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Sample records for activation induces close

  1. Activation of SIRT3 attenuates triptolide-induced toxicity through closing mitochondrial permeability transition pore in cardiomyocytes.

    Yang, Yanqin; Wang, Wenwen; Xiong, Zhewen; Kong, Jiamin; Qiu, Yuwen; Shen, Feihai; Huang, Zhiying

    2016-08-01

    Triptolide (TP), an active component of the traditional Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook f. (TWHF), has multiple pharmacological effects. However, the severe toxicity of TP greatly restricts its clinical applications. Although TP exposure causes serious heart injury, the mechanism underlying TP-induced cardiotoxicity has rarely been investigated. In previous studies, we found that TP-induced oxidative stress was involved in the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis of cardiomyocytes. Opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) is the key to the mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiac toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential cardioprotective effects of sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) on the mPTP. In the present study, the cytotoxicity of TP was accompanied by the up-regulation of the SIRT3 protein level and its rapid aggregation in nuclei and mitochondria. The SIRT3-FOXO3 signaling pathway was activated simultaneously, resulting in increased transcription of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase (CAT) for the elimination of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, augmentation of the SIRT3 level via the overexpression plasmid SIRT3-Flag provided resistance to TP-induced cellular damage, whereas knocking down the SIRT3 level via siRNA accelerated the damage. Because it is an activator of SIRT3, the protective effect of resveratrol was also evaluated in H9c2 cells. In conclusion, the current results suggest that activation of SIRT3 substantially ameliorates the detrimental effects of TP by closing the mPTP. PMID:27064125

  2. Solvent-Induced Reversal of Activities between Two Closely Related Heterogeneous Catalysts in the Aldol Reaction

    Kandel, Kapil [Ames Laboratory; Althaus, Stacey M [Ames Laboratory; Peeraphatdit, Chorthip [Ames Laboratory; Kobayashi, Takeshi [Ames Laboratory; Trewyn, Brian G [Ames Laboratory; Pruski, Marek [Ames Laboratory; Slowing, Igor I [Ames Laboratory

    2013-01-11

    The relative rates of the aldol reaction catalyzed by supported primary and secondary amines can be inverted by 2 orders of magnitude, depending on the use of hexane or water as a solvent. Our analyses suggest that this dramatic shift in the catalytic behavior of the supported amines does not involve differences in reaction mechanism, but is caused by activation of imine to enamine equilibria and stabilization of iminium species. The effects of solvent polarity and acidity were found to be important to the performance of the catalytic reaction. This study highlights the critical role of solvent in multicomponent heterogeneous catalytic processes.

  3. Retraction: Open and closed conformations reveal induced fit movements in butyrate kinase 2 activation. J. Diao, Y. D. Ma, and M. S. Hasson.

    2012-06-01

    The following article from Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics, "Open and closed conformations reveal induced fit movements in butyrate kinase 2 activation," by Jiasheng Diao, Yunglin D. Ma, and Miriam S. Hasson, published online on 21 October 2010 in Wiley Online Library (onlinelibrary.wiley.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Bertrand Garcia-Moreno, and Wiley Periodicals. The retraction has been agreed because it was established by internal investigation performed by Purdue University that the authors of this article are not the owners of the data and have no right to publication. PMID:19847916

  4. Preinduction activities: a closed malpractice claims perspective.

    Moody, M L; Kremer, M J

    2001-12-01

    The American Association of Nurse Anesthetists Foundation conducts an ongoing study of closed malpractice claims that involve nurse anesthetists. A team of 8 CRNA researchers has to date investigated 223 closed claim files from the St Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Company. Research findings have demonstrated that failure to provide appropriate anesthesia care relative to the Scope and Standards for Nurse Anesthesia Practice was significantly associated with adverse anesthetic outcomes. Claims that involved inadequate preinduction activities (n = 22) were analyzed in the context of their compliance with published standards of care. The largest group of claims in this analysis (59%) involved damaging respiratory events, 28% entailed damaging cardiovascular events, and the principal issue in 13% of these claims involved failure to seek available information such as laboratory studies on the medical record. The most prevalent occurrence with damaging respiratory events was undocumented airway assessment in 27% of the claims. In 55% of these claims, the medical history was not completely documented. The surgical procedure categories were general surgical (32%), obstetrical (27%), otolaryngogical (23%), orthopedic (14%), and gynecologic (5%). The involved standards of care are reviewed, and recommendations are made regarding consistent completion of preinduction activities. PMID:11837148

  5. 12 CFR 225.129 - Activities closely related to banking.

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Activities closely related to banking. 225.129 Section 225.129 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL... Holding Companies Interpretations § 225.129 Activities closely related to banking. Courier activities....

  6. 12 CFR 225.131 - Activities closely related to banking.

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Activities closely related to banking. 225.131 Section 225.131 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL... Holding Companies Interpretations § 225.131 Activities closely related to banking. (a) Bank...

  7. 12 CFR 225.123 - Activities closely related to banking.

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Activities closely related to banking. 225.123 Section 225.123 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL... Holding Companies Interpretations § 225.123 Activities closely related to banking. (a) Effective June...

  8. Ventricular Septal Defect Spontaneous Close Induced by Transcatheter: A Case Report

    Qilian Xie; Jun Wang; Lei Gao; Zhen Wang; Milin Zhang; Kunshen Liu

    2007-01-01

    Congenital ventricular septal defect (VSD) spontaneous close induced by transcatheter treatment is rare and has not yet been reported.We report on one case of VSD spontaneous close induced by transcatheter treatment in a 10 years old girl.

  9. Climate-induced range overlap among closely related species

    Krosby, Meade; Wilsey, Chad B.; McGuire, Jenny L.; Duggan, Jennifer M.; Nogeire, Theresa M.; Heinrichs, Julie A.; Tewksbury, Joshua J.; Lawler, Joshua J.

    2015-09-01

    Contemporary climate change is causing large shifts in biotic distributions, which has the potential to bring previously isolated, closely related species into contact. This has led to concern that hybridization and competition could threaten species persistence. Here, we use bioclimatic models to show that future range overlap by the end of the century is predicted for only 6.4% of isolated, congeneric species pairs of New World birds, mammals and amphibians. Projected rates of climate-induced overlap are higher for birds (11.6%) than for mammals (4.4%) or amphibians (3.6%). As many species will have difficulty tracking shifting climates, actual rates of future overlap are likely to be far lower, suggesting that hybridization and competition impacts may be relatively modest.

  10. Red deer synchronise their activity with close neighbours

    Sean A. Rands

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Models of collective animal behaviour frequently make assumptions about the effects of neighbours on the behaviour of focal individuals, but these assumptions are rarely tested. One such set of assumptions is that the switch between active and inactive behaviour seen in herding animals is influenced by the activity of close neighbours, where neighbouring animals show a higher degree of behavioural synchrony than would be expected by chance. We tested this assumption by observing the simultaneous behaviour of paired individuals within a herd of red deer Cervus elaphus. Focal individuals were more synchronised with their two closest neighbours than with the third closest or randomly selected individuals from the herd. Our results suggest that the behaviour of individual deer is influenced by immediate neighbours. Even if we assume that there are no social relationships between individuals, this suggests that the assumptions made in models about the influence of neighbours may be appropriate.

  11. Radio Astrometry Of The Close Active Binary HR5110

    Abbuhl, Evan; Lynch, Christene; Güedel, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The close active binary HR 5110 was observed at six epochs over 26 days using a global VLBI array at 15.4~GHz. We used phase-referencing to determine the position of the radio centroid at each epoch with an uncertainty significantly smaller than the component separation. After correcting for proper motion and parallax, we find that the centroid locations of all six epochs have barycenter separations consistent with an emission source located on the KIV secondary, and not in an interaction region between the stars or on the F primary. We used a homogeneous power-law gyrosynchrotron emission model to reproduce the observed flux densities and fractional circular polarization. The resulting ranges of mean magnetic field strength and relativistic electron densities are of order 10 G and $10^5$ cm$^{-3}$ respectively in the source region.

  12. Activation of high and low affinity dopamine receptors generates a closed loop that maintains a conductance ratio and its activity correlate

    Ryan M Hooper

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuromodulators alter network output and have the potential to destabilize a circuit. The mechanisms maintaining stability in the face of neuromodulation are not well described. Using the pyloric network in the crustacean stomatogastric nervous system, we show that dopamine (DA does not simply alter circuit output, but activates a closed loop in which DA-induced alterations in circuit output consequently drive a change in an ionic conductance to preserve a conductance ratio and its activity correlate. DA acted at low affinity type 1 receptors (D1Rs to induce an immediate modulatory decrease in the transient potassium current (IA of a pyloric neuron. This, in turn, advanced the activity phase of that component neuron, which disrupted its network function and thereby destabilized the circuit. DA simultaneously acted at high affinity D1Rs on the same neuron to confer activity-dependence upon the hyperpolarization activated current (Ih such that the DA-induced changes in activity subsequently reduced Ih. This DA-enabled, activity-dependent, intrinsic plasticity exactly compensated for the modulatory decrease in IA to restore the IA:Ih ratio and neuronal activity phase, thereby closing an open loop created by the modulator. Activation of closed loops to preserve conductance ratios may represent a fundamental operating principle neuromodulatory systems use to ensure stability in their target networks.

  13. 12 CFR 225.126 - Activities not closely related to banking.

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Activities not closely related to banking. 225.126 Section 225.126 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE... Financial Holding Companies Interpretations § 225.126 Activities not closely related to banking. Pursuant...

  14. Active vibration and balance system for closed cycle thermodynamic machines

    Qiu, Songgang (Inventor); Augenblick, John E. (Inventor); Peterson, Allen A. (Inventor); White, Maurice A. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An active balance system is provided for counterbalancing vibrations of an axially reciprocating machine. The balance system includes a support member, a flexure assembly, a counterbalance mass, and a linear motor or an actuator. The support member is configured for attachment to the machine. The flexure assembly includes at least one flat spring having connections along a central portion and an outer peripheral portion. One of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion is fixedly mounted to the support member. The counterbalance mass is fixedly carried by the flexure assembly along another of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion. The linear motor has one of a stator and a mover fixedly mounted to the support member and another of the stator and the mover fixedly mounted to the counterbalance mass. The linear motor is operative to axially reciprocate the counterbalance mass. A method is also provided.

  15. Methods for determining enzymatic activity comprising heating and agitation of closed volumes

    Thompson, David Neil; Henriksen, Emily DeCrescenzo; Reed, David William; Jensen, Jill Renee

    2016-03-15

    Methods for determining thermophilic enzymatic activity include heating a substrate solution in a plurality of closed volumes to a predetermined reaction temperature. Without opening the closed volumes, at least one enzyme is added, substantially simultaneously, to the closed volumes. At the predetermined reaction temperature, the closed volumes are agitated and then the activity of the at least one enzyme is determined. The methods are conducive for characterizing enzymes of high-temperature reactions, with insoluble substrates, with substrates and enzymes that do not readily intermix, and with low volumes of substrate and enzyme. Systems for characterizing the enzymes are also disclosed.

  16. Dark/light transition and vigilance states modulate jaw-closing muscle activity level in mice.

    Katayama, Keisuke; Mochizuki, Ayako; Kato, Takafumi; Ikeda, Minako; Ikawa, Yasuha; Nakamura, Shiro; Nakayama, Kiyomi; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Inoue, Tomio

    2015-12-01

    Bruxism is associated with an increase in the activity of the jaw-closing muscles during sleep and wakefulness. However, the changes in jaw-closing muscle activity across states of vigilance over a 24-h period are unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of dark/light transition and sleep/wake state on EMG activity of the masseter (jaw-closing) muscle in comparison with the activity of the upper trapezius muscle (a neck muscle) over a 24-h period in mice. The activities of the masseter and neck muscles during wakefulness were much greater than during non-REM and REM sleep. In contrast, the activities of both muscles slightly, but significantly, decreased during the transition period from dark to light. Histograms of masseter activity during wakefulness and non-REM sleep showed bimodal distributions, whereas the neck muscle showed unimodal activation in all states. These results suggest that the activities of jaw-closing and neck muscles are modulated by both sleep/wake state and dark/light transition, with the latter being to a lesser degree. Furthermore, even during non-REM sleep, jaw-closing muscles display bimodal activation, which may contribute to the occurrence of exaggerated aberrant muscle activity, such as sleep bruxism. PMID:26188127

  17. Cytokinin activity induced by thidiazuron.

    Thomas, J C; Katterman, F R

    1986-06-01

    The diphenylurea derivative thidiazuron induces a variety of cytokinin responses. Levels above 5 x 10(-9) molar and 4 x 10(-7) molar stimulate maximum soybean callus growth and radish cotyledon expansion, respectively. A wider range of dose response related effects follows thidiazuron induced tobacco plant regeneration. Analysis of soybean callus extracts strongly suggests that thidiazuron treatment creates an accumulation and/or synthesis of purine cytokinins, able to induce the growth, expansion and regeneration, mentioned above. PMID:16664878

  18. A CORRELATION BETWEEN HOST STAR ACTIVITY AND PLANET MASS FOR CLOSE-IN EXTRASOLAR PLANETS?

    The activity levels of stars are influenced by several stellar properties, such as stellar rotation, spectral type, and the presence of stellar companions. Analogous to binaries, planetary companions are also thought to be able to cause higher activity levels in their host stars, although at lower levels. Especially in X-rays, such influences are hard to detect because coronae of cool stars exhibit a considerable amount of intrinsic variability. Recently, a correlation between the mass of close-in exoplanets and their host star's X-ray luminosity has been detected, based on archival X-ray data from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. This finding has been interpreted as evidence for star-planet interactions. We show in our analysis that this correlation is caused by selection effects due to the flux limit of the X-ray data used and due to the intrinsic planet detectability of the radial velocity method, and thus does not trace possible planet-induced effects. We also show that the correlation is not present in a corresponding complete sample derived from combined XMM-Newton and ROSAT data.

  19. Modeling Stellar Proton Event-induced particle radiation dose on close-in exoplanets

    Atri, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    Kepler observations have uncovered the existence of a large number of close-in exoplanets and serendipitously of stellar superflares with emissions several orders of magnitude higher than those observed on the Sun. The interaction between the two and its implications on planetary habitability is of great interest to the community. Stellar Proton Events interact with the planetary atmosphere, generate secondary particles and increase the radiation dose on the surface. This effect is amplified for close-in exoplanets and can be a serious threat to potential planetary life. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we model the SPE-induced particle radiation dose on the surface of such exoplanets. We study the dependence of radiation dose on flare energy, planet's orbital distance, magnetic field strength and atmospheric column density, and discuss its implications on constraining planetary habitability.

  20. Whence Induced Demand: How Access Affects Activity

    Levinson, David; Kanchi, Seshasai

    2000-01-01

    Additional highway capacity, by increasing travel speed, affects the individual share of time within a 24-hour budget allocated to various activities (time spent at and traveling to home, shop, work and other), some activities will be undertaken more, others less. This paper extends previous research that identified and quantified induced demand in terms of vehicle miles traveled, by considering questions of what type of demand is induced and which activities are consequently reduced. This pa...

  1. Calpain Activator Dibucaine Induces Platelet Apoptosis

    Jun Liu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Calcium-dependent calpains are a family of cysteine proteases that have been demonstrated to play key roles in both platelet glycoprotein Ibα shedding and platelet activation and altered calpain activity is associated with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Calpain activators induce apoptosis in several types of nucleated cells. However, it is not clear whether calpain activators induce platelet apoptosis. Here we show that the calpain activator dibucaine induced several platelet apoptotic events including depolarization of the mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, up-regulation of Bax and Bak, down-regulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, caspase-3 activation and phosphatidylserine exposure. Platelet apoptosis elicited by dibucaine was not affected by the broad spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. Furthermore, dibucaine did not induce platelet activation as detected by P-selectin expression and PAC-1 binding. However, platelet aggregation induced by ristocetin or α-thrombin, platelet adhesion and spreading on von Willebrand factor were significantly inhibited in platelets treated with dibucaine. Taken together, these data indicate that dibucaine induces platelet apoptosis and platelet dysfunction.

  2. Stresslets induced by active swimmers

    Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Active particles disturb the fluid around them as force dipoles, or stresslets, which govern their collective dynamics. Unlike swimming speeds, the stresslets of active particles are rarely determined due to the lack of a suitable theoretical framework for arbitrary geometry. We propose a general method, based on the reciprocal theorem of Stokes flows, to compute stresslets as integrals of the velocities on the particle's surface, which we illustrate for spheroidal chemically-active particles. Our method will allow tuning the stresslet of artificial swimmers and tailoring their collective motion in complex environments.

  3. Rolling-induced Face Centered Cubic Titanium in Hexagonal Close Packed Titanium at Room Temperature

    Wu, H. C.; Kumar, A.; Wang, J.; Bi, X. F.; Tomé, C. N.; Zhang, Z.; Mao, S. X.

    2016-04-01

    Combining transmission electron microscopes and density functional theory calculations, we report the nucleation and growth mechanisms of room temperature rolling induced face-centered cubic titanium (fcc-Ti) in polycrystalline hexagonal close packed titanium (hcp-Ti). Fcc-Ti and hcp-Ti take the orientation relation: hcp||fcc and , different from the conventional one. The nucleation of fcc-Ti is accomplished via pure-shuffle mechanism with a minimum stable thickness of three atomic layers, and the growth via shear-shuffle mechanisms through gliding two-layer disconnections or pure-shuffle mechanisms through gliding four-layer disconnections. Such phase transformation offers an additional plastic deformation mode comparable to twinning.

  4. Acutely induced anxiety increases negative interpretations of events in a closed-circuit television monitoring task.

    Cooper, Robbie; Howard, Christina J; Attwood, Angela S; Stirland, Rachel; Rostant, Viviane; Renton, Lynne; Goodwin, Christine; Munafò, Marcus R

    2013-01-01

    In two experiments we measured the effects of 7.5% CO₂ inhalation on the interpretation of video footage recorded on closed circuit television (CCTV). As predicted, inhalation of 7.5% CO₂ was associated with increases in physiological and subjective correlates of anxiety compared with inhalation of medical air (placebo). Importantly, when in the 7.5% CO₂ condition, participants reported the increased presence of suspicious activity compared with placebo (Experiment 1), a finding that was replicated and extended (Experiment 2) with no concomitant increase in the reporting of the presence of positive activity. These findings support previous work on interpretative bias in anxiety but are novel in terms of how the anxiety was elicited, the nature of the interpretative bias, and the ecological validity of the task. PMID:22780582

  5. An evolutionary vaccination game in the modified activity driven network by considering the closeness

    Han, Dun; Sun, Mei

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we explore an evolutionary vaccination game in the modified activity driven network by considering the closeness. We set a closeness parameter p which is used to describe the way of connection between two individuals. The simulation results show that the closeness p may have an active role in weakening both the spreading of epidemic and the vaccination. Besides, when vaccination is not allowed, the final recovered density increases with the value of the ratio of the infection rate to the recovery rate λ / μ. However, when vaccination is allowed the final density of recovered individual first increases and then decreases with the value of λ / μ. Two variables are designed to identify the relation between the individuals' activities and their states. The results draw that both recovered and vaccinated frequency increase with the increase of the individuals' activities. Meanwhile, the immune fee has less impact on the individuals' vaccination than the closeness. While the λ / μ is in a certain range, with the increase of the value of λ / μ, the recovered frequency of the whole crowds reduces. Our results, therefore, reveal the fact that the best of intentions may lead to backfire.

  6. Experimental study on flow-induced acoustic resonance in square closed side branch

    Flow-induced acoustic resonance is a phenomenon caused by the interaction of flow and acoustic fields in special structure. Acoustic resonance characteristic experiments were carried out on square closed side branch. The influences of the velocity in main pipe and the length of the side branch on acoustic resonance were studied. The range of occurrence and characteristics of pressure pulsation were analyzed. Three lengths of side branches (L/d=5.6 and 7) were experimentally studied and the Reynolds number in the experiment was 2.74 X 104-2.429 X 105 while the Mach number was 0.025-0.218. The results show that the resonance frequency shows a lock-in phenomenon with the increase of velocity. As the length of the side branch increasing, the amplitude of the acoustic pressure and the resonance frequency decrease. In the considered structure, the acoustic resonance occurs when Strouhal number is 0.3-0.6 and 0.7-1.0. (authors)

  7. Alloxan-induced diabetes delays repair in a rat model of closed tibial fracture

    S.F. Diniz

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A closed fracture was performed on the left tibia of 3-month-old Wistar rats weighing 250 to 350 g that were either healthy (N = 24 or made diabetic with alloxan (N = 24 to investigate the effect of alloxan-induced diabetes on the course of bone fracture healing. Histomorphometric analysis of the fracture site was performed at 7, 14, 25, and 35 days. After 7 days, diabetic rats had significantly less cartilage (P = 0.045 and greater fibrous connective (P = 0.006 tissue formation at the fracture site compared to controls. In contrast, marked callus formation was seen in diabetic rats with significant osteogenesis (P = 0.011, P = 0.010, P = 0.010, respectively, for 14, 25, and 35 days and chondrogenesis (P = 0.028, P = 0.033, P = 0.019 compared to controls. Radiographic analysis revealed a displaced fracture with poor bone fragment alignment and delayed consolidation at these times in the diabetic group. The levels of alkaline phosphatase were significantly higher in diabetic rats at 25 days (P = 0.009. These results suggest that the initial excessive formation of fibrous connective tissue associated with delay in chondrogenesis and osteogenesis may not provide suitable stability of the fractured site, contributing to the inappropriate alignment of fragments and an increase in the volume of callus in later stages of repair. The resulting displaced fracture in diabetic rats requires long periods for remodeling and complete bone consolidation.

  8. A crude model to study radio frequency induced density modification close to launchers

    The interplay between radio frequency (RF) waves and the density is discussed by adopting the general framework of a 2-time-scale multi-fluid treatment, allowing to separate the dynamics on the RF time scale from that on the time scale on which macroscopic density and flows vary as a result of the presence of electromagnetic and/or electrostatic fields. The focus is on regions close to launchers where charge neutrality is incomplete and waves are commonly evanescent. The fast time scale dynamics influences the slow time scale behavior via quasilinear terms (the Ponderomotive force for the case of the equation of motion). Electrons and ions are treated on the same footing. Also, both fast and slow waves are retained in the wave description. Although this work is meant as a subtopic of a large study—the wave induced “convective cell” physics at hand is of a 2- or 3-dimensional nature while this paper limits itself to a single dimension—a few tentative examples are presented

  9. A crude model to study radio frequency induced density modification close to launchers

    Van Eester, Dirk [Laboratory for Plasma Physics (ERM/KMS), EUROfusion Consortium Member, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Brussels (Belgium); Crombé, Kristel [Laboratory for Plasma Physics (ERM/KMS), EUROfusion Consortium Member, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Brussels (Belgium); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-12-15

    The interplay between radio frequency (RF) waves and the density is discussed by adopting the general framework of a 2-time-scale multi-fluid treatment, allowing to separate the dynamics on the RF time scale from that on the time scale on which macroscopic density and flows vary as a result of the presence of electromagnetic and/or electrostatic fields. The focus is on regions close to launchers where charge neutrality is incomplete and waves are commonly evanescent. The fast time scale dynamics influences the slow time scale behavior via quasilinear terms (the Ponderomotive force for the case of the equation of motion). Electrons and ions are treated on the same footing. Also, both fast and slow waves are retained in the wave description. Although this work is meant as a subtopic of a large study—the wave induced “convective cell” physics at hand is of a 2- or 3-dimensional nature while this paper limits itself to a single dimension—a few tentative examples are presented.

  10. The Effects of Close Companions (and Rotation) on the Magnetic Activity of M Dwarfs

    Morgan, Dylan P; Garcés, Ane; Catalán, Silvia; Dhital, Saurav; Fuchs, Miriam; Silvestri, Nicole M

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of close white dwarf and M dwarf (WD+dM) binary systems and examine the effect that a close companion has on the magnetic field generation in M dwarfs. We use a base sample of 1602 white dwarf -- main sequence binaries from Rebassa et al. to develop a set of color cuts in GALEX, SDSS, UKIDSS, and 2MASS color space to construct a sample of 1756 WD+dM high-quality pairs from the SDSS DR8 spectroscopic database. We separate the individual WD and dM from each spectrum using an iterative technique that compares the WD and dM components to best-fit templates. Using the absolute height above the Galactic plane as a proxy for age, and the H{\\alpha} emission line as an indicator for magnetic activity, we investigate the age-activity relation for our sample for spectral types \\leqM7. Our results show that early-type M dwarfs (\\leqM4) in close binary systems are more likely to be active and have longer activity lifetimes compared to their field counterparts. However, at a spectral type of M5 (just pas...

  11. Comparative Analysis of Methods to Induce Myocardial Infarction in a Closed-Chest Rabbit Model

    Marc-Antoine Isorni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To develop a rabbit model of closed-chest catheter-induced myocardial infarction. Background. Limitations of rodent and large animal models justify the search for clinically relevant alternatives. Methods. Microcatheterization of the heart was performed in 47 anesthetized 3-4 kg New Zealand rabbits to test five techniques of myocardial ischemia: free coils (n=4, interlocking coils (n=4, thrombogenic gelatin sponge (n=4, balloon occlusion (n=4, and alcohol injection (n=8. In order to limit ventricular fibrillation, an antiarrhythmic protocol was implemented, with beta-blockers/amiodarone before and xylocaine infusion during the procedure. Clinical, angiographic, and echographic data were gathered. End points included demonstration of vessel occlusion (TIMI flow grades 0 and 1 on the angiogram, impairment of left ventricular function at 2 weeks after procedure (by echocardiography, and pathologically confirmed myocardial infarction. Results. The best arterial access was determined to be through the right carotid artery. The internal mammary guiding catheter 4-Fr was selected as the optimal device for selective intracoronary injection. Free coils deployed prematurely and tended to prolapse into the aorta. Interlocking coils did not deploy completely and failed to provide reliable results. Gelatin sponge was difficult to handle, adhered to the catheter, and could not be clearly visualized by fluoroscopy. Balloon occlusion yielded inconsistent results. Alcohol injection was the most efficient and reproducible method for inducing myocardial infarction (4 out of 6 animals, the extent of which could be fine-tuned by using a coaxial balloon catheter as a microcatheter (0.52 mm to achieve a superselective injection of 0.2 mL of alcohol. This approach resulted in a 20% decrease in LVEF and infarcted myocardium was confirmed histologically. Conclusions. By following a stepwise approach, a minimally invasive, effective, and reproducible

  12. Exopolysaccharide from Trichoderma pseudokoningii induces macrophage activation.

    Wang, Guodong; Zhu, Lei; Yu, Bo; Chen, Ke; Liu, Bo; Liu, Jun; Qin, Guozheng; Liu, Chunyan; Liu, Huixia; Chen, Kaoshan

    2016-09-20

    In this study, we evaluated the immunomodulatory activity of an exopolysaccharide (EPS) derived from Trichoderma pseudokoningii and investigated the molecular mechanism of EPS-mediated activation of macrophages. Results revealed that EPS could significantly induce the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β and enhance phagocytic activity in RAW 264.7 cells. Immunofluorescence staining indicated that EPS promoted the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 subunit. Western blot analysis showed that EPS increased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein, the degradation of IκB-α and the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Furthermore, pretreatment of RAW 264.7 cells with specific inhibitors of NF-κB and MAPKs significantly attenuated EPS-induced TNF-α and IL-1β production. EPS also induced the inhibition of cytokine secretion by special antibodies against Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and Dectin-1. These data suggest that EPS from Trichoderma pseudokoningii activates RAW 264.7 cells through NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways via TLR4 and Dectin-1. PMID:27261736

  13. Wave induced density modification in RF sheaths and close to wave launchers

    Van Eester, D., E-mail: d.van.eester@fz-juelich.de [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, ERM/KMS, EUROfusion Consortium Member, Brussels (Belgium); Crombé, K. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, ERM/KMS, EUROfusion Consortium Member, Brussels (Belgium); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Lu, Ling-Feng [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2015-12-10

    With the return to full metal walls - a necessary step towards viable fusion machines - and due to the high power densities of current-day ICRH (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating) or RF (radio frequency) antennas, there is ample renewed interest in exploring the reasons for wave-induced sputtering and formation of hot spots. Moreover, there is experimental evidence on various machines that RF waves influence the density profile close to the wave launchers so that waves indirectly influence their own coupling efficiency. The present study presents a return to first principles and describes the wave-particle interaction using a 2-time scale model involving the equation of motion, the continuity equation and the wave equation on each of the time scales. Through the changing density pattern, the fast time scale dynamics is affected by the slow time scale events. In turn, the slow time scale density and flows are modified by the presence of the RF waves through quasilinear terms. Although finite zero order flows are identified, the usual cold plasma dielectric tensor - ignoring such flows - is adopted as a first approximation to describe the wave response to the RF driver. The resulting set of equations is composed of linear and nonlinear equations and is tackled in 1D in the present paper. Whereas the former can be solved using standard numerical techniques, the latter require special handling. At the price of multiple iterations, a simple ’derivative switch-on’ procedure allows to reformulate the nonlinear problem as a sequence of linear problems. Analytical expressions allow a first crude assessment - revealing that the ponderomotive potential plays a role similar to that of the electrostatic potential arising from charge separation - but numerical implementation is required to get a feeling of the full dynamics. A few tentative examples are provided to illustrate the phenomena involved.

  14. Wave induced density modification in RF sheaths and close to wave launchers

    Van Eester, D.; Crombé, K.; Lu, Ling-Feng

    2015-12-01

    With the return to full metal walls - a necessary step towards viable fusion machines - and due to the high power densities of current-day ICRH (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating) or RF (radio frequency) antennas, there is ample renewed interest in exploring the reasons for wave-induced sputtering and formation of hot spots. Moreover, there is experimental evidence on various machines that RF waves influence the density profile close to the wave launchers so that waves indirectly influence their own coupling efficiency. The present study presents a return to first principles and describes the wave-particle interaction using a 2-time scale model involving the equation of motion, the continuity equation and the wave equation on each of the time scales. Through the changing density pattern, the fast time scale dynamics is affected by the slow time scale events. In turn, the slow time scale density and flows are modified by the presence of the RF waves through quasilinear terms. Although finite zero order flows are identified, the usual cold plasma dielectric tensor - ignoring such flows - is adopted as a first approximation to describe the wave response to the RF driver. The resulting set of equations is composed of linear and nonlinear equations and is tackled in 1D in the present paper. Whereas the former can be solved using standard numerical techniques, the latter require special handling. At the price of multiple iterations, a simple 'derivative switch-on' procedure allows to reformulate the nonlinear problem as a sequence of linear problems. Analytical expressions allow a first crude assessment - revealing that the ponderomotive potential plays a role similar to that of the electrostatic potential arising from charge separation - but numerical implementation is required to get a feeling of the full dynamics. A few tentative examples are provided to illustrate the phenomena involved.

  15. Wave induced density modification in RF sheaths and close to wave launchers

    With the return to full metal walls - a necessary step towards viable fusion machines - and due to the high power densities of current-day ICRH (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating) or RF (radio frequency) antennas, there is ample renewed interest in exploring the reasons for wave-induced sputtering and formation of hot spots. Moreover, there is experimental evidence on various machines that RF waves influence the density profile close to the wave launchers so that waves indirectly influence their own coupling efficiency. The present study presents a return to first principles and describes the wave-particle interaction using a 2-time scale model involving the equation of motion, the continuity equation and the wave equation on each of the time scales. Through the changing density pattern, the fast time scale dynamics is affected by the slow time scale events. In turn, the slow time scale density and flows are modified by the presence of the RF waves through quasilinear terms. Although finite zero order flows are identified, the usual cold plasma dielectric tensor - ignoring such flows - is adopted as a first approximation to describe the wave response to the RF driver. The resulting set of equations is composed of linear and nonlinear equations and is tackled in 1D in the present paper. Whereas the former can be solved using standard numerical techniques, the latter require special handling. At the price of multiple iterations, a simple ’derivative switch-on’ procedure allows to reformulate the nonlinear problem as a sequence of linear problems. Analytical expressions allow a first crude assessment - revealing that the ponderomotive potential plays a role similar to that of the electrostatic potential arising from charge separation - but numerical implementation is required to get a feeling of the full dynamics. A few tentative examples are provided to illustrate the phenomena involved

  16. Actively Closing the Gap? Social Class, Organized Activities, and Academic Achievement in High School

    Morris, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Participation in Organized Activities (OA) is associated with positive behavioral and developmental outcomes in children. However, less is known about how particular aspects of participation affect the academic achievement of high school students from different social class positions. Using the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002, this study…

  17. Linear Closed-form Solution and Finite-element Analysis of an Active Tensegrity Unit

    Kmeť, Stanislav; Platko, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Results of the linear closed form solution of an active or adaptive tensegrity unit, as well as its numerical analysis using finite element method are presented in the paper. The shape of the unit is an octahedral cell with a square base and it is formed by thirteen members (four bottom and four top cables, four edge struts and one central strut). The central strut is designed as an actuator that allows for an adjustment of the shape of the unit which leads to changes of tensile forces in the cables. Due to the diagonal symmetry of the 3D tensegrity unit the closed-form analysis is based on the 2D solution of the equivalent planar biconvex cable system with one central strut under a vertical point load.

