van Opdenbosch, Nina; Vande Walle, Lieselotte; Sirard, Jean-Claude; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Lamkanfi, Mohamed

    2015-02-01

    The Nlrc4 inflammasome contributes to immunity against intracellular pathogens that express flagellin and type III secretion systems, and activating mutations in NLRC4 cause autoinflammation in patients. Both Naip5 and phosphorylation of Nlrc4 at Ser533 are required for flagellin-induced inflammasome activation, but how these events converge upon inflammasome activation is not known. Here, we showed that Nlrc4 phosphorylation occurs independently of Naip5 detection of flagellin because Naip5 deletion in macrophages abolished caspase-1 activation, interleukin (IL)-1β secretion, and pyroptosis, but not Nlrc4 phosphorylation by cytosolic flagellin of Salmonella Typhimurium and Yersinia enterocolitica. ASC speck formation and caspase-1 expression also were dispensable for Nlrc4 phosphorylation. Interestingly, Helicobacter pylori flagellin triggered robust Nlrc4 phosphorylation, but failed to elicit caspase-1 maturation, IL-1β secretion, and pyroptosis, suggesting that it retained Nlrc4 Ser533 phosphorylating-activity despite escaping Naip5 detection. In agreement, the flagellin D0 domain was required and sufficient for Nlrc4 phosphorylation, whereas deletion of the S. Typhimurium flagellin carboxy-terminus prevented caspase-1 maturation only. Collectively, this work suggests a biphasic activation mechanism for the Nlrc4 inflammasome in which Ser533 phosphorylation prepares Nlrc4 for subsequent activation by the flagellin sensor Naip5. PMID:25605939

  17. Sequential Myosin Phosphorylation Activates Tarantula Thick Filament via a Disorder-Order Transition

    Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Thomas, David D.; Padrón, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) N-terminal extension (NTE) activates myosin in thick filaments. RLC phosphorylation plays a primary regulatory role in smooth muscle and a secondary (modulatory) role in striated muscle, which is regulated by Ca2+ via TnC/TM on the thin filament. Tarantula striated muscle exhibits both regulatory systems: one switches on/off contraction through thin filament regulation, and another through PKC constitutively Ser35 phosphorylated swaying f...

  18. Phosphorylation of both nucleoplasmin domains is required for activation of its chromatin decondensation activity

    Bañuelos, Sonia; Omaetxebarria, Miren J; Ramos, Isbaal; Larsen, Martin R; Arregi, Igor; Jensen, Ole N; Arizmendi, Jesus M; Prado, Adelina; Muga, Arturo

    2007-01-01

    Nucleoplasmin (NP) is a histone chaperone involved in nucleosome assembly, chromatin decondensation at fertilization, and apoptosis. To carry out these activities NP has to interact with different types of histones, an interaction that is regulated by phosphorylation. Here we have identified a nu...

  19. Phosphorylation of Human Choline Kinase Beta by Protein Kinase A: Its Impact on Activity and Inhibition

    Chang, Ching Ching; Few, Ling Ling; Konrad, Manfred; See Too, Wei Cun

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta (CKβ) is one of the CK isozymes involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. CKβ is important for normal mitochondrial function and muscle development as the lack of the ckβ gene in human and mice results in the development of muscular dystrophy. In contrast, CKα is implicated in tumorigenesis and has been extensively studied as an anticancer target. Phosphorylation of human CKα was found to regulate the enzyme’s activity and its subcellular location. This study provides evidence for CKβ phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). In vitro phosphorylation of CKβ by PKA was first detected by phosphoprotein staining, as well as by in-gel kinase assays. The phosphorylating kinase was identified as PKA by Western blotting. CKβ phosphorylation by MCF-7 cell lysate was inhibited by a PKA-specific inhibitor peptide, and the intracellular phosphorylation of CKβ was shown to be regulated by the level of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a PKA activator. Phosphorylation sites were located on CKβ residues serine-39 and serine-40 as determined by mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis. Phosphorylation increased the catalytic efficiencies for the substrates choline and ATP about 2-fold, without affecting ethanolamine phosphorylation, and the S39D/S40D CKβ phosphorylation mimic behaved kinetically very similar. Remarkably, phosphorylation drastically increased the sensitivity of CKβ to hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) inhibition by about 30-fold. These findings suggest that CKβ, in concert with CKα, and depending on its phosphorylation status, might play a critical role as a druggable target in carcinogenesis. PMID:27149373

  20. AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in brain is dependent on method of sacrifice and tissue preparation

    Scharf, Matthew T.; Mackiewicz, Miroslaw; Naidoo, Nirinjini; O'Callaghan, James P.; Pack, Allan I.

    2007-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase is activated when the catalytic α subunit is phosphorylated on Thr172 and therefore, phosphorylation of the α subunit is used as a measure of activation. However, measurement of α-AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in vivo can be technically challenging. To determine the most accurate method for measuring α-AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in the mouse brain, we compared different methods of sacrifice and tissue preparation. We found that fre...

  1. Phosphorylation of Serine422 increases the stability and transactivation activities of human Osterix

    Xu, Yuexin; Yao, Bing; Shi, Kaikai;

    2015-01-01

    Osterix (Osx) is an essential regulator for osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Although phosphorylation has been reported to be involved in the regulation of Osx activity, the precise underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here we identified S422 as a novel phosphorylation sit...

  2. FUNCTION OF THE ACTIVATED PROTEIN C (APC) AUTOLYSIS LOOP IN ACTIVATED FVIII INACTIVATION

    Cramer, Thomas J.; Gale, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Activated protein C (APC) binds to its substrates activated factor V (FVa) and activated factor VIII (FVIIIa) with a basic exosite that consists of loops 37, 60, 70 and the autolysis loop. These loops have a high density of basic residues, resulting in a positive charge on the surface of APC. Many of these residues are important in the interaction of APC with FVa and FVIIIa. The current study focused on the function of the autolysis loop in the interaction with FVIIIa. This loop was previousl...

  3. Phosphorylation of influenza A virus NS1 protein at threonine 49 suppresses its interferon antagonistic activity.

    Kathum, Omer Abid; Schräder, Tobias; Anhlan, Darisuren; Nordhoff, Carolin; Liedmann, Swantje; Pande, Amit; Mellmann, Alexander; Ehrhardt, Christina; Wixler, Viktor; Ludwig, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation acts as a fundamental molecular switch that alters protein function and thereby regulates many cellular processes. The non-structural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A virus is an important factor regulating virulence by counteracting cellular immune responses against viral infection. NS1 was shown to be phosphorylated at several sites; however, so far, no function has been conclusively assigned to these post-translational events yet. Here, we show that the newly identified phospho-site threonine 49 of NS1 is differentially phosphorylated in the viral replication cycle. Phosphorylation impairs binding of NS1 to double-stranded RNA and TRIM25 as well as complex formation with RIG-I, thereby switching off its interferon antagonistic activity. Because phosphorylation was shown to occur at later stages of infection, we hypothesize that at this stage other functions of the multifunctional NS1 beyond its interferon-antagonistic activity are needed. PMID:26687707

  4. Lectin-induced activation of platelets may require only limited phosphorylation of the 47K protein

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is an N-acetylglucosamine (Glc-NAc) specific lectin which can activate platelets. Like thrombin, stimulation of platelets by WGA is accompanied by enhanced phosphorylation of two polypeptides of M/sub r/ 47K and 20K. Addition of GlcNAc at different time intervals arrested that aggregation of platelets by WGA and paralleled the modification of phosphorylation of the 47K polypeptide. So, the phosphorylation of the 47K polypeptide may regulate the WGA-receptor mediated stimulation of platelets. However, the ratio of phosphoserine to phosphothreonine in the 47K protein was markedly different in WGA-activated than thrombin-stimulated platelets. Thus, the molecular mechanism of action of thrombin and WGA could be different. To explore this idea, 32P/sub i/-labeled platelets were stimulated with WGA and the activation arrested with N-acetyl-glucosamine at different times. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of total protein at 5s showed only two phosphorylated species of 47K protein. At 60s, maximally four phosphorylated species were noted. In contrast, with thrombin using the same technique, seven to nine phosphorylated components have been reported. These results suggest that the different activators of platelets may act by different mechanisms. In addition, activation of platelets may require only limited levels of phosphorylation of the 47K polypeptide

  5. Allosteric activation mechanism of the cys-loop receptors

    Yong-chang CHANG; Wen WU; Jian-liang ZHANG; Yao HUANG

    2009-01-01

    Binding of a neurotransmitter to its ionotropic receptor opens a distantly located ion channel, a process termed allosteric activation. Here we review recent advances in the molecular mechanism by which the cys-loop receptors are activated with emphasis on the best studied nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). With a combination of affinity labeling, mutagenesis, electrophysiology, kinetic modeling, electron microscopy (EM), and crystal structure analysis, the allosteric activation mechanism is emerging. Specifically, the binding domain and gating domain are interconnected by an allosteric activation network. Agonist binding induces conformational changes, resulting in the rotation of a β sheet of amino-terminal domain and outward movement of loop 2, loop F, and cys-loop, which are coupled to the M2-M3 linker to pull the channel to open. However, there are still some controversies about the movement of the channel-lining domain M2. Nine angstrom resolution EM structure of a nAChR imaged in the open state suggests that channel opening is the result of rotation of the M2 domain. In contrast, recent crystal structures of bacterial homologues of the cys-loop receptor family in apparently open state have implied an M2 tilting model with pore dilation and quaternary twist of the whole pentameric receptor. An elegant study of the nAChR using protonation scanning of M2 domain supports a similar pore dilation activation mechanism with minimal rotation of M2. This remains to be validated with other approaches including high resolution structure determination of the mammalian cys-loop receptors in the open state.

  6. Fenofibrate activates AMPK and increases eNOS phosphorylation in HUVEC

    Fenofibrate improves endothelial function by lipid-lowering and anti-inflammatory effects. Additionally, fenofibrate has been demonstrated to upregulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been reported to phosphorylate eNOS at Ser-1177 and stimulate vascular endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) production. We report here that fenofibrate activates AMPK and increases eNOS phosphorylation and NO production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Incubation of HUVEC with fenofibrate increased the phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Fenofibrate simultaneously increased eNOS phosphorylation and NO production. Inhibitors of protein kinase A and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase failed to suppress the fenofibrate-induced eNOS phosphorylation. Neither bezafibrate nor WY-14643 activated AMPK in HUVEC. Furthermore, fenofibrate activated AMPK without requiring any transcriptional activities. These results indicate that fenofibrate stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production through AMPK activation, which is suggested to be a novel characteristic of this agonist and unrelated to its effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α

  7. How Phosphorylation and ATPase Activity Regulate Anion Flux though the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR).

    Zwick, Matthias; Esposito, Cinzia; Hellstern, Manuel; Seelig, Anna

    2016-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, ABCC7), mutations of which cause cystic fibrosis, belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family and works as a channel for small anions, such as chloride and bicarbonate. Anion channel activity is known to depend on phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and CFTR-ATPase activity. Whereas anion channel activity has been extensively investigated, phosphorylation and CFTR-ATPase activity are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the two processes can be measured in a label-free and non-invasive manner in real time in live cells, stably transfected with CFTR. This study reveals three key findings. (i) The major contribution (≥90%) to the total CFTR-related ATP hydrolysis rate is due to phosphorylation by PKA and the minor contribution (≤10%) to CFTR-ATPase activity. (ii) The mutant CFTR-E1371S that is still conductive, but defective in ATP hydrolysis, is not phosphorylated, suggesting that phosphorylation requires a functional nucleotide binding domain and occurs in the post-hydrolysis transition state. (iii) CFTR-ATPase activity is inversely related to CFTR anion flux. The present data are consistent with a model in which CFTR is in a closed conformation with two ATPs bound. The open conformation is induced by ATP hydrolysis and corresponds to the post-hydrolysis transition state that is stabilized by phosphorylation and binding of chloride channel potentiators. PMID:27226582

  8. Sequential myosin phosphorylation activates tarantula thick filament via a disorder-order transition.

    Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Thomas, David D; Padrón, Raúl

    2015-08-01

    Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) N-terminal extension (NTE) activates myosin in thick filaments. RLC phosphorylation plays a primary regulatory role in smooth muscles and a secondary (modulatory) role in striated muscles, which is regulated by Ca(2+)via TnC/TM on the thin filament. Tarantula striated muscle exhibits both regulatory systems: one switches on/off contraction through thin filament regulation, and another through PKC constitutively Ser35 phosphorylated swaying free heads in the thick filaments that produces quick force on twitches regulated from 0 to 50% and modulation is accomplished recruiting additional force-potentiating free and blocked heads via Ca(2+)4-CaM-MLCK Ser45 phosphorylation. We have used microsecond molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of tarantula RLC NTE to understand the structural basis for phosphorylation-based regulation in tarantula thick filament activation. Trajectory analysis revealed that an inter-domain salt bridge network (R39/E58,E61) facilitates the formation of a stable helix-coil-helix (HCH) motif formed by helices P and A in the unphosphorylated NTE of both myosin heads. Phosphorylation of the blocked head on Ser45 does not induce any substantial structural changes. However, phosphorylation of the free head on Ser35 disrupts this salt bridge network and induces a partial extension of helix P along RLC helix A. While not directly participating in the HCH folding, phosphorylation of Ser35 unlocks a compact structure and allows the NTE to spontaneously undergo coil-helix transitions. The modest structural change induced by the subsequent Ser45 diphosphorylation monophosphorylated Ser35 free head facilitates full helix P extension into a single structurally stable α-helix through a network of intra-domain salt bridges (pS35/R38,R39,R42). We conclude that tarantula thick filament activation is controlled by sequential Ser35-Ser45 phosphorylation via a conserved disorder-to-order transition. PMID

  9. AMP-activated protein kinase modulates tau phosphorylation and tau pathology in vivo

    Domise, Manon; Didier, Sébastien; Marinangeli, Claudia; Zhao, Haitian; Chandakkar, Pallavi; Buée, Luc; Viollet, Benoit; Davies, Peter; Marambaud, Philippe; Vingtdeux, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are the pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases commonly known as tauopathies. NFTs result from the intracellular aggregation of abnormally and hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Tau functions, which include the regulation of microtubules dynamics, are dependent on its phosphorylation status. As a consequence, any changes in tau phosphorylation can have major impacts on synaptic plasticity and memory. Recently, it has been demonstrated that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was deregulated in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients where it co-localized with phosphorylated tau in pre-tangle and tangle-bearing neurons. Besides, it was found that AMPK was a tau kinase in vitro. Here, we find that endogenous AMPK activation in mouse primary neurons induced an increase of tau phosphorylation at multiple sites, whereas AMPK inhibition led to a rapid decrease of tau phosphorylation. We further show that AMPK mice deficient for one of the catalytic alpha subunits displayed reduced endogenous tau phosphorylation. Finally, we found that AMPK deficiency reduced tau pathology in the PS19 mouse model of tauopathy. These results show that AMPK regulates tau phosphorylation in mouse primary neurons as well as in vivo, and thus suggest that AMPK could be a key player in the development of AD pathology. PMID:27230293

  10. Slow magnetosonic waves and fast flows in active region loops

    Ofman, Leon; Davila, Joseph M

    2012-01-01

    Recent EUV spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast (~100-300 km/s) quasi-periodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux-tubes and the establishment of siphon flow. We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magn...

  11. Phosphorylation by PKA potentiates retinoic acid receptor α activity by means of increasing interaction with and phosphorylation by cyclin H/cdk7

    Gaillard, Emilie; Bruck, Nathalie; Brelivet, Yann; Bour, Gaétan; Lalevée, Sébastien; Bauer, Annie; Poch, Olivier; Moras, Dino; Rochette-Egly, Cécile

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs) work as ligand-dependent heterodimeric RAR/retinoid X receptor transcription activators, which are targets for phosphorylations. The N-terminal activation function (AF)-1 domain of RARα is phosphorylated by the cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) 7/cyclin H complex of the general transcription factor TFIIH and the C-terminal AF-2 domain by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). Here, we report the identification of a molecular pathway by which phosphorylat...

  12. Activation of repair and checkpoints by double-strand breaks of DNA. Activational cascade of protein phosphorylation

    Molecular mechanisms of double-strand breaks repair and checkpoints include phosphorylations of repair and checkpoint-proteins by protein kinases. Chemical modification of proteins has different consequences including activation, changing of affinity to proteins and localization

  13. Site-specific Interaction Mapping of Phosphorylated Ubiquitin to Uncover Parkin Activation.

    Yamano, Koji; Queliconi, Bruno B; Koyano, Fumika; Saeki, Yasushi; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Tanaka, Keiji; Matsuda, Noriyuki

    2015-10-16

    Damaged mitochondria are eliminated through autophagy machinery. A cytosolic E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin, a gene product mutated in familial Parkinsonism, is essential for this pathway. Recent progress has revealed that phosphorylation of both Parkin and ubiquitin at Ser(65) by PINK1 are crucial for activation and recruitment of Parkin to the damaged mitochondria. However, the mechanism by which phosphorylated ubiquitin associates with and activates phosphorylated Parkin E3 ligase activity remains largely unknown. Here, we analyze interactions between phosphorylated forms of both Parkin and ubiquitin at a spatial resolution of the amino acid residue by site-specific photo-crosslinking. We reveal that the in-between-RING (IBR) domain along with RING1 domain of Parkin preferentially binds to ubiquitin in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, another approach, the Fluoppi (fluorescent-based technology detecting protein-protein interaction) assay, also showed that pathogenic mutations in these domains blocked interactions with phosphomimetic ubiquitin in mammalian cells. Molecular modeling based on the site-specific photo-crosslinking interaction map combined with mass spectrometry strongly suggests that a novel binding mechanism between Parkin and ubiquitin leads to a Parkin conformational change with subsequent activation of Parkin E3 ligase activity. PMID:26260794

  14. Phosphorylation controls the localization and activation of the lumenal carbonic anhydrase in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Amaya Blanco-Rivero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cah3 is the only carbonic anhydrase (CA isoform located in the thylakoid lumen of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Previous studies demonstrated its association with the donor side of the photosystem II (PSII where it is required for the optimal function of the water oxidizing complex. However this enzyme has also been frequently proposed to perform a critical function in inorganic carbon acquisition and CO(2 fixation and all mutants lacking Cah3 exhibit very poor growth after transfer to low CO(2 conditions. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: In the present work we demonstrate that after transfer to low CO(2, Cah3 is phosphorylated and that phosphorylation is correlated to changes in its localization and its increase in activity. When C. reinhardtii wild-type cells were acclimated to limiting CO(2 conditions, the Cah3 activity increased about 5-6 fold. Under these conditions, there were no detectable changes in the level of the Cah3 polypeptide. The increase in activity was specifically inhibited in the presence of Staurosporine, a protein kinase inhibitor, suggesting that the Cah3 protein was post-translationally regulated via phosphorylation. Immunoprecipitation and in vitro dephosphorylation experiments confirm this hypothesis. In vivo phosphorylation analysis of thylakoid polypeptides indicates that there was a 3-fold increase in the phosphorylation signal of the Cah3 polypeptide within the first two hours after transfer to low CO(2 conditions. The increase in the phosphorylation signal was correlated with changes in the intracellular localization of the Cah3 protein. Under high CO(2 conditions, the Cah3 protein was only associated with the donor side of PSII in the stroma thylakoids. In contrast, in cells grown at limiting CO(2 the protein was partly concentrated in the thylakoids crossing the pyrenoid, which did not contain PSII and were surrounded by Rubisco molecules. SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of a CA being post

  15. Synaptic Activation of Ribosomal Protein S6 Phosphorylation Occurs Locally in Activated Dendritic Domains

    Pirbhoy, Patricia Salgado; Farris, Shannon; Steward, Oswald

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) induces phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) in postsynaptic neurons, but the functional significance of rpS6 phosphorylation is poorly understood. Here, we show that synaptic stimulation that induces perforant path LTP triggers phosphorylation of rpS6 (p-rpS6)…

  16. Structural basis of how stress-induced MDMX phosphorylation activates p53.

    Chen, X; Gohain, N; Zhan, C; Lu, W-Y; Pazgier, M; Lu, W

    2016-04-14

    The tumor-suppressor protein p53 is tightly controlled in normal cells by its two negative regulators--the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 and its homolog MDMX. Under stressed conditions such as DNA damage, p53 escapes MDM2- and MDMX-mediated functional inhibition and degradation, acting to prevent damaged cells from proliferating through induction of cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, senescence or apoptosis. Ample evidence suggests that stress signals induce phosphorylation of MDM2 and MDMX, leading to p53 activation. However, the structural basis of stress-induced p53 activation remains poorly understood because of the paucity of technical means to produce site-specifically phosphorylated MDM2 and MDMX proteins for biochemical and biophysical studies. Herein, we report total chemical synthesis, via native chemical ligation, and functional characterization of (24-108)MDMX and its Tyr99-phosphorylated analog with respect to their ability to interact with a panel of p53-derived peptide ligands and PMI, a p53-mimicking but more potent peptide antagonist of MDMX, using FP and surface plasmon resonance techniques. Phosphorylation of MDMX at Tyr99 weakens peptide binding by approximately two orders of magnitude. Comparative X-ray crystallographic analyses of MDMX and of pTyr99 MDMX in complex with PMI as well as modeling studies reveal that the phosphate group of pTyr99 imposes extensive steric clashes with the C-terminus of PMI or p53 peptide and induces a significant lateral shift of the peptide ligand, contributing to the dramatic decrease in the binding affinity of MDMX for p53. Because DNA damage activates c-Abl tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates MDMX at Tyr99, our findings afford a rare glimpse at the structural level of how stress-induced MDMX phosphorylation dislodges p53 from the inhibitory complex and activates it in response to DNA damage. PMID:26148237

  17. NOMAGE4 activities 2011. Part II, Supercritical water loop

    Vierstraete, P. (Ecole Nationale Superieure des mines, Paris (France)); Van Nieuwenhove, R. (Institutt for Energiteknikk, OECD Halden Reactor Project (HRP), Kjeller (Norway)); Lauritzen, B. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark))

    2012-01-15

    The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) is one of the six different reactor technologies selected for research and development under the Generation IV program. Several countries have shown interest to this concept but up to now, there exist no in-pile facilities to perform the required material and fuel tests. Working on this direction, the Halden Reactor Project has started an activity in collaboration with Risoe-DTU (with Mr. Rudi Van Nieuwenhove as the project leader) to study the feasibility of a SCW loop in the Halden Reactor, which is a Heavy Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR). The ultimate goal of the project is to design a loop allowing material and fuel test studies at significant mass flow with in-core instrumentation and chemistry control possibilities. The present report focusses on the main heat exchanger required for such a loop in the Halden Reactor. The goal of this heat exchanger is to assure a supercritical flow state inside the test section (the core side) and a subcritical flow state inside the pump section. The objective is to design the heat exchanger in order to optimize the efficiency of the heat transfer and to respect several requirements as the room available inside the reactor hall, the maximal total pressure drop allowed and so on. (Author)

  18. Carboxyl terminal of rhodopsin kinase is required for the phosphorylation of photo—activated rhodopsin

    YUQINGMING; LANMA; 等

    1998-01-01

    Human rhodopsin kinase (RK) and a carboxyl terminus-truncated mutant RK lacking the last 59 amino acids (RKC) were expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells to investigate the role of the carboxyl terminus of RK in recognition and phosphorylation of rhodopsin.RKC,like the wild-type RK,was detected in both plasma membranes and cytosolic fractions.The Cterminal truncated rhodopsin kinase was unable to phosphorylate photo-activated rhodopsin,but possesses kinase activity similar to the wild-type RK in phosphorylation of small peptide substrate.It suggests that the truncation did not disturb the gross structures of RK catalytic domain.Our results also show that RKC failed to translocate to photo-activated rod out segments.Taken together,our study demonstrate the carboxyl terminus of RK is required for phosphorylation of photo-activated rhodopsin and strongly indicate that carboxyl-terminus of RK may be involved in interaction with photo-activated rhodopsin.

  19. Kin28 Is Found within TFIIH and a Kin28-Ccl1-Tfb3 Trimer Complex with Differential Sensitivities to T-Loop Phosphorylation

    Keogh, Michael-Christopher; Cho, Eun-Jung; Podolny, Vladimir; Buratowski, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Basal transcription factor TFIIH phosphorylates the RNA polymerase II (RNApII) carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) within the transcription initiation complex. The catalytic kinase subunit of TFIIH is a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) family, designated Kin28 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Cdk7 in higher eukaryotes. Together with TFIIH subunits cyclin H and Mat1, Cdk7 kinase is also found in a trimer complex known as Cdk activating kinase (CAK). A yeast trimer complex has not previousl...

  20. Regulation of Xenopus laevis DNA topoisomerase I activity by phosphorylation in vitro

    DNA topoisomerase I has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from ovaries of the frog Xenopus laevis. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the most purified fraction revealed a single major band at 110 kDa and less abundant minor bands centered at 62 kDa. Incubation of the most purified fraction with immobilized calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase abolished all DNA topoisomerase enzymatic activity in a time-dependent reaction. Treatment of the dephosphorylated X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I with a X. laevis casein kinase type II activity and ATP restored DNA topoisomerase activity to a level higher than that observed in the most purified fraction. In vitro labeling experiments which employed the most purified DNA topoisomerase I fraction, [γ-32P]ATP, and the casein kinase type II enzyme showed that both the 110- and 62-kDa bands became phosphorylated in approximately molar proportions. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that only serine residues became phosphorylated. Phosphorylation was accompanied by an increase in DNA topoisomerase activity in vitro. Dephosphorylation of DNA topoisomerase I appears to block formation of the initial enzyme-substrate complex on the basis of the failure of the dephosphorylated enzyme to nick DNA in the presence of camptothecin. The authors conclude that X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I is partially phosphorylated as isolated and that this phosphorylation is essential for expression of enzymatic activity in vitro. On the basis of the ability of the casein kinase type II activity to reactivate dephosphorylated DNA topoisomerase I, they speculate that this kinase may contribute to the physiological regulation of DNA topoisomerase I activity

  1. Hypoxia activates Akt and induces phosphorylation of GSK-3 in PC12 cells.

    Beitner-Johnson, D; Rust, R T; Hsieh, T C; Millhorn, D E

    2001-01-01

    Akt is a serine/threonine kinase that has been shown to play a central role in promoting cell survival and opposing apoptosis. We evaluated the effect of hypoxia on Akt in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. PC12 cells were exposed to varying levels of hypoxia, including 21%, 15%, 10%, 5%, and 1% O(2). Hypoxia dramatically increased phosphorylation of Akt (Ser(473)). This effect peaked after 6 h exposure to hypoxia, but persisted strongly for up to 24 h. Phosphorylation of Akt was paralleled with a progressive increase in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), one of its downstream substrates. The effect of hypoxia on phosphorylation of Akt was completely blocked by pretreatment of the cells with wortmannin (100 nM), indicating that this effect is mediated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (P13K). In contrast, whereas hypoxia also strongly induced phosphorylation of the transcription factors CREB and EPAS1, these effects persisted in the presence of wortmannin. Thus, hypoxia regulates both P13K-dependent and P13K-independent signaling pathways. Furthermore, activation of the P13K and Akt signaling pathways may be one mechanism by which cells adapt and survive under conditions of hypoxia. PMID:11257444

  2. Studies on Synthesis and Antitumor Activity of Phosphorylated Achyranthes bidentata Polysaccharide (P-AbPS)

    CHEN,Xiao-Ming(陈晓明); ZHANG,Jian(张健); TIAN,Geng-Yuan(田庚元)

    2002-01-01

    The synthesis of phosphorylated Achyranthes bidentata polysaccharide (P-AbPS) was reported based on different strategies.The P-AbPS with high degree of substitution (D.S. >0.5) was obtained when phosphorus oxychloride (POCl3) was used as a phosphorylating agent and trimethyl phosphate-pyridine or dimethyl formamide was used as solvent. The influences of different solvents and reaction conditins were discussed. Thepharmacology assay shows that P-AbPS possesses antitumor activity against sarcoma 180 and Lewis lung carner in mice.

  3. AGC kinases regulate phosphorylation and activation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4B

    van Gorp, A. G. M.; van der Vos, K. E.; Brenkman, A. B.; Bremer, A.; van den Broek, N.; Zwartkruis, F.; Hershey, J. W.; Burgering, B. M. T.; Calkhoven, C. F.; Coffer, P. J.

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4B (eIF4B) plays a critical role during the initiation of protein synthesis and its activity can be regulated by multiple phosphorylation events. In a search for novel protein kinase B (PKB/c-akt) substrates, we identified eIF4B as a potential target. Using a

  4. Phosphorylation and inhibition of. gamma. -glutamyl transferase activity by cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    Kolesnichenko, L.S.; Chernov, N.N.

    1986-10-20

    It was shown that preparations of bovine kidney ..gamma..-glutamyl transferase of differing degrees of purity are phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. This is accompanied by a decrease in both the transferase and hydrolase activities of the enzyme. Consequently, ..gamma..-glutamyl transferase may serve as the substrate and target of the regulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

  5. Dehydration stress activates Arabidopsis MPK6 to signal DCP1 phosphorylation

    Xu, Jun; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2012-01-01

    The pathways regulating mRNA stability in response to environment stress in plants are not well understood. The stress responsive MAPK, MPK6, phosphorylates the mRNA decapping enzyme DCP1 to enhance its activity and regulate mRNA stability.

  6. Protein kinase C {alpha} activity is important for contraction-induced FXYD1 phosphorylation in skeletal muscle

    Thomassen, Martin; Rose, Adam John; Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt;

    2011-01-01

    Exercise induced phosphorylation of FXYD1 is a potential important regulator of Na(+), K(+) pump activity. It was investigated if skeletal muscle contractions induce phosphorylation of FXYD1 and if Protein Kinase C a (PKCa) activity is a prerequisite for this possible mechanism. In part 1, human ...

  7. Inhibition of nucleoside diphosphate kinase activity by in vitro phosphorylation by protein kinase CK2. Differential phosphorylation of NDP kinases in HeLa cells in culture

    Biondi, R M; Engel, M; Sauane, M;

    1996-01-01

    Although a number of nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDPKs) have been reported to act as inhibitors of metastasis or as a transcription factor in mammals, it is not known whether these functions are linked to their enzymatic activity or how this protein is regulated. In this report, we show that ...... on histidine residues, however, only the B isoform appeared to be serine phosphorylated....

  8. The temperature structure and pressure balance of magnetic loops in active regions. [in solar atmosphere

    Foukal, P.

    1975-01-01

    EUV observations show many active region loops in lines formed at temperatures between 10,000 and 2,000,000 K. The brightest loops are associated with flux tubes leading to the umbrae of sunspots. It is shown that the high visibility of certain loops in transition region lines is due principally to a sharp radial decrease of temperature to chromospheric values toward the loop axis. The plasma density of these cool loops is not significantly greater than in the hot gas immediately surrounding it. Consequently, the internal gas pressure of the cool material is clearly lower. The hot material immediately surrounding the cool loops is generally denser than the external corona by a factor 3-4. When the active region is examined in coronal lines, this hot high pressure plasma shows up as loops that are generally parallel to the cool loops but significantly displaced laterally.

