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Sample records for zircaloy-4 endplate welding

  1. Characterization of electron beam welded Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anishetty, Sharath; Manna, I.; Majumdar, J. Dutta

    2015-01-01

    Zirconium (Zr) alloys are the backbone materials for thermal reactors because of their low neutron absorption cross section and in addition have suitable properties like high temperature mechanical and corrosion properties. For various structural applications, different Zirconium based alloys are used. Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) is most commonly used as channel boxes in boiling water reactors (BWRs), intermediate grid applications in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and in fuel cladding. Zircaloy cladding acts as a barrier between the radioactive fuel and exterior coolants. Therefore, the structural integrity of the cladding tube is extremely important in the safe operation of reactors. Efforts are being made to produce Zircaloy-4 products with better mechanical properties. Different routes of processing are involved like forging, pilgering and extrusion are developed over years in fabricating components to improve in-reactor performance. In this study, microstructure and hardness properties of electron beam welded Zr-4 was evaluated

  2. Technical Support of Performance Improvement for Resistance Welding Using Zr-4 Endcap and Endplate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Sung

    2008-10-15

    The proper welding process for Zircaloy-4 endplate of PHWR and DUPIC fuel bundle assembly is considered important in respect to the soundness of weldment and the improvement of the performance of nuclear fuel bundle during the operation in reactor. The Zircaloy-4 endplate of PHWR and DUPIC fuel bundles are welded by the projection joint type, connecting the endcaps of fuel elements. Therefore, the purpose of this projection joint is to improve the welding quality of torque strength and welding deformation and to apply the commercial productions for the endplate welding of PHWR and DUPIC nuclear fuel bundle assembly.

  3. Microstructure in welding zone of a zircaloy 4 tube welded by TIG process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolfarini, C.; Domingues Filho, H.

    1982-01-01

    The details concerned with the welding of seamless zircaloy 4 tubes for nuclear application and the earlier welding tests made in the tubes that will be used for the construction of the Argonautas' Reactor fuel element, are described. Based on the references the microestructure changes in the heat affected zone were analyzed in respect to the material's performance in operation. (Author) [pt

  4. Comparison study between GTWA and PAW welding techniques in zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, R.L.; Boccanera, L.; Ortiz, L.; Fernandez, L.; Corso, H.

    2003-01-01

    The wide use of zirconium alloys in different structural parts of nuclear reactors mainly under severe environmental conditions has encouraged the study of Zircaloy-4 and specifically welded joints of this material.Many different factors affect mechanical properties, specifically hydrides, formed by absorbed hydrogen.Hydrogen solubility in Zircaloy-4 is low and because Zircaloy-4 picks up hydrogen during service the potential exist that zirconium hydrides phase precipitate causing loss of ductility, the most undesirable consequence. Therefore, the study and characterization of welded joint of nuclear materials assumes fundamental importance in the safety of nuclear reactors.This paper presents experimental results regarding of hardness and hydrogen concentration in Zircaloy-4 plates obtained by two different welding techniques GTWA (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) and PAW (Plasma Arc Welding).In this work following these remarks the difference observed between these two techniques are presented and point out some aspects of PAW for further discussion

  5. Linear Friction Welding of Dissimilar Materials 316L Stainless Steel to Zircaloy-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanjara, P.; Naik, B. S.; Yang, Q.; Cao, X.; Gholipour, J.; Chen, D. L.

    2018-02-01

    In the nuclear industry, there are a number of applications where the transition of stainless steel to Zircaloy is of technological importance. However, due to the differences in their properties there are considerable challenges associated with developing a joining process that will sufficiently limit the heat input and welding time—so as to minimize the extent of interaction at the joint interface and the resulting formation of intermetallic compounds—but still render a functional metallurgical bond between these two alloys. As such, linear friction welding, a solid-state joining technology, was selected in the present study to assess the feasibility of welding 316L stainless steel to Zircaloy-4. The dissimilar alloy welds were examined to evaluate their microstructural characteristics, microhardness evolution across the joint interface, static tensile properties, and fatigue behavior. Microstructural observations revealed a central intermixed region and, on the Zircaloy-4 side, dynamically recrystallized and thermomechanically affected zones were present. By contrast, deformation on the 316L stainless steel side was limited. In the intermixed region a drastic change in the composition was observed along with a local increase in hardness, which was attributed to the presence of intermetallic compounds, such as FeZr3 and Cr2Zr. The average yield (316 MPa) and ultimate tensile (421 MPa) strengths met the minimum strength properties of Zircaloy-4, but the elongation was relatively low ( 2 pct). The tensile and fatigue fracture of the welds always occurred at the interface in the mode of partial cohesive failure.

  6. TEM study of microstructure in explosive welded joints between Zircaloy-4 and stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Hairong; Zhou Bangxin

    1996-10-01

    The microstructure of explosive welded joints between Zircaloy-4 and 18/8 stainless steel has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The metallurgical bonding was achieved by combining effect of diffusion and local melting when the explosive parameters were selected correctly. The molten region which consists of amorphous and crystalline with hexagonal crystal structure is hard and brittle. But the welded joints can be pulled, bent and cold rolled without cracks formed on the bonding layer, so as the molten regions are small and distributed as isolated islands. (6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.)

  7. Development of remote welding technology for nuclear fuel end capping (A study on the weldability of Zircaloy-4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kho, Jin Hyun; Sung, Ho Hyun; Hyun, Yong Kyu; Suh, Hee Kang [Korea University of Technology and Education, Cheonan (Korea)

    1998-03-01

    The integrity of nuclear fuel end cap welds is essential to the nuclear fuel performance and safety as well as the usability of power plant. The first aim of this project is to obtain experimental data on the nuclear fuel cladding materials of Zircaloy-4 with welding processes such as plasma arc, gas tungsten arc and laser beam welding. the data obtained in this study will be applicable to the nuclear fuel design, fabrication and nuclear fuel quality control. In addition, the welding processes applicable to the Zircaloy-4 welding were compared and contrasted. The weldability of Zircaloy-4 was evaluated from the metallurgical and mechanical standpoints. 88 refs., 57 figs., 16 tabs. (Author)

  8. Improvements in welding parameters for a new design of zircaloy-4 tube-end plug joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, R.L.; Fernandez, L.; Corso, H.L.; Ausas, J; Santisteban, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents the experimental results for the characterization of welds using a new design for zircaloy-4 tube-end plug joints, applicable to the production of fuel elements for the Atucha I Nuclear Plant. Test specimens were prepared following the new joint design and were welded using orbital welding equipment. Hydrogen content was measured in the different welding areas, and corrosion tests, and mechanical and microstructural descriptions were carried out, obtaining values that meet the current production standards. We reported previously that test samples welded in equipment with a smaller camera showed some relatively high hydrogen levels, together with alterations in the welded zone in the corrosion tests. Given these results, new tests were undertaken to optimize the welding parameters, being very careful with the purity of the welding atmosphere and in the handling of the samples. The intensity of the welding current was increased slightly to obtain better penetration of the material, without significantly increasing the heat input. The traction resistance values improved, reducing the hydrogen content to well below the maximum allowed by the standards (25 ppm) in all the welding zones and obtaining satisfactory results in the corrosion tests

  9. Outlook for a new design application for the joint union geometry of zircaloy-4 pipe-plug welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, R.L; Corso, H.L; Ausas, J; Fernandez, L

    2008-01-01

    The potential advantages are described and the test results shown for a new joint design for the Zircaloy-4 sheath-plug welding, used in the production of fuel elements for nuclear reactor power generators. Samples taken from sheaths and plugs similar to those used in the Atucha I Reactor were welded using the orbital GTAW process (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding), using a new joint design and equipment that is now applied to the production of high quality welding, with very low levels of contamination. The test results from the experiments with hydrogen content, corrosion, metallographic and traction on samples of these welds are compared with those obtained in simples taken from the conventionally processed fuel elements for Atucha I. The results are also presented for the characterization of samples obtained with the same orbital welding method, but with a smaller protective chamber. This work aimed to verify the influence of the welding chamber size on the contamination with hydrogen. The utility of applying the new design together with the orbital GTAW method to the fabrication process for fuel elements is discussed

  10. Torque Measurement of Welding of Endplug-Endplate using Multi-pin Remote Welding System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Dae-Seo; Kim, Soo-Sung; Park, Geun-Il; Lee, Jung-Won; Song, Kee-Chan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    As fuel bundles in PHWR irradiates, inner pressure in claddings of fuel rods increases owing to outer pressure and fission products of nuclear fissions. Because of leak possibility of welding between cladding and end plug, this welding part connects with safety of nuclear fuel rods. Because of importance of this welding part, weldability of end plug-cladding of nuclear fuel rods is continually researched. Welding method for research and commercialization is classified as melting, solid type welding or resistance welding. End plug cladding welding of nuclear fuel rods in PHWR takes advantage of resistance upset butt welding using multicycle mode. This method makes weld flash and shapes re-entrant corner owing to welding heat due to resistivity, contact resistance of cladding-end plug, and inelasticity deformation due to pressure. Welding part between cladding and end plug receives stresses and makes small cracks. In this study, remote welding system for multi-pin assembly was designed, fabricated and welding specimens of end plug-endplate were made using electrical resistance method. The torques of welding between end plug and endplate were measured. These results on welding current, pressure of main electrode and pressure of branch electrode were analyzed. Weldability between end plug and endplate was confirmed through metallographic examinations. In the future, optimal welding examinations due to welding current, welding pressure and welding time will be performed to improve weldability of end plug-endplate.

  11. Development of laser welded appendages to Zircaloy-4 fuel tubing (sheath/cladding)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingstone, S., E-mail: steve.livingstone@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories Limited, Chalk River, ON, Canada K0J 1J0 (Canada); Xiao, L. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories Limited, Chalk River, ON, Canada K0J 1J0 (Canada); Corcoran, E.C.; Ferrier, G.A.; Potter, K.N. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON, Canada K7K 7B4 (Canada)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • Examines feasibility of laser welding appendages to Zr-4 tubing. • Laser welding minimizes the HAZ and removes toxic Be. • Mechanical properties of laser welds appear competitive with induction brazed joints. • Work appears promising and lays the foundation for further investigations. - Abstract: Laser welding is a potential alternative to the induction brazing process commonly used for appendage attachment in CANDU{sup ®} fuel fabrication that uses toxic Be as a filler metal, and creates multiple large heat affected zones in the sheath. For this work, several appendages were laser welded to tubing using different laser heat input settings and then examined with a variety of techniques: visual examination, metallography, shear strength testing, impact testing, and fracture surface analysis. Where possible, the examination results are contrasted against production induction brazed joints. The work to date looks promising for laser welded appendages. Further work on joint optimization, corrosion testing, irradiation testing, and post-irradiation examination will be performed in the future.

  12. Torque strength of an endplate welding due to process parameters using a fuel assembling welder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Dae-Seo; Kim, Soo-Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    As fuel bundles in a PHWR core irradiated, inner pressure in the claddings of the fuel rods increases owing to the outer pressure and fission products of the nuclear fissions. Because of a leak possibility from a welding between a cladding and end plug, this welding part is connected with the safety of nuclear fuel rods. Endplug-cladding welding of nuclear fuel rods in a PHWR takes advantage of a resistance upset butt welding. The weldment between a cladding and endplug is to be sound to prevent a leakage of fission products from a cladding as a UO{sub 2} pellet is irradiated. Weld flash was made from a deformation due to a welding heat and increasing the pressure of the resistivity and resistance from a cladding and endplug. Weld line of a welding interface, microstructure of a weldment and a crystallographic structure change were sources of an iodine induced SCC in a reactor. The soundness of a weldment is important because a weld line connects the leakage of fission products from an operational reactor. In this study, welding specimens were fabricated by a resistance welding method using a bundle fuel welder to measure and analyze the torque of an endplug-endplate welding. The torque of a weldment between an endplug and endplate was measured and analyzed with the welding time. The weldability of a weldment between an endplug and endplate was investigated by a metallographic examination.

  13. A Relationship of the Torque Strength between Endplates and Endcaps due to the Welding Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Dae Seo; Kim, Soo Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    As fuel bundles in a PHWR core irradiated, inner pressure in the claddings of the fuel rods increases owing to the outer pressure and fission products of the nuclear fissions. Because of a leak possibility from a welding between a cladding and an endcap, this welding part is connected with the safety of nuclear fuel rods. Endcap-cladding welding of nuclear fuel rods in a PHWR takes advantage of a resistance upset butt welding. The weldment between a cladding and an endcap is to be sound to prevent a leakage of fission products from a cladding as a UO{sub 2} pellet is irradiated. Weld flash was made from a deformation due to a welding heat and increasing the pressure of the resistivity and resistance from a cladding and an endcap. Weld line of a welding interface, microstructure of a weldment and a crystallographic structure change were sources of an iodine induced SCC in a reactor. The soundness of a weldment is important because a weld line connects the leakage of fission products from an operational reactor. In this study, welding specimens were fabricated by a resistance welding method using a fuel bundle welder to measure and analyze the torque strength of an endplate-endcap welding. The torque strength between endplates and endcaps was measured and analyzed with the welding current and the welding time. The torque strength between endplates and endcaps was, on the whole, within 6.9-12.7 N{center_dot}m in the range of fabrication specification of the fuel bundles. The weldability of between an endplate and an endcap was investigated by a metallographic examination.

  14. Numerical Simulations on the Laser Spot Welding of Zirconium Alloy Endplate for Nuclear Fuel Bundle Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, G.; Narayana, K. L.; Boggarapu, Nageswara Rao

    2018-03-01

    In the nuclear industry, a critical welding process is joining of an end plate to a fuel rod to form a fuel bundle. Literature on zirconium welding in such a critical operation is limited. A CFD model is developed and performed for the three-dimensional non-linear thermo-fluid analysis incorporating buoyancy and Marnangoni stress and specifying temperature dependent properties to predict weld geometry and temperature field in and around the melt pool of laser spot during welding of a zirconium alloy E110 endplate with a fuel rod. Using this method, it is possible to estimate the weld pool dimensions for the specified laser power and laser-on-time. The temperature profiles will estimate the HAZ and microstructure. The adequacy of generic nature of the model is validated with existing experimental data.

  15. Zircaloy-4 corrosion in PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fyfitch, S.; Smalley, W.R.; Roberts, E.

    1985-01-01

    Zircaloy-4 waterside corrosion has been studied extensively in the nuclear industry for a number of years. Following the early crud-related corrosion failures in the Saxton test reactor, Westinghouse undertook numerous programs to minimize crud deposition on fuel rods in power reactors through primary coolant chemistry control. Modern plants today are operating with improved coolant chemistry guidelines, and crud deposition levels are very low in proportion to earlier experience. Zircaloy-4 corrosion under a variety of coolant chemistry, heat flux and exposure conditions has been studied extensively. Experience to date, even in relatively high coolant temperature plants, has indicated that -for both fuel cladding and structural components- Zircaloy-4 waterside corrosion performance has been excellent. Recognizing future industry trends, however, which will result in Zircaloy-4 being subjected to ever increasing corrosion duties, Westinghouse will continue accumulating Zircaloy-4 corrosion experience in large power plants. 13 refs.

  16. Feasibility demonstration of using wire electrical-discharge machining, abrasive flow honing, and laser spot welding to manufacture high-precision triangular-pitch Zircaloy-4 fuel-rod-support grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwood, W.A.

    1982-05-01

    Results are reported supporting the feasibility of manufacturing high precision machined triangular pitch Zircaloy-4 fuel rod support grids for application in water cooled nuclear power reactors. The manufacturing processes investigated included wire electrical discharge machining of the fuel rod and guide tube cells in Zircaloy plate stock to provide the grid body, multistep pickling of the machined grid to provide smooth and corrosion resistant surfaces, and laser welding of thin Zircaloy cover plates to both sides of the grid body to capture separate AM-350 stainless steel insert springs in the grid body. Results indicated that dimensional accuracy better than +- 0.001 and +- 0.002 inch could be obtained on cell shape and position respectively after wire EDM and surface pickling. Results on strength, corrosion resistance, and internal quality of laser spot welds are provided

  17. Zircaloy 4 ingots' industrial fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyt, A.

    1987-01-01

    The technology developed for the industrial fabrication of Zircaloy-4 ingots is presented. According to the results obtained: a) the homogeneity of the ingots is analyzed, regarding the distribution of components (tin, iron, chromium, oxygen) and Brinell hardness as a function of different types of charge: zirconium sponge-recycling alloy material, sponge of zirconium-alloy; b) the distribution of the same parameters as a function of production is also analyzed. (Author)

  18. Recovery and recrystallisation of zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derep, J.L.; Rouby, D.; Fantozzi, G.

    1981-01-01

    Examination of the three mechanisms that control the recovery of zircaloy-4 workhardened by rolling: polygonisation leading to a cellular structure, annihilation of dislocations of opposite sign producing thinning of the cell walls, and growth of subgrains by coalescence [fr

  19. Hydrogen terminal solubility in Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizcaino, Pablo; Banchik, Abrahan D.

    1999-01-01

    Terminal solubility temperature of hydrogen in zirconium and its alloys is an important parameter because hydrides precipitation embrittled these materials making them susceptible to the phenomenon known as retarded hydrogen cracking. This work continues the study presented in the 25 AATN Meeting. Within this framework, a study focused on determining these curves in recrystallized Zircaloy-4, using scanning differential calorimetric technique. Terminal solubility curves for Zircaloy-4 were constructed within a concentration range from 40 to 640 ppm in hydrogen weight and comparisons with results obtained by other authors were made. (author)

  20. Hydriding and neutron irradiation in zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Ruben Fortunato; Martin, Juan Ezequiel; Orellano, Pablo; Dorao, Carlos; Analia Soldati; Ghilarducci, Ada Albertina; Corso, Hugo Luis; Peretti, Hernan Americo; Bolcich, Juan Carlos

    2003-01-01

    The composition of Zircaloy-4 for nuclear applications is specified by the ASTM B350 Standard, that fixes the amount of alloying elements (Sn, Fe, Cr) and impurities (Ni, Hf, O, N, C, among others) to optimize good corrosion and mechanical behavior.The recycling of zircaloy-4 scrap and chips resulting from cladding tube fabrication is an interesting issue.However, changes in the final composition of the recycled material may occur due to contamination with tool pieces, stainless steel chips, turnings, etc. while scrap is stored and handled. Since the main components of the possible contaminants are Fe, Cr and Ni, it arises the interest in studying up to what limit the Fe, Ni and Cr contents could be exceeded beyond the standard specification without affecting significantly the alloy properties.Zircaloy-4 alloys elaborated with Fe, Cr and Ni additions and others of standard composition in use in nuclear plants are studied by tensile tests, SEM observations and EDS microanalysis.Some samples are tested in the initial condition and others after hydriding treatments and neutron irradiation in the RA6

  1. Embrittlement by hydrogen in zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almendariz M, M.C.

    1981-01-01

    The brittleness study of zircaloy-4 (nuclear quality) by hydrogen in the lattice was carried out with the purpose to watch the alterations at mechanic properties and fracture appearance for different thermal treatments. We used a statistical experimental method to watch both alterations. Fracture toughness property was evaluated in a semiquantitative way, and this property was calculated by integral J method but at a modified version, this modification lies in the area calculation under the curve of load versus head displacement plot; we used Instron machine to evaluate it. Three points bending proof was carried out in accordance with the device that specify A.S.T.M. standards. The samples were treated with hydrogen by means of catodic charged method and subsequently mechanic proof was realized. We used statistical analysis to get information of experimental results, and the watched general behaviour was a great disminution of the fracture toughness (in relation to not treated hydrogen sample), always that the hydrogen is present in the lattice, likewise we did watch that hydrogen does not influence at fracture appearance change, further there is a threshold hydrogen concentration at wich it starts to brittle and prior not influence it. We did conclude of results analysis that the fracture toughness is reduced by hydrogen and threshold concentration is subject to thermal treatment. Experimental results can be considered as semiquantitatives, but they gave us an explicit idea of hydrogen effect in zircaloy-4. (author)

  2. Biaxial mechanical tests in zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mintzer, S.R.; Bordoni, R.A.A.; Falcone, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The texture of the zircaloy-4 tubes used as cladding in nuclear fuel elements determines anisotropy of the mechanical properties. As a consequence, the uniaxial tests to determine the mechanical behaviour of the tubes are incomplete. Furthermore, the cladding in use is subject to creep with a state of biaxial tensions. For this reason it is also important to determine the biaxial mechanical properties. The creep tests were performed by internal pressure for a state of axial to circumferential tensions of 0.5. Among the experimental procedures are described: preparation of the test specimens, pressurizing equipment, and the implementation of a device that permits a permanent register of the deformation. For the non-irradiated Atucha type zircaloy-4 sheaths, experimental curves of circumferential deformation versus time were obtained, in tests at constant pressure and for different values of temperature and pressure. An empirical function was determined to adjust the experimental values for the speed of the circumferential deformation in terms of the initial tension applied, temperature and deformation, and the change of the corresponding parameters in accordance to the range of the tensions. Also the activation energy for creep was determined. (M.E.L.) [es

  3. Thermal creep of Zircaloy-4 cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murty, K.L.; Clevinger, G.S.; Papazoglou, T.P.

    1977-01-01

    Data on the hoop creep characteristics of Zircaloy tubing were collected at temperatures between 600 F and 800 F, and at stress levels ranging from 10 ksi to 25 ksi using internal pressurization tests. At low driving forces, exposures as long as 2000 hours were found insufficient to establish steady state creep. The experimental data at temperatures of 650 F to 800 F correlate well with an exponential stress dependence, and the activation energy for creep was found to be in excellent agreement with that for self-diffusion. The range of stresses and temperatures is too small to study the overall effect of these variables on the activation energy for creep. The experimental steady state creep-rates and those predicted from the creep equation used agree within a factor of 1.3. These correlations imply that the mechanism for hoop creep of Zircaloy-4 cladding is characterized by an activation energy of approximately 60 kcal/mole and an activation area of about 20b 3 . In addition, the exponential stress dependence implies that the activation area for creep is stress-independent. These results suggest that the climb of edge dislocations is the rate controlling mechanism for creep of Zircaloy-4. The transient creep regime was also analysed on the premise that primary creep is directly related to the rate of dispersal of dislocation entanglements by climb. (Auth.)

  4. Process development for fabrication of zircaloy- 4 of dissolver assembly for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonpe, Sunil; Saibaba, N.; Jairaj, R.N.; Ravi Shankar, A.; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Raj, Baldev

    2010-01-01

    Spent fuel reprocessing for fast breeder reactor (FBR) requires a dissolver made of a material which has resistance to corrosion as the process involves Nitric Acid as the process medium. Various materials to achieve minimum corrosion rates have been tried for this operation. Particularly the focus was on the use of advanced materials with high performance (corrosion rate and product life) for high concentrations greater than 8 N and temperatures (boiling and vapour) of Nitric Acid employed in the dissolver unit. The different commercially available materials like SS316L , Pure Titanium, Ti - 5% Ta and Ti - 5% Ta - 1.8% Nb were tried and the corrosion behavior of these materials was studied in detail. As this is continuous process of evolution of new materials, it was decided to try out zircaloy - 4 as the material of construction for construction due to its excellent corrosion resistance properties in Nitric Acid environment. The specifications were stringent and the geometrical configurations of the assembly were very intricate in shape. On accepting the challenge of fabrication of dissolver, NFC has made different fixtures for Electron Beam Welding and TIG Welding. Various trials were carried out for optimization of various operating parameter like beam current, Acceleration voltage, welding speed to get adequate weld penetration. Both EB welding and TIG welding process were standardized and qualified by carrying out a number of trials and testing these welds by various weld qualification procedures like radiography, Liquid dye penetrant testing etc. for different intricate weld geometries. All the welds were simulated with samples to optimize the weld parameters. Tests such as include metallographic (for microstructure and HAZ), mechanical (for weld strength) and chemical (material analysis for gases) were conducted and all the weld samples met the acceptable criteria. Finally the dissolver was made meeting stringent specifications. All the welds were checked

  5. Reaction of tellurium with Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, R. de; Cordfunke, E.H.P.

    1994-09-01

    Interaction of tellurium vapour with Zircaloy during the initial stage of an accident will lead to retention of tellurium in the core. For reliable estimation of the release behaviour of tellurium, it is necessary to know which zirconium tellurides are formed during this interaction. In this work the reaction of tellurium with Zircaloy-4 has been studied, using various reaction temperatures and tellurium vapour pressures. The compound ZrTe 2-x is formed on the surface of the Zircaloy in a broad range of reaction temperatures and vapour pressures. It is found that the formation of the more zirconium-rich compound Zr 5 Te 4 is favoured at high reaction temperatures is combination with low tellurium vapour pressures. (orig.)

  6. Creep damage in zircaloy-4 at LWR temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keusseyan, R.L.; Hu, C.P.; Li, C.Y.

    1978-08-01

    The observation of creep damage in the form of grain boundary cavitation in Zircaloy-4 in the temperature range of interest to Light Water Reactor (LWR) applications is reported. The observed damage is shown to reduce the ductility of Zircaloy-4 in a tensile test at LWR temperatures

  7. Study on kinetic of strain-aging in zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, P.A.

    1977-01-01

    The strain-aging in zircaloy-4 has been investigated in this work and a study of the general problems involving this phenomenon has been realized in Zirconium and its alloys. It has been verified that a yield point appears in the Zircaloy-4, when it is submitted to strain-aging treatment between the temperatures 200 0 C and 400 0 C. (author)

  8. Hydrogen pickup and redistribution in alpha-annealed Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kammenzind, B.F.; Franklin, D.G.; Duffin, W.J.; Peters, H.R.

    1996-01-01

    Zircaloy-4, which is widely used as a core structural material in Pressurized-Water Reactors (PWR), picks up hydrogen during service. Hydrogen solubility in Zircaloy-4 is low and hydrides precipitate after the Zircaloy-4 matrix becomes supersaturated with hydrogen. These hydrides embrittle the Zircaloy-4. To study hydrogen pickup and concentration, a postirradiation nondestructive radiographic technique for measuring hydrogen concentration was developed and qualified. Experiments on hydrogen pickup were conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). Ex-reactor tests were conducted to determine the conditions for which hydrogen would dissolve, migrate, and precipitate. Finally, a phenomenological model for hydrogen diffusion was indexed to the data. This presentation describes the equipment and the model, presents the results of experiments, and compares the model predictions to experimental results

  9. Influence of temperature on the Zircaloy-4 plastic anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limon, R.; Bechade, J.L.; Lehmann, S.; Maury, R.; Soniak, A.

    1995-01-01

    In order to improve the comportment modelling of PWR fuel pin, and more precisely their canning tubes, Framatome and the CEA have undertake an important study program of Zircaloy-4 mechanical properties. It includes in particular the study of the plasticity between 20 and 400 degree Celsius. This material being not isotropic because of the zirconium hexagonal crystal network and the texture presented by the canning tubes, its plastic anisotropy has been measured. The obtained results for the canning in *slack* and recrystallized before irradiation Zircaloy-4 are presented and the deformation systems able to explain the observed anisotropy is researched. (O.L.). 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  10. Influence of hydrogen on the oxygen solubility in Zircaloy-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilbert-Banti, Séverine, E-mail: severine.guilbert@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, SEREX/LE2M, Bâtiment 327, BP3, 13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Lacote, Pauline; Taraud, Gaëlle [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, SEREX/LE2M, Bâtiment 327, BP3, 13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Berger, Pascal [NIMBE, CEA, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Desquines, Jean; Duriez, Christian [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, SEREX/LE2M, Bâtiment 327, BP3, 13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2016-02-15

    Despite the influence of hydrogen on the behavior of zirconium fuel cladding in many nuclear safety issues, the pseudo-binary Zircaloy-4 – oxygen phase diagram still lacks of data, especially above 1000 °C. The aim of this study was to provide experimental data to better assess the influence of hydrogen on the oxygen solubility in Zircaloy-4. Homogenized two-phase Zircaloy-4 samples were elaborated from 300 to 1000 wppm pre-hydrided samples. Local distributions were characterized thoroughly using Electron Probe Micro-Analysis (EPMA) for oxygen and Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) for hydrogen. The data obtained in this work were included in the pseudo-binary Zircaloy-4 – oxygen phase diagram and have shown that hydrogen has limited influence on the α + β → β transus. Regarding the α → α + β transus, no influence of hydrogen concentration in the α phase below 400 wppm was evidenced.

  11. Microstructural characterization of second phase irradiated Zircaloy-4 particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, Alejandra V.; Vizcaino, Pablo; Banchik, Abraham D.; Bozzano, Patricia B.; Versaci, Raul A.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray diffraction diagrams of neutron irradiated Zircaloy-4 were obtained at the LNLS with the aim to obtain bulk information about the amorphization process in which the Zircaloy-4 second phase particles (SPPs) undergoes due to neutron irradiation. Owing to the low concentration of the SPPs in the alloy (∼0.4 V %), no data regarding to the bulk were obtained until now. The synchrotron experiences allowed to detect five of the more intense lines of the phase C 14 (SPPs structure) in unirradiated Zircaloy-4: (110) θ, (103) θ, (112) θ, (201) θ and (004) θ in the 34 degrees ≤ θ2≤45 degrees Bragg angle range and others of minor intensity. The diagrams of the samples irradiated at moderate doses (1020n/cm 2 ) show these lines even in the as received samples. In contrast, none of these lines are observed for high fluence samples (∼1022neutrons/cm 2 ). In addition, in similar high fluence samples annealed 24 h or 72 h at 600 C degrees the intensity rises just at the 2q range where the C 14 lines were observed, showing a wide peak. That peak is interpreted as a result of the superposition of unresolved diffraction lines corresponding to the Zircaloy SPPs which are in a reconstitution process of crystallization. Analytical Electron Microscopy techniques were used, in order to study the effects on the Zircaloy-4 SPPs and compared with samples of the same material without irradiation. Spots in SAD patterns of non irradiated SPPS, evidences the presence of a C 14 structure, but in irradiated SSP SAD patterns evidences the beginning of an amorphization process. Another important feature to point out is the different Fe / Cr ratio presented in both irradiated and non irradiated SSPs. In non irradiated precipitates the Fe / Cr ratio is approximately 1.5, while in irradiated precipitates the Fe / Cr ratio becomes near 1.0. (author) [es

  12. Investigation on Nd:YAG laser weldability of zircaloy-4 end cap closure for nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo Sung; Lee, Chul Yung; Yang, Myung Seung

    2001-01-01

    Various welding processes are now available for end cap closure of nuclear fuel element such as TIG(Tungsten Inert Gas) welding, magnetic resistance welding and laser welding. Even though the resistance and TIG welding processes are widely used for manufacturing commercial fuel elements, they can not be recommended for the remote seal welding of a fuel element at a hot cell facility due to the complexity of electrode alignment, difficulty in the replacement of parts in the remote manner and a large heat input for a thin sheath. Therefore, the Nd:YAG laser system using optical fiber transmission was selected for Zircaloy-4 end cap welding inside hot cell. The laser welding apparatus was developed using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser of 500 watt average power with optical fiber transmission. The weldability of laser welding was satisfactory with respect to the microstructures and mechanical properties comparing with TIG and resistance welding. The optimum operation processes of laser welding and the optical fiber transmission system for hot cell operation in a remote manner have been developed. The effects of irradiation on the properties of the laser apparatus were also being studied

  13. Semi-empirical corrosion model for Zircaloy-4 cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeem Elahi, Waseem; Atif Rana, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The Zircaloy-4 cladding tube in Pressurize Water Reactors (PWRs) bears corrosion due to fast neutron flux, coolant temperature, and water chemistry. The thickness of Zircaloy-4 cladding tube may be decreased due to the increase in corrosion penetration which may affect the integrity of the fuel rod. The tin content and inter-metallic particles sizes has been found significantly in the magnitude of oxide thickness. In present study we have developed a Semiempirical corrosion model by modifying the Arrhenius equation for corrosion as a function of acceleration factor for tin content and accumulative annealing. This developed model has been incorporated into fuel performance computer code. The cladding oxide thickness data obtained from the Semi-empirical corrosion model has been compared with the experimental results i.e., numerous cases of measured cladding oxide thickness from UO 2 fuel rods, irradiated in various PWRs. The results of the both studies lie within the error band of 20μm, which confirms the validity of the developed Semi-empirical corrosion model. Key words: Corrosion, Zircaloy-4, tin content, accumulative annealing factor, Semi-empirical, PWR. (author)

  14. Cyclic deformation of zircaloy-4 at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armas, A. F; Herenu, S; Bolmaro, R; Alvarez-Armas, I

    2003-01-01

    Annealed materials hardens under low cyclic fatigue tests.However, FCC metals tested with medium strain amplitudes show an initial cyclic softening.That behaviour is related with the strong interstitial atom-dislocation interactions.For HCP materials the information is scarce.Commercial purity Zirconium and Zircaloy-4 alloys show also a pronounced cyclic softening, similar to Titanium alloys.Recently the rotation texture induced softening model has been proposed according to which the crystals are placed in a more favourable deformation orientation by prismatic slip due to the cyclic strain.The purpose of the current paper is the presentation of decisive results to discuss the causes for cyclic softening of Zircaloy-4. Low cycle fatigue tests were performed on recrystallized Zircaloy-4 samples.The cyclic behaviour shows an exponential softening at room temperature independently of the deformation range.Only at high temperature a cyclic hardening is shown at low number of cycles.Friction stresses, related with dislocation movement itself, and back stresses, related with dislocation pile-ups can be calculated from the stress-strain loops.The cyclic softening is due to diminishing friction stress while the starting hardening behaviour is due to increasing back stresses.The rotation texture induced softening model is ruled out assuming instead a model based on dislocation unlocking from interstitial oxygen solute atoms

  15. Temperature effect on Zircaloy-4 stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, Silvia B.; Duffo, Gustavo S.; Galvele, Jose R.

    1999-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of Zircaloy-4 alloy in chloride, bromide and iodide solutions with variables as applied electrode potential, deformation rate and temperature have been studied. In those three halide solutions the susceptibility to SCC is only observed at potentials close to pitting potential, the crack propagation rate increases with the increase of deformation rate, and that the temperature has a notable effect only for iodide solutions. For chloride and bromide solutions and temperatures ranging between 20 to 90 C degrees it was not found measurable changes in crack propagation rates. (author)

  16. The oxidation kinetics of zircaloy - 4 under isothermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A.M.M. dos; Cardoso, P.E.

    1982-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of zircaloy-4 tubes was studied by means of isothermal tests in the temperature interval 500 0 C to 900 0 C. Dry oxygen and water steam, were used as oxidant agents. The results show that the oxidation kinetics law exhibits a behaviour from cubic to parabolic in the range of the time and temperatures of the experiment. Dry oxygen shows a stronger oxidation effect than water steam. A special mechanical test to study the embrittlement effect in the small samples of zircaloy tubes was used. (Author) [pt

  17. Irradiation creep and growth of zircaloy-4 tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lansiart, S.; Darchis, L.; Pelchat, J.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of temperature and fast neutron flux on irradiation creep and growth of stress relieved zircaloy-4 pressurized tubes has been derived from experimental irradiations in NaK, performed up to 2.5 10 25 n.m -2 in the temperature range [280, 350] 0 C. A significant influence of temperature on axial growth has been observed: at 280 0 C the elongation can no longer be expressed as a linear function of fluence as for the 350 0 C irradiation temperature; diametral growth, on the other hand, always appears negligible. Irradiation creep obviously depends on temperature too; the diametral strain (including thermal part) has been modelled as a sum of primary and secondary terms, the former being independent of fluence. For the tubing considered it is observed that the ranking of the different batches, with respect to diametral creep resistance, is the same before and under irradiation. Concerning axial creep strain the stress relieved material behaves as does an isotropic tube. This is not the case of recrystallized zircaloy-4 F, which shows a non negligible axial deformation, related to the diametral creep one, even though this diametral irradiation creep strain is strongly reduced comparatively to that of the stress relieved material. The comparison of the two materials growth rates is more complex since their dependence on temperature and flux differs

  18. Adsorption and diffusion of hydrogen in Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, E.; Desquines, J.; Baietto, M.C.; Coret, M.; Wehling, F.; Blat-Yrieix, M.; Ambard, A.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen in zirconium alloys is considered in many nuclear safety issues. Below 500 Celsius degrees, rather limited knowledge is available on the combined hydrogen adsorption at the sample surface and diffusion in the metal. A modeling of hydrogen gaseous charging has been established starting with a set of relevant laws and parameters derived from open literature. Simulating the hydrogen charging process requires simultaneous analysis of gaseous surface adsorption, hydrogen solid-solution diffusion and precipitation, when exceeding the material solubility limit. The modeling has been extended to reproduce the solid-gas exchange. Gaseous charging experiments have been performed at 420 C. degrees on Stress Relieved Annealed (SRA) Zircaloy-4 cladding samples to validate the model. The sample hydrogen content has been systematically measured after charging and compared to the calculated value thus providing a validation of the adsorption modeling. Complementary tests have been carried out on Recrystallized Annealed (RXA) Zircaloy-4 rods to characterize the combined diffusion and adsorption process. The hydrogen concentration distribution has been characterized using an inverse technique based on destructive analyses of the samples. This additional set of data was relevant for the validation of the hydrogen combined adsorption/diffusion modeling up to 420 C. degrees. (authors)

  19. Oligo cyclic plastic fatigue of Zircaloy-4 under vacuum and in iodinated methanol; Fatigue plastique oligocyclique du Zircaloy-4 sous vide et dans le methanol iode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beloucif, A.

    1995-01-01

    Our study was bound to the Zircaloy-4 fuel can damage in PWR type reactors. The topic was the damage mechanisms of Zircaloy-4 by oligo-cyclic plastic fatigue in inert atmosphere and in iodinated methanol. The oligo-cyclic plastic fatigue tests, under vacuum, were performed with steady plastic deformation and deformation speed. The corrosion fatigue tests in iodinated methanol put to the fore one obvious harmful part of iodine on Zircaloy-4 resistance to cyclic solicitations. The observations proved the existence of a very strong synergic effect between cyclic mechanical damage and corrosion. (MML). 84 refs., 117 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Apparatus for study of transient oxidation of Zircaloy-4 tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagat, S.; Iglesias, F.C.; Newell, G.W.

    1985-11-01

    Complex transient oxidation tests on Zircaloy-4 tubing were performed to provide data for validation of the computer code FROM2. This code was developed to calculate oxygen distribution through oxidized Zircaloy tubing. The test temperature histories consisted of ramp, hold and cool cycles. The heating and cooling rates were in the range of 1 to 100 K/s and the maximum temperature was 1875 K. The apparatus developed to perform these experiments is described. In principle, Joule heating is used to heat the specimen and the temperature is controlled by a computer in conjunction with temperature and SCR power controllers. Using this combination, fast heating and cooling rates were achieved without sacrificing the accuracy of temperature control

  1. Electrolytic hydriding and hydride distribution in zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, M.H.L.

    1974-01-01

    A study has been made of the electrolytic hydriding of zircaloy-4 in the range 20-80 0 C, for reaction times from 5 to 30 hours, and the effect of potential, pH and dissolved oxygen has been investigated. The hydriding reaction was more sensitive to time and temperature conditions than to the electrochemical variables. It has been shown that a controlled introduction of hydrides in zircaloy is feasible. Hydrides were found to be plate like shaped and distributed mainly along grain-boundaries. It has been shown that hydriding kinetics do not follow a simple law but may be described by a Johnson-Mehl empirical equation. On the basis of this equation an activation energy of 9.400 cal/mol has been determined, which is close to the activation energy for diffusion of hydrogen in the hydride. (author)

  2. High temperature deformation behavior of gradually pressurized zircaloy-4 tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoye

    1982-03-01

    In order to obtain preliminary perspectives on fuel cladding deformation behavior under changing temperature and pressure conditions in a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident of PWR, a Zircaloy-4 tube burst test was conducted in both air and 99.97% Ar atomospheres. The tubes were directly heated by AC-current and maintained at various temperatures, and pressurized gradually until rupture occurred. Rupture circumferential strains were generally larger in Ar gas than in air and attained a maximum around 1100 K in both atmospheres. Some tube tested in air produced axially-extended long balloons, which proved not to be explained by such properties or ideas as effect of cooling on strain rate, superplasticity, geometrical plastic instability and stresses generated by surface oxide layer. A cause of the long balloon may be obtained in the anisotropy of the material structure. But even a qualitative analysis based on this property can not be made due to insufficient data of the anisotropy. (author)

  3. Pressure effects on high temperature steam oxidation of Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kwangheon; Kim, Kwangpyo; Ryu, Taegeun

    2000-01-01

    The pressure effects on Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) cladding in high temperature steam have been analyzed. A double layer autoclave was made for the high pressure, high temperature oxidation tests. The experimental test temperature range was 700 - 900 deg C, and pressures were 0.1 - 15 MPa. Steam partial pressure turns out to be an important one rather than total pressure. Steam pressure enhances the oxidation rate of Zry-4 exponentially. The enhancement depends on the temperature, and the maximum exists between 750 - 800 deg C. Pre-existing oxide layer decreases the enhancement about 40 - 60%. The acceleration of oxidation rate by high pressure team seems to be originated from the formation of cracks by abrupt transformation of tetragonal phase in oxide, where the un-stability of tetragonal phase comes from the reduction of surface energy by steam. (author)

  4. Understanding thermally activated plastic deformation behavior of Zircaloy-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, N.; Alomari, A.; Murty, K. L.

    2018-06-01

    Understanding micromechanics of plastic deformation of existing materials is essential for improving their properties further and/or developing advanced materials for much more severe load bearing applications. The objective of the present work was to understand micromechanics of plastic deformation of Zircaloy-4, a zirconium-based alloy used as fuel cladding and channel (in BWRs) material in nuclear reactors. The Zircaloy-4 in recrystallized (at 973 K for 4 h) condition was subjected to uniaxial tensile testing at a constant cross-head velocity at temperatures in the range 293 K-1073 K and repeated stress relaxation tests at 293 K, 573 K, and 773 K. The minimum in the total elongation was indicative of dynamic strain aging phenomenon in this alloy in the intermediate temperature regime. The yield stress of the alloy was separated into effective and athermal components and the transition from thermally activated dislocation glide to athermal regime took place at around 673 K with the athermal stress estimated to be 115 MPa. The activation volume was found to be in the range of 40 b3 to 160 b3. The activation volume values and the data analyses using the solid-solution models in literature indicated dislocation-solute interaction to be a potential deformation mechanism in thermally activated regime. The activation energy calculated at 573 K was very close to that found for diffusivity of oxygen in α-Zr that was suggestive of dislocations-oxygen interaction during plastic deformation. This type of information may be helpful in alloy design in selecting different elements to control the deformation behavior of the material and impart desired mechanical properties in those materials for specific applications.

  5. Uniaxial ratcheting behavior of Zircaloy-4 tubes at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Mingjian; Li, Hua; Yu, Dunji; Chen, Gang; Chen, Xu

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a series of uniaxial tensile, strain cycling and uniaxial ratcheting tests were conducted at room temperature on Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) tubes used as nuclear fuel cladding in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) for the purpose to investigate the uniaxial ratcheting behavior of Zr-4 and the factors which may influence it. The experimental results show that at room temperature this material features cyclic softening remarkably within the strain range of 1.6%, and former cycling under larger strain amplitude cannot retard cyclic softening of later cycling under lower strain amplitude. Uniaxial ratcheting strain accumulates in the direction of mean stress, and the ratcheting stain level is larger under tensile mean stress than that under compressive mean stress. Uniaxial ratcheting strain level increases with the increase of mean stress and stress amplitude, and decreases with the increase of loading rate. The sequence of loading rate appears to have no effects on the final ratcheting strain accumulation. Loading history has great influence on the uniaxial ratcheting behavior. Lower stress level after loading history with higher stress level leads to the shakedown of ratcheting. Higher loading rate after loading history with lower loading rate brings down the ratcheting strain rate. Uniaxial ratcheting behavior is sensitive to compressive pre-strain, and the decay rate of the ratcheting strain rate is slowed down by pre-compression

  6. Irradiation effect on fatigue behaviour of zircaloy-4 cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soniak, A.; Lansiart, S.; Royer, J.; Waeckel, N.

    1993-01-01

    Since nuclear electricity has a predominant share in French generating capacity, PWR's are required to fit grid load following and frequency control operating conditions. Consequently cyclic stresses appear in the fuel element cladding. In order to characterize the possible resulting clad damage, fatigue tests were performed at 350 deg C on unirradiated material or irradiated stress relieved Zircaloy-4 tube portions, using a special device for tube fatigue by repeated pressurization. It appears that, for high stress levels, the material fatigue life is not affected by irradiation. But the endurance fatigue limit undergoes a decrease from the 350 MPa value for unirradiated material to the 210 MPa value for the material irradiated for four cycles in a PWR. However, this effect seems to saturate with irradiation dose: no difference could be detected between the two cycles results and the corresponding four cycles results. The corrosion effect and the load following influence were also investigated: they do not appear to modify the fatigue behaviour in our experimental conditions

  7. Characterization of Zircaloy-4 oxide layers by impedance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barberis, P.

    1999-01-01

    Two Zircaloy-4 type alloys with different tin contents (0.5 and 1.2 wt%) have been oxidized in autoclave (400 C in steam) for several durations (1-140 days). The film has been characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Several soaking times have been investigated (up to 40 days). The Cole-Cole representation has been used to display and study the data. A simple electrical model has been derived from the observed spectra: the electrical circuit includes two RC loops in series, whose capacitances are frequency dispersed. It is thoroughly related to the layer structure. It has been shown that even before the kinetic transition, the film is constituted of three parts: an inner layer which is compact, an outer layer subdivided in an external region immediately soaked by the electrolyte, and an internal one in which electrolyte diffusion processes can take place. The kinetic transition is interpreted in terms of an abrupt 'compacity' change, both layers degrading at this point. The alloy with high tin content exhibits higher dispersive properties of the oxide layer formed on it, in correlation with its faster oxidation kinetics. (orig.)

  8. Delayed hydride cracking of Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizarro, Luis M.; Fernandez, Silvia; Lafont, Claudio; Mizrahi, Rafael; Haddad, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Crack propagation rates, grown by the delayed hydride cracking mechanism, were measured in Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding, according to a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). During the first stage of the program a Round Robin Testing was performed on fuel cladding samples provided by Studsvik (Sweden), of the type used in PWR reactors. Crack growth in the axial direction is obtained through the specially developed 'pin load testing' (PLT) device. In these tests, crack propagation rates were determined at 250 C degrees on several samples of the material described above, obtaining a mean value of about 2.5 x 10 -8 m s -1 . The results were analyzed and compared satisfactorily with those obtained by the other laboratories participating in the CRP. At the present moment, similar tests on CANDU and Atucha I type fuel cladding are being performed. It is thought that the obtained results will give valuable information concerning the analysis of possible failures affecting fuel cladding under reactor operation. (author) [es

  9. Quantification and characterization of zirconium hydrides in Zircaloy-4 by the image analysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J.H.; Groos, M.; Bredel, T.; Trotabas, M.; Combette, P.

    1992-01-01

    The image analysis method is used to determine the hydrogen content in specimens of Zircaloy-4. Two parameters, surface density of hydride, S v , and degree of orientation, Ω, are defined to represent separately the hydrogen content and the orientation of hydrides. By analysing the stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 specimens with known hydrogen content from 100 to 1000 ppm, a relationship is established between the parameter S v and the hydrogen content when the magnifications of the optical microscope are 1000 and 250. The degree of orientation for the hydride in the stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding is about 0.3. (orig.)

  10. Influence of temperature on the Zircaloy-4 plastic anisotropy; Influence de la temperature sur l`anisotropie plastique du Zircaloy-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limon, R.; Bechade, J.L.; Lehmann, S.; Maury, R.; Soniak, A. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Direction des Technologies Avancees; Mardon, J.P. [Societe Franco-Americaine de Constructions Atomiques (FRAMATOME), 92 - Paris-La-Defense (France)

    1995-12-31

    In order to improve the comportment modelling of PWR fuel pin, and more precisely their canning tubes, Framatome and the CEA have undertake an important study program of Zircaloy-4 mechanical properties. It includes in particular the study of the plasticity between 20 and 400 degree Celsius. This material being not isotropic because of the zirconium hexagonal crystal network and the texture presented by the canning tubes, its plastic anisotropy has been measured. The obtained results for the canning in *slack* and recrystallized before irradiation Zircaloy-4 are presented and the deformation systems able to explain the observed anisotropy is researched. (O.L.). 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Microstructure evolution of recrystallized Zircaloy-4 under charged particles irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaumé, M.; Onimus, F.; Dupuy, L.; Tissot, O.; Bachelet, C.; Mompiou, F.

    2017-11-01

    Recrystallized zirconium alloys are used as nuclear fuel cladding tubes of Pressurized Water Reactors. During operation, these alloys are submitted to fast neutron irradiation which leads to their in-reactor deformation and to a change of their mechanical properties. These phenomena are directly related to the microstructure evolution under irradiation and especially to the formation of -type dislocation loops. In the present work, the radiation damage evolution in recrystallized Zircaloy-4 has been studied using charged particles irradiation. The loop nucleation and growth kinetics, and also the helical climb of linear dislocations, were observed in-situ using a High Voltage Electron Microscope (HVEM) under 1 MeV electron irradiation at 673 and 723 K. In addition, 600 keV Zr+ ion irradiations were conducted at the same temperature. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) characterizations have been performed after both types of irradiations, and show dislocation loops with a Burgers vector belonging to planes close to { 10 1 bar 0 } first order prismatic planes. The nature of the loops has been characterized. Only interstitial dislocation loops have been observed after ion irradiation at 723 K. However, after electron irradiation conducted at 673 and 723 K, both interstitial and vacancy loops were observed, the proportion of interstitial loops increasing as the temperature is increased. The loop growth kinetics analysis shows that as the temperature increases, the loop number density decreases and the loop growth rate tends to increase. An increase of the flux leads to an increase of the loop number density and a decrease of the loop growth rate. The results are compared to previous works and discussed in the light of point defects diffusion.

  12. Hydride phase dissolution enthalpy in neutron irradiated Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizcaino, Pablo; Banchik, Abraham D.

    2003-01-01

    The differential calorimetric technique has been applied to measure the dissolution enthalpy, ΔH irrad δ→α , of zirconium hydrides precipitated in structural components removed from the Argentine Atucha 1 PHWR nuclear power plant after 10.3 EFPY. An average value of ΔH irrad δ→α = 5 kJ/mol H was obtained after the first calorimetric run. That value is seven times lower than the value of ΔH δ→α = 37.7 kJ/mol H recently determined in Zircaloy-4 specimens taken from similar unirradiated structural components using the same calorimetric technique, [1]. Post-irradiation thermal treatments gradually increase that low value towards the unirradiated value with increasing annealing temperature similar to that observed for TSSd irrad . Therefore the same H atom trapping mechanism during reactor operation already proposed to explain the evolution of TSSd irrad is also valid for Q irrad δ→α . As the ratio Q/ΔH is proportional to the number N H of H atoms precipitated as hydrides, the increment of Q irrad δ→α with the thermal treatment indicates that the value of N H also grows with the annealing reaching the value corresponding to the bulk H concentration when ΔH irrad δ→α ≅ 37 kJ/mol H. That is a direct indication that the post-irradiation thermal treatment releases the H atoms from their traps increasing the number of H atoms available to precipitate at the end of each calorimetric run and/or isothermal treatment. (author)

  13. Modelling of zircaloy-4 corrosion in nitrogen and oxygen mixtures at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasserre, M.; Peres, V.; Pijolat, M.; Coindreau, O.; Duriez, C.; Mardon, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of zircaloy-4 corrosion in air have shown accelerated corrosion in the 600-1000 Celsius degrees temperature range with Zr nitrides precipitating near the metal/oxide surface. The aim of this series of slides is to assess the influence of N 2 and O 2 partial pressures on the kinetic rate of growth of a new phase and to propose a kinetic modelling of zircaloy-4 corrosion

  14. Determination of I-SCC crack propagation rate of zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo-Seog, Ryu

    2002-01-01

    Threshold stress intensity (K ISCC ) and propagation rate of iodine-induced SCC in recrystallized and stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 were determined using a DCPD method. Dynamic system flowing Ar gas through iodine chamber at 60 deg C provided a constant iodine pressure of 1000 Pa during test. The SCC curves of crack velocity vs. stress intensity showed the typical SCC curves that are composed of stages I, II and III. The threshold K ISCC at 350 deg C was about 9 and 9.5 MPa √m for the stress- relieved Zircaloy-4 and the recrystallized Zircaloy-4, respectively. The plateau velocity in the stage II at 350 deg C was 4-8x 10 -4 mm/sec in the range of 20-40 MPa√m. In comparison with recrystallized Zircaloy-4, stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 had a lower threshold stress intensity factor and a little higher SCC velocity, indicating that SRA Zircaloy-4 was more sensitive to SCC in respect of velocity. The fracture mode in recrystallized Zircaloy was mostly a transgranular fracture with river pattern. An intergranular mode and the flutting were scarcely observed. (author)

  15. Effect of a surface oxide-dispersion-strengthened layer on mechanical strength of zircaloy-4 tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Il Jung

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available An oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS layer was formed on Zircaloy-4 tubes by a laser beam scanning process to increase mechanical strength. Laser beam was used to scan the yttrium oxide (Y2O3–coated Zircaloy-4 tube to induce the penetration of Y2O3 particles into Zircaloy-4. Laser surface treatment resulted in the formation of an ODS layer as well as microstructural phase transformation at the surface of the tube. The mechanical strength of Zircaloy-4 increased with the formation of the ODS layer. The ring-tensile strength of Zircaloy-4 increased from 790 to 870 MPa at room temperature, from 500 to 575 MPa at 380°C, and from 385 to 470 MPa at 500°C. Strengthening became more effective as the test temperature increased. It was noted that brittle fracture occurred at room temperature, which was not observed at elevated temperatures. Resistance to dynamic high-temperature bursting improved. The burst temperature increased from 760 to 830°C at a heating rate of 5°C/s and internal pressure of 8.3 MPa. The burst opening was also smaller than those in fresh Zircaloy-4 tubes. This method is expected to enhance the safety of Zr fuel cladding tubes owing to the improvement of their mechanical properties. Keywords: Laser Surface Treatment, Microstructure, Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Alloy, Tensile Strength, Zirconium Alloy

  16. Surface analytical investigations of the thermal behaviour of passivated Zircaloy-4 surfaces and of the reaction behaviour of iodine with Zircaloy-4 surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, R.

    1988-07-01

    In the first part of the present work the thermal behaviour of atmospherically oxidized Zircaloy-4 samples was investigated at various temperatures. In a next step the amount of iodine adsorbed at the metallic surface was determined as well at room temperature with varying iodine exposures as for constant exposure but varying temperatures. Furthermore, the zirconium iodide species resulting from the interaction of iodine with the Zircaloy-4 and desorbed at higher temperatures were identified by means of residual gas analysis. During these studies it was found that the oxidic overlayer of the passivated Zircaloy-4 samples is decomposed at temperatures above 200 0 C. The iodine uptake at metallic surfaces (cleaned by Ar-ion sputtering) at room temperature slows markedly down after formation of a closed zirconium-iodide overlayer and consequently the further reaction proceeds diffusion-controlled. At 200 0 C ZrI 4 is formed being the thermodynamically most stable Zr-iodide. During desorption experiments using iodine exposed Zircaloy-4 samples the release of ZrI 4 was proved. The results obtained from the various experiments are finally discussed with respect to the iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking process and the underlying basic mechanisms and a transport mechanism for the SCC in nuclear fuel rods is proposed. (orig./RB) [de

  17. Hydrides formation In Zircaloy-4 irradiated with neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizcaino, P; Flores, A V; Vicente Alvarez, M A; Banchik, A.D; Tolley, A; Condo, A; Santisteban, J R

    2012-01-01

    Under reactor operating conditions zirconium components go through transformations which affect their original properties. Two phenomena of significant consequences for the integrity of the components are hydrogen uptake and radiation damage, since both contribute to the material fragilization. In the case of the Atucha I nuclear power reactor, the cooling channels, Zircaloy-4 tubular structural components about 6 meters long, were designed to withstand the entire lifetime of the reactor. Inside them, fuel elements 5.3 meters long are located. The fuel elements are cooled by a heavy water flow which circulates from the bottom (250 o ) to the top of the reactor (305 o C). The channels are affected by a fast neutron flux (En>1 Mev), increasing from a nominal value of 1.35 x 10 13 neutrons/cm 2 sec at the bottom to 1.69 x 10 13 neutrons/cm 2 sec at the top, reaching a maximum value of 3.76 x 10 13 neutrons/cm 2 sec at the center of the channels. However, due to the reactor operating conditions, they are replaced after about 10 effective full power years, time at which they reach 10 22 neutrons/cm 2 at the most neutronically active regions of the reactor. Studies on cooling channels are meaningful from many points of view. The channels are structural components which do not work under internal pressure or any other type of structural stress. The typical temperature of the cladding tubes in the reactor is about 350 o C, at which many types of irradiation defects are annealed [1]. The temperature range of the cooling channels lies between 200 o C-235 o C (outer foil of the channels) and 260 o C-300 o C (internal tube), a difference which makes the defect recovery kinetics slower. In the present context, following the program developed in the research contract 15810, we continue with the work started on the effects of the radiation on the hydride formation focusing on the dislocation loops in the zirconium matrix and its possible role as preferential sites for hydride

  18. Effect of the anodization variables in the corrosion resistence of the zircaloy-4 tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, M.E.