  18. Characterization and restoration of performance of {open_quotes}aged{close_quotes} radioiodine removing activated carbons

    Freeman, W.P. [NUCON International, Inc., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The degradation of radioiodine removal performance for impregnated activated carbons because of ageing is well established. However, the causes for this degradation remain unclear. One theory is that this reduction in performance from the ageing process results from an oxidation of the surface of the carbon. Radioiodine removing activated carbons that failed radioiodine removal tests showed an oxidized surface that had become hydrophilic compared with new carbons. We attempted to restore the performance of these {open_quotes}failed{close_quotes} carbons with a combination of thermal and chemical treatment. The results of these investigations are presented and discussed with the view of extending the life of radioiodine removing activated carbons. 4 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Thermal Dihydrogen Activation by a Closed-Shell AuCeO2(+) Cluster.

    Meng, Jing-Heng; He, Sheng-Gui

    2014-11-01

    Laser-ablation-generated AuCeO2(+) and CeO2(+) oxide clusters were mass-selected using a quadrupole mass filter and reacted with H2 in an ion trap reactor at ambient conditions. The reactions were characterized by mass spectrometry and density functional theory calculations. The gold-cerium bimetallic oxide cluster AuCeO2(+) is more reactive in H2 activation than the pure cerium oxide cluster CeO2(+). The gold atom is the active adsorption site and facilitates the heterolytic cleavage of H2 in collaboration with the separated O(2-) ion of the CeO2 support. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of thermal H2 activation by a closed-shell atomic cluster, which provides molecular-level insights into the single gold atom catalysis over metal oxide supports. PMID:26278765

  20. Electric current-induced lymphatic activation.

    Kajiya, Kentaro; Matsumoto-Okazaki, Yuko; Sawane, Mika; Fukada, Kaedeko; Takasugi, Yuya; Akai, Tomonori; Saito, Naoki; Mori, Yuichiro

    2014-12-01

    The lymphatic system in skin plays important roles in drainage of wastes and in the afferent phase of immune response. We previously showed that activation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), specifically the VEGFC/VEGFR-3 pathway, attenuates oedema and inflammation by promoting lymphangiogenesis, suggesting a protective role of lymphatic vessels against skin inflammation. However, it remains unknown how physical stimuli promote lymphatic function. Here, we show that lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are activated by direct-current (DC) electrical stimulation, which induced extension of actin filaments of LECs, increased calcium influx into LECs, and increased phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). An inhibitor of focal adhesion kinase, which plays a role in cellular adhesion and motility, diminished the DC-induced extension of F-actin and abrogated p38 phosphorylation. Time-lapse imaging revealed that pulsed-DC stimulation promoted proliferation and migration of LECs. Overall, these results indicate that electro-stimulation activates lymphatic function by activating p38 MAPK. PMID:25308203

  1. HIFU-induced gene activation in vitro

    Liu, Yunbo; Zhong, Pei; Kon, Takashi; Li, Chuanyuan

    2001-05-01

    This work investigated the inducible gene activation in cancer cells that were sublethally injured during HIFU treatment. HeLa cells were transfected by an adenovirus vector that encodes GFP under the control of hsp70B promoter, leading to about 65% transfection efficiency. A volume of 10 μL transfected HeLa cells in suspension (5×107 cells/ml) were placed at the bottom of a PCR tube so that the cell suspension could be heated to a peak temperature of 50°C, 60°C, and 70°C for 120, 10, and 1 s, respectively, by a focused 1.1-MHz HIFU transducer operated at a peak negative pressure of -2.7 MPa at different duty cycles. One day after HIFU treatment, cell viability was determined to be 63%, 35%, and 18%, respectively, based on Trypan Blue exclusion test. Importantly, in all test groups, inducible GFP expression was detected in about 40%-50% of the surviving cells with GFP intensity increased by 25-fold based on flow cytometry analysis. These results demonstrate that even under the short exposure duration of HIFU treatment, inducible gene expression could be produced in sublethally injured cell population in vitro. Further studies are underway to explore the optimal HIFU condition for gene activation in vivo.

  2. Activities induced in the human body by thermal neutrons

    Activities of 17 radionuclides induced in the human body by the activation of 14 elements with thermal neutrons were calculated. Resulting dependences of these activities on the activation time are shown in graphs. (author)

  3. How the IMF By induces a By component in the closed magnetosphere and how it leads to asymmetric currents and convection patterns in the two hemispheres

    Tenfjord, P.; Østgaard, N.; Snekvik, K.; Laundal, K. M.; Reistad, J. P.; Haaland, S.; Milan, S. E.

    2015-11-01

    We used the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global magnetohydrodynamics model to study the effects of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By component on the coupling between the solar wind and magnetosphere-ionosphere system. When the IMF reconnects with the terrestrial magnetic field with IMF By≠0, flux transport is asymmetrically distributed between the two hemispheres. We describe how By is induced in the closed magnetosphere on both the dayside and nightside and present the governing equations. The magnetosphere imposes asymmetric forces on the ionosphere, and the effects on the ionospheric flow are characterized by distorted convection cell patterns, often referred to as "banana" and "orange" cell patterns. The flux asymmetrically added to the lobes results in a nonuniform induced By in the closed magnetosphere. By including the dynamics of the system, we introduce a mechanism that predicts asymmetric Birkeland currents at conjugate foot points. Asymmetric Birkeland currents are created as a consequence of y directed tension contained in the return flow. Associated with these currents, we expect fast localized ionospheric azimuthal flows present in one hemisphere but not necessarily in the other. We also present current density measurements from Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment that are consistent with this picture. We argue that the induced By produces asymmetrical Birkeland currents as a consequence of asymmetric stress balance between the hemispheres. Such an asymmetry will also lead to asymmetrical foot points and asymmetries in the azimuthal flow in the ionosphere. These phenomena should therefore be treated in a unified way.

  4. Radiation degradation of polysaccharides and induced biological activity

    Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Yoshii, Fumio; Makuuchi Keizo; Kume Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Mitomo, Hiroshi [Gunma Univ., Kiryu (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-09-01

    Relationship between irradiation effect of polysaccharides and induced biological activity for plants has been investigated. Sodium alginate was irradiated by gamma-rays from a Co-60 source in liquid state (aqueous solution) and in solid state (powder form). Measurement of molecular weight and analysis of UV spectra of irradiated sodium alginate have been carried out. The molecular weight was decreased by irradiation in both conditions. New absorbance peak derived from double bond or/and carbonyl group was appeared at close to 267 nm by irradiation in UV spectra. It was found that alginate having molecular weight about 10,000 is most suitable to used as growth promoter in plants. To obtain the molecular weight of 10,000 by irradiation, the necessary doses are 100 kGy in liquid state and 500 kGy in solid state, respectively. (author)

  5. Wounding coordinately induces cell wall protein, cell cycle and pectin methyl esterase genes involved in tuber closing layer and wound periderm development.

    Neubauer, Jonathan D; Lulai, Edward C; Thompson, Asunta L; Suttle, Jeffrey C; Bolton, Melvin D

    2012-04-15

    Little is known about the coordinate induction of genes that may be involved in agriculturally important wound-healing events. In this study, wound-healing events were determined together with wound-induced expression profiles of selected cell cycle, cell wall protein, and pectin methyl esterase genes using two diverse potato genotypes and two harvests (NDTX4271-5R and Russet Burbank tubers; 2008 and 2009 harvests). By 5 d after wounding, the closing layer and a nascent phellogen had formed. Phellogen cell divisions generated phellem layers until cessation of cell division at 28 d after wounding for both genotypes and harvests. Cell cycle genes encoding epidermal growth factor binding protein (StEBP), cyclin-dependent kinase B (StCDKB) and cyclin-dependent kinase regulatory subunit (StCKS1At) were induced by 1 d after wounding; these expressions coordinated with related phellogen formation and the induction and cessation of phellem cell formation. Genes encoding the structural cell wall proteins extensin (StExt1) and extensin-like (StExtlk) were dramatically up-regulated by 1-5 d after wounding, suggesting involvement with closing layer and later phellem cell layer formation. Wounding up-regulated pectin methyl esterase genes (StPME and StPrePME); StPME expression increased during closing layer and phellem cell formation, whereas maximum expression of StPrePME occurred at 5-14 d after wounding, implicating involvement in later modifications for closing layer and phellem cell formation. The coordinate induction and expression profile of StTLRP, a gene encoding a cell wall strengthening "tyrosine-and lysine-rich protein," suggested a role in the formation of the closing layer followed by phellem cell generation and maturation. Collectively, the genes monitored were wound-inducible and their expression profiles markedly coordinated with closing layer formation and the index for phellogen layer meristematic activity during wound periderm development; results were more

  6. New Atglistatin closely related analogues: Synthesis and structure-activity relationship towards adipose triglyceride lipase inhibition.

    Roy, Pierre-Philippe; D'Souza, Kenneth; Cuperlovic-Culf, Miroslava; Kienesberger, Petra C; Touaibia, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    Adipose Triglyceride Lipase (ATGL) performs the first and rate-limiting step in lipolysis by hydrolyzing triacylglycerols stored in lipid droplets to diacylglycerols. By mediating lipolysis in adipose and non-adipose tissues, ATGL is a major regulator of overall energy metabolism and plasma lipid levels. Since chronically high levels of plasma lipids are linked to metabolic disorders including insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, ATGL is an interesting therapeutic target. In the present study, fourteen closely related analogues of Atglistatin (1), a newly discovered ATGL inhibitor, were synthesized, and their ATGL inhibitory activity was evaluated. The effect of these analogues on lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes clearly shows that inhibition of the enzyme by Atglistatin (1) is due to the presence of the carbamate and N,N-dimethyl moieties on the biaryl central core at meta and para position, respectively. Mono carbamate-substituted analogue C2, in which the carbamate group was in the meta position as in Atglistatin (1), showed slight inhibition. Low dipole moment of Atglistatin (1) compared to the synthesized analogues possibly explains the lower inhibitory activities. PMID:27155760

  7. The Extremely Low Activity Comet 209P/LINEAR During Its Extraordinary Close Approach in 2014

    Schleicher, David G

    2016-01-01

    We present results from our observing campaign of Comet 209P/LINEAR during its exceptionally close approach to Earth during May of 2014, the third smallest perigee of any comet in two centuries. These circumstances permitted us to pursue several studies of this intrinsically faint object, including measurements of gas and dust production rates, searching for coma morphology, and direct detection of the nucleus to measure its properties. Indeed, we successfully measured the lowest water production rates of an intact comet in over 35 years and a corresponding smallest active area, ~0.007 km^2. When combined with the nucleus size found from radar (Howell et al. 2014), this also yields the smallest active fraction for any comet, ~0.024%. In all, this strongly suggests that 209P/LINEAR is on its way to becoming an inert object. The nucleus was detected but could not easily be disentangled from the inner coma due to seeing variations and changing spatial scales. Even so, we were able to measure a double-peaked ligh...

  8. Noise-Induced Amplification of Seasonal to Century Scale Oscillations in Closed Basins

    Duffy, C. J.

    2001-05-01

    In the western US, the Great Basin region of the Basin and Range physiographic province, and individual closed-lake basins (e.g. the Great Salt Lake, Mono Lake), form a macrocosm of the water cycle where a balance of regional-scale natural and human impacts can be studied in a system forced by global weather and climate. Topographically and hydrologically, the region is a closed system, in that no rivers drain the region, and the water cycle is completed through a balance of precipitation and evaporation. It is often held that closed basins have the effect of "amplifying" the climate or the orbital signal. However, the physical mechanism to explain the dominant low-frequency behavior of lake fluctuations is largely based on the relatively short time scales of surface processes. Much evidence suggests that low-frequency components in the Great Salt Lake level/volume record (Lall and Mann, 1995; Mann et al. 1995), are consistent with the El Nino-Southern Oscillation, quasi-biennial, and quasi-decadal signature. However, the physical role that the lake-basin hydrology, topography and geology play is unresolved. This research is formulating multi-scale physical models of regional subsurface-surface hydrologic processes where soil moisture and groundwater interact nonlinearly with runoff and lake levels at multiple scales. Our preliminary hypothesis is that random fluctuations and weak low-frequency oscillations in seasonal to interdecadal climatic forcing in closed basins, may interact with the longer time scales of deep soil-moisture and groundwater storage to amplify low-frequency modes in runoff and lake levels. For the simplest explanation, subsurface storage can be thought of as a linear low-pass filter to atmospheric forcing which attenuates high frequency variance components in runoff. However, nonlinear storage effects (e.g. free surface condition, unsaturated storage, etc.) subject to stochastic and periodic forcing can under certain conditions, amplify low

  9. High-pressure torsion induced microstructural evolution in a hexagonal close-packed Zr alloy

    Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the microstructural evolution of a hexagonal close-packed Zr alloy subjected to high-pressure torsion at 3.8 GPa. Results show that an inhomogeneous grain size distribution was obtained at the early stages of deformation, which is unique to hexagonal structures. {1-bar 011} deformation twins, which have never been reported in Zr alloys, were observed in coarse grains but not in refined grains. The grain refinement mechanism is discussed based on the experimental observation.

  10. Activation induced deaminase: how much and where?

    Orthwein, Alexandre; Di Noia, Javier M

    2012-08-01

    Activation induced deaminase (AID) plays a central role in adaptive immunity by initiating the processes of somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR). On the other hand, AID also predisposes to lymphoma and plays a role in some autoimmune diseases, for which reasons AID expression and activity are regulated at various levels. Post-translational mechanisms regulating the amount and subcellular localization of AID are prominent in balancing AID physiological and pathological functions in B cells. Mechanisms regulating AID protein levels include stabilizing chaperones in the cytoplasm and proteins efficiently targeting AID to the proteasome within the nucleus. Nuclear export and cytoplasmic retention contribute to limit the amount of AID accessing the genome. Additionally, a number of factors have been implicated in AID active nuclear import. We review these intertwined mechanisms proposing two scenarios in which they could interact as a network or as a cycle for defining the optimal amount of AID protein. We also comparatively review the expression levels of AID necessary for its function during the immune response, present in different cancers as well as in those tissues in which AID has been implicated in epigenetic remodeling of the genome by demethylating DNA. PMID:22687198

  11. Stellar wind induced soft X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets

    Kislyakova, K G; Johnstone, C P; Holmström, M; Zaitsev, V V; Lammer, H

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we estimate the X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets. We show that the Solar/Stellar Wind Charge Exchange Mechanism (SWCX) which produces soft X-ray emission is very effective for hot Jupiters. In this mechanism, X-ray photons are emitted as a result of the charge exchange between heavy ions in the solar wind and the atmospheric neutral particles. In the Solar System, comets produce X-rays mostly through the SWCX mechanism, but it has also been shown to operate in the heliosphere, in the terrestrial magnetosheath, and on Mars, Venus and Moon. Since the number of emitted photons is proportional to the solar wind mass flux, this mechanism is not very effective for the Solar system giants. Here we present a simple estimate of the X-ray emission intensity that can be produced by close-in extrasolar giant planets due to charge exchange with the heavy ions of the stellar wind. Using the example of HD~209458b, we show that this mechanism alone can be responsible for an X-ray emission of $\\approx 10...

  12. STELLAR WIND INDUCED SOFT X-RAY EMISSION FROM CLOSE-IN EXOPLANETS

    Kislyakova, K. G.; Lammer, H. [Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz (Austria); Fossati, L. [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie der Universität Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Johnstone, C. P. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Holmström, M. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna (Sweden); Zaitsev, V. V., E-mail: kristina.kislyakova@oeaw.ac.at [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-30

    In this Letter, we estimate the X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets. We show that the Solar/Stellar Wind Charge Exchange Mechanism (SWCX), which produces soft X-ray emission, is very effective for hot Jupiters. In this mechanism, X-ray photons are emitted as a result of the charge exchange between heavy ions in the solar wind and the atmospheric neutral particles. In the solar system, comets produce X-rays mostly through the SWCX mechanism, but it has also been shown to operate in the heliosphere, in the terrestrial magnetosheath, and on Mars, Venus, and the Moon. Since the number of emitted photons is proportional to the solar wind mass flux, this mechanism is not very effective for the solar system giants. Here we present a simple estimate of the X-ray emission intensity that can be produced by close-in extrasolar giant planets due to charge exchange with the heavy ions of the stellar wind. Using the example of HD 209458b, we show that this mechanism alone can be responsible for an X-ray emission of ≈10{sup 22} erg s{sup –1}, which is 10{sup 6} times stronger than the emission from the Jovian aurora. We discuss also the possibility of observing the predicted soft X-ray flux of hot Jupiters and show that despite high emission intensities they are unobservable with current facilities.

  13. Stelllar wind induced soft X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets

    Kislyakova, Kristina; Fossati, Luca; Johnstone, Colin P.; Holmström, Mats; Zaitsev, Valery V.; Lammer, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    We estimate the X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets. We show that the Solar/Stellar Wind Charge Exchange Mechanism (SWCX) which produces soft X-ray radiation is very effective for hot Jupiters. In this mechanism, X-ray photons are produces by charge exchange between heavy ions in the solar wind and the atmospheric neutral particles. This mechanism is know to generate X-ray emission of comets in the Solar system. It has also been shown to operate in the heliosphere, in the terrestrial magnetosheath, and on Mars, Venus and Moon. Since the number of emitted photons is proportional to the solar wind mass flux, this mechanism is not effective for the Solar system giants. We present a simple estimate of the X-ray emission intensity that can be produced by close-in extrasolar Hot Jupiters due to charge exchange with the heavy ions of the stellar wind. Using the example of HD 209458b, we show that this mechanism alone can be responsible for an X-ray emission of ≈ 1022 erg s‑1, which is 106 times stronger than the emission from the Jovian aurora. We discuss the possibility to observe the predicted soft X-ray flux of hot Jupiters and show that despite high emission intensities they are unobservable with current facilities.

  14. Reaction mechanisms in collisions induced by 8B beam close to the barrier

    The aim of the proposed experiment is to investigate on the reaction dynamics of proton-halo induced collisions at energies around the Coulomb barrier where coupling to continuum effects are expected to be important. We propose to measure $^{8}$B+$^{64}$Zn elastic scattering angular distribution together with the measurement, for the first time, of p-$^{7}$Be coincidences coming from transfer and/or break-up of $^{8}$B. The latter will allow a better understanding of the relative contribution of elastic $\\textit{vs}$ non-elastic break-up in reactions induced by extremely weakly-bound nuclei. We believe that with the availability of the post accelerated $^{8}$B beam at REX-ISOLDE we will be able to collect for the first time high quality data for the study of such an important topic.

  15. Application of microwave induced combustion in closed vessels for carbon black-containing elastomers decomposition

    A rapid digestion procedure for the determination of Al, Fe, Mn, Sr and Zn in carbon black-containing elastomers (30%) has been developed using sample combustion in closed quartz vessels. Microwave radiation was used for ignition. Combustion takes place in the presence of oxygen under pressure using ammonium nitrate (50 μl of 6 mol l-1) as aid for ignition. Samples of nitrile-butadiene rubber and ethylenepropylene-diene monomer were decomposed. A quartz device was used simultaneously as a sample holder and for the protection of vessel cap. The influence of the absorption solution (nitric acid or water) and the necessity of an additional reflux step were evaluated. Determination of Al, Fe, Mn, Sr and Zn was performed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. A reference method (ASTM D 4004-06) based on conventional dry ashing and flame atomic absorption spectrometry was used for comparison (Mn and Zn). Results were also compared to those obtained by using wet acid digestion in closed systems. Concentrated and diluted (4 mol l-1) nitric acid, with 5 min of reflux after the combustion, gave best recoveries for all analytes (from 97 to 101%). For dry ashing quantitative recoveries were found only for Zn whereas for Al, Fe, Mn and Sr the recoveries were only 14, 37, 72 and 37%, respectively. With the proposed procedure the residual carbon content was below 0.5% and further determination of analytes was feasible with only the combustion step (for Fe a reflux with diluted HNO3 was necessary). Complete sample digestion is obtained in less time using the proposed procedure than with other procedures and no concentrated acids were necessary

  16. A Distant Echo of Milky Way Central Activity closes the Galaxy's Baryon Census

    Nicastro, F; Krongold, Y; Mathur, S; Elvis, M

    2016-01-01

    We report on the presence of large amounts of million-degree gas in the Milky Way's interstellar and circum-galactic medium. This gas (1) permeates both the Galactic plane and the halo, (2) extends to distances larger than 60-200 kpc from the center, and (3) its mass is sufficient to close the Galaxy's baryon census. Moreover, we show that a vast, $\\sim 6$ kpc radius, spherically-symmetric central region of the Milky Way above and below the 0.16 kpc thick plane, has either been emptied of hot gas or the density of this gas within the cavity has a peculiar profile, increasing from the center up to a radius of $\\sim 6$ kpc, and then decreasing with a typical halo density profile. This, and several other converging pieces of evidence, suggest that the current surface of the cavity, at 6 kpc from the Galaxy's center, traces the distant echo of a period of strong nuclear activity of our super-massive black-hole, occurred about 6 Myrs ago.

  17. Optimal semi-active damping of cables: evolutionary algorithms and closed-form solutions

    This paper presents a solution to the problem of cable vibration mitigation using a semi-active damping device. The optimal control of such a device is investigated with an evolutionary algorithm. A fitness function for the algorithm is defined, as the total energy removed from the cable by the damper in a numerical simulation. The initial and end conditions of the optimization are defined such that the solution is optimal for a single mode of vibration. The solution produced by the evolutionary algorithm is shown to outperform other popular semi-active control strategies for the given conditions, removing as much as 2.0 and 1.2 times more energy than the optimal linear viscous damper and clipped linear quadratic regulator controller, respectively. It is furthermore shown that the solution can be given as a simple control law parametrized with a single parameter. The performance of the control law derived is assessed by means of numerical simulation with a free vibration decay test. Due to the multiple modes of vibrations induced by the nonlinear damper in this test, the control law performance is slightly decreased compared to the aforementioned efficiency

  18. Walk on Floor Eyes Closed Test: A Unique Test of Spaceflight Induced Ataxia

    Reschke, M. F.; Fisher, E. A.; Kofman, I. S.; Cerisano, J. M.; Harm, D. L.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    Measurement and quantification of posture and locomotion following spaceflight is an evolving process. Based on the data obtained from the current investigation we believe that the walk on the floor line test with the eyes closed (WOFEC) provides a unique procedure for quantifying postflight ataxia. As a part of an ongoing investigation designed to look at functional changes in astronauts returning from spaceflight seven astronauts (5 short duration with flights of 12-16 days; 2 long duration crewmembers with flights of 6 months) were tested twice before flight, on landing day (short duration only), and 1, 6, and 30 days after flight. The WOFEC consisted of walking for 10 steps (repeated twice) with the feet heel to toe in tandem, arms folded across the chest and the eyes closed. The performance metric (scored by three examiners from video) was the percentage of correct steps completed over the three trials. A step was not counted as correct if the crewmember side-stepped, opened their eyes, or paused for more than three seconds between steps. The data reveled a significant decrease in percentage of correct steps on landing day (short duration crew) and on the first day following landing (long duration) with partial recovery the following day, and full recovery beginning on day sixth after flight. Both short and long duration fliers appeared to be unaware of foot position relative to their bodies or the floor. Postflight, deviation from a straight path was common, and seemed to be determined by the angle of foot placement relative to their body. While deviation from a straight line could be either left or right, primary deviations were observed to occur to the right. Furthermore, the test for two crewmembers elicited motion sickness symptoms. These data clearly demonstrate the sensorimotor challenges facing crewmembers after returning from spaceflight. The WOFEC test has value providing the investigator or crew surgeon with a simple method to quantify vestibular

  19. Nanostrain induced pinning in YBa2Cu3O7−x nanocomposites even close to the irreversibility line

    It has been recently shown that solution-derived YBa2Cu3O7−x (YBCO) nanocomposites can reach extraordinary pinning forces at 77 K, thanks to the isotropic nanostrain introduced by nanoparticles. In this paper we demonstrate that nanostrain pinning is even effective very close to the irreversibility line (IL). Ac susceptibility and transport measurements are used to determine the isotropic and anisotropic contributions to the activation energy for thermal depinning in different (BaZrO3, Y2O3, Ba2YTaO6) YBCO nanocomposites. Results demonstrate that the activation energy associated with isotropic defects correlates linearly with the nanostrain. (rapid communication)

  20. A Comparative Analysis between Active and Passive Techniques for Underwater 3D Reconstruction of Close-Range Objects

    Bianco, Gianfranco; Gallo, Alessandro; Bruno, Fabio; Muzzupappa, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    In some application fields, such as underwater archaeology or marine biology, there is the need to collect three-dimensional, close-range data from objects that cannot be removed from their site. In particular, 3D imaging techniques are widely employed for close-range acquisitions in underwater environment. In this work we have compared in water two 3D imaging techniques based on active and passive approaches, respectively, and whole-field acquisition. The comparison is performed under poor v...

  1. A close correlation between induced ferromagnetism and oxygen deficiency in Fe doped In 2O 3

    Singhal, R. K.; Samariya, A.; Kumar, Sudhish; Sharma, S. C.; Xing, Y. T.; Deshpande, U. P.; Shripathi, T.; Saitovitch, E.

    2010-11-01

    We report on the reversible manipulation of room temperature ferromagnetism in Fe (5%) doped In 2O 3 polycrystalline magnetic semiconductor. The X-ray diffraction and photoemission measurements confirm that the Fe ions are well incorporated into the lattice, substituting the In 3+ ions. The magnetization measurements show that the host In 2O 3 has a diamagnetic ground state, while it shows weak ferromagnetism at 300 K upon Fe doping. The as-prepared sample was then sequentially annealed in hydrogen, air, vacuum and finally in air. The ferromagnetic signal shoots up by hydrogenation as well as vacuum annealing and bounces back upon re-annealing the samples in air. The sequence of ferromagnetism shows a close inter-relationship with the behavior of oxygen vacancies ( Vo). The Fe ions tend to a transform from 3+ to 2+ state during the giant ferromagnetic induction, as revealed by photoemission spectroscopy. A careful characterization of the structure, purity, magnetic, and transport properties confirms that the ferromagnetism is due to neither impurities nor clusters but directly related to the oxygen vacancies. The ferromagnetism can be reversibly controlled by these vacancies while a parallel variation of carrier concentration, as revealed by resistance measurements, appears to be a side effect of the oxygen vacancy variation.

  2. Surface modification-induced phase transformation of hexagonal close-packed gold square sheets

    Fan, Zhanxi

    2015-03-13

    Conventionally, the phase transformation of inorganic nanocrystals is realized under extreme conditions (for example, high temperature or high pressure). Here we report the complete phase transformation of Au square sheets (AuSSs) from hexagonal close-packed (hcp) to face-centered cubic (fcc) structures at ambient conditions via surface ligand exchange, resulting in the formation of (100)f-oriented fcc AuSSs. Importantly, the phase transformation can also be realized through the coating of a thin metal film (for example, Ag) on hcp AuSSs. Depending on the surfactants used during the metal coating process, two transformation pathways are observed, leading to the formation of (100)f-oriented fcc Au@Ag core-shell square sheets and (110)h/(101)f-oriented hcp/fcc mixed Au@Ag nanosheets. Furthermore, monochromated electron energy loss spectroscopy reveals the strong surface plasmon resonance absorption of fcc AuSS and Au@Ag square sheet in the infrared region. Our findings may offer a new route for the crystal-phase and shape-controlled synthesis of inorganic nanocrystals. © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  3. Reelin induces EphB activation

    Elisabeth Bouché; Mario I Romero-Ortega; Mark Henkemeyer; Timothy Catchpole; Jost Leemhuis; Michael Frotscher; Petra May

    2013-01-01

    The integration of newborn neurons into functional neuronal networks requires migration of cells to their final position in the developing brain,the growth and arborization of neuronal processes and the formation of synaptic contacts with other neurons.A central player among the signals that coordinate this complex sequence of differentiation events is the secreted glycoprotein Reelin,which also modulates synaptic plasticity,learning and memory formation in the adult brain.Binding of Reelin to ApoER2 and VLDL receptor,two members of the LDL receptor family,initiates a signaling cascade involving tyrosine phosphorylation of the intracellular cytoplasmic adaptor protein Disabled-l,which targets the neuronal cytoskeleton and ultimately controls the positioning of neurons throughout the developing brain.However,it is possible that Reelin signals interact with other receptor-mediated signaling cascades to regulate different aspects of brain development and plasticity.EphB tyrosine kinases regulate cell adhesion and repulsion-dependent processes via bidirectional signaling through ephrin B transmembrane proteins.Here,we demonstrate that Reelin binds to the extracellular domains of EphB transmembrane proteins,inducing receptor clustering and activation of EphB forward signaling in neurons,independently of the ‘classical' Reelin receptors,ApoER2 and VLDLR.Accordingly,mice lacking EphB1 and EphB2 display a positioning defect of CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons,similar to that in Reelin-deficient mice,and this cell migration defect depends on the kinase activity of EphB proteins.Together,our data provide biochemical and functional evidence for signal integration between Reelin and EphB forward signaling.

  4. WASP-121 b: a hot Jupiter close to tidal disruption transiting an active F star

    Delrez, L.; Santerne, A.; Almenara, J.-M.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier-Cameron, A.; Díaz, R. F.; Gillon, M.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Neveu-VanMalle, M.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Ségransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Smith, A. M. S.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Udry, S.; Van Grootel, V.; West, R. G.

    2016-06-01

    We present the discovery by the WASP-South survey of WASP-121 b, a new remarkable short-period transiting hot Jupiter. The planet has a mass of 1.183_{-0.062}^{+0.064} MJup, a radius of 1.865 ± 0.044 RJup, and transits every 1.274 9255_{-0.000 0025}^{+0.000 0020} days an active F6-type main-sequence star (V = 10.4, 1.353_{-0.079}^{+0.080} M⊙, 1.458 ± 0.030 R⊙, Teff = 6460 ± 140 K). A notable property of WASP-121 b is that its orbital semimajor axis is only ˜1.15 times larger than its Roche limit, which suggests that the planet is close to tidal disruption. Furthermore, its large size and extreme irradiation (˜7.1 109 erg s-1 cm-2) make it an excellent target for atmospheric studies via secondary eclipse observations. Using the TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope, we indeed detect its emission in the z'-band at better than ˜4σ, the measured occultation depth being 603 ± 130 ppm. Finally, from a measurement of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect with the CORALIE spectrograph, we infer a sky-projected spin-orbit angle of 257.8°_{-5.5°}^{+5.3°}. This result may suggest a significant misalignment between the spin axis of the host star and the orbital plane of the planet. If confirmed, this high misalignment would favour a migration of the planet involving strong dynamical events with a third body.

  5. Toxoplasma gondii Chitinase Induces Macrophage Activation.

    Fausto Almeida

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite found worldwide that is able to chronically infect almost all vertebrate species, especially birds and mammalians. Chitinases are essential to various biological processes, and some pathogens rely on chitinases for successful parasitization. Here, we purified and characterized a chitinase from T. gondii. The enzyme, provisionally named Tg_chitinase, has a molecular mass of 13.7 kDa and exhibits a Km of 0.34 mM and a Vmax of 2.64. The optimal environmental conditions for enzymatic function were at pH 4.0 and 50 °C. Tg_chitinase was immunolocalized in the cytoplasm of highly virulent T. gondii RH strain tachyzoites, mainly at the apical extremity. Tg_chitinase induced macrophage activation as manifested by the production of high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, a pathogenic hallmark of T. gondii infection. In conclusion, to our knowledge, we describe for the first time a chitinase of T. gondii tachyzoites and provide evidence that this enzyme might influence the pathogenesis of T. gondii infection.