  9. Analysis of protein phosphorylation in nerve terminal reveals extensive changes in active zone proteins upon exocytosis.

    Kohansal-Nodehi, Mahdokht; Chua, John Je; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Reinhard; Czernik, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the fast, calcium-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane, followed by endocytosis and recycling of the membrane of synaptic vesicles. While many of the proteins governing these processes are known, their regulation is only beginning to be understood. Here we have applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify changes in phosphorylation status of presynaptic proteins in resting and stimulated nerve terminals isolated from the brains of Wistar rats. Using rigorous quantification, we identified 252 phosphosites that are either up- or downregulated upon triggering calcium-dependent exocytosis. Particularly pronounced were regulated changes of phosphosites within protein constituents of the presynaptic active zone, including bassoon, piccolo, and RIM1. Additionally, we have mapped kinases and phosphatases that are activated upon stimulation. Overall, our study provides a snapshot of phosphorylation changes associated with presynaptic activity and provides a foundation for further functional analysis of key phosphosites involved in presynaptic plasticity. PMID:27115346

  10. Determination of the starch-phosphorylating enzyme activity in plant extracts

    Ritte, G.; Steup, M.; Kossmann, J.;

    2003-01-01

    For quantification of alpha-glucan, water dikinase(GWD) activity in crude extracts of plant tissues a radio-labeling assay was established that uses soluble starch and P-33-labeled ATP as phosphate acceptor and donor, respectively. A constant rate of starch labeling was observed only if the ATP...... applied was labeled at the beta position. In wild-type extracts from leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. the maximum rate of starch phosphorylation was approximately 27 pmol min(-1) (mg protein)(-1). Leaf extracts from the GWD-deficient sex1 mutants of Arabidopsis showed no significant...... incorporation of phosphate whereas extracts from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tuber expressing a GWD antisense construct exhibited less activity than the wild-type control. To our knowledge this is the first time that a quantification of the starch-phosphorylating activity has been achieved in plant crude...

  11. Tyrosine phosphorylation and protein degradation control the transcriptional activity of WRKY involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIQ) are among the most structurally diverse and pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. A plant-specific WRKY-type transcription factor, CjWRKY1, was isolated from Coptis japonica and identified as a transcriptional activator of BIQ biosynthesis. However, the expression of CjWRKY1 gene alone was not sufficient for the activation of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes. Here, we report the importance of post-translational regulation of CjWRKY1 in BIQ biosynthesis. First, we detected the differential accumulation of CjWRKY1 protein in two cell lines with similar CjWRKY1 gene expression but different levels of accumulated alkaloids. Further investigation of the WRKY protein identified the phosphorylation of the WRKYGQK core domain at Y115. The CjWRKYY115E phosphorylation-mimic mutant showed loss of nuclear localization, DNA-binding activity, and transactivation activity compared to wild-type CjWRKY1. Rapid degradation of the CjWRKY1 protein was also confirmed following treatment with inhibitors of the 26S proteasome and protease inhibitors. The existence of two independent degradation pathways as well as protein phosphorylation suggests the fine-tuning of CjWRKY1 activities is involved in the regulation of biosynthesis of BIQs. PMID:27552928

  12. PLK1-dependent activation of LRRK1 regulates spindle orientation by phosphorylating CDK5RAP2.

    Hanafusa, Hiroshi; Kedashiro, Shin; Tezuka, Motohiro; Funatsu, Motoki; Usami, Satoshi; Toyoshima, Fumiko; Matsumoto, Kunihiro

    2015-08-01

    Correct formation of the cell division axis requires the initial precise orientation of the mitotic spindle. Proper spindle orientation depends on centrosome maturation, and Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is known to play a crucial role in this process. However, the molecular mechanisms that function downstream of PLK1 are not well understood. Here we show that LRRK1 is a PLK1 substrate that is phosphorylated on Ser 1790. PLK1 phosphorylation is required for CDK1-mediated activation of LRRK1 at the centrosomes, and this in turn regulates mitotic spindle orientation by nucleating the growth of astral microtubules from the centrosomes. Interestingly, LRRK1 in turn phosphorylates CDK5RAP2(Cep215), a human homologue of Drosophila Centrosomin (Cnn), in its γ-tubulin-binding motif, thus promoting the interaction of CDK5RAP2 with γ-tubulin. LRRK1 phosphorylation of CDK5RAP2 Ser 140 is necessary for CDK5RAP2-dependent microtubule nucleation. Thus, our findings provide evidence that LRRK1 regulates mitotic spindle orientation downstream of PLK1 through CDK5RAP2-dependent centrosome maturation. PMID:26192437

  13. Tau phosphorylation at Alzheimer's disease-related Ser356 contributes to tau stabilization when PAR-1/MARK activity is elevated.

    Ando, Kanae; Oka, Mikiko; Ohtake, Yosuke; Hayashishita, Motoki; Shimizu, Sawako; Hisanaga, Shin-Ichi; Iijima, Koichi M

    2016-09-16

    Abnormal phosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein tau is observed in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD-related phosphorylation of two tau residues, Ser262 and Ser356, by PAR-1/MARK stabilizes tau in the initial phase of mismetabolism, leading to subsequent phosphorylation events, accumulation, and toxicity. However, the relative contribution of phosphorylation at each of these sites to tau stabilization has not yet been elucidated. In a Drosophila model of human tau toxicity, we found that tau was phosphorylated at Ser262, but not at Ser356, and that blocking Ser262 phosphorylation decreased total tau levels. By contrast, when PAR-1 was co-overexpressed with tau, tau was hyperphosphorylated at both Ser262 and Ser356. Under these conditions, the protein levels of tau were significantly elevated, and prevention of tau phosphorylation at both residues was necessary to completely suppress this elevation. These results suggest that tau phosphorylation at Ser262 plays the predominant role in tau stabilization when PAR-1/MARK activity is normal, whereas Ser356 phosphorylation begins to contribute to this process when PAR-1/MARK activity is abnormally elevated, as in diseased brains. PMID:27520376

  14. Phosphorylation and activation of calcineurin by glycogen synthase (casein) kinase-1 and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase

    Calcineurin is a phosphoprotein phosphatase that is activated by divalent cations and further stimulated by calmodulin. In this study calcineurin is shown to be a substrate for both glycogen synthase (casein) kinase-1 (CK-1) and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (A-kinase). Either kinase can catalyze the incorporation of 1.0-1.4 mol 32P/mol calcineurin. Analysis by SDS-PAGE revealed that only the α subunit is phosphorylated. Phosphorylation of calcineurin by either kinase leads to its activation. Using p-nitrophenyl phosphate as a substrate the authors observed a 2-3 fold activation of calcineurin by either Mn2+ or Ni2+ (in the presence or absence of calmodulin) after phosphorylation of calcineurin by either CK-1 or A-kinase. In the absence of Mn2+ or Ni2+ phosphorylated calcineurin, like the nonphosphorylated enzyme, showed very little activity. Ni2+ was a more potent activator of phosphorylated calcineurin compared to Mn2+. Higher levels of activation (5-8 fold) of calcineurin by calmodulin was observed when phosphorylated calcineurin was pretreated with Ni2+ before measurement of phosphatase activity. These results indicate that phosphorylation may be an important mechanism by which calcineurin activity is regulated by Ca2+

  15. MHC class I signaling in T cells leads to tyrosine kinase activity and PLC-gamma 1 phosphorylation

    Skov, S; Odum, Niels; Claesson, M H

    1995-01-01

    phosphorylation and the subsequent calcium response. The early tyrosine kinase activity was found to be dependent on expression of the TCR/CD3 complex and the CD45 molecule on the surface of the T cells. Furthermore, MHC-I cross-linking was shown to tyrosine phosphorylate PLC-gamma 1 (phospholipase C-gamma 1...

  16. Polycomb Group Protein Displacement and Gene Activation through MSK-Dependent H3K27me3S28 Phosphorylation

    Gehani, Simmi Suman; Agrawal-Singh, Shuchi; Dietrich, Nikolaj;

    2010-01-01

    phosphorylation, and displacement of PcG proteins, lead to gene activation. We present evidence that the H3K27me3S28 phosphorylation is functioning in response to stress signaling, mitogenic signaling, and retinoic acid (RA)-induced neuronal differentiation. We propose that MSK-mediated H3K27me3S28...

  17. Basal aurora kinase B activity is sufficient for histone H3 phosphorylation in prophase

    Ly-Thuy-Tram Le

    2013-02-01

    Histone H3 phosphorylation is the hallmark of mitosis deposited by aurora kinase B. Benzo[e]pyridoindoles are a family of potent, broad, ATP-competitive aurora kinase inhibitors. However, benzo[e]pyridoindole C4 only inhibits histone H3 phosphorylation in prophase but not in metaphase. Under the C4 treatment, the cells enter into mitosis with dephosphorylated histone H3, assemble chromosomes normally and progress to metaphase, and then to anaphase. C4 also induces lagging chromosome in anaphase but we demonstrated that these chromosome compaction defects are not related to the absence of H3 phosphorylation in prophase. As a result of C4 action, mitosis lasts longer and the cell cycle is slowed down. We reproduced the mitotic defects with reduced concentrations of potent pan aurora kinase as well as with a specific aurora B ATP-competitive inhibitor; we therefore propose that histone H3 phosphorylation and anaphase chromosome compaction involve the basal activity of aurora kinase B. Our data suggest that aurora kinase B is progressively activated at mitosis entry and at anaphase onset. The full activation of aurora kinase B by its partners, in prometaphase, induces a shift in the catalytic domain of aurora B that modifies its affinity for ATP. These waves of activation/deactivation of aurora B correspond to different conformations of the chromosomal complex revealed by FRAP. The presence of lagging chromosomes may have deleterious consequences on the daughter cells and, unfortunately, the situation may be encountered in patients receiving treatment with aurora kinase inhibitors.

  18. Activation of mammalian DNA ligase I through phosphorylation by casein kinase II.

    Prigent, C.; Lasko, D D; Kodama, K.; Woodgett, J R; Lindahl, T

    1992-01-01

    Mammalian DNA ligase I has been shown to be a phosphoprotein. Dephosphorylation of purified DNA ligase I causes inactivation, an effect dependent on the presence of the N-terminal region of the protein. Expression of full-length human DNA ligase I in Escherichia coli yielded soluble but catalytically inactive enzyme whereas an N-terminally truncated form expressed activity. Incubation of the full-length preparation from E. coli with purified casein kinase II (CKII) resulted in phosphorylation...

  19. Mek1 Down Regulates Rad51 Activity during Yeast Meiosis by Phosphorylation of Hed1.

    Callender, Tracy L; Laureau, Raphaelle; Wan, Lihong; Chen, Xiangyu; Sandhu, Rima; Laljee, Saif; Zhou, Sai; Suhandynata, Ray T; Prugar, Evelyn; Gaines, William A; Kwon, YoungHo; Börner, G Valentin; Nicolas, Alain; Neiman, Aaron M; Hollingsworth, Nancy M

    2016-08-01

    During meiosis, programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired preferentially between homologs to generate crossovers that promote proper chromosome segregation at Meiosis I. In many organisms, there are two strand exchange proteins, Rad51 and the meiosis-specific Dmc1, required for interhomolog (IH) bias. This bias requires the presence, but not the strand exchange activity of Rad51, while Dmc1 is responsible for the bulk of meiotic recombination. How these activities are regulated is less well established. In dmc1Δ mutants, Rad51 is actively inhibited, thereby resulting in prophase arrest due to unrepaired DSBs triggering the meiotic recombination checkpoint. This inhibition is dependent upon the meiosis-specific kinase Mek1 and occurs through two different mechanisms that prevent complex formation with the Rad51 accessory factor Rad54: (i) phosphorylation of Rad54 by Mek1 and (ii) binding of Rad51 by the meiosis-specific protein Hed1. An open question has been why inhibition of Mek1 affects Hed1 repression of Rad51. This work shows that Hed1 is a direct substrate of Mek1. Phosphorylation of Hed1 at threonine 40 helps suppress Rad51 activity in dmc1Δ mutants by promoting Hed1 protein stability. Rad51-mediated recombination occurring in the absence of Hed1 phosphorylation results in a significant increase in non-exchange chromosomes despite wild-type levels of crossovers, confirming previous results indicating a defect in crossover assurance. We propose that Rad51 function in meiosis is regulated in part by the coordinated phosphorylation of Rad54 and Hed1 by Mek1. PMID:27483004

  20. EMT phenotype is induced by increased Src kinase activity via Src-mediated caspase-8 phosphorylation.

    Zhao, Yang; Li, XiaoJun; Sun, XiangFei; Zhang, YunFeng; Ren, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Caspase-8 governs multiple cell responses to the microenvironmental cues. However, its integration of "death-life" signalings remains elusive. In our study, the role of caspase-8-Src is well-established as a promoter for migration or metastasis in Casp8(+)Src(+) A549/H226 cells in vivo and in vitro. In particular for nude mice models, mice implanted with Casp8(+)Src(+) A459/H226 cells remarkably increased spontaneous tumor metastatic burden with a significant survival disadvantage. Additionally, we detect that Src-mediated caspase-8 phosphorylation stimulates Src phosphorylation at Tyr-416 via the linkage of Src SH2 domain with phosph-Tyr-380 site of caspase-8. In turn, activated Src can efficiently induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotypic features to promote tumor cells metastasis. Surprisingly, RXDLL motif deletion in the DEDa of caspase-8 attenuates tumor cell migration or metastasis via impairing the recruitment of caspase-8 into the cellular periphery where activated Src is subject to caspase-8 phosphorylation. Together, a simple model is that the peripherization of caspase-8 is well-poised to facilitate Src-mediated caspase-8 phosphrylation at Tyr-380, then binding of phospho-Tyr380 of caspase-8 to Src SH2 domain may maintain Src in an active conformation to induce EMT phenotype, a key step toward cancer metastasis. PMID:22508042

  1. Promotion of beta-glucan synthase activity in corn microsomal membranes by calcium and protein phosphorylation

    Paliyath, G.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1988-01-01

    Regulation of the activity of beta-glucan synthase was studied using microsomal preparations from corn coleoptiles. The specific activity as measured by the incorporation of glucose from uridine diphospho-D-[U-14C]glucose varied between 5 to 15 pmol (mg protein)-1 min-1. Calcium promoted beta-glucan synthase activity and the promotion was observed at free calcium concentrations as low as 1 micromole. Kinetic analysis of substrate-velocity curve showed an apparent Km of 1.92 x 10(-4) M for UDPG. Calcium increased the Vmax from 5.88 x 10(-7) mol liter-1 min-1 in the absence of calcium to 9.52 x 10(-7) mol liter-1 min-1 and 1.66 x 10(-6) mol liter-1 min-1 in the presence of 0.5 mM and 1 mM calcium, respectively. The Km values remained the same under these conditions. Addition of ATP further increased the activity above the calcium-promoted level. Sodium fluoride, a phosphoprotein phosphatase inhibitor, promoted glucan synthase activity indicating that phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are involved in the regulation of the enzyme activity. Increasing the concentration of sodium fluoride from 0.25 mM to 10 mM increased glucan synthase activity five-fold over the + calcium + ATP control. Phosphorylation of membrane proteins also showed a similar increase under these conditions. Calmodulin, in the presence of calcium and ATP stimulated glucan synthase activity substantially, indicating that calmodulin could be involved in the calcium-dependent phosphorylation and promotion of beta-glucan synthase activity. The role of calcium in mediating auxin action is discussed.

  2. Inhibition of Rb Phosphorylation Leads to mTORC2-Mediated Activation of Akt.

    Zhang, Jinfang; Xu, Kai; Liu, Pengda; Geng, Yan; Wang, Bin; Gan, Wenjian; Guo, Jianping; Wu, Fei; Chin, Y Rebecca; Berrios, Christian; Lien, Evan C; Toker, Alex; DeCaprio, James A; Sicinski, Piotr; Wei, Wenyi

    2016-06-16

    The retinoblastoma (Rb) protein exerts its tumor suppressor function primarily by inhibiting the E2F family of transcription factors that govern cell-cycle progression. However, it remains largely elusive whether the hyper-phosphorylated, non-E2F1-interacting form of Rb has any physiological role. Here we report that hyper-phosphorylated Rb directly binds to and suppresses the function of mTORC2 but not mTORC1. Mechanistically, Rb, but not p107 or p130, interacts with Sin1 and blocks the access of Akt to mTORC2, leading to attenuated Akt activation and increased sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs. As such, inhibition of Rb phosphorylation by depleting cyclin D or using CDK4/6 inhibitors releases Rb-mediated mTORC2 suppression. This, in turn, leads to elevated Akt activation to confer resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs in Rb-proficient cells, which can be attenuated with Akt inhibitors. Therefore, our work provides a molecular basis for the synergistic usage of CDK4/6 and Akt inhibitors in treating Rb-proficient cancer. PMID:27237051

  3. Changes in diacylglycerol labeling, cell shape, and protein phosphorylation distinguish triggering from activation of human neutrophils

    Upon activation neutrophils release reactive oxygen intermediates such as superoxide anion (O2-) which are potent mediators of inflammation. Various agents elicit different responses. In contrast, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA, 1.6 μM) acting directly via protein kinase C is a potent stimulus for O2-. The authors compared the kinetics of appearance of various second messengers with the capacity of these ligands to elicit O2- generation. Kinetic analysis showed a two-phase response to membrane ligands; both an early (≥ 15 s) and a late (>15 s) increase in [3H]- and [14C]diacylglycerol (DG) was noted in response to fMLP. In contrast, LTB4 elicited only a rapid early increase in DG. The rise in DG evoked by PMA was late. Moreover, comparison of increases in [3H]DG versus those of [14C]DG at early and late time points suggested that DG was not formed exclusively from the hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositides. Kinetic analysis of protein phosphorylation was compared to the early and late increments of DG labeling. A 47,000 M/sub r/ protein was phosphorylated with kinetics consistent with the production of O2- and DG in response to fMLP and PMA. The temporal pattern of the formation of diacylglycerol and the phosphorylation of proteins describe a dual signal. The data suggest that neutrophils require not only triggering (the rapid generation of a signal) but also activation (the maintenance of a signal) to sustain responses

  4. Cardiac myosin light chain is phosphorylated by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent and -independent kinase activities.

    Chang, Audrey N; Mahajan, Pravin; Knapp, Stefan; Barton, Hannah; Sweeney, H Lee; Kamm, Kristine E; Stull, James T

    2016-07-01

    The well-known, muscle-specific smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) (smMLCK) and skeletal muscle MLCK (skMLCK) are dedicated protein kinases regulated by an autoregulatory segment C terminus of the catalytic core that blocks myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) binding and phosphorylation in the absence of Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM). Although it is known that a more recently discovered cardiac MLCK (cMLCK) is necessary for normal RLC phosphorylation in vivo and physiological cardiac performance, information on cMLCK biochemical properties are limited. We find that a fourth uncharacterized MLCK, MLCK4, is also expressed in cardiac muscle with high catalytic domain sequence similarity with other MLCKs but lacking an autoinhibitory segment. Its crystal structure shows the catalytic domain in its active conformation with a short C-terminal "pseudoregulatory helix" that cannot inhibit catalysis as a result of missing linker regions. MLCK4 has only Ca(2+)/CaM-independent activity with comparable Vmax and Km values for different RLCs. In contrast, the Vmax value of cMLCK is orders of magnitude lower than those of the other three MLCK family members, whereas its Km (RLC and ATP) and KCaM values are similar. In contrast to smMLCK and skMLCK, which lack activity in the absence of Ca(2+)/CaM, cMLCK has constitutive activity that is stimulated by Ca(2+)/CaM. Potential contributions of autoregulatory segment to cMLCK activity were analyzed with chimeras of skMLCK and cMLCK. The constitutive, low activity of cMLCK appears to be intrinsic to its catalytic core structure rather than an autoinhibitory segment. Thus, RLC phosphorylation in cardiac muscle may be regulated by two different protein kinases with distinct biochemical regulatory properties. PMID:27325775

  5. Phosphorylation of inhibitor-2 and activation of MgATP-dependent protein phosphatase by rat skeletal muscle glycogen synthase kinase

    Rat skeletal muscle contains a glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-M) which is not stimulated by Ca2+ or cAMP. This kinase has an apparent Mr of 62,000 and uses ATP but not GTP as a phosphoryl donor. GSK-M phosphorylated glycogen synthase at sites 2 and 3. It phosphorylated ATP-citrate lyase and activated MgATP-dependent phosphatase in the presence of ATP but not GTP. As expected, the kinase also phosphorylated phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I-2). Phosphatase incorporation reached approximately 0.3 mol/mol of I-2. Phosphopeptide maps were obtained by digesting 32P-labeled I-2 with trypsin and separating the peptides by reversed phase HPLC. Two partially separated 32P-labeled peaks were obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with either GSK-M or glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and these peptides were different from those obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (CSU) or casein kinase II (CK-II). When I-2 was phosphorylated with GSK-M or GSK-3 and cleaved by CNBr, a single radioactive peak was obtained. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that I-2 was phosphorylated by GSK-M or GSK-3 predominately in Thr whereas CSU and CK-II phosphorylated I-2 exclusively in Ser. These results indicate that GSK-M is similar to GSK-3 and to ATP-citrate lyase kinase. However, it appears to differ in Mr from ATP-citrate lyase kinase and it differs from GSK-3 in that it phosphorylates glycogen synthase at site 2 and it does not use GTP as a phosphoryl donor

  6. Phosphorylation of inhibitor-2 and activation of MgATP-dependent protein phosphatase by rat skeletal muscle glycogen synthase kinase

    Hegazy, M.G.; Reimann, E.M.; Thysseril, T.J.; Schlender, K.K.

    1986-05-01

    Rat skeletal muscle contains a glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-M) which is not stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/ or cAMP. This kinase has an apparent Mr of 62,000 and uses ATP but not GTP as a phosphoryl donor. GSK-M phosphorylated glycogen synthase at sites 2 and 3. It phosphorylated ATP-citrate lyase and activated MgATP-dependent phosphatase in the presence of ATP but not GTP. As expected, the kinase also phosphorylated phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I-2). Phosphatase incorporation reached approximately 0.3 mol/mol of I-2. Phosphopeptide maps were obtained by digesting /sup 32/P-labeled I-2 with trypsin and separating the peptides by reversed phase HPLC. Two partially separated /sup 32/P-labeled peaks were obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with either GSK-M or glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and these peptides were different from those obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (CSU) or casein kinase II (CK-II). When I-2 was phosphorylated with GSK-M or GSK-3 and cleaved by CNBr, a single radioactive peak was obtained. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that I-2 was phosphorylated by GSK-M or GSK-3 predominately in Thr whereas CSU and CK-II phosphorylated I-2 exclusively in Ser. These results indicate that GSK-M is similar to GSK-3 and to ATP-citrate lyase kinase. However, it appears to differ in Mr from ATP-citrate lyase kinase and it differs from GSK-3 in that it phosphorylates glycogen synthase at site 2 and it does not use GTP as a phosphoryl donor.

  7. Electrical stimulation affects metabolic enzyme phosphorylation, protease activation and meat tenderization in beef

    Li, C.B.; Li, J.; Zhou, G.H.;

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the response of sarcoplasmic proteins in bovine longissimus muscle to low-voltage electrical stimulation (ES, 80 V, 35 s) after dressing and its contribution to meat tenderization at early postmortem time. Proteome analysis showed that ES resulted in...... lower (P <0.05) phosphorylation levels of creatine kinase M chain, fructose bisphosphate aldolase C-A, ß-enolase and pyruvate kinase at 3 h postmortem. Zymography indicated an earlier (P <0.05) activation of µ-calpain in ES muscles. Free lysosomal cathepsin B&L activity increased faster (P <0.05) in ES...

  8. Nickel compounds induce phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10 by activating JNK–MAPK pathway

    Ke, Qingdong; Li, Qin; Ellen, Thomas P.; Sun, Hong; Costa, Max

    2008-01-01

    Nickel (Ni) is a known carcinogen, although the mechanism of its carcinogenicity is not clear. Here, we provide evidence that Ni can induce phosphorylation of histone H3 at its serine 10 residue in a c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK)-dependent manner. Ni induces the phosphorylation of JNK, with no effect on the phosphorylation states of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases. An inhibitor of JNK eliminated th...

  9. Protein kinase C phosphorylation sensitizes but does not activate the capsaicin receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)

    Bhave, Gautam; HU, HUI-JUAN; Glauner, Kathi S.; Zhu, Weiguo; Wang, Haibin; Brasier, D. J.; Oxford, Gerry S; Gereau, Robert W.

    2003-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) modulates the function of the capsaicin receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). This modulation manifests as increased current when the channel is activated by capsaicin. In addition, studies have suggested that phosphorylation by PKC might directly gate the channel, because PKC-activating phorbol esters induce TRPV1 currents in the absence of applied ligands. To test whether PKC both modulates and gates the TRPV1 function by direct phosphorylation, w...

  10. Mechanism of influence of phosphorylation on serine 124 on a decrease of catalytic activity of human thymidylate synthase

    Jarmuła, Adam; Frączyk, Tomasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Rode, Wojciech

    2010-01-01

    Regulation by phosphorylation is a well-established mechanism for controlling biological activity of proteins. Recently, phosphorylation of serine 124 in human thymidylate synthase (hTS) has been shown to lower the catalytic activity of the enzyme. To clarify a possible mechanism of the observed influence, molecular dynamics (MD), essential dynamics (ED) and MM-GBSA studies were undertaken. Structures derived from the MD trajectories reveal incorrect binding alignment between the pyrimidine r...

  11. Survival factor-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylates BIM, inhibiting its association with BAX and proapoptotic activity

    Harada, Hisashi; Quearry, Bonnie; Ruiz-Vela, Antonio; Korsmeyer, Stanley J.

    2004-01-01

    The “BH3-only” proapoptotic BCL-2 family members initiate the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. A small interfering RNA knockdown of BIM confirms this BH3-only member is important for the cytokine-mediated homeostasis of hematopoietic cells. We show here that the phosphorylation status of BIM controls its proapoptotic activity. IL-3, a hematopoietic survival factor, induces extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase-mediated phosphorylation of BIM on three serine sites ...

  12. Fisetin stimulates autophagic degradation of phosphorylated tau via the activation of TFEB and Nrf2 transcription factors

    Sunhyo Kim; Ki Ju Choi; Sun-Jung Cho; Sang-Moon Yun; Jae-Pil Jeon; Young Ho Koh; Jihyun Song; Johnson, Gail V. W.; Chulman Jo

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal accumulation of phosphorylated tau plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here, we examined the effect of fisetin, a flavonol, on tau levels. Treatment of cortical cells or primary neurons with fisetin resulted in significant decreases in the levels of phosphorylated tau. In addition, fisetin decreased the levels of sarkosyl-insoluble tau in an active GSK-3β-induced tau aggregation model. However, there was no difference in activities of tau kinase...

  13. Activation of ERK induces phosphorylation of MAPK phosphatase-7, a JNK specific phosphatase, at Ser-446.

    Masuda, Kouhei; Shima, Hiroshi; Katagiri, Chiaki; Kikuchi, Kunimi

    2003-08-22

    We previously showed that MKP-7 suppresses MAPK activation in COS-7 cells in the order of selectivity, JNK > p38 > ERK, but interacts with ERK as well as JNK and p38. In this study we found that, when expressed in COS-7 cells with HA-ERK2, the mobility of FLAG-MKP-7 was decreased on SDS-PAGE gels depending on several stimuli, including phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, fetal bovine serum, epidermal growth factor, H2O2, and ionomycin. By using U0126, a MEK inhibitor, and introducing several point mutations, we demonstrated that this upward mobility shift is because of phosphorylation and identified Ser-446 of MKP-7 as the phosphorylation site targeted by ERK activation. To determine how MKP-7 interacts with MAPKs, we identified three domains in MKP-7 required for interaction with MAPKs, namely, putative MAP kinase docking domains (D-domain) I and II and a long COOH-terminal stretch unique to MKP-7. The D-domain I is required for interaction with ERK and p38, whereas the D-domain II is required for interaction with JNK and p38, which is likely to be important for MKP-7 to suppress JNK and p38 activations. The COOH-terminal stretch of MKP-7 was shown to determine JNK preference for MKP-7 by masking MKP-7 activity toward p38 and is a domain bound by ERK. These data strongly suggested that Ser-446 of MKP-7 is phosphorylated by ERK. PMID:12794087

  14. Protein kinase C activation and myosin light chain phosphorylation in 32P-labeled arterial smooth muscle

    Experiments using 32P-labeled strips of swine carotid artery medial smooth muscle were performed to define the relative contribution of myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation as an activation mechanism mediating contractile responses stimulated by phorbol dibutyrate (PDB). Tryptic phosphopeptide mapping of phosphorylated MLC indicated that near-maximal force responses were associated with increases in functional MLC phosphorylation of less than 10% of the total MLC content following tonic (45 min) stimulation by PDB. Significant phosphorylation of MLC residues, consistent with the specificity of protein kinase C, occurred in response to high concentrations of PDB (greater than 0.1 microM). Histamine (10 microM)-induced MLC phosphorylation after 2 min (72.5% of total MLC) or 45 min (61.7%) was restricted to serine residues on peptides thought to contain serine19. Although agonist (histamine)-induced responses were eliminated under conditions of Ca2+ depletion, near-maximal force in response to 10 microM PDB (89.4% of a standard KCl response) was associated with monophosphorylation of less than 9% of the total MLC on peptides interpreted as containing serine19. A substantial fraction of this was localized to threonine residues. The quantitative analysis of the relation between PDB-stimulated force and the residues in MLC phosphorylated supports the concept that PDB stimulation results in activation of arterial smooth muscle cross bridges by MLC-phosphorylation-independent mechanisms

  15. Protein kinase C activation and myosin light chain phosphorylation in sup 32 P-labeled arterial smooth muscle

    Singer, H.A. (Geisinger Clinic, Danville, PA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Experiments using 32P-labeled strips of swine carotid artery medial smooth muscle were performed to define the relative contribution of myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation as an activation mechanism mediating contractile responses stimulated by phorbol dibutyrate (PDB). Tryptic phosphopeptide mapping of phosphorylated MLC indicated that near-maximal force responses were associated with increases in functional MLC phosphorylation of less than 10% of the total MLC content following tonic (45 min) stimulation by PDB. Significant phosphorylation of MLC residues, consistent with the specificity of protein kinase C, occurred in response to high concentrations of PDB (greater than 0.1 microM). Histamine (10 microM)-induced MLC phosphorylation after 2 min (72.5% of total MLC) or 45 min (61.7%) was restricted to serine residues on peptides thought to contain serine19. Although agonist (histamine)-induced responses were eliminated under conditions of Ca2+ depletion, near-maximal force in response to 10 microM PDB (89.4% of a standard KCl response) was associated with monophosphorylation of less than 9% of the total MLC on peptides interpreted as containing serine19. A substantial fraction of this was localized to threonine residues. The quantitative analysis of the relation between PDB-stimulated force and the residues in MLC phosphorylated supports the concept that PDB stimulation results in activation of arterial smooth muscle cross bridges by MLC-phosphorylation-independent mechanisms.

