WorldWideScience

Sample records for actinide burner reactors

  1. Thermal-hydraulics of actinide burner reactors

    As a part of conceptual study of actinide burner reactors, core thermal-hydraulic analyses were conducted for two types of reactor concepts, namely (1) sodium-cooled actinide alloy fuel reactor, and (2) helium-cooled particle-bed reactor, to examine the feasibility of high power-density cores for efficient transmutation of actinides within the maximum allowable temperature limits of fuel and cladding. In addition, calculations were made on cooling of actinide fuel assembly. (author)

  2. Fast Burner Reactor Devoted to Minor Actinide Incineration

    This study proposes a new fast reactor core concept dedicated to plutonium and minor actinide burning by transmutation. This core has a large power level of ∼1500 MW(electric) favoring the economic aspect. To promote plutonium and minor actinide burning as much as possible, total suppression of 238U, which produces 239Pu by conversion, and large quantities of minor actinides in the core are desirable. Therefore, the 238U-free fuel is homogeneously mixed with a considerable quantity of minor actinides.From the safety point of view, both the Doppler effect and the coolant (sodium) void reactivity become less favorable in a 238U-free core. To preserve these two important safety parameters on an acceptable level, a hydrogenated moderator separated from the fuel and nuclides, such as W or 99Tc, is added to the core in the place of 238U. Tungsten and 99Tc have strong capture resonances at appropriate energies, and 99Tc itself is a long-lived fission product to be transmuted with profit.This core allows the achievement of a consumption rate of ∼100 kg/TW(electric).h of transuranic elements, ∼70 kg/TW(electric).h for plutonium (due to 238U suppression), and 30 to 35 kg/TW(electric).h for minor actinides. In addition, ∼14 kg/TW(electric).h of 99Tc is destroyed when this element is present in the core (the initial loading of 99Tc is >4000 kg in the core).The activity of newly designed subassemblies has also been investigated in comparison to standard fast reactor subassemblies (neutron sources, decay heat, and gamma dose rate). Finally, a transmutation scenario involving pressurized water reactors and minor actinide-burning fast reactors has been studied to estimate the necessary proportion of burner reactors and the achievable radiotoxicity reduction with respect to a reference open cycle

  3. Fuel cycle of actinide burner-reactor. Review of investigations by > program

    The problem of long-lived minor-actinides (Np, Am, Cm) transmutation is one of major part of problem of nuclear power ecological safety. The problem of Pu surpluses burning-out adjoins to this problem. Existing and perspective reactor systems could be used for it, but task of optimum organization of the external closed cycle for actinide burner reactor becomes the important aspect of transmutation problem. Since 1992, SSC RIAR has proposed the demonstration program-concept DOVITA (Dry reprocessing, Oxide fuel, Vibropac, Integral, Transmutation of Actinides), which should demonstrate opportunities of new technologies for realization of the optimized fuel cycle for actinide burner reactor. The brief review of study on DOVITA program for 5 years is given in this paper. (J.P.N.)

  4. Actinide transmutation using inert matrix fuels versus recycle in a low conversion fast burner reactor

    infinite fuel residence time. In previous work we have shown that the amount of fluence required to achieve a unit of burnup in yttrium stabilized ZrO2 based IMF with 85 w/o zirconium oxide and 15 w/o minor actinides (MA) and plutonium increases dramatically beyond 750 MWd/kgIHM (75% burnup). In this paper we discuss the repository implications for recycle of actinides in LWR's using this type of IMF and compare this to actinide recycle in a low conversion fast burner reactor. We perform the analysis over a finite horizon of 100 years, in which reprocessing of spent LWR fuel begins in 2020. Reference [1] C. Lombardi and A. Mazzola, Exploiting the plutonium stockpiles in PWRs by using inert matrix fuel, Annals of Nuclear Energy. 23 (1996) 1117-1126. [2] U. Kasemeyer, J.M. Paratte, P. Grimm and R. Chawla, Comparison of pressurized water reactor core characteristics for 100% plutonium-containing loadings, Nuclear Technology. 122 (1998) 52-63. [3] G. Ledergerber, C. Degueldre, P. Heimgartner, M.A. Pouchon and U. Kasemeyer, Inert matrix fuel for the utilisation of plutonium, Progress in Nuclear Energy. 38 (2001) 301-308. [4] U. Kasemeyer, C. Hellwig, J. Lebenhaft and R. Chawla, Comparison of various partial light water reactor core loadings with inert matrix and mixed oxide fuel, Journal of Nuclear Materials. 319 (2003) 142-153. [5] E.A. Schneider, M.R. Deinert and K.B. Cady, Burnup simulations of an inert matrix fuel using a two region, multi-group reactor physics model, in Proceedings of the physics of advanced fuel cycles, PHYSOR 2006, Vancouver, BC, 2006. [6] E.A. Schneider, M.R. Deinert and K.B. Cady, Burnup simulations and spent fuel characteristics of ZRO2 based inert matrix fuels, Journal of Nuclear Materials. 361 (2007) 41-51. (authors)

  5. Status of the EC-FP7 Project ARCAS: Comparing the economics of accelerator-driven systems and fast reactors as minor actinide burners

    The ARCAS Project aims to compare, on a technological and economical basis, accelerator-driven systems and fast reactors as minor actinide burners. It is split into five work packages: the reference scenario definition, the fast reactor system definition, the accelerator-driven system definition, the fuel reprocessing and fabrication facilities definition and the economical comparison. This paper summarises the status of the project and its five work packages. (authors)

  6. Some aspects of risk reduction strategy by multiple recycling in fast burner reactors of the plutonium and minor actinide inventories

    This paper shows the impact of recycling light water reactor (LWR) mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in a fast burner reactor on the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) inventories and on the related radioactivities. Reprocessing of the targets for multiple recycling will become increasingly difficult as the burnup increases. Multiple recycling of Pu + MA in fast reactors is a feasible option which has to be studied very carefully: the Pu (except the isotopes Pu-238 and Pu-240), Am and Np levels decrease as a function of the recycle number, while the Cm-244 level accumulates and gradually transforms into Cm-245. Long cooling times (10 + 2 years) are necessary with aqueous processing. The paper discusses the problems associated with multiple reprocessing of highly active fuel types and particularly the impact of Pu-238, Am-241 and Cm-244 on the fuel cycle operations. The calculations were performed with the zero-dimensional ORIGEN-2 code. The validity of the results depends on that of the code and its cross-section library. The time span to reduce the initial inventory of Pu + MA by a factor of 10 amounts to 255 years when average burnups are limited to 150 GW.d t-1 (tonne). (orig.)

  7. Some aspects of risk reduction strategy by multiple recycling in fast burner reactors of the plutonium and minor actinide inventories

    The paper shows the impact of recycling LWR-MOX fuel in a fast burner reactor on the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) inventories and on the related radio activities. Reprocessing of the targets for multiple recycling will become increasingly difficult as the burn up increases. Multiple recycling of Pu + MA in fast reactors is a feasible option which has to be studied very carefully: the Pu (except the isotopes Pu-238 and Pu-240), Am and Np levels decrease as a function of the recycle number, while the Cm-244 level accumulates and gradually transforms into Cm-245. Long cooling times (10 + 2 years) are necessary with aqueous processing. The paper discusses the problems associated with multiple reprocessing of highly active fuel types and particularly the impact of Pu-238, Am-241 and Cm-244 on the fuel cycle operations. The calculations were performed with the zero-dimensional ORIGEN-2 code. The validity of the results depends on that of the code and its cross section library. The time span to reduce the initial inventory of Pu + MA by a factor of 10, amounts to 255 years when average burn ups are limited to 150 GWd t-1. (orig.)

  8. Fusion-Fission Burner for Transuranic Actinides

    Choi, Chan

    2013-10-01

    The 14-MeV DT fusion neutron spectrum from mirror confinement fusion can provide a unique capability to transmute the transuranic isotopes from light water reactors (LWR). The transuranic (TRU) actinides, high-level radioactive wastes, from spent LWR fuel pose serious worldwide problem with long-term decay heat and radiotoxicity. However, ``transmuted'' TRU actinides can not only reduce the inventory of the TRU in the spent fuel repository but also generate additional energy. Typical commercial LWR fuel assemblies for BWR (boiling water reactor) and PWR (pressurized water reactor) measure its assembly lengths with 4.470 m and 4.059 m, respectively, while its corresponding fuel rod lengths are 4.064 m and 3.851 m. Mirror-based fusion reactor has inherently simple geometry for transmutation blanket with steady-state reactor operation. Recent development of gas-dynamic mirror configuration has additional attractive feature with reduced size in central plasma chamber, thus providing a unique capability for incorporating the spent fuel assemblies into transmutation blanket designs. The system parameters for the gas-dynamic mirror-based hybrid burner will be discussed.

  9. Thermal-hydraulic analyses of transients in an actinide-burner reactor cooled by forced convection of lead-bismuth

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) are investigating the suitability of lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The current analysis evaluated a pool type design that relies on forced circulation of the primary coolant, a conventional steam power conversion system, and a passive decay heat removal system. The ATHENA computer code was used to simulate various transients without reactor scram, including a primary coolant pump trip, a station blackout, and a step reactivity insertion. The reactor design successfully met identified temperature limits for each of the transients analyzed

  10. HTGR actinide burner feasibility studies: Calculation scheme related considerations

    At the CEA, the actinides burner version of the prismatic block-type reactor is currently investigated, including studies about the design proposed by General Atomics. The purpose of this paper is essentially to evaluate the capability of the deterministic methods to calculate a wide range of core configurations. In the first part of the paper, the analysis is carried out on the 'Deep Burner' fuel element geometry. The fuel element calculations are performed with both Transport code APOLLO2 and Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI4. This preliminary analysis shows the reliability of the deterministic code APOLLO2 to calculate heterogeneous fuel element configurations (fuel element loaded with plutonium and minor actinides). In the second part, the analysis deals with the core geometry in order to estimate the impact of some physical assumptions on the fine fuel isotopic depletion. Due to the strong spectrum transient in the core, it turns out that the transuranic mass balances in a GT-MHR cannot be estimated easily from fuel element calculations but rather need the use of a core modeling approach taking into account the presence of the graphite reflectors. Two different methods based on a fine core Diffusion calculation in CRONOS2 and a simplified Transport calculation in APOLLO2 are investigated in this paper. (authors)

  11. Track 5: safety in engineering, construction, operations, and maintenance. Reactor physics design, validation, and operating experience. 5. A Negative Reactivity Feedback Device for Actinide Burner Cores

    per atmosphere increase in pressure. 4. This lifts the floats higher into the core above their equilibrium position at hot full power. 5. The increased neutron absorption produces a negative reactivity feedback. 6. The surrounding primary coolant keeps all boundaries at nearly constant temperature. The ex-core helium has very low energy absorption, plus good heat transfer, which helps maintain constant temperature and pressure. The neutron absorber floats are thin metal tubes that contain a rhenium slug, as a high-capture cross-section ballast, and an upper section of 10B4C pellets. The tops and bottoms of the floats are rounded to guard against sticking inside the riser tubes. The top of the float is vented through a porous disk into the cool helium plenum to allow the helium produced in 10B capture to escape. The absorber float is cooled by conduction through the LBE bath, and guide-tube wall, into the ambient LBE primary coolant. Whole-core Monte Carlo calculations for RFDs substituted for the central void tube in 20% of the streaming fuel assemblies proposed for actinide burner cores in Ref. 1 indicate a steady- state reactivity power feedback coefficient exceeding -1 c/% power, which is better than that of sodium-cooled integral fast reactor (IFR)-type cores (at approximately 20.5 c/%) and about half of that of oxide-fueled fast breeder reactors (FBRs). However, the RFD feedback is considerably slower following a step power increase: Preliminary estimates suggest a factor of 5 slower than the oxide fuel Doppler reactivity insertion rate. Nevertheless, this may be adequate since the reactors in question can be designed to have no obvious large, rapid reactivity insertion accidents to cope with. Much remains to be done to refine and optimize this concept. Among necessary evaluations are seismic response, the consequences of gas plenum failure, and reactivity insertion by the automatic RFD withdrawal following a power reduction, safety scram in particular. Various

  12. High conversion burner type reactor

    Purpose: To simply and easily dismantle and reassemble densified fuel assemblies taken out of a high conversion ratio area thereby improve the neutron and fuel economy. Constitution: The burner portion for the purpose of fuel combustion is divided into a first burner region in adjacent with the high conversion ratio area at the center of the reactor core, and a second burner region formed to the outer circumference thereof and two types of fuels are charged therein. Densified fuel assemblies charged in the high conversion ratio area are separatably formed as fuel assemblies for use in the two types of burners. In this way, dense fuel assembly is separated into two types of fuel assemblies for use in burner of different number and arranging density of fuel elements which can be directly charged to the burner portion and facilitate the dismantling and reassembling of the fuel assemblies. Further, since the two types of fuel assemblies are charged in the burner portion, utilization factor for the neutron fuels can be improved. (Kamimura, M.)

  13. Use of fast reactors for actinide transmutation

    The management of radioactive waste is one of the key issues in today's discussions on nuclear energy, especially the long term disposal of high level radioactive wastes. The recycling of plutonium in liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) would allow 'burning' of the associated extremely long life transuranic waste, particularly actinides, thus reducing the required isolation time for high level waste from tens of thousands of years to hundreds of years for fission products only. The International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) decided to include the topic of actinide transmutation in liquid metal fast breeder reactors in its programme. The IAEA organized the Specialists Meeting on Use of Fast Breeder Reactors for Actinide Transmutation in Obninsk, Russian Federation, from 22 to 24 September 1992. The specialists agree that future progress in solving transmutation problems could be achieved by improvements in: Radiochemical partitioning and extraction of the actinides from the spent fuel (at least 98% for Np and Cm and 99.9% for Pu and Am isotopes); technological research and development on the design, fabrication and irradiation of the minor actinides (MAs) containing fuels; nuclear constants measurement and evaluation (selective cross-sections, fission fragments yields, delayed neutron parameters) especially for MA burners; demonstration of the feasibility of the safe and economic MA burner cores; knowledge of the impact of maximum tolerable amount of rare earths in americium containing fuels. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Design Strategy and Constraints for Medium-Power Lead-Alloy-Cooled Actinide Burners

    We outline the strategy and constraints adopted for the design of medium-power lead-alloy-cooled actinide-burning reactors that strive for a lower cost than accelerator-driven systems and for robust safety. Reduced cost is pursued through the use of (1) a modular design and maximum power rating to capitalize on an economy of scale within the constraints imposed by modularity, (2) a very compact and simple supercritical-CO2 power cycle, and (3) simplifications of the primary system allowed by the use of lead coolant. Excellent safety is pursued by adopting the integral fast reactor approach of achieving a self-controllable reactor that responds to all key abnormal occurrences, including anticipated transients without scrams, by a safe shutdown without exceeding core integrity limits. The three concepts developed are the fertile-free actinide burner for incineration of all transuranics from light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel, the fertile-free minor actinide (MA) burner for preferential burning of MAs working in tandem with LWRs or gas-cooled thermal reactors, and the actinide burner with thorium fuel aimed also at reducing the electricity generation costs through longer-cycle operation

  15. Figure of merit for the feasibility of a CANDU PHWR actinide burner

    In this work it is presented a global criterion (GCR) to evaluate feasibility of a CANDU PHWR actinide burner (CPAB). A set of dimensionless criteria as components of GCR is given and discussed. This set comprises ten terms and is based on the newest data appeared in worldwide literature. We considered the Open Fuel Cycle Option (OFCO) and the Closed Fuel Cycle Option (CFCO) too. The evaluation of the GCR is considered for these two options. The purpose of this work was to put in evidence the minimum cost approach. In international literature there were proposed many options to burn the actinide species resulted from fuel burnup in nuclear reactors. Until now it is not clear which is the most advantageous version. However, the problem is very important and therefore further developments can be foreseen. (author)

  16. OECD/NEA Benchmark Calculations for an Accelerator-Driven Minor Actinide Burner

    Noticing the current interest in accelerator-driven systems as actinide waste burners, the OECD/NEA has organised an international benchmark exercise for evaluating the performance of computational tools and nuclear data for this type of system. The benchmark model simulates a lead-bismuth cooled sub-critical system driven by a beam of 1 GeV protons. The core design is similar to that of an ALMR, and the fuel composition is typical for a minor actinide burner in a 'double strata' fuel cycle. Lead-bismuth was chosen as target material. Since the intention was to validate data and codes in the energy region below 20 MeV, a predefined spallation neutron source was provided to the benchmark participants. The solutions from seven organisations (ANL, CIEMAT, KAERI, JAERI, PSI/CEA, RIT and SCK-CEN) are based on three different basic data libraries (ENDF/B-VI, JEF-2.2 and JENDL-3.2) and both deterministic and Monte Carlo reactor codes. Significant discrepancies are observed for important neutronic parameters such as initial keff, burn-up reactivity swing and flux distribution. Additional investigations of the basic nuclear data, the data processing methods and the approximations for the reactor simulation will be necessary to understand the origin of all observed discrepancies. (authors)

  17. Advanced fuel cycle scenario study in the European context using different burner reactor concepts

    Different types of fast spectrum dedicated burners have been proposed for the management of radioactive wastes in the frame of various advanced fuel cycle scenarios. Accelerator-driven systems (ADS) and critical low conversion ratio fast reactors have been studied, e.g. within the European context. A potential alternative system is a fusion-fission hybrid (FFH). In the present study, a sodium-cooled fast reactor driven by a D-T fusion neutron source, the subcritical advanced burner reactor (SABR) system is considered. In order to intercompare the different systems, a systematic study is under way. The performances of the two types of systems (SABR, ADS) will be compared from a minor actinide (MA) or transuranic (i.e. Pu+MA) burning potential point of view. The present paper reports preliminary results of the first phase of study, i.e. the comparison of SABR and ADS when used as minor actinides burners. (authors)

  18. Actinide transmutation in nuclear reactors

    This report has also been published as a PhD thesis. It discusses the reduction of the transuranics part of nuclear waste. Requirements and criteria for efficient burning of transuranics are developed. It is found that a large reduction of transuranics produced per unit of energy is possible when the losses in reprocessing are small and when special transuranics burner reactors are used at the end of the nuclear era to reduce the transuranics inventory. Two special burner reactors have been studied in this thesis. In chapter 3, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor is discussed. A method has been developed to optimize the burning capability while complying to constraints imposed on the design for safety, reliability, and economics. An oxide fueled and metallic fueled ALMR have been compared for safety and transuranics burning. Concluded is that the burning capability is the same, but that the higher thermal conductivity of the metallic fuel has a positive effect on safety. In search for a more effective waste transmuter, a modified Molten Salt Reactor was designed for this study. The continuous refueling capability and the molten salt fuel make a safe design possible without uranium as fuel. A four times faster reduction of the transuranics is possible with this reactor type. The amount of transuranics can be halved every 10 years. The most important conclusion of this work is that it is of utmost importance in the study of waste transmutation that a high burning is obtained with a safe design. In future work, safety should be the highest priority in the design process of burner reactors. (orig.)

  19. Actinides recycling assessment in a thermal reactor

    Highlights: • Actinides recycling is assessed using BWR fuel assemblies. • Four fuel rods are substituted by minor actinides rods in a UO2 and in a MOX fuel assembly. • Performance of standard fuel assemblies and the ones with the substitution is compared. • Reduction of actinides is measured for the fuel assemblies containing minor actinides rods. • Thermal reactors can be used for actinides recycling. - Abstract: Actinides recycling have the potential to reduce the geological repository burden of the high-level radioactive waste that is produced in a nuclear power reactor. The core of a standard light water reactor is composed only by fuel assemblies and there are no specific positions to allocate any actinides blanket, in this assessment it is proposed to replace several fuel rods by actinides blankets inside some of the reactor core fuel assemblies. In the first part of this study, a single uranium standard fuel assembly is modeled and the amount of actinides generated during irradiation is quantified for use it as reference. Later, in the same fuel assembly four rods containing 6 w/o of minor actinides and using depleted uranium as matrix were replaced and depletion was simulated to obtain the net reduction of minor actinides. Other calculations were performed using MOX fuel lattices instead of uranium standard fuel to find out how much reduction is possible to obtain. Results show that a reduction of minor actinides is possible using thermal reactors and a higher reduction is obtained when the minor actinides are embedded in uranium fuel assemblies instead of MOX fuel assemblies

  20. Neutron economy and transmutation performance of coupling system of fast reactor and a-burner

    Neutron economy and transmutation performance are examined for a fast reactor (FR), a PWR, and an A-Burner which transmutes Minor-Actinide (MA) in a well-thermalized neutron field and a slightly hard neutron field optimized for the burn-up of 246Cm. The neutron economies of the FR and the A-Burner are, respectively, favorable and acceptable to transmute MA. The coupling system of both the reactors can reduce 8.1 ton of MA to almost zero within 60 years by using one FR and one A-Burner. This coupling system is expected to achieve the final goal of transmutation, i.e., to make us free from the geological disposal. (authors)

  1. Utilization of fast reactor excess neutrons for burning minor actinides and long lived FPs

    An evaluation is made on a large MOX fuel fast reactor's capability of burning minor actinides and long lived fission products (FPs) without imposing penalties on core nuclear and safety characteristics. The excess neutrons generated in the fast reactor core are fully utilized not only to generate the fissile material but also to transmute the minor actinides and long lived FPs. The FP target assemblies which consist of Tc-99 and I-129 are loaded into the selected blanket positions whereas the minor actinides are loaded to the rest of the blanket. A long term FP accumulation scenario is also considered in the mix of FP burner fast reactor and non-burner LWRs. (author)

  2. The GDT-based fusion neutron source as driver of a minor actinides burner

    To become a long-term sustainable option for the world's energy supply fission reactor technology must minimize its high-level waste, which finally has to be disposed. To solve the problem, worldwide great Research and Development effort is made to develop new closed fuel cycle options. Longlived fission products and, in particular, minor actinides are the components of the spent nuclear fuel which cause the most concern. Regarding the incineration of minor actinides, systems producing and confining the high-energetic (fast) neutrons have the highest efficiency. These systems can be built as fast reactors and as sub-critical nuclear fuel systems, the so-called driven systems, which are fed with neutrons from an outer neutron source. At present, the accelerator driven spallation neutron source is favored for this purpose thanks to the high neutron emission intensity achievable. Compared to fast reactors the combined accelerator driven system (ADS) has several advantages. The most important are the higher possible burning efficiency and the enhanced inherent safety characteristics. Therefore this develop-ment line is intensively pursued by several research projects, e.g. by the project EUROTRANS of the European Union [1]. The Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics Novosibirsk has made the proposal of a powerful 14 MeV neutron source on the base of the gas dynamic trap (GDT) plasma device [2,3]. This neutron source is primarily thought for an irradiation test facility of materials that must be developed for the fusion DEMO reactor. A research project of the Budker Institute aims at completing the database of the GDT in the range of high plasma parameters, which are relevant for the neutron source, and at demonstrating its feasibility and suitability by a hydrogen-prototype [4]. The situation outlined before raises the questions whether the GDT based neutron source could also be a candidate for driving a sub-critical system devoted to nuclear waste transmutation and how

  3. The uncertainty analysis of a liquid metal reactor for burning minor actinides from light water reactors

    Choi, Hang Bok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    The neutronics analysis of a liquid metal reactor for burning minor actinides has shown that uncertainties in the nuclear data of several key minor actinide isotopes can introduce large uncertainties in the predicted performance of the core. A comprehensive sensitivity and uncertainty analysis was performed on a 1200 MWth actinide burner designed for a low burnup reactivity swing, negative doppler coefficient, and low sodium void worth. Sensitivities were generated using depletion perturbation methods for the equilibrium cycle of the reactor and covariance data was taken ENDF-B/V and other published sources. The relative uncertainties in the burnup swing, doppler coefficient, and void worth were conservatively estimated to be 180%, 97%, and 46%, respectively. 5 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs. (Author)

  4. Actinide transmutation in nuclear reactors

    An optimization method is developed to maximize the burning capability of the ALMR while complying with all constraints imposed on the design for reliability and safety. This method leads to a maximal transuranics enrichment, which is being limited by constraints on reactivity. The enrichment can be raised by using the neutrons less efficiently by increasing leakage from the fuel. With the developed optimization method, a metallic and an oxide fueled ALMR were optimized. Both reactors perform equally well considering the burning of transuranics. However, metallic fuel has a much higher heat conductivity coefficient, which in general leads to better safety characteristics. In search of a more effective waste transmuter, a modified Molten Salt Reactor was designed. A MSR operates on a liquid fuel salt which makes continuous refueling possible, eliminating the issue of the burnup reactivity loss. Also, a prompt negative reactivity feedback is possible for an overmoderated reactor design, even when the Doppler coefficient is positive, due to the fuel expansion with fuel temperature increase. Furthermore, the molten salt fuel can be reprocessed based on a reduction process which is not sensitive to the short-lived spontaneously fissioning actinides. (orig./HP)

  5. OECD/NEA comparison calculations for an accelerator-driven minor actinide burner: analysis of preliminary results

    In the framework of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee, an international benchmark exercise for an accelerator-driven system is being undertaken. A model of a lead-bismuth cooled subcritical system driven by a beam of 1 GeV protons was chosen for the exercise. Except for the subassembly geometry, the design of the subcritical core is based on the ALMR reference design of a sodium-cooled actinide burner. To reduce the high pumping power for the lead-bismuth coolant, the reference subassembly was replaced by a subassembly with a smaller number of pins, and the fission power of the system was proportionally reduced. Lead-bismuth was chosen as target material to reflect the generally increased interest in this material for high-power spallation target applications. An interesting role of accelerator-driven systems is to burn actinide waste from reactors with conventional fuel cycles. The benchmark reactor is assumed to operate as a minor actinide burner in a 'double strata' fuel cycle scheme, featuring a fully closed fuel cycle with a top-up of pure minor actinides. Two fuel compositions for a start-up and an equilibrium core are considered, both differing considerably from normal U-Pu mixed oxide fuel compositions. Six organisations (ANL, CIEMAT, JAERI, KAERI, PSI/CEA and RIT) have contributed preliminary results for inclusion in this paper. The results are based on deterministic transport as well as Monte Carlo calculations using data from ENDF/B-VI, JENDL3.2 and JEF2.2. Significant difference in important neutronic parameters are observed. (authors)

  6. Advanced burner test reactor preconceptual design report.

    Chang, Y. I.; Finck, P. J.; Grandy, C.; Cahalan, J.; Deitrich, L.; Dunn, F.; Fallin, D.; Farmer, M.; Fanning, T.; Kim, T.; Krajtl, L.; Lomperski, S.; Moisseytsev, A.; Momozaki, Y.; Sienicki, J.; Park, Y.; Tang, Y.; Reed, C.; Tzanos, C; Wiedmeyer, S.; Yang, W.; Chikazawa, Y.; JAEA

    2008-12-16

    The goals of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand, to address nuclear waste management concerns and to promote non-proliferation. Implementation of the GNEP requires development and demonstration of three major technologies: (1) Light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel separations technologies that will recover transuranics to be recycled for fuel but not separate plutonium from other transuranics, thereby providing proliferation-resistance; (2) Advanced Burner Reactors (ABRs) based on a fast spectrum that transmute the recycled transuranics to produce energy while also reducing the long term radiotoxicity and decay heat loading in the repository; and (3) Fast reactor fuel recycling technologies to recover and refabricate the transuranics for repeated recycling in the fast reactor system. The primary mission of the ABR Program is to demonstrate the transmutation of transuranics recovered from the LWR spent fuel, and hence the benefits of the fuel cycle closure to nuclear waste management. The transmutation, or burning of the transuranics is accomplished by fissioning and this is most effectively done in a fast spectrum. In the thermal spectrum of commercial LWRs, some transuranics capture neutrons and become even heavier transuranics rather than being fissioned. Even with repeated recycling, only about 30% can be transmuted, which is an intrinsic limitation of all thermal spectrum reactors. Only in a fast spectrum can all transuranics be effectively fissioned to eliminate their long-term radiotoxicity and decay heat. The Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) is the first step in demonstrating the transmutation technologies. It directly supports development of a prototype full-scale Advanced Burner Reactor, which would be followed by commercial deployment of ABRs. The primary objectives of the ABTR are: (1) To demonstrate reactor-based transmutation of transuranics as part of an

  7. ZZ WPPR-FR-MOX/BNCMK, Benchmark on Pu Burner Fast Reactor

    Description of program or function: In order to intercompare the characteristics of the different reactors considered for Pu recycling, in terms of neutron economy, minor actinide production, uranium content versus Pu burning, the NSC Working Party on Physics of Plutonium Recycling (WPPR) is setting up several benchmark studies. They cover in particular the case of the evolution of the Pu quality and Pu fissile content for Pu recycling in PWRs; the void coefficient in PWRs partly fuelled with MOX versus Pu content; the physics characteristics of non-standard fast reactors with breeding ratios around 0.5. The following benchmarks are considered here: - Fast reactors: Pu Burner MOX fuel, Pu Burner metal fuel; - PWRs: MOX recycling (bad quality Pu), Multiple MOX recycling

  8. On the feasibility of a CANDU PHWR actinide burner

    In this work a review of the current solutions to burn the actinide i.e. the spallation method, LWR, FBR, Siemens proposal and inert matrix is presented. Finally, a proposal is made to use the CANDU PHWR for this purpose, taking into account the techniques envisaged for LWR and the prospect of the advanced fuel cycle in CANDU system. (Author) 5 Refs

  9. Transmutation rates of technetium 99 and iodine 129 in the CANDU actinide burner

    Transmutation rates for the two long-lived fission products technetium 99 and iodine 129 have been calculated for the CANDU Actinide Burner that operates with weapons grade plutonium in an inert matrix as fuel. These transmutation rates are compared with those obtained for the current natural uranium CANDU and for LWRs and FBRs. The higher thermal flux and the softer neutron spectrum of the CANDU Actinide Burner, which is a result of its lower fissile requirements can provide net transmutation half lives as short as 14 y for technetium 99 and 2 y for iodine 129. It is assumed that the iodine 129 can be irradiated as a solution in heavy water. The shorter half life for iodine 129 is due to the large volume of moderator and reflector available that leads to negligible self shielding of the iodine 129 cross section. (author) 1 fig., 2 tabs., 2 refs

  10. Advanced Burner Reactor Preliminary NEPA Data Study.

    Briggs, L. L.; Cahalan, J. E.; Deitrich, L. W.; Fanning, T. H.; Grandy, C.; Kellogg, R.; Kim, T. K.; Yang, W. S.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-10-15

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is a new nuclear fuel cycle paradigm with the goals of expanding the use of nuclear power both domestically and internationally, addressing nuclear waste management concerns, and promoting nonproliferation. A key aspect of this program is fast reactor transmutation, in which transuranics recovered from light water reactor spent fuel are to be recycled to create fast reactor transmutation fuels. The benefits of these fuels are to be demonstrated in an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), which will provide a representative environment for recycle fuel testing, safety testing, and modern fast reactor design and safeguard features. Because the GNEP programs will require facilities which may have an impact upon the environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), preparation of a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for GNEP is being undertaken by Tetra Tech, Inc. The PEIS will include a section on the ABR. In support of the PEIS, the Nuclear Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory has been asked to provide a description of the ABR alternative, including graphics, plus estimates of construction and operations data for an ABR plant. The compilation of this information is presented in the remainder of this report. Currently, DOE has started the process of engaging industry on the design of an Advanced Burner Reactor. Therefore, there is no specific, current, vendor-produced ABR design that could be used for this PEIS datacall package. In addition, candidate sites for the ABR vary widely as to available water, geography, etc. Therefore, ANL has based its estimates for construction and operations data largely on generalization of available information from existing plants and from the environmental report assembled for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) design [CRBRP, 1977]. The CRBRP environmental report was chosen as a resource because it thoroughly