  6. Closing Statement [International Symposium on Induced Mutations in Plants, Vienna (Austria), 12-15 August 2008

    This Symposium was the eighth in the Joint FAO/IAEA Programme's Symposium series, dedicated to harnessing and disseminating information on current trends in induced mutagenesis in plants. The first meeting was held in 1969, and the most recent in 1995. Thirteen years on, in a climate of increasing food shortages, it was high time that this Symposium was held. Although mutation breeding is 80 years old, as we just heard, new applications continue to be found and will continue to be developed. The application of mutation techniques, such as Gamma-rays and other physical and chemical mutagens, has generated a vast amount of genetic variability and has played a significant role in plant breeding and genetic studies in countries throughout the world. The importance of these techniques is reflected in the large number of participants gathered here: a total of 500 delegates from 81 countries that are IAEA and FAO Member States and nine organizations. I believe that the extensive scientific programme, which included 126 oral and 252 poster presentations, is an indicator of the range, depth and relevance of the topic. Being aware of the scientific nature of this Symposium, let me however, say a few words on behalf of the IAEA's TC Programme. The programme provided financial support to several participants to attend this Symposium, but more importantly, many of the participants have been trained through the Technical Cooperation Programme, supported by the FAO/IAEA Joint Division. Technical training of this sort is a core component in the implementation of the IAEA mandate 'Atoms for Peace, Health and Prosperity'. Over the past five years, food and agriculture has accounted for one of the largest areas of the IAEA Technical Cooperation Programme around the world, and projects in this area are on the increase in the 2009-2011 programme cycle. The Agency's combination of technical and managerial expertise offers Member States significant benefits in the formulation and

  7. Gene activation by induced DNA rearrangements

    A murine cell line (EN/NIH) containing the retroviral vector ZIPNeoSV(x)1 that was modified by deletion of the enhancer elements in the viral long terminal repeats has been used as an assay system to detect induced DNA rearrangements that result in activation of a transcriptionally silent reporter gene encoded by the viral genome. The spontaneous frequency of G418 resistance is less than 10(-7), whereas exposure to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or the combination of UV irradiation plus TPA resulted in the emergence of drug resistant cell lines at a frequency of 5 per 10(6) and 67 per 10(6) cells, respectively. In several of the cell lines that were analyzed a low level of amplification of one of the two parental retroviral integrants was observed, whereas in others no alteration in the region of the viral genome was detected. To determine the effect of the SV40 large T antigen on induced DNA rearrangements, EN/NIH cells were transfected with a temperature sensitive (ts) mutant of SV40 T. Transfectants were maintained at the permissive temperature (33 degrees C) for varying periods of time (1-5 days) in order to vary SV40 T antigen exposure, after which they were shifted to 39.5 degrees C for selection in G418. The frequency of emergence of drug resistant cell clones increased with duration of exposure to large T antigen (9-52 per 10(6) cells over 1-5 days, respectively), and all cell lines analyzed demonstrated DNA rearrangements in the region of the neo gene. A novel 18-kilobase pair XbaI fragment was cloned from one cell line which revealed the presence of a 2.0-kilobase pair EcoRI segment containing an inverted duplication which hybridized to neo sequences. It is likely that the observed rearrangement was initiated by the specific binding of large T antigen to the SV40 origin of replication encoded within the viral genome

  8. Laser-induced transformation of GaS and GaSe nanosheets to onion structures with closed cages

    K Vasu

    2014-10-01

    Experimental evidence for the transformation of nanosheets of GaS and GaSe into onion structures on UV excimer pulsed laser irradiation is presented. Few-layer GaS and GaSe on Si substrates were exposed to KrF pulsed laser with wavelength of 248 nm and the effect was studied as a function of number of laser pulses. Laser-induced dewetting of the layers results in the formation of spherical nanoparticles after 50 laser pulses. HREM images of these particles reveal the formation of onions with several concentric layers. The initial thickness of the layers controls the size of the onion cages. A mechanism of transformation of few layers to closed cage onions on UV pulsed laser irradiation is presented.

  9. Discrimination between induced, triggered, and natural earthquakes close to hydrocarbon reservoirs: A probabilistic approach based on the modeling of depletion-induced stress changes and seismological source parameters

    Dahm, Torsten; Cesca, Simone; Hainzl, Sebastian; Braun, Thomas; Krüger, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Earthquakes occurring close to hydrocarbon fields under production are often under critical view of being induced or triggered. However, clear and testable rules to discriminate the different events have rarely been developed and tested. The unresolved scientific problem may lead to lengthy public disputes with unpredictable impact on the local acceptance of the exploitation and field operations. We propose a quantitative approach to discriminate induced, triggered, and natural earthquakes, which is based on testable input parameters. Maxima of occurrence probabilities are compared for the cases under question, and a single probability of being triggered or induced is reported. The uncertainties of earthquake location and other input parameters are considered in terms of the integration over probability density functions. The probability that events have been human triggered/induced is derived from the modeling of Coulomb stress changes and a rate and state-dependent seismicity model. In our case a 3-D boundary element method has been adapted for the nuclei of strain approach to estimate the stress changes outside the reservoir, which are related to pore pressure changes in the field formation. The predicted rate of natural earthquakes is either derived from the background seismicity or, in case of rare events, from an estimate of the tectonic stress rate. Instrumentally derived seismological information on the event location, source mechanism, and the size of the rupture plane is of advantage for the method. If the rupture plane has been estimated, the discrimination between induced or only triggered events is theoretically possible if probability functions are convolved with a rupture fault filter. We apply the approach to three recent main shock events: (1) the Mw 4.3 Ekofisk 2001, North Sea, earthquake close to the Ekofisk oil field; (2) the Mw 4.4 Rotenburg 2004, Northern Germany, earthquake in the vicinity of the Söhlingen gas field; and (3) the Mw 6

  10. Computation of induced electric field for the sacral nerve activation

    Hirata, Akimasa; Hattori, Junya; Laakso, Ilkka; Takagi, Airi; Shimada, Takuo

    2013-11-01

    The induced electric field/current in the sacral nerve by stimulation devices for the treatment of bladder overactivity is investigated. Implanted and transcutaneous electrode configurations are considered. The electric field induced in the sacral nerve by the implanted electrode is largely affected by its surrounding tissues, which is attributable to the variation in the input impedance of the electrode. In contrast, the electric field induced by the transcutaneous electrode is affected by the tissue conductivity and anatomical composition of the body. In addition, the electric field induced in the subcutaneous fat in close proximity of the electrode is comparable with the estimated threshold electric field for pain. These computational findings explain the clinically observed weakness and side effect of each configuration. For the transcutaneous stimulator, we suggest that the electrode contact area be increased to reduce the induced electric field in the subcutaneous fat.

  11. Computation of induced electric field for the sacral nerve activation

    The induced electric field/current in the sacral nerve by stimulation devices for the treatment of bladder overactivity is investigated. Implanted and transcutaneous electrode configurations are considered. The electric field induced in the sacral nerve by the implanted electrode is largely affected by its surrounding tissues, which is attributable to the variation in the input impedance of the electrode. In contrast, the electric field induced by the transcutaneous electrode is affected by the tissue conductivity and anatomical composition of the body. In addition, the electric field induced in the subcutaneous fat in close proximity of the electrode is comparable with the estimated threshold electric field for pain. These computational findings explain the clinically observed weakness and side effect of each configuration. For the transcutaneous stimulator, we suggest that the electrode contact area be increased to reduce the induced electric field in the subcutaneous fat. (paper)

  12. Comparison of body-powered voluntary opening and voluntary closing prehensor for activities of daily life

    Kelsey Berning

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Persons with an upper-limb amputation who use a body-powered prosthesis typically control the prehensor through contralateral shoulder movement, which is transmitted through a Bowden cable. Increased cable tension either opens or closes the prehensor; when tension is released, some passive element, such as a spring, returns the prehensor to the default state (closed or open. In this study, we used the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure to examine functional differences between these two types of prehensors in 29 nondisabled subjects (who used a body-powered bypass prosthesis and 2 persons with unilateral transradial amputations (who used a conventional body-powered device. We also administered a survey to determine whether subjects preferred one prehensor or the other for specific tasks, with a long-term goal of assessing whether a prehensor that could switch between both modes would be advantageous. We found that using the voluntary closing prehensor was 1.3 s faster (p = 0.02 than using the voluntary opening prehensor, across tasks, and that there was consensus among subjects on which types of tasks they preferred to do with each prehensor type. Twenty-five subjects wanted a device that could switch between the two modes in order to perform particular tasks.

  13. PENELOPE-2008 Monte Carlo simulation of gamma exposure induced by 60Co and NORM-radionuclides in closed geometries

    We present Monte Carlo simulations of the gamma exposure in closed rooms made of steel or concrete and contaminated by 60Co or NORM radionuclides. The computer code PENELOPE-2008 (Salvat et al., 2009) was used. Our simulations for 60Co suggest considering detailed Monte Carlo simulations in future recommendations on clearance and exemption of materials with low radioactivity. For NORM nuclides our calculations suggest that Monte Carlo simulations are a possible alternative in case a material fails the dose rate criteria by using the RP 112 screening method. - Highlights: • PENELOPE-2008 was used for Monte Carlo simulations of gamma exposure in closed rooms made of steel or concrete. • Findings support introducing IAEA SR 44 activity concentration value of 0.1 Bq/g as exemption value for 60Co. • PENELOPE-2008 calculations show good agreement with a density corrected Berger model for dose rate calculations concerning NORM building materials. • Monte Carlo calculations or a density corrected Berger model could be used to modify the model suggested in RP 112

  14. Genetic influences on drug-induced psychomotor activation in mice.

    Gill, K J; Boyle, A E

    2008-11-01

    A number of processes are important in the development of substance dependence including initial sensitivity to the acute pharmacological effects of drugs/alcohol. The objectives of the present study were (1) to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with the initial sensitivity to the effects of morphine in the A/J, C57BL/6J and AXB/BXA recombinant inbred strains of mice; (2) to identify potential commonalities in the chromosomal regions associated with morphine, cocaine and ethanol sensitivity using multiple-trait genetic analysis and (3) to determine whether there were interstrain differences in dopamine uptake and transporter binding. Initial sensitivity to morphine was determined by measuring locomotor activity in a computerized open-field apparatus following acute morphine administration (0, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg). Significant differences in morphine-induced activation were observed across the panel of AXB/BXA mice. Genetic analysis found significant QTLs on chromosomes 5, 7, 11, 12, 15 and 17 close to loci previously mapped for cocaine-related behaviours and to parameters of dopaminergic functioning (uptake and receptor binding). Comparisons of the A/J vs. C57BL/6J progenitors found no strain differences for total dopamine uptake (V(max) or K(m)) in freshly prepared striatal synaptosomes from naive animals, and no differences in the IC(50) for the inhibition of dopamine uptake by cocaine. In addition, there were no differences in dopamine transporter density (B(max) or K(d)) measured using (3)H-GBR 12935 binding in synaptosomal membranes or via quantitative autoradiography. Multiple-trait analysis was conducted to examine the genetic interrelationships among morphine-, cocaine- and ethanol-induced activation in the AXB/BXA. Analysis yielded suggestive QTLs for the joint trait on chromosomes 5, 8, 13 and 15, as well as significant regions on chromosomes 11 (Pmv46, 11 cM, LOD = 7.39) and 12 (D12Mit110, 19 cM, LOD = 4.43) that may be common to all

  15. Variability of atmospheric krypton-85 activity concentrations observed close to the ITCZ in the southern hemisphere

    Krypton-85 activity concentrations in surface air have been measured at Darwin, which is located in northern Australia and is influenced by seasonal monsoonal activity. Measurements between August 2007 and May 2010 covered three wet seasons. The mean activity concentration of krypton-85 measured during this period was 1.31 ± 0.02 Bq m−3. A linear model fitted to the average monthly data, using month and monsoon as predictors, shows that krypton-85 activity concentration measured during the sampling period has declined by 0.01 Bq m−3 per year. Although there is no statistically significant difference in mean activity concentration of krypton-85 between wet and dry season, the model implies that activity concentration is higher by about 0.015 Bq m−3 during months influenced by the monsoon when a north westerly flow prevails. Backward dispersion runs using the Lagrangian particle dispersion model Hysplit4 highlight possible source regions during an active monsoon located deep in the northern hemisphere, and include reprocessing facilities in Japan and India. However, the contribution of these facilities to krypton-85 activity concentrations in Darwin would be less than 0.003 Bq m−3. -- Highlights: • Atmospheric krypton-85 was measured in Darwin, Australia. • Wet and dry season samples were taken from 2007–2010. • Activity concentration has decreased by 0.01 Bq m−3 per year. • Krypton-85 activity concentration more variable during monsoon

  16. Spin-Selective Thermal Activation of Methane by Closed-Shell [TaO3 ](.).

    Zhou, Shaodong; Li, Jilai; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-06-13

    Thermal reactions of the closed-shell metal-oxide cluster [TaO3 ](+) with methane were investigated by using FTICR mass spectrometry complemented by high-level quantum chemical calculations. While the generation of methanol and formaldehyde is somewhat expected, [TaO3 ](+) remarkably also has the ability to abstract two hydrogen atoms from methane with the elimination of CH2 . Mechanistically, the generation of CH2 O and CH3 OH occurs on the singlet-ground-state surface, while for the liberation of (3) CH2 , a two-state reactivity scenario prevails. PMID:27159562

  17. 29 CFR 1620.4 - “Closely related” and “directly essential” activities.

    2010-07-01

    ...; employees in the personnel, labor relations, employee benefits, safety and health, advertising, promotion, and public relations activities of the producing enterprise; work instructors for the...

  18. Optimization of quantum cascade laser operation by geometric design of cascade active band in open and closed models

    M.V. Tkach; Ju.O. Seti; I.V. Boyko; O.M. Voitsekhivska

    2013-01-01

    Using the effective mass and rectangular potential approximations, the theory of electron dynamic conductivity is developed for the plane multilayer resonance tunnel structure placed into a constant electric field within the model of open nanosystem, and oscillator forces of quantum transitions within the model of closed nanosystem. For the experimentally produced quantum cascade laser with four-barrier active band of separate cascade, it is proven that just the theory of dynamic conductivity...

  19. A prospective cohort study of latent tuberculosis in adult close contacts of active pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Korea

    Park, Sun Hyo; Lee, Seung Jun; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Kim, Ho Cheol; Lee, Jong Deog; Kim, Hee Jin; Menzies, Dick

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in adult close contacts of active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients in Korea. Methods: Adult close contacts of active pulmonary TB patients were recruited at a regional tertiary hospital in Korea. The participants were tested for LTBI using the tuberculin skin test (TST) and/or QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G) test. LTBI patients, who consented to treatment, were randomly assigned to receive isoniazid for 9 months (9INH) or rifampin for 4 months (4RIF). Results: We examined 189 adult close contacts (> 18 years) of 107 active pulmonary TB patients. The TST and QFT-G were positive (≥ 10 mm) in 75/183 (39.7%) and 45/118 (38.1%) tested participants, respectively. Among 88 TST or QFT-G positive LTBI participants, 45 participants were randomly assigned to receive 4RIF (n = 21) or 9INH (n = 24), respectively. The average treatment duration for the 4RIF and 9INH groups was 3.3 ± 1.3 and 6.1 ± 2.7 months, respectively. Treatment was completed in 25 participants (4RIF, n = 16; 9INH, n = 9). LTBI participants who accepted treatment were more likely to be women and have more cavitary lesions on the chest radiographs of index cases and positive TST and QFT-G results compared to those who refused treatment. Conclusions: About 40% of adult close contacts of active pulmonary TB patients had LTBI; about 50% of these LTBI participants agreed to treatment. PMID:27052266

  20. Methylphenidate Actively Induces Emergence from General Anesthesia

    Solt, Ken; Cotten, Joseph F.; Cimenser, Aylin; Wong, Kin F.K.; Chemali, Jessica J.; Brown, Emery N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Although accumulating evidence suggests that arousal pathways in the brain play important roles in emergence from general anesthesia, the roles of monoaminergic arousal circuits are unclear. In this study, the authors tested the hypothesis that methylphenidate (an inhibitor of dopamine and norepinephrine transporters) induces emergence from isoflurane general anesthesia. Methods: Using adult rats, the authors tested the effect of intravenous methylphenidate on time to emergence...

  1. Human-induced soil degradation activities

    Oldeman L.R.; Van Baren J.H. V.

    1998-01-01

    Soil degradation is occurring over vast areas. The GLASOD and ASSOD projects reflect the present status of human-induced soil degradation and its impact on food productivity related to productivity changes observed in the recent past. However, there is a great need for well-documented, reliable soil information and other related data at national and regional levels to better understand and qualify the impact of changing soil conditions or biomass production.

  2. Estrus Traits Derived from Activity Measurements are Heritable and Closely Related to Conventional

    Ismael, Ahmed Ismael Sayed; Kargo, Morten; Fogh, Anders; Strandberg, Erling; Løvendahl, Peter

    This study was aimed at assessing the genetic parameters for fertility-related traits, comparing the interval from calving to first insemination (ICF) to physical activity traits, especially days from calving to first high activity, DFHA. Data from commercial Holstein herds included insemination ...

  3. Long-term rise in geomagnetic activity - A close connection between quiet days and storms

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne

    2000-01-01

    index aa we examine the activity level of the most quiet and most disturbed days separately through 130 years from 1868 to 1998. We find that the linear correlation between the average level of activity at the 5 most quiet days pr year and the yearly average is 0.8. For the 5 most disturbed days it is 0...

  4. Adenosine-induced activation of esophageal nociceptors.

    Ru, F; Surdenikova, L; Brozmanova, M; Kollarik, M

    2011-03-01

    Clinical studies implicate adenosine acting on esophageal nociceptive pathways in the pathogenesis of noncardiac chest pain originating from the esophagus. However, the effect of adenosine on esophageal afferent nerve subtypes is incompletely understood. We addressed the hypothesis that adenosine selectively activates esophageal nociceptors. Whole cell perforated patch-clamp recordings and single-cell RT-PCR analysis were performed on the primary afferent neurons retrogradely labeled from the esophagus in the guinea pig. Extracellular recordings were made from the isolated innervated esophagus. In patch-clamp studies, adenosine evoked activation (inward current) in a majority of putative nociceptive (capsaicin-sensitive) vagal nodose, vagal jugular, and spinal dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons innervating the esophagus. Single-cell RT-PCR analysis indicated that the majority of the putative nociceptive (transient receptor potential V1-positive) neurons innervating the esophagus express the adenosine receptors. The neural crest-derived (spinal DRG and vagal jugular) esophageal nociceptors expressed predominantly the adenosine A(1) receptor while the placodes-derived vagal nodose nociceptors expressed the adenosine A(1) and/or A(2A) receptors. Consistent with the studies in the cell bodies, adenosine evoked activation (overt action potential discharge) in esophageal nociceptive nerve terminals. Furthermore, the neural crest-derived jugular nociceptors were activated by the selective A(1) receptor agonist CCPA, and the placodes-derived nodose nociceptors were activated by CCPA and/or the selective adenosine A(2A) receptor CGS-21680. In contrast to esophageal nociceptors, adenosine failed to stimulate the vagal esophageal low-threshold (tension) mechanosensors. We conclude that adenosine selectively activates esophageal nociceptors. Our data indicate that the esophageal neural crest-derived nociceptors can be activated via the adenosine A(1) receptor while the placodes

  5. Physical Activity Capture Technology With Potential for Incorporation Into Closed-Loop Control for Type 1 Diabetes.

    Dadlani, Vikash; Levine, James A; McCrady-Spitzer, Shelly K; Dassau, Eyal; Kudva, Yogish C

    2015-11-01

    Physical activity is an important determinant of glucose variability in type 1 diabetes (T1D). It has been incorporated as a nonglucose input into closed-loop control (CLC) protocols for T1D during the last 4 years mainly by 3 research groups in single center based controlled clinical trials involving a maximum of 18 subjects in any 1 study. Although physical activity data capture may have clinical benefit in patients with T1D by impacting cardiovascular fitness and optimal body weight achievement and maintenance, limited number of such studies have been conducted to date. Clinical trial registries provide information about a single small sample size 2 center prospective study incorporating physical activity data input to modulate closed-loop control in T1D that are seeking to build on prior studies. We expect an increase in such studies especially since the NIH has expanded support of this type of research with additional grants starting in the second half of 2015. Studies (1) involving patients with other disorders that have lasted 12 weeks or longer and tracked physical activity and (2) including both aerobic and resistance activity may offer insights about the user experience and device optimization even as single input CLC heads into real-world clinical trials over the next few years and nonglucose input is introduced as the next advance. PMID:26481641

  6. A Closed-Loop Model of the Respiratory System: Focus on Hypercapnia and Active Expiration

    Molkov, Yaroslav I.; Shevtsova, Natalia A.; Park, Choongseok; Ben-Tal, Alona; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Rubin, Jonathan E.; Rybak, Ilya A.

    2014-01-01

    Breathing is a vital process providing the exchange of gases between the lungs and atmosphere. During quiet breathing, pumping air from the lungs is mostly performed by contraction of the diaphragm during inspiration, and muscle contraction during expiration does not play a significant role in ventilation. In contrast, during intense exercise or severe hypercapnia forced or active expiration occurs in which the abdominal “expiratory” muscles become actively involved in breathing. The mechanis...

  7. Close temporal coupling of neuronal activity and tissue oxygen responses in rodent whisker barrel cortex

    Li, Jennifer; Bravo, Diego S.; Upton, A. Louise; Gilmour, Gary; Tricklebank, Mark; Fillenz, Marianne; Martin, Chris; Lowry, John P.; Bannerman, David M.; McHugh, Stephen B.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal activity elicits metabolic and vascular responses, during which oxygen is first consumed and then supplied to the tissue via an increase in cerebral blood flow. Understanding the spatial and temporal dynamics of blood and tissue oxygen (To2 ) responses following neuronal activity is crucial for understanding the physiological basis of functional neuroimaging signals. However, our knowledge is limited because previous To2 measurements have been made at low temporal resolution...

  8. A correlation between host star activity and planet mass for close-in extrasolar planets?

    Poppenhaeger, K.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2011-01-01

    The activity levels of stars are influenced by several stellar properties, such as stellar rotation, spectral type and the presence of stellar companions. In analogy to binaries, planetary companions are also thought to be able to cause higher activity levels in their host stars, although at lower levels. Especially in X-rays, such influences are hard to detect because coronae of cool stars exhibit a considerable amount of intrinsic variability. Recently, a correlation between the mass of clo...

  9. Neutron induced activity in fuel element components

    A thorough investigation of the importance of various nuclides in neutron-induced radioactivity from fuel element construction materials has been carried out for both BWR and PWR fuel assemblies. The calculations were performed with the ORIGEN computer code. The investigation was directed towards the final storage of the assembly components and special emphasis was put to the examination of the sources of carbon-14, cobalt-60, nickel-59, nickel-63 and zirconium-93/niobium-93m. It is demonstrated that the nuclides nickel-59, in Inconel and stainless steel, and zirconium-93/niobium-93m, in Zircaloy, are the ones which constitute the very long term radiotoxic hazard of the irradiated materials. (author)

  10. A preliminary census of engineering activities located in Sicily (Southern Italy) which may "potentially" induce seismicity

    Aloisi, Marco; Briffa, Emanuela; Cannata, Andrea; Cannavò, Flavio; Gambino, Salvatore; Maiolino, Vincenza; Maugeri, Roberto; Palano, Mimmo; Privitera, Eugenio; Scaltrito, Antonio; Spampinato, Salvatore; Ursino, Andrea; Velardita, Rosanna

    2015-04-01

    The seismic events caused by human engineering activities are commonly termed as "triggered" and "induced". This class of earthquakes, though characterized by low-to-moderate magnitude, have significant social and economical implications since they occur close to the engineering activity responsible for triggering/inducing them and can be felt by the inhabitants living nearby, and may even produce damage. One of the first well-documented examples of induced seismicity was observed in 1932 in Algeria, when a shallow magnitude 3.0 earthquake occurred close to the Oued Fodda Dam. By the continuous global improvement of seismic monitoring networks, numerous other examples of human-induced earthquakes have been identified. Induced earthquakes occur at shallow depths and are related to a number of human activities, such as fluid injection under high pressure (e.g. waste-water disposal in deep wells, hydrofracturing activities in enhanced geothermal systems and oil recovery, shale-gas fracking, natural and CO2 gas storage), hydrocarbon exploitation, groundwater extraction, deep underground mining, large water impoundments and underground nuclear tests. In Italy, induced/triggered seismicity is suspected to have contributed to the disaster of the Vajont dam in 1963. Despite this suspected case and the presence in the Italian territory of a large amount of engineering activities "capable" of inducing seismicity, no extensive researches on this topic have been conducted to date. Hence, in order to improve knowledge and correctly assess the potential hazard at a specific location in the future, here we started a preliminary study on the entire range of engineering activities currently located in Sicily (Southern Italy) which may "potentially" induce seismicity. To this end, we performed: • a preliminary census of all engineering activities located in the study area by collecting all the useful information coming from available on-line catalogues; • a detailed compilation

  11. Novel Rat Model of Weight Drop-Induced Closed Diffuse Traumatic Brain Injury Compatible with Electrophysiological Recordings of Vigilance States.

    Büchele, Fabian; Morawska, Marta M; Schreglmann, Sebastian R; Penner, Marco; Muser, Markus; Baumann, Christian R; Noain, Daniela

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of persistent disabilities such as sleep-wake disorders (SWD). Rodent studies of SWD after TBI are scarce, however, because of lack of appropriate TBI models reproducing acceleration-deceleration forces and compatible with electroencephalography/myography (EEG/EMG)-based recordings of vigilance states. We therefore adapted the Marmarou impact acceleration model to allow for compatibility with EEG-headset implantation. After implantation of EEG/EMG electrodes, we induced closed TBI by a frontal, angular hit with a weight-drop device (56 rats, weight 2500 g, fall height 25 cm). Subsequently, we tested our model's usefulness for long-term studies on a behavioral, electrophysiological, and histological level. Neurological, motor, and memory deficits were assessed with the neurological severity score, open field, and novel object recognition tests, respectively. EEG/EMG recordings were performed in both Sham (n = 7) and TBI (n = 7) rats before and 1, 7, and 28 days after trauma to evaluate sleep-wake proportions and post-traumatic implant stability. Histological assessments included hematoxylin and eosin staining for parenchymal damage and hemorrhage and amyloid precursor protein staining for diffuse axonal damage. All rats survived TBI without major neurological or motor deficits. Memory function was impaired after TBI at weeks 1, 2, and 3 and recovered at week 4. EEG implants were stable for at least 1 month and enabled qualitative and quantitative sleep analyses. Histological assessments revealed no major bleedings or necrosis but intense diffuse axonal damage after TBI. This approach fulfills major pre-conditions for experimental TBI models and offers a possibility to electrophysiologically study behavioral states before and after trauma. PMID:26414556

  12. Ultraviolet induced lysosome activity in corneal epithelium

    A 5.000 W Xe-Hg high pressure lamp and a double monochromator were used to produce a 3.3 nm half-bandpass ultraviolet radiation at 295 nm. Pigmented rabbit eyes were irradiated with radiant exposures from 140 Jm-2 to 10.000 Jm-2 and evaluated by slit-lamp biomicroscopy, light and electron microscopy. Corneal threshold (Hsub(c) was 200 Jm-2 and lens threshold (Hsub(L)) was 7.500 Jm-2. The most repeatable and reliable corneal response to these levels of UV was the development of corneal epithelial granules. Histological changes included a loss of superficial epithelial cells and selective UV induced autolysis of the wing cells. It is suggested that the biomicroscopically observed granules are the clinical manifestation of the secondary lysosomes revealed by light and electron microscopy. It is proposed that UV breaks down the primary lysosome membranes to release hydrolytic enzymes which in turn form the secondary lysosomes during autolysis. Extreme levels of radiant exposure at 295 nm result in indiscriminate destruction of all layers of the corneal epithelium, but the posterior cornea was spared. (orig.)

  13. A slow anion channel in guard cells, activating at large hyperpolarization, may be principal for stomatal closing.

    Linder, B; Raschke, K

    1992-11-16

    Slowly activating anion channel currents were discovered at micromolar 'cytoplasmic' Ca2+ during patch-clamp measurements on guard-cell protoplasts of Vicia faba and Xanthium strumarium. They activated at potentials as low as -200 mV, with time constants between 5 and 60 s, and no inactivation. The broad voltage dependence exhibited a current maximum near -40 mV. The single-channel open time was in the order of seconds, and the unitary conductance was 33 ps, similar to that of the already described 'quick' anion channel of guard cells. Because of its activity at low potentials, the slow anion channel may be essential for the depolarization of the plasmalemma that is required for salt efflux during stomatal closing. PMID:1385219

  14. Optimization of quantum cascade laser operation by geometric design of cascade active band in open and closed models

    M.V. Tkach

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the effective mass and rectangular potential approximations, the theory of electron dynamic conductivity is developed for the plane multilayer resonance tunnel structure placed into a constant electric field within the model of open nanosystem, and oscillator forces of quantum transitions within the model of closed nanosystem. For the experimentally produced quantum cascade laser with four-barrier active band of separate cascade, it is proven that just the theory of dynamic conductivity in the model of open cascade most adequately describes the radiation of high frequency electromagnetic field while the electrons transport through the resonance tunnel structure driven by a constant electric field.

  15. T-cell receptor downregulation by ceramide-induced caspase activation and cleavage of the zeta chain

    Menné, C; Lauritsen, Jens Peter Holst; Dietrich, J;

    2001-01-01

    gamma L-based motif-dependent and the tyrosine kinase-dependent pathways. This pathway is dependent on ceramide-induced activation of caspases and correlate with caspase-mediated cleavage of the zeta chain. Thus, a 10--15% downregulation of the TCR was induced following the treatment of the T cells with...... ceramide for 4 h. A close correlation between TCR downregulation, caspase activation, and cleavage of the zeta chain was found. Furthermore, the caspase inhibitors abolished the cleavage of the zeta chain and TCR downregulation in parallel with the inhibition of the caspase activity....

  16. The climatic change induced by human activities

    The climate of the Earth is a changing climate. Along their history many natural climate changes have existed in all time scales. At the present time we use the term climate changes have existed in all time scales. At the present time we use the term climate change in a restricted way, understanding that we have referring to a singular change that has their origin in the modification of the natural composition of the atmosphere. The increase of greenhouse gases from the second half the XVIII century, is due to the human activities of fossil fuels burning to obtain energy and to industrial and agricultural activities needing for the development of a world which population has been duplicated between 1960 and 2000, until overcoming the 6,000 million inhabitants. In particular, the concentrations of carbon dioxide-CO2 have increased in a 34%. The more recent emission scenarios proposed by the IPCC (SRES, 2000) are based on hypothesis about the population evolution, the energy consumption and the word patterns of development, which are grouped in four families dominated as A1, A2, B1 and B2. The answer for these scenarios from a range of climate models results in an increase of the world average surface atmospheric temperature between 1,4 degree centigrade and 5,8 degree centigrade and a corresponding sea level rise understood between 9 cm and 88 cm. The changes in the precipitation patterns show us that could be above to the current one in high and media latitudes and below in subtropical latitudes, with exceptions highly depending of the model used. (Author)

  17. Near Infrared Activity Close to the Crab Pulsar Correlated with Giant Gamma-ray Flares

    Rudy, Alexander R.; Max, Claire E.; Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    We describe activity observed in the near-infrared correlated with a giant gamma-ray flare in the Crab Pulsar. The Crab Pulsar has been observed by the Fermi and AGILE satellites to flare for a period of 3 to 7 days, once every 1-1.5 years, increasing in brightness by a factor of 3-10 between 100MeV and 1GeV. We used Keck NIRC2 laser guide star adaptive optics imaging to observe the Crab Pulsar and environs before and during the March 2013 flare. We discuss the evidence for the knot as the location of the flares, and the theoretical implications of these observations. Ongoing target-of-opportunity programs hope to confirm this correlation for future flares.

  18. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation. - Highlights: • COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, could enhance radiosensitization. • Radiation induced PTEN inactivation (phosphorylation) and AKT activation. • COX-2 inhibitor induced PTEN expression and activation, and inactivated AKT. • COX-2 inhibitor enhanced radiosensitization through activating PTEN

  19. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization

    Meng, Zhen [Central Laboratory, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China); Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China); Gan, Ye-Hua, E-mail: kqyehuagan@bjmu.edu.cn [Central Laboratory, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China); Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation. - Highlights: • COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, could enhance radiosensitization. • Radiation induced PTEN inactivation (phosphorylation) and AKT activation. • COX-2 inhibitor induced PTEN expression and activation, and inactivated AKT. • COX-2 inhibitor enhanced radiosensitization through activating PTEN.

  20. Active Emergence from Propofol General Anesthesia Is Induced by Methylphenidate

    Chemali, Jessica J.; Van Dort, Christa J.; Brown, Emery N.; Solt, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Background: A recent study showed that methylphenidate induces emergence from isoflurane general anesthesia. Isoflurane and propofol are general anesthetics that may have distinct molecular mechanisms of action. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that methylphenidate actively induces emergence from propofol general anesthesia. Methods: Using adult rats, the effect of methylphenidate on time to emergence after a single bolus of propofol was determined. The ability of met...

  1. Isotopic compositions of inventory designations, open-quote mixed fission product close-quote and open-quote mixed activation product close-quote

    The Area G Performance Assessment requires that the entire inventory be specified in terms of specific nuclide activities. The inventory data base has historically allowed some less specific inventory designations including Mixed Fission Products (MFP), Mixed Activation Products (MAP), several Material Type (MT) designations and others. This report describes the assignment of specific nuclide activities from the listed activity amounts in two of the inventory data base categories, MFP and MAP. The MFP nuclide assignment is based on standard fission product yield data and normalized to total activity at two years post-fission. The MAP assignment is based on site-specific analyses conducted by the major generator of the activation products at Los Alamos, the LAMPE

  2. Active harmonic filtering using current-controlled, grid-connected DG units with closed-loop power control

    He, Jinwei; Li, Yun Wei; Blaabjerg, Frede;

    2014-01-01

    The increasing application of nonlinear loads may cause distribution system power quality issues. In order to utilize distributed generation (DG) unit interfacing converters to actively compensate harmonics, this paper proposes an enhanced current control approach, which seamlessly integrates...... voltage detection are not necessary for the proposed harmonic compensation method. Moreover, a closed-loop power control scheme is employed to directly derive the fundamental current reference without using any phase-locked loops (PLL). The proposed power control scheme effectively eliminates the impacts...... of steady-state fundamental current tracking errors in the DG units. Thus, an accurate power control is realized even when the harmonic compensation functions are activated. In addition, this paper also briefly discusses the performance of the proposed method when DG unit is connected to a grid with...