  16. Regulation of Smoothened Phosphorylation and High-Level Hedgehog Signaling Activity by a Plasma Membrane Associated Kinase

    Tong, Chao; Wang, Bing; Chen, Yongbin; Jiang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling controls embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis through the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-family protein Smoothened (Smo). Upon stimulation, Smo accumulates on the cell surface in Drosophila or primary cilia in vertebrates, which is thought to be essential for its activation and function, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show that Hh stimulates the binding of Smo to a plasma membrane-associated kinase Gilgamesh (Gish)/CK1γ and that Gish fine-tunes Hh pathway activity by phosphorylating a Ser/Thr cluster (CL-II) in the juxtamembrane region of Smo carboxyl-terminal intracellular tail (C-tail). We find that CL-II phosphorylation is promoted by protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of Smo C-tail and depends on cell surface localization of both Gish and Smo. Consistent with CL-II being critical for high-threshold Hh target gene expression, its phosphorylation appears to require higher levels of Hh or longer exposure to the same level of Hh than PKA-site phosphorylation on Smo. Furthermore, we find that vertebrate CK1γ is localized at the primary cilium to promote Smo phosphorylation and Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway activation. Our study reveals a conserved mechanism whereby Hh induces a change in Smo subcellular localization to promote its association with and activation by a plasma membrane localized kinase, and provides new insight into how Hh morphogen progressively activates Smo. PMID:27280464

  17. Phosphorylation and activation of the plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE1 during osmotic cell shrinkage.

    Robert R Rigor

    Full Text Available The Na(+/H(+Exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1 is a highly versatile, broadly distributed and precisely controlled transport protein that mediates volume and pH regulation in most cell types. NHE1 phosphorylation contributes to Na(+/H(+ exchange activity in response to phorbol esters, growth factors or protein phosphatase inhibitors, but has not been observed during activation by osmotic cell shrinkage (OCS. We examined the role of NHE1 phosphorylation during activation by OCS, using an ideal model system, the Amphiuma tridactylum red blood cell (atRBC. Na(+/H(+ exchange in atRBCs is mediated by an NHE1 homolog (atNHE1 that is 79% identical to human NHE1 at the amino acid level. NHE1 activity in atRBCs is exceptionally robust in that transport activity can increase more than 2 orders of magnitude from rest to full activation. Michaelis-Menten transport kinetics indicates that either OCS or treatment with the phosphatase inhibitor calyculin-A (CLA increase Na(+ transport capacity without affecting transport affinity (K(m=44 mM in atRBCs. CLA and OCS act non-additively to activate atNHE1, indicating convergent, phosphorylation-dependent signaling in atNHE1 activation. In situ(32P labeling and immunoprecipitation demonstrates that the net phosphorylation of atNHE1 is increased 4-fold during OCS coinciding with a more than 2-order increase in Na(+ transport activity. This is the first reported evidence of increased NHE1 phosphorylation during OCS in any vertebrate cell type. Finally, liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS analysis of atNHE1 immunoprecipitated from atRBC membranes reveals 9 phosphorylated serine/threonine residues, suggesting that activation of atNHE1 involves multiple phosphorylation and/or dephosphorylation events.

  18. The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase ERK induces tRNA synthesis by phosphorylating TFIIIB

    Felton-Edkins, Zoe A.; Fairley, Jennifer A.; Graham, Emma L.; Johnston, Imogen M.; White, Robert J.; Scott, Pamela H.

    2003-01-01

    RNA polymerase (pol) III transcription increases within minutes of serum addition to growth-arrested fibroblasts. We show that ERK mitogen-activated protein kinases regulate pol III output by directly binding and phosphorylating the BRF1 subunit of transcription factor TFIIIB. Blocking the ERK signalling cascade inhibits TFIIIB binding to pol III and to transcription factor TFIIIC2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation shows that the association of BRF1 and pol III with tRNALeu genes in cells decrea...

  19. Electrical stimulation affects metabolic enzyme phosphorylation, protease activation, and meat tenderization in beef.

    Li, C B; Li, J; Zhou, G H; Lametsch, R; Ertbjerg, P; Brüggemann, D A; Huang, H G; Karlsson, A H; Hviid, M; Lundström, K

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the response of sarcoplasmic proteins in bovine LM to low-voltage electrical stimulation (ES; 80 V, 35 s) after dressing and its contribution to meat tenderization at an early postmortem time. Proteome analysis showed that ES resulted in decreased (P tenderization, resulting in lesser (P tenderization of beef. Our results suggested the possible importance of the activation of μ-calpain, phosphorylation of sarcoplasmic proteins, and release of lysosomal enzymes for ES-induced tenderization of beef muscle. PMID:22147478

  20. Type III effector activation via nucleotide binding, phosphorylation, and host target interaction.

    Darrell Desveaux

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The Pseudomonas syringae type III effector protein avirulence protein B (AvrB is delivered into plant cells, where it targets the Arabidopsis RIN4 protein (resistance to Pseudomonas maculicula protein 1 [RPM1]-interacting protein. RIN4 is a regulator of basal host defense responses. Targeting of RIN4 by AvrB is recognized by the host RPM1 nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat disease resistance protein, leading to accelerated defense responses, cessation of pathogen growth, and hypersensitive host cell death at the infection site. We determined the structure of AvrB complexed with an AvrB-binding fragment of RIN4 at 2.3 A resolution. We also determined the structure of AvrB in complex with adenosine diphosphate bound in a binding pocket adjacent to the RIN4 binding domain. AvrB residues important for RIN4 interaction are required for full RPM1 activation. AvrB residues that contact adenosine diphosphate are also required for initiation of RPM1 function. Nucleotide-binding residues of AvrB are also required for its phosphorylation by an unknown Arabidopsis protein(s. We conclude that AvrB is activated inside the host cell by nucleotide binding and subsequent phosphorylation and, independently, interacts with RIN4. Our data suggest that activated AvrB, bound to RIN4, is indirectly recognized by RPM1 to initiate plant immune system function.

  1. Preparation, characterization and antibacterial activity of chitosan and phosphorylated chitosan from cuttlebone of Sepia kobiensis (Hoyle, 1885)

    Annaian Shanmugam; Kandasamy Kathiresan; Lakshman Nayak

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan is a commercially available derivative of chitin that has been extensively studied for its antimicrobial properties. In order to improve the water solubility and its biological activity, the chemical modification or derivatisation is attempted. In the present investigation, the chitosan prepared from the cuttlebone of Sepia kobiensis was being chemically modified by reacting it with orthophosphoric acid so as to obtain phosphorylated chitosan. Then the chitosan and phosphorylated chi...

  2. Tyr724 phosphorylation of ELMO1 by Src is involved in cell spreading and migration via Rac1 activation

    Makino, Yoshinori; Tsuda, Masumi; Ohba, Yusuke; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Sawa, Hirofumi; Nagashima, Kazuo; Tanaka, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    Background The complex of Dock180/ELMO1 that functions as a bipartite guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac is essential for diverse physiological and pathological processes of cells such as cell migration, phagocytosis, and invasion of cancer cells. Among the Src-family tyrosine kinases (SFKs), it has been reported that Hck directly phosphorylates ELMO1, regulating phagocytosis by promoting activation of Rac1; however, the involvement of other SFKs in ELMO1 phosphorylation has remained ...

  3. Phosphorylated heat shock protein 27 promotes lipid clearance in hepatic cells through interacting with STAT3 and activating autophagy.

    Shen, Lei; Qi, Zhilin; Zhu, Yanyan; Song, Xiaomeng; Xuan, Chunxia; Ben, Peiling; Lan, Lei; Luo, Lan; Yin, Zhimin

    2016-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the major liver disease worldwide. Recently, several studies have identified that the activation of autophagy attenuates hepatic steatosis. Heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) is involved in autophagy in response to various stimuli. In this study, we demonstrate that phosphorylated Hsp27 stimulates autophagy and lipid droplet clearance and interacts with STAT3. In vivo study showed that high fat diet (HFD) feeding increased Hsp25 (mouse orthology of Hsp27) phosphorylation and autophagy in mouse livers. Inhibition of Hsp25 phosphorylation exacerbated HFD-induced hepatic steatosis in mice. In vitro study showed that palmitate-induced lipid overload in hepatic cells was enhanced by Hsp27 knockdown, KRIBB3 treatment and Hsp27-3A (non-phosphorylatable) overexpression but was prevented by Hsp27-WT (wild type) and Hsp27-3D (phosphomimetic) overexpression. Mechanism analysis demonstrated that palmitate could induce Hsp27 phosphorylation which promoted palmitate-induced autophagy. Phosphorylated Hsp27 interacted with STAT3 in response to palmitate treatment, and disrupted the STAT3/PKR complexes, facilitated PKR-dependent eIF2α phosphorylation, and thus stimulated autophagy. To conclude, our study provides a novel mechanism by which the phosphorylated Hsp27 promotes hepatic lipid clearance and suggests a new insight for therapy of steatotic diseases such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). PMID:27185187

  4. Axl phosphorylates Elmo scaffold proteins to promote Rac activation and cell invasion.

    Abu-Thuraia, Afnan; Gauthier, Rosemarie; Chidiac, Rony; Fukui, Yoshinori; Screaton, Robert A; Gratton, Jean-Philippe; Côté, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase Axl contributes to cell migration and invasion. Expression of Axl correlates with metastatic progression in cancer patients, yet the specific signaling events promoting invasion downstream of Axl are poorly defined. Herein, we report Elmo scaffolds to be direct substrates and binding partners of Axl. Elmo proteins are established to interact with Dock family guanine nucleotide exchange factors to control Rac-mediated cytoskeletal dynamics. Proteomics and mutagenesis studies reveal that Axl phosphorylates Elmo1/2 on a conserved carboxyl-terminal tyrosine residue. Upon Gas6-dependent activation of Axl, endogenous Elmo2 becomes phosphorylated on Tyr-713 and enters into a physical complex with Axl in breast cancer cells. Interfering with Elmo2 expression prevented Gas6-induced Rac1 activation in breast cancer cells. Similarly to blocking of Axl, Elmo2 knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of Dock1 abolishes breast cancer cell invasion. Interestingly, Axl or Elmo2 knockdown diminishes breast cancer cell proliferation. Rescue of Elmo2 knockdown cells with the wild-type protein but not with Elmo2 harboring Tyr-713-Phe mutations restores cell invasion and cell proliferation. These results define a new mechanism by which Axl promotes cell proliferation and invasion and identifies inhibition of the Elmo-Dock pathway as a potential therapeutic target to stop Axl-induced metastases. PMID:25332238

  5. Cell proliferation and migration are modulated by Cdk-1-phosphorylated endothelial-monocyte activating polypeptide II.

    Margaret A Schwarz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endothelial-Monocyte Activating Polypeptide (EMAP II is a secreted protein with well-established anti-angiogenic activities. Intracellular EMAP II expression is increased during fetal development at epithelial/mesenchymal boundaries and in pathophysiologic fibroproliferative cells of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, emphysema, and scar fibroblast tissue following myocardial ischemia. Precise function and regulation of intracellular EMAP II, however, has not been explored to date. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that high intracellular EMAP II suppresses cellular proliferation by slowing progression through the G2M cell cycle transition in epithelium and fibroblast. Furthermore, EMAP II binds to and is phosphorylated by Cdk1, and exhibits nuclear/cytoplasmic partitioning, with only nuclear EMAP II being phosphorylated. We observed that extracellular secreted EMAP II induces endothelial cell apoptosis, where as excess intracellular EMAP II facilitates epithelial and fibroblast cells migration. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that EMAP II has specific intracellular effects, and that this intracellular function appears to antagonize its extracellular anti-angiogenic effects during fetal development and pulmonary disease progression.

  6. Detection of phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase in the developing spinal cord of the mouse embryo

    Teraishi, Toshiya, E-mail: saiseihassei@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Psychiatry, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-8513 (Japan); Miura, Kenji, E-mail: kmiura@ndmc.ac.jp [Department of Developmental Anatomy and Regenerative Biology, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-8513 (Japan)

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} We detected physiologically phosphorylated MAPKs in developing spinal cord. {yields} We detected physiologically phosphorylated MAPKs by an improved method. {yields} p-ERK1/2 and p-JNK1/2 were detected in the marginal layer and the dorsal horn. {yields} p-ERK1/2 and p-JNK1/2 might play critical roles in the developing spinal cord. {yields} Constructing phosphoprotein atlases will be possible if expanding this work. -- Abstract: Global understanding of the proteome is a major research topic. The comprehensive visualization of the distribution of proteins in vivo or the construction of in situ protein atlases may be a valuable strategy for proteomic researchers. Information about the distribution of various proteins under physiological and pathological conditions should be extremely valuable for the basic and clinical sciences. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade plays an essential role in intracellular signaling in organisms. This cascade also regulates biological processes involving development, differentiation, and proliferation. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are integral reactions in regulating the activity of MAPKs. Changes in the phosphorylation state of MAPKs are rapid and reversible; therefore, the localizations of physiologically phosphorylated MAPKs in vivo are difficult to accurately detect. Furthermore, phosphorylated MAPKs are likely to change phosphorylated states through commonly used experimental manipulations. In the present study, as a step toward the construction of in situ phosphoprotein atlases, we attempted to detect physiologically phosphorylated MAPKs in vivo in developing spinal cords of mice. We previously reported an improved immunohistochemical method for detecting unstable phosphorylated MAPKs. The distribution patterns of phosphorylated MAPKs in the spinal cords of embryonic mice from embryonic day 13 (E13) to E17 were observed with an improved immunohistochemical method. Phosphorylated

  7. Insulin-induced decrease in protein phosphorylation in rat adipocytes not explained by decreased A-kinase activity

    In isolated rat adipocytes, insulin inhibits lipolysis to a greater extent than would be predicted by the decrease in (-/+)cAMP activity ratio of cAMP-dependent protein kinase [A-kinase], from which it was speculated that insulin promotes the dephosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase. They have examined the phosphorylation state of cellular proteins under conditions of varying A-kinase activities in the presence and absence of insulin. Protein phosphorylation was determined by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis of extracts from 32P-loaded cells; glycerol and A-kinase activity ratios were measured in the cytosolic extracts from control, non-radioactive cells. Increased protein phosphorylation in general occurred over the same range of A-kinase activity ratios, 0.1-0.3, associated with increased glycerol release. The insulin-induced decrease in lipolysis was associated with a decrease in the 32P content of several proteins, an effect not explained by the modest reduction in A-kinase activity by insulin. This effect of insulin on protein phosphorylation was lost as the A-kinase activity ratios exceeded 0.5. The results suggest that insulin promotes the dephosphorylation of those adipocyte proteins which are subject to phosphorylation by A-kinase

  8. Insulin-induced decrease in protein phosphorylation in rat adipocytes not explained by decreased A-kinase activity

    Egan, J.J.; Greenberg, A.S.; Chang, M.K.; Londos, C.

    1987-05-01

    In isolated rat adipocytes, insulin inhibits lipolysis to a greater extent than would be predicted by the decrease in (-/+)cAMP activity ratio of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (A-kinase), from which it was speculated that insulin promotes the dephosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase. They have examined the phosphorylation state of cellular proteins under conditions of varying A-kinase activities in the presence and absence of insulin. Protein phosphorylation was determined by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis of extracts from /sup 32/P-loaded cells; glycerol and A-kinase activity ratios were measured in the cytosolic extracts from control, non-radioactive cells. Increased protein phosphorylation in general occurred over the same range of A-kinase activity ratios, 0.1-0.3, associated with increased glycerol release. The insulin-induced decrease in lipolysis was associated with a decrease in the /sup 32/P content of several proteins, an effect not explained by the modest reduction in A-kinase activity by insulin. This effect of insulin on protein phosphorylation was lost as the A-kinase activity ratios exceeded 0.5. The results suggest that insulin promotes the dephosphorylation of those adipocyte proteins which are subject to phosphorylation by A-kinase.

  9. Fisetin stimulates autophagic degradation of phosphorylated tau via the activation of TFEB and Nrf2 transcription factors

    Kim, Sunhyo; Choi, Ki Ju; Cho, Sun-Jung; Yun, Sang-Moon; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Koh, Young Ho; Song, Jihyun; Johnson, Gail V. W.; Jo, Chulman

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal accumulation of phosphorylated tau plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here, we examined the effect of fisetin, a flavonol, on tau levels. Treatment of cortical cells or primary neurons with fisetin resulted in significant decreases in the levels of phosphorylated tau. In addition, fisetin decreased the levels of sarkosyl-insoluble tau in an active GSK-3β-induced tau aggregation model. However, there was no difference in activities of tau kinases and phosphatases such as protein phosphatase 2A, irrespective of fisetin treatment. Fisetin activated autophagy together with the activation of transcription factor EB (TFEB) and Nrf2 transcriptional factors. The activation of autophagy including TFEB is likely due to fisetin-mediated mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibition, since the phosphorylation levels of p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1 were decreased in the presence of fisetin. Indeed, fisetin-induced phosphorylated tau degradation was attenuated by chemical inhibitors of the autophagy-lysosome pathway. Together the results indicate that fisetin reduces levels of phosphorylated tau through the autophagy pathway activated by TFEB and Nrf2. Our result suggests fisetin should be evaluated further as a potential preventive and therapeutic drug candidate for AD. PMID:27112200

  10. Phosphorylation of Raf-1 serine 338-serine 339 is an essential regulatory event for Ras-dependent activation and biological signaling.

    Diaz, B.; Barnard, D.; Filson, A; MacDonald, S; King, A.; Marshall, M.

    1997-01-01

    Activation of the Raf serine/threonine protein kinases is tightly regulated by multiple phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation of either tyrosine 340 or 341 in the catalytic domain of Raf-1 has been previously shown to induce the ability of the protein kinase to phosphorylate MEK. By using a combination of mitogenic and enzymatic assays, we found that phosphorylation of the adjacent residue, serine 338, and, to a lesser extent, serine 339 is essential for the biological and enzymatic activit...

  11. Cooperation between the two heads of smooth muscle myosin is essential for full activation of the motor function by phosphorylation.

    Ma, Rong-Na; Mabuchi, Katsuhide; Li, Jing; Lu, Zekuan; Wang, Chih-Lueh Albert; Li, Xiang-dong

    2013-09-10

    The motor function of smooth muscle myosin (SmM) is regulated by phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain (RLC) bound to the neck region of the SmM heavy chain. It is generally accepted that unphosphorylated RLC induces interactions between the two heads and between the head and the tail, thus inhibiting the motor activity of SmM, whereas phosphorylation of RLC interrupts those interactions, thus reversing the inhibition and restoring the motor activity to the maximal value. One assumption of this model is that single-headed SmM is fully active regardless of phosphorylation. To re-evaluate this model, we produced a number of SmM constructs with coiled coils of various lengths and examined their structure and regulation. With these constructs we identified the segment in the coiled-coil key for the formation of a stable double-headed structure. In agreement with the current model, we found that the actin-activated ATPase activity of unphosphorylated SmM increased with shortening of the coiled-coil. However, contrary to the current model, we found that the actin-activated ATPase activity of phosphorylated SmM decreased with shortening coiled-coil and only the stable double-headed SmM was fully activated by phosphorylation. These results indicate that single-headed SmM is neither fully active nor fully inhibited. Based on our findings, we propose that cooperation between the two heads is essential, not only for the inhibition of unphosphorylated SmM, but also for the activation of phosphorylated SmM. PMID:23947723

  12. Slack sodium-activated potassium channel membrane expression requires p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation.

    Gururaj, Sushmitha; Fleites, John; Bhattacharjee, Arin

    2016-04-01

    p38 MAPK has long been understood as an inducible kinase under conditions of cellular stress, but there is now increasing evidence to support its role in the regulation of neuronal function. Several phosphorylation targets have been identified, an appreciable number of which are ion channels, implicating the possible involvement of p38 MAPK in neuronal excitability. The KNa channel Slack is an important protein to be studied as it is highly and ubiquitously expressed in DRG neurons and is important in the maintenance of their firing accommodation. We sought to examine if the Slack channel could be a substrate of p38 MAPK activity. First, we found that the Slack C-terminus contains two putative p38 MAPK phosphorylation sites that are highly conserved across species. Second, we show via electrophysiology experiments that KNa currents and further, Slack currents, are subject to tonic modulation by p38 MAPK. Third, biochemical approaches revealed that Slack channel regulation by p38 MAPK occurs through direct phosphorylation at the two putative sites of interaction, and mutating both sites prevented surface expression of Slack channels. Based on these results, we conclude that p38 MAPK is an obligate regulator of Slack channel function via the trafficking of channels into the membrane. The present study identifies Slack KNa channels as p38 MAPK substrates. PMID:26721627

  13. CD133 promotes gallbladder carcinoma cell migration through activating Akt phosphorylation

    Zhen, Jiaojiao; Ai, Zhilong

    2016-01-01

    Gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) is the fifth most common malignancy of gastrointestinal tract. The prognosis of gallbladder carcinoma is extremely terrible partially due to metastasis. However, the mechanisms underlying gallbladder carcinoma metastasis remain largely unknown. CD133 is a widely used cancer stem cell marker including in gallbladder carcinoma. Here, we found that CD133 was highly expressed in gallbladder carcinoma as compared to normal tissues. CD133 was located in the invasive areas in gallbladder carcinoma. Down-regulation expression of CD133 inhibited migration and invasion of gallbladder carcinoma cell without obviously reducing cell proliferation. Mechanism analysis revealed that down-regulation expression of CD133 inhibited Akt phosphorylation and increased PTEN protein level. The inhibitory effect of CD133 down-regulation on gallbladder carcinoma cell migration could be rescued by Akt activation. Consistent with this, addition of Akt inhibitor Wortmannin markedly inhibited the migration ability of CD133-overexpressing cells. Thus, down-regulation of CD133 inhibits migration of gallbladder carcinoma cells through reducing Akt phosphorylation. These findings explore the fundamental biological aspect of CD133 in gallbladder carcinoma progression, providing insights into gallbladder carcinoma cell migration. PMID:26910892

  14. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Activity Is Regulated by Pten Phosphorylation Through a Niche-Dependent Mechanism.

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Jun; Tang, Minghui; Xin, Junping; Xu, Yan; Volk, Andrew; Hao, Caiqin; Hu, Chenglong; Sun, Jiewen; Wei, Wei; Cao, Quichan; Breslin, Peter; Zhang, Jiwang

    2016-08-01

    The phosphorylated form of Pten (p-Pten) is highly expressed in >70% of acute myeloid leukemia samples. However, the role of p-Pten in normal and abnormal hematopoiesis has not been studied. We found that Pten protein levels are comparable among long-term (LT) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), short-term (ST) HSCs, and multipotent progenitors (MPPs); however, the levels of p-Pten are elevated during the HSC-to-MPP transition. To study whether p-Pten is involved in regulating self-renewal and differentiation in HSCs, we compared the effects of overexpression of p-Pten and nonphosphorylated Pten (non-p-Pten) on the hematopoietic reconstitutive capacity (HRC) of HSCs. We found that overexpression of non-p-Pten enhances the LT-HRC of HSCs, whereas overexpression of p-Pten promotes myeloid differentiation and compromises the LT-HRC of HSCs. Such phosphorylation-regulated Pten functioning is mediated by repressing the cell:cell contact-induced activation of Fak/p38 signaling independent of Pten's lipid phosphatase activity because both p-Pten and non-p-Pten have comparable activity in repressing PI3K/Akt signaling. Our studies suggest that, in addition to repressing PI3K/Akt/mTor signaling, non-p-Pten maintains HSCs in bone marrow niches via a cell-contact inhibitory mechanism by inhibiting Fak/p38 signaling-mediated proliferation and differentiation. In contrast, p-Pten promotes the proliferation and differentiation of HSCs by enhancing the cell contact-dependent activation of Src/Fak/p38 signaling. Stem Cells 2016;34:2130-2144. PMID:27096933

  15. Novel STAT3 phosphorylation inhibitors exhibit potent growth suppressive activity in pancreatic and breast cancer cells

    Lin, Li; Hutzen, Brian; Zuo, Mingxin; Ball, Sarah; Deangelis, Stephanie; Foust, Elizabeth; Pandit, Bulbul; Ihnat, Michael A.; Shenoy, Satyendra S.; Kulp, Samuel; Li, Pui-Kai; Li, Chenglong; Fuchs, James; Lin, Jiayuh

    2010-01-01

    The constitutive activation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is frequently detected in most types of human cancer where it plays important roles in survival, drug-resistance, angiogenesis, and other functions. Targeting constitutive STAT3 signaling is thus an attractive therapeutic approach for these cancers. We have recently developed novel small molecule STAT3 inhibitors known as FLLL31 and FLLL32, which are derived from curcumin (the primary bioactive compound of turmeric). These compounds are designed to bind selectively to Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2) and the STAT3 SH2 domain, which serves crucial roles in STAT3 dimerization and signal transduction. Here we show that FLLL31 and FLLL32 are effective inhibitors of STAT3 phosphorylation, DNA binding activity, and transactivation in vitro, leading to the impediment of multiple oncogenic processes and the induction of apoptosis in pancreatic and breast cancer cell lines. FLLL31 and FLLL32 also inhibit colony formation in soft agar, cell invasion, and exhibit synergy with the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin against breast cancer cells. In addition, we show that FLLL32 can inhibit the induction of STAT3 phosphorylation by Interferon-α (IFNα) and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) in breast cancer cells. We also demonstrate that administration of FLLL32 can inhibit tumor growth and vascularity in chicken embryo xenografts as well as substantially reduce tumor volumes in mouse xenografts. Our findings highlight the potential of these new compounds and their efficacy in targeting pancreatic and breast cancers that exhibit constitutive STAT3 signaling. PMID:20215512

  16. Active site loop conformation regulates promiscuous activity in a lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426.

    Yu Zhang

    Full Text Available Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a "hot spot" in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity.

  17. Potentiality of phosphorylation of BRCA1 at ser 1524 to activate p21 in response to X-ray irradiation

    The breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 encodes a nuclear phosphoprotein, which functions as a tumor suppressor gene. Many studies suggested that multiple functions of BRCA1 may contribute to its tumor suppressor activity, including roles in cell cycle checkpoints, apoptosis and transcription. It is postulated that phosphorylation of BRCA1 is an important means by which its cellular functions are regulated. In this study, we employed phospho-Ser-specific antibody recognizing Ser-1524 to study BRCA1 phosphorylation under conditions of DNA damage and the effects of phosphorylation on BRCA1 functions. The results showed that 10 Gy X-ray treatment significantly induced phosphorylation of Ser-1524 but not total BRCA1 protein levels. The expression both of p53 and p21 increased after irradiation, but ionizing radiation (IR) -induced activation of p21 was prior to that of p53. The pementages of G0/G1 phase remarkably increased after IR. In addition, no detectable levels of 89 kDa fragment of PARP, a marker of apoptotic cells, were observed. Data implied that IR-induced phosphorylation of BRCA1 at Ser-1524 might activate p21 protein, by which BRCA1 regulated cell cycle, but play no role in apoptosis. (authors)

  18. Essential role of RelA Ser311 phosphorylation by ζPKC in NF-κB transcriptional activation

    Duran, Angeles; Diaz-Meco, María T.; Moscat, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    The activation of the transcription factor NF-κB is central to the control of the cellular response triggered by many stimuli. Once released from the inhibitory molecule IκB, NF-κB is translocated to the nucleus, and it has to be phosphorylated to activate transcription. In ζ protein kinase C (PKC)-deficient cells, NF-κB is transcriptionally inactive and the phosphorylation of the RelA subunit in response to tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) is severely impaired. In vitro assays showed that ζPKC ...

  19. Effects of platelet inhibitors on propyl gallate-induced platelet aggregation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and platelet factor 3 activation.

    Xiao, Hongyan; Kovics, Richard; Jackson, Van; Remick, Daniel G

    2004-04-01

    Propyl gallate (PG) is a platelet agonist characterized by inducing platelet aggregation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and platelet factor 3 activity. The mechanisms of platelet activation following PG stimulation were examined by pre-incubating platelets with well-defined platelet inhibitors using platelet aggregation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, activated plasma clotting time, and annexin V binding by flow cytometry. PG-induced platelet aggregation and tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple proteins were substantially abolished by aspirin, apyrase, and abciximab (c7E3), suggesting that PG is associated with activation of platelet cyclooxygenase 1, adenosine phosphate receptors, and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, respectively. The phosphorylation of the cytoskeletal enzyme pp60(c-src) increased following PG stimulation, but was blunted by pre-incubation of platelets with aspirin, apyrase, and c7E3, suggesting that tyrosine kinase is important for the signal transduction of platelet aggregation. Propyl gallate also activates platelet factor 3 by decreasing the platelet coagulation time and increasing platelet annexin V binding. Platelet incubation with aspirin, apyrase, and c7E3 did not alter PG-induced platelet coagulation and annexin V binding. The results suggest that platelet factor 3 activation and membrane phosphotidylserine expression were not involved with activation of platelet cyclooxygenase, adenosine phosphate receptors, and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa. PG is unique in its ability to stimulate platelet aggregation and coagulation simultaneously, and platelet inhibitors in this study affect only platelet aggregation but not platelet coagulation. PMID:15060414

  20. Resistance of Cancer Cells to Targeted Therapies Through the Activation of Compensating Signaling Loops.

    von Manstein, Viktoria; Yang, Chul Min; Richter, Diane; Delis, Natalia; Vafaizadeh, Vida; Groner, Bernd

    2013-12-01

    The emergence of low molecular weight kinase inhibitors as "targeted" drugs has led to remarkable advances in the treatment of cancer patients. The clinical benefits of these tumor therapies, however, vary widely in patient populations and with duration of treatment. Intrinsic and acquired resistance against such drugs limits their efficacy. In addition to the well studied mechanisms of resistance based upon drug transport and metabolism, genetic alterations in drug target structures and the activation of compensatory cell signaling have received recent attention. Adaptive responses can be triggered which counteract the initial dependence of tumor cells upon a particular signaling molecule and allow only a transient inhibition of tumor cell growth. These compensating signaling mechanisms are often based upon the relief of repression of regulatory feedback loops. They might involve cell autonomous, intracellular events or they can be mediated via the secretion of growth factor receptor ligands into the tumor microenvironment and signal induction in an auto- or paracrine fashion. The transcription factors Stat3 and Stat5 mediate the biological functions of cytokines, interleukins and growth factors and can be considered as endpoints of multiple signaling pathways. In normal cells this activation is transient and the Stat molecules return to their non-phosphorylated state within a short time period. In tumor cells the balance between activating and de-activating signals is disturbed resulting in the persistent activation of Stat3 or Stat5. The constant activation of Stat3 induces the expression of target genes, which cause the proliferation and survival of cancer cells, as well as their migration and invasive behavior. Activating components of the Jak-Stat pathway have been recognized as potentially valuable drug targets and important principles of compensatory signaling circuit induction during targeted drug treatment have been discovered in the context of kinase

  1. miR-34 activity is modulated through 5'-end phosphorylation in response to DNA damage.

