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Sample records for yeast mediated reduction

  1. Molecular architecture of the yeast Mediator complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Philip J; Trnka, Michael J; Pellarin, Riccardo; Greenberg, Charles H; Bushnell, David A; Davis, Ralph; Burlingame, Alma L; Sali, Andrej; Kornberg, Roger D

    2015-01-01

    The 21-subunit Mediator complex transduces regulatory information from enhancers to promoters, and performs an essential role in the initiation of transcription in all eukaryotes. Structural information on two-thirds of the complex has been limited to coarse subunit mapping onto 2-D images from electron micrographs. We have performed chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry, and combined the results with information from X-ray crystallography, homology modeling, and cryo-electron microscopy by an integrative modeling approach to determine a 3-D model of the entire Mediator complex. The approach is validated by the use of X-ray crystal structures as internal controls and by consistency with previous results from electron microscopy and yeast two-hybrid screens. The model shows the locations and orientations of all Mediator subunits, as well as subunit interfaces and some secondary structural elements. Segments of 20–40 amino acid residues are placed with an average precision of 20 Å. The model reveals roles of individual subunits in the organization of the complex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08719.001 PMID:26402457

  2. Dimensional reduction in anomaly mediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyda, Ed; Murayama, Hitoshi; Pierce, Aaron

    2002-01-01

    We offer a guide to dimensional reduction in theories with anomaly-mediated supersymmetry breaking. Evanescent operators proportional to ε arise in the bare Lagrangian when it is reduced from d=4 to d=4-2ε dimensions. In the course of a detailed diagrammatic calculation, we show that inclusion of these operators is crucial. The evanescent operators conspire to drive the supersymmetry-breaking parameters along anomaly-mediation trajectories across heavy particle thresholds, guaranteeing the ultraviolet insensitivity

  3. Uranium bioprecipitation mediated by yeasts utilizing organic phosphorus substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xinjin; Csetenyi, Laszlo; Gadd, Geoffrey Michael

    2016-06-01

    In this research, we have demonstrated the ability of several yeast species to mediate U(VI) biomineralization through uranium phosphate biomineral formation when utilizing an organic source of phosphorus (glycerol 2-phosphate disodium salt hydrate (C3H7Na2O6P·xH2O (G2P)) or phytic acid sodium salt hydrate (C6H18O24P6·xNa(+)·yH2O (PyA))) in the presence of soluble UO2(NO3)2. The formation of meta-ankoleite (K2(UO2)2(PO4)2·6(H2O)), chernikovite ((H3O)2(UO2)2(PO4)2·6(H2O)), bassetite (Fe(++)(UO2)2(PO4)2·8(H2O)), and uramphite ((NH4)(UO2)(PO4)·3(H2O)) on cell surfaces was confirmed by X-ray diffraction in yeasts grown in a defined liquid medium amended with uranium and an organic phosphorus source, as well as in yeasts pre-grown in organic phosphorus-containing media and then subsequently exposed to UO2(NO3)2. The resulting minerals depended on the yeast species as well as physico-chemical conditions. The results obtained in this study demonstrate that phosphatase-mediated uranium biomineralization can occur in yeasts supplied with an organic phosphate substrate as sole source of phosphorus. Further understanding of yeast interactions with uranium may be relevant to development of potential treatment methods for uranium waste and utilization of organic phosphate sources and for prediction of microbial impacts on the fate of uranium in the environment.

  4. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of oleaginous yeast Lipomyces species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ziyu; Deng, Shuang; Culley, David E; Bruno, Kenneth S; Magnuson, Jon K

    2017-08-01

    Interest in using renewable sources of carbon, especially lignocellulosic biomass, for the production of hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals has fueled interest in exploring various organisms capable of producing hydrocarbon biofuels and chemicals or their precursors. The oleaginous (oil-producing) yeast Lipomyces starkeyi is the subject of active research regarding the production of triacylglycerides as hydrocarbon fuel precursors using a variety of carbohydrate and nutrient sources. The genome of L. starkeyi has been published, which opens the door to production strain improvements through the development and use of the tools of synthetic biology for this oleaginous species. The first step in establishment of synthetic biology tools for an organism is the development of effective and reliable transformation methods with suitable selectable marker genes and demonstration of the utility of the genetic elements needed for expression of introduced genes or deletion of endogenous genes. Chemical-based methods of transformation have been published but suffer from low efficiency. To address these problems, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was investigated as an alternative method for L. starkeyi and other Lipomyces species. In this study, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was demonstrated to be effective in the transformation of both L. starkeyi and other Lipomyces species. The deletion of the peroxisomal biogenesis factor 10 gene was also demonstrated in L. starkeyi. In addition to the bacterial antibiotic selection marker gene hygromycin B phosphotransferase, the bacterial β-glucuronidase reporter gene under the control of L. starkeyi translation elongation factor 1α promoter was also stably expressed in six different Lipomyces species. The results from this study demonstrate that Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is a reliable and effective genetic tool for homologous recombination and expression of heterologous genes in L. starkeyi and other Lipomyces

  5. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of oleaginous yeast Lipomyces species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Ziyu; Deng, Shuang; Culley, David E.; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Magnuson, Jon K.

    2017-06-19

    Background: Because of interest in the production of renewable bio-hydrocarbon fuels, various living organisms have been explored for their potential use in producing fuels and chemicals. The oil-producing (oleaginous) yeast Lipomyces starkeyi is the subject of active research regarding the production of lipids using a wide variety of carbon and nutrient sources. The genome of L. starkeyi has been published, which opens the door to production strain improvements using the tools of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering. However, using these tools for strain improvement requires the establishment of effective and reliable transformation methods with suitable selectable markers (antibiotic resistance or auxotrophic marker genes) and the necessary genetic elements (promoters and terminators) for expression of introduced genes. Chemical-based methods have been published, but suffer from low efficiency or the requirement for targeting to rRNA loci. To address these problems, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was investigated as an alternative method for L. starkeyi and other Lipomyces species. Results: In this study, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was demonstrated to be effective in the transformation of both L. starkeyi and other Lipomyces species and that the introduced DNA can be reliably integrated into the chromosomes of these species. The gene deletion of Ku70 and Pex10 was also demonstrated in L. starkeyi. In addition to the bacterial antibiotic selection marker gene hygromycin B phosphotransferase, the bacterial -glucuronidase reporter gene under the control of L. starkeyi translation elongation factor 1 promoter was also stably expressed in seven different Lipomyces species. Conclusion: The results from this study clearly demonstrate that Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is a reliable genetic tool for gene deletion and integration and expression of heterologous genes in L. starkeyi and other Lipomyces species.

  6. Synergistic reduction of toluylene blue induced by acetaldehyde and menadione in yeast cell suspension: Application to determination of yeast cell activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiro Yamashoji

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Membrane permeant acetaldehyde and menadione induced the synergistic reduction of toluylene blue (TB acting as non-membrane permeant redox indicator in yeast cell suspension. NADH and acetaldehyde also induced the synergistic TB reduction in permeabilized yeast cells and phosphate buffer, but menadione had no ability to promote TB reduction. The pre-incubation of acetaldehyde inhibited the above synergistic reduction of TB in intact and permeabilized yeast cell suspension. The pre-incubation of acetaldehyde might promote NADH oxidation by alcohol dehydrogenase, because acetaldehyde decreased the intracellular NAD(PH concentration. The above facts indicate that the synergistic reduction of TB is controlled by the order of addition of menadione and acetaldehyde. The synergistic reduction of TB by menadione and acetaldehyde was proportional to viable yeast cell number from 104 to 2×106 cells/ml, and this assay was applicable to cytotoxicity test. The time required for the above assay was only 2 min.

  7. Novel baker's yeast catalysed hydride reduction of an epoxide moiety

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Horak, RM

    1995-02-27

    Full Text Available 8. This was successfully prepared by the coupling 4 of valeric acid chloride to Meldrum' s acid to yield the C-acyl derivative 6. Compound 6 was treated with SO2Ci 2 yielding the chloro acyl derivative of Meldrum...) O D (8) (v) + O2 N/~/CHO Reagents: (i) SOCI2, 70%, (ii) Meldrum's acid, pyridine, 80%, (iii) SO2C12, 65%, (iv) D20, Ac20, 20%, (v) K-t-butoxide, 20%, (vi) Baker's yeast, 12%. Scheme 3 The deuterium labelled...

  8. Bakers yeast-mediated transformations of alpha-keto epoxides

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meth-Cohn, O

    1994-06-07

    Full Text Available Alpha beta-Epoxy ketones on treatment with baker's yeast yield different types of products depending on their substitution. Small groups such as H or Me attached at the epoxy end protect that end from attack. Thus, 1-acyl epoxides with H, methyl...

  9. Transparent mediation-based access to multiple yeast data sources using an ontology driven interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briache, Abdelaali; Marrakchi, Kamar; Kerzazi, Amine; Navas-Delgado, Ismael; Rossi Hassani, Badr D; Lairini, Khalid; Aldana-Montes, José F

    2012-01-25

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is recognized as a model system representing a simple eukaryote whose genome can be easily manipulated. Information solicited by scientists on its biological entities (Proteins, Genes, RNAs...) is scattered within several data sources like SGD, Yeastract, CYGD-MIPS, BioGrid, PhosphoGrid, etc. Because of the heterogeneity of these sources, querying them separately and then manually combining the returned results is a complex and time-consuming task for biologists most of whom are not bioinformatics expert. It also reduces and limits the use that can be made on the available data. To provide transparent and simultaneous access to yeast sources, we have developed YeastMed: an XML and mediator-based system. In this paper, we present our approach in developing this system which takes advantage of SB-KOM to perform the query transformation needed and a set of Data Services to reach the integrated data sources. The system is composed of a set of modules that depend heavily on XML and Semantic Web technologies. User queries are expressed in terms of a domain ontology through a simple form-based web interface. YeastMed is the first mediation-based system specific for integrating yeast data sources. It was conceived mainly to help biologists to find simultaneously relevant data from multiple data sources. It has a biologist-friendly interface easy to use. The system is available at http://www.khaos.uma.es/yeastmed/.

  10. Maximizing the concentrations of wheat grain fructans in bread by exploring strategies to prevent their yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae )-mediated degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verspreet, Joran; Hemdane, Sami; Dornez, Emmie; Cuyvers, Sven; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2013-02-13

    The degradation of endogenous wheat grain fructans, oligosaccharides with possible health-promoting potential, during wheat whole meal bread making was investigated, and several strategies to prevent their degradation were evaluated. Up to 78.4 ± 5.2% of the fructans initially present in wheat whole meal were degraded during bread making by the action of yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae ) invertase. The addition of sucrose to dough delayed fructan degradation but had no effect on final fructan concentrations. However, yeast growth conditions and yeast genotype did have a clear impact. A 3-fold reduction of fructan degradation could be achieved when the commercial bread yeast strain was replaced by yeast strains with lower sucrose degradation activity. Finally, fructan degradation during bread making could be prevented completely by the use of a yeast strain lacking invertase. These results show that the nutritional profile of bread can be enhanced through appropriate yeast technology.

  11. A Mitochondria-Dependent Pathway Mediates the Apoptosis of GSE-Induced Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Sishuo; Xu, Wentao; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Yan; Luo, YunBo; He, Xiaoyun; Huang, Kunlun

    2012-01-01

    Grapefruit seed extract (GSE), which has powerful anti-fungal activity, can induce apoptosis in S. cerevisiae. The yeast cells underwent apoptosis as determined by testing for apoptotic markers of DNA cleavage and typical chromatin condensation by Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase-mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) and 4,6'-diaminidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining and electron microscopy. The changes of ΔΨmt (mitochondrial transmembrane potential) and ROS (reactive oxygen species) ...

  12. Toxicity of Aromatic Ketone to Yeast Cell and Improvement of the Asymmetric Reduction of Aromatic Ketone Catalyzed by Yeast Cell with the Introduction of Resin Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Hua Yang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetric reduction of the prochiral aromatic ketone catalyzed by yeast cells is one of the most promising routes to produce its corresponding enantiopure aromatic alcohol, but the space-time yield does not meet people’s expectations. Therefore, the toxicity of aromatic ketone and aromatic alcohol to the yeast cell is investigated in this work. It has been found that the aromatic compounds are poisonous to the yeast cell. The activity of yeast cell decreases steeply when the concentration of acetophenone (ACP is higher than 30.0 mmol/L. Asymmetric reduction of acetophenone to chiral S-α-phenylethyl alcohol (PEA catalyzed by the yeast cell was chosen as the model reaction to study in detail the promotion effect of the introduction of the resin adsorption on the asymmetric reduction reaction. The resin acts as the substrate reservoir and product extraction agent in situ. It has been shown that this reaction could be remarkably improved with this technique when the appropriate kind of resin is applied. The enantioselectivity and yield are acceptable even though the initial ACP concentration reaches 72.2 mmol/L.

  13. Genome-wide association of mediator and RNA polymerase II in wild-type and mediator mutant yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Emily; Zhu, Z Iris; Landsman, David; Morse, Randall H

    2015-01-01

    Mediator is a large, multisubunit complex that is required for essentially all mRNA transcription in eukaryotes. In spite of the importance of Mediator, the range of its targets and how it is recruited to these is not well understood. Previous work showed that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mediator contributes to transcriptional activation by two distinct mechanisms, one depending on the tail module triad and favoring SAGA-regulated genes, and the second occurring independently of the tail module and favoring TFIID-regulated genes. Here, we use chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) to show that dependence on tail module subunits for Mediator recruitment and polymerase II (Pol II) association occurs preferentially at SAGA-regulated over TFIID-regulated genes on a genome-wide scale. We also show that recruitment of tail module subunits to active gene promoters continues genome-wide when Mediator integrity is compromised in med17 temperature-sensitive (ts) yeast, demonstrating the modular nature of the Mediator complex in vivo. In addition, our data indicate that promoters exhibiting strong and stable occupancy by Mediator have a wide range of activity and are enriched for targets of the Tup1-Cyc8 repressor complex. We also identify a number of strong Mediator occupancy peaks that overlap dubious open reading frames (ORFs) and are likely to include previously unrecognized upstream activator sequences. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Analysis of Schizosaccharomyces pombe mediator reveals a set of essential subunits conserved between yeast and metazoan cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spåhr, H; Samuelsen, C O; Baraznenok, V

    2001-01-01

    . cerevisiae share an essential protein module, which associates with nonessential speciesspecific subunits. In support of this view, sequence analysis of the conserved yeast Mediator components Med4 and Med8 reveals sequence homology to the metazoan Mediator components Trap36 and Arc32. Therefore, 8 of 10...... essential genes conserved between S. pombe and S. cerevisiae also have a metazoan homolog, indicating that an evolutionary conserved Mediator core is present in all eukaryotic cells. Our data suggest a closer functional relationship between yeast and metazoan Mediator than previously anticipated....

  15. A mitochondria-dependent pathway mediates the apoptosis of GSE-induced yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sishuo Cao

    Full Text Available Grapefruit seed extract (GSE, which has powerful anti-fungal activity, can induce apoptosis in S. cerevisiae. The yeast cells underwent apoptosis as determined by testing for apoptotic markers of DNA cleavage and typical chromatin condensation by Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase-mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL and 4,6'-diaminidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI staining and electron microscopy. The changes of ΔΨmt (mitochondrial transmembrane potential and ROS (reactive oxygen species indicated that the mitochondria took part in the apoptotic process. Changes in this process detected by metabonomics and proteomics revealed that the yeast cells tenaciously resisted adversity. Proteins related to redox, cellular structure, membrane, energy and DNA repair were significantly increased. In this study, the relative changes in the levels of proteins and metabolites showed the tenacious resistance of yeast cells. However, GSE induced apoptosis in the yeast cells by destruction of the mitochondrial 60 S ribosomal protein, L14-A, and prevented the conversion of pantothenic acid to coenzyme A (CoA. The relationship between the proteins and metabolites was analyzed by orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS. We found that the changes of the metabolites and the protein changes had relevant consistency.

  16. ADA1 and NET1 genes of yeast mediate both chromosome maintenance and mitochondrial rho- mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koltovaya, N.A.; Gerasimova, A.S.; Chekhuta, I.A.; Devin, A.B.

    2002-01-01

    An increase in the mitochondrial (mt) rho - mutagenesis is a well-known response of yeast cells to mutations in the numerous nuclear genes as well as to various kinds of stress. Notwithstanding the extensive studies during several decades the biological significance of this response is not yet fully understood. The genetic approach to solution of this subject includes the study of genes that are required for the high incidence of spontaneous rho - mutants. Previously we found that mutations in certain nuclear genes including CDC28, the central cell-cycle regulation gene, may decrease the spontaneous rho - mutability and simultaneously affect maintenance of the yeast chromosomes and plasmids. The present work provides data on identification of two more genes, resembling CDC28 in this respect. These genes NET1 and ADA1 mediate important regulatory protein-protein interactions in the yeast cell. The effects of net1 and ada1 mutations on the maintenance of yeast mt genome, chromosomes and plasmids as well on cell sensitivity to ionizing radiation are also described. (author)

  17. ADA1 and NET1 Genes of Yeast Mediate Both Chromosome Maintenance and Mitochondrial $\\rho^{-}$ Mutagenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Koltovaya, N A; Tchekhouta, I A; Devin, A B

    2002-01-01

    An increase in the mitochondrial (mt) rho^- mutagenesis is a well-known respose of yeast cells to mutations in the numerous nuclear genes as well as to various kinds of stress. Notwithstanding the extensive studies during several decades the biological significance of this response is not yet fully understood. The genetic approach to solution of this subject includes the study of genes that are required for the high incidence of spontaneous rho^- mutants. Previously we found that mutations in certain nuclear genes including CDC28, the central cell-cycle regulation gene, may decrease the spontaneous rho^- mutability and simultaneously affect maintenance of the yeast chromosomes and plasmids. The present work provides data on identification of two more genes, resembling CDC28 in this respect. These genes NET1 and ADA1 mediate important regulatory protein-protein interactions in the yeast cell. The effects of net1 and ada1 mutations on the maintenance of yeast mt genome, chromosomes and plasmids as well as on ce...

  18. A mitochondria-dependent pathway mediates the apoptosis of GSE-induced yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Sishuo; Xu, Wentao; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Yan; Luo, YunBo; He, Xiaoyun; Huang, Kunlun

    2012-01-01

    Grapefruit seed extract (GSE), which has powerful anti-fungal activity, can induce apoptosis in S. cerevisiae. The yeast cells underwent apoptosis as determined by testing for apoptotic markers of DNA cleavage and typical chromatin condensation by Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase-mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) and 4,6'-diaminidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining and electron microscopy. The changes of ΔΨmt (mitochondrial transmembrane potential) and ROS (reactive oxygen species) indicated that the mitochondria took part in the apoptotic process. Changes in this process detected by metabonomics and proteomics revealed that the yeast cells tenaciously resisted adversity. Proteins related to redox, cellular structure, membrane, energy and DNA repair were significantly increased. In this study, the relative changes in the levels of proteins and metabolites showed the tenacious resistance of yeast cells. However, GSE induced apoptosis in the yeast cells by destruction of the mitochondrial 60 S ribosomal protein, L14-A, and prevented the conversion of pantothenic acid to coenzyme A (CoA). The relationship between the proteins and metabolites was analyzed by orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS). We found that the changes of the metabolites and the protein changes had relevant consistency.

  19. Evidence for Multiple Mediator Complexes in Yeast Independently Recruited by Activated Heat Shock Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandhakumar, Jayamani; Moustafa, Yara W; Chowdhary, Surabhi; Kainth, Amoldeep S; Gross, David S

    2016-07-15

    Mediator is an evolutionarily conserved coactivator complex essential for RNA polymerase II transcription. Although it has been generally assumed that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mediator is a stable trimodular complex, its structural state in vivo remains unclear. Using the "anchor away" (AA) technique to conditionally deplete select subunits within Mediator and its reversibly associated Cdk8 kinase module (CKM), we provide evidence that Mediator's tail module is highly dynamic and that a subcomplex consisting of Med2, Med3, and Med15 can be independently recruited to the regulatory regions of heat shock factor 1 (Hsf1)-activated genes. Fluorescence microscopy of a scaffold subunit (Med14)-anchored strain confirmed parallel cytoplasmic sequestration of core subunits located outside the tail triad. In addition, and contrary to current models, we provide evidence that Hsf1 can recruit the CKM independently of core Mediator and that core Mediator has a role in regulating postinitiation events. Collectively, our results suggest that yeast Mediator is not monolithic but potentially has a dynamic complexity heretofore unappreciated. Multiple species, including CKM-Mediator, the 21-subunit core complex, the Med2-Med3-Med15 tail triad, and the four-subunit CKM, can be independently recruited by activated Hsf1 to its target genes in AA strains. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Sequential fermentation using non-Saccharomyces yeasts for the reduction of alcohol content in wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciani Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades there has been a progressive increase in wine ethanol content due to global climate change and modified wine styles that involved viticulture and oenology practices. Among the different approaches and strategies to reduce alcohol content in wine we propose a sequential fermentation using immobilized non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts. Preliminary results showed that sequential fermentations with Hanseniaspora osmophila, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Starmerella bombicola and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains showed an ethanol reduction when compared with pure S. cerevisiae fermentation trials.

  1. Prevention of GABA reduction during dough fermentation using a baker's yeast dal81 mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Akira; Nakamura, Toshihide

    2016-10-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is consumed by yeasts during fermentation. To prevent GABA reduction in bread dough, a baker's yeast mutant AY77 deficient in GABA assimilation was characterized and utilized for wheat dough fermentation. An amber mutation in the DAL81 gene, which codes for a positive regulator of multiple nitrogen degradation pathways, was found in the AY77 strain. The qPCR analyses of genes involved in nitrogen utilization showed that transcriptional levels of the UGA1 and DUR3 genes encoding GABA transaminase and urea transporter, respectively, are severely decreased in the AY77 cells. The AY77 strain cultivated by fed-batch culture using cane molasses exhibited inferior gas production during dough fermentation compared to that of wild-type strain AY13. However, when fed with molasses containing 0.5% ammonium sulfate, the mutant strain exhibited gas production comparable to that of the AY13 strain. In contrast to the AY13 strain, which completely consumed GABA in dough within 5 h, the AY77 strain consumed no GABA under either culture condition. Dough fermentation with the dal81 mutant strain should be useful for suppression of GABA reduction in breads. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mediator can regulate mitotic entry and direct periodic transcription in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyai, Gabor; Lopez, Marcela Davila; Szilagyi, Zsolt; Gustafsson, Claes M

    2014-11-01

    Cdk8 is required for correct timing of mitotic progression in fission yeast. How the activity of Cdk8 is regulated is unclear, since the kinase is not activated by T-loop phosphorylation and its partner, CycC, does not oscillate. Cdk8 is, however, a component of the multiprotein Mediator complex, a conserved coregulator of eukaryotic transcription that is connected to a number of intracellular signaling pathways. We demonstrate here that other Mediator components regulate the activity of Cdk8 in vivo and thereby direct the timing of mitotic entry. Deletion of Mediator components Med12 and Med13 leads to higher cellular Cdk8 protein levels, premature phosphorylation of the Cdk8 target Fkh2, and earlier entry into mitosis. We also demonstrate that Mediator is recruited to clusters of mitotic genes in a periodic fashion and that the complex is required for the transcription of these genes. We suggest that Mediator functions as a hub for coordinated regulation of mitotic progression and cell cycle-dependent transcription. The many signaling pathways and activator proteins shown to function via Mediator may influence the timing of these cell cycle events. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Charge transfer mediator based systems for electrocatalytic oxygen reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Shannon S.; Gerken, James B.; Anson, Colin W.