  3. Proteases induce secretion of collagenase and plasminogen activator by fibroblasts

    Werb, Z.; Aggeler, J.

    1978-04-01

    We have observed that treatment of rabbit synovial fibroblasts with proteolytic enzymes can induce secretion of collagenase (EC 3.4.24.7) and plasminogen activator (EC 3.4.21.-). Cells treated for 2 to 24 hr with plasmin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, pancreatic elastase, papain, bromelain, thermolysin, or ..cap alpha..-protease but not with thrombin or neuraminidase secreted detectable amounts of collagenase within 16 to 48 hr. Treatment of fibroblasts with trypsin also induced secretion of plasminogen activator. Proteases initiated secretion of collagenase (up to 20 units per 10/sup 6/ cells per 24 hr) only when treatment produced decreased cell adhesion. Collagenase production did not depend on continued presence of proteolytic activity or on subsequent cell adhesion, spreading, or proliferation. Routine subculturing with crude trypsin also induced collagenase secretion by cells. Secretion of collagenase was prevented and normal spreading was obtained if the trypsinized cells were placed into medium containing fetal calf serum. Soybean trypsin inhibitor, ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin, bovine serum albumin, collagen, and fibronectin did not inhibit collagenase production. Although proteases that induced collagenase secretion also removed surface glycoprotein, the kinetics of induction of cell protease secretion were different from those for removal of fibronectin. Physiological inducers of secretion of collagenase and plasminogen activator by cells have not been identified. These results suggest that extracellular proteases in conjunction with plasma proteins may govern protease secretion by cells.

  4. Non-dimensionalised closed-form parametric analysis of semi-active vehicle suspensions using a quarter-car model

    Ahmadian, Mehdi; Blanchard, Emmanuel

    2011-02-01

    This article provides a non-dimensionalised closed-form analysis of semi-active vehicle suspensions, using a quarter-car model. The derivation of the closed-form solutions for three indices that can be used for ride comfort, vehicle handling, and stability are presented based on non-dimensionalised suspension parameters. The behaviour of semi-active vehicle suspensions is evaluated using skyhook, groundhook, and hybrid control policies, and compared with passive suspensions. The relationship between vibration isolation, suspension deflection, and road holding is studied, using three performance indices based on the mean square of the sprung mass acceleration, rattle space, and tyre deflection, respectively. The results of the study indicate that the hybrid control policy yields significantly better comfort than a passive suspension, without reducing the road-holding quality or increasing the suspension displacement for typical passenger cars. The results also indicate that for typical passenger cars, the hybrid control policy results in a better compromise between comfort, road holding and suspension travel requirements than both the skyhook and groundhook control methods.

  5. Activation barrier scaling for fluctuation induced switching in driven non-linear micromechanical oscillators

    We explore fluctuation induced switching in an underdamped micromechanical torsional oscillator driven far from equilibrium. Under a sufficiently strong periodic driving field, the oscillator possesses multiple stable dynamical states. Depending on whether the device is resonantly or parametrically driven, two different types of bifurcation occur. In the presence of noise, the oscillator is induced to switch from one dynamical state into the other. Near the bifurcation points, the activation barrier exhibits a power law dependence on the frequency detuning. The critical exponents are measured to be different for the two types of bifurcation. Both values are in agreement with theoretical predictions. Such scaling of the activation barrier close to the bifurcation point is expected to occur in all systems that are driven away from equilibrium

  6. Residual activity induced by ion bombardment on insulating samples

    In this work we investigate some properties of the residual activity induced by protons impinging on quartz, mylar and other insulating materials. In particular, we discuss the time constant related to the decay of the emitted radiation after the primary ion beam is turned off. This radiation includes a continuum of bremsstrahlung and, in some cases, characteristic X-rays induced in the process as well. In general, the results indicate the presence of two time constants in the decaying process. Moreover, it appears that the residual activity has a strong dependence on the material specifications and on the conditions of the surface under bombardment. A simple mechanism for this process is suggested

  7. Base substitution mutations induced by metabolically activated aflatoxin B1.

    Foster, P L; Eisenstadt, E; Miller, J H

    1983-05-01

    We have determined the base substitutions generated by metabolically activated aflatoxin B1 in the lacI gene of a uvrB- strain of Escherichia coli. By monitoring over 70 different nonsense mutation sites, we show that activated aflatoxin B1 specifically induced GxC leads to TxA transversions. One possible pathway leading to this base change involves depurination at guanine residues. We consider this mechanism of mutagenesis in the light of our other findings that the carcinogens benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide and N-acetoxyacetylaminofluorene also specifically induce GxC leads to TxA transversions. PMID:6405385

  8. Porphyromonas gingivalis induces receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand expression in osteoblasts through the activator protein 1 pathway.

    Okahashi, Nobuo; Inaba, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Yamamura, Taihei; Kuboniwa, Masae; Nakayama, Koji; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Amano, Atsuo

    2004-03-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important periodontal pathogen, is closely associated with inflammatory alveolar bone resorption, and several components of the organism such as lipopolysaccharides have been reported to stimulate production of cytokines that promote inflammatory bone destruction. We investigated the effect of infection with viable P. gingivalis on cytokine production by osteoblasts. Reverse transcription-PCR and real-time PCR analyses revealed that infection with P. gingivalis induced receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) ligand (RANKL) mRNA expression in mouse primary osteoblasts. Production of interleukin-6 was also stimulated; however, osteoprotegerin was not. SB20350 (an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase), PD98059 (an inhibitor of classic mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, MEK1/2), wortmannin (an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase), and carbobenzoxyl-leucinyl-leucinyl-leucinal (an inhibitor of NF-kappaB) did not prevent the RANKL expression induced by P. gingivalis. Degradation of inhibitor of NF-kappaB-alpha was not detectable; however, curcumin, an inhibitor of activator protein 1 (AP-1), prevented the RANKL production induced by P. gingivalis infection. Western blot analysis revealed that phosphorylation of c-Jun, a component of AP-1, occurred in the infected cells, and an analysis of c-Fos binding to an oligonucleotide containing an AP-1 consensus site also demonstrated AP-1 activation in infected osteoblasts. Infection with P. gingivalis KDP136, an isogenic deficient mutant of arginine- and lysine-specific cysteine proteinases, did not stimulate RANKL production. These results suggest that P. gingivalis infection induces RANKL expression in osteoblasts through AP-1 signaling pathways and cysteine proteases of the organism are involved in RANKL production. PMID:14977979

  9. Activation-induced resetting of cerebral oxygen and glucose uptake in the rat

    Madsen, P L; Linde, R; Hasselbalch, S G;

    1998-01-01

    In the clinical setting it has been shown that activation will increase cerebral glucose uptake in excess of cerebral oxygen uptake. To study this phenomenon further, this study presents an experimental setup that enables precise determination of the ratio between cerebral uptake of glucose and...... oxygen in the awake rat. Global CBF was measured by the Kety-Schmidt technique, and the ratio between cerebral uptake rates for oxygen, glucose, and lactate was calculated from cerebral arterial-venous differences. During baseline conditions, rats were kept in a closed box designed to minimize...... interference. During baseline conditions CBF was 1.08 +/- 0.25 mL x g(-1) x minute(-1), and the cerebral oxygen to glucose uptake ratio was 5.5. Activation was induced by opening the sheltering box for 6 minutes. Activation increased CBF to 1.81 mL x g(-1) x minute(-1). During activation cerebral glucose...

  10. Antidiabetic activity of Rheum emodi in Alloxan induced diabetic rats.

    Radhika.R

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to evaluate the antidiabetic effect of Rheum emodi rhizome extract and to study the activities of hexokinase, aldolase and phosphoglucoisomerase, and gluconeogenic enzymes such as glucose-6- phosphatase and fructose 1,6-diphosphatase in liver and kidney of normal and alloxan induced diabetic rats. Oral administration of 75 % ethanolic extract of R. emodi (250 mg/kg body weight for 30 days, resulted in decrease inthe activities of glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-disphosphatase, aldolase and an increase in the activity of phosphoglucoisomerase and hexokinase in tissues. The study clearly shows that the R.emodi possesses antidiabetic activity.

  11. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Links Ovulation-Induced Inflammation and Serous Carcinogenesis

    Stav Sapoznik

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the notion that ovarian carcinoma results from ovulation-induced inflammation of the fallopian tube epithelial cells (FTECs has gained evidence. However, the mechanistic pathway for this process has not been revealed yet. In the current study, we propose the mutator protein activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID as a link between ovulation-induced inflammation in FTECs and genotoxic damage leading to ovarian carcinogenesis. We show that AID, previously shown to be functional only in B lymphocytes, is expressed in FTECs under physiological conditions, and is induced in vitro upon ovulatory-like stimulation and in vivo in carcinoma-associated FTECs. We also report that AID activity results in epigenetic, genetic and genomic damage in FTECs. Overall, our data provides new insights into the etiology of ovarian carcinogenesis and may set the ground for innovative approaches aimed at prevention and early detection.

  12. Induced Dwarf Mutant in Catharanthus roseus with Enhanced Antibacterial Activity

    Verma, A.K.; Singh, R R

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of an ethyl methane sulphonate-induced dwarf mutant of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don revealed that the mutant exhibited marked variation in morphometric parameters. The in vitro antibacterial activity of the aqueous and alcoholic leaf extracts of the mutant and control plants was investigated against medically important bacteria. The mutant leaf extracts showed enhanced antibacterial activity against all the tested bacteria except Bacillus subtilis.

  13. Induced dwarf mutant in Catharanthus roseus with enhanced antibacterial activity

    Verma A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of an ethyl methane sulphonate-induced dwarf mutant of Catharanthus roseus (L. G. Don revealed that the mutant exhibited marked variation in morphometric parameters. The in vitro antibacterial activity of the aqueous and alcoholic leaf extracts of the mutant and control plants was investigated against medically important bacteria. The mutant leaf extracts showed enhanced antibacterial activity against all the tested bacteria except Bacillus subtilis.

  14. Induced Dwarf Mutant in Catharanthus roseus with Enhanced Antibacterial Activity

    Verma, A. K.; Singh, R. R.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of an ethyl methane sulphonate-induced dwarf mutant of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don revealed that the mutant exhibited marked variation in morphometric parameters. The in vitro antibacterial activity of the aqueous and alcoholic leaf extracts of the mutant and control plants was investigated against medically important bacteria. The mutant leaf extracts showed enhanced antibacterial activity against all the tested bacteria except Bacillus subtilis. PMID:21695004

  15. Defense-Inducing Volatiles: In Search of the Active Motif

    Heil, Martin; Lion, Ulrich; Boland, Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    Herbivore-induced volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are widely appreciated as an indirect defense mechanism since carnivorous arthropods use VOCs as cues for host localization and then attack herbivores. Another function of VOCs is plant–plant signaling. That VOCs elicit defensive responses in neighboring plants has been reported from various species, and different compounds have been found to be active. In order to search for a structural motif that characterizes active VOCs, we used lima be...

  16. Induced activity in accelerator structures, air and water

    Stevenson, Graham Roger

    2001-01-01

    A summary is given of several 'rules of thumb' which can be used to predict the formation and decay of radionuclides in the structure of accelerators together with the dose rates from the induced radioactivity. Models are also given for the activation of gases (air of the accelerator vault) and liquids (in particular cooling water), together with their transport front the activation region to the release point. (18 refs).

  17. Oil removal and effects of spilled oil on active microbial communities in close to salt-saturation brines.

    Corsellis, Yannick Y; Krasovec, Marc M; Sylvi, Léa L; Cuny, Philippe P; Militon, Cécile C

    2016-05-01

    Abiotic and biotic processes associated with the degradation of a light petroleum in brines close to the salt-saturation (~31 %) and the effect of labile organic matter (LOM) supply (casaminoacids/citrate; 0.2 and 0.1 % w/v, respectively) were followed during an incubation of 30 days. After 4-week incubation at 40 °C under light/dark cycles, a 24 % of abiotic degradation was observed in untreated brines. The stimulation of native brines community with LOM addition allowed an additional 12.8 % oil attenuation due to biodegradation processes. Successional changes in the active microbial community structure due to the oil contamination (16S rRNA DGGE approach) showed the selection of one phylotype affiliated to Salinibacter and the disappearance of Haloquadratum walsbyi in untreated brines. In LOM-amended microcosms, phylotypes related to Salinibacter, Haloarcula, Haloterrigena and Halorhabdus were selected. An effect of hydrocarbon contamination was only observed in the bacterial community with the inhibition of two dominant proteobacterial phylotypes. This study further confirms that short-term and moderate oil biodegradation is possible in LOM-stimulated brines. Biodegradation should be much more reduced under in situ conditions. Self-cleaning capacities of close to saturation hypersaline lakes appears, therefore very limited compared to non-extreme haline environments. PMID:26955981

  18. A comparative analysis between active and passive techniques for underwater 3D reconstruction of close-range objects.

    Bianco, Gianfranco; Gallo, Alessandro; Bruno, Fabio; Muzzupappa, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    In some application fields, such as underwater archaeology or marine biology, there is the need to collect three-dimensional, close-range data from objects that cannot be removed from their site. In particular, 3D imaging techniques are widely employed for close-range acquisitions in underwater environment. In this work we have compared in water two 3D imaging techniques based on active and passive approaches, respectively, and whole-field acquisition. The comparison is performed under poor visibility conditions, produced in the laboratory by suspending different quantities of clay in a water tank. For a fair comparison, a stereo configuration has been adopted for both the techniques, using the same setup, working distance, calibration, and objects. At the moment, the proposed setup is not suitable for real world applications, but it allowed us to conduct a preliminary analysis on the performances of the two techniques and to understand their capability to acquire 3D points in presence of turbidity. The performances have been evaluated in terms of accuracy and density of the acquired 3D points. Our results can be used as a reference for further comparisons in the analysis of other 3D techniques and algorithms. PMID:23966193

  19. A Comparative Analysis between Active and Passive Techniques for Underwater 3D Reconstruction of Close-Range Objects

    Maurizio Muzzupappa

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In some application fields, such as underwater archaeology or marine biology, there is the need to collect three-dimensional, close-range data from objects that cannot be removed from their site. In particular, 3D imaging techniques are widely employed for close-range acquisitions in underwater environment. In this work we have compared in water two 3D imaging techniques based on active and passive approaches, respectively, and whole-field acquisition. The comparison is performed under poor visibility conditions, produced in the laboratory by suspending different quantities of clay in a water tank. For a fair comparison, a stereo configuration has been adopted for both the techniques, using the same setup, working distance, calibration, and objects. At the moment, the proposed setup is not suitable for real world applications, but it allowed us to conduct a preliminary analysis on the performances of the two techniques and to understand their capability to acquire 3D points in presence of turbidity. The performances have been evaluated in terms of accuracy and density of the acquired 3D points. Our results can be used as a reference for further comparisons in the analysis of other 3D techniques and algorithms.

  20. Lipoprotein-induced phenoloxidase-activity in tarantula hemocyanin.

    Schenk, Sven; Schmidt, Juliane; Hoeger, Ulrich; Decker, Heinz

    2015-08-01

    Phenoloxidases play vital roles in invertebrate innate immune reactions, wound closure and sclerotization processes in arthropods. In chelicerates, where phenoloxidases are lacking, phenoloxidase-activity can be induced in the oxygen carrier hemocyanin in vitro by proteolytic cleavage, incubation with the artificial inducer SDS, or lipids. The role of protein-protein interaction has up to now received little attention. This is remarkable, as lipoproteins - complexes of proteins and lipids - are present at high concentrations in arthropod hemolymph. We characterized the three lipoproteins present in tarantula hemolymph, two high-density lipoproteins and one very high-density lipoprotein, and show that the two high-density lipoproteins have distinct structures: the more abundant high-density lipoprotein is an ellipsoid particle with axes of ~22.5 nm and ~16.8 nm, respectively. The second high-density lipoprotein, present only in trace amount, is a large discoidal lipoprotein with a diameter of ~38.4 nm and an on-edge thickness of ~7.1 nm. We further demonstrate that the interaction between lipoproteins and hemocyanin induces phenoloxidase activity in hemocyanin, and propose that this activation is due to protein-protein interaction rather than protein-lipid interaction, as neither lipid micelles nor lipid monomers were found to be activating. Activation was strongest in the presence of high-density lipoproteins; very high-density lipoproteins were found to be non-activating. This is the first time that the ability of lipoproteins to induce phenoloxidase activity of hemocyanin has been demonstrated, thus adding novel aspects to the function of lipoproteins apart from their known role in nutrient supply. PMID:25817204

  1. Closed bore XMR (CBXMR) systems for aortic valve replacement: Active magnetic shielding of x-ray tubes

    Bracken, John A.; DeCrescenzo, Giovanni; Komljenovic, Philip; Lillaney, Prasheel V.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Rowlands, J. A. [Department of Medical Biophysics and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Medical Biophysics and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    Hybrid closed bore x-ray/MRI systems are being developed to improve the safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures by harnessing the complementary strengths of the x-ray and MRI modalities in a single interventional suite without requiring patient transfer between two rooms. These systems are composed of an x-ray C-arm in close proximity ({approx_equal}1 m) to an MRI scanner. The MRI magnetic fringe field can cause the electron beam in the x-ray tube to deflect. The deflection causes the x-ray field of view to shift position on the detector receptacle. This could result in unnecessary radiation exposure to the patient and the staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Therefore, the electron beam deflection must be corrected. The authors developed an active magnetic shielding system that can correct for electron beam deflection to within an accuracy of 5% without truncating the field of view or increasing exposure to the patient. This system was able to automatically adjust to different field strengths as the external magnetic field acting on the x-ray tube was changed. Although a small torque was observed on the shielding coils of the active shielding system when they were placed in a magnetic field, this torque will not impact their performance if they are securely mounted on the x-ray tube and the C-arm. The heating of the coils of the shielding system for use in the clinic caused by electric current was found to be slow enough not to require a dedicated cooling system for one percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedure. However, a cooling system will be required if multiple procedures are performed in one session.

  2. Closed bore XMR (CBXMR) systems for aortic valve replacement: active magnetic shielding of x-ray tubes.

    Bracken, John A; DeCrescenzo, Giovanni; Komljenovic, Philip; Lillaney, Prasheel V; Fahrig, Rebecca; Rowlands, J A

    2009-05-01

    Hybrid closed bore x-ray/MRI systems are being developed to improve the safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures by harnessing the complementary strengths of the x-ray and MRI modalities in a single interventional suite without requiring patient transfer between two rooms. These systems are composed of an x-ray C-arm in close proximity (approximately 1 m) to an MRI scanner. The MRI magnetic fringe field can cause the electron beam in the x-ray tube to deflect. The deflection causes the x-ray field of view to shift position on the detector receptacle. This could result in unnecessary radiation exposure to the patient and the staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Therefore, the electron beam deflection must be corrected. The authors developed an active magnetic shielding system that can correct for electron beam deflection to within an accuracy of 5% without truncating the field of view or increasing exposure to the patient. This system was able to automatically adjust to different field strengths as the external magnetic field acting on the x-ray tube was changed. Although a small torque was observed on the shielding coils of the active shielding system when they were placed in a magnetic field, this torque will not impact their performance if they are securely mounted on the x-ray tube and the C-arm. The heating of the coils of the shielding system for use in the clinic caused by electric current was found to be slow enough not to require a dedicated cooling system for one percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedure. However, a cooling system will be required if multiple procedures are performed in one session. PMID:19544789

  3. LPS induces pulp progenitor cell recruitment via complement activation.

    Chmilewsky, F; Jeanneau, C; Laurent, P; About, I

    2015-01-01

    Complement system, a major component of the natural immunity, has been recently identified as an important mediator of the dentin-pulp regeneration process through STRO-1 pulp cell recruitment by the C5a active fragment. Moreover, it has been shown recently that under stimulation with lipoteichoic acid, a complex component of the Gram-positive bacteria cell wall, human pulp fibroblasts are able to synthesize all proteins required for complement activation. However, Gram-negative bacteria, which are also involved in tooth decay, are known as powerful activators of complement system and inflammation. Here, we investigated the role of Gram-negative bacteria-induced complement activation on the pulp progenitor cell recruitment using lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major component of all Gram-negative bacteria. Our results show that incubating pulp fibroblasts with LPS induced membrane attack complex formation and C5a release in serum-free fibroblast cultures. The produced C5a binds to the pulp progenitor cells' membrane and induces their migration toward the LPS stimulation chamber, as revealed by the dynamic transwell migration assays. The inhibition of this migration by the C5aR-specific antagonist W54011 indicates that the pulp progenitor migration is mediated by the interaction between C5a and C5aR. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, a direct interaction between the recruitment of progenitor pulp cells and the activation of complement system generated by pulp fibroblast stimulation with LPS. PMID:25359783

  4. Antimicrobial Activity of UV-Induced Phenylamides from Rice Leaves

    Hye Lin Park

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Rice produces a wide array of phytoalexins in response to pathogen attacks and UV-irradiation. Except for the flavonoid sakuranetin, most phytoalexins identified in rice are diterpenoid compounds. Analysis of phenolic-enriched fractions from UV-treated rice leaves showed that several phenolic compounds in addition to sakuranetin accumulated remarkably in rice leaves. We isolated two compounds from UV-treated rice leaves using silica gel column chromatography and preparative HPLC. The isolated phenolic compounds were identified as phenylamide compounds: N-trans-cinnamoyltryptamine and N-p-coumaroylserotonin. Expression analysis of biosynthetic genes demonstrated that genes for arylamine biosynthesis were upregulated by UV irradiation. This result suggested that phenylamide biosynthetic pathways are activated in rice leaves by UV treatment. To unravel the role of UV-induced phenylamides as phytoalexins, we examined their antimicrobial activity against rice fungal and bacterial pathogens. N-trans-Cinnamoyltryptamine inhibited the growth of rice brown spot fungus (Bipolaris oryzae. In addition to the known antifungal activity to the blast fungus, sakuranetin had antimicrobial activity toward B. oryzae and Rhizoctonia solani (rice sheath blight fungus. UV-induced phenylamides and sakuranetin also had antimicrobial activity against rice bacterial pathogens for grain rot (Burkholderia glumae, blight (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and leaf streak (X. oryzae pv. oryzicola diseases. These findings suggested that the UV-induced phenylamides in rice are phytoalexins against a diverse array of pathogens.

  5. Antimicrobial activity of UV-induced phenylamides from rice leaves.

    Park, Hye Lin; Yoo, Youngchul; Hahn, Tae-Ryong; Bhoo, Seong Hee; Lee, Sang-Won; Cho, Man-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Rice produces a wide array of phytoalexins in response to pathogen attacks and UV-irradiation. Except for the flavonoid sakuranetin, most phytoalexins identified in rice are diterpenoid compounds. Analysis of phenolic-enriched fractions from UV-treated rice leaves showed that several phenolic compounds in addition to sakuranetin accumulated remarkably in rice leaves. We isolated two compounds from UV-treated rice leaves using silica gel column chromatography and preparative HPLC. The isolated phenolic compounds were identified as phenylamide compounds: N-trans-cinnamoyltryptamine and N-p-coumaroylserotonin. Expression analysis of biosynthetic genes demonstrated that genes for arylamine biosynthesis were upregulated by UV irradiation. This result suggested that phenylamide biosynthetic pathways are activated in rice leaves by UV treatment. To unravel the role of UV-induced phenylamides as phytoalexins, we examined their antimicrobial activity against rice fungal and bacterial pathogens. N-trans-Cinnamoyltryptamine inhibited the growth of rice brown spot fungus (Bipolaris oryzae). In addition to the known antifungal activity to the blast fungus, sakuranetin had antimicrobial activity toward B. oryzae and Rhizoctonia solani (rice sheath blight fungus). UV-induced phenylamides and sakuranetin also had antimicrobial activity against rice bacterial pathogens for grain rot (Burkholderia glumae), blight (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae) and leaf streak (X. oryzae pv. oryzicola) diseases. These findings suggested that the UV-induced phenylamides in rice are phytoalexins against a diverse array of pathogens. PMID:25383752

  6. Calciumreleasing activity induced by nuclei of mouse fertilized early embryos

    2003-01-01

    At fertilization, repetitive transient rises of intracellular calcium concentration occur in all mammals studied so far. It has been shown that calcium rises could be induced when mouse fertilized 1-, 2-cell nuclei were transplanted into unfertilized eggs and that the reconstituted embryo could be activated. However, whether the capability of inducing calcium rises occurs in all stages of mammalian embryos remains unknown. In this study, by using the nuclear transplantation technique and measurement of intracellular calcium rises in living cells, we showed that only the nuclei from mouse fertilized 1-cell and 2-cell embryos, neither the nuclei from 4-, 8-cell and ethanol activated parthenogenetic embryos nor 2 or 3 nuclei of electrofused 4-cell stage syncytium, have calcium-releasing activity when they were transferred into unfertilized mature oocytes. Our results indicate that the calcium-releasing activity in nuclei of 1-, 2-cell embryos is produced during fertilization and exists at the special stage of fertilized early embryos. These suggested that the capacity of inducing calcium release activity in fertilized early embryos is important for normal embryonic development.

  7. Characteristics of induced activity from medical linear accelerators

    A study of the induced activity in a medical linear accelerator (linac) room was carried out on several linac installations. Higher beam energy, higher dose rate, and larger field size generally result in higher activation levels at a given point of interest, while the use of multileaf collimators (MLC) can also increase the activation level at the isocenter. Both theoretical and experimental studies reveal that the activation level in the morning before any clinical work increases from Monday to Saturday and then decreases during the weekend. This weekly activation picture keeps stable from one week to another during standard clinical operation of the linac. An effective half-life for a given point in the treatment room can be determined from the measured or calculated activity decay curves. The effective half-life for points inside the treatment field is longer than that for points outside of the field in the patient plane, while a larger field and longer irradiation time can also make the effective half-life longer. The activation level reaches its practical saturation value after a 30 min continuous irradiation, corresponding to 12 000 MU at a 'dose rate' of 400 MU/min. A 'dose' of 300 MU was given 20 times in 15 min intervals to determine the trends in the activation level in a typical clinical mode. As well, a long-term (85 h over a long weekend) decay curve was measured to evaluate the long-term decay of room activation after a typical day of clinical linac use. A mathematical model for the activation level at the isocenter has been established and shown to be useful in explaining and predicting the induced activity levels for typical clinical and experimental conditions. The activation level for a 22 MeV electron beam was also measured and the result shows it is essentially negligible

  8. Nrf2 activation prevents cadmium-induced acute liver injury

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in cadmium-induced liver injury. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that up-regulates cytoprotective genes in response to oxidative stress. To investigate the role of Nrf2 in cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity, Nrf2-null mice, wild-type mice, kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1-knockdown (Keap1-KD) mice with enhanced Nrf2, and Keap1-hepatocyte knockout (Keap1-HKO) mice with maximum Nrf2 activation were treated with cadmium chloride (3.5 mg Cd/kg, i.p.). Blood and liver samples were collected 8 h thereafter. Cadmium increased serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities, and caused extensive hepatic hemorrhage and necrosis in the Nrf2-null mice. In contrast, Nrf2-enhanced mice had lower serum ALT and LDH activities and less morphological alternations in the livers than wild-type mice. H2DCFDA (2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluoresein diacetate) staining of primary hepatocytes isolated from the four genotypes of mice indicated that oxidative stress was higher in Nrf2-null cells, and lower in Nrf2-enhanced cells than in wild-type cells. To further investigate the mechanism of the protective effect of Nrf2, mRNA of metallothionein (MT) and other cytoprotective genes were determined. Cadmium markedly induced MT-1 and MT-2 in livers of all four genotypes of mice. In contrast, genes involved in glutathione synthesis and reducing reactive oxygen species, including glutamate-cysteine ligase (Gclc), glutathione peroxidase-2 (Gpx2), and sulfiredoxin-1 (Srxn-1) were only induced in Nrf2-enhanced mice, but not in Nrf2-null mice. In conclusion, the present study shows that Nrf2 activation prevents cadmium-induced oxidative stress and liver injury through induction of genes involved in antioxidant defense rather than genes that scavenge Cd. -- Highlights: ► Cadmium caused extensive hepatic hemorrhage and necrosis in Nrf2-null mice. ► Keap1-KD and Keap1-HKO mice were

  9. Nrf2 activation prevents cadmium-induced acute liver injury

    Wu, Kai C. [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Liu, Jie J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Klaassen, Curtis D., E-mail: cklaasse@kumc.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in cadmium-induced liver injury. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that up-regulates cytoprotective genes in response to oxidative stress. To investigate the role of Nrf2 in cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity, Nrf2-null mice, wild-type mice, kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1-knockdown (Keap1-KD) mice with enhanced Nrf2, and Keap1-hepatocyte knockout (Keap1-HKO) mice with maximum Nrf2 activation were treated with cadmium chloride (3.5 mg Cd/kg, i.p.). Blood and liver samples were collected 8 h thereafter. Cadmium increased serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities, and caused extensive hepatic hemorrhage and necrosis in the Nrf2-null mice. In contrast, Nrf2-enhanced mice had lower serum ALT and LDH activities and less morphological alternations in the livers than wild-type mice. H{sub 2}DCFDA (2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluoresein diacetate) staining of primary hepatocytes isolated from the four genotypes of mice indicated that oxidative stress was higher in Nrf2-null cells, and lower in Nrf2-enhanced cells than in wild-type cells. To further investigate the mechanism of the protective effect of Nrf2, mRNA of metallothionein (MT) and other cytoprotective genes were determined. Cadmium markedly induced MT-1 and MT-2 in livers of all four genotypes of mice. In contrast, genes involved in glutathione synthesis and reducing reactive oxygen species, including glutamate-cysteine ligase (Gclc), glutathione peroxidase-2 (Gpx2), and sulfiredoxin-1 (Srxn-1) were only induced in Nrf2-enhanced mice, but not in Nrf2-null mice. In conclusion, the present study shows that Nrf2 activation prevents cadmium-induced oxidative stress and liver injury through induction of genes involved in antioxidant defense rather than genes that scavenge Cd. -- Highlights: ► Cadmium caused extensive hepatic hemorrhage and necrosis in Nrf2-null mice. ► Keap1-KD and Keap1-HKO mice

  10. Acupuncture inhibits cue-induced heroin craving and brain activation

    Xinghui Cai; Xiaoge Song; Chuanfu Li; Chunsheng Xu; Xiliang Li; Qi Lu

    2012-01-01

    Previous research using functional MRI has shown that specific brain regions associated with drug dependence and cue-elicited heroin craving are activated by environmental cues.Craving is an important trigger of heroin relapse,and acupuncture may inhibit craving.In this study,we performed functional MRI in heroin addicts and control subjects.We compared differences in brain activation between the two groups during heroin cue exposure,heroin cue exposure plus acupuncture at the Zusanli point(ST36)without twirling of the needle,and heroin cue exposure plus acupuncture at the Zusanli point with twirling of the needle.Heroin cue exposure elicited significant activation in craving-related brain regions mainly in the frontal lobes and callosal gyri.Acupuncture without twirling did not significantly affect the range of brain activation induced by heroin cue exposure,but significantly changed the extent of the activation in the heroin addicts group.Acupuncture at the Zusanli.point with twirling of the needle significantly decreased both the range and extent of activation induced by heroin cue exposure compared with heroin cue exposure plus acupuncture without twirling of the needle.These experimental findings indicate that presentation of heroin cues can induce activation in craving-related brain regions,which are involved in reward,learning and memory,cognition and emotion.Acupuncture at the Zusanli point can rapidly suppress the activation of specific brain regions related to craving,supporting its potential as an intervention for drug craving.

  11. Enhanced stimulus-induced gamma activity in humans during propofol-induced sedation.

    Neeraj Saxena

    Full Text Available Stimulus-induced gamma oscillations in the 30-80 Hz range have been implicated in a wide number of functions including visual processing, memory and attention. While occipital gamma-band oscillations can be pharmacologically modified in animal preparations, pharmacological modulation of stimulus-induced visual gamma oscillations has yet to be demonstrated in non-invasive human recordings. Here, in fifteen healthy humans volunteers, we probed the effects of the GABAA agonist and sedative propofol on stimulus-related gamma activity recorded with magnetoencephalography, using a simple visual grating stimulus designed to elicit gamma oscillations in the primary visual cortex. During propofol sedation as compared to the normal awake state, a significant 60% increase in stimulus-induced gamma amplitude was seen together with a 94% enhancement of stimulus-induced alpha suppression and a simultaneous reduction in the amplitude of the pattern-onset evoked response. These data demonstrate, that propofol-induced sedation is accompanied by increased stimulus-induced gamma activity providing a potential window into mechanisms of gamma-oscillation generation in humans.

  12. Estimation of the Effect of Green Water and Bow Flare Slamming on the Wave-Induced Vertical Bending Moment Using Closed-Form Ex-pressions

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Mansour, A. E.