    1981-02-01

    The anodization effect in the oxidation of the zircaloy-4 in steam atmosphere at 10,06MPa was investigated. It was also studied how the voltage and the types of electrolytes at several values of pH affect the growing of the anodic oxide film and the performance of the zircaloy-4 in relation to corrosion. Anodizations of zircaloy-4 tubes have been made with voltages ranging from zero to 280V and using electrolytic solutions of Na 2 B 4 O 7 , CH 3 COOH and NaOH in the concentrations of 1,0N, 0,1N and 0,01N. After anodization, the tubes were oxidized in autoclave under steam at 400 0 C and 10,06 MPa during 3 and 14 days. The results show that the anodization inhibit the oxidation process of zircaloy-4, and that this protection increases with the voltage applied for film formation. The relationship between the weight gain after oxidation in autoclave and the anodization voltage is of the exponential type: (σM/A) sub(AC) = Ce sup(-DV). The observed relationship between the applied voltage and the weight gain due to anodization is of the linear type: (σM/A) sub(AN) = aV. Concerning the influence of different electrolytes, it was observed a similar behaviour between them with respect to the thickness of the anodic oxide and the weight gain of zircaloy-4 after the autoclave test. (Author) [pt

  19. Formation of Lamellar Structured Oxide Dispersion Strengthening Layers in Zircaloy-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Jung-Hwan; Park, Dong-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Yang, Jae-Ho; Koo, Yang-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Yoon-Soo [Hanbat National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is one of the leading organizations for developing ATF claddings. One concept is to form an oxidation-resistant layer on Zr cladding surface. The other is to increase high-temperature mechanical strength of Zr tube. The oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) zirconium was proposed to increase the strength of the Zr-based alloy up to high temperatures. According to our previous investigations, the tensile strength of Zircaloy-4 was increased by up to 20% with the formation of a thin dispersed oxide layer with a thickness less than 10% of that of the Zircaloy-4 substrate. However, the tensile elongation of the samples decreased drastically. The brittle fracture was a major concern in development of the ODS Zircaloy-4. In this study, a lamellar structure of ODS layer was formed to increase ductility of the ODS Zircaloy-4. The mechanical properties were varied depending on the structure of ODS layer. For example, the partial formation of ODS layer with the thickness of 10% to the substrate thickness induced the increase in tensile strength up to about 20% than fresh Zircaloy-4.

  20. Oxide thickness measurement technique for duplex-layer Zircaloy-4 cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClelland, R.G.; O'Leary, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation (SNP) is investigating the use of duplex-layer Zircaloy-4 tubing to improve the waterside corrosion resistance of cladding for high-burnup pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel designs. Standard SNP PWR cladding is typically 0.762-mm (0.030-in.)-thick Zircaloy-4. The SNP duplex cladding is nominally 0.660-mm (0.026-in.)-thick Zircalloy-4 with an ∼0.102-mm (0.004-in.) outer layer of another, more corrosion-resistant, zirconium-based alloy. It is common industry practice to monitor the in-reactor corrosion behavior of Zircaloy cladding by using an eddy-current 'lift-off' technique to measure the oxide thickness on the outer surface of the fuel cladding. The test program evaluated three different cladding samples, all with the same outer diameter and wall thickness: Zircaloy-4 and duplex clad types D2 and D4

  1. Crack resistance curve determination of zircaloy-4 cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsch, J.; Alam, A.; Zubler, R.

    2009-03-01

    Fracture mechanics properties of fuel claddings are of relevance with respect to fuel rod integrity. The integrity of a fuel rod, in turn, is important for the fuel performance, for the safe handling of fuel rods, for the prevention of leakages and subsequent dissemination of fuel, for the avoidance of unnecessary dose rates, and for safe operation. Different factors can strongly deteriorate the mechanical fuel rod properties: irradiation damage, thermo-mechanical impact, corrosion or hydrogen uptake. To investigate the mechanical properties of fuel rod claddings which are used in Swiss nuclear power plants, PSI has initiated a program for mechanical testing. A major issue was the interaction between specific loading devices and the tested cladding tube, e.g. in the form of bending or friction. Particular for Zircaloy is the hexagonal closed packed structure of the zirconium crystallographic lattice. This structure implies plastic deformation mechanisms with specific, preferred orientations. Further, the manufacturing procedure of Zircaloy claddings induces a specific texture which plays a salient role with respect to the embrittlement by irradiation or integration of hydrogen in the form of hydrides. Both, the induced microstructure as well as the plastic deformation behaviour play a role for the mechanical properties. At PSI, in a first step inactive thin walled Zircaloy tubes and, for comparison reasons, plates were tested. The validity of the mechanical testing of the non standard tube and plate geometries had to be verified. The used Zircaloy-4 cladding tube sections and small plates of the same wall thickness have been notched, fatigue pre-cracked and tensile tested to evaluate the fracture toughness properties at room temperature, 300 o C and 350 o C. The crack propagation has been determined optically. The test results of the plates have been further used to validate FEM calculations. For each sample a complete crack resistance (J-R) curve could be

  2. Crack resistance curve determination of zircaloy-4 cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertsch, J.; Alam, A.; Zubler, R

    2009-03-15

    Fracture mechanics properties of fuel claddings are of relevance with respect to fuel rod integrity. The integrity of a fuel rod, in turn, is important for the fuel performance, for the safe handling of fuel rods, for the prevention of leakages and subsequent dissemination of fuel, for the avoidance of unnecessary dose rates, and for safe operation. Different factors can strongly deteriorate the mechanical fuel rod properties: irradiation damage, thermo-mechanical impact, corrosion or hydrogen uptake. To investigate the mechanical properties of fuel rod claddings which are used in Swiss nuclear power plants, PSI has initiated a program for mechanical testing. A major issue was the interaction between specific loading devices and the tested cladding tube, e.g. in the form of bending or friction. Particular for Zircaloy is the hexagonal closed packed structure of the zirconium crystallographic lattice. This structure implies plastic deformation mechanisms with specific, preferred orientations. Further, the manufacturing procedure of Zircaloy claddings induces a specific texture which plays a salient role with respect to the embrittlement by irradiation or integration of hydrogen in the form of hydrides. Both, the induced microstructure as well as the plastic deformation behaviour play a role for the mechanical properties. At PSI, in a first step inactive thin walled Zircaloy tubes and, for comparison reasons, plates were tested. The validity of the mechanical testing of the non standard tube and plate geometries had to be verified. The used Zircaloy-4 cladding tube sections and small plates of the same wall thickness have been notched, fatigue pre-cracked and tensile tested to evaluate the fracture toughness properties at room temperature, 300 {sup o}C and 350 {sup o}C. The crack propagation has been determined optically. The test results of the plates have been further used to validate FEM calculations. For each sample a complete crack resistance (J-R) curve could

  3. Substructure evolution of Zircaloy-4 during creep and implications for the Modified Jogged-Screw model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, B.M., E-mail: morrow@lanl.gov [The Ohio State University, 2041 College Rd., 477 Watts Hall, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS G755, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Kozar, R.W.; Anderson, K.R. [Bettis Laboratory, Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corp., West Mifflin, PA 15122 (United States); Mills, M.J., E-mail: millsmj@mse.osu.edu [The Ohio State University, 2041 College Rd., 477 Watts Hall, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2016-05-17

    Several specimens of Zircaloy-4 were creep tested at a single stress-temperature condition, and interrupted at different accumulated strain levels. Substructural observations were performed using bright field scanning transmission electron microscopy (BF STEM). The dislocation substructure was characterized to ascertain how creep strain evolution impacts the Modified Jogged-Screw (MJS) model, which has previously been utilized to predict steady-state strain rates in Zircaloy-4. Special attention was paid to the evolution of individual model parameters with increasing strain. Results of model parameter measurements are reported and discussed, along with possible extensions to the MJS model.

  4. The anisotropic creep behaviour of zircaloy-4 fuel cladding at 1073 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinger, H.E.; Bowden, J.; Shewfelt, R.S.W.

    1982-04-01

    The anisotropy coefficients (F, G and H) of Hill's equation, suitably modified for creep deformation, have been determined for Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding from steady-state creep tests at an elevated temperature. Creep specimens were subjected to both uniaxial and biaxial loads (via internal pressure) at 1073 K and the strain measured concurrently in the axial and tangential directions. It has been found that Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding is almost, but not completely, isotropic at 1073 K; the values of F, G and H are 0.57, 0.48 and 0.45 respectively

  5. In-situ neutron diffraction study of Zircaloy 4 subjected to biaxial tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharghouri, M.A. [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada); McDonald, D.; Xiao, L. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Zircaloy-4 is widely used as fuel element cladding in nuclear reactors. Pellet-clad interaction (PCI) failure is a concern for many water reactor fuel designs. Extensive work on the mechanism of PCI failure has led to the conclusion that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) induced by iodine vapour in the temperature range relevant to fuel operation is the most probable cause of PCI failure in zirconium alloy fuel element cladding. In-situ neutron diffraction measurements performed on tubular Zircaloy-4 specimens simultaneously pulled in tension and pressurized internally will provide information on the effects of stress biaxiality on the distribution of stresses at the crystal level during loading. (author)

  6. Plastic behaviour of Zircaloy-4 in the temperature range 77-1000 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derep, J.L.; Ibrahim, S.; Rouby, D.; Fantozzi, G.; Gobin, P.

    1979-01-01

    Tensile tests were carried out on Zircaloy-4 over a temperature range 77-1000 K. So, we have determined the flow stress variations as a function of temperature and strain rate. Two thermally activated zones were observed between about 77 and 600 K, a plateau stress between 600 and 700 K and an other thermally activated zone above 700 K. The various mechanisms which can be responsible for the thermally activated and athermal zones are discussed in the light of experimental results. The mechanical behaviour of Zircaloy-4 appears similar to the zirconium-oxygen alloys one. (orig.) [de

  7. Investigation of the effect of hydride and iodine on the mechanical behaviour of the zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, M.I.

    1981-12-01

    To investigate the effect of hydride and iodine on the mechanical behaviour of the zircaloy-4 tubes, deformation tests under pressure of samples hydrided in autoclave and of samples containing iodine were carried out, in order to simulate the fission product. The same tests were carried out in samples without hydride and iodine contents that were used as reference samples in the temperature range of 650 0 C-950 0 C. The hydrided samples and the samples containing iodine tested at 650 0 C and 750 0 C showed a higher ductility than the samples of reference. The hydrided samples tested at 850 0 C and 950 0 C showed a higher embritlement than the samples of reference and than the samples containing iodine tested at the same temperatures. A mechanical test has been developed to investigate the effect of hydride and iodine on the mechanical behaviour of the zircaloy-4 tubes. The mechanical test were carried out at room temperature. At room temperature the hydrition decreased the ductility of zircaloy-4. At room temperature the sample containing iodine showed a higher ductility than the sample without iodine. The combined action of hydrogen and iodine at room temperature enhanced the embrittlment of the samples zircaloy-4. (Author) [pt

  8. The effect of second-phase particles on the corrosion and struture of Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortie, M.B.

    1982-10-01

    The effect of heat treatment and second-phase particles on the corrosion resistance and microstructure of Zircaloy-4 has been examined. In particular the effect of precipitates on the rate and mechanism of high-temperature, high-pressure water or steam corrosion is discussed. Measurements of corrosion rate are presented for specimens which have received various heat treatments. The heat treatments studied included a fast cool from the beta field, prolonged annealing at temperatures ranging from 500 degrees Celsius to 1 100 degrees Celsius as well as combinations of the above. The fabrication of a small quantity of Zircaloy-4 strip was undertaken and the methods used and observations made are recorded. The wide range of microstructures produced in Zircaloy-4 by the heat treatments and fabrication procedures utilized are described and discussed with optical or electron microscope photographs showing the important features. Qualitative and semi-quantitative chemical analyses of the second-phase particles were carried out by both the scanning electron microscope and Auger spectroscopy. Evidence for the existence of a tin-rich precipitate in Zircaloy-4 is presented and discussed

  9. Experimental studies on the crystallographic and plastic anisotropies of zircaloy-4 tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa Viana, C.S. da

    1982-01-01

    The crystallographic and plastic anisotropies of a zircaloy-4 tubing using direct pole figures and experimental yield loci are analyzed. Tensile and plane-strain compression tests were used to assess the mecahnical behaviour. The results are discussed with respect to the dimensional stability and mechanical behaviour expected for the tube in its use in the core of pressurized water cooled reactors. (Author) [pt

  10. Mechanical behavior of zircaloy-4 tubes under complexe state of stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa Viana, C.S. da

    1980-01-01

    The use of zircaloy-4 tubing as cladding material for fuel elements is reviewed with respect to its microstructural, textural and loading conditions. Its anisotropic plastic behaviour is studied through the experimental determination of its yield locus by mechanical testing and Knoop hardness and compared to Hill's anisotropic yield criterion. (Author) [pt

  11. Fracture properties of hydrided Zircaloy-4 cladding in recrystallization and stress-relief anneal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hung, E-mail: hhhsu@iner.gov.tw [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), Lungtan Township, Taoyuan County 325, Taiwan (China); Institute of Materials Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 202, Taiwan (China); Tsay, Leu-Wen [Institute of Materials Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 202, Taiwan (China)

    2012-03-15

    In this work, the stress-relieved (SRA) and recrystallized (RXA) Zircaloy-4 cladding specimens were hydrogen-charged to the target concentration of 300 wppm and then manufactured into X-specimens for fracture toughness test. The hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of Zircaloy-4 cladding specimens in both SRA and RXA conditions were investigated. At the hydrogen concentration level of 300 wppm, J-integral values for RXA cladding were higher than those for SRA cladding at both 25 Degree-Sign C and 300 Degree-Sign C. The formation of brittle zirconium hydrides had a significant impact on the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-4 cladding in both SRA and RXA states, especially at 25 Degree-Sign C. Among all the tests, SRA cladding tested at 25 Degree-Sign C exhibited a great loss of the fracture toughness. The micrographic and fractographic observations further demonstrated that the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-4 cladding would be improved by the coarse grains in RXA cladding, but degraded by zirconium hydrides precipitated along the grain boundary.

  12. Analysis of the tensile behaviour of zircaloy-4 in the region of dynamic strain aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellaretti Filho, O.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis of the tensile behavior of Zircaloy 4, centering around the influence of dynamic strain aging and strain rate history, is presented. This analysis is based on techniques introduced by Jaoul-Crussard and Reed-Hill. An attempt is also made to assess the experimental errors that influence these methods. (author)

  13. Contribution to study on recovery and recrystallization of cold rolling zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persiano, A.I.C.

    1977-01-01

    Recovery and recrystallization of work-hardened (40-60% - Cold rolling) Zircaloy-4 were studied between 200 and 600 0 C with times varying from 15 to 240 minutes, from electrical resistance and hardness measurements. Activation energy calculation for the recovery and recrystallization processes using the samples work-hardened 60% gave 0,7 and 2,1 eV. (author)

  14. Nondestructive hydrogen analysis of steam-oxidized Zircaloy-4 by wide-angle neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yong; Qian, Shuo; Garrison, Ben; Smith, Tyler; Kim, Peter

    2018-04-01

    A nondestructive neutron scattering method to precisely measure the hydrogen content in high-temperature steam-oxidized Zircaloy-4 cladding was developed. Zircaloy-4 cladding was used to produce hydrided specimens with hydrogen content up to ≈500 wppm. Following hydrogen charging, the hydrogen content of the hydrided specimens was measured using the vacuum hot extraction method, by which the samples with desired hydrogen concentrations were selected for the neutron study. The hydrided samples were then oxidized in steam up to ≈6.0 wt. % at 1100 °C. Optical microscopy shows that our hydriding procedure results in uniform distribution of circumferential hydrides across the wall thickness, and uniform oxide layers were formed on the sample surfaces by the steam oxidation. Small- and wide-angle neutron scattering were simultaneously performed to provide a quick (less than an hour per sample) measurement of the hydrogen content in various types of hydrided and oxidized Zircaloy-4. Our study demonstrates that the hydrogen in pre-oxidized Zircaloy-4 cladding can be measured very accurately by both small- and wide-angle neutron scattering. For steam-oxidized samples, the small-angle neutron scattering is contaminated with coherent scattering from additional structural features induced by the steam oxidation. However, the scattering intensity of the wide-angle neutron scattering increases proportionally with the hydrogen charged in the samples. The hydrogen content and wide-angle neutron scattering intensity are highly linearly correlated for the oxidized cladding samples examined in this work, and can be used to precisely determine the hydrogen content in steam-oxidized Zircaloy-4 samples. Hydrogen contents determined by neutron scattering of oxidation samples were also found to be consistent with the results of chemical analysis within acceptable margins for error.

  15. Thermomechanical treatment of {beta}-treated Zircaloy-4 within the upper {alpha}-range; Traitements thermomecaniques dans le haut domaine {alpha} du zircaloy-4 trempe-{beta}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauvy, C

    2004-09-15

    Zircaloy-4 is a Zr base alloy mainly used for nuclear applications. This study deals with its behaviour during forming, with a special interest for physical mechanisms acting in the upper {alpha}-range. The {beta}-treated Zircaloy-4 is first described in terms of microstructure and texture. The {alpha} plates are organised in colonies with alternating crystallographic orientations. The Burgers relationships have also been checked. The mechanical behaviour shows two distinct domains (with or without hardening). This could be linked to interactions between the solutes (Sn, O) and mobile dislocations. The evolution of crystallographic texture is characterised by X-ray diffraction. At 550 C, twinning is shown to be the main deformation mechanism under specific experimental conditions. Globularization of the initial lamellar structure is identified as a continuous dynamic recrystallization process, more efficient at higher temperature. High strains are necessary to achieve this phenomenon but meta-dynamic recrystallization can also be used to obtain an equiaxed microstructure after limited strains. (author)

  16. Irradiation creep and growth behavior of Zircaloy-4 inner shell of HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jong-Ha; Cho, Yeong-Garp; Kim, Jong-In [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    The inner shell of the reflector vessel of HANARO was made of Zircaloy-4 rolled plate. Zircaloy-4 rolled plate shows highly anisotropic behavior by fast neutron irradiation. This paper describes the analysis method for the irradiation induced creep and growth of the inner shell of HANARO. The anisotropic irradiation creep behavior was modeled as uniaxial strain-hardening power law modified by Hill's stress potential and the anisotropic irradiation growth was modeled by using volumetric swelling with anisotropic strain rate. In this study, the irradiation induced creep and growth behavior of the inner shell of the HANARO reflector vessel was re-evaluated. The rolling direction, the fast neutron flux, and the boundary conditions were applied with the same conditions as the actual inner shell. Analysis results show that deformation of the inner shell due to irradiation does not raise any problem for the lifetime of HANARO. (author)

  17. Effect of current density on the anodic behaviour of zircaloy-4 and niobium: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghunath Reddy, G.; Lavanya, A.; Ch Anjaneyulu

    2004-01-01

    The kinetics of anodic oxidation of zircaloy-4 and niobium have been studied at current densities ranging from 2 to 14 mA.cm -2 at room temperature in order to investigate the dependence of ionic current density on the field across the oxide film. Thickness of the anodic films were estimated from capacitance data. The formation rate, current efficiency and differential field were found to increase with increase in the ionic current density for both zircaloy-4 and niobium. Plots of the logarithm of formation rate vs. logarithm of the current density are fairly linear. From linear plots of logarithm of ionic current density vs. differential field, and applying the Cabrera-Mott theory, the half-jump distance and the height of the energy barrier are deduced and compared. (author)

  18. Crack behavior of oxidation resistant coating layer on Zircaloy-4 for accident tolerant fuel claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung Hwan; Kim, Eui Jung; Jung, Yang Il; Park, Dong Jun; Kim, Hyun Gil; Park, Jeong Yong; Yang, Jae Ho

    2016-01-01

    Terrani et al. reported the oxidation resistance of Fe-based alloys for protecting zirconium alloys from the rapid oxidation in a high-temperature steam environment. Kim and co-workers also reported the corrosion behavior of Cr coated zirconium alloy using a plasma spray and laser beam scanning. Cracks are developed by tensile stress, and this significantly deteriorates the oxidation resistance. This tensile stress is possibly generated by the thermal cycle or bending or the irradiation growth of zirconium. In this study, Cr was deposited by AIP on to Zircaloy-4 plate, and the crack behavior of Cr coated Zircaloy-4 under uni-axial tensile strain was observed. In addition, the strain of the as-deposited state was calculated by iso-inclination method. Coating began to crack at 8% of applied strain. It is assumed that a well-densified structure by AIP tends to be resistant to cracking under tensile strain.

  19. Crack behavior of oxidation resistant coating layer on Zircaloy-4 for accident tolerant fuel claddings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung Hwan; Kim, Eui Jung; Jung, Yang Il; Park, Dong Jun; Kim, Hyun Gil; Park, Jeong Yong; Yang, Jae Ho [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Terrani et al. reported the oxidation resistance of Fe-based alloys for protecting zirconium alloys from the rapid oxidation in a high-temperature steam environment. Kim and co-workers also reported the corrosion behavior of Cr coated zirconium alloy using a plasma spray and laser beam scanning. Cracks are developed by tensile stress, and this significantly deteriorates the oxidation resistance. This tensile stress is possibly generated by the thermal cycle or bending or the irradiation growth of zirconium. In this study, Cr was deposited by AIP on to Zircaloy-4 plate, and the crack behavior of Cr coated Zircaloy-4 under uni-axial tensile strain was observed. In addition, the strain of the as-deposited state was calculated by iso-inclination method. Coating began to crack at 8% of applied strain. It is assumed that a well-densified structure by AIP tends to be resistant to cracking under tensile strain.

  20. Stress corrosion of Zircaloy-4. Fracture mechanics study of the intergranular - transgranular transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, Silvia B.; Duffo, Gustavo S.

    2003-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of Zircaloy-4 wires was studied in 1M NaCl, 1M KBr and 1M KI aqueous solutions, and in iodine alcoholic solutions. In all cases, intergranular attack preceded transgranular propagation. It is generally accepted that the intergranular-transgranular transition occurs when a critical value of the stress intensity factor is reached. In the present work it was confirmed that the transition from intergranular to transgranular propagation cracking in Zircaloy-4 wires also occurs when a critical value of the stress intensity factor is reached. This critical stress intensity factor in wire samples is independent of the solution tested and close to 10 MPa.m-1/2. This value is in good agreement with those reported in the literature measured by different techniques. (author)

  1. The influence of hydride on fracture toughness of recrystallized Zircaloy-4 cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hung, E-mail: 175877@mail.csc.com.tw [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), Lungtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan, ROC (China); China Steel Corporation, Hsiao Kang District, Kaohsiung 81233, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chiang, Ming-Feng [China Steel Corporation, Hsiao Kang District, Kaohsiung 81233, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Yen-Chen [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), Lungtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2014-04-01

    In this work, RXA cladding tubes were hydrogen-charged to target hydrogen content levels between 150 and 800 wppm (part per million by weight). The strings of zirconium hydrides observed in the cross sections are mostly oriented in the circumferential direction. The fracture toughness of hydrided RXA Zircaloy-4 cladding was measured to evaluate its hydride embrittlement susceptibility. With increasing hydrogen content, the fracture toughness of hydrided RXA cladding decreases at both 25 °C and 300 °C. Moreover, highly localized hydrides (forming a hydride rim) aggravate the degradation of the fracture properties of RXA Zircaloy-4 cladding at both 25 °C and 300 °C. Brittle features in the form of quasi-cleavages and secondary cracks were observed on the fracture surface of the hydride rim, even for RXA cladding tested at 300 °C.

  2. The steam pressure effect on high temperature corrosion of zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. P.; Park, G. H.

    1998-01-01

    To find the effect of pressure on the high temperature oxidation of zircaloy-4, an autoclave capable of measuring the degree of oxidation at high temperatures and high pressure was manufactured. The degree of high temperature oxidation of zircaloy-4 was measured at three different conditions, high pressure steam, high pressure Ar gas with small amount of steam, and 1 atm steam. All the measurements were done at 750 deg C. The oxide thickness is much thicker in high pressure steam, comparing to that in the 1 atm steam. And, the higher is the steam pressure, the thicker becomes the oxide. No effect was observed in the case of high pressure Ar containing small amount of steam. Many cracks exist on the surface of specimens oxidized at high pressure steam, which come from the enhanced tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation due to high pressure steam. The enhanced oxidation seems to oxide cracking

  3. Effect of ageing time and temperature on the strain ageing behaviour of quenched zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rheem, K.S.; Park, W.K.; Yook, C.C.

    1977-01-01

    The strain ageing behaviour of quenched Zircaloy-4 has been studied as a function of ageing time and temperature in the temperature range 523-588 K for a short-ageing time of 1 to 52 seconds. A the test conditions, the strain ageing stress increased with ageing time and temperature at a strain rate of 5.55x10 -4 sec -1 . Applying stress on the quenched Zircaloy-4, the strain ageing effect indicated following two states: an initial stage having an activation energy of 0.39ev considered to be due to Snoek type ordering of interstitial oxygen atoms in the stress field of a dislocaiton and a second stage havingan activation energy of 0.60 ev, due to mainly long range diffusion of oxygen atoms. (author)

  4. The characteristics of surface oxidation and corrosion resistance of nitrogen implanted zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, G.; Choi, B.H.; Kim, W.; Jung, K.S.; Kwon, H.S.; Lee, S.J.; Lee, J.H.; Song, T.Y.; Shon, D.H.; Han, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    This work is concerned with the development and application of ion implantation techniques for improving the corrosion resistance of zircaloy-4. The corrosion resistance in nitrogen implanted zircaloy-4 under a 120 keV nitrogen ion beam at an ion dose of 3 x 10 17 cm -2 depends on the implantation temperature. The characteristics of surface oxidation and corrosion resistance were analyzed with the change of implantation temperature. It is shown that as implantation temperature rises from 100 to 724 C, the colour of specimen surface changes from its original colour to light yellow at 100 C, golden at 175 C, pink at 300 C, blue at 440 C and dark blue at 550 C. As the implantation temperature goes above 640 C, the colour of surface changes to light black, and the surface becomes a little rough. The corrosion resistance of zircaloy-4 implanted with nitrogen is sensitive to the implantation temperature. The pitting potential of specimens increases from 176 to 900 mV (SCE) as the implantation temperature increases from 100 to 300 C, and decreases from 900 to 90 mV(SCE) as the implantation temperature increases from 300 to 640 C. The microstructure, the distribution of oxygen, nitrogen and carbon elements, the oxide grain size and the feature of the precipitation in the implanted surface were investigated by optical microscope, TEM, EDS, XRD and AES. The experimental results reveal that the ZrO 2 is distributed mainly on the outer surface. The ZrN is distributed under the ZrO 2 layer. The characteristics of the distribution of ZrO 2 and ZrN in the nitrogen-implanted zircaloy-4 is influenced by the implantation temperature of the sample, and in turn the corrosion resistance is influenced. (orig.)

  5. The effects of irradiation and temperature on the growth of Zircaloy-4 tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendoush, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    The growth strain was measured after irradiation for 16 Zircaloy-4 tubes of the recrystallised and stress relieved types. The operating temperature during irradiation ranged between 317 and 344 0 C. The average fast neutron fluence was 9.6x10 20 n/cm 2 . Experimental results indicated the dependence of the growth on the irradiation temperature. The stress relieved result was compared with data of the literature. (orig.)

  6. Determination of lower bound crystallographic yield loci of zircaloy-4 tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa Viana, C.S. da

    1980-01-01

    The use of zircaloy-4 tubing in fuel elements of water cooled reactors is discussed with respect to its mechanisms of deformation and also its resulting anisotropic plastic behaviour. A method for obtaining lower bound crystallographic yield loci of α-Zr is presented and applied to individual crystal orientations and to a real texture described by the main components observed on a direct pole figure. (Author) [pt

  7. Zircaloy-4 and M5 high temperature oxidation and nitriding in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duriez, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et Surete Nucleaire, Direction de Prevention des Accidents Majeurs, Centre de Cadarache, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France)], E-mail: christian.duriez@irsn.fr; Dupont, T.; Schmet, B.; Enoch, F. [Universite Technologique de Troyes, BP 2060, 10010 Troyes (France)

    2008-10-15

    For the purpose of nuclear power plant severe accident analysis, degradation of Zircaloy-4 and M5 cladding tubes in air at high temperature was investigated by thermo-gravimetric analysis, in isothermal conditions, in a 600-1200 deg. C temperature range. Alloys were investigated either in a 'as received' bare state, or after steam pre-oxidation at 500 {sup o}C to simulate in-reactor corrosion. At the beginning of air exposure, the oxidation rate obeys a parabolic law, characteristic of solid-state diffusion limited regime. Parabolic rate constants compare, for Zircaloy-4 as well as for M5, with recently assessed correlations for high temperature Zircaloy-4 steam-oxidation. A thick layer of dense protective zirconia having a columnar structure forms during this diffusion-limited regime. Then, a kinetic transition (breakaway type) occurs, due to radial cracking along the columnar grain boundaries of this protective dense oxide scale. The breakaway is observed for a scale thickness that strongly increases with temperature. At the lowest temperatures, the M5 alloy appears to be breakaway-resistant, showing a delayed transition compared to Zircaloy-4. However, for both alloys, a pre-existing corrosion scale favours the transition, which occurs much earlier. The post transition kinetic regime is linear only for the lowest temperatures investigated. From 800 deg. C, a continuously accelerated regime is observed and is associated with formation of a strongly porous non-protective oxide. A mechanism of nitrogen-assisted oxide growth, involving formation and re-oxidation of ZrN particles, as well as nitrogen associated zirconia phase transformations, is proposed to be responsible for this accelerated degradation.

  8. A unified model to describe the anisotropic viscoplastic behavior of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delobelle, P.; Robinet, P.; Bouffioux, P.; Geyer, P.; Pichon, I. Le

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the constitutive equations of a unified viscoplastic model and its validation with experimental data. The mechanical tests were carried out in a temperature range of 20 to 400 C on both cold-worked stress-relieved and fully annealed Zircaloy-4 tubes. Although their geometry (14.3 by 1.2 mm) is different, the crystallographic texture was close to that expected in the cladding tubes. To characterize the anisotropy, mechanical tests were performed under both monotonic and cyclic uni- and bi-directional loadings, i.e., tension-compression, tension-torsion, and tension-internal pressure tests. The results obtained at ambient temperatures and the independence of the ratio R p = var-epsilon θθ p /var-epsilon zz p , with respect to temperature would seem to indicate that the set of anisotropy coefficients does not depend on temperature. Zircaloy-4 material also has a slight supplementary hardening during out-of-phase cyclic loading. The authors propose to extend the formulation of a unified viscoplastic model, developed and identified elsewhere for other initially isotropic materials, to the case of Zircaloy-4. Generally speaking, anisotropy is introduced through fourth order tensors affecting the flow directions, the linear kinematical hardening components, as well as the dynamic and static recoveries of the forementioned hardening variables. The ability of the model to describe all the mechanical properties of the material is shown. The application of the model to simulate mechanical tests (tension, creep, and relaxation) performed on true CWSR Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes with low tin content is also presented

  9. Influence of surface treatment on the oxidation behavior of zirconium and zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, I.; Ramanathan, L.V.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of fluoride concentration in surface treatment solutions on the oxidation behavior of Zr and Zircaloy-4 in the temperature range 350-760 0 C have been studied by means of thermogravimetric analysis. Two solutions containing different concentrations of hydrofluoric acid have been used for surface treatments, following which surface roughness measurements were also carried out. The influence of fluoride ion concentration on oxidation behavior has been found to be significant at higher temperatures. (Author) [pt

  10. Effects of oxidation in the mechanical behavior of zircaloy-4 tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A.M.M. dos.

    1981-07-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of zircaloy-4 is isothermally studied utilizing discontinous gravimetric method under two different oxidizing conditions, using gaseous oxigen and steam. The total weight gain during oxidation occurs in two different way: formation of oxide and solid solution. A mechanical test for studying the effect of embrittlement due to the absorption of oxygen in small zircalloy tubes have been developed. (Author) [pt

  11. Brazing characteristics of a Zr-Ti-Cu-Fe eutectic alloy filler metal for Zircaloy-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung G.; Lim, C. H.; Kim, K. H.; Park, S. S.; Lee, M. K.; Rhee, C. K.

    2013-10-01

    A Zr-Ti-Cu-Fe quaternary eutectic alloy was employed as a new Be-free brazing filler metal for Zircaloy-4 to supersede physically vapor-deposited Be coatings used conventionally with several disadvantages. The quaternary eutectic composition of Zr58Ti16Cu10Fe16 (at.%) showing a low melting temperature range from 832 °C to 853 °C was designed by a partial substitution of Zr with Ti based on a Zr-Cu-Fe ternary eutectic system. By applying an alloy ribbon with the determined composition, a highly reliable joint was obtained with a homogeneous formation of predominantly grown α-Zr phases owing to a complete isothermal solidification, exhibiting strength higher than that of Zircaloy-4. The homogenization of the joint was rate-controlled by the diffusion of the filler elements (Ti, Cu, and Fe) into the Zircaloy-4 base metal, and the detrimental segregation of the Zr2Fe phase in the central zone was completely eliminated by an isothermal holding at a brazing temperature of 920 °C for 10 min.

  12. Pool boiling CHF enhancement by micro/nanoscale modification of zircaloy-4 surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Ho Seon; Lee, Chan; Kim, Hyungdae; Jo, HangJin; Kang, SoonHo; Kim, Joonwon; Shin, Jeongseob; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2010-01-01

    Consideration of the critical heat flux (CHF) requires difficult compromises between economy and safety in many types of thermal systems, including nuclear power plants. Much research has been directed towards enhancing the CHF, and many recent studies have revealed that the significant CHF enhancement in nanofluids is due to surface deposition of nanoparticles. The surface deposition of nanoparticles influenced various surface characteristics. This fact indicated that the surface wettability is a key parameter for CHF enhancement and so is the surface morphology. In this study, surface wettability of zircaloy-4 used as cladding material of fuel rods in nuclear power plants was modified using surface treatment technique (i.e. anodization). Pool boiling experiments of distilled water on the prepared surfaces was conducted at atmospheric and saturated conditions to examine effects of the surface modification on CHF. The experimental results showed that CHF of zircaloy-4 can be significantly enhanced by the improvement in surface wettability using the surface modification, but only the wettability effect cannot explain the CHF increase on the treated zircaloy-4 surfaces completely. It was found that below a critical value of contact angle (10 o ), micro/nanostructures created by the surface treatment increased spreadability of liquid on the surface, which could lead to further increase in CHF even beyond the prediction caused only by the wettability improvement. These micro/nanostructures with multiscale on heated surface induced more significant CHF enhancement than it based on the wettability effect, due to liquid spreadability.

  13. Texture Of Zircaloy-4 Result Of Beta-Quenching, Cold Rolling And Recrystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futichah; Sulistioso

    1998-01-01

    Differences of crystallographic texture of zircaloy-4 plate depends on cold working and heat treatment.To determine the change of zircaloy-4 textures, the solid solution treatment process at beta phase which was followed by quenching on water was employed for this sample. The next step was cold rolling until deformation epsilon = 1.62. The specimens were recrystallized at 750 o C, for 2 hours. The result of beta-quench gave a spread and different orientations and the main orientation occurred at (0001)[1010] and (0001)[1120]. Result of cold rolling with epsilon = 1.39 and epsilon 1.62 is the deformation texture at the main orientation of (0001)[1010] with the angle of inclination was around 38 o. However, the result of Recrystallization process on 750 o C for 2 hours gave annealing textures with orientations of (0001)[1120]. It means that the recrystallization process of zircaloy-4 plate can not remove the deformation textures, but can change the crystallographic orientation

  14. The corrosion of Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Swam, L.F.P.; Shann, S.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the effects of thermo-mechanical processing of cladding on the corrosion of Zircaloy-4 in commercial PWRs that have been investigated. Visual observations and nondestructive measurements at poolside, augmented by observations in the hot cell, indicate that the initial black oxide transforms into a grey or tan later white oxide layer at a thickness of 10 to 15 μm independent of the thermal processing history of the tubing. At an oxide layer thickness of 60 to 80 μm, the oxide may spall depending somewhat on the particular oxide morphology formed and possibly on the frequency of power and temperature changes of the fuel rods. Because spalling of oxide lowers the metal-to-oxide interface temperature of fuel rods, it reduces the corrosion rate and is beneficial from that point of view. To determine the effect of thermo-mechanical processing on in-reactor corrosion of Zircaloy-4, oxide thickness measurements at poolside and in the hot cell have been analyzed with the MATPRO corrosion model. A calibrated corrosion parameter in this model provides a measure of the corrosion susceptibility of the Zircaloy-4 cladding. It was found necessary to modify the MATPRO equations with a burnup dependent term to obtain a near constant value of the corrosion parameter over a burnup range of approximately 10 to 45 MWd/kgU. Different calculational tests were performed to confirm that the modified model accurately predicts the corrosion behavior of fuel rods

  15. The steady-state creep of zircaloy-4 fuel cladding from 940 to 1873 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinger, H.E.; Bera, P.C.; Clendening, W.R.

    1978-11-01

    The steady-state creep rates of as-received Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding have been determined in the α-Zr phase (940 -6 and 10 -3 s -1 were determined under constant uniaxial load conditions. Assuming that creep rates can be described by a power law - Arrhenius equation, the creep rate for α-phase Zircaloy-4 is given by: epsilon sub(ss) = 2000σ sup(5.32) exp (-284 600/kT) s -1 and for the β-phase Zircaloy-4 is given by: epsilon sub(ss) = 8.1σ sup(3.79) exp (-142 300/kT) s -1 . For both the α-Zr and β-Zr phases, the activation energies for creep are in agreement with those for self-diffusion of zirconium and the rate-controlling mechanism is attributed to dislocation climb. Because of the scarcity of data, it is not possible to determine the rate equation unambiguously, nor to identify the mechanism for creep in the mixed α + β phase region. (author)

  16. Characterization of Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 by X-Ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, I.M.; Imakuma, K.; Salvador, V.L.R.

    1981-03-01

    The analytical characterization of zircaloy-2 and zircaloy-4 is intimataly connected with the determination of Sn, Fe, Cr, Ni, O, N, H, and Hf. An analytical method developed in this laboratory is discribed for the determination of metallic elements like Sn, Fe, Cr and Ni using the technique of X-ray fluorescence. The samples are prepared in the form of double-layer pellets using boric acid as a binding agent. The zircaloy-4 is dissolved in hydrofluoric acid and the metallic elements are converted to fluorides. The standard samples used for calibration are prepared from synthetic materials. The elements are determined by measuring the characteristic first order K α lines. A Zircaloy-4 sample analysed yielded the following values: Sn=1.30+-0.03%, Fe=0.18+-0.01%, Cr=0.088+-0.004% and Ni=14+-3 ppm. The reproducibility, precision, as well as the theoretical limit of detection of the method are discussed. The determination of the elements O, N and H present as occluded gas in the zircaloy is nearing completion. These analyses are being carried out by a Mass Spectrometric technique where an aliquot of the released gas is analysed. (Author) [pt

  17. MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL STRENGTH OF SURFACE ODS TREATED ZIRCALOY-4 SHEET USING LASER BEAM SCANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HYUN-GIL KIM

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The surface modification of engineering materials by laser beam scanning (LBS allows the improvement of properties in terms of reduced wear, increased corrosion resistance, and better strength. In this study, the laser beam scan method was applied to produce an oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS structure on a zirconium metal surface. A recrystallized Zircaloy-4 alloy sheet with a thickness of 2 mm, and Y2O3 particles of 10 μm were selected for ODS treatment using LBS. Through the LBS method, the Y2O3 particles were dispersed in the Zircaloy-4 sheet surface at a thickness of 0.4 mm, which was about 20% when compared to the initial sheet thickness. The mean size of the dispersive particles was 20 nm, and the yield strength of the ODS treated plate at 500°C was increased more than 65 % when compared to the initial state. This strength increase was caused by dispersive Y2O3 particles in the matrix and the martensite transformation of Zircaloy-4 matrix by the LBS.

  18. Comparison of the air oxidation behaviors of Zircaloy-4 implanted with yttrium and cerium ions at 500 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X.W.; Bai, X.D.; Xu, J.; Zhou, Q.G.; Chen, B.S.

    2002-01-01

    As a valuable process for surface modification of materials, ion implantation is eminent to improve mechanical properties, electrochemical corrosion resistance and oxidation behaviors of varieties of materials. To investigate and compare the oxidation behaviors of Zircaloy-4, implantation of yttrium ion and cerium ion were respectively employed by using an MEVVA source at the energy of 40 keV with a dose ranging from 1x10 16 to 1x10 17 ions/cm 2 . Subsequently, weight gain curves of the different specimens including as-received Zircaloy-4 and Zircaloy-4 specimens implanted with the different ions were measured after oxidation in air at 500 deg. C for 100 min. It was obviously found that a significant improvement was achieved in the oxidation behaviors of implanted Zircaloy-4 compared with that of the as-received Zircaloy-4, and the oxidation behavior of cerium-implanted Zircaloy-4 was somewhat better than that of yttrium-implanted specimen. To obtain the valence and the composition of the oxides in the scale, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy was used in the present study. Glancing angle X-ray diffraction, employed to analyze the phase transformation in the oxide films, showed that the addition of yttrium transformed the phase from monoclinic zirconia to tetragonal zirconia, yet the addition of cerium transformed the phase from monoclinic zirconia to hexagonal zirconia. In the end, the mechanism of the improvement of the oxidation behavior was discussed

  19. Stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4 in non-aqueous iodine solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Sanchez, Andrea V.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work the susceptibility to intergranular attack and stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4 in different iodine alcoholic solutions was studied. The influence of different variables such as the molecular weight of the alcohols, the water content of the solutions, the alcohol type (primary, secondary or tertiary) and the temperature was evaluated. To determine the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking the slow strain rate technique was used. Specimens of Zircaloy-4 were also exposed between 0.5 and 300 hours to the solutions without applied stress to evaluate the susceptibility to intergranular attack. The electrochemical behavior of the material in the corrosive media was studied by potentiodynamic polarization tests. It was determined that the active species responsible for the stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4 in iodine alcoholic solutions is a molecular complex between the alcohol and iodine. The intergranular attack precedes the 'true' stress corrosion cracking phenomenon (which is associated to the transgranular propagation of the crack) and it is controlled by the diffusion of the active specie to the tip of the crack. Water acts as inhibitor to intergranular attack. Except for methanolic solutions, the minimum water content necessary to inhibit stress corrosion cracking was determined. This critical water content decreases when increasing the molecular weight of the alcohol. An explanation for this behavior is proposed. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking also depends on the type of the alcohol used as solvent. The temperature dependence of the crack propagation rate is in agreement with a thermal activated process, and the activation energy is consistent with a process controlled by the volume diffusion of the active species. (author) [es

  20. The increase in fatigue crack growth rates observed for Zircaloy-4 in a PWR environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockeram, B. V.; Kammenzind, B. F.

    2018-02-01

    Cyclic stresses produced during the operation of nuclear reactors can result in the extension of cracks by processes of fatigue. Although fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) data for Zircaloy-4 in air are available, little testing has been performed in a PWR primary water environment. Test programs have been performed by Gee et al., in 1989 and Picker and Pickles in 1984 by the UK Atomic Energy Authority, and by Wisner et al., in 1994, that have shown an enhancement in FCGR for Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 in high-temperature water. In this work, FCGR testing is performed on Zircaloy-4 in a PWR environment in the hydrided and non-hydrided condition over a range of stress-intensity. Measurements of crack extension are performed using a direct current potential drop (DCPD) method. The cyclic rate in the PWR primary water environment is varied between 1 cycle per minute to 0.1 cycle per minute. Faster FCGR rates are observed in water in comparison to FCGR testing performed in air for the hydrided material. Hydrided and non-hydrided materials had similar FCGR values in air, but the non-hydrided material exhibited much lower rates of FCGR in a PWR primary water environment than for hydrided material. Hydrides are shown to exhibit an increased tendency for cracking or decohesion in a PWR primary water environment that results in an enhancement in FCGR values. The FCGR in the PWR primary water only increased slightly with decreasing cycle frequency in the range of 1 cycle per minute to 0.1 cycle per minute. Comparisons between the FCGR in water and air show the enhancement from the PWR environment is affected by the applied stress intensity.

  1. In-reactor oxidation of zircaloy-4 under low water vapor pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Clayton, Kevin K.; Longhurst, Glen R.

    2015-01-01

    Complementary in- and ex-reactor oxidation tests have been performed to evaluate the oxidation and hydrogen absorption performance of Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) under relatively low partial pressures (300 and 1000 Pa) of water vapor at specified test temperatures (330 and 370 °C). Data from these tests will be used to support the fabrication of components intended for isotope-producing targets and provide information regarding the temperature and pressure dependence of oxidation and hydrogen absorption of Zr-4 over the specified range of test conditions. Comparisons between in- and ex-reactor test results were performed to evaluate the influence of irradiation.

  2. In-reactor oxidation of zircaloy-4 under low water vapor pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Clayton, Kevin K.; Longhurst, Glen R.

    2015-01-01

    Complementary in- and ex-reactor oxidation tests have been performed to evaluate the oxidation and hydrogen absorption performance of Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) under relatively low partial pressures (300 and 1000 Pa) of water vapor at specified test temperatures (330 and 370 ℃). Data from these tests will be used to support the fabrication of components intended for isotope-producing targets and provide information regarding the temperature and pressure dependence of oxidation and hydrogen absorption of Zr- 4 over the specified range of test conditions. Comparisons between in- and ex-reactor test results were performed to evaluate the influence of irradiation.

  3. Statistics of the acoustic emission signals parameters from Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveto, Maria E.; Lopez Pumarega, Maria I.; Ruzzante, Jose E.

    2000-01-01

    Statistic analysis of acoustic emission signals parameters: amplitude, duration and risetime was carried out. CANDU type Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings were pressurized up to rupture, one set of five normal pieces and six with defects included, acoustic emission was used on-line. Amplitude and duration frequency distributions were fitted with lognormal distribution functions, and risetime with an exponential one. Using analysis of variance, acoustic emission was appropriated to distinguish between defective and non-defective subsets. Clusters analysis applied on mean values of acoustic emission signal parameters were not effective to distinguish two sets of fuel claddings studied. (author)

  4. A new method of residual stress distribution analysis for corroded Zircaloy-4 cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godlewski, J.; Cadalbert, R.

    1992-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction method of residual stress measurement is developed to determine the stress level in the metal near the metal/oxide interface of Zircaloy-4 cladding samples oxidized in steam water at 400degC under a pressure of 10.3 MPa. The stress gradient is obtained and the evolution of the average stress is determined as function of the oxidation time. The presence of tetragonal zirconia phase in quite large quantity near the metal/oxide interface could be correlated to the high stress level in the base metal, adjacent to the interface. (author)

  5. Process for reliewing stresses in a zircaloy 2 or zircaloy 4 strip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charquet, D.; Dombre, M.

    1986-01-01

    Fabrication process of a zircaloy 2 or zircaloy 4 strip with an oxygen content between 900 and 1600 ppm with the following mechanical properties: E0.2≥250MPa at 315 deg C, parallel and perpendicular A% ≥4 at 20 deg C. The strip is rolled and stabilized by heat treatment between 490 and 580 deg C for 1 to 10 minutes and partially recrystallized for 0.5 to 5 vol.%. It is used for spacers of nuclear fuels [fr

  6. Spectrophotometric determination of uranium traces in zircaloy-4 and zirconium sponge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correia, R.J.; Weber de D'Alessio, Ana; Zucal, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    The uranium contents of the zircaloy-4 which is used for the fabrication of the fuel cans for the PHWR Atucha and Embalse nuclear power stations must not exceed 3.ppM. A method was developed for performing that control, involving the separation of the uranium from its matrix by partition chromatography and its determination by spectrophotometry with Arsenazo (III). This method is applied within the range of 0.2 to 10 ppM, obtaining a relative standard deviation of 6% for U contents of 3 ppm. (M.E.L.) [es

  7. A new method for residual stress distribution - analysis of corroded zircaloy-4 cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godlewski, J.; Cadalbert, R.

    1992-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction method for residual stress measurement is developed to determine the stress level in the metal near the metal/oxide interface of Zircaloy-4 cladding samples oxidized in steam water at 400 deg C under a pressure of 10.3 MPa. The stress gradient is obtained and the evolution of the average stress is determined as a function of the oxidation time. The presence of tetragonal zirconia phase in quite large quantity near the metal/oxide interface could be correlated to the high stress level in the base metal, adjacent to the interface. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  8. Biaxial creep deformation of Zircaloy-4 in the high alpha phase temperature range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, A.T.; Horwood, R.A.; Healey, T.

    1983-01-01

    The ballooning response of Zircaloy-4 fuel tubes during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident may be calculated from a knowledge of the thermal environment of the rods and the creep deformation characteristics of the cladding. In support of such calculations biaxial creep studies have been performed on fuel tubes supplied by Westinghouse, Wolverine and Sandvik of temperatures in the alpha phase range. This paper presents the results of an investigation of their respective creep behaviour which has resulted in the formulation of equations for use in LOCA fuel ballooning codes. (author)

  9. Determination of the initial oxidation behavior of Zircaloy-4 by in-situ TEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harlow, Wayne; Ghassemi, Hessam; Taheri, Mitra L.

    2016-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4), specifically by oxidation, is a problem of great importance as this material is critical for current nuclear reactor cladding. The early formation behavior and structure of the oxide layer during oxidation was studied using in-situ TEM techniques that allowed for Zry-4 to be monitored during corrosion. These environmental exposure experiments were coupled with precession electron diffraction to identify and quantify the phases present in the samples before and after the oxidation. Following short-term, high temperature oxidation, the dominant phase was revealed to be monoclinic ZrO 2 in a columnar structure. These samples oxidized in-situ contained structures that correlated well with bulk Zry-4 subjected to autoclave treatment, which were used for comparison and validation of this technique. By using in-situ TEM the effect of microstructure features, such as grain boundaries, on oxidation behavior of an alloy can be studied. The technique presented herein holds the potential to be applied any alloy system to study these effects. - Highlights: • In-situ TEM was used to oxidize samples of Zircaloy-4. • Similar behavior was found in the in-situ oxidized and autoclave-oxidized samples. • Precession diffraction was used to characterize oxide phase and texture.

  10. An investigation of deformed microstructure and mechanical properties of Zircaloy-4 processed through multiaxial forging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuloria, Devasri; Nageswararao, P. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering & Centre of Nanotechnology, IIT Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Jayaganthan, R., E-mail: rjayafmt@iitr.ernet.in [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering & Centre of Nanotechnology, IIT Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Jha, S. [Nuclear Fuel Complex Limited, Hyderabad 501301 (India); Srivastava, D. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 40085 (India)

    2016-04-15

    In the present work, the mechanical behavior of Zircaloy-4 subjected to various deformation strains by multiaxial forging (MAF) at cryogenic temperature (CT) was investigated. The alloy was strained up to different number of cycles, viz., 6 cycles, 9 cycles, and 12 cycles at cumulative strains of 2.96, 4.44, and 5.91, respectively. The mechanical properties of the alloy were investigated by performing the universal tensile test and the Vickers hardness test. Both the test showed improvement in the ultimate tensile strength and hardness value by 51% and 26%, respectively, at the highest cumulative strain of 5.91. The electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) measurement and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used for analyzing the deformed microstructure. The microstructures of the alloy underwent deformation at various cumulative strains/cycles showed grain refinement with the evolution of shear and twin bands that were highest for the alloy deformed at the highest number of cycles. The effective grain refinement was due to twins formation and their intersection, which led to the improvement in mechanical properties of the MAFed alloy, as observed in the present work. - Highlights: • Zircaloy-4 was subjected to MAF at cryogenic temperature. • Microstructural evolution was studied through EBSD and TEM. • Deformed microstructure was marked with various types of twinning and shear banding. • Twins formations are responsible for effective grain refinement and enhanced mechanical properties.

  11. Oxidation of Zircaloy-4 under limited steam supply at 1000 and 13000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uetsuka, H.

    1984-12-01

    With the view of examining the oxidation behavior of Zircaloy-4 under limited steam supply occurring in severe accidents of LWRs, Zircaloy-4 cladding specimens were examined at the isothermal oxidation temperatures of 1000 and 1300 0 C under a steam atmosphere, flowing at a reduced and constant rate in the range of 3proportional170 mg/cm 2 xmin. The effect of steam starvation, which was restricted to very low levels of steam supply rate, was observed at the two examined temperatures. And the critical supply rate of steam starvation was evaluated to be 13 and 20 mg/cm 2 xmin for the oxidation at 1000 and 1300 0 C, respectively. Variation of the oxidation duration between 2 and 60 min at 1000 0 C allowed to compare the reaction kinetics for three different rates of steam supply. The short-term results confirmed the reduced reaction rates for the lower steam supplies. At the longer times, however, a clear trend towards linear kinetics was observed for the lower supplies. This can be interpreted as the result of earlier breakaway transition under limited steam supply. In the test at 1300 0 C, an acceleration of the oxidation rate was measured for the specified steam supply rate between 20 and 60 mg/cm 2 xmin. This related strongly with high hydrogen concentration in the atmosphere. Hydrogen blanketing - the retarding effect of hydrogen on Zircaloy oxidation - was not identified in the examined temperature range. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Experimental investigation of strain, damage and failure of hydrided zircaloy-4 with various hydride orientations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racine, A; Catherine, C.S.; Cappelaere, C.; Bornert, M.; Caldemaison, D.

    2005-01-01

    This experimental investigation is devoted to the influence of the orientation of hydrides on the mechanical response of Zircaloy-4. Ring tensile tests are performed on unirradiated CWSR Zircaloy-4, charged with about 200 or 500wppm hydrogen. Hydrides are oriented either parallel ('tangential'), or perpendicular ('radial') to the circumferential tensile direction. Tangential hydrides are usually observed in cladding tubes, however, hydrides can be reoriented after cooling under stress to become radial and then trigger brittle behavior. In this investigation, we perform, 'macroscopic' or SEM in-situ tensile tests on smooth rings, at room temperature. We get the mechanical response of the material as a function of hydride orientation and hydrogen content and we investigate the deformation, damage and failure mechanisms. In both cases, digital image correlation techniques are used to estimate local and global strain distributions. The results lead to the following conclusions: neither the tensile stress-strain response nor the strain modes are affected by hydrogen content or hydride orientation, but the failure modes are. Indeed, only 200wppm radial hydrides embrittle Zy-4: sample fails in the elastic domain at about 350 MPa before strain bands could develop; whereas in other cases samples reach at least 750 MPa before failure, with ductile or brittle mode. (authors)

  13. Texture, morphology and deformation mechanisms in β-transformed Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciurchea, D.; Furtuna, I.; Todica, M.; Roth, M.

    1996-01-01

    The morphology of the β(bcc) transformed Zircaloy-4 may be treated as a lenticular-twinned martensite. The texture is a consequence of the degeneration of the left angle 0001 right angle α , left angle 1010 right angle α and left angle 1011 right angle α directions into left angle 110 right angle β directions. The crystallographic mechanisms implied in the accommodation of the microscopic Bain strain are (1010) left angle 1120 right angle prism slip, (1012) left angle 101 1 right angle twinning and (1011) left angle 1012 right angle twinning. This degeneration explains the 'parallel plate' and 'basketweave' morphologies observed by microscopy and the texture of the β transformed tube. The macroscopic Bain strain was calculated and agrees with the dimensional measurements. The deformation mechanisms of β transformed Zircaloy-4 are identified from the new texture and from deformation experiments as twinning and interplatelet glide. The interplatelet glide induces a fragile character of fracture in the 'parallel plate' morphology. (orig.)