  11. Advanced Burner Reactor Preliminary NEPA Data Study

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is a new nuclear fuel cycle paradigm with the goals of expanding the use of nuclear power both domestically and internationally, addressing nuclear waste management concerns, and promoting nonproliferation. A key aspect of this program is fast reactor transmutation, in which transuranics recovered from light water reactor spent fuel are to be recycled to create fast reactor transmutation fuels. The benefits of these fuels are to be demonstrated in an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), which will provide a representative environment for recycle fuel testing, safety testing, and modern fast reactor design and safeguard features. Because the GNEP programs will require facilities which may have an impact upon the environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), preparation of a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for GNEP is being undertaken by Tetra Tech, Inc. The PEIS will include a section on the ABR. In support of the PEIS, the Nuclear Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory has been asked to provide a description of the ABR alternative, including graphics, plus estimates of construction and operations data for an ABR plant. The compilation of this information is presented in the remainder of this report. Currently, DOE has started the process of engaging industry on the design of an Advanced Burner Reactor. Therefore, there is no specific, current, vendor-produced ABR design that could be used for this PEIS datacall package. In addition, candidate sites for the ABR vary widely as to available water, geography, etc. Therefore, ANL has based its estimates for construction and operations data largely on generalization of available information from existing plants and from the environmental report assembled for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) design [CRBRP, 1977]. The CRBRP environmental report was chosen as a resource because it thoroughly

  12. Ball plasma dynamics for FBX BURNER reactor

    The authors have been conducting fundamental experiments on the moving plasma balls in the major axis direction. This has a fundamental importance for the quasi-steady fusion reactor scheme FBX BURNER. This configuration is the descendants of Spheromak type nuclear fusion scheme but with long toroidal field coils. The main issues have been focused onto the dynamic stability of the moving plasma balls. The second issue is the collision between two successive plasma balls as shown. This shows a basic result from an optical measurement. The comparison with magnetic measurements shows peculiar but interesting features of the system. The dimension of the plasma injector is 2 m in length as a whole. It is in a coaxial configuration. The external electrode is 150 mm in inner diameter and the inner electrode is 50 mm in diameter. This is attached to a 1 m insulation reservoir with same inner diameter. An axial magnetic field up to 0.1 Tesla is applied on the discharge with a current of up to 10 kA in few ms. The authors show their experimental and numerical simulation results on these problems

  13. Linear accelerator for burner-reactor

    Future development of nuclear power engineering depends on the successful solution of two key problems of safety and utilization of high level radioactive wastes (HLRW) of atomic power plants (APP). Modern methods of HLRW treatment involve solidification, preliminary storing for a period of 30-50 years necessary for the decay of long-living nuclides and final burial in geological formations several hundred meters below the ground surface. The depth burial of the radioactive wastes requires complicated under ground constructions. It's very expensive and doesn't meet modern ecological requirements. Alternative modern and more reasonable methods of APP HLRW treatment are under consideration now. One of the methods involves separation of APP waste radionuclides for use in economy with subsequent transmutation of the long-living isotopes into the short-living ones by high-intensity neutron fluxes generated by proton accelerators. The installation intended for the long-living radionuclides transmutation into the short-living ones is called burner-reactor. It can be based on the continuous regime proton accelerator with 1.5 GeV energy, 0.3 A current and beam mean power of 450 MW. The preferable type of the proton accelerator with the aforementioned parameters is the linear accelerator

  14. Fuel selection criteria specific for double stratum minor actinide burners

    The scope of this presentation covers the following topics: Accelerator driven systems in the double strata fuel cycle; parametric studies of neutronic properties foe dedicated inert matrix fuels (solid solution oxides ZrO2, ThO; solid solution nitrides ZrN, HfN, YN; CERCER oxides MgO; CERMET oxides Cr, V, Mo, Mo-92, W). Fertile matrices do not improve neutronic performance of americium bearing fuels. High linear rating (high thermal conductivity + high melting temperature) improves neutronic performance as well. CERCER oxide in MgO matrix appears to be a reasonable reference fuel for Minor Actinide burning in LBE cooled ADS. Solid solution nitride in ZrN or CERMET oxide in Mo-92 matrix offer better performance, but high T stability (nitrides) and helium release (CERMET) issues need to be addressed. These fuels will be fabricated and irradiated in Phenix starting 2005

  15. A blueprint for GNEP advanced burner reactor startup fuel fabrication facility

    Research highlights: → This article discusses use of WG-plutonium as the startup fuel for Advanced Burner Reactor. → The presence of gallium in WG fuel may compromise the fuel integrity. → There is no facility exists to remove gallium from plutonium except at laboratory scale. → This article discusses the processes and issues associated with the gallium removal. → The article provides realistic scenario to all stack-holders involved in designing and operating ABR. - Abstract: The purpose of this article is to identify the requirements and issues associated with design of GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor Fuel Facility. The report was prepared in support of providing data for preparation of a NEPA Environmental Impact Statement in support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). One of the GNEP objectives was to reduce the inventory of long lived actinide from the light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The LWR spent fuel contains Plutonium (Pu)-239 and other transuranics (TRU) such as Americium-241. One of the options is to transmute or burn these actinides in fast neutron spectra as well as generate the electricity. A sodium-cooled Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) concept was proposed to achieve this goal. However, fuel with relatively high TRU content has not been used in the fast reactor. To demonstrate the utilization of TRU fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype of ARR was proposed, which would necessarily be started up using weapons grade (WG) Pu fuel. The WG Pu is distinguished by relatively highest proportions of Pu-239 and lesser amount of other actinides. The WG Pu was assumed to be used as the startup fuel along with TRU fuel in lead test assemblies. Because such fuel is not currently being produced in the US, a new facility (or new capability in an existing facility) was being considered for fabrication of WG Pu fuel for the ABR. It was estimated that the facility will provide the

  16. Fast molten salt reactor-transmuter for closing nuclear fuel cycle on minor actinides

    Creation fast critical molten salt reactor for burning-out minor actinides and separate long-living fission products in the closed nuclear fuel cycle is the most perspective and actual direction. The reactor on melts salts - molten salt homogeneous reactor with the circulating fuel, working as burner and transmuter long-living radioactive nuclides in closed nuclear fuel cycle, can serve as an effective ecological cordon from contamination of the nature long-living radiotoxic nuclides. High-flux fast critical molten-salt nuclear reactors in structure of the closed nuclear fuel cycle of the future nuclear power can effectively burning-out / transmute dangerous long-living radioactive nuclides, make radioisotopes, partially utilize plutonium and produce thermal and electric energy. Such reactor allows solving the problems constraining development of large-scale nuclear power, including fueling, minimization of radioactive waste and non-proliferation. Burning minor actinides in molten salt reactor is capable to facilitate work solid fuel power reactors in system NP with the closed nuclear fuel cycle and to reduce transient losses at processing and fabrications fuel pins. At substantiation MSR-transmuter/burner as solvents fuel nuclides for molten-salt reactors various salts were examined, for example: LiF - BeF2; NaF - LiF - BeF2; NaF-LiF ; NaF-ZrF4 ; LiF-NaF -KF; NaCl. RRC 'Kurchatov institute' together with other employees have developed the basic design reactor installations with molten salt reactor - burner long-living nuclides for fluoride fuel composition with the limited solubility minor actinides (MAF3 10 mol %) allows to develop in some times more effective molten salt reactor with fast neutron spectrum - burner/ transmuter of the long-living radioactive waste. In high-flux fast reactors on melts salts within a year it is possible to burn ∼300 kg minor actinides per 1 GW thermal power of reactor. The technical and economic estimation given power

  17. Assessment of Startup Fuel Options for the GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR)

    Jon Carmack (062056); Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu (103171); David Alberstein

    2008-02-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Program (GNEP) includes a program element for the development and construction of an advanced sodium cooled fast reactor to demonstrate the burning (transmutation) of significant quantities of minor actinides obtained from a separations process and fabricated into a transuranic bearing fuel assembly. To demonstrate and qualify transuranic (TRU) fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype is needed. The ABR would necessarily be started up using conventional metal alloy or oxide (U or U, Pu) fuel. Startup fuel is needed for the ABR for the first 2 to 4 core loads of fuel in the ABR. Following start up, a series of advanced TRU bearing fuel assemblies will be irradiated in qualification lead test assemblies in the ABR. There are multiple options for this startup fuel. This report provides a description of the possible startup fuel options as well as possible fabrication alternatives available to the program in the current domestic and international facilities and infrastructure.

  18. Fusion-driven actinide burner design study. Second quarterly progress report

    The Second Quarterly Progress Report summarizes the status at the mid-point of the conceptual design effort. The fusion driver continues to pose some of the principal design problems due to the necessity of advancing plasma engineering and technology for long pulse, high duty cycle operation. The development of credible design solutions to these problems is one of the major objectives of the study. The TF and OH coil designs have been modified to provide a more compact arrangement in the nose region of the TF coils and to ensure fully cryostable operation. A unique concept has been developed to effectively shield the TF coils from the poloidal fields. A vacuum vessel concept which separates the functions for sustaining the differential pressure load and for sealing the vacuum system is described. The thickness of the blanket has been decreased to reduce the power density and the actinide inventory. Determination and presentation of actinide depletion characteristics represents a major element thus far in the study and is a principal objective. Evaluation of the changes in the hazard only during irradiation proved to be an inadequate measure of the reduction in long term hazards due to the importance of radioactive daughter products which appear much later in time. Therefore, comparisons have been made of long term decay characteristics before and after irradiation in the actinide burner. It has also been noted that some of the actinides that are produced during irradiation have beneficial applications as radioisotopic power sources. These and other considerations suggest that alternate approaches to assessing the waste management problem be considered to develop a meaningful perspective on long term hazards from the actinides

  19. Fusion-driven actinide burner design study. Second quarterly progress report

    Chi, J.W.H.; Gold, R.E.; Holman, R.R.

    1975-11-01

    The Second Quarterly Progress Report summarizes the status at the mid-point of the conceptual design effort. The fusion driver continues to pose some of the principal design problems due to the necessity of advancing plasma engineering and technology for long pulse, high duty cycle operation. The development of credible design solutions to these problems is one of the major objectives of the study. The TF and OH coil designs have been modified to provide a more compact arrangement in the nose region of the TF coils and to ensure fully cryostable operation. A unique concept has been developed to effectively shield the TF coils from the poloidal fields. A vacuum vessel concept which separates the functions for sustaining the differential pressure load and for sealing the vacuum system is described. The thickness of the blanket has been decreased to reduce the power density and the actinide inventory. Determination and presentation of actinide depletion characteristics represents a major element thus far in the study and is a principal objective. Evaluation of the changes in the hazard only during irradiation proved to be an inadequate measure of the reduction in long term hazards due to the importance of radioactive daughter products which appear much later in time. Therefore, comparisons have been made of long term decay characteristics before and after irradiation in the actinide burner. It has also been noted that some of the actinides that are produced during irradiation have beneficial applications as radioisotopic power sources. These and other considerations suggest that alternate approaches to assessing the waste management problem be considered to develop a meaningful perspective on long term hazards from the actinides.

  20. Actinide management with commercial fast reactors

    The capability of plutonium-breeding and minor-actinide (MA) transmutation in the Japanese commercial sodium-cooled fast reactor offers one of practical solutions for obtaining sustainable energy resources as well as reducing radioactive toxicity and inventory. The reference core design meets the requirement of flexible breeding ratio from 1.03 to 1.2. The MA transmutation amount has been evaluated as 50-100 kg/GWey if the MA content in fresh fuel is 3-5 wt%, where about 30-40% of initial MA can be transmuted in the discharged fuel

  1. Actinide management with commercial fast reactors

    Ohki, Shigeo

    2015-12-01

    The capability of plutonium-breeding and minor-actinide (MA) transmutation in the Japanese commercial sodium-cooled fast reactor offers one of practical solutions for obtaining sustainable energy resources as well as reducing radioactive toxicity and inventory. The reference core design meets the requirement of flexible breeding ratio from 1.03 to 1.2. The MA transmutation amount has been evaluated as 50-100 kg/GWey if the MA content in fresh fuel is 3-5 wt%, where about 30-40% of initial MA can be transmuted in the discharged fuel.

  2. Actinide management with commercial fast reactors

    Ohki, Shigeo [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, O-arai-machi, Higashi-Ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    The capability of plutonium-breeding and minor-actinide (MA) transmutation in the Japanese commercial sodium-cooled fast reactor offers one of practical solutions for obtaining sustainable energy resources as well as reducing radioactive toxicity and inventory. The reference core design meets the requirement of flexible breeding ratio from 1.03 to 1.2. The MA transmutation amount has been evaluated as 50-100 kg/GW{sub e}y if the MA content in fresh fuel is 3-5 wt%, where about 30-40% of initial MA can be transmuted in the discharged fuel.

  3. Calculational benchmark comparisons for a low sodium void worth actinide burner core design

    Recently, a number of low void worth core designs with non-conventional core geometries have been proposed. Since these designs lack a good experimental and computational data base, benchmark calculations are useful for the identification of possible biases in performance characteristics predictions. In this paper, a simplified benchmark model of a metal fueled, low void worth actinide burner design is detailed: and two independent neutronic performance evaluations are compared. Calculated performance characteristics are evaluated for three spatially uniform compositions (fresh uranium/plutonium, batch-averaged uranium/transuranic, and batch-averaged uranium/transuranic with fission products) and a regional depleted distribution obtained from a benchmark depletion calculation. For each core composition, the flooded and voided multiplication factor, power peaking factor, sodium void worth (and its components), flooded Doppler coefficient and control rod worth predictions are compared. In addition, the burnup swing, average discharge burnup, peak linear power, and fresh fuel enrichment are calculated for the depletion case. In general, remarkably good agreement is observed between the evaluations. The mot significant difference in predicted performance characteristics is a 0.3-05% Δk/(kk') bias in the sodium void worth. Significant differences in the transmutation rate of higher actinides are also observed; however, these differences do not cause discrepancies in the performance predictions

  4. Calculational benchmark comparisons for a low sodium void worth actinide burner core design

    Recently, a number of low void worth core designs with non-conventional core geometries have been proposed. Since these designs lack a good experimental and computational database, benchmark calculations are useful for the identification of possible biases in performance characteristics predictions. In this paper, a simplified benchmark model of a metal fueled, low void worth actinide burner design is detailed; and two independent neutronic performance evaluations are compared. Calculated performance characteristics are evaluated for three spatially uniform compositions (fresh uranium/plutonium, batch-averaged uranium/transuranic, and batch-averaged uranium/transuranic with fission products) and a regional depleted distribution obtained from a benchmark depletion calculation. For each core composition, the flooded and voided multiplication factor, power peaking factor, sodium void worth (and its components), flooded Doppler coefficient and control rod worth predictions are compared. In addition, the burnup swing, average discharge burnup, peak linear power, and fresh fuel enrichment are calculated for the depletion case. In general, remarkably good agreement is observed between the evaluations. The most significant difference is predicted performance characteristics is a 0.3--0.5% Δk/(kk) bias in the sodium void worth. Significant differences in the transmutation rate of higher actinides are also observed; however, these differences do not cause discrepancies in the performing predictions

  5. Homogeneous recycling of minor actinides in an EFR type fast reactor

    The capability of the European Fast Reactor (EFR) as a typical large fast reactor to incinerate the minor actinides Np and Am, produced in LWRs, has been investigated for the case of homogeneous recycling of Np, Am and Pu. Detailed account is taken for a three-region reload scheme in which every two years 1/3 of the core is refuelled. The fraction of admixed minor actinides is varied from 2.8 to 7.5%. Results are given in terms of the number of clean-up LWRs by one burner, the nuclide inventories during recycling, and the risk potential of the waste from the incineration system compared to the non-incineration case. It is concluded that an enforced research should be done in chemistry to prove that a satisfactory separation especially of Am and also of Cm from the rare earths in the waste is possible on large scale. (author). 4 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  6. Preliminary studies of a new accelerator-driven minor actinide burner in industrial scale

    Highlights: • A new accelerator-driven minor actinide (MA) burner was proposed. • Comprehensive design of spallation target, fuel assembly and subcritical core was performed. • Preliminary safety analyses indicate the inherent safety of the core in the reactivity insertion (500 pcm) and beam overpower (50% increase) transients. - Abstract: Pursuing high transmutation rate of minor actinide (MA), a preliminary conceptual design of a lead-bismuth (LBE) cooled accelerator-driven system (ADS) is proposed in this study. Parametric studies are performed to optimize the neutronics and thermal–hydraulics performances. The proton energy and axial position of the proton beam impact is investigated to obtain high neutron source efficiency and spallation neutron yield. The influences of MA/Pu mixing ratio and the ratio of pin pitch to diameter (P/D) are also optimized to control the burnup reactivity swing and the minimum coolant velocity for adequate cooling. To reduce the power peak, three kinds of power flattening techniques are adopted and compared. The results show that the inert matrix ratio zone loading method seems more versatile. Based on the analyses, an optimized three zone loading pattern is proposed for the 800 MWth subcritical core. The total transmutation rate of MA is 328.8 kg per effective full power year. Preliminary safety analyses based on the balance of power method (BOP) are performed and the results show that in the reactivity insertion and beam overpower transients, the core shows inherent safety, but the scram is necessary by cutting off the beam current to protect the core from possible damages caused by the loss of flow

  7. Preliminary studies of a new accelerator-driven minor actinide burner in industrial scale

    Li, Xunzhao; Zhou, Shengcheng [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Zheng, Youqi, E-mail: yqzheng@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Wang, Kunpeng [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center, PO Box 8088, No. 54, Beijing 100082 (China); Wu, Hongchun [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A new accelerator-driven minor actinide (MA) burner was proposed. • Comprehensive design of spallation target, fuel assembly and subcritical core was performed. • Preliminary safety analyses indicate the inherent safety of the core in the reactivity insertion (500 pcm) and beam overpower (50% increase) transients. - Abstract: Pursuing high transmutation rate of minor actinide (MA), a preliminary conceptual design of a lead-bismuth (LBE) cooled accelerator-driven system (ADS) is proposed in this study. Parametric studies are performed to optimize the neutronics and thermal–hydraulics performances. The proton energy and axial position of the proton beam impact is investigated to obtain high neutron source efficiency and spallation neutron yield. The influences of MA/Pu mixing ratio and the ratio of pin pitch to diameter (P/D) are also optimized to control the burnup reactivity swing and the minimum coolant velocity for adequate cooling. To reduce the power peak, three kinds of power flattening techniques are adopted and compared. The results show that the inert matrix ratio zone loading method seems more versatile. Based on the analyses, an optimized three zone loading pattern is proposed for the 800 MWth subcritical core. The total transmutation rate of MA is 328.8 kg per effective full power year. Preliminary safety analyses based on the balance of power method (BOP) are performed and the results show that in the reactivity insertion and beam overpower transients, the core shows inherent safety, but the scram is necessary by cutting off the beam current to protect the core from possible damages caused by the loss of flow.

  8. Optimizing advanced liquid metal reactors for burning actinides

    In this report, the process to design an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) for burning the transuranic part of nuclear waste is discussed. The influence of design parameters on ALMR burner performance is studied and the results are incorporated in a design schedule for optimizing ALMRs for burning transuranics. This schedule is used to design a metallic and an oxide fueled ALMR burner to burn as much as possible transurancis. The two designs burn equally well. (orig.)

  9. Advanced Recycling Reactor with Minor Actinide Fuel

    The Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) with minor actinide fuel has been studied. This paper presents the pre-conceptual design of the ARR proposed by the International Nuclear Recycling Alliance (INRA) for FOA study sponsored by DOE of the United States of America (U.S.). Although the basic reactor concept is technically mature, it is not suitable for commercial use due to the need to reduce capital costs. As a result of INRA's extensive experience, it is anticipated that a non-commercial ARR1 will be viable and meet U.S. requirements by 2025. Commercial Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) operations are expected to be feasible in competition with LWRs by 2050, based on construction of ARR2 in 2035. The ARR based on the Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) is a loop-typed sodium cooled reactor with MOX fuel that is selected because of much experience of SFRs in the world. Major features of key technology enhancements incorporated into the ARR are the following: Decay heat can be removed by natural circulation to improve safety. The primary cooling system consists of two-loop system and the integrated IHX/Pump to improve economics. The steam generator with the straight double-walled tube is used to improve reliability. The reactor core of the ARR1 is 70 cm high and the volume fraction of fuel is 31.6%. The conversion ratio of fissile is set up less than 0.65 and the amount of burned TRU is 45-51 kg/TWeh. According to survey of more effective TRU burning core, the oxide fuel core containing high TRU (MA 15%, Pu 35% average) with moderate pins of 12% arranged driver fuel assemblies can decrease TRU conversion ratio to 0.33 and improve TRU burning capability to 67 kg/TWeh. The moderator can enhance TRU burning, while increasing the Doppler effect and reducing the positive sodium void effect. High TRU fraction promotes TRU burning by curbing plutonium production. High Am fraction and Am blanket promote Am transmutation. The ARR1 consists of a reactor building (including

  10. Carbide and Nitride Fuels for Advanced Burner Reactor

    The impacts of the mixed carbide and nitride fuels on the core performances and passive safety features of TRU burner were assessed and comapred with the metallic and oxide fuels. Targeting the potential design goals adopted in the Advanced Burner Reactor core concepts, the alternative TRU burner concepts were developed by loading carbide and nitride fuels. The neutron spectrum is softer than that of the metal core, but harder than that of the oxide core, and the core performance parameters such as fuel residence time, discharge burnup, flux level, etc are generally between the values of the metal and oxide cores. The margin to fuel melt was significantly increased because of the high thermal conductivity and high melting temperature, and hence there is an additional room to improve the thermal efficiency by increasing the operating temperature. The changed fuel composition affected the kinetics parameters and reactivity feedback coefficients, but the variations were minimal. The reduced core height decreases the sodium void worth, and the high thermal conductivity decreases the fuel temperature and Doppler constant. As a result, both carbide and nitride cores have favorable passive safety features without additional design fixes that are required in the oxide core concepts. (author)

  11. Actinides reduction by recycling in a thermal reactor

    This work is directed towards the evaluation of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle in which radioactive actinides could be recycled to remove most of the radioactive material; firstly a production reference of actinides in standard nuclear fuel of uranium at the end of its burning in a BWR reactor is established, after a fuel containing plutonium is modeled to also calculate the actinides production in MOX fuel type. Also it proposes a design of fuel rod containing 6% of actinides in a matrix of uranium from the tails of enrichment, then four standard uranium fuel rods are replaced by actinides rods to evaluate the production and transmutation thereof, the same procedure was performed in the fuel type MOX and the end actinide reduction in the fuel was evaluated. (Author)

  12. Investigation of CANDU reactors as a thorium burner

    Large quantities of plutonium have been accumulated in the nuclear waste of civilian LWRs and CANDU reactors. Reactor grade plutonium can be used as a booster fissile fuel material in the form of mixed ThO2/PuO2 fuel in a CANDU fuel bundle in order to assure reactor criticality. The paper investigates the prospects of exploiting the rich world thorium reserves in CANDU reactors. Two different fuel compositions have been selected for investigations: (1) 96% thoria (ThO2) + 4% PuO2 and (2) 91% ThO2 + 5% UO2 + 4% PuO2. The latter is used for the purpose of denaturing the new 233U fuel with 238U. The behavior of the reactor criticality k ∞ and the burn-up values of the reactor have been pursued by full power operation for >∼8 years. The reactor starts with k ∞ = ∼1.39 and decreases asymptotically to values of k ∞ > 1.06, which is still tolerable and useable in a CANDU reactor. The reactor criticality k ∞ remains nearly constant between the 4th year and the 7th year of plant operation, and then, a slight increase is observed thereafter, along with a continuous depletion of the thorium fuel. After the 2nd year, the CANDU reactor begins to operate practically as a thorium burner. Very high burn-up can be achieved with the same fuel (>160,000 MW D/MT). The reactor criticality would be sufficient until a great fraction of the thorium fuel is burned up, provided that the fuel rods could be fabricated to withstand such high burn-up levels. Fuel fabrication costs and nuclear waste mass for final disposal per unit energy could be reduced drastically

  13. Exposure calculation code module for reactor core analysis: BURNER

    The code module BURNER for nuclear reactor exposure calculations is presented. The computer requirements are shown, as are the reference data and interface data file requirements, and the programmed equations and procedure of calculation are described. The operating history of a reactor is followed over the period between solutions of the space, energy neutronics problem. The end-of-period nuclide concentrations are determined given the necessary information. A steady state, continuous fueling model is treated in addition to the usual fixed fuel model. The control options provide flexibility to select among an unusually wide variety of programmed procedures. The code also provides user option to make a number of auxiliary calculations and print such information as the local gamma source, cumulative exposure, and a fine scale power density distribution in a selected zone. The code is used locally in a system for computation which contains the VENTURE diffusion theory neutronics code and other modules

  14. Actinide transmutation in the advanced liquid metal reactor (ALMR)

    The Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored fast reactor design based on the Power Reactor, Innovative Small Module (PRISM) concept originated by General Electric. The current reference design is a 471 MWt modular reactor loaded with ternary metal fuel. This paper discusses actinide transmutation core designs that fit the design envelope of the ALMR and utilize spent LWR fuel as startup material and makeup. Actinide transmutation may be accomplished in the ALMR by using either a breeding or burning configuration. Lifetime actinide mass consumption is calculated as well as changes in consumption behaviour throughout the lifetime of the reactor. Impacts on system operational and safety performance are evaluated in a preliminary fashion. (author). 3 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  15. Gas core reactors for actinide transmutation. [uranium hexafluoride

    Clement, J. D.; Rust, J. H.; Wan, P. T.; Chow, S.

    1979-01-01

    The preliminary design of a uranium hexafluoride actinide transmutation reactor to convert long-lived actinide wastes to shorter-lived fission product wastes was analyzed. It is shown that externally moderated gas core reactors are ideal radiators. They provide an abundant supply of thermal neutrons and are insensitive to composition changes in the blanket. For the present reactor, an initial load of 6 metric tons of actinides is loaded. This is equivalent to the quantity produced by 300 LWR-years of operation. At the beginning, the core produces 2000 MWt while the blanket generates only 239 MWt. After four years of irradiation, the actinide mass is reduced to 3.9 metric tonnes. During this time, the blanket is becoming more fissile and its power rapidly approaches 1600 MWt. At the end of four years, continuous refueling of actinides is carried out and the actinide mass is held constant. Equilibrium is essentially achieved at the end of eight years. At equilibrium, the core is producing 1400 MWt and the blanket 1600 MWt. At this power level, the actinide destruction rate is equal to the production rate from 32 LWRs.

  16. EC-FP7 ARCAS: technical and economical comparison of Fast Reactors and Accelerator Driven Systems for transmutation of Minor Actinides

    The ARCAS project aims to compare, on a technological and economical basis, Accelerator Driven Systems and Fast Reactors as Minor Actinide burners. It is split in five work packages: the reference scenario definition, the fast reactor system definition, the accelerator driven system definition, the fuel reprocessing and fabrication facilities definition and the economical comparison. This paper summarizes the status of the project and its five work packages. (author)

  17. Preliminary safety evaluation of the advanced burner test reactor.

    Dunn, F. E.; Fanning, T. H.; Cahalan, J. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-09-15

    Results of a preliminary safety evaluation of the Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) pre-conceptual design are reported. The ABTR safety design approach is described. Traditional defense-in-depth design features are supplemented with passive safety performance characteristics that include natural circulation emergency decay heat removal and reactor power reduction by inherent reactivity feedbacks in accidents. ABTR safety performance in design-basis and beyond-design-basis accident sequences is estimated based on analyses. Modeling assumptions and input data for safety analyses are presented. Analysis results for simulation of simultaneous loss of coolant pumping power and normal heat rejection are presented and discussed, both for the case with reactor scram and the case without reactor scram. The analysis results indicate that the ABTR pre-conceptual design is capable of undergoing bounding design-basis and beyond-design-basis accidents without fuel cladding failures. The first line of defense for protection of the public against release of radioactivity in accidents remains intact with significant margin. A comparison and evaluation of general safety design criteria for the ABTR conceptual design phase are presented in an appendix. A second appendix presents SASSYS-1 computer code capabilities and modeling enhancements implemented for ABTR analyses.