    2003-01-01

    rate. These loads can be due to bow flare slamming, bottom slamming or green water loads as they all can be characterised by a short duration relative to the wave cycle. The magnitude of the bow flare slamming loads is estimated using accurate results from wedge-shaped sections, Zhao and Faltinsen...... (1993) and for green water loads the results from Buchner (1995) and Wang et al .(1998) are applied. The phase lag relative to the wave-induced peak and the decay rate are derived mainly from published experimental results, Sikora, (1998). The results are given in closed-form expressions and the......ABSTRACT: The effect of impulsive loads like slamming and green water on deck on the wave-induced bending mo-ment is estimated by a semi-analytical approach. The impulse loads leading to transient vibrations are described in terms of magnitude, phase lag relative to the wave-induced peak and decay...

  13. Active ocular vergence improves postural control in elderly as close viewing distance with or without a single cognitive task.

    Matheron, Eric; Yang, Qing; Delpit-Baraut, Vincent; Dailly, Olivier; Kapoula, Zoï

    2016-01-01

    Performance of the vestibular, visual, and somatosensory systems decreases with age, reducing the capacity of postural control, and increasing the risk of falling. The purpose of this study is to measure the effects of vision, active vergence eye movements, viewing distance/vergence angle and a simple cognitive task on postural control during an upright stance, in completely autonomous elderly individuals. Participated in the study, 23 elderly subjects (73.4 ± 6.8 years) who were enrolled in a center dedicated to the prevention of falling. Their body oscillations were measured with the DynaPort(®) device, with three accelerometers, placed at the lumbosacral level, near the center of mass. The conditions were the following: eyes open fixating on LED at 20 cm or 150 cm (vergence angle 17.0° and 2.3° respectively) with or without additional cognitive tasks (counting down from one hundred), performing active vergence by alternating the fixation between the far and the near LED (convergence and divergence), eyes closed after having fixated the far LED. The results showed that the postural stability significantly decreased when fixating on the LED at a far distance (weak convergence angle) with or without cognitive tasks; active convergence-divergence between the LEDs improved the postural stability while eye closure decreased it. The privilege of proximity (with increased convergence at near), previously established with foot posturography, is shown here to be valid for accelerometry with the center of mass in elderly. Another major result is the beneficial contribution of active vergence eye movements to better postural stability. The results bring new perspectives for the role of eye movement training to preserve postural control and autonomy in elderly. PMID:26522373

  14. Towards closing the gap between hygroscopic growth and activation for secondary organic aerosol: Part 1 – Evidence from measurements

    H. Wex

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA studied in previous laboratory experiments generally showed only slight hygroscopic growth, but a much better activity as a CCN (Cloud Condensation Nucleus than indicated by the hygroscopic growth. This discrepancy was examined at LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator, using a portable generator that produced SOA particles from the ozonolysis of α-pinene, and adding butanol or butanol and water vapor during some of the experiments. The light scattering signal of dry SOA-particles was measured by the LACIS optical particle spectrometer and was used to derive a refractive index for SOA of 1.45. LACIS also measured the hygroscopic growth of SOA particles up to 99.6% relative humidity (RH, and a CCN counter was used to measure the particle activation. SOA-particles were CCN active with critical diameters of e.g. 100 nm and 55 nm at super-saturations of 0.4% and 1.1%, respectively. But only slight hygroscopic growth with hygroscopic growth factors ≤1.05 was observed at RH<98% RH. At RH>98%, the hygroscopic growth increased stronger than would be expected if a constant hygroscopicity parameter for the particle/droplet solution was assumed. An increase of the hygroscopicity parameter by a factor of 4–6 was observed in the RH-range from below 90% to 99.6%, and this increase continued for increasingly diluted particle solutions for activating particles. This explains an observation already made in the past: that the relation between critical super-saturation and dry diameter for activation is steeper than what would be expected for a constant value of the hygroscopicity. Combining measurements of hygroscopic growth and activation, it was found that the surface tension that has to be assumed to interpret the measurements consistently is greater than 55 mN/m, possibly close to that of pure water, depending on the different SOA-types produced, and therefore only in part accounts for the discrepancy

  15. Hepatoprotective Activity of Herbal Preparation (HP-4 Against D-Galactosamine Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice

    P. Padmanabhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress in mammals results from imbalance between generation of free radicals and the rate of their suppression by antioxidant. Hepatotoxicity may result as an effect of excessive free radical formation due to exogenous chemicals or metabolic reactions. D-Galactosamine (D-GalN is a well known hepatotoxicant. Herbal medicines have been utilized to manage hepatotoxicity according to recent trends. In the present study Herbal Preparation or HP-4 is a combination of 80% alcoholic extract of leaves of Aloe vera, Bacopa monniera, Moringa oleifera and rhizome of Zingiber officinale has been utilized to study its efficacy on mice model of D-GalN hepatotoxicity. D-GalN hepatotoxicity induces liver injury closely resembling human viral hepatitis with necrosis, inflammation and regeneration. Evidenced by biochemical and histopathological studies it is concluded that polyherbal formulation HP-4 offered a synergistic protection due to the phytochemicals present which provide hepatoprotective activity induced by D-GalN hepatotoxicity.

  16. Reducing friction-induced vibration using intelligent active force control (AFC) with piezoelectric actuators

    S M Hashemi-Dehkordi; A R Abu-Bakar; M Mailah

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a novel approach to reduce the effect of mode coupling that causes friction induced vibration (FIV) is proposed by applying an intelligent active force control (AFC)-based strategy employing piezoelectric actuators with hysteresis effect to a simplified two degree-of-freedom mathematical model of a friction-induced vibration system. At first, the model is simulated and analysed using a closed loop pure Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controller. Later, it is integrated with the intelligent AFC with fuzzy logic (FL) estimator and simulated under similar operating condition. After running several tests with different sets of operating and loading conditions, the results both in time and frequency domains show that the PID controller with the intelligent AFC is much more effective in reducing the vibration, compared to the pure PID controller alone.

  17. Activation of the Canonical Wnt Signaling Pathway Induces Cementum Regeneration.

    Han, Pingping; Ivanovski, Saso; Crawford, Ross; Xiao, Yin

    2015-07-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling is important in tooth development but it is unclear whether it can induce cementogenesis and promote the regeneration of periodontal tissues lost because of disease. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the influence of canonical Wnt signaling enhancers on human periodontal ligament cell (hPDLCs) cementogenic differentiation in vitro and cementum repair in a rat periodontal defect model. Canonical Wnt signaling was induced by (1) local injection of lithium chloride; (2) local injection of sclerostin antibody; and (3) local injection of a lentiviral construct overexpressing β-catenin. The results showed that the local activation of canonical Wnt signaling resulted in significant new cellular cementum deposition and the formation of well-organized periodontal ligament fibers, which was absent in the control group. In vitro experiments using hPDLCs showed that the Wnt signaling pathway activators significantly increased mineralization, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and gene and protein expression of the bone and cementum markers osteocalcin (OCN), osteopontin (OPN), cementum protein 1 (CEMP1), and cementum attachment protein (CAP). Our results show that the activation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway can induce in vivo cementum regeneration and in vitro cementogenic differentiation of hPDLCs. PMID:25556853

  18. Research on the wind-induced aero-elastic response of closed-type saddle-shaped tensioned membrane models

    Yue WU; Zhao-qing CHEN; Xiao-ying SUN

    2015-01-01

    The aero-elastic instability mechanism of a tensioned membrane structure is studied in this paper. The response and wind velocities above two closed-type saddle-shaped tensioned membrane structures, with the same shape but different pre-tension levels, were measured in uniform flow and analyzed. The results indicate that, for most wind directions, several vibration modes are excited and the amplitude and damping ratio of the roof slowly increase with the on-coming flow velocity. However, for particular wind directions, only one vibration mode is excited, and the amplitude and damping ratio of the vibration mode increase slowly with the on-coming flow velocity. The aero-elastic instability is caused by vortex-induced resonance. On ex-ceeding a certain wind speed, the amplitude of the roof vibration increases sharply and the damping ratio of the vibration mode decreases quickly to near zero; the frequency of the vortex above the roof is locked in by the vibration within a certain wind velocity range; the amplitudes of the roof in these wind directions reach 2–4 times the amplitudes for other wind directions. The reduced critical wind speeds for the aero-elastic instability of saddle-shaped membrane structures at the first two modes are around 0.8–1.0.%目的:明确张拉膜结构风致气弹响应特征及气弹失稳机理。  创新点:1.采用无接触测量技术设计鞍形张拉膜结构气弹模型风洞试验;2.研究鞍形张拉膜结构的气弹响应特征;3.给出鞍形张拉膜结构的失稳机理。  方法:1.在风洞中测量两个形状相同但预张力不同的封闭式鞍形张拉膜结构气弹模型在不同风速下的均匀流中的位移响应及膜面上方不同高度的风速时程;2.通过对位移响应及风速时程进行分析,明确结构的响应随风速变化特征及气弹失稳原因。  结论:1.膜结构在风荷载作用下变形到平衡位置,并围绕该平衡位置

  19. Association of trace elements with colloidal fractions in leachates from closed and active municipal solid waste landfills

    Leachates from two Czech municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills (closed site and active site) were size-fractionated using the cascade frontal filtration/ultrafiltration procedure with filter cut-offs of 3 μm, 0.8 μm, 0.45 μm, 0.1 μm, 10 kDa and 1 kDa. To evaluate the binding of trace elements to colloidal particles, the filtrates were analyzed for major compounds (FAAS, ICP-OES and HPLC) and trace elements (ICP-MS) and the obtained elemental patterns were statistically evaluated. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that the colloids were mostly inorganic, mainly composed of carbonates and clays. Characteristic features of the behaviour of trace elements and the main compounds were more pronounced at the active landfill site. Amongst the main compounds, only Fe and Ca decrease significantly and have similar patterns to numerous trace elements, indicating their capture by colloidal particles (at least 25%). Arsenic, Se and Rb exhibit zero or negligible decrease in concentration in the leachate during the filtration procedure. This fact indicates their particularly high mobility, which should be considered in preventing the flux of harmful compounds from landfill systems.

  20. Association of trace elements with colloidal fractions in leachates from closed and active municipal solid waste landfills

    Matura, Marek [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, Albertov 6, 128 43 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Ettler, Vojtech, E-mail: ettler@natur.cuni.cz [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, Albertov 6, 128 43 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Jezek, Josef [Institute of Applications of Mathematics and Information Technologies, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, Albertov 6, 128 43 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Mihaljevic, Martin [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, Albertov 6, 128 43 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Sebek, Ondrej [Laboratories of the Geological Institutes, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, Albertov 6, 128 43 Praha 2 (Czech Republic); Sykora, Vladimir [Department of Water Technology and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Environmental Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Technicka 5, 166 28 Praha 6 (Czech Republic); Klementova, Mariana [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i., 250 68 Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic)

    2010-11-15

    Leachates from two Czech municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills (closed site and active site) were size-fractionated using the cascade frontal filtration/ultrafiltration procedure with filter cut-offs of 3 {mu}m, 0.8 {mu}m, 0.45 {mu}m, 0.1 {mu}m, 10 kDa and 1 kDa. To evaluate the binding of trace elements to colloidal particles, the filtrates were analyzed for major compounds (FAAS, ICP-OES and HPLC) and trace elements (ICP-MS) and the obtained elemental patterns were statistically evaluated. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that the colloids were mostly inorganic, mainly composed of carbonates and clays. Characteristic features of the behaviour of trace elements and the main compounds were more pronounced at the active landfill site. Amongst the main compounds, only Fe and Ca decrease significantly and have similar patterns to numerous trace elements, indicating their capture by colloidal particles (at least 25%). Arsenic, Se and Rb exhibit zero or negligible decrease in concentration in the leachate during the filtration procedure. This fact indicates their particularly high mobility, which should be considered in preventing the flux of harmful compounds from landfill systems.

  1. ATP-sensitive K+ channels that are blocked by hypoglycemia-inducing sulfonylureas in insulin-secreting cells are activated by galanin, a hyperglycemia-inducing hormone

    The action of the hyperglycemia-inducing hormone galanin, a 29-amino acid peptide names from its N-terminal glycine and C-terminal amidated alanine, was studied in rat insulinoma (RINm5F) cells using electrophysiological and 86Rb+ flux techniques. Galanin hyperpolarizes and reduces spontaneous electrical activity by activating a population of APT-sensitive K+ channels with a single-channel conductance of 30 pS (at -60 mV). Galanin-induced hyperpolarization and reduction of spike activity are reversed by the hypoglycemia-inducing sulfonylurea glibenclamine. Glibenclamide blocks the galanin-activated ATP-sensitive K+ channel. 86Rb+ efflux from insulinoma cells is stimulated by galanin in a dose-dependent manner. The half-maximum value of activation is found at 1.6 nM. Galanin-induced 86Rb+ efflux is abolished by glibenclamide. The half-maximum value of inhibition is found at 0.3 nM, which is close to the half-maximum value of inhibition of the ATP-dependent K+ channel reported earlier. 86Rb+ efflux studies confirm the electrophysiological demonstration that galanin activates and ATP-dependent K+ channel

  2. A Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-α Activator Induces Renal CYP2C23 Activity and Protects from Angiotensin II-Induced Renal Injury

    Muller, Dominik N.; Theuer, Juergen; Shagdarsuren, Erdenechimeg; Kaergel, Eva; Honeck, Horst; Park, Joon-Keun; Markovic , Marija; Barbosa-Sicard, Eduardo; Dechend, Ralf; Wellner, Maren; Kirsch, Torsten; Fiebeler, Anette; Rothe, Michael; Haller, Hermann; Luft, Friedrich C.

    2004-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites are involved in the regulation of renal vascular tone and salt excretion. The epoxygenation product 11,12-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) is anti-inflammatory and inhibits nuclear factor-κB activation. We tested the hypothesis that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α-activator fenofibrate (Feno) induces CYP isoforms, AA hydroxylation, and epoxygenation activity, and protects against inflammatory organ damage. Double...

  3. Resveratrol Induces Glioma Cell Apoptosis through Activation of Tristetraprolin

    Ryu, Jinhyun; Yoon, Nal Ae; Seong, Hyemin; Jeong, Joo Yeon; Kang, Seokmin; Park, Nammi; Choi, Jungil; Lee, Dong Hoon; Roh, Gu Seob; Kim, Hyun Joon; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Choi, Wan Sung; Park, Jae-Yong; Park, Jeong Woo; Kang, Sang Soo

    2015-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is an AU-rich elements (AREs)-binding protein, which regulates the decay of AREs-containing mRNAs such as proto-oncogenes, anti-apoptotic genes and immune regulatory genes. Despite the low expression of TTP in various human cancers, the mechanism involving suppressed expression of TTP is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Resveratrol (3,5,4′-trihydroxystilbene, Res), a naturally occurring compound, induces glioma cell apoptosis through activation of tristetr...

  4. Overinhibition of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Inducing Tau Hyperphosphorylation

    LI Hong-lian; CHEN Juan; LIU Shi-jie; ZHANG Jia-yu; WANG Qun; WANG Jian-zhi

    2005-01-01

    To reveal the relationship between mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and tau phosphorylation, we used different concentration of PD98059, an inhibitor of MEK (MAPK kinase), to treat mice neuroblastma (N2a) cell line for 6 h. It showed that the activity of MAPK decreased in a dose-dependent manner. But Western blot and immunofluorescence revealed that just when the cells were treated with 16 μmol/L PD98059, tau was hyperphosphorylated at Ser396/404 and Ser199/202 sites. We obtained the conclusion that overinhibited MAPK induced tau hyperphosphorylation at Ser396/404 and Ser199/202 sites.

  5. Base substitution mutations induced by metabolically activated aflatoxin B1.

    Foster, P. L.; Eisenstadt, E; Miller, J H

    1983-01-01

    We have determined the base substitutions generated by metabolically activated aflatoxin B1 in the lacI gene of a uvrB- strain of Escherichia coli. By monitoring over 70 different nonsense mutation sites, we show that activated aflatoxin B1 specifically induced GxC leads to TxA transversions. One possible pathway leading to this base change involves depurination at guanine residues. We consider this mechanism of mutagenesis in the light of our other findings that the carcinogens benzo[a]pyren...

  6. Tinospora cordifolia induces colony stimulating activity in serum.

    Thatte U

    1994-10-01

    Full Text Available Tinospora cordifolia (Tc is an Indian medicinal plant with proven immunomodulatory activity. This study was performed to elucidate its possible mechanism of action. We measured CFU-GM Cotony forming units of the granulocyte-macrophage series in serum of mice treated with Tc. We found that 10 days treatment with Tc (100 mg/ kg/d induced a significant (p < 0.01 increase in the number of CFU-GM (255 +/- 49.32 vs 38.51 +/- 9.98 This suggests that activation of macrophages by Tc leads to increase in GM-CSF which leads to leucocytosis and improved neutrophil function.

  7. Tinospora cordifolia induces colony stimulating activity in serum.

    Thatte U; Rao S; Dahanukar S

    1994-01-01

    Tinospora cordifolia (Tc) is an Indian medicinal plant with proven immunomodulatory activity. This study was performed to elucidate its possible mechanism of action. We measured CFU-GM Cotony forming units of the granulocyte-macrophage series in serum of mice treated with Tc. We found that 10 days treatment with Tc (100 mg/ kg/d) induced a significant (p < 0.01) increase in the number of CFU-GM (255 +/- 49.32 vs 38.51 +/- 9.98) This suggests that activation of macrophages by ...

  8. Identifying induced seismicity in active tectonic regions: A case study of the San Joaquin Basin, California

    Aminzadeh, F.; Göbel, T.

    2013-12-01

    active oil fields generally show different characteristics of frequency-magnitude distributions, higher fractal dimensions and higher b-values compared to natural seismicity. The estimated b-values vary between 0.7 close to the San Andreas fault up to 1.3 within the North-western corner of the Kern County. High b-values within this particular region are likely related to active petroleum production. The spatial differences in seismicity statistics delineate earthquakes related to active faults from distributed seismicity toward the center of the basin. Our results highlight, that the analysis of spatial and temporal variations in seismicity statistics may be a promising tool to identify induced seismicity in active tectonic regions.

  9. Cisplatin-induced Casepase-3 activation in different tumor cells

    Shi, Hua; Li, Xiao; Su, Ting; Zhang, Yu-Hai

    2008-12-01

    Apoptosis plays an essential role in normal organism development which is one of the main types of programmed cell death to help tissues maintain homeostasis. Defective apoptosis can result in cell accumulation and therefore effects on tumor pathogenesis, progression and therapy resistance. A family of proteins, known as caspases, is typically activated in the early stages of apoptosis. Therefore, studying the kinetics of activation of caspases induced by antitumor drugs can contribute to antitumor drug discovery and explanation of the molecular mechanisms. This paper detected the Caspase-3 activity induced by cisplatin in human adenoid cystic carcinoma cell line (ACC-M), human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) and human epithelial carcinoma cell line (Hela) with stably expressing ECFP-DEVDDsRed (CD3) probe, a fluorescent probe consisting of Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP), red fluorescent protein (DsRed) and a linker with a recognition site of Caspase-3, by using the capillary electrophoresis (CE) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging system. Under the same concentration of cisplatin, ACC-M cells responded the most rapidly, and then HepG2 cells and Hela cells, respectively, in the early 30 hours. Later, HepG2 cells represented acceleration in the Caspase-3 activation speed and reached full activation the earliest comparing to other two cell types. The results demonstrated that ACC-M cell is more sensitive than the other two cell types under the treatment of cisplatin.

  10. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity

    Diederichsen, L.P.; Winther, A.; Dyhre-Poulsen, P.;

    2009-01-01

    -105A degrees) at a speed of approximately 120A degrees/s, controlled by a metronome. During abduction, electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded by intramuscular wire electrodes inserted in two deeply located shoulder muscles and by surface-electrodes over six superficially located shoulder...... muscles. EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper...... trapezius and the infraspinatus and an increase in activity of lower trapezius and latissimus dorsi muscles. Following subacromial injection a significantly increased muscle activity was seen in the lower trapezius, the serratus anterior and the latissimus dorsi muscles. In conclusion, this study shows that...

  11. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Winther, Annika; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul;

    2009-01-01

    -105 degrees) at a speed of approximately 120 degrees/s, controlled by a metronome. During abduction, electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded by intramuscular wire electrodes inserted in two deeply located shoulder muscles and by surface-electrodes over six superficially located shoulder muscles....... EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper trapezius...... and the infraspinatus and an increase in activity of lower trapezius and latissimus dorsi muscles. Following subacromial injection a significantly increased muscle activity was seen in the lower trapezius, the serratus anterior and the latissimus dorsi muscles. In conclusion, this study shows that...

  12. Creatine kinase activity in dogs with experimentally induced acute inflammation

    Dimitrinka Zapryanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of acute inflammation on total creatine kinase (CK activity in dogs. In these animals, CK is an enzyme found predominantly in skeletal muscle and significantly elevated serum activity is largely associated with muscle damage. Plasma increases in dogs are associated with cell membrane leakage and will therefore be seen in any condition associated with muscular inflammation. The study was induced in 15 mongrel male dogs (n=9 in experimental group and n=6 in control group at the age of two years and body weight 12-15 kg. The inflammation was reproduced by inoculation of 2 ml turpentine oil subcutaneously in lumbar region. The plasma activity of creatine kinase was evaluated at 0, 6, 24, 48, 72 hours after inoculation and on days 7, 14 and 21 by a kit from Hospitex Diagnostics. In the experimental group, the plasma concentrations of the CK-activity were increased at the 48th hour (97.48±6.92 U/L and remained significantly higher (p<0.05 at the 72 hour (97.43±2.93 U/L compared to the control group (77.08±5.27 U/L. The results of this study suggest that the evaluation of creatine kinase in dogs with experimentally induced acute inflammation has a limited diagnostic value. It was observed that the creatine kinase activity is slightly affected by the experimentally induced acute inflammation in dogs.

  13. Genetic dissection of independent and cooperative transcriptional activation by the LysR-type activator ThnR at close divergent promoters.

    Rivas-Marín, Elena; Floriano, Belén; Santero, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of tetralin biodegradation operons is one of the examples of unconventional LysR-type mediated transcriptional regulation. ThnR activates transcription from two divergent and closely located promoters PB and PC. Although ThnR activates each promoter independently, transcription from each one increases when both promoters are together. Mutational analysis of the intergenic region shows that cooperative transcription is achieved through formation of a ThnR complex when bound to its respective sites at each promoter, via formation of a DNA loop. Mutations also defined ThnR contact sites that are important for independent transcriptional activation at each promoter. A mutation at the PB promoter region, which abolishes its independent transcription, does not affect at all PB transcription in the presence of the divergent promoter PC, thus indicating that the complex formed via DNA loop can compensate for the deficiencies in the correct protein-DNA interaction at one of the promoters. Combination of mutations in both promoters identifies a region at PC that is not important for its independent transcription but it is essential for cooperative transcription from both promoters. This work provides new insights into the diversity and complexity of activation mechanisms used by the most abundant type of bacterial transcriptional regulators. PMID:27087658

  14. Denitrification activity is closely linked to the total ambient Fe concentration in mangrove sediments of Goa, India

    Fernandes, Sheryl Oliveira; Gonsalves, Maria-Judith; Michotey, Valérie D.; Bonin, Patricia C.; Loka, A.; Bharathi, P.

    2013-10-01

    Denitrification activity (DNT) and associated environmental parameters were examined in two mangrove ecosystems of Goa, India - the relatively unimpacted Tuvem and the anthropogenically-influenced Divar. Sampling was carried out at every 2 cm interval within the 0-10 cm depth range to determine (1) seasonal (pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon) down-core variation in DNT (2) assess the environmental factors influencing the DNT and (3) to build predictive models for benthic DNT. Denitrification generally decreased with depth and showed marked seasonal variation at both the locations. Denitrification peaked during the pre-monsoon occurring at a rate of up to 21.00 ± 12.84 nmol N2O g-1 h-1 within 0-4 cm at both the locations. Further, DNT at pre-monsoon was significantly influenced by Fe content at Tuvem and Divar suggesting Fe-mediated nitrate respiration. The influence of other limiting substrates such as NO3- and NO2- was most important during the monsoon and post-monsoon especially at Divar. The multiple regression models developed could predict 67-98% of the observed variability in DNT through the seasons. About 6-9 environmental variables were required to relatively well-predict DNT in these sediments with the complexity governing DNT decreasing from pre-monsoon to post-monsoon. Our results reveal that seasonal dynamics of DNT in tropical mangrove sediments are closely linked to the total Fe at the prevailing ambient concentration in both the systems.

  15. Chemically Induced and Light-Independent Cryptochrome Photoreceptor Activation

    Gesa Rosenfeldt; Rafael Mu(n)oz Viana; Henning D.Mootz; Albrecht G.Von Arnim; Alfred Batschauer

    2008-01-01

    The cryptochrome photoreceptors of higher plants are dimeric proteins. Their N-terminal photosensory domain mediates dimerization, and the unique C-terminal extension (CCT) mediates signaling. We made use of the human FK506-binding protein (FKBP) that binds with high affinity to rapamycin or rapamycin analogs (rapalogs). The FKBP-rapamycin complex is recognized by another protein, FRB, thus allowing rapamycin-induced dimerization of two target proteins. Here we demonstrate by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assays the applicability of this regulated dimerization system to plants. Furthermore, we show that fusion proteins consisting of the C-terminal domain of Arabidopsis cryptochrome 2 fused to FKBP and FRB and coexpressed in Arabidopsis cells specifically induce the expression of cryptochrome-controlled reporter and endogenous genes in darkness upon incubation with the rapalog. These results demonstrate that the activation of cryptochrome signal transduction can be chemically induced in a dose-dependent fashion and uncoupled from the light signal, and provide the groundwork for gain-of-function experiments to study specifically the role of photoreceptors in darkness or in signaling cross-talk even under light conditions that activate members of all photoreceptor families.

  16. Saturation of retinol-binding protein correlates closely to the severity of alcohol-induced liver disease

    Wagnerberger, S.; Schäfer, C.; Bode, C.;

    2006-01-01

    Impaired metabolism of retinol has been shown to occur in alcohol-induced liver disease (ALD). The purpose of the present study was to investigate the saturation of retinol-binding protein (RBP) in 6 patients with different stages of ALD. Hospitalized alcohol consumers (n=118) with different stages...... chromatography and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods, respectively. No differences were noted in daily retinol intake, but subjects with ALD had significantly lower concentrations of retinol in plasma (ALD1: 1.81+/-0.17 micromol/l [mean+/-S.E.M.]; ALD2: 1.95+/-0.24 micromol/l; ALD3: 0.67+/-0.13 micromol...

  17. Optical activity of chitosan films with induced anisotropy

    Gegel, Natalia O.; Shipovskaya, Anna B.

    2016-04-01

    The optical anisotropy and optical activity of salt and basic chitosan films, both initial and modified in formic acid vapor were studied. The modification of such films was found to be accompanied by induced time-stable optical anisotropy, by varying the values of specific optical rotation [α] and an inversion of the sign of [α]. The angular dependences (indicatrices) of the specific optical rotation of films on the orientation angle of the sample relative to the direction of the polarization vector of the incident light beam in a plane perpendicular to the beam were obtained. The indicatrices of the initial chitosan films have an almost symmetrical character while those of the films modified in formic acid vapor are irregular. It is concluded of the formation of a vitrified cholesteric mesophase in the chitosan films with induced optical anisotropy.

  18. Tuning of polarization sensitivity in closely stacked trilayer InAs/GaAs quantum dots induced by overgrowth dynamics

    Tailoring of electronic and optical properties of self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs) is a critical limit for the design of several QD-based optoelectronic devices operating in the telecom frequency range. We describe how fine control of the strain-induced surface kinetics during the growth of vertically stacked multiple layers of QDs allows for the engineering of their self-organization process. Most noticeably, this study shows that the underlying strain field induced along a QD stack can be modulated and controlled by time-dependent intermixing and segregation effects occurring after capping with a GaAs spacer. This leads to a drastic increase of the TM/TE polarization ratio of emitted light, not accessible from conventional growth parameters. Our detailed experimental measurements, supported by comprehensive multi-million atom simulations of strain, electronic and optical properties, provide in-depth analysis of the grown QD samples allowing us to give a clear picture of the atomic scale phenomena affecting the proposed growth dynamics and consequent QD polarization response. (paper)

  19. Trypsin-induced ATPase activity in potato mitochondria

    Jung, D.W.; Laties, G.G.

    1976-04-01

    Potato mitochondria (Solanum tuberosum var. Russet Burbank), which readily phosphorylate ADP in oxidative phosphorylation, show low levels of ATPase activity which is stimulated neither by Mg/sup 2 +/, 2,4-dinitrophenol, incubation with respiratory substrates, nor disruption by sonication or treatment with Triton X-100, individually or in concert. Treatment of disrupted potato mitochondria with trypsin stimulates Mg/sup 2 +/-dependent, oligomycin-sensitive ATPase activity 10- to 15-fold, suggesting the presence of an ATPase inhibitor protein. Trypsin-induced ATPase activity was unaffected by uncoupler. Oligomycin-sensitive ATPase activity decreases as exposure to trypsin is increased. Incubation at alkaline pH or heating at 60/sup 0/C for 2 minutes also activates ATPase of sonicated potato mitochondria. Disruption of cauliflower (Brassica oleracea), red sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), and carrot (Daucus carota) mitochondria increases ATPase activity, which is further enhanced by treatment with trypsin. The significance of the tight association of the inhibitor protein and ATPase in potato mitochondria is not clear.

  20. Advanced glycation end products induce fibrogenic activity in NASH by modulating the TNFα converting enzyme activity

    Joy, Jiang X; Chen, Xiangling; Fukada, Hiroo; Serizawa, Nobuko; Devaraj, Sridevi; Török, Natalie J.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulate in patients with diabetes, yet the link between AGEs and the inflammatory and fibrogenic activity in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has not been explored. TNFα converting enzyme (TACE) is at the center of inflammatory processes. As the main natural regulator of TACE activity is the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (Timp3), we hypothesized that AGEs induce TACE through NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2); and the downregulation of Sirtuin 1 (Si...

  1. Peripheral nerve injury induces glial activation in primary motor cortex

    Julieta Troncoso

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary evidence suggests that peripheral facial nerve injuries are associated with sensorimotor cortex reorganization. We have characterized facial nerve lesion-induced structural changes in primary motor cortex layer 5 pyramidal neurons and their relationship with glial cell density using a rodent facial paralysis model. First, we used adult transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein in microglia and yellow fluorescent protein in pyramidal neurons which were subjected to either unilateral lesion of the facial nerve or sham surgery. Two-photon excitation microscopy was then used for evaluating both layer 5 pyramidal neurons and microglia in vibrissal primary motor cortex (vM1. It was found that facial nerve lesion induced long-lasting changes in dendritic morphology of vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons and in their surrounding microglia. Pyramidal cells’ dendritic arborization underwent overall shrinkage and transient spine pruning. Moreover, microglial cell density surrounding vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons was significantly increased with morphological bias towards the activated phenotype. Additionally, we induced facial nerve lesion in Wistar rats to evaluate the degree and extension of facial nerve lesion-induced reorganization processes in central nervous system using neuronal and glial markers. Immunoreactivity to NeuN (neuronal nuclei antigen, GAP-43 (growth-associated protein 43, GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein, and Iba 1 (Ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 were evaluated 1, 3, 7, 14, 28 and 35 days after either unilateral facial nerve lesion or sham surgery. Patches of decreased NeuN immunoreactivity were found bilaterally in vM1 as well as in primary somatosensory cortex (CxS1. Significantly increased GAP-43 immunoreactivity was found bilaterally after the lesion in hippocampus, striatum, and sensorimotor cortex. One day after lesion GFAP immunoreactivity increased bilaterally in hippocampus, subcortical white

  2. Survivin S81A Enhanced TRAIL's Activity in Inducing Apoptosis

    Ferry Sandra

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Survivin is rarely expressed in normal healthy adult tissues, however, it is upregulated in the majority of cancers. Survivin, which belongs to IAPs family, has been widely reported to protect cells from apoptosis by inhibiting caspases pathway. Survivin’s mitotic activity is modulated by many kinases, and its phosphor status can also influence its ability to inhibit apoptosis. There are several important survivin’s phosphorylation sites, such as S20 and T34. We have continued our investigation on other potential survivin’s phosphorylation sites that could be important site for regulating survivin’s cyto-protection. METHODS: By assuming that S81 could be a potential target to modify activity of survivin, wild-type survivin (Survivin, antisense survivin (Survivin-AS, mutated-survivin Thr34Ala (Survivin-T34A and mutated-survivin Ser81Ala (Survivin-S81A were constructed and inserted into pMSCV-IRES-GFP vector with cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter. Each retroviral product was produced in BOSC23 cells. LY294002 pretreatment and TRAIL treatment along with infection of retroviral products were performed in murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells. For analysis, flow cytometric apoptosis assay and western blot were performed. RESULTS: In our present study, survivin for providing cytoprotection was regulated by PI3K. The results showed that LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3K, effectively suppressed survivin-modulated cytoprotection in a TRAIL-induced apoptotic model. In addition, mutated survivin S81A showed marked suppression on survivin’s cytoprotection. Along with that, TRAIL’s apoptotic activity was enhanced for inducing apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: We suggested that survivin could inhibit apoptosis through PI3K and S81A could be another potential target in order to inhibit Survivin-modulated cytoprotection as well as to sensitize efficacy of TRAIL or other related apoptotic inducers. KEYWORDS: apoptosis, survivin, TRAIL, S81A, L929, LY294002.