  14. Air Oxidation Behaviors of Zircaloy-4 Cladding During a LOCA In Spent Fuel Pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Je Geon; Chun, Tae Hyun; Kim, Sun Ki; Koo, Yang Hyun

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that air oxidation induces a serious degradation of the Zircaloy cladding material, compared with steam oxidation. From the oxidant point of view, in comparison with steam, chemical heat release during oxidation in air is higher by 80%, which may lead to a more rapid degradation of the Zircaloy cladding, and further evolution of the accident.. Additionally, the oxidation kinetics in air is much faster than in steam due to the formation of non-protective oxide layer. From the safety point of view, the barrier effect of the cladding against release of fission products is lost much earlier in air compared to steam. The objective of this study is to investigate the oxidation behaviors of fuel cladding in two different conditions such as isothermal and transient condition and to generate its kinetic data under an accident condition in the spent fuel pool. In this study, the oxidation behaviors and its kinetics of the Zircaloy-4 were investigated in air environment for various air ingress scenarios in the temperature range 600 .deg. C-1,400 .deg. C by thermo-gravimetric analysis. In this study, the oxidation behaviors of the Zircaloy-4 for both isothermal condition and transient condition were investigated in air environment. In comparison with isothermal condition, the retardation of oxidation rate in transient condition was observed at both 1,200 .deg. C and 1,400 .deg. C. This seems to be ascribed to the effect of thin oxide formed during a heating

  15. Effects of deposited pyrolytic carbon on some mechanical properties of zircaloy-4 tubes. Vol. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrkawy, S W; Abdel-razek, I D; El-Sayed, H A [Metallurgy Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Zircaloy cladding tubes are not compatible with the uranium fuel pellets as they suffer from failure due to pelletclad interaction (PCI). A carbon coating, as used in the canadian CANLUB fuel elements, is thought to improve the cladding performance with respect to the PCI problem. In this paper pyrolytic carbon coating was deposited on zircaloy-4 cladding tubes by the thermal cracking of commercial butant gas at the temperature range 250-450 degree C. In order to evaluate the effect of gaseous species on the mechanical properties of the tubes tensile and microhardness testing measurements were performed on samples prepared from the coated tubes. The fractured surface of the tensile zircaloy tubes and the deposited carbon coating, both, were examined by the SEM. The results of the tensile tests of zircaloy-4 tubes indicated that the coating process has insignificant effect on the ultimate strength of the tubes tested. The values of Vickers hardness numbers were not significantly changed across the tubes thickness. The microstructure of deposited carbon, due to the cracking process, was granular in all the temperature range (250-450 degree C) studied. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  16. The effects of corrosion conditions and cold work on the nodular corrosion of zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Gil Sung

    1992-02-01

    The nodular corrosion of Zircaloy-4 was investigated on the effects of corrosion conditions and cold work. Variation of steam pressures, heat-up environments and prefilms were considered and cold work effects were also studied. The corrosion rate of Zircaloy-4 was dependent on pressure between 1 and 100 atm and it followed the cubic law as W=16.85 x P 0.31 for plate specimens and W=12.69 x P 0.27 for tube specimens, where W is weight gain (mg/dm 2 ) and P is the steam pressure (atm). The environment variation in autoclave during heat-up period did not affect the early stage of nodular corrosion. The prefilm, which was formed at 500 .deg. C under 1 atm steam for 4 hours, restrained the formation of the initial small nodules. The oxide film formed under 1 atm steam showed no difference of electrical resistivity from the oxides formed under 100 atm steam pressure. Cold work specimens showed the higher resistivity against nodular corrosion than as-received specimens. The corrosion resistance arising from cold work seems to be due to the texture changes by the cold work. The results showed that cold work can affect the later stage of uniform corrosion and the early stage of nodular corrosion, namely, the nodule initiation stage

  17. Hydrides blister formation and induced embrittlement on zircaloy-4 cladding tubes in reactivity initiated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellouin-De-Menibus, A.

    2012-01-01

    Our aim is to study the cladding fracture with mechanical tests more representative of RIA conditions, taking into account the hydrides blisters, representative strain rates and stress states. To obtain hydride blisters, we developed a thermodiffusion setup that reproduces blister growth in reactor conditions. By metallography, nano-hardness, XRD and ERDA, we showed that they are constituted by 80% to 100% of δ hydrides in a Zircaloy-4 matrix, and that the zirconium beneath has some radially oriented hydrides. We modeled the blister growth kinetics taking into account the hysteresis of the hydrogen solubility limit and defined the thermal gradient threshold for blister growth. The modeling of the dilatometric behavior of hydrided zirconium indicates the important role of the material crystallographic texture, which could explain differences in the blister shape. Mechanical tests monitored with an infrared camera showed that significant local heating occurred at strain rates higher than 0.1/s. In parallel, the Expansion Due to Compression test was optimized to increase the bi-axiality level from uniaxial stress to plane strain (HB-EDC and VHB-EDC tests). This increase in loading bi-axiality lowers greatly the fracture strain at 25 C and 350 C only in homogeneous material without blister. Eventually, the ductility decrease of unirradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding tube in function of the blister depth was quantified. (author) [fr

  18. Strengthening of Zircaloy-4 using Oxide Particles by Laser Beam Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Dong-Jun; Park, Jung-Hwan; Park, Jeong-Yong; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Koo, Yang-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Oxide particles such as Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2} were dispersed homogeneously in a Zircaloy-4 plate surface using an LBS method. From the tensile test at 380 .deg. C, the strength of laser ODS alloying on the Zircaloy-4 sheet was increased more than 50% when compared to the initial state of the sheet, although the ODS alloyed layer was less than 20% of the specimen thickness. This technology showed a good opportunity to increase the strength without major changes in the substrates of zirconium-based alloys. Accident tolerant fuel (ATF) cladding is being developed globally after the Fukushima accident with the demands for the nuclear fuel having higher safety at normal operation conditions as well as even in a severe accident conditions. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is one of the leading organizations for developing ATF claddings. One concept is to form an oxidation-resistant layer on Zr cladding surface. The other is to increase high-temperature mechanical strength of Zr tube. The oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) zirconium was proposed to increase the strength of the Zr-based alloy up to high temperatures.

  19. Fatigue testing on samples from Zircaloy-4 tubes type SEU-43

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olaru, V.; Ionescu, V.; Nitu, A.; Ionescu, D.; Voicu, F.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the testing of samples worked from Zicaloy-4 tubes (as-received.. metallurgical state), utilized in the composition of the CANDU SEU-43 fuel bundle. These tests are intended to simulate their behaviour in a power cycling process inside the reactor. The testing process is of low cycle fatigue type, done outside of the reactor, on ''C-ring'' samples, cut along the transversal direction. These samples are tested at 1%, 2% and 3% amplitude deformation, at room temperature. The calibration curves for both types of tube (small and big diameter) are determined by using the finite element analyses with the ANSYS computer code. The cycling test results are in the form of a fatigue life curve (N-e) for zircaloy-4 used in the SEU-43 fuel bundle. The curve is determined by the experimental dependency between the number of cycles to fracture and the deformation amplitude. The low cycle fatigue mechanical tests done at room temperature together with electronic microscopy analyses have reflected the characteristic behaviour of the zircaloy-4 metal in the given environment conditions. (authors)

  20. Effect of cyclic loading on the viscoplastic behaviour of Zircaloy 4 cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouffioux, P.; Gabriel, B.; Soniak, A.; Mardon, J.P.

    1995-06-01

    Most of the electricity being generated by nuclear energy load follow and remote control have become normal operating modes in the French PWR. In addition, EDF is developing a strategy of fuel sub-assembly burnup extension. Those operating conditions will lead to cyclic straining of the Zircaloy cladding tube which could induce damages. Therefore, EDF, CEA, and FRAMATOME has started a joint R and D cooperative program in order to investigate the mechanical behaviour of Zircaloy cladding tubes under cyclic loading. This paper is dealing with the effect of a pre-cyclic loading on the plasticity properties of Zircaloy 4 cladding tubes. Load controlled cyclic tests were carried out at 350 deg. C and 0.5 Hz in both axial and hoop directions. The Woehler curves were determined. Sequential tests combining pre-cyclic loading to 50 and 75 % fraction life with tension were then performed. It has ben noticed that the pre-cycling loading does not change the plastic flow curve of the Zircaloy 4 cladding tubes and therefore does not induce observable macroscopic damage. It has been concluded that a linear cumulative damage rule like ΣΔN(σ)/N r(σ) is very conservative. (author)

  1. Thermomechanical treatment of β-treated Zircaloy-4 within the upper α-range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvy, C.

    2004-09-01

    Zircaloy-4 is a Zr base alloy mainly used for nuclear applications. This study deals with its behaviour during forming, with a special interest for physical mechanisms acting in the upper α-range. The β-treated Zircaloy-4 is first described in terms of microstructure and texture. The α plates are organised in colonies with alternating crystallographic orientations. The Burgers relationships have also been checked. The mechanical behaviour shows two distinct domains (with or without hardening). This could be linked to interactions between the solutes (Sn, O) and mobile dislocations. The evolution of crystallographic texture is characterised by X-ray diffraction. At 550 C, twinning is shown to be the main deformation mechanism under specific experimental conditions. Globularization of the initial lamellar structure is identified as a continuous dynamic recrystallization process, more efficient at higher temperature. High strains are necessary to achieve this phenomenon but meta-dynamic recrystallization can also be used to obtain an equiaxed microstructure after limited strains. (author)

  2. The accelerated oxidation of zircaloy-4 at 700∼900 .deg. C in high pressure steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. P.; Park, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    To find the effect of pressure on the high temperature oxidation of zircaloy-4, an autoclave capable of measuring the degree of oxidation at high temperatures and high pressure was manufactured. The specimens used in experiments are commercially available Zircaloy-4 used in Kori nuclear power plants. All the measurements were done at 700∼900 .deg. C in steam. Pressure effects were noticed. The oxide thickness was much thicker in high pressure steam, comparing to that in the 1 atm steam. And, the higher is the steam pressure, the thicker becomes the oxide. The enhancement of oxide growth rate at 700∼900 .deg. C in high pressure steam is approximately propotion to the power of 1.0∼1.6 of the ratio of experimental steam pressure to critical steam pressure. There is a critical steam pressure above that the oxidation rate enhances. The critical steam pressure was measured as 30∼40 bar. The enhanced oxidation seems from the oxide cracking due to the tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation at high pressure steam

  3. Zircaloy-4 stress corrosion by iodine: crack kinetics and influence of irradiation on the crack initiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serres, A.

    2008-01-01

    During the PWR power transients, iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC) is one of the potential failure modes of Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings under Pellet-Cladding Interaction conditions. The primary objective of this study is to distinguish the parameters that contribute to the I-SCC phenomenon in iodized methanol solutions at ambient temperature, on notched tensile specimens, using crack growth rate measurements provided by Direct Current Potential Drop. The results show that for a KI lower than 20 MPa.m 1/2 , the IG and mixed IG/TG velocity of propagation is a linear function of KI, regardless of the propagation mode. Between 20 and 25 MPa.m 1/2 , the TG crack growth rate also depends linearly on KI, but increases at a faster rate with respect to KI than during the IG and mixed IG/TG propagation steps. The crack propagation direction and plane (LT and TL) have an impact on the propagation modes, but no impact on the kinetics. The increase of iodine content induces an increase of the crack growth rate for a given KI, and a decrease of the KI, threshold, allowing the crack propagation. This work enables us to quantify the effect of iodine content and of KI on the crack propagation step, propose a propagation law taking into accounts these parameters, and improve the I-SCC description for models. During operation, a zirconium cladding is neutron-irradiated, modifying its microstructure and deformation modes. The second objective of the study is therefore to investigate the impact of these modifications on I-SCC. For that purpose, smooth specimens in recrystallized Zircaloy-4 are proton-irradiated to 2 dpa at 305 C, the microstructure and deformation modes of unirradiated and irradiated Zircaloy-4 are characterized by TEM and SEM, and the influence of these radiation-induced modifications on the I-SCC susceptibility is studied. The Laves phases precipitates are slightly modified by irradiation. The formation of P -type dislocation loops correlated with

  4. Effect of deformation on crystallite characteristic and yield stress of zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugondo; Futichah

    2007-01-01

    The effect of deformation (rolling) on micro strain, crystallite size, crystallite density, and yield strength of Zircaloy-4 was characterized by x-ray diffraction. The goal of this investigation is to characterize the cladding materials of PWR and the target is to have data on the crystallography of Zircaloy-4. The as-received material with the composition 1.3% Sn, 0.22% Fe, 0.1% Cr, and Zr balanced was cut 10 mm × 100 mm in size using diamond blade. The samples were cleaned and heated at 1100 °C for 2 hours and then quenched in cold water. Then the sample were cleaned and heated at 750 °C for 2 hours. Afterward the samples were cold rolled with 40%, 75%, and 80% reduction in thickness. After the preparation was completed, the crystals of the samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction. The processes being analysed were quenching followed by annealing, plastic deformation of annealing and reduction from 40% to 80%, and the constancy of the c/a ratio. From the analyses, three conclusions were obtained. Firstly, the annealing process at 750 °C of Zircaloy-4 from the quenched samples resulted in the recrystallization and the grain growth which was proven by the increase of micro strain from 25.05% to 32.83%, the increase of crystallite size from 10.1015 Å to 287.4798 Å, the decrease of dislocation density from 2.94E+16 m/m3 to 3.63E+13 m/m3, and the decrease of yield strength from 1125.52 MPa to 304.44 MPa. Secondly, the process of reduction of Zircaloy-4 from the annealed samples reduced to 80% resulted in the plastic deformation and crystallite which was shown by the decrease of micro strain from 32.83% to 3.15%, the decrease of crystallite size from 287.4798 Å to 10.9764 Å, the increase of dislocation density from 3.63E+13 m/m3 to 2.49E+16 m/m3, and the increase of yield strength from 304.44 MPa to 1057.69 MPa. Thirdly, the process of plastic deformation of Zircaloy-4 was limited by the constancy of the c/a ratio which was verified by the decrease

  5. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Zircaloy-4 in Halide Solutions: Effect of Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farina S.B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Zircaloy-4 was found to be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in 1 M NaCl, 1 M KBr and 1 M KI aqueous solutions at potentials above the pitting potential. In all the solutions tested crack propagation was initially intergranular and then changed to transgranular. The effect of strain rate and temperature on the SCC propagation was investigated. An increase in the strain rate was found to lead to an increase in the crack propagation rate. The crack propagation rate increases in the three solutions tested as the temperatures increases between 20 and 90 °C. The Surface-Mobility SCC mechanism accounts for the observation made in the present work, and the activation energy predicted in iodide solutions is similar to that found in the literature.

  6. High temperature interaction between Zircaloy-4 and stainless steel type 304

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Fumihisa; Otomo, Takashi; Uetsuka, Hiroshi

    2001-03-01

    The chemical interactions between Zircaloy-4 and stainless steel type 304 were investigated in the temperature range from 1273 to 1573 K to obtain the basic information on the melt progress in the fuel bundle during an LWR severe accident. Reaction layers were formed at the contact interface and grew as the temperature and the time increase. The Zircaloy was preferentially dissolved by the reaction. The SEM/EDX analyses showed that the main process of the reaction was diffusion of Fe, Cr and Ni into the Zircaloy which resulted in the formation of a Zr-rich eutectic through the tested temperature range. Reaction rates for decrease in the materials thickness were evaluated and the reaction generally obeyed a parabolic rate law. The reaction rate constant was determined at every examined temperature and Arrhenius type rate equations were estimated for the temperature range. (author)

  7. Hydride reorientation in Zircaloy-4 examined by in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weekes, H.E. [Department of Materials, Royal School of Mines, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom); Jones, N.G. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Lindley, T.C. [Department of Materials, Royal School of Mines, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom); Dye, D., E-mail: david.dye@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Royal School of Mines, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    The phenomenon of stress-reorientation has been investigated using in situ X-ray diffraction during the thermomechanical cycling of hydrided Zircaloy-4 tensile specimens. Results have shown that loading along a sample’s transverse direction (TD) leads to a greater degree of hydride reorientation when compared to rolling direction (RD)-aligned samples. The elastic lattice micro-strains associated with radially oriented hydrides have been revealed to be greater than those oriented circumferentially, a consequence of strain accommodation. Evidence of hydride redistribution after cycling, to α-Zr grains oriented in a more favourable orientation when under an applied stress, has also been observed and its behaviour has been found to be highly dependent on the loading axis. Finally, thermomechanical loading across multiple cycles has been shown to reduce the difference in terminal solid solubility of hydrogen during dissolution (TSS{sub D,H}) and precipitation (TSS{sub P,H}).

  8. Corrosion behavior of Zircaloy 4 cladding material. Evaluation of the hydriding effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blat, M.

    1997-04-01

    In this work, particular attention has been paid to the hydriding effect in PIE and laboratory test to validate a detrimental hydrogen contribution on Zircaloy 4 corrosion behavior at high burnup. Laboratory corrosion tests results confirm that hydrides have a detrimental role on corrosion kinetics. This effect is particularly significant for cathodic charged samples with a massive hydride outer layer before corrosion test. PIE show that at high burnup a hydride layer is formed underneath the metal/oxide interface. The results of the metallurgical examinations are discussed with respect to the possible mechanisms involved in this detrimental effect of hydrogen. Therefore, according to the laboratory tests results and PIE, hydrogen could be a strong contributor to explain the increase in corrosion rate at high burnup. (author)

  9. Development of zircaloy deformation model to describe the zircaloy-4 cladding tube during accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raff, S.

    1978-01-01

    The development of a high-temperature deformation model for Zircaloy-4 cans is primarily based on numerous well-parametrized tensile tests to get the material behaviour including statistical variance. It is shown that plastic deformation may be described by a power creep law, the coefficients of which show strong dependence on temperature in the relevant temperature region. These coefficients have been determined. A model based on these coefficients has been established which, apart from best estimate deformation, gives upper and lower bounds of possible deformation. The model derived from isothermal uniaxial tests is being verified against isothermal and transient tube burst tests. The influence of preoxidation and increased oxygen concentration during deformation is modeled on the basis of the pseudobinary Zircaloy-oxygen phase diagram. (author)

  10. An investigation of the microstructures of heat-treated zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangaru, N.V.

    1985-01-01

    A TEM/STEM investigation of the microstructure and microchemistry of commercial Zircaloy-4 samples subjected to three different final heat treatments in the laboratory has been conducted to understand the processing-microstructure-corrosion relationships in these alloys. Pronounced differences in the volume fraction, morphology, and chemistry of the intermetallic particles as well as in the α phase microstructure have been observed among the beta-quenched, as-received (stress-relieved) and alpha-annealed samples. The beta-quenched sample exhibits the most uniform microstructure consisting of acicular α phase with lath boundary Sn enrichment and fine intermetallic particle formation. The as-received sample has the most inhomogeneous microstructure made up of annealed and deformed α phase. The relevance of the observed microstructural features to the nodular corrosion susceptibility is discussed in the light of some existing models of modular corrosion. (orig.)

  11. Effect of an Excess of Iron and Hydriding on the Metallurgical Properties of Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghilarducci, Ada; Ramos, R; Martin, E; Peretti, Hernan; Corso Hugo

    2000-01-01

    Results are presented of mechanical properties and microstructure morphologies obtained in samples of zircaloy-4 of modified composition by an excess in the content of alloying elements as well as hydrides.This work is focused mainly on the effect of 1000 wt. ppm additional Fe as compared to the standard composition alloy.The study is carried out by means of tensile tests at room temperature and at 240 0 C, by hardness tests, by SEM observations and EDS microanalysis.The results indicate that precipitates concentrate along grain boundaries in all cases, and that for higher contents of alloying elements corresponds a higher quantity of precipitates and smaller grain sizes.Except for the hydrided sample, the fracture is ductile with cavities nucleated at precipitates. Finally it is concluded that an increase in Fe content affect the mechanical properties

  12. Analysis of the texture of zircaloy-4 sheet by crystallite orientation distribution function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryoo, Hwei Soo; Hwang Sun Keum

    1990-01-01

    In order to analyze the texture variation of Zircaloy-4 sheet the Roe's method of calculating the crystallite orientation distribution function(CODF) for hcp system was computer programmed. The coefficients W lmn of CODF were calculated from plane-normal distribution pole figures obtained by X-ray diffraction, and the CODF was computed from a series expansion of spherical harmonics. The Legendre function, which is the basis of the harmonics, was computed up to l=16 to account for the symmetry systems of specimen and hcp crystal. A cross-rolling followed by beta-phase heat treatment and furnace cooling increased the density of basal poles along the sheet normal direction and rotated prism poles around the c axis. (Author)

  13. Behaviour of MZFR-type Zircaloy-4 cans under tensile stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordoni, R.A.; Casario, J.A.; Coroli, Graciela; Povolo, Francisco

    1981-01-01

    The paper describes the experimental procedure and results from the tensile tests of Zircaloy-4 fuel cans of the MZFR-type, performed at temperatures ranging from 250 to 450 deg C and for a relative deformation velocity of about 0.5%/min. In the representation of the results by a curve of the type sigma = K epsilon/sup n/, two different stages are observed. By statistically fitting the experimental curves, the values for the K and n parameters were obtained for each stage as a function of temperature. The results are discussed and compared with similar data found in current literature. It is concluded that new tests on tubes of different characteristics are necessary in order to obtain a clearer idea about the mechanical behaviour of these materials. (C.A.K.) [es

  14. Investigation of the high temperature steam oxidation of Zircaloy 4 cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leistikow, S.; Berg, H. v.; Kraft, R.; Pott, E.; Schanz, G.

    1979-01-01

    Also for the ORNL Zircaloy 4 cladding material, an intermediate decrease of the proportion of the ZrO 2 /α-phase layer was found, followed by an drastic increase when the breakaway of the ZrO 2 -scale occurred. Other reasons for small divergencies were evaluated, for instance temperature and time measurements, metallographic evaluation of layer thicknesses, consequences of one-sided (ORNL) and double-sided (KfK) oxidation. The so-called anomalous effect of steam oxidation during temperature transients was reproduced qualitatively and-in case that a reduced gain of oxygen was observed-explained by the predominant existence of the monoclinic oxide phase. The creep-rupture tests below 800 0 C showed a moderate prolongation of time-to-rupture when the tests were performed in steam (or after preoxidation in steam) instead of argon. Also slightly reduced maximum circumferential strain could be measured. (orig./RW) [de

  15. The influences of deformation velocity and temperature on localized deformation of zircaloy-4 in tensile tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boratto, F.J.M.

    1973-01-01

    A new parameter to describe the necking stability in zircaloy-4 during tensile tests is introduced. The parameter is defined as: s = ∂Ln (dσ/dε)/∂Ln ((1/L)dL/dt) for constant temperature, deformation and history. Measures of stress strain rate sensitivity n, reduction of the area at fracture, and deformation profiles of tensile fracture, are done. A complete description of the curve of non-uniform deformation variation with the temperature, is presented. The results are compared with existing data for pure commercially titanium. The influence of strain rate and history on s and n parameters, in the temperature range from 100-700 0 C). (author) [pt

  16. Fatigue tests and characterization of resulting microstructure by transmission electron microscope on zircaloy 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Toma, S.; Bertolino, G.; Tolley, A.

    2012-01-01

    This work reports the results of load controlled tension-tension fatigue tests on Zircaloy 4 (Zy-4). The resulting microstructure, particularly the kind and density of dislocations was characterized using a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). Specimens were cut from a rolled plate, with tensile axis parallel and perpendicular to the rolling direction. The results show a significant anisotropy of the mechanical properties due to the strong texture developed during rolling. Mainly type dislocations were observed, only in a longitudinal tensile axis specimen, dislocations were observed with a much lower density. The Schmid factors corresponding to the different glide systems were determined for specific grains in both tensile directions (author)

  17. Microstructure and Oxidation Behavior of CrAl Laser-Coated Zircaloy-4 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Min Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Laser coating of a CrAl layer on Zircaloy-4 alloy was carried out for the surface protection of the Zr substrate at high temperatures, and its microstructural and thermal stability were investigated. Significant mixing of CrAl coating metal with the Zr substrate occurred during the laser surface treatment, and a rapidly solidified microstructure was obtained. A considerable degree of diffusion of solute atoms and some intermetallic compounds were observed to occur when the coated specimen was heated at a high temperature. Oxidation appears to proceed more preferentially at Zr-rich region than Cr-rich region, and the incorporation of Zr into the CrAl coating layer deteriorates the oxidation resistance because of the formation of thermally unstable Zr oxides.

  18. Solvent effects on stress corrosion cracking of zirconium and Zircaloy-4 in iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, Silvia B.; Duffo, Gustavo S.; Galvele, Jose R.

    2000-01-01

    Localized corrosion (pitting, intergranular attack and stress corrosion cracking) of Zircaloy-4 and its principal component, zirconium, was investigated in solutions of iodine in different alcohols (methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 1-pentanol and 1-octanol). Intergranular attack was found in all of the solutions tested, and the attack velocity increases when the size of the alcohol molecule decreases. In some cases it was found that intergranular attack is accompanied by pitting. Slow strain-rate experiments showed that the propagation rate of stress corrosion cracks also depends on the size of the solvent molecule. From these results it may be inferred that the cause of the variation in the velocity is the steric hindrance of the alcohol molecules. The surface mobility SCC mechanism may account for these results. (author)

  19. Characterization of LWRS Hybrid SiC-CMC-Zircaloy-4 Fuel Cladding after Gamma Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isabella J van Rooyen

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of the gamma irradiation tests conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was to obtain a better understanding of chemical interactions and potential changes in microstructural properties of a mock-up hybrid nuclear fuel cladding rodlet design (unfueled) in a simulated PWR water environment under irradiation conditions. The hybrid fuel rodlet design is being investigated under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program for further development and testing of one of the possible advanced LWR nuclear fuel cladding designs. The gamma irradiation tests were performed in preparation for neutron irradiation tests planned for a silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic matrix composite (CMC) zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) hybrid fuel rodlet that may be tested in the INL Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) if the design is selected for further development and testing

  20. Electrochemical Studies on Important Elements for Zirconium Recovery Form Irradiated Zircaloy-4 Cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.; Sohn, S.; Hwang, I.S.

    2015-01-01

    Since Zircaloy cladding accounts for about 16 wt. % of used nuclear fuel assembly, decontamination process is required to reduce the final waste volume from spent nuclear fuel. To develop Zircaloy-4 electrorefining process as an irradiated Zircaloy cladding decontamination process, electrochemical studies on Sn, Cr, Fe and Co which are major or important elements in the irradiated cladding were conducted based on cyclic voltammetry in LiCl-KCl at 500 deg. C. Cyclic voltammetry for Sn, Fe, Cr and Co elements that should be eliminated was conducted and revealed that redox reactions of these ions are much simpler than Zr and more reductive than Zr. The reliability of cyclic voltammetry was verified by comparing diffusion coefficients and formal reduction potentials of these ions obtained in this study to previous studies. (authors)

  1. Experiments on ballooning in pressurized and transiently heated Zircaloy-4 tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markiewicz, M.E.; Erbacher, F.J.

    1988-02-01

    Single-rod burst tests were performed with Atucha I Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes in the REBEKA burst equipment of KfK. The objective was to investigate the ballooning and burst behavior of argentine cladding tubes obtained from NRG, Germany and CONVAR, Argentina. The burst data were compared with those of cladding tubes used in german PWR's. It was found that the burst data e.g. burst temperature, circumferential burst strain and its response to azimuthal temperature differences are identical for the Argentine and German tubing quality. The burst data are in good agreement with those of German PWR-Zircaloy tubes. Thus, the fuel rod behavior codes developed for German PWR's can also be used for the Argentine reactor Atucha I. (orig.) [de

  2. Mechanical properties of zircaloy-4 tubes for CAREM 25 fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juarez, G; Bianchi, D; Flores, A; Vizcaino, P

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present work was giving support to the development of Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings for the CAREM 25 reactor through microstructural and mechanical properties studies along the manufacturing process. The manufacturing route was defined in 4 cold rolling stages and two thermal treatments, one at the middle and one after the last rolling stage. The first two rolling stages were performed in FAESA and the last two in PPFAE-CNEA using the rolling machine HPTR 8-15. The reference values for the evaluation were those indicated in the technical specification CAREM25 F ET-3-B0610. In this context, four tubes were received from FAESA. To these tubes mechanical properties determinations were performed to characterize the material in each step performed in PPFAE. The mechanical properties of the cladding tubes also achieve the standard values (σ 0.2 = 450 MPa, e = 15%), being σ 0.2 = 530 MPa and 18% the elongation (author)

  3. Flow stress and dynamic strain-ageing of β-transformed Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, O.T.; Tseng, D.; Tangri, K.; MacEwen, S.R.

    1979-01-01

    The 0.2% yield stress of β-transformed Zircaloy-4 was found to be independent of prior-β grain size but varied as the inverse of the transformed β plate width. A dislocation loop expansion model originally proposed by Langford and Cohen (1969) for cold-drawn iron wires is used to explain the inverse plate width dependence. Both air-cooled and water-quenched samples exhibited dynamic strain-ageing effects in approximately the same temperature range of 573 to 673 K: (a) a local minimum in strain-rate sensitivity is associated with a peak or an inflection point in the temperature dependence of the 0.2% yield stress for water-quenched or air-cooled samples respectively, and (b) yield drops were observed in strain rate change tests. (Auth.)

  4. Electrochemical behavior of thin anodic oxide films on Zircaloy-4: Role of the mobile defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salot, R.; Lefebvre-Joud, F.; Baroux, B.

    1996-01-01

    The first stages of the electrochemical oxidation of Zircaloy-4 are investigated using simple electrochemical tests and modeling the passive film modifications occurring as a result of contact with the electrolyte. Variations in electrode potential (open-circuit conditions) or current density (potentiodynamic scans) can be simply explained by a high field (F ∼ 10 6 V/cm) assisted passive film growth. Under open-circuit conditions, this field does not vary with exposure time (in the 2 h to 48 h range). The minimum electric field for the onset of high-field behavior is also evaluated and found smaller than the theoretical value which can be explained by a variation in the concentration of mobile defects throughout the film. Measurements of the electrode potential decay after a potentiodynamic scan confirm this model, allowing interpretation of the film modification as a combination of two separate phenomena: film growth under a high electric field and point defect annihilation

  5. Influence of hydrides orientation on strain, damage and failure of hydrided zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racine, A.

    2005-09-01

    In pressurized water reactors of nuclear power plants, fuel pellets are contained in cladding tubes, made of Zirconium alloy, for instance Zircaloy-4. During their life in the primary water of the reactor (155 bars, 300 C), cladding tubes are oxidized and consequently hydrided. A part of the hydrogen given off precipitates as Zirconium hydrides in the bulk material and embrittles the material. This embrittlement depends on many parameters, among which hydrogen content and orientation of hydrides with respect to the applied stress. This investigation is devoted to the influence of the orientation of hydrides with respect to the applied stress on strain, damage and failure mechanisms. Macroscopic and SEM in-situ ring tensile tests are performed on cladding tube material (unirradiated cold worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4) hydrided with about 200 and 500 wppm hydrogen, and with different main hydrides orientation: either parallel or perpendicular to the circumferential tensile direction. We get the mechanical response of the material as a function of hydride orientation and hydrogen content and we investigate the deformation, damage and failure mechanisms. In both cases, digital image correlation techniques are used to estimate local and global strain distributions. Neither the tensile stress-strain response nor the global and local strain modes are significantly affected by hydrogen content or hydride orientation, but the failure modes are strongly modified. Indeed, only 200 wppm radial hydrides embrittle Zy-4: sample fail in the elastic domain at about 350 MPa before strain bands could develop; whereas in other cases sample reach at least 750 MPa before necking and final failure, in ductile or brittle mode. To model this particular heterogeneous material behavior, a non-coupled damage approach which takes into account the anisotropic distribution of the hydrides is proposed. Its parameters are identified from the macroscopic strain field measurements and a

  6. Effects of stress on the oxide layer thickness and post-oxidation creep strain of zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sang Ho; Yoon, Young Ku

    1986-01-01

    Effects of compressive stress generated in the oxide layer and its subsequent relief on oxidation rate and post-oxidation creep characteristics of zircaloy-4 were investigated by oxidation studies in steam with and without applied tensile stress and by creep testing at 700 deg C in high purity argon. The thickness of oxide layer increased with the magnitude of tensile stress applied during oxidation at 650 deg C in steam whereas similar phenomenon was not observed during oxidation at 800 deg C. Zircaloy-4 specimens oxidized at 600 deg C in steam without applied stress exhibited higher creep strain than that shown by unoxidized specimens when creep-tested in argon. Zircaloy-4 specimens oxidized at 600 deg C steam under the applied stress of 8.53MPa and oxidized at 800 deg C under the applied stress of 0 and 8.53MPa exhibited lower strain than that shown by unoxidized specimen. The above experimental results were accounted for on the basis of interactions among applied stress during oxidation, compressive stress generated in the oxide layer and elasticity of zircaloy-4 matrix. (Author)

  7. Biaxial creep deformation of Zircaloy-4 PWR fuel cladding in the alpha,(alpha + beta) and beta phase temperature ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, A.T.; Healey, T.; Horwood, R.A.L.

    1985-01-01

    The biaxial creep behaviour of Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding has been determined at temperatures between 973 - 1073 K in the alpha phase range, in the duplex (alpha + beta) region between 1098 - 1223 K and in the beta phase range between 1323 - 1473 K. This paper presents the creep data together with empirical equations which describe the creep deformation response within each phase region. (author)

  8. Effects of Nitrogen Implantation on the Resistance to Localized Corrosion of Zircaloy-4 in a Chloride Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Joon; Kwon, Hyuk Sang; Kim, Wan; Choi, Byung Ho

    1996-01-01

    The influences of ion dose and substrate temperature on the resistance to localized corrosion of nitrogen-implanted Zircaloy-4 are examined in terms of potentiodynamic anodic polarization tests in deaerated 4M NaCl solution at 80 .deg. C. Nitrogen implantations into the Zircaloy-4 were performed under conditions of varying the ion dose from 3 x 10 17 to 1.2 x 10 18 ions/cm 2 and of maintaining the substrate temperatures respectively at 100, 200, and 300 .deg. C by controlling the current density of ion beam. The resistance to localized corrosion of Zircaloy-4 was significantly increased with increasing the ion dose when implanted at substrate temperatures above 200 .deg. C. However, it was not almost improved by implantation at 100 .deg. C. Specifically, the pitting potential increased from 350mV (vs. SCE) for the unimplanted to values of 900 to about 1400mV (vs. SCE) for the implanted alloy depending on the nitrogen dose. This significant improvement in the resistance to localized corrosion of the implanted Zircaloy-4 was found to be associate with the formation of compound layers of ZrO 2 + ZrN during the implantation. The galvanostatic anodization tests on the nitrogen-implanted Zircaloy-4 in 1M H 2 SO 4 at 20 .deg. C demonstrated that an increase in the ion dose and also in the substrate temperature increased the thickness of the compound layer of ZrO 2 + ZrN, and hence increased the pitting potential of the alloy. The low resistance to localized and general corrosion of the alloy implanted at 100 .deg. C was attributed to the increase in surface defect density and also to thinner implanted layer compared with those formed at higher temperatures

  9. PEM Low Cost Endplates. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Martin; Clyens, S.; Steenstrup, F.R.; Christiansen, Jens [Danish Technological Institute. Plastics Technology, Taastrup (Denmark); Yde-Andersen, S. [IRD Fuel Cell A/S, Svendborg (Denmark)

    2013-03-15

    In the project, an endplate for the PEM-type fuel cells has been developed. The initial idea was to use an injection mouldable fibre reinforced polymer to produce the endplate and thereby exploit the opportunities of greater geometrical freedom to reduce weight and material consumption. Different PPS/glass-fibre compounds were produced and tested in order to use the results to optimize the results on the computer through FEM simulations. As it turned out, it was impossible to achieve adequate stiffness for the endplates within the given geometrical limitations. At the relatively high temperatures at which the endplates operate the material simply goes to soft. Material focus shifted to fibre reinforced high strength concrete composite. Test specimens were produced and tested so the results again could be used for FEM-simulations which also accounted for the technical limitations the concrete composite has regarding casting ability. In the process, the way the endplate is mounted was also alternated to better accommodate the properties of the concrete composite. A number of endplates were cast in specially produced moulds in order to map the optimum process parameters, and a final endplate was tested at IRD Fuel Cells A/S. The field test was in many aspects successful. However, the gas sealing and the surface finish can be further improved. The weight may still be an issue for some applications, even though it is lower than the endplate currently used. This issue can be addressed in a future project. The work has resulted in a new endplate design, which makes the stack assembly simpler and with fewer components. The endplates fabrication involves low cost methods, which can be scaled up as demand of fuel cells begin to take off. (Author)

  10. Effect of annealing temperature on the mechanical properties of Zircaloy-4 cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauregard, R.J.; Clevinger, G.S.; Murty, K.L.

    1977-01-01

    The mechanical properties of Zircaloy cladding materials are sensitive to those fabrication variables which have an effect on the preferred crystallographic orientation or texture of the finished tube. The effect of one such variable, the final annealing temperature, on various mechanical properties is examined using tube reduced Zircaloy-4 fuel rod cladding annealed at temperatures from 905F to 1060F. This temperature range provides cladding with varying degrees of recrystallization including full recrystallization. The burst strength of the cladding at 650F decreased with the annealing temperature reaching a saturation value at approximately 1000F. The total circumferential elongation increased with the annealing temperature reaching a maximum at approximately 1000F and decreasing at higher temperatures. Hoop creep characteristics of Zircaloy cladding were studied as a function of the annealing temperature using closed-end internal pressurization tests at 750F and hoop stresses of 10, 15, 20 and 25 ksi. The effect of annealing temperature on the room temperature mechanical anisotropy parameters, R and P, was studied. The R-parameter was essentially independent of the annealing temperature while the P-parameter increased with annealing temperature. The mechanical anisotropy parameters were also studied as a function of the test temperature from ambient to approximately 800F using continuously monitored high precision extensometry. (Auth.)

  11. The influence of hydrogen on the deformation behavior of zircaloy 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, M. E.; Koss, D. A.; Motta, A. T.

    2008-01-01

    The deformation behavior of Zr based cladding forms a basis for fuel behavior codes and affects failure criteria; as such, it is critical to reactor safety. The present study examines the influence of hydrogen on the uniaxial deformation behavior of hydrided cold worked and stress relieved Zircaloy 4 plate material. Specimens of various orientations (i.e., stress axis aligned with the rolling direction, the transverse direction, or normal to the plate surface direction) were tested in compression at a range of temperatures (25 .deg. , 300 .deg. , and 400 .deg. C), and strain rates (from 10-4/s to 10-1/s). Contrasting the deformation behavior of the material containing ∼45 wt ppm H with that of the material containing ∼420 wt. ppm H shows that increasing H content (a) causes a small decrease in the 0.2% yield stress that is eliminated at 1.0% flow stress, (b) increases the strain hardening in the rolling direction but not in the other orientations, (c) has no effect on the temperature dependence of the strain hardening, and (d) does not affect the strain rate hardening behavior. Increasing H content also has no observable effect on the high degree of plastic anisotropy of this plate material which is manifested in difficult through thickness deformation, resulting in high flow stresses for specimens oriented in the normal to plate surface direction

  12. Oxidation of Zircaloy-4 in steam-nitrogen mixtures at 600–1200 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbrueck, Martin, E-mail: martin.steinbrueck@kit.edu; Oliveira da Silva, Fabio; Grosse, Mirco

    2017-07-15

    High-temperature oxidation of zirconium alloys in steam-nitrogen atmospheres may be relevant during various nuclear accident scenarios. Therefore, isothermal oxidation tests with Zircaloy-4 in steam-nitrogen mixtures have been performed at 600, 800, 1000, and 1200 °C using thermogravimetry. The gas compositions were varied between 0 and 100 vol% nitrogen including 0.1 and 90 vol%. The strong effect of nitrogen on the oxidation kinetics of zirconium alloys was confirmed in these tests in mixed steam-nitrogen atmospheres. Even very low concentrations of nitrogen (starting from less than 1 vol%) strongly increase reaction kinetics. Nitrogen reduces transition time from protective to non-protective oxide scale (breakaway). The formation of zirconium nitride, ZrN, and its re-oxidation is the main reason for the highly porous oxide scales after transition. The results of this study have shown the safety relevant role of nitrogen during severe accidents and, more generally, suggest the need of using well controlled gas atmospheres for experiments on oxidation of zirconium alloys.

  13. Oxidation of Zircaloy-4 in steam-nitrogen mixtures at 600-1200 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrueck, Martin; da Silva, Fabio Oliveira; Grosse, Mirco

    2017-07-01

    High-temperature oxidation of zirconium alloys in steam-nitrogen atmospheres may be relevant during various nuclear accident scenarios. Therefore, isothermal oxidation tests with Zircaloy-4 in steam-nitrogen mixtures have been performed at 600, 800, 1000, and 1200 °C using thermogravimetry. The gas compositions were varied between 0 and 100 vol% nitrogen including 0.1 and 90 vol%. The strong effect of nitrogen on the oxidation kinetics of zirconium alloys was confirmed in these tests in mixed steam-nitrogen atmospheres. Even very low concentrations of nitrogen (starting from less than 1 vol%) strongly increase reaction kinetics. Nitrogen reduces transition time from protective to non-protective oxide scale (breakaway). The formation of zirconium nitride, ZrN, and its re-oxidation is the main reason for the highly porous oxide scales after transition. The results of this study have shown the safety relevant role of nitrogen during severe accidents and, more generally, suggest the need of using well controlled gas atmospheres for experiments on oxidation of zirconium alloys.

  14. The effect of heat treatments on the corrosion behavior of Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Bangxin; Zhao Wenjin; Miao Zhi; Pan Shufang; Li Cong; Jiang Yourong

    1996-06-01

    The effect of penultimate annealing temperature and cooling rate on the corrosion behavior of Zircaloy-4 cladding tube has been investigated. Both nodular corrosion and uniform corrosion resistance can be improved obviously after changing the heat treatment from the original annealing at 650 degree C to quenching from 830 degree C (upper temperature of alpha phase region or lower temperature of beta phase region). Although the nodular corrosion resistance can be improved obviously after quenching from beta phase, there was a second transition in the variation between weight gain and exposure time, which shows a poor uniform corrosion resistance after a long exposure time during the autoclave tests. The main factor of affecting corrosion behavior is the solid solution contents of Fe and Cr in alpha zirconium rather than the size of second phase particles. About 200 μg/g Fe and Cr super saturated solid solution in alpha zirconium could get good uniform and nodular corrosion resistance, but much more solid solution contents of Fe and Cr in alpha zirconium could bring about a trend toward poor uniform corrosion resistance for long-term exposure time. (14 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.)

  15. Effect of external stress on deuteride (hydride) precipitation in Zircaloy-4 using in situ neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jun-li [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); An, Ke; Stoica, Alexandru D. [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Heuser, Brent J., E-mail: bheuser@illinois.edu [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    In situ neutron diffraction is utilized to study the deuteride (hydride) precipitation behavior in a cold-worked stress-relieved (CWSR) Zircaloy-4 material upon cooling from 420 °C to room temperature with a 78 MPa external stress applied along the rolling direction (RD) of the material. Two banks detector capture the diffraction signal from two principal directions of the specimen, the normal direction (ND) and the rolling direction (RD). The evolution of deuterium concentration in zirconium solid solution along the two specimen directions is measured by studying the δ-(220) peak intensity, applying the Rietveld refinement method to the diffraction data and using the measured zirconium c-axis lattice distortion. The deuterium concentration is observed to be higher for zirconium grains in the ND than the RD. The terminal solid solubility of precipitation (TSSp) for deuterium in the solution is then described using the Arrhenius equation. It is observed that the applied stress reduces the energy term Q in the Arrhenius equation when compared with the unstressed Q values from the work of others. A model by Puls is applied to study the effect of stress on deuterium solubility, with polycrystalline hydride precipitation strain calculated using the Kearns factor representative of the studied material. The experimental result does not agree with the model prediction of Puls.

  16. Microstructure and orientation of hydrides in zircaloy-4 tubes for CAREM 25 fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juarez, G; Flores, A; Bianchi, D; Vizcaino, P

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present work was giving support to the development of Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings for the CAREM 25 reactor through microstructural and mechanical properties studies along the manufacturing process. The manufacturing route was defined in 4 cold rolling stages and two thermal treatments, one at the middle and one after the last rolling stage. The first two rolling stages were performed in FAESA and the last two in PPFAECNEA using the rolling machine HPTR 8-15. The reference values for the evaluation were those indicated in the technical specification CAREM25 F ET-3-B0610. In this context, four tubes were received from FAESA. To these tubes microstructural and hydride orientation studies were performed to characterize the material in each step performed in PPFAE. The material received from FAESA has a grain size of 6 um, which fulfills the specification requirements for the final product (<11.2 um), so that, the final rolling stages (3rd and 4th) refine the grain until 3 um finished in the microstructure. Hydride morphology evolved from a random orientation in the recrystallized material or radial in the stress relieved material to the circumferential orientation requested in the specification. The final thermal treatment did not modify this morphology. The PD. (Marshall parameter) produced a value of 48, indicating that only 4% of the hydrides are oriented between 48 o and 90 o , that is, far from the circumferential direction (author)

  17. Characterization of Zircaloy-4 tubing procured for fuel cladding research programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, R.H.

    1976-01-01

    A quantity of Zircaloy-4 tubing [10.92 mm outside diameter by 0.635 mm wall thickness] was purchased specifically for use in a number of related fuel cladding research programs sponsored by the Division of Reactor Safety Research, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC/RSR). Identical tubing (produced simultaneously and from the same ingot) was purchased concurrently by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) for use in similar research programs sponsored by that organization. In this way, source variability and prior fabrication history were eliminated as parameters, thus permitting direct comparison (as far as as-received material properties are concerned) of experimental results from the different programs. The tubing is representative of current reactor technology. Consecutive serial numbers assigned to each tube identify the sequence of the individual tubes through the final tube wall reduction operation. The report presented documents the procurement activities, provides a convenient reference source of manufacturer's data and tubing distribution to the various users, and presents some preliminary characterization data. The latter have been obtained routinely in various research programs and are not complete. Although the number of analyses, tests, and/or examinations performed to date are insufficient to draw statistically valid conclusions with regard to material characterization, the data are expected to be representative of the as-received tubing. It is anticipated that additional characterizations will be performed and reported routinely by the various research programs that use the tubing

  18. Out-of pile mechanical test: simulating reactivity initiated accident (RIA) of zircaloy-4 cladding tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myung Ho; Kim, Jun Hwan; Choi, Byoung Kwon; Jeong, Young Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The ejection or drop of a control rod in a reactivity initiated accident (RIA) causes a sudden increase in reactor power and in turn deposits a large amount of energy into the fuel. In a RIA, cladding tubes bear thermal expansion due to sudden reactivity and may fail from the resulting mechanical damage. Thus, RIA can be one of the safety margin reducers because the oxide on the tubes makes their thickness to support the load less as well as hydrides from the corrosion reduce the ductility of the tubes. In a RIA, the peak of reactor power from reactivity change is about 0.1m second and the temperature of the cladding tubes increases up to 1000 .deg. C in several seconds. Although it is hard to fully simulate the situation, several attempts to measure the change of mechanical properties under a RIA situation has done using a reduction coil, ring tension tests with high speed. This research was done to see the effect of oxide on the change of circumferential strength and ductility of Zircaloy-4 tubes in a RIA. The ring stretch tensile tests were performed with the strain rate of 1/sec and 0.01/s to simulate a transient of the cladding tube under a RIA. Since the test results of the ring tensile test are very sensitive to the lubricant, the tests were also carried out to select a suitable lubricant before the test of oxided specimens.

  19. Calorimetric determination of the δ hydride dissolution enthalpy in Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizcaino, Pablo; Banchik, Abraham D.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, the dissolution enthalpy, ΔH δ→α , of the δ hydride phase in the αZr matrix in Zircaloy-4 has been determined with a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) in two different ways: by means of a vant Hoff equation, measuring the terminal solubility temperature in dissolution, TSSd, and by direct measurement of the dissolution heat, Q δ→α , as the area between the base line and the calorimetric curve. The application of the DSC technique to the hydride dissolution heat measurements, a transformation which covers an extended temperature range, is completely original and requires a special treatment of the calorimetric curve. These measurements were done on samples, which practically cover the whole solubility range of hydrogen in αZr phase (80-640 ppm). The values obtained, 36.9 kJ/mol H and 39.3 kJ/mol H respectively, are self-consistent and in good agreement with the values of the more recent revisions, but reduces considerably the scatter of the literature data. (author)

  20. Influence of hydride microstructure on through-thickness crack growth in zircaloy-4 sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raynaud, P.A.; Meholic, M.J.; Koss, D.A.; Motta, A.T.; Chan, K.S.

    2007-01-01

    The fracture toughness of cold-worked and stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 sheet subject to through-thickness crack growth within a 'sunburst' hydride microstructure was determined at 25 o C. The results were obtained utilizing a novel testing procedure in which a narrow linear strip of hydride blister was fractured at small loads under bending to create a well-defined sharp pre-crack that arrested at the blister-substrate interface. The hydriding procedure also forms 'sunburst' hydrides emanating from the blister that were aligned both in the plane of the crack and in the crack growth direction. Subsequent tensile loading caused crack growth initiation into the field of 'sunburst' hydrides. Specimen failure occurred under near-linear elastic behavior, and the fracture toughness for crack growth initiation into sunburst hydrides was in the range K Q ∼10-15 MPa√m. These results, when combined with those of a previous study, indicate that the through-thickness crack growth initiation toughness at 25 o C is very sensitive to the hydride microstructure. (author)

  1. A study on the reaction of Zircaloy-4 tube with hydrogen/steam mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Min; Kook, Dong-Hak; Cho, Il-Je; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2017-08-01

    In order to fundamentally understand the secondary hydriding mechanism of zirconium alloy cladding, the reaction of commercial Zircaloy-4 tubes with hydrogen and steam mixture was studied using a thermo-gravimetric analyser with two variables, H2/H2O ratio and temperature. Phenomenological analysis revealed that in the steam starvation condition, i.e., when the H2/H2O ratio is greater than 104, hydriding is the dominant reaction and the weight gain increases linearly after a short incubation time. On the other hand, when the gas ratio is 5 × 102 or 103, both hydriding and oxidation reactions take place simultaneously, leading to three distinct regimes: primary hydriding, enhanced oxidation, and massive hydriding. Microstructural changes of oxide demonstrate that when the weight gain exceeds a certain critical value, massive hydriding takes place due to the significant localized crack development within the oxide, which possibly simulates the secondary hydriding failure in a defective fuel operation. This study reveals that the steam starvation condition above the critical H2/H2O ratio is only a necessary condition for the secondary hydriding failure and, as a sufficient condition, oxide needs to grow sufficiently to reach the critical thickness that produces substantial crack development. In other words, in a real defective fuel operation incident, the secondary failure is initiated only when both steam starvation and oxide degradation conditions are simultaneously met. Therefore, it is concluded that the indispensable time for the critical oxide growth primarily determines the triggering time of massive hydriding failure.

  2. Amorphization of Laves-Phase Precipitates in Zircaloy-4 by Neutron Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, H.R.; Taylor, D.F.; Yang, Walter J.S.

    1999-04-23

    Examination of corrosion coupons by transmission electron microscopy after their exposure in the Idaho Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has broadened the Zircaloy-4 precipitate-amorphization database and validated a new kinetic model for previously unavailable values of temperature and fast-neutron flux. The model describes the amorphization of Zr(Fe,Cr){sub 2} intermetallic precipitates in zirconium alloys as a dynamic competition between radiation damage and thermal annealing that leaves some iron atoms available for flux-assisted diffusion to the zirconium matrix. It predicts the width of the amorphous zone as a function of neutron flux (E>1 MeV), temperature, and time. In its simplest form, the model treats the crystalline/amorphous and precipitate/matrix interfaces as parallel planes, and its accuracy decreases for small precipitates and high fluence as the amorphous-zone width approaches precipitate dimensions. The simplest form of the model also considers diffusion to be rate-determining. This is an accurate approximation for steady-state conditions or slow changes in flux and temperature, but inappropriate for the analysis of faster transients. The paper addresses several difficulties inherent in measuring amorphous-zone width, and utilizes the expanded database to evaluate the improvements in predictive accuracy available through both conversion of the model to spherical coordinates and extension of its time dependency.

  3. The effect of zinc addition on PWR corrosion product deposition on zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, W.S.; Page, J.D.; Gaffka, A.P.; Kingsbury, A.F.; Foster, J.; Anderson, A.; Wickenden, D.; Henshaw, J.; Zmitko, M.; Masarik, V.; Svarc, V.

    2002-01-01

    During the period 1995 to 2001 a programme of loop irradiation tests have been performed to confirm the effectiveness of zinc additions on PWR circuit chemistry and corrosion. The programme included two loop irradiation experiments, and subsequent PIE; the experiments were a baseline test (no added zinc) and a test with added zinc (10 ppb). This paper addresses the findings regarding corrosion product deposition and activation on irradiated Zircaloy-4 surfaces. The findings are relevant to overall corrosion of the reactor primary circuit, the use of zinc as a corrosion inhibitor, and activation and transport of corrosion products. The irradiation experience provides information on the equilibration of the loop chemistry, with deliberate injection of zinc. The PIE used novel and innovative techniques (described below) to obtain samples of the oxide from the irradiated Zircaloy. The results of the PIE, under normal chemistry and zinc chemistry, indicate the effect of zinc on the deposition and activation of corrosion products on Zircaloy. It was found that corrosion product deposition on Zircaloy is enhanced by the addition of zinc (but corrosion product deposition on other materials was reduced in the presence of zinc). Chemical analysis and radioisotope gamma counting results are presented, to interpret the findings. A computer model has also been used to simulate the corrosion product deposition and activation, to assist in the interpretation of the results. (authors)

  4. Air oxidation of Zircaloy-4, M5 (registered) and ZIRLOTM cladding alloys at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbrueck, M.; Boettcher, M.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the results of isothermal and transient oxidation experiments of the advanced cladding alloys M5 (registered) and ZIRLO TM in comparison to Zircaloy-4 in air at temperatures from 973 to 1853 K. Generally, oxidation in air leads to a strong degradation of the cladding material. The main mechanism of this process is the formation of zirconium nitride and its re-oxidation. From the point of view of safety, the barrier effect of the fuel cladding is lost much earlier than during accident transients with a steam atmosphere only. Comparison of the three alloys investigated reveals a qualitatively similar, but quantitatively varying oxidation behavior in air. The mainly parabolic oxidation kinetics, where applicable, is comparable for the three alloys. Strong differences of up to 500% in oxidation rates were observed after transition to linear kinetics at temperatures below 1300 K. The paper presents kinetic rate constants as well as critical times and oxide scale thicknesses at the point of transition from parabolic to linear kinetics.

  5. High-temperature oxidation of Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 in steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbanic, V.F.; Heidrick, T.R.

    1978-01-01

    At temperatures above the (α + β)/β transformation temperature for zirconium alloys, steam reacts with β-Zr to form a superficial layer of zirconium oxide (ZrO 2 ) and an intermediate layer of oxygen-stabilized α-Zr. Reaction kinetics and the rate of growth of the combined (ZrO 2 + α-Zr) layer for Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 oxidation in steam were measured over the temperature range 1050-1850 o C. The reaction rates for both alloys were similar, obeyed parabolic kinetics and were not limited by gas phase diffusion. The parabolic rate constants were consistently less than those given by the Baker and Just correlation for zirconium oxidation in steam. A discontinuity was found in the temperature dependence of both the reaction rate and the rate of growth of the combined (ZrO 2 + α-Zr) layer. The discontinuity is attributed to a change in the oxide microstructure at the discontinuity temperature, an observation which is consistent with the zirconium-oxygen phase diagram. (author)

  6. Effect of an Excess of Chromium and Hydriding on Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soldati, A.; Ghilarducci, A. A; Corso, H.L.; Peretti, H.A.; Bolcich, J.C

    2003-01-01

    Results of mechanical properties and microstructure morphologies of zircaloy-4 are presented.They were obtained in several laboratory made samples of chemical composition modified with respect to the ASTM B 350 by the addition of alloying elements as well as hydrides.This work is focused mainly on the effect of 900 ppm of additional Cr in excess as compared with the standard composition alloy and with two other laboratory alloys studied before, containing 250 ppm of Ni in excess and 1000 ppm of Fe in excess, respectively.The study is carried out by means of tensile tests at room temperature and at 240C, hardness tests, SEM observations and EDS microanalysis.The neutron irradiation was carried out at Bariloche in the RA6-CNEA reactor.The results indicate that precipitates concentrate along grain boundaries in all cases, and that for higher contents of alloying elements corresponds a higher quantity of precipitates and smaller grain sizes.Except for the hydrided sample, the fracture is ductile with cavities nucleated at precipitates

  7. Effect of negative bias on TiAlSiN coating deposited on nitrided Zircaloy-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Zhou; Zhendong, Feng; Xiangfang, Fan; Yanhong, Liu; Huanlin, Li

    2018-01-01

    TiAlSiN coatings were deposited on the nitrided Zircaloy-4 by multi-arc ion plating at -100 V, -200 V and -300 V. In this study, the high temperature oxidation behavior of coatings was tested by a box-type resistance furnace in air for 3 h at 800 °C; the macro-morphology of coatings was observed and analyzed by a zoom-stereo microscope; the micro-morphology of coatings was analyzed by a scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the chemical elements of samples were analyzed by an energy dispersive spectroscopy(EDS); the adhesion strength of the coating to the substrate was measured by an automatic scratch tester; and the phases of coatings were analyzed by an X-ray diffractometer(XRD). Results show that the coating deposited at -100 V shows better high temperature oxidation resistance behavior, at the same time, Al elements contained in the coating is of the highest amount, meanwhile, the adhesion strength of the coating to the substrate is the highest, which is 33N. As the bias increases, high temperature oxidation resistance behavior of the coating weakens first and then increases, the amount of large particles on the surface of the coating increases first and then decreases whereas the density of the coating decreases first and then increases, and adhesion strength of the coating to the substrate increases first and then weakens. The coating's quality is relatively poor when the bias is -200 V.

  8. Effect of annealing temperature on the mechanical properties of zircaloy-4 cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauregard, R.J.; Clevinger, G.S.; Murty, K.L.