  18. Actinides in irradiated graphite of RBMK-1500 reactor

    Highlights: • Activation of actinides in the graphite of the RBMK-1500 reactor was analyzed. • Numerical modeling using SCALE 6.1 and MCNPX was used for actinide calculation. • Measurements of the irradiated graphite sample were used for model validation. • Results are important for further decommissioning process of the RBMK type reactors. - Abstract: The activation of graphite in the nuclear power plants is the problem of high importance related with later graphite reprocessing or disposal. The activation of actinide impurities in graphite due to their toxicity determines a particular long term risk to waste management. In this work the activation of actinides in the graphite constructions of the RBMK-1500 reactor is determined by nuclear spectrometry measurements of the irradiated graphite sample from the Ignalina NPP Unit I and by means of numerical modeling using two independent codes SCALE 6.1 (using TRITON-VI sequence) and MCNPX (v2.7 with CINDER). Both models take into account the 3D RBMK-1500 reactor core fragment with explicit graphite construction including a stack and a sleeve but with a different simplification level concerning surrounding graphite and construction of control roads. The verification of the model has been performed by comparing calculated and measured isotope ratios of actinides. Also good prediction capabilities of the actinide activation in the irradiated graphite have been found for both calculation approaches. The initial U impurity concentration in the graphite model has been adjusted taking into account the experimental results. The specific activities of actinides in the irradiated RBMK-1500 graphite constructions have been obtained and differences between numerical simulation results, different structural parts (sleeve and stack) as well as comparison with previous results (Ancius et al., 2005) have been discussed. The obtained results are important for further decommissioning process of the Ignalina NPP and other RBMK

  19. Use of freeze-casting in advanced burner reactor fuel design

    Lang, A. L.; Yablinsky, C. A.; Allen, T. R. [Dept. of Engineering Physics, Univ. of Wisconsin Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Burger, J.; Hunger, P. M.; Wegst, U. G. K. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, 8000 Cummings Hall, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper will detail the modeling of a fast reactor with fuel pins created using a freeze-casting process. Freeze-casting is a method of creating an inert scaffold within a fuel pin. The scaffold is created using a directional solidification process and results in open porosity for emplacement of fuel, with pores ranging in size from 300 microns to 500 microns in diameter. These pores allow multiple fuel types and enrichments to be loaded into one fuel pin. Also, each pore could be filled with varying amounts of fuel to allow for the specific volume of fission gases created by that fuel type. Currently fast reactors, including advanced burner reactors (ABR's), are not economically feasible due to the high cost of operating the reactors and of reprocessing the fuel. However, if the fuel could be very precisely placed, such as within a freeze-cast scaffold, this could increase fuel performance and result in a valid design with a much lower cost per megawatt. In addition to competitive costs, freeze-cast fuel would also allow for selective breeding or burning of actinides within specific locations in fast reactors. For example, fast flux peak locations could be utilized on a minute scale to target specific actinides for transmutation. Freeze-cast fuel is extremely flexible and has great potential in a variety of applications. This paper performs initial modeling of freeze-cast fuel, with the generic fast reactor parameters for this model based on EBR-II. The core has an assumed power of 62.5 MWt. The neutronics code used was Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) transport code. Uniform pore sizes were used in increments of 100 microns. Two different freeze-cast scaffold materials were used: ceramic (MgO-ZrO{sub 2}) and steel (SS316L). Separate models were needed for each material because the freeze-cast ceramic and metal scaffolds have different structural characteristics and overall porosities. Basic criticality results were compiled for the various models

  20. Use of freeze-casting in advanced burner reactor fuel design

    This paper will detail the modeling of a fast reactor with fuel pins created using a freeze-casting process. Freeze-casting is a method of creating an inert scaffold within a fuel pin. The scaffold is created using a directional solidification process and results in open porosity for emplacement of fuel, with pores ranging in size from 300 microns to 500 microns in diameter. These pores allow multiple fuel types and enrichments to be loaded into one fuel pin. Also, each pore could be filled with varying amounts of fuel to allow for the specific volume of fission gases created by that fuel type. Currently fast reactors, including advanced burner reactors (ABR's), are not economically feasible due to the high cost of operating the reactors and of reprocessing the fuel. However, if the fuel could be very precisely placed, such as within a freeze-cast scaffold, this could increase fuel performance and result in a valid design with a much lower cost per megawatt. In addition to competitive costs, freeze-cast fuel would also allow for selective breeding or burning of actinides within specific locations in fast reactors. For example, fast flux peak locations could be utilized on a minute scale to target specific actinides for transmutation. Freeze-cast fuel is extremely flexible and has great potential in a variety of applications. This paper performs initial modeling of freeze-cast fuel, with the generic fast reactor parameters for this model based on EBR-II. The core has an assumed power of 62.5 MWt. The neutronics code used was Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) transport code. Uniform pore sizes were used in increments of 100 microns. Two different freeze-cast scaffold materials were used: ceramic (MgO-ZrO2) and steel (SS316L). Separate models were needed for each material because the freeze-cast ceramic and metal scaffolds have different structural characteristics and overall porosities. Basic criticality results were compiled for the various models. Preliminary results

  1. Use of fast-spectrum reactors for actinide burning

    Finally, Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) pyroprocessing has been developed only in recent years and it appears to have potential as a relatively uncomplicated, effective actinide recovery process. In fact, actinide recycling occurs naturally in the IFR fuel cycle. Although still very much developmental, the entire IFR fuel cycle will be demonstrated on prototype-scale in conjunction with the EBR-II and its refurbished Fuel Cycle Facility starting in late 1991. A logical extension to this work, therefore, is to establish whether this IFR pyrochemical processing can be applied to extracting actinides from LWR spent fuel. This paper summarizes current thinking on the rationale for actinide recycle, its ramifications on the geologic repository and the current high-level waste management plans, and the necessary development programs. 4 figs., 4 tabs

  2. The advanced liquid metal reactor actinide recycle system

    The current U.S. National Energy Strategy includes four key goals for nuclear policy: enhance safety and design standards, reduce economic risk, reduce regulatory risk, and establish an effective high-level nuclear waste program. The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor Actinide Recycle System is consistent with these objectives. The system has the ability to fulfill multiple missions with the same basic design concept. In addition to providing an option for long-term energy security, the system can be effectively utilized for recycling of actinides in light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel, provide waste management flexibility, including the reduction in the waste quantity and storage time and utilization of the available energy potential of LWR spent fuel. The actinide recycle system is comprised of (1) a compact liquid metal (sodium) cooled reactor system with optimized passive safety characteristics, and (2) pyrometallurgical metal fuel cycle presently under development of Argonne National Laboratory. The waste reduction of LWR spent fuel is accomplished by transmutation or fissioning of the longer-lived transuranic isotopes to shorter-lived fission products in the reactor. In this presentation the economical and environmental incentive of the actinide recycle system is addressed and the status of development including licensing aspects is described. 3 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  3. The energy analysis of burner reactor power systems

    Currently most commercial nuclear power stations are based on thermal reactor designs called burner reactors which are net consumers of fissile material. These power stations form one part of a larger system that generates electricity from uranium. However, in addition to producing energy, such systems also consume energy, in the form of various fuels, during construction and operation. This thesis describes the use of energy analysis to determine the total energy required by these systems. A number of factors are shown to influence energy consumption and, in particular, the effect of extracting uranium from different sources is studied in detail. For ores, an important inverse relationship between energy use and ore grade is investigated and quantified. The physical limit at which the energy input to the system is equal to its output is shown to correspond to an average grade of 15 parts per million of 'triuranium octoxide'. Analysis of proposals for extracting uranium from seawater indicates that the only schemes giving a positive energy balance are costly (500 dollars/lb U3O8) and limited to low production rates. The effects of feedback within fuel systems are analysed and the results are used to formulate an economic model in which nuclear electricity prices determine uranium ore costs as well as vice versa. The model demonstrates that, with present techniques, the average economic limit to ore grade is 50 ppm U3O8 with subsequent resources, on current assessment, of only 107 tonnes U3O8. This contradicts most traditional studies which, by assuming fixed, non-dependent fuel costs, suggest an ore grade limit of less than 4 ppm U3O8 and economically recoverable resources in excess of 1010 tonnes U3O8. (author)

  4. Conceptual Neutronic Design of a Lead-Bismuth-Cooled Actinide Burning Reactor

    A conceptual design of a lead-bismuth-eutectic (LBE)-cooled actinide burner core with innovative streaming fuel assemblies (FAs) is described. The 1800-MW(thermal) core employs metallic, fertile-free fuel where the transuranics (plutonium plus minor actinides) are dispersed in a zirconium matrix. The core contains 157 streaming FAs that enhance neutron streaming by employing gas-filled, sealed streaming tubes at the FA periphery and center. The large reactivity excess at the beginning of life is compensated for by a system of double-entry control rods. The arrangement of top-entry and bottom-entry control rods in a staggered pattern allows the achievement of a very uniform axial power profile and a small reactivity change from control rod driveline expansion. The reactor can operate with an 18- to 24-month cycle length.Safety is provided through negative reactivity coefficients and tight neutronic coupling. The void coefficient is negative for a partially as well as a fully voided core. The effective delayed neutron fraction is 25% less than that of typical oxide-fueled fast reactors, making the requirements on reactor control performance more demanding. The Doppler coefficient is negative with a magnitude appreciably lower than the typical values of oxide fuels in sodium-cooled reactors, but comparable to the values observed in integral fast reactor (IFR) cores with metallic U-Pu-Zr fuels. The fuel thermal expansion coefficient is also negative, having a magnitude approximately equal to the Doppler coefficient. In terms of the transuranic destruction rate per MW(thermal) per effective full-power year, the design is comparable to accelerator-driven systems (ADSs). Long-lived fission products also can be transmuted, albeit at lower incineration efficiency than in ADSs

  5. Minor actinide burning in dedicated lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors

    The destruction of minor actinides (MA) in dedicated burners is of contemporary interest in Europe and Japan because it requires the deployment of smaller number of special transmutation facilities. A major fraction of Pu from spent LWR fuel can be then burned in PWRs (or fast reactors) using dedicated fertile-free fuel assemblies. However, the design of MA burning fast spectrum cores poses significant challenges because of deterioration of key safety parameters, in particular of the coolant void coefficient. This study proposes the concept of an lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE)-cooled dedicated MA burner having metallic fuel (MA-Pu-Zr) and streaming assemblies to attain acceptable coolant void worth performance. It is shown that a large 1800 MWth fertile-free core containing 37 wt% TRU with very high fraction of MA(59 wt%) from LWR spent fuel can be burned in a first cycle for 700 EFPDs with a very small reactivity swing: less than βeff. Moreover, the reactivity void worth is negative for a fully voided core when all surrounding coolant is kept at reference density. However, the core reactivity increases as coolant density falls from the reference value of 10.25 to 6 g/cm3. Because its coolant density coefficient value is less than that of a sodium cooled IFR, the concept provides good potential for the achievement of self-regulation characteristics in unprotected events, provided that small negative fuel temperature feedback can be maintained. (authors)

  6. Plutonium and minor actinides utilization in Thorium molten salt reactor

    Waris, Abdul; Aji, Indarta K.; Novitrian, Kurniadi, Rizal; Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-06-01

    FUJI-12 reactor is one of MSR systems that proposed by Japan. The original FUJI-12 design considers Th/233U or Th/Pu as main fuel. In accordance with the currently suggestion to stay away from the separation of Pu and minor actinides (MA), in this study we evaluated the utilization of Pu and MA in FUJI-12. The reactor grade Pu was employed in the present study as a small effort of supporting THORIMS-NES scenario. The result shows that the reactor can achieve its criticality with the Pu & MA composition in the fuel of 5.96% or more.

  7. Behavior of actinides in the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle

    Courtney, J.C. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Nuclear Science Center; Lineberry, M.J. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Technology Development Div.

    1994-06-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) under development by Argonne National Laboratory uses metallic fuels instead of ceramics. This allows electrorefining of spent fuels and presents opportunities for recycling minor actinide elements. Four minor actinides ({sup 237}Np, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am) determine the waste storage requirements of spent fuel from all types of fission reactors. These nuclides behave the same as uranium and other plutonium isotopes in electrorefining, so they can be recycled back to the reactor without elaborate chemical processing. An experiment has been designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the high-energy neutron spectra of the IFR in consuming these four nuclides and plutonium. Eighteen sets of seven actinide and five light metal targets have been selected for ten day exposure in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 which serves as a prototype of the IFR. Post-irradiation analyses of the exposed targets by gamma, alpha, and mass spectroscopy are used to determine nuclear reaction-rates and neutron spectra. These experimental data increase the authors` confidence in their ability to predict reaction rates in candidate IFR designs using a variety of neutron transport and diffusion programs.

  8. Behavior of actinides in the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) under development by Argonne National Laboratory uses metallic fuels instead of ceramics. This allows electrorefining of spent fuels and presents opportunities for recycling minor actinide elements. Four minor actinides (237Np, 240Pu, 241Am, and 243Am) determine the waste storage requirements of spent fuel from all types of fission reactors. These nuclides behave the same as uranium and other plutonium isotopes in electrorefining, so they can be recycled back to the reactor without elaborate chemical processing. An experiment has been designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the high-energy neutron spectra of the IFR in consuming these four nuclides and plutonium. Eighteen sets of seven actinide and five light metal targets have been selected for ten day exposure in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 which serves as a prototype of the IFR. Post-irradiation analyses of the exposed targets by gamma, alpha, and mass spectroscopy are used to determine nuclear reaction-rates and neutron spectra. These experimental data increase the authors' confidence in their ability to predict reaction rates in candidate IFR designs using a variety of neutron transport and diffusion programs

  9. Actinide behavior in the Integral Fast Reactor. Final project report

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) under development by Argonne National Laboratory uses metallic fuels instead of ceramics. This allows electrorefining of spent fuels and presents opportunities for recycling minor actinide elements. Four minor actinides (237Np, 240Pu, 241Am, and 243Am) determine the waste storage requirements of spent fuel from all types of fission reactors. These nuclides behave the same as uranium and other plutonium isotopes in electrorefining, so they can be recycled back to the reactor without elaborate chemical processing. An experiment has been designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the high-energy neutron spectra of the IFR in consuming these four nuclides and weapons grade plutonium. Eighteen sets of seven actinide and five light metal targets have been selected for seven day exposure in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II which serves as a prototype of the IFR. Post-irradiation analyses of the exposed targets by gamma, alpha, and mass spectroscopy are used to determine nuclear reaction rates and neutron spectra. These experimental data increase the authors confidence in their ability to predict reaction rates in candidate IFR designs using a variety of neutron transport and diffusion programs

  10. PC code STAR. Show transmutation of actinides in reactors

    A program is made named STAR (acronym for Show Transmutation of Actinides in Reactors), which solves analytically the differential equations describing buildup and removal (by decay and transmutation) of nuclides irradiated in a constant neutron flux. The model and algorithm according to which STAR solves the differential equations are explained. Also a short description of the data library is given. STAR is validated with the ORIGEN-S fuel depletion code and runs on IBM compatible PCs and DEC alpha workstations. (orig.)

  11. Sensitivity analysis for actinide production and depletion in fast reactors

    In sensitivity analysis of the actinide production and depletion in fast reactors, a mathematical method of calculating sensitivity coefficients is improved and simplified by combining the time-dependent generalized perturbation technique with the eigenvalue method. Numerical calculations show that the eigenvalue method is well applicable in solving the nuclide chain equation and its adjoint equation and the cylic chains in the decay scheme of the actinides can be interpreted by means of complex eigenvalues. The sensitivity coefficients of actinide production and depletion in a 1000 MWe fast reactor are strongly dependent on the type of Pu fuel used, i.e. Pu fuel from BWR or Pu fuel from the blanket of FBR. The sensitivity coefficients due to variations of capture cross sections, σsub(n,2n) of 238U, lambda sub(β) of 241Pu and lambda sub(α) of 242Cm are especially large. Sensitivity analyses for the 1000 MWe fast reactors show that higher priorily should be given to decay constants of 241Pu and 242Cm, capture cross sections of 237Np, 241Am, 243Am and 242Pu, and fission cross sections of 237Np, 242Pu, 241Am and sup(242m)Am. (author)

  12. Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light Water Reactor/Fast Burner Reactor Fuel Cycles Proposed as Part of the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI)

    A spreadsheet-based 'static equilibrium' economic analysis was performed for three nuclear fuel cycle scenarios, each designed for 100 GWe-years of electrical generation annually: 1) a 'once-through' fuel cycle based on 100% LWRs fueled by standard UO2 fuel assemblies with all used fuel destined for geologic repository emplacement, 2) a 'singletier recycle' scenario involving multiple fast burner reactors (37% of generation) accepting actinides (Pu,Np,Am,Cm) from the reprocessing of used fuel from the uranium-fueled LWR fleet (63% of generation), and 3) a 'two-tier' 'thermal+fast' recycle scenario where co-extracted U,Pu from the reprocessing of used fuel from the uranium-fueled part of the LWR fleet (66% of generation) is recycled once as full-core LWR MOX fuel (8% of generation), with the LWR MOX used fuel being reprocessed and all actinide products from both UO2 and MOX used fuel reprocessing being introduced into the closed fast burner reactor (26% of generation) fuel cycle. The latter two 'closed' fuel cycles, which involve symbiotic use of both thermal and fast reactors, have the advantages of lower natural uranium requirements per kilowatt-hour generated and less geologic repository space per kilowatt-hour as compared to the 'once-through' cycle. The overall fuel cycle cost in terms of $ per megawatt-hr of generation, however, for the closed cycles is 15% (single tier) to 29% (two-tier) higher than for the once-through cycle, based on 'expected values' from an uncertainty analysis using triangular distributions for the unit costs for each required step of the fuel cycle. (The fuel cycle cost does not include the levelized reactor life cycle costs.) Since fuel cycle costs are a relatively small percentage (10 to 20%) of the overall bus-bar cost (LUEC or 'levelized unit electricity cost') of nuclear power generation, this fuel cycle cost increase should not have a highly deleterious effect on the competitiveness of nuclear power. If the reactor life cycle

  13. Conceptual design of minor actinides burner with an accelerator-driven subcritical system.

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-11-04

    In the environmental impact study of the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository, the limit of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for disposal is assessed at 70,000 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM), among which 63,000 MTHM are the projected SNF discharge from U.S. commercial nuclear power plants though 2011. Within the 70,000 MTHM of SNF in storage, approximately 115 tons would be minor actinides (MAs) and 585 tons would be plutonium. This study describes the conceptual design of an accelerator-driven subcritical (ADS) system intended to utilize (burn) the 115 tons of MAs. The ADS system consists of a subcritical fission blanket where the MAs fuel will be burned, a spallation neutron source to drive the fission blanket, and a radiation shield to reduce the radiation dose to an acceptable level. The spallation neutrons are generated from the interaction of a 1 GeV proton beam with a lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) or liquid lead target. In this concept, the fission blanket consists of a liquid mobile fuel and the fuel carrier can be LBE, liquid lead, or molten salt. The actinide fuel materials are dissolved, mixed, or suspended in the liquid fuel carrier. Therefore, fresh fuel can be fed into the fission blanket to adjust its reactivity and to control system power during operation. Monte Carlo analyses were performed to determine the overall parameters of an ADS system utilizing LBE as an example. Steady-state Monte Carlo simulations were studied for three fission blanket configurations that are similar except that the loaded amount of actinide fuel in the LBE is either 5, 7, or 10% of the total volume of the blanket, respectively. The neutron multiplication factor values of the three configurations are all approximately 0.98 and the MA initial inventories are each approximately 10 tons. Monte Carlo burnup simulations using the MCB5 code were performed to analyze the performance of the three conceptual ADS systems. Preliminary burnup analysis shows that all three conceptual ADS

  14. Minor actinides transmutation strategies in sodium fast reactors

    In minor actinides transmutation strategies for fast spectrum reactors, different possibilities regarding the core loading are considered. We study both homogeneous patterns (HOM) with various minor actinides (MA) content values and heterogeneous schemes (HET) with higher percentages of MA (Np, Am and Cm) at the periphery of reactor. We analyze the capability of transmutation of each design and the reactivity coefficients such as the Doppler constant, void worth and the fraction of delayed neutrons. The EVOLCODE2 code is the computational tool used in this study. It is based on MCNPX and ORIGEN/ACAB codes and allows carrying out burn-up calculations to get the isotopic evolution of fuel composition. Among the three strategies studied (HOM 2.5 %, HOM 4% and HET 20 %) for a possible design of a Sodium Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor, the one with better transmutation results is the HOM 4%, which shows higher absolute and relative values (12 Kg-MA/TWe, 29% respectively). Concerning transmutation in blankets with 20% MA content, results show a very little or no transmutation values when considering Np, Am and Cm together, though a positive small value for Np and Am is obtained

  15. Carbide and nitride fuels for advanced burner reactor

    Full text: Under the U.S. fast reactor program, reference and alternative 1000 MWth Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) core concepts were developed using ternary metallic (U-TRU-Zr) and mixed oxide (UO2+TRUO2) fuels. Recently, mixed carbide and nitride fuels have been considered as fast reactor fuels on the basis of their high density, compatibility with coolant, high melting temperature, and excellent thermal conductivity although they are ceramic fuel like a mixed oxide fuel. Thus, the performance of the ABR core loaded with carbide and nitride fuels was evaluated in this study with an expectation that the carbide and nitride fuels can mitigate disadvantages of both metallic and oxide fuels in the ABR: favorable passive safety features in a severe accident compared to the oxide core, a higher discharge burnup compared to the metallic core, and a potential to increase thermal efficiency. All calculations performed in this study were focused on the neutronics characteristics, although the fabrication and irradiation experiences for carbide and nitride fuels are limited and some problems were observed in the reprocessing and irradiation of these fuels. The mixed monocarbide and mixed mononitride fuels were selected as the alternative fuel forms and the ABR core concepts with these fuels were developed based on the reference 1000 MWth ABR core concepts. For consistency, the potential design goals used in the reference ABR core concepts were also employed in this study: a 1000 MWth power rating, medium TRU conversion ratio of ∼0.75, a compact core, one-year operational cycle length at least with a capacity factor of 90%, sufficient shutdown margin with a limited maximum single control assembly fault, and possible use of either metallic or any ceramic fuels in the same core layout. The core layout and outer assembly dimensions of the reference 1000 MWth ABR core were kept, but the intra assembly design parameters were varied to maximize the discharge burnup within the

  16. Analysis of Reactor Deployment Scenarios with Introduction of SFR Breakeven Reactors and Burners Using DANESS Code

    Kim, Young In; Hahn, Do Hee; Won, Byung Chool; Lee, Dong Uk

    2008-01-15

    Using the DANESS code newly employed for future scenario analysis, reactor deployment scenarios with the introduction of sodium cooled fast reactors(SFRs) having different conversion ratios in the existing PWRs dominant nuclear fleet have been analyzed to find the SFR deployment strategy for replacing PWRs with the view of a spent fuel reduction and an efficient uranium utilization through its reuse in a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Descriptions of the DANESS code and how to use are briefly given from the viewpoint of its first application. The use of SFRs and recycling of TRUs by reusing PWR spent fuel leads to the substantial reduction of the amount of PWR spent fuel and environmental burden by decreasing radiotoxicity of high level waste, and a significant improvement on the natural uranium resources utilization. A continuous deployment of burners effectively decreases the amount of PWR spent fuel accumulation, thus lightening the burden for PWR spent fuel management. An introduction of breakeven reactors effectively reduces the uranium demand through producing excess TRU during the operation, thus contributing to a sustainable nuclear power development. With SFR introduction starting in 2040, PWRs will remain as a main power reactor type till 2100 and SFRs will be in support of waste minimization and fuel utilization.

  17. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems

    D. E. Shropshire

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

  18. Concept of fast reactors-plutonium burners and their fuel cycle

    In this report the concept is considered of a closed fuel cycle of nuclear power, consisting of thermal and fast reactors, providing utilization of practically all actinides produced in the nuclear power. The major calculation results and the ways to form fast reactors cores for effective actinides burning are presented. The existing limitations on the fresh fuel composition by heat release and radiation characteristics are given. The calculation studies results on the fuel cycle characteristics at repeated fuel recycling in a system of VVER-1000 and BN-800 types reactors are presented. The calculations were carried out for different type cores of the BN-800 reactor -with oxide fuel of increased enrichment and with fuel without uranium-238, varying the burn-out level and the decay time of spent fuel. (author)

  19. Reducing the impact of used fuel by transmuting actinides in a CANDU reactor

    With world stockpiles of used nuclear fuel increasing, the need to address the long term utilization of this resource is being studied. Many of the transuranic (TRU) actinides in nuclear spent fuel produce decay heat for long durations, resulting in significant nuclear waste management challenges. These actinides can be transmuted to shorter-lived isotopes in CANDU reactors to reduce the decay heat period. Many of the design features of the CANDU reactor make it uniquely adaptable to actinide transmutation. The small, simple fuel bundle facilitates the fabrication and handling of active fuels. Online refueling allows precise management of core reactivity and separate insertion of the actinides and fuel bundles into the core. The high neutron economy of the CANDU reactor results in high TRU destruction to fissile-loading ratio. This paper provides a summary of actinide transmutation in CANDU reactors, including both recent and past activities. The transmutation schemes that are presented reflect several different partitioning schemes and include both homogeneous scenarios in which actinides are uniformly distributed in all fuel bundles in the reactor, as well as heterogeneous scenarios in which dedicated channels in the reactor are loaded with actinide targets and the rest of the reactor is loaded with fuel. (author)

  20. Molten salt related extensions of the SIMMER-III code and its application for a burner reactor

    Molten salt reactors (MSRs) can be used as effective burners of plutonium (Pu) and minor actinides (MAs) from light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. In this paper a study was made to examine the thermal hydraulic behaviour of the conceptual design of the molten salt advanced reactor transmuter (MOSART) [Ignatiev, V., Feynberg, O., Myasnikov, A., Zakirov, R., 2003a. Neutronic properties and possible fuel cycle of a molten salt transmuter. Proceedings of the 2003 ANS/ENS International Winter Meeting (GLOBAL 2003), Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA, USA 16-20 November 2003]. The molten salt fuel is a ternary NaF-LiF-BeF2 system fuelled with ca. 1 mol% typical compositions of transuranium-trifluorides (PuF3, etc.) from light water reactor spent fuel. The MOSART reactor core does not contain graphite structure elements to guide the flow, so the neutron spectrum is rather hard in order to improve the burning performance. Without those structure elements in the core, the molten salt in core flows freely and the flow pattern could be potentially complicated and may affect significantly the fuel temperature distribution in the core. Therefore, some optimizations of the salt flow pattern may be needed. Here, the main attention has been paid to the fluid dynamic simulations of the MOSART core with the code SIMMER-III [Kondo, Sa., Morita, K., Tobita, Y., Shirakawa, K., 1992. SIMMER-III: an advanced computer program for LMFBR severe accident analysis. Proceedings of the ANP' 92, Tokyo, Japan; Kondo, Sa., Tobita, Y., Morita, K., Brear, D.J., Kamiyama, K., Yamano, H., Fujita, S., Maschek, W., Fischer, E.A., Kiefhaber, E., Buckel, G., Hesselschwerdt, E., Flad, M., Costa, P., Pigny, S., 1999. Current status and validation of the SIMMER-III LMFR safety analysis code. Proceedings of the ICONE-7, Tokyo, Japan], which was originally developed for the safety assessment of sodium-cooled fast reactors and recently extended by the authors for the thermo-hydraulic and neutronic models so as to

  1. Lead coolant for the fast reactor-burner with a hard neutron spectrum

    The possibility of the efficiency increasing of the junior actinides burn-up on the account of their fission in the fast reactor by using the Pb-208 lead isotope as a coolant is considered. The calculation relative values of the fission reduction: rates and capture the neutrons by the Np-237, Am-241 and Am-243 nuclei in the fast reactor blanket for different coolants: sodium, lead, lead of natural composition and lead with 100%-Pb-208 content are presented. The radioactivity, induced during one year of the reactor operation and its decay during the time up to 1000 years is calculated for the lead coolants of various isotopic composition

  2. Preliminary Study for Inventories of Minor Actinides in Thorium Molten Salt Reactor

    Lee, Choong Wie; Kim, Hee Reyoung [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    It has different characteristic with the conventional reactors which use a solid fuel. It can continually supply the fuel by online refueling and reprocessing of minor actinides so that those can be separated and eliminated from the reactor. The MSR maintains steady state except initial stage and the reactor becomes stable. In this research, considering online refueling, bubbling and reprocessing, the basic concept for evaluation of the inventory of minor actinide in the molten salt reactor is driven using the Bateman equation. The simulation results, where REM and MCNP code from CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique) applied to the concept equation are analyzed. The analysis of the basic concept was carried out for evaluation of the inventory of the minor actinides in MSR. It was thought that the inventories of the minor actinides should be evaluated by solving the modified Bateman equation due to the MSR characteristic of online refueling, chemical reprocessing and bubbling.

  3. Preliminary Study for Inventories of Minor Actinides in Thorium Molten Salt Reactor

    It has different characteristic with the conventional reactors which use a solid fuel. It can continually supply the fuel by online refueling and reprocessing of minor actinides so that those can be separated and eliminated from the reactor. The MSR maintains steady state except initial stage and the reactor becomes stable. In this research, considering online refueling, bubbling and reprocessing, the basic concept for evaluation of the inventory of minor actinide in the molten salt reactor is driven using the Bateman equation. The simulation results, where REM and MCNP code from CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique) applied to the concept equation are analyzed. The analysis of the basic concept was carried out for evaluation of the inventory of the minor actinides in MSR. It was thought that the inventories of the minor actinides should be evaluated by solving the modified Bateman equation due to the MSR characteristic of online refueling, chemical reprocessing and bubbling

  4. Actinides reduction by recycling in a thermal reactor; Reduccion de actinidos por reciclado en un reactor termico

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Martinez C, E.; Balboa L, H., E-mail: ramon.ramirez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    This work is directed towards the evaluation of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle in which radioactive actinides could be recycled to remove most of the radioactive material; firstly a production reference of actinides in standard nuclear fuel of uranium at the end of its burning in a BWR reactor is established, after a fuel containing plutonium is modeled to also calculate the actinides production in MOX fuel type. Also it proposes a design of fuel rod containing 6% of actinides in a matrix of uranium from the tails of enrichment, then four standard uranium fuel rods are replaced by actinides rods to evaluate the production and transmutation thereof, the same procedure was performed in the fuel type MOX and the end actinide reduction in the fuel was evaluated. (Author)

  5. Ability to burn plutonium and minor actinides. Interest of accelerator driven system compared to critical reactor

    In the frame of the French Act of December 1991, EDF is presently assessing the interest of Acceleration Driven System (ADS) for the Transmutation of the Plutonium and Minor Actinides (MA) produced by its park of nuclear reactors. The studies presented here assess the efficiency of ADS and critical reactors to incinerate Pu and MA (Minor Actinides) and the potential interest of ADS for that purpose. (author)

  6. Build-up and decay of fuel actinides in the fuel cycle of nuclear reactors

    For boiling water reactors, pressurized light-water reactors, pressure-tube-type heavy water reactors, high-temperature gas-cooled reactors, and sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors, uranium fueled and mixed-oxide fueled, each of 1000 MWe, the following have been studied: (1) quantities of plutonium and other fuel actinides built up in the reactor, (2) cooling behaviors of activities of plutonium and other fuel actinides in the spent fuels, and (3) activities of plutonium and other fuel actinides in the high-level reprocessing wastes as a function of storage time. The neutron cross section and decay data of respective actinide nuclides are presented, with their evaluations. For effective utilization of the uranium resources and easy reprocessing and high-level waste management, a thermal reactor must be fueled with uranium; the plutonium produced in a thermal reactor should be used in a fast reactor; and the plutonium produced in the blanket of a fast reactor is more appropriate for a fast reactor than that from a thermal reactor. (auth.)