    2017-07-18

    Disclosed are systems for the electrocatalytic reduction of oxygen, having redox mediator/redox catalyst pairs and an electrolyte solution in contact with an electrode. The redox mediator is included in the electrolyte solution, and the redox catalyst may be included in the electrolyte solution, or alternatively, may be in contact with the electrolyte solution. In one form a cobalt redox catalyst is used with a quinone redox mediator. In another form a nitrogen oxide redox catalyst is used with a nitroxyl type redox mediator. The systems can be used in electrochemical cells wherein neither the anode nor the cathode comprise an expensive metal such as platinum.

  4. Charge transfer mediator based systems for electrocatalytic oxygen reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, Shannon S.; Gerken, James B.; Anson, Colin W.

    2017-11-07

    Disclosed are systems for the electrocatalytic reduction of oxygen, having redox mediator/redox catalyst pairs and an electrolyte solution in contact with an electrode. The redox mediator is included in the electrolyte solution, and the redox catalyst may be included in the electrolyte solution, or alternatively, may be in contact with the electrolyte solution. In one form a cobalt redox catalyst is used with a quinone redox mediator. In another form a nitrogen oxide redox catalyst is used with a nitroxyl type redox mediator. The systems can be used in electrochemical cells wherein neither the anode nor the cathode comprise an expensive metal such as platinum.

  5. Mitochondrion-mediated cell death: dissecting yeast apoptosis for a better understanding of neurodegeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, Ralf J.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial damage and dysfunction are common hallmarks for neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer, Parkinson, Huntington diseases, and the motor neuron disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Damaged mitochondria pivotally contribute to neurotoxicity and neuronal cell death in these disorders, e.g., due to their inability to provide the high energy requirements for neurons, their generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and their induction of mitochondrion-mediated cell death pathways. Therefore, in-depth analyses of the underlying molecular pathways, including cellular mechanisms controlling the maintenance of mitochondrial function, is a prerequisite for a better understanding of neurodegenerative disorders. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an established model for deciphering mitochondrial quality control mechanisms and the distinct mitochondrial roles during apoptosis and programmed cell death. Cell death upon expression of various human neurotoxic proteins has been characterized in yeast, revealing neurotoxic protein-specific differences. This review summarizes how mitochondria are affected in these neurotoxic yeast models, and how they are involved in the execution and prevention of cell death. I will discuss to which extent this mimics the situation in other neurotoxic model systems, and how this may contribute to a better understanding of the mitochondrial roles in the human disorders.

  6. Mitochondrion-mediated cell death: dissecting yeast apoptosis for a better understanding of neurodegeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Ralf J., E-mail: ralf.braun@uni-bayreuth.de [Institut für Zellbiologie, Universität Bayreuth, Bayreuth (Germany)

    2012-11-28

    Mitochondrial damage and dysfunction are common hallmarks for neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer, Parkinson, Huntington diseases, and the motor neuron disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Damaged mitochondria pivotally contribute to neurotoxicity and neuronal cell death in these disorders, e.g., due to their inability to provide the high energy requirements for neurons, their generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and their induction of mitochondrion-mediated cell death pathways. Therefore, in-depth analyses of the underlying molecular pathways, including cellular mechanisms controlling the maintenance of mitochondrial function, is a prerequisite for a better understanding of neurodegenerative disorders. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an established model for deciphering mitochondrial quality control mechanisms and the distinct mitochondrial roles during apoptosis and programmed cell death. Cell death upon expression of various human neurotoxic proteins has been characterized in yeast, revealing neurotoxic protein-specific differences. This review summarizes how mitochondria are affected in these neurotoxic yeast models, and how they are involved in the execution and prevention of cell death. I will discuss to which extent this mimics the situation in other neurotoxic model systems, and how this may contribute to a better understanding of the mitochondrial roles in the human disorders.

  7. RNAi mediates post-transcriptional repression of gene expression in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smialowska, Agata; Djupedal, Ingela; Wang, Jingwen; Kylsten, Per; Swoboda, Peter; Ekwall, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Protein coding genes accumulate anti-sense sRNAs in fission yeast S. pombe. • RNAi represses protein-coding genes in S. pombe. • RNAi-mediated gene repression is post-transcriptional. - Abstract: RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism conserved from fungi to mammals. Small interfering RNAs are products and mediators of the RNAi pathway and act as specificity factors in recruiting effector complexes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome encodes one of each of the core RNAi proteins, Dicer, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (dcr1, ago1, rdp1). Even though the function of RNAi in heterochromatin assembly in S. pombe is established, its role in controlling gene expression is elusive. Here, we report the identification of small RNAs mapped anti-sense to protein coding genes in fission yeast. We demonstrate that these genes are up-regulated at the protein level in RNAi mutants, while their mRNA levels are not significantly changed. We show that the repression by RNAi is not a result of heterochromatin formation. Thus, we conclude that RNAi is involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing in S. pombe

  8. Intracellular trehalose and sorbitol synergistically promoting cell viability of a biocontrol yeast, Pichia anomala, for aflatoxin reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Sui Sheng T; Hernlem, Bradley J; Yokoyama, Wallace; Sarreal, Siov Bouy L

    2015-05-01

    Pichia anomala (Wickerhamomyces anomalus) WRL-076 was discovered by a visual screening bioassay for its antagonism against Aspergillus flavus. The yeast was shown to significantly inhibit aflatoxin production and the growth of A. flavus. P. anomala is a potential biocontrol agent for reduction of aflatoxin in the food chain. Maintaining the viability of biocontrol agents in formulated products is a great challenge for commercial applications. Four media, NYG, NYGS, NYGT and NYGST are described which support good growth of yeast cells and were tested as storage formulations. Post growth supplement of 5 % trehalose to NYGST resulted in 83 % viable yeast cells after 12 months in cold storage. Intracellular sorbitol and trehalose concentrations were determined by HPLC analysis at the beginning of the storage and at the end of 12 month. Correlation of cell viability to both trehalose and sorbitol suggested a synergistic effect. Bonferroni (Dunn) t Test, Tukey's Studentized Range (HSD) Test and Duncan's Multiple Range Test, all showed that yeast cell viability in samples with both intracellular trehalose and sorbitol were significantly higher than those with either or none, at a 95 % confidence level. DiBAC4(5) and CFDA-AM were used as the membrane integrity fluorescent stains to create a two-color vital staining scheme with red and green fluorescence, respectively. Yeast cells stored in formulations NYG and NYGS with no detectable trehalose, displayed mostly red fluorescence. Yeast cells in NYGST+5T showed mostly green fluorescence.

  9. Quantitative Estimation of Yeast on Maxillary Denture in Patients with Denture Stomatitis and the Effect of Chlorhexidine Gluconate in Reduction of Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaykumar R Gade

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Denture stomatitis is a condition associated with wearing of a denture. The predisposing factor leading to denture stomatitis could be poor oral hygiene, ill-fitting denture and relief areas. Around 30 patients with denture stomatitis were advised to rinse with chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwash for 14 days and were directed to immerse the upper denture in the chlorhexidine solution for 8 hours. The samples were collected by scraping maxillary denture in saline at three intervals, prior to, at the end of 24 hours and after 14 days of treatment, then were inoculated and quantitative estimation of the yeast growth on Sabouraud′s dextrose agar plate was done. It was observed that after a period of 14 days, there was a reduction in the growth of yeast and also improvement in the clinical picture of the oral mucosa

  10. Bioelectrochemical ethanol production through mediated acetate reduction by mixed cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbusch, Kirsten J J; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Schaap, Joris D; Kampman, Christel; Buisman, Cees J N

    2010-01-01

    Biological acetate reduction with hydrogen is a potential method to convert wet biomass waste into ethanol. Since the ethanol concentration and reaction rates are low, this research studies the feasibility of using an electrode, in stead of hydrogen, as an electron donor for biological acetate reduction in conjunction of an electron mediator. Initially, the effect of three selected mediators on metabolic flows during acetate reduction with hydrogen was explored; subsequently, the best performing mediator was used in a bioelectrochemical system to stimulate acetate reduction at the cathode with mixed cultures at an applied cathode potential of -550 mV. In the batch test, methyl viologen (MV) was found to accelerate ethanol production 6-fold and increased ethanol concentration 2-fold to 13.5 +/- 0.7 mM compared to the control. Additionally, MV inhibited n-butyrate and methane formation, resulting in high ethanol production efficiency (74.6 +/- 6%). In the bioelectrochemical system, MV addition to an inoculated cathode led directly to ethanol production (1.82 mM). Hydrogen was coproduced at the cathode (0.0035 Nm(3) hydrogen m(-2) d(-1)), so it remained unclear whether acetate was reduced to ethanol by electrons supplied by the mediator or by hydrogen. As MV reacted irreversibly at the cathode, ethanol production stopped after 5 days.

  11. Influence of yeast immobilization on fermentation and aldehyde reduction during the production of alcohol-free beer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iersel, van M.F.M.; Brouwer-Post, E.; Rombouts, F.M.; Abee, T.

    2000-01-01

    Production of alcohol-free beer by limited fermentation is optimally performed in a packed-bed reactor. This highly controllable system combines short contact times between yeast and wort with the reduction of off-flavors to concentrations below threshold values. In the present study, the influence

  12. The different behaviors of three oxidative mediators in probing the redox activities of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jinsheng; Wang Min; Yang Zhenyu; Wang Zhong; Wang Huaisheng; Yang Zhengyu

    2007-01-01

    The different behaviors of three lipophilic mediators including 2-methyl-1,4-naphthalenedione(menadione), 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCPIP) and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) in probing the redox activity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied by several comparative factor-influencing experiments. Hydrophilic ferricyanide was employed as an extracellular electron acceptor, and constituted dual mediator system with each of three lipophilic mediators. Limiting-current microelectrode voltammetry was used to measure the quantity of ferrocyanide accumulations, giving a direct measure of the redox activity. It was found that under anaerobic condition, menadione interacts with anaerobic respiration pathway, whereas DCPIP and TMPD interact with fermentation pathway in the yeast. Based on the understanding of the interaction between the yeast and each of three mediators, three mediators were respectively employed in evaluating the toxicity of acetic acid on S. cerevisiae and, the results for the first showed that the mediators are complementary to each other when used as electron carriers in biotoxicity assay

  13. The different behaviors of three oxidative mediators in probing the redox activities of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Jinsheng [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng 252059 (China); Wang Min [School of Medicine, Ehime University, Toon 791-0295 (Japan); Yang Zhenyu [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Jiangxi 330047 (China); Wang Zhong [School of Medicine, Ehime University, Toon 791-0295 (Japan); Wang Huaisheng [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng 252059 (China); Yang Zhengyu [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2007-07-30

    The different behaviors of three lipophilic mediators including 2-methyl-1,4-naphthalenedione(menadione), 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCPIP) and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) in probing the redox activity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied by several comparative factor-influencing experiments. Hydrophilic ferricyanide was employed as an extracellular electron acceptor, and constituted dual mediator system with each of three lipophilic mediators. Limiting-current microelectrode voltammetry was used to measure the quantity of ferrocyanide accumulations, giving a direct measure of the redox activity. It was found that under anaerobic condition, menadione interacts with anaerobic respiration pathway, whereas DCPIP and TMPD interact with fermentation pathway in the yeast. Based on the understanding of the interaction between the yeast and each of three mediators, three mediators were respectively employed in evaluating the toxicity of acetic acid on S. cerevisiae and, the results for the first showed that the mediators are complementary to each other when used as electron carriers in biotoxicity assay.

  14. Cth2 Protein Mediates Early Adaptation of Yeast Cells to Oxidative Stress Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Castells-Roca

    Full Text Available Cth2 is an mRNA-binding protein that participates in remodeling yeast cell metabolism in iron starvation conditions by promoting decay of the targeted molecules, in order to avoid excess iron consumption. This study shows that in the absence of Cth2 immediate upregulation of expression of several of the iron regulon genes (involved in high affinity iron uptake and intracellular iron redistribution upon oxidative stress by hydroperoxide is more intense than in wild type conditions where Cth2 is present. The oxidative stress provokes a temporary increase in the levels of Cth2 (itself a member of the iron regulon. In such conditions Cth2 molecules accumulate at P bodies-like structures when the constitutive mRNA decay machinery is compromised. In addition, a null Δcth2 mutant shows defects, in comparison to CTH2 wild type cells, in exit from α factor-induced arrest at the G1 stage of the cell cycle when hydroperoxide treatment is applied. The cell cycle defects are rescued in conditions that compromise uptake of external iron into the cytosol. The observations support a role of Cth2 in modulating expression of diverse iron regulon genes, excluding those specifically involved in the reductive branch of the high-affinity transport. This would result in immediate adaptation of the yeast cells to an oxidative stress, by controlling uptake of oxidant-promoting iron cations.

  15. Climate change and WTO : boundary mediation on certified emission reductions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Cheol

    2011-07-01

    This book mentions climate change and WTO with is climate change true? International effort for reduce of greenhouse gas with UNFCCC, Kyoto protocol, Copenhagen Accord and Cancun Agreement, WTO norm, discussion on introduction of boundary mediation on certified emission reductions, analysis on regulation related WTO norm, violation of regulation on border measure of prohibition, violation of principle on GATT, justification, except through Article 20 of GATT, assessment of policy and supplementation on the law.

  16. Use of one- and two-mediator systems for developing a BOD biosensor based on the yeast Debaryomyces hansenii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitseva, A S; Arlyapov, V A; Yudina, N Yu; Alferov, S V; Reshetilov, A N

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the use of one- and two-mediator systems in amperometric BOD biosensors (BOD, biochemical oxygen demand) based on the yeast Debaryomyces hansenii. Screening of nine mediators potentially capable of electron transfer - ferrocene, 1,1'-dimethylferrocene, ferrocenecarboxaldehyde, ferroceneacetonitrile, neutral red, 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol, thionine, methylene blue and potassium ferricyanide - showed only ferrocene and neutral red to be efficient electron carriers for the eukaryotes studied. Two-mediator systems based on combinations of the investigated compounds were used to increase the efficiency of electron transfer. The developed two-mediator biosensors exceeded their one-mediator analogs by their characteristics. The most preferable two-mediator system for developing a BOD biosensor was a ferrocene-methylene blue combination that ensured a satisfactory long-time stability (43 days), selectivity, sensitivity (the lower limit of the determined BOD 5 concentrations, 2.5mg О 2 /dm 3 ) and speed (assay time for one sample, not greater than 10min) of BOD determination. Analysis of water samples showed that the use of a ferrocene-methylene blue two-mediator system and the yeast D. hansenii enabled registration of data that highly correlated with the results of the standard method (R=0.9913). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Different characteristics between menadione and menadione sodium bisulfite as redox mediator in yeast cell suspension

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashoji, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Menadione promoted the production of active oxygen species (AOS) in both yeast cell suspension and the crude enzymes from the cells, but menadione sodium bisulfite (MSB) had little effect on the production of AOS in the cell suspension. MSB kept the stable increase in the electron transfer from intact yeast cells to anode compared to menadione, but the electron transfer promoted by MSB was inhibited in permeabilized yeast cell suspension. Menadione promoted oxidation of NAD(P)H much faster th...

  18. Extracellular Electron Transfer Mediated by Flavins in Gram-positive Bacillus sp. WS-XY1 and Yeast Pichia stipitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Song; Xiao, Yong; Wang, Lu; Zheng, Yue; Chang, Kenlin; Zheng, Zhiyong; Yang, Zhaohui; Varcoe, John R.; Zhao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) of microorganisms represents a communicative bridge between the interior and exterior of the cells. Most prior EET studies have focused on Gram-negative bacteria. However, fungi and Gram-positive bacteria, that contain dense cellular walls, have rarely been reported. Herein, two model dense cell wall microorganisms (Bacillus sp. WS-XY1 and the yeast Pichia stipitis) were identified to be electrochemically active. Further analysis indicated that the two microorganisms were able to secrete flavins to mediate their EET. The discovery, that dense cell wall containing microorganisms can undertake mediated EET, adds to the body of knowledge towards building a comprehensive understanding of biogeochemical and bioelectrical processes

  19. Reduction of acrylamide in whole-wheat bread by combining lactobacilli and yeast fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri Esfahani, Behnaz; Kadivar, Mahdi; Shahedi, Mohammad; Soleimanian-Zad, Sabihe

    2017-11-01

    This study mainly focuses on a strategy for reducing acrylamide content in whole-wheat bread by combining lactobacilli and yeast in sourdough breadmaking. Combinations of sourdough (fermented dough using different Lactobacillus strains including Lactobacillus plantarum PTCC 1896 [probiotic], L. sakei DSM 20,017, L. rhamnosus DSM 20,021, and L. delbrueckii DSM 20,081) and yeast, in comparison with yeast alone, were used for breadmaking. The results showed that acrylamide levels in breads fermented using sourdough+yeast were in all cases much lower (6.9-20 μg/kg on a dry weight basis [d.b.]) than those in the yeast-only fermented bread (47.6 μg/kg d.b.). Significant (p bread (r = 0.925, p breads and either the reducing sugar or free amino acid contents in dough samples. According to the different effects of Lactobacillus strains, it could be concluded that the acrylamide reducing potential of lactobacilli was strain-specific, with L. rhamnosus being the most effective. This suggests that sourdough fermentation with appropriate Lactobacillus strains can be used as an advantageous technology to reduce the acrylamide content of whole-wheat breads.

  20. Development of an Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation Method and Evaluation of Two Exogenous Constitutive Promoters in Oleaginous Yeast Lipomyces starkeyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xinping; Liu, Sasa; Bao, Ruiqi; Gao, Ning; Zhang, Sufang; Zhu, Rongqian; Zhao, Zongbao Kent

    2017-11-01

    Oleaginous yeast Lipomyces starkeyi, a promising strain of great biotechnical importance, is able to accumulate over 60% of its cell biomass as triacylglycerols (TAGs). It is promising to directly produce the derivatives of TAGs, such as long-chain fatty acid methyl esters and alkanes, in L. starkeyi. However, techniques for genetic modification of this oleaginous yeast are lacking, thus, further research is needed to develop genetic tools and functional elements. Here, we used two exogenous promoters (pGPD and pPGK) from oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides to establish a simpler Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (AMT) method for L. starkeyi. Hygromycin-resistant transformants were obtained on antibiotic-contained plate. Mitotic stability test, genotype verification by PCR, and protein expression confirmation all demonstrated the success of this method. Furthermore, the strength of these two promoters was evaluated at the phenotypic level on a hygromycin-gradient plate and at the transcriptional level by real-time quantitative PCR. The PGK promoter strength was 2.2-fold as that of GPD promoter to initiate the expression of the hygromycin-resistance gene. This study provided an easy and efficient genetic manipulation method and elements of the oleaginous yeast L. starkeyi for constructing superior strains to produce advanced biofuels.

  1. Cytosolic chaperones mediate quality control of higher-order septin assembly in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Courtney R; Weems, Andrew D; Brewer, Jennifer M; Thorner, Jeremy; McMurray, Michael A

    2015-04-01

    Septin hetero-oligomers polymerize into cytoskeletal filaments with essential functions in many eukaryotic cell types. Mutations within the oligomerization interface that encompasses the GTP-binding pocket of a septin (its "G interface") cause thermoinstability of yeast septin hetero-oligomer assembly, and human disease. When coexpressed with its wild-type counterpart, a G interface mutant is excluded from septin filaments, even at moderate temperatures. We show that this quality control mechanism is specific to G interface mutants, operates during de novo septin hetero-oligomer assembly, and requires specific cytosolic chaperones. Chaperone overexpression lowers the temperature permissive for proliferation of cells expressing a G interface mutant as the sole source of a given septin. Mutations that perturb the septin G interface retard release from these chaperones, imposing a kinetic delay on the availability of nascent septin molecules for higher-order assembly. Un-expectedly, the disaggregase Hsp104 contributes to this delay in a manner that does not require its "unfoldase" activity, indicating a latent "holdase" activity toward mutant septins. These findings provide new roles for chaperone-mediated kinetic partitioning of non-native proteins and may help explain the etiology of septin-linked human diseases. © 2015 Johnson et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  2. Deoxynucleoside salvage in fission yeast allows rescue of ribonucleotide reductase deficiency but not Spd1-mediated inhibition of replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleck, Oliver; Fahnøe, Ulrik; Løvschal, Katrine Vyff

    2017-01-01

    In fission yeast, the small, intrinsically disordered protein S-phase delaying protein 1 (Spd1) blocks DNA replication and causes checkpoint activation at least in part, by inhibiting the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase, which is responsible for the synthesis of DNA. The CRL4(Cdt2) E3 ubiquitin...... ligase mediates degradation of Spd1 and the related protein Spd2 at S phase of the cell cycle. We have generated a conditional allele of CRL4(Cdt2), by expressing the highly unstable substrate-recruiting protein Cdt2 from a repressible promoter. Unlike Spd1, Spd2 does not regulate deoxynucleotide...... triphosphate (dNTP) pools; yet we find that Spd1 and Spd2 together inhibit DNA replication upon Cdt2 depletion. To directly test whether this block of replication was solely due to insufficient dNTP levels, we established a deoxy-nucleotide salvage pathway in fission yeast by expressing the human nucleoside...

  3. Yeast transformation mediated by Agrobacterium strains harboring an Ri plasmid: comparative study between GALLS of an Ri plasmid and virE of a Ti plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyokawa, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Shinji; Sato, Yukari; Momota, Naoto; Tanaka, Katsuyuki; Moriguchi, Kazuki; Suzuki, Katsunori

    2012-07-01

    Agrobacterium strains containing a Ti plasmid can transfer T-DNA not only to plants but also to fungi, including the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, no Agrobacterium strain harboring an Ri plasmid has been evaluated in fungal transformation. Some Ri plasmids have GALLS , instead of virE1 and virE2. GALLS protein can functionally substitute in plant transformation for a structurally different protein VirE2. In this study, we compared the yeast transformation ability among Agrobacterium donors: a strain containing a Ti plasmid, strains harboring either an agropine-type or a mikimopine-type Ri plasmid, and a strain having a modified Ri plasmid supplemented with a Ti plasmid type virE operon. Agrobacterium strains possessing GALLS transformed yeast cells far less efficiently than the strain containing virE operon. Production of GALLS in recipient yeast cells improved the yeast transformation mediated by an Agrobacterium strain lacking neither GALLS nor virE operon. A reporter assay to detect mobilization of the proteins fused with Cre recombinase revealed that VirE2 protein is much more abundant in yeast cells than GALLS. Based on these results, we concluded that the low yeast transformability mediated by Agrobacterium strains having the Ri plasmid is because of low amount of mobilized GALLS in yeast cells. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Evaluation of Non-Saccharomyces Yeasts for the Reduction of Alcohol Content in Wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, A.; Hidalgo, C.; Henschke, P. A.; Chambers, P. J.; Curtin, C.