    Salzman, David W; Nakamura, Kotoka; Nallur, Sunitha; Dookwah, Michelle T; Metheetrairut, Chanatip; Slack, Frank J; Weidhaas, Joanne B

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is tightly regulated by several mechanisms, including transcription and cleavage of the miRNA precursor RNAs, to generate a mature miRNA, which is thought to be directly correlated with activity. MiR-34 is a tumour-suppressor miRNA important in cell survival, that is transcriptionally upregulated by p53 in response to DNA damage. Here, we show for the first time that there is a pool of mature miR-34 in cells that lacks a 5'-phosphate and is inactive. Following exposure to a DNA-damaging stimulus, the inactive pool of miR-34 is rapidly activated through 5'-end phosphorylation in an ATM- and Clp1-dependent manner, enabling loading into Ago2. Importantly, this mechanism of miR-34 activation occurs faster than, and independently of, de novo p53-mediated transcription and processing. Our study reveals a novel mechanism of rapid miRNA activation in response to environmental stimuli occurring at the mature miRNA level. PMID:26996824

  2. The role of GH receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in Stat5 activation

    Hansen, J A; Hansen, L H; Wang, X;

    1997-01-01

    phosphorylated GST-GH receptor fusion proteins specifically bound to Stat5 in extracts from COS 7 cells transfected with Stat5 cDNA. This binding could be inhibited by tyrosine phosphorylated peptides derived from the GH receptor. This study thus demonstrated that specific GH receptor tyrosine residues, in their...

  3. Direct interaction of natural and synthetic catechins with signal transducer activator of transcription 1 affects both its phosphorylation and activity

    Menegazzi, Marta

    2013-12-10

    Our previous studies showed that (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) inhibits signal transducer activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) activation. Since EGCG may be a promising lead compound for new anti-STAT1 drug design, 15 synthetic catechins, characterized by the (-)-gallocatechin-3-gallate stereochemistry, were studied in the human mammary MDA-MB-231 cell line to identify the minimal structural features that preserve the anti-STAT1 activity. We demonstrate that the presence of three hydroxyl groups of B ring and one hydroxyl group in D ring is essential to preserve their inhibitory action. Moreover, a possible molecular target of these compounds in the STAT1 pathway was investigated. Our results demonstrate a direct interaction between STAT1 protein and catechins displaying anti-STAT1 activity. In particular, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis and molecular modeling indicate the presence of two putative binding sites (a and b) with different affinity. Based on docking data, site-directed mutagenesis was performed, and interaction of the most active catechins with STAT1 was studied with SPR to test whether Gln518 on site a and His568 on site b could be important for the catechin-STAT1 interaction. Data indicate that site b has higher affinity for catechins than site a as the highest affinity constant disappears in the H568ASTAT1 mutant. Furthermore, Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) kinase assay data suggest that the contemporary presence in vitro of STAT1 and catechins inhibits JAK2-elicited STAT1 phosphorylation. The very tight catechin-STAT1 interaction prevents STAT1 phosphorylation and represents a novel, specific and efficient molecular mechanism for the inhibition of STAT1 activation. © Copyright 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. All rights reserved.

  4. Pim-1 kinase phosphorylates RUNX family transcription factors and enhances their activity

    Peltola Katriina J

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pim family genes encode oncogenic serine/threonine kinases which in hematopoietic cells have been implicated in cytokine-dependent signaling as well as in lymphomagenesis, especially in cooperation with other oncogenes such as myc, bcl-2 or Runx family genes. The Runx genes encode α-subunits of heterodimeric transcription factors which regulate cell proliferation and differentiation in various tissues during development and which can become leukemogenic upon aberrant expression. Results Here we have identified novel protein-protein interactions between the Pim-1 kinase and the RUNX family transcription factors. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we were able to show that the C-terminal part of human RUNX3 associates with Pim-1. This result was confirmed in cell culture, where full-length murine Runx1 and Runx3 both coprecipitated and colocalized with Pim-1. Furthermore, catalytically active Pim-1 kinase was able to phosphorylate Runx1 and Runx3 proteins and enhance the transactivation activity of Runx1 in a dose-dependent fashion. Conclusion Altogether, our results suggest that mammalian RUNX family transcription factors are novel binding partners and substrates for the Pim-1 kinase, which may be able to regulate their activities during normal hematopoiesis as well as in leukemogenesis.

  5. The active site of oxidative phosphorylation and the origin of hyperhomocysteinemia in aging and dementia.

    McCully, Kilmer S

    2015-01-01

    The active site of oxidative phosphorylation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis in mitochondria is proposed to consist of two molecules of thioretinamide bound to cobalamin, forming thioretinaco, complexed with ozone, oxygen, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. and inorganic phosphate, TR2CoO3O2NAD(+)H2PO4(-). Reduction of the pyridinium nitrogen of the nicotinamide group by an electron from electron transport complexes initiates polymerization of phosphate with adenosine diphosphate, yielding nicotinamide riboside and ATP bound to thioretinaco ozonide oxygen. A second electron reduces oxygen to hydroperoxyl radical, releasing ATP from the active site. A proton gradient is created within F1F0 ATPase complexes of mitochondria by reaction of protons with reduced nicotinamide riboside and with hydroperoxyl radical, yielding reduced nicotinamide riboside and hydroperoxide. The hyperhomocysteinemia of aging and dementia is attributed to decreased synthesis of adenosyl methionine by thioretinaco ozonide and ATP, causing decreased allosteric activation of cystathionine synthase and decreased allosteric inhibition of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and resulting in dysregulation of methionine metabolism. PMID:25887881

  6. Use of an open-loop system to increase physical activity

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of an open-loop system that reinforces physical activity with TV watching to increase children’s physical activity. Non-overweight, sedentary boys and girls (8-12 y) were randomized to a group that received feedback of activity counts + reinforcement for physic...

  7. Activation of multifunctional calcium/calmodullin dependent protein kinase and phosphorylation of MAP-2 in GH3 cells

    Jefferson, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    The author utilized the pituitary-derived cell line, GH3, as a model system for studying the in situ regulation of multifunctional Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase). The author partially purified a Ca{sup 2+}/ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase from GH3 cells and demonstrated that it is similar in biochemical properties to neuronal CaM kinase. Autophosphorylation at the autonomy site converts the kinase into a Ca{sup 2+}-independent enzyme. Regulation of CaM kinase in situ was examined by high K{sup +} depolarization of ({sup 32}P)Pi-labeled H3 cells followed by immunoprecipitation and trypic phosphopeptide mapping. The enzyme displayed a Ca{sup 2+} dependent increase in phosphorylation of the autonomy site. Accordingly, this led to a considerable increase in the Ca{sup 2+}-independent or autonomous activity of the enzyme. Thus, activation of CaM kinase by Ca{sup 2}/calmodulin and the subsequent formation of a Ca{sup 2+}-independent species, previously established in vitro, occur after Ca{sup 2+} influx in situ. In a parallel study the author tested whether microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP-2), an in vitro substrate of CaM kinase, is phosphorylated by CaM kinase in GH3 cells. MAP-2 phosphorylation is enhanced by depolarization with high K{sup +} at sites characteristic of those recognized by CaM kinase and distinct from those phosphorylated by cAMP kinase or protein kinase C. Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) increased Ca{sup 2+} via the phosphatidyl inositol signaling pathway but neither stimulated autophosphorylation of CaM kinase nor increased phosphorylation of the CaM kinase array of sites on MAP-2. TRH does increase MAP-2 phosphorylation but at sites which closely match those stimulated by phorbol esters that activate protein kinase C.

  8. Activation of multifunctional calcium/calmodullin dependent protein kinase and phosphorylation of MAP-2 in GH3 cells

    The author utilized the pituitary-derived cell line, GH3, as a model system for studying the in situ regulation of multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase). The author partially purified a Ca2+/ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase from GH3 cells and demonstrated that it is similar in biochemical properties to neuronal CaM kinase. Autophosphorylation at the autonomy site converts the kinase into a Ca2+-independent enzyme. Regulation of CaM kinase in situ was examined by high K+ depolarization of [32P]Pi-labeled H3 cells followed by immunoprecipitation and trypic phosphopeptide mapping. The enzyme displayed a Ca2+ dependent increase in phosphorylation of the autonomy site. Accordingly, this led to a considerable increase in the Ca2+-independent or autonomous activity of the enzyme. Thus, activation of CaM kinase by Ca2/calmodulin and the subsequent formation of a Ca2+-independent species, previously established in vitro, occur after Ca2+ influx in situ. In a parallel study the author tested whether microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP-2), an in vitro substrate of CaM kinase, is phosphorylated by CaM kinase in GH3 cells. MAP-2 phosphorylation is enhanced by depolarization with high K+ at sites characteristic of those recognized by CaM kinase and distinct from those phosphorylated by cAMP kinase or protein kinase C. Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) increased Ca2+ via the phosphatidyl inositol signaling pathway but neither stimulated autophosphorylation of CaM kinase nor increased phosphorylation of the CaM kinase array of sites on MAP-2. TRH does increase MAP-2 phosphorylation but at sites which closely match those stimulated by phorbol esters that activate protein kinase C

  9. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-Activated ATM-Dependent Phosphorylation of Cytoplasmic Substrates Identified by Large-Scale Phosphoproteomics Screen.

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Waardenberg, Ashley J; Engholm-Keller, Kasper; Arthur, Jonathan W; Graham, Mark E; Lavin, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated (ATM) protein plays a central role in phosphorylating a network of proteins in response to DNA damage. These proteins function in signaling pathways designed to maintain the stability of the genome and minimize the risk of disease by controlling cell cycle checkpoints, initiating DNA repair, and regulating gene expression. ATM kinase can be activated by a variety of stimuli, including oxidative stress. Here, we confirmed activation of cytoplasmic ATM by autophosphorylation at multiple sites. Then we employed a global quantitative phosphoproteomics approach to identify cytoplasmic proteins altered in their phosphorylation state in control and ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) cells in response to oxidative damage. We demonstrated that ATM was activated by oxidative damage in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus and identified a total of 9,833 phosphorylation sites, including 6,686 high-confidence sites mapping to 2,536 unique proteins. A total of 62 differentially phosphorylated peptides were identified; of these, 43 were phosphorylated in control but not in A-T cells, and 19 varied in their level of phosphorylation. Motif enrichment analysis of phosphopeptides revealed that consensus ATM serine glutamine sites were overrepresented. When considering phosphorylation events, only observed in control cells (not observed in A-T cells), with predicted ATM sites phosphoSerine/phosphoThreonine glutamine, we narrowed this list to 11 candidate ATM-dependent cytoplasmic proteins. Two of these 11 were previously described as ATM substrates (HMGA1 and UIMCI/RAP80), another five were identified in a whole cell extract phosphoproteomic screens, and the remaining four proteins had not been identified previously in DNA damage response screens. We validated the phosphorylation of three of these proteins (oxidative stress responsive 1 (OSR1), HDGF, and ccdc82) as ATM dependent after H2O2 exposure, and another protein (S100A11) demonstrated ATM

  10. Casein kinase 1 controls the activation threshold of an α-arrestin by multisite phosphorylation of the interdomain hinge.

    Herrador, Antonio; Livas, Daniela; Soletto, Lucía; Becuwe, Michel; Léon, Sébastien; Vincent, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    α-Arrestins play a key role as trafficking adaptors in both yeast and mammals. The yeast Rim8/Art9 α-arrestin mediates the recruitment of endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) to the seven-transmembrane protein Rim21 in the ambient pH signaling RIM pathway. ESCRT is believed to function as a signaling platform that enables the proteolytic activation of the Rim101 transcription factor upon external alkalization. Here we provide evidence that the pH signal promotes the stable association of Rim8 with Rim21 at the plasma membrane. We show that Rim8 is phosphorylated in a pH-independent but Rim21-dependent manner by the plasma membrane-associated casein kinase 1 (CK1). We further show that this process involves a cascade of phosphorylation events within the hinge region connecting the arrestin domains. Strikingly, loss of casein kinase 1 activity causes constitutive activation of the RIM pathway, and, accordingly, pH signaling is activated in a phosphodeficient Rim8 mutant and impaired in the corresponding phosphomimetic mutant. Our results indicate that Rim8 phosphorylation prevents its accumulation at the plasma membrane at acidic pH and thereby inhibits RIM signaling. These findings support a model in which CK1-mediated phosphorylation of Rim8 contributes to setting a signaling threshold required to inhibit the RIM pathway at acidic pH. PMID:25851600

  11. Facilitation of polymer looping and giant polymer diffusivity in crowded solutions of active particles

    Shin, Jaeoh; Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Kim, Won Kyu; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    We study the dynamics of polymer chains in a bath of self-propelled particles (SPP) by extensive Langevin dynamics simulations in a two-dimensional model system. Specifically, we analyse the polymer looping properties versus the SPP activity and investigate how the presence of the active particles alters the chain conformational statistics. We find that SPPs tend to extend flexible polymer chains, while they rather compactify stiffer semiflexible polymers, in agreement with previous results. Here we show that higher activities of SPPs yield a higher effective temperature of the bath and thus facilitate the looping kinetics of a passive polymer chain. We explicitly compute the looping probability and looping time in a wide range of the model parameters. We also analyse the motion of a monomeric tracer particle and the polymer’s centre of mass in the presence of the active particles in terms of the time averaged mean squared displacement, revealing a giant diffusivity enhancement for the polymer chain via SPP pooling. Our results are applicable to rationalising the dimensions and looping kinetics of biopolymers at constantly fluctuating and often actively driven conditions inside biological cells or in suspensions of active colloidal particles or bacteria cells.

  12. Convoluted dislocation loops induced by helium irradiation in reduced-activation martensitic steel and their impact on mechanical properties

    Helium irradiation induced dislocation loops in reduced-activation martensitic steels were investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The specimens were irradiated with 100 keV helium ions to 0.8 dpa at 350 °C. Unexpectedly, very large dislocation loops were found, significantly larger than that induced by other types of irradiations under the same dose. Moreover, the large loops were convoluted and formed interesting flower-like shape. The large loops were determined as interstitial type. Loops with the Burgers vectors of b=〈100〉 were only observed. Furthermore, irradiation induced hardening caused by these large loops was observed using the nano-indentation technique

  13. p38 MAP Kinase Links CAR Activation and Inactivation in the Nucleus via Phosphorylation at Threonine 38

    Hori, Takeshi; Moore, Rick

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3), which regulates hepatic drug and energy metabolisms as well as cell growth and death, is sequestered in the cytoplasm as its inactive form phosphorylated at threonine 38. CAR activators elicit dephosphorylation, and nonphosphorylated CAR translocates into the nucleus to activate its target genes. CAR was previously found to require p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) to transactivate the cytochrome P450 2B (CYP2B) genes. Here we have demonstrated that p38 MAPK forms a complex with CAR, enables it to bind to the response sequence, phenobarbital-responsive enhancer module (PBREM), within the CYP2B promoter, and thus recruits RNA polymerase II to activate transcription. Subsequently, p38 MAPK elicited rephosphorylation of threonine 38 to inactivate CAR and exclude it from the nucleus. Thus, nuclear p38 MAPK exerted dual regulation by sequentially activating and inactivating CAR-mediated transcription through phosphorylation of threonine 38. PMID:27074912

  14. p38 MAP Kinase Links CAR Activation and Inactivation in the Nucleus via Phosphorylation at Threonine 38.

    Hori, Takeshi; Moore, Rick; Negishi, Masahiko

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3), which regulates hepatic drug and energy metabolisms as well as cell growth and death, is sequestered in the cytoplasm as its inactive form phosphorylated at threonine 38. CAR activators elicit dephosphorylation, and nonphosphorylated CAR translocates into the nucleus to activate its target genes. CAR was previously found to require p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) to transactivate the cytochrome P450 2B (CYP2B) genes. Here we have demonstrated that p38 MAPK forms a complex with CAR, enables it to bind to the response sequence, phenobarbital-responsive enhancer module (PBREM), within the CYP2B promoter, and thus recruits RNA polymerase II to activate transcription. Subsequently, p38 MAPK elicited rephosphorylation of threonine 38 to inactivate CAR and exclude it from the nucleus. Thus, nuclear p38 MAPK exerted dual regulation by sequentially activating and inactivating CAR-mediated transcription through phosphorylation of threonine 38. PMID:27074912

  15. Flarelike brightenings of active region loops observed with SUMER

    Wang, T J; Solanki, S K; Curdt, W

    2015-01-01

    Coronal loops on the east limb of the Sun were observed by SUMER on SOHO for several days. Small flare-like brightenings are detected very frequently in the hot flare line Fe~{\\small XIX}. We find that the relatively intense events are in good coincidence with the transient brightenings seen by Yohkoh/SXT. A statistical analysis shows that these brightenings have durations of 5-84 min and extensions along the slit of 2-67 Mm. The integrated energy observed in Fe~{\\small XIX} for each event is in the range of $3\\times10^{18}-5\\times10^{23}$ ergs, and the estimated thermal energy ranges from $10^{26}-10^{29}$ ergs. Application of the statistical method proposed by Parnell \\& Jupp (2000) yields a value of 1.5 to 1.8 for the index of a power law relation between the frequency of the events and the radiated energy in Fe~{\\small XIX}, and a value of 1.7 to 1.8 for the index of the frequency distribution of the thermal energy in the energy range $>10^{27}$ ergs. We examine the possibility that these small bright...

  16. Preparation, characterization and antibacterial activity of chitosan and phosphorylated chitosan from cuttlebone of Sepia kobiensis (Hoyle, 1885

    Annaian Shanmugam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a commercially available derivative of chitin that has been extensively studied for its antimicrobial properties. In order to improve the water solubility and its biological activity, the chemical modification or derivatisation is attempted. In the present investigation, the chitosan prepared from the cuttlebone of Sepia kobiensis was being chemically modified by reacting it with orthophosphoric acid so as to obtain phosphorylated chitosan. Then the chitosan and phosphorylated chitosan were structurally characterized through FT-IR spectroscopy. Further the antibacterial activity of chitosan and phosphorylated chitosan was tested against clinically isolated human pathogens (Gram-positive: Streptococcus sp., Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative: Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae, V. alginolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella sp. and Proteus vulgaris by well diffusion method and the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC was also calculated. The results of the present study suggests that the chitosan and phosphorylated chitosan has concentration dependent antibacterial activity with variation against several pathogenic human pathogenic bacterial strains which indicates their possible use as antibacterial agents.

  17. B lymphocytes from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia contain signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 and STAT3 constitutively phosphorylated on serine residues.

    Frank, D A; Mahajan, S; Ritz, J

    1997-12-15

    To explore the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), we examined whether phosphorylation of one or more signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) factors was abnormal in cells from CLL patients. No constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation was detected on any STAT in CLL cells. To assess the phosphorylation of serine residues of STAT1 and STAT3 in CLL cells, we raised antibodies that specifically recognize the form of STAT1 phosphorylated on ser-727 and the form of STAT3 phosphorylated on ser-727. We found that in 100% of patients with CLL (n = 32), STAT1 and STAT3 were constitutively phosphorylated on serine. This was in contrast to normal peripheral blood B lymphocytes or CD5+) B cells isolated from tonsils, in which this phosphorylation was absent. Serine phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3 was seen occasionally in other leukemias, but it was a universal finding only in CLL. The serine phosphorylation of these STATs was a continuous process, as incubation of CLL cells with the kinase inhibitor H7 led to the dephosphorylation of these serine residues. The STAT serine kinase in CLL cells has not been identified, and appears to be neither mitogen-activated protein kinase nor pp70(s6k). In summary, the constitutive serine phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3 is present in all CLL samples tested to date, although the physiologic significance of this modification remains to be determined. PMID:9399961

  18. Phosphorylation status of 72 kDa MMP-2 determines its structure and activity in response to peroxynitrite.

    Anna Laura Jacob-Ferreira

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 is a key intra- and extra-cellular protease which contributes to several oxidative stress related pathologies. A molecular understanding of 72 kDa MMP-2 activity, directly mediated by S-glutathiolation of its cysteine residues in the presence of peroxynitrite (ONOO(- and by phosphorylation of its serine and threonine residues, is essential to develop new generation inhibitors of intracellular MMP-2. Within its propeptide and collagen binding domains there is an interesting juxtaposition of predicted phosphorylation sites with nearby cysteine residues which form disulfide bonds. However, the combined effect of these two post-translational modifications on MMP-2 activity has not been studied. The activity of human recombinant 72 kDa MMP-2 (hrMMP-2 following in vitro treatments was measured by troponin I proteolysis assay and a kinetic activity assay using a fluorogenic peptide substrate. ONOO(- treatment in the presence of 30 µM glutathione resulted in concentration-dependent changes in MMP-2 activity, with 0.1-1 µM increasing up to twofold and 100 µM attenuating its activity. Dephosphorylation of MMP-2 with alkaline phosphatase markedly increased its activity by sevenfold, either with or without ONOO(-. Dephosphorylation of MMP-2 also affected the conformational structure of the enzyme as revealed by circular dichroism studies, suggesting an increase in the proportion of α-helices and a decrease in β-strands compared to the phosphorylated form of MMP-2. These results suggest that ONOO(- activation (at low µM and inactivation (at high µM of 72 kDa MMP-2, in the presence or absence of glutathione, is also influenced by its phosphorylation status. These insights into the role of post-translational modifications in the structure and activity of 72 kDa MMP-2 will aid in the development of inhibitors specifically targeting intracellular MMP-2.

  19. Phosphorylation Status of 72 kDa MMP-2 Determines Its Structure and Activity in Response to Peroxynitrite

    Jacob-Ferreira, Anna Laura; Kondo, Marcia Yuri; Baral, Pravas Kumar; James, Michael N. G.; Holt, Andrew; Fan, Xiaohu; Schulz, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is a key intra- and extra-cellular protease which contributes to several oxidative stress related pathologies. A molecular understanding of 72 kDa MMP-2 activity, directly mediated by S-glutathiolation of its cysteine residues in the presence of peroxynitrite (ONOO−) and by phosphorylation of its serine and threonine residues, is essential to develop new generation inhibitors of intracellular MMP-2. Within its propeptide and collagen binding domains there is an interesting juxtaposition of predicted phosphorylation sites with nearby cysteine residues which form disulfide bonds. However, the combined effect of these two post-translational modifications on MMP-2 activity has not been studied. The activity of human recombinant 72 kDa MMP-2 (hrMMP-2) following in vitro treatments was measured by troponin I proteolysis assay and a kinetic activity assay using a fluorogenic peptide substrate. ONOO− treatment in the presence of 30 µM glutathione resulted in concentration-dependent changes in MMP-2 activity, with 0.1–1 µM increasing up to twofold and 100 µM attenuating its activity. Dephosphorylation of MMP-2 with alkaline phosphatase markedly increased its activity by sevenfold, either with or without ONOO−. Dephosphorylation of MMP-2 also affected the conformational structure of the enzyme as revealed by circular dichroism studies, suggesting an increase in the proportion of α-helices and a decrease in β-strands compared to the phosphorylated form of MMP-2. These results suggest that ONOO− activation (at low µM) and inactivation (at high µM) of 72 kDa MMP-2, in the presence or absence of glutathione, is also influenced by its phosphorylation status. These insights into the role of post-translational modifications in the structure and activity of 72 kDa MMP-2 will aid in the development of inhibitors specifically targeting intracellular MMP-2. PMID:24013357

  20. Neurotensin Phosphorylates GSK-3α/β through the Activation of PKC in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Qingding Wang

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurotensin (NT, a gastrointestinal hormone, binds its receptor [neurotensin receptor (NTR] to regulate the growth of normal and neoplastic intestinal cells; molecular mechanisms remain largely undefined. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 regulates diverse cellular processes, including cell growth and apoptosis. Here, we show that NT induces the phosphorylation of GSK-3α/β in the human colon cancer cell line HT29, HCT116, or SW480, which possesses high-affinity NTR. The effect of NT was blocked by inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC, but not by inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK1 or phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, suggesting a predominant role for PKC in GSK-3β phosphorylation by NT. Pretreatment with Gö6976 (which inhibits PKCα and PKCβ1 or downregulation of endogenous PKCα or PKCβ1 blocked NT-mediated GSK-3β (but not GSK-3α phosphorylation. Moreover, a selective PKCβ inhibitor, LY379196, reduced NT-mediated GSK-3β (but not GSK-3α phosphorylation, suggesting a role for PKCbβ in the NT-mediated phosphorylation of GSK-3β and an undefined kinase in the NT-mediated phosphorylation of GSK-3α. Treatment with NT or the GSK-3 inhibitor SB216763 increased the expression of cyclin D1, a downstream effector protein of GSK-3 and a critical protein for the proliferation of various cells. Our results indicate that NT uses PKC-dependent pathways to modulate GSK-3, which may play a role in the NT regulation of intestinal cell growth.

  1. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Tarantula Myosin Filaments Suggests How Phosphorylation May Regulate Myosin Activity

    Alamo, Lorenzo; Wriggers, Willy; Pinto, Antonio; Bártoli, Fulvia; Salazar, Leiría; Zhao, Fa-Qing; Craig, Roger; Padrón, Raúl

    2008-01-01

    Muscle contraction involves the interaction of the myosin heads of the thick filaments with actin subunits of the thin filaments. Relaxation occurs when this interaction is blocked by molecular switches on these filaments. In many muscles, myosin-linked regulation involves phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chains (RLC). Electron microscopy of vertebrate smooth muscle myosin molecules (regulated by phosphorylation) has provided insight into the relaxed structure, revealing that my...

  2. HIPK1 interacts with c-Myb and modulates its activity through phosphorylation

    Matre, Vilborg; Nordgard, Oddmund; Alm-Kristiansen, Anne Hege; Ledsaak, Marit [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Gabrielsen, Odd Stokke, E-mail: o.s.gabrielsen@imbv.uio.no [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo (Norway)

    2009-10-09

    The transcription factor v-Myb is a potent inducer of myeloid leukaemias, and its cellular homologue c-Myb plays a crucial role in the regulation of haematopoiesis. In a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screening we identified the nuclear kinase HIPK1 as an interaction partner for human c-Myb. The interaction involves a C-terminal region of HIPK1, while a bipartite interaction surface was identified in c-Myb, including regions in its N-terminal DNA-binding domain as well as in its C-terminal region. HIPK1 and c-Myb co-localize in distinct nuclear foci upon co-transfection. c-Myb appears to be phosphorylated by HIPK1 in its negative regulatory domain as supported by both in vivo and in vitro data. A functional assay revealed that HIPK1 repressed the ability of c-Myb to activate a chromatin embedded target gene, mim-1, in haematopoetic cells. Our findings point to a novel link between an important kinase and a key regulator of haematopoiesis.

  3. Disruption of spectrin-like cytoskeleton in differentiating keratinocytes by PKCδ activation is associated with phosphorylated adducin.

    Kong-Nan Zhao

    Full Text Available Spectrin is a central component of the cytoskeletal protein network in a variety of erythroid and non-erythroid cells. In keratinocytes, this protein has been shown to be pericytoplasmic and plasma membrane associated, but its characteristics and function have not been established in these cells. Here we demonstrate that spectrin increases dramatically in amount and is assembled into the cytoskeleton during differentiation in mouse and human keratinocytes. The spectrin-like cytoskeleton was predominantly organized in the granular and cornified layers of the epidermis and disrupted by actin filament inhibitors, but not by anti-mitotic drugs. When the cytoskeleton was disrupted PKCδ was activated by phosphorylation on Thr505. Specific inhibition of PKCδ(Thr505 activation with rottlerin prevented disruption of the spectrin-like cytoskeleton and the associated morphological changes that accompany differentiation. Rottlerin also inhibited specific phosphorylation of the PKCδ substrate adducin, a cytoskeletal protein. Furthermore, knock-down of endogenous adducin affected not only expression of adducin, but also spectrin and PKCδ, and severely disrupted organization of the spectrin-like cytoskeleton and cytoskeletal distribution of both adducin and PKCδ. These results demonstrate that organization of a spectrin-like cytoskeleton is associated with keratinocytes differentiation, and disruption of this cytoskeleton is mediated by either PKCδ(Thr505 phosphorylation associated with phosphorylated adducin or due to reduction of endogenous adducin, which normally connects and stabilizes the spectrin-actin complex.

  4. The Corepressor mSin3A Regulates Phosphorylation-Induced Activation, Intranuclear Location, and Stability of AML1

    Imai, Yoichi; Kurokawa, Mineo; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Izutsu, Koji; Nitta, Eriko; Mitani, Kinuko; Satake, Masanobu; Noda, Tetsuo; Ito, Yoshiaki; Hirai, Hisamaru

    2004-01-01

    The AML1 (RUNX1) gene, one of the most frequent targets of translocations associated with human leukemias, encodes a DNA-binding protein that plays pivotal roles in myeloid differentiation through transcriptional regulation of various genes. Previously, we reported that AML1 is phosphorylated on two serine residues with dependence on activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, which positively regulates the transcriptional activity of AML1. Here, we demonstrate that the interaction b...

  5. Active serine involved in the stabilization of the active site loop in the Humicola lanuginosa lipase

    Peters, Günther H.j.; Svendsen, A.; Langberg, H.; Vind, J.; Patkar, S.A.; Toxvaerd, S.; Kinnunen, P.K.J.

    1998-01-01

    reveal that the hinges of the active site lid are more flexible in the wild-type Hll than in S146A. In contrast, larger fluctuations are observed in the middle region of the active site loop in S 146A than in Hll. These findings reveal that the single mutation (S146A) of the active site serine leads to...

  6. Role of the NC-loop in catalytic activity and stability in lipase from Fervidobacterium changbaicum.

    Binchun Li

    Full Text Available Flexible NC-loops between the catalytic domain and the cap domain of the α/β hydrolase fold enzymes show remarkable diversity in length, sequence, and configuration. Recent investigations have suggested that the NC-loop might be involved in catalysis and substrate recognition in many enzymes from the α/β hydrolase fold superfamily. To foster a deep understanding of its role in catalysis, stability, and divergent evolution, we here systemically investigated the function of the NC-loop (residues 131-151 in a lipase (FClip1 from thermophilic bacterium Fervidobacterium changbaicum by loop deletion, alanine-scanning mutagenesis and site-directed mutagenesis. We found that the upper part of the NC-loop (residues 131-138 was of great importance to enzyme catalysis. Single substitutions in this region could fine-tune the activity of FClip1 as much as 41-fold, and any deletions from this region rendered the enzyme completely inactive. The lower part of the NC-loop (residues 139-151 was capable of enduring extensive deletions without loss of activity. The shortened mutants in this region were found to show both improved activity and increased stability simultaneously. We therefore speculated that the NC-loop, especially the lower part, would be a perfect target for enzyme engineering to optimize the enzymatic properties, and might present a hot zone for the divergent evolution of α/β hydrolases. Our findings may provide an opportunity for better understanding of the mechanism of divergent evolution in the α/β hydrolase fold superfamily, and may also guide the design of novel biocatalysts for industrial applications.