  7. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed

  8. Economic Analyiss of "Symbiotic" Light Water Reactor/Fast Burner Reactor Fuel Cycles Proposed as Part of the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI)

    Williams, Kent Alan [ORNL; Shropshire, David E. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2009-01-01

    A spreadsheet-based 'static equilibrium' economic analysis was performed for three nuclear fuel cycle scenarios, each designed for 100 GWe-years of electrical generation annually: (1) a 'once-through' fuel cycle based on 100% LWRs fueled by standard UO2 fuel assemblies with all used fuel destined for geologic repository emplacement, (2) a 'single-tier recycle' scenario involving multiple fast burner reactors (37% of generation) accepting actinides (Pu,Np,Am,Cm) from the reprocessing of used fuel from the uranium-fueled LWR fleet (63% of generation), and (3) a 'two-tier' 'thermal+fast' recycle scenario where co-extracted U,Pu from the reprocessing of used fuel from the uranium-fueled part of the LWR fleet (66% of generation) is recycled once as full-core LWR MOX fuel (8% of generation), with the LWR MOX used fuel being reprocessed and all actinide products from both UO2 and MOX used fuel reprocessing being introduced into the closed fast burner reactor (26% of generation) fuel cycle. The latter two 'closed' fuel cycles, which involve symbiotic use of both thermal and fast reactors, have the advantages of lower natural uranium requirements per kilowatt-hour generated and less geologic repository space per kilowatt-hour as compared to the 'once-through' cycle. The overall fuel cycle cost in terms of $ per megawatt-hr of generation, however, for the closed cycles is 15% (single tier) to 29% (two-tier) higher than for the once-through cycle, based on 'expected values' from an uncertainty analysis using triangular distributions for the unit costs for each required step of the fuel cycle. (The fuel cycle cost does not include the levelized reactor life cycle costs.) Since fuel cycle costs are a relatively small percentage (10 to 20%) of the overall busbar cost (LUEC or 'levelized unit electricity cost') of nuclear power generation, this fuel cycle cost increase should not have a

  9. Minor Actinide Transmutation Performance in Fast Reactor Metal Fuel. Isotope Ratio Change in Actinide Elements upon Low-Burnup Irradiation

    Metal fuel alloys containing 5 wt% or less minor actinide (MA) and rare earth (RE) were irradiated in the fast reactor Phénix. After nondestructive postirradiation tests, a chemical analysis of the alloys irradiated for 120 effective full power days was carried out by the inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) technique. From the analysis results, it was determined that the discharged burnups of U-19Pu-10Zr, U-19Pu-10Zr-2MA-2RE, and U-19Pu-10Zr-5MA were 2.17, 2.48, and 2.36 at.%, respectively. Actinide isotope ratio analyses before and after the irradiation experiment revealed that Pu, Am, and Cm nuclides added to U-Pu-Zr alloy and irradiated up to 2.0 - 2.5 at.% burnups in a fast reactor are transmuted properly as predicted by ORIGEN2 calculations. (author)

  10. Actinide recycle potential in the IFR [Integral Fast Reactor

    Rising concern about the greenhouse effect reinforces the need to reexamine the question of a next-generation reactor concept that can contribute significantly toward substitution for fossil-based energy generation. Even with only the nuclear capacity on-line today, world-wide reasonably assured uranium resources would last for only about 50 years. If nuclear is to make a significant contribution, breeding is a fundamental requirement. Uranium resources can then be extended by two orders of magnitude, making nuclear essentially a renewable energy source. The key technical elements of the IFR concept are metallic fuel and fuel cycle technology based on pyroprocessing. Pyroprocessing is radically different from the conventional PUREX reprocessing developed for the LWR oxide fuel. Chemical feasibility of pyroprocessing has been demonstrated. The next major step in the IFR development program will be the full-scale pyroprocessing demonstration to be carried out in conjunction with EBR-II. IFR fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing can also have a dramatic impact on the waste management options, and in particular on the actinide recycling. 6 figs

  11. Minor actinide transmutation in thorium and uranium matrices in heavy water moderated reactors

    The irradiation of Th232 breeds fewer of the problematic minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) than the irradiation of U238. This characteristic makes thorium an attractive potential matrix for the transmutation of these minor actinides, as these species can be transmuted without the creation of new actinides as is the case with a uranium fuel matrix. Minor actinides are the main contributors to long term decay heat and radiotoxicity of spent fuel, so reducing their concentration can greatly increase the capacity of a long term deep geological repository. Mixing minor actinides with thorium, three times more common in the Earth's crust than natural uranium, has the additional advantage of improving the sustainability of the fuel cycle. In this work, lattice cell calculations have been performed to determine the results of transmuting minor actinides from light water reactor spent fuel in a thorium matrix. 15-year-cooled group-extracted transuranic elements (Np, Pu, Am, Cm) from light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel were used as the fissile component in a thorium-based fuel in a heavy water moderated reactor (HWR). The minor actinide (MA) transmutation rates, spent fuel activity, decay heat and radiotoxicity, are compared with those obtained when the MA were mixed instead with natural uranium and taken to the same burnup. Each bundle contained a central pin containing a burnable neutron absorber whose initial concentration was adjusted to have the same reactivity response (in units of the delayed neutron fraction β) for coolant voiding as standard NU fuel. (authors)

  12. Fundamental experiments for FBX burner linear fusion reactor core with FBX plasma flow

    FBX is a production and confinement scheme of a spherical torus that carries a strong plasma current with both toroidal and poloidal components. On the other hand HI-I is a fundamental experiment on moving plasma. With two of them, a new type of fusion reactor scheme FBX-III BURNER (III) is established. In this paper, the fundamental results of the first two types of experiments are introduced to find out a total plasma behavior of the long term project. 9 refs., 5 figs

  13. Plutonium and minor actinide utilisation in a pebble-bed high temperature reactor

    This paper contains results of the analysis of the pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled PUMA reactor loaded with plutonium and minor actinide (Pu/MA) fuel. Starting from knowledge and experience gained in the Euratom FP5 projects HTR-N and HTR-N1, this study aims at demonstrating the potential of high temperature reactors to utilize or transmute Pu/MA fuel. The work has been performed within the Euratom FP6 project PUMA. A number of different fuel types and fuel configurations have been analyzed and compared with respect to incineration performance and safety-related reactor parameters. The results show the excellent plutonium and minor actinide burning capabilities of the high temperature reactor. The largest degree of incineration is attained in the case of an HTR fuelled by pure plutonium fuel as it remains critical at very deep burnup of the discharged pebbles. Addition of minor actinides to the fuel leads to decrease of the achievable discharge burnup and therefore smaller fraction of actinides incinerated during reactor operation. The inert-matrix fuel design improves the transmutation performance of the reactor, while the 'wallpaper' fuel does not have advantage over the standard fuel design in this respect. After 100 years of decay following the fuel discharge, the total amount of actinides remains almost unchanged for all of the fuel types considered. Among the plutonium isotopes, only the amount of Pu-241 is reduced significantly due to its relatively short half-life. (authors)

  14. Plutonium and minor actinide utilisation in a pebble-bed high temperature reactor

    Petrov, B. Y.; Kuijper, J. C.; Oppe, J.; De Haas, J. B. M. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-07-01

    This paper contains results of the analysis of the pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled PUMA reactor loaded with plutonium and minor actinide (Pu/MA) fuel. Starting from knowledge and experience gained in the Euratom FP5 projects HTR-N and HTR-N1, this study aims at demonstrating the potential of high temperature reactors to utilize or transmute Pu/MA fuel. The work has been performed within the Euratom FP6 project PUMA. A number of different fuel types and fuel configurations have been analyzed and compared with respect to incineration performance and safety-related reactor parameters. The results show the excellent plutonium and minor actinide burning capabilities of the high temperature reactor. The largest degree of incineration is attained in the case of an HTR fuelled by pure plutonium fuel as it remains critical at very deep burnup of the discharged pebbles. Addition of minor actinides to the fuel leads to decrease of the achievable discharge burnup and therefore smaller fraction of actinides incinerated during reactor operation. The inert-matrix fuel design improves the transmutation performance of the reactor, while the 'wallpaper' fuel does not have advantage over the standard fuel design in this respect. After 100 years of decay following the fuel discharge, the total amount of actinides remains almost unchanged for all of the fuel types considered. Among the plutonium isotopes, only the amount of Pu-241 is reduced significantly due to its relatively short half-life. (authors)

  15. Recycle of LWR [Light Water Reactor] actinides to an IFR [Integral Fast Reactor

    A large quantity of actinide elements is present in irradiated Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel that is stored throughout the world. Because of the high fission-to-capture ratio for the transuranium (TRU) elements with the high-energy neutrons in the metal-fueled Integral Fast Reactor (IFR), that reactor can consume these elements effectively. The stored fuel represents a valuable resource for an expanding application of fast power reactors. In addition, removal of the TRU elements from the spent LWR fuel has the potential for increasing the capacity of a high-level waste facility by reducing the heat loads and increasing the margin of safety in meeting licensing requirements. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing a pyrochemical process, which is compatible with the IFR fuel cycle, for the recovery of TRU elements from LWR fuel. The proposed product is a metallic actinide ingot, which can be introduced into the electrorefining step of the IFR process. The major objective of the LWR fuel recovery process is high TRU element recovery, with decontamination a secondary issue, because fission product removal is accomplished in the IFR process. The extensive pyrochemical processing studies of the 1960s and 1970s provide a basis for the design of possible processes. Two processes were selected for laboratory-scale investigation. One is based on the Salt Transport Process studied at ANL for mixed-oxide fast reactor fuel, and the other is based on the blanket processing studies done for ANL's second Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-2). This paper discusses the two processes and is a status report on the experimental studies. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Minor Actinide Burning in Thermal Reactors. A Report by the Working Party on Scientific Issues of Reactor Systems

    The actinides (or actinoids) are those elements in the periodic table from actinium upwards. Uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) are two of the principal elements in nuclear fuel that could be classed as major actinides. The minor actinides are normally taken to be the triad of neptunium (Np), americium (Am) and curium (Cm). The combined masses of the remaining actinides (i.e. actinium, thorium, protactinium, berkelium, californium, einsteinium and fermium) are small enough to be regarded as very minor trace contaminants in nuclear fuel. Those elements above uranium in the periodic table are known collectively as the transuranics (TRUs). The operation of a nuclear reactor produces large quantities of irradiated fuel (sometimes referred to as spent fuel), which is either stored prior to eventual deep geological disposal or reprocessed to enable actinide recycling. A modern light water reactor (LWR) of 1 GWe capacity will typically discharge about 20-25 tonnes of irradiated fuel per year of operation. About 93-94% of the mass of uranium oxide irradiated fuel is comprised of uranium (mostly 238U), with about 4-5% fission products and ∼1% plutonium. About 0.1-0.2% of the mass is comprised of neptunium, americium and curium. These latter elements accumulate in nuclear fuel because of neutron captures, and they contribute significantly to decay heat loading and neutron output, as well as to the overall radio-toxic hazard of spent fuel. Although the total minor actinide mass is relatively small - approximately 20-25 kg per year from a 1 GWe LWR - it has a disproportionate impact on spent fuel disposal, and thus the longstanding interest in transmuting these actinides either by fission (to fission products) or neutron capture in order to reduce their impact on the back end of the fuel cycle. The combined masses of the trace actinides actinium, thorium, protactinium, berkelium and californium in irradiated LWR fuel are only about 2 parts per billion, which is far too low for

  17. Comparative study of fast critical burner reactors and subcritical accelerator driven systems and the impact on transuranics inventory in a regional fuel cycle

    Research highlights: → Double-strata fuel cycle has a potential to minimize transuranics mass in Europe. → European Minor Actinides legacy can be reduced down to 0 before the end of century. → 40% higher capacity needed to burn MA for fast critical reactor then for EFIT fleet. → Na cooled fast reactor cores with high content of MA and low CR have been assessed. → Fast critical and ADS-EFIT reactors show comparable MA transmutation performance. - Abstract: In the frame of Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) strategies, many solutions have been proposed in order to burn transuranics (TRU) discharged from conventional thermal reactors in fast reactor systems. This is due to the favourable feature of neutron fission to capture cross section ratio in a fast neutron spectrum for most TRU. However the majority of studies performed use the Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS), due to their potential flexibility to utilize various fuel types, loaded with significant amounts of TRU having very different Minor Actinides (MA) over Pu ratios. Recently the potential of low conversion ratio critical fast reactors has been rediscovered, with very attractive burning capabilities. In the present paper the burning performances of two systems are directly compared: a sodium cooled critical fast reactor with a low conversion ratio, and the European lead cooled subcritical ADS-EFIT reactor loaded with fertile-free fuel. Comparison is done for characteristics of both the intrinsic core and the regional fuel cycle within a European double-strata scenario. Results of the simulations, obtained by use of French COSI6 code, show comparable performance and confirm that in a double strata fuel cycle the same goals could be achieved by deploying dedicated fast critical or ADS-EFIT type reactors. However the critical fast burner reactor fleet requires ∼30-40% higher installed power then the ADS-EFIT one. Therefore full comparative assessment and ranking can be done only by a

  18. Advanced Reactor Technology Options for Utilization and Transmutation of Actinides in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Renewed interest in the potential of nuclear energy to contribute to a sustainable worldwide energy mix is strengthening the IAEA's statutory role in fostering the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, in particular the need for effective exchanges of information and collaborative research and technology development among Member States on advanced nuclear power technologies (Articles III-A.1 and III-A.3). The major challenges facing the long term development of nuclear energy as a part of the world's energy mix are improvement of the economic competitiveness, meeting increasingly stringent safety requirements, adhering to the criteria of sustainable development, and public acceptability. The concern linked to the long life of many of the radioisotopes generated from fission has led to increased R and D efforts to develop a technology aimed at reducing the amount of long lived radioactive waste through transmutation in fission reactors or accelerator driven hybrids. In recent years, in various countries and at an international level, more and more studies have been carried out on advanced and innovative waste management strategies (i.e. actinide separation and elimination). Within the framework of the Project on Technology Advances in Fast Reactors and Accelerator Driven Systems (http://www.iaea.org/inisnkm/nkm/aws/fnss/index.html), the IAEA initiated a number of activities on utilization of plutonium and transmutation of long lived radioactive waste, accelerator driven systems, thorium fuel options, innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles, non-conventional nuclear energy systems, and fusion/fission hybrids. These activities are implemented under the guidance and with the support of the IAEA Nuclear Energy Department's Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR). This publication compiles the analyses and findings of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Studies of Advanced Reactor Technology Options for Effective Incineration of Radioactive Waste (2002

  19. Gas core reactors for actinide transmutation and breeder applications. Annual report

    This work consists of design power plant studies for four types of reactor systems: uranium plasma core breeder, uranium plasma core actinide transmuter, UF6 breeder and UF6 actinide transmuter. The plasma core systems can be coupled to MHD generators to obtain high efficiency electrical power generation. A 1074 MWt UF6 breeder reactor was designed with a breeding ratio of 1.002 to guard against diversion of fuel. Using molten salt technology and a superheated steam cycle, an efficiency of 39.2% was obtained for the plant and the U233 inventory in the core and heat exchangers was limited to 105 Kg. It was found that the UF6 reactor can produce high fluxes (10 to the 14th power n/sq cm-sec) necessary for efficient burnup of actinide. However, the buildup of fissile isotopes posed severe heat transfer problems. Therefore, the flux in the actinide region must be decreased with time. Consequently, only beginning-of-life conditions were considered for the power plant design. A 577 MWt UF6 actinide transmutation reactor power plant was designed to operate with 39.3% efficiency and 102 Kg of U233 in the core and heat exchanger for beginning-of-life conditions

  20. Fabrication of fuel and recycling of minor actinides in fast reactors

    Somers, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Fuels for future fast reactors will not only produce energy, but they must also actively contribute to the minimisation of long lived wastes produced by these, and other reactor systems. The fuels must incorporate minor actinides (MA = Np, Am, Cm) for neutron transmutation into short lived isotopes. Within Europe oxide fuels are favoured. Transmutation can be considered in homogeneous or heterogeneous reactor recycle modes (i.e. in fuels or targets, respectively). Fabrication of such fuels...

  1. Possibilities to optimize sodium cooled fast reactors with respect to Actinide burning

    The optimization of fast reactor cores with respect to the destruction of Minor Actinides starts from the question, whether the neutron spectrum can be hardened by changing the core geometry, core size or fuel type. Spectrum hardening would increase the destruction (fission) of actinides compared to their further production due to capture processes. Reference point of this study is the European Fast Reactor EFR. It is shown that a flat core geometry with metal fuel would offer an optimum and that small power units, i. e. smaller cores are most favourable

  2. Design of an Actinide Burning, Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor That Produces Low Cost Electricity

    C. Davis; S. Herring; P. MacDonald; K. McCarthy; V. Shah; K. Weaver (INEEL); J. Buongiorno; R. Ballinger; K. Doyoung; M. Driscoll; P. Hejzler; M. Kazimi; N. Todreas (MIT)

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the suitability of lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The goal is to identify and analyze the key technical issues in core neutronics, materials, thermal-hydraulics, fuels, and economics associated with the development of this reactor concept. The choice of lead-bismuth for the reactor coolant is an actinide burning fast reactor offers enhanced safety and reliability. The advantages of lead-bismuth over sodium as a coolant are related to the following material characteristics: chemical inertness with air and water; higher atomic number; lower vapor pressure at operating temperatures; and higher boiling temperature. Given the status of the field, it was agreed that the focus of this investigation in the first two years will be on the assessment of approaches to optimize core and plant arrangements in order to provide maximum safety and economic potential in this type of reactor.

  3. Prospects of subcritical molten salt reactor for minor actinides incineration in closed fuel cycle

    Alekseev, Pavel N.; Balanin, Andrey L.; Dudnikov, Anatoly A.; Fomichenko, Petr A.; Nevinitsa, Vladimir A.; Frolov, Aleksey A.; Lubina, Anna S.; Sedov, Aleksey A.; Subbotin, Aleksey S.; Blandinsky, Viktor Yu. [Nuclear Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    A subcritical molten salt reactor is proposed for minor actinides (separated from spent fuel VVER-1000 light water reactor) incineration and for {sup 233}U conversion from {sup 232}Th. Here the subcritical molten salt reactor with fuel composition of heavy nuclide fluorides in molten LiF - NaF - KF salt and with external neutron source, based on 1 GeV proton accelerator and molten salt cooled tungsten target is considered. The paper presents the results of parametrical analysis of equilibrium nuclide composition of molten salt reactor with minor actinides feed in dependence of core dimensions, average neutron flux and external neutron source intensity. Reactor design is defined; requirements to external neutron source are posed; heavy nuclides equilibrium and fuel cycle main parameters are calculated.

  4. Performance comparison of metallic, actinide burning fuel in lead-bismuth and sodium cooled fast reactors

    Various methods have been proposed to ''incinerate'' or ''transmute'' the current inventory of transuranic waste (TRU) that exits in spent light-water-reactor (LWR) fuel, and weapons plutonium. These methods include both critical (e.g., fast reactors) and non-critical (e.g., accelerator transmutation) systems. The work discussed here is part of a larger effort at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to investigate the suitability of lead and lead-alloy cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The neutronics of non fertile fuel loaded with 20 or 30-wt% light water reactor (LWR) plutonium plus minor actinides for use in a lead-bismuth cooled fast reactor are discussed in this paper, with an emphasis on the fuel cycle life and isotopic content. Calculations show that the average actinide burn rate is similar for both the sodium and lead-bismuth cooled cases ranging from -1.02 to -1.16 g/MWd, compared to a typical LWR actinide generation rate of 0.303 g/MWd. However, when using the same parameters, the sodium-cooled case went subcritical after 0.2 to 0.8 effective full power years, and the lead-bismuth cooled case ranged from 1.5 to 4.5 effective full power years. (author)

  5. Performance comparison of metallic, actinide burning fuel in lead-bismuth and sodium cooled fast reactors

    Weaver, K.D.; Herring, J.S.; Macdonald, P.E. [Idaho National Engineering and Environment Lab., Advanced Nuclear Energy, Idaho (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Various methods have been proposed to ''incinerate'' or ''transmute'' the current inventory of transuranic waste (TRU) that exits in spent light-water-reactor (LWR) fuel, and weapons plutonium. These methods include both critical (e.g., fast reactors) and non-critical (e.g., accelerator transmutation) systems. The work discussed here is part of a larger effort at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to investigate the suitability of lead and lead-alloy cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The neutronics of non fertile fuel loaded with 20 or 30-wt% light water reactor (LWR) plutonium plus minor actinides for use in a lead-bismuth cooled fast reactor are discussed in this paper, with an emphasis on the fuel cycle life and isotopic content. Calculations show that the average actinide burn rate is similar for both the sodium and lead-bismuth cooled cases ranging from -1.02 to -1.16 g/MWd, compared to a typical LWR actinide generation rate of 0.303 g/MWd. However, when using the same parameters, the sodium-cooled case went subcritical after 0.2 to 0.8 effective full power years, and the lead-bismuth cooled case ranged from 1.5 to 4.5 effective full power years. (author)

  6. Performance Comparison of Metallic, Actinide Burning Fuel in Lead-Bismuth and Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors

    Weaver, Kevan Dean; Herring, James Stephen; Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2001-04-01

    Various methods have been proposed to “incinerate” or “transmutate” the current inventory of trans-uranic waste (TRU) that exits in spent light-water-reactor (LWR) fuel, and weapons plutonium. These methods include both critical (e.g., fast reactors) and non-critical (e.g., accelerator transmutation) systems. The work discussed here is part of a larger effort at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to investigate the suitability of lead and lead-alloy cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The neutronics of non-fertile fuel loaded with 20 or 30-wt% light water reactor (LWR) plutonium plus minor actinides for use in a lead-bismuth cooled fast reactor are discussed in this paper, with an emphasis on the fuel cycle life and isotopic content. Calculations show that the average actinide burn rate is similar for both the sodium and lead-bismuth cooled cases ranging from -1.02 to -1.16 g/MWd, compared to a typical LWR actinide generation rate of 0.303 g/MWd. However, when using the same parameters, the sodium-cooled case went subcritical after 0.2 to 0.8 effective full power years, and the lead-bismuth cooled case ranged from 1.5 to 4.5 effective full power years.

  7. The role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor in the future of nuclear power

    Hollaway, W.R.; Lidsky, L.M.; Miller, M.M.

    1990-12-01

    A preliminary assessment is made of the potential role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) in the future of nuclear power. The development of a usable actinide burning strategy could be an important factor in the acceptance and implementation of a next generation of nuclear power. First, the need for nuclear generating capacity is established through the analysis of energy and electricity demand forecasting models which cover the spectrum of bias from anti-nuclear to pro-nuclear. The analyses take into account the issues of global warming and the potential for technological advances in energy efficiency. We conclude, as do many others, that there will almost certainly be a need for substantial nuclear power capacity in the 2000--2030 time frame. We point out also that any reprocessing scheme will open up proliferation-related questions which can only be assessed in very specific contexts. The focus of this report is on the fuel cycle impacts of actinide burning. Scenarios are developed for the deployment of future nuclear generating capacity which exploit the advantages of actinide partitioning and actinide burning. Three alternative reactor designs are utilized in these future scenarios: The Light Water Reactor (LWR); the Modular Gas-Cooled Reactor (MGR); and the Integral Fast Reactor (FR). Each of these alternative reactor designs is described in some detail, with specific emphasis on their spent fuel streams and the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Four separation and partitioning processes are utilized in building the future nuclear power scenarios: Thermal reactor spent fuel preprocessing to reduce the ceramic oxide spent fuel to metallic form, the conventional PUREX process, the TRUEX process, and pyrometallurgical reprocessing.

  8. The role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor in the future of nuclear power

    A preliminary assessment is made of the potential role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) in the future of nuclear power. The development of a usable actinide burning strategy could be an important factor in the acceptance and implementation of a next generation of nuclear power. First, the need for nuclear generating capacity is established through the analysis of energy and electricity demand forecasting models which cover the spectrum of bias from anti-nuclear to pro-nuclear. The analyses take into account the issues of global warming and the potential for technological advances in energy efficiency. We conclude, as do many others, that there will almost certainly be a need for substantial nuclear power capacity in the 2000--2030 time frame. We point out also that any reprocessing scheme will open up proliferation-related questions which can only be assessed in very specific contexts. The focus of this report is on the fuel cycle impacts of actinide burning. Scenarios are developed for the deployment of future nuclear generating capacity which exploit the advantages of actinide partitioning and actinide burning. Three alternative reactor designs are utilized in these future scenarios: The Light Water Reactor (LWR); the Modular Gas-Cooled Reactor (MGR); and the Integral Fast Reactor (FR). Each of these alternative reactor designs is described in some detail, with specific emphasis on their spent fuel streams and the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Four separation and partitioning processes are utilized in building the future nuclear power scenarios: Thermal reactor spent fuel preprocessing to reduce the ceramic oxide spent fuel to metallic form, the conventional PUREX process, the TRUEX process, and pyrometallurgical reprocessing

  9. Comparative analysis of the efficiency of minor actinide burning in the accelerator-driven system and critical reactors within various scenarios for closing the nuclear fuel cycle

    The choice of efficient types of systems for the utilization of long-lived radioactive wastes (RW) of nuclear power is one of the highest priority concerns in nuclear sphere. The accelerator-driven systems (ADS) with heavy liquid metal coolant (HLMC) and fast neutron spectrum are considered among the most efficient nuclear devices for burning minor actinides (MA). Results of numerical studies for the optimization of characteristics of an ADS-system with lead-bismuth coolant for burning minor actinides produced in the open fuel cycle of thermal reactors have been summarized. Criteria of efficiency of MA burning have been determined (time of transmutation, etc.). It has been shown that neutronic characteristics ensuring nuclear safety in an analogous critical reactor - MA burner - are significantly inferior vs. fast critical reactor with UO2 fuel. In order to define whether or not it is justified to use ADS in different scenarios for the nuclear fuel cycle closure, a comparative study has been fulfilled on radiation and technological characteristics of spent fuel from subcritical reactor ADS and on fuel from other nuclear facilities. The VVER-1000 reactor and the variant of fast reactor with lead-bismuth coolant were chosen for the comparison. SVBR-100 reactor can be considered as a prototype of the latter facility. Two options of closing the fuel cycle have been analyzed: the variant with recycling U,Pu without MA, the variant with total recycling of U and all transuranic isotopes (Pu, Np, Am, Cm). The differences have been defined in terms of specific values of radioactivity, residual heat release, intensity of sources of neutrons and gamma-radiation of spent fuel. (author)

  10. Experimental investigations of actinide release from coated fuel particles for high-temperature reactors

    The migrational behaviour of actinides in the coated fuel particles proposed for high-temperature reactors is investigated experimentally. Data are described in the framework of the diffusion model. The experimental procedures are presented and the necessary computer codes are discussed. The diffusion coefficients of the actinides - plutonium, americium and curium - as well as of the fission product cesium are derived from the experimental data by a nonlinear least squares fit procedure and are presented in the form of Arrhenius lines D = Do esup(-Q/RT) for U(Th)-O2, HTI-PyC and SiC. (orig.)

  11. Georgia Institute of Technology research on the Gas Core Actinide Transmutation Reactor (GCATR)

    Clement, J. D.; Rust, J. H.; Schneider, A.; Hohl, F.

    1976-01-01

    The program reviewed is a study of the feasibility, design, and optimization of the GCATR. The program is designed to take advantage of initial results and to continue work carried out on the Gas Core Breeder Reactor. The program complements NASA's program of developing UF6 fueled cavity reactors for power, nuclear pumped lasers, and other advanced technology applications. The program comprises: (1) General Studies--Parametric survey calculations performed to examine the effects of reactor spectrum and flux level on the actinide transmutation for GCATR conditions. The sensitivity of the results to neutron cross sections are to be assessed. Specifically, the parametric calculations of the actinide transmutation are to include the mass, isotope composition, fission and capture rates, reactivity effects, and neutron activity of recycled actinides. (2) GCATR Design Studies--This task is a major thrust of the proposed research program. Several subtasks are considered: optimization criteria studies of the blanket and fuel reprocessing, the actinide insertion and recirculation system, and the system integration. A brief review of the background of the GCATR and ongoing research is presented.

  12. Fertile-Free Fast Lead-Cooled Incinerators for Efficient Actinide Burning

    Fertile-free fast lead-cooled modular reactors are proposed as efficient incinerators of plutonium and minor actinides (MAs) for application to advanced fuel cycles devoted to transmutation. Two concepts are presented: (1) an actinide burner reactor, designed to incinerate mostly plutonium and some MAs, and (2) a minor actinide burner reactor, devoted to burning mostly minor actinides and some plutonium. These transuranics are loaded in a fertile-free Zr-based metallic fuel to maximize the incineration rate. Both designs feature streaming fuel assemblies that enhance neutron leakage to achieve favorable neutronic feedback and a double-entry control rod system that reduces reactivity perturbations during seismic events and flattens the axial power profile. A detailed neutronic analysis shows that both designs have favorable neutronic characteristics and reactivity feedback mechanisms that yield passive safety features comparable to those of the Integral Fast Reactor. A safety analysis presents the response of the burners to anticipated transients without scram on the basis of (1) the integral parameter approach and (2) simulations of thermal-hydraulic accident scenario conditions. It is shown that both designs have large thermal margins that lead to safe shutdown without structural damage to the core components for a large spectrum of unprotected transients. Furthermore, the actinide destruction rates are comparable to those of the accelerator transmutation of waste concept, and a fuel cycle cost analysis shows the potential for economical accomplishment of the transmutation mission compared to other proposed actinide-burning options

  13. Build up of actinides in burnt fuel rods of the ET-RR-1 reactor

    The content concentrations of actinides are calculated as a function of operating reactor regime and cooling time at different percentage of fuel burn-up. The build-up transmutation equations of actinides content in an irradiated fuel are solved numerically .A computer code BAC was written to operate on a PC computer to provide the required calculations. The fuel element of 10% 235U enrichment of ET-RR-1 reactor was taken as an example for calculations using the BAC code. The results are compared with other calculations for the ET-RR-1 fuel rod. An estimation of fissile build-up content of a proposed new fuel of 20% 235U enrichment for ET-RR-1 reactor is given. The sensitivity coefficients of build-up plutonium concentrations as a function of cross-section data uncertainties are also calculated. (author)

  14. Build-Up Of Actinides In Irradiated Fuel Rods Of The ETRR-1 Reactor

    The content concentrations of actinides are calculated as a function of operating reactor regime and cooling time at different percentage of fuel burn-up. The build-up transmutation equations of actinides content in an irradiated fuel are solved numerically .A computer code BAC was written to operate on PC computer to provide the required calculations. The fuel element of 10% 235U enrichment of ETRR-1 reactor was taken as an example for calculations using BAC code. The results are compared with other calculations for the ETRR-1 fuel rod. An estimation of fissile build-up content of a proposed new fuel of 20% '235U enrichment for ETRR-1 reactor is given. The sensitivity coefficients of build-up plutonium concentrations as a function of cross-section data uncertainties are also calculated

  15. Georgia Institute of Technology research on the gas core actinide transmutation reactor (GCATR)

    The Gas Core Actinide Transmutation Reactor (GCATR) offers several advantages including (1) the gaseous state of the fuel may reduce problems of processing and recycling fuel and wastes, (2) high neutron fluxes are achievable, (3) the possibility of using a molten salt in the blanket may also simplify the reprocessing problem and permit breeding, (4) the spectrum can be varied from fast to thermal by increasing the moderation in the blanket so that the trade-off of critical mass versus actinide and fission product burnup can be studied for optimization, and (5) the U233-Th cycle, which can be used, appears superior to the U235-Pu cycle in regard to actinide burnup. The program at Georgia Tech is a study of the feasibility, design, and optimization of the GCATR

  16. The effects of actinide based fuels on incremental cross sections in a Candu reactor

    The reprocessing of spent fuel such as the extraction of actinide materials for use in mixed oxide fuels is a key component of reducing the end waste from nuclear power plant operations. Using recycled spent fuels in current reactors is becoming a popular option to help close the fuel cycle. In order to ensure safe and consistent operations in existing facilities, the properties of these fuels must be compatible with current reactor designs. This paper examines the features of actinide mixed oxide fuel, TRUMOX, in a CANDU reactor. Specifically, the effect of this fuel design on the incremental cross sections related to the use of adjuster rods is investigated. The actinide concentrations studied in this work were based on extraction from thirty year cooled spent fuel and mixed with natural uranium to yield a MOX fuel of 4.75% actinide by weight. The incremental cross sections were calculated using the DRAGON neutron transport code. The results for the actinide fuel were compared to those for standard natural uranium fuel and for a slightly enriched (1% U-235) fuel designed to reduce void reactivity. Adjuster reactivity effect calculations and void reactivity simulations were also performed. The impact of the adjuster on reactivity decreased by as much as 56% with TRUMOX fuel while the CVR was reduced by 71% due to the addition of central burnable poison. The incremental cross sections were largely affected by the use of the TRUMOX fuel primarily due to its increased level of fissile material (five times that of NU). The largest effects are in the thermal neutron group where the ΣT value is increased by 46.7%, the Σny) values increased by 13.0% and 9.9%. The value associated with thermal fission, υΣf, increased by 496.6% over regular natural uranium which is expected due to the much higher reactivity of the fuel. (author)

  17. Clays at the natural nuclear reactor at Bangombe, Gabon: migration of actinides

    Clay minerals were examined from the natural nuclear reactor at Bangombe. The clay mineralogy of the reactor facies is: illite, kaolinite and minor chlorite (FB formation); illite with chlorite and kaolinite in hydrothermal veins (argile de pile); illite and chlorite (reactor core); and (i) chlorite and kaolinite ± illite ± smectite or (ii) illite in the underlying FA formation. Illite crystallinity values are in general highest in rocks that experienced the highest temperatures during reactor operation. Chlorite chemistry varies with respect to position around the reactor: both di-tri and trioctahedral chlorites are present in hydrothermal veins within the argile de pile, dioctahedral chlorites are present in the FA formation within cm of the reactor core, trioctahedral chlorites are present within a meter of the reactor. Chemical data for the argile de pile and the FB formation suggest that formation of the former unit occurred as a result of thermal metamorphism of the FB pelites, as opposed to large-scale dissolution of the sandstones of the FA formation. Autoradiography is used to study the sorptive characteristics of the clays for actinides. The results show that actinide sorption varies in the order: chlorite > illite ≅ kaolinite. (orig.)