    2014-01-01

    Over recent decades, the average ethanol concentration of wine has increased, largely due to consumer preference for wine styles associated with increased grape maturity; sugar content increases with grape maturity, and this translates into increased alcohol content in wine. However, high ethanol content impacts wine sensory properties, reducing the perceived complexity of flavors and aromas. In addition, for health and economic reasons, the wine sector is actively seeking technologies to facilitate the production of wines with lower ethanol content. Nonconventional yeast species, in particular, non-Saccharomyces yeasts, have shown potential for producing wines with lower alcohol content. These yeast species, which are largely associated with grapes preharvest, are present in the early stages of fermentation but, in general, are not capable of completing alcoholic fermentation. We have evaluated 50 different non-Saccharomyces isolates belonging to 24 different genera for their capacity to produce wine with a lower ethanol concentration when used in sequential inoculation regimes with a Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strain. A sequential inoculation of Metschnikowia pulcherrima AWRI1149 followed by an S. cerevisiae wine strain was best able to produce wine with an ethanol concentration lower than that achieved with the single-inoculum, wine yeast control. Sequential fermentations utilizing AWRI1149 produced wines with 0.9% (vol/vol) and 1.6% (vol/vol) (corresponding to 7.1 g/liter and 12.6 g/liter, respectively) lower ethanol concentrations in Chardonnay and Shiraz wines, respectively. In Chardonnay wine, the total concentration of esters and higher alcohols was higher for wines generated from sequential inoculations, whereas the total concentration of volatile acids was significantly lower. In sequentially inoculated Shiraz wines, the total concentration of higher alcohols was higher and the total concentration of volatile acids was reduced compared with those in

  5. Mediator, TATA-binding Protein, and RNA Polymerase II Contribute to Low Histone Occupancy at Active Gene Promoters in Yeast*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Suraiya A.; Paul, Emily; Sommer, Sebastian; Lieleg, Corinna; He, Qiye; Daly, Alexandre Z.; Rode, Kara A.; Barber, Wesley T.; Ellis, Laura C.; LaPorta, Erika; Orzechowski, Amanda M.; Taylor, Emily; Reeb, Tanner; Wong, Jason; Korber, Philipp; Morse, Randall H.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in eukaryotes requires the Mediator complex, and often involves chromatin remodeling and histone eviction at active promoters. Here we address the role of Mediator in recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex and its role, along with components of the preinitiation complex (PIC), in histone eviction at inducible and constitutively active promoters in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex to the induced CHA1 promoter, as well as its association with several constitutively active promoters, depends on the Mediator complex but is independent of Mediator at the induced MET2 and MET6 genes. Although transcriptional activation and histone eviction at CHA1 depends on Swi/Snf, Swi/Snf recruitment is not sufficient for histone eviction at the induced CHA1 promoter. Loss of Swi/Snf activity does not affect histone occupancy of several constitutively active promoters; in contrast, higher histone occupancy is seen at these promoters in Mediator and PIC component mutants. We propose that an initial activator-dependent, nucleosome remodeling step allows PIC components to outcompete histones for occupancy of promoter sequences. We also observe reduced promoter association of Mediator and TATA-binding protein in a Pol II (rpb1-1) mutant, indicating mutually cooperative binding of these components of the transcription machinery and indicating that it is the PIC as a whole whose binding results in stable histone eviction. PMID:24727477

  6. A rice tonoplastic calcium exchanger, OsCCX2 mediates Ca2+/cation transport in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Akhilesh K.; Shankar, Alka; Jha, Saroj K.; Kanwar, Poonam; Pandey, Amita; Pandey, Girdhar K.

    2015-01-01

    In plant cell, cations gradient in cellular compartments is maintained by synergistic action of various exchangers, pumps and channels. The Arabidopsis exchanger family members (AtCCX3 and AtCCX5) were previously studied and belong to CaCA (calcium cation exchangers) superfamily while none of the rice CCXs has been functionally characterized for their cation transport activities till date. Rice genome encode four CCXs and only OsCCX2 transcript showed differential expression under abiotic stresses and Ca2+ starvation conditions. The OsCCX2 localized to tonoplast and suppresses the Ca2+ sensitivity of K667 (low affinity Ca2+ uptake deficient) yeast mutant under excess CaCl2 conditions. In contrast to AtCCXs, OsCCX2 expressing K667 yeast cells show tolerance towards excess Na+, Li+, Fe2+, Zn2+ and Co2+ and suggest its ability to transport both mono as well as divalent cations in yeast. Additionally, in contrast to previously characterized AtCCXs, OsCCX2 is unable to complement yeast trk1trk2 double mutant suggesting inability to transport K+ in yeast system. These finding suggest that OsCCX2 having distinct metal transport properties than previously characterized plant CCXs. OsCCX2 can be used as potential candidate for enhancing the abiotic stress tolerance in plants as well as for phytoremediation of heavy metal polluted soil. PMID:26607171

  7. Yeast mediates lactic acidosis suppression after antibiotic cocktail treatment in short small bowel?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongaerts, G.P.A.; Severijnen, R.S.V.M.; Skladal, D.; Bakkeren, J.A.J.; Sperl, W.

    2005-01-01

    During acidotic periods in a girl with a short small bowel, very high D-lactic acid concentrations were measured in blood and urine; the patient's characteristic faecal flora contained mainly lactobacilli, and during antibiotic cocktail treatment also many yeasts. In this case report we sought to

  8. Cdc7-Dbf4 regulates NDT80 transcription as well as reductional segregation during budding yeast meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hsiao-Chi; Wan, Lihong; Rosebrock, Adam; Futcher, Bruce; Hollingsworth, Nancy M

    2008-11-01

    In budding yeast, as in other eukaryotes, the Cdc7 protein kinase is important for initiation of DNA synthesis in vegetative cells. In addition, Cdc7 has crucial meiotic functions: it facilitates premeiotic DNA replication, and it is essential for the initiation of recombination. This work uses a chemical genetic approach to demonstrate that Cdc7 kinase has additional roles in meiosis. First, Cdc7 allows expression of NDT80, a meiosis-specific transcriptional activator required for the induction of genes involved in exit from pachytene, meiotic progression, and spore formation. Second, Cdc7 is necessary for recruitment of monopolin to sister kinetochores, and it is necessary for the reductional segregation occurring at meiosis I. The use of the same kinase to regulate several distinct meiosis-specific processes may be important for the coordination of these processes during meiosis.

  9. Cdc7-Dbf4 Regulates NDT80 Transcription as Well as Reductional Segregation during Budding Yeast Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hsiao-Chi; Wan, Lihong; Rosebrock, Adam; Futcher, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    In budding yeast, as in other eukaryotes, the Cdc7 protein kinase is important for initiation of DNA synthesis in vegetative cells. In addition, Cdc7 has crucial meiotic functions: it facilitates premeiotic DNA replication, and it is essential for the initiation of recombination. This work uses a chemical genetic approach to demonstrate that Cdc7 kinase has additional roles in meiosis. First, Cdc7 allows expression of NDT80, a meiosis-specific transcriptional activator required for the induction of genes involved in exit from pachytene, meiotic progression, and spore formation. Second, Cdc7 is necessary for recruitment of monopolin to sister kinetochores, and it is necessary for the reductional segregation occurring at meiosis I. The use of the same kinase to regulate several distinct meiosis-specific processes may be important for the coordination of these processes during meiosis. PMID:18768747

  10. Mediator, TATA-binding protein, and RNA polymerase II contribute to low histone occupancy at active gene promoters in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Suraiya A; Paul, Emily; Sommer, Sebastian; Lieleg, Corinna; He, Qiye; Daly, Alexandre Z; Rode, Kara A; Barber, Wesley T; Ellis, Laura C; LaPorta, Erika; Orzechowski, Amanda M; Taylor, Emily; Reeb, Tanner; Wong, Jason; Korber, Philipp; Morse, Randall H

    2014-05-23

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in eukaryotes requires the Mediator complex, and often involves chromatin remodeling and histone eviction at active promoters. Here we address the role of Mediator in recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex and its role, along with components of the preinitiation complex (PIC), in histone eviction at inducible and constitutively active promoters in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex to the induced CHA1 promoter, as well as its association with several constitutively active promoters, depends on the Mediator complex but is independent of Mediator at the induced MET2 and MET6 genes. Although transcriptional activation and histone eviction at CHA1 depends on Swi/Snf, Swi/Snf recruitment is not sufficient for histone eviction at the induced CHA1 promoter. Loss of Swi/Snf activity does not affect histone occupancy of several constitutively active promoters; in contrast, higher histone occupancy is seen at these promoters in Mediator and PIC component mutants. We propose that an initial activator-dependent, nucleosome remodeling step allows PIC components to outcompete histones for occupancy of promoter sequences. We also observe reduced promoter association of Mediator and TATA-binding protein in a Pol II (rpb1-1) mutant, indicating mutually cooperative binding of these components of the transcription machinery and indicating that it is the PIC as a whole whose binding results in stable histone eviction. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. A novel method to prepare L-Arabinose from xylose mother liquor by yeast-mediated biopurification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Shuangjun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background L-arabinose is an important intermediate for anti-virus drug synthesis and has also been used in food additives for diets-controlling in recent years. Commercial production of L-arabinose is a complex progress consisting of acid hydrolysis of gum arabic, followed by multiple procedures of purification, thus making high production cost. Therefore, there is a biotechnological and commercial interest in the development of new cost-effective and high-performance methods for obtaining high purity grade L-arabinose. Results An alternative, economical method for purifying L-arabinose from xylose mother liquor was developed in this study. After screening 306 yeast strains, a strain of Pichia anomala Y161 was selected as it could effectively metabolize other sugars but not L-arabinose. Fermentation in a medium containing xylose mother liquor permitted enrichment of L-arabinose by a significant depletion of other sugars. Biochemical analysis of this yeast strain confirmed that its poor capacity for utilizing L-arabinose was due to low activities of the enzymes required for the metabolism of this sugar. Response surface methodology was employed for optimization the fermentation conditions in shake flask cultures. The optimum conditions were: 75 h fermentation time, at 32.5°C, in a medium containing 21% (v/v xylose mother liquor. Under these conditions, the highest purity of L-arabinose reached was 86.1% of total sugar, facilitating recovery of white crystalline L-arabinose from the fermentation medium by simple methods. Conclusion Yeast-mediated biopurification provides a dynamic method to prepare high purity of L-arabinose from the feedstock solution xylose mother liqour, with cost-effective and high-performance properties.

  12. Cell cycle- and chaperone-mediated regulation of H3K56ac incorporation in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Tommy; Liu, Chih Long; Erkmann, Judith A; Holik, John; Grunstein, Michael; Kaufman, Paul D; Friedman, Nir; Rando, Oliver J

    2008-11-01

    Acetylation of histone H3 lysine 56 is a covalent modification best known as a mark of newly replicated chromatin, but it has also been linked to replication-independent histone replacement. Here, we measured H3K56ac levels at single-nucleosome resolution in asynchronously growing yeast cultures, as well as in yeast proceeding synchronously through the cell cycle. We developed a quantitative model of H3K56ac kinetics, which shows that H3K56ac is largely explained by the genomic replication timing and the turnover rate of each nucleosome, suggesting that cell cycle profiles of H3K56ac should reveal most first-time nucleosome incorporation events. However, since the deacetylases Hst3/4 prevent use of H3K56ac as a marker for histone deposition during M phase, we also directly measured M phase histone replacement rates. We report a global decrease in turnover rates during M phase and a further specific decrease in turnover at several early origins of replication, which switch from rapidly replaced in G1 phase to stably bound during M phase. Finally, by measuring H3 replacement in yeast deleted for the H3K56 acetyltransferase Rtt109 and its two co-chaperones Asf1 and Vps75, we find evidence that Rtt109 and Asf1 preferentially enhance histone replacement at rapidly replaced nucleosomes, whereas Vps75 appears to inhibit histone turnover at those loci. These results provide a broad perspective on histone replacement/incorporation throughout the cell cycle and suggest that H3K56 acetylation provides a positive-feedback loop by which replacement of a nucleosome enhances subsequent replacement at the same location.

  13. Cell cycle- and chaperone-mediated regulation of H3K56ac incorporation in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommy Kaplan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Acetylation of histone H3 lysine 56 is a covalent modification best known as a mark of newly replicated chromatin, but it has also been linked to replication-independent histone replacement. Here, we measured H3K56ac levels at single-nucleosome resolution in asynchronously growing yeast cultures, as well as in yeast proceeding synchronously through the cell cycle. We developed a quantitative model of H3K56ac kinetics, which shows that H3K56ac is largely explained by the genomic replication timing and the turnover rate of each nucleosome, suggesting that cell cycle profiles of H3K56ac should reveal most first-time nucleosome incorporation events. However, since the deacetylases Hst3/4 prevent use of H3K56ac as a marker for histone deposition during M phase, we also directly measured M phase histone replacement rates. We report a global decrease in turnover rates during M phase and a further specific decrease in turnover at several early origins of replication, which switch from rapidly replaced in G1 phase to stably bound during M phase. Finally, by measuring H3 replacement in yeast deleted for the H3K56 acetyltransferase Rtt109 and its two co-chaperones Asf1 and Vps75, we find evidence that Rtt109 and Asf1 preferentially enhance histone replacement at rapidly replaced nucleosomes, whereas Vps75 appears to inhibit histone turnover at those loci. These results provide a broad perspective on histone replacement/incorporation throughout the cell cycle and suggest that H3K56 acetylation provides a positive-feedback loop by which replacement of a nucleosome enhances subsequent replacement at the same location.

  14. Calorie Restriction-Mediated Replicative Lifespan Extension in Yeast Is Non-Cell Autonomous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Szu-Chieh; Brenner, Charles

    2015-01-01

    In laboratory yeast strains with Sir2 and Fob1 function, wild-type NAD+ salvage is required for calorie restriction (CR) to extend replicative lifespan. CR does not significantly alter steady state levels of intracellular NAD+ metabolites. However, levels of Sir2 and Pnc1, two enzymes that sequentially convert NAD+ to nicotinic acid (NA), are up-regulated during CR. To test whether factors such as NA might be exported by glucose-restricted mother cells to survive later generations, we developed a replicative longevity paradigm in which mother cells are moved after 15 generations on defined media. The experiment reveals that CR mother cells lose the longevity benefit of CR when evacuated from their local environment to fresh CR media. Addition of NA or nicotinamide riboside (NR) allows a moved mother to maintain replicative longevity despite the move. Moreover, conditioned medium from CR-treated cells transmits the longevity benefit of CR to moved mother cells. Evidence suggests the existence of a longevity factor that is dialyzable but is neither NA nor NR, and indicates that Sir2 is not required for the longevity factor to be produced or to act. Data indicate that the benefit of glucose-restriction is transmitted from cell to cell in budding yeast, suggesting that glucose restriction may benefit neighboring cells and not only an individual cell. PMID:25633578

  15. Calorie restriction-mediated replicative lifespan extension in yeast is non-cell autonomous.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Chieh Mei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In laboratory yeast strains with Sir2 and Fob1 function, wild-type NAD+ salvage is required for calorie restriction (CR to extend replicative lifespan. CR does not significantly alter steady state levels of intracellular NAD+ metabolites. However, levels of Sir2 and Pnc1, two enzymes that sequentially convert NAD+ to nicotinic acid (NA, are up-regulated during CR. To test whether factors such as NA might be exported by glucose-restricted mother cells to survive later generations, we developed a replicative longevity paradigm in which mother cells are moved after 15 generations on defined media. The experiment reveals that CR mother cells lose the longevity benefit of CR when evacuated from their local environment to fresh CR media. Addition of NA or nicotinamide riboside (NR allows a moved mother to maintain replicative longevity despite the move. Moreover, conditioned medium from CR-treated cells transmits the longevity benefit of CR to moved mother cells. Evidence suggests the existence of a longevity factor that is dialyzable but is neither NA nor NR, and indicates that Sir2 is not required for the longevity factor to be produced or to act. Data indicate that the benefit of glucose-restriction is transmitted from cell to cell in budding yeast, suggesting that glucose restriction may benefit neighboring cells and not only an individual cell.

  16. Filtration, haze and foam characteristics of fermented wort mediated by yeast strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, P; Meneses, F J; Jiranek, V

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the influence of the choice of yeast strain on the haze, shelf life, filterability and foam quality characteristics of fermented products. Twelve strains were used to ferment a chemically defined wort and hopped ale or stout wort. Fermented products were assessed for foam using the Rudin apparatus, and filterability and haze characteristics using the European Brewing Convention methods, to reveal differences in these parameters as a consequence of the choice of yeast strain and growth medium. Under the conditions used, the choice of strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae effecting the primary fermentation has an impact on all of the parameters investigated, most notably when the fermentation medium is devoid of macromolecular material. The filtration of fermented products has a large cost implication for many brewers and wine makers, and the haze of the resulting filtrate is a key quality criterion. Also of importance to the quality of beer and some wines is the foaming and head retention of these beverages. The foam characteristics, filterability and potential for haze formation in a fermented product have long been known to be dependant on the raw materials used, as well as other production parameters. The choice of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain used to ferment has itself been shown here to influence these parameters.

  17. Reduções enantiosseletivas de cetonas utilizando-se fermento de pão Enantioselective reductions of ketones using baker's yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Augusto R. Rodrigues

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Baker's yeast has been successful employed to reduce carbonyl compounds carrying appropriated substituents at distances under the electronic influence of the keto group. High yields and enantiomeric excess (ee were obtained with 1,2-alkanedione, 1,2-alkanedione (2-O-methyloxime and 1,3-alkanedione. Potential chiral building blocks were obtained and applied for stereoselective synthesis of valuable compounds. Evidence for a free radical chain process was obtained with baker's yeast reduction of a-iodoacetophenone using radical inhibitors.

  18. Enhanced targeted integration mediated by translocated I-SceI during the Agrobacterium mediated transformation of yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolloos, Martijn; Hooykaas, Paul J J; van der Zaal, Bert J

    2015-02-09

    Agrobacterium mediated transformation (AMT) has been embraced by biotechnologists as the technology of choice to introduce or alter genetic traits of plants. However, in plants it is virtually impossible to predetermine the integration site of the transferred T-strand unless one is able to generate a double stranded break (DSB) in the DNA at the site of interest. In this study, we used the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae to investigate whether the Agrobacterium mediated translocation of site-specific endonucleases via the type IV secretion system (T4SS), concomitantly with T-DNA transfer is possible and whether this can improve the gene targeting efficiency. In addition to that, the effect of different chromatin states on targeted integration, was investigated. It was found that Agrobacterium mediated translocation of the homing endonuclease I-SceI has a positive effect on the integration of T-DNA via the homologous repair (HR) pathway. Furthermore, we obtained evidence that nucleosome removal has a positive effect on I-SceI facilitated T-DNA integration by HR. Reversely; inducing nucleosome formation at the site of integration removes the positive effect of translocated I-SceI on T-DNA integration.

  19. ER-associated SNAREs and Sey1p mediate nuclear fusion at two distinct steps during yeast mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jason V; Arlow, Tim; Inkellis, Elizabeth R; Koo, Timothy S; Rose, Mark D

    2013-12-01

    During yeast mating, two haploid nuclei fuse membranes to form a single diploid nucleus. However, the known proteins required for nuclear fusion are unlikely to function as direct fusogens (i.e., they are unlikely to directly catalyze lipid bilayer fusion) based on their predicted structure and localization. Therefore we screened known fusogens from vesicle trafficking (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors [SNAREs]) and homotypic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) fusion (Sey1p) for additional roles in nuclear fusion. Here we demonstrate that the ER-localized SNAREs Sec20p, Ufe1p, Use1p, and Bos1p are required for efficient nuclear fusion. In contrast, Sey1p is required indirectly for nuclear fusion; sey1Δ zygotes accumulate ER at the zone of cell fusion, causing a block in nuclear congression. However, double mutants of Sey1p and Sec20p, Ufe1p, or Use1p, but not Bos1p, display extreme ER morphology defects, worse than either single mutant, suggesting that retrograde SNAREs fuse ER in the absence of Sey1p. Together these data demonstrate that SNAREs mediate nuclear fusion, ER fusion after cell fusion is necessary to complete nuclear congression, and there exists a SNARE-mediated, Sey1p-independent ER fusion pathway.

  20. Isonicotinamide Enhances Sir2 Protein-mediated Silencing and Longevity in Yeast by Raising Intracellular NAD+ Concentration*

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Julie M.; Wierman, Margaret B.; Maqani, Nazif; Smith, Jeffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    Sirtuins are an evolutionarily conserved family of NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases that function in the regulation of gene transcription, cellular metabolism, and aging. Their activity requires the maintenance of an adequate intracellular NAD+ concentration through the combined action of NAD+ biosynthesis and salvage pathways. Nicotinamide (NAM) is a key NAD+ precursor that is also a byproduct and feedback inhibitor of the deacetylation reaction. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the nicotinamidase Pnc1 converts NAM to nicotinic acid (NA), which is then used as a substrate by the NAD+ salvage pathway enzyme NA phosphoribosyltransferase (Npt1). Isonicotinamide (INAM) is an isostere of NAM that stimulates yeast Sir2 deacetylase activity in vitro by alleviating the NAM inhibition. In this study, we determined that INAM stimulates Sir2 through an additional mechanism in vivo, which involves elevation of the intracellular NAD+ concentration. INAM enhanced normal silencing at the rDNA locus but only partially suppressed the silencing defects of an npt1Δ mutant. Yeast cells grown in media lacking NA had a short replicative life span, which was extended by INAM in a SIR2-dependent manner and correlated with increased NAD+. The INAM-induced increase in NAD+ was strongly dependent on Pnc1 and Npt1, suggesting that INAM increases flux through the NAD+ salvage pathway. Part of this effect was mediated by the NR salvage pathways, which generate NAM as a product and require Pnc1 to produce NAD+. We also provide evidence suggesting that INAM influences the expression of multiple NAD+ biosynthesis and salvage pathways to promote homeostasis during stationary phase. PMID:22539348

  1. Isonicotinamide enhances Sir2 protein-mediated silencing and longevity in yeast by raising intracellular NAD+ concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Julie M; Wierman, Margaret B; Maqani, Nazif; Smith, Jeffrey S

    2012-06-15

    Sirtuins are an evolutionarily conserved family of NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylases that function in the regulation of gene transcription, cellular metabolism, and aging. Their activity requires the maintenance of an adequate intracellular NAD(+) concentration through the combined action of NAD(+) biosynthesis and salvage pathways. Nicotinamide (NAM) is a key NAD(+) precursor that is also a byproduct and feedback inhibitor of the deacetylation reaction. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the nicotinamidase Pnc1 converts NAM to nicotinic acid (NA), which is then used as a substrate by the NAD(+) salvage pathway enzyme NA phosphoribosyltransferase (Npt1). Isonicotinamide (INAM) is an isostere of NAM that stimulates yeast Sir2 deacetylase activity in vitro by alleviating the NAM inhibition. In this study, we determined that INAM stimulates Sir2 through an additional mechanism in vivo, which involves elevation of the intracellular NAD(+) concentration. INAM enhanced normal silencing at the rDNA locus but only partially suppressed the silencing defects of an npt1Δ mutant. Yeast cells grown in media lacking NA had a short replicative life span, which was extended by INAM in a SIR2-dependent manner and correlated with increased NAD(+). The INAM-induced increase in NAD(+) was strongly dependent on Pnc1 and Npt1, suggesting that INAM increases flux through the NAD(+) salvage pathway. Part of this effect was mediated by the NR salvage pathways, which generate NAM as a product and require Pnc1 to produce NAD(+). We also provide evidence suggesting that INAM influences the expression of multiple NAD(+) biosynthesis and salvage pathways to promote homeostasis during stationary phase.

  2. Deoxynucleoside Salvage in Fission Yeast Allows Rescue of Ribonucleotide Reductase Deficiency but Not Spd1-Mediated Inhibition of Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Fleck

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In fission yeast, the small, intrinsically disordered protein S-phase delaying protein 1 (Spd1 blocks DNA replication and causes checkpoint activation at least in part, by inhibiting the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase, which is responsible for the synthesis of DNA. The CRL4Cdt2 E3 ubiquitin ligase mediates degradation of Spd1 and the related protein Spd2 at S phase of the cell cycle. We have generated a conditional allele of CRL4Cdt2, by expressing the highly unstable substrate-recruiting protein Cdt2 from a repressible promoter. Unlike Spd1, Spd2 does not regulate deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP pools; yet we find that Spd1 and Spd2 together inhibit DNA replication upon Cdt2 depletion. To directly test whether this block of replication was solely due to insufficient dNTP levels, we established a deoxy-nucleotide salvage pathway in fission yeast by expressing the human nucleoside transporter human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1 and the Drosophila deoxynucleoside kinase. We present evidence that this salvage pathway is functional, as 2 µM of deoxynucleosides in the culture medium is able to rescue the growth of two different temperature-sensitive alleles controlling ribonucleotide reductase. However, salvage completely failed to rescue S phase delay, checkpoint activation, and damage sensitivity, which was caused by CRL4Cdt2 inactivation, suggesting that Spd1—in addition to repressing dNTP synthesis—together with Spd2, can inhibit other replication functions. We propose that this inhibition works at the point of the replication clamp proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a co-factor for DNA replication.