  7. Scaling laws of coronal loops compared to a 3D MHD model of an Active Region

    Bourdin, Philippe-A; Peter, Hardi

    2016-01-01

    Context. The structure and heating of coronal loops are investigated since decades. Established scaling laws relate fundamental quantities like the loop apex temperature, pressure, length, and the coronal heating. Aims. We test such scaling laws against a large-scale 3D MHD model of the Solar corona, which became feasible with nowadays high-performance computing. Methods. We drive an active region simulation a with photospheric observations and found strong similarities to the observed coronal loops in X-rays and EUV wavelength. A 3D reconstruction of stereoscopic observations showed that our model loops have a realistic spatial structure. We compare scaling laws to our model data extracted along an ensemble of field lines. Finally, we fit a new scaling law that represents well hot loops and also cooler structures, which was not possible before only based on observations. Results. Our model data gives some support for scaling laws that were established for hot and EUV-emissive coronal loops. For the RTV scali...

  8. Influence of S100A6 on CacyBP/SIP Phosphorylation and Elk-1 Transcriptional Activity in Neuroblastoma NB2a Cells.

    Wasik, Urszula; Kadziolka, Beata; Kilanczyk, Ewa; Filipek, Anna

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we have found that casein kinase II (CKII) phosphorylates the CacyBP/SIP protein under in vitro conditions and have mapped the phosphorylation site to threonine 184. Moreover, we present evidence that S100A6, a CacyBP/SIP interacting protein, inhibits this phosphorylation in the presence of Ca(2+). CacyBP/SIP phosphorylation by CKII was also observed in neuroblastoma NB2a cells. Interestingly, we have found that the effect of DRB, a CKII inhibitor, on CacyBP/SIP phosphorylation state is similar to that of S100A6 overexpression. Phosphorylation at threonine 184 seems to have an effect on CacyBP/SIP phosphatase activity since the T184E phosphorylation mimic mutant overexpressed in NB2a cells has lower phosphatase activity toward p-ERK1/2 when compared to the non-phosphorylable T184A mutant or to the wild-type protein. In conclusion, our data suggest that S100A6 and Ca(2+), through inhibiting CacyBP/SIP phosphorylation on threonine 184, are important regulators of CacyBP/SIP phosphatase activity and of ERK1/2-Elk-1 signaling pathway. PMID:26085436

  9. Combination of PKCε Activation and PTP1B Inhibition Effectively Suppresses Aβ-Induced GSK-3β Activation and Tau Phosphorylation.

    Kanno, Takeshi; Tsuchiya, Ayako; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2016-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) is a key element to phosphorylate tau and form neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) found in tauopathies including Alzheimer's disease (AD). A current topic for AD therapy is focused upon how to prevent tau phosphorylation. In the present study, PKCε activated Akt and inactivated GSK-3β by directly interacting with each protein. Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), alternatively, caused an enhancement in the tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), allowing activation of Akt through a pathway along an IRS-1/phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1)/Akt axis, to phosphorylate and inactivate GSK-3β. Combination of PKCε activation and PTP1B inhibition more sufficiently activated Akt and inactivated GSK-3β than each independent treatment, to suppress amyloid β (Aβ)-induced tau phosphorylation and ameliorate spatial learning and memory impairment in 5xFAD transgenic mice, an animal model of AD. This may represent an innovative strategy for AD therapy. PMID:26328540

  10. Peptides complementary to the active loop of porin P2 from Haemophilus influenzae modulate its activity

    Galdiero S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Marco Cantisani,1 Mariateresa Vitiello,2 Annarita Falanga,1 Emiliana Finamore,2 Marilena Galdiero,2 Stefania Galdiero11Department of Biological Sciences, CIRPeB and IBB CNR, University of Naples "Federico II," Napoli, Italy; 2Department of Experimental Medicine, II University of Naples, Napoli, ItalyAbstract: Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib is one of the leading causes of invasive bacterial infection in young children. It is characterized by inflammation that is mainly mediated by cytokines and chemokines. One of the most abundant components of the Hib outer membrane is the P2 porin, which has been shown to induce the release of several inflammatory cytokines. A synthetic peptide corresponding to loop L7 of the porin activates JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways. We report a novel use of the complementary peptide approach to design a peptide that is able to bind selectively to the protein P2, thereby reducing its activity. This work provides insights into essential molecular details of P2 that may affect the pathogenesis of Hib infections where interruption of the signaling cascade could represent an attractive therapeutic strategy.Keywords: complementary-peptide, rational design, porin

  11. Phosphorylation of human hnRNP protein A1 abrogates in vitro strand annealing activity.

    Cobianchi, F; Calvio, C; Stoppini, M; Buvoli, M; Riva, S

    1993-01-01

    In HeLa cells metabolically labeled in vivo with [32P] orthophosphate in the presence of okadaic acid the concentration of phosphorylated A1 protein was increased significantly as compared to controls. Purified recombinant hnRNP protein A1 served as an excellent substrate in vitro for the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and for casein kinase II (CKII). Thin layer electrophoresis of A1 acid hydrolysates showed the protein to be phosphorylated exclusively on serine resi...

  12. Tyrosine 601 of Bacillus subtilis DnaK undergoes phosphorylation and is crucial for chaperone activity and heat shock survival

    Lei eShi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to screen for cellular substrates of the Bacillus subtilis BY-kinase PtkA, and its cognate phosphotyrosine-protein phosphatase PtpZ, we performed a triple SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteome analysis. Detected tyrosine phosphorylation sites for which the phosphorylation level decreased in the ΔptkA strain and increased in the ΔptpZ strain, compared to the wild type, were considered as potential substrates of PtkA/PtpZ. One of those sites was the residue tyrosine 601 of the molecular chaperone DnaK. We confirmed that DnaK is a substrate of PtkA and PtpZ by in vitro phosphorylation and dephosphorylation assays. In vitro, DnaK Y601F mutant exhibited impaired interaction with its co-chaperones DnaJ and GrpE, along with diminished capacity to hydrolyze ATP and assist the re-folding of denatured proteins. In vivo, loss of DnaK phosphorylation in the mutant strain dnaK Y601F, or in the strain overexpressing the phosphatase PtpZ, led to diminished survival upon heat shock, consistent with the in vitro results. The decreased survival of the mutant dnaK Y601F at an elevated temperature could be rescued by complementing with the wild type dnaK allele expressed ectopically. We concluded that the residue tyrosine 601 of DnaK can be phosphorylated and dephosphorylated by PtkA and PtpZ, respectively. Furthermore, Y601 is important for DnaK chaperone activity and heat shock survival of B. subtilis.

  13. Soluble perlecan domain i enhances vascular endothelial growth factor-165 activity and receptor phosphorylation in human bone marrow endothelial cells

    Gomes Ronald R

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immobilized recombinant perlecan domain I (PlnDI binds and modulates the activity of heparin-binding growth factors, in vitro. However, activities for PlnDI, in solution, have not been reported. In this study, we assessed the ability of soluble forms to modulate vascular endothelial growth factor-165 (VEGF165 enhanced capillary tube-like formation, and VEGF receptor-2 phosphorylation of human bone marrow endothelial cells, in vitro. Results In solution, PlnDI binds VEGF165 in a heparan sulfate and pH dependent manner. Capillary tube-like formation is enhanced by exogenous PlnDI; however, PlnDI/VEGF165 mixtures combine to enhance formation beyond that stimulated by either PlnDI or VEGF165 alone. PlnDI also stimulates VEGF receptor-2 phosphorylation, and mixtures of PlnDI/VEGF165 reduce the time required for peak VEGF receptor-2 phosphorylation (Tyr-951, and increase Akt phosphorylation. PlnDI binds both immobilized neuropilin-1 and VEGF receptor-2, but has a greater affinity for neuropilin-1. PlnDI binding to neuropilin-1, but not to VEGF receptor-2 is dependent upon the heparan sulfate chains adorning PlnDI. Interestingly, the presence of VEGF165 but not VEGF121 significantly enhances PlnDI binding to Neuropilin-1 and VEGF receptor-2. Conclusions Our observations suggest soluble forms of PlnDI are biologically active. Moreover, PlnDI heparan sulfate chains alone or together with VEGF165 can enhance VEGFR-2 signaling and angiogenic events, in vitro. We propose PlnDI liberated during basement membrane or extracellular matrix turnover may have similar activities, in vivo.

  14. Cholecystokinin (CCK) stimulates S6 phosphorylation and induced activation of S6 protein kinase in rat pancreatic acini

    CCK and insulin stimulate pancreatic protein synthesis at a post transcriptional step. To better understand this regulation the authors evaluated the phosphorylation state of ribosomal protein S6 and the presence of a specific S6 protein kinase in pancreatic acini from diabetic rats. Both CCK and insulin increased S6 phosphorylation by up to 400% in intact 32P-labelled acini. The phorbol ester 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate also stimulated both protein synthesis and S6 phosphorlyation suggesting a role for protein kinase C in mediating the effect of CCK. By contrast, the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin had no effect on either parameter. Recently, insulin has been shown to activate a unique S6 kinase in various cells. To test for its presence, cytosolic extracts were prepared from acini stimulated with CCK and insulin by homogenization in β-glycerophosphate buffer and assayed for the kinase using γ-32P ATP and rat pancreatic ribosomes followed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. CCK and insulin both increased S6 kinase activity which required neither Ca2+ or phospholipid. The dose response for CCk was similar to S6 phosphorlyation in the intact acini. TPA did not stimulate the S6 kinase. Thus, CCK may induce S6 phosphorylation both via C kinase and by activation of a unique S6 kinase

  15. Cholecystokinin (CCK) stimulates S6 phosphorylation and induced activation of S6 protein kinase in rat pancreatic acini

    Sung, C.; Okabayashi, Y.; Williams, J.

    1987-05-01

    CCK and insulin stimulate pancreatic protein synthesis at a post transcriptional step. To better understand this regulation the authors evaluated the phosphorylation state of ribosomal protein S6 and the presence of a specific S6 protein kinase in pancreatic acini from diabetic rats. Both CCK and insulin increased S6 phosphorylation by up to 400% in intact TSP-labelled acini. The phorbol ester 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate also stimulated both protein synthesis and S6 phosphorlyation suggesting a role for protein kinase C in mediating the effect of CCK. By contrast, the CaS ionophore ionomycin had no effect on either parameter. Recently, insulin has been shown to activate a unique S6 kinase in various cells. To test for its presence, cytosolic extracts were prepared from acini stimulated with CCK and insulin by homogenization in US -glycerophosphate buffer and assayed for the kinase using el-TSP ATP and rat pancreatic ribosomes followed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. CCK and insulin both increased S6 kinase activity which required neither CaS or phospholipid. The dose response for CCk was similar to S6 phosphorlyation in the intact acini. TPA did not stimulate the S6 kinase. Thus, CCK may induce S6 phosphorylation both via C kinase and by activation of a unique S6 kinase.

  16. ROS-activated ATM-dependent phosphorylation of cytoplasmic substrates identified by large scale phosphoproteomics screen

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Waardenberg, Ashley J; Engholm-Keller, Kasper;

    2016-01-01

    ATM substrates (HMGA1 and UIMCI/RAP80), another five were identified in a whole cell extract phosphoproteomic screens and the remaining four proteins had not been identified previously in DNA damage response screens. We validated the phosphorylation of three of these proteins (OSR1, HDGF and ccdc82...

  17. Behaviour of oscillations in loop structures above active regions

    Kolobov, D Y; Chelpanov, A A; Kochanov, A A; Anfinogentov, S A; Chupin, S A; Myshyakov, I I; Tomin, V E

    2015-01-01

    In this study we combine the multiwavelength ultraviolet -- optical (Solar Dynamics Observatory, SDO) and radio (Nobeyama Radioheliograph, NoRH) observations to get further insight into space-frequency distribution of oscillations at different atmospheric levels of the Sun. We processed the observational data on NOAA 11711 active region and found oscillations propagating from the photospheric level through the transition region upward into the corona. The power maps of low-frequency (1--2 mHz) oscillations reproduce well the fan-like coronal structures visible in the Fe ix 171A line. High frequency oscillations (5--7 mHz) propagate along the vertical magnetic field lines and concentrate inside small-scale elements in the umbra and at the umbra-penumbra boundary. We investigated the dependence of the dominant oscillation frequency upon the distance from the sunspot barycentre to estimate inclination of magnetic tubes in higher levels of sunspots where it cannot be measured directly, and found that this angle i...

  18. Functional regulation of PVBV Nuclear Inclusion protein-a protease activity upon interaction with Viral Protein genome-linked and phosphorylation

    Regulation of NIa-Pro is crucial for polyprotein processing and hence, for successful infection of potyviruses. We have examined two novel mechanisms that could regulate NIa-Pro activity. Firstly, the influence of VPg domain on the proteolytic activity of NIa-Pro was investigated. It was shown that the turnover number of the protease increases when these two domains interact (cis: two-fold; trans: seven-fold) with each other. Secondly, the protease activity of NIa-Pro could also be modulated by phosphorylation at Ser129. A mutation of this residue either to aspartate (phosphorylation-mimic) or alanine (phosphorylation-deficient) drastically reduces the protease activity. Based on these observations and molecular modeling studies, we propose that interaction with VPg as well as phosphorylation of Ser129 could relay a signal through Trp143 present at the protein surface to the active site pocket by subtle conformational changes, thus modulating protease activity of NIa-Pro.

  19. Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Activated by Prostaglandin E2 Phosphorylates Connexin 43 and Closes Osteocytic Hemichannels in Response to Continuous Flow Shear Stress.

    Riquelme, Manuel A; Burra, Sirisha; Kar, Rekha; Lampe, Paul D; Jiang, Jean X

    2015-11-20

    Cx43 hemichannels serve as a portal for the release of prostaglandins, a critical process in mediating biological responses of mechanical loading on bone formation and remodeling. We have previously observed that fluid flow shear stress (FFSS) opens hemichannels; however, sustained FFSS results in hemichannel closure, as continuous opening of hemichannels is detrimental to cell viability and bone remodeling. However, the mechanism that regulates the closure of the hemichannels is unknown. Here, we show that activation of p44/42 ERK upon continuous FFSS leads to Cx43 phosphorylation at Ser(279)-Ser(282), sites known to be phosphorylated sites by p44/42 MAPK. Incubation of osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells with conditioned media (CM) collected after continuous FFSS increased MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of Cx43. CM treatment inhibited hemichannel opening and this inhibition was reversed when cells were pretreated with the MAPK pathway inhibitor. We found that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) accumulates in the CM in a time-dependent manner. Treatment with PGE2 increased phospho-p44/42 ERK levels and also Cx43 phosphorylation at Ser(279)-Ser(282) sites. Depletion of PGE2 from CM, and pre-treatment with a p44/42 ERK pathway-specific inhibitor, resulted in a complete inhibition of ERK-dependent Cx43 phosphorylation and attenuated the inhibition of hemichannels by CM and PGE2. Consistently, the opening of hemichannels by FFSS was blocked by PGE2 and CM and this blockage was reversed by U0126 and the CM depleted of PGE2. A similar observation was also obtained in isolated primary osteocytes. Together, results from this study suggest that extracellular PGE2 accumulated after continuous FFSS is responsible for activation of p44/42 ERK signaling and subsequently, direct Cx43 phosphorylation by activated ERK leads to hemichannel closure. PMID:26442583

  20. Optogenetic activation of intracellular adenosine A2A receptor signaling in the hippocampus is sufficient to trigger CREB phosphorylation and impair memory.

    Li, P; Rial, D; Canas, P M; Yoo, J-H; Li, W; Zhou, X; Wang, Y; van Westen, G J P; Payen, M-P; Augusto, E; Gonçalves, N; Tomé, A R; Li, Z; Wu, Z; Hou, X; Zhou, Y; IJzerman, A P; PIJzerman, Ad; Boyden, E S; Cunha, R A; Qu, J; Chen, J-F

    2015-11-01

    Human and animal studies have converged to suggest that caffeine consumption prevents memory deficits in aging and Alzheimer's disease through the antagonism of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs). To test if A2AR activation in the hippocampus is actually sufficient to impair memory function and to begin elucidating the intracellular pathways operated by A2AR, we have developed a chimeric rhodopsin-A2AR protein (optoA2AR), which retains the extracellular and transmembrane domains of rhodopsin (conferring light responsiveness and eliminating adenosine-binding pockets) fused to the intracellular loop of A2AR to confer specific A2AR signaling. The specificity of the optoA2AR signaling was confirmed by light-induced selective enhancement of cAMP and phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-MAPK) (but not cGMP) levels in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells, which was abolished by a point mutation at the C terminal of A2AR. Supporting its physiological relevance, optoA2AR activation and the A2AR agonist CGS21680 produced similar activation of cAMP and p-MAPK signaling in HEK293 cells, of p-MAPK in the nucleus accumbens and of c-Fos/phosphorylated-CREB (p-CREB) in the hippocampus, and similarly enhanced long-term potentiation in the hippocampus. Remarkably, optoA2AR activation triggered a preferential p-CREB signaling in the hippocampus and impaired spatial memory performance, while optoA2AR activation in the nucleus accumbens triggered MAPK signaling and modulated locomotor activity. This shows that the recruitment of intracellular A2AR signaling in the hippocampus is sufficient to trigger memory dysfunction. Furthermore, the demonstration that the biased A2AR signaling and functions depend on intracellular A2AR loops prompts the possibility of targeting the intracellular A2AR-interacting partners to selectively control different neuropsychiatric behaviors. PMID:25687775

  1. Interleukin 2 regulates Raf-1 kinase activity through a tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent mechanism in a T-cell line.

    Turner, B C; Tonks, N K; Rapp, U R; Reed, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Previously we found that interleukin 2 (IL-2) induces tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of the serine/threonine-specific kinase encoded by the raf-1 protooncogene in a T-cell line, CTLL-2. Here we extended these findings by exploring the effects of selective removal of phosphate from tyrosines in p72-74-Raf-1 kinase that had been immunoprecipitated from IL-2-stimulated CTLL-2 cells. Treatment in vitro of IL-2-activated Raf-1 with the tyrosine-specific phosphatases CD45 and TCPTP (former...

  2. Activation of p53 protein to sequence-specific DNA binding by its phosphorylation

    Pospíšilová, Š.; Brázda, Václav; Müller, P.; Kaňková, K.; Paleček, Emil; Vojtěšek, B.

    Oeiras : Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, 2001. s. 13. [Protein Structure-Function Trafficking and Signaling. Satellite meeting of the FEBS/PABMB /27./. 28.06.2001-30.06.2001, Oeiras] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA312/99/1550; GA ČR GP301/00/P094; GA MZd NC6404 Keywords : p53 * sequence-specific DNA binding * phosphorylation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  3. R-Ras Inhibits VEGF-Induced p38MAPK Activation and HSP27 Phosphorylation in Endothelial Cells.

    Sawada, Junko; Li, Fangfei; Komatsu, Masanobu

    2015-01-01

    R-Ras is a Ras family small GTPase that is highly expressed in mature functional blood vessels in normal tissues. It inhibits pathological angiogenesis and promotes vessel maturation and stabilization. Previous studies suggest that R-Ras affects cellular signaling in endothelial cells, pericytes and smooth-muscle cells to regulate vessel formation and remodeling in adult tissues. R-Ras suppresses VEGF-induced endothelial permeability and vessel sprouting while promoting normalization of pathologically developing vessels in mice. It attenuates VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR2) activation by inhibiting internalization of the receptor upon VEGF ligand binding, leading to significant reduction of VEGFR2 autophosphorylation. Here, we show that R-Ras strongly suppresses the VEGF-dependent activation of stress-activated protein kinase-2/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (SAPK2/p38MAPK) and the phosphorylation of downstream heat-shock protein 27 (HSP27), a regulator of actin cytoskeleton organization, in endothelial cells. The suppression of p38MAPK activation and HSP27 phosphorylation by R-Ras concurred with altered actin cytoskeleton architecture, reduced membrane protrusion and inhibition of endothelial cell migration toward VEGF. Silencing of endogenous R-Ras by RNA interference increased membrane protrusion and cell migration stimulated by VEGF, and these effects were offset by p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580. These results suggest that R-Ras regulates angiogenic activities of endothelial cells in part via inhibition of the p38MAPK-HSP27 axis of VEGF signaling. PMID:27029009

  4. LRRK2 Kinase Activity and Biology are Not Uniformly Predicted by its Autophosphorylation and Cellular Phosphorylation Site Status

    April Reynolds

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Missense mutations in the Leucine Rich Repeat protein Kinase 2 (LRRK2 gene are the most common genetic predisposition to develop Parkinson’s disease (PD LRRK2 is a large multi-domain phosphoprotein with a GTPase domain and a serine/threonine protein kinase domain whose activity is implicated in neuronal toxicity; however the precise mechanism is unknown. LRRK2 autophosphorylates on several serine/threonine residues across the enzyme and is found constitutively phosphorylated on Ser910, Ser935, Ser955 and Ser973, which are proposed to be regulated by upstream kinases. Here we investigate the phosphoregulation at these sites by analyzing the effects of disease-associated mutations Arg1441Cys, Arg1441Gly, Ala1442Pro, Tyr1699Cys, Ile2012Thr, Gly2019Ser, and Ile2020Thr. We also studied alanine substitutions of phosphosite serines 910, 935, 955 and 973 and specific LRRK2 inhibition on autophosphorylation of LRRK2 Ser1292, Thr1491, Thr2483 and phosphorylation at the cellular sites. We found that mutants in the Roc-COR domains, including Arg1441Cys, Arg1441His, Ala1442Pro and Tyr1699Cys, can positively enhance LRRK2 kinase activity while concomitantly inducing the dephosphorylation of the cellular sites. Mutation of the cellular sites individually did not affect LRRK2 intrinsic kinase activity; however, Ser910/935/955/973Ala mutations trended toward increased kinase activity of LRRK2. Increased cAMP levels did not lead to increased LRRK2 cellular site phosphorylation, 14-3-3 binding or kinase activity. In cells, inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity leads to dephosphorylation of Ser1292 by Calyculin A and okadaic acid sensitive phosphatases, while the cellular sites are dephosphorylated by Calyculin A sensitive phosphatases. These findings indicate that comparative analysis of both Ser1292 and Ser910/935/955/973 phosphorylation sites will provide important and distinct measures of LRRK2 kinase and biological activity in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Histamine H4 receptor activation alleviates neuropathic pain through differential regulation of ERK, JNK, and P38 MAPK phosphorylation.

    Sanna, Maria D; Stark, Holger; Lucarini, Laura; Ghelardini, Carla; Masini, Emanuela; Galeotti, Nicoletta

    2015-12-01

    Histamine plays a complex role in pain modulation with opposite roles in nociception for histamine receptor subtypes 1, 2, and 3. The histamine H4 receptor (H4R) is expressed primarily on cells involved in inflammation and immune responses with a proinflammatory activity, but little is known about the role in nociception of neuronal H4R. To investigate the effects of neuronal H4R in pain transmission, the effects produced by the H4R agonist ST-1006 were detected in the spared nerve injury model of neuropathic pain. ST-1006 counteracted mechanical allodynia in neuropathic mice, an effect prevented by the H4R antagonist JNJ 10191584. In spared nerve injury mice, an early over-phosphorylation of ERK1 and ERK2 was observed in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), spinal cord, and sciatic nerve. A progressive and long-lasting activation of JNK1 was observed in the sciatic nerve and, to a lesser extent, in the spinal cord and DRG. An increased p-P38 content was detected in the spinal cord and DRG, with no modification in the sciatic nerve. Administration of ST-1006 prevented phosphorylation of all 3 MAPK within DRG, and phosphorylation of ERK1, ERK2, and pJNK1 in the sciatic nerve. In the spinal cord, the H4R agonist prevented selectively the pERK2 increase with no effect on pJNK1 and p-P38 levels. Double immunofluorescence experiments showed a neuronal localization and site of action for H4R. These findings suggest a prevalent modulation of ERK activity after H4R stimulation and indicate the DRG as prominent site of action for H4R-mediated antineuropathic activity. Targeting neuronal H4R with selective agonists could have therapeutic potential for neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:26270581

  6. A redox-sensitive loop regulates plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI-2) polymerization

    Wilczynska, Malgorzata; Lobov, Sergei; Ohlsson, Per-Ingvar; Ny, Tor

    2003-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI-2) is the only wild-type serpin that polymerizes spontaneously under physiological conditions. We show that PAI-2 loses its ability to polymerize following reduction of thiol groups, suggesting that an intramolecular disulfide bond is essential for the polymerization. A novel disulfide bond was identified between C79 (in the CD-loop) and C161 (at the bottom of helix F). Substitution mutants in which this disulfide bond was broken did not polymerize....

  7. Determination of 16N and 19O activities in loop water of swimming pool reactor

    Measurements of activities for 16N and 19O nuclei in the loop water of swimming pool reactor at China Institute of Atomic Energy were carried out. In order to verify the experiment results, a calculation for same purpose was also performed. The results show their coincidence is well in uncertainty range. The evaluated recommendation data for 18O(n, γ)19O reaction cross sections are also given in the paper. (authors)

  8. Laboratory Scale Study of Activated Sludge Process in Jet Loop Reactor for Waste WaterTreatment

    M. S. Patil; G. A. Usmani

    2014-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of Activated Sludge Process (ASP) for the treatment of synthetic wastewater and to develop a simple design criteria under local conditions.A laboratory scale Compact jet loop reactor model comprising of an aeration tank and final clarifier was used for this purpose.Settled synthetic wastewater was used as influent to the aeration tank. The Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) of the influent and effluent was measured to find...

  9. Activation of ERK/IER3/PP2A-B56γ-positive feedback loop in lung adenocarcinoma by allelic deletion of B56γ gene.

    Ito, Tomoko; Ozaki, Satoru; Chanasong, Rachanee; Mizutani, Yuki; Oyama, Takeru; Sakurai, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Isao; Takemura, Hirofumi; Kawahara, Ei

    2016-05-01

    In order to investigate the involvement of the IER3/PP2A-B56γ/ERK-positive feedback loop, which leads to sustained phosphorylation/activation of ERK in carcinogenesis, we immunohistochemically examined the expression of IER3 and phosphorylated ERK in lung tumor tissues. IER3 was overexpressed in all cases of adenocarcinomas examined, but was not overexpressed in squamous cell carcinomas. Phosphorylated ERK (pERK) was also overexpressed in almost all adenocarcinomas. EGFR and RAS, whose gene product is located upstream of ERK, were sequenced. Activating mutation of EGFR, which is a possible cause of overexpression of IER3 and pERK, was found only in 5 adenocarcinomas (42%). No mutation of RAS was found. We further examined the sequences of all exons of B56γ gene (PPP2R5C) and IER3, but no mutation was found. Using a single nucleotide insertion in intron 1 of PPP2R5C, which was found in the process of sequencing, allelic deletion of PPP2R5C was examined. Eight cases were informative (67%), and the deletion was found in 4 of them (50%). Three cases having deletion of PPP2R5C did not have EGFR mutation. Finally, PPP2R5C deletion or EGFR mutation that could be responsible for IER3/pERK overexpression was found in at least 8 cases (67% or more). This is the first report of a high incidence of deletion of PPP2R5C in human carcinomas. PMID:26986830

  10. Evidence against direct involvement of phosphorylation in the activation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase by okadaic acid in rat hepatocytes.

    Guzman, M; Kolodziej, M P; Caldwell, A; Corstorphine, C G; Zammit, V A

    1994-01-01

    The mechanism of activation of mitochondrial overt carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT I) by treatment of hepatocytes with okadaic acid (OA) was investigated. Activation was observed when cells were permeabilized with digitonin, but not when a total membrane fraction was obtained by sonication. Both cell disruption methods preserved the activation of phosphorylase observed in OA-treated hepatocytes. Activation of CPT I was also observed in crude homogenates of OA-treated hepatocytes, but it was lost upon subsequent isolation of mitochondria from such homogenates. In all experiments, any activation observed did not depend on the presence or absence of fluoride ions in the permeabilization/homogenization media. When hepatocytes were permeabilized in the absence of fluoride and further incubated with exogenous phosphatases 1 and 2A, the OA-induced activation of CPT was not reversed, whereas the activation of glycogen phosphorylase in the same cells was rapidly reversed. Treatment of hepatocytes with OA, followed by permeabilization and incubation before assay of CPT I, demonstrated that OA had no short-term effect on the sensitivity of CPT I to malonyl-CoA, although the difference in sensitivity between cells isolated from fed and starved rats was fully preserved. Incubation of isolated mitochondria or purified mitochondrial outer membranes with cyclic AMP-dependent or AMP-activated protein kinases, under phosphorylating conditions, did not affect the activity of CPT I or its sensitivity to malonyl-CoA inhibition. Under the same conditions, the use of [32P]ATP resulted in the labelling of several outer-membrane proteins but, unlike [3H]etomoxir-labelled CPT I, none of them was specifically removed from membrane extracts by a specific polyclonal antibody to the enzyme. We conclude that the increase in overt CPT activity observed in permeabilized hepatocytes is not due to direct phosphorylation of CPT I, but may involve interactions between the mitochondrial outer

  11. Active-Flux-Based, V/f-with-Stabilizing-Loops Versus Sensorless Vector Control of IPMSM Drives

    Moldovan, Ana; Blaabjerg, Frede; Boldea, Ion

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes two control methods for Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor (IPMSM) Drives. The first one is a V/f control with two stabilizing loops: one loop based on active flux balance for voltage magnitude correction and a second, based on speed error, with voltage phase correction...

  12. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase up-regulates NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activation through RelA phosphorylation during stretch-induced myogenesis

    Ji, Guoping [Department of Orthodontics, College of Stomatology, Ninth People' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai Research Institute of Stomatology, Shanghai 200011 (China); Liu, Dongxu [Department of Orthodontics, College of Stomatology, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province 250012 (China); Liu, Jing [Department of Orthodontics, The Affiliated Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong Province 266075 (China); Gao, Hui [Department of Orthodontics, Tianjin Stomatological Hospital, Tianjin 300041 (China); Yuan, Xiao, E-mail: yuanxiaoqd@163.com [Department of Orthodontics, The Affiliated Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong Province 266075 (China); Shen, Gang, E-mail: ganshen2007@163.com [Department of Orthodontics, College of Stomatology, Ninth People' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai Research Institute of Stomatology, Shanghai 200011 (China)

    2010-01-01

    p38 MAPK and nuclear factor-B (NF-B) signaling pathways play an indispensable role in the control of skeletal myogenesis. The specific contribution of these signaling pathways to the response of myoblast to the mechanical stimulation and the molecular mechanisms underlying this response remain unresolved. Using an established in vitro model, we now show that p38 MAP kinase activity regulates the transcriptional activation of NF-{kappa}B in response to mechanical stimulation of myoblasts. Furthermore, SB203580 blocked stretch-induced NF-{kappa}B activation during myogenesis, not through down-regulation of degradation of I{kappa}B-{alpha}, and consequent translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-{kappa}B to the nucleus. It is likely that stretch-induced NF-{kappa}B activation by phosphorylation of p65 NF-{kappa}B. Moreover, depletion of p38{alpha} using siRNA significantly reduces stretch-induced phosphorylation of RelA and NF-{kappa}B activity. These results provides the first evidence of a cross-talk between p38 MAPK and NF-{kappa}B signaling pathways during stretch-induced myogenesis, with phosphorylation of RelA being one of the effectors of this promyogenic mechanism. The {alpha} isoform of p38MAP kinase regulates the transcriptional activation of NF-{kappa}B following stimulation with cyclic stretch.