    1977-01-01

    The mechanical properties of zircaloy cladding materials are sensitive to those fabrication variables which have an effect on the preferred crystallographic orientation or texture of the finished tube. The effect of one such variable, the final annealing temperature, on various mechanical properties is examined using tube reduced zircaloy-4 fuel rod cladding annealed at temperatures from 905F to 1060F. This temperature range provides cladding with varying degrees of recrystallization including full recrystallization. Hoop creep characteristics of zircaloy cladding were studied as a function of the annealing temperature using closed-end internal pressurization tests at 750F and hoop stresses of 10, 15, 20 and 25 ksi. The critical annealing temperature at which a minimum creep strain occurs decreases as the applied stress increases. An additional test at 700F and 30 ksi hoop stress was conducted to demonstrate that the critical annealing temperature is essentially independent of the test temperature. Plausible explanations based on differing substructures developed in cold-worked stress-relieved material are forwarded. The effect of annealing temperature on the room temperature mechanical anisotropy parameters, R and P, was studied. R-parameters were determined from in situ transverse strain gage measurements in uniaxial tensile tests. P-parameters were calculated from uniaxial test data (R and yield stress) and hoop yield stress determined in biaxial, closed-end internal pressurization tests

  9. Behavior and failure of fresh, hydrided and irradiated Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings under RIA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Saux, M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize and simulate the mechanical behaviour and failure of fresh, hydrided and irradiated (in pressurized water reactors) cold-worked stress relieved Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings under reactivity initiated accident conditions. A model is proposed to describe the anisotropic viscoplastic mechanical behavior of the material as a function of temperature (from 20 C up to 1100 C), strain rate (from 3.10 -4 s -1 up to 5 s -1 ), fluence (from 0 up to 1026 n.m -2 ) and irradiation conditions. Axial tensile, hoop tensile, expansion due to compression and hoop plane strain tensile tests are performed at 25 C, 350 C and 480 C in order to analyse the anisotropic plastic and failure properties of the non-irradiated material hydrided up to 1200 ppm. Material strength and strain hardening depend on temperature and hydrogen in solid solution and precipitated hydride contents. Plastic anisotropy is not significantly modified by hydrogen. The material is embrittled by hydrides at room temperature. The plastic strain that leads to hydride cracking decreases with increasing hydrogen content. The material ductility, which increases with increasing temperature, is not deteriorated by hydrogen at 350 C and 480 C. Macroscopic fracture modes and damage mechanisms depend on specimen geometry, temperature and hydrogen content. A Gurson type model is finally proposed to describe both the anisotropic viscoplastic behavior and the ductile fracture of the material as a function of temperature and hydrogen content. (author) [fr

  10. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of hydrides in Zircaloy-4 during thermomechanical cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinbiz, Mahmut N., E-mail: cinbizmn@ornl.gov [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802 (United States); Koss, Donald A., E-mail: koss@ems.psu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802 (United States); Motta, Arthur T., E-mail: atm2@psu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802 (United States); Park, Jun-Sang, E-mail: parkjs@aps.anl.gov [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, 60439 (United States); Almer, Jonathan D., E-mail: almer@aps.anl.gov [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, 60439 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    The d-spacing evolution of both in-plane and out-of-plane hydrides has been studied using in situ synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction during thermo-mechanical cycling of cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4. The structure of the hydride precipitates is such that the δ{111} d-spacing of the planes aligned with the hydride platelet face is greater than the d-spacing of the 111 planes aligned with the platelet edges. Upon heating from room temperature, the δ{111} planes aligned with hydride plate edges exhibit bi-linear thermally-induced expansion. In contrast, the d-spacing of the (111) plane aligned with the hydride plate face initially contracts upon heating. These experimental results can be understood in terms of a reversal of stress state associated with precipitating or dissolving hydride platelets within the α-zirconium matrix. - Highlights: •The δ{111} d-spacings aligned with the hydride plate edges exhibit a bi-linear thermal expansion. •Stress state reversal is predicted with the onset of hydride dissolution. •During dissolution, the δ{111} planes oriented parallel to the hydride plate face initially contract upon heating. •Hydride d-spacings indicate that both in-plane (circumferential) and out-of-plane (radial) hydrides are in the same strain-state and likely in the same stress state as well.

  11. Aerosol material release rates from zircaloy-4 at temperatures from 2000 to 22000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulpuru, S.R.; Wren, D.J.; Rondeau, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    During some postulated severe accidents involving loss of coolant and loss of emergency coolant injection, the temperatures in a CANDU reactor fuel channel become high enough to cause failure and melting of the Zircaloy fuel cladding. At such high temperatures, vapors of fission products and structural (fuel and cladding) materials will be released into the coolant steam and hydrogen mixture. These vapors will condense as cooler conditions are encountered downstream. The vapors from structural materials are relatively involatile; therefore, they will condense readily into aerosol particles. These particles, in turn, will provide sites for the condensation of the more volatile fission products. The aerosol transport of fission products in the primary heat transport system (PHTS) will thus be influenced by the structural material release rates. As part of an ongoing program to develop predictive tools for aerosol and associated fission product transport through the PHTS, experiments have been conducted to measure the vapor mass release rates of the alloying elements from Zircaloy-4 at high temperatures. The paper presents the results and analysis of these experiments

  12. Influence of hydride on the mechanical behavior under irradiation of zirconium and Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Carolina A.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work the radiation hardening law for zirconium with different thermal treatments and with two hydrogen contents, and Zircaloy-4 with low hydrogen content was studied. The irradiations were made at room temperature to a neutron fluences lower than those where the dislocation channeling and deformation inhomogeneities are expected. For zirconium with hydrogen contents lower than 20 ppm and with 100 ppm, irradiated to a neutron dose of 0.0008 dpa (3.6 x 10 17 n/cm 2 ), a behavior according to the Seeger's model was observed. The model predicts the lineal dependence of the yield stress with the square root of the neutron fluence. At this dose range and at room temperature, the hardening due the hydrogen content and the irradiation hardening are additive. Isochronal annealings to determine the hardening recovery temperature were carried out. Values for this temperature above 425 C degrees were found, which are circa 100 C degrees higher than those corresponding to Stage V of radiation damage in Zr and Zry without hydrogen. This suggests that there is a synergistic effect of radiation damage and hydrogen uptake on the mechanical properties; it is possible to think in a probable and severe ductility reduction, even at low neutron fluences. (author) [es

  13. Cumulative fatigue and creep-fatigue damage at 3500C on recrystallized zircaloy 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, G.; Pelchat, J.; Floze, J.C.; Galimberti, M.

    1985-06-01

    An experimental programme undertaken by C.E.A., E.D.F. and FRAGEMA with the aim of characterizing the fatigue and creep fatigue behaviour of zircaloy-4 following annealing treatments (recrystallized, stress-delived) is in progress. The results given below concern only recrystallized material. Cyclic properties, low-cycle fatigue curves and creep behaviour laws under stresses have been established. Sequential tests of pure fatigue and creep-fatigue were performed. The cumulative life fractions at fracture depend on the sequence of leading, stress history and number of cycles of prestressing. The MINER's rule appears to be conservative with regard to a low-high loading sequence whereas it is not for the reverse high-low loading sequences. Fatigue and creep damage are not interchangeable. Pre-creep improves the fatigue resistance. Pre-fatigue improves the creep strength as long as the beneficial effect of cyclic hardening overcomes the damaging effect of surface cracking. The introduction of a tension hold time into the fatigue cycle slightly increases cyclic hardening and reduces the number of cycles to failure. For hold times of less than one hour, the sum of fatigue and creep life fractions is closed to one

  14. Chemical interactions between as-received and pre-oxidized Zircaloy-4 and Inconel-718 at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, P.; Markiewicz, M.

    1994-06-01

    Isothermal reaction experiments were performed in the temperature range of 1000 - 1300 C in order to determine the chemical interactions between Zircaloy-4 fuel rod cladding and Inconel-718 spacer grids of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) under severe accident conditions. It was not possible to apply even higher temperatures since fast and complete liquefaction of the components occurred as a result of eutectic interactions during heatup. The liquid reaction products formed enhance and accelerate the degradation of the material couples and the fuel elements, respectively. Only small amounts of Inconel are necessary to liquefy large amounts of Zircaloy. Thin oxide layers on the Zircaloy surface delay the beginning of the chemical interactions with Inconel but cannot prevent them. In this work the reaction kinetics have been determined for the system: as-received and pre-oxidized Zircaloy-4/Inconel 718. The interactions can be described by parabolic rate laws; the Arrhenius equations for the various interactions are given. (orig.) [de

  15. Investigation of flow condition on the oxidation of Zircaloy-4 in air at 850 and 1100 .deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeng, Yun Hwan; Lee, Jae Young [Hangdong Global University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Gil [ACT Co. Ltd, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    An oxidation behavior of the Zircaloy-4 was experimentally studied by varying a flow rate and partial pressure of air. Tests were conducted at two distinct temperatures in which a kinetic transition was occurred, or not: 850 .deg. C and 1100 .deg. C. The effects of flow rate and partial pressure of air was studied by a measurement of mass gain using thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). After experiments, samples were observed with macrophotography and metallography using optical microscopy. The effect of flow rate and partial pressure of air were qualitatively analyzed with those methods. The effects of flow conditions on the oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 samples were qualitatively studied. The flow rate and the partial pressure of air were changed and their effects was different when the temperature was changed.

  16. Effect of water content on the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of Zircaloy-4 in iodine-alcoholic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Sanchez, Andrea; Farina, Silvia B.; Duffo, Gustavo S.

    2005-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of Zircaloy-4 (UNS R60804) was studied in 10 g/L iodine dissolved in various alcohols: methanol, ethanol, 1 propanol, 1-butanol, 1-pentanol and 1-octanol. SCC was observed in all the systems studied and it was found that the higher the size of alcohol molecule, the lower the SCC susceptibility. The existence of intergranular attack -controlled by the diffusion of the active species- is a condition for the SCC process to occur. In the present work the inhibiting effect of water on the SCC susceptibility of Zircaloy-4 in iodine-alcoholic solutions was also investigated and the results showed that the minimum water content to inhibit the SCC process depends on the type of alcohol used as a solvent. (author) [es

  17. Stress-relaxation in bending of zircaloy-4 at 673 K, as a function of cold-work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povolo, F.

    1983-01-01

    Stress-relaxation data, in bending, in Zircaloy-4 with different degrees of cold-work are presented. The measurements were performed at 673 K, with six different initial stresses and up to times of the order of 1000 h. The stress-relaxation curves are interpreted in terms of a creep model involving jog-drag and cell formation and some dislocation parameters are calculated from the experimental results. The influence of cold-work on these parameters is discussed. (author)

  18. High-temperature deformation and rupture behavior of internally-pressurized Zircaloy-4 cladding in vacuum and steam enivronments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Garde, A.M.; Kassner, T.F.

    1977-01-01

    The high-temperature diametral expansion and rupture behavior of Zircaloy-4 fuel-cladding tubes have been investigated in vacuum and steam environments under transient-heating conditions that are of interest in hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident situations in light-water reactors. The effects of internal pressure, heating rate, axial constraint, and localized temperature nonuniformities in the cladding on the maximum circumferential strain have been determined for burst temperatures between approximately 650 and 1350 0 C

  19. Texture and hydride orientation relationship of Zircaloy-4 fuel clad tube during its fabrication for pressurized heavy water reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaibhaw, Kumar; Rao, S. V. R.; Jha, S. K.; Saibaba, N.; Jayaraj, R. N.

    2008-12-01

    Zircaloy-4 material is used for cladding tube in pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) of 220 MWe and 540 MWe capacity in India. These tubes are fabricated by using various combinations of thermo-mechanical processes to achieve desired mechanical and corrosion properties. Cladding tube develops crystallographic texture during its fabrication, which has significant influence on its in-reactor performance. Due to radiolytic decomposition of water Zircaloy-4 picks-up hydrogen. This hydrogen in excess of its maximum solubility in reactor operating condition (˜300 °C), precipitates as zirconium hydrides causing embrittlement of cladding tube. Hydride orientation in the radial direction of the tube limits the service life and lowers the fuel burn-up in reactor. The orientation of the hydride primarily depends on texture developed during fabrication. A correlation between hydride orientation ( F n) with the texture in the tube during its fabrication has been developed using a second order polynomial. The present work is aimed at quantification and correlation of texture evolved in Zircaloy-4 cladding tube using Kearn's f-parameter during its fabrication process.

  20. Forming Limit Diagrams of Zircaloy-4 and Zirlo Sheets for Stamping of Spacer Grids of Nuclear Fuel Rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Yun Mi; Hyun, Hong Chul; Lee, Hyung Yil; Kim, Nak Soo

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the theoretical forming limit models for Zircaloy-4 and Zirlo used for spacer grid of nuclear fuel rods. Tensile and anisotropy tests were performed to obtain stress-strain curves and anisotropic coefficients. The experimental forming limit diagrams (FLD) for two materials were obtained by dome stretching tests following NUMISHEET 96. Theoretical FLD depends on FL models and yield criteria. To obtain the right hand side (RHS) of FLD, we applied the FL models (Swift's diffuse necking, M-K theory, S-R vertex theory) to Zircaloy-4 and Zirlo sheets. Hill's local necking theory was adopted for the left hand side (LHS) of FLD. To consider the anisotropy of sheets, the yield criteria of Hill and Hosford were applied. Comparing the predicted curves with the experimental data, we found that the RHS of FLD for Zircaloy-4 can be described by the Swift model (with the Hill's criterion), while the LHS of the FLD can be explained by Hill model. The FLD for Zirlo can be explained by the S-R model and the Hosford's criterion (a = 8)

  1. Texture and hydride orientation relationship of Zircaloy-4 fuel clad tube during its fabrication for pressurized heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaibhaw, Kumar; Rao, S.V.R.; Jha, S.K.; Saibaba, N.; Jayaraj, R.N.

    2008-01-01

    Zircaloy-4 material is used for cladding tube in pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) of 220 MWe and 540 MWe capacity in India. These tubes are fabricated by using various combinations of thermo-mechanical processes to achieve desired mechanical and corrosion properties. Cladding tube develops crystallographic texture during its fabrication, which has significant influence on its in-reactor performance. Due to radiolytic decomposition of water Zircaloy-4 picks-up hydrogen. This hydrogen in excess of its maximum solubility in reactor operating condition (∼300 deg. C), precipitates as zirconium hydrides causing embrittlement of cladding tube. Hydride orientation in the radial direction of the tube limits the service life and lowers the fuel burn-up in reactor. The orientation of the hydride primarily depends on texture developed during fabrication. A correlation between hydride orientation (F n ) with the texture in the tube during its fabrication has been developed using a second order polynomial. The present work is aimed at quantification and correlation of texture evolved in Zircaloy-4 cladding tube using Kearn's f-parameter during its fabrication process

  2. Recrystallization curve study of zircaloy-4 with DRX line width method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juarez, G; Buioli, C; Samper, R; Vizcaino, P

    2012-01-01

    X-ray diffraction peak broadening analysis is a method that allows to characterize the plastic deformation in metals. This technique is a complement of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine dislocation densities. So that, both techniques may cover a wide range in the analysis of metals deformation. The study of zirconium alloys is an issue of usual interest in the nuclear industry since such materials present the best combination of good mechanical properties, corrosion behavior and low neutron cross section. It is worth noting there are two factors to be taken into account in the application of the method developed for this purpose: the characteristic anisotropy of the hexagonals and the strong texture that these alloys acquire during the manufacturing process. In order to assess the recrystallization curve of Zircaloy-4, a powder of this alloy was produced through filing. Then, fractions of the powder were subjected to thermal treatments at different temperatures for the same time. Since the powder has a random crystallographic orientation, the texture effect practically disappears; this is the reason why the Williamson and Hall method may be easily used, producing good fittings and predicting confidence values of diffraction domain size and the accumulated deformation. The temperatures selected for the thermal treatments were 1000, 700, 600, 500, 420, 300 and 200 o C during 2 hs. As a result of these annealings, powders in different recovery stages were obtained (completely recrystallized, partially recrystallized and non-recrystallized structures with different levels of stress relieve). The obtained values were also compared with the non annealed powder ones. All the microstructural evolution through the annealings was followed by optical microscopy (author)

  3. Performance monitoring of zircaloy-4 square fuel channels at TAPS-1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, J.; Ramu, A.; Anilkumar, K.R.; Sharma, B.L.; Bhattacharjee, S.; Ramamurty, U.; Srivastava, S.P.; Prasad, P.N.; Anantharaman, K.

    2006-01-01

    Tarapur Atomic Power Station is a twin unit Boiling Water Reactors. The initial rated capacity of each unit was 210 MWe. Subsequently due to Secondary Steam Generator tube leak problem, the units were de-rated to 160 MWe in the year 1984-85. The station has completed 36 years of successful commercial operation. TAPS reactor fuel channels are made of Zircaloy-4, material. These are used along with 6x6 array nuclear fuel assemblies. The fuel channels need to be discharged once it reaches an optimum exposure limit and based on the surveillance programme, which monitors the channels performance. NFC has indigenously developed fuel channels for TAPS and these are at various stages of exposure in both the reactor cores. The performance review of these channels was carried out by the experts from TAPS-Site, NPCIL-ED and RED, BARC. The two major factors, which affect fuel channels performance, are (a) Bulge and (b) Bow. The phenomenon of longitudinal bow occurs due to the neutron flux gradient across the channels faces. Studies made on this subject by General Electric (GE) indicated that this channel deflection occurs at a slow rate. Therefore, fuel channels surveillance programme is essential to check the irradiated fuel channels performance in order to replace the fuel channels once it reaches the optimum exposure limit. To estimate the useful life of irradiated fuel channels, channel deflection/bulge measurement inspection system and methodology was developed jointly by TAPS and Centre for Design and manufacture (CDM), BARC. This system was successfully deployed at TAPS. This paper briefly describes the developmental efforts made by Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), Hyderabad, NPCIL-Fuel Group, Engg.Directorate, RED/BARC, CDM/BARC. (author)

  4. Corrosion characteristics and oxide microstructures of Zircaloy-4 in aqueous alkali hydroxide solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Y.H.; Baek, J.H.; Kim, S.J.; Kim, H.G.

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion characteristics of Zircaloy-4 have been investigated in various aqueous solutions of LiOH, NaOH, KOH, RbOH and CsOH with equimolar M + and OH - at 350 C. The characterization of the oxides was performed using transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) on the samples which were prepared to have an equal oxide thickness in pre-transition and post-transition regimes. At a low concentration (4.3 mmol) of aqueous alkali hydroxide solutions, the corrosion rates decrease gradually as the ionic radius of cation increases. At a high concentration (32.5 mmol), the corrosion rate increases significantly in LiOH solution and slightly in NaOH solution, but in the other hydroxide solutions such as KOH, RbOH and CsOH, the corrosion rate is not accelerated. Even if the specimens have an equal oxide thickness in LiOH, NaOH and KOH solutions, the oxide microstructure formed in the LiOH solution is quite different from those formed in the NaOH or the KOH solutions. In the LiOH solution, the oxides grown in the pre-transition regime as well as in the post-transition regime have an equiaxed structure including many pores and open grain boundaries. The oxides grown in the NaOH solution have a protective columnar structure in the pre-transition regime but an equiaxed structure in the post-transition regime. On the other hand, in the KOH solution, the columnar structure is maintained from its pre-transition regime to the post-transition regime. On the basis of the above results, it can be suggested that the cation incorporation into zirconium oxide would control the oxide microstructure, the oxide growth mechanism at the metal-oxide interface and the corrosion rate in alkali hydroxide solutions. (orig.)

  5. Effect of elevated lithium on the waterside corrosion of zircaloy-4: Experimental and predictive studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecheur, D.; Giordano, A.; Picard, E.; Billot, P.; Thomazet, J.

    1997-01-01

    Lithium and boron content in the coolant are known to influence the oxidation behaviour of the fuel cladding. Since new PWR operating conditions could consist in an increase of the lithium and the boron concentration in the coolant early in the cycle, a specific study has been conducted to analyze and to predict the effect of such new water chemistry conditions on the oxidation kinetics of the Zircaloy-4 material. Experimental studies have been performed in out-of-pile loop tests, under one and two phase flow heat transfer in various water chemistry conditions (0≤Li≤350 ppm, 0≤B≤1000 ppm, 0≤K≤56 ppm). A simulation of the effect of elevated lithium on the corrosion has been made using the semi-empirical COCHISE corrosion code. Under one phase flow heat transfer conditions, the addition of lithium hydroxide in the coolant increases the oxidation rate, essentially in the post-transition regime for low lithium levels (≤ 75 ppm) and immediately in the pre-transition phase for very high lithium level (350 ppm). Under two phase flow heat transfer, an enhancement of the corrosion is observed in the area of the rod submitted to boiling. Based on the out-of-pile loop test performed in presence of KOH instead of LiOH, such an enhancement of the corrosion appears to be due to a lithium enrichment in the oxide layer induced by boiling and not to a pH effect. The simulation of the increase of lithium content in the coolant from 2.2 to 3.5 ppm leads to an enhancement in corrosion rates which becomes only significant at high burn up. This predictive result of elevated lithium effect on corrosion is then compared with oxidation data derived from reactors operating under an elevated lithium regime. (author). 14 refs, 9 figs, 3 tabs

  6. Stress-relaxation of zirconium and Zircaloy-4 near to 673 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubiolo, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    Stress-relaxation data in polycrystalline -zirconium and Zircaloy-4, between 645 K and 695 K, are reported. The study has been performed at different initial conditions of the material: recrystallized, cold-worked 64% by rolling and stress relieved at 813 K, for 1 h in high vacuum. The results are interpreted in terms of a constitutive equation of plastic deformation based on diffusion controlled motion of jogged screw dislocations and cell-formation. The internal stress field, in the recrystallized material, is assumed to be composed of two terms. A component is generated by the cell walls and is stable during a relaxation run. The other one is generated by the impurities segregated to the mobile dislocations and is strain rate dependent. From fitting of the experimental data to the model, it was possible to estimate: a) the activation energy for self-diffusion; b) the binding energy between the impurity and the dislocation; c) the activation energy for the diffusion of the impurity; d) the concentration of jogs and, e) the concentration of impurities in the crystal. The results obtained seem to indicate that oxygen is responsible for dynamic strain-ageing. It is concluded that, in the temperature region where strain-ageing is active, the mobile dislocations will form cell walls with jogs saturated with oxygen. This can inhibit climb and stop the recovery process in the walls. Furthermore, the strain-rate sensitivity parameter, derived from the proposed model, can explain the changes in curvature found on-the stress-relaxation curves between 298 and 723 K. (Author) [es

  7. Effect of elevated lithium on the waterside corrosion of zircaloy-4: Experimental and predictive studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pecheur, D; Giordano, A; Picard, E; Billot, P [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Thomazet, J [FRAMATOME, Nuclear Fuel Div., Lyon (France)

    1997-02-01

    Lithium and boron content in the coolant are known to influence the oxidation behaviour of the fuel cladding. Since new PWR operating conditions could consist in an increase of the lithium and the boron concentration in the coolant early in the cycle, a specific study has been conducted to analyze and to predict the effect of such new water chemistry conditions on the oxidation kinetics of the Zircaloy-4 material. Experimental studies have been performed in out-of-pile loop tests, under one and two phase flow heat transfer in various water chemistry conditions (0{<=}Li{<=}350 ppm, 0{<=}B{<=}1000 ppm, 0{<=}K{<=}56 ppm). A simulation of the effect of elevated lithium on the corrosion has been made using the semi-empirical COCHISE corrosion code. Under one phase flow heat transfer conditions, the addition of lithium hydroxide in the coolant increases the oxidation rate, essentially in the post-transition regime for low lithium levels ({<=} 75 ppm) and immediately in the pre-transition phase for very high lithium level (350 ppm). Under two phase flow heat transfer, an enhancement of the corrosion is observed in the area of the rod submitted to boiling. Based on the out-of-pile loop test performed in presence of KOH instead of LiOH, such an enhancement of the corrosion appears to be due to a lithium enrichment in the oxide layer induced by boiling and not to a pH effect. The simulation of the increase of lithium content in the coolant from 2.2 to 3.5 ppm leads to an enhancement in corrosion rates which becomes only significant at high burn up. This predictive result of elevated lithium effect on corrosion is then compared with oxidation data derived from reactors operating under an elevated lithium regime. (author). 14 refs, 9 figs, 3 tabs.

  8. Corrosion behaviour of zircaloy 4 fuel rod cladding in EDF power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romary, H; Deydier, D [EDF, Direction de l` Equipment SEPTEN, Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-02-01

    Since the beginning of the French nuclear program, a surveillance of fuel has been carried out in order to evaluate the fuel behaviour under irradiation. Until now, nuclear fuels provided by suppliers have met EDF requirements concerning fuel behaviour and reliability. But, the need to minimize the costs and to increase the flexibility of the power plants led EDF to the definition of new targets: optimization of the core management and fuel cycle economy. The fuel behaviour experience shows that some of these new requirements cannot be fully fulfilled by the present standard fuel due to some technological limits. Particularly, burnup enhancement is limited by the oxidation and the hydriding of the Zircaloy 4 fuel rod cladding. Also, fuel suppliers and EDF need to have a better knowledge of the Zy-4 cladding behaviour in order to define the existing margins and the limiting factors. For this reason, in-reactor fuel characterization programs have been set up by fuel suppliers and EDF for a few years. This paper presents the main results and conclusions of EDF experience on Zy-4 in-reactor corrosion behaviour. Data obtained from oxide layer or zirconia thickness measurements show that corrosion performance of Zy-4 fuel rod cladding, as irradiated until now in EDF reactors, is satisfactory but not sufficient to meet the future needs. The fuel suppliers propose in order to improve the corrosion resistance of fuel rod cladding, low tin Zy-4 cladding and then optimized Zy-4 cladding. Irradiation of these claddings are ongoing. The available corrosion data show the better in-reactor corrosion resistance of optimized Zy-4 fuel rod cladding compared to the standard Zy-4 cladding. The scheduled fuel surveillance program will confirm if the optimized Zy-4 fuel rod cladding will meet the requirements for the future high burnup and high flexibility fuel. (author). 10 refs, 19 figs, 4 tabs.

  9. Investigation of effect of air flow rate on Zircaloy-4 oxidation kinetics and breakaway phenomenon in air at 850 .deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeng, Yunhwan; Lee, Jaeyoung; Park, Sanggil

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzed an effect of flow rate on oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 in air at 850 .deg. C. In case of the oxidation of Zircaloy-4 in air at 850 .deg. C, acceleration of oxidation kinetics from parabolic to linear (breakaway phenomenon) occurs. Oxidation and breakaway kinetics of the Zircaloy-4 in air was experimentally studied by changing a flow rate of argon/air mixture. Tests were conducted at 850 .deg. C under constant ratio of argon and air. The effects of flow rate on the oxidation and breakaway kinetics was observed. This paper is based on a revised and considerably extended presentation given at the 21 st International Quench Workshop. The effects of flow conditions on the oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 samples were explained with residence time and percent flow efficiency. In addition, several issues were observed from this study, interdiffusion at breakaway and deformation of oxide structure by breakaway phenomenon

  10. Modelling of zircaloy-4 degradation in oxygen and nitrogen mixtures at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasserre-Gagnaire, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Zircaloy-4 claddings provide the first containment of UO 2 fuel in Pressurised Water Reactors. It has been demonstrated that the fuel assemblies cladding could be exposed to air at high temperature in several accidental situations such as a loss of cooling accident in a spent fuel storage When mixed to oxygen at high temperature, the nitrogen, usually used as an inert gas, causes the accelerated corrosion of the cladding. The kinetic curves obtained by thermogravimetry reveal two stages: a pre-transition and a post-transition one. The pre-transition stage corresponds to the growth of a protective dense oxide layer: the kinetic rate decreases with time and is controlled by oxygen vacancy diffusion in the oxide layer. In the post-transition stage, the oxide layer is no longer protective and the kinetic rate increases with time. Images obtained by optical microscopy of a sample in the post-transition stage reveal the presence of corroded zones characterized by a porous scale with zirconium nitride precipitates at metal - oxide interface. Corrosion of Zy4 plates at 850 deg. C under mixed oxygen - nitrogen atmospheres has been studied during the post-transition stage. A sequence of three reactions is proposed to explain the mechanism of nitrogen-enhanced corrosion and the porosity of the corroded regions. The accelerating effect of nitrogen in the corrosion scale can therefore be described on the basis of an autocatalytic effect of the zirconium nitride precipitates. Then, it is demonstrated that the steady-state approximation as well as the existence of an elementary step controlling the growth process are valid during the post-transition stage. Thanks to the study of the variations of the surface rate of growth with the oxygen and nitrogen partial pressure, the rate-determining step is identified as the external interface reaction step of the oxidation of the zirconium nitride precipitates. Finally, a nucleation and growth model used for thermal reactions in powders

  11. Out-of-pile UO2/Zircaloy-4 experiments under severe fuel damage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, P.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical interactions between UO 2 fuel and Zircaloy-4 cladding up to the melting point of zircaloy (Zry) are described. Out-of-pile UO 2 /zircaloy reaction experiments have been performed to investigate the chemical interaction behavior under possible severe fuel damage conditions (very high temperatures and external overpressure). The tests have been conducted in inert gas (1 to 80 bar) with 10-cm-long zircaloy cladding specimens filled with UO 2 pellets. The annealing temperature varied between 1000 and 1700 deg. C and the annealing period between 1 and 150 min. The extent of the chemical reaction depends decisively on whether or not good contact between UO 2 and zircaloy has been established. If solid contact exists, zircaloy reduces the UO 2 to form oxygen-stabilized α-Zr(O) and uranium metal. The uranium reacts with zircaloy to form a (U,Zr) alloy rich in uranium. The (U,Zr) alloy, which is liquid above approx. 1150 deg. C, lies between two α-Zr(O) layers. The UO 2 /zircaloy reaction obeys a parabolic rate law. The degree of chemical interaction is determined by the extent of oxygen diffusion into the cladding, and hence by the time and temperature. The affinity of zirconium for oxygen, which results in an oxygen gradient across the cladding, is the driving force for the reaction. The growth of the reaction layers can be represented in an Arrhenius diagram. The UO 2 /Zry-4 reaction occurs as rapidly as the steam/Zry-4 reaction above about 1100 deg. C. The extent of the interaction is independent of external pressure above about 10 bar at 1400 deg. C and 5 bar at 1700 deg. C. The maximum measured oxygen content of the cladding is approx. 6wt.%. Up to approx. 9 volume % of the UO 2 can be chemically dissolved by the zircaloy. In an actual fuel rod, complete release of the fission products in this region of the fuel must therefore be assumed. (author)

  12. Stress corrosion cracks initiation of recrystallized Zircaloy-4 in iodine-methanol solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozzani, N.

    2013-01-01

    During the pellet-cladding interaction, Zirconium-alloy fuel claddings might fail when subjected to incidental power transient in nuclear Pressurized Water Reactors, by Iodine-induced Stress Corrosion Cracking (I-SCC). This study deals with the intergranular initiation of I-SCC cracks in fully recrystallized Zircaloy-4, in methyl alcohol solution of iodine at room temperature, with the focus on critical mechanical parameters and iodine concentration. It was carried out with an approach mixing experiments and numerical simulations. An anisotropic and viscoplastic mechanical behavior model was established and validated over a wide range of loadings. With numerous constant elongation rate tensile tests and four points bending creep tests, the existence of a threshold iodine concentration I0 close to 10 -6 g.g -1 was highlighted, necessary to the occurrence of I-SCC damage, along with a transition concentration I1 close to 2.10 -4 g.g -1 . Above I1 the mechanism changes, leading to a sped up crack initiation and a loss of sensitivity towards mechanical parameters. The importance of concentration on parameters such as crack density, crack average length and intergranular and transgranular crack velocities was evidenced. Experimental results show that plastic strain is not required for I-SCC crack initiation, if the test time is long enough in the presence of stress. Its main influence is to rush the occurrence of cracking by creating initiation sites, by way of breaking the oxide layer and building up intergranular stress. Below I1, the critical strains at initiation show a substantial strain rate sensitivity. In this domain, a threshold stress of 100 MPa was found, well below the yield stress. Thanks to the combined use of notched specimens and numerical simulations, a strong protective effect of an increasing stress bi-axiality ratio was found, both in the elastic and plastic domains. Proton-irradiated samples, up to a dose of 2 dpa, were tested in the same conditions

  13. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of Zircaloy-4 and ZIRLO™ oxide layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabory, Benoit de; Motta, Arthur T.; Wang, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Waterside corrosion of zirconium alloy nuclear fuel cladding varies markedly from one alloy to another. In addition, for a given alloy, the corrosion rate evolves during the corrosion process, most notably when the oxide loses its stability at the oxide transition. In an effort to understand the mechanism resulting in the variations of corrosion rate observed at the oxide transition, oxide layers formed on Zircaloy-4 and ZIRLO™ in high temperature water autoclave environments, and archived before and after the transition, are characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The study characterizes and compares the oxide morphology in both alloys at different times during the corrosion process, in an effort to understand the oxide growth mechanism for these alloys. Results show that the oxide is mainly composed of monoclinic ZrO 2 , with a preponderance of columnar oxide grains which extend to the oxide/metal interface. The oxide formed right after the transition has occurred, exhibits a 150 nm-wide layer of small equiaxed grains with high tetragonal oxide fraction. This layer has a similar morphology and structure as the first oxide layer formed (observed near the oxide/water interface). A study of the oxygen-rich region near the oxide/metal interface reveals a complex structure of different phases at different stages of corrosion. The interface exhibits an intermediate layer, identified as ZrO, a discontinuous layer of “blocky” Zr 3 O grains embedded in the ZrO layer, and a suboxide layer corresponding to an oxygen saturated solid solution in the metal matrix side. The thickness of this interfacial layer decreased markedly at the transition. Hydrides are also observed in that region, with a definite orientation relationship with the matrix. The observations of the oxide/metal interface are qualitatively similar for the two alloys but quantitatively different. The incorporation of intermetallic precipitates into the oxide layer is also studied, and

  14. Determinations of the temperature of terminal solid solubility in dissolution and precipitation of hydrogen/deuterium in irradiated Zircaloy-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vizcaino, P [CNEA-CONICET, Centro Atomico Ezeiza (Argentina)

    2012-07-01

    The proposed plan is an approach to the metallurgical consequences of the high neutron fluencies (10''2''2 n/cm''2) on the hydrogen behavior in zirconium based alloys, based on the significance of the microstructural behavior of the high burn up fuel claddings during the dry storage period. The studies are focused on Zircaloy-4, concerning to two processes: Neutron irradiation damage; Hydrogen pick up. The Zircaloy-4 was taken from cooling channels of the PHWR Atucha 1. These components remained more than 10 years in service, reaching neutron fluencies up to 10''2''2 n/cm''2. In the last recent years, measurements of the hydride dissolution temperatures have shown that hydrogen solubility is affected by the neutron irradiation, increasing it respect to the unirradiated Zircaloy solubility. In addition, in this material the amorphization/dissolution of the second phase particles (SPPs) was observed, being proposed an interaction between the hydrogen atoms, the SPPs and the irradiation defects as a possible explanation of the observed behavior. For the present case, attention will be focused on the hydride precipitation process, since it is strongly related with delay hydrogen cracking initiation, a problem of direct concern for the dry storage. The goal of the present proposal is to make an approach to the source of the observed effect, applying several specific techniques as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), high resolution x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The objectives can be divided as follows: Determination of the temperatures of terminal solid solubility in dissolution (TTSSd) and in precipitation (TTSSp) in high fluency irradiated Zircaloy-4, reproducing the temperatures at which the Zircaloy fuel claddings remain during dry storage by an annealing program during the DSC experiments; Observations by optical and transmission electron microscopy of the hydride distribution before (as received material) and after high temperature

  15. Dynamic thermo-chemo-mechanical strain of Zircaloy-4 slotted rings for evaluating strategies that mitigate stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrier, G.A.; Metzler, J.; Farahani, M.; Chan, P.K.; Corcoran, E.C. [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in Zircaloy-4 fuel sheaths has been investigated by static loading of slotted ring samples under hot and corrosive conditions. However, in nuclear reactors, power ramps can have short (e.g., 10-20 minutes) and recurring time frames due to dynamic processes such as on-power refuelling, adjuster rod manoeuvres, and load following. Therefore, to enable out-reactor dynamic testing, an apparatus was designed to dynamically strain slotted ring samples under SCC conditions. This apparatus can additionally be used to test fatigue properties. Unique capabilities of this apparatus and preliminary results obtained from static and dynamic tests are presented. (author)

  16. Effect of hydrides on the ductile-brittle transition in stress-relieved, recrystallized and beta-treated zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelchat, J.; Barcelo, F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the influence of δ-hydrides on the mechanical properties of three heat treated cold-rolled Zircaloy-4 sheets (stress-relieved, recrystallized and β treated), tested at room temperature and 350 0 C. Smooth tensile specimens of two thicknesses: 0.5 and 3.1 mm, containing different hydride volume fractions, up to 18% (about 1400 ppm H), have been tested. Metallographic and fractographic analysis were carried out in order to examine the fracture morphology near and on the fracture surface, and to determine the evolution of the fracture mechanism of hydrides as a function of temperature, hydride orientation and volume fraction

  17. Verification of a mechanistic model for the strain rate of zircaloy-4 fuel sheaths during transient heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, C.E.L.

    1980-10-01

    A mechanistic strain rate model for Zircaloy-4, named NIRVANA, was tested against experiments where pressurized fuel sheaths were strained during complex temperature-stress-time histories. The same histories were then examined to determine the spread in calculated strain which may be expected because of variations in dimensions, chemical content and mechanical properties which are allowed in the fuel sheath specifications. It was found that the variations allowed by the specifications could result in a probable spread in the predicted strain of plus or minus a factor of two from the mean value. The experimental results were well within this range. (auth)

  18. Octanol reduces end-plate channel lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Peter W.; McBurney, Robert N.; Van Helden, Dirk

    1978-01-01

    1. Post-synaptic effects of n-octanol at concentrations of 0·1-1 mM were examined in toad sartorius muscles by use of extracellular and voltage-clamp techniques. 2. Octanol depressed the amplitude and duration of miniature end-plate currents and hence depressed neuromuscular transmission. 3. The decay of miniature end-plate currents remained exponential in octanol solutions even when the time constant of decay (τD) was decreased by 80-90%. 4. The lifetime of end-plate channels, obtained by analysis of acetylcholine noise, was also decreased by octanol. The average lifetime measured from noise spectra agreed reasonably well with the time constant of decay of miniature end-plate currents, both in control solution and in octanol solutions. 5. Octanol caused a reduction in the conductance of end-plate channels. Single channel conductance was on average about 25 pS in control solution and 20 pS in octanol. 6. In most cells the normal voltage sensitivity of the decay of miniature end-plate currents was retained in octanol solutions. The lifetime of end-plate channels measured from acetylcholine noise also remained voltage-sensitive in octanol solutions. In some experiments in which channel lifetime was exceptionally reduced the voltage sensitivity was less than normal. 7. In octanol solutions, τD was still very sensitive to temperature changes in most cells although in some the temperature sensitivity of τD was clearly reduced. Changes in τD with temperature could generally be fitted by the Arrhenius equation suggesting that a single step reaction controlled the decay of currents both in control and in octanol solutions. In some cells in which τD became less than 0·3 ms, the relationship between τD and temperature became inconsistent with the Arrhenius equation. 8. As the decay of end-plate currents in octanol solutions remains exponential, and the voltage and temperature sensitivity can be unchanged even when τD is significantly reduced, it seems likely that

  19. SiC-CMC-Zircaloy-4 Nuclear Fuel Cladding Performance during 4-Point Tubular Bend Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IJ van Rooyen; WR Lloyd; TL Trowbridge; SR Novascone; KM Wendt; SM Bragg-Sitton

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE NE) established the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to develop technologies and other solutions to improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors. The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development Pathway in the LWRS program encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. Recent investigations of potential options for “accident tolerant” nuclear fuel systems point to the potential benefits of silicon carbide (SiC) cladding. One of the proposed SiC-based fuel cladding designs being investigated incorporates a SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) as a structural material supplementing an internal Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) liner tube, referred to as the hybrid clad design. Characterization of the advanced cladding designs will include a number of out-of-pile (nonnuclear) tests, followed by in-pile irradiation testing of the most promising designs. One of the out-of-pile characterization tests provides measurement of the mechanical properties of the cladding tube using four point bend testing. Although the material properties of the different subsystems (materials) will be determined separately, in this paper we present results of 4-point bending tests performed on fully assembled hybrid cladding tube mock-ups, an assembled Zr-4 cladding tube mock-up as a standard and initial testing results on bare SiC-CMC sleeves to assist in defining design parameters. The hybrid mock-up samples incorporated SiC-CMC sleeves fabricated with 7 polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) cycles. To provide comparative information; both 1- and 2-ply braided SiC-CMC sleeves were used in this development study. Preliminary stress simulations were performed using the BISON nuclear fuel performance code to show the stress distribution differences for varying lengths between loading points

  20. Studies on the Electrochemical Dissolution for the Treatment of 10 g-Scale Zircaloy-4 Cladding Hull Wastes in LiCl-KCl Molten Salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, You Lee; Lee, Jang Hwa; Jeon, Min Ku; Kang, Kweon Ho

    2012-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviors of 10 g-scale fresh and oxidized Zircaloy-4 cladding hulls were examined in 500 degree C LiCl-KCl molten salts to confirm the feasibility of the electrorefining process for the treatment of hull wastes. In the results of measuring the potential-current response using a stainless steel basket filled with oxidized Zircaloy-4 hull specimens, the oxidation peak of Zr appears to be at -0.7 to -0.8 V vs. Ag/AgCl, which is similar to that of fresh Zircaloy-4 hulls, while the oxidation current is found to be much smaller than that of fresh Zircaloy-4 hulls. These results are congruent with the outcome of current-time curves at -0.78 V and of measuring the change in the average weight and thickness after the electrochemical dissolution process. Although the oxide layer on the surface affects the uniformity and rate of dissolution by decreasing the conductivity of Zircaloy-4 hulls, electrochemical dissolution is considered to occur owing to the defect of the surface and phase properties of the Zr oxide layer.

  1. Performance of indigenous resistance welding equipment for PHWR fuel fabrication in NFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemantha Rao, G.V.S.; Jayaraj, R.N.; Prakash, M.S.; Gupta, U.C.; Ganguly, C.

    1999-01-01

    Indigenisation of critical equipment for manufacturing of PHWR fuel and automation in the production line have been the main thrust in NFC in recent years. As part of this endeavour, resistance welding equipment for end plug welding of Zircaloy-4 clad Uranium Oxide fuel pin and end plates of 19-element fuel bundles have been developed. The paper discusses the equipment design features, critical operating parameters and performance of these indigenous welding machines. (author)

  2. Study of mechanical properties from 77 to 900 K and of recovery-recrystallization of zircaloy 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derep, J.L.

    1981-09-01

    Tensile tests carried out on zircaloy-4 between 77 and 900 K show five deformation domains: 1) 77-100 K the deformation is controlled by dislocation-interstitial interaction; 2) 180-205 K alternally activated transition zone with a Orowan process; 3) 250-600 K a thermally activated zone with mobile dislocations through interstitial clusters; 4) 600-700 K two mechanisms are superposed: Orowan or Frank and Read for the migration of dislocations fixed to the Frank network and a Snoek order associated to a dynamic hardening; 5) above 700 K another thermally activated zone. In the study of recovery-recrystallization the mechanisms were determined. Recovery is controlled by polygonisation leading to a cellular structure and annihilation of dislocations of opposite sign producing the growth of the cells. In the crystallisation the germination is controlled by the same mechanism and the growth by interactions between boundaries and second phase precipitates (Zrsub(x)-Fe 5 -Cr 2 ). It is then evident that zircaloy-4 plates used in PWR reactors between 350 and 450 0 C will evolve with time (even without the supplementary effect of irradiation) [fr

  3. Reaction in air and in nitrogen of pre-oxidised Zircaloy-4 and M5™ claddings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duriez, C., E-mail: christian.duriez@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PSN-RES/SEREX-LE2M, Centre de Cadarache, St Paul-Lez-Durance 13115 (France); Drouan, D. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PSN-RES/SEREX-LE2M, Centre de Cadarache, St Paul-Lez-Durance 13115 (France); Pouzadoux, G. [Université Technologique de Troyes, BP 2060, Troyes 10010 (France)

    2013-10-15

    High temperature reactivity in air and in nitrogen of pre-oxidised Zircaloy-4 and M5™ claddings has been studied by thermogravimetry. Claddings were pre-oxidised at low temperature with the aim of simulating spent fuel. Different pre-oxidation modes, inducing significant variation in the pre-oxides microstructure, were compared. The behaviour in air, investigated in the 850–1000 °C temperature range, was found to be strongly dependant on the type of pre-oxide: the compact pre-oxide formed in autoclave (at temperature, pressure, and water chemistry representative of PWR conditions) significantly slows down the degradation in air compared to the bare alloys; on the contrary, a pre-oxide formed at 500 °C at ambient pressure, either in oxygen or in steam, favours the initiation of post-breakaway type oxidation, which in air is associated with nitride formation. The behaviour in nitrogen has been investigated in the 800–1200 °C temperature range, with Zircaloy-4 pre-oxidised at 500 °C in O{sub 2}. Reactivity is low up to 1000 °C but becomes very significant at the highest temperatures investigated, 1100 and 1200 °C. Finally, cladding segments first reacted in N{sub 2} at 1100 °C, were exposed to air and show fast oxidation even at the lowest temperature investigated (600 °C)

  4. Thermal isocreep curves obtained during multi-axial creep tests on recrystallized Zircaloy-4 and M5™ alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rautenberg, M.; Poquillon, D.; Pilvin, P.; Grosjean, C.; Cloué, J.M.; Feaugas, X.

    2014-01-01

    Zirconium alloys are widely used in the nuclear industry. Several components, such as cladding or guide tubes, undergo strong mechanical loading during and after their use inside the pressurized water reactors. The current requirements on higher fuel performances lead to the developing on new Zr based alloys exhibiting better mechanical properties. In this framework, creep behaviors of recrystallized Zircaloy-4 and M5™, have been investigated and then compared. In order to give a better understanding of the thermal creep anisotropy of Zr-based alloys, multi-axial creep tests have been carried out at 673 K. Using a specific device, creep conditions have been set using different values of β = σ zz /σ θθ , σ zz and σ θθ being respectively the axial and hoop creep stresses. Both axial and hoop strains are measured during each test which is carried out until stationary creep is stabilized. The steady-state strain rates are then used to build isocreep curves. Considering the isocreep curves, the M5™ alloy shows a largely improved creep resistance compared to the recrystallized Zircaloy-4, especially for tubes under high hoop loadings (0 < β < 1). The isocreep curves are then compared with simulations performed using two different mechanical models. Model 1 uses a von Mises yield criterion, the model 2 is based on a Hill yield criterion. For both models, a coefficient derived from Norton law is used to assess the stress dependence

  5. Effect of Aquo-glycolic Media and Added Anions on the Anodization of Zircaloy-4 in Sulphamic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viplav Duth Shukla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anodization of zircaloy-4 in 0.1 M sulphamic acid has been carried out. Kinetics of anodic oxidation of zircaloy-4 has been studied at a constant current density of 8 mA/cm2 and at room temperature. Thickness estimates were made from capacitance data. The plots of formation voltage vs. time, reciprocal capacitance vs. time, reciprocal capacitance vs. formation voltage and thickness vs. formation voltage were drawn and rate of formation, current efficiency and differential field were calculated. The addition of solvent (ethylene glycol showed better kinetic results. For 25%, 50% and 75% aquo-glycolic media, the dielectric constant values are low leading to a marked improvement in the kinetics. In 80% ethylene glycol, though the dielectric constant value of solution is less, the kinetics was slow which may be attributed to the fact that the electrolyte becomes highly non-polar. Improvement in the kinetics of oxide film formation was observed by the addition of millimolar concentration of anions (CO32-, SO42-, PO43-. The presence of phosphate ions improved the kinetics of anodization to better extent.

  6. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  7. Effect of hydrogen and hydrides on the viscoplastic behaviour of the recrystallized zircaloy-4; Effet de l'hydrogene et des hydrures sur le comportement viscoplastique du zircaloy-4 recristallise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rupa, N

    2000-04-15

    Zircaloy-4 is the main material of PWR fuel assemblies. In service as during the storage, the integrity of these compounds has to be guaranteed in spite of the presence of hydrogen (in solution in the zirconium matrix) and of hydrides (which precipitate when the amount of hydrogen is higher than the solubility limit). The aim of this work is to characterize the hydrogen and hydrides effect on the viscoplastic behaviour of the non irradiated recrystallized zircaloy-4. The presence of hydrogen in solid solution induces a decrease of the mechanical properties: the creep kinetics are then increased and the tensile stresses decreased. This decrease is particularly visible in conditions of oxygen/dislocations dynamic interactions (revealed on the material without hydrogen). The advanced hypothesis, strengthened by the atomic simulation results, is that the hydrogen facilitates the dislocations movement, in diminishing the effects of anchoring by the interstitials, and/or in increasing the intrinsic mobility of dislocations. The hydrides effect induces a hardening of the material (decrease of the creep kinetics, increase of the tensile stresses and of the relaxed stresses) compensating the decrease by hydrogen. The hardening mechanism is due to an increase of the internal constraints, determined by load-unload tests. For the very weak plastic deformations, the hydrides are an obstacle to the dislocations gliding. They are then passed (that corresponds to a saturation of the internal constraint). The TEM observations as well as the results obtained on the titanium indicate that the precipitates are then submitted to a deformation mechanism. (O.M.)

  8. Influence of hydrides orientation on strain, damage and failure of hydrided zircaloy-4; Influence de l'orientation des hydrures sur les modes de deformation, d'endommagement et de rupture du zircaloy-4 hydrure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racine, A

    2005-09-15

    In pressurized water reactors of nuclear power plants, fuel pellets are contained in cladding tubes, made of Zirconium alloy, for instance Zircaloy-4. During their life in the primary water of the reactor (155 bars, 300 C), cladding tubes are oxidized and consequently hydrided. A part of the hydrogen given off precipitates as Zirconium hydrides in the bulk material and embrittles the material. This embrittlement depends on many parameters, among which hydrogen content and orientation of hydrides with respect to the applied stress. This investigation is devoted to the influence of the orientation of hydrides with respect to the applied stress on strain, damage and failure mechanisms. Macroscopic and SEM in-situ ring tensile tests are performed on cladding tube material (unirradiated cold worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4) hydrided with about 200 and 500 wppm hydrogen, and with different main hydrides orientation: either parallel or perpendicular to the circumferential tensile direction. We get the mechanical response of the material as a function of hydride orientation and hydrogen content and we investigate the deformation, damage and failure mechanisms. In both cases, digital image correlation techniques are used to estimate local and global strain distributions. Neither the tensile stress-strain response nor the global and local strain modes are significantly affected by hydrogen content or hydride orientation, but the failure modes are strongly modified. Indeed, only 200 wppm radial hydrides embrittle Zy-4: sample fail in the elastic domain at about 350 MPa before strain bands could develop; whereas in other cases sample reach at least 750 MPa before necking and final failure, in ductile or brittle mode. To model this particular heterogeneous material behavior, a non-coupled damage approach which takes into account the anisotropic distribution of the hydrides is proposed. Its parameters are identified from the macroscopic strain field measurements and a

  9. Oxidation-induced deformation of zircaloy-4 tubing in steam in the temperature range 600-1000 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, A.E.; Hussein, A.G.; EL-Raghy, S.M.; EL-Sayed, A.A.; EL-Banna, O.A.

    1992-01-01

    The oxidation-induced deformation of zircaloy-4 (zry-4) tubing in steam has been studied in the temperature range 600 to 1000 degree C. The induced deformation has been measured in both radial and axial directions of the tube. The effect of hydrogen addition to steam was also investigated. The oxidation-induced deformation has been characterized by uniform and non-uniform (distortion) strain period. During the uniform strain period the radial strain kinetics were found in general, to be parallel to the oxidation kinetics. The axial strain (δA) induced by oxidation was found to be always lower than the radial strain (εR). The addition of 5% by volume hydrogen to steam leads to an increase in the oxidation rate and to a decrease in the degree of anisotropy between radial and axial strains

  10. Modeling of the cold work stress relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes mechanical behavior under PWR operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, F.; Delobelle, P.; Leclercq, S.; Bouffioux, P.; Rousselier, G.

    2003-01-01

    This paper proposes a damaged viscoplastic model to simulate, for different isotherms (320, 350, 380, 400 and 420 degC), the out-of-flux anisotropic mechanical behavior of cold work stress relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes over the fluence range 0-85.1024 nm -2 (E > 1 MeV). The model, identified from uni and biaxial tests conducted at 350 and 400 degC, is validated from tests performed at 320, 380 and 420 degC. This model is able to simulate strain hardening under internal pressure followed by a stress relaxation period (thermal creep), which is representative of a pellet cladding mechanical interaction occurring during a power transient (class 2 incidental condition). Both the integration of a scalar state variable, characterizing the damage caused by a bombardment with neutrons, and the modification of the static recovery law allowed us to simulate the fast neutron flux effect (irradiation creep). (author)

  11. Study of radiation effects on zircaloy 4 microstructure (Impact on susceptibility to fuel pellet-cladding interaction in PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefebvre, F.

    1989-01-01

    In PWR the fast neutron flux is an important parameter for fuel can aging by modification of zircaloy-4 microstructure: amorphisation and dissolution of intermetallic precipitates. These phenomena are both analysed and their influence on fuel-cladding interaction is discussed. Irradiations by 1 MeV electrons, Ar ions, Kr ions and fast neutrons are realized for comparison of damages with different defect creation kinetics. Amorphisation is explained as the crystal amorphous state transformation allowing precipitate dissolution by creation of a chemical potential gradient between matrix and amorphous phase. Progressive dissolution of precipitates produced by irradiation decrease the number of potential sites for stress corrosion cracking, improving rupture resistance of the alloy by fuel-cladding interaction [fr

  12. Deformation behavior of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes under inert gas conditions in the temperature range from 600 to 12000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, P.; Raff, S.; Gausmann, G.

    1981-07-01

    Within the temperature range from 600 0 to 1200 0 isothermal, isobaric creep rupture experiments were performed under inert gas with short Zircaloy-4 tube specimens in order to obtain experimental data supporting the development of the NORA cladding tube deformation model. The values of the tube inner pressure were so selected that the time-to-failure values varied between 2 and 2000 s. The corresponding creep rupture curves are indicated. Besides the temperature and the burst pressure the development of deformation over time of the tube specimens was measured. This allowed to draw diagrams of stress, strain rate and strain. On account of the type of specimen heating applied (radiation heating) the temperature difference at the cladding tube circumference is very small ( [de

  13. Oxidation-induced embrittlement and structural changes of Zircaloy-4 tubing in steam at 700-1000 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, A E; Huessein, A G; El-Sayed, A A; El Banna, O A [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); El Raghy, S M [Cairo Univ. (Egypt). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-02-01

    The oxidation-induced embrittlement and structural changes of Zircaloy-4 (KWU-Type) tubing was investigated under light water reactors (LWR) Loss-of-Coolant. Accident conditions (LOCA) in temperature range 700-1000 deg. C. The effect of hydrogen addition to steam was also investigated in the temperature range 800-1000 deg. C. The oxidation-induced embrittlement was found to be a function of both temperature and time. Fractography investigation of oxidized tubing showed a typical brittle fracture in the stabilized-alpha zone. The microhardness measurements revealed that the alpha-Zr is harder than that near the mid-wall position. The oxidation-induced embrittlement at 900 deg. C was found to be higher than at 1000 deg. C. The results also indicated that the addition of 5% by volume hydrogen to steam resulted in an increase in the degree of embrittlement. (author). 22 refs, 9 figs, 3 tabs.

  14. Influence of laser treatment of beta phase on texture, mechanical properties and water corrosion of zircaloy 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darchis, L.; Brun, G.; Baron, J.L.

    1987-06-01

    Two heat treatments by laser of zircaloy 4 cladding tubes are compared: one is superficial (1/1Oth of the thickness) and the other full thickness. In the full thickness treatment a global attenuation of preferential orientations is induced without marked gradient with the same texture found in a classical heat treatment. A peculiar texture is observed when beta transformation affects only 1/10. Mechanical properties measured by elongation and burst tests at 20 and 400 0 C are decreased by 40 to 60% for full thickness treatment and only 1 to 5% for superficial treatment. Water corrosion resistance at 360 0 C in conditions found for PWR is slightly increased by treatment on full thickness. No decrease of behavior is observed after 6 months on the martensitic structure obtained by superficial treatment [fr

  15. A Eutectic Melting Study of Double Wall Cladding Tubes of FeCrAl and Zircaloy-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Woojin; Son, Seongmin; Lee, You Ho; Lee, Jeong Ik; Ryu, Ho Jin [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Eun [Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The eutectic melting behavior of FeCrAl/Zircaloy-4 double wall cladding tubes was investigated by annealing at various temperatures ranging from 900 .deg. C to 1300 .deg. C. It was found that significant eutectic melting occurred after annealing at temperatures equal to or higher than 1150 .deg. C. It means that an additional diffusion barrier layer is necessary to limit the eutectic melting between FeCrAl and Zircaloy-4 alloy cladding tubes. Coating of FeCrAl layers on the Zr alloy cladding tube is being investigated for the development of accident tolerant fuel by exploiting of both the oxidation resistance of FeCrAl alloys and the neutronic advantages of Zr alloys. Coating of FeCrAl alloys on Zr alloy cladding tubes can be performed by various techniques including thermal spray, laser cladding, and co-extrusion. Son et al. also reported the fabrication of FeCrAl/Zr ally double wall cladding by the shrink fit method. For the double layered cladding tubes, the thermal expansion mismatch between the dissimilar materials, severe deformation or mechanical failure due to the evolution of thermal stresses can occur when there is a thermal cycling. In addition to the thermal stress problems, chemical compatibilities between the two different alloys should be investigated in order to check the stability and thermal margin of the double wall cladding at a high temperature. Generally, it is considered that Zr alloy cladding will maintain its mechanical integrity up to 1204 .deg. C (2200 .deg. F) to satisfy the acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems.