  3. Aeration Controls the Reduction and Methylation of Tellurium by the Aerobic, Tellurite-Resistant Marine Yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollivier, Patrick R. L.; Bahrou, Andrew S.; Church, Thomas M.; Hanson, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    We previously described a marine, tellurite-resistant strain of the yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa that both precipitates intracellular Te(0) and volatilizes methylated Te compounds when grown in the presence of the oxyanion tellurite. The uses of microbes as a “green” route for the production of Te(0)-containing nanostructures and for the remediation of Te-oxyanion wastes have great potential, and so a more thorough understanding of this process is required. Here, Te precipitation and volatilization catalyzed by R. mucilaginosa were examined in continuously aerated and sealed (low oxygen concentration) batch cultures. Continuous aeration was found to strongly promote Te volatilization while inhibiting Te(0) precipitation. This differs from the results in sealed batch cultures, for which tellurite reduction to Te(0) was found to be very efficient. We show also that volatile Te species may be degraded rapidly in medium and converted to the particulate form by biological activity. Further experiments revealed that Te(0) precipitates produced by R. mucilaginosa can be further transformed to volatile and dissolved Te species. However, it was not clearly determined whether Te(0) is a required intermediate for Te volatilization. Based on these results, we conclude that low oxygen concentrations will be the most efficient for production of Te(0) nanoparticles while limiting the production of toxic volatile Te species, although the production of these compounds may never be completely eliminated. PMID:21602387

  4. Bioelectrochemical Ethanol Production through Mediated Acetate Reduction by Mixed Cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinbusch, K.J.J.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Schaap, J.D.; Kampman, C.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2010-01-01

    Biological acetate reduction with hydrogen is a potential method to convert wet biomass waste into ethanol. Since the ethanol concentration and reaction rates are low, this research studies the feasibility of using an electrode, in stead of hydrogen, as an electron donor for biological acetate

  5. APC/C-Cdc20 mediates deprotection of centromeric cohesin at meiosis II in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonak, Katarzyna; Zagoriy, Ievgeniia; Oz, Tugce; Graf, Peter; Rojas, Julie; Mengoli, Valentina; Zachariae, Wolfgang

    2017-06-18

    Cells undergoing meiosis produce haploid gametes through one round of DNA replication followed by 2 rounds of chromosome segregation. This requires that cohesin complexes, which establish sister chromatid cohesion during S phase, are removed in a stepwise manner. At meiosis I, the separase protease triggers the segregation of homologous chromosomes by cleaving cohesin's Rec8 subunit on chromosome arms. Cohesin persists at centromeres because the PP2A phosphatase, recruited by the shugoshin protein, dephosphorylates Rec8 and thereby protects it from cleavage. While chromatids disjoin upon cleavage of centromeric Rec8 at meiosis II, it was unclear how and when centromeric Rec8 is liberated from its protector PP2A. One proposal is that bipolar spindle forces separate PP2A from Rec8 as cells enter metaphase II. We show here that sister centromere biorientation is not sufficient to "deprotect" Rec8 at meiosis II in yeast. Instead, our data suggest that the ubiquitin-ligase APC/C Cdc20 removes PP2A from centromeres by targeting for degradation the shugoshin Sgo1 and the kinase Mps1. This implies that Rec8 remains protected until entry into anaphase II when it is phosphorylated concurrently with the activation of separase. Here, we provide further support for this model and speculate on its relevance to mammalian oocytes.

  6. Humic substances-mediated microbial reductive dehalogenation of triclosan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Xu, S.; Yang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The role of natural organic matter in regulating the redox reactions as an electron shuttle has received lots of attention, because it can significantly affect the environmental degradation of contaminants and biogeochemical cycles of major elements. However, up to date, limited studies examined the role of natural organic matter in affecting the microbial dehalogenation of emergent organohalides, a critical detoxification process. In this study, we investigated the humic substance (HS)-mediated microbial dehalogenation of triclosan, a widely used antimicrobial agent. We found that the presence of HS stimulated the microbial degradation of triclosan by Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32. In the absence of HS, the triclosan was degraded gradually, achieving 8.6% residual at 8 days. With HS, the residual triclosan was below 2% after 4 days. Cl- was confirmed by ion chromatography analysis, but the dehalogenation processes and other byproducts warrant further investigations. The impact of HS on the degradation of triclosan was highly dependent on the concentration of HS. When the HS was below 15 mg/L, the degradation rate constant for triclosan increased with the organic carbon concentration. Beyond that point, the increased organic carbon concentration decreased the degradation of triclosan. Microbially pre-reduced HS abiotically reduced triclosan, testifying the electron shuttling processes. These results indicate that dissolved organic matter plays a dual role in regulating the degradation of triclosan: it mediates electron transport and inhibits the bioavailability through complexation. Such novel organic matter-mediated reactions for organohalides are important for evaluating the natural attenuation of emergent contaminants and designing cost-effective engineering treatment.

  7. Pressure-mediated reduction of ultrasonically induced cell lysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciaravino, V.E.; Miller, M.W.; Carstensen, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    Chinese hamster V-79 cells, exposed in polystyrene tubes for 5 min to 1-MHz continuous-wave ultrasound, were lysed more by a 10 than a 5 W/cm 2 intensity. Higher atmospheric pressure was needed to eliminate lysis with the former relative to the latter intensity, but lysis by 10 W/cm 2 was completely climinated with 2 atm of hydrostatic pressure. The reduction in lysis per unit increase in atmospheric pressure was comparable for both ultrasound intensities

  8. Reductive glutamine metabolism by IDH1 mediates lipogenesis under hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metallo, Christian M.; Gameiro, Paulo A.; Bell, Eric L.; Mattaini, Katherine R.; Yang, Juanjuan; Hiller, Karsten; Jewell, Christopher M.; Johnson, Zachary R.; Irvine, Darrell J.; Guarente, Leonard; Kelleher, Joanne K.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Iliopoulos, Othon; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) is the central biosynthetic precursor for fatty acid synthesis and protein acetylation. In the conventional view of mammalian cell metabolism, AcCoA is primarily generated from glucose-derived pyruvate through the citrate shuttle and adenosine triphosphate citrate lyase (ACL) in the cytosol1-3. However, proliferating cells that exhibit aerobic glycolysis and those exposed to hypoxia convert glucose to lactate at near stoichiometric levels, directing glucose carbon away from the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and fatty acid synthesis4. Although glutamine is consumed at levels exceeding that required for nitrogen biosynthesis5, the regulation and utilization of glutamine metabolism in hypoxic cells is not well understood. Here we show that human cells employ reductive metabolism of alpha-ketoglutarate (αKG) to synthesize AcCoA for lipid synthesis. This isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) dependent pathway is active in most cell lines under normal culture conditions, but cells grown under hypoxia rely almost exclusively on the reductive carboxylation of glutamine-derived αKG for de novo lipogenesis. Furthermore, renal cell lines deficient in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor protein preferentially utilize reductive glutamine metabolism for lipid biosynthesis even at normal oxygen levels. These results identify a critical role for oxygen in regulating carbon utilization in order to produce AcCoA and support lipid synthesis in mammalian cells. PMID:22101433

  9. Nutrient Control of Yeast Gametogenesis Is Mediated by TORC1, PKA and Energy Availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilla Weidberg

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell fate choices are tightly controlled by the interplay between intrinsic and extrinsic signals, and gene regulatory networks. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the decision to enter into gametogenesis or sporulation is dictated by mating type and nutrient availability. These signals regulate the expression of the master regulator of gametogenesis, IME1. Here we describe how nutrients control IME1 expression. We find that protein kinase A (PKA and target of rapamycin complex I (TORC1 signalling mediate nutrient regulation of IME1 expression. Inhibiting both pathways is sufficient to induce IME1 expression and complete sporulation in nutrient-rich conditions. Our ability to induce sporulation under nutrient rich conditions allowed us to show that respiration and fermentation are interchangeable energy sources for IME1 transcription. Furthermore, we find that TORC1 can both promote and inhibit gametogenesis. Down-regulation of TORC1 is required to activate IME1. However, complete inactivation of TORC1 inhibits IME1 induction, indicating that an intermediate level of TORC1 signalling is required for entry into sporulation. Finally, we show that the transcriptional repressor Tup1 binds and represses the IME1 promoter when nutrients are ample, but is released from the IME1 promoter when both PKA and TORC1 are inhibited. Collectively our data demonstrate that nutrient control of entry into sporulation is mediated by a combination of energy availability, TORC1 and PKA activities that converge on the IME1 promoter.

  10. Interactive uncertainty reduction strategies and verbal affection in computer-mediated communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antheunis, M.L.; Schouten, A.P.; Valkenburg, P.M.; Peter, J.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the language-based strategies that computer-mediated communication (CMC) users employ to reduce uncertainty in the absence of nonverbal cues. Specifically, this study investigated the prevalence of three interactive uncertainty reduction strategies (i.e.,

  11. Cdc7-Dbf4 Regulates NDT80 Transcription as Well as Reductional Segregation during Budding Yeast Meiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Hsiao-Chi; Wan, Lihong; Rosebrock, Adam; Futcher, Bruce; Hollingsworth, Nancy M.

    2008-01-01

    In budding yeast, as in other eukaryotes, the Cdc7 protein kinase is important for initiation of DNA synthesis in vegetative cells. In addition, Cdc7 has crucial meiotic functions: it facilitates premeiotic DNA replication, and it is essential for the initiation of recombination. This work uses a chemical genetic approach to demonstrate that Cdc7 kinase has additional roles in meiosis. First, Cdc7 allows expression of NDT80, a meiosis-specific transcriptional activator required for the induct...

  12. Identification of auxotrophic mutants of the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus by non-homologous end joining-mediated integrative transformation with genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarimizu, Tohru; Nonklang, Sanom; Nakamura, Junpei; Tokuda, Shuya; Nakagawa, Takaaki; Lorreungsil, Sasithorn; Sutthikhumpha, Surasit; Pukahuta, Charida; Kitagawa, Takao; Nakamura, Mikiko; Cha-Aim, Kamonchai; Limtong, Savitree; Hoshida, Hisashi; Akada, Rinji

    2013-12-01

    The isolation and application of auxotrophic mutants for gene manipulations, such as genetic transformation, mating selection and tetrad analysis, form the basis of yeast genetics. For the development of these genetic methods in the thermotolerant fermentative yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus, we isolated a series of auxotrophic mutants with defects in amino acid or nucleic acid metabolism. To identify the mutated genes, linear DNA fragments of nutrient biosynthetic pathway genes were amplified from Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomal DNA and used to directly transform the K. marxianus auxotrophic mutants by random integration into chromosomes through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). The appearance of transformant colonies indicated that the specific S. cerevisiae gene complemented the K. marxianus mutant. Using this interspecific complementation approach with linear PCR-amplified DNA, we identified auxotrophic mutations of ADE2, ADE5,7, ADE6, HIS2, HIS3, HIS4, HIS5, HIS6, HIS7, LYS1, LYS2, LYS4, LYS9, LEU1, LEU2, MET2, MET6, MET17, TRP3, TRP4 and TRP5 without the labour-intensive requirement of plasmid construction. Mating, sporulation and tetrad analysis techniques for K. marxianus were also established. With the identified auxotrophic mutant strains and S. cerevisiae genes as selective markers, NHEJ-mediated integrative transformation with PCR-amplified DNA is an attractive system for facilitating genetic analyses in the yeast K. marxianus. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Mediation of an efficacious HIV risk reduction intervention for South African men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Ann; Jemmott, John B; Jemmott, Loretta S; Bellamy, Scarlett; Icard, Larry D; Ngwane, Zolani

    2015-10-01

    "Men, Together Making a Difference!" is an HIV/STD risk-reduction intervention that significantly increased self-reported consistent condom use during vaginal intercourse compared with a health-promotion attention-control intervention among men (N = 1181) in Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. The present analyses were designed to identify mediators of the intervention's efficacy. The potential mediators were Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) constructs that the intervention targeted, including several aspects of condom-use self-efficacy, outcome expectancies, and knowledge. Mediation was assessed using a product-of-coefficients approach where an α path (the intervention's effect on the potential mediator) and a β path (the potential mediator's effect on the outcome of interest, adjusting for intervention) were estimated independently in a generalized estimating equations framework. Condom-use negotiation self-efficacy, technical-skill self-efficacy, and impulse-control self-efficacy were significant mediators. Although not mediators, descriptive norm and expected friends' approval of condom use predicted subsequent self-reported condom use, whereas the expected approval of sexual partner did not. The present results suggest that HIV/STD risk-reduction interventions that draw upon SCT and that address self-efficacy to negotiate condom use, to apply condoms correctly, and to exercise sufficient control when sexually aroused to use condoms may contribute to efforts to reduce sexual risk behavior among South African men. Future research must examine whether approaches that build normative support for condom use among men's friends are also efficacious.

  14. Effect of dye structure and redox mediators on anaerobic azo and anthraquinone dye reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara Carantino Costa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the biological decolourisation of dyes with different molecular structures. The kinetic constant values (k1 achieved with azo dye Reactive Red 120 were 7.6 and 10.1 times higher in the presence of RM (redox mediators AQDS and riboflavin, respectively, than the assays lacking RM. The kinetic constant achieved with the azo dye Congo Red was 42 times higher than that obtained with the anthraquinone dye Reactive Blue 4. The effect of RM on dye reduction was more evident for azo dyes resistant to reductive processes, and ineffective for anthraquinone dyes because of the structural stability of the latter.

  15. Moderation and Mediation of an Efficacious Sexual Risk-Reduction Intervention for South African Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Leary, Ann; Jemmott, John B.; Jemmott, Loretta Sweet; Bellamy, Scarlett; Ngwane, Zolani; Icard, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Background “Let Us Protect Our Future” is a sexual risk-reduction intervention for sixth-grade adolescents in South Africa. Tested in a cluster-randomized controlled trial, the intervention significantly reduced self-reported intercourse and unprotected intercourse during a 12-month follow-up period. Purpose The present analyses were conducted to identify moderators of the intervention’s efficacy as well as which theory-based variables mediated the intervention’s effects. Methods: Intervention efficacy over the 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups was tested using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. Results Living with their father in the home, parental strictness, and religiosity moderated the efficacy of the intervention in reducing unprotected intercourse. Self-efficacy to avoid risky situations and expected parental disapproval of their having intercourse, derived from Social Cognitive Theory, significantly mediated the intervention’s effect on abstinence. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate that Social Cognitive variables mediate the efficacy of a sexual risk-reduction intervention among South African adolescents. PMID:22618963

  16. Chronological Lifespan in Yeast Is Dependent on the Accumulation of Storage Carbohydrates Mediated by Yak1, Mck1 and Rim15 Kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yingzhi; Quan, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Zhe; Oliver, Stephen G.; Zhang, Nianshu

    2016-01-01

    Upon starvation for glucose or any other macronutrient, yeast cells exit from the mitotic cell cycle and acquire a set of characteristics that are specific to quiescent cells to ensure longevity. Little is known about the molecular determinants that orchestrate quiescence entry and lifespan extension. Using starvation-specific gene reporters, we screened a subset of the yeast deletion library representing the genes encoding ‘signaling’ proteins. Apart from the previously characterised Rim15, Mck1 and Yak1 kinases, the SNF1/AMPK complex, the cell wall integrity pathway and a number of cell cycle regulators were shown to be necessary for proper quiescence establishment and for extension of chronological lifespan (CLS), suggesting that entry into quiescence requires the integration of starvation signals transmitted via multiple signaling pathways. The CLS of these signaling mutants, and those of the single, double and triple mutants of RIM15, YAK1 and MCK1 correlates well with the amount of storage carbohydrates but poorly with transition-phase cell cycle status. Combined removal of the glycogen and trehalose biosynthetic genes, especially GSY2 and TPS1, nearly abolishes the accumulation of storage carbohydrates and severely reduces CLS. Concurrent overexpression of GSY2 and TSL1 or supplementation of trehalose to the growth medium ameliorates the severe CLS defects displayed by the signaling mutants (rim15Δyak1Δ or rim15Δmck1Δ). Furthermore, we reveal that the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species are cooperatively controlled by Yak1, Rim15 and Mck1, and the three kinases mediate the TOR1-regulated accumulation of storage carbohydrates and CLS extension. Our data support the hypothesis that metabolic reprogramming to accumulate energy stores and the activation of anti-oxidant defence systems are coordinated by Yak1, Rim15 and Mck1 kinases to ensure quiescence entry and lifespan extension in yeast. PMID:27923067

  17. Exercise training attenuates chemoreflex-mediated reductions of renal blood flow in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Noah J; Pügge, Carolin; Mediratta, Jai; Schiller, Alicia M; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Zucker, Irving H; Schultz, Harold D

    2015-07-15

    In chronic heart failure (CHF), carotid body chemoreceptor (CBC) activity is increased and contributes to increased tonic and hypoxia-evoked elevation in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Elevated RSNA and reduced renal perfusion may contribute to development of the cardio-renal syndrome in CHF. Exercise training (EXT) has been shown to abrogate CBC-mediated increases in RSNA in experimental heart failure; however, the effect of EXT on CBC control of renal blood flow (RBF) is undetermined. We hypothesized that CBCs contribute to tonic reductions in RBF in CHF, that stimulation of the CBC with hypoxia would result in exaggerated reductions in RBF, and that these responses would be attenuated with EXT. RBF was measured in CHF-sedentary (SED), CHF-EXT, CHF-carotid body denervation (CBD), and CHF-renal denervation (RDNX) groups. We measured RBF at rest and in response to hypoxia (FiO2 10%). All animals exhibited similar reductions in ejection fraction and fractional shortening as well as increases in ventricular systolic and diastolic volumes. Resting RBF was lower in CHF-SED (29 ± 2 ml/min) than in CHF-EXT animals (46 ± 2 ml/min, P < 0.05) or in CHF-CBD animals (42 ± 6 ml/min, P < 0.05). In CHF-SED, RBF decreased during hypoxia, and this was prevented in CHF-EXT animals. Both CBD and RDNX abolished the RBF response to hypoxia in CHF. Mean arterial pressure increased in response to hypoxia in CHF-SED, but was prevented by EXT, CBD, and RDNX. EXT is effective in attenuating chemoreflex-mediated tonic and hypoxia-evoked reductions in RBF in CHF. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Yeast G-proteins mediate directional sensing and polarization behaviors in response to changes in pheromone gradient direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Travis I.; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Kim, Hyung Joon; Jeon, Noo Li; Yi, Tau-Mu

    2013-01-01

    Yeast cells polarize by projecting up mating pheromone gradients, a classic cell polarity behavior. However, these chemical gradients may shift direction. We examine how yeast cells sense and respond to a 180o switch in the direction of microfluidically generated pheromone gradients. We identify two behaviors: at low concentrations of α-factor, the initial projection grows by bending, whereas at high concentrations, cells form a second projection toward the new source. Mutations that increase heterotrimeric G-protein activity expand the bending-growth morphology to high concentrations; mutations that increase Cdc42 activity result in second projections at low concentrations. Gradient-sensing projection bending requires interaction between Gβγ and Cdc24, whereas gradient-nonsensing projection extension is stimulated by Bem1 and hyperactivated Cdc42. Of interest, a mutation in Gα affects both bending and extension. Finally, we find a genetic perturbation that exhibits both behaviors. Overexpression of the formin Bni1, a component of the polarisome, makes both bending-growth projections and second projections at low and high α-factor concentrations, suggesting a role for Bni1 downstream of the heterotrimeric G-protein and Cdc42 during gradient sensing and response. Thus we demonstrate that G-proteins modulate in a ligand-dependent manner two fundamental cell-polarity behaviors in response to gradient directional change. PMID:23242998

  19. An unexpected role for the yeast nucleotide exchange factor Sil1 as a reductant acting on the molecular chaperone BiP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenthaler, Kevin D; Pareja, Kristeen A; Wang, Jie; Sevier, Carolyn S

    2017-01-01

    Unfavorable redox conditions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can decrease the capacity for protein secretion, altering vital cell functions. While systems to manage reductive stress are well-established, how cells cope with an overly oxidizing ER remains largely undefined. In previous work (Wang et al., 2014), we demonstrated that the chaperone BiP is a sensor of overly oxidizing ER conditions. We showed that modification of a conserved BiP cysteine during stress beneficially alters BiP chaperone activity to cope with suboptimal folding conditions. How this cysteine is reduced to reestablish 'normal' BiP activity post-oxidative stress has remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that BiP's nucleotide exchange factor – Sil1 – can reverse BiP cysteine oxidation. This previously unexpected reductant capacity for yeast Sil1 has potential implications for the human ataxia Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome, where it is interesting to speculate that a disruption in ER redox-signaling (due to genetic defects in SIL1) may influence disease pathology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24141.001 PMID:28257000

  20. Cobamide-mediated enzymatic reductive dehalogenation via long-range electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Cindy; Bommer, Martin; Hagen, Wilfred R; Uksa, Marie; Dobbek, Holger; Schubert, Torsten; Diekert, Gabriele

    2017-07-03

    The capacity of metal-containing porphyrinoids to mediate reductive dehalogenation is implemented in cobamide-containing reductive dehalogenases (RDases), which serve as terminal reductases in organohalide-respiring microbes. RDases allow for the exploitation of halogenated compounds as electron acceptors. Their reaction mechanism is under debate. Here we report on substrate-enzyme interactions in a tetrachloroethene RDase (PceA) that also converts aryl halides. The shape of PceA's highly apolar active site directs binding of bromophenols at some distance from the cobalt and with the hydroxyl substituent towards the metal. A close cobalt-substrate interaction is not observed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Nonetheless, a halogen substituent para to the hydroxyl group is reductively eliminated and the path of the leaving halide is traced in the structure. Based on these findings, an enzymatic mechanism relying on a long-range electron transfer is concluded, which is without parallel in vitamin B 12 -dependent biochemistry and represents an effective mode of RDase catalysis.

  1. Csm4, in collaboration with Ndj1, mediates telomere-led chromosome dynamics and recombination during yeast meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer J Wanat

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome movements are a general feature of mid-prophase of meiosis. In budding yeast, meiotic chromosomes exhibit dynamic movements, led by nuclear envelope (NE-associated telomeres, throughout the zygotene and pachytene stages. Zygotene motion underlies the global tendency for colocalization of NE-associated chromosome ends in a "bouquet." In this study, we identify Csm4 as a new molecular participant in these processes and show that, unlike the two previously identified components, Ndj1 and Mps3, Csm4 is not required for meiosis-specific telomere/NE association. Instead, it acts to couple telomere/NE ensembles to a force generation mechanism. Mutants lacking Csm4 and/or Ndj1 display the following closely related phenotypes: (i elevated crossover (CO frequencies and decreased CO interference without abrogation of normal pathways; (ii delayed progression of recombination, and recombination-coupled chromosome morphogenesis, with resulting delays in the MI division; and (iii nondisjunction of homologs at the MI division for some reason other than absence of (the obligatory CO(s. The recombination effects are discussed in the context of a model where the underlying defect is chromosome movement, the absence of which results in persistence of inappropriate chromosome relationships that, in turn, results in the observed mutant phenotypes.