  18. Comparison of actinides and fission products recycling scheme with the normal plutonium recycling scheme in fast reactors

    Salahuddin Asif; Iqbal Masood

    2013-01-01

    Multiple recycling of actinides and non-volatile fission products in fast reactors through the dry re-fabrication/reprocessing atomics international reduction oxidation process has been studied as a possible way to reduce the long-term potential hazard of nuclear waste compared to that resulting from reprocessing in a wet PUREX process. Calculations have been made to compare the actinides and fission products recycling scheme with the normal plutonium recycling scheme in a fast reactor....

  19. Evaluation of actinide partitioning and transmutation in light-water reactors

    Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) studies were made to evaluate the feasibility of multicycle transmutation of plutonium and the minor actinides (MAs) in light-water reactors (LWRs). Results showed that significant repository benefits, cost reductions, proliferation resistance, and effective use of facilities can be obtained. Key advantages are shown to be made possible by processing 30-year-decayed spent fuel rather than the more traditional 5-year-decayed fuel. (authors)

  20. Minor actinides impact on basic safety parameters of medium-sized sodium-cooled fast reactor

    Darnowski Piotr; Uzunow Nikolaj

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of the influence of addition of minor actinides (MA) to the fast reactor fuel on the most important safety characteristics was performed. A special emphasis was given to the total control rods worth in order to describe qualitatively and quantitatively its change with MA content. All computations were performed with a homogeneous assembly model of modified BN-600 sodium-cooled fast reactor core with 0, 3 and 6% of MA. A model was prepared for the Monte Carlo neutron transport code...

  1. Plutonium and minor actinides recycle in equilibrium fuel cycles of pressurized water reactor

    A study on plutonium and minor actinides (MA) recycle in equilibrium fuel cycles of pressurized water reactors (PWR) has been performed. The calculation results showed that the enrichment and the required amount of natural uranium decrease significantly with increasing number of confined plutonium and MA when uranium is discharged from the reactor. However, when uranium is totally confined, the enrichment becomes extremely high. The recycle of plutonium and MA together with discharging uranium can reduce the radio-toxicity of discharged heavy metal (HM) waste to become less than that of loaded uranium. (author)

  2. The technical and economic impact of minor actinide transmutation in a sodium fast reactor

    Within the frame work of the French National Act of June 28, 2006 pertaining to the management of high activity, long-lived radioactive waste, one of the proposed processes consists in transmuting the Minor Actinides (MA) in the radial blankets of a Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). With this option, we may assess the additional cost of the reactor by comparing two SFR designs, one with no Minor Actinides, and the other involving their transmutation. To perform this exercise, we define a reference design called SFRref, of 1500 MWe that is considered to be representative of the Reactor System. The SFRref mainly features a pool architecture with three pumps, six loops with one steam generator per loop. The reference core is the V2B core that was defined by the CEA a few years ago for the Reactor System. This architecture is designed to meet current safety requirements. In the case of transmutation, for this exercise we consider that the fertile blanket is replaced by two rows of assemblies having either 20% of Minor Actinides or 20% of Americium. The assessment work is performed in two phases. - The first consists in identifying and quantifying the technical differences between the two designs: the reference design without Minor Actinides and the design with Minor Actinides. The main differences are located in the reactor vessel, in the fuel handling system and in the intermediate storage area for spent fuel. An assessment of the availability is also performed so that the impact of the transmutation can be known. - The second consists in making an economic appraisal of the two designs. This work is performed using the CEA's SEMER code. The economic results are shown in relative values. For a transmutation of 20% of MA in the assemblies (S/As) and a hypothesis of 4 kW allowable for the washing device, there is a large external storage demanding a very long cooling time of the S/As. In this case, the economic impact may reach 5% on the capital part of the Levelized Unit

  3. Human factors and safety issues associated with actinide retrieval from spent light water reactor fuel assemblies

    A major problem in environmental restoration and waste management is the disposition of used fuel assemblies from the many light water reactors in the United States, which present a radiation hazard to those whose job is to dispose of them, with a similar threat to the general environment associated with long-term storage in fuel repositories around the country. Actinides resident in the fuel pins as a result of their use in reactor cores constitute a significant component of this hazard. Recently, the Department of Energy has initiated an Actinide Recycle Program to study the feasibility of using pyrochemical (molten salt) processes to recover actinides from the spent fuel assemblies of commercial reactors. This project concerns the application of robotics technology to the operation and maintenance functions of a plant whose objective is to recover actinides from spent fuel assemblies, and to dispose of the resulting hardware and chemical components from this process. Such a procedure involves a number of safety and human factors issues. The purpose of the project is to explore the use of robotics and artificial intelligence to facilitate accomplishment of the program goals while maintaining the safety of the humans doing the work and the integrity of the environment. This project will result in a graphic simulation on a Silicon Graphics workstation as a proof of principle demonstration of the feasibility of using robotics along with an intelligent operator interface. A major component of the operator-system interface is a hybrid artificial intelligence system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which combines artificial neural networks and an expert system into a hybrid, self-improving computer-based system interface. 10 refs

  4. Comparison of actinide production in traveling wave and pressurized water reactors

    Osborne, A.G.; Smith, T.A.; Deinert, M.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The geopolitical problems associated with civilian nuclear energy production arise in part from the accumulation of transuranics in spent nuclear fuel. A traveling wave reactor is a type of breed-burn reactor that could, if feasible, reduce the overall production of transuranics. In one possible configuration, a cylinder of natural or depleted uranium would be subjected to a fast neutron flux at one end. The neutrons would transmute the uranium, producing plutonium and higher actinides. Under the right conditions, the reactor could become critical, at which point a self-stabilizing fission wave would form and propagate down the length of the reactor cylinder. The neutrons from the fission wave would burn the fissile nuclides and transmute uranium ahead of the wave to produce additional fuel. Fission waves in uranium are driven largely by the production and fission of {sup 239}Pu. Simulations have shown that the fuel burnup can reach values greater than 400 MWd/kgIHM, before fission products poison the reaction. In this work we compare the production of plutonium and minor actinides produced in a fission wave to that of a UOX fueled light water reactor, both on an energy normalized basis. The nuclide concentrations in the spent traveling wave reactor fuel are computed using a one-group diffusion model and are verified using Monte Carlo simulations. In the case of the pressurized water reactor, a multi-group collision probability model is used to generate the nuclide quantities. We find that the traveling wave reactor produces about 0.187 g/MWd/kgIHM of transuranics compared to 0.413 g/MWd/kgIHM for a pressurized water reactor running fuel enriched to 4.95 % and burned to 50 MWd/kgIHM. (authors)

  5. Comparison of actinide production in traveling wave and pressurized water reactors

    The geopolitical problems associated with civilian nuclear energy production arise in part from the accumulation of transuranics in spent nuclear fuel. A traveling wave reactor is a type of breed-burn reactor that could, if feasible, reduce the overall production of transuranics. In one possible configuration, a cylinder of natural or depleted uranium would be subjected to a fast neutron flux at one end. The neutrons would transmute the uranium, producing plutonium and higher actinides. Under the right conditions, the reactor could become critical, at which point a self-stabilizing fission wave would form and propagate down the length of the reactor cylinder. The neutrons from the fission wave would burn the fissile nuclides and transmute uranium ahead of the wave to produce additional fuel. Fission waves in uranium are driven largely by the production and fission of 239Pu. Simulations have shown that the fuel burnup can reach values greater than 400 MWd/kgIHM, before fission products poison the reaction. In this work we compare the production of plutonium and minor actinides produced in a fission wave to that of a UOX fueled light water reactor, both on an energy normalized basis. The nuclide concentrations in the spent traveling wave reactor fuel are computed using a one-group diffusion model and are verified using Monte Carlo simulations. In the case of the pressurized water reactor, a multi-group collision probability model is used to generate the nuclide quantities. We find that the traveling wave reactor produces about 0.187 g/MWd/kgIHM of transuranics compared to 0.413 g/MWd/kgIHM for a pressurized water reactor running fuel enriched to 4.95 % and burned to 50 MWd/kgIHM. (authors)

  6. On a fast reactor cycle scheme that incorporates a thoria-based minor actinide-containing cermet fuel

    A fast reactor cycle scheme that incorporates a thoria-based minor actinide-containing cermet fuel is given. The present cermet fuel consists of an oxide solid solution of Th and minor actinides and Mo-inert matrix. It has been proposed as a high-performance device that can enhance minor actinide incineration in a fast reactor cycle. It is used in an independent small sub-cycle, whereby dedicated cycle technologies are adopted. Two-step reprocessing process was proposed for the present cermet fuel; it consists of a pre-removal of Mo-inert matrix and an actinide recovery. A preliminary test for the pre-removal of Mo-inert matrix was carried out using a surrogate cermet fuel. Burnup characteristics of a fast reactor core loaded with the cermet fuel were investigated by using neutronic calculation codes. It was revealed that a heterogeneous composition of Mo-inert in inner and outer cores may lead to an effective transmutation of minor actinides and a flattered power density. It was concluded that the present cermet fuel was potentially promising as a high-performance incineration device of minor actinides for fast reactors. (author)

  7. Neutronics design of transmutation of minor actinides in a fusion reactor

    A concept of transmutation of Minor Actinide (MA) nuclear waste based on the spherical torus (ST) tokamak reactor, FDTR, is put forward. A set of plasma parameter was decided suitable for the ST transmuting nuclear waste blanket. The 2-D neutron transport code TWODANT, 3-D Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B and 1-D burn-up calculation code BISON3.0 and their associated data libraries are used to calculate the transmutation rate, the energy multiplication factor and the tritium breeding rate of the transmutation blanket. The calculation results of the system parameters and the actinide series isotopes for different operation times are also given. The engineering feasibility of the center-post of FDTR is investigated. Relevant results are also given. A preliminary neutronics calculation based on ST transmutation blanket shows that proposed system has high transmuting ability for MA wastes

  8. Neutron-based measurements for nondestructive assay of minor actinides produced in nuclear power reactors

    Stewart, J.E.; Eccleston, G.W.; Ensslin, N.; Cremers, T.L.; Foster, L.A.; Menlove, H.O.; Rinard, P.M.

    1996-10-01

    Because of their impacts on long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste and their value as nuclear fuels, measurement and accounting of the minor actinides produced in nuclear power reactors are becoming significant issues. This paper briefly reviews the commercial nuclear fuel cycle with emphasis on reprocessing plants and key measurement points therein. Neutron signatures and characteristics are compared and contrasted for special nuclear materials (SNMs) and minor actinides (MAs). The paper focuses on application of neutron-based nondestructive analysis (NDA) methods that can be extended for verification of MAs. We describe current IAEA methods for NDA of SNMs and extension of these methods to satisfy accounting requirements for MAs in reprocessing plant dissolver solutions, separated products, and high-level waste. Recommendations for further systems studies and development of measurement methods are also included.

  9. Neutron-based measurements for nondestructive assay of minor actinides produced in nuclear power reactors

    Because of their impacts on long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste and their value as nuclear fuels, measurement and accounting of the minor actinides produced in nuclear power reactors are becoming significant issues. This paper briefly reviews the commercial nuclear fuel cycle with emphasis on reprocessing plants and key measurement points therein. Neutron signatures and characteristics are compared and contrasted for special nuclear materials (SNMs) and minor actinides (MAs). The paper focuses on application of neutron-based nondestructive analysis (NDA) methods that can be extended for verification of MAs. We describe current IAEA methods for NDA of SNMs and extension of these methods to satisfy accounting requirements for MAs in reprocessing plant dissolver solutions, separated products, and high-level waste. Recommendations for further systems studies and development of measurement methods are also included

  10. Assessment of sensitivity of neutron-physical parameters of fast neutron reactor to purification of reprocessed fuel from minor actinides

    Cherny, V. A.; Kochetkov, L. A.; Nevinitsa, A. I.

    2013-12-01

    The work is devoted to computational investigation of the dependence of basic physical parameters of fast neutron reactors on the degree of purification of plutonium from minor actinides obtained as a result of pyroelectrochemical reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel and used for manufacturing MOX fuel to be reloaded into the reactors mentioned. The investigations have shown that, in order to preserve such important parameters of a BN-800 type reactor as the criticality, the sodium void reactivity effect, the Doppler effect, and the efficiency of safety rods, it is possible to use the reprocessed fuel without separation of minor actinides for refueling (recharging) the core.

  11. Minor Actinide Recycle in Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors Using Heterogeneous Targets

    This paper investigates the plausible design of transmutation target assemblies for minor actinides (MA) in Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR). A heterogeneous recycling strategy is investigated, whereby after each reactor pass, un-burned MAs from the targets are blended with MAs produced by the driver fuel and additional MAs from Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF). A design iteration methodology was adopted for customizing the core design, target assembly design and matrix composition design. The overall design was constrained against allowable peak or maximum in-core performances. While respecting these criteria, the overall design was adjusted to reduce the total number of assemblies fabricated per refueling cycle. It was found that an inert metal-hydride MA-Zr-Hx target matrix gave the highest transmutation efficiency, thus allowing for the least number of targets to be fabricated per reactor cycle.

  12. Minor Actinide Recycle in Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors Using Heterogeneous Targets

    Samuel Bays; Pavel Medvedev; Michael Pope; Rodolfo Ferrer; Benoit Forget; Mehdi Asgari

    2009-04-01

    This paper investigates the plausible design of transmutation target assemblies for minor actinides (MA) in Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR). A heterogeneous recycling strategy is investigated, whereby after each reactor pass, un-burned MAs from the targets are blended with MAs produced by the driver fuel and additional MAs from Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF). A design iteration methodology was adopted for customizing the core design, target assembly design and matrix composition design. The overall design was constrained against allowable peak or maximum in-core performances. While respecting these criteria, the overall design was adjusted to reduce the total number of assemblies fabricated per refueling cycle. It was found that an inert metal-hydride MA-Zr-Hx target matrix gave the highest transmutation efficiency, thus allowing for the least number of targets to be fabricated per reactor cycle.

  13. Proceedings of the Workshop on Experimental and theoretical problems around actinides for future reactors

    Since the two last decades, in the framework of general researches on future reactors, strong efforts have been devoted to improve the quantity and quality of nuclear data. Indeed, in order to improve safety margins and fuel optimization, but also to develop new kind of reactors or fuel cycles, accurate nuclear data are mandatory. At the end of the twentieth century, nuclear data bases did not reach the required quality level to be used in future reactor simulations. Therefore, both experimentalists and theoreticians, in the framework of several European research programs (HINDAS, NUDATRA, ANDES, CHANDA...), have tried to make the situation better. New sets of precise data measurements concerning fission, capture, (n,xn),..., reaction cross sections for a large variety of nuclei have been initiated. From evaluation point of view, the JEFF project has also improved the quality of nuclear data bases for several nuclei. In parallel, on the theoretical side, progress has also been made concerning cross section modeling in a wide range of energy (eV to GeV). The goal was to provide theoretical models with a good predictive power to feed data bases where experimental data are still missing and where the measurement is too complex. In this context, for example, a new nuclear reaction code TALYS has been developed. Collaboration between experimentalists, theoreticians and evaluators are then of strong interest to make progress. The number of problems to be solved covers various fields of nuclear reactions such as fission, capture or inelastic scattering. In order to avoid too large an audience we have decided, as a first step, to focus on inelastic scattering on actinides. Experimentally, three main methods exist to measure the total inelastic cross section: activation, detection of the emitted neutrons and prompt-gamma spectroscopy. This last method is, nevertheless, dependent on theoretical models since it provides (n,xn γ) cross sections and not the total inelastic

  14. Physics studies of higher actinide consumption in an LMR

    Hill, R.N.; Wade, D.C.; Fujita, E.K.; Khalil, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    The core physics aspects of the transuranic burning potential of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) are assessed. The actinide behavior in fissile self-sufficient IFR closed cycles of 1200 MWt size is characterized, and the transuranic isotopics and risk potential of the working inventory are compared to those from a once-through LWR. The core neutronic performance effects of rare-earth impurities present in the recycled fuel are addressed. Fuel cycle strategies for burning transuranics from an external source are discussed, and specialized actinide burner designs are described. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Limitations of actinide recycle and waste disposal consequences

    The paper emphasizes the impact of Light Water Reactor - Mixed Oxides introduction on the subsequent actinide management and fate of reprocessed and depleted uranium. The spent fuel from LWR-MOX contains in principle 75% of the initially produced plutonium. This new source term has to be considered together with the minor actinides from the conventional reprocessing. Subsequent LWR-MOX reprocessing in the first step in a very long term Pu + minor actinides management. Recycling of Pu + minor actinides in fast reactors to significantly reduce the Pu and minor actinides inventory (e.g. a factor of 10) is a very slow process which requires the development and operation of a large park of actinide burner reactors during an extended period of time. The overall feasibility of the P and T option will greatly depend on the massive introduction during the next century of fast neutron reactors as a replacement to the present LWR generation of nuclear power plants. (authors). 11 refs., 6 tabs., 2 figs

  16. Comparison of actinides and fission products recycling scheme with the normal plutonium recycling scheme in fast reactors

    Salahuddin Asif

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple recycling of actinides and non-volatile fission products in fast reactors through the dry re-fabrication/reprocessing atomics international reduction oxidation process has been studied as a possible way to reduce the long-term potential hazard of nuclear waste compared to that resulting from reprocessing in a wet PUREX process. Calculations have been made to compare the actinides and fission products recycling scheme with the normal plutonium recycling scheme in a fast reactor. For this purpose, the Karlsruhe version of isotope generation and depletion code, KORIGEN, has been modified accordingly. An entirely novel fission product yields library for fast reactors has been created which has replaced the old KORIGEN fission products library. For the purposes of this study, the standard 26 groups data set, KFKINR, developed at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany, has been extended by the addition of the cross-sections of 13 important actinides and 68 most important fission products. It has been confirmed that these 68 fission products constitute about 95% of the total fission products yield and about 99.5% of the total absorption due to fission products in fast reactors. The amount of fissile material required to guarantee the criticality of the reactor during recycling schemes has also been investigated. Cumulative high active waste per ton of initial heavy metal is also calculated. Results show that the recycling of actinides and fission products in fast reactors through the atomics international reduction oxidation process results in a reduction of the potential hazard of radioactive waste.

  17. Fast Reactor Systems and Innovative Fuels for Minor Actinides Homogeneous Recycling

    This work is focused on the performance of critical fast reactor systems aimed at the transmutation of minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) homogeneously dispersed in the MOX driver fuel. In particular, the paper deals with two scenarios in the 2050 time horizon, at first evaluating an extension of once-through fuel cycle strategy, hence introducing fast reactors in a closed fuel cycle strategy beyond 2030. The synergistic use of the DESAE and NFCSS scenario codes permitted to evaluate key indicators for natural resources usage, waste management, proliferation issues, and fuel cycle infrastructures needs. The paper aims at discussing the sustainability of a high development of nuclear energy to promote a transition to a low-carbon energy future. Finally, the results of scenarios analysis are discussed in the light of the ongoing studies moving ahead in the development of innovative fuels for minor actinides transmutation (e.g., PELGRIMM EU projects), where ENEA is actively involved on the track of related past activities. (author)

  18. PUMA - plutonium and minor actinides management in thermal high-temperature reactors

    The PUMA project, a Specific Targeted Research Project (STREP) of the European Union EURATOM 6. Framework Program, is mainly aimed at providing additional key elements for the utilisation and transmutation of plutonium and minor actinides in contemporary and future (high temperature) gas-cooled (HTR) reactor designs. The project runs from September 1, 2006 until August 31, 2009. The investigation on core physics aims at optimising the coated particle (CP) fuel and reactor characteristics, and assuring nuclear stability and safety of a Pu/Ma (minor actinides) HTR core. New CP designs will be explored in order to withstand very high burn-ups and obtain optimal adaptation for disposal after irradiation. In particular, helium production in Pu and MA-based fuel will be assessed and supported by experiments. Fuel irradiation performance codes, developed and used by several organisations, will permit convergence on optimized design criteria. The impact of the introduction of Pu/MA fuel on the fuel cycle and future energy mix will be assessed

  19. Minor actinides impact on basic safety parameters of medium-sized sodium-cooled fast reactor

    Darnowski Piotr

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the influence of addition of minor actinides (MA to the fast reactor fuel on the most important safety characteristics was performed. A special emphasis was given to the total control rods worth in order to describe qualitatively and quantitatively its change with MA content. All computations were performed with a homogeneous assembly model of modified BN-600 sodium-cooled fast reactor core with 0, 3 and 6% of MA. A model was prepared for the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP5 for fresh fuel in the beginning-of-life (BOL state. Additionally, some other parameters, such as Doppler constant, sodium void reactivity, delayed neutron fraction, neutron fluxes and neutron spectra distribution, were computed and their change with MA content was investigated. Study indicates that the total control rods worth (CRW decreases with increasing MA inventory in the fuel and confirms that the addition of MA has a negative effect on the delayed neutron fraction.

  20. On the management of minor actinides. From sub-critical to critical reactors

    In the frame of the current activities on the Minor Actinides (MA) management, the European Lead cooled fast SYstem concept, called ELSY and developed in ENEA in the wrapper less design option, was considered a potential candidate for TRU recycle. Significant MA transmutation rate is observed when the loaded MA amount is significantly higher than their 'equilibrium concentrations'. It is of interest the investigation of the transmutation capabilities of this fast critical systems in comparison with the EFIT sub - critical system capabilities which has been designed from the beginning to maximize the MA transmutation rate. In this context the studies of the MA transmutation capabilities of the ELSY reactor are reasonable and also justified, even though the ELSY reactor hasn't been designed nor optimised to enhance the MA transmutation. The main goal of this analysis is the collection of the 'physical knowledge' concerning the MA transmutation process. (author)

  1. Physical mechanism analysis of burnup actinide composition in light water reactor MOX fuel and its application to uncertainty evaluation

    Highlights: • We discuss physical mechanisms for burnup actinide compositions in LWR’s MOX fuel. • Mechanisms of 244Cm and 238Pu productions are analyzed in detail with sensitivity. • We can evaluate the indirect effect on actinide productions by nuclear reactions. • Burnup sensitivity is applied to uncertainty evaluation of nuclide production. • Actinides can be categorized into patterns according to a burnup sensitivity trend. - Abstract: In designing radioactive waste management and decommissioning facilities, understanding the physical mechanisms for burnup actinide composition is indispensable to satisfy requirements for its validity and reliability. Therefore, the uncertainty associated with physical quantities, such as nuclear data, needs to be quantitatively analyzed. The present paper illustrates an analysis methodology to investigate the physical mechanisms of burnup actinide composition with nuclear-data sensitivity based on the generalized depletion perturbation theory. The target in this paper is the MOX fuel of the light water reactor. We start with the discussion of the basic physical mechanisms for burnup actinide compositions using the reaction-rate flow chart on the burnup chain. After that, the physical mechanisms of the productions of Cm-244 and Pu-238 are analyzed in detail with burnup sensitivity calculation. Conclusively, we can identify the source of actinide productions and evaluate the indirect influence of the nuclear reactions if the physical mechanisms of burnup actinide composition are analyzed using the reaction-rate flow chart on the burnup chain and burnup sensitivity calculation. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of the burnup sensitivity coefficients in an application to determine the priority of accuracy improvement in nuclear data in combination with the covariance of the nuclear data. In addition, the target actinides and reactions are categorized into patterns according to a sensitivity trend

  2. Fabrication and Pre-irradiation Characterization of a Minor Actinide and Rare Earth Containing Fast Reactor Fuel Experiment for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Timothy A. Hyde

    2012-06-01

    The United States Department of Energy, seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter lived fission products, thereby decreasing the volume of material requiring disposal and reducing the long-term radiotoxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. This transmutation of the long lived actinides plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium can be accomplished by first separating them from spent Light Water Reactor fuel using a pyro-metalurgical process, then reprocessing them into new fuel with fresh uranium additions, and then transmuted to short lived nuclides in a liquid metal cooled fast reactor. An important component of the technology is developing actinide-bearing fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium isotopes that meet the stringent requirements of reactor fuels and materials.

  3. Advanced Burner Reactor with Breed-and-Burn Thorium Blankets for Improved Economics and Resource Utilization

    Greenspan, Ehud [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-11-04

    This study assesses the feasibility of designing Seed and Blanket (S&B) Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) to generate a significant fraction of the core power from radial thorium fueled blankets that operate on the Breed-and-Burn (B&B) mode without exceeding the radiation damage constraint of presently verified cladding materials. The S&B core is designed to maximize the fraction of neutrons that radially leak from the seed (or “driver”) into the subcritical blanket and reduce neutron loss via axial leakage. The blanket in the S&B core makes beneficial use of the leaking neutrons for improved economics and resource utilization. A specific objective of this study is to maximize the fraction of core power that can be generated by the blanket without violating the thermal hydraulic and material constraints. Since the blanket fuel requires no reprocessing along with remote fuel fabrication, a larger fraction of power from the blanket will result in a smaller fuel recycling capacity and lower fuel cycle cost per unit of electricity generated. A unique synergism is found between a low conversion ratio (CR) seed and a B&B blanket fueled by thorium. Among several benefits, this synergism enables the very low leakage S&B cores to have small positive coolant voiding reactivity coefficient and large enough negative Doppler coefficient even when using inert matrix fuel for the seed. The benefits of this synergism are maximized when using an annular seed surrounded by an inner and outer thorium blankets. Among the high-performance S&B cores designed to benefit from this unique synergism are: (1) the ultra-long cycle core that features a cycle length of ~7 years; (2) the high-transmutation rate core where the seed fuel features a TRU CR of 0.0. Its TRU transmutation rate is comparable to that of the reference Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) with CR of 0.5 and the thorium blanket can generate close to 60% of the core power; but requires only one sixth of the reprocessing and

  4. Heavy coolant fast neutron reactor BRUS-150 for minor actinides burning and U-233 build-up

    The present paper deals with the calculational research into the performance of fast reactor BRUS-150 cooled with liquid metal coolant eutectic lead-bismuth alloy with reference to minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) transmutation and isotopic pure U 233 build up. (authors). 10 refs., 2 figs

  5. Characterization of actinide physics specimens for the US/UK joint experiment in the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor

    The United States and the United Kingdom are engaged in a joint research program in which samples of the higher actinides are irradiated in the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor in Scotland. The purpose of the porogram is (1) to study the materials behavior of selected higher actinide fuels and (2) to determine the integral cross sections of a wide variety of the higher actinide isotopes. Samples of the actinides are incorporated in fuel pins inserted in the core. For the fuel study, the actinides selected are 241Am and 244Cm in the form of Am2O3, Cm2O3, and Am6Cm(RE)7O21, where (RE) represents a mixture of lanthanides. For the cross-section determinations, the samples are milligram quantities of actinide oxides of 248Cm, 246Cm, 244Cm, 243Cm, 243Am, 241Am, 244Pu, 242Pu, 241Pu, 240Pu, 239Pu, 238Pu, 237Np, 238U, 236U, 235U, 234U, 233U, 232Th, 230Th, and 231Pa encapsulated in vanadium. Coincident with the irradiations, neutron flux and energy spectral measurements are made with vanadium-encapsulated dosimeter materials located within the same fuel pins

  6. Fuel reprocessing of the fast molten salt reactor: actinides et lanthanides extraction

    The fuel reprocessing of the molten salt reactor (Gen IV concept) is a multi-steps process in which actinides and lanthanides extraction is performed by a reductive extraction technique. The development of an analytic model has showed that the contact between the liquid fuel LiF-ThF4 and a metallic phase constituted of Bi-Li provide firstly a selective and quantitative extraction of actinides and secondly a quantitative extraction of lanthanides. The control of this process implies the knowledge of saline phase properties. Studies of the physico-chemical properties of fluoride salts lead to develop a technique based on potentiometric measurements to evaluate the fluoro-acidity of the salts. An acidity scale was established in order to classify the different fluoride salts considered. Another electrochemical method was also developed in order to determine the solvation properties of solutes in fluoride F- environment (and particularly ThF4 by F-) in reductive extraction technique, a metallic phase is also involved. A method to prepare this phase was developed by electro-reduction of lithium on a bismuth liquid cathode in LiCl-LiF melt. This technique allows to accurately control the molar fraction of lithium introduced into the liquid bismuth, which is a main parameter to obtain an efficient extraction. (author)

  7. FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL

    Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

    2009-03-10

    The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: 1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs 2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs 3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs 4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs.

  8. Actinide isotopes compositions and neutrons emission rate calculations for irradiated research reactors fuel

    the availability of burn-up data is an essential first step in any systematic approach to the enhancement of safety, economics and performance of research reactors. A computer program has been designed to solve the system of equations describing the depletion, decay and production of uranium, plutonium and transplutonium nuclides. monte Carlo code was used to calculate the effective one group microscopic cross sections averaged over ETRR-1 fuel cell. the compositions of actinide isotopes, burn-up and neutrons emission rate have been calculated as a function of irradiation time and cooling time. results indicate that the amount of plutonium produced and neutrons emission rate are strongly dependent on the fuel burn-up

  9. FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL

    The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: (1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs; (2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs; (3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs; and (4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs

  10. Measurement and accounting of the minor actinides produced in nuclear power reactors

    Because of their value as nuclear fuels and their impact on long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste, measurement and accounting for minor actinides (MAs) produced in nuclear power reactors are becoming significant issues. This report attempts to put the issues in perspective by reviewing the commercial nuclear fuel cycle with emphasis on reprocessing plants and key measurement points therein. Radiation signatures and characteristics are compared and contrasted for special nuclear materials (SNMs) and MAs. Also, inventories and relative amounts of SNMs and MAs are generally described for irradiated nuclear fuel and reprocessing plants. The bulk of the report describes appropriate measurement technologies, capabilities, and development needs to satisfy material accounting requirements for MAs, with emphasis on adaptation of current technologies. Recommendations for future systems studies and development of measurement methods are also included. 38 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs

  11. Measurement and accounting of the minor actinides produced in nuclear power reactors

    Stewart, J.E.; Walton, R.B.; Phillips, J.R.; Hsue, S.T.; Eccleston, G.W.; Menlove, H.O.; Davidson, J.M.; Stanbro, W.D.