  16. Effects of operating conditions on molten-salt electrorefining for zirconium recovery from irradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding of pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jaeyeong, E-mail: d486916@snu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sungyeol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Sungjune [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Rag [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Il Soon [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Computational simulation on electrorefining of irradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding. • Composition of irradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding of pressurized water reactor. • Redox behavior of elements in irradiated Zircaloy cladding during electrorefining. • Effect of electrorefining operating conditions on decontamination factor. - Abstract: To reduce the final waste volume from used nuclear fuel assembly, it is significant to decontaminate irradiated cladding. Electrorefining in high temperature molten salt could be one of volume decontamination processes for the cladding. This study examines the effect of operating conditions on decontamination factor in electrorefining of irradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding of pressurized water reactor. One-dimensional time-dependent electrochemical reaction code, REFIN, was utilized for simulating irradiated cladding electrorefining. Composition of irradiated Zircaloy was estimated based on ORIGEN-2 and other literatures. Co and U were considered in electrorefining simulation with major elements of Zircaloy-4 to represent activation products and actinides penetrating into the cladding respectively. Total 240 cases of electrorefining are simulated including 8 diffusion boundary layer thicknesses, 10 concentrations of contaminated molten salt and 3 termination conditions. Decontamination factors for each case were evaluated and it is revealed that the radioactivity of Co-60 in recovered zirconium on cathode could decrease below the clearance level when initial concentration of chlorides except ZrCl{sub 4} is lower than 1 × 10{sup −11} weight fraction if electrorefining is finished before anode potential reaches −1.8 V (vs. Cl{sub 2}/Cl{sup −})

  17. Development of endplug welding technology for irradiation testing capsule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. W.; Shin, Y. T.; Kim, S. S.; Kim, B. K.; Kang, Y. H. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    To evaluate the performance of newly developed nuclear fuel, it is necessary to irradiate the fuel at a research reactor and examine the irradiated fuel. For the irradiation test in a reasearch reactor, a fuel assembly which is generally called a capsule should be fabricated, considering the fuel irradiation plan and the characteristics of the reactor to be used. And also the fuel elements containing the developed fuel pellets should be made and assembled into a capsule. In this study, the welding method, welding equipment, welding conditions and parameters were developed to make fuel elements for the irradiation test at the HANARO research reactor. The TIG welding method using automatic orbital tube welding system was adopted and the welding joint design was developed for the fabrication of various kinds of irradiation fuel elements. And the optimal welding conditions and parameters were also established for the endplug welding of Zircaloy-4 cladding tube.

  18. Study of the mechanisms controlling the oxide growth under irradiation: characterization of irradiated zircaloy-4 and Zr-1 Nb-O oxide scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossis, Ph.; Thomazet, J.; Lefebvre, F.

    2002-01-01

    In PWRs, the Zr-1Nb-O alloy shows a marked enhancement in corrosion resistance in comparison with Zircaloy-4. The aim of this work is to analyze the reasons for these different behaviors and to determine the respective nature of the oxide growth controlling mechanisms under irradiation. Samples taken from Zircaloy-4 irradiated 1, 2, and 4 cycles and Zr-1Nb-O irradiated 1 and 3 cycles have been systematically characterized by optical microscopy, SEM coupled with image analysis, hydride distribution, and XRD. Specific TEM characterizations have been performed on the Zr-1Nb-O samples. A XPS analysis of a nonirradiated sample is also reported. It has been shown that under irradiation the slow oxidation kinetics of the Zr-1Nb-O alloy is associated with very regular metal-oxide interface and oxide layer. On the contrary, the accelerated oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 is associated with highly perturbed metal-oxide interface and oxide layer. On both irradiated alloys, cracks are observed to initiate preferentially above the delayed parts of the oxidation front. Hydrogen intake during water oxidation in PWR environment is found to be much lower on the Zr-1Nb-O alloy than on Zircaloy-4. More β-ZrO 2 is found on the oxide layer formed on Zircaloy-4 than on Zr-1NbO after oxidation in PWR. Classical irradiation-induced microstructural evolution is observed in the Zr-1Nb-O metallic alloy after 3 cycles, i.e., a fine β-Nb precipitation. β-Nb precipitates are observed to undergo a delayed oxidation associated with a crystalline to amorphous transformation. After water oxidation in autoclave, a pronounced Nb segregation is detected on the oxide surface of a Zr-1Nb-O sample. These results suggest that the oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 is controlled essentially by oxygen diffusion through the inner barrier layer, which is significantly accelerated under irradiation. The oxidation kinetics of Zr-1Nb-O is controlled by both oxygen diffusion through the inner barrier and by

  19. Reactive endplate marrow changes: a systematic morphologic and epidemiologic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karchevsky, Michael; Schweitzer, Mark E.; Carrino, John A.; Zoga, Adam; Montgomery, Douglas; Parker, Laurence

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the morphology and location of vertebral endplate changes, and to analyze their association with age, gender, and body mass index (BMI). At 1.5 T (T1-weighted, T2-weighted/STIR) 100 lumbar spines were evaluated separately by three observers. The readers classified the endplate bone marrow abnormalities on sagittal MR images according to the definitions of Modic et al. Findings were localized by disc segment; whether in the upper and/or lower endplate; and within each endplate divided into 15 segments. Disc space narrowing, as well as disc desiccation, was also noted at each vertebral level. In addition, endplate changes were correlated with age, gender, and BMI (weight(kg)/height(m) 2 ). A total of 15,000 data points were studied and 422 total changes recorded. A total of 99 vertebral levels were affected in 58 patients. Of these, 171 were of type I, 242 were of type II, and 9 were of type III. L4 - L5 and L5 - S1 vertebral levels were most commonly involved, having (142, 4.73%) and (116, 3.87%) changes respectively (P<0.0001). The upper and lower aspects of the endplate were affected similarly. Changes most frequently occurred at the anterior aspect of the endplate (P<0.0001). Endplate marrow changes were associated with increasing age (P<0.0001) and, surprisingly, male gender (P<0.0001). Endplate changes were not associated with BMI. The fatty pattern was most common, with the sclerotic pattern being rare. Endplate marrow changes most often occurred at the anterior aspect of the endplate, particularly at L4 - L5 and L5 - S1 levels. Modic changes occur more frequently with aging, evidence of their degenerative etiology. They were, however, not related to body habitus, but to weight and male gender. (orig.)

  20. Reactive endplate marrow changes: a systematic morphologic and epidemiologic evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karchevsky, Michael [Hahnemann University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia (United States); Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia (United States); Schweitzer, Mark E. [Hospital for Joint Diseases, Department of Radiology, New York (United States); Carrino, John A.; Zoga, Adam; Montgomery, Douglas; Parker, Laurence [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia (United States)

    2005-03-01

    To evaluate the morphology and location of vertebral endplate changes, and to analyze their association with age, gender, and body mass index (BMI). At 1.5 T (T1-weighted, T2-weighted/STIR) 100 lumbar spines were evaluated separately by three observers. The readers classified the endplate bone marrow abnormalities on sagittal MR images according to the definitions of Modic et al. Findings were localized by disc segment; whether in the upper and/or lower endplate; and within each endplate divided into 15 segments. Disc space narrowing, as well as disc desiccation, was also noted at each vertebral level. In addition, endplate changes were correlated with age, gender, and BMI (weight(kg)/height(m){sup 2}). A total of 15,000 data points were studied and 422 total changes recorded. A total of 99 vertebral levels were affected in 58 patients. Of these, 171 were of type I, 242 were of type II, and 9 were of type III. L4 - L5 and L5 - S1 vertebral levels were most commonly involved, having (142, 4.73%) and (116, 3.87%) changes respectively (P<0.0001). The upper and lower aspects of the endplate were affected similarly. Changes most frequently occurred at the anterior aspect of the endplate (P<0.0001). Endplate marrow changes were associated with increasing age (P<0.0001) and, surprisingly, male gender (P<0.0001). Endplate changes were not associated with BMI. The fatty pattern was most common, with the sclerotic pattern being rare. Endplate marrow changes most often occurred at the anterior aspect of the endplate, particularly at L4 - L5 and L5 - S1 levels. Modic changes occur more frequently with aging, evidence of their degenerative etiology. They were, however, not related to body habitus, but to weight and male gender. (orig.)

  1. Evaluation of the DSC technique in the determination of the terminal temperature solubility of hydrogen in Zircaloy 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizcaino, Pablo; Banchik, Abraham D.

    1999-01-01

    The determination of the terminal temperature solubility of hydrogen in the zirconium alloys is a matter of our interest, since the hydride precipitation in these materials make them susceptible to the delay hydrogen cracking (DHC). Nowadays efforts are directed to the determination of this parameter on irradiated materials. In this frame we have begun a program to determine these curves on irradiated zirconium alloys like Zircaloys, Zr 2.5% Nb, Zr 1% Nb, zirconium sponge and high oxygen zirconium with different microstructures using the differential scanning calorimeter technique. The earlier task that we have imposed to us is the evaluation the reproducibility of this technique and the influence of the heating and cooling rates on the results. With these objectives we have initiated this work measuring the terminal temperature solubility (TTS) in unirradiated recrystallized and cold worked Zircaloy-4. We have found that the reproducibility of the technique is good; the average values (TSSD) and (TSSP) agree within the experimental error and the dispersions are low. Variance analysis indicates that the values of TSSD and TSSP do not depend on the heating and cooling rates. Within the rank analyzed the differences in the measurements are only possible to be attributed to statistical and/or experimental errors. The obtained curves of solubility show to a good agreement with the values obtained by others authors until 200 ppm (weight) of hydrogen. Similar comparisons between precipitation curves have not been made in regard to which these values depend on the maximum temperature reached in the experience. (author)

  2. Recovery and deformation substructures of zircaloy-4 in high temperature plasticity under stationary or non-stationary stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocek, M.; Armas, I.

    1982-01-01

    It was the aim of the present investigation to examine how the recovery rate in creep is influenced by a non-stationary stress. For purposes of phenomenological analysis it is postulated that, irrespective of whether the applied stress is stationary or not, for large strains the mean internal stress sigmasub(i) approaches a stationary value sigmasub(i,s). The stationary recovery rate Rsub(s) for constant load creep turns out be governed by the applied stress indicating that the recovery mechanism is dynamic in nature. For sigma-ramp loading, Rsub(s) is dependent on the stress rate sigma. In tensional stress cycling, Rsub(s) is governed by the maximum stress sigmasub(M) and is also dependent on the ratio of sigmasub(M) to the minimum stress sigma 0 . TEM examination of Zircaloy-4 specimens crept at 800 0 C at constant and cycling load respectively could not reveal any differences in the deformation substructure for the two loading types. Subgrain formation did not appear, individual dislocations were observed only rarely. However, typical networks were formed as well as pileups which perhaps are responsible for the back stress in high temperature plasticity (HTP). (orig.)

  3. Iodine stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of unirradiated Zircaloy-4 tubing by means of internal gas pressurization, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onchi, Takeo; Inoue, Tadashi

    1982-01-01

    The internal gas pressurization tests were conducted at 360 0 C, to examine the influence of iodine concentration on the iodine stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of Zircaloy-4 tubing of 17 x 17 type PWR design. The iodine contents studied were ranging of 0.06 to 6 mg/cm 2 , corresponding to 30 from 0.3 mg/cm 3 . Applied hoop stress vs. time-to-failure relationships were obtained in argon gas with iodine, as well as without iodine, from the tests of maximum holding times up to 72 hrs. The relationships obtained were insensitive to iodine contents. The applied stress lowering in iodine atmosphere approached a threshold stress below which SCC failure did not occur within the holding time, but not in argon gas alone. The threshold stresses were approximately 25.5 kg/mm 2 (250 Mpa), independent on iodine concentrations. Based on fracture mechanics approach and fractographic analysis, an interpretation was made of those applied stress and time-to-failure relationships. (author)

  4. Effect of grain shape and texture on equi-biaxial creep of stress relieved and recrystallized Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murty, K.L.; Tanikella, B.V.; Earthman, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Zirconium alloys are extensively used in various types of fission reactors both light and heavy water types for different applications, examples being thin-walled tubing to clad radioactive fuel, grids, channels in boiling water reactors (BWRs) as well as pressure and calandria tubes in pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs). Biaxial creep behaviors of stress relieved and recrystallized thin-walled tubing of Zircaloy-4 are considered under equal hoop and axial stresses by internal pressurization superimposed with axial load. Both hoop and axial strains were monitored and the ratio of the strain rates along the hoop to axial directions is considered to represent the degree of anisotropy. The slightly stronger hoop direction of the recrystallized material became weaker compared to the axial direction following cold work and a stress-relief anneal. Crystallographic texture was considered in terms of x-ray pole figures from which the crystallite orientation distribution functions (CODF) were derived. A crystal plasticity model based on slip on representative systems was combined with the CODF to predict the creep anisotropy. It was found that the textural differences between the recrystallized and stress-relieved material is believed to invoke anisotropic grain boundary sliding leading to stress enhancement in the hoop direction. This stress enhancement is shown to account for the observed differences in creep behavior between the present equiaxed and columnar grain structures

  5. Experimental and statistical study on fracture boundary of non-irradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding tube under LOCA conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narukawa, Takafumi; Yamaguchi, Akira; Jang, Sunghyon; Amaya, Masaki

    2018-02-01

    For estimating fracture probability of fuel cladding tube under loss-of-coolant accident conditions of light-water-reactors, laboratory-scale integral thermal shock tests were conducted on non-irradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding tube specimens. Then, the obtained binary data with respect to fracture or non-fracture of the cladding tube specimen were analyzed statistically. A method to obtain the fracture probability curve as a function of equivalent cladding reacted (ECR) was proposed using Bayesian inference for generalized linear models: probit, logit, and log-probit models. Then, model selection was performed in terms of physical characteristics and information criteria, a widely applicable information criterion and a widely applicable Bayesian information criterion. As a result, it was clarified that the log-probit model was the best among the three models to estimate the fracture probability in terms of the degree of prediction accuracy for both next data to be obtained and the true model. Using the log-probit model, it was shown that 20% ECR corresponded to a 5% probability level with a 95% confidence of fracture of the cladding tube specimens.

  6. Air oxidation of Zircaloy-4 in the 600-1000 °C temperature range: Modeling for ASTEC code application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coindreau, O.; Duriez, C.; Ederli, S.

    2010-10-01

    Progress in the treatment of air oxidation of zirconium in severe accident (SA) codes are required for a reliable analysis of severe accidents involving air ingress. Air oxidation of zirconium can actually lead to accelerated core degradation and increased fission product release, especially for the highly-radiotoxic ruthenium. This paper presents a model to simulate air oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 in the 600-1000 °C temperature range. It is based on available experimental data, including separate-effect experiments performed at IRSN and at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The kinetic transition, named "breakaway", from a diffusion-controlled regime to an accelerated oxidation is taken into account in the modeling via a critical mass gain parameter. The progressive propagation of the locally initiated breakaway is modeled by a linear increase in oxidation rate with time. Finally, when breakaway propagation is completed, the oxidation rate stabilizes and the kinetics is modeled by a linear law. This new modeling is integrated in the severe accident code ASTEC, jointly developed by IRSN and GRS. Model predictions and experimental data from thermogravimetric results show good agreement for different air flow rates and for slow temperature transient conditions.

  7. The effect of small specimen volume on the deformation of Zircaloy-4 PWR cladding under mainly convective cooling by steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oakden, M.M.; Reynolds, A.E.

    1983-01-01

    Creep rupture tests were performed in flowing steam on single rod specimens of 17x17 type PWR Zircaloy-4 cladding 460 mm long. They were tested at temperatures between 640 deg.C and 985 deg.C with internal pressures in the range 1.00-9.65 MPa (gauge) (145-1400 lb/in 2 ). The internal free volume was limited to 2.9 ml. Axially extended 'carrot' shaped deformations were produced, the range of temperatures and pressures over which these occurred was found to be similar to that observed in previous tests conducted with a much larger free volume. The main result of limiting the internal volume was that straining of the specimens was accompanied by a more rapid drop in the internal pressure than occurred previously, and which reduced the extent of the deformation compared with that seen in the earlier work. However, diametral strains in excess of 33% were observed which would result in mechanical interaction of neighbouring bulges if this occurred in a multi-rod array. (author)

  8. A study of the accelerated zircaloy-4 oxidation reaction with H2O/H2 mixture gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. S.; Cho, I. J.

    2001-01-01

    A study of the Zircaloy-4 reaction with H 2 O/H 2 mixture gas is carried out by using TGA (Thermo Gravimetric Apparatus) to estimate the hydrogen embrittlement which can possibly cause catastrophic nuclear fuel rod failure. Reaction rates are measured as a function of H 2 /H 2 O. In the experiments reaction temperature is set at 500 .deg. C and total pressure of the mixture gas is maintained at 1 atm. Experimental results reveal that hydriding and oxidation reaction are competing. In early stage, hydriding kinetics is faster than oxidation, however, oxidant in H 2 O forms oxide on the surface as steam environment is maintained, thus, this growing oxide begins to protect the zirconium base metal against hydrogen permeation. In this second stage, the total kinetic rate follows enhanced oxidation kinetics. In the final stage, it is observed that the oxide is broken down and massive hydriding takes place through the mechanical defects in the oxide, whose kinetics is similar to pure hydriding kinetics. These results are confirmed by SEM and EDX analysis along with hydrogen concentration measurements

  9. Effect of hydriding temperature and strain rate on the ductile-brittle transition in β treated Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of hydriding temperature and strain rate on the ductile-brittle transition in β treated Zircaloy-4 has been investigated. The hydriding temperature used is 700degC, strain rates being 4x10 -4 s -1 and 4x10 -3 s -1 . The results show that at same conditions the ductility of hydrides decreases as the hydriding temperature decreases. There exists a critical temperature (transition temperature) of 250degC for hydriding at 700degC, below which the hydrided specimens (and so for the hydrides) are brittle, while above it they are ductile. This transition temperature is lower than the one mentioned by various authors obtained for hydriding at 400degC. For the same hydriding temperature of 700degC, the specimens tested at 4x10 -3 s -1 are less ductile than those tested at 4x10 -4 s -1 . Furthermore, unlike at a strain rate of 4x10 -4 s -1 , there is no more a clear ductile-brittle transition behaviour. (author)

  10. Chemical interactions between as-received and pre-oxidized Zircaloy-4 and stainless steel at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, P.

    1994-05-01

    The chemical reaction behavior between Zircaloy-4 and 1.4919 (AISI 316) stainless steel, which are used in absorber assemblies of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR), has been studied in the temperature range 1000 - 1400 C. Zircaloy was used in the as-received, pre-oxidized and oxygen-containing condition. The maximum temperature was limited by the fast and complete liquefaction of the reaction couple as a result of eutectic chemical interactions. Liquefaction of the components occurs below their melting point. The effect of oxygen dissolved in Zircaloy plays an important role in the interaction; oxide layers on the Zircaloy surface delay the chemical interactions with stainless steel but cannot prevent them. Oxygen dissolved in Zircaloy reduces the reaction rates and shift the liquefaction temperature to slightly higher levels. The interaction experiments at the examined temperatures with or without pre-oxidized Zircaloy can be described by parabolic rate laws. The Arrhenius equations for the various conditions of interactions are given. (orig.) [de

  11. Statistical study on applied stress dependence of failure time in stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirao, Keiichi; Yamane, Toshimi; Minamino, Yoritoshi; Tanaka, Akiei.

    1988-01-01

    Effects of applied stress on failure time in stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4 alloy were investigated by Weibull distribution method. Test pieces in the evaculated silica tubes were annealed at 1,073 K for 7.2 x 10 3 s, and then quenched into ice-water. These species under constant applied stresses of 40∼90 % yield stress were immersed in CH 3 OH-1 w% I 2 solution at room temperature. The probability distribution of failure times under applied stress of 40 % of yield stress was described as single Weibull distribution, which had one shape parameter. The probability distributions of failure times under applied stress above 60 % of yield stress were described as composite and mixed Weibull distributions, which had the two shape parameters of Weibull distributions for the regions of the shorter time and longer one of failure. The values of these shape parameters in this study were larger than the value of 1 which corresponded to that of wear out failure. The observation of fracture surfaces and the stress dependence of the shape parameters indicated that the shape parameters both for the times of failure under 40 % of yield stress and for the longer ones above 60 % of yield stress corresponded to intergranular cracking, and that for shorter times of failure corresponded to transgranular cracking and dimple fracture. (author)

  12. Stacking faults in Zr(Fe, Cr)2 Laves structured secondary phase particle in Zircaloy-4 alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengze; Li, Geping; Yuan, Fusen; Han, Fuzhou; Zhang, Yingdong; Gu, Hengfei

    2018-02-01

    Stacking faults (SFs) in secondary phase particles (SPPs), which generally crystallize in the Laves phase in Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) alloy, have been frequently observed by researchers. However, few investigations on the nano-scale structure of SFs have been carried out. In the present study, an SF containing C14 structured SPP, which located at grain boundaries (GBs) in the α-Zr matrix, was chosen to be investigated, for its particular substructure as well as location, aiming to reveal the nature of the SFs in the SPPs in Zr-4 alloy. It was indicated that the SFs in the C14 structured SPP actually existed in the local C36 structured Laves phase, for their similarities in crystallography. The C14 → C36 phase transformation, which was driven by synchroshearing among the (0001) basal planes, was the formation mechanism of the SFs in the SPPs. By analyzing the strained regions near the SPP, a model for understanding the driving force of the synchroshear was proposed: the interaction between SPP and GB resulted in the Zener pinning effect, leading to the shearing parallel to the (0001) basal planes of the C14 structured SPP, and the synchroshear was therefore activated.

  13. Nucleation and growth of intermetallic precipitates in Zircaloy-2 and zircaloy-4 and correlation to nodular corrosion behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maussner, G.; Steinberg, E.; Tenckhoff, E.

    1987-01-01

    One of the fundamental aspects in the history of the development of zirconium alloys for nuclear applications is the corrosion behavior under in-pile conditions. In boiling-water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) the zirconium alloys Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 are the most commonly used materials, permitting attainment of a very high level of integrity and reliability. Nevertheless, efforts are required to optimize these well-established alloys with regard to their resistance to nodular corrosion, where improvements will give long-term advantages in fuel integrity and fuel economy. Phenomenological studies allow correlation of the nodular corrosion behavior with the morphological appearance of precipitated intermetallic phases in the microstructures of Zry-2 and Zry-4. To understand the fundamental processes of precipitation, particle nucleation-and-growth studies were made with Zry-2 and Zry-4 in different fabrication dimensions and with variations in β-quenching rates followed by isothermal and isochronical heat treatments. The microstructural characteristics of the precipitates were investigated by optical and transmission-electron microscopy. The macroscopic behavior was studied by electrical-resistivity measurements and hardness measurements. The nodular-corrosion susceptibility was determined by weight-gain and nodule distribution measurements after a 500 0 C laboratory-autoclave test

  14. Effects of the plastic deformation and thermal cycles on the mechanical properties of fully recrystallized Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvack, Nicolas

    2005-01-01

    The development of crystallographic texture in a product depends, for a given material, of its fabrication history. In our case, the evolution of that texture results from a combination of cold working and thermal cycles applied together or separately. In the present work, cold working levels ranging from 50 % to approximately 90 % and different heat treatment cycles has been applied to Zircaloy-4 sheets and tubes. Using X-ray diffraction techniques and the direct pole figure method, the evolution of crystallographic texture has been analyzed for each fabrication route. We observed that cold working levels up to 90 % without intermediate annealing heat treatment do not change significantly the classic angle between basal pole and the normal/radial direction of the product (φ ≅ ± 25 degrees). Furthermore, the application of intermediate cold working levels (50 % - 60 %) and more than two intermediate annealing heat treatments exhibits a marked modification of the basal pole orientation. The basal poles appear now parallel to the normal direction (φ ≅ 0 degrees) of the product. Additionally, the crystallographic texture change observed with X-ray procedures was evaluated by the measure of anisotropic parameters R and P. The results here obtained will be use in the future as a basis for the design of a fabrication route capable to obtain in a HPTR process, seamless calandria tubes strengthened by crystallographic texture. (author) [es

  15. Design study of the geometry of the blanking tool to predict the burr formation of Zircaloy-4 sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Jisun, E-mail: nskim@sogang.ac.kr; Lee, Hyungyil, E-mail: nskim@sogang.ac.kr; Kim, Dongchul, E-mail: nskim@sogang.ac.kr; Kim, Naksoo, E-mail: nskim@sogang.ac.kr [Sogang University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seoul, 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-16

    In this work, we investigated factors that influence burr formation for zircaloy-4 sheet used for spacer grids of nuclear fuel roads. Factors we considered are geometric factors of punch. We changed clearance and velocity in order to consider the failure parameters, and we changed shearing angle and corner radius of L-shaped punch in order to consider geometric factors of punch. First, we carried out blanking test with failure parameter of GTN model using L-shaped punch. The tendency of failure parameters and geometric factors that affect burr formation by analyzing sheared edges is investigated. Consequently, geometric factor's influencing on the burr formation is also high as failure parameters. Then, the sheared edges and burr formation with failure parameters and geometric factors is investigated using FE analysis model. As a result of analyzing sheared edges with the variables, we checked geometric factors more affect burr formation than failure parameters. To check the reliability of the FE model, the blanking force and the sheared edges obtained from experiments are compared with the computations considering heat transfer.

  16. Influence of temperature and hydrogen content on stress-induced radial hydride precipitation in Zircaloy-4 cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desquines, J., E-mail: jean.desquines@irsn.fr; Drouan, D.; Billone, M.; Puls, M.P.; March, P.; Fourgeaud, S.; Getrey, C.; Elbaz, V.; Philippe, M.

    2014-10-15

    Radial hydride precipitation in stress relieved Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings is studied using a new thermal–mechanical test. Two maximum temperatures for radial hydride precipitation heat treatment are studied, 350 and 450 °C with hydrogen contents ranging between 50 and 600 wppm. The new test provides two main results of interest: the minimum hoop stress required to precipitate radial hydrides and a maximum stress above which, all hydrides precipitate in the radial direction. Based on these two extreme stress conditions, a model is derived to determine the stress level required to obtain a given fraction of radial hydrides after high temperature thermal–mechanical heat treatment. The proposed model is validated using metallographic observation data on pressurized tubes cooled down under constant pressure. Most of the samples with reoriented hydrides are further subjected to a ductility test. Using finite element modeling, the test results are analyzed in terms of crack nucleation within radial hydrides at the outer diameter and crack growth through the thickness of the tubular samples. The combination of test results shows that samples with hydrogen contents of about 100 wppm had the lowest ductility.

  17. Structural and corrosive properties of ZrO2 thin films on zircaloy-4 by RF reactive magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo Ho; Lee, Kwang Hoon; Ko, Jae Hwan; Yoon, Young Soo; Baek, Jong Hyuk; Lee, Sang Jin

    2006-01-01

    Zirconium-oxide (ZrO 2 ) thin films as protective layers were grown on a Zircaloy-4 (Z-4) cladding material as a substrate by RF reactive magnetron sputtering at room temperature. To investigate the effect of plasma immersion on the structural and the corrosive properties of the as-grown ZrO 2 thin film, we immersed Z-4 in plasma during the deposition process. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements showed that the as-grown ZrO 2 thin films immersed in plasma had cubic, well as monoclinic and tetragonal, phases whereas those immersed in the plasma had monoclinic and tetragonal phases only. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of the surface morphology showed that the surface roughness of the as-grown ZrO 2 thin films immersed in plasma was larger than that of the films not immersed in plasma. In addition, the corrosive property of the as-grown ZrO 2 thin films immersed in the plasma was characterized using the weight gains of Z-4 after the corrosion test. Compared with the non-immersed films, the weight gains of the immersed films were larger. These results indicate that the ZrO 2 films immersed in plasma cannot protect Z-4 from corrosive phenomena.

  18. Corrosion behavior in high-temperature pressurized water of Zircaloy-4 joints brazed with Zr-Cu-based amorphous filler alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Gu; Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Park, Jin-Ju; Lee, Min-Ku

    2017-05-01

    The compositional effects of ternary Zr-Cu-X (X: Al, Fe) amorphous filler alloys on galvanic corrosion susceptibility in high-temperature pressurized water were investigated for Zircaloy-4 brazed joints. Through an Al-induced microgalvanic reaction that deteriorated the overall nobility of the joint, application of the Zr-Cu-Al filler alloy caused galvanic coupling to develop readily between the Al-bearing joint and the Al-free base metal, finally leading to massive localized corrosion of the joint. Contrastingly, joints prepared with a Zr-Cu-Fe filler alloy showed excellent corrosion resistance comparable to that of the Zircaloy-4 base metal, since the Cu and Fe elements forming fine intermetallic particles with Zr did not influence the electrochemical stability of the resultant joints. The present results demonstrate that Fe is a more suitable alloying element than Al for brazing filler alloys subjected to high-temperature corrosive environments.

  19. Performance assessment on high strength steel endplate connections after fire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiang, X.; Wu, N.; Jiang, X.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.; Kolstein, M.H.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose – This study aims to reveal more information and understanding on performance and failure mechanisms of high strength steel endplate connections after fire. Design/methodology/approach – An experimental and numerical study on seven endplate connections after

  20. Development of a new bundle welding technology for CANDU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo Sung; Lee, D. Y.; Goo, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    The new technology of welding process for fuel bundle of CANDU nuclear fuels is considered important in respect to the soundness of weldments and the improvement of the performance of nuclear fuels during the operation in reactor. The probability of leakage of the fission products is mostly apt to occur at the weldments of fuel bundles, and it is connected directly with the safety and life prediction of the nuclear reactor in operation. The fuel bundles of CANDU nuclear fuels are welded by the electrical resistance method, connecting the endplates and endcaps with fuel rods. Therefore, the purpose of this study of the 2nd year is to select the proper welding parameters and to investigate the characteristics of the full-sized samples using the projection endplates and make some prototype samples for the endplate welding of CANDU nuclear fuels. This study will be also provide the fundamental data for the new design and fabrications of CANDU nuclear fuel bundles

  1. Influence de l'orientation des hydrures sur les modes de déformation, d'endommagement et de rupture du Zircaloy-4 hydruré.

    OpenAIRE

    Racine , Aude

    2005-01-01

    In pressurized water reactors of nuclear power plants, fuel pellets are contained in cladding tubes, made of Zirconium alloy, for instance Zircaloy-4. During their life in the primary water of the reactor (155 bars, 300°C), cladding tubes are oxidized and consequently hydrided. A part of the hydrogen given off precipitates as Zirconium hydrides in the bulk material and embrittles the material. This embitterment depends on many parameters, among which hydrogen content and orientation of hydrid...

  2. Endplates Changes Related to Age and Vertebral Segment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Fernando P. S. Herrero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endplate separations are defined as the presence of a space between the hyaline cartilage and the cortical bone of the adjacent vertebral body. This study evaluates endplate separations from the vertebral body and intervertebral discs and verifies if endplate separation is related to age and the spinal level. Groups were formed based on age (20–40 and 41–85 years old and the vertebral segment (T7-T8 and L4-L5 segments. Histological analysis included assessment of the length of the vertebral endplates, the number and dimensions of the separations, and orientation of the collagen fibers, in the mid-sagittal slice. Two indexes were created: the separation index (number of separations/vertebral length and separation extension index (sum of all separations/vertebral length. The results of the study demonstrated a direct relationship between the density of separations in the endplate and two variables: age and spinal level.

  3. Corrosion behavior in high-temperature pressurized water of Zircaloy-4 joints brazed with Zr-Cu-based amorphous filler alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Gu, E-mail: jglee88@ulsan.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 44610 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Park, Jin-Ju [Nuclear Materials Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Yuseong, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Min-Ku, E-mail: leeminku@kaeri.re.kr [Nuclear Materials Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Yuseong, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    The compositional effects of ternary Zr-Cu-X (X: Al, Fe) amorphous filler alloys on galvanic corrosion susceptibility in high-temperature pressurized water were investigated for Zircaloy-4 brazed joints. Through an Al-induced microgalvanic reaction that deteriorated the overall nobility of the joint, application of the Zr-Cu-Al filler alloy caused galvanic coupling to develop readily between the Al-bearing joint and the Al-free base metal, finally leading to massive localized corrosion of the joint. Contrastingly, joints prepared with a Zr-Cu-Fe filler alloy showed excellent corrosion resistance comparable to that of the Zircaloy-4 base metal, since the Cu and Fe elements forming fine intermetallic particles with Zr did not influence the electrochemical stability of the resultant joints. The present results demonstrate that Fe is a more suitable alloying element than Al for brazing filler alloys subjected to high-temperature corrosive environments. - Highlights: •Corrosion of Zircaloy-4 joints brazed with Zr-Cu-X filler alloys was investigated. •Alloyed Al deteriorated the overall nobility of joints by microgalvanic reaction. •Compositional gradient of Al in joints was the driving force for galvanic corrosion. •Cu and Fe did not influence the electrochemical stability of joints. •Zr-Cu-Fe filler alloy yielded excellent high-temperature corrosion resistance.

  4. Study of the response of Zircaloy- 4 cladding to thermal shock during water quenching after double sided steam oxidation at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawarn, Tapan K., E-mail: sawarn@barc.gov.in; Banerjee, Suparna; Kumar, Sunil

    2016-05-15

    This study investigates the failure of embrittled Zircaloy-4 cladding in a simulated loss of coolant accident condition and correlates it with the evolved stratified microstructure. Isothermal steam oxidation of Zircaloy-4 cladding at high temperatures (900–1200 °C) with soaking periods in the range 60–900 s followed by water quenching was carried out. The combined oxide + oxygen stabilized α-Zr layer thickness and the fraction of the load bearing phase (recrystallised α-Zr grains + prior β-Zr or only prior β-Zr) of clad tube specimens were correlated with the %ECR calculated using Baker-Just equation. Average oxygen concentration of the load bearing phase corresponding to different oxidation conditions was calculated from the average microhardness using an empirical correlation. The results of these experiments are presented in this paper. Thermal shock sustainability of the clad was correlated with the %ECR, combined oxide+α-Zr(O) layer thickness, fraction of the load bearing phase and its average oxygen concentration. - Highlights: • Response of the embrittled Zircaloy-4 clad towards thermal shock, simulated under LOCA condition was investigated. • Thermal shock sustainability of the clad was correlated with its evolved stratified microstructure. • Cladding fails at %ECR value ≥ 29. • To resist the thermal shock, clad should have load bearing phase fraction > 0.44 and average oxygen concentration < 0.69 wt%.

  5. Hydride precipitation, fracture and plasticity mechanisms in pure zirconium and Zircaloy-4 at temperatures typical for the postulated loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pshenichnikov, Anton; Stuckert, Juri; Walter, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • All δ-hydrides in Zr and Zircaloy-4 have basal or pyramidal types of habit planes. • Seven orientation relationships for δ-hydrides in Zr matrix were detected. • Decohesion fracture mechanism of hydrogenated Zr was investigated by fractography. - Abstract: The results of investigations of samples of zirconium and its alloy Zircaloy-4, hydrogenated at temperatures 900–1200 K (typical temperatures for loss-of-coolant accidents) are presented. The analyses, based on a range of complementary techniques (X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction) reveals the direct interrelation of internal structure transformation and hydride distribution with the degradation of mechanical properties. Formation of small-scale zirconium hydrides and their bulk distribution in zirconium and Zircaloy-4 were investigated. Fractographical analysis was performed on the ruptured samples tested in a tensile machine at room temperature. The already-known hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms based on hydride formation and hydrogen-enhanced decohesion and the applicability of them in the case of zirconium and its alloys is discussed.

  6. Corrosion behavior in high-temperature pressurized water of Zircaloy-4 joints brazed with Zr-Cu-based amorphous filler alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Gu; Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Park, Jin-Ju; Lee, Min-Ku

    2017-01-01

    The compositional effects of ternary Zr-Cu-X (X: Al, Fe) amorphous filler alloys on galvanic corrosion susceptibility in high-temperature pressurized water were investigated for Zircaloy-4 brazed joints. Through an Al-induced microgalvanic reaction that deteriorated the overall nobility of the joint, application of the Zr-Cu-Al filler alloy caused galvanic coupling to develop readily between the Al-bearing joint and the Al-free base metal, finally leading to massive localized corrosion of the joint. Contrastingly, joints prepared with a Zr-Cu-Fe filler alloy showed excellent corrosion resistance comparable to that of the Zircaloy-4 base metal, since the Cu and Fe elements forming fine intermetallic particles with Zr did not influence the electrochemical stability of the resultant joints. The present results demonstrate that Fe is a more suitable alloying element than Al for brazing filler alloys subjected to high-temperature corrosive environments. - Highlights: •Corrosion of Zircaloy-4 joints brazed with Zr-Cu-X filler alloys was investigated. •Alloyed Al deteriorated the overall nobility of joints by microgalvanic reaction. •Compositional gradient of Al in joints was the driving force for galvanic corrosion. •Cu and Fe did not influence the electrochemical stability of joints. •Zr-Cu-Fe filler alloy yielded excellent high-temperature corrosion resistance.

  7. Ductility and failure behaviour of both unirradiated and irradiated zircaloy-4 cladding using plane strain tensile specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carassou, S.; Le Saux, M.; Pizzanelli, J.P.; Rabouille, O.; Averty, X.; Poussard, C.; Cazalis, B.; Desquines, J.; Bernaudat, C.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, eight PST (Plan Strain Tensile) tests machined from a Zircaloy-4 (Zy-4) cladding irradiated up to 5 annual cycles have been performed at 280, 350 and 480 Celsius degrees. The specimen displacements during the tests were filmed and digitally recorded to allow the use of a Digital Image Correlation (DIC) analysis technique to experimentally determine the local strains on the outer surface of the specimens. The plane strain conditions have been verified and prevail over a wide area between the notches of the specimen, as expected from full 3D FE numerical analysis performed in support of the tests. For the first time, the location of the onset of fracture for this geometry on irradiated material has been experimentally observed: at 280 C.degrees, crack initiates in the vicinity of the notches, in an area where plane strain conditions are not fulfilled, and for a local circumferential strain value of about 5%. At 350 C. degrees and 480 C. degrees, cracks initiate at a location where plane strain conditions prevail, for circumferential strain values respectively close to 10% and greater than 50%. These results have been compared to results obtained previously by similar test on fresh and hydrided material, as well as tests performed as support to the study. At 350 C. degrees, the homogeneous 700 ppm hydrided Zy-4 and the Zy-4 irradiated during 5 annual cycles exhibit similar fracture behaviour, for both fracture hoop strain values (10%) and fracture mode (through-wall slant fracture). For the irradiated material, it has clearly been established that at 350 C. degrees, a brittle fracture occurs at the outer surface in the hydride rim. The crack propagates subsequently toward the inner surface and the notches, where final fracture occurs

  8. Use of Zircaloy 4 material for the pressure vessels of hot and cold neutron sources and beam tubes for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuer, A.; Gutsmiedl, E.

    1999-01-01

    The material Zircaloy 4 can be used for the pressure retaining walls for the cold and hot neutron sources and beam tubes. For the research reactor FRM-II of the Technical University Munich, Germany, the material Zircaloy 4 were chosen for the vessels of the cold and hot neutron source and for the beam tube No. 6. The sheets and forgings of Zircaloy 4 were examined in the temperature range between -256 deg. C and 250 deg. C. The thickness of the sheets are 3, 4, 5 and 10 mm, the maximum diameter of the forgings was 560 mm. This great forging diameters are not be treated in the ASTM rule B 351 for nuclear material, so a special approval with independent experts was necessary. The requirements for the material examinations were specified in a material specification and material test sheets which based on the ASTM rules B 351 and B 352 with additional restriction and additional requirements of the basic safety concept for nuclear power plants in Germany, which was take into consideration in the nuclear licensing procedure. Charpy-V samples were carried out in the temperature range between -256 deg. C and 150 deg. C to get more information on the ductile behaviour of the Zircaloy 4. The results of the sheet examination confirm the requirements of the specifications, the results of the forging examination in the tangential testing direction are lower than specified and expected for the tensile strength. The axial and transverse values confirm the specification requirements. For the strength calculation of the pressure retaining wall a reduced material value for the forgings has to take into consideration. The material behaviour of Zircaloy 4 under irradiation up to a fluence of ∼ 1x10 22 n/cm 2 was investigated. The loss of ductility was determined. As an additional criteria the variation of the fracture toughness was studies. Fracture mechanic calculations of the material were carried out in the licensing procedure with the focus to fulfill the leak before rupture

  9. Use of Zircaloy 4 material for the pressure vessels of hot and cold neutron sources and beam tubes for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutsmiedl, Erwin

    2001-01-01

    The material Zircaloy 4 can be used for the pressure retaining walls for the cold and hot neutron sources and beam tubes. For the research reactor FRM-II of the Technical University Munich, Germany, the material Zircaloy 4 were chosen for the vessels of the cold and hot neutron source and for the beam tube No. 6. The sheets and forgings of Zircaloy 4 were examined in the temperature range between -256degC and 250degC. The thickness of the sheets are 3, 4, 5 and 10 mm, the maximum diameter of the forgings was 560 mm. This great forging diameters are not be treated in the ASTM rule B 351 for nuclear material, so a special approval with independent experts was necessary. The requirements for the material examinations were specified in a material specification and material test sheets which based on the ASTM rules B 351 and B 352 with additional restriction and additional requirements of the basic safety concept for nuclear power plants in Germany, which was taken into consideration in the nuclear licensing procedure. Charpy-V samples were carried out in the temperature range between -256degC and 150degC to get more information on the ductile behaviour of the Zircaloy 4. The results of the sheet examination confirm the requirements of the specifications, the results of the forging examination in the tangential testing direction are lower than specified and expected for the tensile strength. The axial and transverse values confirm the specification requirements. For the strength calculation of the pressure retaining wall a reduced material value for the forgings has to taken into consideration. The material behaviour of Zircaloy 4 under irradiation up to a fluence of ∼1·10 22 n/cm 2 was investigated. The loss of ductility was determined. As an additional criteria the variation of the fracture toughness was studies. Fracture mechanic calculations of the material were carried out in the licensing procedure with the focus to fulfill the leak before rupture criteria of

  10. Mechanisms of initial endplate failure in the human vertebral body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Aaron J; Lee, Gideon L; Keaveny, Tony M

    2010-12-01

    Endplate failure occurs frequently in osteoporotic vertebral fractures and may be related to the development of high tensile strain. To determine whether the highest tensile strains in the vertebra occur in the endplates, and whether such high tensile strains are associated with the material behavior of the intervertebral disc, we used micro-CT-based finite element analysis to assess tissue-level strains in 22 elderly human vertebrae (81.5 ± 9.6 years) that were compressed through simulated intervertebral discs. In each vertebra, we compared the highest tensile and compressive strains across the different compartments: endplates, cortical shell, and trabecular bone. The influence of Poisson-type expansion of the disc on the results was determined by compressing the vertebrae a second time in which we suppressed the Poisson expansion. We found that the highest tensile strains occurred within the endplates whereas the highest compressive strains occurred within the trabecular bone. The ratio of strain to assumed tissue-level yield strain was the highest for the endplates, indicating that the endplates had the greatest risk of initial failure. Suppressing the Poisson expansion of the disc decreased the amount of highly tensile-strained tissue in the endplates by 79.4 ± 11.3%. These results indicate that the endplates are at the greatest risk of initial failure due to the development of high tensile strains, and that such high tensile strains are associated with the Poisson expansion of the disc. We conclude that initial failure of the vertebra is associated with high tensile strains in the endplates, which in turn are influenced by the material behavior of the disc. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Zircaloy-4 hydridation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizcaino, Pablo

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of this work can be summarized as: 1) To reproduce, by heat treatments, matrix microstructures and hydride morphologies similar to those observed in structural components of the CNA-1 and CNE nuclear power plants; 2) To study the evolution of the mechanical properties of the original material with different hydrogen concentrations, such as microhardness, and its capacity to distinguish these materials; 3) To find parameters that allow to estimate the hydrogen content of a material by quantitative metallographic techniques, to be used as complementary in the study of the radioactive materials from reactors

  12. Development of remote laser welding technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo-Sung; Kim, Woong-Ki; Lee, Jung-Won; Yang, Myung-Seung; Park, Hyun-Soo

    1999-01-01

    Various welding processes are now available for end cap closure of nuclear fuel element such as TIG(Tungsten Inert Gas) welding, magnetic resistance welding and laser welding. Even though the resistance and TIG welding process are widely used for manufacturing of the commercial fuel elements, it can not be recommended for the remote seal welding of fuel element at PIE facility due to its complexity of the electrode alignment, difficulty in the replacement of parts in the remote manner and its large heat input for thin sheath. Therefore, Nd:YAG laser system using the optical fiber transmission was selected for Zircaloy-4 end cap welding. Remote laser welding apparatus is developed using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser of 500 watt average power with optical fiber transmission. The laser weldability is satisfactory in respect of the microstructures and mechanical properties comparing with the TIG and resistance welding. The optimum operation processes of laser welding and the optical fiber transmission system for hot cell operation in remote manner have been developed. (author)

  13. Significance of angular mismatch between vertebral endplate and prosthetic endplate in lumbar total disc replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chong Suh; Chung, Sung Soo; Oh, Sung Kyun; You, Je Wook

    2011-05-01

    A retrospective study. To determine whether angular mismatch between the vertebral endplate and prosthetic endplate during lumbar total disc replacement (L-TDR) affects the radiological and clinical outcomes. A prosthesis anchored to the vertebral body by using a large central keel carries an inherent risk of angular mismatch between the vertebral endplate and prosthetic endplate at a segment with a greater degree of lordosis, such as L5-S1. Theoretically, this angular mismatch can cause several problems, such as segmental hyperlordosis, anterior positioning of the upper prosthesis, posterior prosthetic edge subsidence, decreased range of motion (ROM), and a poor clinical outcome. This study evaluated 64 prosthetic levels of 56 patients who were implanted with L-TDR between June 2002 and February 2006. There were 38 and 26 prosthetic levels at the L4-5 and L5-S1, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 25.6 (12 to 49) months. The angle of mismatch between the lower endplate of the upper vertebral body and the upper prosthetic plate, segmental flexion/extension ROM, segmental lordosis angle at extension, distance from the posterior wall of the vertebral body to the posterior prosthetic edge were measured by obtaining radiographs. Clinically, the Visual Analogue Scale and Oswestry Disability Index were also evaluated. The angular mismatches between the upper vertebra and prosthesis at L4-5 and L5-S1 were 1.6 degree and 5.6 degree, respectively (P body to the posterior edge of the prosthesis in L5-S1 were 6.8 degree (4 to 13), 12.8 degree (8 to 17), and 3.8 mm (1 to 6 mm) in patients with an angular mismatch of 0.05). Angular mismatch was more common in L5-S1 than in L4-5. L-TDR at the most lordotic level, L5-S1, and implantation of an upper prosthesis with a mismatched angle seem to be the causes of a reduced segmental ROM, increased segmental lordosis, and anterior malpositioning of the prosthesis. However, these changes do not affect the clinical outcomes of

  14. Mechano-electrochemical study of stress corrosion crack tip area: Case of Zircaloy-4 in halide solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durif, E.

    2012-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a damage phenomenon which results from the synergy between corrosion process (dissolution, adsorption) and mechanical fracture (crack propagation). Although this phenomenon is well known, its modelling is still a challenging issue, especially concerning mechano-electrochemical coupling mechanisms at crack tip, because it depends on model system (metal/aggressive media) and large number of mechanical and electrochemical factors. In this thesis, mutual interactions between dissolution and the stress state around the crack tip (stress intensity factor) are studied in the case of Zircaloy-4 in aqueous halide solution. Samples are first pre-cracked in air by using fatigue load-shedding procedure to control the stress intensity factor. Then, pre-oxidation is used to produce a thin protective passive layer on their surface. The electro-chemical reactions are thus concentrated at the crack tip which also induces a concentration of the mechanical effect. During the test, digital images of the sample surface are acquired. Digital Image Correlation is performed a posteriori in order to obtain the evolution of the crack length and the stress intensity factors. Further, a specific procedure is developed in order to perform the DIC analysis while the test is running. This allows to control the load so that a given value of the stress intensity factor is prescribed. With this innovative experimental technique, we perform experimental tests that allow to discriminate the effects between different stress corrosion cracking mechanisms. It is suggested that once a critical anodic polarization is exceeded, the crack growth rate depends on the stress intensity factor but also on its time derivative. Indeed, a threshold effect is obtained on the stress intensity factor, meaning that plasticity must increase for the dissolution reaction to occur, but also on its rate meaning that time for plasticity to produce new dislocations must not exceed the

  15. Welding of zircalloy-2 and zircalloy-4 by CO2 laser and by TIG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ram, V.

    1990-01-01

    This study deals with the welding of zircaloy-2 and zircaloy-4 by means of two techniqes, namely tungsten inert gas welding and CO 2 laser welding. Suitable devices and jigs were developed and manufactured to allow the welding of flat specimens and cylindrical specimens. The optimal welding parameters for the two welding methods were determined. The quality of the welds was determined by tensile strength tests at room temperature and by determining the corrosion resistance to steam at temprature of 450 deg C, 550 deg C, and at 650 deg C. The influence of the weld on the microstructure of the material, on its composition and its crystallographic structure was investigated. Analysis of fracture surfaces of the tensile specimens was carried out with a scanning electron microscope. (author)

  16. Study of hydrogen migration produced during the corrosion of PWR reactors fuel cans in zircaloy 4 and zirconia; Etude du transport de l`hydrogene produit lors de la corrosion des gaines d`elements combustibles des reacteurs a eau sous pression dans la zircone et le zircaloy-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufore, L

    1997-12-12

    The corrosion of Zircaloy-4-claddings by water from the primary circuit of nuclear power plant goes hand in hand with the release of hydrogen which penetrates the oxide and then the metal. This work focuses on the mechanisms of hydrogen transport in oxide and in metal. Hydrogen transport in oxide is studied on the basis of corrosion tests performed in the autoclave at 360 deg C. These tests are performed on Zircaloy-4 claddings under different chemical conditions (pure water, and pure water with lithium hydroxide). The distribution of hydrogen in oxide film is measured by SIMS. Hydrogen profiles in the oxide are dependent on the oxide microstructure and vary with oxidation time. These observations are confirmed by experiments in which some samples, previously oxidized in the autoclave, are immersed in heavy water. In the oxide layer, two zones are observed: one external porous zone and one internal dense zone. Deuterium diffusion coefficients in dense oxide are determined using SIMS profiles and Fischer diffusion model. Hydrogen transport in metal is also studied by means of gas-phase permeation experiments. These are set up at different temperature (400-500 deg. C) and under different hydrogen pressures and make it possible to determine the hydrogen diffusion coefficients in a Zircaloy-4 cladding under experimental conditions. All these results lead us to discuss of hydrogen transport evolution in cladding during oxidation. A model taking into account hydrogen transport in oxide and in metal, and the hydrides precipitations is proposed. (author) 110 refs.

  17. Growth and microstructure formation of isothermally-solidified Zircaloy-4 joints brazed by a Zr-Ti-Cu-Ni amorphous alloy ribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K. H.; Lim, C. H.; Lee, J. G.; Lee, M. K.; Rhee, C. K.

    2013-10-01

    The microstructure and growth characteristics of Zircaloy-4 joints brazed by a Zr48Ti16Cu17Ni19 (at.%) amorphous filler metal have been investigated with regard to the controlled isothermal solidification and intermetallic formation. Two typical joints were produced depending on the isothermal brazing temperature: (1) a dendritic growth structure including bulky segregation in the central zone (at 850 °C), and (2) a homogeneous dendritic structure throughout the joint without segregation (at 890 °C). The primary α-Zr phase was solidified isothermally, nucleating to grow into a joint with a cellular or dendritic structure. Also, the continuous Zr2Ni and particulate Zr2Cu phases were formed in the segregated center zone and at the intercellular region, respectively, owing to the different solubility and atomic mobility of the solute elements (Ti, Cu, and Ni) in the α-Zr matrix. A disappearance of the central Zr2Ni phase was also rate-controlled by the outward diffusion of the Cu and Ni elements. When the detrimental Zr2Ni intermetallic phase was eliminated by a complete isothermal solidification at 890 °C, the strengths of the joints were high enough to cause yielding and fracture in the base metal, exceeding those of the bulk Zircaloy-4, at room temperature as well as at elevated temperatures (up to 400 °C).

  18. Growth and microstructure formation of isothermally-solidified Zircaloy-4 joints brazed by a Zr–Ti–Cu–Ni amorphous alloy ribbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.H. [University of Science and Technology, Nuclear Materials Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, C.H. [Nuclear Materials Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J.G., E-mail: jglee88@kaeri.re.kr [Nuclear Materials Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, M.K.; Rhee, C.K. [Nuclear Materials Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The microstructure and growth characteristics of Zircaloy-4 joints brazed by a Zr{sub 48}Ti{sub 16}Cu{sub 17}Ni{sub 19} (at.%) amorphous filler metal have been investigated with regard to the controlled isothermal solidification and intermetallic formation. Two typical joints were produced depending on the isothermal brazing temperature: (1) a dendritic growth structure including bulky segregation in the central zone (at 850 °C), and (2) a homogeneous dendritic structure throughout the joint without segregation (at 890 °C). The primary α-Zr phase was solidified isothermally, nucleating to grow into a joint with a cellular or dendritic structure. Also, the continuous Zr{sub 2}Ni and particulate Zr{sub 2}Cu phases were formed in the segregated center zone and at the intercellular region, respectively, owing to the different solubility and atomic mobility of the solute elements (Ti, Cu, and Ni) in the α-Zr matrix. A disappearance of the central Zr{sub 2}Ni phase was also rate-controlled by the outward diffusion of the Cu and Ni elements. When the detrimental Zr{sub 2}Ni intermetallic phase was eliminated by a complete isothermal solidification at 890 °C, the strengths of the joints were high enough to cause yielding and fracture in the base metal, exceeding those of the bulk Zircaloy-4, at room temperature as well as at elevated temperatures (up to 400 °C)

  19. Azimuthally anisotropic hydride lens structures in Zircaloy 4 nuclear fuel cladding: High-resolution neutron radiography imaging and BISON finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun-Li; Zhong, Weicheng; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Heuser, Brent J.

    2017-12-01

    High-resolution neutron radiography has been used to image bulk circumferential hydride lens particles in unirradiated Zircaloy 4 tubing cross section specimens. Zircaloy 4 is a common light water nuclear reactor (LWR) fuel cladding; hydrogen pickup, hydride formation, and the concomitant effect on the mechanical response are important for LWR applications. Ring cross section specimens with three hydrogen concentrations (460, 950, and 2830 parts per million by weight) and an as-received reference specimen were imaged. Azimuthally anisotropic hydride lens particles were observed at 950 and 2830 wppm. The BISON finite element analysis nuclear fuel performance code was used to model the system elastic response induced by hydride volumetric dilatation. The compressive hoop stress within the lens structure becomes azimuthally anisotropic at high hydrogen concentrations or high hydride phase fraction. This compressive stress anisotropy matches the observed lens anisotropy, implicating the effect of stress on hydride formation as the cause of the observed lens azimuthal asymmetry. The cause and effect relation between compressive stress and hydride lens anisotropy represents an indirect validation of a key BISON output, the evolved hoop stress associated with hydride formation.

  20. Endplate effect on aerodynamic characteristics of three-dimensional wings in close free surface proximity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hwan Jung

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the aerodynamic characteristics of a three-dimensional (3D wing with an endplate in the vicinity of the free surface by solving incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with the turbulence closure model. The endplate causes a blockage effect on the flow, and an additional viscous effect especially near the endplate. These combined effects of the endplate significantly reduce the magnitudes of the velocities under the lower surface of the wing, thereby enhancing aerodynamic performance in terms of the force coefficients. The maximum lift-to-drag ratio of a wing with an endplate is increased 46% compared to that of wing without an endplate at the lowest clearance. The tip vortex of a wing-with-endplate (WWE moved laterally to a greater extent than that of a wing-without-endplate (WOE. This causes a decrease in the induced drag, resulting in a reduction in the total drag.