  2. Reductions in Corpus Callosum Volume Partially Mediate Effects of Prenatal Alcohol Exposure on IQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevie C. Biffen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Disproportionate volume reductions in the basal ganglia, corpus callosum (CC and hippocampus have been reported in children with prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE. However, few studies have investigated these reductions in high prevalence communities, such as the Western Cape Province of South Africa, and only one study made use of manual tracing, the gold standard of volumetric analysis. The present study examined the effects of PAE on subcortical neuroanatomy using manual tracing and the relation of volumetric reductions in these regions to IQ and performance on the California Verbal Learning Test-Children's Version (CVLT-C, a list learning task sensitive to PAE. High-resolution T1-weighted images were acquired, using a sequence optimized for morphometric neuroanatomical analysis, on a Siemens 3T Allegra MRI scanner from 71 right-handed, 9- to 11-year-old children [9 fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS, 19 partial FAS (PFAS, 24 non-syndromal heavily exposed (HE and 19 non-exposed controls]. Frequency of maternal drinking was ascertained prospectively during pregnancy using timeline follow-back interviews. PAE was examined in relation to volumes of the CC and left and right caudate nuclei, nucleus accumbens and hippocampi. All structures were manually traced using Multitracer. Higher levels of PAE were associated with reductions in CC volume after adjustment for TIV. Although the effect of PAE on CC was confounded with smoking and lead exposure, additional analyses showed that it was not accounted for by these exposures. Amongst dysmorphic children, smaller CC was associated with poorer IQ and CVLT-C scores and statistically mediated the effect of PAE on IQ. In addition, higher levels of PAE were associated with bilateral volume reductions in caudate nuclei and hippocampi, effects that remained significant after control for TIV, child sex and age, socioeconomic status, maternal smoking during pregnancy, and childhood lead exposure. These data confirm

  3. Menadione-mediated WST1 reduction assay for the determination of metabolic activity of cultured neural cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapelfeldt, Karsten; Ehrke, Eric; Steinmeier, Johann; Rastedt, Wiebke; Dringen, Ralf

    2017-12-01

    Cellular reduction of tetrazolium salts to their respective formazans is frequently used to determine the metabolic activity of cultured cells as an indicator of cell viability. For membrane-impermeable tetrazolium salts such as WST1 the application of a membrane-permeable electron cycler is usually required to mediate the transfer of intracellular electrons for extracellular WST1 reduction. Here we demonstrate that in addition to the commonly used electron cycler M-PMS, menadione can also serve as an efficient electron cycler for extracellular WST1 reduction in cultured neural cells. The increase in formazan absorbance in glial cell cultures for the WST1 reduction by menadione involves enzymatic menadione reduction and was twice that recorded for the cytosolic enzyme-independent WST1 reduction in the presence of M-PMS. The optimized WST1 reduction assay allowed within 30 min of incubation a highly reliable detection of compromised cell metabolism caused by 3-bromopyruvate and impaired membrane integrity caused by Triton X-100, with a sensitivity as good as that of spectrophotometric assays which determine cellular MTT reduction or lactate dehydrogenase release. The short incubation period of 30 min and the observed good sensitivity make this optimized menadione-mediated WST1 reduction assay a quick and reliable alternative to other viability and toxicity assays. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Yeast Microcapsule-Mediated Targeted Delivery of Diverse Nanoparticles for Imaging and Therapy via the Oral Route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xing; Zhang, Xiangjun; Han, Songling; Dou, Yin; Liu, Mengyu; Zhang, Lin; Guo, Jiawei; Shi, Qing; Gong, Genghao; Wang, Ruibing; Hu, Jiang; Li, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianxiang

    2017-02-08

    Targeting of nanoparticles to distant diseased sites after oral delivery remains highly challenging due to the existence of many biological barriers in the gastrointestinal tract. Here we report targeted oral delivery of diverse nanoparticles in multiple disease models, via a "Trojan horse" strategy based on a bioinspired yeast capsule (YC). Diverse charged nanoprobes including quantum dots (QDs), iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs), and assembled organic fluorescent nanoparticles can be effectively loaded into YC through electrostatic force-driven spontaneous deposition, resulting in different diagnostic YC assemblies. Also, different positive nanotherapies containing an anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin (IND) or an antitumor drug paclitaxel (PTX) are efficiently packaged into YC. YCs containing either nanoprobes or nanotherapies may be rapidly endocytosed by macrophages and maintained in cells for a relatively long period of time. Post oral administration, nanoparticles packaged in YC are first transcytosed by M cells and sequentially endocytosed by macrophages, then transported to neighboring lymphoid tissues, and finally delivered to remote diseased sites of inflammation or tumor in mice or rats, all through the natural route of macrophage activation, recruitment, and deployment. For the examined acute inflammation model, the targeting efficiency of YC-delivered QDs or IONPs is even higher than that of control nanoprobes administered at the same dose via intravenous injection. Assembled IND or PTX nanotherapies orally delivered via YCs exhibit remarkably potentiated efficacies as compared to nanotherapies alone in animal models of inflammation and tumor, which is consistent with the targeting effect and enhanced accumulation of drug molecules at diseased sites. Consequently, through the intricate transportation route, nanoprobes or nanotherapies enveloped in YC can be preferentially delivered to desired targets, affording remarkably improved efficacies for the

  5. Subsurface bio-mediated reduction of higher-valent uranium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Donald T.; Pepper, Sarah E.; Richmann, Michael K.; Smith, Geof; Deo, Randhir; Rittmann, Bruce E.

    2007-01-01

    Bio-mediated reduction of multivalent actinide contaminants plays an important role in their fate and transport in the subsurface. To initiate the process of extending recent progress in uranium biogeochemistry to plutonium, a side-by-side comparison of the bioreduction of uranyl and plutonyl species was conducted with Shewanella alga BrY, a facultative metal-reducing bacterium that is known to enzymatically reduce uranyl. Uranyl was reduced in our system, consistent with literature reports, but we have noted a strong coupling between abiotic and biotic processes and observe that non-reductive pathways to precipitation typically exist. Additionally, a key role of biogenic Fe 2+ , which is known to reduce uranyl at low pH, is suggested. In contrast, residual organics, present in biologically active systems, reduce Pu(VI) species to Pu(V) species at near-neutral pH. The predominance of relatively weak complexes of PuO 2 + is an important difference in how the uranyl and plutonyl species interacted with S. alga. Pu(V) also led to increased toxicity towards S. alga and is also more easily reduced by microbial activity. Biogenic Fe 2+ , produced by S. alga when Fe(III) is present as an electron acceptor, also played a key role in understanding redox controls and pathways in this system. Overall, the bioreduction of plutonyl is observed under anaerobic conditions, which favors its immobilization in the subsurface. Understanding the mechanism by which redox control is established in biologically active systems is a key aspect of remediation and immobilization strategies for actinides when they are present as subsurface contaminants

  6. Cyclic-AMP mediated drugs: differential or global reduction of eicosanoid synthesis in the isolated rat lung?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J. Post

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the question was addressed whether cAMP mediated drugs induce a differential reduction of branches of the arachidonic acid metabolism rather than a global reduction of eicosanoid synthesis. The isolated lungs of actively sensitized rats were employed to study prostaglandin and leukotriene release in the presence and absence of the cAMP mediated drugs theophylline, milrinone, sulmazole, isobutyl-methylxanthine and salbutamol. The release of eicosanoids as measured by RIA was predominantly basal and continuous, with a mild antigen induced stimulation only for TXB2 and the leukotrienes. All drugs reduced eicosanoid release globally. It is concluded that cAMP mediated drugs interfere with arachidonic acid metabolism at a site proximal to the branching into lipoxygenase and cyclo-oxygenase pathways.

  7. The pathway by which the yeast protein kinase Snf1p controls acquisition of sodium tolerance is different from that mediating glucose regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Tian; Elbing, Karin; Hohmann, Stefan

    2008-09-01

    It recently became apparent that the highly conserved Snf1p protein kinase plays roles in controlling different cellular processes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in addition to its well-known function in glucose repression/derepression. We have previously reported that Snf1p together with Gis4p controls ion homeostasis by regulating expression of ENA1, which encodes the Ena1p Na(+) extrusion system. In this study we found that Snf1p is rapidly phosphorylated when cells are exposed to NaCl and this phosphorylation is required for the role of Snf1p in Na(+) tolerance. In contrast to activation by low glucose levels, the salt-induced phosphorylation of Snf1p promoted neither phosphorylation nor nuclear export of the Mig1p repressor. The mechanism that prevents Mig1p phosphorylation by active Snf1p under salt stress does not involve either hexokinase PII or the Gis4p regulator. Instead, Snf1p may mediate upregulation of ENA1 expression via the repressor Nrg1p. Activation of Snf1p in response to glucose depletion requires any of the three upstream protein kinases Sak1p, Tos3p and Elm1p, with Sak1p playing the most prominent role. The same upstream kinases were required for salt-induced Snf1p phosphorylation, and also under these conditions Sak1p played the most prominent role. Unexpectedly, however, it appears that Elm1p plays a dual role in acquisition of salt tolerance by activating Snf1p and in a presently unknown parallel pathway. Together, these results indicate that under salt stress Snf1p takes part in a different pathway from that during glucose depletion and this role is performed together as well as in parallel with its upstream kinase Elm1p. Snf1p appears to be part of a wider functional network than previously anticipated and the full complexity of this network remains to be elucidated.

  8. Reduction of oxidative cellular damage by overexpression of the thioredoxin TRX2 gene improves yield and quality of wine yeast dry active biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ros Joaquim

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, adapted to anaerobic must fermentations, suffer oxidative stress when they are grown under aerobic conditions for biomass propagation in the industrial process of active dry yeast production. Oxidative metabolism of sugars favors high biomass yields but also causes increased oxidation damage of cell components. The overexpression of the TRX2 gene, coding for a thioredoxin, enhances oxidative stress resistance in a wine yeast strain model. The thioredoxin and also the glutathione/glutaredoxin system constitute the most important defense against oxidation. Trx2p is also involved in the regulation of Yap1p-driven transcriptional response against some reactive oxygen species. Results Laboratory scale simulations of the industrial active dry biomass production process demonstrate that TRX2 overexpression increases the wine yeast final biomass yield and also its fermentative capacity both after the batch and fed-batch phases. Microvinifications carried out with the modified strain show a fast start phenotype derived from its enhanced fermentative capacity and also increased content of beneficial aroma compounds. The modified strain displays an increased transcriptional response of Yap1p regulated genes and other oxidative stress related genes. Activities of antioxidant enzymes like Sod1p, Sod2p and catalase are also enhanced. Consequently, diminished oxidation of lipids and proteins is observed in the modified strain, which can explain the improved performance of the thioredoxin overexpressing strain. Conclusions We report several beneficial effects of overexpressing the thioredoxin gene TRX2 in a wine yeast strain. We show that this strain presents an enhanced redox defense. Increased yield of biomass production process in TRX2 overexpressing strain can be of special interest for several industrial applications.

  9. Research of the influencing factors of the immobilized redox mediators accelerating Cr(Ⅵ reduction by Escherichia coli BL21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiapeng PING

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the influencing factors of non-dissolved redox mediators on Cr (Ⅵ bioreduction, the accelerating effect of non-dissolved redox mediators immobilized by cellulose acetate (CA on the reduction of Cr(Ⅵ by Escherichia coli BL21 is investigated. The results show that the accelerating order is 1-chloroanthraquinone>1,5-dichloroanthraquinone>2-chloroanthraquinone>1,8-dichloroanthraquinone>anthraquinone>1,4,5,8-tetrachloroanthtaquinone; the optimal concentration of 1-chloroanthraquinone pH and initial Cr(Ⅵ concentration are 0.048 mol/L, 7.00 and 30 mg/L, respectively; the removal rate increases with the increasing temperature when it is in the range of 20~60 ℃; after 6 times of recycling experiments, and the Cr(Ⅵ bioreduction rate with the immobilized 1-chloroanthraquinone maintains above 5 times of margin bacterium's. It indicates that non-dissolved redox mediators immobilized by CA can effectively accelerate the reduction rate of Cr(Ⅵ by Escherichia coli BL21, which has favourable application value.

  10. Flow-through Column Experiments and Modeling of Microbially Mediated Cr(VI) Reduction at Hanford 100H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L.; Molins, S.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.; Steefel, C.; Nico, P. S.; Han, R.

    2010-12-01

    Microbially mediated Cr(VI) reduction at the Hanford 100H area was investigated by flow-through column experiments. Three separate experiments were conducted to promote microbial activities associated with denitrification, iron and sulfate reduction, respectively. Replicate columns packed with natural sediments from the site under anaerobic environment were injected with 5mM Lactate as the electron donor and 5 μM Cr(VI) in all experiments. Sulfate and nitrate solutions were added to act as the main electron acceptors in the respective experiments, while iron columns relied on the indigenous sediment iron (and manganese) oxides as electron acceptors. Column effluent solutions were analyzed by IC and ICP-MS to monitor the microbial consumption/conversion of lactate and the associated Cr(VI) reduction. Biogeochemical reactive transport modeling was performed to gain further insights into the reaction mechanisms and Cr(VI) bioreduction rates. All experimental columns showed a reduction of the injected Cr(VI). Columns under denitrifying conditions showed the least Cr(VI) reduction at early stages (simulations indicated that biomass growth completely depleted influent ammonium, and called for an additional source of N to account for the measured reduction rates. Iron columns were the least active with undetectable consumption of the injected lactate, slowest cell growth, and the smallest change in Cr(VI) concentrations during the course of the experiment. In contrast, columns under sulfate-reducing/fermentative conditions exhibited the greatest Cr(VI) reduction capacity. Two sulfate columns evolved to complete lactate fermentation with acetate and propionate produced in the column effluent after 40 days of experiments. These fermenting columns showed a complete removal of injected Cr(VI), visible precipitation of sulfide minerals, and a significant increase in effluent Fe and Mn concentrations. Reactive transport simulations suggested that direct reduction of Cr(VI) by

  11. Involvement of Na,K-pump in SEPYLRFamide-mediated reduction of cholinosensitivity in Helix neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarov, Arkady S; Foreman, Richard C; Walker, Robert J

    2007-02-01

    SEPYLRFamide acts as an inhibitory modulator of acetylcholine (ACh) receptors in Helix lucorum neurones. Ouabain, a specific inhibitor of Na,K-pump, (0.1 mM, bath application) decreased the ACh-induced inward current (ACh-current) and increased the leak current. Ouabain decreased the modulatory SEPYLRFamide effect on the ACh-current. There was a correlation between the effects of ouabain on the amplitude of the ACh-current and on the modulatory peptide effect. Ouabain and SEPYLRFamide inhibited the activity of Helix aspersa brain Na,K-ATPase. Activation of Na,K-pump by intracellular injection of 3 M Na acetate or 3 M NaCl reduced the modulatory peptide effect on the ACh-current. An inhibitor of Na/Ca-exchange, benzamil (25 muM, bath application), and an inhibitor of Ca(2+)-pump in the endoplasmic reticulum, thapsigargin (TG, applied intracellularly), both prevented the effect of ouabain on SEPYLRFamide-mediated modulatory effect. Another inhibitor of Ca(2+)-pump in the endoplasmic reticulum, cyclopiazonic acid (applied intracellularly), did not prevent the effect of ouabain on SEPYLRFamide-mediated modulatory effect. These results indicate that Na,K-pump is responsible for the SEPYLRFamide-mediated inhibition of ACh receptors in Helix neurons. Na/Ca-exchange and intracellular Ca(2+) released from internal pools containing TG-sensitive Ca(2+)-pump are involved in the Na,K-pump pathway for the SEPYLRFamide-mediated inhibition of ACh receptors.

  12. Significant Improvement Selected Mediators of Inflammation in Phenotypes of Women with PCOS after Reduction and Low GI Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Szczuko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many researchers suggest an increased risk of atherosclerosis in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. In the available literature, there are no studies on the mediators of inflammation in women with PCOS, especially after dietary intervention. Eicosanoids (HETE and HODE were compared between the biochemical phenotypes of women with PCOS (normal and high androgens and after the 3-month reduction diet. Eicosanoid profiles (9(S-HODE, 13(S-HODE, 5(S-HETE, 12(S-HETE, 15(S-HETE, 5(S-oxoETE, 16(R-HETE, 16(S-HETE and 5(S, 6(R-lipoxin A4, 5(S, 6(R, 15(R-lipoxin A4 were extracted from 0.5 ml of plasma using solid-phase extraction RP-18 SPE columns. The HPLC separations were performed on a 1260 liquid chromatograph. No significant differences were found in the concentration of analysed eicosanoids in phenotypes of women with PCOS. These women, however, have significantly lower concentration of inflammatory mediators than potentially healthy women from the control group. Dietary intervention leads to a significant (p<0.01 increase in the synthesis of proinflammatory mediators, reaching similar levels as in the control group. The development of inflammatory reaction in both phenotypes of women with PCOS is similar. The pathways for synthesis of proinflammatory mediators in women with PCOS are dormant, but can be stimulated through a reduction diet. Three-month period of lifestyle change may be too short to stimulate the pathways inhibiting inflammatory process.

  13. Mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig

    2017-01-01

    Mediatization research shares media effects studies' ambition of answering the difficult questions with regard to whether and how media matter and influence contemporary culture and society. The two approaches nevertheless differ fundamentally in that mediatization research seeks answers...... to these general questions by distinguishing between two concepts: mediation and mediatization. The media effects tradition generally considers the effects of the media to be a result of individuals being exposed to media content, i.e. effects are seen as an outcome of mediated communication. Mediatization...... research is concerned with long-term structural changes involving media, culture, and society, i.e. the influences of the media are understood in relation to how media are implicated in social and cultural changes and how these processes come to create new conditions for human communication and interaction...

  14. Radical-mediated reduction of the dithiocarbamate group under tin-free conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMaster, Claire; Bream, Robert N; Grainger, Richard S

    2012-06-28

    Reductive desulfurisation of dithiocarbamates is conveniently achieved using H(3)PO(2)-Et(3)N-ACCN in refluxing dioxane. Fused and spirocyclic β-lactams, prepared through 4-exo trig carbamoyl radical cyclisation-dithiocarbamate group transfer reactions, are reduced without fragmentation of the strained 4-membered ring. Diethyl tetraacetyl-d-glucopyranosyl dithiocarbamate is selectively reduced with or without acyloxy group migration depending on reaction conditions and choice of reductant. Deuterium incorporation from D(3)PO(2)-Et(3)N is observed for a system involving a nucleophilic radical intermediate, but not in the case of the electrophilic radical obtained through acyloxy group migration on a glucose derivative.

  15. Extracellular Saccharide-Mediated Reduction of Au3+ to Gold Nanoparticles: New Insights for Heavy Metals Biomineralization on Microbial Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Fuxing; Qu, Xiaolei; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2017-03-07

    Biomineralization is a critical process controlling the biogeochemical cycling, fate, and potential environmental impacts of heavy metals. Despite the indispensability of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to microbial life and their ubiquity in soil and aquatic environments, the role played by EPS in the transformation and biomineralization of heavy metals is not well understood. Here, we used gold ion (Au 3+ ) as a model heavy metal ion to quantitatively assess the role of EPS in biomineralization and discern the responsible functional groups. Integrated spectroscopic analyses showed that Au 3+ was readily reduced to zerovalent gold nanoparticles (AuNPs, 2-15 nm in size) in aqueous suspension of Escherichia coli or dissolved EPS extracted from microbes. The majority of AuNPs (95.2%) was formed outside Escherichia coli cells, and the removal of EPS attached to cells pronouncedly suppressed Au 3+ reduction, reflecting the predominance of the extracellular matrix in Au 3+ reduction. XPS, UV-vis, and FTIR analyses corroborated that Au 3+ reduction was mediated by the hemiacetal groups (aldehyde equivalents) of reducing saccharides of EPS. Consistently, the kinetics of AuNP formation obeyed pseudo-second-order reaction kinetics with respect to the concentrations of Au 3+ and the hemiacetal groups in EPS, with minimal dependency on the source of microbial EPS. Our findings indicate a previously overlooked, universally significant contribution of EPS to the reduction, mineralization, and potential detoxification of metal species with high oxidation state.

  16. Solid-state Water-mediated Transport Reduction of Nanostructured Iron Oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, Vladimir M.; Povarov, Vladimir G.; Voronkov, Gennadii P.; Semenov, Valentin G.; Murin, Igor' V.; Gittsovich, Viktor N.; Sinel'nikov, Boris M.

    2001-01-01

    The Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ ratio in two-dimensional iron oxide nanosructures (nanolayers with a thickness of 0.3-1.5 nm on silica surface) may be precisely controlled using the transport reduction (TR) technique. The species ≡-O-Fe(OH) 2 and (≡Si-O-) 2 -FeOH forming the surface monolayer are not reduced at 400-600 deg. C because of their covalent bonding to the silica surface, as demonstrated by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Iron oxide microparticles (microstructures) obtained by the impregnation technique, being chemically unbound to silica, are subjected to reduction at T ≥ 500 deg. C with formation of metallic iron in the form of α-Fe. Transport reduction of supported nanostructures (consisting of 1 or 4 monolayers) at T ≥ 600 deg. C produces bulk iron(II) silicate and metallic iron phases. The structural-chemical transformations occurring in transport reduction of supported iron oxide nanolayers are proved to be governed by specific phase processes in the nanostructures themselves

  17. Copper-mediated reductive dechlorination by green rust intercalated with dodecanoate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Lizhi; Yin, Zhou; Cooper, Nicola G.A.

    2018-01-01

    A layered FeII-FeIII hydroxide (green rust, GR) was intercalated with dodecanoate (known as GRC12) and then amended with CuII (GRC12(Cu)) before reaction with chloroform (CF), carbon tetrachloride (CT), trichloroethylene (TCE) or tetrachloroethylene (PCE). Reduction of CT by GRC12(Cu) was 37 times...

  18. Reduction of saliva-promoted adhesion of Streptococcus mutans MT8148 and dental biofilm development by tragacanth gum and yeast-derived phosphomannan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimotoyodome, A; Kobayashi, H; Nakamura, J; Tokimitsu, I; Hase, T; Inoue, T; Matsukubo, T; Takaesu, Y

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate materials which reduce saliva-promoted adhesion of Streptococcus mutans onto enamel surfaces, and their potential in preventing dental biofilm development. The effects of hydroxyapatite (HA) surface pretreatment with hydrophilic polysaccharides on saliva-promoted S. mutans adhesion in vitro and de novo dental biofilm deposition in vivo were examined. Saliva-promoted adhesion of S. mutans MT8148 was significantly reduced by pretreatment of the HA surface with tragacanth gum (TG) and yeast-derived phosphoglycans. Extracellular phosphomannan (PM) from Pichia capsulata NRRL Y-1842 and TG reduced biofilm development on lower incisors in plaque-susceptible rats when administered via drinking water at concentrations of 0.5% and 0.01%, respectively. The inhibitory effect of TG on de novo dental biofilm formation was also demonstrated when administered via mouthwash in humans. It is concluded that TG and yeast-derived PM have the potential for use as anti-adherent agents and are effective in reducing de novo dental biofilm formation.

  19. Ammonia production and its possible role as a mediator of communication for Debaryomyces hansenii and other cheese-relevant yeast species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gori, Klaus; Mortensen, Henrik Dam; Arneborg, Nils

    2007-01-01

    lipolytica, and Geotrichum candidum was determined on glycerol medium (GM) agar and cheese agar. The ammonia production was found to vary, especially among yeast species, but also within strains of D. hansenii. In addition, variations in ammonia production were found between GM agar and cheese agar. Ammonia...... yeasts. On GM agar and cheese agar, D. hansenii showed ammonia production oriented toward neighboring colonies when colonies were grown close to other colonies of the same species; however, the time to oriented ammonia production differed among strains and media. In addition, an increase of ammonia...... production was determined for double colonies compared with single colonies of D. hansenii on GM agar. In general, similar levels of ammonia production were determined for both single and double colonies of D. hansenii on cheese agar....