  13. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase up-regulates NF-κB transcriptional activation through RelA phosphorylation during stretch-induced myogenesis

    p38 MAPK and nuclear factor-B (NF-B) signaling pathways play an indispensable role in the control of skeletal myogenesis. The specific contribution of these signaling pathways to the response of myoblast to the mechanical stimulation and the molecular mechanisms underlying this response remain unresolved. Using an established in vitro model, we now show that p38 MAP kinase activity regulates the transcriptional activation of NF-κB in response to mechanical stimulation of myoblasts. Furthermore, SB203580 blocked stretch-induced NF-κB activation during myogenesis, not through down-regulation of degradation of IκB-α, and consequent translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB to the nucleus. It is likely that stretch-induced NF-κB activation by phosphorylation of p65 NF-κB. Moreover, depletion of p38α using siRNA significantly reduces stretch-induced phosphorylation of RelA and NF-κB activity. These results provides the first evidence of a cross-talk between p38 MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways during stretch-induced myogenesis, with phosphorylation of RelA being one of the effectors of this promyogenic mechanism. The α isoform of p38MAP kinase regulates the transcriptional activation of NF-κB following stimulation with cyclic stretch.

  14. Metformin, an AMPK activator, stimulates the phosphorylation of aquaporin 2 and urea transporter A1 in inner medullary collecting ducts.

    Klein, Janet D; Wang, Yanhua; Blount, Mitsi A; Molina, Patrick A; LaRocque, Lauren M; Ruiz, Joseph A; Sands, Jeff M

    2016-05-15

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is characterized by production of very large quantities of dilute urine due to an inability of the kidney to respond to vasopressin. Congenital NDI results from mutations in the type 2 vasopressin receptor (V2R) in ∼90% of families. These patients do not have mutations in aquaporin-2 (AQP2) or urea transporter UT-A1 (UT-A1). We tested adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK) since it is known to phosphorylate another vasopressin-sensitive transporter, NKCC2 (Na-K-2Cl cotransporter). We found AMPK expressed in rat inner medulla (IM). AMPK directly phosphorylated AQP2 and UT-A1 in vitro. Metformin, an AMPK activator, increased phosphorylation of both AQP2 and UT-A1 in rat inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCDs). Metformin increased the apical plasma membrane accumulation of AQP2, but not UT-A1, in rat IM. Metformin increased both osmotic water permeability and urea permeability in perfused rat terminal IMCDs. These findings suggest that metformin increases osmotic water permeability by increasing AQP2 accumulation in the apical plasma membrane but increases urea permeability by activating UT-A1 already present in the membrane. Lastly, metformin increased urine osmolality in mice lacking a V2R, a mouse model of congenital NDI. We conclude that AMPK activation by metformin mimics many of the mechanisms by which vasopressin increases urine-concentrating ability. These findings suggest that metformin may be a novel therapeutic option for congenital NDI due to V2R mutations. PMID:26962099

  15. Gene expression profiles and phosphorylation patterns of AMP-activated protein kinase subunits in various mesenchymal cell types

    Wang Yugang; Fan Qiming; Ma Rui; Lin Wentao; Tang Tingting

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies on bone have shown an endocrine role of the skeleton,which could be impaired in various human diseases,including osteoporosis,obesity,and diabetes-associated bone diseases.As a sensor and regulator of energy metabolism,AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) may also play an important role in the regulation of bone metabolism.The current study aimed to establish the expression profiles and phosphorylation patterns of AMPK subunits in several mesenchymal cell types.Methods Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for relative quantification,real-time PCR for absolute quantification,and Western blotting were used to investigate the gene expression profiles and phosphorylation patterns of AMPK subunits in several mesenchymal cell types,including primary human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and hFOB,Saos-2,C3H/10T1/2,MC3T3-E1,3T3-L1,and C2C12 cells.Results AMPKα1 and AMPKβ1 mRNAs were abundantly expressed in all cell types.AMPKY1 mRNA was abundantly expressed in C3H/10T1/2,MC3T3-E1,3T3-L1,and C2C12 but not detected in human-derived cell types.AMPKY2 mRNA was mildly expressed in all cell types.AMPKα1 protein was highly expressed in all cell types and AMPKα2 protein was highly expressed only in hFOB and Saos-2 cells.AMPKβ1 protein was abundantly expressed in all cell types except for Saos-2,in which AMPKβ2 protein overwhelmed AMPKβ1 expression.AMPKy1 and AMPKY2 proteins were expressed in C3H/10T1/2,MC3T3-E1,3T3-L1,and C2C12 cells and only AMPKY2 protein was expressed in hMSCs,hFOB and Saos2 cells.AMPKα was phosphorylated at Thr172 and Ser485 and AMPKβ1 was phosphorylated at Ser108 and Ser182 in all cell types with a specific pattern in each cell type.Conclusion The combination of AMPK α,β,and Y subunits and phosphorylation of AMPKα (Thr172 and Ser485) and AMPKβ1 (Ser108 and Ser182) showed a specific pattern in each cell type.

  16. c-Abl Mediated Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Aha1 Activates Its Co-chaperone Function in Cancer Cells

    Diana M. Dunn; Mark R. Woodford; Andrew W. Truman; Sandra M. Jensen; Jacqualyn Schulman; Tiffany Caza; Taylor C. Remillard; David Loiselle; Donald Wolfgeher; Brian S.J. Blagg; Lucas Franco; Timothy A. Haystead; Soumya Daturpalli; Matthias P. Mayer; Jane B. Trepel

    2015-01-01

    Summary The ability of Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) to hydrolyze ATP is essential for its chaperone function. The co-chaperone Aha1 stimulates Hsp90 ATPase activity, tailoring the chaperone function to specific “client” proteins. The intracellular signaling mechanisms directly regulating Aha1 association with Hsp90 remain unknown. Here, we show that c-Abl kinase phosphorylates Y223 in human Aha1 (hAha1), promoting its interaction with Hsp90. This, consequently, results in an increased Hsp90 ...

  17. β-Catenin Inhibits T Cell Activation by Selective Interference with Linker for Activation of T Cells–Phospholipase C-γ1 Phosphorylation

    Driessens, Gregory; Zheng, Yan; Locke, Frederick; Cannon, Judy L.; Gounari, Fotini; Gajewski, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the defined function of the β-catenin pathway in thymocytes, its functional role in peripheral T cells is poorly understood. We report that in a mouse model, β-catenin protein is constitutively degraded in peripheral T cells. Introduction of stabilized β-catenin into primary T cells inhibited proliferation and cytokine secretion after TCR stimulation and blunted effector cell differentiation. Functional and biochemical studies revealed that β-catenin selectively inhibited linker for activation of T cells phosphorylation on tyrosine 136, which was associated with defective phospholipase C-γ1 phosphorylation and calcium signaling but normal ERK activation. Our findings indicate that β-catenin negatively regulates T cell activation by a previously undescribed mechanism and suggest that conditions under which β-catenin might be inducibly stabilized in vivo would be inhibitory for T cell-based immunity. PMID:21149602

  18. Sex differences in hormone-sensitive lipase expression, activity, and phosphorylation in skeletal muscle at rest and during exercise

    Roepstorff, Carsten; Donsmark, Morten; Thiele, Maja; Vistisen, Bodil; Stewart, Greg; Vissing, Kristian; Schjerling, Peter; Hardie, D. Grahame; Galbo, Henrik; Kiens, Bente

    2006-01-01

    significantly (r = 0.72, P = 0.001). Muscle HSL mRNA (80%, P = 0.11) and protein content (50%, P < 0.05) were higher in women than in men. HSL total activity increased during exercise (47%, P < 0.05) but did not differ between sexes. Accordingly, HSL specific activity (HSL activity per HSL protein content......Women have been shown to use more intramuscular triacylglycerol (IMTG) during exercise than men. To investigate whether this could be due to sex-specific regulation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and to use sex comparison as a model to gain further insight into HSL regulation, nine women and...... than in women during the end of the exercise bout (P < 0.05). We conclude that, although HSL expression and Ser(659) phosphorylation in skeletal muscle during exercise is sex specific, total muscle HSL activity measured in vitro was similar between sexes. The higher basal IMTG content in women compared...

  19. SATB1 packages densely-looped, transciptionally-active chromatinfor coordinated expression of cytokine genes

    Cai, Shutao; Lee, Charles C.; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi

    2006-05-23

    SATB1 is an important regulator of nuclear architecture that anchors specialized DNA sequences onto its cage-like network and recruits chromatin remodeling/modifying factors to control gene transcription. We studied the role of SATB1 in regulating the coordinated expression of Il5, Il4, and Il13 from the 200kb cytokine gene cluster region of mouse chromosome 11 during T-helper 2 (Th2)-cell activation. We show that upon cell activation, SATB1 is rapidly induced to form a unique transcriptionally-active chromatin structure that includes the cytokine gene region. Chromatin is folded into numerous small loops all anchored by SATB1, is histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9/14, and associated with Th2-specific factors, GATA3, STAT6, c-Maf, the chromatin-remodeling enzyme Brg-1, and RNA polymerase II across the 200kb region. Before activation, the chromatin displays some of these features, such as association with GATA3 and STAT6, but these were insufficient for cytokine gene expression. Using RNA interference (RNAi), we show that upon cell activation, SATB1 is not only required for chromatin folding into dense loops, but also for c-Maf induction and subsequently for Il4, Il5, and Il13 transcription. Our results show that SATB1 is an important determinant for chromatin architecture that constitutes a novel higher-order, transcriptionally-active chromatin structure upon Th2-cell activation.

  20. Inhibition of Phosphatase Activity Follows Decline in Sulfatase Activity and Leads to Transcriptional Effects through Sustained Phosphorylation of Transcription Factor MITF.

    Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Feferman, Leo; Tobacman, Joanne K

    2016-01-01

    Arylsulfatase B (B-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase; ARSB) is the enzyme that removes 4-sulfate groups from the non-reducing end of the glycosaminoglycans chondroitin 4-sulfate and dermatan sulfate. Decline in ARSB has been shown in malignant prostate, colonic, and mammary cells and tissues, and decline in ARSB leads to transcriptional events mediated by galectin-3 with AP-1 and Sp1. Increased mRNA expression of GPNMB (transmembrane glycoprotein NMB) in HepG2 cells and in hepatic tissue from ARSB-deficient mice followed decline in expression of ARSB and was mediated by the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), but was unaffected by silencing galectin-3. Since GPNMB is increased in multiple malignancies, studies were performed to determine how decline in ARSB increased GPNMB expression. The mechanism by which decline in ARSB increased nuclear phospho-MITF was due to reduced activity of SHP2, a protein tyrosine phosphatase with Src homology (SH2) domains that regulates multiple cellular processes. SHP2 activity declined due to increased binding with chondroitin 4-sulfate when ARSB was reduced. When SHP2 activity was inhibited, phosphorylations of p38 mitogen-associated phosphokinase (MAPK) and of MITF increased, leading to GPNMB promoter activation. A dominant negative SHP2 construct, the SHP2 inhibitor PHSP1, and silencing of ARSB increased phospho-p38, nuclear MITF, and GPNMB. In contrast, constitutively active SHP2 and overexpression of ARSB inhibited GPNMB expression. The interaction between chondroitin 4-sulfate and SHP2 is a novel intersection between sulfation and phosphorylation, by which decline in ARSB and increased chondroitin 4-sulfation can inhibit SHP2, thereby regulating downstream tyrosine phosphorylations by sustained phosphorylations with associated activation of signaling and transcriptional events. PMID:27078017

  1. The HIV Protease Inhibitor Nelfinavir Downregulates Akt Phosphorylation by Inhibiting Proteasomal Activity and Inducing the Unfolded Protein Response

    Anjali K. Gupta

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available HIV protease inhibitors (HPIs, which have been used to treat HIV patients since the mid 1990s, have been shown to downregulate the phosphatidylinositol 3kinase (PI3K-Akt pathway. Because this pathway is frequently activated in human malignancies and associated with resistance to ionizing radiation, we investigated and confirmed that HPIs could radiosensitize cells. However, the mechanism underlying this downregulation was unclear, prompting the investigations in this report. In this paper we show that nelfinavir inhibits proteasome activity. Inhibition of the proteasome leads to endoplasmic reticulum-based stress with accumulation of misfolded proteins, which triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR. As part of the UPR, the alpha subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α is phosphorylated, resulting in a decrease in global protein synthesis and induction of the feedback regulator growth arrest and DNA damageinducible protein (GADD34, which acts as a phosphatase in complex with protein phosphatase 1. This complex dephosphorylates eIF2α; however, our data also suggest that this phosphatase activity can dephosphorylate Akt. Furthermore, our data indicate that nelfinavir decreases Akt phosphorylation by triggering this response. These findings may have important implications in understanding how nelfinavir may increase radiation sensitivity and also result in downregulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway.

  2. 'Up with the LRRK': a phosphorylated Rab10 assay for evaluation of LRRK2 activity and inhibitor engagement.

    Eyers, Patrick A

    2016-09-15

    Protein kinases catalyse the addition of phosphate groups to Ser/Thr and Tyr residues in cognate substrates and are mutated or hyperactive in a variety of diseases, making them important targets for rationally designed drugs. A good example is the Parkinson's disease-associated kinase, leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), which is mutated (and probably hyperactive) in a small, but significant, subset of patients. An exciting new approach for personalised therapy is the development of central nervous system (CNS)-active small-molecule kinase inhibitors, which could be employed to 'normalise' LRRK2 signalling in affected cell types. However, the development of such drugs requires validated assays for the analysis of target engagement and the assembly of a set of tools for interrogating LRRK2, and its substrates, both in vitro and in vivo A new study published in the Biochemical Journal by Ito et al. establishes that a 'Phos-tag'™-binding assay can be exploited to measure phosphorylation of a recently identified LRRK2 substrate (Ras-related protein in brain 10 (Rab10)), and to compare and contrast relative catalytic output from disease-associated LRRK2 mutants. Powerful in vivo chemical genetic approaches are also disclosed, in which the catalytic activity of LRRK2 is unequivocally linked to the extent of Rab10 phosphorylation and the effects of chemically distinct LRRK2 inhibitors are matched with on-target inhibition mechanisms mediated through LRRK2 and its substrate Rab10. These important findings should simplify the generic analysis of Rab10 phosphorylation in model biological systems and are likely to be applicable to other substrates of LRRK2 (or indeed other kinases) for which phospho-specific antibodies are either absent or unsatisfactory. PMID:27621483

  3. RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) depletes nutrients, inducing phosphorylation of AMP-activated kinase in lung cancer.

    Guo, Chengcheng; Hao, Chuncheng; Shao, RuPing; Fang, Bingliang; Correa, Arlene M; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Roth, Jack A; Behrens, Carmen; Kalhor, Neda; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Swisher, Stephen G; Pataer, Apar

    2015-05-10

    We have demonstrated that RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and its downstream protein p-eIF2α are independent prognostic markers for overall survival in lung cancer. In the current study, we further investigate the interaction between PKR and AMPK in lung tumor tissue and cancer cell lines. We examined PKR protein expression in 55 frozen primary lung tumor tissues by Western blotting and analyzed the association between PKR expression and expression of 139 proteins on tissue samples examined previously by Reverse Phase Protein Array (RPPA) from the same 55 patients. We observed that biomarkers were either positively (phosphorylated AMP-activated kinase(T172) [p-AMPK]) or negatively (insulin receptor substrate 1, meiotic recombination 11, ATR interacting protein, telomerase, checkpoint kinase 1, and cyclin E1) correlated with PKR. We further confirmed that induction of PKR with expression vectors in lung cancer cells causes activation of the AMPK protein independent of the LKB1, TAK1, and CaMKKβ pathway. We found that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which increases AMP levels and decreases ATP levels, causing AMPK phosphorylation. We further demonstrated that inhibiting AMPK expression with compound C or siRNA enhanced PKR-mediated cell death. We next explored the combination of PKR and p-AMPK expression in NSCLC patients and observed that expression of p-AMPK predicted a poor outcome for adenocarcinoma patients with high PKR expression and a better prognosis for those with low PKR expression. These findings were consistent with our in vitro results. AMPK might rescue cells facing metabolic stresses, such as ATP depletion caused by PKR. Our data indicate that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which induces the phosphorylation of AMPK. AMPK might act as a protective response to metabolic stresses, such as nutrient deprivation. PMID:25798539

  4. Disruption of parathyroid hormone and parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor phosphorylation prolongs ERK1/2 MAPK activation and enhances c-fos expression

    Tawfeek, Hesham A.; Abou-Samra, Abdul B.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that parathyroid hormone (PTH) binding to the PTH/PTH-related peptide receptor (PPR) stimulates G protein coupling, receptor phosphorylation, β-arrestin translocation, and internalization of the ligand/receptor complex. The extracellular signal-regulated mitogen-activated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2 MAPK) are downstream effectors of PPR. In the current study, we investigated the role of PPR phosphorylation in the PTH regulation of the ERK1/2 MAPK pathway. Sh...

  5. Activation of NMDA receptors leads to phosphorylation of TRPV1 S800 by protein kinase C and A-Kinase anchoring protein 150 in rat trigeminal ganglia

    Lee, Jongseok; Chung, Man-Kyo; Ro, Jin Y.

    2012-01-01

    A-Kinase anchoring protein 150 (AKAP150) is required for the phosphorylation of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) by PKA or PKC in sensory neurons and, hence, affects TRPV1-dependent hyperalgesia under pathological conditions. Recently, we showed that the activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors sensitizes TRPV1 by enhancing serine phosphorylation through PKC in trigeminal nociceptors. In this study, we extended this observation by investigati...

  6. Stimulation of casein kinase II by epidermal growth factor: relationship between the physiological activity of the kinase and the phosphorylation state of its beta subunit.

    Ackerman, P; Glover, C V; Osheroff, N

    1990-01-01

    To determine relationships between the hormonal activation of casein kinase II and its phosphorylation state, epidermal growth factor (EGF)-treated and EGF-naive human A-431 carcinoma cells were cultured in the presence of [32P]orthophosphate. Immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that casein kinase II in the cytosol of EGF-treated cells contained approximately 3-fold more incorporated [32P]phosphate than did its counterpart in untreated cells. Levels of kinase phosphorylation paralleled ...

  7. Maintained activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} despite of its phosphorylation at serine-9 in okadaic acid-induced neurodegenerative model

    Lim, Yong-Whan [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Seung-Yong, E-mail: ysy@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute for Biomacromolecules, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jung-Eun [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute for Biomacromolecules, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang-Min [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hui-Sun; Choe, Han [Department of Physiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute for Biomacromolecules, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung-Chul [CrystalGenomics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Hou, E-mail: dhkim@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute for Biomacromolecules, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-30

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK3{beta}) is recognized as one of major kinases to phosphorylate tau in Alzheimer's disease (AD), thus lots of AD drug discoveries target GSK3{beta}. However, the inactive form of GSK3{beta} which is phosphorylated at serine-9 is increased in AD brains. This is also inconsistent with phosphorylation status of other GSK3{beta} substrates, such as {beta}-catenin and collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2) since their phosphorylation is all increased in AD brains. Thus, we addressed this paradoxical condition of AD in rat neurons treated with okadaic acid (OA) which inhibits protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) and induces tau hyperphosphorylation and cell death. Interestingly, OA also induces phosphorylation of GSK3{beta} at serine-9 and other substrates including tau, {beta}-catenin and CRMP2 like in AD brains. In this context, we observed that GSK3{beta} inhibitors such as lithium chloride and 6-bromoindirubin-3'-monoxime (6-BIO) reversed those phosphorylation events and protected neurons. These data suggest that GSK3{beta} may still have its kinase activity despite increase of its phosphorylation at serine-9 in AD brains at least in PP2A-compromised conditions and that GSK3{beta} inhibitors could be a valuable drug candidate in AD.

  8. Source terms due to the activated corrosion products in primary cooling loops of ITER

    The paper deals with the Source Terms due to activated corrosion products escaping from a primary cooling loop of the ITER blanket following a Loss Of Cooling Accident (LOCA). Both in-vessel and out of vessel accident are considered. The assessment is based on the European multi-code methodological approach set-up to estimate the environmental releases of the activated corrosion/erosion products involved in the accident scenarios of a fusion machine. The approach is based on the following parameters: Radioactivity Inventory (RI), Process Source Terms (PST), and Environmental Source Terms (EST). Different codes have been used and compared to evaluate such parameters

  9. A novel small molecule inhibits STAT3 phosphorylation and DNA binding activity and exhibits potent growth suppressive activity in human cancer cells

    Lin Li

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeting Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3 signaling is an attractive therapeutic approach for most types of human cancers with constitutively activated STAT3. A novel small molecular STAT3 inhibitor, FLLL32 was specifically designed from dietary agent, curcumin to inhibit constitutive STAT3 signaling in multiple myeloma, glioblastoma, liver cancer, and colorectal cancer cells. Results FLLL32 was found to be a potent inhibitor of STAT3 phosphorylation, STAT3 DNA binding activity, and the expression of STAT3 downstream target genes in vitro, leading to the inhibition of cell proliferation as well as the induction of Caspase-3 and PARP cleavages in human multiple myeloma, glioblastoma, liver cancer, and colorectal cancer cell lines. However, FLLL32 exhibited little inhibition on some tyrosine kinases containing SH2 or both SH2 and SH3 domains, and other protein and lipid kinases using a kinase profile assay. FLLL32 was also more potent than four previously reported JAK2 and STAT3 inhibitors as well as curcumin to inhibit cell viability in these cancer cells. Furthermore, FLLL32 selectively inhibited the induction of STAT3 phosphorylation by Interleukin-6 but not STAT1 phosphorylation by IFN-γ. Conclusion Our findings indicate that FLLL32 exhibits potent inhibitory activity to STAT3 and has potential for targeting multiple myeloma, glioblastoma, liver cancer, and colorectal cancer cells expressing constitutive STAT3 signaling.

  10. Eriocalyxin B Inhibits STAT3 Signaling by Covalently Targeting STAT3 and Blocking Phosphorylation and Activation of STAT3.

    Xiaokui Yu

    Full Text Available Activated STAT3 plays an important role in oncogenesis by stimulating cell proliferation and resisting apoptosis. STAT3 therefore is an attractive target for cancer therapy. We have screened a traditional Chinese herb medicine compound library and found Eriocalyxin B (EB, a diterpenoid from Isodon eriocalyx, as a specific inhibitor of STAT3. EB selectively inhibited constitutive as well as IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 and induced apoptosis of STAT3-dependent tumor cells. EB did not affect the upstream protein tyrosine kinases or the phosphatase (PTPase of STAT3, but rather interacted directly with STAT3. The effects of EB could be abolished by DTT or GSH, suggesting a thiol-mediated covalent linkage between EB and STAT3. Site mutagenesis of cysteine in and near the SH2 domain of STAT3 identified Cys712 to be the critical amino acid for the EB-induced inactivation of STAT3. Furthermore, LC/MS/MS analyses demonstrated that an α, β-unsaturated carbonyl of EB covalently interacted with the Cys712 of STAT3. Computational modeling analyses also supported a direct interaction between EB and the Cys712 of STAT3. These data strongly suggest that EB directly targets STAT3 through a covalent linkage to inhibit the phosphorylation and activation of STAT3 and induces apoptosis of STAT3-dependent tumor cells.

  11. 1,2-Naphthoquinone activates vanilloid receptor 1 through increased protein tyrosine phosphorylation, leading to contraction of guinea pig trachea

    1,2-Naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ) has recently been identified as an environmental quinone in diesel exhaust particles (DEP) and atmospheric PM2.5. We have found that this quinone is capable of causing a concentration-dependent contraction of tracheal smooth muscle in guinea pigs with EC5 value of 18.7 μM. The contraction required extracellular calcium and was suppressed by L-type calcium channel blockers nifedipine and diltiazem. It was found that 1,2-NQ activated phospholipase A2 (PLA2)/lipoxygenase (LO)/vanilloid receptor (VR1) signaling. Additionally, 1,2-NQ was capable of transactivating protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in guinea pig trachea, suggesting that phosphorylation of PTKs contributes to 1,2-NQ-induced tracheal contraction. Consistent with this notion, this action was blocked by the PTKs inhibitor genistein and the EGFR antagonist PD153035, indicating that contraction was, at least in part, attributable to PTKs phosphorylation that activates VR1, resulting in increased intracellular calcium content in the smooth muscle cells

  12. Suppressive effect of CORM-2 on LPS-induced platelet activation by glycoprotein mediated HS1 phosphorylation interference.

    Dadong Liu

    Full Text Available In recent years, it has been discovered that septic patients display coagulation abnormalities. Platelets play a major role in the coagulation system. Studies have confirmed that carbon monoxide (CO has important cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory function. However, whether CO could alter abnormal activation of platelets and coagulation and thereby reduce the incidence of mortality during sepsis has not been defined. In this report, we have used CO-releasing molecules (CORM-2 to determine whether CO inhibits LPS-induced abnormal activation of platelets and have explored the potential mechanisms. LPS was used to induce activation of platelets in vitro, which were purified from the peripheral venous blood of healthy adult donors. CORM-2 was applied as a potential therapeutic agent. CORM-2 preconditioning and delayed treatment were also studied. We found that in the LPS groups, the function of platelets such as spreading, aggregation, and release were enhanced abnormally. By contrast, the platelets in the CORM-2 group were gently activated. Further studies showed that the expression of platelet membrane glycoproteins increased in the LPS group. Coincidently, both hematopoietic lineage cell-specific protein 1 and its phosphorylated form also increased dramatically. These phenomena were less dramatically seen in the CORM-2 groups. Taken together, we conclude that during LPS stimulation, platelets were abnormally activated, and this functional state may be associated with the signal that is transmitted between membrane glycoproteins and HS1. CORM-released CO suppresses the abnormal activation of platelets by interfering with glycoprotein-mediated HS1 phosphorylation.

  13. Cyclin H binding to the RARα activation function (AF)-2 domain directs phosphorylation of the AF-1 domain by cyclin-dependent kinase 7

    Bour, Gaétan; Gaillard, Emilie; Bruck, Nathalie; Lalevée, Sébastien; Plassat, Jean-Luc; Busso, Didier; Samama, Jean-Pierre; Rochette-Egly, Cécile

    2005-01-01

    The transcriptional activity of nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs), which act as RAR/retinoid X receptor (RXR) heterodimers, depends on two activation functions, AF-1 and AF-2, which are targets for phosphorylations and synergize for the activation of retinoic acid target genes. The N-terminal AF-1 domain of RARα is phosphorylated at S77 by the cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk)-activating kinase (CAK) subcomplex (cdk7/cyclin H/MAT1) of the general transcription factor TFIIH. Here, we show tha...

  14. DOUBLE LOOP ACTIVE VIBRATION CONTROL OF PNEUMATIC ISOLATOR WITH TWO SEPARATE CHAMBERS

    YANG Qingjun; LI Jun; WANG Zuwen

    2006-01-01

    A newly designed pneumatic spring with two separate chambers is promoted and double-loop active control is introduced to overcome the following drawbacks of passive pneumatic level with different force load. The design of two separate chambers is for the purpose of tuning support frequency and force independently and each chamber is controlled by a different valve. The inner one of double-loop structure is pressure control, and in order to obtain good performance,nonlinearities compensation and motion flow rate compensation (MFRC) are added besides the basic cascade compensation, and the influence of tube length is studied. The outer loop has two functions:one is to eliminate the resonance caused by isolation support and to broaden the isolation frequency band by payload velocity feedback and base velocity feed forward, and the other is to rune support force and support stiffness simultaneously and independently, which means the support force will have no effect on support stiffness. Theoretical analysis and experiment results show that the three drawbacks are overcome simultaneously.

  15. Chronic hyperammonemia reduces the activity of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in cerebellum by altering its localization and increasing its phosphorylation by calcium-calmodulin kinase II.

    El-Mlili, Nisrin; Rodrigo, Regina; Naghizadeh, Bahareh; Cauli, Omar; Felipo, Vicente

    2008-08-01

    Impaired function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway contributes to cognitive impairment in hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy. The mechanisms by which hyperammonemia impairs this pathway remain unclear. Understanding these mechanisms would allow designing clinical treatments for cognitive deficits in hepatic encephalopathy. The aims of this work were: (i) to assess whether chronic hyperammonemia in vivo alters basal activity of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in cerebellum and/or its activation in response to NMDA receptor activation and (ii) to analyse the molecular mechanisms by which hyperammonemia induces these alterations. It is shown that hyperammonemia reduces both basal activity of nNOS and its activation following NMDA receptor activation. Reduced basal activity is because of increased phosphorylation in Ser847 (by 69%) which reduces basal activity of nNOS by about 40%. Increased phosphorylation of nNOS in Ser847 is because of increased activity of calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMKII) which in turn is because of increased phosphorylation at Thr286. Inhibiting CaMKII with KN-62 normalizes phosphorylation of Ser847 and basal NOS activity in hyperammonemic rats, returning to values similar to controls. Reduced activation of nNOS in response to NMDA receptor activation in hyperammonemia is because of altered subcellular localization of nNOS, with reduced amount in post-synaptic membranes and increased amount in the cytosol. PMID:18498443

  16. TCR-induced Akt serine 473 phosphorylation is regulated by protein kinase C-alpha

    Yang, Lifen [Department of Pediatrics, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China); Section of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); The Committees on Immunology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Qiao, Guilin; Ying, Haiyan [Section of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); The Committees on Immunology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Zhang, Jian, E-mail: jzhang@medicine.bsd.uchicago.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China); Section of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); The Committees on Immunology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); The Committees on Molecular Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Yin, Fei, E-mail: yf2323@hotmail.com [Department of Pediatrics, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan (China)

    2010-09-10

    Research highlights: {yields} Conventional PKC positively regulates TCR-induced phosphorylation of Akt. {yields} PKC-alpha is the PDK-2 responsible for phosphorylating Akt at Ser{sup 473} upon TCR stimulation. {yields} Knockdown of PKC-alpha decreases TCR-induced Akt phosphorylation. -- Abstract: Akt signaling plays a central role in T cell functions, such as proliferation, apoptosis, and regulatory T cell development. Phosphorylation at Ser{sup 473} in the hydrophobic motif, along with Thr{sup 308} in its activation loop, is considered necessary for Akt function. It is widely accepted that phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK-1) phosphorylates Akt at Thr{sup 308}, but the kinase(s) responsible for phosphorylating Akt at Ser{sup 473} (PDK-2) remains elusive. The existence of PDK-2 is considered to be specific to cell type and stimulus. PDK-2 in T cells in response to TCR stimulation has not been clearly defined. In this study, we found that conventional PKC positively regulated TCR-induced Akt Ser{sup 473} phosphorylation. PKC-alpha purified from T cells can phosphorylate Akt at Ser{sup 473} in vitro upon TCR stimulation. Knockdown of PKC-alpha in T-cell-line Jurkat cells reduced TCR-induced phosphorylation of Akt as well as its downstream targets. Thus our results suggest that PKC-alpha is a candidate for PDK-2 in T cells upon TCR stimulation.