    1996-01-01

    Because of their value as nuclear fuels and their impact on long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste, measurement and accounting for minor actinides (MAs) produced in nuclear power reactors are becoming significant issues. This report attempts to put the issues in perspective by reviewing the commercial nuclear fuel cycle with emphasis on reprocessing plants and key measurement points therein. Radiation signatures and characteristics are compared and contrasted for special nuclear materials (SNMs) and MAs. Also, inventories and relative amounts of SNMs and MAs are generally described for irradiated nuclear fuel and reprocessing plants. The bulk of the report describes appropriate measurement technologies, capabilities, and development needs to satisfy material accounting requirements for MAs, with emphasis on adaptation of current technologies. Recommendations for future systems studies and development of measurement methods are also included. 38 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  12. Actinides in liquid waste formed in the regeneration of nuclear fuel from a VVER-1000 reactor

    In the radiochemical reprocessing of spent fuel from nuclear reactors, a considerable amount of liquid, solid, and gaseous waste is formed; this waste is potentially dangerous to humans and requires the development of special and complex technological techniques for its localization and reliable long-term storage. The most hazardous are liquid wastes of high specific activity - water-tailings solutions obtained in the first cycle of extraction after the removal of uranium and plutonium. These solutions contain more than 99.9% of all the other transuranic elements - isotopes of neptunium, americium, and curium. Where necessary, some fission products and actinides may be removed from wastes of high specific activity for subsequent use. The quantity, composition, and activity of these wastes varies within broad limits, depending on the type and power of the reactor, the initial nuclide composition of the fuel, and its specific energy yield, the regeneration technology, and other factors. The aim of the present work is to study some radiation characteristics of the wastes of high specific activity formed in the radiochemical reprocessing of the fuel from a VVER-1000 water-cooled, water-moderated reactor

  13. Plutonium and minor actinides management in thermal high - temperature reactors - the EU FP6 project puma

    The High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (HTR) can fulfil a very useful niche for the purposes of Pu and Minor Actinide (MA) incineration due to its unique and unsurpassed safety features, as well as to the attractive incentives offered by the nature of the coated particle (CP) fuel. No European reactor of this type is currently available, but there has been, and still is, considerable interest internationally. Decisions to construct such a reactor in China and in South Africa have already been made or are about to be made. Apart from the unique and unsurpassed safety features offered by this reactor type, the nature of the CP fuel offers a number of attractive characteristics. In particular, it can withstand burn-ups far beyond that in either LWR or FR systems. Demonstrations as high as 75% FIMA have been achieved. The coated particle itself offers significantly improved proliferation resistance, and finally with a correct choice of the kernel composition, it can be a very effective support for direct geological disposal of the fuel. The overall objective of the PUMA project, a Specific Targeted Research Project (STREP) within the European Union 6th Framework (EU FP6), is to investigate the possibilities for the utilisation and transmutation of plutonium and especially minor actinides in contemporary and future (high temperature) gas-cooled reactor designs, which are promising tools for improving the sustainability of the nuclear fuel cycle. This contributes to the reduction of Pu and MA stockpiles, and also to the development of safe and sustainable reactors for CO2-free energy generation. A number of important issues concerning the use of Pu and MA in gas-cooled reactors have already been dealt with in other projects, or are being treated in ongoing projects, e.g. as part of EU FP6. However, further steps are required to demonstrate the potential of HTRs as Pu/MA transmuters based on realistic/feasible designs of CP Pu/MA fuel and the PUMA focuses on necessary

  14. Fuel cycle analysis of TRU or MA burner fast reactors with variable conversion ratio using a new algorithm at equilibrium

    Salvatores, Massimo [CEA Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Argonne National Laboratory, NE Division, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: massimo.salvatores@cea.fr; Chabert, Christine [CEA Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Fazio, Concetta [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Hill, Robert [Argonne National Laboratory, NE Division, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Peneliau, Yannick; Slessarev, Igor [CEA Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Yang, Won Sik [Argonne National Laboratory, NE Division, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) strategies assessment and implementation play a key role in the definition of advanced fuel cycles, in order to insure both sustainability and waste minimization. Several options are under study worldwide, and their impact on core design and associated fuel cycles are under investigation, to offer a rationale to down selection and to streamline efforts and resources. Interconnected issues like fuel type, minor actinide content, conversion ratio values, etc. need to be understood and their impact quantified. Then, from a practical point of view, studies related to advanced fuel cycles require a considerable amount of analysis to assess performances both of the reactor cores and of the associated fuel cycles. A physics analysis should provide a sound understanding of major trends and features, in order to provide guidelines for more detailed studies. In this paper, it is presented an improved version of a generalization of the Bateman equation that allows performing analysis at equilibrium for a large number of systems. It is shown that the method reproduces very well the results obtained with full depletion calculations. The method is applied to explore the specific issue of the features of the fuel cycle parameters related to fast reactors with different fuel types, different conversion ratios (CR) and different ratios of Pu over minor actinide (Pu/MA) in the fuel feed. As an example of the potential impact of such analysis, it is shown that for cores with CR below {approx}0.8, the increase of neutron doses and decay heat can represent a significant drawback to implement the corresponding reactors and associated fuel cycles.

  15. Fuel cycle analysis of TRU or MA burner fast reactors with variable conversion ratio using a new algorithm at equilibrium

    Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) strategies assessment and implementation play a key role in the definition of advanced fuel cycles, in order to insure both sustainability and waste minimization. Several options are under study worldwide, and their impact on core design and associated fuel cycles are under investigation, to offer a rationale to down selection and to streamline efforts and resources. Interconnected issues like fuel type, minor actinide content, conversion ratio values, etc. need to be understood and their impact quantified. Then, from a practical point of view, studies related to advanced fuel cycles require a considerable amount of analysis to assess performances both of the reactor cores and of the associated fuel cycles. A physics analysis should provide a sound understanding of major trends and features, in order to provide guidelines for more detailed studies. In this paper, it is presented an improved version of a generalization of the Bateman equation that allows performing analysis at equilibrium for a large number of systems. It is shown that the method reproduces very well the results obtained with full depletion calculations. The method is applied to explore the specific issue of the features of the fuel cycle parameters related to fast reactors with different fuel types, different conversion ratios (CR) and different ratios of Pu over minor actinide (Pu/MA) in the fuel feed. As an example of the potential impact of such analysis, it is shown that for cores with CR below ∼0.8, the increase of neutron doses and decay heat can represent a significant drawback to implement the corresponding reactors and associated fuel cycles.

  16. Inert matrix fuel concept for the rapid incineration of minor actinides harmonious with a fast reactor cycle system

    We proposed a fast reactor cycle concept that incorporates inert matrix fuels as a high-performance device for rapid incineration of minor actinides and a harmonious system with the existing fast reactor cycle technologies. R and D of minor actinides containing advanced fuels for use in fast reactors is described in relation to inert matrix fuels with MgO, Mo and Si3N4. As related technologies, burn-up characteristics of a fast reactor core loaded with the inert matrix fuel with MgO and Mo were analyzed, mainly in terms of core criticality. Fabrication tests of inert matrix fuels with MgO, Mo and Si3N4 were done by a practical process that could be adapted to the presently-used commercial manufacturing technology. Preliminary investigations for the solubility of inert matrix fuels to the HNO3 were carried out for the evaluation of applicability to existing reprocessing technology. This paper describes a part of our efforts towards the establishment of a fast reactor cycle that incorporates the minor actinides containing inert matrix fuels. (author)

  17. A walkthrough of the Copenhagen atomics waste burner design

    This talk will give an introduction on Copenhagen Atomics and then elaborate on Copenhagen Atomics major objectives, which is to build thorium molten salt reactors (MSR) on an assembly line preferably with the reactor core fitted in a 40 foot shipping container. The first model will be 50 MWt and it will start on a 78% LiF-22% ThF4 salt, mixed with plutonium and actinides from spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Over decades 233U in the salt will increase and eventually help to burn out long lived actinides. The plan is to locate these waste burners at the site of existing Light Water Reactors (LWR) plants to avoid SNF transport, avoid approval of new sites and take advantage of the security and power grid infrastructures. The talk will allow the audience to understand similarities and differences between the Copenhagen Atomics Waste Burner and other MSRs such as LFTR and IMSR. The main objective of Copenhagen Atomics is to convince the public that it is possible to build a machine (MSR), which can burn many of the long lived actinides out of SNF and reduce the storage time from 100.000+ years to 300 years, while at the same time produce enough energy to pay for the process and decommissioning. The heavy water cooled thorium reactor is feasible to be introduced by using Pu recovered from spent fuel of LWR, keeping continuity with current LWR infrastructure. This thorium reactor can be operated as sustainable energy supplier and also MA transmuter to realize future society with less long-lived nuclear waste. (author)

  18. Regenerative burner

    Davies, T.E.; Quinn, D.E.; Watson, J.E.

    1986-08-05

    A regenerative burner is described operable in fire and flue modes comprising: a burner shell having first and second internal chambers, the first chamber being disposed on the flame axis of the burner and the second chamber surrounding the radial perimeter of the first chamber; a gas permeable annular regenerative bed separating the first and second chambers such that gas flow between the first and second chambers must travel through the regenerative bed in a generally radial direction with respect to the flame axis; means for supplying combustion air to the second chamber when the burner is in the fire mode and for exhausting the products of combustion from the second chamber when the burner is in the flue mode; and means for supplying fuel in the vicinity of the flame axis for mixing with combustion air to support combustion when the burner is in the fire mode.

  19. Regenerative burner

    Gitman, G.M.

    1990-05-08

    This patent describes a method of combusting fuel in a furnace having a pair of regenerative burners, each burner having a combustion chamber. It comprises: supplying fuel and oxygen alternatively to each burner to create alternating firing burners wherein the oxygen is supplied from two sources providing first and second oxidizing gases having different oxygen concentrations and simultaneously alternating the application of negative pressure to the remaining non-firing burner to recover heat from flue gases exhausted by the regenerative bed of the non-firing burner to be used further to preheat at least part of the oxygen being supplied to the firing burner; mixing the fuel with a fraction of the oxygen under substoichiometric combustion condition to create products of incomplete combustion to form a hot, luminous flame core containing partially pyrolized fuel; and mixing the partially pyrolyzed fuel with a remaining fraction of the oxygen to complete combustion of the pyrolized fuel; and controlling the total flow of fuel and oxygen supplied to each burner to provide each burner with a desired flame stoichiometry.

  20. Numerical modelling of the CHEMREC black liquor gasification process. Conceptual design study of the burner in a pilot gasification reactor

    Marklund, Magnus

    2001-02-01

    The work presented in this report is done in order to develop a simplified CFD model for Chemrec's pressurised black liquor gasification process. This process is presently under development and will have a number of advantages compared to conventional processes for black liquor recovery. The main goal with this work has been to get qualitative information on influence of burner design for the gas flow in the gasification reactor. Gasification of black liquor is a very complex process. The liquor is composed of a number of different substances and the composition may vary considerably between liquors originating from different mills and even for black liquor from a single process. When a black liquor droplet is gasified it loses its organic material to produce combustible gases by three stages of conversion: Drying, pyrolysis and char gasification. In the end of the conversion only an inorganic smelt remains (ideally). The aim is to get this smelt to form a protective layer, against corrosion and heat, on the reactor walls. Due to the complexity of gasification of black liquor some simplifications had to be made in order to develop a CFD model for the preliminary design of the gasification reactor. Instead of modelling droplets in detail, generating gas by gasification, sources were placed in a prescribed volume where gasification (mainly drying and pyrolysis) of the black liquor droplets was assumed to occur. Source terms for the energy and momentum equations, consistent with the mass source distribution, were derived from the corresponding control volume equations by assuming a symmetric outflow of gas from the droplets and a uniform degree of conversion of reactive components in the droplets. A particle transport model was also used in order to study trajectories from droplets entering the reactor. The resulting model has been implemented in a commercial finite volume code (AEA-CFX) through customised Fortran subroutines. The advantages with this simple

  1. PWRs potentialities for minor actinides burning

    In the frame of the SPIN program at CEA, the impacts of the minor actinides (MA) incineration in PWRs are analysed. The aim is to reduce the mass, the potential radiotoxicity level. The recycling of all actinide elements is evaluated in a PWR nuclear yard. A sensitivity study is done to evaluate the incineration for each minor actinide element. This gives the most efficient way of incineration for each MA elements in a PWR and helps to design a PWR burner. This burner is disposed in a PWR nuclear system in which the actinides are recycled until equilibrium. (author)

  2. Evaluation of Homogeneous Options: Effects of Minor Actinide Exclusion from Single and Double Tier Recycle in Sodium Fast Reactors

    R. M. Ferrer; S. Bays; M. Pope

    2008-03-01

    The Systems Analysis Campaign under the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) has requested the fuel cycle analysis group at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to analyze and provide isotopic data for four scenarios in which different strategies for Minor Actinides (MA) management are investigated. A 1000 MWth commercial-scale Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) design was selected as the baseline in this scenario study. Two transuranic (TRU) conversion ratios, defined as the ratio of the amount of TRU produced over the TRU destroyed in the reactor core, along with different fuel-types were investigated.

  3. Preparation of actinide specimens for the US/UK joint experiment in the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor

    A joint research program involving the United States and the United Kingdom was initiated about four years ago for the purpose of studying the fuel behavior of higher actinides using in-core irradiation in the fast reactor at Dounreay, Scotland. Simultaneously, determination of integral cross sections of a wide variety of higher actinide isotopes (physics specimens) was proposed. Coincidental neutron flux and energy spectral measurements were to be made using vanadium encapsulated dosimetry materials in the immediate region of the fuel pellets and physics samples. The higher actinide samples chosen for the fuel study were 241Am and 244Cm in the forms of Am2O3, Cm2O3, and Am6Cm(RE)7O21, where (RE) represents a mixture of lanthanides. Milligram quantities of actinide oxides of 248Cm, 246Cm, 244Cm, 243Cm, 243Am, 241Am, 244Pu, 242Pu, 241Pu, 240Pu, 239Pu, 238Pu, 237Np, 238U, 236U, 235U, 234U, 233U, 232Th, 230Th, and 231Pa were encapsulated to obtain nuclear cross section and reaction rate data for these materials

  4. Minimization of actinide waste by multi-recycling of thoriated fuels in the EPR reactor

    Rose, S. J.; Wilson, J. N.; Capellan, N.; David, S.; Guillemin, P.; Ivanov, E.; Méplan, O.; Nuttin, A.; Siem, S.

    2012-02-01

    The multi-recycling of innovative uranium/thorium oxide fuels for use in the European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR) has been investigated. If increasing quantities of 238U, the fertile isotope in standard UO2 fuel, are replaced by 232Th, then a greater yield of new fissile material (233U) is produced during the cycle than would otherwise be the case. This leads to economies of natural uranium of around 45% if the uranium in the spent fuel is multi-recycled. In addition we show that minor actinide and plutonium waste inventories are reduced and hence waste radio-toxicities and decay heats are up to a factor of 20 lower after 103 years. Two innovative fuel types named S90 and S20, ThO2 mixed with 90% and 20% enriched UO2 respectively, are compared as an alternative to standard uranium oxide (UOX) and uranium/plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) fuels at the longest EPR fuel discharge burn-ups of 65 GWd/t. Fissile and waste inventories are examined, waste radio-toxicities and decay heats are extracted and safety feedback coefficients are calculated.

  5. Measurement of fission cross-section of actinides at n_TOF for advanced nuclear reactors

    Calviani, Marco; Montagnoli, G; Mastinu, P

    2009-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the determination of high accuracy neutron-induced fission cross-sections of various isotopes - all of which radioactive - of interest for emerging nuclear technologies. The measurements had been performed at the CERN neutron time-of-flight facility n TOF. In particular, in this work, fission cross-sections on 233U, the main fissile isotope of the Th/U fuel cycle, and on the minor actinides 241Am, 243Am and 245Cm have been analyzed. Data on these isotopes are requested for the feasibility study of innovative nuclear systems (ADS and Generation IV reactors) currently being considered for energy production and radioactive waste transmutation. The measurements have been performed with a high performance Fast Ionization Chamber (FIC), in conjunction with an innovative data acquisition system based on Flash-ADCs. The first step in the analysis has been the reconstruction of the digitized signals, in order to extract the information required for the discrimination between fission fragm...

  6. Minimization of actinide waste by multi-recycling of thoriated fuels in the EPR reactor

    Nuttin A.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The multi-recycling of innovative uranium/thorium oxide fuels for use in the European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR has been investigated. If increasing quantities of 238U, the fertile isotope in standard UO2 fuel, are replaced by 232Th, then a greater yield of new fissile material (233U is produced during the cycle than would otherwise be the case. This leads to economies of natural uranium of around 45% if the uranium in the spent fuel is multi-recycled. In addition we show that minor actinide and plutonium waste inventories are reduced and hence waste radio-toxicities and decay heats are up to a factor of 20 lower after 103 years. Two innovative fuel types named S90 and S20, ThO2 mixed with 90% and 20% enriched UO2 respectively, are compared as an alternative to standard uranium oxide (UOX and uranium/plutonium mixed oxide (MOX fuels at the longest EPR fuel discharge burn-ups of 65 GWd/t. Fissile and waste inventories are examined, waste radio-toxicities and decay heats are extracted and safety feedback coefficients are calculated.

  7. Specification of the Advanced Burner Test Reactor Multi-Physics Coupling Demonstration Problem

    Shemon, E. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Grudzinski, J. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lee, C. H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Thomas, J. W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yu, Y. Q. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-12-21

    This document specifies the multi-physics nuclear reactor demonstration problem using the SHARP software package developed by NEAMS. The SHARP toolset simulates the key coupled physics phenomena inside a nuclear reactor. The PROTEUS neutronics code models the neutron transport within the system, the Nek5000 computational fluid dynamics code models the fluid flow and heat transfer, and the DIABLO structural mechanics code models structural and mechanical deformation. The three codes are coupled to the MOAB mesh framework which allows feedback from neutronics, fluid mechanics, and mechanical deformation in a compatible format.

  8. Fast burner reactor benchmark results from the NEA working party on physics of plutonium recycle

    As part of a program proposed by the OECD/NEA Working Party on Physics of Plutonium Recycling (WPPR) to evaluate different scenarios for the use of plutonium, fast reactor physics benchmarks were developed; fuel cycle scenarios using either PUREX/TRUEX (oxide fuel) or pyrometallurgical (metal fuel) separation technologies were specified. These benchmarks were designed to evaluate the nuclear performance and radiotoxicity impact of a transuranic-burning fast reactor system. International benchmark results are summarized in this paper; and key conclusions are highlighted

  9. Calculations of the actinide transmutation with HELIOS for fuels of light water reactors

    In this work a comparison of the obtained results with the HELIOS code is made and those obtained by other similar codes, used in the international community, respect to the transmutation of smaller actinides. For this the one it is analyzed the international benchmark: 'Calculations of Different Transmutation Concepts', of the Nuclear Energy Agency. In this benchmark two cell types are analyzed: one small corresponding to a PWR standard, and another big one corresponding to a PWR highly moderated. Its are considered two types of burnt of discharge: 33 GWd/tHM and 50 GWd/tHM. The following types of results are approached: the keff like a function of the burnt one, the atomic densities of the main isotopes of the actinides, the radioactivities in the moment in that the reactor it is off and in the times of cooling from 7 up to 50000 years, the reactivity by holes and the Doppler reactivity. The results are compared with those obtained by the following institutions: FZK (Germany), JAERI (Japan), ITEP (Russia) and IPPE (Russian Federation). In the case of the eigenvalue, the obtained results with HELIOS showed a discrepancy around 3% Δk/k, which was also among other participants. For the isotopic concentrations: 241Pu, 242 Pu and 242m Am the results of all the institutions present a discrepancy bigger every time, as the burnt one increases. Regarding the activities, the discrepancy of results is acceptable, except in the case of the 241 Pu. In the case of the Doppler coefficients the discrepancy of results is acceptable, except for the cells with high moderation; in the case of the holes coefficients, the discrepancy of results increases in agreement with the holes fraction increases, being quite high to 95% of holes. In general, the results are consistent and in good agreement with those obtained by all the participants in the benchmark. The results are inside of the established limits by the work group on Plutonium Fuels and Innovative Fuel Cycles of the Nuclear

  10. Nuclear data needs for the analysis of generation and burn-up of actinide isotopes in nuclear reactors

    A reliable prediction of the in-pile and out-of-pile physics characteristics of nuclear fuel is one of the objectives of present-day reactor physics. The paper describes the main production paths of important actinides for light water and fast breeder reactors. The accuracy of recent nuclear data is examined by comparisons of theoretical predictions with the results from post-irradiation analysis of nuclear fuel from power reactors, and partly with results obtained in zero-power facilities. A world-wide comparison of nuclear data to be used in large fast power reactor burn-up and long term considerations is presented. The needs for further improvement of nuclear data are discussed. (orig.)

  11. Technological research on Recycling of Actinides and fission products (RAS). Irradiations in the High Flux Reactor (HFR), Petten, Netherlands

    The purpose of the title irradiations is to study the efficiency and technical feasibility of possible transmutation processes for those long-lived actinides and fission products, that contribute to long-term radiotoxicity and leaking risks of geological storage. A cooperative research program (EFFTRA or Experimental Feasibility of Targets for TRAnsmutation) has been set up for irradiations of technetium, iodine and americium in the thermal reactor HFR and the fast reactor Phenix. A radiation program for fission products is in progress in the HFR. An inert matrix concept is developed, in which the actinide is mixed with a ceramic material, which hardly reacts with neutrons and actinides and containment materials. Irradiation experiments with candidate inert matrices will be carried out in the HFR. Also, the feasibility of transmutation of americium in a thermal spectrum will be demonstrated by means of a long-range experiment in the HFR. Plans are elaborated for the irradiation of plutonium in inert matrices in the HFR to realize an efficient transmutation of existing supplies, both military and civil, of plutonium. 8 figs., 4 tabs., 18 refs

  12. The different facilities of the reactor PHENIX for radio isotope production and fission product burner

    During the last few years different tests have been made to optimize the blanket of the reactor. Year after year the breeding ratio has lost a part of interest regarding the production and availability of plutonium in the world. A characteristic of a fast reactor is to have important neutron leaks from the core. The spectrum of those neutrons is intermediate, the idea was to find a moderator compatible with sodium and stable in temperature. After different tests we kept as a moderator the calcium hydride and as a samply support, a cluster which is separated from the carrier. At the end we present the model used for thermalized calculations. The scheme is then applied to a heavy nuclide transmutation example (Np237 Pu238) and to fission product transmutation (Tc99). (author)

  13. Cooperative Russian-French experiment on plutonium-enriched fuels for fast burner reactor

    Various kinds of nuclear fuels with an increased plutonium content are under study according to the program including three stages: fabrication, irradiation in BOR-60 reactor, post-irradiation examination. Flowsheets for fabricating pelletized and vibrocompacted fuels of UPu0.45O2, UPu0.45N, UPu0.6N, PuN + ZrN, PuO2 + MgO are presented along with basic fuel properties. The irradiation of oxide fuel is carried out in an individual irradiation device at rated maximum temperature of the fuel at the beginning of irradiation equal to 2100 deg C. The irradiation of nitride fuel and the fuel based on inert matrices is performed in the other device with the aim of limitation of maximum temperature by the value of 1550 deg C. The duration of irradiation for all fuel types constitutes 750 EFPD. Fuel element charge in Bor-60 reactor core was realized in 2000

  14. Minor actinide transmutation in a board type sodium cooled breed and burn reactor core

    Highlights: • A 1250 MWt board type sodium cooled breed and burn reactor core is further designed. • MCNP–ORIGEN coupled code MCORE is applied to perform neutronics and depletion calculation. • Transmutation efficiency and neutronic safety parameters are compared under different MA weight fraction. - Abstract: In this paper, a board type sodium cooled breed and burn reactor core is further designed and applied to perform minor actinide (MA) transmutation. MA is homogeneously loaded in all the fuel sub-assemblies with a weight fraction of 2.0 wt.%, 4.0 wt.%, 6.0 wt.%, 8.0 wt.%, 10.0 wt.% and 12.0 wt.%, respectively. The transmutation efficiency, transmutation amount, power density distribution, neutron fluence distribution and neutronic safety parameters, such as reactivity, Doppler feedback, void worth and delayed neutron fraction, are compared under different MA weight fraction. Neutronics and depletion calculations are performed based on the self-developed MCNP–ORIGEN coupled code with the ENDF/B-VII data library. In the breed and burn reactor core, a number of breeding sub-assemblies are arranged in the inner core in a board type way (scatter load) to breed, and a number of absorbing sub-assemblies are arranged in the inner side of the outer core to absorb neutrons and reduce power density in this area. All the fuel sub-assemblies (ignition and breeding sub-assemblies) are shuffled from outside in. The core reached asymptotically steady state after about 22 years, and the average and maximum discharged burn-up were about 17.0% and 35.3%, respectively. The transmutation amount increased linearly with the MA weight fraction, while the transmutation rate parabolically varied with the MA weight fraction. Power density in ignition sub-assembly positions increased with the MA weight fraction, while decreased in breeding sub-assembly positions. Neutron fluence decreased with the increase of MA weight fraction. Generally speaking, the core reactivity and void

  15. Passive safety features of low sodium void worth metal fueled cores in a bottom supported reactor vessel

    A study has been performed on the passive safety features of low-sodium-void-worth metallic-fueled reactors with emphasis on using a bottom-supported reactor vessel design. The reactor core designs included self-sufficient types as well as actinide burners. The analyses covered the reactor response to the unprotected, i.e. unscrammed, transient overpower accident and the loss-of-flow accident. Results are given demonstrating the safety margins that were attained. (author)

  16. Neutronic design of a plutonium-thorium burner small nuclear reactor

    A small nuclear reactor using thorium and plutonium fuel has been designed from the neutronic point of view. The thermal power of the reactor is 150 MWth and it is proposed to be used to supply electricity in an island in Indonesia. Thorium and plutonium fuel was chosen because in recent years the thorium fuel cycle is one of the promising ways to deal with the increasing number of plutonium stockpiles, either from the utilization of uranium fuel cycle or from nuclear weapon dismantling. A mixed fuel of thorium and plutonium will not generate the second generation of plutonium which will be a better way to incinerate the excess plutonium compared with the MOX fuel. Three kinds of plutonium grades which are the reactor grade (RG), weapon grade (WG), and spent fuel grade (SFG) plutonium, were evaluated as the thorium fuel mixture in the 17x17 Westinghouse PWR Fuel assembly. The evaluated parameters were the multiplication factor, plutonium depletion, fissile buildup, neutron spectrum, and temperature reactivity feedback. An optimization was also done to increase the plutonium depletion by changing the Moderator to Fuel Ratio (MFR). The computer codes TRITON (coupled NEWT and ORIGEN-S) in SCALE version 6 were used as the calculation tool for this assembly level. From the evaluation and optimization of the fuel assembly, the whole core was designed. The core was consisted of 2 types of thorium fuel with different plutonium grade and it followed the checkerboard loading pattern. A new concept of enriched burnable poison was also introduced to the core. The core life is 6.4 EFPY or 75 GWd/MTHM. It can burn up to 58% of its total mass of initial plutonium. VENTURE was used as the calculation tool for the core level

  17. Methods For The Calculation Of Pebble Bed High Temperature Reactors With High Burnup Plutonium And Minor Actinide Based Fuel

    The graphite moderated Modular High Temperature Pebble Bed Reactor enables very flexible loading strategies and is one candidate of the Generation IV reactors. For this reactor fuel cycles with high burnup (about 600 MWd/kg HM) based on plutonium (Pu) and minor actinides (MA) fuel will be investigated. The composition of this fuel is defined in the EU-PuMA-project which aims the reduction of high level waste. There exist nearly no neutronic full core calculations for this fuel composition with high burnup. Two methods (deterministic and Monte Carlo) will be used to determine the neutronics in a full core. The detailed results will be compared with respect to the influence on criticality and safety related parameters. (authors)

  18. Reduction of minor actinides for recycling in a light water reactor

    The aim of actinide transmutation from spent nuclear fuel is the reduction in mass of high-level waste which must be stored in geological repositories and the lifetime of high-level waste; these two achievements will reduce the number of repositories needed, as well as the duration of storage. The present work is directed towards the evaluation of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle in which the minor actinides (Np, Am and Cm) could be recycled to remove most of the radioactive material; a reference of actinides production in standard nuclear fuel of uranium at the end of its burning in a BWR is first established, after a design of fuel rod containing 6% of minor actinides in a matrix of uranium from the enrichment lines is proposed, then 4 fuel rods of standard uranium are replaced by 4 actinides bars to evaluate the production and transmutation of them and finally the minor actinides reduction in the fuel is evaluated. In the development of this work the calculation tool are the codes: Intrepin-3, Casmo-4 and Simulate-3. (Author)

  19. Diagnostics for hybrid reactors

    The Hybrid Reactor(HR) can be considered an attractive actinide-burner or a fusion assisted transmutation for destruction of transuranic(TRU) nuclear waste. The hybrid reactor has two important subsystems: the tokamak neutron source and the blanket which includes a fuel zone where the TRU are placed and a tritium breeding zone. The diagnostic system for a HR must be as simple and robust as possible to monitor and control the plasma scenario, guarantee the protection of the machine and monitor the transmutation.

  20. AECL/U.S. INERI - Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Power Reactors Fuel Requirements and Down-Select Report

    William Carmack; Randy Fielding; Pavel Medvedev; Mitch Meyer

    2005-08-01

    This report documents the first milestone of the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) U.S./Euratom Joint Proposal 1.8 entitled “Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Light-Water Reactors.” The milestone represents the assessment and preliminary study of a variety of fuels that hold promise as transmutation and minor actinide burning fuel compositions for light-water reactors. The most promising fuels of interest to the participants on this INERI program have been selected for further study. These fuel compositions are discussed in this report.

  1. Preliminary calculational analysis of the actinide samples from FP-4 exposed in the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor

    This report discusses the current status of results from an extensive experiment on the irradiation of selected actinides in a fast reactor. These actinides ranged from thorium to curium. They were irradiated in the core of the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor. Rates for depletion, transmutation, and fission-product generation were experimentally measured, and, in turn, were calculated using current cross-section and fission-yield data. Much of the emphasis is on the comparison between experimental and calculated values for both actinide and fission-product concentrations. Some of the discussion touches on the adequacy of current cross-section and fission-yield data. However, the main purposes of the report are: to collect in one place the most recent yield data, to discuss the comparisons between the experimental and calculated results, to discuss each sample that was irradiated giving details of any adjustments needed or specific problems encountered, and to give a chronology of the analysis as it pertained to the set of samples (referred to as FP-4 samples) that constitutes the most extensively irradiated and final set. The results and trends reported here, together with those discussions touching on current knowledge about cross sections and fission yields, are intended to serve as a starting point for further analysis. In general, these results are encouraging with regard to the adequacy of much of the currently available nuclear data in this region of the periodic table. But there are some cases where adjustments and improvements can be suggested. However, the application of these results in consolidating current cross-section and fission-yield data must await further analysis

  2. A fast lead-cooled incinerator for economical actinide burning

    A fast lead-cooled modular reactor is proposed as an efficient incinerator of plutonium and minor actinides (MAs) for application to advanced fuel cycles devoted to transmutation. This actinide burner reactor (ABR) is loaded only with transuranics (TRU) in a fertile-free Zr-based metallic fuel to maximize the incineration rates and features (a) streaming fuel assemblies that enhance neutron leakage to achieve favorable neutronic feedbacks and (b) a double-entry control rod system that reduces reactivity perturbations during seismic events and flattens the axial power profile. A detailed neutronic analysis shows that the delayed neutron fraction is comparable to that of fast reactors and that negative reactivity feedbacks from lead voiding, Doppler, fuel thermal expansion and core radial expansion lead to safety characteristics similar to those of the Integral Fast Reactor. The ABR TRU destruction rate is the same as that of the ATW and fuel cycle cost analysis shows potential for economical accomplishment of the transmutation mission compared to other proposed actinide burning options. (author)

  3. Evaluation of Heterogeneous Options: Effects of MgO versus UO2 Matrix Selection for Minor Actinide Targets in a Sodium Fast Reactor

    M. Pope; S. Bays; R. Ferrer

    2008-03-01

    The primary focus of this work was to compare MgO with UO2 as target matrix material options for burning minor actinides in a transmutation target within a sodium fast reactor. This analysis compared the transmutation performance of target assemblies having UO2 matrix to those having specifically MgO inert matrix.