  20. Electron transfer capacity dependence of quinone-mediated Fe(III) reduction and current generation by Klebsiella pneumoniae L17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomin; Liu, Liang; Liu, Tongxu; Yuan, Tian; Zhang, Wei; Li, Fangbai; Zhou, Shungui; Li, Yongtao

    2013-06-01

    Quinone groups in exogenous electron shuttles can accelerate extracellular electron transfer (EET) from bacteria to insoluble terminal electron acceptors, such as Fe(III) oxides and electrodes, which are important in biogeochemical redox processes and microbial electricity generation. However, the relationship between quinone-mediated EET performance and electron-shuttling properties of the quinones remains incompletely characterized. This study investigates the effects of a series of synthetic quinones (SQs) on goethite reduction and current generation by a fermenting bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae L17. In addition, the voltammetric behavior and electron transfer capacities (ETCs) of SQ, including electron accepting (EAC) and donating (EDC) capacities, is also examined using electrochemical methods. The results showed that SQ can significantly increase both the Fe(III) reduction rates and current outputs of L17. Each tested SQ reversibly accepted and donated electrons as indicated by the cyclic voltammograms. The EAC and EDC results showed that Carmine and Alizarin had low relative capacities of electron transfer, whereas 9,10-anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid (AQDS), 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (2-HNQ), and 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (5-HNQ) showed stronger relative ETC, and 9,10-anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (AQC) and 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonic acid (AQS) had high relative ETC. Enhancement of microbial goethite reduction kinetics and current outputs by SQ had a good linear relationship with their ETC, indicating that the effectiveness of quinone-mediated EET may be strongly dependent on the ETC of the quinones. Therefore, the presence of quinone compounds and fermenting microorganisms may increase the diversity of microbial populations that contribute to element transformation in natural environments. Moreover, ETC determination of different SQ would help to evaluate their performance for microbial EET under anoxic conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier

  1. The role microbial sulfate reduction in the direct mediation of sedimentary authigenic carbonate precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchyn, A. V.; Walker, K.; Sun, X.

    2016-12-01

    The majority of modern deep marine sediments are bathed in water that is undersaturated with respect to calcium carbonate. However, within marine sediments changing chemical conditions, driven largely by the microbial oxidation of organic carbon in the absence of oxygen, lead to supersaturated conditions and drive calcium carbonate precipitation. This sedimentary calcium carbonate is often called `authigenic carbonate', and is found in the form of cements and disseminated crystals within the marine sedimentary pile. As this precipitation of this calcium carbonate is microbially mediated, identifying authigenic carbonate within the geological record and understanding what information its geochemical and/or isotopic signature may hold is key for understanding its importance and what information it may contain past life. However, the modern controls on authigenic carbonate precipitation remain enigmatic because the myriad of microbially mediated reactions occurring within sediments both directly and indirectly impact the proton balance. In this submission we present data from 25 ocean sediment cores spanning the globe where we explore the deviation from the stoichiometrically predicted relationships among alkalinity, calcium and sulfate concentrations. In theory for every mol of organic carbon reduced by sulfate, two mol of alkalinity is produced, and to precipitate subsurface calcium carbonate one mol of calcium is used to consume two mol of alkalinity. We use this data with a model to explore changes in carbonate saturation state with depth below the seafloor. Alkalinity changes in the subsurface are poorly correlated with changes in calcium concentrations, however calcium concentrations are directly and tightly coupled to changes in sulfate concentrations in all studied sites. This suggests a direct role for sulfate reducing bacteria in the precipitation of subsurface carbonate cements.

  2. Diffusion-controlled oxygen reduction on multi-copper oxidase-adsorbed carbon aerogel electrodes without mediator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimura, S.; Kamitaka, Y.; Kano, K. [Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto (Japan)

    2007-12-15

    Bioelectrocatalytic reduction of O{sub 2} into water was archived at diffusion-controlled rate by using enzymes (laccase from Trametes sp. and bilirubin oxidase from Myrothecium verrucaria, which belong to the family of multi-copper oxidase) adsorbed on mesoporous carbon aerogel particle without a mediator. The current density was predominantly controlled by the diffusion of dissolved O{sub 2} in rotating-disk electrode experiments, and reached a value as large as 10 mA cm{sup -2} at 1 atm O{sub 2}, 25 C, and 8,000 rpm on the laccase-adsorbed electrode. The overpotential of the bioelectrocatalytic reduction of O{sub 2} was 0.4-0.55 V smaller than that observed on a Pt disk electrode. Without any optimization, the laccase-adsorbed biocathode showed stable current intensity of the O{sub 2} reduction in an air-saturated buffer at least for 10 days under continuous flow system. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. Metal-Organic-Framework-Mediated Nitrogen-Doped Carbon for CO2 Electrochemical Reduction

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Riming; Sun, Xiaohui; Ould-Chikh, Samy; Osadchii, Dmitrii; Bai, Fan; Kapteijn, Freek; Gascon, Jorge

    2018-01-01

    A nitrogen-doped carbon was synthesized through the pyrolysis of the well-known metal-organic framework ZIF-8, followed by a subsequent acid treatment, and has been applied as a catalyst in the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide. The resulting electrode shows Faradaic efficiencies to carbon monoxide as high as ∼78%, with hydrogen being the only byproduct. The pyrolysis temperature determines the amount and the accessibility of N species in the carbon electrode, in which pyridinic-N and quaternary-N species play key roles in the selective formation of carbon monoxide.

  4. Metal-Organic-Framework-Mediated Nitrogen-Doped Carbon for CO2 Electrochemical Reduction

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Riming

    2018-04-11

    A nitrogen-doped carbon was synthesized through the pyrolysis of the well-known metal-organic framework ZIF-8, followed by a subsequent acid treatment, and has been applied as a catalyst in the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide. The resulting electrode shows Faradaic efficiencies to carbon monoxide as high as ∼78%, with hydrogen being the only byproduct. The pyrolysis temperature determines the amount and the accessibility of N species in the carbon electrode, in which pyridinic-N and quaternary-N species play key roles in the selective formation of carbon monoxide.

  5. Bacteria-mediated arsenic oxidation and reduction in the growth media of arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; de Oliveira, Letuzia Maria; Guilherme, Luiz R G; Ma, Lena Q

    2012-10-16

    Microbes play an important role in arsenic transformation and cycling in the environment. Microbial arsenic oxidation and reduction were demonstrated in the growth media of arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L. All arsenite (AsIII) at 0.1 mM in the media was oxidized after 48 h incubation. Oxidation was largely inhibited by antibiotics, indicating that bacteria played a dominant role. To identify AsIII oxidizing bacteria, degenerate primers were used to amplify ∼500 bp of the AsIII oxidase gene aioA (aroA) using DNA extracted from the media. One aioA (aroA)-like sequence (MG-1, tentatively identified as Acinetobacter sp.) was amplified, exhibiting 82% and 91% identity in terms of gene and deduced protein sequence to those from Acinetobacter sp. 33. In addition, four bacterial strains with different arsenic tolerance were isolated and identified as Comamonas sp.C-1, Flavobacterium sp. C-2, Staphylococcus sp. C-3, and Pseudomonas sp. C-4 using carbon utilization, fatty acid profiles, and/or sequencing 16s rRNA gene. These isolates exhibited dual capacity for both AsV reduction and AsIII oxidation under ambient conditions. Arsenic-resistant bacteria with strong AsIII oxidizing ability may have potential to improve bioremediation of AsIII-contaminated water using P. vittata and/or other biochemical strategies.

  6. Treatment of Aqueous Bromate by Superparamagnetic BiOCl-Mediated Advanced Reduction Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bromate ( BrO 3 − contamination in drinking water is a growing concern. Advanced reduction processes (ARPs are reportedly promising in relieving this concern. In this work, UV/superparamagnetic BiOCl (BiOCl loaded onto superparamagnetic hydroxyapatite assisted with small molecule carboxylic acid (formate, citrate, and acetate, a carboxyl anion radical ( CO 2 • − -based ARP, was proposed to eliminate aqueous BrO 3 − . Formate and citrate were found to be ideal CO 2 • − precursor, and the latter was found to be safe for practical use. BrO 3 − (10 μg·L−1, WHO guideline for drinking water can be completely degraded within 3 min under oxygen-free conditions. In this process, BrO 3 − degradation was realized by the reduction of CO 2 • − (major role and formyloxyl radical (minor role in bulk solution. The formation mechanism of radicals and the transformation pathway of BrO 3 − were proposed based on data on electron paramagnetic resonance monitoring, competitive kinetics, and degradation product analysis. The process provided a sustainable decontamination performance (<5% deterioration for 10 cycles and appeared to be more resistant to common electron acceptors (O2, NO 3 − , and Fe3+ than hydrated electron based-ARPs. Phosphate based-superparamagnetic hydroxyapatite, used to support BiOCl in this work, was believed to be applicable for resolving the recycling problem of other metal-containing catalyst.

  7. Hydrologically mediated iron reduction/oxidation fluctuations and dissolved organic carbon exports in tidal wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimond, J. A.; Seyfferth, A.; Michael, H. A.

    2017-12-01

    Salt marshes are biogeochemical hotspots where large quantities of carbon are processed and stored. High primary productivity and deposition of carbon-laden sediment enable salt marsh soils to accumulate and store organic carbon. Conversely, salt marshes can laterally export carbon from the marsh platform to the tidal channel and eventually the ocean via tidal pumping. However, carbon export studies largely focus on tidal channels, missing key physical and biogeochemical mechanisms driving the mobilization of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) within the marsh platform and limiting our understanding of and ability to predict coastal carbon dynamics. We hypothesize that iron redox dynamics mediate the mobilization/immobilization of DOC in the top 30 cm of salt marsh sediment near tidal channels. The mobilized DOC can then diffuse into the flooded surface water or be advected to tidal channels. To elucidate DOC dynamics driven by iron redox cycles, we measured porewater DOC, Fe(II), total iron, total sulfate, pH, redox potential, and electrical conductivity (EC) beside the creek, at the marsh levee, and in the marsh interior in a mid-latitude tidal salt marsh in Dover, Delaware. Samples were collected at multiple tide stages during a spring and neap tide at depths of 5-75cm. Samples were also collected from the tidal channel. Continuous Eh measurements were made using in-situ electrodes. A prior study shows that DOC and Fe(II) concentrations vary spatially across the marsh. Redox conditions near the creek are affected by tidal oscillations. High tides saturate the soil and decrease redox potential, whereas at low tide, oxygen enters the sediment and increases the Eh. This pattern is always seen in the top 7-10cm of sediment, with more constant low Eh at depth. However, during neap tides, this signal penetrates deeper. Thus, between the creek and marsh levee, hydrology mediates redox conditions. Based on porewater chemistry, if DOC mobilization can be linked to redox

  8. Cold Water Mediates Greater Reductions in Limb Blood Flow than Whole Body Cryotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawhinney, Chris; Low, David A; Jones, Helen; Green, Daniel J; Costello, Joseph T; Gregson, Warren

    2017-06-01

    Cold-water immersion (CWI) and whole body cryotherapy (WBC) are widely used recovery methods in an attempt to limit exercise-induced muscle damage, soreness, and functional deficits after strenuous exercise. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of ecologically valid CWI and WBC protocols on postexercise lower limb thermoregulatory, femoral artery, and cutaneous blood flow responses. Ten males completed a continuous cycle exercise protocol at 70% maximal oxygen uptake until a rectal temperature of 38°C was attained. Participants were then exposed to lower-body CWI (8°C) for 10 min, or WBC (-110°C) for 2 min, in a randomized crossover design. Rectal and thigh skin, deep, and superficial muscle temperatures, thigh, and calf skin blood flow (laser Doppler flowmetry), superficial femoral artery blood flow (duplex ultrasound), and arterial blood pressure were measured before, and for 40 min post, cooling interventions. Greater reductions in thigh skin (CWI, -5.9°C ± 1.8°C; WBC, 0.2°C ± 0.5°C; P < 0.001) and superficial (CWI, -4.4°C ± 1.3°C; WBC, -1.8°C ± 1.1°C; P < 0.001) and deep (CWI, -2.9°C ± 0.8°C; WBC, -1.3°C ± 0.6°C; P < 0.001) muscle temperatures occurred immediately after CWI. Decreases in femoral artery conductance were greater after CWI (CWI, -84% ± 11%; WBC, -59% ± 21%, P < 0.02) and thigh (CWI, -80% ± 5%; WBC, -59% ± 14%, P < 0.001), and calf (CWI, -73% ± 13%; WBC, -45% ± 17%, P < 0.001) cutaneous vasoconstriction was greater after CWI. Reductions in rectal temperature were similar between conditions after cooling (CWI, -0.6°C ± 0.4°C; WBC, -0.6°C ± 0.3°C; P = 0.98). Greater reductions in blood flow and tissue temperature were observed after CWI in comparison with WBC. These novel findings have practical and clinical implications for the use of cooling in the recovery from exercise and injury.

  9. Cell-mediated reduction of protein and peptide hydroperoxides to reactive free radicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, Henrietta A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Radical attack on proteins in the presence of O(2) gives protein hydroperoxides in high yields. These peroxides are decomposed by transition metal ions, reducing agents, UV light and heat, with the formation of a range of reactive radicals that are capable of initiating further damage. Evidence has...... been presented for the formation of alcohols as stable products of peroxide decomposition, and these have been employed as markers of oxidative damage in vivo. The mechanism of formation of these alcohols is unclear, with both radical and nonradical pathways capable of generating these products....... In this study we have investigated the reduction of peptide and protein hydroperoxides by THP-1 (human monocyte-like) cells and it is shown that this process is accompanied by radical formation as detected by EPR spin trapping. The radicals detected, which are similar to those detected from metal-ion catalyzed...

  10. Recent Advances in Transition-Metal-Mediated Electrocatalytic CO2 Reduction: From Homogeneous to Heterogeneous Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Ming Feng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Global climate change and increasing demands for clean energy have brought intensive interest in the search for proper electrocatalysts in order to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2 to higher value carbon products such as hydrocarbons. Recently, transition-metal-centered molecules or organic frameworks have been reported to show outstanding electrocatalytic activity in the liquid phase. Their d-orbital electrons are believed to be one of the key factors to capture and convert CO2 molecules to value-added low-carbon fuels. In this review, recent advances in electrocatalytic CO2 reduction have been summarized based on the targeted products, ranging from homogeneous reactions to heterogeneous ones. Their advantages and fallbacks have been pointed out and the existing challenges, especially with respect to the practical and industrial application are addressed.

  11. Recent Advances in Transition-Metal-Mediated Electrocatalytic CO2 Reduction: From Homogeneous to Heterogeneous Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Da-Ming

    2017-12-01

    Global climate change and increasing demands for clean energy have brought intensive interest in the search for proper electrocatalysts in order to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) to higher value carbon products such as hydrocarbons. Recently, transition-metal-centered molecules or organic frameworks have been reported to show outstanding electrocatalytic activity in the liquid phase. Their d-orbital electrons are believed to be one of the key factors to capture and convert CO2 molecules to value-added low-carbon fuels. In this review, recent advances in electrocatalytic CO2 reduction have been summarized based on the targeted products, ranging from homogeneous reactions to heterogeneous ones. Their advantages and fallbacks have been pointed out and the existing challenges, especially with respect to the practical and industrial application are addressed.

  12. Reduction of Sodium Arsenite-Mediated Adverse Effects in Mice using Dietary Supplementation of Water Hyacinth (Eichornia crassipes) Root Powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Rim Sabrina Jahan; Ahsan, Nazmul; Hossain, Khaled; Ghosh, Paritosh Kumar; Ahsan, Chowdhury Rafiqul; Akhand, Anwarul Azim

    2012-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated the protective effects of water Hyacinth Root Powder (HRP) on arsenic-mediated toxic effects in mice. Swiss albino mice, used in this study, were divided into four different groups (for each group n=5). The control group was supplied with normal feed and water, Arsenic group (As-group) was supplied with normal feed plus arsenic (sodium arsenite)-containing water, and arsenic+hyacinth group (As+Hy group) was supplied with feed supplemented with HRP plus arsenic water. The remaining Hy-group was supplied with feed supplemented with HRP plus normal water. Oral administration of arsenic reduced the normal growth of the mice as evidenced by weight loss. Interestingly, tip of the tails of these mice developed wound that caused gradual reduction of the tail length. Supplementation of HRP in feed significantly prevented mice growth retardation and tail wounding in As+Hy group mice. However, the growth pattern in Hy-group mice was observed to be almost similar to that of the control group indicating that HRP itself has no toxic or negative effect in mice. Ingested arsenic also distorted the shape of the blood cells and elevated the serum enzymes such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT). Importantly, elevation of these enzymes and distortion of blood cell shape were partially reduced in mice belong to As+Hy group, indicating HRP-mediated reduction of arsenic toxicity. Therefore, the preventive effect of hyacinth root on arsenic-poisoned mice suggested the future application of hyacinth to reduce arsenic toxicity in animal and human.

  13. Superoxide dismutase 1-mediated production of ethanol- and DNA-derived radicals in yeasts challenged with hydrogen peroxide: molecular insights into the genome instability of peroxiredoxin-null strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogusucu, Renata; Rettori, Daniel; Netto, Luis E S; Augusto, Ohara

    2009-02-27

    Peroxiredoxins are receiving increasing attention as defenders against oxidative damage and sensors of hydrogen peroxide-mediated signaling events. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, deletion of one or more isoforms of the peroxiredoxins is not lethal but compromises genome stability by mechanisms that remain under scrutiny. Here, we show that cytosolic peroxiredoxin-null cells (tsa1Deltatsa2Delta) are more resistant to hydrogen peroxide than wild-type (WT) cells and consume it faster under fermentative conditions. Also, tsa1Deltatsa2Delta cells produced higher yields of the 1-hydroxyethyl radical from oxidation of the glucose metabolite ethanol, as proved by spin-trapping experiments. A major role for Fenton chemistry in radical formation was excluded by comparing WT and tsa1Deltatsa2Delta cells with respect to their levels of total and chelatable metal ions and of radical produced in the presence of chelators. The main route for 1-hydroxyethyl radical formation was ascribed to the peroxidase activity of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1), whose expression and activity increased approximately 5- and 2-fold, respectively, in tsa1Deltatsa2Delta compared with WT cells. Accordingly, overexpression of human Sod1 in WT yeasts led to increased 1-hydroxyethyl radical production. Relevantly, tsa1Deltatsa2Delta cells challenged with hydrogen peroxide contained higher levels of DNA-derived radicals and adducts as monitored by immuno-spin trapping and incorporation of (14)C from glucose into DNA, respectively. The results indicate that part of hydrogen peroxide consumption by tsa1Deltatsa2Delta cells is mediated by induced Sod1, which oxidizes ethanol to the 1-hydroxyethyl radical, which, in turn, leads to increased DNA damage. Overall, our studies provide a pathway to account for the hypermutability of peroxiredoxin-null strains.

  14. Peripheral fatigue limits endurance exercise via a sensory feedback-mediated reduction in spinal motoneuronal output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Markus; Venturelli, Massimo; Ives, Stephen J; McDaniel, John; Layec, Gwenael; Rossman, Matthew J; Richardson, Russell S

    2013-08-01

    This study sought to determine whether afferent feedback associated with peripheral muscle fatigue inhibits central motor drive (CMD) and thereby limits endurance exercise performance. On two separate days, eight men performed constant-load, single-leg knee extensor exercise to exhaustion (85% of peak power) with each leg (Leg1 and Leg2). On another day, the performance test was repeated with one leg (Leg1) and consecutively (within 10 s) with the other/contralateral leg (Leg2-post). Exercise-induced quadriceps fatigue was assessed by reductions in potentiated quadriceps twitch-force from pre- to postexercise (ΔQtw,pot) in response to supramaximal magnetic femoral nerve stimulation. The output from spinal motoneurons, estimated from quadriceps electromyography (iEMG), was used to reflect changes in CMD. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was recorded during exercise. Time to exhaustion (∼9.3 min) and exercise-induced ΔQtw,pot (∼51%) were similar in Leg1 and Leg2 (P > 0.5). In the consecutive leg trial, endurance performance of the first leg was similar to that observed during the initial trial (∼9.3 min; P = 0.8); however, time to exhaustion of the consecutively exercising contralateral leg (Leg2-post) was shorter than the initial Leg2 trial (4.7 ± 0.6 vs. 9.2 ± 0.4 min; P fatigue and associated afferent feedback limits the development of peripheral fatigue and compromises endurance exercise performance by inhibiting CMD.

  15. Seed-mediated co-reduction in a large lattice mismatch system: synthesis of Pd-Cu nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Meredith R; McClain, Sophia M; Chen, Dennis P; Koczkur, Kallum M; Weiner, Rebecca G; Skrabalak, Sara E

    2017-06-08

    Metal nanoparticles (NPs) are of interest for applications in catalysis, electronics, chemical sensing, and more. Their utility is dictated by their composition and physical parameters such as particle size, particle shape, and overall architecture (e.g., hollow vs. solid). Interestingly, the addition of a second metal to create bimetallic NPs adds multifunctionality, with new emergent properties common. However, synthesizing structurally defined bimetallic NPs remains a great challenge. One synthetic pathway to architecturally controlled bimetallic NPs is seed-mediated co-reduction (SMCR) in which two metal precursors are simultaneously co-reduced to deposit metal onto shape-controlled metal seeds, which direct the overgrowth. Previously demonstrated in a Au-Pd system, here SMCR is applied to a system with a larger lattice mismatch between the depositing metals: Pd and Cu (7% mismatch for Pd-Cu vs. 4% for Au-Pd). Through manipulation of precursor reduction kinetics, the morphology and bimetallic distribution of the resultant NPs can be tuned to achieve eight-branched Pd-Cu heterostructures with Cu localized at the tips of the Pd nanocubes as well as branched Pd-Cu alloyed nanostructures and polyhedra. Significantly, the symmetry of the seeds can be transferred to the final nanostructures. This study expands our understanding of SMCR as a route to structurally defined bimetallic nanostructures and the synthesis of multicomponent nanomaterials more generally.

  16. Chemoselective biohydrogenation of chalcone (2Ε)-3-(1,3-benzodioxole-5-yl)-1-phenyl-2-propen-1-one mediated by baker yeasts immobilized in polymeric supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundstock, Flavia L.S.; Silva, Vanessa D.; Nascimento, Maria da G.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, baker's yeast (BY) was immobilized in poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), sodium caseinate (SC), gelatin (G) films and in agar (A) and gelatin (G) gels, and used as a biocatalyst in the biohydrogenation reaction of (2Ε)-3-(1,3-benzodioxyl-5-yl)-1-phenyl-2-propen-1-one (1). The transformation of (1) into the corresponding dehydro chalcone (2) through biohydrogenation reactions was carried out in n-hexane at 25 or 35 deg C, for 4-48 h reaction. The product conversion, under different experimental conditions, was evaluated by hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance, 1 H NMR.The highest conversion degrees were achieved using BY immobilized in agar gel, (29-47%), depending also on the temperature. Using BY immobilized in PEO, PVA, SC and G films, the conversion into (2) was lower (0-21%). The results show the feasibility of the use of BY immobilized in polymeric materials to reduce a,b-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. (author)

  17. Prions in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Bezdíčka, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The thesis describes yeast prions and their biological effects on yeast in general. It defines the basic characteristics of yeast prions, that distinguish prions from other proteins. The thesis introduces various possibilities of prion formation, and propagation as well as specific types of yeast prions, including various functions of most studied types of prions. The thesis also focuses on chaperones that affect the state of yeast prions in cells. Lastly, the thesis indicates similarities be...