  3. Propionate induces the bovine cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase promoter activity.

    Zhang, Qian; Koser, Stephanie L; Donkin, Shawn S

    2016-08-01

    Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) is a critical enzyme within the metabolic networks for gluconeogenesis, hepatic energy metabolism, and tricarboxylic acid cycle function, and is controlled by several transcription factors including hepatic nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α). The primary objective of the present study was to determine whether propionate regulates bovine PCK1 transcription. The second objective was to determine the action of cyclic AMP (cAMP), glucocorticoids, and insulin, hormonal cues known to modulate glucose metabolism, on bovine PCK1 transcriptional activity. The proximal promoter of the bovine PCK1 gene was ligated to a Firefly luciferase reporter and transfected into H4IIE hepatoma cells. Cells were exposed to treatments for 23 h and luciferase activity was determined in cell lysates. Activity of the PCK1 promoter was linearly induced by propionate, and maximally increased 7-fold with 2.5 mM propionate, which was not muted by 100 nM insulin. Activity of the PCK1 promoter was increased 1-fold by either 1.0 mM cAMP or 5.0µM dexamethasone, and 2.2-fold by their combination. Induction by cAMP and dexamethasone was repressed 50% by 100 nM insulin. Propionate, cAMP, and dexamethasone acted synergistically to induce the PCK1 promoter activity. Propionate-responsive regions, identified by 5' deletion analysis, were located between -1,238 and -409 bp and between -85 and +221 bp. Deletions of the core sequences of the 2 putative HNF4α sites decreased the responsiveness to propionate by approximately 40%. These data indicate that propionate regulates its own metabolism through transcriptional stimulation of the bovine PCK1 gene. This induction is mediated, in part, by the 2 putative HNF4α binding sites in the bovine PCK1 promoter. PMID:27289145

  4. Neutron distribution and induced activity inside a Linac treatment room.

    Juste, B; Miró, R; Verdú, G; Díez, S; Campayo, J M

    2015-08-01

    Induced radioactivity and photoneutron contamination inside a radiation therapy bunker of a medical linear accelerator (Linac) is investigated in this work. The Linac studied is an Elekta Precise electron accelerator which maximum treatment photon energy is 15 MeV. This energy exceeds the photonuclear reaction threshold (around 7 MeV for high atomic number metals). The Monte Carlo code MCNP6 has been used for quantifying the neutron contamination inside the treatment room for different gantry rotation configuration. Walls activation processes have also been simulated. The approach described in this paper is useful to prevent the overexposure of patients and medical staff. PMID:26737878

  5. Activation-Induced Cell Death in T Cells and Autoimmunity

    JianZhang; XuemeiXu; YongLiu

    2004-01-01

    Activation-induced cell death (AICD), which results from the interaction between Fas and Fas ligand, is responsible for maintaining tolerance to self-antigen. A defect in AICD may lead to development of autoimmunity. During the last several years, much progress has been made in understanding the mechanism(s) of AICD and its potential role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the most recent progress on the regulation of the susceptibility of T cells to AICD and its possible involvement in autoimmune diseases.

  6. Transition polarizability model of induced resonance Raman optical activity

    Yamamoto, S.; Bouř, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 25 (2013), s. 2152-2158. ISSN 0192-8651 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0105; GA ČR GA13-03978S; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11033 Grant ostatní: AV ČR(CZ) M200551205 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : induced resonance Raman optical activity * europium complexes * density functional computations * light scattering Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.601, year: 2013

  7. LSD-induced entropic brain activity predicts subsequent personality change.

    Lebedev, A V; Kaelen, M; Lövdén, M; Nilsson, J; Feilding, A; Nutt, D J; Carhart-Harris, R L

    2016-09-01

    Personality is known to be relatively stable throughout adulthood. Nevertheless, it has been shown that major life events with high personal significance, including experiences engendered by psychedelic drugs, can have an enduring impact on some core facets of personality. In the present, balanced-order, placebo-controlled study, we investigated biological predictors of post-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) changes in personality. Nineteen healthy adults underwent resting state functional MRI scans under LSD (75µg, I.V.) and placebo (saline I.V.). The Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R) was completed at screening and 2 weeks after LSD/placebo. Scanning sessions consisted of three 7.5-min eyes-closed resting-state scans, one of which involved music listening. A standardized preprocessing pipeline was used to extract measures of sample entropy, which characterizes the predictability of an fMRI time-series. Mixed-effects models were used to evaluate drug-induced shifts in brain entropy and their relationship with the observed increases in the personality trait openness at the 2-week follow-up. Overall, LSD had a pronounced global effect on brain entropy, increasing it in both sensory and hierarchically higher networks across multiple time scales. These shifts predicted enduring increases in trait openness. Moreover, the predictive power of the entropy increases was greatest for the music-listening scans and when "ego-dissolution" was reported during the acute experience. These results shed new light on how LSD-induced shifts in brain dynamics and concomitant subjective experience can be predictive of lasting changes in personality. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3203-3213, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27151536

  8. Fission and spallation data evaluation using induced-activity method

    Karapetyan, G S

    2015-01-01

    The induced-activity investigations in off-line analysis performed in different experiments, concerning pre-actinide and actinide nuclei, are here presented and discussed. Generalized expressions for the determination of independent yields/cross sections of radioactive nuclei, formed in the targets, are derived and analysed. The fragment mass distribution from U-238, Th-232 and Ta-181 photofission at the bremsstrahlung end-point energies of 50 and 3500 MeV, and from Am-241, U-238 and Np-237 fission induced by 660-MeV protons, are scrutinized from the point of view of the multimodal fission approach. The results of these studies are hence compared with theoretical model calculations using the CRISP code. We subsequently discuss the complex particle-induced reaction, such as heavy-ions and deuterons, by using the thick-target thick-catcher technique and the two-step vector model framework as well. This is accomplished in order to present the investigation of the main processes (fission, spallation and (multi)fr...

  9. Hypoxia activated EGFR signaling induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT.

    Ashish Misra

    Full Text Available Metastasis is a multi-step process which requires the conversion of polarized epithelial cells to mesenchymal cells, Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT. EMT is essential during embryonic morphogenesis and has been implicated in the progression of primary tumors towards metastasis. Hypoxia is known to induce EMT; however the molecular mechanism is still poorly understood. Using the A431 epithelial cancer cell line, we show that cells grown under hypoxic conditions migrated faster than cells grown under normal oxygen environment. Cells grown under hypoxia showed reduced adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM probably due to reduced number of Vinculin patches. Growth under hypoxic conditions also led to down regulation of E-cadherin and up regulation of vimentin expression. The increased motility of cells grown under hypoxia could be due to redistribution of Rac1 to the plasma membrane as opposed to increased expression of Rac1. EGF (Epidermal Growth Factor is a known inducer of EMT and growth of A431 cells in the absence of oxygen led to increased expression of EGFR (EGF Receptor. Treatment of A431 cells with EGF led to reduced cell adhesion to ECM, increased cell motility and other EMT characteristics. Furthermore, this transition was blocked by the monoclonal antibody Cetuximab. Cetuximab also blocked the hypoxia-induced EMT suggesting that cell growth under hypoxic conditions led to activation of EGFR signaling and induction of EMT phenotype.

  10. Nitric oxide induces caspase activity in boar spermatozoa.

    Moran, J M; Madejón, L; Ortega Ferrusola, C; Peña, F J

    2008-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a highly reactive free radical that plays a key role in intra- and intercellular signaling. Production of radical oxygen species and an apoptotic-like phenomenon have recently been implicated in cryodamage during sperm cryopreservation. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an NO donor, on boar sperm viability. Semen samples were pooled from four boars that were routinely used for artificial insemination. Flow cytometry was used to compare semen incubated with SNP to control semen. Specifically, NO production was measured using the NO indicator dye diaminofluorescein diacetate, and caspase activity was determined using the permeable pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD linked to FITC. SNP induced a significant increase in the percentage of sperm cells showing caspase activity, from 9.3% in control samples to 76.2% in SNP-incubated samples (Pboar sperm damage. PMID:18433854

  11. Tests of an Induced Activity Monitor in a magnetic environment

    Pangallo, M; Perrot, Anne Laure; Vincke, H; CERN. Geneva. TS Department

    2005-01-01

    The Induced Activity Monitors (IAM) dedicated to measure the gamma ambient dose equivalent rate (due to the photons from the activated materials) will be installed inside the LHC accelerator and in the experimental caverns. Some of these IAM detectors (plastic ionization chambers) will be located in areas were magnetic fields will be present. Therefore the response of such radiation detectors in a magnetic field environment has been experimentally and theoretically studied and the results are reported in this note. The tests were performed at CERN in the CMS H2 experimental area with conventional and superconductor magnets. The response of the IAM was studied for different orientations of its chamber with respect to the magnetic field lines and for different magnetic field intensities up to 3T. Moreover, FLUKA Monte Carlo Simulations were performed to fully understand the physical effects responsible for the various measurement results. The conclusions of this study will permit to choose the proper orientatio...

  12. THE POSSIBLE ROLE OF CORONAL STREAMERS AS MAGNETICALLY CLOSED STRUCTURES IN SHOCK-INDUCED ENERGETIC ELECTRONS AND METRIC TYPE II RADIO BURSTS

    Kong, Xiangliang; Chen, Yao; Feng, Shiwei; Wang, Bing; Du, Guohui [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, and Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai, Shandong 264209 (China); Guo, Fan [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Li, Gang, E-mail: yaochen@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Space Science and CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2015-01-10

    Two solar type II radio bursts, separated by ∼24 hr in time, are examined together. Both events are associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) erupting from the same active region (NOAA 11176) beneath a well-observed helmet streamer. We find that the type II emissions in both events ended once the CME/shock fronts passed the white-light streamer tip, which is presumably the magnetic cusp of the streamer. This leads us to conjecture that the closed magnetic arcades of the streamer may play a role in electron acceleration and type II excitation at coronal shocks. To examine such a conjecture, we conduct a test-particle simulation for electron dynamics within a large-scale partially closed streamer magnetic configuration swept by a coronal shock. We find that the closed field lines play the role of an electron trap via which the electrons are sent back to the shock front multiple times and therefore accelerated to high energies by the shock. Electrons with an initial energy of 300 eV can be accelerated to tens of keV concentrating at the loop apex close to the shock front with a counter-streaming distribution at most locations. These electrons are energetic enough to excite Langmuir waves and radio bursts. Considering the fact that most solar eruptions originate from closed field regions, we suggest that the scenario may be important for the generation of more metric type IIs. This study also provides an explanation of the general ending frequencies of metric type IIs at or above 20-30 MHz and the disconnection issue between metric and interplanetary type IIs.

  13. Absolute technique for neutron source calibration by radiation induced activity

    The neutron yield from a Radium Beryllium neutron source has been determined experimentally by the induced Mn-56 activity. The neutron source was placed in the center of a tank filled with aqueous manganese sulphate (MnSO4) solution. Irradiation time usually lasted about 16-18 hours in order to secure saturation. The average induced Mn-56 activity within the MnSO4 bath was then measured by the use of NaI scintillation detector. This detector was placed in a sealed aluminum jacket at the center of the tank. This detector was connected with the necessary electronic counting system and was pre calibrated against a 4 πβ-γ coincidence counting system. The efficiency of the NaI counting system as a function of MnSO4 solution density is investigated as well as the proper dimension of the used tank for the sake of calibration purposes. The neutron leakage within the MnSO4 baths was also investigated for different dimensions of tanks. The experimental errors involved in the counting system were also considered. The numerical value of neutron yield from the used radium beryllium neutron source was given with its corresponding statistical errors as (1.10 + 0.065) x 106 neutron per second

  14. Hyaluronic acid induces activation of the κ-opioid receptor.

    Barbara Zavan

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Nociceptive pain is one of the most common types of pain that originates from an injury involving nociceptors. Approximately 60% of the knee joint innervations are classified as nociceptive. The specific biological mechanism underlying the regulation of nociceptors is relevant for the treatment of symptoms affecting the knee joint. Intra-articular administration of exogenous hyaluronic acid (HA in patients with osteoarthritis (OA appears to be particularly effective in reducing pain and improving patient function. METHODS: We performed an in vitro study conducted in CHO cells that expressed a panel of opioid receptors and in primary rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons to determine if HA induces the activation of opioid peptide receptors (OPr using both aequorin and the fluorescent dye Fura-2/AM. RESULTS: Selective agonists and antagonists for each OPr expressed on CHO cells were used to test the efficacy of our in vitro model followed by stimulation with HA. The results showed that HA induces stimulatory effects on the κ receptor (KOP. These effects of HA were also confirmed in rat DRG neurons, which express endogenously the OPr. CONCLUSIONS: HA activates the KOP receptor in a concentration dependent manner, with a pEC(50 value of 7.57.

  15. High physical activity in young children suggests positive effects by altering autoantigen-induced immune activity.

    Carlsson, E; Ludvigsson, J; Huus, K; Faresjö, M

    2016-04-01

    Physical activity in children is associated with several positive health outcomes such as decreased cardiovascular risk factors, improved lung function, enhanced motor skill development, healthier body composition, and also improved defense against inflammatory diseases. We examined how high physical activity vs a sedentary lifestyle in young children influences the immune response with focus on autoimmunity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells, collected from 55 5-year-old children with either high physical activity (n = 14), average physical activity (n = 27), or low physical activity (n = 14), from the All Babies In Southeast Sweden (ABIS) cohort, were stimulated with antigens (tetanus toxoid and beta-lactoglobulin) and autoantigens (GAD65 , insulin, HSP60, and IA-2). Immune markers (cytokines and chemokines), C-peptide and proinsulin were analyzed. Children with high physical activity showed decreased immune activity toward the autoantigens GAD65 (IL-5, P < 0.05), HSP60 and IA-2 (IL-10, P < 0.05) and also low spontaneous pro-inflammatory immune activity (IL-6, IL-13, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and CCL2 (P < 0.05)) compared with children with an average or low physical activity. High physical activity in young children seems to have positive effects on the immune system by altering autoantigen-induced immune activity. PMID:25892449

  16. Baicalein selectively induces apoptosis in activated lymphocytes and ameliorates concanavalin a-induced hepatitis in mice.

    Yan Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insufficient apoptosis in activated lymphocytes contributes to the development of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH. Baicalein (BE, a flavonoid originally isolated from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, possesses anti-inflammatory properties. However, whether BE can selectively induce apoptosis in activated lymphocytes and exert therapeutic effect on AIH has not been studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The pro-apoptotic properties of BE were evaluated in vitro on different types of immune cells, and in vivo effects of BE were examined in a murine model of Concanavalin A (Con A-induced hepatitis. In vitro treatment with BE resulted in a higher increase in the level of apoptosis in Con A-stimulated murine splenocytes, Con A-stimulated CD3(+ splenocytes, lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated CD19(+ splenocytes, and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate/ionomycin-stimulated Jurkat T cells, compared with that in unstimulated naïve ones. Murine bone marrow-derived dentritic cells, peritoneal macrophages, and RAW264.7 cells, either stimulated with LPS or unstimulated, were all insensitive to the BE-induced apoptosis. BE treatment also led to a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, an increase of cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytosol, a decrease in the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax, and activation of caspase-9,-3 in Con A-stimulated CD3(+ splenocytes and LPS-stimulated CD19(+ splenocytes, while showing no impact on Fas/FasL expressions and caspase-8 activation. In vivo administration of BE alleviated Con A-induced liver injury, suppressed serum level of TNF-α and IFN-γ, and reduced liver infiltration of mononuclear cells (MNCs. Furthermore, BE treatment increased the incidences of apoptosis in liver-infiltrating MNCs and splenocytes, as well as in CD3(+ and CD19(+ splenocytes. When liver MNCs and splenocytes from BE-treated mice were cultured in vitro for 24 h, they exhibited marked increase in apoptosis compared to vehicle

  17. The changes in telomerase activity and telomere length in HeLa cells undergoing apop- tosis induced by sodium butyrate

    2001-01-01

    The changes in telomerase activity and telomere length during apoptosis in HeLa cells as induced by sodium butyrate (SB) have been studied. After a 48 h SB treatment, HeLa cells demonstrated characteristic apoptotic hallmarks including chromatin condensation, formation of apoptotic bodies and DNA Laddering which were caused by the cleavage and degradation of DNA between nucleosomes. There were no significant changes in telomerase activity of apoptotic cells, while the telomere length shortened markedly. In the meanwhile, cells became more susceptible to apoptotic stimuli and telomere became more vulnerable to degradation after telomerase activity was inhibited. All the results suggest that the apoptosis induced by SB is closely related to telomere shortening, while telomerase enhances resistance of HeLa cells to apoptotic stimuli by protecting telomere.

  18. Curvature-induced activation of a passive tracer in an active bath

    Mallory, S. A.; Valeriani, C.; Cacciuto, A.

    2014-09-01

    We use numerical simulations to study the motion of a large asymmetric tracer immersed in a low-density suspension of self-propelled particles in two dimensions. Specifically, we analyze how the curvature of the tracer affects its translational and rotational motion in an active environment. We find that even very small amounts of curvature are sufficient for the active bath to impart directed motion to the tracer, which results in its effective activation. We propose simple scaling arguments to characterize this induced activity in terms of the curvature of the tracer and the strength of the self-propelling force. Our results suggest new ways of controlling the transport properties of passive tracers in an active medium by carefully tailoring their geometry.

  19. Activation of Protease-Activated Receptor 2 Induces VEGF Independently of HIF-1

    Rasmussen, Jeppe Grøndahl; Riis, Simone Elkjær; Frøbert, Ole; Yang, Sufang; Kastrup, Jens; Zachar, Vladimir; Simonsen, Ulf; Fink, Trine

    2012-01-01

    Background Human adipose stem cells (hASCs) can promote angiogenesis through secretion of proangiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In other cell types, it has been shown that induction of VEGF is mediated by both protease activated receptor 2 (PAR2) and hypoxia inducible factor 1(HIF-1). The present study hypothesized that PAR2 stimulation through activation of kinase signaling cascades lead to induction of HIF-1 and secretion of VEGF. Methodology/Principal Findings Immunohistochemistry revealed the expression of PAR2 receptors on the surface of hASCs. Blocking the PAR2 receptors with a specific antibody prior to trypsin treatment showed these receptors are involved in trypsin-evoked increase in VEGF secretion from hASCs. Blocking with specific kinase inhibitors suggested that that activation of MEK/ERK and PI3-kinase/Akt pathways are involved in trypsin-eveoked induction of VEGF. The effect of the trypsin treatment on the transcription of VEGF peaked at 6 hours after the treatment and was comparable to the activation observed after keeping hASCs for 24 hours at 1% oxygen. In contrast to hypoxia, trypsin alone failed to induce HIF-1 measured with ELISA, while the combination of trypsin and hypoxia had an additive effect on both VEGF transcription and secretion, results which were confirmed by Western blot. Conclusion In hASCs trypsin and hypoxia induce VEGF expression through separate pathways. PMID:23049945

  20. Telomerase Activity and Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Expression Induced by Selenium in Rat Hepatocytes

    RI-AN YU; HUA-JIE CHEN; LING-FEI HE; BING CHEN; XUE-MIN CHEN

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effects of sodium selenite on telomerase activity, apoptosis and expression of TERT, c-myc and p53 in rat hepatocytes. Methods Selenium at doses of 2.5, 5.0, and 10μmol/kg was given to SD rats by garage. In rat hepatocytes, telomerase activity was measured by the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP), apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry, and expressions of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), c-myc and p53 were analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).c-Myc and P53 proteins were detected by immunochemistry. Results Selenium at doses of 2.5, 5.0, and 10μmol/kg significantly increased hepatocellular telomerase activity and induced apoptosis in a close-dependent manner. Although selenium at doses of 2.5, 5.0, and 10μmol/kg displayed no obvious enhancing effect on the TERT mRNA expression in rat hepatocytes (P>0.05), it significantly increased the c-myc mRNA and p53 mRNA expression at the dose of 10μmol/kg (p<0.05). Selenium at doses of 5.0 and 10μmol/kg obviously increased the content of P53 protein in rat hepatocytes, but only at the dose of 10μmol/kg, it significantly promoted the value of c-Myc protein in them. Conclusion Selenium can slightly increase telomerase activity and TERT expression, and significantly induce apoptosis and over-expression of c-myc and p53 at relatively high doses. The beneficial effects of selenium on senescence and aging may be mediated by telomerase activation and expression of TERT, c-myc, and p53 in rat hepatocytes.

  1. Paclitaxel-induced activation of murine peritoneal macrophage in vitro

    Li Zhongxiang; Wang Fufeng; Qiao Yuhuan

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of paclitaxel on macrophage activation. Methods:Mouse macrophages were isolated by peritoneal lavage and cultured in RPMI 1640 medium according to the following groups: paclitaxel (5μmol/L) group, IFN-γ (5U/L) group, paclitaxel (5μmol/L) and IFN-γ (5U/L) combination group, and control group(without paclitaxel and IFNγ) .24 hours later, supematants were collected for nitric oxide(NO) assessment using the Griess reagent, and ttanor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α) assessment using the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity(ADCC) of the macrophages was assessed using the method of hemoglobin-enzyme release assay (Hb-ERA). Results: Paclitaxel induced the production of higher levels of NO(8.86 ± 1.16μmol/L) and TNF-α(120.2 ± 10.2pg/ml) ,and enhanced the ADCC of macrophages[ (20.61 + 1.13)% ]. The differences were significant compared with the control group[no NO and TNF-α detected,ADCC (15.37 + 1.93)% ](P < 0.01). Paclitaxel and IFN-γ in combination induced the production of higher levels of NO(22.85 ± 0.91μmol/L) and TNF-α(358.6 ± 27 .5pg/ml), and enhanced the ADCC of macrophages[ (42.49 + 3.09) % ]. The differences were significant compared with paclitaxel or IFN-γ[NO 8.09 ± 1.13μmol/L, TNF-α1 24.8 + 9.6pg/ml, ADCC(23.32 ± 2.63) % ] alone (P<0.01). Conclusion: These findings indicate that paclitaxel can promote NO and TNF-α production,enhance ADCC of macrophages, and induce macrophage activation. The active effects are more significant with paclitaxel and IFN-γcombination.

  2. Possible role of coronal streamer as magnetically-closed structure in shock-induced energetic electrons and metric type II radio bursts

    Kong, Xiangliang; Guo, Fan; Feng, Shiwei; Wang, Bing; Du, Guohui; Li, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Two solar type II radio bursts, separated by ~24 hours in time, are examined together. Both events are associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) erupting from the same active region (NOAA 11176) beneath a well-observed helmet streamer. We find that the type II emissions in both events ended once the CME/shock fronts passed the white-light streamer tip, which is presumably the magnetic cusp of the streamer. This leads us to conjecture that the closed magnetic arcades of the streamer may play a role in electron acceleration and type II excitation at coronal shocks. To examine such a conjecture, we conduct a test-particle simulation for electron dynamics within a large-scale partially-closed streamer magnetic configuration swept by a coronal shock. We find that the closed field lines play the role of an electron trap, via which the electrons are sent back to the shock front for multiple times, and therefore accelerated to high energies by the shock. Electrons with an initial energy of 300eV can be accelerate...

  3. Biological function of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID

    Ritu Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Activation-induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID is an essential regulator of B cell diversification, but its full range of action has until recently been an enigma. Based on homology, it was originally proposed to be an RNA-editing enzyme, but so far, no RNA substrates are known. Rather, it functions by deaminating cytidine, and in this manner, coupled with base-excision repair or mismatch repair machinery, it is a natural mutator. This allows it to play a central role in adaptive immunity, whereby it initiates the processes of class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation to help generate a diverse and high-affinity repertoire of immunoglobulin isotypes. More recently, it has been appreciated that methylated cytidine, already known as a key epigenetic mark on DNA controlling gene expression, can also be a target for AID modification. Coupled with repair machinery, this can facilitate the active removal of methylated DNA. This activity can impact the process of cellular reprogramming, including transition of a somatic cell to pluripotency, which requires major reshuffling of epigenetic memory. Thus, seemingly disparate roles for AID in controlling immune diversity and epigenetic memory have a common mechanistic basis. However, the very activity that is so useful for B cell diversity and cellular reprogramming is dangerous for the integrity of the genome. Thus, AID expression and activity is tightly regulated, and deregulation is associated with diseases including cancer. Here, we review the range of AID functions with a focus on its mechanisms of action and regulation. Major questions remain to be answered concerning how and when AID is targeted to specific loci and how this impacts development and disease.

  4. Minimizing actuator-induced errors in active space telescope mirrors

    Smith, Matthew W.; Miller, David W.

    2010-07-01

    The trend in future space telescopes points toward increased primary mirror diameter, which improves resolution and sensitivity. However, given the constraints on mass and volume deliverable to orbit by current launch vehicles, creative design solutions are needed to enable increased mirror size while keeping mass and volume within acceptable limits. Lightweight, segmented, rib-stiffened, actively controlled primary mirrors have emerged as a potential solution. Embedded surface-parallel actuators can be used to change the mirror prescription onorbit, lowering mirror mass overall by enabling lighter substrate materials such as silicon carbide (SiC) and relaxing manufacturing constraints. However, the discrete nature of the actuators causes high spatial frequency residual errors when commanding low-order prescription changes. A parameterized finite element model is used to simulate actuator-induced residual error and investigate design solutions that mitigate this error source. Judicious specification of mirror substrate geometry and actuator length is shown to reduce actuator-induced residual while keeping areal density constant. Specifically, a sinusoidally-varying rib shaping function is found to increase actuator influence functions and decrease residual. Likewise, longer actuators are found to offer reduced residual. Other options for geometric shaping are discussed, such as rib-to-facesheet blending and the use of two dimensional patch actuators.

  5. Photonic Activation of Plasminogen induced by low dose UVB

    Correia, Manuel Guiherme L.P. Marins; Snabe, Torben; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam;

    2015-01-01

    products, e.g. dityrosine and N-formylkynurenine. Most of the protein fold is maintained after 10 min illumination since no major changes are observed in the near-UV CD spectrum. Far-UV CD shows loss of secondary structure after illumination (33.4% signal loss at 206 nm). Thermal unfolding CD studies show...... observed after 10 min illumination of human plasminogen. Irradiance levels used are in the same order of magnitude of the UVB solar irradiance. Activation is correlated with light induced disruption of disulphide bridges upon UVB excitation of the aromatic residues and with the formation of photochemical.......3 Å). Such proximity makes its disruption very likely, which may occur upon electron transfer from excited Trp761. Reduction of Cys737-Cys765 will result in likely conformational changes in the catalytic site. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that reduction of Cys737-Cys765 in plasminogen leads...

  6. Load-Induced Confinement Activates Diamond Lubrication by Water

    Zilibotti, G.; Corni, S.; Righi, M. C.

    2013-10-01

    Tribochemical reactions are chemical processes, usually involving lubricant or environment molecules, activated at the interface between two solids in relative motion. They are difficult to be monitored in situ, which leaves a gap in the atomistic understanding required for their control. Here we report the real-time atomistic description of the tribochemical reactions occurring at the interface between two diamond films in relative motion, by means of large scale ab initio molecular dynamics. We show that the load-induced confinement is able to catalyze diamond passivation by water dissociative adsorption. Such passivation decreases the energy of the contacting surfaces and increases their electronic repulsion. At sufficiently high coverages, the latter prevents surface sealing, thus lowering friction. Our findings elucidate effects of the nanoscale confinement on reaction kinetics and surface thermodynamics, which are important for the design of new lubricants.

  7. Photoxidative effect on lysozyme activity induced by duroquinone

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is effective for treating various tumors and to induce apoptosis in many tumor cells . To apply theoretical reference for choosing appropriate a photosensitizer, many approaches have been employed. We studied the photooxidative reaction between duroquinone (DQ) and lysozyme (Lyso). The DQ was excited by 315-375 nm UVA light at an irradiance of 34.3 mW·cm-2. The solutions of Lyso (5 x 10-4 mol·L-1) and a mixed solutions of DQ (1.5 x 10-3 mol·L-1) and Lyso (5 x 10-4 mol·L-1) were irradiated for 60 min while bubbling the sample solutions continuously with nitrogen, air and oxygen, respectively. The irradiated solutions were analyzed with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) to check structural changes of Lyso. Lytic activity of the Lyso against micrococcus lysodeikticus was turbidimetrically determined. The result of SDS-PAGE showed a new band at 28-29 kDa under all the three ambiences, and this was the dimer of Lyso (14.6 kDa). Both the results of structural and activity changes demonstrated that DQ can induce photooxidation damage of Lyso. Interestingly, the degree of Lyso damage was the greatest when the solution was bubbled with air, and the damage was the smallest with nitrogen bubbling. The degree of damage increased with the DQ concentration. The effect of irradiation time on Lyso damage was also investigated. It indicated that Lyso damage was strengthened at higher DQ concentrations or longer irradiation. (authors)

  8. Activation-induced and damage-induced cell death in aging human T cells.

    Sikora, Ewa

    2015-11-01

    In multicellular organisms the proper system functionality is ensured by the balance between cell division, differentiation, senescence and death. This balance is changed during aging. Immunosenescence plays a crucial role in aging and leads to the shrinkage of T cell repertoire and the propensity to apoptosis. The elimination of expanded T cells at the end of immune response is crucial to maintain homeostasis and avoid any uncontrolled inflammation. Resting mature T lymphocytes, when activated via their antigen-specific receptor (TCR) and CD28 co-receptor, start to proliferate and then undergo the so called activation induced cell death (AICD), which mechanistically is triggered by the death receptor and leads to apoptosis. T lymphocytes, like other cells, are also exposed to damage, which can trigger the so called damage-induced cell death (DICD). It was hypothesized that oxidative stress and chronic antigenic load increasing with age reduced lymphocyte susceptibility to DICD and enhanced a proinflamatory status leading to increased AICD. However, data collected so far are inconsistent and does not support this assumption. Systematic and comprehensive studies are still needed for conclusive elucidation of the role of AICD and DICD in human immunosenescence, including the role of autophagy and necroptosis in the processes. PMID:25843236

  9. TNF-α Induces Caspase-1 Activation Independently of Simultaneously Induced NLRP3 in 3T3-L1 Cells.

    Furuoka, Mana; Ozaki, Kei-Ichi; Sadatomi, Daichi; Mamiya, Sayaka; Yonezawa, Tomo; Tanimura, Susumu; Takeda, Kohsuke

    2016-12-01

    The intracellular cysteine protease caspase-1 is critically involved in obesity-induced inflammation in adipose tissue. A substantial body of evidence from immune cells, such as macrophages, has shown that caspase-1 activation depends largely on a protein complex, called the NLRP3 inflammasome, which consists of the NOD-like receptor (NLR) family protein NLRP3, the adaptor protein ASC, and caspase-1 itself. However, it is not fully understood how caspase-1 activation is regulated within adipocytes upon inflammatory stimuli. In this study, we show that TNF-α-induced activation of caspase-1 is accompanied by robust induction of NLRP3 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes but that caspase-1 activation may not depend on the NLRP3 inflammasome. Treatment of 3T3-L1 cells with TNF-α induced mRNA expression and activation of caspase-1. Although the basal expression of NLRP3 and ASC was undetectable in unstimulated cells, TNF-α strongly induced NLRP3 expression but did not induce ASC expression. Interestingly, inhibitors of the ERK MAP kinase pathway strongly suppressed NLRP3 expression but did not suppress the expression and activation of caspase-1 induced by TNF-α, suggesting that NLRP3 is dispensable for TNF-α-induced caspase-1 activation. Moreover, we did not detect the basal and TNF-α-induced expression of other NLR proteins (NLRP1a, NLRP1b, and NLRC4), which do not necessarily require ASC for caspase-1 activation. These results suggest that TNF-α induces caspase-1 activation in an inflammasome-independent manner in 3T3-L1 cells and that the ERK-dependent expression of NLRP3 may play a role independently of its canonical role as a component of inflammasomes. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2761-2767, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26989816

  10. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from pistachio nut shells via microwave-induced chemical activation

    In this work, pistachio nut shell, a biomass residue abundantly available from the pistachio nut processing industries, was utilized as a feedstock for the preparation of activated carbon (PSAC) via microwave assisted KOH activation. The activation step was performed at the microwave input power of 600 W and irradiation time of 7 min. The porosity, functional and surface chemistry were featured by means of low temperature nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Result showed that the BET surface area, Langmuir surface area, and total pore volume of PSAC were 700.53 m2 g-1, 1038.78 m2 g-1 and 0.375 m3 g-1, respectively. The adsorptive property of PSAC was tested using methylene blue dye as the targeted adsorbate. Equilibrium data was best fitted by the Langmuir isotherm model, showing a monolayer adsorption capacity of 296.57 mg g-1. The study revealed the potentiality of microwave-induced activation as a viable activation method. -- Highlights: → Pistachio nut shell activated carbon (PSAC) was prepared via microwave assisted KOH activation. → The activation step was performed at the microwave input power of 600 W and irradiation time of 7 min. → BET surface area of PSAC was 700.53 m2/g. → Monolayer adsorption capacity of PSAC for MB was 296.57 mg/g.