  4. Fluoride reactor for the destruction of actinides from spent nuclear fuel

    Reactor based on liquid salts (Molten Salt Reactor - MSR) is one of 6 prospective reactors, designed in the Generation IV initiative. Fluoride in the reactor fuel is dissolved in a mixture of fluoride salts. This technology was developed in the fifties and sixties of the twentieth century. New technologies associated with this research include the Brayton cycle, which eliminates several shortcomings related to the historical construction of fluoride reactor, mainly focusing on security. When compared with other reactors, the largest differences are in the MSR that uses less fissionable material and to maintain a controlled nuclear reaction in its radius has only a homogeneous liquid mixture of all the chemical components. (author)

  5. Fission production and actinides in the spent graphite of the reactor stacks of the Siberian chemical integrated plant

    The peculiarity of the accomplished studies consisted in the representative selection of the reactor graphite stacks samples and in the performance of the complex analysis of their radioactive contamination. The role of incidents in forming the graphite contamination by individual radionuclides is identified and their distribution in stacks is studied. The correlation between the content of various radionuclides is investigated. The schemes for evaluating their reserve in the graphite stack are plotted. The results on evaluating the radionuclides reserve in the graphite stack highly differ from the earlier forecasted ones. The fission products and actinides reserves are by 10 times lesser as it was fore coated earlier, which may essentially simplify dismantling and selection of utilization technologies

  6. Conversion of actinide solutions for the production of MA bearing fuels for Gen IV fast reactor systems

    The conversion of the solution to solid for fuels containing minor actinides for accelerator driven systems or Gen IV fast reactors cannot be made by conventional ammonia or oxalate precipitation as is the case in today's reprocessing plant. The small particle size and concomitant dust that is produced in subsequent processing steps will not permit use of these processes on industrial scale. Innovation is needed to avoid dust generating powders, and indeed to simplify the processes themselves. Two such processing routes have been developed at the JRC-ITU. The sol gel route has been used to produce fuel containing Am and Np for the SUPERFACT, TRABANT and other irradiation experiments. The infiltration process has also been established and fuels have been produced for the FUTURIX and HELIOS experiments. (authors)

  7. AN INTEGRAL REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT TO INFER ACTINIDE CAPTURE CROSS-SECTIONS FROM THORIUM TO CALIFORNIUM WITH ACCELERATOR MASS SPECTROMETRY

    The principle of the proposed experiment is to irradiate very pure actinide samples in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INL and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The determination of the nuclide densities before and after neutron irradiation will allow inference of effective neutron capture cross-sections. This approach has been used in the past and the novelty of this experiment is that the atom densities of the different transmutation products will be determined using the Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) technique at the ATLAS facility located at ANL. It is currently planned to irradiate the following isotopes: 232Th, 235U, 236U, 238U, 237Np, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, 241Am, 243Am and 248Cm.

  8. Analysis of thorium/U-233 lattices and cores in a breeder/burner heavy water reactor

    Due to the inevitable dwindling of uranium resources, advanced fuel cycles in the current generation of reactors stand to be of great benefit in the future. Heavy water moderated reactors have much potential to make use of thorium, a currently unexploited resource. Core fuelling configurations of a Heavy Water Reactor based on the self-sufficient thorium fuel cycle were simulated using the DRAGON and DONJON reactor physics codes. Three heterogeneously fuelled reactors and one homogeneously fuelled reactor were studied. (author)

  9. MANTRA: An Integral Reactor Physics Experiment to Infer the Neutron Capture Cross Sections of Actinides and Fission Products in Fast and Epithermal Spectra

    Youinou, G.; Vondrasek, R.; Veselka, H.; Salvatores, M.; Paul, M.; Pardo, R.; Palmiotti, G.; Palchan, T.; Nusair, O.; Nimmagadda, J.; Nair, C.; Murray, P.; Maddock, T.; Kondrashev, S.; Kondev, F. G.; Jones, W.; Imel, G.; Glass, C.; Fonnesbeck, J.; Berg, J.; Bauder, W.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents an update of an on-going collaborative INL-ANL-ISU integral reactor physics experiment whose objective is to infer the effective neutron capture cross sections for most of the actinides of importance for reactor physics and fuel cycle studies in both fast and epithermal spectra. Some fission products are also being considered. The principle of the experiment is to irradiate very pure actinide samples in the Advanced Test Reactor at INL and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The determination of the nuclide densities before and after neutron irradiation together with the neutron fluence will allow inference of effective neutron capture cross-sections in different neutron spectra.

  10. RF torch discharge combined with conventional burner

    The design of the combined flame-rf-plasma reactor and experimental examination of this reactor are presented. For the determination of the temperature in different parts of the combined burner plasma the methods of emission spectroscopy were used. The temperatures measured in the conventional burner reach the maximum temperature 1900 K but in the burner with the superimposed rf discharge the neutral gas temperature substantially increased up to 2600 K but also the plasma volume increases substantially. Consequently, the resident time of reactants in the reaction zone increases

  11. Method for the recovery of actinide elements from nuclear reactor waste

    A process is described for partitioning and recovering actinide values from acidic waste solutions resulting from reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels by adding hydroxylammonium nitrate and hydrazine to the waste solution to adjust the valence of the neptunium and plutonium values in the solution to the +4 oxidation state, thus forming a feed solution and contacting the feed solution with an extractant of dihexoxyethyl phosphoric acid in an organic diluent whereby the actinide values, most of the rare earth values and some fission product values are taken up by the extractant. Separation is achieved by contacting the loaded extractant with two aqueous strip solutions, a nitric acid solution to selectively strip the americium, curium and rare earth values and an oxalate and oxalic acid or trimethylammonium hydrogen oxalate to selectively strip the neptunium, plutonium and fission product values. Uranium values remain in the extractant and may be recovered with a phosphoric acid strip. The neptunium and plutonium values are recovered from the oxalate by adding sufficient nitric acid to destroy the complexing ability of the oxalate, forming a second feed, and contacting the second feed with a second extractant of tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate in an inert diluent whereby the neptunium and plutonium values are selectively extracted. The values are recovered from the extractant with formic acid

  12. Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward.

    Kasza, K.; Grandy, C.; Chang, Y.; Khalil, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-06-30

    This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition

  13. Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward

    This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition from normal high

  14. Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Publishable Final Activity Report

    The PUMA project -the acronym stands for 'Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors'- was a Specific Targeted Research Project (STREP) within the EURATOM 6th Framework Program (EU FP6). The PUMA project ran from September 1, 2006, until August 31, 2009, and was executed by a consortium of 14 European partner organisations and one from the USA. This report serves 2 purposes. It is both the 'Publishable Final Activity Report' and the 'Final (Summary) Report', describing, per Work Package, the specific objectives, research activities, main conclusions, recommendations and supporting documents. PUMA's main objective was to investigate the possibilities for the utilisation and transmutation of plutonium and especially minor actinides in contemporary and future (high temperature) gas-cooled reactor designs, which are promising tools for improving the sustainability of the nuclear fuel cycle. This contributes to the reduction of Pu and MA stockpiles, and also to the development of safe and sustainable reactors for CO2-free energy generation. The PUMA project has assessed the impact of the introduction of Pu/MA-burning HTRs at three levels: fuel and fuel performance (modelling), reactor (transmutation performance and safety) and reactor/fuel cycle facility park. Earlier projects already indicated favourable characteristics of HTRs with respect to Pu burning. So, core physics of Pu/MA fuel cycles for HTRs has been investigated to study the CP fuel and reactor characteristics and to assure nuclear stability of a Pu/MA HTR core, under both normal and abnormal operating conditions. The starting point of this investigation comprised the two main contemporary HTR designs, viz. the pebble-bed type HTR, represented by the South-African PBMR, and hexagonal block type HTR, represented by the GT-MHR. The results (once again) demonstrate the flexibility of the contemporary (and near future) HTR designs and their ability to accept a variety

  15. Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Publishable Final Activity Report

    Kuijper, J.C., E-mail: kuijper@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (Netherlands); Somers, J.; Van Den Durpel, L.; Chauvet, V.; Cerullo, N.; Cetnar, J.; Abram, T.; Bakker, K.; Bomboni, E.; Bernnat, W.; Domanska, J.G.; Girardi, E.; De Haas, J.B.M.; Hesketh, K.; Hiernaut, J.P.; Hossain, K.; Jonnet, J.; Kim, Y.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Kopec, M.; Murgatroyd, J.; Millington, D.; Lecarpentier, D.; Lomonaco, G.; McEachern, D.; Meier, A.; Mignanelli, M.; Nabielek, H.; Oppe, J.; Petrov, B.Y.; Pohl, C.; Ruetten, H.J.; Schihab, S.; Toury, G.; Trakas, C.; Venneri, F.; Verfondern, K.; Werner, H.; Wiss, T.; Zakova, J.

    2010-11-15

    The PUMA project -the acronym stands for 'Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors'- was a Specific Targeted Research Project (STREP) within the EURATOM 6th Framework Program (EU FP6). The PUMA project ran from September 1, 2006, until August 31, 2009, and was executed by a consortium of 14 European partner organisations and one from the USA. This report serves 2 purposes. It is both the 'Publishable Final Activity Report' and the 'Final (Summary) Report', describing, per Work Package, the specific objectives, research activities, main conclusions, recommendations and supporting documents. PUMA's main objective was to investigate the possibilities for the utilisation and transmutation of plutonium and especially minor actinides in contemporary and future (high temperature) gas-cooled reactor designs, which are promising tools for improving the sustainability of the nuclear fuel cycle. This contributes to the reduction of Pu and MA stockpiles, and also to the development of safe and sustainable reactors for CO{sub 2}-free energy generation. The PUMA project has assessed the impact of the introduction of Pu/MA-burning HTRs at three levels: fuel and fuel performance (modelling), reactor (transmutation performance and safety) and reactor/fuel cycle facility park. Earlier projects already indicated favourable characteristics of HTRs with respect to Pu burning. So, core physics of Pu/MA fuel cycles for HTRs has been investigated to study the CP fuel and reactor characteristics and to assure nuclear stability of a Pu/MA HTR core, under both normal and abnormal operating conditions. The starting point of this investigation comprised the two main contemporary HTR designs, viz. the pebble-bed type HTR, represented by the South-African PBMR, and hexagonal block type HTR, represented by the GT-MHR. The results (once again) demonstrate the flexibility of the contemporary (and near future) HTR

  16. The recycling of the actinides neptunium, americium and curium in a fast power reactor to reduce the long term activity in a final store

    The starting point for the considerations and calculations given in this dissertation is the inevitable production of radioactive materials in the use of nuclear energy, which creates a considerable potential danger in a final store for a very long period. As one possibility of alleviating this problem, a concept for recycling the waste actinides neptunium, americium and curium was proposed. The waste actinides are separated in the reprocessing of burnt-up fuel elements and reach a further irradiation circuit. There they pass through the stages 'manufacture of irradiation elements', 'use in a fast power reactor' and reprocessing of irradiation elements' several times. In each irradiation and subsequent storage, about 17% of the waste actinides are removed by fission or by conversion into nuclides which can be reused as fuel, so that during the life of 40 years of the fast recycling reacor, the waste actinides can be reduced in mass by one half. In order to determine this mass reduction effect, a model calculation was developed, which includes the representation of the neutron physics and thermal properties of the reactor core and the storage and reprocessing of the irradiation elements. (orig./RB)

  17. Closed Fuel Cycle and Minor Actinide Multirecycling in a Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor

    Van Rooijen, W.F.G.; Kloosterman, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    The Generation IV International Forum has identified the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) as one of the reactor concepts for future deployment. The GCFR targets sustainability, which is achieved by the use of a closed nuclear fuel cycle where only fission products are discharged to a repository; all H

  18. Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Publishable Final Activity Report

    The PUMA project - the acronym stands for “Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors” - was a Specific Targeted Research Project (STREP) within the Euratom 6th Framework (EU FP6). The PUMA project ran from September 1, 2006, until August 31, 2009, and was executed by a consortium of 14 European partner organisations and one from the USA. This report serves 2 purposes. It is both the 'Publishable Final Activity Report' and the 'Final (Summary) Report', describing, per Work Package, the specific objectives, research activities, main conclusions, recommendations and supporting documents. PUMA's main objective was to investigate the possibilities for the utilisation and transmutation of plutonium and especially minor actinides in contemporary and future (high temperature) gas-cooled reactor designs, which are promising tools for improving the sustainability of the nuclear fuel cycle. This contributes to the reduction of Pu and MA stockpiles, and also to the development of safe and sustainable reactors for CO2-free energy generation. The PUMA project has assessed the impact of the introduction of Pu/MA-burning HTRs at three levels: fuel and fuel performance (modelling), reactor (transmutation performance and safety) and reactor/fuel cycle facility park. Earlier projects already indicated favourable characteristics of HTRs with respect to Pu burning. So, core physics of Pu/MA fuel cycles for HTRs has been investigated to study the CP fuel and reactor characteristics and to assure nuclear stability of a Pu/MA HTR core, under both normal and abnormal operating conditions. The starting point of this investigation comprised the two main contemporary HTR designs, viz. the pebble-bed type HTR, represented by the South-African PBMR, and hexagonal block type HTR, represented by the GT-MHR. The results (once again) demonstrate the flexibility of the contemporary (and near future) HTR designs and their ability to accept a variety

  19. Actinide, Activation Product and Fission Product Decay Data for Reactor-based Applications

    The UK Activation Product Decay Data Library was first released in September 1977 as UK-PADD1, to be followed by regular improvements on an almost yearly basis up to the assembly of UKPADD6.12 in March 2013. Similarly, the UK Heavy Element and Actinide Decay Data Library followed in December 1981 as UKHEDD1, with the implementation of various modifications leading to UKHEDD2.6, February 2008. Both the data content and evaluation procedures are defined, and the most recent evaluations are described in terms of specific radionuclides and the resulting consistency of their recommended decay-data files. New versions of the UKPADD and UKHEDD libraries are regularly submitted to the NEA Data Bank for possible inclusion in the JEFF library

  20. PWRs potentialities for minor actinides burning

    In the frame of the SPIN program at CEA, the impacts of the Minor Actinides (MA) incineration in PWRs are analysed. The aim is to reduce the mass and the potential radiotoxicity level. This study is done separately one on the Plutonium recycling. But the plutonium is essential. Thus, the recycling of all Actinide elements is evaluated in a PWR nuclear yard. A sensitivity study is done to evaluate the incineration for each Minor Actinide element. This gives us the most efficient way of incineration for each MA element in a PWR and help us to design a PWR burner. This burner is disposed in a PWR nuclear system in which the Actinides are recycled until equilibrium. (authors). 2 refs

  1. Development of a CMPO based extraction process for partitioning of minor actinides and demonstration with genuine fast reactor fuel solution (155 GWd/Te)

    Antony, M.P.; Kumaresan, R.; Suneesh, A.S. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (IN). Fuel Chemistry Div.] (and others)

    2011-07-01

    A method has been developed for partitioning of minor actinides from fast reactor (FR) fuel solution by a TRUEX solvent composed of 0.2 M n-octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoyl-methylphosphine oxide (CMPO)-1.2 M tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) in n-dodecane (n-DD), and subsequently demonstrated with genuine fast reactor dissolver solution (155 GWd/Te) using a novel 16-stage ejector mixer settler in hot cells. Cesium, plutonium and uranium present in the dissolver solution were removed, prior to minor actinide partitioning, by using ammonium molybdophosphate impregnated XAD-7 (AMP-XAD), methylated poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP-Me), and macroporous bifunctional phosphinic acid (MPBPA) resins respectively. Extraction of europium(III) and cerium(III) from simulated and real dissolver solution, and their stripping behavior from loaded organic phase was studied in batch method using various citric acid-nitric acid formulations. Based on these results, partitioning of minor actinides from fast reactor dissolver solution was demonstrated in hot cells. The extraction and stripping profiles of {sup 154}Eu, {sup 144}Ce, {sup 106}Ru and {sup 137}Cs, and mass balance of {sup 241}Am(III) achieved in the demonstration run have been reported in this paper. (orig.)

  2. Development of a CMPO based extraction process for partitioning of minor actinides and demonstration with genuine fast reactor fuel solution (155 GWd/Te)

    A method has been developed for partitioning of minor actinides from fast reactor (FR) fuel solution by a TRUEX solvent composed of 0.2 M n-octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoyl-methylphosphine oxide (CMPO)-1.2 M tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) in n-dodecane (n-DD), and subsequently demonstrated with genuine fast reactor dissolver solution (155 GWd/Te) using a novel 16-stage ejector mixer settler in hot cells. Cesium, plutonium and uranium present in the dissolver solution were removed, prior to minor actinide partitioning, by using ammonium molybdophosphate impregnated XAD-7 (AMP-XAD), methylated poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP-Me), and macroporous bifunctional phosphinic acid (MPBPA) resins respectively. Extraction of europium(III) and cerium(III) from simulated and real dissolver solution, and their stripping behavior from loaded organic phase was studied in batch method using various citric acid-nitric acid formulations. Based on these results, partitioning of minor actinides from fast reactor dissolver solution was demonstrated in hot cells. The extraction and stripping profiles of 154Eu, 144Ce, 106Ru and 137Cs, and mass balance of 241Am(III) achieved in the demonstration run have been reported in this paper. (orig.)

  3. Transmutation capabilities of generation 4 reactors

    The Generation IV reactors all have the potential to play a significant role in future scenarios dealing with transmutation of spent fuel from LWR power reactors. The nature of the flux spectrum, thermal or fast, is the major factor in the effectiveness of transmuting various transuranic isotopes. We conclude that each Generation IV reactor concept could have a role, if properly co-ordinated and supported by significant development programmes. The fast reactor concepts (liquid metal and gas-cooled) are the most effective in consumption by fission of unwanted actinides (plutonium, neptunium, americium and possibly curium). Thermal spectrum concepts (water-cooled reactors with and without inert-matrix cores, high-temperature gas-cooled reactors with and without inert-matrix cores, and liquid-salt-cooled thermal reactors) all can potentially reduce some of the minor actinides, even if only used in a single pass. When teamed up with subsequent fast-reactor irradiations to reduce higher minor actinides (specifically americium and curium), their use could result in reducing the number of fast burner reactors required, per spent-fuel-producing LWR, compared to a system of only LWRs and fast burner reactors. After listing the six main Generation IV candidates with attributes, benefits and viability concerns, this presentation will focus on one example of fast spectrum systems and two thermal spectrum systems to indicate transmuting capabilities of both types of systems. These will be used for illustrative purposes only and are not meant to give any indication of the relative importance of these systems to concepts not mentioned. Likewise, the figures and graphs in this paper are presented without alteration from the originators (see acknowledgements), and are for illustration purposes only. (authors)

  4. Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward.

    Kasza, K.; Grandy, C.; Chang, Y.; Khalil, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-06-30

    This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition

  5. Plutonium build-up credits for a material test research reactor and influence of cross-section differences on actinide production

    Burnup calculations with SARC system were carried out to analyse the effects of plutonium build-up on criticality of MTR type research reactor PARR-1 using several WIMSD libraries based on evaluated nuclear data files ENDFB-VI.8, JEF-2.2, JEFF-3.1 and JENDL-3.2. For equilibrium core of the reactor, it was found that a net reactivity of more than 3.5 mk is induced due to build-up of plutonium isotopes during depletion. The plutonium credit amounts to 3% of the length of equilibrium cycle. From the analysis of actinide production in the core during burnup, it was observed that in most of the cases, the amounts of actinides obtained using various cross section libraries agree fairly with each other, however, significant differences were observed for 238Pu, 241Pu, 242mAm, 243Am, 242Cm and 244Cm for some libraries. The actinide chain analysis was conducted to investigate the reasons for the observed differences

  6. Plutonium build-up credits for a material test research reactor and influence of cross-section differences on actinide production

    Ahmad, Siraj Islam [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad-45650 (Pakistan)]. E-mail: sirajisl@yahoo.co.uk; Ahmad, Nasir [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad-45650 (Pakistan)

    2006-12-15

    Burnup calculations with SARC system were carried out to analyse the effects of plutonium build-up on criticality of MTR type research reactor PARR-1 using several WIMSD libraries based on evaluated nuclear data files ENDFB-VI.8, JEF-2.2, JEFF-3.1 and JENDL-3.2. For equilibrium core of the reactor, it was found that a net reactivity of more than 3.5 mk is induced due to build-up of plutonium isotopes during depletion. The plutonium credit amounts to 3% of the length of equilibrium cycle. From the analysis of actinide production in the core during burnup, it was observed that in most of the cases, the amounts of actinides obtained using various cross section libraries agree fairly with each other, however, significant differences were observed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, {sup 242m}Am, {sup 243}Am, {sup 242}Cm and {sup 244}Cm for some libraries. The actinide chain analysis was conducted to investigate the reasons for the observed differences.

  7. Generation of an actinide isotopes cross section set for fast reactor calculations using data from ENDL and ENDF/B-IV

    A Bondarenko format 25-group cross section set of actinide isotopes was generated for the fuel cycle evaluation and the incineration study in fast reactor systems. Evaluated Nuclear Data Library of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (U.S.) was used as the source data. The actinide isotopes treated are the following 28: Th-232, U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-237, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, Pu-243, Am-241, Am-242, Am-243, Cm-242, Cm-243, Cm-245, Cm-246, Cm-247, Cm-248, Bk-249, Cf-249, Cf-250, Cf-251, Cf-252 and a pseudo-fission product. ENDF/B-IV was used for U-238. The set was then collapsed to one energy group using a large LMFBR core spectrum for the comparison with other one-group sets. (author)

  8. Minimization of actinide waste by multi-recycling of thoriated fuels in the EPR reactor

    Nuttin A.; Siem S.; Ivanov E.; Méplan O.; David S; Guillemin P.; Wilson J.N.; Capellan N.; Rose S.J.

    2012-01-01

    The multi-recycling of innovative uranium/thorium oxide fuels for use in the European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR) has been investigated. If increasing quantities of 238U, the fertile isotope in standard UO2 fuel, are replaced by 232Th, then a greater yield of new fissile material (233U) is produced during the cycle than would otherwise be the case. This leads to economies of natural uranium of around 45% if the uranium in the spent fuel is multi-recycled. In addition we show that minor ac...

  9. Analysis of the minority actinides transmutation in a sodium fast reactor with uniform load pattern by the MCNPX-CINDER code; Analisis de la transmutacion de actinidos en un reactor rapido de sodio con modelo de carga homogeneo mediante el codigo MCNPX-CINDER

    Ochoa Valero, R.; Garcia-Herranz, N.; Aragones, J. M.

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the minority actinides transmutation in sodium fast reactors (SFR) assuming a uniform load pattern. It is determined the isotopic evolution of the actinides along burn, and the evolution of the reactivity and the reactivity coefficients. For that, it is used the MCNPX neutron transport code coupled with the inventory code CINDER90.

  10. Calculations of the actinide transmutation with HELIOS for fuels of light water reactors; Calculos de la transmutacion de actinidos con HELIOS para combustibles de reactores de agua ligera

    Francois L, J.L.; Guzman A, J.R. [UNAM-FI, Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: jlfl@fi-b.unam.mx

    2006-07-01

    In this work a comparison of the obtained results with the HELIOS code is made and those obtained by other similar codes, used in the international community, respect to the transmutation of smaller actinides. For this the one it is analyzed the international benchmark: 'Calculations of Different Transmutation Concepts', of the Nuclear Energy Agency. In this benchmark two cell types are analyzed: one small corresponding to a PWR standard, and another big one corresponding to a PWR highly moderated. Its are considered two types of burnt of discharge: 33 GWd/tHM and 50 GWd/tHM. The following types of results are approached: the k{sub eff} like a function of the burnt one, the atomic densities of the main isotopes of the actinides, the radioactivities in the moment in that the reactor it is off and in the times of cooling from 7 up to 50000 years, the reactivity by holes and the Doppler reactivity. The results are compared with those obtained by the following institutions: FZK (Germany), JAERI (Japan), ITEP (Russia) and IPPE (Russian Federation). In the case of the eigenvalue, the obtained results with HELIOS showed a discrepancy around 3% {delta}k/k, which was also among other participants. For the isotopic concentrations: {sup 241}Pu, {sup 242} Pu and {sup 242m} Am the results of all the institutions present a discrepancy bigger every time, as the burnt one increases. Regarding the activities, the discrepancy of results is acceptable, except in the case of the {sup 241} Pu. In the case of the Doppler coefficients the discrepancy of results is acceptable, except for the cells with high moderation; in the case of the holes coefficients, the discrepancy of results increases in agreement with the holes fraction increases, being quite high to 95% of holes. In general, the results are consistent and in good agreement with those obtained by all the participants in the benchmark. The results are inside of the established limits by the work group on Plutonium Fuels

  11. ALMR potential for actinide consumption

    The Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored fast reactor design based on the Power Reactor, Innovative Small Module (PRISM) concept originated by General Electric. This reactor combines a high degree of passive safety characteristics with a high level of modularity and factory fabrication to achieve attractive economics. The current reference design is a 471 MWt modular reactor fueled with ternary metal fuel. This paper discusses actinide transmutation core designs that fit the design envelope of the ALMR and utilize spent LWR fuel as startup material and for makeup. Actinide transmutation may be accomplished in the ALMR core by using either a breeding or burning configuration. Lifetime actinide mass consumption is calculated as well as changes in consumption behavior throughout the lifetime of the reactor. Impacts on system operational and safety performance are evaluated in a preliminary fashion. Waste disposal impacts are discussed. (author)

  12. Demonstration of a CMPO based extraction process in hot cells for the separation of minor actinides from fast reactor fuel solution

    Efficient recovery of minor actinides (MA) from a fast reactor dissolver solution (155 GWd/Te) has been successfully demonstrated using a TRUEX solvent and novel 16-stage ejector mixer settler in hot cells. Stripping of trivalents (Ln (III) + An(III)) from loaded TRUEX solvent by citric acid formulation in a batch mode was performed as a prelude to the demonstration run. Separation of trivalents were quantitative and the extracted trivalents were quantitatively stripped with citric acid formulation. Among the non-lanthanides only ruthenium was co-extracted into the product stream. (author)

  13. Transmutation of minor actinides in a Candu thorium borner

    denaturized the new 233U fuel with 238U. The temporal variation of the criticality k∞ and the burn-up values of the reactor have been calculated by full power operation for a period of 20 years. The criticality starts by k∞= ∼ 1.48 for both fuel compositions. A sharp decrease of the criticality has been observed in the first year as a consequence of rapid plutonium burnout. The criticality becomes quasi constant after the 2nd year and remains above k∞ > 1.06 for ∼ 20 years. After the 2nd year, the CANDU reactor begins to operate practically as a thorium burner. Nuclear waste actinides can also be used as a booster fissile fuel material in form of mixed fuel with thorium in a CANDU reactor in order to assure the initial criticality at startup. In the third phase, two different fuel compositions have been found useful to provide sufficient reactor criticality over a long operation period: 1) 95% thoria (ThO2) + 5% minor actinides MAO2 and 2) 95% ThO2 + 5% MAO2 + 5% UO2. The latter allows a higher degree of nuclear safeguarding thorough denaturing the new 233U fuel with 238U. The temporal variation of the criticality k∞ and the burn-up values of the reactor have been calculated by full power operation for a period of 10 years. The criticality starts by k∞ > 1.3 for both fuel compositions. A sharp decrease of the criticality has been observed in the first year as a consequence of rapid plutonium burnout in the actinide fuel. The criticality becomes quasi constant after the 2nd year and remains close to k∞ =∼1.06 for ∼ 10 years. After the 2nd year, the CANDU reactor begins to operate practically as a thorium burner. Finally, in the fourth phase, a CANDU reactor fueled with a mixed fuel made of thoria (ThO2) and the totality of nuclear waste actinides has been investigated. The mixed fuel composition has been varied in radial direction to achieve a uniform power distribution and fuel burn up in the fuel bundle. The best fuel compositions with respect to power

  14. Passive safety features of low sodium void worth metal fueled cores in a bottom supported reactor vessel

    A study has been performed on the passive safety features of low-sodium-void-worth metallic-fueled reactors with emphasis on using a bottom-supported reactor vessel design. The reactor core designs included self-sufficient types as well as actinide burners. The analyses covered the reactor response to the unprotected, i.e. unscrammed, transient overpower accident and the loss-of-flow accident. Results are given demonstrating the safety margins that were attained. 4 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  15. AECL/US INERI - Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Power Reactors -- Fuel Requirements and Down-Select Report

    William Carmack; Randy D. Lee; Pavel Medvedev; Mitch Meyer; Michael Todosow; Holly B. Hamilton; Juan Nino; Simon Philpot; James Tulenko

    2005-06-01

    The U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Program and the Atomic Energy Canada Ltd (AECL) seek to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to minimize the overall Pu and minor actinides present in the light water reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel cycles. It is proposed to reuse the Pu from LWR spent fuel both for the energy it contains and to decrease the hazard and proliferation impact resulting from storage of the Pu and minor actinides. The use of fuel compositions with a combination of U and Pu oxide (MOX) has been proposed as a way to recycle Pu and/or minor actinides in LWRs. It has also been proposed to replace the fertile U{sup 238} matrix of MOX with a fertile-free matrix (IMF) to reduce the production of Pu{sup 239} in the fuel system. It is important to demonstrate the performance of these fuels with the appropriate mixture of isotopes and determine what impact there might be from trace elements or contaminants. Previous work has already been done to look at weapons-grade (WG) Pu in the MOX configuration [1][2] and the reactor-grade (RG) Pu in a MOX configuration including small (4000 ppm additions of Neptunium). This program will add to the existing database by developing a wide variety of MOX fuel compositions along with new fuel compositions called inert-matrix fuel (IMF). The goal of this program is to determine the general fabrication and irradiation behavior of the proposed IMF fuel compositions. Successful performance of these compositions will lead to further selection and development of IMF for use in LWRs. This experiment will also test various inert matrix material compositions with and without quantities of the minor actinides Americium and Neptunium to determine feasibility of incorporation into the fuel matrices for destruction. There is interest in the U.S. and world-wide in the investigation of IMF (inert matrix fuels) for scenarios involving stabilization or burn down of plutonium in the fleet of existing commercial power reactors. IMF offer the

  16. Reduction of minor actinides for recycling in a light water reactor; Reduccion de actinidos menores por reciclado en un reactor de agua ligera

    Martinez C, E.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G., E-mail: eduardo.martinez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The aim of actinide transmutation from spent nuclear fuel is the reduction in mass of high-level waste which must be stored in geological repositories and the lifetime of high-level waste; these two achievements will reduce the number of repositories needed, as well as the duration of storage. The present work is directed towards the evaluation of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle in which the minor actinides (Np, Am and Cm) could be recycled to remove most of the radioactive material; a reference of actinides production in standard nuclear fuel of uranium at the end of its burning in a BWR is first established, after a design of fuel rod containing 6% of minor actinides in a matrix of uranium from the enrichment lines is proposed, then 4 fuel rods of standard uranium are replaced by 4 actinides bars to evaluate the production and transmutation of them and finally the minor actinides reduction in the fuel is evaluated. In the development of this work the calculation tool are the codes: Intrepin-3, Casmo-4 and Simulate-3. (Author)

  17. Transmutation efficiency in the prismatic deep burner HTR concept by a 3D Monte Carlo depletion analysis

    This paper summarizes studies performed on the Deep-Burner Modular Helium Reactor (DB-MHR) concept-design. Feasibility and sensitivity studies as well as fuel-cycle studies with probabilistic methodology are presented. Current investigations on design strategies in one and two pass scenarios, and the computational tools are also presented. Computations on the prismatic concept-design were performed on a full-core 3D model basis. The probabilistic MCNP-MONTEBURNS-ORIGEN chain, with either JEF2.2 or BVI libraries, was used. One or two independently depleting media per assembly were accounted. Due to the calculation time necessary to perform MCNP5 calculations with sufficient accuracy, the different parameters of the depletion calculations have to be optimized according to the desired accuracy of the results. Three strategies were compared: the two pass with driver and transmuter fuel loading in three rings, the one pass with driver fuel only in three rings geometry and finally the one pass in four rings. The 'two pass' scenario is the best deep burner with about 70% mass reduction of actinides for the PWR discharged fuel. However the small difference obtained for incineration (∼5%) raises the question of the interest of this scenario given the difficulty of the process for TF fuel. Finally the advantage of the 'two pass' scenario is mainly the reduction of actinide activity. (author)

  18. Design of an Actinide Burning, Lead or Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor That Produces Low Cost Electricty - FY-02 Annual Report

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this collaborative Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project is to investigate the suitability of lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The goal is to identify and analyze the key technical issues in core neutronics, materials, thermal-hydraulics, fuels, and economics associated with the development of this reactor concept. Work has been accomplished in four major areas of research: core neutronic design, plant engineering, material compatibility studies, and coolant activation. The publications derived from work on this project (since project inception) are listed in Appendix A. This is the third in a series of Annual Reports for this project, the others are also listed in Appendix A as FY-00 and FY-01 Annual Reports.