  18. Baker's yeast: production of D- and L-3-hydroxy esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Allan Carsten; Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard

    1998-01-01

    harvested while growing. In contrast, the stereoselectivity was shifted towards L-hydroxy esters when the oxo esters were added slowly to ordinary baker's yeast supplied with gluconolactone as co-substrate. The reduction rate with gluconolactone was increased by active aeration. Ethyl L-(S)-3......Baker's yeast grown under oxygen limited conditions and used in the reduction of 3-oxo esters results in a shift of the stereoselectivity of the yeast towards D-hydroxy esters as compared with ordinary baker's yeast. The highest degree of stereoselectivity was obtained with growing yeast or yeast......-hydroxybutanoate was afforded in >99% ee. Both enantiomers of ethyl 3-hydroxypentanoate, D-(R) in 96% ee and L-(S) in 93% ee, and of ethyl 4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate, D-(S) in 98% ee and L-(R) in 94% ee, were obtained. The results demonstrate that the stereoselectivity of baker's yeast can be controlled...

  19. Observations of surface-mediated reduction of Pu(VI) to Pu(IV) on hematite nanoparticles by ATR FT-IR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emerson, Hilary P. [Florida International Univ., Applied Research Center, Miami, FL (United States); Powell, Brian A. [Clemson Univ., Dept. of Enviromental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Anderson, SC (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that mineral surfaces may facilitate the reduction of plutonium though the mechanisms of the reduction are still unknown. The objective of this study is to use batch sorption and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy experiments to observe the surface-mediated reduction of plutonium on hematite nanoparticles. These techniques allow for in situ measurement of reduction of plutonium with time and may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of surface mediated reduction of plutonium. For the first time, ATR FT-IR peaks for Pu(VI) sorbed to hematite are measured at ∝ 916 cm{sup -1}, respectively. The decrease in peak intensity with time provides a real-time, direct measurement of Pu(VI) reduction on the hematite surface. In this work pseudo first order rate constants estimated at the high loadings (22 mg{sub Pu}/g{sub hematite}, 1.34 x 10{sup -6} M{sub Pu}/m{sup 2}) for ATR FT-IR are approximately 10 x slower than at trace concentrations based on previous work. It is proposed that the reduced rate constant at higher Pu loadings occurs after the reduction capacity due to trace Fe(II) has been exhausted and is dependent on the oxidation of water and possibly electron shuttling based on the semiconducting nature of hematite. Therefore, the reduction rate at higher loadings is possibly due to the thermodynamic favorability of Pu(IV)-hydroxide complexes.

  20. Yeasts in sustainable bioethanol production: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Azhar, Siti Hajar; Abdulla, Rahmath; Jambo, Siti Azmah; Marbawi, Hartinie; Gansau, Jualang Azlan; Mohd Faik, Ainol Azifa; Rodrigues, Kenneth Francis

    2017-07-01

    Bioethanol has been identified as the mostly used biofuel worldwide since it significantly contributes to the reduction of crude oil consumption and environmental pollution. It can be produced from various types of feedstocks such as sucrose, starch, lignocellulosic and algal biomass through fermentation process by microorganisms. Compared to other types of microoganisms, yeasts especially Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the common microbes employed in ethanol production due to its high ethanol productivity, high ethanol tolerance and ability of fermenting wide range of sugars. However, there are some challenges in yeast fermentation which inhibit ethanol production such as high temperature, high ethanol concentration and the ability to ferment pentose sugars. Various types of yeast strains have been used in fermentation for ethanol production including hybrid, recombinant and wild-type yeasts. Yeasts can directly ferment simple sugars into ethanol while other type of feedstocks must be converted to fermentable sugars before it can be fermented to ethanol. The common processes involves in ethanol production are pretreatment, hydrolysis and fermentation. Production of bioethanol during fermentation depends on several factors such as temperature, sugar concentration, pH, fermentation time, agitation rate, and inoculum size. The efficiency and productivity of ethanol can be enhanced by immobilizing the yeast cells. This review highlights the different types of yeast strains, fermentation process, factors affecting bioethanol production and immobilization of yeasts for better bioethanol production.

  1. Yeasts in sustainable bioethanol production: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Hajar Mohd Azhar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bioethanol has been identified as the mostly used biofuel worldwide since it significantly contributes to the reduction of crude oil consumption and environmental pollution. It can be produced from various types of feedstocks such as sucrose, starch, lignocellulosic and algal biomass through fermentation process by microorganisms. Compared to other types of microoganisms, yeasts especially Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the common microbes employed in ethanol production due to its high ethanol productivity, high ethanol tolerance and ability of fermenting wide range of sugars. However, there are some challenges in yeast fermentation which inhibit ethanol production such as high temperature, high ethanol concentration and the ability to ferment pentose sugars. Various types of yeast strains have been used in fermentation for ethanol production including hybrid, recombinant and wild-type yeasts. Yeasts can directly ferment simple sugars into ethanol while other type of feedstocks must be converted to fermentable sugars before it can be fermented to ethanol. The common processes involves in ethanol production are pretreatment, hydrolysis and fermentation. Production of bioethanol during fermentation depends on several factors such as temperature, sugar concentration, pH, fermentation time, agitation rate, and inoculum size. The efficiency and productivity of ethanol can be enhanced by immobilizing the yeast cells. This review highlights the different types of yeast strains, fermentation process, factors affecting bioethanol production and immobilization of yeasts for better bioethanol production.

  2. Impact of Fe(III) as an effective electron-shuttle mediator for enhanced Cr(VI) reduction in microbial fuel cells: Reduction of diffusional resistances and cathode overpotentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qiang [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education (MOE), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Huang, Liping, E-mail: lipinghuang@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education (MOE), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Pan, Yuzhen [College of Chemistry, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Quan, Xie [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education (MOE), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Li Puma, Gianluca, E-mail: g.lipuma@lboro.ac.uk [Environmental Nanocatalysis & Photoreaction Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • Fe(III) shuttles electrons for enhanced reduction of Cr(VI) in MFCs. • The coulombic efficiency increases by 1.6 fold in the presence of Fe(III). • The reduction of Cr(VI) occurs via an indirect Fe(III) mediation mechanism. • Fe(III) decreases the diffusional resistances and the cathode overpotentials. - Abstract: The role of Fe(III) was investigated as an electron-shuttle mediator to enhance the reduction rate of the toxic heavy metal hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in wastewaters, using microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The direct reduction of chromate (CrO{sub 4}{sup −}) and dichromate (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}{sup 2−}) anions in MFCs was hampered by the electrical repulsion between the negatively charged cathode and Cr(VI) functional groups. In contrast, in the presence of Fe(III), the conversion of Cr(VI) and the cathodic coulombic efficiency in the MFCs were 65.6% and 81.7%, respectively, 1.6 times and 1.4 folds as those recorded in the absence of Fe(III). Multiple analytical approaches, including linear sweep voltammetry, Tafel plot, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and kinetic calculations demonstrated that the complete reduction of Cr(VI) occurred through an indirect mechanism mediated by Fe(III). The direct reduction of Cr(VI) with cathode electrons in the presence of Fe(III) was insignificant. Fe(III) played a critical role in decreasing both the diffusional resistance of Cr(VI) species and the overpotential for Cr(VI) reduction. This study demonstrated that the reduction of Cr(VI) in MFCs was effective in the presence of Fe(III), providing an alternative and environmentally benign approach for efficient remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated sites with simultaneous production of renewable energy.

  3. Impact of Fe(III) as an effective electron-shuttle mediator for enhanced Cr(VI) reduction in microbial fuel cells: Reduction of diffusional resistances and cathode overpotentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qiang; Huang, Liping; Pan, Yuzhen; Quan, Xie; Li Puma, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Fe(III) shuttles electrons for enhanced reduction of Cr(VI) in MFCs. • The coulombic efficiency increases by 1.6 fold in the presence of Fe(III). • The reduction of Cr(VI) occurs via an indirect Fe(III) mediation mechanism. • Fe(III) decreases the diffusional resistances and the cathode overpotentials. - Abstract: The role of Fe(III) was investigated as an electron-shuttle mediator to enhance the reduction rate of the toxic heavy metal hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in wastewaters, using microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The direct reduction of chromate (CrO_4"−) and dichromate (Cr_2O_7"2"−) anions in MFCs was hampered by the electrical repulsion between the negatively charged cathode and Cr(VI) functional groups. In contrast, in the presence of Fe(III), the conversion of Cr(VI) and the cathodic coulombic efficiency in the MFCs were 65.6% and 81.7%, respectively, 1.6 times and 1.4 folds as those recorded in the absence of Fe(III). Multiple analytical approaches, including linear sweep voltammetry, Tafel plot, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and kinetic calculations demonstrated that the complete reduction of Cr(VI) occurred through an indirect mechanism mediated by Fe(III). The direct reduction of Cr(VI) with cathode electrons in the presence of Fe(III) was insignificant. Fe(III) played a critical role in decreasing both the diffusional resistance of Cr(VI) species and the overpotential for Cr(VI) reduction. This study demonstrated that the reduction of Cr(VI) in MFCs was effective in the presence of Fe(III), providing an alternative and environmentally benign approach for efficient remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated sites with simultaneous production of renewable energy.

  4. Mediation Analysis of the Efficacy of the Eban HIV/STD Risk-Reduction Intervention for African American HIV Serodiscordant Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bassel, Nabila; Jemmott, John B; Bellamy, Scarlett L; Pequegnat, Willo; Wingood, Gina M; Wyatt, Gail E; Landis, J Richard; Remien, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Targeting couples is a promising behavioral HIV risk-reduction strategy, but the mechanisms underlying the effects of such interventions are unknown. We report secondary analyses testing whether Social-Cognitive-Theory variables mediated the Eban HIV-risk-reduction intervention's effects on condom-use outcomes. In a multisite randomized controlled trial conducted in four US cities, 535 African American HIV-serodiscordant couples were randomized to the Eban HIV risk-reduction intervention or attention-matched control intervention. Outcomes were proportion condom-protected sex, consistent condom use, and frequency of unprotected sex measured pre-, immediately post-, and 6 and 12 months post-intervention. Potential mediators included Social-Cognitive-Theory variables: outcome expectancies and self-efficacy. Mediation analyses using the product-of-coefficients approach in a generalized-estimating-equations framework revealed that condom-use outcome expectancy, partner-reaction outcome expectancy, intention, self-efficacy, and safer-sex communication improved post-intervention and mediated intervention-induced improvements in condom-use outcomes. These findings underscore the importance of targeting outcome expectancies, self-efficacy, and safer-sex communication in couples-level HIV risk-reduction interventions.

  5. 2D Ultrathin Core-shell Pd@Ptmonolayer Nanosheets: Defect-Mediated Thin Film Growth and Enhanced Oxygen Reduction Performance

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Wenxin

    2015-06-16

    An operational strategy for the synthesis of atomically smooth Pt skin by a defect-mediated thin film growth method is reported. Extended ultrathin core-shell structured Pd@Ptmonolayer nanosheets (thickness below 5 nm) exhibit a seven-fold enhancement in mass-activity and surprisingly good durability toward oxygen reduction reaction as compared with the commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  6. 2D Ultrathin Core-shell Pd@Ptmonolayer Nanosheets: Defect-Mediated Thin Film Growth and Enhanced Oxygen Reduction Performance

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Wenxin; Zhao, Yunfeng; Ding, Yi

    2015-01-01

    An operational strategy for the synthesis of atomically smooth Pt skin by a defect-mediated thin film growth method is reported. Extended ultrathin core-shell structured Pd@Ptmonolayer nanosheets (thickness below 5 nm) exhibit a seven-fold enhancement in mass-activity and surprisingly good durability toward oxygen reduction reaction as compared with the commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  7. DNA repair genes RAD52 and SRS2, a cell wall synthesis regulator gene SMI1, and the membrane sterol synthesis scaffold gene ERG28 are important in efficient Agrobacterium-mediated yeast transformation with chromosomal T-DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmine, Yuta; Satoh, Yukari; Kiyokawa, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Shinji; Moriguchi, Kazuki; Suzuki, Katsunori

    2016-04-02

    Plant pathogenic Agrobacterium strains can transfer T-DNA regions of their Ti plasmids to a broad range of eukaryotic hosts, including fungi, in vitro. In the recent decade, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used as a model host to reveal important host proteins for the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (AMT). Further investigation is required to understand the fundamental mechanism of AMT, including interaction at the cell surface, to expand the host range, and to develop new tools. In this study, we screened a yeast mutant library for low AMT mutant strains by advantage of a chromosome type T-DNA, which transfer is efficient and independent on integration into host chromosome. By the mutant screening, we identified four mutant strains (srs2Δ, rad52Δ, smi1Δ and erg28Δ), which showed considerably low AMT efficiency. Structural analysis of T-DNA product replicons in AMT colonies of mutants lacking each of the two DNA repair genes, SRS2 and RAD52, suggested that the genes act soon after T-DNA entry for modification of the chromosomal T-DNA to stably maintain them as linear replicons and to circularize certain T-DNA simultaneously. The cell wall synthesis regulator SMI1 might have a role in the cell surface interaction between the donor and recipient cells, but the smi1Δ mutant exhibited pleiotropic effect, i.e. low effector protein transport as well as low AMT for the chromosomal T-DNA, but relatively high AMT for integrative T-DNAs. The ergosterol synthesis regulator/enzyme-scaffold gene ERG28 probably contributes by sensing a congested environment, because growth of erg28Δ strain was unaffected by the presence of donor bacterial cells, while the growth of the wild-type and other mutant yeast strains was suppressed by their presence. RAD52 and the DNA helicase/anti-recombinase gene SRS2 are necessary to form and maintain artificial chromosomes through the AMT of chromosomal T-DNA. A sterol synthesis scaffold gene ERG28 is important in the high

  8. β-lactam antibiotics promote bacterial mutagenesis via an RpoS-mediated reduction in replication fidelity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, A.; Laureti, L.; Crussard, S.; Abida, H.; Rodríguez-Rojas, A.; Blázquez, J.; Baharoglu, Z.; Mazel, D.; Darfeuille, F.; Vogel, J.; Matic, I.

    2013-01-01

    Regardless of their targets and modes of action, subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics can have an impact on cell physiology and trigger a large variety of cellular responses in different bacterial species. Subinhibitory concentrations of β-lactam antibiotics cause reactive oxygen species production and induce PolIV-dependent mutagenesis in Escherichia coli. Here we show that subinhibitory concentrations of β-lactam antibiotics induce the RpoS regulon. RpoS-regulon induction is required for PolIV-dependent mutagenesis because it diminishes the control of DNA-replication fidelity by depleting MutS in E. coli, Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We also show that in E. coli, the reduction in mismatch-repair activity is mediated by SdsR, the RpoS-controlled small RNA. In summary, we show that mutagenesis induced by subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics is a genetically controlled process. Because this mutagenesis can generate mutations conferring antibiotic resistance, it should be taken into consideration for the development of more efficient antimicrobial therapeutic strategies. PMID:23511474

  9. Vaginal yeast infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeast infection - vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis ... Most women have a vaginal yeast infection at some time. Candida albicans is a common type of fungus. It is often found in small amounts ...

  10. Gene expression and yeast two-hybrid studies of transcription factors mediating drought stress response in root tissues of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abirami eRamalingam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Drought stress has been one of the serious constraints affecting chickpea productivity to a great extent. Genomic assisted breeding in chickpea has been effective in providing a yield advantage of up to 24 %, thus having a potential to accelerate breeding precisely and efficiently. In order to do so, understanding the molecular mechanisms for drought tolerance and identification of candidate genes are crucial. Transcription factors (TFs have important roles in the regulation of plant stress related genes. In this context, quantitative real time-PCR (qRT-PCR was used to study the differential gene expression of selected TFs, identified from large-scale gene expression analysis, in contrasting drought responsive genotypes. Root tissues of ICC 4958 (tolerant, ICC 1882 (sensitive, JG 11 (elite and JG 11+ (introgression line were used for the study. Subsequently, a candidate single repeat MYB gene (1R-MYB that was remarkably induced in the drought tolerant genotypes under drought stress was cloned and subjected to Y2H analysis by screening a root cDNA library. The protein-protein interaction study identified three interacting peptides, a galactinol-sucrose galactosyltransferase 2, a CBL (Calcineurin B-like-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 25 and an ABA responsive 17-like, which were confirmed by the co-transformation of candidate plasmids in yeast. These findings provide preliminary insights into the ability of 1R-MYB TF to co-regulate drought tolerance mechanism in chickpea roots.

  11. Torin1-mediated TOR kinase inhibition reduces Wee1 levels and advances mitotic commitment in fission yeast and HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, Jane; Halova, Lenka; Ferguson, Jennifer; Hitchin, James R; Lichawska-Cieslar, Agata; Jordan, Allan M; Pines, Jonathon; Wellbrock, Claudia; Petersen, Janni

    2014-03-15

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase regulates cell growth and division. Rapamycin only inhibits a subset of TOR activities. Here we show that in contrast to the mild impact of rapamycin on cell division, blocking the catalytic site of TOR with the Torin1 inhibitor completely arrests growth without cell death in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. A mutation of the Tor2 glycine residue (G2040D) that lies adjacent to the key Torin-interacting tryptophan provides Torin1 resistance, confirming the specificity of Torin1 for TOR. Using this mutation, we show that Torin1 advanced mitotic onset before inducing growth arrest. In contrast to TOR inhibition with rapamycin, regulation by either Wee1 or Cdc25 was sufficient for this Torin1-induced advanced mitosis. Torin1 promoted a Polo and Cdr2 kinase-controlled drop in Wee1 levels. Experiments in human cell lines recapitulated these yeast observations: mammalian TOR (mTOR) was inhibited by Torin1, Wee1 levels declined and mitotic commitment was advanced in HeLa cells. Thus, the regulation of the mitotic inhibitor Wee1 by TOR signalling is a conserved mechanism that helps to couple cell cycle and growth controls.

  12. Anthracycline resistance mediated by reductive metabolism in cancer cells: The role of aldo-keto reductase 1C3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, Jakub; Malcekova, Beata; Skarka, Adam; Novotna, Eva; Wsol, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug resistance is a serious obstacle that emerges during cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the possible role of aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) in the resistance of cancer cells to anthracyclines. First, the reducing activity of AKR1C3 toward anthracyclines was tested using incubations with a purified recombinant enzyme. Furthermore, the intracellular reduction of daunorubicin and idarubicin was examined by employing the transfection of A549, HeLa, MCF7 and HCT 116 cancer cells with an AKR1C3 encoding vector. To investigate the participation of AKR1C3 in anthracycline resistance, we conducted MTT cytotoxicity assays with these cells, and observed that AKR1C3 significantly contributes to the resistance of cancer cells to daunorubicin and idarubicin, whereas this resistance was reversible by the simultaneous administration of 2′-hydroxyflavanone, a specific AKR1C3 inhibitor. In the final part of our work, we tracked the changes in AKR1C3 expression after anthracycline exposure. Interestingly, a reciprocal correlation between the extent of induction and endogenous levels of AKR1C3 was recorded in particular cell lines. Therefore, we suggest that the induction of AKR1C3 following exposure to daunorubicin and idarubicin, which seems to be dependent on endogenous AKR1C3 expression, eventually might potentiate an intrinsic resistance given by the normal expression of AKR1C3. In conclusion, our data suggest a substantial impact of AKR1C3 on the metabolism of daunorubicin and idarubicin, which affects their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic behavior. In addition, we demonstrate that the reduction of daunorubicin and idarubicin, which is catalyzed by AKR1C3, contributes to the resistance of cancer cells to anthracycline treatment. - Highlights: • Metabolism of anthracyclines by AKR1C3 was studied at enzyme and cellular levels. • Anthracycline resistance mediated by AKR1C3 was demonstrated in cancer cells. • Induction of AKR1C3

  13. Yeast for virus research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Richard Yuqi

    2017-01-01

    Budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) are two popular model organisms for virus research. They are natural hosts for viruses as they carry their own indigenous viruses. Both yeasts have been used for studies of plant, animal and human viruses. Many positive sense (+) RNA viruses and some DNA viruses replicate with various levels in yeasts, thus allowing study of those viral activities during viral life cycle. Yeasts are single cell eukaryotic organisms. Hence, many of the fundamental cellular functions such as cell cycle regulation or programed cell death are highly conserved from yeasts to higher eukaryotes. Therefore, they are particularly suited to study the impact of those viral activities on related cellular activities during virus-host interactions. Yeasts present many unique advantages in virus research over high eukaryotes. Yeast cells are easy to maintain in the laboratory with relative short doubling time. They are non-biohazardous, genetically amendable with small genomes that permit genome-wide analysis of virologic and cellular functions. In this review, similarities and differences of these two yeasts are described. Studies of virologic activities such as viral translation, viral replication and genome-wide study of virus-cell interactions in yeasts are highlighted. Impacts of viral proteins on basic cellular functions such as cell cycle regulation and programed cell death are discussed. Potential applications of using yeasts as hosts to carry out functional analysis of small viral genome and to develop high throughput drug screening platform for the discovery of antiviral drugs are presented. PMID:29082230

  14. Differences between flocculating yeast and regular industrial yeast in transcription and metabolite profiling during ethanol fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To improve ethanolic fermentation performance of self-flocculating yeast, difference between a flocculating yeast strain and a regular industrial yeast strain was analyzed by transcriptional and metabolic approaches. Results: The number of down-regulated (industrial yeast YIC10 vs. flocculating yeast GIM2.71 and up-regulated genes were 4503 and 228, respectively. It is the economic regulation for YIC10 that non-essential genes were down-regulated, and cells put more “energy” into growth and ethanol production. Hexose transport and phosphorylation were not the limiting-steps in ethanol fermentation for GIM2.71 compared to YIC10, whereas the reaction of 1,3-disphosphoglycerate to 3-phosphoglycerate, the decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetaldehyde and its subsequent reduction to ethanol were the most limiting steps. GIM2.71 had stronger stress response than non-flocculating yeast and much more carbohydrate was distributed to other bypass, such as glycerol, acetate and trehalose synthesis. Conclusions: Differences between flocculating yeast and regular industrial yeast in transcription and metabolite profiling will provide clues for improving the fermentation performance of GIM2.71.

  15. 2D ultrathin core-shell Pd@Ptmonolayer nanosheets: defect-mediated thin film growth and enhanced oxygen reduction performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenxin; Zhao, Yunfeng; Ding, Yi

    2015-07-01

    An operational strategy for the synthesis of atomically smooth Pt skin by a defect-mediated thin film growth method is reported. Extended ultrathin core-shell structured d@Ptmonolayer nanosheets (thickness below 5 nm) exhibit nearly seven-fold enhancement in mass-activity and surprisingly good durability toward oxygen reduction reaction as compared with the commercial Pt/C catalyst.An operational strategy for the synthesis of atomically smooth Pt skin by a defect-mediated thin film growth method is reported. Extended ultrathin core-shell structured d@Ptmonolayer nanosheets (thickness below 5 nm) exhibit nearly seven-fold enhancement in mass-activity and surprisingly good durability toward oxygen reduction reaction as compared with the commercial Pt/C catalyst. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Sample preparation, physical and electrochemical characterization, Fig. S1 to S11. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02748a

  16. Chiral Pharmaceutical Intermediaries Obtained by Reduction of 2-Halo-1-(4-substituted phenyl-ethanones Mediated by Geotrichum candidum CCT 1205 and Rhodotorula glutinis CCT 2182

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucídio C. Fardelone

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Enantioselective reductions of p-R1-C6H4C(OCH2R2 (R1 = Cl, Br, CH3, OCH3, NO2 and R2 = Br, Cl mediated by Geotrichum candidum CCT 1205 and Rhodotorula glutinis CCT 2182 afforded the corresponding halohydrins with complementary R and S configurations, respectively, in excellent yield and enantiomeric excesses. The obtained (R- or (S-halohydrins are important building blocks in chemical and pharmaceutical industries.