  11. Synthesis and Catalytic Activity of a Two-core Ruthenium Carbene Complex: a Unique Catalyst for Ring Closing Metathesis Reaction

    SHAO Ming-bo; WANG Jian-hui

    2011-01-01

    The reaction of a ruthenium carbide complex RuCl2(C:)(PCy3)2 with [H(Et2O)x]+[BF4]- at a molar ratio of 1:2 produced a two-core ruthenium carbene complex,{[RuCl(=HPCy3)(PCy3)]2(μ-Cl)3}+[BF4]-,in the form of a yellow-green crystalline solid in a yield of 94%.This two-core ruthenium complex is a selective catalyst for ring closing metathesis of unsubstituted terminal dienes.More importantly,no isomerized byproduct was observed for N-substrates when the two-core ruthenium complex was used as the catalyst at an elevated temperature(137 ℃),indicating that the complex is a chemo-selective catalyst for ring closing metathesis reactions.

  12. FACS identifies unique cocaine-induced gene regulation in selectively activated adult striatal neurons

    Guez-Barber, Danielle; Fanous, Sanya; Golden, Sam A.; Schrama, Regina; Koya, Eisuke; Stern, Anna L.; Bossert, Jennifer M; Harvey, Brandon K.; Picciotto, Marina R.; Hope, Bruce T.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies with the neural activity marker Fos indicate that cocaine activates only a small proportion of sparsely distributed striatal neurons. Until now, efficient methods were not available to assess neuroadaptations induced specifically within these activated neurons. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to purify striatal neurons activated during cocaine-induced locomotion in naïve and cocaine-sensitized cfos-lacZ transgenic rats. Activated neurons were labeled with a...

  13. Clinical significance of plasminogen activator inhibitor activity in patients with exercise-induced ischemia

    To assess the fibrinolytic system in patients with exercise-induced ischemia and its relation to ischemia and severity of coronary artery disease (CAD), 47 patients with CAD confirmed by results of coronary angiography underwent symptom-limited multistage exercise thallium-201 emission computed tomography. All patients with CAD had exercise-induced ischemia as assessed from thallium-201 images. Pre- and peak exercise blood samples from each patient and preexercise blood samples from control subjects were assayed for several fibrinolytic components and were also assayed for plasma adrenaline. The extent of ischemia was defined as delta visual uptake score (total visual uptake score in delayed images minus total visual uptake score in initial images) and the severity of CAD as the number of diseased vessels. In the basal condition, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) activity was significantly higher in patients with exercise-induced ischemia as compared to control subjects (p less than 0.01), although there were no significant differences in other fibrinolytic variables between the two groups. Moreover, PAI activity in the basal condition displayed a significantly positive correlation with the extent of ischemia (r = 0.47, p less than 0.01). Patients with exercise-induced ischemia were divided into two groups (24 with single-vessel disease and 23 with multivessel disease). There were no significant differences in coronary risk factors, hemodynamics, or plasma adrenaline levels during exercise between single-vessel and multivessel disease except that delta visual uptake score was significantly higher in multivessel disease (p less than 0.01)

  14. Role of hippocampal activity-induced transcription in memory consolidation.

    Eagle, Andrew L; Gajewski, Paula A; Robison, Alfred J

    2016-08-01

    Experience-dependent changes in the strength of connections between neurons in the hippocampus (HPC) are critical for normal learning and memory consolidation, and disruption of this process drives a variety of neurological and psychiatric diseases. Proper HPC function relies upon discrete changes in gene expression driven by transcription factors (TFs) induced by neuronal activity. Here, we describe the induction and function of many of the most well-studied HPC TFs, including cyclic-AMP response element binding protein, serum-response factor, AP-1, and others, and describe their role in the learning process. We also discuss the known target genes of many of these TFs and the purported mechanisms by which they regulate long-term changes in HPC synaptic strength. Moreover, we propose that future research in this field will depend upon unbiased identification of additional gene targets for these activity-dependent TFs and subsequent meta-analyses that identify common genes or pathways regulated by multiple TFs in the HPC during learning or disease. PMID:27180338

  15. Mechanisms for microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles

    Chen Hong; Brayman, Andrew A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Matula, Thomas J. [Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology and Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States); Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-10-03

    To provide insight into the mechanisms of microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles, experimental studies were performed to correlate microvascular damage to the dynamics of bubble-vessel interactions. High-speed photomicrography was used to record single microbubbles interacting with microvessels in ex vivo tissue, under the exposure of short ultrasound pulses with a center frequency of 1 MHz and peak negative pressures (PNP) ranging from 0.8-4 MPa. Vascular damage associated with observed bubble-vessel interactions was either indicated directly by microbubble extravasation or examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. As observed previously, the high-speed images revealed that ultrasound-activated microbubbles could cause distention and invagination of adjacent vessel walls, and could form liquid jets in microvessels. Vessel distention, invagination, and liquid jets were associated with the damage of microvessels whose diameters were smaller than those of maximally expanded microbubbles. However, vessel invagination appeared to be the dominant mechanism for the damage of relative large microvessels.

  16. Mechanisms for microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles

    To provide insight into the mechanisms of microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles, experimental studies were performed to correlate microvascular damage to the dynamics of bubble-vessel interactions. High-speed photomicrography was used to record single microbubbles interacting with microvessels in ex vivo tissue, under the exposure of short ultrasound pulses with a center frequency of 1 MHz and peak negative pressures (PNP) ranging from 0.8–4 MPa. Vascular damage associated with observed bubble-vessel interactions was either indicated directly by microbubble extravasation or examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. As observed previously, the high-speed images revealed that ultrasound-activated microbubbles could cause distention and invagination of adjacent vessel walls, and could form liquid jets in microvessels. Vessel distention, invagination, and liquid jets were associated with the damage of microvessels whose diameters were smaller than those of maximally expanded microbubbles. However, vessel invagination appeared to be the dominant mechanism for the damage of relative large microvessels.

  17. HISTOPATHOLOGICAL CHANGES AND ENZYMATIC ACTIVITIES INDUCED BY MELOIDOGYNE INCOGNITA ON RESISTANT AND SUSCEPTIBLE POTATO

    Moawad M. Mohamad

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available All potato cultivars are susceptible to root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp. which infest the roots and induce galls on the surface and necrotic spots in the flesh tuber of potato, Solanum tuberosum. Infested tubers are unacceptable for processing and fresh market. Tubers are also putative source of dissemination of the nematode. A French nematode- resistant tetraploid potato genotype gained from ex-S. sparsipilum material hybridized with S. tuberosum in F1 and in their back cross progenies and designated as 02T.155.6 was tested and compared in the present study in Egypt as a suitable different environment. Histopathological changes and chitinase activity induced by M. incognita population, of common occurrence in Egypt, in four French tetraploid materials and two common cultivars known as nematode- resistant and susceptible potato genotypes were investigated. Hypertrophied cells were initiated in both cortical and steler regions of the roots which were then developed to abnormal xylem elements expanding into the cortex in French susceptible genotypes designated as 02T.149.6, 02T.150.54, and 02T.157.16. Nematode within the vascular tissue (stele could induce giant cell development close to nematode heads. The largest number of such induced cells was shown by the cultivars Spunta and Diamant. The clone 02T.155.6 with putative nematode resistance demonstrated none or very little nematode development. Recently dead second stage juveniles could also indicate incompatible plant reaction to the invading nematodes in 02T.155.6. M. incognita, Giza population, resistance was generally more coherent to 02T.155.6 as demonstrated by our histological investigations but less coherent as shown by another Egyptian M. incognita population. Chitinase activity was enhanced in M. incognita (Giza-inoculated with respect to uninoculated roots in all plants. After inoculation, such an activity generally increased more in roots of a potato genotype previously known to

  18. Dural administration of inflammatory soup or Complete Freund's Adjuvant induces activation and inflammatory response in the rat trigeminal ganglion

    Lukács, M; Haanes, K A; Majláth, Zs;

    2015-01-01

    induces inflammatory activation in the trigeminal ganglion. METHODS: We performed topical administration of inflammatory soup (IS) or Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) onto an exposed area of the rat dura mater in vivo for 20 min. The window was closed and the rats were sacrificed after 4 h and up to 7...... previously been shown that application of inflammatory or algesic substances onto the dura mater or chemical stimulation of the dural receptive fields causes hypersensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimulation together with direct activation of the TG. We asked whether local inflammation of dura mater...... days. Myography was performed on middle meningeal arteries. The trigeminal ganglia were removed and processed for immunohistochemistry or Western blot. RESULTS: Both CFA and IS induced enhanced expression of pERK1/2, IL-1β and CGRP in the trigeminal ganglia. The pERK1/2 immunoreactivity was mainly seen...

  19. Fracture-induced mechanophore activation and solvent healing in poly(methyl methacrylate)

    Celestine, Asha-Dee N.

    of the crack tip. Control specimens in which the mechanophore is absent or tethered in positions in which no mechanochemical activation is expected are also tested and exhibit no change in color or fluorescence intensity with crack propagation. The relationship between fracture-induced mechanophore activation in rubber toughened SP-PMMA and the strain and stress ahead of the propagating crack is also studied. SP activation is again detected and quantified by in situ fluorescence imaging. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is used to measure the strain ahead of the crack tip. The corresponding stress is generated through the use of the Hutchinson-Rice-Rosengren (HRR) singularity field equations. Mechanophore activation ahead of the crack tip is shown to follow a power law distribution that is closely aligned with strain. The potential of SP as a damage sensor is explored further by incorporating the spiropyran into the core of rubber nanoparticles. SP-linked rubber nanoparticles are synthesized using a seeded emulsion polymerization process and incorporated into cross-linked PMMA at a concentration of 5 wt%. Cylindrical specimens are torsion tested and the activation of the SP within the nanoparticles is monitored via full field fluorescence imaging. SP activation within the core is shown to increase with shear strain. Autonomous damage repair in PMMA is also investigated. The first demonstration of fully autonomous self-healing in PMMA is achieved through the use of solvent microcapsules. Solvent microcapsules with a PMMA-anisole liquid core are prepared and embedded within a linear PMMA matrix. Specimens of the microcapsule-loaded material are then fabricated for Double Cleavage Drilled Compression (DCDC) fracture testing. The DCDC specimens, containing increasing concentrations of solvent microcapsules, are tested and then allowed to heal for a fixed period of time before a second DCDC test. The healing efficiency of each material system is evaluated based on the

  20. Candesartan ameliorates impaired fear extinction induced by innate immune activation.

    Quiñones, María M; Maldonado, Lizette; Velazquez, Bethzaly; Porter, James T

    2016-02-01

    Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) tend to show signs of a relatively increased inflammatory state suggesting that activation of the immune system may contribute to the development of PTSD. In the present study, we tested whether activation of the innate immune system can disrupt acquisition or recall of auditory fear extinction using an animal model of PTSD. Male adolescent rats received auditory fear conditioning in context A. The next day, an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg/kg) prior to auditory fear extinction in context B impaired acquisition and recall of extinction. LPS (100 μg/kg) given after extinction training did not impair extinction recall suggesting that LPS did not affect consolidation of extinction. In contrast to cued fear extinction, contextual fear extinction was not affected by prior injection of LPS (100 μg/kg). Although LPS also reduced locomotion, we could dissociate the effects of LPS on extinction and locomotion by using a lower dose of LPS (50 μg/kg) which impaired locomotion without affecting extinction. In addition, 15 h after an injection of 250 μg/kg LPS in adult rats, extinction learning and recall were impaired without affecting locomotion. A sub-chronic treatment with candesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, prevented the LPS-induced impairment of extinction in adult rats. Our results demonstrate that activation of the innate immune system can disrupt auditory fear extinction in adolescent and adult animals. These findings also provide direction for clinical studies of novel treatments that modulate the innate immune system for stress-related disorders like PTSD. PMID:26520214

  1. Saponins from Aralia taibaiensis Attenuate D-Galactose-Induced Aging in Rats by Activating FOXO3a and Nrf2 Pathways

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are closely related to the aging process. In our previous studies, we found that the saponins from Aralia taibaiensis have potent antioxidant activity, suggesting the potential protective activity on the aging. However, the protective effect of the saponins and the possible underlying molecular mechanism remain unknown. In the present study, we employed a D-galactose-induced aging rat model to investigate the protective effect of the saponins. We found that D-gal...

  2. Damage-induced DNA replication stalling relies on MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 activity

    Kopper, F.; Bierwirth, C.; Schon, M.;

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage can obstruct replication forks, resulting in replicative stress. By siRNA screening, we identified kinases involved in the accumulation of phosphohistone 2AX (gamma H2AX) upon UV irradiation-induced replication stress. Surprisingly, the strongest reduction of phosphohistone 2AX followed...... replication impaired by gemcitabine or by Chk1 inhibition. This rescue strictly depended on transiesion DNA polymerases. In conclusion, instead of being an unavoidable consequence of DNA damage, alterations of replication speed and origin firing depend on MK2-mediated signaling....... knockdown of the MAP kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), a kinase currently implicated in p38 stress signaling and G2 arrest. Depletion or inhibition of MK2 also protected cells from DNA damage-induced cell death, and mice deficient for MK2 displayed decreased apoptosis in the skin upon UV irradiation...

  3. Inhibition of zymosan-induced alternative complement pathway activation by concanavalin A.

    Smith, M. C.; Pensky, J.; Naff, G. B.

    1982-01-01

    Zymosan, a polysaccharide composed primarily of glucan and mannan residues, activates the complement system through the alternative complement pathway. We showed that zymosan-induced complement activation is inhibited by zymosan-bound lectins with carbohydrate specificities for mannosyl and glycosyl residues. Lectins unable to bind mannosyl or glucosyl residues did not inhibit zymosan-induced complement activation.

  4. Single substitutions to closely related amino acids contribute to the functional diversification of an insect-inducible, positively selected plant cystatin.

    Rasoolizadeh, Asieh; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Sainsbury, Frank; Cloutier, Conrad; Michaud, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    A causal link has been reported between positively selected amino acids in plant cystatins and the inhibitory range of these proteins against insect digestive cysteine (Cys) proteases. Here we assessed the impact of single substitutions to closely related amino acids on the contribution of positive selection to cystatin diversification. Cystatin sequence alignments, while confirming hypervariability, indicated a preference for related amino acids at positively selected sites. For example, the non-polar residues leucine (Leu), isoleucine (Ile) and valine (Val) were shown to predominate at positively selected site 2 in the N-terminal region, unlike selected sites 6 and 10, where polar residues are preferred. The model cystatin SlCYS8 and single variants with Leu, Ile or Val at position 2 were compared with regard to their ability to bind digestive proteases of the coleopteran pest Leptinotarsa decemlineata and to induce compensatory responses in this insect. A functional proteomics procedure to capture target Cys proteases in midgut extracts allowed confirmation of distinct binding profiles for the cystatin variants. A shotgun proteomics procedure to monitor whole Cys protease complements revealed protease family specific compensatory responses in the insect, dependent on the variant ingested. Our data confirm the contribution of closely related amino acids to the functional diversity of positively selected plant cystatins in a broader structure/function context imposing physicochemical constraints to primary structure alterations. They also underline the complexity of protease/inhibitor interactions in plant-insect systems, and the challenges still to be met in order to harness the full potential of ectopically expressed protease inhibitors in crop protection. PMID:26833679

  5. Nf1+/- monocytes/macrophages induce neointima formation via CCR2 activation.

    Bessler, Waylan K; Kim, Grace; Hudson, Farlyn Z; Mund, Julie A; Mali, Raghuveer; Menon, Keshav; Kapur, Reuben; Clapp, D Wade; Ingram, David A; Stansfield, Brian K

    2016-03-15

    Persons with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) have a predisposition for premature and severe arterial stenosis. Mutations in the NF1 gene result in decreased expression of neurofibromin, a negative regulator of p21(Ras), and increases Ras signaling. Heterozygous Nf1 (Nf1(+/-)) mice develop a marked arterial stenosis characterized by proliferating smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and a predominance of infiltrating macrophages, which closely resembles arterial lesions from NF1 patients. Interestingly, lineage-restricted inactivation of a single Nf1 allele in monocytes/macrophages is sufficient to recapitulate the phenotype observed in Nf1(+/-) mice and to mobilize proinflammatory CCR2+ monocytes into the peripheral blood. Therefore, we hypothesized that CCR2 receptor activation by its primary ligand monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) is critical for monocyte infiltration into the arterial wall and neointima formation in Nf1(+/-) mice. MCP-1 induces a dose-responsive increase in Nf1(+/-) macrophage migration and proliferation that corresponds with activation of multiple Ras kinases. In addition, Nf1(+/-) SMCs, which express CCR2, demonstrate an enhanced proliferative response to MCP-1 when compared with WT SMCs. To interrogate the role of CCR2 activation on Nf1(+/-) neointima formation, we induced neointima formation by carotid artery ligation in Nf1(+/-) and WT mice with genetic deletion of either MCP1 or CCR2. Loss of MCP-1 or CCR2 expression effectively inhibited Nf1(+/-) neointima formation and reduced macrophage content in the arterial wall. Finally, administration of a CCR2 antagonist significantly reduced Nf1(+/-) neointima formation. These studies identify MCP-1 as a potent chemokine for Nf1(+/-) monocytes/macrophages and CCR2 as a viable therapeutic target for NF1 arterial stenosis. PMID:26740548

  6. Airflow limitation or static hyperinflation: which is more closely related to dyspnea with activities of daily living in patients with COPD?

    Nishimura Takashi; Yasui Maya; Nishimura Koichi; Oga Toru

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Dyspnea while performing the activities of daily living has been suggested to be a better measurement than peak dyspnea during exercise. Furthermore, the inspiratory capacity (IC) has been shown to be more closely related to exercise tolerance and dyspnea than the FEV1, because dynamic hyperinflation is the main cause of shortness of breath in patients with COPD. However, breathlessness during exercise is measured in most studies to evaluate this relationship. Purpose To e...

  7. Diaphragmatic activity induced by cortical stimulation: surface versus esophageal electrodes.

    Gea, J; Espadaler, J M; Guiu, R; Aran, X; Seoane, L; Broquetas, J M

    1993-02-01

    Evoked responses of the diaphragm can be induced by magnetic cortical stimulation and recorded by either surface or esophageal electrodes. The former recording system is tolerated better by the patient but has potential problems with the specificity of the diaphragmatic signal. This study compares the responses of the diaphragm to cortical stimulation that were recorded simultaneously with surface and esophageal electrodes on seven patients (61 +/- 4 yr) with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. Stimuli were delivered in three ventilatory conditions: at baseline, during deep breathing, and during voluntary panting. No differences were observed between results recorded by surface and esophageal electrodes [amplitude of the compound motor of the action potential (CMAP), 0.8 +/- 0.1 vs. 0.8 +/- 0.1 mV, NS; latency, 13.1 +/- 0.4 vs. 12.6 +/- 0.5 ms, NS]. In addition, significant correlations were found (CMAP, r = 0.77, P < 0.001; latency, r = 0.71, P = 0.002). The concordance analysis, however, indicated some dissimilarity between the recordings of the electrodes (CMAP, R1 = 0.31; latency, R1 = 0.26). These differences may be due to the area of the muscle mainly recorded by each electrode and/or to the additional activity from other muscles recorded by surface electrodes. On the other hand, the diaphragmatic responses observed in these patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases were similar to those previously reported in healthy subjects. PMID:8458780

  8. Cuneiform neurons activated during cholinergically induced active sleep in the cat.

    Pose, I; Sampogna, S; Chase, M H; Morales, F R

    2000-05-01

    In the present study, we report that the cuneiform (Cun) nucleus, a brainstem structure that before now has not been implicated in sleep processes, exhibits a large number of neurons that express c-fos during carbachol-induced active sleep (AS-carbachol). Compared with control (awake) cats, during AS-carbachol, there was a 671% increase in the number of neurons that expressed c-fos in this structure. Within the Cun nucleus, three immunocytochemically distinct populations of neurons were observed. One group consisted of GABAergic neurons, which predominantly did not express c-fos during AS-carbachol. Two other different populations expressed c-fos during this state. One of the Fos-positive (Fos(+)) populations consisted of a distinct group of nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d)-containing neurons; the neurotransmitter of the other Fos(+) population remains unknown. The Cun nucleus did not contain cholinergic, catecholaminergic, serotonergic, or glycinergic neurons. On the basis of neuronal activation during AS-carbachol, as indicated by c-fos expression, we suggest that the Cun nucleus is involved, in an as yet unknown manner, in the physiological expression of active sleep. The finding of a population of NOS-NADPH-d containing neurons, which were activated during AS-carbachol, suggests that nitrergic modulation of their target cell groups is likely to play a role in active sleep-related physiological processes. PMID:10777795

  9. Closed headpiece of integrin [alpah]IIb[beta]3 and its complex with an [alpha]IIb[beta]3-specific antagonist that does not induce opening

    Zhu, Jieqing; Zhu, Jianghai; Negri, Ana; Provasi, Davide; Filizola, Marta; Coller, Barry S.; Springer, Timothy A. (Sinai); (Rockefeller); (CH-Boston)

    2011-08-24

    The platelet integrin {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} is essential for hemostasis and thrombosis through its binding of adhesive plasma proteins. We have determined crystal structures of the {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} headpiece in the absence of ligand and after soaking in RUC-1, a novel small molecule antagonist. In the absence of ligand, the {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} headpiece is in a closed conformation, distinct from the open conformation visualized in presence of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) antagonists. In contrast to RGD antagonists, RUC-1 binds only to the {alpha}{sub IIb} subunit. Molecular dynamics revealed nearly identical binding. Two species-specific residues, {alpha}{sub IIb} Y190 and {alpha}{sub aIIb} D232, in the RUC-1 binding site were confirmed as important by mutagenesis. In sharp contrast to RGD-based antagonists, RUC-1 did not induce {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} to adopt an open conformation, as determined by gel filtration and dynamic light scattering. These studies provide insights into the factors that regulate integrin headpiece opening, and demonstrate the molecular basis for a novel mechanism of integrin antagonism.

  10. Involvement of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase in leptin-induced sympathetic nerve activation.

    Mamoru Tanida

    Full Text Available In mammals, leptin released from the white adipose tissue acts on the central nervous system to control feeding behavior, cardiovascular function, and energy metabolism. Central leptin activates sympathetic nerves that innervate the kidney, adipose tissue, and some abdominal organs in rats. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is essential in the intracellular signaling pathway involving the activation of leptin receptors (ObRb. We investigated the potential of AMPKα2 in the sympathetic effects of leptin using in vivo siRNA injection to knockdown AMPKα2 in rats, to produce reduced hypothalamic AMPKα2 expression. Leptin effects on body weight, food intake, and blood FFA levels were eliminated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. Leptin-evoked enhancements of the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney, brown and white adipose tissues were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. To check whether AMPKα2 was specific to sympathetic changes induced by leptin, we examined the effects of injecting MT-II, a melanocortin-3 and -4 receptor agonist, on the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney and adipose tissue. MT-II-induced sympatho-excitation in the kidney was unchanged in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. However, responses of neural activities involving adipose tissue to MT-II were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. These results suggest that hypothalamic AMPKα2 is involved not only in appetite and body weight regulation but also in the regulation of sympathetic nerve discharges to the kidney and adipose tissue. Thus, AMPK might function not only as an energy sensor, but as a key molecule in the cardiovascular, thermogenic, and lipolytic effects of leptin through the sympathetic nervous system.

  11. Small molecule antagonism of oxysterol-induced Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 2 (EBI2) activation

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Madsen, Christian M; Arfelt, Kristine N;

    2013-01-01

    682753A, which blocks oxysterol-induced G-protein activation, β-arrestin recruitment and B-cell chemotaxis. We furthermore demonstrate that activation triggers pertussis toxin-sensitive MAP kinase phosphorylation, which is also inhibited by GSK682753A. Thus, EBI2 signalling in B cells mediates key...

  12. Denbinobin induces apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells via Akt inactivation, Bad activation, and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Kuo, Chen-Tzu; Hsu, Ming-Jen; Chen, Bing-Chang; Chen, Chien-Chih; Teng, Che-Ming; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Lin, Chien-Huang

    2008-02-28

    Increasing evidence demonstrated that denbinobin, isolated from Ephemerantha lonchophylla, exert cytotoxic effects in cancer cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether denbinobin induces apoptosis and the apoptotic mechanism of denbinobin in human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549). Denbinobin (1-20microM) caused cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis and annexin V labeling demonstrated that denbinobin increased the percentage of apoptotic cells. A549 cells treated with denbinobin showed typical characteristics of apoptosis including morphological changes and DNA fragmentation. Denbinobin induced caspase 3 activation, and N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (zVAD-fmk), a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor, prevented denbinobin-induced cell death. Denbinobin induced the loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential and the release of mitochondrial apoptotic proteins including cytochrome c, second mitochondria derived activator of caspase (Smac), and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). In addition, denbinobin-induced Bad activation was accompanied by the dissociation of Bad with 14-3-3 and the association of Bad with Bcl-xL. Furthermore, denbinobin induced Akt inactivation in a time-dependent manner. Transfection of A549 cells with both wild-type and constitutively active Akt significantly suppressed denbinobin-induced Bad activation and cell apoptosis. These results suggest that Akt inactivation, followed by Bad activation, mitochondrial dysfunction, caspase 3 activation, and AIF release, contributes to denbinobin-induced cell apoptosis. PMID:18262737

  13. Comparison of Nuclear Activation Methods for Bromine. Instrumental Analyses of Pesticides in Plant Materials Close to the Limit of Sensitivity

    There has been worldwide interest in pesticide residue analysis for control and ecological purposes. Although several agricultural research establishments have in the past developed suitable radioisotope tracer techniques to detect and remove organic pesticides from food, suitable micro-analytical techniques for the measurement of traces of toxic elements present in these materials have not been available. In cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture, Plant Pest Control Laboratory, an investigation has been conducted on the use of neutron activation techniques for determining bromine, arsenic and mercury residues in soils, foliage, fruit, and vegetable materials. This paper discusses the various instrumental and data reduction techniques which were developed to measure traces of bromine by neutron activation methods, especially those employed in the limit of sensitivity range wherein special statistical methods are necessary. A large number of samples of soils, foliage, orange and vegetable materials, activated in the Texas A and M Research Reactor were counted at appropriate times after activation using three different counting systems: firstly, an automated system with an Nal (Tl) spectrometer; secondly, a 2 cm3 Ge(Li) solid-state detector connected to a Victoreen 3200-channel analyzer; and thirdly a slow γ-γ coincidence unit. The spectral data from the automated system were reduced by the AA-6 least squares method, and alternatively by means of computer spectrum stripping and peak area computation methods. The photopeak activities from the solid-state detector spectra were measured by the peak area method. The results obtained from the three counting systems using different data reduction techniques were compared to determine the best for the measurement of bromine concentration in the limit-of-sensitivity range. The γ-γ coincidence counting technique appears to have advantages in measuring the bromine content even in the ppm range in

  14. Tectonic and gravity-induced deformation along the active Talas-Fergana Fault, Tien Shan, Kyrgyzstan

    Tibaldi, A.; Corazzato, C.; Rust, D.; Bonali, F. L.; Pasquarè Mariotto, F. A.; Korzhenkov, A. M.; Oppizzi, P.; Bonzanigo, L.

    2015-08-01

    This paper shows, by field palaeoseismological data, the Holocene activity of the central segment of the intracontinental Talas-Fergana Fault (TFF), and the relevance of possible future seismic shaking on slope stability around a large water reservoir. The fault, striking NW-SE, is marked by a continuous series of scarps, deflected streams and water divides, and prehistoric earthquakes that offset substrate and Holocene deposits. Fault movements are characterised by right-lateral strike-slip kinematics with a subordinate component of uplift of the NE block. Structural, geological and geomorphological field data indicate that shallow and deep landslides are aligned along the TFF, and some of them are active. Where the TFF runs close to the reservoir, the fault trace is obscured by a series of landslides, affecting rock and soil materials and ranging in size from small slope instabilities to deep-seated gravity-induced slope deformations (DGSDs). The largest of these, which does not show clear evidence of present-day activity, involves a volume of about 1 km3 and is associated with smaller but active landslides in its lower part, with volumes in the order of 2.5 × 104 m3 to 1 × 106 m3. Based on the spatial and temporal relations between landslides and faults, we argue that at least some of these slope failures may have a coseismic character. Stability analyses by means of limit equilibrium methods (LEMs), and stress-strain analysis by finite difference numerical modelling (FDM), were carried out to evaluate different hazard scenarios linked to these slope instabilities. The results indicate concern for the different threats posed, ranging from the possible disruption of the M-41 highway, the main transportation route in central Asia, to the possible collapse of huge rock masses into the reservoir, possibly generating a tsunami.

  15. Guard cell photosynthesis is critical for stomatal turgor production, yet does not directly mediate CO2 - and ABA-induced stomatal closing.

    Azoulay-Shemer, Tamar; Palomares, Axxell; Bagheri, Andisheh; Israelsson-Nordstrom, Maria; Engineer, Cawas B; Bargmann, Bastiaan O R; Stephan, Aaron B; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-08-01

    Stomata mediate gas exchange between the inter-cellular spaces of leaves and the atmosphere. CO2 levels in leaves (Ci) are determined by respiration, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and atmospheric [CO2 ]. [CO2 ] in leaves mediates stomatal movements. The role of guard cell photosynthesis in stomatal conductance responses is a matter of debate, and genetic approaches are needed. We have generated transgenic Arabidopsis plants that are chlorophyll-deficient in guard cells only, expressing a constitutively active chlorophyllase in a guard cell specific enhancer trap line. Our data show that more than 90% of guard cells were chlorophyll-deficient. Interestingly, approximately 45% of stomata had an unusual, previously not-described, morphology of thin-shaped chlorophyll-less stomata. Nevertheless, stomatal size, stomatal index, plant morphology, and whole-leaf photosynthetic parameters (PSII, qP, qN, FV '/FM' ) were comparable with wild-type plants. Time-resolved intact leaf gas-exchange analyses showed a reduction in stomatal conductance and CO2 -assimilation rates of the transgenic plants. Normalization of CO2 responses showed that stomata of transgenic plants respond to [CO2 ] shifts. Detailed stomatal aperture measurements of normal kidney-shaped stomata, which lack chlorophyll, showed stomatal closing responses to [CO2 ] elevation and abscisic acid (ABA), while thin-shaped stomata were continuously closed. Our present findings show that stomatal movement responses to [CO2 ] and ABA are functional in guard cells that lack chlorophyll. These data suggest that guard cell CO2 and ABA signal transduction are not directly modulated by guard cell photosynthesis/electron transport. Moreover, the finding that chlorophyll-less stomata cause a 'deflated' thin-shaped phenotype, suggests that photosynthesis in guard cells is critical for energization and guard cell turgor production. PMID:26096271

  16. The major differences in chemical composition and antibacterial activity of two closely related Leonotis species (Lamiaceae may have taxonomic value

    J.N. Eloff

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Several Leonotis species are used widely for medicinal purposes in Africa. There have been drastic changes in the taxonomic treatment of Leonotis species during the past decade. Two species, L. dysophylla and L. microphylla occurring in Pretoria have been considered as varieties of the same species and as different species by different authors. Because Leonotis species are used widely as medicinal plants inter alia against bacterial infections, we decided to compare the chemical composition and antibacterial activity of four plants from each of two populations of the species. The chemical composition of acetone extracts of finely ground leaves was determined by thin layer chromatography followed by spraying with vanillin-sulphuric acid. There were hardly any differences between plants from the same population. There were major differences between the two species in the composition of pigments separated by thin layer chromatography and for compounds visualized with the vanillin-sulphuric acid spray reagent. This supported the viewpoint that the two species should not be considered as varieties. The major differences found in chemical composition indicate that chemical parameters may play an important role in resolving taxonomic differences. Because such a small quantity of material is needed, it may be feasible to analyze one or two leaves obtained from herbarium sheets as an additional taxonomic parameter. The antibacterial activity of the acetone extracts was determined using a two-fold serial dilution microplate method with tetrazolium violet as indicator of growth. The specific strains of the four most important nosocomial bacterial pathogens suggested by the United States National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards were used: Staphylococcus aureus (American Type Culture Collection 29213, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853, Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922 and Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 21212. The minimum inhibitory activity of the

  17. Studies of phenolic chelating agents on free radical scavenging activities and inhibitory action in radiation-induced lipid peroxidation

    Effects of single molecular and double molecular substituted phenolic chelating agents on scavenging of superoxide anions and hydroxyl radicals and inhibition of rat liver mitochondria lipid peroxidation induced by irradiation were studied. The phenolic chelating agents were shown to different extent to scavenge oxygen free radical and the protect against radiation-induced lipid peroxidation, and their half inhibition concentrations (IC50) on hydroxyl radicals generation and lipid peroxidation were 1 x 10-6 mol/L, which of scavenging of superoxide anions were 1 x 10-3 mol/L. 7601(CBMIDA), 9501 and 9502 were the best among them. The free radical scavenging and antioxidant activities were close related to chemical structure and de-corporate bioactivity

  18. Growth hormone-induced insulin resistance in human subjects involves reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase activity

    Nellemann, Birgitte; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Nielsen, Thomas S;

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance induced by growth hormone (GH) is linked to promotion of lipolysis by unknown mechanisms. We hypothesized that suppression of the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase in the active form (PDHa) underlies GH-induced insulin resistance similar to what is observed during fasting....