  19. Design of an Actinide Burning, Lead or Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor that Produces Low Cost Electricity FY-01 Annual Report, October 2001

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Herring, James Stephen; Loewen, Eric Paul; Smolik, Galen Richard; Weaver, Kevan Dean; Todreas, N.

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this collaborative Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project is to investigate the suitability of lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The goal is to identify and analyze the key technical issues in core neutronics, materials, thermal-hydraulics, fuels, and economics associated with the development of this reactor concept. Work has been accomplished in four major areas of research: core neutronic design, plant engineering, material compatibility studies, and coolant activation. The publications derived from work on this project (since project inception) are listed in Appendix A.

  20. Thermionic cogeneration burner assessment

    Both electric power and high-temperature flue gas can be cogenerated by combining a furnace burner with thermionic converters, forming a thermionic cogeneration burner. To assess the performance and cost of such a burner, a one-for-one replacement, bolt-on burner, which could be used in most industrial applications, was designed in detail. It was analyzed and parametric performance data was derived from a mathematical model. Details of the design analysis, as well as an economic evaluation of installed cost ($/kW) and internal rate-of-return, are presented

  1. Actinides-1981

    1981-09-01

    Abstracts of 134 papers which were presented at the Actinides-1981 conference are presented. Approximately half of these papers deal with electronic structure of the actinides. Others deal with solid state chemistry, nuclear physic, thermodynamic properties, solution chemistry, and applied chemistry.

  2. Actinides-1981

    Abstracts of 134 papers which were presented at the Actinides-1981 conference are presented. Approximately half of these papers deal with electronic structure of the actinides. Others deal with solid state chemistry, nuclear physic, thermodynamic properties, solution chemistry, and applied chemistry

  3. P and T: An option for spent fuel and waste management using a double strata fuel cycle with a dedicated waste burner reactor

    constrain plutonium even in a present time reactors (LWR, CANDU), or in the concepts under development (Molten Salt Reactors, Gas Cooled Fast Reactors, HTR, considered in INPRO and GIF initiatives). The IAEA has promoted several technical meetings, coordinated research projects related to Thorium utilization (TECDOC-1319 and TECDOC-1349. The second point is that OTC assumes that the final solution for HLW is the geological repository for thousand of years(>10,000 y). Although this looks most attractive and economically competitive, there is still a lot of controversies and unsolved issues (possibility of physical control by engineering design and natural barriers for such long period of time (10,000-100,000 y), and security). The second fuel cycle option, already implemented or in planning by countries like France, Japan, Russia, etc. Is the aqueous reprocessing fuel cycle with vitrification of HLW. In fact LWR-MOX is already in use in Western in Europe in LWRs, and are a first step in a global losed fuel cycle scenario. The PUREX aqueous process is well established, and reprocessing of Plutonium and uranium is available in France, UK, Japan, India, Russia, and China., and the recycling of these major actinides(U,Pu- 99.9% are extracted). For the innovative reactors under consideration RFC is an option, and if we include in cycle the possibility to separate MA (pyroreprocess), and burn in fast reactors than the goal to reduce the requirement in the repository by a hundred fold could be achieved. On should add, the possibility to use thorium in a closed fuel cycle with aqueous reprocessing (THOREX), with Fast Reactors, as also an option to reduce the burden in the repository, besides to increase the utilization of natural resources (thorium is 3 times more abundant than U in the earth crust, 6.000 ppb), in a sustainable nuclear energy scenario. Finally, the Advanced Fuel Cycle with Partining of MA could be a sustainable option for spent fuel and HLW management. So P and T

  4. Comparative study of plutonium burning in heavy and light water reactors

    There is interest in the U.S. and world-wide in reducing the burden on geological nuclear fuel disposal sites. In some disposal scenarios, the decay heat loading of the surrounding rock limits the commercial spent fuel capacity of the sites. In the long term (100 to 1,500 years), this decay heat is generated primarily by actinides, particularly 241Am and 241Pu. One possible approach to reducing this decay-heat burden would be to reprocess commercial spent nuclear fuel and use intermediate-tier thermal reactors to 'burn' these actinides and other transuranics (plutonium and higher actinides). The viability of this approach is dependent on the detailed changes in chemical and isotopic compositions of actinide-bearing fuels after irradiation in thermal reactor spectra. The intermediate-tier thermal burners could bridge the commercial water-cooled reactors and fast reactors required for ultimate consumption of the transuranics generated in the commercial reactors. This would reduce the number of such fast reactors required to complete the mission of burning transuranics. If thermal systems are to be used for the transmutation mission, it is likely that they would be similar to or are advanced versions of the systems currently used for power generation. In both the U.S. and Canada, light- and heavy-water-cooled thermal reactors are used for power generation in the commercial nuclear sector. About 103 pressurized- and boiling- light water reactors (PWRs and BRWs) are deployed in the U.S. nuclear industry while about 18 CANDU (heavy-water-cooled) reactors are used in the Canadian industry. There are substantial differences between light and heavy water-cooled reactors that might affect transmutation potential. These arise from differences in neutron balance of the reactors, in neutron energy spectra, in operational approaches (e.g., continuous refueling enhancing fuel burnup), and so on. A systematic study has been conducted to compare the transmutation potentials of

  5. Combustor burner vanelets

    Lacy, Benjamin (Greer, SC); Varatharajan, Balachandar (Loveland, OH); Kraemer, Gilbert Otto (Greer, SC); Yilmaz, Ertan (Albany, NY); Zuo, Baifang (Simpsonville, SC)

    2012-02-14

    The present application provides a burner for use with a combustor of a gas turbine engine. The burner may include a center hub, a shroud, a pair of fuel vanes extending from the center hub to the shroud, and a vanelet extending from the center hub and/or the shroud and positioned between the pair of fuel vanes.

  6. Transmutation of actinides from light water reactors in modular high-temperature reactors for the reduction of long-lived nuclides; Verbrennung von Aktiniden aus Leichtwasserreaktoren in modularen Hochtemperaturreaktoren zur Reduzierung langlebiger Nuklide

    Meier, Astrid

    2012-05-15

    Only one of many different ways to produce electric power is the Light Water Reactor (LWR).This reactor produces high level long-lived and radiotoxic nuclides like Plutonium and Minore Actinides (Neptunium, Americium, Curium,..), which have to be safely isolated and controlled in a final storage over a long time. Thus, many projects worldwide concentrate on the transformation of these long-lived nuclides into short-lived nuclides by transmutation and fission processes. Here, mainly accelerator driven systems and Generation-IV-reactors, like the graphite moderated, Helium cooled High Temperature Reactor (HTR), are in focus of research. The main advantages of the HTR are the fuel structure, which allows high burnups and the inherent safety. In case of a Loss Of Cooling Accident (LOCA), the decay heat will be dissipated without any active cooling system. This passive heat transfer is high enough to stay below the upper temperature limit in the fuel. Therefore, the fuel structure stays intact and the fission products retain inside the fuel. In this thesis, the long-lived nuclides like Plutonium, Neptunium and Americium, extracted from the spent LWR fuel, will be reused in a fresh fuel element for the HTR. To achieve the aim of reducing these nuclides and their radiotoxicity, the HTR has to operate at the highest possible burnup. Therefore parameters, like e.g. the fuel temperature or the power density distribution and also the behaviour in case of an accident have to be comparable to the HTR loaded with uranium fuel. The European Union project ''Plutonium and Minore Actinide Waste Management'' (PuMA) is the origin for the used reference reactor geometry, the fuel structure as well as the nuclide densities in the Plutonium and Minor Actinides fuel. The reactor design of this project is almost identical to the South African reactor concept with 400 MW{sub th} thermal power and an inner graphite column (Pebble Bed Modular Reactor PBMR-400).For

  7. MANTRA: An Integral Reactor Physics Experiment to Infer Actinide Capture Cross-sections from Thorium to Californium with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    G. Youinou; C. McGrath; G. Imel; M. Paul; R. Pardo; F. Kondev; M. Salvatores; G. Palmiotti

    2011-08-01

    The principle of the proposed experiment is to irradiate very pure actinide samples in the Advanced Test Reactor at INL and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The determination of the nuclide densities before and after neutron irradiation will allow inference of effective neutron capture cross-sections. This approach has been used in the past and the novelty of this experiment is that the atom densities of the different transmutation products will be determined using the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry technique at the ATLAS facility located at ANL. It is currently planned to irradiate the following isotopes: 232Th, 235U, 236U, 238U, 237Np, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, 241Am, 243Am, 244Cm and 248Cm.

  8. MANTRA: An Integral Reactor Physics Experiment to Infer Actinide Capture Cross-sections from Thorium to Californium with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    The principle of the proposed experiment is to irradiate very pure actinide samples in the Advanced Test Reactor at INL and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The determination of the nuclide densities before and after neutron irradiation will allow inference of effective neutron capture cross-sections. This approach has been used in the past and the novelty of this experiment is that the atom densities of the different transmutation products will be determined using the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry technique at the ATLAS facility located at ANL. It is currently planned to irradiate the following isotopes: 232Th, 235U, 236U, 238U, 237Np, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, 241Am, 243Am, 244Cm and 248Cm.

  9. Medium-Power Lead-Alloy Reactors: Missions for This Reactor Technology

    A multiyear project at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology investigated the potential of medium-power lead-alloy-cooled technology to perform two missions: (1) the production of low-cost electricity and (2) the burning of actinides from light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The goal of achieving a high power level to enhance economic performance simultaneously with adoption of passive decay heat removal and modularity capabilities resulted in designs in the range of 600-800 MW(thermal), which we classify as a medium power level compared to the lower [∼100 MW(thermal)] and higher [2800 MW(thermal)] power ratings of other lead-alloy-cooled designs. The plant design that was developed shows promise of achieving all the Generation-IV goals for future nuclear energy systems: sustainable energy generation, low overnight capital cost, a very low likelihood and degree of core damage during any conceivable accident, and a proliferation-resistant fuel cycle. The reactor and fuel cycle designs that evolved to achieve these missions and goals resulted from study of the following key trade-offs: waste reduction versus reactor safety, waste reduction versus cost, and cost versus proliferation resistance. Secondary trade-offs that were also considered were monolithic versus modular design, active versus passive safety systems, forced versus natural circulation, alternative power conversion cycles, and lead versus lead-bismuth coolant.These studies led to a selection of a common modular design with forced convection cooling, passive decay heat removal, and a supercritical CO2 power cycle for all our reactor concepts. However, the concepts adopt different core designs to optimize the achievement of the two missions. For the low-cost electricity production mission, a design approach based on fueling with low enriched uranium operating without costly reprocessing in a once-through cycle was pursued to achieve a

  10. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production, Progress Report for Work Through September 2002, 4th Quarterly Report

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2002-09-01

    The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If no additional moderator is added to the fuel rod lattice, it is possible to attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions in a supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR). This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain a hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity. One can also add moderation and design a thermal spectrum SCWR. The Generation IV Roadmap effort has identified the thermal spectrum SCWR (followed by the fast spectrum SCWR) as one of the advanced concepts that should be developed for future use. Therefore, the work in this NERI project is addressing both types of SCWRs.

  11. Modeling minor actinide multiple recycling in a lead-cooled fast reactor to demonstrate a fuel cycle without long-lived nuclear waste

    Stanisz Przemysław

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The concept of closed nuclear fuel cycle seems to be the most promising options for the efficient usage of the nuclear energy resources. However, it can be implemented only in fast breeder reactors of the IVth generation, which are characterized by the fast neutron spectrum. The lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR was defined and studied on the level of technical design in order to demonstrate its performance and reliability within the European collaboration on ELSY (European Lead-cooled System and LEADER (Lead-cooled European Advanced Demonstration Reactor projects. It has been demonstrated that LFR meets the requirements of the closed nuclear fuel cycle, where plutonium and minor actinides (MA are recycled for reuse, thereby producing no MA waste. In this study, the most promising option was realized when entire Pu + MA material is fully recycled to produce a new batch of fuel without partitioning. This is the concept of a fuel cycle which asymptotically tends to the adiabatic equilibrium, where the concentrations of plutonium and MA at the beginning of the cycle are restored in the subsequent cycle in the combined process of fuel transmutation and cooling, removal of fission products (FPs, and admixture of depleted uranium. In this way, generation of nuclear waste containing radioactive plutonium and MA can be eliminated. The paper shows methodology applied to the LFR equilibrium fuel cycle assessment, which was developed for the Monte Carlo continuous energy burnup (MCB code, equipped with enhanced modules for material processing and fuel handling. The numerical analysis of the reactor core concerns multiple recycling and recovery of long-lived nuclides and their influence on safety parameters. The paper also presents a general concept of the novel IVth generation breeder reactor with equilibrium fuel and its future role in the management of MA.

  12. Calculation and Analysis of B/T (Burning and/or Transmutation Rate of Minor Actinides and Plutonium Performed by Fast B/T Reactor

    Marsodi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Calculation and analysis of B/T (Burning and/or Transmutation rate of MA (minor actinides and Pu (Plutonium has been performed in fast B/T reactor. The study was based on the assumption that the spectrum shift of neutron flux to higher side of neutron energy had a potential significance for designing the fast B/T reactor and a remarkable effect for increasing the B/T rate of MA and/or Pu. The spectrum shifts of neutron have been performed by change MOX to metallic fuel. Blending fraction of MA and or Pu in B/T fuel and the volume ratio of fuel to coolant in the reactor core were also considered. Here, the performance of fast B/T reactor was evaluated theoretically based on the calculation results of the neutronics and burn-up analysis. In this study, the B/T rate of MA and/or Pu increased by increasing the blending fraction of MA and or Pu and by changing the F/C ratio. According to the results, the total B/T rate, i.e. [B/T rate]MA + [B/T rate]Pu, could be kept nearly constant under the critical condition, if the sum of the MA and Pu inventory in the core is nearly constant. The effect of loading structure was examined for inner or outer loading of concentric geometry and for homogeneous loading. Homogeneous loading of B/T fuel was the good structure for obtaining the higher B/T rate, rather than inner or outer loading

  13. Actinide recycle in LMFBRs as a waste management alternative

    Beaman, S.L.

    1979-08-21

    A strategy of actinide burnup in fast reactor systems has been investigated as an approach for reducing the long term hazards and storage requirements of the actinide waste elements and their decay daughters. The actinide recycle studies also included plutonium burnup studies in the event that plutonium is no longer required as a fuel. Particular emphasis was placed upon the timing of the recycle program, the requirements for separability of the waste materials, and the impact of the actinides on the reactor operations and performance. It is concluded that actinide recycle and plutonium burnout are attractive alternative waste management concepts. 25 refs., 14 figs., 34 tabs.

  14. Actinide recycle in LMFBRs as a waste management alternative

    A strategy of actinide burnup in fast reactor systems has been investigated as an approach for reducing the long term hazards and storage requirements of the actinide waste elements and their decay daughters. The actinide recycle studies also included plutonium burnup studies in the event that plutonium is no longer required as a fuel. Particular emphasis was placed upon the timing of the recycle program, the requirements for separability of the waste materials, and the impact of the actinides on the reactor operations and performance. It is concluded that actinide recycle and plutonium burnout are attractive alternative waste management concepts. 25 refs., 14 figs., 34 tabs

  15. Innovative reactor core: potentialities and design

    Gen IV nuclear reactors are considered a very attractive answer for the demand of energy. Because public acceptance they have to fulfil very clearly the requirement of sustainable development. In this sense a reactor concept, having by itself a rather no significant interaction with the environment both on the front and back end ('adiabatic concept'), is vital. This goal in mind, a new way of designing such a core has to be assumed. The starting point must be the 'zero impact'. Therefore the core will be designed having as basic constraints: a) fed with only natural or depleted Uranium, and b) discharges only fission products. Meantime its potentiality as a net burner of Minor Actinide has to be carefully estimated. This activity, referred to the ELSY reactor, shows how to design such an 'adiabatic' core and states its reasonable capability of burning MA legacy in the order of 25-50 kg/GWey. (authors)

  16. Recovering actinide values

    Actinide values are recovered from sodium carbonate scrub waste solutions containing these and other values along with organic compounds resulting from the radiolytic and hydrolytic degradation of neutral organophosphorus extractants such as tri-n butyl phosphate (TBP) and dihexyl-N, N-diethyl carbamylmethylene phosphonate (DHDECMP) which have been used in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear reactor fuels. The scrub waste solution is made acidic with mineral acid, to form a feed solution which is then contacted with a water-immiscible, highly polar organic extractant which selectively extracts the degradation products from the feed solution. The feed solution can then be processed to recover the actinides for storage or recycled back into the high-level waste process stream. The extractant can be recycled after stripping the degradation products with a neutral sodium carbonate solution. (author)

  17. Transmutation of nuclear waste. State-of-the-art national and international research and strategy studies on partitioning and transmutation of actinides and fission products

    Since 1991 the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN) in Petten, Netherlands, runs a programme on recycling and transmutation of actinides and long-lived fission products that are present in the spent fuel from nuclear power generation. This programme, which is known under the Dutch acronym RAS, is concentrated on the following topics: reactor physics and scenario studies for transmutation, non-proliferation, thorium cycle, irradiations in the High Flux Reactor at Petten, chemical and material studies of fuels and targets, radiological effects and risks. In the present paper a short description of the achievements of the RAS programme is given. Next, the status of the international research on recycling of actinides and fission products is described. Strategies and (innovative) fuel cycle technology required for the recycling of plutonium, minor actinides and fission products are discussed and their possibilities and limits are identified. Also the potential of future options with low actinide production (thorium cycles, accelerators) is considered. Recommendations for future research in this field are given, taking into account the results of a review by a national committee of experts from government, science and industry. The future work should concentrate on: advanced partitioning methods for trivalent actinides, for which a break-through is required, transmutation of actinides using inert matrices as support (non-fissionable materials), studies using 100% MOX-PWRs, HWRs, HTRs and fast burners, innovative systems for future 'clean' energy production using thorium cycle and/or accelerators. It is emphasized that the radiological effects of all new concepts to be developed for recycling and transmutation should be analysed adequately. 6 figs., 14 tabs., 97 refs

  18. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  19. Actinide recovery techniques utilizing electromechanical processes

    Under certain conditions, the separation of actinides using electromechanical techniques may be an effective means of residue processing. The separation of granular mixtures of actinides and other materials discussed in this report is based on appreciable differences in the magnetic and electrical properties of the actinide elements. In addition, the high density of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium, may render a simultaneous separation based on mutually complementary parameters. Both high intensity magnetic separation and electrostatic separation have been investigated for the concentration of an actinide waste stream. Waste stream constituents include an actinide metal alloy and broken quartz shards. The investigation of these techniques is in support of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept currently being developed at Argonne National Laboratory under the auspices of the Department of Energy

  20. Actinide recycle

    A multitude of studies and assessments of actinide partitioning and transmutation were carried out in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Probably the most comprehensive of these was a study coordinated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The conclusions of this study were that only rather weak economic and safety incentives existed for partitioning and transmuting the actinides for waste management purposes, due to the facts that (1) partitioning processes were complicated and expensive, and (2) the geologic repository was assumed to contain actinides for hundreds of thousands of years. Much has changed in the few years since then. A variety of developments now combine to warrant a renewed assessment of the actinide recycle. First of all, it has become increasingly difficult to provide to all parties the necessary assurance that the repository will contain essentially all radioactive materials until they have decayed. Assurance can almost certainly be provided to regulatory agencies by sound technical arguments, but it is difficult to convince the general public that the behavior of wastes stored in the ground can be modeled and predicted for even a few thousand years. From this point of view alone there would seem to be a clear benefit in reducing the long-term toxicity of the high-level wastes placed in the repository

  1. Actinide burning and waste disposal

    Here we review technical and economic features of a new proposal for a synergistic waste-management system involving reprocessing the spent fuel otherwise destined for a U.S. high-level waste repository and transmuting the recovered actinides in a fast reactor. The proposal would require a U.S. fuel reprocessing plant, capable of recovering and recycling all actinides, including neptunium americium, and curium, from LWR spent fuel, at recoveries of 99.9% to 99.999%. The recovered transuranics would fuel the annual introduction of 14 GWe of actinide-burning liquid-metal fast reactors (ALMRs), beginning in the period 2005 to 2012. The new ALMRs would be accompanied by pyrochemical reprocessing facilities to recover and recycle all actinides from discharged ALMR fuel. By the year 2045 all of the LWR spent fuel now destined f a geologic repository would be reprocessed. Costs of constructing and operating these new reprocessing and reactor facilities would be borne by U.S. industry, from the sale of electrical energy produced. The ALMR program expects that ALMRs that burn actinides from LWR spent fuel will be more economical power producers than LWRs as early as 2005 to 2012, so that they can be prudently selected by electric utility companies for new construction of nuclear power plants in that era. Some leaders of DOE and its contractors argue that recovering actinides from spent fuel waste and burning them in fast reactors would reduce the life of the remaining waste to about 200-300 years, instead of 00,000 years. The waste could then be stored above ground until it dies out. Some argue that no geologic repositories would be needed. The current view expressed within the ALMR program is that actinide recycle technology would not replace the need for a geologic repository, but that removing actinides from the waste for even the first repository would simplify design and licensing of that repository. A second geologic repository would not be needed. Waste now planned

  2. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production, 3rd Quarterly Report

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2002-06-01

    The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed.

  3. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production, 3rd Quarterly Report

    The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O and M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed

  4. Using a modified CINDER90 routine in MCNPX 2.6.0 for the prediction of helium production in minor actinide targets

    Highlights: ► Modification of the CINDER90 depletion code used by MCNPX 2.6.0. ► Testing using the Sodium-Cooled Heterogeneous Innovative Burner Reactor model. ► Verified using the ORIGEN-ARP module of SCALE6. ► Verified by depleting a single Sodium Fast Reactor assembly. ► Gas production rates are more accurate for heterogeneous MA target rods. - Abstract: Fast reactors containing heterogeneous minor actinide (MA) target rods are now being modeled. When studying transmutation in these rods, helium production from α-decay must be considered since it is produced in substantial quantities. This research utilized an innovative method to calculate gas production by modifying the CINDER90 depletion code used by MCNPX 2.6.0 to include helium production from α-decay. The modified CINDER90 code was verified using the ORIGEN-ARP module of SCALE6. It was tested using the Sodium-Cooled Heterogeneous Innovative Burner Reactor model created at the University of South Carolina. It is recommended that the modified version of the cinder.dat file be distributed in subsequent MCNPX 2.6.0 releases for use in fast reactor calculations using heterogeneous MA target rods since it includes helium production otherwise not available from the current version.

  5. Downhole burner for wells

    Brandt, H.; Hazard, H.R.; Hummell, J.D.; Schulz, E.J.

    1966-03-22

    This is a downhole gas and air burner for use in wells to stimulate production. The combustible mixture is supplied to the combustion chamber of the downhole burner through a delivery tube. This tube includes a flow-back preventer and a check valve. The flashback preventers consist of a porous material which has restricted flow paths. The check valve controls the flow of combustible mixture to the combustion chamber and prevents undesirable pulsating flow through the combustion chamber and the delivery tube. The check valve also prevents flooding of the combustion chamber by well fluid. The burner is ignited electrically. The porous material can be flat strip or a conically shaped piece of thin porous metal.

  6. Fundamental studies on porous flame reactors for minimizing pollutant emissions of premix burners. Continued report; Grundlagenuntersuchungen an poroesen Flammenreaktoren zur Minimierung von Schadgasemissionen bei der vorgemischten Verbrennung. Fortsetzungsbericht

    Durst, F.; Moessbauer, S.

    2001-01-31

    The report summarizes investigations of effective heat transport processes inside highly porous solid structures. These heat transport processes are of decisive importance for the pore burner technology developed at Erlangen-Nuremberg University. A test stand was set up for recording the two-dimensional temperature field of cross-flowed solid structures. [German] Der vorliegende Bericht fasst Arbeiten zusammen, die sich mit der Bestimmung effektiver Waermetransportvorgaenge im Inneren von hochporoesen Festkoerperstrukturen befassen. Diese Waermetransportvorgaenge sind entscheidend fuer die Vorteile der am Lehrstuhl fuer Stroemungsmechanik der Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg entwickelten Porenbrennertechnologie. Um diese Vorteile besser zu nutzen und um diese neuartige Technologie weiter verbessern zu koennen, ist es erforderlich, dass die ablaufenden Waermetransportvorgaenge im Inneren von hochporoesen Strukturen im Detail verstanden werden. Zu diesem Zweck wurde ein Versuchsstand erstellt, mit dem das zweidimensionale Temperaturfeld von durchstroemten Festkoerperstrukturen erfasst werden kann. (orig.)

  7. MANTA. An Integral Reactor Physics Experiment to Infer the Neutron Capture Cross Sections of Actinides and Fission Products in Fast and Epithermal Spectra

    Youinou, Gilles Jean-Michel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-01

    neutron irradiation allows to infer energy-integrated neutron cross sections, i.e. ∫₀σ(E)φ(E)dE, where φ(E) is the neutron flux “seen” by the sample. This approach, which is usually defined and led by reactor physicists, is referred to as integral and is the object of this report. These two sources of information, i.e. differential and integral, are complementary and are used by the nuclear physicists in charge of producing the evaluated nuclear data files used by the nuclear community (ENDF, JEFF…). The generation of accurate nuclear data files requires an iterative process involving reactor physicists and nuclear data evaluators. This experimental program has been funded by the ATR National Scientific User Facility (ATR-NSUF) and by the DOE Office of Science in the framework of the Recovery Act. It has been given the name MANTRA for Measurement of Actinides Neutron TRAnsmutation.

  8. Flat flame burner

    Matsumura, Y.; Mitsudomi, H.

    1976-02-24

    Osaka Gas Co., Ltd.'s new flat-flame heat-treatment burner offers lower material costs, reduced combustion noise, and elimination of the need for a high-pressure fuel gas to provide a high-velocity combustion burner. The flat-flame burner contains an air-swirling chamber with a flame opening in one side; the wall defining the flame opening has a small thickness around the opening and a flat outer face. This construction causes the combustion gas to be forced out from the flame opening in a spiral direction by the swirling air current within the air chamber; together with the orifice effect of permitting the flame to emanate from a small opening to an unconfined outer space, this helps assure the formation of a flat flame spreading out over a very wide area for very rapid, uniform, and highly efficient heat treatment of an article to be heated. This approach also permits the thickness of the overall device to be reduced. The supply of combustion air in the form of a swirling stream makes it possible to provide a high-velocity combustion burner without using a high-pressure fuel gas, with the advantage of satisfactory mixture of the fuel gas and combustion air and consequently markedly reduced combustion noise.

  9. Analysis of the transmutation of actinides minority in a sodium cooled fast reactor; Analisis de la transmutacion de actinidos minoritarios en un reactor rapido refrigerado por sodio

    Ochoa Valero, R.

    2011-07-01

    Fast reactors represent a highly sustainable source of energy due to the use of a closed fuel cycle, which makes better use of natural resource and reducing the volume and heat load of high level radioactive waste.

  10. System and safety studies of accelerator driven systems and generation IV reactors for transmutation of minor actinides. Annual report 2009

    During 2009, the reactor physics division has made a design study of a source efficient ADS with nitride fuel and 15/15Ti cladding, based on the EFIT design made within the EUROTRANS project. It was shown that the source efficiency may be doubled as compared to the reference design with oxide fuel and T91 cladding. Transient analysis of a medium sized sodium cooled reactor with MOX fuel allowed to define criteria in terms of power penalty for americium introduction. It was shown that for each percent of americium added to the fuel, the linear rating must be reduced by 6% in order for the fuel to survive postulated unprotected transients. The Sjoestrand area ratio method for reactivity determination has been evaluated experimentally in the strongly heterogeneous subcritical facility YALINA-Booster. Surprisingly, it has been found that the area ratio reactivity estimates may differ by a factor of two depending on detector position. It is shown that this strong spatial dependence can be explained based on a two-region point kinetics model and rectified by means of correction factors obtained through Monte Carlo simulations. For the purpose of measuring high energy neutron cross sections at the SCANDAL facility in Uppsala, Monte Carlo simulations of neutron to proton conversion efficiencies in CsI detectors have been performed. A uranium fuel fabrication laboratory has been taken into operation at KTH in 2009. Uranium and zirconium nitride powders have been fabricated by hydridation/nitridation of metallic source materials. Sample pellets have been pressed and ZrN discs have been sintered to 93% density by means of spark plasma sintering methods