  1. Behaviour of High Strength Steel Endplate Connections in Fire and after Fire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiang, X.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to reveal more information and understanding on behaviour and failure mechanisms of high strength steel endplate connections (combining high strength steel endplates with either mild steel or high strength steel beams and columns in endplate connections) in fire and after

  2. Electrochemical impedance spectrometry using Inconel 690, zircaloy 4, 316Ti steel, 17-4-PH, UR52N et URSB8. Simulation in tritiated water. Tome 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellanger, G.

    1994-11-01

    The redox potential of 3 H 2 O, as well as the corrosion potentials in this medium are found, abnormally, in the trans-passive region. This is completely different from behavior in the chemical industry or in the water in nuclear powers. With such behavior, there will be breakdowns of the protective oxide layers, and in the presence of chloride there will be immediate pitting. Polarization and electrochemical impedance spectrometry curves are presented and discussed. These curves make it possible to ascertain the corrosion domains and to compare the kinetics of different stainless steel alloys. These corrosion kinetics and the corrosion potentials provide a classification of the steels studied here: Inconel 690, zircaloy 4, 316 Ti steel, 17-4-PH, UR52N et URSB8. From the results it can be concluded that URSB8 has the best corrosion resistance. (author). 13 refs., 522 figs., tabs

  3. Electrochemical impedance spectrometry using Inconel 690, zircaloy 4, 316Ti steel, 17-4-PH, UR52N et URSB8. Simulation in tritiated water. Tome 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellanger, G.

    1994-11-01

    The redox potential of 3 H 2 O, as well as the corrosion potentials in this medium are found, abnormally, in the trans-passive region. This is completely different from the behavior in the chemical industry or in the water in nuclear powers. With such behavior, there will be breakdowns of the protective oxide layers, and in the presence of chloride there will be immediate pitting. Polarization and electrochemical impedance spectrometry curves are presented and discussed. These curves make it possible to ascertain the corrosion domains and to compare the kinetics of different stainless alloys. These corrosion kinetics and the corrosion potentials provide a classification of the steels studied here: Inconel 690, zircaloy 4, 316 Ti steel, 17-4-PH, UR52N et URSB8. From the results it can be concluded that URSB8 has the best corrosion resistance. (author). 279 figs., tabs

  4. Ex-reactor determination of thermal gap and contact conductance between uranium dioxide: zircaloy-4 interfaces. Stage I: low gas pressure. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, J.E.; Begej, S.

    1979-04-01

    A study of thermal gap and contact conductance between depleted uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/) and Zircaloy-4 (Zr4) has been made utilizing two measurement apparatuses developed as part of this program. The Modified Pulse Design (MPD) apparatus is a transient technique employing a heat pulse (laser) and a signal detector to monitor the thermal energy transmitted through a UO/sub 2//Zr4 sample pair which are either physically separated or in contact. The Modified Longitudinal Design (MLD) apparatus is a steady-state technique based on a modified cylindrical column design with a self-guarding sample geometry. Description of the MPD and MLD apparatus, data acquisition, reduction and error analysis is presented along with information on specimen preparation, thermal property and surface characterization. A technique using an optical height gauge to determine the average mean-plane of separation between the simple pairs is also presented.

  5. Young's modulus of crystal bar zirconium and zirconium alloys (zircaloy-2, zircaloy-4, zirconium-2.5wt% niobium) to 1000 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinger, H.E.; Ritchie, I.G.; Shillinglaw, A.J.

    1975-09-01

    This report contains experimentally determined data on the dynamic elastic moduli of zircaloy-2, zircaloy-4, zirconium-2.5wt% niobium and Marz grade crystal bar zirconium. Data on both the dynamic Young's moduli and shear moduli of the alloys have been measured at room temperature and Young's modulus as a function of temperature has been determined over the temperature range 300 K to 1000 K. In every case, Young's modulus decreases linearly with increasing temperature and is expressed by an empirical equation fitted to the data. Differences in Young's modulus values determined from specimens with longitudinal axes parallel and perpendicular to the rolling direction are small, as are the differences between Young's moduli determined from strip, bar stock and fuel sheathing. (author)

  6. Ex-reactor determination of thermal gap and contact conductance between uranium dioxide: zircaloy-4 interfaces. Stage I: low gas pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier, J.E.; Begej, S.

    1979-04-01

    A study of thermal gap and contact conductance between depleted uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) and Zircaloy-4 (Zr4) has been made utilizing two measurement apparatuses developed as part of this program. The Modified Pulse Design (MPD) apparatus is a transient technique employing a heat pulse (laser) and a signal detector to monitor the thermal energy transmitted through a UO 2 /Zr4 sample pair which are either physically separated or in contact. The Modified Longitudinal Design (MLD) apparatus is a steady-state technique based on a modified cylindrical column design with a self-guarding sample geometry. Description of the MPD and MLD apparatus, data acquisition, reduction and error analysis is presented along with information on specimen preparation, thermal property and surface characterization. A technique using an optical height gauge to determine the average mean-plane of separation between the simple pairs is also presented

  7. Adhesion property and high-temperature oxidation behavior of Cr-coated Zircaloy-4 cladding tube prepared by 3D laser coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Gil, E-mail: hgkim@kaeri.re.kr; Kim, Il-Hyun; Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Dong-Jun; Park, Jeong-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun

    2015-10-15

    A 3D laser coating technology using Cr powder was developed for Zr-based alloys considering parameters such as: the laser beam power, inert gas flow, cooling of Zr-based alloys, and Cr powder control. This technology was then applied to Zr cladding tube samples to study the effect of Cr coating on the high-temperature oxidation of Zr-based alloys in a steam environment of 1200 °C for 2000s. It was revealed that the oxide layer thickness formed on the Cr-coated tube surface was about 25-times lower than that formed on a Zircaloy-4 tube surface. In addition, both the ring compression and the tensile tests were performed to evaluate the adhesion properties of the Cr-coated sample. Although some cracks were formed on the Cr-coated layer, the Cr-coated layer had not peeled off after the two tests.

  8. Resistance welding equipment manufacturing capability for exports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sastry, V.S.; Raju, Y.S.; Somani, A.K.; Setty, D.S.; Rameswara Raw, A.; Hermantha Rao, G.V.S.; Jayaraj, R.N. [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Dept. of Atomic Energy, Hyderbad (India)

    2010-07-01

    Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) fuel bundle is fully welded and is unique in its design. Appendage welding, end closure welding, and end plate welding is carried out using resistance welding technique. Out of many joining processes available, resistance-welding process is reliable, environment friendly and best suitable for mass production applications. Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), an industrial unit is established in Hyderabad, under the aegis of the Dept of Atomic Energy to manufacture fuel for Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors. From inception, NFC has given importance for self-reliance and indigenization with respect to manufacturing process and equipment. Sintering furnaces, centreless grinders, appendage-welding machines, end-closure welding equipment and end-plate welding equipments, which were initially imported, are either indigenized or designed and manufactured in house. NFC has designed, manufactured a new appendage-welding machine for manufacturing 37 element fuel bundles. Recently NFC has bagged an order from IAEA through international bidding for design, manufacture, supply, erection and commissioning of end-closure welding equipment. The paper gives in detail the salient features of these welding equipment. (author)

  9. Cervical endplate and facet arthrosis: an anatomic study of cadaveric specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, Daniel L; Toy, Jason O; Eubanks, Jason D; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2012-10-01

    An anatomic, epidemiologic study of cervical endplate and facet arthrosis in cadaveric spines. To determine the prevalence of cervical endplate and facet arthrosis and the relationship between these 2 entities in a large population sample. Cervical endplate and facet arthrosis are common radiographic findings, which have both been linked to pain. However, the prevalence and relationship between cervical endplate and facet arthrosis has not been clearly defined. The cervical vertebrae from 234 cadaveric spines were examined by a single investigator for evidence of endplate and facet arthrosis. Arthrosis at each endplate and facet was graded on a continuum from 0 to IV. Race, age at death, and sex of each specimen were also recorded. Stepwise multiple linear regression was used to analyze any association between race, age, sex, endplate arthrosis, and facet arthrosis. Factors with P values arthrosis severity scores among patients within the same decades of life. Concurrent cervical endplate and facet arthrosis was present in 77% of the study population. Stepwise multiple linear regression revealed significant (Parthrosis and between age and facet arthrosis. Race and sex did not correlate with facet arthrosis. In addition, patients in age groups 30 to 39, 40 to 49, 50 to 59, 60 to 69, 70 to 79, and 80 to 89 demonstrated more severe (Parthrosis in comparison with facet arthrosis. Concurrent cervical endplate and facet arthrosis is a common condition. Cervical endplate arthrosis and advancing age are associated with cervical facet arthrosis independent of race and sex. Cervical endplate arthrosis precedes facet arthrosis.

  10. Residual stresses in zircaloy welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santisteban, J. R.; Fernandez, L; Vizcaino, P.; Banchik, A.D.; Samper, R; Martinez, R. L; Almer, J; Motta, A.T.; Colas, K.B; Kerr, M.; Daymond, M.R

    2009-01-01

    Welds in Zirconium-based alloys are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement, as H enters the material due to dissociation of water. The yield strain for hydride cracking has a complex dependence on H concentration, stress state and texture. The large thermal gradients produced by the applied heat; drastically changes the texture of the material in the heat affected zone, enhancing the susceptibility to delayed hydride cracking. Normally hydrides tend to form as platelets that are parallel to the normal direction, but when welding plates, hydride platelets may form on cooling with their planes parallel to the weld and through the thickness of the plates. If, in addition to this there are significant tensile stresses, the susceptibility of the heat affected zone to delayed hydride cracking will be increased. Here we have measured the macroscopic and microscopic residual stressed that appear after PLASMA welding of two 6mm thick Zircaloy-4 plates. The measurements were based on neutron and synchrotron diffraction experiments performed at the Isis Facility, UK, and at Advanced Photon Source, USA, respectively. The experiments allowed assessing the effect of a post-weld heat treatment consisting of a steady increase in temperature from room temperature to 450oC over a period of 4.5 hours; followed by cooling with an equivalent cooling rate. Peak tensile stresses of (175± 10) MPa along the longitudinal direction were found in the as-welded specimen, which were moderately reduced to (150±10) MPa after the heat-treatment. The parent material showed intergranular stresses of (56±4) MPa, which disappeared on entering the heat-affected zone. In-situ experiments during themal cyclong of the material showed that these intergranular stresses result from the anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficient of the hexagonal crystal lattice. [es

  11. Research progress of aluminium alloy endplates for PEMFCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yu.; Hou, Junbo [Fuel Cell system and Engineering Laboratory, Dalian Institute of Chemical and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Hou, Ming; Yan, Xiqiang; Luo, Xiaokuan; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian [Fuel Cell system and Engineering Laboratory, Dalian Institute of Chemical and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2007-04-15

    The endplate is a crucial component in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack. It can provide the necessary rigidity and strength for the stack. An aluminium alloy is one of the ideal materials for PEMFC endplates because of its low density and high rigidity. But it does not meet the requirements of corrosion resistance and electrical insulation in PEMFC environments. In this work, methods of sealing treatments and the conditions of aluminium alloy anodization were investigated. Corrosion resistances of the samples prepared by different technologies were evaluated in simulated PEMFC environments. The results showed that the corrosion resistance of the samples sealed by epoxy resin was greatly improved compared with those sealed in boiling water, and the samples anodized at a constant current density performed better than those anodized at a constant voltage. By insulation measurements, all of the samples showed good electrical insulation. The aluminium alloy endplate anodized at a constant current density and sealed with thermosetting bisphenol-A epoxy resin exhibited promising potential for practical applications by assembling it in a PEMFC stack and applying a life test. (author)

  12. Influence of cortical endplates on ultrasonic properties of trabecular bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yoon Mi; Lee, Kang Il

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the influence of thick cortical endplates on the ultrasonic properties of trabecular bone in a femur with a high fracture risk. Twelve trabecular bone samples were prepared from bovine femurs, and acrylic plates with thicknesses of 1.25, 1.80, and 2.75 mm were manufactured to simulate the cortical endplates using acrylic with a density and a sound speed similar to cortical bone. Although the thickness of the acrylic plates attached to the two sides of the trabecular bone increased, high correlations were observed between the speed of sound and the apparent bone density of the trabecular bone, with Pearson's correlation coefficients of 0.80-0.86. High correlations were also observed between the attenuation coefficient at 0.5 mm and the apparent bone density of the trabecular bone, with Pearson's correlation coefficients of 0.84-0.91. These results suggest that the speed of sound and attenuation coefficient at a specific frequency measured in a femur with relatively thick cortical endplates compared to the calcaneus could be used as indices for predicting the bone mineral density of the femur.

  13. Control of microstructure in brazed zone of Zircaloy-4 nuclear fuel sheathing by optimization of Σ(C+P+Si) contents and cooling schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quach, V.; Northwood, D.O.

    1985-01-01

    In the production of fuel elements for the CANDU-PHW reactor, induction brazing is used to attach appendages (bearing and split spacer pads) onto the outside wall of the Zircaloy-4 sheathing. The brazing process, 40 to 60 seconds at temperature in excess of 1000 0 C, produces 3 heat-affected zones amounting to about 30% of the thickness. These heat affected zones quite often contain large grains and either a basketweave or a parallel plate type of Widmanstatten structure. Small grains and a basketweave structure are preferred. Using simulated brazing treatments, it is demonstrated that by control of the impurity content, Σ(C+P+Si), and cooling rate from the brazing temperature, the desired microstructure can be obtained in the braze heat-affected zone. The formation of the basketweave structure is promoted by higher impurity contents, with the second phase impurity particles acting as nuclei for the basketweave structure in preference to the β-grain boundaries where the parallel plate structure is nucleated

  14. Stress corrosion crack initiation of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes in an iodine vapor environment during creep, relaxation, and constant strain rate tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezequel, T.; Auzoux, Q.; Le Boulch, D.; Bono, M.; Andrieu, E.; Blanc, C.; Chabretou, V.; Mozzani, N.; Rautenberg, M.

    2018-02-01

    During accidental power transient conditions with Pellet Cladding Interaction (PCI), the synergistic effect of the stress and strain imposed on the cladding by thermal expansion of the fuel, and corrosion by iodine released as a fission product, may lead to cladding failure by Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). In this study, internal pressure tests were conducted on unirradiated cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes in an iodine vapor environment. The goal was to investigate the influence of loading type (constant pressure tests, constant circumferential strain rate tests, or constant circumferential strain tests) and test temperature (320, 350, or 380 °C) on iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC). The experimental results obtained with different loading types were consistent with each other. The apparent threshold hoop stress for I-SCC was found to be independent of the test temperature. SEM micrographs of the tested samples showed many pits distributed over the inner surface, which tended to coalesce into large pits in which a microcrack could initiate. A model for the time-to-failure of a cladding tube was developed using finite element simulations of the viscoplastic mechanical behavior of the material and a modified Kachanov's damage growth model. The times-to-failure predicted by this model are consistent with the experimental data.

  15. Finite element modelling of the oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 with a controlled metal-oxide interface and the influence of growth stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zumpicchiat, Guillaume; Pascal, Serge; Tupin, Marc; Berdin-Méric, Clotilde

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: We developed two finite element models of zirconium-based alloy oxidation using the CEA Cast3M code to simulate the oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4: the diffuse interface model and the sharp interface model. We also studied the effect of stresses on the oxidation kinetics. The main results are: • Both models lead to parabolic oxidation kinetics in agreement with the Wagner’s theory. • The modellings enable to calculate the stress distribution in the oxide as well as in the metal. • A strong effect of the hydrostatic stress on the oxidation kinetics has been evidenced. • The stress gradient effect changes the parabolic kinetics into a sub-parabolic law closer to the experimental kinetics because of the stress gradient itself, but also because of the growth stress increase with the oxide thickness. - Abstract: Experimentally, zirconium-based alloys oxidation kinetics is sub-parabolic, by contrast with the Wagner theory which predicts a parabolic kinetics. Two finite element models have been developed to simulate this phenomenon: the diffuse interface model and the sharp interface model. Both simulate parabolic oxidation kinetics. The growth stress effects on oxygen diffusion are studied to try to explain the gap between theory and experience. Taking into account the influence of the hydrostatic stress and its gradient into the oxygen flux expression, sub-parabolic oxidation kinetics have been simulated. The sub-parabolic behaviour of the oxidation kinetics can be explained by a non-uniform compressive stress level into the oxide layer.

  16. Influence of γ-irradiation on the transport kinetics of hydrogen in pre-transition oxidized Zircaloy-4 at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Frantz A., E-mail: frantz.martin@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, Laboratoire d' Etude de la Corrosion Aqueuse, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dauvois, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.dauvois@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, Laboratoire de Radiolyse et de la Matière Organique, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Esnouf, Stéphane, E-mail: stephane.esnouf@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, Laboratoire de Radiolyse et de la Matière Organique, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); CEA, DSM, IRAMIS, LIDYL, PCR, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Fourdrin, Chloé, E-mail: chloe.fourdrin@culture.gouv.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, Laboratoire de Radiolyse et de la Matière Organique, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Jomard, François, E-mail: francois.jomard@uvsq.fr [CNRS/UVSQ, UMR 8635, GEMAC, 45 avenue des Etats Unis – Bâtiment Fermat, F-78035 Versailles (France); Chêne, Jacques, E-mail: chene_jacques@orange.fr [CNRS/CEA, UMR 8587, LECA – CEA, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-10-15

    In a context of nuclear fuel reprocessing, the free-of-fuel hulls and ends of cladding tubes are compacted. The possibility of hydrogen degasing or absorption from/into these tubes has been studied with and without gamma irradiation at 293 K by means of deuterium as isotopic tracer for hydrogen. Under irradiation, as without, the hydrides present in the Zircaloy-4 hulls seem stable. The oxide layer present at the surface of the hulls allows a slow diffusion of deuterium, and the irradiation appeared to have no specific effect on the diffusion process: in both cases, hydrogen diffusion coefficients of the order of 5·10{sup −18} cm{sup 2} s{sup −1} have been found. The subsurface activity of deuterium is increased by one order of magnitude at least under irradiation, probably due to an activation of the dissociation/absorption kinetic steps. - Highlights: • Hydrogen diffusion coefficients at RT in zirconia grain boundaries were determined. • γ irradiation increases the hydrogen subsurface activity when exposed to H{sub 2} gas. • The dense thin zirconia film is not altered much by HNO{sub 3} exposure at 90 °C for 24 h. • Hydrogen desorption from Zr hydrides was studied at room temperature under γ rays.

  17. The effect of papaine on the time course of the end-plate current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humar, M; Kordas, M; Melik, Z

    1980-07-01

    Papaine is known to detach cholinesterases from the synaptic cleft. It could be expected that this would result in an increase of the amplitude and half-time of the end-plate current. Thus, the effect of papaine on the end-plate current. Thus, the effect of papaine on the end-plate current should be similar to the effect of anticholinesterase methanesulfonylfluoride. The end-plate current was recorded in frog skeletal muscle at various levels of membrane potential, before and after papaine was added to the bath. The effect of papaine was an increase of the half-time of the end-plate current, similarly as after treatment of the muscle by methanesulfonylfluoride. It seems that both papaine and methanesulfonylfluoride have a similar mechanism of action. In either experimental condition hydrolysis of transmitter is decreased or abolished, which results in an increase of the half-time of the end-plate current.

  18. Effets de la radiolyse de l'air humide et de l'eau sur la corrosion de la couche d'oxyde du Zircaloy-4 oxydé

    OpenAIRE

    Guipponi , Claire

    2009-01-01

    Pas de résumé donné.; Les Colis Standards de Déchets Compactés (CSD-C) sont des déchets issus du retraitement des assemblages de combustibles nucléaires. Ils sont en partie constitués des gaines oxydées de Zircaloy-4. Ces pièces métalliques sont cisaillées avant d'être placées dans un étui en acier et compactées sous forme de galettes. Ces galettes contiennent des traces de produits d'activation, de produits de fission et d'actinides présents à la surface du Zircaloy-4 oxydé. Dans l'hypothèse...

  19. Behavior and failure of uniformly hydrided Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings between 25 C and 480 C under various stress states, including RIA loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Saux, M.; Carassou, S.; Averty, X.; Le Saux, M.; Besson, J.; Poussard, C.

    2010-01-01

    The anisotropic plastic behavior and the fracture of as-received and hydrided Cold-Worked Stress Relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes are investigated under thermal-mechanical loading conditions representative of Pellet-Clad Mechanical Interaction during Reactivity Initiated Accidents in Pressurized Water Reactors. In order to study the combined effects of temperature, hydrogen content, loading direction and stress state, Axial Tensile, Hoop Tensile, Expansion Due to Compression and hoop Plane Strain Tensile tests are performed at room temperature, 350 C and 480 C on the material containing various hydrogen contents up to 1200 wt. ppm (hydrides are circumferential and homogeneously distributed). These tests are combined with digital image correlation and metallographic and fractographic observations at different scales. The flow stress of the material decreases with increasing temperature. The material is either strengthened or softened by hydrogen depending on temperature and hydrogen content. Plastic anisotropy depends on temperature but not on hydrogen content. The ductility of the material decreases with increasing hydrogen content at room temperature due to damage nucleation by hydride cracking. The plastic strain that leads to hydride fracture at room temperature decreases with increasing hydrogen content. The influence of stress triaxiality on hydride cracking is negligible in the studied range. The influence of hydrogen on material ductility is negligible at 350 C and 480 C since hydrides do not crack at these temperatures. The ductility of the material increases with increasing temperature. The evolution of material ductility is associated with a change in both the macroscopic fracture mode of the specimens and the microscopic failure mechanisms. (authors)

  20. Investigation of morphological, structural, and mechanical characteristics of Zircaloy-4 irradiated with 3.5 MeV hydrogen ions beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Butt, M. Z.; Ahmad, Sajjad

    2017-09-01

    Zircaloy-4 specimens were irradiated with 3.5 MeV hydrogen ions (dose range: 1  ×  1013 H+1 cm-2 to 1  ×  1015 H+1 cm-2) using a Pelletron accelerator. FESEM studies reveal formation of hydrogen micro-bubbles, bubbles induced blisters of irregular shapes, and development of cracks on the specimen surface, as in the case of pure zirconium. However, for the highest irradiation dose of 1  ×  1015 H+1 cm-2, agglomeration of flower-shape blisters is observed. XRD analysis shows that the most preferentially oriented crystallographic plane is (0 0 4) with texture coefficient values 1.832-2.308 depending on the ions dose. Its diffraction peak intensity first decreases with the increase in ions dose up to 5  ×  1013 H+1 cm-2 and later increases up to 1  ×  1015 H+1 cm-2. Opposite is found in case of diffraction peak width. Crystallite size and lattice strain determined by Williamson-Hall analysis display a linear relationship between the two with positive slope. Mechanical strength, namely yield stress (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and fracture stress (FS), increases sharply with ions dose up to 5  ×  1013 H+1 cm-2. For 1  ×  1014 H+1 cm-2 dose there is a sudden drop of stress to a lowest value and then a slow steady increase in stress up to the highest dose 1  ×  1015 H+1 cm-2. Same pattern is followed by uniform elongation and total elongation. All three stress parameters YS, UTS, and FS follow Inverse Hall-Petch relation.

  1. Utilising DualEELS to probe the nanoscale mechanisms of the corrosion of Zircaloy-4 in 350 °C pressurised water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annand, Kirsty J., E-mail: k.annand.1@research.gla.ac.uk [Materials and Condensed Matter Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); MacLaren, Ian [Materials and Condensed Matter Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Gass, Mhairi [AMEC Foster Wheeler, Clean Energy, Walton House, Birchwood Park, WA3 6GA (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Characterisation of materials utilised for fuel cladding in nuclear reactors prior to service is integral in order to understand corrosion mechanisms which would take place in reactor. Zircaloy-4 is one such material of choice for nuclear fuel containment in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWRs). In particular, the metal-oxide interface has been a predominant focus of previous research, however, due to the complex oxidation process of zirconium cladding, there is still no clear understanding of what is present at the interface. Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) and Dual Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (DualEELS), we have studied the corrosion of this material under conditions similar to those that could be encountered in service. It is shown that under all conditions, whether during faster oxidation in the early stages, slow growth just prior to the transition to a new growth regime, or in the faster growth that happens after this transition, the surface of the metal below the scale is loaded with oxygen up to around 33 at%. Approaching transition, in conditions of slow growth and slow oxygen supply, an additional metastable suboxide is apparent with a thickness of tens of nm. By studying changes in both chemical composition and dielectric function of the material at the oxide scale – metal interface with nanometre resolution, quantitative mapping could be achieved, clearly showing that this is a suboxide composition of ZrO and a Zr oxidation state close to +2. - Highlights: • Metal-oxide interface evolution studied by few-nm resolution EELS mapping. • Low loss EELS is very effective for mapping phase evolution. • ZrO suboxide phase characterised using EELS, which fits theoretical predictions. • ZrO formation found to correlate to local growth rate of oxide scale.

  2. Vertebral endplate (modic) changes and the treatment of back pain using antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manniche, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Vertebral end-plate changes/modic changes are the MRI-image of inflammatory vertebral endplate damage, most often related to general disc degeneration. However, in a subgroup of patients disc infection may be the causal factor. In patients with prolonged back pain, the prevalence of modic changes......'. Most commonly, Propionibacterium acnes is involved. Long-term antibiotics may be effective....

  3. Recovery of Zircaloy-4 waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, A.V; Banchik, A.D; Reale, H.F

    2002-01-01

    Different types of waste with different degrees of contamination are generated by the production of Zry-4 products. Because of this alloy's added value the wastes are routinely recycled internationally. To date the local manufacturer only recovered the solid wastes by refusion, while the shavings were stored. A process for recovering Zry-4 shavings is studied using the existing plant and local industry equipment. The type of contamination produced by the shavings was defined and then the capacity of the ultrasound vibrating method was analyzed as a degreasing for the removal of the materials adhering to the surface of the shavings. The results show that the shavings are contaminated with lubricant film, zirconium oxide, iron oxide and different particles sticking to the surface and that the ultrasound vibration method can be used for their removal (CW)

  4. Tensions relaxation in Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuniberti, A.M.; Picasso, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    Traction and stress relaxation studies were performed on polycrystalline Zry-4 at room temperature. The effect of loading velocity on the plastic behaviour of the material is discussed, analysing log σ vs. log dε/dt at different deformation levels. The contribution introduced by the testing machine was taken into account in data evaluation. (Author). 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Indian hedgehog contributes to human cartilage endplate degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaowei; Yang, Kun; Chen, Shuai; Wang, Jiying; Du, Guoqing; Fan, Shunwu; Wei, Lei

    2015-08-01

    To determine the role of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling in human cartilage endplate (CEP) degeneration. CEP-degenerated tissues from patients with Modic I or II changes (n = 9 and 45, respectively) and normal tissues from vertebral burst fracture patients (n = 17) were collected. Specimens were either cut into slices for organ culture ex vivo or digested to isolate chondrocytes for cell culture in vitro. Ihh expression and the effect of Ihh on cartilage degeneration were determined by investigating degeneration markers in this study. Ihh expression and cartilage degeneration markers significantly increased in the Modic I and II groups. The expression of cartilage degeneration markers was positively correlated with degeneration severity. Gain-of-function for Ihh promoted expression of cartilage degeneration markers in vitro, while loss-of-function for Ihh inhibited their expression both in vitro and ex vivo. These findings demonstrated that Ihh promotes CEP degeneration. Blocking Ihh pathway has potential clinical usage for attenuating CEP degeneration.

  6. A review on the welding technology for the sealing of irradiation test fuel element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. W.; Kang, Y. H.; Kim, B. G.; Joo, K. N.; Oh, J. M.; Park, S. J.; Shin, Y. T

    2000-02-01

    For the irradiation test of nuclear fuel in a research reactor, the fuel manufacturing technology should be developed in advance. Highly radioactive fission products are produced and can be released from the fuel materials during irradiation. Therefore, The sealing of the test is one of the most important procedure among the test fuel manufacturing processes, considering its impacts on the safety of a reactor operation.many welding techniques such as TIG, EBW, LBW, upset butt welding and flash welding are applied in sealing the end of fuel elements. These welding techniques are adopted in conjunction with the weld material, weldability, weld joint design and cost effectiveness. For fuel irradiation test, the centerline temperature of fuel pellets is one of the important item to be measured. For this, a thermocouple is installed into the center of the fuel pellet. The sealing of the penetration hole of the thermocouple sheath should be conducted and the hole should be perfectly sealed using the dissimilar metal joining technique. For this purpose, the dissimilar metal welding between zircaloy-4 and Inconel or stainless steel is needed to be developed. This report describes the techniques sealing the end cap and the penetration of a thermocouple sheath by welding. (author)

  7. Welding hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Welding technology is advancing rapidly in the developed countries and has converted into a science. Welding involving the use of electricity include resistance welding. Welding shops are opened in residential area, which was causing safety hazards, particularly the teenagers and children who eagerly see the welding arc with their naked eyes. There are radiation hazards from ultra violet rays which irritate the skin, eye irritation. Welding arc light of such intensity could damage the eyes. (Orig./A.B.)

  8. Effects of rocuronium and vecuronium on initial rundown of endplate potentials in the isolated phrenic nerve diaphragm preparation of rats

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jun; Liu, Yong-Qin; Zhang, Han-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Rocuronium and vecuronium, two non-depolarizing neuromuscular blockers, have been widely used in surgery procedures. However, their electrophysiological properties need to be more widely explored. We examined the effects of rocuronium and vecuronium on initial rundown of endplate potential amplitudes in the non-uniform stretched muscle preparation of the rat isolated phrenic nerve diaphragm. More specifically, the endplate potentials were recorded with one microelectrode from a single endplat...

  9. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  10. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  11. Resistance seam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueler, A.W.

    1977-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of the resistance seam welding process are presented. Types of seam welds, types of seam welding machines, seam welding power supplies, resistance seam welding parameters and seam welding characteristics of various metals

  12. The change and differential findings of lumbar vertebral endplate on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanamori, Masahiko; Nobukiyo, Masanori; Shigeta, Tetsuya; Ishihara, Hirokazu; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu; Yoshino, Osamu

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the differential findings of vertebral endplate of lumbar spine on MRI. Infected disc showed the T1 low/T2 high (Modic type I) to T2 iso-signal intensity on MRI. Post-operated disc showed the Modic type I findings, although the degenerative disc showed the various kinds of types according to the Modic's classification (type I to III). The characteristics findings of the infected disc were T2-high signal intensity of nucleus purposes and the wide affected area of vertebra including endplate on T1 image compared with T2 image. (author)

  13. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  14. Characteristics and natural course of vertebral endplate signal (Modic) changes in the Danish general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tue S; Bendix, Tom; Sorensen, Joan S

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vertebral endplate signal changes (VESC) are more common among patients with low back pain (LBP) and/or sciatica than in people who are not seeking care for back pain. The distribution and characteristics of VESC have been described in people from clinical and non-clinical populations...

  15. Mechanisms of the inhibition of endplate acetylcholine receptors by antiseptic chlorhexidine (experiments and models)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shaihutdinova, A.R.; Nikolsky, E. E.; Vyskočil, František; Skorinkin, A.I.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 380, č. 6 (2009), s. 551-560 ISSN 0028-1298 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110905 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : acetylcholine * endplate currents Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.631, year: 2009

  16. Effect of prosthesis endplate lordosis angles on L5-S1 kinematics after disc arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitsopoulos, Parmenion P; Wojewnik, Bartosz; Voronov, Leonard I; Havey, Robert M; Renner, Susan M; Zelenakova, Julia; McIntosh, Braden; Carandang, Gerard; Abjornson, Celeste; Patwardhan, Avinash G

    2012-06-01

    We hypothesized that L5-S1 kinematics will not be affected by the lordosis distribution between the prosthesis endplates. Twelve cadaveric lumbosacral spines (51.3 ± 9.8 years) were implanted with 6° or 11° prostheses (ProDisc-L) with four combinations of superior/inferior lordosis (6°/0°, 3°/3°, 11°/0°, 3°/8°). Specimens were tested intact and after prostheses implantation with different lordosis distributions. Center of rotation (COR) and range of motion (ROM) were quantified. Six-degree lordosis prostheses (n = 7) showed no difference in flexion-extension ROM, regardless of design (6°/0° or 3°/3°) (p > 0.05). In lateral bending (LB), both designs reduced ROM (p lordosis prostheses (n = 5) showed no difference in flexion-extension ROM for either design (p > 0.05). LB ROM decreased with distributed lordosis prostheses (3°/8°) (p lordosis distribution among the two prosthesis endplates. The ProDisc-L prosthesis design where all lordosis is concentrated in the superior endplate yielded COR locations that were anterior and caudal to intact controls. The prosthesis with lordosis distributed between the two endplates yielded a COR that tended to be closer to intact. Further clinical and biomechanical studies are needed to assess the long-term impact of lordosis angle distribution on the fate of the facet joints.

  17. Numerical Study on Ultimate Behaviour of Bolted End-Plate Steel Connections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.E.S. Ismail

    Full Text Available Abstract Bolted end-plate steel connections have become more popular due to ease of fabrication. This paper presents a three dimension Finite Element Model (FEM, using the multi-purpose software ABAQUS, to study the effect of different geometrical parameters on the ultimate behavior of the connection. The proposed model takes into account material and geometrical non-linearities, initial imperfection, contact between adjacent surfaces and the pretension force in the bolts. The Finite Element results are calibrated with published experimental results ''briefly reviewed in this paper'' and verified that the numerical model can simulate and analyze the overall and detailed behavior of different types of bolted end-plate steel connections. Using verified FEM, parametric study is then carried out to study the ultimate behavior with variations in: bolt diameter, end-plate thickness, length of column stiffener, angle of rib stiffener. The results are examined with respect to the failure modes, the evolution of the resistance, the initial stiffness, and the rotation capacity. Finally, the ultimate behavior of the bolted end-plate steel connection is discussed in detail, and recommendations for the design purpose are made.

  18. Finite element analysis of an extended end-plate connection using the T-stub approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muresan, Ioana Cristina; Balc, Roxana [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Civil Engineering. 15 C Daicoviciu Str., 400020, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-03-10

    Beam-to-column end-plate bolted connections are usually used as moment-resistant connections in steel framed structures. For this joint type, the deformability is governed by the deformation capacity of the column flange and end-plate under tension and elongation of the bolts. All these elements around the beam tension flange form the tension region of the joint, which can be modeled by means of equivalent T-stubs. In this paper a beam-to-column end-plate bolted connection is substituted with a T-stub of appropriate effective length and it is analyzed using the commercially available finite element software ABAQUS. The performance of the model is validated by comparing the behavior of the T-stub from the numerical simulation with the behavior of the connection as a whole. The moment-rotation curve of the T-stub obtained from the numerical simulation is compared with the behavior of the whole extended end-plate connection, obtained by numerical simulation, experimental tests and analytical approach.

  19. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...... this enabling prediction of the welding performance in details. The paper describes the programme in short and gives examples on industrial applications. Finally investigations of causes for failure in a complex industrial joint of two dissimilar metals are carried out combining numerical modelling...

  20. Development of Mechanical Sealing and Laser Welding Technology to Instrument Thermocouple for Nuclear Fuel Test Rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joung, Chang-Young; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Hong, Jin-Tae; Kim, Ka-Hye; Huh, Sung-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Zircaloy-4 of the nuclear fuel test rod, AISI 316L of the mechanical sealing parts, and the MI (mineral insulated) cable at a thermocouple instrumentation are hetero-metals, and are difficult to weld to dissimilar materials. Therefore, a mechanical sealing method to instrument the thermocouple should be conducted using two kinds of sealing process as follows: One is a mechanical sealing process using Swagelok, which is composed of sealing components that consists of an end-cap, a seal tube, a compression ring and a Swagelok nut. The other is a laser welding process used to join a seal tube, and an MI cable, which are made of the same material. The mechanical sealing process should be sealed up with the mechanical contact compressed by the strength forced between a seal tube and an end-cap, and the laser welding process should be conducted to have no defects on the sealing area between a seal tube and an MI cable. Therefore, the mechanical sealing and laser welding techniques need to be developed to accurately measure the centerline temperature of the nuclear fuel test rod in an experimental reactor. The mechanical sealing and laser welding tests were conducted to develop the thermocouple instrumentation techniques for the nuclear fuel test rod. The optimum torque value of a Swagelok nut to seal the mechanical sealing part between the end-cap and seal tube was established through various torque tests using a torque wrench. The optimum laser welding conditions to seal the welding part between a seal tube and an MI cable were obtained through various welding tests using a laser welding system

  1. Development of Mechanical Sealing and Laser Welding Technology to Instrument Thermocouple for Nuclear Fuel Test Rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joung, Chang-Young; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Hong, Jin-Tae; Kim, Ka-Hye; Huh, Sung-Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Zircaloy-4 of the nuclear fuel test rod, AISI 316L of the mechanical sealing parts, and the MI (mineral insulated) cable at a thermocouple instrumentation are hetero-metals, and are difficult to weld to dissimilar materials. Therefore, a mechanical sealing method to instrument the thermocouple should be conducted using two kinds of sealing process as follows: One is a mechanical sealing process using Swagelok, which is composed of sealing components that consists of an end-cap, a seal tube, a compression ring and a Swagelok nut. The other is a laser welding process used to join a seal tube, and an MI cable, which are made of the same material. The mechanical sealing process should be sealed up with the mechanical contact compressed by the strength forced between a seal tube and an end-cap, and the laser welding process should be conducted to have no defects on the sealing area between a seal tube and an MI cable. Therefore, the mechanical sealing and laser welding techniques need to be developed to accurately measure the centerline temperature of the nuclear fuel test rod in an experimental reactor. The mechanical sealing and laser welding tests were conducted to develop the thermocouple instrumentation techniques for the nuclear fuel test rod. The optimum torque value of a Swagelok nut to seal the mechanical sealing part between the end-cap and seal tube was established through various torque tests using a torque wrench. The optimum laser welding conditions to seal the welding part between a seal tube and an MI cable were obtained through various welding tests using a laser welding system.

  2. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  3. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  4. Welding stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, J.; Barbe, B.; Jolly, N.

    1976-01-01

    The aim is to show how internal stresses are generated and to fix the orders of magnitude. A realistic case, the vertical welding of thick plates free to move one against the other, is described and the deformations and stresses are analyzed. The mathematical model UEDA, which accounts for the elastic modulus, the yield strength and the expansion coefficient of the metal with temperature, is presented. The hypotheses and results given apply only to the instantaneous welding of a welded plate and to a plate welded by a moving electrode [fr

  5. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility of vertebral endplate signal (modic) changes in the lumbar spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tue Secher; Sorensen, Joan Solgaard; Kjær, Per

    2007-01-01

    . PURPOSE: To assess the intra- and interobserver reliability of the "Nordic Modic classification" protocol. MATERIAL AND METHODS: MRI scans of 50 individuals representative of the general Danish population aged 40 were evaluated by two observers. Criteria for grading the changes were developed...... by the Nordic Modic Consensus Group. After consensus was established, all 50 MRI examinations were evaluated independently by each observer. Intraobserver reliability was assessed by re-evaluation of the 50 examinations by one of the observers. Kappa statistics were used to calculate agreement. RESULTS: Intra....... CONCLUSION: In this study, we found convincing reproducibility of a detailed evaluation protocol of vertebral endplate signal changes, the "Nordic Modic Classification." The authors recommend that the evaluation protocol should be used in future studies investigating vertebral endplate signal changes....

  6. Predictors of new vertebral endplate signal (Modic) changes in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tue Secher; Kjaer, Per; Korsholm, Lars

    2010-01-01

    predictors of new VESC were female gender, disc-related MRI findings (disc degeneration, disc bulges, disc herniation, and other endplate changes) and lifestyle factors [high physical work or leisure activity, high body mass index (BMI), and heavy smoking]. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions...... with disc degeneration, bulges or herniations at 40 were the only predictors of new VESC at age 44. Therefore, the development of new VESC at the age of 44 appears to be based on the status and dynamics of the disc, rather than being the result of gender or lifestyle factors such as smoking and physical...... were used to identify predictors of new VESC. New VESC at the age of 44 appeared in 67 of the 344. The majority (84%) of these new signal changes were type 1 VESC and almost half (45%) were only in the endplate and did not extend into the vertebral body. In the multivariate analysis, lumbar disc levels...

  7. The significance of calcified fibrocartilage on the cortical endplate of the translational sheep spine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Sarina K; Bell, Spencer; Epperson, Richard Tyler; Bloebaum, Roy D

    2013-05-01

    To gain an understanding of the vertebral cortical endplate and factors that may affect the ability to achieve skeletal attachment to intervertebral implants and fusion, this study aimed to characterize the hypermineralized tissue on the cortical endplate of the vertebral body on a commonly used animal model. Skeletally mature sheep were injected with tetracycline prior to euthanasia and the C2-C3, T5-T6, and L2-L3 spinal motion segments were excised and prepared. Vertebral tissues were imaged using backscatter electron (BSE) imaging, histology, and tetracycline labeling was used to assess bone remodeling within different tissue layers. It was determined that the hypermineralized tissue layer was calcified fibrocartilage (CFC). No tetracycline labels were identified in the CFC layer, in contrast to single and double labels that were present in the underlying bone, indicating the CFC present on the cortical endplate was not being actively remodeled. The average thickness of the CFC layer was 146.3 ± 70.53 µm in the cervical region, 98.2 ± 40.29 µm in the thoracic region, and 150.89 ± 69.25 µm in the lumbar region. This difference in thickness may be attributed to the regional biomechanical properties of the spine. Results from this investigation indicate the presence of a nonremodeling tissue on the cortical endplate of the vertebral body in sheep spines, which attaches the intervertebral disc to the vertebrae. This tissue, if not removed, would likely prevent successful bony attachment to an intervertebral device in spinal fusion studies and total disc replacement surgeries. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Morphologic and radiologic data of isolated vertebral end-plates under particular consideration of radiodensitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unflath, U.

    1979-01-01

    The intention was to find examination techniques for macroscopico-morphological diagnosis, for quantification of the concavity and methods for roentgenologico-densitometric analysis of vertebral end-plates. The following factors were used for macromorphologic diagnosis: osteophytes, ridge constitution, ridge transition, cribriform plate and concavity. The radiodensitometric analysis comprised investigation of bone density, anisotropy and ridge mineralisation. The specimen were radiographed on a mammograph together with calcium chloride solutions of increasing concentration. Statistically significant differences in the behaviour of basal and upper plates were not observed. With reference to the factors osteophytes and ridge constitution the basal plates seem to be morphologically more variable than the upper plates. It resulted that the features absolute concavity and concavity quotient are highly appropriate factors to document the constitution of the isolated vertebral end-plates. Also the features density, anisotropy and ridge mineralisation were found to be useful for documentation. The result of data correlation was that high concavity quotients are accompanied by macroscopically medium- to small-sized pores. Density and anisotropy of the overall profiles do not show correlation, but voluminous cribriform laminae tend to develop more inhomogenic structures. As to be expected, bone density increases with macroscopic fine porosity. The higher the concavity quotient is, the smaller are the values for density, ridge mineralisation and anisotropy. Thus a high degree of vertebral end-plate concavity indicates reduced bone density and lower mineral content. (orig./MG) [de

  9. Behavior of four-bolt extended end-plate connection subjected to lateral loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsayed Mashaly

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A considerable number of literatures have been published on the behavior of end-plate connections in ordinary moment-resisting frames. It was found, experimentally, that this type of connection might act as either a fully-rigid or a semi-rigid connection depending mainly on the thickness of the end plate and the diameter of bolts. In recent years, due to their good ductility and their good ability of energy dissipation, extended end-plate connections are recommended to be widely used in special moment-resisting frames subjected to lateral loads. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of both the material and geometric properties of four-bolt extended end-plate connections upon their behavior when subjected to lateral loading. This is done through a parametric study upon a finite element model using the multi-purpose software package ANSYS. The parametric study takes into account 12 parameters which are expected to be effective on the behavior of the studied connection. The results are presented by the relation between the storey drift, which represents the rotation of the connection and the applied lateral load, which simulates the moment on the connection. The results verify that the chosen parameters are considered effective depending on the energy dissipation of the connection.

  10. WELDING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  11. Longitudinal study of vertebral type-1 end-plate changes on MR of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitra, D. [Department of Neuroradiology, Newcastle General Hospital, Westgate Road, NE4 6BE, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Cassar-Pullicino, V.N.; Mccall, I.W. [Department of Radiology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry (United Kingdom)

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the temporal evolution of type-1 end-plate changes on MRI in patients with degenerative disease of the lumbar spine and to evaluate whether any correlation exists between such evolution and the change in patients' symptoms. Forty-four patients with 48 Modic type-1 end-plate changes (low TI signal and high T2 signal) were studied. All patients had an initial and a follow-up non-contrast lumbar MRI with variable intervals between the studies (12-72 months). Severity of the end-plate changes was assessed by eyeball estimation. Correlation with patients' symptoms was studied with the help of the Visual Analogue Score (VAS), Oswestry Questionnaire Score (OQS) and patients' subjective assessment. Of the 48 disc levels with type-1 changes, 18 (37.5%) converted fully to type 2 (high T1 signal and intermediate to high T2 signal), 7 (14.6%) partially converted to type 2, 19 (39.6%) became worse (i.e. type 1 changes became more extensive) and 4 (8.3%) showed no change. Higher average VAS (5.7) and OQS (42.3) scores were noted in patients where there was worsening type-1 change and lower scores (3.8 and 27, respectively) were seen in those where there was conversion to type-2 change. These trends, however, did not reach statistical significance (P values 0.16 and 0.09 for VAS and OQS, respectively). The statistical relationship was stronger after exclusion of patients with confounding factors (i.e. changes in lumbar MRI other than end-plate changes that could independently explain the evolution of patients' symptoms) with P-values of 0.08 and 0.07 for VAS and OQS, respectively. Type-1 end-plate change represents a dynamic process and in a large majority of cases either converts to type-2 change or becomes more extensive. The evolution of type-1 change relates to change in patient's symptoms, but not to a statistically significant level. (orig.)

  12. Longitudinal study of vertebral type-1 end-plate changes on MR of the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, D.; Cassar-Pullicino, V.N.; Mccall, I.W.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the temporal evolution of type-1 end-plate changes on MRI in patients with degenerative disease of the lumbar spine and to evaluate whether any correlation exists between such evolution and the change in patients' symptoms. Forty-four patients with 48 Modic type-1 end-plate changes (low TI signal and high T2 signal) were studied. All patients had an initial and a follow-up non-contrast lumbar MRI with variable intervals between the studies (12-72 months). Severity of the end-plate changes was assessed by eyeball estimation. Correlation with patients' symptoms was studied with the help of the Visual Analogue Score (VAS), Oswestry Questionnaire Score (OQS) and patients' subjective assessment. Of the 48 disc levels with type-1 changes, 18 (37.5%) converted fully to type 2 (high T1 signal and intermediate to high T2 signal), 7 (14.6%) partially converted to type 2, 19 (39.6%) became worse (i.e. type 1 changes became more extensive) and 4 (8.3%) showed no change. Higher average VAS (5.7) and OQS (42.3) scores were noted in patients where there was worsening type-1 change and lower scores (3.8 and 27, respectively) were seen in those where there was conversion to type-2 change. These trends, however, did not reach statistical significance (P values 0.16 and 0.09 for VAS and OQS, respectively). The statistical relationship was stronger after exclusion of patients with confounding factors (i.e. changes in lumbar MRI other than end-plate changes that could independently explain the evolution of patients' symptoms) with P-values of 0.08 and 0.07 for VAS and OQS, respectively. Type-1 end-plate change represents a dynamic process and in a large majority of cases either converts to type-2 change or becomes more extensive. The evolution of type-1 change relates to change in patient's symptoms, but not to a statistically significant level. (orig.)

  13. Evaluation on vertebral endplate injury and adjacent intervertebral disk injury of patients with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures by MRI and its clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yu; Shen Huiliang; Fang Xiutong; Zhang Wenbo

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between vertebral endplate injury and adjacent intervertebral disk injury of patients with acute or sub-acute osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVC-F) by MRI, and to provide basis for diagnosis of OVCF. Methods: The clinical data of a total of 66 patients with OVCF underwent vertebroplasty (76 fracture of vertebral bodies) were selected. The vertebral endplate injury and adjacent intervertebral disk injury of OVCF patients were detected by MRI. Results: There were 57 vertebral endplate injury in 76 fracture vertebral bodies (75% ). There were only 27 vertebral bodies with vertebral endplate injury in 57 fracture vertebral bodies with endplate injury (47% ), and 22 vertebral with superior and inferior vertebral endplate injury (39% ), and 8 vertebral bodies with inferior vertebral endplate injury (14% ). There were 48 vertebral bodies with intervertebral disc injury in 76 fracture vertebral bodies (63% ). There were 22 intervertebral disc injury located above the fracture of the lumbar spine in 48 vertebral bodies with intervertebral disc injury (45% ), and 19 fracture vertebral bodies with upper and lower intervertebral disc injury (40% ), and 7 intervertebral injuries located below the fracture of the lumbar spine (15% ). Conclusion: Vertebral endplate injury is frequently associated with the adjacent intervertebral disk injury. The clinical diagnosis and treatment should be emphasized in the fracture vertebral endplate damage and adjacent intervertebral disc injury. (authors)

  14. Internal friction in hydrited Zircaloy 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piquin, R.; Ghilarducci, Ada A.; Salva, Horacio R.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the microscopic basis of inelastic effects on standard Zry4 alloy, after plastic deformation and hydriding. Polycrystalline samples with cylindrical geometry were taken with dimension 1.62mm in diameter and 40 mm in length. In order to obtain the internal friction and elastic modulus spectra at low frequencies (0.01 to 10Hz), a sub resonant forced pendulum was used, with resonance at about 130Hz. The results are peaks between 150 and 350K. They are analysed on the basis of their response at frequency changes, amplitude of measurement, grade of plastic deformation 'in situ' and cathodical hydriding (650 H wt ppm). The peaks are interpreted as follows: the 250K peak corresponds to the interaction between dislocations and Cottrel cloud of solute atoms surrounding the dislocation cores. After hydruration, the spectrum is dominated by the 220K peak, which is attributed to the hydrogen atoms in solid solution trapped by the dislocation cores. The anelastic parameters allow to evaluate the H concentration segregated on dislocations, in this case it is 300 wt ppm H. (author) [es

  15. Welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab. Razak Hamzah; Abd. Aziz Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2008-01-01

    For the final chapter of this book, there is basic introduction on welding process. The good radiography must know somehow on welding process so that they can know what kind of welding that must rejected or not. All of the exposure technique that mention in earlier chapter almost applicable in this field because welding process is critical problem if there is no inspection will be done. So, for this chapter, all the discontinuity that usually appeared will be discussed and there is another discontinuity maybe not to important and do not give big impact if found it, do not described here. On top of that, the decision to accept or reject based on code, standard and specification that agreed by both to make sure that decision that agreed is corrected and more meaningful.

  16. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  17. Association of endothelin-1 expression and cartilaginous endplate degeneration in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yuan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inflammatory cytokines are involved in intervertebral disc (IVD degeneration. Endothelin-1 (ET-1, a 21-amino-acid cytokine implicated with cartilage degradation, is secreted by vascular endothelial cells and also by many other cell types. The expression of ET-1 in human IVD cartilage endplate (CEP and its role in disc degeneration have not been explored. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The expression of ET-1 in degenerated CEP was analyzed by immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting; ET-1 was demonstrated in cartilaginous endplate cells (CECs by immunofluorescent staining. The ET-1 mRNA expression and protein production by CECs stimulated by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, were determined by real-time PCR analysis and Western blotting, respectively. The matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1, MMP-13 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases-1 (TIMP-1 levels in the supernatant of cultured CECs treated with ET-1 were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Nitric oxide (NO release and nitric oxide synthase (NOS activity were measured using a spectrophotometric assay. The apoptosis of CECs by ET-1 was measured by an Annexin V-FITC detection assay. The production of ET-1 in degenerated cartilage endplate was significantly higher than normal CEP. The results showed that ET-1 was expressed by CECs and modulated by TNF-α in a dose-dependent manner. ET-1 increased production of MMP-1 and MMP-13, decreased TIMP-1 production, and induced NO and NOS release by cultured CECs. The direct stimulation of CECs by ET-1 did not promote cell apoptosis. CONCLUSION: The study results suggest that ET-1 played a pivotal role in human CEP degeneration, and may be a new target for development of therapies for this condition.

  18. An analysis of the effect of endplates upon the fin keel of a sailing yacht

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, G.T.; Raiskums, C.L.; Keffer, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    A long-term investigation is presently underway to assess the overall performance of the modern design of fin keels for sailing yachts. An ultimate goal is to determine the specific advantages for such designs with respect to a centre-board configuration with outside ballast. The present preliminary studies were carried out to determine the basic performance of a typical fin keel shape for various values of leeway angle. A second aspect was to determine the effect upon this baseline performance of a number of endplates of varying sizes and shapes. (author)

  19. Relationship between screw sagittal angle and stress on endplate of adjacent segments after anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion with internal fixation: a Chinese finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Tang, Yibo; Shen, Hongxing

    2017-12-01

    In order to reduce the incidence of adjacent segment disease (ASD), the current study was designed to establish Chinese finite element models of normal 3rd~7th cervical vertebrae (C3-C7) and anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) with internal fixation , and analyze the influence of screw sagittal angle (SSA) on stress on endplate of adjacent cervical segments. Mimics 8.1 and Abaqus/CAE 6.10 softwares were adopted to establish finite element models. For C4 superior endplate and C6 inferior endplate, their anterior areas had the maximum stress in anteflexion position, and their posterior areas had the maximum stress in posterior extension position. As SSA increased, the stress reduced. With an increase of 10° in SSA, the stress on anterior areas of C4 superior endplate and C6 inferior endplate reduced by 12.67% and 7.99% in anteflexion position, respectively. With an increase of 10° in SSA, the stress on posterior areas of C4 superior endplate and C6 inferior endplate reduced by 9.68% and 10.22% in posterior extension position, respectively. The current study established Chinese finite element models of normal C3-C7 and ACCF with internal fixation , and demonstrated that as SSA increased, the stress on endplate of adjacent cervical segments decreased. In clinical surgery, increased SSA is able to play important role in protecting the adjacent cervical segments and reducing the incidence of ASD.

  20. Numerical Study on the Structural Performance of Steel Beams with Slant End-plate Connections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshad Zahmatkesh

    Full Text Available Abstract Thermal effects can be one of the most harmful conditions that any steel structure should expect throughout its service life. To counteract this effect, a new beam, with a capability to dissipate thermally induced axial force by slanting of end-plate connection at both ends, is proposed. The beam was examined in terms of its elastic mechanical behavior under symmetric transverse load in presence of an elevated temperature by means of direct stiffness finite element model. The performance of such connection is defined under two resisting mechanisms; by friction force dissipation between faces of slant connection and by small upward crawling on slant plane. The presented numerical method is relatively easy and useful to evaluate the behavior of the proposed beam of various dimensions at different temperatures. Its applicability is evident through satisfactory results verification with those from experimental, analytical and commercially available finite element software. Based on the good agreement between theoretical and experimental methods, a series of design curves were developed as a safe-practical range for the slant end-plate connections which are depend on the conditions of the connection.

  1. Welding template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Venue, R.J. of.

    1976-01-01

    A welding template is described which is used to weld strip material into a cellular grid structure for the accommodation of fuel elements in a nuclear reactor. On a base plate the template carries a multitude of cylindrical pins whose upper half is narrower than the bottom half and only one of which is attached to the base plate. The others are arrested in a hexagonal array by oblong webs clamped together by chuck jaws which can be secured by means of screws. The parts are ground very accurately. The template according to the invention is very easy to make. (UWI) [de

  2. Development of the manufacture and process for DUPIC fuel elements; development of the quality evaluation techniques for end cap welds of DUPIC fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Tae; Choi, Myong Seon; Yang, Hyun Tae; Kim, Dong Gyun; Park, Jin Seok; Kim, Jin Ho [Yeungnam University, Kyongsan (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this research is to set up the quality evaluation techniques for end cap welds of DUPIC fuel element. High temperature corrosion test and the SCC test for Zircaloy-4 were performed, and also the possibility of the ultrasonic test technique was verified for the quality evaluation and control of the laser welds in the DUPIC fuel rod end cap. From the evaluation of corrosion properties with measuring the weight gain and observing oxide film of the specimen that had been in the circumstance of steam(400 .deg. C, 1,500 psi) by max. 70 days later, the weight gain of the welded specimens was larger than original tube and the weight increasing rate increased with the exposed days. For the Development of techniques for ultrasonic test, semi-auto ultrasonic test system has been made based on immersion pulse-echo technique using spherically concentrated ultrasonic beam. Subsequently, developed ultrasonic test technique is quite sensible to shape of welds in the inside and outside of tube as well as crack, undercut and expulsion, and also this ultrasonic test, together with metallurgical fracture test, has good reliance as enough to be used for control method of welding process. 43 refs., 47 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  3. Microstructure and crystallographic texture evolution during TIG welding of zircaloy-2 material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, S.K.; Singh, R.P.; Singh, V.K.; Ramanathan, R.; Samjdar, I.; Srivastava, D.; Tewari, R.; Dey, G.K.