  19. Active Harmonic Filtering Using Current-Controlled, Grid-Connected DG Units With Closed-Loop Power Control

    Jinwei He,; Yun Wei Li,; Blaabjerg, Frede; Xiongfei Wang,

    2014-01-01

    The increasing application of nonlinear loads may cause distribution system power quality issues. In order to utilize distributed generation (DG) unit interfacing converters to actively compensate harmonics, this paper proposes an enhanced current control approach, which seamlessly integrates system harmonic mitigation capabilities with the primary DG power generation function. As the proposed current controller has two well-decoupled control branches to independently control fundamental and ...

  20. Androgen via p21 Inhibits Tumor Necrosis Factor α-induced JNK Activation and Apoptosis*

    Tang, Fangming; Kokontis, John; Lin, Yuting; Liao, Shutsung; Lin, Anning; Xiang, Jialing

    2009-01-01

    The male hormone androgen is a growth/survival factor for its target tissues or organs. Yet, the underlying mechanism is incompletely understood. Here, we report that androgen via p21 inhibits tumor necrosis factor α-induced JNK activation and apoptosis. Inhibition by androgen requires the transcription activity of androgen receptor (AR) and de novo protein synthesis. Androgen·AR induces expression of p21 that in turn inhibits tumor necrosis factor α-induced JNK and apoptosis. Furthermore, ge...

  1. Effects of Active Mastication on Chronic Stress-Induced Bone Loss in Mice

    Azuma, Kagaku; Furuzawa, Manabu; Fujiwara, Shu; YAMADA, Kumiko; Kubo, Kin-Ya

    2015-01-01

    Chronic psychologic stress increases corticosterone levels, which decreases bone density. Active mastication or chewing attenuates stress-induced increases in corticosterone. We evaluated whether active mastication attenuates chronic stress-induced bone loss in mice. Male C57BL/6 (B6) mice were randomly divided into control, stress, and stress/chewing groups. Stress was induced by placing mice in a ventilated restraint tube (60 min, 2x/day, 4 weeks). The stress/chewing group was given a woode...

  2. Closing the gap between ethics knowledge and practice through active engagement: an applied model of physical therapy ethics.

    Delany, Clare M; Edwards, Ian; Jensen, Gail M; Skinner, Elizabeth

    2010-07-01

    Physical therapist practice has a distinct focus that is holistic (ie, patient centered) and at the same time connected to a range of other providers within health care systems. Although there is a growing body of literature in physical therapy ethics knowledge, including clinical obligations and underlying philosophical principles, less is known about the unique ethical issues that physical therapists encounter, and how and why they make ethical decisions. As moral agents, physical therapists are required to make autonomous clinical and ethical decisions based on connections and relationships with their patients, other health care team members, and health institutions and policies. This article identifies specific ethical dimensions of physical therapist practice and highlights the development and focus of ethics knowledge in physical therapy over the last several decades. An applied ethics model, called the "active engagement model," is proposed to integrate clinical and ethical dimensions of practice with the theoretical knowledge and literature about ethics. The active engagement model has 3 practical steps: to listen actively, to think reflexively, and to reason critically. The model focuses on the underlying skills, attitudes, and actions that are required to build a sense of moral agency and purpose within physical therapist practice and to decrease gaps between the ethical dimensions of physical therapist practice and physical therapy ethics knowledge and scholarship. A clinical case study is provided to illustrate how the ethics engagement model might be used to analyze and provide insight into the ethical dimensions of physical therapist practice. PMID:20448105

  3. Simplified Fiber-Wireless Distribution of HD Video in Passive and Active W-band Close Proximity Terminals

    Lebedev, Alexander; Rodes Lopez, Roberto; Yu, Xianbin;

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate uncompressed high-definition (HD) video distribution at 84 GHz Radio over Fiber link achieving up to 3 meters of wireless transmission. We experimentally emulate Metro-Access architecture by deploying single/multimode fibers. Passive and active approaches for remote...... antenna unit (RAU) are experimentally investigated. The bit error rate (BER) performance of the optical and wireless channels is reported. A successful transmission of uncompressed HD video in the W-band wireless channel is demonstrated with prospects to pave the way for application-focused fiber......-wireless connectivity supported by diverse optical fiber distribution infrastructure....

  4. The prediction of induced activity levels in and around NIMROD

    Hack, R C

    1973-01-01

    Comparisons are reported between measured and predicted levels of induced radioactivity for a number of irradiation conditions. Good agreement was found between experimental measurements and fairly simple methods of prediction developed at CERN.

  5. Glucose Enhances Basal or Melanocortin-Induced cAMP-Response Element Activity in Hypothalamic Cells.

    Breit, Andreas; Wicht, Kristina; Boekhoff, Ingrid; Glas, Evi; Lauffer, Lisa; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH)-induced activation of the cAMP-response element (CRE) via the CRE-binding protein in hypothalamic cells promotes expression of TRH and thereby restricts food intake and increases energy expenditure. Glucose also induces central anorexigenic effects by acting on hypothalamic neurons, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. It has been proposed that glucose activates the CRE-binding protein-regulated transcriptional coactivator 2 (CRTC-2) in hypothalamic neurons by inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPKs), but whether glucose directly affects hypothalamic CRE activity has not yet been shown. Hence, we dissected effects of glucose on basal and MSH-induced CRE activation in terms of kinetics, affinity, and desensitization in murine, hypothalamic mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells that stably express a CRE-dependent reporter gene construct. Physiologically relevant increases in extracellular glucose enhanced basal or MSH-induced CRE-dependent gene transcription, whereas prolonged elevated glucose concentrations reduced the sensitivity of mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells towards glucose. Glucose also induced CRCT-2 translocation into the nucleus and the AMPK activator metformin decreased basal and glucose-induced CRE activity, suggesting a role for AMPK/CRTC-2 in glucose-induced CRE activation. Accordingly, small interfering RNA-induced down-regulation of CRTC-2 expression decreased glucose-induced CRE-dependent reporter activation. Of note, glucose also induced expression of TRH, suggesting that glucose might affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis via the regulation of hypothalamic CRE activity. These findings significantly advance our knowledge about the impact of glucose on hypothalamic signaling and suggest that TRH release might account for the central anorexigenic effects of glucose and could represent a new molecular link between hyperglycaemia and thyroid dysfunction. PMID:27144291

  6. p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase in beryllium-induced dendritic cell activation

    Li, L.; Huang, Z.; Gillespie, M.; Mroz, P.M.; Maier, L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a role in the regulation of immune responses to haptens, which in turn impact DC maturation. Whether beryllium (Be) is able to induce DC maturation and if this occurs via the MAPK pathway is not known. Primary monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) models were generated from Be non-exposed healthy volunteers as a non-sensitized cell model, while PBMCs from BeS (Be sensitized) and CBD (chronic beryllium disease) were used as disease models. The response of these cells to Be was evaluated. The expression of CD40 was increased significantly (pBeS and CBD subjects, SB203580 downregulated Be-stimulated proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, and decreased Be-stimulated TNF-α and IFNγ cytokine production. Taken together, this study suggests that Be-induces non-sensitized Glu69+ DCs maturation, and that p38MAPK signaling is important in the Be-stimulated DCs activation as well as subsequent T cell proliferation and cytokine production in BeS and CBD. In total, the MAPK pathway may serve as a potential therapeutic target for human granulomatous lung diseases. PMID:25454621

  7. Active books: the design of an implantable stimulator that minimizes cable count using integrated circuits very close to electrodes.

    Liu, Xiao; Demosthenous, Andreas; Vanhoestenberghe, Anne; Jiang, Dai; Donaldson, Nick

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an integrated stimulator that can be embedded in implantable electrode books for interfacing with nerve roots at the cauda equina. The Active Book overcomes the limitation of conventional nerve root stimulators which can only support a small number of stimulating electrodes due to cable count restriction through the dura. Instead, a distributed stimulation system with many tripole electrodes can be configured using several Active Books which are addressed sequentially. The stimulator was fabricated in a 0.6-μm high-voltage CMOS process and occupies a silicon area of 4.2 × 6.5 mm(2). The circuit was designed to deliver up to 8 mA stimulus current to tripole electrodes from an 18 V power supply. Input pad count is limited to five (two power and three control lines) hence requiring a specific procedure for downloading stimulation commands to the chip and extracting information from it. Supported commands include adjusting the amplitude of stimulus current, varying the current ratio at the two anodes in each channel, and measuring relative humidity inside the chip package. In addition to stimulation mode, the chip supports quiescent mode, dissipating less than 100 nA current from the power supply. The performance of the stimulator chip was verified with bench tests including measurements using tripoles in saline. PMID:23853144

  8. Azorella compacta methanolic extract induces apoptosis via activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    Sung, Min Hee; Kwon, Ok-Kyoung; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Lee, Joongku; Park, Sang-Hong; Han, Sang Bae; Ahn, Kyung-Seop

    2015-11-01

    Azorella compacta Phil. (AC) is an alpine medicinal plant used traditionally for antibacterial treatment. Recent studies have revealed that this plant also has anti‑diabetic effects, but that it is toxic. The present study investigated the underlying mechanisms of action of AC extract against human leukemia HL60 cells. Apoptosis induction was measured by MTT assay, fluorescence microscopy, DNA fragmentation assay, flow cytometric analysis, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses. It was found that AC extract inhibited the growth of HL60 and other cancer cell lines in a dose‑dependent manner. The cytotoxic effects of AC extract on HL60 cells were associated with apoptosis characterized by DNA fragmentation and dose‑dependent increases in Annexin V‑positive cells, as determined by flow cytometric analysis. AC‑extract‑induced apoptosis was accompanied by activated/cleaved caspase‑3, caspase‑9 and poly(adenosine diphosphate‑ribose) polymerase (PARP). The increases in apoptosis were also associated with decreases of the apoptosis-inhibitor B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2), upregulation of pro‑apoptotic Bcl-2-associated X (Bax) protein and downregulation of anti‑apoptotic Bcl extra large protein. Furthermore, western blot analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-associated proteins indicated that treatment with AC extract increased the levels of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p38. In addition, the expression of Bax and cleaved PARP was blocked when AC treatment was performed in the presence of MAPK inhibitors. It was therefore concluded that AC induced apoptosis in human leukemia HL60 cells via an intrinsic pathway controlled through MAPK-associated signaling. PMID:26397193

  9. Direct Optical Ice Sensing and Closed-Loop Controller Design for Active De-icing of Wind Turbines Using Distributed Heating

    Shajiee, Shervin

    Ice accumulation on wind turbines operating in cold regions reduces power generation by degrading aerodynamic efficiency and causes mass imbalance and fatigue loads on the blades. Due to blade rotation and variation of the pitch angle, different locations on the blade experience large variations of Reynolds number, Nusselt number, heat loss, and non-uniform ice distribution. Hence, applying different amounts of heat flux in different blade locations can provide more effective de-icing for the same total power consumption. This large variation of required heat flux motivates using distributed resistive heating, with the capability of locally adjusting thermal power as a function of location on the blade. The main contributions of this research are developing the experimental feasibility of direct ice sensing using an optical sensing technique as well as development of a computational framework for implementation of closed-loop localized active de-icing using distributed sensing. A script-base module was developed in a commercial finite-element software (ANSYS) which provides the capability of (i) Closed-loop de-icing simulations for a distributed network of sensors and actuators, (ii) investigating different closed-loop thermal control schemes and their de-icing efficiency (iii) optimizing thermal actuation for a distributed resistive heating, and (iv) analyzing different faulty scenarios for sensors and thermal actuators under known faults in the network. Different surrogate models were used to enhance the computational efficiency of this approach. The results showed that optimal value of control parameters in a distributed network of heaters depends on convective heat transfer characteristics, layout of heaters and type of closed-loop controller scheme used for thermal actuation. Furthermore, It was shown that closed-loop control provides much faster de-icing than the open-loop constant heat flux thermal actuation. It was observed both experimentally and

  10. Manganese oxide-induced strategy to high-performance iron/nitrogen/carbon electrocatalysts with highly exposed active sites

    Sun, Tao; Wu, Qiang; Zhuo, Ou; Jiang, Yufei; Bu, Yongfeng; Yang, Lijun; Wang, Xizhang; Hu, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    Iron/nitrogen/carbon (Fe/N/C) catalyst is so far the most promising non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic medium, whose performance depends closely on the synthesis chemistry. Herein, we report a MnOx-induced strategy to construct the Fe/N/C with highly exposed Fe-Nx active sites, which involves the uniform spreading of polyaniline on hierarchical N-doped carbon nanocages by a reactive-template polymerization, followed by the successive iron incorporation and polyaniline pyrolysis. The resulting Fe/N/C demonstrates an excellent ORR performance, including an onset potential of 0.92 V (vs. RHE), four electron selectivity, superb stability and immunity to methanol crossover. The excellent performance is well correlated with the greatly enhanced surface active sites of the catalyst stemming from the unique MnOx-induced strategy. This study provides an efficient approach for exploring the advanced ORR electrocatalysts by increasing the exposed active sites.Iron/nitrogen/carbon (Fe/N/C) catalyst is so far the most promising non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic medium, whose performance depends closely on the synthesis chemistry. Herein, we report a MnOx-induced strategy to construct the Fe/N/C with highly exposed Fe-Nx active sites, which involves the uniform spreading of polyaniline on hierarchical N-doped carbon nanocages by a reactive-template polymerization, followed by the successive iron incorporation and polyaniline pyrolysis. The resulting Fe/N/C demonstrates an excellent ORR performance, including an onset potential of 0.92 V (vs. RHE), four electron selectivity, superb stability and immunity to methanol crossover. The excellent performance is well correlated with the greatly enhanced surface active sites of the catalyst stemming from the unique MnOx-induced strategy. This study provides an efficient approach for exploring the advanced ORR electrocatalysts by increasing the

  11. Pd Close Coupled Catalyst

    Zhong Hua SHI; Mao Chu GONG; Yao Qiang CHEN

    2006-01-01

    A catalyst comprised novel high surface area alumina support was prepared to control emission of automobiles. The results showed that prepared catalyst could satisfy the requirements of a high performance close coupled catalyst for its good catalytic activity at low temperature and good stability at high temperature.

  12. Arterial baroreflex buffering of sympathetic activation during exercise-induced elevations in arterial pressure.

    Scherrer, U; Pryor, S L; Bertocci, L A; Victor, R G

    1990-01-01

    Static muscle contraction activates metabolically sensitive muscle afferents that reflexively increase sympathetic nerve activity and arterial pressure. To determine if this contraction-induced reflex is modulated by the sinoaortic baroreflex, we performed microelectrode recordings of sympathetic nerve activity to resting leg muscle during static handgrip in humans while attempting to clamp the level of baroreflex stimulation by controlling the exercise-induced rise in blood pressure with pha...

  13. Antihyperglycemic and antioxidant activity of Clitorea ternatea Linn. on streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Talpate, Karuna A.; Uma A. Bhosale; Zambare, Mandar R; Somani, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol extract of Clitorea ternatea Linn. (EECT) was evaluated for its antihyperglycemic and antioxidative activity in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Antihyperglycemic activity of EECT was studied in normal fasted and glucose fed hyperglycemic and epinephrine induced hyperglycemic rats by estimating fasting serum glucose (FSG) by glucose oxidisae or peroxidase enzymatic method. Antioxidant activity of EECT was studied by assaying lipid peroxide/Thiobarbituric acid reactive ...

  14. Enhanced sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex in rats with heart failure induced by adriamycin

    Zhang, Shujuan; Feng ZHANG; Sun, Haijian; Zhou, Yebo; Han, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex is enhanced in rats with chronic heart failure (CHF) induced by coronary artery ligation and contributes to the over-excitation of sympathetic activity. We sought to determine whether sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced in adriamycin-induced CHF and whether angiotensin II (Ang II) in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was involved in enhancing sympathetic activity and cardiac sym...

  15. Chronic hyperammonemia induces tonic activation of NMDA receptors in cerebellum.

    ElMlili, Nisrin; Boix, Jordi; Ahabrach, Hanan; Rodrigo, Regina; Errami, Mohammed; Felipo, Vicente

    2010-02-01

    Reduced function of the glutamate--nitric oxide (NO)--cGMP pathway is responsible for some cognitive alterations in rats with hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy. Hyperammonemia impairs the pathway in cerebellum by increasing neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) phosphorylation in Ser847 by calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), reducing nNOS activity, and by reducing nNOS amount in synaptic membranes, which reduces its activation following NMDA receptors activation. The reason for increased CaMKII activity in hyperammonemia remains unknown. We hypothesized that it would be as a result of increased tonic activation of NMDA receptors. The aims of this work were to assess: (i) whether tonic NMDA activation receptors is increased in cerebellum in chronic hyperammonemia in vivo; and (ii) whether this tonic activation is responsible for increased CaMKII activity and reduced activity of nNOS and of the glutamate--NO--cGMP pathway. Blocking NMDA receptors with MK-801 increases cGMP and NO metabolites in cerebellum in vivo and in slices from hyperammonemic rats. This is because of reduced phosphorylation and activity of CaMKII, leading to normalization of nNOS phosphorylation and activity. MK-801 also increases nNOS in synaptic membranes and reduces it in cytosol. This indicates that hyperammonemia increases tonic activation of NMDA receptors leading to reduced activity of nNOS and of the glutamate--NO--cGMP pathway. PMID:20002515

  16. Radiation-induced Akt activation modulates radioresistance in human glioblastoma cells

    Ionizing radiation (IR) therapy is a primary treatment for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a common and devastating brain tumor in humans. IR has been shown to induce PI3K-Akt activation in many cell types, and activation of the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway has been correlated with radioresistance. Initially, the effects of IR on Akt activation were assessed in multiple human GBM cell lines. Next, to evaluate a potential causative role of IR-induced Akt activation on radiosensitivity, Akt activation was inhibited during IR with several complementary genetic and pharmacological approaches, and radiosensitivity measured using clonogenic survival assays. Three of the eight cell lines tested demonstrated IR-induced Akt activation. Further studies revealed that IR-induced Akt activation was dependent upon the presence of a serum factor, and could be inhibited by the EGFR inhibitor AG1478. Inhibition of PI3K activation with LY294002, or with inducible wild-type PTEN, inhibition of EGFR, as well as direct inhibition of Akt with two Akt inhibitors during irradiation increased the radiosensitivity of U87MG cells. These results suggest that Akt may be a central player in a feedback loop whereby activation of Akt induced by IR increases radioresistance of GBM cells. Targeting the Akt signaling pathway may have important therapeutic implications when used in combination with IR in the treatment of a subset of brain tumor patients

  17. A Taiwanese Propolis Derivative Induces Apoptosis through Inducing Endoplasmic Reticular Stress and Activating Transcription Factor-3 in Human Hepatoma Cells

    Fat-Moon Suk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Activating transcription factor-(ATF- 3, a stress-inducible transcription factor, is rapidly upregulated under various stress conditions and plays an important role in inducing cancer cell apoptosis. NBM-TP-007-GS-002 (GS-002 is a Taiwanese propolin G (PPG derivative. In this study, we examined the antitumor effects of GS-002 in human hepatoma Hep3B and HepG2 cells in vitro. First, we found that GS-002 significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis in dose-dependent manners. Several main apoptotic indicators were found in GS-002-treated cells, such as the cleaved forms of caspase-3, caspase-9, and poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. GS-002 also induced endoplasmic reticular (ER stress as evidenced by increases in ER stress-responsive proteins including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78, growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153, phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α, phosphorylated protein endoplasmic-reticular-resident kinase (PERK, and ATF-3. The induction of ATF-3 expression was mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways in GS-002-treated cells. Furthermore, we found that GS-002 induced more cell apoptosis in ATF-3-overexpressing cells. These results suggest that the induction of apoptosis by the propolis derivative, GS-002, is partially mediated through ER stress and ATF-3-dependent pathways, and GS-002 has the potential for development as an antitumor drug.

  18. Oral glucose ingestion attenuates exercise-induced activation of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase in human skeletal muscle

    Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Birk, Jesper Bratz; Klein, Ditte Kjærsgaard;

    2006-01-01

    5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been suggested to be a 'metabolic master switch' regulating various aspects of muscle glucose and fat metabolism. In isolated rat skeletal muscle, glucose suppresses the activity of AMPK and in human muscle glycogen loading decreases exercise-induced AMPK...

  19. Adrenergic activation attenuates astrocyte swelling induced by hypotonicity and neurotrauma.

    Vardjan, Nina; Horvat, Anemari; Anderson, Jamie E; Yu, Dou; Croom, Deborah; Zeng, Xiang; Lužnik, Zala; Kreft, Marko; Teng, Yang D; Kirov, Sergei A; Zorec, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Edema in the central nervous system can rapidly result in life-threatening complications. Vasogenic edema is clinically manageable, but there is no established medical treatment for cytotoxic edema, which affects astrocytes and is a primary trigger of acute post-traumatic neuronal death. To test the hypothesis that adrenergic receptor agonists, including the stress stimulus epinephrine protects neural parenchyma from damage, we characterized its effects on hypotonicity-induced cellular edema in cortical astrocytes by in vivo and in vitro imaging. After epinephrine administration, hypotonicity-induced swelling of astrocytes was markedly reduced and cytosolic 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) was increased, as shown by a fluorescence resonance energy transfer nanosensor. Although, the kinetics of epinephrine-induced cAMP signaling was slowed in primary cortical astrocytes exposed to hypotonicity, the swelling reduction by epinephrine was associated with an attenuated hypotonicity-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) excitability, which may be the key to prevent astrocyte swelling. Furthermore, in a rat model of spinal cord injury, epinephrine applied locally markedly reduced neural edema around the contusion epicenter. These findings reveal new targets for the treatment of cellular edema in the central nervous system. GLIA 2016;64:1034-1049. PMID:27018061

  20. Closing remarks

    In line with the findings of this conference, the IAEA Secretariat will continue to commit its resources and efforts to supporting international initiatives: To facilitate throughout the world the locating, recovering and securing of high risk radioactive sources that are not secure and not under proper regulatory control (including the 'orphan' sources); To encourage and assist governments to establish long term effective national infrastructures for the safe and secure management of vulnerable and dangerous radioactive sources from cradle to grave, including their ultimate disposal; and to promote broad adherence to the Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources. To this end, the Secretariat will continue its consultations with Member States, with the aims of: (1) Proceeding to the formal endorsement by the Board of Governors of the Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources and the Categorization of Sources, which are currently being revised. (2) Accelerating the development of additional documents to provide a common and technically sound basis for national and international actions. (3) Supporting States in establishing effective legal and regulatory systems that clearly define the roles and responsibilities, during all stages of the life cycle of radioactive sources, relating to safety and security and to the prevention of criminal activities; and continuing to work on the long term management and disposal of disused sources. The Secretariat will further support greater international efforts to help States to prevent, detect, interdict and respond to illicit trafficking in radioactive sources and to take appropriate enforcement action. Finally, the Secretariat also stands ready to help States to develop comprehensive plans for preparedness for and response to radiological emergencies, taking into account the new scenarios presented by high risk radioactive sources

  1. Activation of endothelial β-catenin signaling induces heart failure

    Nakagawa, Akito; Naito, Atsuhiko T.; Sumida, Tomokazu; Nomura, Seitaro; Shibamoto, Masato; Higo, Tomoaki; Okada, Katsuki; Sakai, Taku; Hashimoto, Akihito; Kuramoto, Yuki; Oka, Toru; Lee, Jong-Kook; Harada, Mutsuo; Ueda, Kazutaka; Shiojima, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Activation of β-catenin-dependent canonical Wnt signaling in endothelial cells plays a key role in angiogenesis during development and ischemic diseases, however, other roles of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells remain poorly understood. Here, we report that sustained activation of β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells causes cardiac dysfunction through suppressing neuregulin-ErbB pathway in the heart. Conditional gain-of-function mutation of β-catenin, which activates Wnt/β-cat...

  2. Hypoxia Induces a Prothrombotic State Independently of the Physical Activity

    Ninivaggi, Marisa; de Laat, Marieke; Lancé, Marcus M. D.; Kicken, Cécile H.; Pelkmans, Leonie; Bloemen, Saartje; Dirks, Marlou L.; van Loon, Luc J. C.; Govers-Riemslag, José W.P.; Lindhout, Theo; Konings, Joke; de Laat, Bas

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia (oxygen deprivation) is known to be associated with deep vein thrombosis and venous thromboembolism. We attempted to get a better comprehension of its mechanism by going to high altitude, thereby including the potential contributing role of physical activity. Two groups of 15 healthy individuals were exposed to hypoxia by going to an altitude of 3900 meters, either by climbing actively (active group) or transported passively by cable car (passive group). Both groups were tested for pl...

  3. ATP-sensitive K/sup +/ channels that are blocked by hypoglycemia-inducing sulfonylureas in insulin-secreting cells are activated by galanin, a hyperglycemia-inducing hormone

    de Weille, J.; Schmid-Antomarchi, H.; Fosset, M.; Lazdunski, M.

    1988-02-01

    The action of the hyperglycemia-inducing hormone galanin, a 29-amino acid peptide names from its N-terminal glycine and C-terminal amidated alanine, was studied in rat insulinoma (RINm5F) cells using electrophysiological and /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ flux techniques. Galanin hyperpolarizes and reduces spontaneous electrical activity by activating a population of APT-sensitive K/sup +/ channels with a single-channel conductance of 30 pS (at -60 mV). Galanin-induced hyperpolarization and reduction of spike activity are reversed by the hypoglycemia-inducing sulfonylurea glibenclamine. Glibenclamide blocks the galanin-activated ATP-sensitive K/sup +/ channel. /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux from insulinoma cells is stimulated by galanin in a dose-dependent manner. The half-maximum value of activation is found at 1.6 nM. Galanin-induced /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux is abolished by glibenclamide. The half-maximum value of inhibition is found at 0.3 nM, which is close to the half-maximum value of inhibition of the ATP-dependent K/sup +/ channel reported earlier. /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux studies confirm the electrophysiological demonstration that galanin activates and ATP-dependent K/sup +/ channel.

  4. Effect of montelukast on platelet activating factor- and tachykinin induced mucus secretion in the rat

    Groneberg David A

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelet activating factor and tachykinins (substance P, neurokinin A, neurokinin B are important mediators contributing to increased airway secretion in the context of different types of respiratory diseases including acute and chronic asthma. Leukotriene receptor antagonists are recommended as add-on therapy for this disease. The cys-leukotriene-1 receptor antagonist montelukast has been used in clinical asthma therapy during the last years. Besides its inhibitory action on bronchoconstriction, only little is known about its effects on airway secretions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of montelukast on platelet activating factor- and tachykinin induced tracheal secretory activity. Methods The effects of montelukast on platelet activating factor- and tachykinin induced tracheal secretory activity in the rat were assessed by quantification of secreted 35SO4 labelled mucus macromolecules using the modified Ussing chamber technique. Results Platelet activating factor potently stimulated airway secretion, which was completely inhibited by the platelet activating factor receptor antagonist WEB 2086 and montelukast. In contrast, montelukast had no effect on tachykinin induced tracheal secretory activity. Conclusion Cys-leukotriene-1 receptor antagonism by montelukast reverses the secretagogue properties of platelet activating factor to the same degree as the specific platelet activating factor antagonist WEB 2086 but has no influence on treacheal secretion elicited by tachykinins. These results suggest a role of montelukast in the signal transduction pathway of platelet activating factor induced secretory activity of the airways and may further explain the beneficial properties of cys-leukotriene-1 receptor antagonists.

  5. Oligomerization of Vibrio cholerae Hemolysin Induces CXCR3 Upregulation and Activation of B-1a Cell

    Gayatri Mukherjee; Kalyan K Banerjee; Tapas Biswas

    2008-01-01

    The hemolysin oligomer promotes the proliferation of B-1a cells and the expression of CD25, which is indicative of cell activation, on B-1a cells. The upregulation of CD86 induced by the oligomer showed its selective bias for the B7-2 member of B7 family while the monomer failed to induce these effects. The oligomer induced the expression of CXCR3, associated with B cell activation, while the monomer induced the expression of CXCL4, a powerful angiostatic chemokine. In conclusion, we found that B-1a cells responded to the apoptogenic monomer by expressing CXCL4, whereas oligomerization of the immunogen induced CXCR3 to shift the response towards activation. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2008;5(3):231-234.

  6. Comparison of δ13C and 14C activities of CO2 samples combusted in closed-tube and elemental-analyzer systems

    For combustion of organic samples, a closed tube-combustion (CTC) method is generally used, but this method requires much time and labor. The AMS facility at the Center for Chronological Research, Nagoya University, has established a CO2 production and purification system using an elemental analyzer (EA) connected to cryogenic traps. This system enables faster combustion and CO2 purification of samples than does the conventional CTC method. We compared measured carbon yields, δ13C values and 14C activities between EA and CTC samples of carbon standards of various sample quantities. This newly developed EA system had low background 14C activity due to sample preparation; the background activity was similar to that observed for the CTC method. The EA system also showed high precision and accuracy for δ13C and 14C measurements. The EA sample data obtained from conventional quantities (>1 mg carbon) of standards showed good agreement with the results obtained by the CTC method and with the consensus values, though background contamination was detected for samples containing 13C and 14C activity, suggesting that the CO2 produced by combustion might have been prone to adsorption to an inner wall of the combustion tube, to CuO or to both, and that the CO2 produced in the CTC method might have decomposed.

  7. Activity concentration and spatial distribution of radionuclides in marine sediments close to the estuary of Shatt al-Arab/Arvand Rud River, the Gulf.

    Patiris, D L; Tsabaris, C; Anagnostou, C L; Androulakaki, E G; Pappa, F K; Eleftheriou, G; Sgouros, G

    2016-06-01

    Tigris and Euphrates rivers both emerge in eastern Turkey and cross Syria and Iraq. They unite to Shatt al-Arab/Arvand Rud River and discharge in Arabic/Persian Gulf. The activity concentration of natural and anthropogenic radionuclides was measured during the August of 2011 in a number of surficial sediment samples collected from the seabed along an almost straight line beginning near the estuary mouth and extending seaward. The results exhibited low activity concentration levels and an almost homogeneous spatial distribution except locations where sediment of biogenic origin, poor in radionuclides, dilute their concentrations. Dose rates absorbed by reference marine biota were calculated by the ERICA Assessment Tool considering the contribution of 40 K. The results revealed a relatively low impact of 40 K mainly to species living in, on and close to the seabed. Also, statistical association of radionuclides with selected stable elements (Ca, Ba and Sr) did not indicate presence of by-products related with oil and gas exploitation and transportation activities. Moreover, a semi-empirical sedimentology model applied to reproduce seabed granulometric facies based entirely on radionuclides activity concentrations. PMID:26945883

  8. Evaluation of Antitussive activity of Polyherbomineral formulation on cough reflex induced by different cough induced models in mice

    Gupta Reena

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Now day scientists focus the research to develop the novel cough suppressant therapies of herbomineral formulation because in respiratory disease cough is an important defensive pulmonary reflex. It removes fluids, irritants, or foreign substances. When cough becomes non-productive and require suppression and opioid receptor agonists which do not have respiratory suppressant activity but opoids produce side effects such as sedation, addiction potential and constipation, and also compromise the respiratory function. The present study was carried out to evaluate the antitussive activity of polyherbomineral formulation on cough reflex induced by different cough induced models in mice. Healthy albino mice of either sex, weighing 25-30 g were divided into seven groups, (n = 6. Group I considered as control, Group II and III received lab prepared herbomineral formulation (LPHF (250 and 500 mg/kg, p.o., Group VI and VII treated with marketed formulation (MF (250 and 500 mg/kg, p.o., Group IV and V were positive control and treated with standard (10 and 20 mg/kg, p.o. at a dose of 0.3 ml/mice, orally. Antitussive activity of LPHF and MF were studied by sulphur dioxide gas and Ammonium liquor induced cough in mice. All the formulations used showed significant antitussive activity in sulphur dioxide induced cough model. Thus, these formulations can prove to be useful for alleviating cough. Therefore, the poly herbomineral formulation contains a major piperine active constituent which induces a cough suppressant pharmacological effect and represents an attractive approach in phytotherapeutic managements.

  9. Thioredoxin interacting protein inhibits hypoxia-inducible factor transcriptional activity

    Farrell, Michael R; Rogers, Lynette K.; Liu, Yusen; Welty, Stephen E.; Tipple, Trent E.

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is required for proper lung development and is transcriptionally regulated in alveolar epithelial cells by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF). Previous findings in a newborn mouse model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) suggest that thioredoxin interacting protein (Txnip) is a novel regulator of VEGF expression. The present studies were designed to test the hypothesis that Txnip negatively regulates VEGF through effects on HIF-mediated gene expression. ...

  10. Neutron yield and induced activity in LBE target by protons

    Neutron emission cross sections, total neutron yield, angle integrated neutron energy distributions and production of various radioisotopes as primary products from proton induced reactions on thick lead-bismuth-eutectic (LBS) target have been estimated using the codes ALICE91 and EMPIRE 2.18. In the absence of measured data these values can be accepted for shielding and radiation safety design in facilities where intermediate energy proton beams are employed for logistic studies involving spallation reactions. (author)