  17. Adiponectin Upregulates MiR-133a in Cardiac Hypertrophy through AMPK Activation and Reduced ERK1/2 Phosphorylation.

    Ying Li

    Full Text Available Adiponectin and miR-133a are key regulators in cardiac hypertrophy. However, whether APN has a potential effect on miR-133a remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether APN could regulate miR-133a expression in Angiotensin II (Ang II induced cardiac hypertrophy in vivo and in vitro. Lentiviral-mediated adiponectin treatment attenuated cardiac hypertrophy induced by Ang II infusion in male wistar rats as determined by reduced cell surface area and mRNA levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANF and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP, also the reduced left ventricular end-diastolic posterior wall thickness (LVPWd and end-diastolic interventricular septal thickness (IVSd. Meanwhile, APN elevated miR-133a level which was downregulated by Ang II. To further investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms, we treated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs with recombinant rat APN before Ang II stimulation. Pretreating cells with recombinant APN promoted AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK phosphorylation and inhibited ERK activation. By using the inhibitor of AMPK or a lentiviral vector expressing AMPK short hairpin RNA (shRNA cancelled the positive effect of APN on miR-133a. The ERK inhibitor PD98059 reversed the downregulation of miR-133a induced by Ang II. These results indicated that the AMPK activation and ERK inhibition were responsible for the positive effect of APN on miR-133a. Furthermore, adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1 mRNA expression was inhibited by Ang II stimulation. The positive effects of APN on AMPK activation and miR-133a, and the inhibitory effect on ERK phosphorylation were inhibited in NRVMs transfected with lentiviral AdipoR1shRNA. In addition, APN depressed the elevated expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, a direct target of miR-133a, through the AMPK pathway. Taken together, our data indicated that APN reversed miR-133a levels through AMPK activation, reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in

  18. Source terms due to the activated corrosion products in primary cooling loops of ITER

    This paper deals with the source terms due to the escape of activated corrosion products from a first wall or shielding blanket primary cooling loop of the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) machine following a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). The assessment is based on the European multi-code methodological approach set up to estimate the environmental releases of the activated corrosion/erosion products involved in accident scenarios of a fusion machine. The radioactive inventories (RIs) associated with the activation products have been estimated via the ANITA inventory code, using updated cross-section and decay data libraries based on EAF-3 activation data. The process source terms (PSTs) relevant to the LOCAs are estimated by considering mechanisms leading to RI mobilization (e.g. corrosion/erosion). The impact of the main operating parameters of the primary cooling loops is assessed. The FUMO codes have been used to estimate the thermal hydraulic conditions inside the containment. The PST transport and deposition in the containment are evaluated by the NAUA code in order to assess the released fraction from the last containment (reactor building). (orig.)

  19. The Impurity Processing Loop for the JET active gas handling plant

    The Impurity Processing Loop (IPL) of the JET Active Gas Handling System is designed to recover tritium from impurities such as tritiated water and hydrocarbons present in the JET plasma exhaust. All impurities are fully oxidized in a catalytic recombiner, the tritiated water frozen in a cold trap and subsequently decomposed on hot uranium powder. Hydrogen isotopes set free in this reaction are scavenged from the helium carrier gas in a cold uranium bed. The modular design of the IPL permits implementation of advanced processing schemes (EG avoiding solid UO2 waste) in the future without major hardware modifications

  20. Active roll control: system design and hardware-in-the-loop test bench

    A. Sorniotti; Morgando, A; Velardocchia, M

    2006-01-01

    The first part of the article describes the targets related to the design of an Active Roll Control (ARC) system, based on the hydraulic actuation of the anti-roll bars of an automobile. Then the basic static and dynamic design principles of the system are commented upon in detail. The second part of the article presents the hardware-in-the-loop test bench implemented to evaluate the designed system. In the end, the main experimental results are summarized and discussed from the point of view...

  1. Protein phosphatases active on acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphorylated by casein kinase I, casein kinase II and the cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    The protein phosphatases in rat liver cytosol, active on rat liver acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylated by casein kinase I, casein kinase II and the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, have been partially purified by anion-exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The major phosphatase activities against all three substrates copurify through fractionation and appear to be identical to protein phosphatases 2A1 and 2A2. No unique protein phosphatase active on 32P-ACC phosphorylated by the casein kinases was identified

  2. Pin1-mediated Sp1 phosphorylation by CDK1 increases Sp1 stability and decreases its DNA-binding activity during mitosis.

    Yang, Hang-Che; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Jeng, Wen-Yih; Liu, Chia-I; Wang, Andrew H-J; Lu, Pei-Jung; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2014-12-16

    We have shown that Sp1 phosphorylation at Thr739 decreases its DNA-binding activity. In this study, we found that phosphorylation of Sp1 at Thr739 alone is necessary, but not sufficient for the inhibition of its DNA-binding activity during mitosis. We demonstrated that Pin1 could be recruited to the Thr739(p)-Pro motif of Sp1 to modulate the interaction between phospho-Sp1 and CDK1, thereby facilitating CDK1-mediated phosphorylation of Sp1 at Ser720, Thr723 and Thr737 during mitosis. Loss of the C-terminal end of Sp1 (amino acids 741-785) significantly increased Sp1 phosphorylation, implying that the C-terminus inhibits CDK1-mediated Sp1 phosphorylation. Binding analysis of Sp1 peptides to Pin1 by isothermal titration calorimetry indicated that Pin1 interacts with Thr739(p)-Sp1 peptide but not with Thr739-Sp1 peptide. X-ray crystallography data showed that the Thr739(p)-Sp1 peptide occupies the active site of Pin1. Increased Sp1 phosphorylation by CDK1 during mitosis not only stabilized Sp1 levels by decreasing interaction with ubiquitin E3-ligase RNF4 but also caused Sp1 to move out of the chromosomes completely by decreasing its DNA-binding activity, thereby facilitating cell cycle progression. Thus, Pin1-mediated conformational changes in the C-terminal region of Sp1 are critical for increased CDK1-mediated Sp1 phosphorylation to facilitate cell cycle progression during mitosis. PMID:25398907

  3. Novel STAT3 phosphorylation inhibitors exhibit potent growth-suppressive activity in pancreatic and breast cancer cells.

    Lin, Li; Hutzen, Brian; Zuo, Mingxin; Ball, Sarah; Deangelis, Stephanie; Foust, Elizabeth; Pandit, Bulbul; Ihnat, Michael A; Shenoy, Satyendra S; Kulp, Samuel; Li, Pui-Kai; Li, Chenglong; Fuchs, James; Lin, Jiayuh

    2010-03-15

    The constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is frequently detected in most types of human cancer where it plays important roles in survival, drug resistance, angiogenesis, and other functions. Targeting constitutive STAT3 signaling is thus an attractive therapeutic approach for these cancers. We have recently developed novel small-molecule STAT3 inhibitors, known as FLLL31 and FLLL32, which are derived from curcumin (the primary bioactive compound of turmeric). These compounds are designed to bind selectively to Janus kinase 2 and the STAT3 Src homology-2 domain, which serve crucial roles in STAT3 dimerization and signal transduction. Here we show that FLLL31 and FLLL32 are effective inhibitors of STAT3 phosphorylation, DNA-binding activity, and transactivation in vitro, leading to the impediment of multiple oncogenic processes and the induction of apoptosis in pancreatic and breast cancer cell lines. FLLL31 and FLLL32 also inhibit colony formation in soft agar and cell invasion and exhibit synergy with the anticancer drug doxorubicin against breast cancer cells. In addition, we show that FLLL32 can inhibit the induction of STAT3 phosphorylation by IFNalpha and interleukin-6 in breast cancer cells. We also show that administration of FLLL32 can inhibit tumor growth and vascularity in chicken embryo xenografts as well as substantially reduce tumor volumes in mouse xenografts. Our findings highlight the potential of these new compounds and their efficacy in targeting pancreatic and breast cancers that exhibit constitutive STAT3 signaling. PMID:20215512

  4. Astragalus polysaccharide stimulates glucose uptake in L6 myotubes through AMPK activation and AS160/TBC1D4 phosphorylation

    Jian LIU; Si-tu YANG; Lang BU; Jing-ping OU-YANG; Jing-fang ZHANG; Jin-zhi LU; De-ling ZHANG; Ke LI; Ke SU; Jing WANG; Ye-min ZHANG; Nian WANG

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To establish the mechanism responsible for the stimulation of glucose uptake by Astragalus polysaccharide (APS),extracted from Astragalus membranaceus Bunge,in L6 myotubes in vitro.Methods:APS-stimulated glucose uptake in L6 myotubes was measured using the 2-deoxy-[3H]-D-glucose method.The adenine nucleotide contents in the cells were measured by HPLC.The phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) was examined using Western blot analysis.The cells transfected with 4P mutant AS160 (AS160-4P) were constructed using gene transfer approach.Results:Treatment of L6 myotubes with APS (100-1600 μg/mL) significantly increased glucose uptake in time-and concentration-dependent manners.The maximal glucose uptake was reached in the cells treated with APS (400 μg/mL) for 36 h.The APS-stimulated glucose uptake was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with Compound C,a selective AMPK inhibitor or in the cells overexpressing AS160-4P.Treatment of L6 myotubes with APS strongly promoted the activation of AMPK.We further demonstrated that either Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) or liver kinase B1 (LKB1) mediated APS-induced activation of AMPK in L6 myotubes,and the increased cellular AMP:ATP ratio was also involved.Treatment of L6 myotubes with APS robustly enhanced the phosphorylation of AS160,which was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with Compound C.Conclusion:Our results demonstrate that APS stimulates glucose uptake in L6 myotubes through the AMP-AMPK-AS160 pathway,which may contribute to its hypoglycemic effect.

  5. Structural Study of a Flexible Active Site Loop in Human Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase and Its Functional Implications.

    Álvarez, Lucía; Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Roitberg, Adrián; Estrin, Darío A; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Marti, Marcelo A; Capece, Luciana

    2016-05-17

    Human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase catalyzes the oxidative cleavage of tryptophan to N-formyl kynurenine, the initial and rate-limiting step in the kynurenine pathway. Additionally, this enzyme has been identified as a possible target for cancer therapy. A 20-amino acid protein segment (the JK loop), which connects the J and K helices, was not resolved in the reported hIDO crystal structure. Previous studies have shown that this loop undergoes structural rearrangement upon substrate binding. In this work, we apply a combination of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations and site-directed mutagenesis experiments to characterize the structure and dynamics of this protein region. Our simulations show that the JK loop can be divided into two regions: the first region (JK loop(C)) displays specific and well-defined conformations and is within hydrogen bonding distance of the substrate, while the second region (JK loop(N)) is highly disordered and exposed to the solvent. The peculiar flexible nature of JK loop(N) suggests that it may function as a target for post-translational modifications and/or a mediator for protein-protein interactions. In contrast, hydrogen bonding interactions are observed between the substrate and Thr379 in the highly conserved "GTGG" motif of JK loop(C), thereby anchoring JK loop(C) in a closed conformation, which secures the appropriate substrate binding mode for catalysis. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirm the key role of this residue, highlighting the importance of the JK loop(C) conformation in regulating the enzymatic activity. Furthermore, the existence of the partially and totally open conformations in the substrate-free form suggests a role of JK loop(C) in controlling substrate and product dynamics. PMID:27112409

  6. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) cross-talks with canonical Wnt signaling via phosphorylation of β-catenin at Ser 552

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator of energy metabolism; its activity is regulated by a plethora of physiological conditions, exercises and many anti-diabetic drugs. Recent studies show that AMPK involves in cell differentiation but the underlying mechanism remains undefined. Wingless Int-1 (Wnt)/β-catenin signaling pathway regulates the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells through enhancing β-catenin/T-cell transcription factor 1 (TCF) mediated transcription. The objective of this study was to determine whether AMPK cross-talks with Wnt/β-catenin signaling through phosphorylation of β-catenin. C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal cells were used. Chemical inhibition of AMPK and the expression of a dominant negative AMPK decreased phosphorylation of β-catenin at Ser 552. The β-catenin/TCF mediated transcription was correlated with AMPK activity. In vitro, pure AMPK phosphorylated β-catenin at Ser 552 and the mutation of Ser 552 to Ala prevented such phosphorylation, which was further confirmed using [γ-32P]ATP autoradiography. In conclusion, AMPK phosphorylates β-catenin at Ser 552, which stabilizes β-catenin, enhances β-catenin/TCF mediated transcription, expanding AMPK from regulation of energy metabolism to cell differentiation and development via cross-talking with the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  7. COX-2 activation is associated with Akt phosphorylation and poor survival in ER-negative, HER2-positive breast cancer

    Goodman Julie E

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inducible cyclooxgenase-2 (COX-2 is commonly overexpressed in breast tumors and is a target for cancer therapy. Here, we studied the association of COX-2 with breast cancer survival and how this association is influenced by tumor estrogen and HER2 receptor status and Akt pathway activation. Methods Tumor COX-2, HER2 and estrogen receptor α (ER expression and phosphorylation of Akt, BAD, and caspase-9 were analyzed immunohistochemically in 248 cases of breast cancer. Spearman's correlation and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between COX-2 and tumor characteristics. Kaplan-Meier survival and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between COX-2 and disease-specific survival. Results COX-2 was significantly associated with breast cancer outcome in ER-negative [Hazard ratio (HR = 2.72; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.36-5.41; comparing high versus low COX-2] and HER2 overexpressing breast cancer (HR = 2.84; 95% CI, 1.07-7.52. However, the hazard of poor survival associated with increased COX-2 was highest among patients who were both ER-negative and HER2-positive (HR = 5.95; 95% CI, 1.01-34.9. Notably, COX-2 expression in the ER-negative and HER2-positive tumors correlated significantly with increased phosphorylation of Akt and of the two Akt targets, BAD at Ser136 and caspase-9 at Ser196. Conclusions Up-regulation of COX-2 in ER-negative and HER2-positive breast tumors is associated with Akt pathway activation and is a marker of poor outcome. The findings suggest that COX-2-specific inhibitors and inhibitors of the Akt pathway may act synergistically as anticancer drugs in the ER-negative and HER2-positive breast cancer subtype.

  8. Mutations in the catalytic loop HRD motif alter the activity and function of Drosophila Src64.

    Taylor C Strong

    Full Text Available The catalytic loop HRD motif is found in most protein kinases and these amino acids are predicted to perform functions in catalysis, transition to, and stabilization of the active conformation of the kinase domain. We have identified mutations in a Drosophila src gene, src64, that alter the three HRD amino acids. We have analyzed the mutants for both biochemical activity and biological function during development. Mutation of the aspartate to asparagine eliminates biological function in cytoskeletal processes and severely reduces fertility, supporting the amino acid's critical role in enzymatic activity. The arginine to cysteine mutation has little to no effect on kinase activity or cytoskeletal reorganization, suggesting that the HRD arginine may not be critical for coordinating phosphotyrosine in the active conformation. The histidine to leucine mutant retains some kinase activity and biological function, suggesting that this amino acid may have a biochemical function in the active kinase that is independent of its side chain hydrogen bonding interactions in the active site. We also describe the phenotypic effects of other mutations in the SH2 and tyrosine kinase domains of src64, and we compare them to the phenotypic effects of the src64 null allele.

  9. Activated Cdc42-associated kinase Ack1 promotes prostate cancer progression via androgen receptor tyrosine phosphorylation

    Mahajan, Nupam P.; Liu, Yuanbo; Majumder, Samarpan; Warren, Maria R.; Parker, Carol E.; Mohler, James L.; Earp, H. Shelton; Whang, Young E.

    2007-01-01

    Activation of the androgen receptor (AR) may play a role in androgen-independent progression of prostate cancer. Multiple mechanisms of AR activation, including stimulation by tyrosine kinases, have been postulated. We and others have recently shown involvement of activated Cdc42-associated tyrosine kinase Ack1 in advanced human prostate cancer. Here we provide the molecular basis for interplay between Ack1 and AR in prostate cancer cells. Activated Ack1 promoted androgen-independent growth o...

  10. cAMP-dependent Protein Kinase Phosphorylation Produces Interdomain Movement in SUR2B Leading to Activation of the Vascular KATP Channel*S⃞

    Shi, Yun; Chen, Xianfeng; Wu, Zhongying; Shi, Weiwei; Yang, Yang; Cui, Ningren; Jiang, Chun; Harrison, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Vascular ATP-sensitive K+ channels are activated by multiple vasodilating hormones and neurotransmitters via PKA. A critical PKA phosphorylation site (Ser-1387) is found in the second nucleotide-binding domain (NBD2) of the SUR2B subunit. To understand how phosphorylation at Ser-1387 leads to changes in channel activity, we modeled the SUR2B using a newly crystallized ABC protein SAV1866. The model showed that Ser-1387 was located on the interface of NBD2 with TMD1 and...

  11. Purification of a murine protein-tyrosine/threonine kinase that phosphorylates and activates the Erk-1 gene product: relationship to the fission yeast byr1 gene product.

    Crews, C M; Erikson, R L

    1992-01-01

    We report the purification to near homogeneity of a 45-kDa phorbol ester-stimulated protein kinase that phosphorylates and activates the Erk-1 gene product. This kinase, which we provisionally denote MEK for MAPK/Erk kinase, phosphorylated kinase-inactive Erk-1 protein primarily on a tyrosine residue and, to a lesser extent, on a threonine. We extend our previous results and show that two forms of purified MEK activated the myelin basic protein kinase encoded by Erk-1. MEK was inactivated by ...

  12. Platelet-activating factor (PAF)-dependent biochemical, morphologic, and physiologic responses of human platelets: Demonstration of translocation of protein kinase C associated with protein phosphorylation

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent stimulus for platelet aggregation and secretion. PAF has been shown to stimulate the phosphatidylinositol (PI) pathway in platelets, which implies that PAF should activate protein kinase C. In this study, measurements of PI metabolites, the elevation of intracellular free calcium concentration, (Ca2+)i, the activation of protein kinase C, and the phosphorylation of platelet proteins (using a two-dimensional gel electrophoretic technique) were performed before and after the addition of 10(-8) M PAF to human platelets. These findings were correlated with morphologic changes in the platelets as determined by immunoelectron microscopic studies on the cytoskeleton and by X-ray analysis of dense bodies. The results show that PAF stimulates the production of PI metabolites and causes an increase in the membrane-associated activity of protein kinase C. These changes are accompanied by a rise in the (Ca2+)i and protein phosphorylation. The increase in protein kinase C activity reaches a maximum at approximately 60 s, a time frame that is consistent with the protein phosphorylation and the subsequent morphologic and secretory events. X-ray analysis revealed two types of dense bodies containing various amounts of calcium which appeared to be released sequentially after PAF activation. These results suggest that the protein phosphorylation that controls the physiologic events resulting from PAF activation of human platelets is catalyzed by protein kinase C

  13. 17β-estradiol rapidly activates calcium release from intracellular stores via the GPR30 pathway and MAPK phosphorylation in osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells

    Ren, Jian

    2012-03-06

    Estrogen regulates critical cellular functions, and its deficiency initiates bone turnover and the development of bone mass loss in menopausal females. Recent studies have demonstrated that 17β-estradiol (E 2) induces rapid non-genomic responses that activate downstream signaling molecules, thus providing a new perspective to understand the relationship between estrogen and bone metabolism. In this study, we investigated rapid estrogen responses, including calcium release and MAPK phosphorylation, in osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells. E 2 elevated [Ca 2+] i and increased Ca 2+ oscillation frequency in a dose-dependent manner. Immunolabeling confirmed the expression of three estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ, and G protein-coupled receptor 30 [GPR30]) in MLO-Y4 cells and localized GPR30 predominantly to the plasma membrane. E 2 mobilized calcium from intracellular stores, and the use of selective agonist(s) for each ER showed that this was mediated mainly through the GPR30 pathway. MAPK phosphorylation increased in a biphasic manner, with peaks occurring after 7 and 60 min. GPR30 and classical ERs showed different temporal effects on MAPK phosphorylation and contributed to MAPK phosphorylation sequentially. ICI182,780 inhibited E 2 activation of MAPK at 7 min, while the GPR30 agonist G-1 and antagonist G-15 failed to affect MAPK phosphorylation levels. G-1-mediated MAPK phosphorylation at 60 min was prevented by prior depletion of calcium stores. Our data suggest that E 2 induces the non-genomic responses Ca 2+ release and MAPK phosphorylation to regulate osteocyte function and indicate that multiple receptors mediate rapid E 2 responses. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  14. Protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylates human platelet inositol trisphosphate 5/sup +/-/-phosphomonoesterase (IP3 5'-p'tase) increasing phosphatase activity

    Phosphoinositide breakdown in response to thrombin stimulation of human platelets generates messenger molecules that activate PKC (diglyceride) and mobilize Ca++ (inositol tris-phosphates). The water soluble products of phospholipase C-mediated metabolism of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-diphosphate are inositol 1,4,5 P3 (IP3) and inositol 1:2-cyclic 4,5 P3 (cIP3). A specific phosphatase, IP3 5'-p'tase, cleaves the 5 phosphate from IP3 or cIP3 to form IP2 or cIP2 and P/sub i/, none of which mobilizes Ca++. Thus, the IP3 5'-p'tase may regulate cellular responses to IP3 or cIP3. The authors find that IP3 5'-p'tase isolated from human platelets is phosphorylated by rat brain PKC, resulting in a 4-fold increase in IP3 5'-p'tase activity. The authors phosphorylated IP3 5'-p'tase using γ 32P-ATP and found that the labeled enzyme comigrated on SDS-PAGE with the previously described 40K protein phosphorylated in response to thrombin stimulation of platelets. The similarity of the PKC-phosphorylated IP3 5'-p'tase observed in vitro and the thrombin-stimulated phosphorylated 40K protein known to be phosphorylated by PKC in vivo, suggests that these proteins may be the same. These results suggest that platelet Ca++ mobilization maybe regulated by PKC phosphorylation of the IP3 5'-p'tase and can explain the observation that phorbol ester treatment of intact human platelets results in decreased production of IP3 and decreased Ca++ mobilization upon subsequent thrombin addition

  15. 17β-estradiol rapidly activates calcium release from intracellular stores via the GPR30 pathway and MAPK phosphorylation in osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells.

    Ren, Jian; Wu, Jun Hua

    2012-05-01

    Estrogen regulates critical cellular functions, and its deficiency initiates bone turnover and the development of bone mass loss in menopausal females. Recent studies have demonstrated that 17β-estradiol (E(2)) induces rapid non-genomic responses that activate downstream signaling molecules, thus providing a new perspective to understand the relationship between estrogen and bone metabolism. In this study, we investigated rapid estrogen responses, including calcium release and MAPK phosphorylation, in osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells. E(2) elevated [Ca(2+)]( i ) and increased Ca(2+) oscillation frequency in a dose-dependent manner. Immunolabeling confirmed the expression of three estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ, and G protein-coupled receptor 30 [GPR30]) in MLO-Y4 cells and localized GPR30 predominantly to the plasma membrane. E(2) mobilized calcium from intracellular stores, and the use of selective agonist(s) for each ER showed that this was mediated mainly through the GPR30 pathway. MAPK phosphorylation increased in a biphasic manner, with peaks occurring after 7 and 60 min. GPR30 and classical ERs showed different temporal effects on MAPK phosphorylation and contributed to MAPK phosphorylation sequentially. ICI182,780 inhibited E(2) activation of MAPK at 7 min, while the GPR30 agonist G-1 and antagonist G-15 failed to affect MAPK phosphorylation levels. G-1-mediated MAPK phosphorylation at 60 min was prevented by prior depletion of calcium stores. Our data suggest that E(2) induces the non-genomic responses Ca(2+) release and MAPK phosphorylation to regulate osteocyte function and indicate that multiple receptors mediate rapid E(2) responses. PMID:22392527

  16. Non-hypoxic activation of the negative regulatory feedback loop of prolyl-hydroxylase oxygen sensors.

    Tug, Suzan; Delos Reyes, Buena; Fandrey, Joachim; Berchner-Pfannschmidt, Utta

    2009-07-10

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIF) coordinate cellular responses towards hypoxia. HIFs are mainly regulated by a group of prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs) that in the presence of oxygen, target the HIFalpha subunit for degradation. Herein, we studied the role of nitric oxide (NO) in regulating PHD activities under normoxic conditions. In the present study we show that different NO-donors initially inhibited endogenous PHD2 activity which led to accumulation of HIF-1alpha subsequently to enhance HIF-1 dependent increased PHD2 promoter activity. Consequently PHD2 abundance and activity were strongly induced which caused downregulation of HIF-1alpha. Interestingly, upregulation of endogenous PHD2 activity by NO was not found in cells that lack an intact pVHL dependent degradation pathway. Recovery of PHD activity required intact cells and was not observed in cell extracts or recombinant PHD2. In conclusion induction of endogenous PHD2 activity by NO is dependent on a feedback loop initiated despite normoxic conditions. PMID:19427832

  17. Loss of p53-regulatory protein IFI16 induces NBS1 leading to activation of p53-mediated checkpoint by phosphorylation of p53 SER37.

    Tawara, Hideyuki; Fujiuchi, Nobuko; Sironi, Juan; Martin, Sarah; Aglipay, Jason; Ouchi, Mutsuko; Taga, Makoto; Chen, Phang-Lang; Ouchi, Toru

    2008-01-01

    Our previous results that IFI16 is involved in p53 transcription activity under conditions of ionizing radiation (IR), and that the protein is frequently lost in human breast cancer cell lines and breast adenocarcinoma tissues suggesting that IFI16 plays a crucial role in controlling cell growth. Here, we show that loss of IFI16 by RNA interference in cell culture causes elevated phosphorylation of p53 Ser37 and accumulated NBS1 (nibrin) and p21WAF1, leading to growth retardation. Consistent with these observations, doxycyclin-induced NBS1 caused accumulation of p21WAF1 and increased phosphorylation of p53 Ser37, leading to cell cycle arrest in G1 phase. Wortmannin treatment was found to decrease p53 Ser37 phosphorylation in NBS-induced cells. These results suggest that loss of IFI16 activates p53 checkpoint through NBS1-DNA-PKcs pathway. PMID:17981542

  18. The functional synergy between IL-12 and IL-2 involves p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and is associated with the augmentation of STAT serine phosphorylation.

    Gollob, J A; Schnipper, C P; Murphy, E A; Ritz, J; Frank, D A

    1999-04-15

    IL-12 and IL-2 can stimulate mitogen- or CD3-activated T cells to proliferate, produce IFN-gamma, and kill tumor cells. The magnitude of these functional responses is greatly augmented when T cells are activated by the combination of IL-12 and IL-2. Although peripheral blood T cells are largely unresponsive to these cytokines without prior activation, a small subset of CD8+ T cells (CD8+CD18bright) is strongly activated by the combination of IL-12 and IL-2. In this report we show that the functional synergy between IL-12 and IL-2 in CD8+CD18bright T cells correlates with the activation of the stress kinases, p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK)/Jun N-terminal kinase, but not with the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases. The functional synergy between IL-2 and IL-12 is also associated with a prominent increase in STAT1 and STAT3 serine phosphorylation over that observed with IL-12 or IL-2 alone. By contrast, STAT tyrosine phosphorylation is not augmented over that seen with either cytokine alone. A specific inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase completely inhibits the serine phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3 induced by IL-12 and IL-2 and abrogates the functional synergy between IL-12 and IL-2 without affecting STAT tyrosine phosphorylation. This suggests that p38 MAP kinase may play an important role in regulating STAT serine phosphorylation in response to the combination of IL-12 and IL-2. Furthermore, these findings indicate that the optimal activation of T cells by IL-12 and IL-2 may depend on an interaction between the p38 MAP kinase and Janus kinase/STAT signaling pathways. PMID:10201984

  19. Activation of the unliganded estrogen receptor by EGF involves the MAP kinase pathway and direct phosphorylation.

    Bunone, G; Briand, P A; Miksicek, R J; Picard, D.

    1996-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) can be activated as a transcription factor either by binding of cognate estrogenic ligand or, indirectly, by a variety of other extracellular signals. As a first step towards elucidating the mechanism of 'steroid-independent activation' of the ER by the epidermal growth factor (EGF), we have mapped the ER target domain and determined the signaling pathway. We show that the N-terminal transcriptional activation function AF-1, but not the C-terminal AF-2, is necessary...

  20. Laboratory Scale Study of Activated Sludge Process in Jet Loop Reactor for Waste WaterTreatment

    M. S. Patil

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of Activated Sludge Process (ASP for the treatment of synthetic wastewater and to develop a simple design criteria under local conditions.A laboratory scale Compact jet loop reactor model comprising of an aeration tank and final clarifier was used for this purpose.Settled synthetic wastewater was used as influent to the aeration tank. The Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD of the influent and effluent was measured to find process efficiency at various mixed liquorvolatile suspended solids (MLVSS and hydraulic retention time (θ. The results of the studydemonstrated that an efficiency of above 95% could be obtained for COD if the ASP is operated atan MLVSS concentration of 3000 mg/L keeping an aeration time of 1 hour.In the present investigation the preliminary studies were carried out in a lab scale Jet loop reactor made of glass. Synthetic waste water having a composition of 1000 mg/L mixed with other nutrients such as Urea, Primary and secondary Potassium phosphates, Magnesium sulfate, Iron chloriderequired for the bacteria was prepared in the laboratory and reduction in COD and the increase inSuspended Solids (SSand the Sludge Volume Index (SVI were determined.

  1. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation independently of beta-arrestin- and dynamin-mediated FSH receptor internalization

    Crepieux Pascale

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSH-R is a seven transmembrane spanning receptor (7TMR which plays a crucial role in male and female reproduction. Upon FSH stimulation, the FSH-R activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK. However, the mechanisms whereby the agonist-stimulated FSH-R activates ERK are poorly understood. In order to activate ERK, some 7 TMRs require beta-arrestin-and dynamin-dependent internalization to occur, whereas some others do not. In the present study, we examined the ability of the FSH-activated FSH-R to induce ERK phosphorylation, in conditions where its beta-arrestin- and dynamin-mediated internalization was impaired. Methods Human embryonic kidney (HEK 293 cells were transiently transfected with the rat FSH-R. Internalization of the FSH-R was manipulated by co-expression of either a beta-arrestin (319–418 dominant negative peptide, either an inactive dynamin K44A mutant or of wild-type beta-arrestin 1 or 2. The outcomes on the FSH-R internalization were assayed by measuring 125I-FSH binding at the cell surface when compared to internalized 125I-FSH binding. The resulting ERK phosphorylation level was visualized by Western blot analysis. Results In HEK 293 cells, FSH stimulated ERK phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner. Co-transfection of the beta- arrestin (319–418 construct, or of the dynamin K44A mutant reduced FSH-R internalization in response to FSH, without affecting ERK phosphorylation. Likewise, overexpression of wild-type beta-arrestin 1 or 2 significantly increased the FSH-R internalization level in response to FSH, without altering FSH-induced ERK phosphorylation. Conclusion From these results, we conclude that the FSH-R does not require beta-arrestin- nor dynamin-mediated internalization to initiate ERK phosphorylation in response to FSH.