    2005-01-01

    Zirconium and its alloys are extensively used as structural materials in nuclear reactors, because of better neutron economy, good corrosion resistance in water and good mechanical properties at operating temperature. Zircaloy-2 and zircaloy-4 are widely used in both pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water reactors (BWR) as fuel cladding materials and as calandria tube and pressure tube materials in pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWR). The satisfactory performance and the life of the reactor components depend mainly upon their mechanical properties, corrosion properties and dimensional stability in the reactor condition, which are strong function of metallurgical parameters such as microstructure and texture. Therefore, for best performance of the reactor components these parameters are optimized during their fabrication. The microstructure and texture of the zircaloy-2 components are expected to get modified during the welding of the components. In this study the evolution of the microstructure and texture has been investigated as a function of the welding parameters. Heat input was varied the current and welding time. A variety of analytical techniques have been applied for the study on microstructure and texture of the welds. Optical microscopy and electron microscopy were used to evaluate the detailed microstructure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used investigate the crystallographic textures among the base metal, heat affected zone and fusion zone. Particular attention was focused on the determination of microtexture in weld by using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique. After that, an effort was put to compare the results of X-ray macro-texture and EBS-microtexture. (author)

  4. WELDABILITY, WELDING METALLURGY, WELDING CHEMISTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Sarjito Jokosisworo

    2012-01-01

    Sambungan las merupakan bagian penting dari stuktur/bangunan yang dilas, dan kunci dari logam induk yang baik adalah kemampuan las (weld ability). Kemampuan las yang baik dan kemudahan dalam fabrikasi dari suatu logam merupakan pertimbangan dalam memilih suatu logam untuk konstruksi.

  5. Autophagy Is a Protective Response to the Oxidative Damage to Endplate Chondrocytes in Intervertebral Disc: Implications for the Treatment of Degenerative Lumbar Disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain (LBP is the leading cause of disability in the elderly. Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD was considered as the main cause for LBP. Degeneration of cartilaginous endplate was a crucial harmful factor during the initiation and development of IDD. Oxidative stress was implicated in IDD. However, the underlying molecular mechanism for the degeneration of cartilaginous endplate remains elusive. Herein, we found that oxidative stress could induce apoptosis and autophagy in endplate chondrocytes evidenced by western blot analysis, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence staining, GFP-LC3B transfection, and MDC staining. In addition, we also found that the apoptosis of endplate chondrocytes was significantly increased after the inhibition of autophagy by bafilomycin A1 shown by flow cytometry. Furthermore, mTOR pathway upstream autophagy was greatly suppressed suggested by western blot assay. In conclusion, our study strongly revealed that oxidative stress could increase autophagy and apoptosis of endplate chondrocytes in intervertebral disc. The increase of autophagy activity could prevent endplate chondrocytes from apoptosis. The autophagy in endplate chondrocytes induced by oxidative stress was mTOR dependent. These findings might shed some new lights on the mechanism for IDD and provide new strategies for the treatments of IDD.

  6. Thermal Behaviour of Beams with Slant End-Plate Connection Subjected to Nonsymmetric Gravity Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshad Zahmatkesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on the steel structures with confining of axial expansion in fixed beams has been quite intensive in the past decade. It is well established that the thermal behaviour has a key influence on steel structural behaviours. This paper describes mechanical behaviour of beams with bolted slant end-plate connection with nonsymmetric gravity load, subjected to temperature increase. Furthermore, the performance of slant connections of beams in steel moment frame structures in the elastic field is investigated. The proposed model proved that this flexible connection system could successfully decrease the extra thermal induced axial force by both of the friction force dissipation among two faces of slant connection and a small upward movement on the slant plane. The applicability of primary assumption is illustrated. The results from the proposed model are examined within various slant angles, thermal and friction factors. It can be concluded that higher thermal conditions are tolerable when slanting connection is used.

  7. Numerical Study of Electrostatic Field Distortion on LPTPC End-Plates based on Bulk Micromegas Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Purba

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The R&D activities for the linear collider TPC (LC-TPC are currently working on the adoption of the micro pattern devices for the gaseous amplification stage. Several beam tests have been carried out at DESY with a 5 GeV electron beam in a 1 T superconducting magnet. We worked on a large prototype TPC with an end-plate that was built, for the first time, using seven resistive bulk Micromegas modules. During experiments, reduced signal sensitivity was observed at the boundary of these modules. Electrostatic field distortion near the module boundaries was considered to be the possible major reason behind these observations. In the present work, we will explore this hypothesis through numerical simulation. Our aim has been to understand the origin of distortions observed close to the edges of the test beam modules and to explore the possibility of using the Garfield simulation framework for investigating a phenomenon as complex as distortion.

  8. WELDING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  9. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2011-01-01

    Offers an introduction to the range of available welding technologies. This title includes chapters on individual techniques that cover principles, equipment, consumables and key quality issues. It includes material on such topics as the basics of electricity in welding, arc physics, and distortion, and the weldability of particular metals.$bThe first edition of Welding processes handbook established itself as a standard introduction and guide to the main welding technologies and their applications. This new edition has been substantially revised and extended to reflect the latest developments. After an initial introduction, the book first reviews gas welding before discussing the fundamentals of arc welding, including arc physics and power sources. It then discusses the range of arc welding techniques including TIG, plasma, MIG/MAG, MMA and submerged arc welding. Further chapters cover a range of other important welding technologies such as resistance and laser welding, as well as the use of welding techniqu...

  10. Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  11. Introduction to Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  12. Distortion Control during Welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Pazooki, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The local material expansion and contraction involved in welding result in permanent deformations or instability i.e., welding distortion. Considerable efforts have been made in controlling welding distortion prior to, during or after welding. Thermal Tensioning (TT) describes a group of in-situ

  13. Welding and cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drews, P.; Schulze Frielinghaus, W.

    1978-01-01

    This is a survey, with 198 literature references, of the papers published in the fields of welding and cutting within the last three years. The subjects dealt with are: weldability of the materials - Welding methods - Thermal cutting - Shaping and calculation of welded joints - Environmental protection in welding and cutting. (orig.) [de

  14. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  15. A comprehensive model for in-plane and out-of-plane vibration of CANDU fuel endplate rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, S.D., E-mail: syu@ryerson.ca; Fadaee, M.

    2016-08-01

    Highlights: • Proposed an effective method for modelling bending and torsional vibration of CANDU fuel endplate rings. • Applied successfully the thick plate theory to curved structural members by accounting for the transverse shear effect. • The proposed method is computationally more efficient compared to the 3D finite element. - Abstract: In this paper, a comprehensive vibration model is developed for analysing in-plane and out-of-plane vibration of CANDU fuel endplate rings by taking into consideration the effects of in-plane extension in the circumferential and radial directions, shear, and rotatory inertia. The model is based on Reddy’s thick plate theory and the nine-node isoparametric Lagrangian plate finite elements. Natural frequencies of various modes of vibration of circular rings obtained using the proposed method are compared with 3D finite element results, experimental data and results available in the literature. Excellent agreement was achieved.

  16. The role of desensititation in decay time of miniature endplate currents in frogs Rana ridibunda and Rana temporaria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giniatullin, R. A.; Talantova, M. V.; Vyskočil, František

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 3 (2001), s. 287-292 ISSN 0168-0102 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7011902; GA MŠk VS97099; GA MŠk OK 267 Grant - others:RFBR(RU) 98-04-48044; INTAS(BE) 2000-1147 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : frog * desensitisation * miniature endplate potential Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.770, year: 2001

  17. Lentiviral-mediated RNAi targeting caspase-3 inhibits apoptosis induced by serum deprivation in rat endplate chondrocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, L.; Wu, J.P.; Xu, G.; Zhu, B.; Zeng, Q.M.; Li, D.F.; Lu, W.

    2014-01-01

    Current studies find that degenerated cartilage endplates (CEP) of vertebrae, with fewer diffusion areas, decrease nutrient supply and accelerate intervertebral disc degeneration. Many more apoptotic cells have been identified in degenerated than in normal endplates, and may be responsible for the degenerated grade. Previous findings suggest that inhibition of apoptosis is one possible approach to improve disc regeneration. It is postulated that inhibition of CEP cell apoptosis may be responsible for the regeneration of endplates. Caspase-3, involved in the execution phase of apoptosis, is a candidate for regulating the apoptotic process. In the present study, CEP cells were incubated in 1% fetal bovine serum. Activated caspases were detected to identify the apoptotic pathway, and apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry. Lentiviral caspase-3 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) was employed to study its protective effects against serum deprivation. Silencing of caspase-3 expression was quantified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blots, and inhibition of apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry. Serum deprivation increased apoptosis of rat CEP cells through activation of a caspase cascade. Lentiviral caspase-3 shRNA was successfully transduced into CEP cells, and specifically silenced endogenous caspase-3 expression. Surviving cells were protected by the downregulation of caspase-3 expression and activation. Thus, lentiviral caspase-3 shRNA-mediated RNAi successfully silenced endogenous caspase-3 expression, preventing inappropriate or premature apoptosis

  18. Lentiviral-mediated RNAi targeting caspase-3 inhibits apoptosis induced by serum deprivation in rat endplate chondrocytes in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, L.; Wu, J.P. [Fudan University, Jinshan Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Shanghai, China, Department of Orthopaedics, Jinshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Xu, G. [Fudan University, Jinshan Hospital, Center Laboratory, Shanghai, China, Center Laboratory, Jinshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zhu, B.; Zeng, Q.M.; Li, D.F.; Lu, W. [Fudan University, Jinshan Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Shanghai, China, Department of Orthopaedics, Jinshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2014-05-09

    Current studies find that degenerated cartilage endplates (CEP) of vertebrae, with fewer diffusion areas, decrease nutrient supply and accelerate intervertebral disc degeneration. Many more apoptotic cells have been identified in degenerated than in normal endplates, and may be responsible for the degenerated grade. Previous findings suggest that inhibition of apoptosis is one possible approach to improve disc regeneration. It is postulated that inhibition of CEP cell apoptosis may be responsible for the regeneration of endplates. Caspase-3, involved in the execution phase of apoptosis, is a candidate for regulating the apoptotic process. In the present study, CEP cells were incubated in 1% fetal bovine serum. Activated caspases were detected to identify the apoptotic pathway, and apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry. Lentiviral caspase-3 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) was employed to study its protective effects against serum deprivation. Silencing of caspase-3 expression was quantified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blots, and inhibition of apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry. Serum deprivation increased apoptosis of rat CEP cells through activation of a caspase cascade. Lentiviral caspase-3 shRNA was successfully transduced into CEP cells, and specifically silenced endogenous caspase-3 expression. Surviving cells were protected by the downregulation of caspase-3 expression and activation. Thus, lentiviral caspase-3 shRNA-mediated RNAi successfully silenced endogenous caspase-3 expression, preventing inappropriate or premature apoptosis.

  19. Lentiviral-mediated RNAi targeting caspase-3 inhibits apoptosis induced by serum deprivation in rat endplate chondrocytes in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ding

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Current studies find that degenerated cartilage endplates (CEP of vertebrae, with fewer diffusion areas, decrease nutrient supply and accelerate intervertebral disc degeneration. Many more apoptotic cells have been identified in degenerated than in normal endplates, and may be responsible for the degenerated grade. Previous findings suggest that inhibition of apoptosis is one possible approach to improve disc regeneration. It is postulated that inhibition of CEP cell apoptosis may be responsible for the regeneration of endplates. Caspase-3, involved in the execution phase of apoptosis, is a candidate for regulating the apoptotic process. In the present study, CEP cells were incubated in 1% fetal bovine serum. Activated caspases were detected to identify the apoptotic pathway, and apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry. Lentiviral caspase-3 short hairpin RNA (shRNA was employed to study its protective effects against serum deprivation. Silencing of caspase-3 expression was quantified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blots, and inhibition of apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry. Serum deprivation increased apoptosis of rat CEP cells through activation of a caspase cascade. Lentiviral caspase-3 shRNA was successfully transduced into CEP cells, and specifically silenced endogenous caspase-3 expression. Surviving cells were protected by the downregulation of caspase-3 expression and activation. Thus, lentiviral caspase-3 shRNA-mediated RNAi successfully silenced endogenous caspase-3 expression, preventing inappropriate or premature apoptosis.

  20. Selected Welding Techniques, Part 2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1964-01-01

    Partial contents: CONVENTIONAL WELD JOINTS VERSUS BUTT JOINTS IN 1-INCH ALUMINUM PLATE, SPECIAL WELD JOINT PREPARATION, UPSET METAL EDGES FOR INCREASED WELD JOINT STRENGTH, OUT-OF-POSITION WELDING OF HEAVY GAGE...

  1. Automatic welding of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briola, J.

    1958-01-01

    The welding process depends on the type of fuel element, the can material and the number of cartridges to be welded: - inert-gas welding (used for G2 and the 1. set of EL3), - inert atmosphere arc welding (used for welding uranium and zirconium), - electronic welding (used for the 2. set of EL3 and the tank of Proserpine). (author) [fr

  2. Detecting flaws in welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodacre, A.; Lawton, H.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus and a method for detecting flaws in welds in a workpiece, the portion of the workpiece containing the weld is maintained at a constant temperature and the weld is scanned by an infra red detector. The weld is then scanned again with the workpiece in contact with a cooling probe to produce a steeper temperature gradient across the weld. Comparison of the signals produced by each scan reveals the existence of defects in the welds. The signals may be displayed on an oscilloscope and the display may be observed by a TV camera and recorded on videotape. (UK)

  3. Fusion welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Jones, Eric D.; McBride, Marvin A.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

  4. Weld controller for automated nuclear service welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barfield, K.L.; Strubhar, P.M.; Green, D.I.

    1995-01-01

    B and W Nuclear Technologies (BWNT) uses many different types of weld heads for automated welding in the commercial nuclear service industry. Some weld heads are purchased as standard items, while others are custom designed and fabricated by BWNT requiring synchronized multiaxis motion control. BWNT recently completed a development program to build a common weld controller that interfaces to all types of weld heads used by BWNT. Their goal was to construct a system that had the flexibility to add different modules to increase the capability of the controller as different application needs become necessary. The benefits from having a common controller are listed. This presentation explains the weld controller system and the types of applications to which it has been applied

  5. Handbook of Plastic Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the information about the laser welding of plastic. Laser welding is a matured process nevertheless laser welding of micro dimensional plastic parts is still a big challenge. This report collects the latest information about the laser welding of plastic...... materials and provides an extensive knowhow on the industrial plastic welding process. The objectives of the report include: - Provide the general knowhow of laser welding for the beginners - Summarize the state-of-the-art information on the laser welding of plastics - Find the technological limits in terms...... of design, materials and process - Find the best technology, process and machines adaptive to Sonion’s components - Provide the skills to Sonion’s Design Engineers for successful design of the of the plastic components suitable for the laser welding The ultimate goal of this report is to serve...

  6. Nondestructive testing: welding industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Baldev; Subramanian, C.V.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter highlights various conventional and advanced nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques that have been used for weld evaluation. Welding Codes and Standards of International and National organisations that have been followed in India for various weld evaluation purposes are also included. The chapter also emphasises the importance of NDT by way of a few case studies that have been carried out on important critical welded components. (author). 12 refs., 17 figs., 1 appendix

  7. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  8. Welding Course Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  9. Underwater welding of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarra, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental basis to understand the behavior of wet underwater welding of steel is introduced. Both the pyrometallurgical and physical metallurgy concepts are discussed. Modifications of welding consumables and practice are suggested. This chapter promotes further contributions of meatllurgical research to improve and promote wet underwater welding. (orig.)

  10. Welding Over Paint Primer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Kevin S; Liu, Stephen; Olson, David L

    1998-01-01

    .... According to the hydrogen-oxygen and }hydrogen-fluorine equilibrium considerations, an increase in the partial pressure of oxygen or fluorine could decrease the partial pressure of hydrogen within the welding arc. Consequently, a welding consumable that contains chemical ingredients of high oxygen and fluorine potential would be capable of minimizing hydrogen pick-up in the weld pool.

  11. Orbital welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeschen, W.

    2003-01-01

    The TIG (Tungsten-inert gas) orbital welding technique is applied in all areas of pipe welding. The process is mainly used for austenitic and ferritic materials but also for materials like aluminium, nickel, and titanium alloys are commonly welded according to this technique. Thin-walled as well as thick-walled pipes are welded economically. The application of orbital welding is of particular interest in the area of maintenance of thick-walled pipes that is described in this article. (orig.) [de

  12. Homogeneous weldings of copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campurri, C.; Lopez, M.; Fernandez, R.; Osorio, V.

    1995-01-01

    This research explored the metallurgical and mechanical properties of arc welding of copper related with influence of Argon, Helium and mixtures of them. Copper plates of 6 mm thickness were welded with different mixtures of the mentioned gases. The radiography of welded specimens with 100% He and 100% Ar does not show show any porosity. On the other hand, the copper plates welded different gas mixtures presented uniform porosity in the welded zone. The metallographies show recrystallized grain in the heat affected zone, while the welding zone showed a dendritic structure. The results of the tensile strength vary between a maximum of 227 MPa for 100% He and a minimum of 174 MOa for the mixture of 60% He and 40% Ar. For the elongation after fracture the best values, about 36%, were obtained for pure gases. As a main conclusion, we can say that arc welding of copper is possible without loosing the mechanical and metallurgical properties of base metal. 6 refs

  13. Back pain's association with vertebral end-plate signal changes in sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A M; van der Kallen, Bas F; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert J; van den Hout, Wilbert B; Koes, Bart W; Peul, Wilco C

    2014-02-01

    Patients with sciatica frequently experience disabling back pain. One of the proposed causes for back pain is vertebral end-plate signal changes (VESC) as visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To report on VESC findings, changes of VESC findings over time, and the correlation between VESC and disabling back pain in patients with sciatica. A randomized clinical trial with 1 year of follow-up. Patients with 6 to 12 weeks of sciatica who participated in a multicenter, randomized clinical trial comparing an early surgery strategy with prolonged conservative care with surgery if needed. Patients were assessed by means of the 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) for back pain (with 0 representing no pain and 100 the worst pain ever experienced) at baseline and 1 year. Disabling back pain was defined as a VAS score of at least 40 mm. Patients underwent MRI both at baseline and after 1 year follow-up. Presence and change of VESC was correlated with disabling back pain using chi-square tests and logistic regression analysis. At baseline, 39% of patients had disabling back pain. Of the patients with VESC at baseline, 40% had disabling back pain compared with 38% of the patients with no VESC (p=.67). The prevalence of type 1 VESC increased from 1% at baseline to 35% 1 year later in the surgical group compared with an increase from 3% to 11% in the conservative group. The prevalence of type 2 VESC decreased from 40% to 29% in the surgical group while remaining almost stable in the conservative group at 41%. The prevalence of disabling back pain at 1 year was 12% in patients with no VESC at 1 year, 16% in patients with type 1 VESC, 11% in patients with type 2 VESC, and 3% in patients with both types 1 and 2 VESC (p=.36). Undergoing surgery was associated with increase in the extent of VESC (odds ratio [OR], 8.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.7-15.7; psciatica was highly associated with the development of VESC after 1 year. However, in contrast with the intuitive feeling

  14. Modic (endplate) changes in the lumbar spine: bone micro-architecture and remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perilli, Egon; Parkinson, Ian H; Truong, Le-Hoa; Chong, Kuan C; Fazzalari, Nicola L; Osti, Orso L

    2015-09-01

    In the literature, inter-vertebral MRI signal intensity changes (Modic changes) were associated with corresponding histological observations on endplate biopsies. However, tissue-level studies were limited. No quantitative histomorphometric study on bone biopsies has yet been conducted for Modic changes. The aim of this study was to characterise the bone micro-architectural parameters and bone remodelling indices associated with Modic changes. Forty patients suffering from disabling low back pain, undergoing elective spinal surgery, and exhibiting Modic changes on MRI (Modic 1, n = 9; Modic 2, n = 25; Modic 3, n = 6), had a transpedicular vertebral body biopsy taken of subchondral bone. Biopsies were first examined by micro-CT, for 3D morphometric analysis of bone volume fraction (BV/TV), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), trabecular separation, trabecular number, and structure model index. Then, samples underwent histological analysis, for determination of bone remodelling indices: osteoid surface to bone surface ratio (OS/BS), eroded surface to bone surface (ES/BS) and osteoid surface to eroded surface ratio (OS/ES). Micro-CT analysis revealed significantly higher BV/TV (up to 70% increase, p < 0.01) and Tb.Th (up to +57%, p < 0.01) in Modic 3 biopsies, compared to Modic 1 and 2. Histological analysis showed significantly lower OS/BS in Modic 2 biopsies (more than 28% decrease, p < 0.05) compared to 1 and 3. ES/BS progressively decreased from Modic 1 to 2 to 3, whereas OS/ES progressively increased with significantly higher values in Modic 3 (up to 159% increase, p < 0.05) than in Modic 1 and 2. Significant differences were found in bone micro-architectural parameters and remodelling indices among Modic types. Modic 1 biopsies had evidence of highest bone turnover, possibly due to an inflammatory process; Modic 2 biopsies were consistent with a reduced bone formation/remodelling stage; Modic 3 biopsies suggested a more stable sclerotic phase, with significantly

  15. Welding skate with computerized controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    New welding skate concept for automatic TIG welding of contoured or double-contoured parts combines lightweight welding apparatus with electrical circuitry which computes the desired torch angle and positions a torch and cold-wire guide angle manipulator.

  16. Challenges to Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng

    This report originates from the compulsory defense during my Ph.D. study at the Technical University of Denmark. Resistance welding is an old and well-proven technology. Yet the emergence of more and more new materials, new designs, invention off new joining techniques, and more stringent...... requirement in quality have imposed challenges to the resistance welding. More some research and development have to be done to adapt the old technology to the manufacturing industry of the 21st century. In the 1st part of the report, the challenging factors to the resistance welding are reviewed. Numerical...... simulation of resistance welding has been under development for many years. Yet it is no easy to make simulation results reliable and accurate because of the complexity of resistance welding process. In the 2nd part of the report numerical modeling of resistance welding is reviewed, some critical factors...

  17. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  18. Automatization of welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwabuchi, Masashi; Tomita, Jinji; Nishihara, Katsunori.

    1978-01-01

    Automatization of welding is one of the effective measures for securing high degree of quality of nuclear power equipment, as well as for correspondence to the environment at the site of plant. As the latest ones of the automatic welders practically used for welding of nuclear power apparatuses in factories of Toshiba and IHI, those for pipes and lining tanks are described here. The pipe welder performs the battering welding on the inside of pipe end as the so-called IGSCC countermeasure and the succeeding butt welding through the same controller. The lining tank welder is able to perform simultaneous welding of two parallel weld lines on a large thin plate lining tank. Both types of the welders are demonstrating excellent performance at the shops as well as at the plant site. (author)

  19. Dual wire welding torch and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  20. Electric arc welding gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  1. Electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, M.M.

    1974-01-01

    Electron-beam equipment is considered along with fixed and mobile electron-beam guns, questions of weld environment, medium and nonvacuum welding, weld-joint designs, tooling, the economics of electron-beam job shops, aspects of safety, quality assurance, and repair. The application of the process in the case of individual materials is discussed, giving attention to aluminum, beryllium, copper, niobium, magnesium, molybdenum, tantalum, titanium, metal alloys, superalloys, and various types of steel. Mechanical-property test results are examined along with the areas of application of electron-beam welding

  2. Robot welding process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1991-01-01

    This final report documents the development and installation of software and hardware for Robotic Welding Process Control. Primary emphasis is on serial communications between the CYRO 750 robotic welder, Heurikon minicomputer running Hunter & Ready VRTX, and an IBM PC/AT, for offline programming and control and closed-loop welding control. The requirements for completion of the implementation of the Rocketdyne weld tracking control are discussed. The procedure for downloading programs from the Intergraph, over the network, is discussed. Conclusions are made on the results of this task, and recommendations are made for efficient implementation of communications, weld process control development, and advanced process control procedures using the Heurikon.

  3. Use of servo controlled weld head for end closure welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, S.K.; Setty, D.S.; Rameswara Rao, A.; Hemantha Rao, G.V.S.; Jayaraj, R.N. [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Dept. of Atomic Energy, Hyderabad (India)

    2010-07-01

    In the PHWR fuel fabrication line resistance welding processes are used for joining various zirconium based alloy components to fuel tube of similar material. The quality requirement of these welding processes is very stringent and has to meet all the product requirements. At present these welding processes are being carried out by using standard resistance welding machines. In the resistance welding process in addition to current and time, force is one of the critical and important parameter, which influences the weld quality. At present advanced feed back type fast response medium frequency weld controllers are being used. This has upslope/down slope, constant and repetitive weld pattern selection features makes this critical welding process more reliable. Compared to weld controllers, squeeze force application devices are limited and normally standard high response pneumatic cylinders are used in the welding process. With this type of devices the force is constant during welding process and cannot be varied during welding process as per the material deformation characteristics. Similarly due to non-availability of feed back systems in the squeeze force application systems restricts the accuracy and quality of the welding process. In the present paper the influence of squeeze force pattern on the weld quality using advanced feed back type servo based force control system was studied. Different squeeze forces were used during pre and post weld heat periods along with constant force and compared with the weld quality. (author)

  4. Clinical and radiological results 6 years after treatment of traumatic thoracolumbar burst fractures with pedicle screw instrumentation and balloon assisted endplate reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, Jorrit Jan; Somers, Inne; Dhert, Wouter J A; Oner, F. Cumhur

    2015-01-01

    Background context  When used to fixate traumatic thoracolumbar burst fractures, pedicle screw constructs may fail in the presence of severe vertebral body comminution as the intervertebral disc can creep through the fractured endplates leading to insufficient anterior column support.

  5. Measuring the absolute disintegration rate of a radioactive gas with a moveable endplate discharge counter (MEP) and theoretical calculation of wall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffey, A.H.; Gray, J.; Bentley, W.C.; Lerner, J.L.

    1987-09-01

    A precision built moveable endplate Geiger-Mueller counter was used to measure the absolute disintegration rate of a beta-emitting radioactive gas. A Geiger-Mueller counter used for measuring gaseous radioactivity has 85 Kr (beta energy, 0.67 MeV). The wall effect calculation is readily extendable to other beta energies

  6. Measuring weld heat to evaluate weld integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauder, V., E-mail: schauder@hks-prozesstechnik.de [HKS-Prozesstechnik GmbH, Halle (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Eddy current and ultrasonic testing are suitable for tube and pipe mills and have been used for weld seam flaw detection for decades, but a new process, thermography, is an alternative. By measuring the heat signature of the weld seam as it cools, it provides information about weld integrity at and below the surface. The thermal processes used to join metals, such as plasma, induction, laser, and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), have improved since they were developed, and they get better with each passing year. However, no industrial process is perfect, so companies that conduct research in flaw detection likewise continue to develop and improve the technologies used to verify weld integrity: ultrasonic testing (UT), eddy current testing (ET), hydrostatic, X-ray, magnetic particle, and liquid penetrant are among the most common. Two of these are used for verifying the integrity of the continuous welds such as those used on pipe and tube mills: UT and ET. Each uses a transmitter to send waves of ultrasonic energy or electrical current through the material and a receiver (probe) to detect disturbances in the flow. The two processes often are combined to capitalize on the strengths of each. While ET is good at detecting flaws at or near the surface, UT penetrates the material, detecting subsurface flaws. One drawback is that sound waves and electrical current waves have a specific direction of travel, or an alignment. A linear defect that runs parallel to the direction of travel of the ultrasonic sound wave or a flaw that is parallel to the coil winding direction of the ET probe can go undetected. A second drawback is that they don't detect cold welds. An alternative process, thermography, works in a different fashion: It monitors the heat of the material as the weld cools. Although it measures the heat at the surface, the heat signature provides clues about cooling activity deep in the material, resulting in a thorough assessment of the weld's integrity It

  7. TIG welding method and TIG welding device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneda, Eishi

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of TIG welding for members having different heat capacities including a cladding tube and an end plug of a fuel rod to be used, for example, in a reactor, and a device therefor. Namely, in the TIG welding method, the flow rate of a sealed gas to the side of a member having smaller heat capacity is made greater than that on the side of the member having greater heat capacity bordered on the top end of a welding electrode. Since the sealed gas is jetted being localized relative to the welding electrode, arc is restricted in a region of the member having smaller heat capacity and is increased at a region having a larger heat capacity. As a result, the arc is localized, so that the heat input amount to the region having a large heat capacity is increased, and then a plurality of members at the abutting portion are melted uniformly thereby capable of obtaining a uniform molten pool. A bead is formed at the abutting portion thereby capable of obtaining a welded portion with less unevenness and having large strength. (I.S.)

  8. Explosion metal welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popoff, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    Process parameters pertaining to welding similar and dissimilar metals using explosives are reviewed. The discussion centers on the interrelationship of physical parameters which play a part in achieving desirable metallurgical results. Present activities in explosion metal welding at LASL are presented and shown how they related to the interests of the ERDA community

  9. Electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabbay, M.

    1972-01-01

    The bead characteristics and the possible mechanisms of the electron beam penetration are presented. The different welding techniques are exposed and the main parts of an electron beam welding equipment are described. Some applications to nuclear, spatial and other industries are cited [fr

  10. Welding problems in nuclear power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubchenko, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    The problems of welding industry in nuclear power plant engineering, mainly related to the improvement of molten bath protection, are considered. Development of new materials for welding electrodes, for cladding and welding fluxes, is pointed out. Production of the following equipment is brought to a commercial level: welding heads and welding machines for branch pipe welding, anticorrosion cladding, zonal thermal treatment, electron beam welding facilities for the welding and maintenance of turbineblades, equipment for nondestructive testing of welded joints

  11. Method for welding beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1997-04-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs.

  12. Method for welding beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O'Leary, R.F.

    1997-01-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs

  13. Transition welds in welding of two-ply steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fartushnyj, V.G.; Evsyukov, Yu.G.

    1977-01-01

    Studied were physico-mechanical properties of welds made by various welding wires of chromium-nickel and nickel-chromium steels in submerged arc welding of double-layer steels with main layer of the VSt.3sp. carbon steel. It is shown that service-reliable structures welded of two-layer steels are obtained by providing the content from 11 to 20 % Ni in the automatically welded transition layer

  14. Grinding Parts For Automatic Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Richard K.; Hoult, William S.

    1989-01-01

    Rollers guide grinding tool along prospective welding path. Skatelike fixture holds rotary grinder or file for machining large-diameter rings or ring segments in preparation for welding. Operator grasps handles to push rolling fixture along part. Rollers maintain precise dimensional relationship so grinding wheel cuts precise depth. Fixture-mounted grinder machines surface to quality sufficient for automatic welding; manual welding with attendant variations and distortion not necessary. Developed to enable automatic welding of parts, manual welding of which resulted in weld bead permeated with microscopic fissures.

  15. Prediction of Weld Residual Stress of Narrow Gap Welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jun Seog; Huh, Nam Su

    2010-01-01

    The conventional welding technique such as shield metal arc welding has been mostly applied to the piping system of the nuclear power plants. It is well known that this welding technique causes the overheating and welding defects due to the large groove angle of weld. On the other hand, the narrow gap welding(NGW) technique has many merits, for instance, the reduction of welding time, the shrinkage of weld and the small deformation of the weld due to the small groove angle and welding bead width comparing with the conventional welds. These characteristics of NGW affect the deformation behavior and the distribution of welding residual stress of NGW, thus it is believed that the residual stress results obtained from conventional welding procedure may not be applied to structural integrity evaluation of NGW. In this paper, the welding residual stress of NGW was predicted using the nonlinear finite element analysis to simulate the thermal and mechanical effects of the NGW. The present results can be used as the important information to perform the flaw evaluation and to improve the weld procedure of NGW

  16. Capabilities of infrared weld monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, P.G.; Keske, J.S.; Leong, K.H.; Kornecki, G.

    1997-11-01

    A non-obtrusive pre-aligned, solid-state device has been developed to monitor the primary infrared emissions during laser welding. The weld monitor output is a 100-1000 mV signal that depends on the beam power and weld characteristics. The DC level of this signal is related to weld penetration, while AC portions of the output can be correlated with surface irregularities and part misalignment or contamination. Changes in DC behavior are also noted for both full and deep penetration welds. Full penetration welds are signified by an abrupt reduction in the weld monitor output. Bead on plate welds were made on steel, aluminum, and magnesium with both a CW CO{sub 2} laser and a pulsed Nd:YAG laser to explore the relationships between the weld characteristics and the weld monitor output.

  17. Welding method, and welding device for use therein, and method of analysis for evaluating welds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aendenroomer, A.J.; Den Ouden, G.; Xiao, Y.H.; Brabander, W.A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Described is a method of automatically welding pipes, comprising welding with a pulsation welding current and monitoring, by means of a sensor, the variations occurring in the arc voltage caused by weld pool oscillations. The occurrence of voltage variations with only frequency components below 100

  18. Weld analysis and control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Larry Z. (Inventor); Rodgers, Michael H. (Inventor); Powell, Bradley W. (Inventor); Burroughs, Ivan A. (Inventor); Goode, K. Wayne (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a Weld Analysis and Control System developed for active weld system control through real time weld data acquisition. Closed-loop control is based on analysis of weld system parameters and weld geometry. The system is adapted for use with automated welding apparatus having a weld controller which is capable of active electronic control of all aspects of a welding operation. Enhanced graphics and data displays are provided for post-weld analysis. The system provides parameter acquisition, including seam location which is acquired for active torch cross-seam positioning. Torch stand-off is also monitored for control. Weld bead and parent surface geometrical parameters are acquired as an indication of weld quality. These parameters include mismatch, peaking, undercut, underfill, crown height, weld width, puddle diameter, and other measurable information about the weld puddle regions, such as puddle symmetry, etc. These parameters provide a basis for active control as well as post-weld quality analysis and verification. Weld system parameters, such as voltage, current and wire feed rate, are also monitored and archived for correlation with quality parameters.

  19. Welding processes handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Weman, Klas

    2003-01-01

    Deals with the main commercially significant and commonly used welding processes. This title takes the student or novice welder through the individual steps involved in each process in an easily understood way. It covers many of the requirements referred to in European Standards including EN719, EN 729, EN 729 and EN 287.$bWelding processes handbook is a concise, explanatory guide to the main commercially significant and commonly-used welding processes. It takes the novice welder or student through the individual steps involved in each process in a clear and easily understood way. It is intended to provide an up-to-date reference to the major applications of welding as they are used in industry. The contents have been arranged so that it can be used as a textbook for European welding courses in accordance with guidelines from the European Welding Federation. Welding processes and equipment necessary for each process are described so that they can be applied to all instruction levels required by the EWF and th...

  20. Thermal stir welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  1. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  2. Review of Welding Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Petrėtienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses welding terms in accordance with the Lithuanian standard LST EN 1792 „Welding. The multilingual list of welding terms and similar processes”, „The Russian–Lithuanian dictionary of the terms of mechanical engineering technology and welding“ and the examples from postgraduates‘ final works. It analyses the infringement of lexical, word-building and morphological rules. First-year students should already be familiar with the standardized terms of their speciality. More active propagation of the terms should help to avoid terminology mistakes in various scientific spheres.

  3. Half bead welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canonico, D.A.; Holz, P.P.

    1978-05-01

    The ORNL has employed the Section XI half-bead procedure for six repair welds. Table 2 identifies the repairs and the components upon which they were accomplished. The weld repairs were performed to permit us to evaluate material properties, residual stresses, weld repair procedures, and structural behavior of repaired pressure vessels. As a consequence of our study we concluded that when the half bead procedure is correctly applied: (1) there is no metallurgical degradation of the base material, (2) residual stresses of yield point magnitude will be present, and (3) the structural integrity of the pressure vessel is not impaired at Charpy V-notch upper shelf temperatures

  4. Fatigue characteristics of ODS surface treated Zircaloy-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Han; Jung, Yan gIl; Park, Dong Jun; Park, Jung Hwan; Kim, Hyun Gil; Yang, Jae Ho; Koo, Yang Hyun [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Various accident tolerant fuel (ATF) cladding concepts are considered and have being developed to increase the oxidation resistance and ballooning/ rupture resistance of current Zr-based cladding material under accident conditions. One concept is to form an oxidation-resistant layer on Zr cladding surface. The other is to increase high temperature mechanical strength of Zr tube. The oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) zirconium was proposed to increase the strength of the Zr-based alloy up to high temperatures. ODS treatment is a way of improve the high temperature- oxidation resistant and mechanical stress by disperse the hardened particles inside of metal to interrupt the movement of the electric potential. In this study, the accident tolerance improved zirconium alloy by the ODS surface treatment was evaluated for the fatigue characteristics which is one of the significant items of the integrity assessment.

  5. Recent developments in pipeline welding practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Fourteen chapters are included: overview of pipeline welding systems and quality assurance, CRC automatic welding system, H.C. Price Co. automatic welding system, semi-automatic MIG-welding process, partial penetration welding of steel pipes for gas distribution, construction procedures and quality control in offshore pipeline construction, welding in repair and maintenance of gas transmission pipelines, British Gas studies of welding on pressurized gas transmission pipelines, hot tapping pipelines, underwater welding for offshore pipelines and associated equipment, radial friction welding, material composition vs weld properties, review of NDT of pipeline welds, and safety assurance in pipeline construction. A bibliography of approximately 150 references is included, arranged according to subject and year.

  6. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  7. Residual stress by repair welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Toyoda, Masao

    2003-01-01

    Residual stress by repair welds is computed using the thermal elastic-plastic analysis with phase-transformation effect. Coupling phenomena of temperature, microstructure, and stress-strain fields are simulated in the finite-element analysis. Weld bond of a plate butt-welded joint is gouged and then deposited by weld metal in repair process. Heat source is synchronously moved with the deposition of the finite-element as the weld deposition. Microstructure is considered by using CCT diagram and the transformation behavior in the repair weld is also simulated. The effects of initial stress, heat input, and weld length on residual stress distribution are studied from the organic results of numerical analysis. Initial residual stress before repair weld has no influence on the residual stress after repair treatment near weld metal, because the initial stress near weld metal releases due to high temperature of repair weld and then stress by repair weld regenerates. Heat input has an effect for residual stress distribution, for not its magnitude but distribution zone. Weld length should be considered reducing the magnitude of residual stress in the edge of weld bead; short bead induces high tensile residual stress. (author)

  8. Welding of refractory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessmann, G.G.

    1984-01-01

    This review primarily summarizes welding evaluations supported by NASA-Lewis Research Center in the 1960s. A literature search run in preparation for this review indicates that more recent work is modest by comparison. Hence, this review restates these accomplishments briefly and addresses opportunities which have evolved in welding technology (such as lasers) in the intervening decade. Emphasis in this review is given to tantalum- and niobium-base alloys. Considerable work was also done to assure that a consistent comparison was made with tungsten. A wide variety of candidate alloys derived primarily from developments directed at aircraft propulsion applications were available. Early efforts by NASA were directed at screening studies to select promising structural alloys for the space power application. This objective required fine tuning of welding procedures, e.g., the demonstration of stringent standards for control of welding atmosphere to assure good corrosion resistance in liquid alkali metals. 16 figures, 6 tables

  9. Multispot fiber laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt Hansen, Klaus

    This dissertation presents work and results achieved in the field of multi beam fiber laser welding. The project has had a practical approach, in which simulations and modelling have been kept at a minimum. Different methods to produce spot patterns with high power single mode fiber lasers have...... been examined and evaluated. It is found that both diamond turned DOE’s in zinc sulphide and multilevel etched DOE’s (Diffractive Optical Elements) in fused silica have a good performance. Welding with multiple beams in a butt joint configuration has been tested. Results are presented, showing it has...... been possible to control the welding width in incremental steps by adding more beams in a row. The laser power was used to independently control the keyhole and consequently the depth of fusion. An example of inline repair of a laser weld in butt joint configuration was examined. Zinc powder was placed...

  10. Friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolle,; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy, A [Ammon, ID

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  11. Underwater Welding Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Esam F. Alajmi; Ahmad A. Alqenaei

    2017-01-01

    Welding demand in offshore and marine applications is increased with the increasing in oil and gas activities as well as increasing in the marine transportation and industrial applications. Applications of underwater welding well be increased in Kuwait in the coming years due to the strategic directive of the country toward starting the offshore oil and gas exploration and production, and the increase in marine transportation projects. Therefore, there is a need to understand the concept of u...

  12. The mechanisms of inhibition of frog endplate currents with homologous derivatives of the 1,1-dimethyl-3-oxybutyl phosphonic acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pryazhnikov, E.; Ostroumov, A.; Druginina, O.; Vyskočil, František; Skorinkin, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 4 (2012), s. 395-404 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/09/0806; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110905 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : endplate potential * nicotinic cholinoreceptor * allosteric modulation * open channel block * lipophilicity and cholinergic effect Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.531, year: 2012

  13. Electrical stimulation of paralyzed vibrissal muscles reduces endplate reinnervation and does not promote motor recovery after facial nerve repair in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinis, Nektarios; Horn, Frauke; Genchev, Borislav; Skouras, Emmanouil; Merkel, Daniel; Angelova, Srebrina K; Kaidoglou, Katerina; Michael, Joern; Pavlov, Stoyan; Igelmund, Peter; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Irintchev, Andrey; Dunlop, Sarah A; Angelov, Doychin N

    2009-10-01

    The outcome of peripheral nerve injuries requiring surgical repair is poor. Recent work has suggested that electrical stimulation (ES) of denervated muscles could be beneficial. Here we tested whether ES has a positive influence on functional recovery after injury and surgical repair of the facial nerve. Outcomes at 2 months were compared to animals receiving sham stimulation (SS). Starting on the first day after end-to-end suture (facial-facial anastomosis), electrical stimulation (square 0.1 ms pulses at 5 Hz at an ex tempore established threshold amplitude of between 3.0 and 5.0V) was delivered to the vibrissal muscles for 5 min a day, 3 times a week. Restoration of vibrissal motor performance following ES or SS was evaluated using the video-based motion analysis and correlated with the degree of collateral axonal branching at the lesion site, the number of motor endplates in the target musculature and the quality of their reinnervation, i.e. the degree of mono- versus poly-innervation. Neither protocol reduced collateral branching. ES did not improve functional outcome, but rather reduced the number of innervated motor endplates to approximately one-fifth of normal values and failed to reduce the proportion of poly-innervated motor endplates. We conclude that ES is not beneficial for recovery of whisker function after facial nerve repair in rats.

  14. Automatic welding machine for piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Koyama, Takaichi; Iizuka, Tomio; Ito, Yoshitoshi; Takami, Katsumi.

    1978-01-01

    A remotely controlled automatic special welding machine for piping was developed. This machine is utilized for long distance pipe lines, chemical plants, thermal power generating plants and nuclear power plants effectively from the viewpoint of good quality control, reduction of labor and good controllability. The function of this welding machine is to inspect the shape and dimensions of edge preparation before welding work by the sense of touch, to detect the temperature of melt pool, inspect the bead form by the sense of touch, and check the welding state by ITV during welding work, and to grind the bead surface and inspect the weld metal by ultrasonic test automatically after welding work. The construction of this welding system, the main specification of the apparatus, the welding procedure in detail, the electrical source of this welding machine, the cooling system, the structure and handling of guide ring, the central control system and the operating characteristics are explained. The working procedure and the effect by using this welding machine, and the application to nuclear power plants and the other industrial field are outlined. The HIDIC 08 is used as the controlling computer. This welding machine is useful for welding SUS piping as well as carbon steel piping. (Nakai, Y.)

  15. Alternate Welding Processes for In-Service Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-24

    Conducting weld repairs and attaching hot tap tees onto pressurized pipes has the advantage of avoiding loss of service and revenue. However, the risks involved with in-service welding need to be managed by ensuring that welding is performed in a rep...

  16. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  17. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikie, B.L.; Wagg, A.R.; Whittle, M.J.; Yapp, D.

    1976-01-01

    The ultrasonic examination of austenitic stainless steel weld metal has always been regarded as a difficult proposition because of the large and variable ultrasonic attenuations and back scattering obtained from apparently similar weld deposits. The work to be described shows how the existence of a fibre texture within each weld deposit (as a result of epitaxial growth through successive weld beads) produces a systematic variation in the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient and the velocity of sound, depending upon the angle between the ultrasonic beam and the fibre axis. Development work has shown that it is possible to adjust the welding parameters to ensure that the crystallographic texture within each weld is compatible with improved ultrasonic transmission. The application of the results to the inspection of a specific weld in type 316 weld metal is described

  18. Arc-weld pool interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glickstein, S.S.

    1978-08-01

    The mechanisms involved in arc-weld pool interactions are extremely complex and no complete theory is presently available to describe much of the phenomena observed during welding. For the past several years, experimental and analytical studies have been undertaken at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to increase basic understanding of the gas tungsten arc welding process. These studies have included experimental spectral analysis of the arc in order to determine arc temperature and analytical modeling of the arc and weld puddle. The investigations have been directed toward determining the cause and effects of variations in the energy distribution incident upon the weldment. In addition, the effect of weld puddle distortion on weld penetration was investigated, and experimental and analytical studies of weld process variables have been undertaken to determine the effects of the variables upon weld penetration and configuration. A review of the results and analysis of these studies are presented

  19. Resistance Spot Welding of dissimilar Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Kolařík

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the properties of resistance spot welds between low carbon steel and austenitic CrNi stainless steel. The thickness of the welded dissimilar materials was 2 mm. A DeltaSpot welding gun with a process tape was used for welding the dissimilar steels. Resistance spot welds were produced with various welding parameters (welding currents ranging from 7 to 8 kA. Light microscopy, microhardness measurements across the welded joints, and EDX analysis were used to evaluate the quality of the resistance spot welds. The results confirm the applicability of DeltaSpot welding for this combination of materials.

  20. Human cartilaginous endplate degeneration is induced by calcium and the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor in the intervertebral disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MP Grant

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The cartilaginous endplates (CEPs are thin layers of hyaline cartilage found adjacent to intervertebral discs (IVDs. In addition to providing structural support, CEPs regulate nutrient and metabolic exchange in the disc. In IVD pathogenesis, CEP undergoes degeneration and calcification, compromising nutrient availability and disc cell metabolism. The mechanism(s underlying the biochemical changes of CEP in disc degeneration are currently unknown. Since calcification is often observed in later stages of IVD degeneration, we hypothesised that elevations in free calcium (Ca2+ impair CEP homeostasis. Indeed, our results demonstrated that the Ca2+ content was consistently higher in human CEP tissue with grade of disc degeneration. Increasing the levels of Ca2+ resulted in decreases in the secretion and accumulation of collagens type I, II and proteoglycan in cultured human CEP cells. Ca2+ exerted its effects on CEP matrix protein synthesis through activation of the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR; however, aggrecan content was also affected independent of CaSR activation as increases in Ca2+ directly enhanced the activity of aggrecanases. Finally, supplementing Ca2+ in our IVD organ cultures was sufficient to induce degeneration and increase the mineralisation of CEP, and decrease the diffusion of glucose into the disc. Thus, any attempt to induce anabolic repair of the disc without addressing Ca2+ may be impaired, as the increased metabolic demand of IVD cells would be compromised by decreases in the permeability of the CEP.

  1. Lifetime embrittlement of reactor core materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreyns, P.H..; Bourgeois, W.F.; Charpentier, P.L.; Kammenzind, B.F.; Franklin, D.G.; White, C.J.

    1994-08-01

    Over a core lifetime, the reactor materials Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4, and hafnium may become embrittled due to the absorption of corrosion- generated hydrogen and to neutron irradiation damage. Results are presented on the effects of fast fluence on the fracture toughness of wrought Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4, and hafnium; Zircaloy-4 to hafnium butt welds; and hydrogen precharged beta treated and weld metal Zircaloy-4 for fluences up to a maximum of approximately 150 x 10 24 n/M 2 (> 1 Mev). While Zircaloy-4 did not exhibit a decrement in K IC due to irradiation, hafnium and butt welds between hafnium and Zircaloy-4 are susceptible to embrittlement with irradiation. The embrittlement can be attributed to irradiation strengthening, which promotes cleavage fracture in hafnium and hafnium-Zircaloy welds, and, in part, to the lower chemical potential of hydrogen in Zircaloy-4 compared to hafnium, which causes hydrogen, over time, to drift from the hafnium end toward the Zircaloy-4 end and to precipitate at the interface between the weld and base-metal interface. Neutron radiation apparently affects the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4, and hafnium in different ways. Possible explanations for these differences are suggested. It was found that Zircaloy-4 is preferred over Zircaloy-2 in hafnium-to- Zircaloy butt-weld applications due to its absence of a radiation- induced reduction in K IC plus its lower hydrogen absorption characteristics compared with Zircaloy-2

  2. Multipass autogenous electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.L.; Mustaleski, T.M. Jr.; Watson, L.C.

    1986-01-01

    A multipass, autogenous welding procedure was developed for 7.6 mm (0.3 in.) wall thickness Type 304L stainless steel cylinders. The joint geometry has a 1.5 mm (0.06 in.) root-face width and a rectangular stepped groove that is 0.762 mm (0.03 in.) wide at the top of the root face and extends 1.5 mm in height, terminating into a groove width of 1.27 mm which extends to the outside of the 1.27 mm high weld-boss. One weld pass is made on the root, three passes on the 0.762 mm wide groove and three passes to complete the weld. Multipass, autogenous, electron beam welds maintain the characteristic high depth-to-width ratios and low heat input of single-pass, electron beam welds. The increased part distortion (which is still much less than from arc processes) in multipass weldments is corrected by a preweld machined compensation. Mechanical properties of multipass welds compare well with single-pass welds. The yield strength of welds in aluminum alloy 5083 is approximately the same for single-pass or multipass electron beam and gas, metal-arc welds. The incidence and size of porosity is less in multipass electron beam welding of aluminum as compared to gas, metal-arc welds. The multipass, autogenous, electron beam welding method has proven to be a reliable way to make some difficult welds in multilayer parts or in an instance where inside part temperature or weld underbead must be controlled and weld discontinuities must be minimized

  3. Laser welding engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhieh, N. M.; El Eesawi, M. E.; Hashkel, A. E.

    2007-01-01

    Laser welding was in its early life used mainly for unusual applications where no other welding process would be suitable that was twenty five years ago. Today, laser welding is a fully developed part of the metal working industry, routinely producing welds for common items such as cigarette lighters, which springs, motor/transformer lamination, hermetic seals, battery and pacemaker cans and hybrid circuit packages. Yet very few manufacturing engineering have seriously considers employing lasers in their own operations. Why? There are many reasons, but a main one must be not acquainted with the operation and capabilities of a laser system. Other reasons, such as a relatively high initial cost and a concern about using lasers in the manufacturing environment, also are frequently cited, and the complexity of the component and flexibility of the light delivery system. Laser welding could be used in place of many different standard processes, such as resistance (spot or seam), submerged arc, RF induction, high-frequency resistance, ultrasonic and electronic and electron-beam. while each of these techniques has established an independent function in the manufacturing world, the flexible laser welding approach will operate efficiently and economically in many different applications. Its flexibility will even permit the welding system to be used for other machining function, such as drilling, scribing, sealing and serializing. In this article, we will look at how laser welding works and what benefits it can offer to manufacturing engineers. Some industry observers state that there are already 2,000 laser machine tools being used for cutting, welding and drilling and that the number could reach 30,000 over the next 15 years as manufacturing engineers become more aware of the capabilities of lasers [1). While most laser applications are dedicated to one product or process that involves high-volume, long-run manufacturing, the flexibility of a laser to supply energy to hard

  4. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  5. Welding. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of eight terminal objectives for a basic welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (2 hours daily) course developed to teach the fundamentals of welding shop work, to become familiar with the operation of the welding shop…

  6. Pulsed TIG welding of pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killing, U.

    1989-01-01

    The present study investigates into the effects of impulse welding parameters on weld geometry in the joint welding of thin-walled sheets and pipes (d=2.5 mm), and it uses random samples of thick-walled sheets and pipes (d=10 mm), in fixed positions. (orig./MM) [de

  7. Friction welding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Ryuichi; Hatanaka, Tatsuo.

    1969-01-01

    A friction welding method for forming a lattice-shaped base and tie plate supporter for fuel elements is disclosed in which a plate formed with a concavity along its edge is pressure welded to a rotating member such as a boss by longitudinally contacting the projecting surfaces remaining on either side of the concavity with the rotating member during the high speed rotation thereof in the presence of an inert gas. Since only the two projecting surfaces of the plate are fused by friction to the rotary member, heat expansion is absorbed by the concavity to prevent distortion; moreover, a two point contact surface assures a stable fitting and promotes the construction of a rigid lattice in which a number of the abovementioned plates are friction welded between rotating members to form any desired complex arrangement. The inert has serves to protect the material quality of the contacting surfaces from air during the welding step. The present invention thus provides a method in which even Zircaloy may be friction welded in place of casting stainless steel in the construction of supporting lattices to thereby enhance neutron economy. (K. J. Owens)

  8. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  9. Plasma Processes of Cutting and Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-02-01

    TIG process. 2.2.2 Keyhole Welding In plasma arc welding , the term...Cutting 3 3 4 4 4 2.2 Plasma Arc Welding 5 2.2.1 Needle Arc Welding 2.2.2 Keyhole Welding 5 6 3. Applications 8 93.1 Economics 4. Environmental Aspects of...Arc Lengths III. Needle Arc Welding Conditions IV. Keyhole Welding Conditions v. Chemical Analyses of Plates Used - vii - 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

  10. Friction Stir Welding Process: A Green Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Esther T. Akinlabi; Stephen A. Akinlabi

    2012-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented and patented by The Welding Institute (TWI) in the United Kingdom in 1991 for butt and lap welding of metals and plastics. This paper highlights the benefits of friction stir welding process as an energy efficient and a green technology process in the field of welding. Compared to the other conventional welding processes, its benefits, typical applications and its use in joining similar and dissimilar materia...

  11. Crystallographic texture and microstructural changes in fusion welds of recrystallized Zry-4 rolled plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moya Riffo, A.; Vicente Alvarez, M.A.; Santisteban, J.R.; Vizcaino, P.; Limandri, S.; Daymond, M.R.; Kerr, D.; Okasinski, J.; Almer, J.; Vogel, S.C.

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a detailed characterization of the microstructural and crystallographic texture changes observed in the transition region in a weld between two Zircaloy-4 cold rolled and recrystallized plates. The microstructural study was performed by optical microscopy under polarized light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Texture changes were characterized at different lengthscales: in the micrometric size, orientation imaging maps (OIM) were constructed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), in the millimetre scale, high energy XRD experiments were done at the Advanced Photon Source (USA) and compared to neutron diffraction texture determinations performed in the HIPPO instrument at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In the heat affected zone (HAZ) we observed the development of Widmanstätten microstructures, typical of the α(hcp) to β(bcc) phase transformation. Associated with these changes a rotation of the c-poles is found in the HAZ and fusion zone. While the base material shows the typical texture of a cold rolled plate, with their c-poles pointing 35° apart from the normal direction of the plate in the normal-transversal line, in the HAZ, c-poles align along the transversal direction of the plate and then re-orient along different directions, all of these changes occurring within a lengthscale in the order of mm. The evolution of texture in this narrow region was captured by both OIM and XRD, and is consistent with previous measurements done by Neutron Diffraction in the HIPPO diffractometer at Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA. The microstructural and texture changes along the HAZ were interpreted as arising due to the effect of differences in the cooling rate and β grain size on the progress of the different α variants during transformation. Fast cooling rates and large β grains are associated to weak variant selection during the β−>α transformation, while slow cooling rates and fine β grains result in strong variant selection.

  12. Crystallographic texture and microstructural changes in fusion welds of recrystallized Zry-4 rolled plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moya Riffo, A., E-mail: alvaromoya@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Neutron Physics Department, Centro Atómico Bariloche, CNEA-CONICET (Argentina); Vicente Alvarez, M.A.; Santisteban, J.R. [Neutron Physics Department, Centro Atómico Bariloche, CNEA-CONICET (Argentina); Vizcaino, P. [Zirconium Technology Department, Centro Atómico Ezeiza, CNEA-CONICET (Argentina); Limandri, S. [Facultad de Matemática, Astronomía y Física, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba (Argentina); Daymond, M.R.; Kerr, D. [Dept. Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Okasinski, J.; Almer, J. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne (United States); Vogel, S.C. [Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-15

    This work presents a detailed characterization of the microstructural and crystallographic texture changes observed in the transition region in a weld between two Zircaloy-4 cold rolled and recrystallized plates. The microstructural study was performed by optical microscopy under polarized light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Texture changes were characterized at different lengthscales: in the micrometric size, orientation imaging maps (OIM) were constructed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), in the millimetre scale, high energy XRD experiments were done at the Advanced Photon Source (USA) and compared to neutron diffraction texture determinations performed in the HIPPO instrument at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In the heat affected zone (HAZ) we observed the development of Widmanstätten microstructures, typical of the α(hcp) to β(bcc) phase transformation. Associated with these changes a rotation of the c-poles is found in the HAZ and fusion zone. While the base material shows the typical texture of a cold rolled plate, with their c-poles pointing 35° apart from the normal direction of the plate in the normal-transversal line, in the HAZ, c-poles align along the transversal direction of the plate and then re-orient along different directions, all of these changes occurring within a lengthscale in the order of mm. The evolution of texture in this narrow region was captured by both OIM and XRD, and is consistent with previous measurements done by Neutron Diffraction in the HIPPO diffractometer at Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA. The microstructural and texture changes along the HAZ were interpreted as arising due to the effect of differences in the cooling rate and β grain size on the progress of the different α variants during transformation. Fast cooling rates and large β grains are associated to weak variant selection during the β−>α transformation, while slow cooling rates and fine β grains result in strong variant selection.