  2. Activity build-up on the circulation loops of boiling water reactors: Basics for modelling of transport and deposition processes

    In the past 20 years the radiation field of nuclear power plant loops outside the core zone was the object of investigations in many countries. In this context test loops were built and basic research done. At our Institute PSI the installation of a LWR-contamination loop is planned for this year. This experimental loop has the purpose to investigate the complex phenomena of activity deposition from the primary fluid of reactor plants and to formulate analytical models. From the literature the following conclusions can be drawn: The principal correlations of the activity build-up outside the core are known. The plant specific single phenomena as corrosion, crud-transport, activation and deposit of cobalt in the oxide layer are complex and only partially understood. The operational experience of particular plants with low contaminated loops (BWR-recirculation loops) show that in principle the problem is manageable. The reduction of the activity build-up in older plants necessitates a combination of measures to modify the crud balance in the primary circuit. In parallel to the experimental work several simulation models in the form of computer programs were developed. These models have the common feature that they are based on mass balances, in which the exchange of materials and the sedimentation processes are described by global empirical transport coefficients. These models yield satisfactory results and allow parameter studies; the application however is restricted to the particular installation. All programs lack models that describe the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic mechanisms on the surface of deposition layers. Analytical investigations on fouling of process equipment led to models that are also applicable to the activity build-up in reactor loops. Therefore it seems appropriate to combine the nuclear simulation models with the fundamental equations for deposition. 10 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Role of loop activity in correlated percolation: results on a Husimi cactus and relationship with a Bethe lattice

    We consider the problem of correlated percolation on a Husimi cactus, which allows finite loops of size l, to investigate the effects of loop formation on percolation properties. In particular, we calculate how the percolation threshold and the percolation probability depend on l and the loop activity n. We calculate the contribution and its dependence on l and n from finite and infinite clusters to all densities. We show that macroscopic loops are formed immediately after percolation, and we calculate their density dependence on l and n. We compare the results on Husimi cactus with those on a Bethe lattice. We finally establish that the Husimi cactus turns into a Bethe lattice as l→∞. (author)

  4. Increased iPLA2 activity and levels of phosphorylated GSK3B in platelets are associated with donepezil treatment in Alzheimer's disease patients.

    Talib, L L; Hototian, S R; Joaquim, H P G; Forlenza, O V; Gattaz, W F

    2015-12-01

    Reduced phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity and increased phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3B (GSK3B) participate in the production of beta-amyloid plaques and of neurofibrillary tangles, which are two neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Experimental evidences suggest a neuroprotective effect of the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil in the treatment the disease. The aims of the present study were to evaluate in AD patients the effects of treatment with donepezil on PLA2 activity and GSK3B level. Thirty patients with AD were treated during 6 months with 10 mg daily of donepezil. Radio-enzymatic assays were used to measure PLA2 activity and Elisa assays for GSK3B level, both in platelets. Before treatment and after 3 and 6 months on donepezil, AD patients underwent a cognitive assessment and platelet samples were collected. Values were compared to a healthy control group of 42 sex- and age-matched elderly individuals. Before treatment, iPLA2 activity was lower in patients with AD as compared to controls (p cognitive improvement during treatment (p = 0.037). After 6 months, we found an increase in phosphorylated GSK3B (p = 0.02). The present findings suggest two possible mechanisms by which donepezil delays the progression of AD. The increment of iPLA2 activity may reduce the production of beta-amyloid plaques, whereas the phosphorylation of GSK3B inactivates the enzyme, reducing thus the phosphorylation of tau protein. PMID:25920742

  5. From Concept-to-Flight: An Active Active Fluid Loop Based Thermal Control System for Mars Science Laboratory Rover

    Birur, Gajanana C.; Bhandari, Pradeep; Bame, David; Karlmann, Paul; Mastropietro, A. J.; Liu, Yuanming; Miller, Jennifer; Pauken, Michael; Lyra, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, Curiosity, which was launched on November 26, 2011, incorporates a novel active thermal control system to keep the sensitive electronics and science instruments at safe operating and survival temperatures. While the diurnal temperature variations on the Mars surface range from -120 C to +30 C, the sensitive equipment are kept within -40 C to +50 C. The active thermal control system is based on a single-phase mechanically pumped fluid loop (MPFL) system which removes or recovers excess waste heat and manages it to maintain the sensitive equipment inside the rover at safe temperatures. This paper will describe the entire process of developing this active thermal control system for the MSL rover from concept to flight implementation. The development of the rover thermal control system during its architecture, design, fabrication, integration, testing, and launch is described.

  6. Mutation of His-157 in the Second Pore Loop Drastically Reduces the Activity of the Synechocystis Ktr-Type Transporter▿

    Zulkifli, Lalu; Uozumi, Nobuyuki

    2006-01-01

    Mutation of a conserved His-157 in the second pore loop of KtrB drastically reduced the activity of the K+ transporter from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. This result suggests that His-157 plays an essential role in the K+ transport activity of the transporter system.

  7. Density functional theory studies of MTSL nitroxide side chain conformations attached to an activation loop

    Concilio, Maria Grazia; Bayliss, Richard; Burgess, Selena G

    2016-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical (QM) method rooted on density functional theory (DFT) has been employed to determine conformations of the methane-thiosulfonate spin label (MTSL) attached to a fragment extracted from the activation loop of Aurora-A kinase. The features of the calculated energy surface revealed low energy barriers between isoenergetic minima and the system could be described in a population of 76 rotamers that can be also considered for other systems since it was found that the X3, X4 and X5 do not depend on the previous two dihedral angles. Conformational states obtained were seen to comparable to those obtained in the {\\alpha}-helix systems studied previously, indicating that the protein backbone does not affect the torsional profiles significantly and suggesting the possibility to use determined conformations for other protein systems for further modelling studies.

  8. BRF1 Protein Turnover and mRNA Decay Activity Are Regulated by Protein Kinase B at the Same Phosphorylation Sites▿

    Benjamin, Don; Schmidlin, Martin; Min, Lu; Gross, Brigitte; Moroni, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    BRF1 posttranscriptionally regulates mRNA levels by targeting ARE-bearing transcripts to the decay machinery. We previously showed that protein kinase B (PKB) phosphorylates BRF1 at Ser92, resulting in binding to 14-3-3 and impairment of mRNA decay activity. Here we identify an additional regulatory site at Ser203 that cooperates in vivo with Ser92. In vitro kinase labeling and wortmannin sensitivity indicate that Ser203 phosphorylation is also performed by PKB. Mutation of both serines to al...

  9. Platelet-derived growth factor induces multisite phosphorylation of pp60c-src and increases its protein-tyrosine kinase activity.

    Gould, K L; Hunter, T

    1988-01-01

    We have shown previously that pp60c-src is a substrate for protein kinase C in vivo and that the target of protein kinase C phosphorylation in mammalian pp60c-src is serine 12. We now demonstrate that in addition to tumor promoters, all activators of phosphatidylinositol turnover that we have tested in fibroblasts (platelet-derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, serum, vasopressin, sodium orthovanadate, and prostaglandin F2 alpha) lead to the phosphorylation of pp60c-src at serine 1...

  10. Tumor suppressor PTEN affects tau phosphorylation: deficiency in the phosphatase activity of PTEN increases aggregation of an FTDP-17 mutant Tau

    Zhang Xue

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aberrant hyperphosphorylation of tau protein has been implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. Although a number of protein kinases have been shown to phosphorylate tau in vitro and in vivo, the molecular mechanisms by which tau phosphorylation is regulated pathophysiologically are largely unknown. Recently, a growing body of evidence suggests a link between tau phosphorylation and PI3K signaling. In this study, phosphorylation, aggregation and binding to the microtubule of a mutant frontal temporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17 tau in the presence of tumor suppressor PTEN, a major regulatory component in PI3K signaling, were investigated. Results Phosphorylation of the human mutant FTDP-17 tau, T40RW, was evaluated using different phospho-tau specific antibodies in the presence of human wild-type or phosphatase activity null mutant PTEN. Among the evaluated phosphorylation sites, the levels of Ser214 and Thr212 phospho-tau proteins were significantly decreased in the presence of wild-type PTEN, and significantly increased when the phosphatase activity null mutant PTEN was ectopically expressed. Fractionation of the mutant tau transfected cells revealed a significantly increased level of soluble tau in cytosol when wild-type PTEN was expressed, and an elevated level of SDS-soluble tau aggregates in the presence of the mutant PTEN. In addition, the filter/trap assays detected more SDS-insoluble mutant tau aggregates in the cells overexpressing the mutant PTEN compared to those in the cells overexpressing wild-type PTEN and control DNA. This notion was confirmed by the immunocytochemical experiment which demonstrated that the overexpression of the phosphatase activity null mutant PTEN caused the mutant tau to form aggregates in the COS-7 cells. Conclusion Tumor suppressor PTEN can alleviate the phosporylation of the mutant FTDP-17 tau at specific sites, and the phosphatase activity

  11. Pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures are associated with Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase activity decrease and alpha subunit phosphorylation state in the mice cerebral cortex.

    Marquezan, Bárbara P; Funck, Vinícius R; Oliveira, Clarissa V; Pereira, Letícia M; Araújo, Stífani M; Zarzecki, Micheli S; Royes, Luiz Fernando F; Furian, Ana Flávia; Oliveira, Mauro S

    2013-08-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and phosphorylation state of the catalytic α subunit are altered by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures. PTZ (30, 45 or 60 g/kg, i.p.) was administered to adult male Swiss mice, and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and phosphorylation state were measured in the cerebral cortex 15 min after PTZ administration. Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity significantly decreased after PTZ-induced seizures (60 mg/kg). Immunoreactivity of phosphorylated Ser943 at α subunit was increased after PTZ-induced seizures. A significant positive correlation between Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and latency to myoclonic jerks and generalized seizures was found. Conversely, a strong negative correlation between Ser943 phosphorylation and latency to generalized seizures was detected. Given the role of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase as a major regulator of brain excitability, Ser943 at Na(+),K(+)-ATPase α subunit may represent a potentially valuable new target for drug development for seizure disorders. PMID:23602551

  12. SRC-DEPENDENT PHOSPHORYLATION OF THE EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR ON TYROSINE 845 IS REQUIRED FOR ZINC-INDUCED RAS ACTIVATION

    Src-dependent Phosphorylation of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor on Tyrosine 845 Is Required for Zinc-induced Ras ActivationWeidong Wu 1 , Lee M. Graves 2 , Gordon N. Gill 3 , Sarah J. Parsons 4 , and James M. Samet 51 Center for Environmental Medicine and Lung Biolo...

  13. Akt2 influences glycogen synthase activity in human skeletal muscle through regulation of NH2-terminal (sites 2+2a) phosphorylation

    Friedrichsen, Martin; Birk, Jesper Bratz; Richter, Erik; Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Pehmøller, Christian; Hansen, Bo Falck; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Hirshman, Michael F; Goodyear, Laurie J; Vaag, Allan; Poulsen, Pernille; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by reduced muscle glycogen synthesis. The key enzyme in this process, glycogen synthase (GS), is activated via proximal insulin signaling, but the exact molecular events remain unknown. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of Threonine-308 on Akt (pAkt-...

  14. Identification of a novel phosphorylation site on TBC1D4 regulated by AMP-activated protein kinase in skeletal muscle

    Treebak, Jonas Thue; Taylor, Eric B.; Witczak, Carol A.;

    2010-01-01

    TBC1D4 (also known as AS160) regulates GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake in adipocytes and skeletal muscle. Its mode of action involves phosphorylation of Serine (S)/Threonine (T) residues by upstream kinases resulting in inactivation of Rab-GAP activity leading to GLUT4 mobilization. The...... sites. Mouse skeletal muscles were contracted or stimulated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxmide riboside (AICAR) and muscle lysates were subjected to mass spectrometry analyses resulting in identification of novel putative phosphorylation sites on TBC1D4. The surrounding amino acid sequence predicted...... that S711 would be recognized by AMPK. Using a phospho-specific antibody against S711, we found that AICAR and contraction increased S711 phosphorylation in mouse skeletal muscle and this increase was abolished in muscle-specific AMPKalpha2 kinase dead transgenic mice. Exercise in human vastus...

  15. The autophosphorylation and p34cdc2 phosphorylation sites of casein kinase-2 beta-subunit are not essential for reconstituting the fully-active heterotetrameric holoenzyme

    Meggio, F; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G; Pinna, L A

    1993-01-01

    Two mutants of human casein kinase-2 beta-subunit with short deletions at either their amino (delta 1-4) or carboxy (delta 209-215) terminal side have been created that have lost the capability to undergo autophosphorylation and p34cdc2 mediated phosphorylation, respectively. Both mutants give rise...... to reconstituted CK2 holoenzymes displaying basal catalytic activity, thermostability and responsiveness to polylysine, identical to those of wild-type holoenzyme, whose reconstitution, moreover, is not affected by previous phosphorylation of the beta-subunit at either its N-terminal or C......-terminal sites. Unlike the wild-type beta and beta(delta 209-215), however, beta(delta 1-4) fails to confer to the reconstituted holoenzyme the typical responsiveness to NaCl stimulation. These results suggest that while neither the autophosphorylation nor the p34cdc2 phosphorylation sites are required for...

  16. Complete Sucrose Metabolism Requires Fructose Phosphotransferase Activity in Corynebacterium glutamicum To Ensure Phosphorylation of Liberated Fructose

    Dominguez, H.; Lindley, N. D.

    1996-01-01

    Sucrose uptake by Corynebacterium glutamicum involves a phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sucrose phosphotransferase (PTS), but in the absence of fructokinase, further metabolism of the liberated fructose requires efflux of the fructose and reassimilation via the fructose PTS. Mutant strains lacking detectable fructose-transporting PTS activity accumulated fructose extracellularly but consumed sucrose at rates comparable to those of the wild-type strain.

  17. CaMKII, but not protein kinase A, regulates Rpt6 phosphorylation and proteasome activity during the formation of long-term memories

    Timothy J Jarome

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available CaMKII and Protein Kinase A (PKA are thought to be critical for synaptic plasticity and memory formation through their regulation of protein synthesis. Consistent with this, numerous studies have reported that CaMKII, PKA and protein synthesis are critical for long-term memory formation. Recently, we found that protein degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome system is also critical for long-term memory formation in the amygdala. However, the mechanism by which ubiquitin-proteasome activity is regulated during memory formation and how protein degradation interacts with known intracellular signaling pathways important for learning remain unknown. Recently, evidence has emerged suggesting that both CaMKII and PKA are capable of regulating proteasome activity in vitro through the phosphorylation of proteasome regulatory subunit Rpt6 at Serine-120, though whether they regulate Rpt6 phosphorylation and proteasome function in vivo remains unknown. In the present study we demonstrate for the first time that fear conditioning transiently modifies a proteasome regulatory subunit and proteasome catalytic activity in the mammalian brain in a CaMKII-dependent manner. We found increases in the phosphorylation of proteasome ATPase subunit Rpt6 at Serine-120 and an enhancement in proteasome activity in the amygdala following fear conditioning. Pharmacological manipulation of CaMKII, but not PKA, in vivo significantly reduced both the learning-induced increase in Rpt6 Serine-120 phosphorylation and the increase in proteasome activity without directly affecting protein polyubiquitination levels. These results indicate a novel role for CaMKII in memory formation through its regulation of protein degradation and suggest that CaMKII regulates Rpt6 phosphorylation and proteasome function both in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Role of the NC-Loop in Catalytic Activity and Stability in Lipase from Fervidobacterium changbaicum

    Li, Binchun; Yang, Guangyu; Wu, Lie; Feng, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Flexible NC-loops between the catalytic domain and the cap domain of the α/β hydrolase fold enzymes show remarkable diversity in length, sequence, and configuration. Recent investigations have suggested that the NC-loop might be involved in catalysis and substrate recognition in many enzymes from the α/β hydrolase fold superfamily. To foster a deep understanding of its role in catalysis, stability, and divergent evolution, we here systemically investigated the function of the NC-loop (residue...

  19. Actin depolymerization mediated loss of SNTA1 phosphorylation and Rac1 activity has implications on ROS production, cell migration and apoptosis.

    Bhat, Sehar Saleem; Parray, Arif Ali; Mushtaq, Umar; Fazili, Khalid Majid; Khanday, Firdous Ahmad

    2016-06-01

    Alpha-1-syntrophin (SNTA1) and Rac1 are part of a signaling pathway via the dystrophin glycoprotein complex (DGC). Both SNTA1 and Rac1 proteins are over-expressed in various carcinomas. It is through the DGC signaling pathway that SNTA1 has been shown to act as a link between the extra cellular matrix, the internal cell signaling apparatus and the actin cytoskeleton. SNTA1 is involved in the modulation of the actin cytoskeleton and actin reorganization. Rac1 also controls actin cytoskeletal organization in the cell. In this study, we present the interplay between f-actin, SNTA1 and Rac1. We analyzed the effect of actin depolymerization on SNTA1 tyrosine phosphorylation and Rac1 activity using actin depolymerizing drugs, cytochalasin D and latrunculin A. Our results indicate a marked decrease in the tyrosine phosphorylation of SNTA1 upon actin depolymerization. Results suggest that actin depolymerization mediated loss of SNTA1 phosphorylation leads to loss of interaction between SNTA1 and Rac1, with a concomitant loss of Rac1 activation. The loss of SNTA1tyrosine phosphorylation and Rac1 activity by actin depolymerization results in increased apoptosis, decreased cell migration and decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in breast carcinoma cells. Collectively, our results present a possible role of f-actin in the SNTA1-Rac1 signaling pathway and implications of actin depolymerization on cell migration, ROS production and apoptosis. PMID:27048259

  20. The neuroprotective effects of ginsenosides on calcineurin activity and tau phosphorylation in SY5Y cells.

    Tu, Ling-Hui; Ma, Jie; Liu, Hai-Peng; Wang, Rong-Rong; Luo, Jing

    2009-12-01

    Calcineurin (CN) is a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase expressed at high levels in brain. Many findings have shown that calcineurin plays an important role in tau hyperphosphorylation, which is one of the neuropathologic features in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Based on the molecular screening model using p-nitrophenyl phosphate (p-NPP) as a substrate for preliminary screening and (32)P-labeled 19-residue phosphopeptide as a specific substrate for final determination, we found that the total ginsenoside extracts from stems and leaves of Panax ginseng (GSL) could enhance the phosphatase activity of purified CN. In the human neuroblastoma cells SY5Y, inhibition of CN by cyclosporine A (CsA) could induce hyperphosphorylation of tau at multiple sites, accompanied with oxidative stress. Pretreatment of the cells with GSL prior to CsA exposure could alleviate CsA-induced CN inhibition and tau hyperphosphorylation to some degree. Further oxidative parameters demonstrated that GSL caused increased SOD activity and content of SH significantly. It is speculated that GSL weakens CsA-induced CN inhibition through the antioxidant mechanisms. Although our results indicate that GSL may have neuroprotective effects on some characteristic features of AD, the chemical compositions of GSL and their potential for affecting the disease mechanism need to be further studied. PMID:19517226

  1. Lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of NF-{kappa}B non-canonical pathway requires BCL10 serine 138 and NIK phosphorylations

    Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Borthakur, Alip; Dudeja, Pradeep K. [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago and Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612-7227 (United States); Tobacman, Joanne K., E-mail: jkt@uic.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago and Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612-7227 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Background and aims: B-cell lymphoma/leukemia (BCL)-10 and reactive oxygen species mediate two pathways of NF-{kappa}B (RelA) activation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in human colonic epithelial cells. The pathway for LPS activation of RelB by the non-canonical pathway (RelB) in non-myeloid cells was not yet reported, but important for understanding the range of potential microbial LPS-induced effects in inflammatory bowel disease. Methods: Experiments were performed in human colonic epithelial cells and in mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in components of the IkappaB kinase (IKK) signalosome, in order to detect mediators of the non-canonical pathway of NF-{kappa}B activation, including nuclear RelB and p52 and phospho- and total NF-{kappa}B inducing kinase (NIK). BCL10 was silenced by siRNA and effects of mutations of specific phosphorylation sites of BCL10 (Ser138Gly and Ser218Gly) were determined. Results: By the non-canonical pathway, LPS exposure increased nuclear RelB and p52, and phospho-NIK, with no change in total NIK. Phosphorylation of BCL10 serine 138 was required for NIK phosphorylation, since mutation of this residue eliminated the increases in phospho-NIK and nuclear RelB and p52. Mutations of either serine 138 or serine 218 reduced RelA, p50, and phospho-I{kappa}B{alpha} of the canonical pathway. Effects of LPS stimulation and BCL10 silencing on NIK phosphorylation were demonstrated in confocal images. Conclusions: LPS induces activation of both canonical and non-canonical pathways of NF-{kappa}B in human colonic epithelial cells, and the non-canonical pathway requires phosphorylations of BCL10 (serine 138) and NIK. These findings demonstrate the important role of BCL10 in mediating LPS-induced inflammation in human colonic epithelial cells and may open new avenues for therapeutic interventions.

  2. Type 2 diabetes is associated with altered NF-¿B DNA binding activity, JNK phosphorylation, and AMPK phosphorylation in skeletal muscle after LPS

    Andreasen, Anne Sofie; Kelly, Meghan; Berg, Ronan Martin Griffin;

    2011-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is often associated with impaired glucose metabolism. We therefore studied the activation of inflammatory pathway intermediates that interfere with glucose uptake during systemic inflammation by applying a standardised inflammatory stimulus in vivo. After ethical approval, i...

  3. Phosphorylating DNA with DNA

    Li, Yingfu; Breaker, Ronald R.

    1999-01-01

    Nearly 50 individual DNAs with polynucleotide kinase-like activity were isolated from a random-sequence pool by using in vitro selection. Each self-phosphorylating deoxyribozyme makes use of one or more of the eight standard NTPs or dNTPs as a source of activated phosphate. Although most prototypic deoxyribozymes poorly differentiate between the ribose and deoxyribose moieties, further optimization by in vitro selection produced variants that display up to 100-fold discrimination between rela...

  4. Synaptic plasticity and phosphorylation

    Lee, Hey-Kyoung

    2006-01-01

    A number of neuronal functions, including synaptic plasticity, depend on proper regulation of synaptic proteins, many of which can be rapidly regulated by phosphorylation. Neuronal activity controls the function of these synaptic proteins by exquisitely regulating the balance of various protein kinase and protein phosphatase activity. Recent understanding of synaptic plasticity mechanisms underscores important roles that these synaptic phosphoproteins play in regulating both pre- and post-syn...

  5. (S)-Lacosamide Binding to Collapsin Response Mediator Protein 2 (CRMP2) Regulates CaV2.2 Activity by Subverting Its Phosphorylation by Cdk5.

    Moutal, Aubin; François-Moutal, Liberty; Perez-Miller, Samantha; Cottier, Karissa; Chew, Lindsey Anne; Yeon, Seul Ki; Dai, Jixun; Park, Ki Duk; Khanna, May; Khanna, Rajesh

    2016-04-01

    The neuronal circuit remodels during development as well as in human neuropathologies such as epilepsy. Neurite outgrowth is an obligatory step in these events. We recently reported that alterations in the phosphorylation state of an axon specification/guidance protein, the collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2), play a major role in the activity-dependent regulation of neurite outgrowth. We also identified (S)-LCM, an inactive stereoisomer of the clinically used antiepileptic drug (R)-LCM (Vimpat®), as a novel tool for preferentially targeting CRMP2-mediated neurite outgrowth. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which (S)-LCM affects CRMP2 phosphorylation by two key kinases, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β). (S)-LCM application to embryonic cortical neurons resulted in reduced levels of Cdk5- and GSK-3β-phosphorylated CRMP2. Mechanistically, (S)-LCM increased CRMP2 binding to both Cdk5- and GSK-3β without affecting binding of CRMP2 to its canonical partner tubulin. Saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD NMR) and differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) experiments demonstrated direct binding of (S)-LCM to CRMP2. Using an in vitro luminescent kinase assay, we observed that (S)-LCM specifically inhibited Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of CRMP2. Cross-linking experiments and analytical ultracentrifugation showed no effect of (S)-LCM on the oligomerization state of CRMP2. The increased association between Cdk5-phosphorylated CRMP2 and CaV2.2 was reduced by (S)-LCM in vitro and in vivo. This reduction translated into a decrease of calcium influx via CaV2.2 in (S)-LCM-treated neurons compared to controls. (S)-LCM, to our knowledge, is the first molecule described to directly inhibit CRMP2 phosphorylation and may be useful for delineating CRMP2-facilitated functions. PMID:25846820

  6. Activation of the plasma membrane Na/H antiporter salt-overly-sensitive 1 (SOS1) by phosphorylation of an auto-inhibitory C-terminal domain

    Quintero, Francisco J.

    2011-01-24

    The plasma membrane sodium/proton exchanger Salt-Overly-Sensitive 1 (SOS1) is a critical salt tolerance determinant in plants. The SOS2-SOS3 calcium-dependent protein kinase complex upregulates SOS1 activity, but the mechanistic details of this crucial event remain unresolved. Here we show that SOS1 is maintained in a resting state by a C-terminal auto-inhibitory domain that is the target of SOS2-SOS3. The auto-inhibitory domain interacts intramolecularly with an adjacent domain of SOS1 that is essential for activity. SOS1 is relieved from auto-inhibition upon phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory domain by SOS2-SOS3. Mutation of the SOS2 phosphorylation and recognition site impeded the activation of SOS1 in vivo and in vitro. Additional amino acid residues critically important for SOS1 activity and regulation were identified in a genetic screen for hypermorphic alleles.

  7. [Effects of acute hypobaric hypoxia and exhaustive exercise on AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in rat skeletal muscle].

    Yang, Tao; Huang, Qing-Yuan; Shan, Fa-Bo; Guan, Li-Bin; Cai, Ming-Chun

    2012-04-25

    The present study was aimed to explore the changes of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) level in skeletal muscle after exposure to acute hypobaric hypoxia and exhaustive exercise. Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into sea level and high altitude groups. The rats in high altitude group were submitted to simulated 5 000 m of high altitude in a hypobaric chamber for 24 h, and sea level group was maintained at normal conditions. All the rats were subjected to exhaustive swimming exercise. The exhaustion time was recorded. Before and after the exercise, blood lactate and glycogen content in skeletal muscle were determined; AMPK and pAMPK levels in skeletal muscle were detected by Western blot. The results showed that the exhaustion time was significantly decreased after exposure to high altitude. At the moment of exhaustion, high altitude group had lower blood lactate concentration and higher surplus glycogen content in gastrocnemius compared with sea level group. Exhaustive exercise significantly increased the pAMPK/AMPK ratio in rat skeletal muscles from both sea level and high altitude groups. However, high altitude group showed lower pAMPK/AMPK ratio after exhaustion compared to sea level group. These results suggest that, after exposure to acute hypobaric hypoxia, the decrement in exercise capacity may not be due to running out of glycogen, accumulation of lactate or disturbance in energy status in skeletal muscle. PMID:22513470

  8. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate induces oxidative phosphorylation by activating cytochrome c oxidase in human cultured neurons and astrocytes.

    Castellano-González, Gloria; Pichaud, Nicolas; Ballard, J William O; Bessede, Alban; Marcal, Helder; Guillemin, Gilles J

    2016-02-16

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and resulting energy impairment have been identified as features of many neurodegenerative diseases. Whether this energy impairment is the cause of the disease or the consequence of preceding impairment(s) is still under discussion, however a recovery of cellular bioenergetics would plausibly prevent or improve the pathology. In this study, we screened different natural molecules for their ability to increase intracellular adenine triphosphate purine (ATP). Among them, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a polyphenol from green tea, presented the most striking results. We found that it increases ATP production in both human cultured astrocytes and neurons with different kinetic parameters and without toxicity.Specifically, we showed that oxidative phosphorylation in human cultured astrocytes and neurons increased at the level of the routine respiration on the cells pre-treated with the natural molecule. Furthermore, EGCG-induced ATP production was only blocked by sodium azide (NaN3) and oligomycin, inhibitors of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO; complex IV) and ATP synthase (complex V) respectively. These findings suggest that the EGCG modulates CcO activity, as confirmed by its enzymatic activity. CcO is known to be regulated differently in neurons and astrocytes. Accordingly, EGCG treatment is acting differently on the kinetic parameters of the two cell types. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing that EGCG promotes CcO activity in human cultured neurons and astrocytes. Considering that CcO dysfunction has been reported in patients having neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), we therefore suggest that EGCG could restore mitochondrial function and prevent subsequent loss of synaptic function. PMID:26760769

  9. Activation of the TASK-2 channel after cell swelling is dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation

    Kirkegaard, Signe Skyum; Lambert, Ian Henry; Gammeltoft, Steen; Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2010-01-01

    (K,vol) indicating that inhibition of RVD reflects inhibition of TASK-2. We find that in EATC the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein inhibits RVD by 90%, and that the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor monoperoxo(picolinato)-oxo-vanadate(V) [mpV(pic)] shifted the volume set point for inactivation of the channel to a...... lower cell volume. Swelling-activated K(+) efflux was impaired by genistein and the Src kinase family inhibitor 4-amino-5-(4-chloro-phenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP2) and enhanced by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor mpV(pic). With the use of the TASK-2 inhibitor clofilium, it is...... demonstrated that mpV(pic) increased the volume-sensitive part of the K(+) efflux 1.3 times. To exclude K(+) efflux via a KCl cotransporter, cellular Cl(-) was substituted with NO(3)(-). Also under these conditions K(+) efflux was completely blocked by genistein. Thus tyrosine kinases seem to be involved in...

  10. Dietary agent, benzyl isothiocyanate inhibits signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation and collaborates with sulforaphane in the growth suppression of PANC-1 cancer cells

    Deangelis Stephanie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT proteins comprise a family of latent transcription factors with diverse functions. STAT3 has well established roles in cell proliferation, growth and survival, and its persistent activation has been detected with high frequency in many human cancers. As constitutive activation of STAT3 appears to be vital for the continued survival of these cancerous cells, it has emerged as an attractive target for chemotherapeutics. We examined whether the inhibitory activities of bioactive compounds from cruciferous vegetables, such as Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC and sulforaphane, extended to STAT3 activation in PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer cells. BITC and sulforaphane were both capable of inhibiting cell viability and inducing apoptosis in PANC-1. Sulforaphane had minimal effect on the direct inhibition of STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation, however, suggesting its inhibitory activities are most likely STAT3-independent. Conversely, BITC was shown to inhibit the tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3, but not the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, MAPK and p70S6 kinase. These results suggest that STAT3 may be one of the targets of BITC-mediated inhibition of cell viability in PANC-1 cancer cells. In addition, we show that BITC can prevent the induction of STAT3 activation by Interleukin-6 in MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. Furthermore, combinations of BITC and sulforaphane inhibited cell viability and STAT3 phosphorylation more dramatically than either agent alone. These findings suggest that the combination of the dietary agents BITC and sulforaphane has potent inhibitory activity in pancreatic cancer cells and that they may have translational potential as chemopreventative or therapeutic agents.