  13. Weld Nugget Temperature Control in Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A control system for a thermal stir welding system is provided. The control system includes a sensor and a controller. The sensor is coupled to the welding system's containment plate assembly and generates signals indicative of temperature of a region adjacent and parallel to the welding system's stir rod. The controller is coupled to the sensor and generates at least one control signal using the sensor signals indicative of temperature. The controller is also coupled to the welding system such that at least one of rotational speed of the stir rod, heat supplied by the welding system's induction heater, and feed speed of the welding system's weld material feeder are controlled based on the control signal(s).

  14. Thermal Stir Welding: A New Solid State Welding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Thermal stir welding is a new welding process developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Thermal stir welding is similar to friction stir welding in that it joins similar or dissimilar materials without melting the parent material. However, unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the process are all independent of each other and are separately controlled. Furthermore, the heating element of the process can be either a solid-state process (such as a thermal blanket, induction type process, etc), or, a fusion process (YG laser, plasma torch, etc.) The separation of the heating, stirring, forging elements of the process allows more degrees of freedom for greater process control. This paper introduces the mechanics of the thermal stir welding process. In addition, weld mechanical property data is presented for selected alloys as well as metallurgical analysis.

  15. Numerical simulation of welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær; Thorborg, Jesper

    Aim of project:To analyse and model the transient thermal field from arc welding (SMAW, V-shaped buttweld in 15mm plate) and to some extend the mechanical response due to the thermal field. - To implement this model in a general purpose finite element program such as ABAQUS.The simulation...... stress is also taken into account.Work carried out:With few means it is possible to define a thermal model which describes the thermal field from the welding process in reasonable agreement with reality. Identical results are found with ABAQUS and Rosenthal’s analytical solution of the governing heat...... transfer equation under same conditions. It is relative easy tointroduce boundary conditions such as convection and radiation where not surprisingly the radiation has the greatest influence especially from the high temperature regions in the weld pool and the heat affected zone.Due to the large temperature...

  16. Milestones in welding technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolby, Richard E.

    2013-09-01

    Sir Alan's PhD thesis describes his research into cracking during arc welding of armour steels. Throughout his career, he had a strong interest in defects of all types, how they formed in metallic structures and how the larger ones could be detected and sized by non-destructive techniques. He was also vitally concerned with how defects impacted on the engineering integrity of welded structures, particularly the risk of fracture in nuclear plant. This study presents a view of some of the major milestones in global welding technology that took place over the 60 or more years of Sir Alan's career and highlights those where he had a personal and direct involvement.

  17. Welding technologies for nuclear machinery and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masahiro; Yokono, Tomomi.

    1991-01-01

    The main welding methods applied to nuclear machinery and equipment are shielded metal arc welding, submerged arc welding, MAG welding and TIG welding. But in the last 10 years, in order to improve the reliability required for the welding of nuclear machinery and equipment, the welding technologies aiming at the reduction of heat input, the decrease of the number of welding pass and the automatic control of welding factors have been applied for the main purpose of bettering the quality and excluding human errors. The merits and the technology of narrow gap, pulsed MAG welding and melt-through welding are explained. As the automation of TIG welding, image processing type narrow gap, hot wire TIG welding and remote control type automatic TIG welding are described. For the longitudinal welding of active metal sheet products, plasma key-hole welding is applied. Since the concentration of its arc is good, high speed welding with low heat input can be done. For the stainless steel cladding by welding, electroslag welding has become to be employed in place of conventional submerged arc welding. Arc is not generated in the electroslag welding, and the penetration into base metal is small. (K.I.)

  18. Mechanized hyperbaric welding by robots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aust, E.; Santos, J.F. dos; Bohm, K.H.; Hensel, H.D.

    1988-01-01

    At the GKSS-Forschungszentrum investigations are carried out on mechanized welded test plates produced under working pressure between 10 to 110 bar in breathable TRIMIX-5-atmosphere. The welds are performed by a modified industrial robot, which was adapted in its components to withstand these severe conditions. Variations on the welding parameters were made to maintain a stable arc as well as to provide on indication of the effect of the variables on the mechanical properties of the welded joint. During all tests the robot showed a very good function. Good reliable welds were achieved meeting the requirements according API II04 or BS 4515-1984. (orig.) [de

  19. Spot Welding of Honeycomb Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohal, V.

    2017-08-01

    Honeycomb structures are used to prepare meals water jet cutting machines for textile. These honeycomb structures are made of stainless steel sheet thickness of 0.1-0.2 mm. Corrugated sheet metal strips are between two gears with special tooth profile. Hexagonal cells for obtaining these strips are welded points between them. Spot welding device is three electrodes in the upper part, which carries three welding points across the width of the strip of corrugated sheet metal. Spot welding device filled with press and advance mechanisms. The paper presents the values of the regime for spot welding.

  20. Understanding Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2018-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum explains the friction stir welding process in terms of two basic concepts: the concentration of deformation in a shear surface enveloping the tool and the composition of the overall plastic flow field around the tool from simple flow field components. It is demonstrated how weld structure may be understood and torque, drag, and lateral tool forces may be estimated using these concepts. Some discrepancies between computations and accompanying empirical data are discussed in the text. This work is intended to be helpful to engineers in diagnosing problems and advancing technology.

  1. Welding method by remote handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashinokuchi, Minoru.

    1994-01-01

    Water is charged into a pit (or a water reservoir) and an article to be welded is placed on a support in the pit by remote handling. A steel plate is disposed so as to cover the article to be welded by remote handling. The welding device is positioned to the portion to be welded and fixed in a state where the article to be welded is shielded from radiation by water and the steel plate. Water in the pit is drained till the portion to be welded is exposed to the atmosphere. Then, welding is conducted. After completion of the welding, water is charged again to the pit and the welding device and fixing jigs are decomposed in a state where the article to be welded is shielded again from radiation by water and the steel plate. Subsequently, the steel plate is removed by remote handling. Then, the article to be welded is returned from the pit to a temporary placing pool by remote handling. This can reduce operator's exposure. Further, since the amount of the shielding materials can be minimized, the amount of radioactive wastes can be decreased. (I.N.)

  2. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomlinson, J R; Wagg, A R; Whittle, M J [N.D.T. Applications Centre, CEGB, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1980-11-01

    The metallurgical structure of austenitic welds is described and contrasted with that found in ferritic welds. It is shown that this structure imparts a marked elastic anisotropy in the ultrasonic propagation parameters. Measurements of variations in the apparent attenuation of sound and deviations in the beam direction are described. The measurements are interpreted in terms of the measured velocity anisotropy. Two applications of the fundamental work are described. In the first it is shown how, by using short pulse compression wave probes, and with major modification of the welding procedure, a stainless steel fillet weld in an AGR boiler can be inspected. In the second application, alternative designs of a transition butt weld have been compared for ease of ultrasonic inspection. The effects of two different welding processes on such an inspection are described. Finally, the paper examines the prospects for future development of inspection and defect-sizing techniques for austenitic welds. (author)

  3. Visualization of Spot- welding Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Černý

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution devotes to monitoring of processes running during joining of steel sheets by incadescent so called point welding using non-destructive trial method – acoustic emission (AE. The joining process is detailed described within experimental measuring from the point of view of metallurgic effects runnig during weld creation (records obtained by means of AE method. It takes into consideration quality of joined steels within welding data of steel producer. Steel welding (determined by chemical composition during mechanical verification and firmness of welds consider results of measurement AE and fracture effect of point joints. The measurement also demonstrates conclusion about connection of metallurgic processes with material wave effects (AE measurement and their impact on firmness of joint at steel with guaranteed welding, difficult welding and at their potential combination.

  4. Recent Corrosion Research Trends in Weld Joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hwan Tae; Kil, Sang Cheol; Hwang, Woon Suk

    2007-01-01

    The increasing interest in the corrosion properties of weld joints in the corrosive environment is placing stringent demands on the manufacturing techniques and performance requirements, and the manufacture employs the high quality and efficiency welding process to produce welds. Welding plays an important role in the fabrication of chemical plants, nuclear power plant, ship construction, and this has led to an increasing attention to the corrosion resistant weld joints. This paper covers recent technical trends of welding technologies for corrosion resistance properties including the COMPENDEX DB analysis of welding materials, welding process, and welding fabrications

  5. Welding technology transfer task/laser based weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, Alan

    1991-01-01

    Sensors to control and monitor welding operations are currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. The laser based weld bead profiler/torch rotation sensor was modified to provide a weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds. The tracking system features a precision laser based vision sensor, automated two-axis machine motion, and an industrial PC controller. The system benefits are elimination of weld repairs caused by joint tracking errors which reduces manufacturing costs and increases production output, simplification of tooling, and free costly manufacturing floor space.

  6. 49 CFR 192.225 - Welding procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding procedures. 192.225 Section 192.225... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.225 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding procedures...

  7. Integrated sensors for robotic laser welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakovou, D.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Meijer, J.; Beyer, E.; Dausinger, F; Ostendorf, A; Otto, A.

    2005-01-01

    A welding head is under development with integrated sensory systems for robotic laser welding applications. Robotic laser welding requires sensory systems that are capable to accurately guide the welding head over a seam in three-dimensional space and provide information about the welding process as

  8. ICT diagnostic method of beryllium welding quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Lingxia; Wei Kentang; Ye Yunchang

    2002-01-01

    To avoid the interference of high density material for the quality assay of beryllium welding line, a slice by slice scanning method was proposed based upon the research results of the Industrial Computerized Tomography (ICT) diagnostics for weld penetration, weld width, off-centered deviation and weld defects of beryllium-ring welding seam with high density material inside

  9. Sensor integration for robotic laser welding processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakovou, D.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Meijer, J.; Ostendorf, A; Hoult, A.; Lu, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The use of robotic laser welding is increasing among industrial applications, because of its ability to weld objects in three dimensions. Robotic laser welding involves three sub-processes: seam detection and tracking, welding process control, and weld seam inspection. Usually, for each sub-process,

  10. Numerical analysis of weld pool oscillation in laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jung Ho [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Farson, Dave F [The Ohio State University, Columbus (United States); Hollis, Kendall; Milewski, John O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Volume of fluid (VOF) numerical simulation was used to investigate melt flow and volumetric oscillation of conduction-mode pulsed laser weld pools. The result is compared to high speed video stream of titanium laser spot welding experiment. The total simulation time is 10ms with the first 5 ms being heating and melting under constant laser irradiation and the remaining 5 ms corresponding to resolidification of the weld pool. During the melting process, the liquid pool did not exhibit periodic oscillation but was continually depressed by the evaporation recoil pressure. After the laser pulse, the weld pool was excited into volumetric oscillation by the release of pressure on its surface and oscillation of the weld pool surface was analyzed. The simulation model suggested adjusting thermal diffusivity to match cooling rate and puddle diameter during solidification which is distinguishable from previous weld pool simulation. The frequency continuously increased from several thousand cycles per second to tens of thousands of cycles per second as the weld pool solidified and its diameter decreased. The result is the first trial of investigation of small weld pool oscillation in laser welding although there have been several reports about arc welding.

  11. Deconvoluting the Friction Stir Weld Process for Optimizing Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2008-01-01

    In the friction stir welding process, the rotating surfaces of the pin and shoulder contact the weld metal and force a rotational flow within the weld metal. Heat, generated by the metal deformation as well as frictional slippage with the contact surface, softens the metal and makes it easier to deform. As in any thermo-mechanical processing of metal, the flow conditions are critical to the quality of the weld. For example, extrusion of metal from under the shoulder of an excessively hot weld may relax local pressure and result in wormhole defects. The trace of the weld joint in the wake of the weld may vary geometrically depending upon the flow streamlines around the tool with some geometry more vulnerable to loss of strength from joint contamination than others. The material flow path around the tool cannot be seen in real time during the weld. By using analytical "tools" based upon the principles of mathematics and physics, a weld model can be created to compute features that can be observed. By comparing the computed observations with actual data, the weld model can be validated or adjusted to get better agreement. Inputs to the model to predict weld structures and properties include: hot working properties ofthe metal, pin tool geometry, travel rate, rotation and plunge force. Since metals record their prior hot working history, the hot working conditions imparted during FSW can be quantified by interpreting the final microstructure. Variations in texture and grain size result from variations in the strain accommodated at a given strain rate and temperature. Microstructural data from a variety of FSWs has been correlated with prior marker studies to contribute to our understanding of the FSW process. Once this stage is reached, the weld modeling process can save significant development costs by reducing costly trial-and-error approaches to obtaining quality welds.

  12. Welding in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The 3rd international conference 'Welding in nuclear engineering', organized in 1978 by the Deutscher Verband fuer Schweisstechnik e.V., was, like the two foregoing conferences in 1970 and 1974, an absolute success. The noteworthy echo to this meeting in the international technical world - the number of 650 participants from 26 countries is self-evidence - and this fact, was for the Deutscher Verband fuer Schweisstechnik e.V. occasion and at the same time an obligation now to follow in the same way, the meeting that was started 12 years ago, by organizing the international conference 'Welding in nuclear engineering'. The conference this year offers in addition to the two plenary session lectures, 34 short reports and a further 28 single contributions in the form of two poster-sessions. Unfortunately, it was again not possible to accept all the papers submitted because the conference was limited to 2 days only. Nevertheless, the papers will offer a representative cross-section through the total range of welding engineering. In particular, the poster session, which take place for the first time within the scope of a meeting organized by the Working Group 'Welding in Nuclear Engineering', should contribute to the aim that this time again the discussions will form the main point of the conference. (orig./RW) [de

  13. Welding. Student Learning Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm Beach County Board of Public Instruction, West Palm Beach, FL.

    This student learning guide contains 30 modules for completing a course in welding. It is designed especially for use in secondary schools in Palm Beach County, Florida. Each module covers one task, and consists of a purpose, performance objective, enabling objectives, learning activities keyed to resources, information sheets, student self-check…

  14. Thermal Stresses in Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær

    1998-01-01

    Studies of the transient temperature fields and the hereby induced deformations and stressses in a butt-welded mild steel plate modelledrespectively in 2D plane stress state (as well as plane strain state) and in full 3D have been done. The model has been implemented in the generalpurpose FE...

  15. State Skill Standards: Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pointer, Mike; Naylor, Randy; Warden, John; Senek, Gene; Shirley, Charles; Lefcourt, Lew; Munson, Justin; Johnson, Art

    2005-01-01

    The Department of Education has undertaken an ambitious effort to develop statewide occupational skill standards. The standards in this document are for welding programs and are designed to clearly state what the student should know and be able to do upon completion of an advanced high-school program. The writing team determined that any statewide…

  16. Elementary TIG Welding Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, John E., III

    The text was prepared to help deaf students develop the skills needed by an employed welder. It uses simplified language and illustrations to present concepts which should be reinforced by practical experience with welding skills. Each of the 12 lessons contains: (1) an information section with many illustrations which presents a concept or…

  17. Welding, Bonding and Fastening, 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, J. D. (Editor); Stein, B. A. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A compilation of papers presented in a joint NASA, American Society for Metals, The George Washington University, American Welding Soceity, and Society of Manufacturing Engineers conference on Welding, Bonding, and Fastening at Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, on October 23 to 25, 1984 is given. Papers were presented on technology developed in current research programs relevant to welding, bonding, and fastening of structural materials required in fabricating structures and mechanical systems used in the aerospace, hydrospace, and automotive industries. Topics covered in the conference included equipment, hardware and materials used when welding, brazing, and soldering, mechanical fastening, explosive welding, use of unique selected joining techniques, adhesives bonding, and nondestructive evaluation. A concept of the factory of the future was presented, followed by advanced welding techniques, automated equipment for welding, welding in a cryogenic atmosphere, blind fastening, stress corrosion resistant fasteners, fastening equipment, explosive welding of different configurations and materials, solid-state bonding, electron beam welding, new adhesives, effects of cryogenics on adhesives, and new techniques and equipment for adhesive bonding.

  18. Galvanic corrosion of beryllium welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.A.; Butt, D.P.; Lillard, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Beryllium is difficult to weld because it is highly susceptible to cracking. The most commonly used filler metal in beryllium welds is Al-12 wt.% Si. Beryllium has been successfully welded using Al-Si filler metal with more than 30 wt.% Al. This filler creates an aluminum-rich fusion zone with a low melting point that tends to backfill cracks. Drawbacks to adding a filler metal include a reduction in service temperature, a lowering of the tensile strength of the weld, and the possibility for galvanic corrosion to occur at the weld. To evaluate the degree of interaction between Be and Al-Si in an actual weld, sections from a mock beryllium weldment were exposed to 0.1 M Cl - solution. Results indicate that the galvanic couple between Be and the Al-Si weld material results in the cathodic protection of the weld and of the anodic dissolution of the bulk Be material. While the cathodic protection of Al is generally inefficient, the high anodic dissolution rate of the bulk Be during pitting corrosion combined with the insulating properties of the Be oxide afford some protection of the Al-Si weld material. Although dissolution of the Be precipitate in the weld material does occur, no corrosion of the Al-Si matrix was observed

  19. In-field Welding and Coating Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-12

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and Edison Welding Institute (EWI) created both laboratory and infield girth weld samples to evaluate the effects of weld geometry and hydrogen off-gassing on the performance of protective coatings. Laboratory made plat...

  20. Perspectives of special welding methods. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herden, G.; Buness, G.; Wiesner, P.

    1976-01-01

    Laser, electron, ion, and light beam welding as well as plasma arc welding are considered to be special fusion welding methods. The stage of development and possible future applications of these methods are described. (author)

  1. Improvements in and relating to welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, B.D.

    1979-01-01

    This invention concerns apparatus for use in welding, particularly welding which must be effected in a predetermined, for example, inert atmosphere, e.g. the welding of reactive materials such as zircaloy, titanium, magnesium, aluminium, etc. (U.K.)

  2. Welding for the CRBRP steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalaris, C.N.; Ring, P.J.; Durand, R.E.; Wright, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    The rationale for selecting weld design, welding procedures and inspection methods was based upon the desire to obtain the highest reliability welds for the CRBRP steam generators. To assure the highest weld reliability, heavy emphasis was placed on the control of material cleanliness and composition substantially exceeding the requirements of the ASME Code for 2-1/4Cr--1Mo. The high tube/tubesheet weld quality was achieved through close material control, an extensive weld development program and the selection of high reliability welding equipment. Shell and nozzle weld fabrication using TIG, MIG, and submerged arc procedures are also being controlled through precise specifications, including preheat and postheat programs, together with radiography and ultrasonic inspection to ascertain the weld quality desired. Details of the tube/tubesheet welding and shell welding are described and results from the weld testing program are discussed

  3. Developments in welding and joining methods of metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilarczyk, J.

    2007-01-01

    The impact of the welding technology on the economy development. The welding and joining methods review. The particular role of the laser welding and its interesting applications: with filler metal, twin spot laser welding, hybrid welding process, remote welding. The fiber lasers. The high intensity electron beams applications for surface modification. The TIG welding with the use of the active flux. Friction welding, friction stir welding and friction linear welding. (author)

  4. Welding wire pressure sensor assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Timothy B. (Inventor); Milly, Peter F., Sr. (Inventor); White, J. Kevin (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device which is used to monitor the position of a filler wire relative to a base material being welded as the filler wire is added to a welding pool. The device is applicable to automated welding systems wherein nonconsumable electrode arc welding processes are utilized in conjunction with a filler wire which is added to a weld pool created by the electrode arc. The invention senses pressure deviations from a predetermined pressure between the filler wire and the base material, and provides electrical signals responsive to the deviations for actuating control mechanisms in an automatic welding apparatus so as to minimize the pressure deviation and to prevent disengagement of the contact between the filler wire and the base material.

  5. Fundamental Laser Welding Process Investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1998-01-01

    In a number of systematic laboratory investigations the fundamental behavior of the laser welding process was analyzed by the use of normal video (30 Hz), high speed video (100 and 400 Hz) and photo diodes. Sensors were positioned to monitor the welding process from both the top side and the rear...... side of the specimen.Special attention has been given to the dynamic nature of the laser welding process, especially during unstable welding conditions. In one series of experiments, the stability of the process has been varied by changing the gap distance in lap welding. In another series...... video pictures (400 Hz), a clear impact on the seam characteristics has been identified when a hump occurs.Finally, a clear correlation between the position of the focus point, the resultant process type and the corresponding signal intensity and signal variation has been found for sheets welded...

  6. INERT GAS SHIELD FOR WELDING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S.O.; Daly, F.V.

    1958-10-14

    S>An inert gas shield is presented for arc-welding materials such as zirconium that tend to oxidize rapidly in air. The device comprises a rectangular metal box into which the welding electrode is introduced through a rubber diaphragm to provide flexibility. The front of the box is provided with a wlndow having a small hole through which flller metal is introduced. The box is supplied with an inert gas to exclude the atmosphere, and with cooling water to promote the solidification of the weld while in tbe inert atmosphere. A separate water-cooled copper backing bar is provided underneath the joint to be welded to contain the melt-through at the root of the joint, shielding the root of the joint with its own supply of inert gas and cooling the deposited weld metal. This device facilitates the welding of large workpieces of zirconium frequently encountered in reactor construction.

  7. Metals welding by using laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Qaisy, R.A.W.

    1991-01-01

    In the present work, same welding ''conduction limited type'' under atmospheric conditions was performed using pulsed Ng:YAG laser to weld; low carbon steel (LCS), stainless steel (304) (SUS304), stainless steel (303) (SUS303), and brass. Microstructure of welded zone, heat affected zone (HAZ), and the laser energy on penetration depth and effective diameter were studied. Tensile test, micro-hardness, and surface roughness of welded and parent metals were also dealt with. Melting efficiency was worked out and an under vacuum seam welding of low carbon steel has been accomplished. Finally spot welding of aluminium tungsten, and platinium wires were employed using different layer energies. 34 tabs.; 82 figs.; 51 refs.; 1 app

  8. Corrosion of carbon steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, B.

    1988-09-01

    This report assesses the factors which cause preferential attack to occur in carbon steel fusion welds. It was concluded that the main factors were: the inclusion content of the weld metal, the potential of the weld metal being less noble than that of the parent, and the presence of low-temperature transformation products in the heat-affected zone of the weld. These factors should be minimized or eliminated as appropriate so that the corrosion allowances determined for carbon steel waste drums is also adequate for the welds. An experimental/theoretical approach is recommended to evaluate the relative corrosion resistance of welds prepared from BS 4360 grade 43A steel to that of the parent material. (author)

  9. Investigation on mechanical properties of welded material under different types of welding filler (shielded metal arc welding)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Abdullah Mohd; Lair, Noor Ajian Mohd; Wei, Foo Jun

    2018-05-01

    The Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) is (or the Stick welding) defined as a welding process, which melts and joins metals with an arc between a welding filler (electrode rod) and the workpieces. The main objective was to study the mechanical properties of welded metal under different types of welding fillers and current for SMAW. This project utilized the Design of Experiment (DOE) by adopting the Full Factorial Design. The independent variables were the types of welding filler and welding current, whereas the other welding parameters were fixed at the optimum value. The levels for types of welding filler were by the models of welding filler (E6013, E7016 and E7018) used and the levels for welding current were 80A and 90A. The responses were the mechanical properties of welded material, which include tensile strength and hardness. The experiment was analyzed using the two way ANOVA. The results prove that there are significant effects of welding filler types and current levels on the tensile strength and hardness of the welded metal. At the same time, the ANOVA results and interaction plot indicate that there are significant interactions between the welding filler types and the welding current on both the hardness and tensile strength of the welded metals, which has never been reported before. This project found that when the amount of heat input with increase, the mechanical properties such as tensile strength and hardness decrease. The optimum tensile strength for welded metal is produced by the welding filler E7016 and the optimum of hardness of welded metal is produced by the welding filler E7018 at welding current of 80A.

  10. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding system includes a welding head assembly having a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. During a welding operation, ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod as it rotates about its longitudinal axis. The ultrasonic pulses are applied in such a way that they propagate parallel to the longitudinal axis of the rod.

  11. Viewing Welds By Computer Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascua, Antonio G.; Roy, Jagatjit

    1990-01-01

    Computer tomography system used to inspect welds for root penetration. Source illuminates rotating welded part with fan-shaped beam of x rays or gamma rays. Detectors in circular array on opposite side of part intercept beam and convert it into electrical signals. Computer processes signals into image of cross section of weld. Image displayed on video monitor. System offers only nondestructive way to check penetration from outside when inner surfaces inaccessible.

  12. Welding facilities for NPP assembling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojtenberg, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    Recommendations concerning the choice of equipment for welding in pre-assembling work shops, in the enlarging assembling shops and at the assembling site, are given. Advanced production automatic welders and semiautomatic machines, applied during the NPP equipment assembling as well as automatic machines specially produced for welding the main reactor components and pipelines are described. Automatic and semiautomatic machine and manual welding post supply sources are considered

  13. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of performing ultrasonic stir welding uses a welding head assembly to include a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. In the method, the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis during a welding operation. During the welding operation, a series of on-off ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod such that they propagate parallel to the rod's longitudinal axis. At least a pulse rate associated with the on-off ultrasonic pulses is controlled.

  14. Socket welds in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, P.A.; Torres, L.L.

    1995-01-01

    Socket welds are easier and faster to make than are butt welds. However, they are often not used in nuclear facilities because the crevices between the pipes and the socket sleeves may be subject to crevice corrosion. If socket welds can be qualified for wider use in facilities that process nuclear materials, the radiation exposures to welders can be significantly reduced. The current tests at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) are designed to determine if socket welds can be qualified for use in the waste processing system at a nuclear fuel processing plant

  15. Programmable Automated Welding System (PAWS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Martin D.

    1994-01-01

    An ambitious project to develop an advanced, automated welding system is being funded as part of the Navy Joining Center with Babcock & Wilcox as the prime integrator. This program, the Programmable Automated Welding System (PAWS), involves the integration of both planning and real-time control activities. Planning functions include the development of a graphical decision support system within a standard, portable environment. Real-time control functions include the development of a modular, intelligent, real-time control system and the integration of a number of welding process sensors. This paper presents each of these components of the PAWS and discusses how they can be utilized to automate the welding operation.

  16. Comparison of Welding Residual Stresses of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding and Submerged Arc Welding in Offshore Steel Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Michael Joachim; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    In the offshore industry, welding-induced distortion and tensile residual stresses have become a major concern in relation to the structural integrity of a welded structure. Particularly, the continuous increase in size of welded plates and joints needs special attention concerning welding induced...... residual stresses. These stresses have a negative impact on the integrity of the welded joint as they promote distortion, reduce fatigue life, and contribute to corrosion cracking and premature failure in the weld components. This paper deals with the influence and impact of welding method on the welding...... induced residual stresses. It is also investigated whether the assumption of residual stresses up to yield strength magnitude are present in welded structures as stated in the design guidelines. The fatigue strength for welded joints is based on this assumption. The two welding methods investigated...

  17. Ultrashort time-to-echo MRI of the cartilaginous endplate: technique and association with intervertebral disc degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Travis; Anthony, Marina-Portia; Kim, Mina; Khong, Pek-Lan; Chan, Queenie; Samartzis, Dino

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the feasibility of the ultrashort time-to-echo (UTE) MRI technique to assess cartilaginous endplate (CEP) defects in humans in vivo and to assess their relationship with intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. Nine volunteer subjects (mean age=43.9 years; range=22–61 years) were recruited, representing 54 IVDs and 108 CEPs. The subjects underwent T2-weighted and UTE MRI to assess for the presence and severity of IVD degeneration, and for the presence of CEP defects, respectively, from T12 to S1. IVD degeneration was graded according to the Schneiderman et al. classification on T2-weighted MRI. CEP defects were defined on UTE MRI as discontinuity of high signal over four consecutive images and were independently assessed by two observers. Thirty-seven out of 108 (34.3%) CEPs had defects, which mainly occurred at T12/L1, L1/L2 and L4/L5 (P=0.008). Multivariate logistic regression revealed that lower body mass index (P=0.009) and younger (P=0.034) individuals had a decreased likelihood of having CEP defects. A statistically significant association was found to exist between the presence of CEP defects and IVD degeneration (P=0.036). A higher prevalence of degenerated IVDs with CEP defects was found at L4/5 and L5/S1, while degenerated IVDs with no CEP defects were found throughout the whole lumbar region. Mean IVD degeneration scores of the L4/5 and L5/S1 levels with CEP defects were higher in comparison with those with no CEP defects. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of using UTE MRI in humans in vivo to assess the integrity of the CEP. A statistically significant association was found to exist between the presence of CEP defects and IVD degeneration. In the lower lumbar region, more severe degeneration was found to occur in the IVDs with CEP defects than in those without defects.

  18. Steels and welding nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessa, M.; Milella, P.P.

    1987-01-01

    This ENEA Data-Base regards mechanical properties, chemical composition and heat treatments of nuclear pressure vessel materials: type A533-B, A302-B, A508 steel plates and forgings, submerged arc welds and HAZ before and after nuclear irradiation. Irradiation experiments were generally performed in high flux material test reactors. Data were collected from international available literature about water nuclear reactors pressure vessel materials embrittlement

  19. Gas Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 5. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in gas metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety and testing, gas metal arc…

  20. Laser Welding Test Results with Gas Atmospheres in Welding Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joung, Chang-Young; Hong, Jin-Tae; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Heo, Sung-Ho; Jang, Seo-Yun; Yang, Tae-Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The weld beads of specimens welded under identical conditions in the helium and argon gas were cleaner, more regular, and steadier than those in a vacuum. The penetration depth of the FZ in the vacuum was much deeper than those in the helium and argon gas. To measure the irradiation properties of nuclear fuel in a test reactor, a nuclear fuel test rod instrumented with various sensors must be fabricated with assembly processes. A laser welding system to assemble the nuclear fuel test rod was designed and fabricated to develop various welding technologies of the fuel test rods to joint between a cladding tube and end-caps. It is an air-cooling optical fiber type and its emission modes are a continuous (CW) mode of which the laser generates continuous emission, and pulse (QCW) mode in which the laser internally generates sequences of pulses. We considered the system welding a sample in a chamber that can weld a specimen in a vacuum and inert gas atmosphere, and the chamber was installed on the working plate of the laser welding system. In the chamber, the laser welding process should be conducted to have no defects on the sealing area between a cladding tube and an end-cap.

  1. Sustainability of Welding Process through Bobbin Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sued, M. K.; Samsuri, S. S. M.; Kassim, M. K. A. M.; Nasir, S. N. N. M.

    2018-03-01

    Welding process is in high demand, which required a competitive technology to be adopted. This is important for sustaining the needs of the joining industries without ignoring the impact of the process to the environment. Friction stir welding (FSW) is stated to be benefitting the environment through low energy consumption, which cannot be achieved through traditional arc welding. However, this is not well documented, especially for bobbin friction stir welding (BFSW). Therefore, an investigation is conducted by measuring current consumption of the machine during the BFSW process. From the measurement, different phases of BFSW welding process and its electrical demand are presented. It is found that in general total energy in BFSW is about 130kW inclusive of all identified process phases. The phase that utilise for joint formation is in weld phase that used the highest total energy of 120kWs. The recorded total energy is still far below the traditional welding technology and the conventional friction stir welding (CFSW) energy demand. This indicates that BFSW technology with its vast benefit able to sustain the joining technology in near future.

  2. [New welding processes and health effects of welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vecchia, G Marina; Maestrelli, Piero

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes some of the recent developments in the control technology to enhance capability of Pulse Gas Metal Arc Welding. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) processing has been also considered. FSW is a new solid-state joining technique. Heat generated by friction at the rotating tool softens the material being welded. FSW can be considered a green and energy-efficient technique without deleterious fumes, gas, radiation, and noise. Application of new welding processes is limited and studies on health effects in exposed workers are lacking. Acute and chronic health effects of conventional welding have been described. Metal fume fever and cross-shift decline of lung function are the main acute respiratory effects. Skin and eyes may be affected by heat, electricity and UV radiations. Chronic effects on respiratory system include chronic bronchitis, a benign pneumoconiosis (siderosis), asthma, and a possible increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Pulmonary infections are increased in terms of severity, duration, and frequency among welders.

  3. A control system for uniform bead in fillet arc welding on tack welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Woong; Lee, Jun Young

    2008-01-01

    Positioning a workpiece accurately and preventing weld distortion, tack welding is often adopted before main welding in the construction of welded structures. However, this tack weld deteriorates the final weld bead profile, so that the grinding process is usually performed for a uniform weld bead profile. In this study, a control system for uniform weld bead is proposed for the fillet arc welding on tack welds. The system consists of GMA welding machine, torch manipulator, laser vision sensor for measuring the tack weld size and the database for optimal welding conditions. Experiments have been performed for constructing the database and for evaluating the control capability of the system. It has been shown that the system has the capability to smooth the bead at the high level of quality

  4. Effects of Fusion Tack Welds on Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Pendleton, M. L.; Brooke, S. A.; Russell, C. K.

    2012-01-01

    In order to know whether fusion tack welds would affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir seam welds in 2195-T87 aluminum alloy, the fracture stresses of 144 tensile test coupons cut from 24 welded panels containing segments of friction stir welds were measured. Each of the panels was welded under unique processing conditions. A measure of the effect of the tack welds for each panel was devised. An analysis of the measures of the tack weld effect supported the hypothesis that fusion tack welds do not affect the strength of self-reacting friction stir welds to a 5% level of confidence.

  5. Residual stress reduction in the penetration nozzle weld joint by overlay welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Wenchun; Luo, Yun; Wang, B.Y.; Tu, S.T.; Gong, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Residual stress reduction in penetration weld nozzle by overlay welding was studied. • The overlay weld can decrease the residual stress in the weld root. • Long overlay welding is proposed in the actual welding. • Overlay weld to decrease residual stress is more suitable for thin nozzle. - Abstract: Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the penetration nozzle weld joint endangers the structural reliability of pressure vessels in nuclear and chemical industries. How to decrease the residual stress is very critical to ensure the structure integrity. In this paper, a new method, which uses overlay welding on the inner surface of nozzle, is proposed to decrease the residual stresses in the penetration joint. Finite element simulation is used to study the change of weld residual stresses before and after overlay welding. It reveals that this method can mainly decrease the residual stress in the weld root. Before overlay welding, large tensile residual stresses are generated in the weld root. After overlay weld, the tensile hoop stress in weld root has been decreased about 45%, and the radial stress has been decreased to compressive stress, which is helpful to decrease the susceptibility to SCC. With the increase of overlay welding length, the residual stress in weld root has been greatly decreased, and thus the long overlay welding is proposed in the actual welding. It also finds that this method is more suitable for thin nozzle rather than thick nozzle

  6. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikie, B.L.; Wagg, A.R.; Whittle, M.J.; Yapp, D.

    1976-01-01

    Optical and X-ray metallography combined with ultrasonic testing by compression waves was used for inspection of stainless steel weld metal produced by three different welding techniques. X-ray diffraction showed that each weld possessed a characteristic fibre textured structure which was shown by optical microscopy to be parallel to columnar grain boundaries. Metallographic evidence suggested that the development of fibre texture is due to the mechanism of competitive growth. From observations made as a result of optical metallographic examination the orientation of the fibre axis could be predicted if the weld geometry and welding procedure were known. Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements as a continuous function of grain orientation, made on cylinders machined from weld samples, showed that attenuation was strongly orientation dependent. It was concluded that the sensitivity of ultrasonic inspection to small defects is unlikely to be as high for austenitic welds as for ferritic even when transmission is improved by modifying the welding procedure to improve the ultrasonic transmission. (U.K.)

  7. Metal Working and Welding Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by metal workers and welders. Addressed in the six individual units of the course are the following topics: weldable metals and their alloys, arc welding, gas welding,…

  8. Welding abilities of UFG metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawiński, Łukasz; Chmielewski, Tomasz; Olejnik, Lech; Buffa, Gianluca; Campanella, Davide; Fratini, Livan

    2018-05-01

    Ultrafine Grained (UFG) metals are characterized by an average grain size of welded joints with similar properties to the base of UFG material are crucial for the production of finished engineering components. Conventional welding methods based on local melting of the joined edges cannot be used due to the UFG microstructure degradation caused by the heat occurrence in the heat affected zone. Therefore, the possibility of obtaining UFG materials joints with different shearing plane (SP) positions by means of friction welded processes, which do not exceed the melting temperature during the process, should be investigated. The article focuses on the Linear Friction Welding (LFW) method, which belongs to innovative welding processes based on mixing of the friction-heated material in the solid state. LFW is a welding process used to joint bulk components. In the process, the friction forces work due to the high frequency oscillation and the pressure between the specimens is converted in thermal energy. Character and range of recrystallization can be controlled by changing LFW parameters. Experimental study on the welded UFG 1070 aluminum alloy by means of FLW method, indicates the possibility of reducing the UFG structure degradation in the obtained joint. A laboratory designed LFW machine has been used to weld the specimens with different contact pressure and oscillation frequency.

  9. Arc modeling for welding analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glickstein, S.S.

    1978-04-01

    A one-dimensional model of the welding arc that considers heat generation by the Joule effect and heat losses by radiation and conduction has been used to study the effects of various gases and gas mixtures currently employed for welding applications. Minor additions of low ionization potential impurities to these gases are shown to significantly perturb the electrical properties of the parent gas causing gross changes in the radial temperature distribution of the arc discharge. Such changes are reflected in the current density distribution and ultimately in the input energy distribution to the weldment. The result is observed as a variation in weld penetration. Recently published experiments and analyses of welding arcs are also evaluated and shown to contain erroneous data and results. Contrary to previous beliefs, the inclusion of a radiation loss term in the basic energy balance equation is important and cannot be considered as negligible in an argon arc at temperatures as low as 10,000 0 K. The one-dimensional analysis of the welding arc as well as the evaluation of these earlier published reports helps to explain the effects of various gases used for welding, improves our understanding of the physics of the welding arc, and provides a stepping stone for a more elaborate model which can be applied to help optimize welding parameters

  10. Laser welding of tailored blanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecas, P.; Gouveia, H.; Quintino, L.; Olsen, F.O.

    1998-01-01

    Laser welding has an increasing role in the automotive industry, namely on the sub-assemblies manufacturing. Several sheet-shape parts are laser welded, on a dissimilar combination of thicknesses and materials, and are afterwards formed (stamped) being transformed in a vehicle body component. In this paper low carbon CO 2 laser welding, on the thicknesses of 1,25 and 0.75 mm, formability investigation is described. There will be a description of how the laser welded blanks behave in different forming tests, and the influence of misalignment and undercut on the formability. The quality is evaluated by measuring the limit strain and limit effective strain for the laser welded sheets and the base material, which will be presented in a forming limit diagram. (Author) 14 refs

  11. Reduction of Biomechanical and Welding Fume Exposures in Stud Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fethke, Nathan B; Peters, Thomas M; Leonard, Stephanie; Metwali, Mahmoud; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A

    2016-04-01

    The welding of shear stud connectors to structural steel in construction requires a prolonged stooped posture that exposes ironworkers to biomechanical and welding fume hazards. In this study, biomechanical and welding fume exposures during stud welding using conventional methods were compared to exposures associated with use of a prototype system that allowed participants to weld from an upright position. The effect of base material (i.e. bare structural beam versus galvanized decking) on welding fume concentration (particle number and mass), particle size distribution, and particle composition was also explored. Thirty participants completed a series of stud welding simulations in a local apprenticeship training facility. Use of the upright system was associated with substantial reductions in trunk inclination and the activity levels of several muscle groups. Inhalable mass concentrations of welding fume (averaged over ~18 min) when using conventional methods were high (18.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 65.7 mg m(-3) for through deck), with estimated mass concentrations of iron (7.8 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), zinc (0.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), and manganese (0.9 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 1.5 mg m(-3) for through deck) often exceeding the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values (TLVs). Number and mass concentrations were substantially reduced when using the upright system, although the total inhalable mass concentration remained above the TLV when welding through decking. The average diameters of the welding fume particles for both bare beam (31±17 nm) through deck conditions (34±34 nm) and the chemical composition of the particles indicated the presence of metallic nanoparticles. Stud welding exposes ironworkers to potentially high levels of biomechanical loading (primarily to the low back) and welding fume. The upright system used in this study improved exposure

  12. 46 CFR 154.660 - Pipe welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pipe welding. 154.660 Section 154.660 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... § 154.660 Pipe welding. (a) Pipe welding must meet Part 57 of this chapter. (b) Longitudinal butt welds...

  13. 49 CFR 195.214 - Welding procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding procedures. 195.214 Section 195.214... PIPELINE Construction § 195.214 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding procedures qualified under Section 5 of API 1104 or Section IX of the ASME Boiler and...

  14. 29 CFR 1910.255 - Resistance welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resistance welding. 1910.255 Section 1910.255 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Welding, Cutting and Brazing § 1910.255 Resistance welding. (a.... Ignitron tubes used in resistance welding equipment shall be equipped with a thermal protection switch. (3...

  15. METHOD AND SYSTEM FOR LASER WELDING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to laser welding of at least two adjacent, abutting or overlapping work pieces in a welding direction using multiple laser beams guided to a welding region, wherein at least two of the multiple laser beams are coupled into the welding region so as to form a melt and at least...

  16. 49 CFR 179.300-9 - Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding. 179.300-9 Section 179.300-9... Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-9 Welding. (a) Longitudinal... fusion welded on class DOT-110A tanks. Welding procedures, welders and fabricators must be approved in...

  17. Tailor-welded blanks and their production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qi

    2005-01-01

    Tailor welded blanks had been widely used in the automobile industry. A tailor welded blank consists of several flat sheets that were laser welded together before stamping. A combination of different materials, thickness, and coatings could be welded together to form a blank for stamping car body panels. As for the material for automobile industry, this technology was one of the development trend for automobile industry because of its weight reduction, safety improvement and economical use of materials. In this paper, the characters and production of tailor welded blanks in the market were discussed in detail. There had two major methods to produce tailor welded blanks. Laser welding would replace mesh seam welding for the production of tailor welded blanks in the future. The requirements on the edge preparation of unwelded blanks for tailor welded blanks were higher than the other steel processing technology. In order to produce the laser welded blank, there had the other process before the laser welding in the factory. In the world, there had three kinds of patterns for the large volume production of tailor welded blanks. In China, steel factory played the important role in the promotion of the application of tailor welded blanks. The competition for the supply of tailor welded blanks to the automobile industry would become fierce in the near future. As a result, the demand for the quality control on the production of tailor welded blanks would be the first priority concern for the factory.

  18. Clamp and Gas Nozzle for TIG Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gue, G. B.; Goller, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Tool that combines clamp with gas nozzle is aid to tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding in hard-to-reach spots. Tool holds work to be welded while directing a stream of argon gas at weld joint, providing an oxygen-free environment for tungsten-arc welding.

  19. Electron beam welding fundamentals and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mara, G.L.; Armstrong, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    The electron beam welding process is described and the unique mode of operation and penetration explained by a description of the forces operating within the weld pool. This penetration model is demonstrated by high speed cinematography of the weld pool on several materials. The conditions under which weld defects are formed are discussed and examples are presented. (auth)

  20. Electron beam welding of aluminium components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maajid, Ali; Vadali, S.K.; Maury, D.K.

    2015-01-01

    Aluminium is one of the most widely used materials in industries like transportation, shipbuilding, manufacturing, aerospace, nuclear, etc. The challenges in joining of aluminium are distortion, cleanliness and quality. Main difficulties faced during fusion welding of aluminium components are removal of surface oxide layer, weld porosity, high heat input requirement, distortion, hot cracking, etc. Physical properties of aluminium such as its high thermal conductivity, high coefficient of thermal expansion, no change in colour at high temperature, large difference in the melting points of the metal and its oxide (∼ 1400 °C) compound the difficulties faced during welding. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), Plasma Arc Welding (PAW), etc are generally used in industries for fusion welding of aluminium alloys. However in case of thicker jobs the above processes are not suitable due to requirements of elaborate edge preparation, preheating of jobs, fixturing to prevent distortion, etc. Moreover, precise control over the heat input during welding and weld bead penetration is not possible with above processes. Further, if heat sensitive parts are located near the weld joint then high energy density beam welding process like Electron Beam Welding (EBW) is the best possible choice for aluminium welding.This paper discusses EB welding of aluminium components, typical geometry of components, selection/optimization of welding parameters, problems faced during standardization of welding and process parameters and their remedies etc.

  1. Machine for welding solar cell connections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorans, D.Y.

    1977-08-09

    A machine for welding a connection wire over a solar cell electrode is described which comprises a base, a welding mount for the solar cell which is supported on the base, means for holding the solar cell on the welding mount, welding electrodes, means to lower the welding electrodes over the solar cell and the connection wire superimposed thereon, means for applying electric current pulses to said welding electrodes. It is characterized by the fact that it further comprises means for imparting to said mount an alternating transverse movement in relation to said base before and during the welding operation.

  2. Spot Welding Characterizations With Time Variable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Hafid; Pinitoyo, A.; History; Paidjo, Andryansyah; Sagino, Sudarmin; Tamzil, M.

    2001-01-01

    For obtain spot welding used effective data, this research is made, so that time operational of machine increasing. Welding parameters are material classification, electrical current, and weld time. All of the factors are determined welding quality. If the plate more thick, the time must be longer when the current constant. Another factor as determined welding quality are surface condition of electrode, surface condition of weld material, and material classifications. In this research, the weld machine type IP32A2 VI (110 V), Rivoira trademark is characterized

  3. Development of automatic laser welding system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohwaki, Katsura

    2002-01-01

    Laser are a new production tool for high speed and low distortion welding and applications to automatic welding lines are increasing. IHI has long experience of laser processing for the preservation of nuclear power plants, welding of airplane engines and so on. Moreover, YAG laser oscillators and various kinds of hardware have been developed for laser welding and automation. Combining these welding technologies and laser hardware technologies produce the automatic laser welding system. In this paper, the component technologies are described, including combined optics intended to improve welding stability, laser oscillators, monitoring system, seam tracking system and so on. (author)

  4. Research on the Effects of Technical Parameters on the Molding of the Weld by A-TIG Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Kai; Pan, Wu

    2012-01-01

    The effects of welding parameters on the molding of weld by A-TIG welding of a 4mm thickness mild steel plate is studied in the present paper. The results obtained show that: as welding current increases A-TIG welding penetration gets deeper than TIG welding; size and shape of HAZ has remarkable change; A-TIG welding has the narrower weld pool width than TIG welding.

  5. Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesnjak, A.; Tusek, J.

    2002-01-01

    Plasma spot wedding of ferritic stainless steels studied. The study was focused on welding parameters, plasma and shieldings and the optimum welding equipment. Plasma-spot welded overlap joints on a 0.8 mm thick ferritic stainless steel sheet were subjected to a visual examination and mechanical testing in terms of tension-shear strength. Several macro specimens were prepared Plasma spot welding is suitable to use the same gas as shielding gas and as plasma gas , i. e. a 98% Ar/2% H 2 gas mixture. Tension-shear strength of plasma-spot welded joint was compared to that of resistance sport welded joints. It was found that the resistance welded joints withstand a somewhat stronger load than the plasma welded joints due to a large weld sport diameter of the former. Strength of both types of welded joints is approximately the same. (Author) 32 refs

  6. Automatic welding of stainless steel tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of automatic welding for making girth welds in stainless steel tubing was investigated as well as the reduction in fabrication costs resulting from the elimination of radiographic inspection. Test methodology, materials, and techniques are discussed, and data sheets for individual tests are included. Process variables studied include welding amperes, revolutions per minute, and shielding gas flow. Strip chart recordings, as a definitive method of insuring weld quality, are studied. Test results, determined by both radiographic and visual inspection, are presented and indicate that once optimum welding procedures for specific sizes of tubing are established, and the welding machine operations are certified, then the automatic tube welding process produces good quality welds repeatedly, with a high degree of reliability. Revised specifications for welding tubing using the automatic process and weld visual inspection requirements at the Kennedy Space Center are enumerated.

  7. Welding Penetration Control of Fixed Pipe in TIG Welding Using Fuzzy Inference System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskoro, Ario Sunar; Kabutomori, Masashi; Suga, Yasuo

    This paper presents a study on welding penetration control of fixed pipe in Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding using fuzzy inference system. The welding penetration control is essential to the production quality welds with a specified geometry. For pipe welding using constant arc current and welding speed, the bead width becomes wider as the circumferential welding of small diameter pipes progresses. Having welded pipe in fixed position, obviously, the excessive arc current yields burn through of metals; in contrary, insufficient arc current produces imperfect welding. In order to avoid these errors and to obtain the uniform weld bead over the entire circumference of the pipe, the welding conditions should be controlled as the welding proceeds. This research studies the intelligent welding process of aluminum alloy pipe 6063S-T5 in fixed position using the AC welding machine. The monitoring system used a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to monitor backside image of molten pool. The captured image was processed to recognize the edge of molten pool by image processing algorithm. Simulation of welding control using fuzzy inference system was constructed to simulate the welding control process. The simulation result shows that fuzzy controller was suitable for controlling the welding speed and appropriate to be implemented into the welding system. A series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the performance of the fuzzy controller. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the control system that is confirmed by sound welds.

  8. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  9. Corrosion Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weldingh, Jakob; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the corrosion properties of laser welded AISI 316L stainless steel are examined. A number of different welds has been performed to test the influence of the weld parameters of the resulting corrosion properties. It has been chosen to use the potential independent critical pitting...... temperature (CPT) test as corrosion test. The following welding parameters are varied: Welding speed, lsser power, focus point position and laser operation mode (CW or pulsed)....

  10. Heat Source - Materials Interactions during Fusion Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-30

    the capabilities of ultrasonic weld pool measurement, and to address questions of applications to active pool size control. -- mom- 44 TIG welding ...preparation. The fraction of absorbed power increases dramatically upon formation of a keyhole . As a result, welds made with sharply beveled edge...laser end electron beam welding processes characteristically produce a deel,, narrow weld bead. This bead is formed by a keyhole mode of operation in

  11. Real time computer controlled weld skate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A real time, adaptive control, automatic welding system was developed. This system utilizes the general case geometrical relationships between a weldment and a weld skate to precisely maintain constant weld speed and torch angle along a contoured workplace. The system is compatible with the gas tungsten arc weld process or can be adapted to other weld processes. Heli-arc cutting and machine tool routing operations are possible applications.

  12. Collection of arc welding process data

    OpenAIRE

    K. Luksa; Z. Rymarski

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the research was to examine the possibility of detecting welding imperfections by recording the instant values of welding parameters. The microprocessor controlled system for real-time collection and display of welding parameters was designed, implemented and tested.Design/methodology/approach: The system records up to 4 digital or analog signals collected from welding process and displays their run on the LCD display. To disturb the welding process artificial disturbances...

  13. Analysis And Control System For Automated Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Bradley W.; Burroughs, Ivan A.; Kennedy, Larry Z.; Rodgers, Michael H.; Goode, K. Wayne

    1994-01-01

    Automated variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding apparatus operates under electronic supervision by welding analysis and control system. System performs all major monitoring and controlling functions. It acquires, analyzes, and displays weld-quality data in real time and adjusts process parameters accordingly. Also records pertinent data for use in post-weld analysis and documentation of quality. System includes optoelectronic sensors and data processors that provide feedback control of welding process.

  14. Friction Welding of Titanium and Carbon Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Atsushi, HASUI; Yoichi, KIRA; Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University; Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Co., Ltd.

    1985-01-01

    Titanium-steel is a combination of dissimilar materials, which are difficult to weld in general, owing to inevitable formation of brittle intermetallic compounds. A prominent feature of friction welding process is ability to weld dissimilar materials in many kinds of combinations. This report deals with friction weldabilily of pure titanium and S25C steel, which are 12 mm in diameter. Main results are summarized as follows; (1) Suitable welding conditions to obtain a sound weld, which has a j...

  15. Recent advances in the TIG welding process and the application of the welding of nuclear components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, W.; Males, B.O.

    1982-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of precision arc welding techniques and infacilities for production of nuclear power plant components arc presented. Of the precision welding techniques, pulsed TIG welding, pulsed plasma arc welding, hot-wire TIG welding, and pulsed inert-gas metal-arc welding. In the field of weld cladding, GMA plasma welding is cited as an alternative to submerged-arc welding with a strip electrode. Transistors and computer-controlled welding systems get a special mention. Applications of TIG welding in the UK are cited, e.g. welding of components for the AGR nuclear power plant and construction of equipment for repair work in feedwater pipes of the MAGNOX reactor. (orig.) [de

  16. Investigation into Variations of Welding Residual Stresses and Redistribution Behaviors for Different Repair Welding Widths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chiyong; Lee, Hweesueng; Huh, Namsu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the variations in welding residual stresses in dissimilar metal butt weld due to width of repair welding and re-distribution behaviors resulting from similar metal welding (SMW) and mechanical loading. To this end, detailed two-dimensional axi-symmetric finite element (FE) analyses were performed considering five different repair welding widths. Based on the FE results, we first evaluated the welding residual stress distributions in repair welding. We then investigated the re-distribution behaviors of the residual stresses due to SMW and mechanical loads. It is revealed that large tensile welding residual stresses take place in the inner surface and that its distribution is affected, provided repair welding width is larger than certain value. The welding residual stresses resulting from repair welding are remarkably reduced due to SMW and mechanical loading, regardless of the width of the repair welding

  17. 10,170 flawless welds

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    The welding of tubes containing the principal current-carrying busbars in the LHC magnets was one of the main activities of the SMACC project. After a year of preparation and another of intense activity in the tunnel, the last weld was completed on Wednesday 14 May. Over 10,170 welds have been inspected and not a single fault has been found.    The welder (above) creates the weld using an orbital welding machine (below) specifically designed for CERN. Each of the eight sectors of the LHC contains around 210 interconnects between the superconducting magnets. Consolidating these interconnections was the SMACC project’s primary objective. One of the last jobs before closing the interconnects is the welding of the M lines: each has a 104 mm diameter and a radial clearance of just 45 mm. In total: 10,170 welds carried out in a single year of activities. A true challenge, which was carried out by a team of 30 highly specialised welders, working under the supervision o...

  18. Deformation During Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Henry J.

    2002-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process that exhibits characteristics similar to traditional metal cutting processes. The plastic deformation that occurs during friction stir welding is due to the superposition of three flow fields: a primary rotation of a radially symmetric solid plug of metal surrounding the pin tool, a secondary uniform translation, and a tertiary ring vortex flow (smoke rings) surrounding the tool. If the metal sticks to the tool, the plug surface extends down into the metal from the outer edge of the tool shoulder, decreases in diameter like a funnel, and closes up beneath the pin. Since its invention, ten years have gone by and still very little is known about the physics of the friction stir welding process. In this experiment, an H13 steel weld tool (shoulder diameter, 0.797 in; pin diameter, 0.312 in; and pin length, 0.2506 in) was used to weld three 0.255 in thick plates. The deformation behavior during friction stir welding was investigated by metallographically preparing a plan view sections of the weldment and taking Vickers hardness test in the key-hole region.

  19. LASER WELDING WITH MICRO-JET COOLING FOR TRUCK FRAME WELDING

    OpenAIRE

    Jan PIWNIK; Bożena SZCZUCKA-LASOTA; Tomasz WĘGRZYN; Wojciech MAJEWSKI

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the mechanical properties of the weld steel structure of car body truck frames after laser welding. The best welding conditions involve the use of proper materials and alloy elements in steel and filer materials, in addition to welding technology, state of stress and temperature of exploitation. We present for the first time the properties of steel track structures after laser welding with micro-jet cooling. Therefore, good selection of both welding paramet...

  20. A study of weld quality in ultrasonic spot welding of similar and dissimilar metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Sarraf, Z; Lucas, M

    2012-01-01

    Several difficulties are faced in joining thinner sheets of similar and dissimilar materials from fusion welding processes such as resistance welding and laser welding. Ultrasonic metal welding overcomes many of these difficulties by using high frequency vibration and applied pressure to create a solid-state weld. Ultrasonic metal welding is an effective technique in joining small components, such as in wire bonding, but is also capable of joining thicker sheet, depending on the control of welding conditions. This study presents the design, characterisation and test of a lateral-drive ultrasonic metal welding device. The ultrasonic welding horn is modelled using finite element analysis and its vibration behaviour is characterised experimentally to ensure ultrasonic energy is delivered to the weld coupon. The welding stack and fixtures are then designed and mounted on a test machine to allow a series of experiments to be conducted for various welding and ultrasonic parameters. Weld strength is subsequently analysed using tensile-shear tests. Control of the vibration amplitude profile through the weld cycle is used to enhance weld strength and quality, providing an opportunity to reduce part marking. Optical microscopic examination and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to investigate the weld quality. The results show how the weld quality is particularly sensitive to the combination of clamping force and vibration amplitude of the welding tip.