  17. History of genome editing in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraczek, Marcin G; Naseeb, Samina; Delneri, Daniela

    2018-05-01

    For thousands of years humans have used the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of bread and alcohol; however, in the last 30-40 years our understanding of the yeast biology has dramatically increased, enabling us to modify its genome. Although S. cerevisiae has been the main focus of many research groups, other non-conventional yeasts have also been studied and exploited for biotechnological purposes. Our experiments and knowledge have evolved from recombination to high-throughput PCR-based transformations to highly accurate CRISPR methods in order to alter yeast traits for either research or industrial purposes. Since the release of the genome sequence of S. cerevisiae in 1996, the precise and targeted genome editing has increased significantly. In this 'Budding topic' we discuss the significant developments of genome editing in yeast, mainly focusing on Cre-loxP mediated recombination, delitto perfetto and CRISPR/Cas. © 2018 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Cooperative Electrocatalytic O 2 Reduction Involving Co(salophen) with p- Hydroquinone as an Electron–Proton Transfer Mediator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anson, Colin W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin−Madison, 1101 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, United States; Stahl, Shannon S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin−Madison, 1101 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, United States

    2017-12-01

    The molecular cobalt complex, Co(salophen), and para-hydroquinone (H2Q) serve as effective cocatalysts for the electrochemical reduction of O2 to water. Mechanistic studies reveal redox cooperativity between Co(salophen) and H2Q. H2Q serves as an electron-proton transfer mediator (EPTM) that enables electrochemical O2 reduction at higher potentials and with faster rates than is observed with Co(salophen) alone. Replacement of H2Q with the higher potential EPTM, 2-chloro-H2Q, allows for faster O2 reduction rates at higher applied potential. These results demonstrate a unique strategy to achieve improved performance with molecular electrocatalyst systems.

  19. The Catalytic Bias of 2-Oxoacid:ferredoxin Oxidoreductase in CO_2: evolution and reduction through a ferredoxin-mediated electrocatalytic assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Bin; Elliott, Sean J.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes from the 2-oxoacid: ferredoxin oxidoreductase (OFOR) family engage in both CO_2 evolution and reduction in nature, depending on their physiological roles. Two enzymes and their redox partner ferredoxins (Fds) from Hydrogenobacter thermophilus and Desulfovibrio africanus were examined to investigate the basis of the catalytic bias. The Fd1 from H. thermophilus demonstrated a potential of ∼ −485 mV at room temperature, the lowest for known single [4Fe-4S] cluster Fds. It suggests a low potential electron donor may be the key factor in overcoming the large thermodynamic barrier of CO_2 reduction. The Fd-mediated electrocatalytic experiments further demonstrated the impact of Fd’s potential on the direction of the OFOR reaction: as OFOR enzymes could essentially catalyze both CO_2 evolution and reduction in vitro, the difference in their physiological roles is associated with the reduction potential of the redox partner Fd. The electrocatalytic assay could study both CO_2 evolution and reduction in one setup and is a good tool to probe Fds’ reactivity that arise from their reduction potentials.

  20. Polyglutamine toxicity in yeast induces metabolic alterations and mitochondrial defects

    KAUST Repository

    Papsdorf, Katharina; Kaiser, Christoph J. O.; Drazic, Adrian; Grö tzinger, Stefan W.; Haeß ner, Carmen; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Richter, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    formation. Indeed, we find that in vivo iron concentrations are misbalanced and observe a reduction in the activity of the prominent Fe-S cluster containing protein aconitase. Like in other yeast strains with impaired mitochondria, non-fermentative growth

  1. Effect of extracellular calcium chloride on sporangiospore-yeast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-05-16

    May 16, 2011 ... Dimorphism is the conversion of a microorganism from one growth habit to .... formation in media designated for yeast production, while it led to a reduction of ..... on morphological development and biopolymer synthesis in the.

  2. Increased skills usage statistically mediates symptom reduction in self-guided internet-delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy for depression and anxiety: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terides, Matthew D; Dear, Blake F; Fogliati, Vincent J; Gandy, Milena; Karin, Eyal; Jones, Michael P; Titov, Nickolai

    2018-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for clinical and subclinical symptoms of depression and general anxiety, and increases life satisfaction. Patients' usage of CBT skills is a core aspect of treatment but there is insufficient empirical evidence suggesting that skills usage behaviours are a mechanism of clinical change. This study investigated if an internet-delivered CBT (iCBT) intervention increased the frequency of CBT skills usage behaviours and if this statistically mediated reductions in symptoms and increased life satisfaction. A two-group randomised controlled trial was conducted comparing internet-delivered CBT (n = 65) with a waitlist control group (n = 75). Participants were individuals experiencing clinically significant symptoms of depression or general anxiety. Mixed-linear models analyses revealed that the treatment group reported a significantly higher frequency of skills usage, lower symptoms, and higher life satisfaction by the end of treatment compared with the control group. Results from bootstrapping mediation analyses revealed that the increased skills usage behaviours statistically mediated symptom reductions and increased life satisfaction. Although skills usage and symptom outcomes were assessed concurrently, these findings support the notion that iCBT increases the frequency of skills usage behaviours and suggest that this may be an important mechanism of change.

  3. Chemical signaling and insect attraction is a conserved trait in yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Paul G; Hagman, Arne; Verschut, Vasiliki; Chakraborty, Amrita; Rozpędowska, Elżbieta; Lebreton, Sébastien; Bengtsson, Marie; Flick, Gerhard; Witzgall, Peter; Piškur, Jure

    2018-03-01

    Yeast volatiles attract insects, which apparently is of mutual benefit, for both yeasts and insects. However, it is unknown whether biosynthesis of metabolites that attract insects is a basic and general trait, or if it is specific for yeasts that live in close association with insects. Our goal was to study chemical insect attractants produced by yeasts that span more than 250 million years of evolutionary history and vastly differ in their metabolism and lifestyle. We bioassayed attraction of the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster to odors of phylogenetically and ecologically distinct yeasts grown under controlled conditions. Baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae , the insect-associated species Candida californica , Pichia kluyveri and Metschnikowia andauensis , wine yeast Dekkera bruxellensis , milk yeast Kluyveromyces lactis , the vertebrate pathogens Candida albicans and Candida glabrata , and oleophilic Yarrowia lipolytica were screened for fly attraction in a wind tunnel. Yeast headspace was chemically analyzed, and co-occurrence of insect attractants in yeasts and flowering plants was investigated through a database search. In yeasts with known genomes, we investigated the occurrence of genes involved in the synthesis of key aroma compounds. Flies were attracted to all nine yeasts studied. The behavioral response to baker's yeast was independent of its growth stage. In addition to Drosophila , we tested the basal hexapod Folsomia candida (Collembola) in a Y-tube assay to the most ancient yeast, Y. lipolytica, which proved that early yeast signals also function on clades older than neopteran insects. Behavioral and chemical data and a search for selected genes of volatile metabolites underline that biosynthesis of chemical signals is found throughout the yeast clade and has been conserved during the evolution of yeast lifestyles. Literature and database reviews corroborate that yeast signals mediate mutualistic interactions between insects and yeasts

  4. The ecology of the Drosophila-yeast mutualism in wineries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is preferentially found on fermenting fruits. The yeasts that dominate the microbial communities of these substrates are the primary food source for developing D. melanogaster larvae, and adult flies manifest a strong olfactory system-mediated attraction for the volatile compounds produced by these yeasts during fermentation. Although most work on this interaction has focused on the standard laboratory yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a wide variety of other yeasts naturally ferment fallen fruit. Here we address the open question of whether D. melanogaster preferentially associates with distinct yeasts in different, closely-related environments. We characterized the spatial and temporal dynamics of Drosophila-associated fungi in Northern California wineries that use organic grapes and natural fermentation using high-throughput, short-amplicon sequencing. We found that there is nonrandom structure in the fungal communities that are vectored by flies both between and within vineyards. Within wineries, the fungal communities associated with flies in cellars, fermentation tanks, and pomace piles are distinguished by varying abundances of a small number of yeast species. To investigate the origins of this structure, we assayed Drosophila attraction to, oviposition on, larval development in, and longevity when consuming the yeasts that distinguish vineyard microhabitats from each other. We found that wild fly lines did not respond differentially to the yeast species that distinguish winery habitats in habitat specific manner. Instead, this subset of yeast shares traits that make them attractive to and ensure their close association with Drosophila. PMID:29768432

  5. Periplasmic Cytochrome c(3) of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Is Directly Involved in H2-Mediated Metal but Not Sulfate Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Suflita, Joseph M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2004-01-01

    Kinetic parameters and the role of cytochrome c3 in sulfate, Fe(III), and U(VI) reduction were investigated in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. While sulfate reduction followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km 220 uM), loss of Fe(III) and U(VI) was first-order at all concentrations tested. Initial reduction rates of all electron acceptors were similar for cells grown with H2 and sulfate, while cultures grown using lactate and sulfate had similar rates of metal loss but lower sulfate reduction activities. The similarities in metal, but not sulfate, reduction with H2 and lactate suggest divergent pathways. Respiration assays and reduced minus oxidized spectra were carried out to determine c-type cytochrome involvement in electron acceptor reduction. c-type cytochrome oxidation was immediate with Fe(III) and U(VI) in the presence of H2, lactate, or pyruvate. Sulfidogenesis occurred with all three electron donors and effectively oxidized the c-type cytochrome in lactate or pyruvate-reduced, but not H2-reduced cells. Correspondingly, electron acceptor competition assays with lactate or pyruvate as electron donors showed that Fe(III) inhibited U(VI) reduction, and U(VI) inhibited sulfate loss. However, sulfate reduction was slowed but not halted when H2 was the electron donor in the presence of Fe(III) or U(VI). U(VI) loss was still impeded by Fe(III) when H2 was used. Hence, we propose a modified pathway for the reduction of sulfate, Fe(III), and U(VI) which helps explain why these bacteria cannot grow using these metals. We further propose that cytochrome c3 is an electron carrier involved in lactate and pyruvate oxidation and is the reductase for alternate electron acceptors with higher redox potentials than sulfate

  6. Posttraumatic stress symptoms and tobacco abstinence effects in a non-clinical sample: evaluating the mediating role of negative affect reduction smoking expectancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Kirsten J; Leventhal, Adam M

    2014-11-01

    The relation between posttraumatic stress symptoms and smoking is well documented but poorly understood. The present investigation sought to evaluate the impact of posttraumatic stress symptoms on subjective and behavioral tobacco abstinence effects both directly and indirectly through negative affect reduction smoking outcome expectancies. Participants included 275 (68.7% male; Mage =43.9, 10+ cig/day) adult non-treatment seeking smokers, who attended two counterbalanced laboratory sessions (16 h of smoking deprivation vs ad libitum smoking), during which they completed self-report measures of withdrawal symptoms and mood followed by a smoking lapse task in which they could earn money for delaying smoking and purchase cigarettes to smoke. Results supported a mediational pathway whereby higher baseline symptoms of posttraumatic stress predicted greater endorsement of expectancies that smoking will effectively reduce negative affect, which in turn predicted greater abstinence-provoked exacerbations in nicotine withdrawal symptoms and negative affect. Posttraumatic stress symptoms also predicted number of cigarettes purchased independent of negative affect reduction expectancies, but did not predict delaying smoking for money. Findings highlight tobacco abstinence effects as a putative mechanism underlying posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-smoking comorbidity, indicate an important mediating role of beliefs for smoking-induced negative affect reduction, and shed light on integrated treatment approaches for these two conditions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Determination of kinetic parameters of Fe sup 3+ reduction mediated by a polyaniline film using steady-state and impedance methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deslouis, C. (LP15 du CNRS, Physique des Liquides et Electrochimie, Lab. de l' Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (FR)); Musiani, M.M.; Pagura, C.; Tribollet, C. (Inst. di Polarografia de Elettrochimica Preparativa del CNR, Corso Stati Uniti, 4, 35020 Camin, Padova (IT))

    1991-09-01

    This paper discusses the Fe{sup 3+} reduction reaction studied at Pt and polyaniline rotating disk electrodes by steady-state and impedance methods with the aim of testing the possibility of achieving the charge transfer resistance (R{sub ts}) of a redox reaction mediated by a conducting polymer film by ac impedance R{sub ts} was obtained as a function of electrode potential and rotation rate by nonlinear least squares fitting of a previously developed kinetic equation to the experimental data. These R{sub ts} values were combined with steady-state ones to calculate b{sub c} and k{sup 0}.

  8. Do coping skills mediate the relationship between cognitive-behavioral therapy and reductions in gambling in pathological gamblers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nancy M; Litt, Mark D; Kadden, Ronald; Ledgerwood, David M

    2007-08-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is useful for treating substance abusers, and recent data suggest it is also efficacious for pathological gamblers. CBT is purported to exert its beneficial effects by altering coping skills, but data supporting coping changes as the mechanism of action are mixed. This study examined whether coping skills acquisition mediated the effects of CBT on decreasing gambling in pathological gamblers. Participants were assigned randomly to CBT plus referral to Gamblers Anonymous (GA) or to GA referral alone. Setting Out-patient clinic. A total of 127 pathological gamblers. Participants completed the Coping Strategies Scale (CSS) before treatment and 2 months later; indices of gambling behavior and problems were administered pretreatment and at months 2 and 12. Overall, CSS scores increased for participants in both conditions, but those receiving CBT evidenced larger increases than those in the GA condition (P < 0.05), and they also reduced gambling more substantially between pretreatment and month 2. Changes in CSS scores mediated the relationship between treatment assignment and gambling outcomes from pretreatment to month 2, but little evidence of mediation occurred for the long-term follow-ups. CBT's beneficial effects in decreasing gambling may be related partly to changes in coping responses, and improvements in coping are associated with long-term changes in gambling. However, relationships between coping skills and gambling behavior are fairly strong, regardless of treatment received.

  9. Changes in negative cognitions mediate PTSD symptom reductions during client-centered therapy and prolonged exposure for adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Carmen P; Yeh, Rebecca; Rosenfield, David; Foa, Edna B

    2015-05-01

    To assess whether changes in negative trauma-related cognitions play an important role in reducing symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression during prolonged exposure therapy for adolescents (PE-A). Secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial comparing PE-A with client-centered therapy (CCT) for PTSD. Participants were 61 adolescent female sexual assault survivors ages 13-18 who received 8-14 weekly sessions of PE-A or CCT at a community rape crisis center. PTSD severity was assessed at baseline, mid-treatment, post-treatment, and 3-months post-treatment. Participants also completed self-report measures of negative posttraumatic cognitions and depressive symptoms at the same assessment points. Cross lag panel mediation analyses showed that change in negative trauma-related cognitions mediated change in PTSD symptoms and depressive symptoms whereas change in PTSD and depressive symptoms did not mediate change in negative cognitions. Our findings support EPT and suggest that change in negative trauma-related cognitions is a mechanism of both PE-A and CCT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Metallic Biosorption Using Yeasts in Continuous Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Miriam Hernández Mata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mining effluents were found to be the main source of pollution by heavy metals of the surface water in the San Pedro River in Sonora, Mexico. The overall objective of this study was to determine the biosorption of Zn, Cu, Mn, and Fe with yeasts isolated from San Pedro River in a continuous system. The tests conducted in two reactors packed with zeolite connected in series. The first reactor was inoculated mixing two yeasts species, and the effluent of the first reactor was fed to second reactor. Subsequently, the first reactor was fed with contaminated water of San Pedro River and effluent from this was the second reactor influent. After 40 days of the experiment a reduction of 81.5% zinc, 76.5% copper, manganese 95.5%, and 99.8% of iron was obtained. These results show that the selected yeasts are capable of biosorbing zinc, copper, manganese, and iron under these conditions.

  11. L-Selectride-Mediated Highly Diastereoselective Asymmetric Reductive Aldol Reaction: Access to an Important Subunit for Bioactive Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Kass, Jorden; Anderson, David D.; Xu, Xiaoming; Marian, Christine

    2008-01-01

    L-Selectride reduction of a chiral or achiral enone followed by reaction of the resulting enolate with optically active α-alkoxy aldehydes proceeded with excellent diastereoselectivity. The resulting α,α-dimethyl-β-hydroxy ketones are inherent to a variety of biologically active natural products.

  12. L-selectride-mediated highly diastereoselective asymmetric reductive aldol reaction: access to an important subunit for bioactive molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arun K; Kass, Jorden; Anderson, David D; Xu, Xiaoming; Marian, Christine

    2008-11-06

    L-selectride reduction of a chiral or achiral enone followed by reaction of the resulting enolate with optically active alpha-alkoxy aldehydes proceeded with excellent diastereoselectivity. The resulting alpha,alpha-dimethyl-beta-hydroxy ketones are inherent to a variety of biologically active natural products.

  13. A rapid room temperature chemical route for the synthesis of graphene: metal-mediated reduction of graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Ramendra Sundar; Hajra, Saumen; Sahu, Ranjan K; Raj, C Retna; Panigrahi, M K

    2012-02-07

    A rapid and facile route for the synthesis of reduced graphene oxide sheets (rGOs) at room temperature by the chemical reduction of graphene oxide using Zn/acid in aqueous solution is demonstrated. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  14. Removal efficiency and economic cost comparison of hydrated electron-mediated reductive pathways for treatment of bromate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawaz, Shah; Shah, Noor S.; Khan, Javed Ali

    2017-01-01

    Bromate, a potential carcinogen, is a well known highly persistent and environmentally recalcitrant contaminant. UV-254/sulfite-based advanced reductive pathways (ARPs) were proposed to eliminate bromate successfully from water. Experiments with N2, N2O, 2-chlorophenol, inorganic ions, and differ...

  15. The complexity and implications of yeast prion domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Prions are infectious proteins with altered conformations converted from otherwise normal host proteins. While there is only one known mammalian prion protein, PrP, a handful of prion proteins have been identified in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast prion proteins usually have a defined region called prion domain (PrD) essential for prion properties, which are typically rich in glutamine (Q) and asparagine (N). Despite sharing several common features, individual yeast PrDs are generally intricate and divergent in their compositional characteristics, which potentially implicates their prion phenotypes, such as prion-mediated transcriptional regulations. PMID:22156731

  16. Mechanism of porcine liver xanthine oxidoreductase mediated N-oxide reduction of cyadox as revealed by docking and mutagenesis studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chigang Chen

    Full Text Available Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR is a cytoplasmic molybdenum-containing oxidoreductase, catalyzing both endogenous purines and exogenous compounds. It is suggested that XOR in porcine hepatocytes catalyzes the N-oxide reduction of quinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxides (QdNOs. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this metabolism, the cDNA of porcine XOR was cloned and heterologously expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. The bovine XOR, showing sequence identity of 91% to porcine XOR, was employed as template for homology modeling. By docking cyadox, a representative compound of QdNOs, into porcine XOR model, eight amino acid residues, Gly47, Asn352, Ser360, Arg427, Asp430, Asp431, Ser1227 and Lys1230, were located at distances of less than 4Å to cyadox. Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze their catalytic functions. Compared with wild type porcine XOR, G47A, S360P, D431A, S1227A, and K1230A displayed altered kinetic parameters in cyadox reduction, similarly to that in xanthine oxidation, indicating these mutations influenced electron-donating process of xanthine before subsequent electron transfer to cyadox to fulfill the N-oxide reduction. Differently, R427E and D430H, both located in the 424-434 loop, exhibited a much lower K(m and a decreased V(max respectively in cyadox reduction. Arg427 may be related to the substrate binding of porcine XOR to cyadox, and Asp430 is suggested to be involved in the transfer of electron to cyadox. This study initially reveals the possible catalytic mechanism of porcine XOR in cyadox metabolism, providing with novel insights into the structure-function relationship of XOR in the reduction of exogenous di-N-oxides.

  17. Reduction in food away from home is associated with improved child relative weight and body composition outcomes and this relation is mediated by changes in diet quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Myra; Cahill Holland, Jodi; Lundeen, Delaney; Kolko, Rachel P; Stein, Richard I; Saelens, Brian E; Welch, R Robinson; Perri, Michael G; Schechtman, Kenneth B; Epstein, Leonard H; Wilfley, Denise E

    2015-09-01

    Reducing consumption of food away from home is often targeted during pediatric obesity treatment, given the associations with weight status and gain. However, the effects of this dietary change on weight loss are unknown. Our aim was to evaluate associations between changes in dietary factors and child anthropometric outcomes after treatment. It is hypothesized that reduced consumption of food away from home will be associated with improved dietary intake and greater reductions in anthropometric outcomes (standardized body mass index [BMI] and percent body fat), and the relationship between food away from home and anthropometric outcomes will be mediated by improved child dietary intake. We conducted a longitudinal evaluation of associations between dietary changes and child anthropometric outcomes. Child diet (three 24-hour recalls) and anthropometric data were collected at baseline and 16 weeks. Participants were 170 overweight and obese children ages 7 to 11 years who completed a 16-week family-based behavioral weight-loss treatment as part of a larger multi-site randomized controlled trial conducted in two cohorts between 2010 and 2011 (clinical research trial). Dietary treatment targets during family-based behavioral weight-loss treatment included improving diet quality and reducing food away from home. The main outcome measures in this study were child relative weight (standardized BMI) and body composition (percent body fat). We performed t tests and bootstrapped single-mediation analyses adjusting for relevant covariates. As hypothesized, decreased food away from home was associated with improved diet quality and greater reductions in standardized BMI (Paway from home and anthropometric outcomes were mediated by changes in diet quality. Specifically, change in total energy intake and added sugars mediated the association between change in food away from home and standardized BMI, and change in overall diet quality, fiber, added sugars, and added fats

  18. Yeast genome sequencing:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold

    2004-01-01

    For decades, unicellular yeasts have been general models to help understand the eukaryotic cell and also our own biology. Recently, over a dozen yeast genomes have been sequenced, providing the basis to resolve several complex biological questions. Analysis of the novel sequence data has shown...... of closely related species helps in gene annotation and to answer how many genes there really are within the genomes. Analysis of non-coding regions among closely related species has provided an example of how to determine novel gene regulatory sequences, which were previously difficult to analyse because...... they are short and degenerate and occupy different positions. Comparative genomics helps to understand the origin of yeasts and points out crucial molecular events in yeast evolutionary history, such as whole-genome duplication and horizontal gene transfer(s). In addition, the accumulating sequence data provide...

  19. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing

  20. Abroma augusta Linn bark extract-mediated green synthesis of gold nanoparticles and its application in catalytic reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subhajit; Bag, Braja Gopal; Basu, Ranadhir

    2015-10-01

    The bark extract of Abroma augusta Linn is rich in medicinally important phytochemicals including antioxidants and polyphenols. First one step green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been described utilizing the bark extract of Abroma augusta L. and chloroauric acid under very mild reaction conditions. The phytochemicals present in the bark extract acted both as a reducing as well as a stabilizing agent, and no additional stabilizing and capping agents were needed. Detailed characterizations of the stabilized AuNPs were carried out by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction studies. The catalytic activity of the freshly synthesized gold nanoparticles has been demonstrated for the sodium borohydride reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol, and the kinetics of the reduction reaction have been studied spectrophotometrically.

  1. A new look at auranofin, dextromethorphan and rosiglitazone for reduction of glia-mediated inflammation in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyn M Madeira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer′s disease are characterized by chronic inflammation in the central nervous system. The two main glial types involved in inflammatory reactions are microglia and astrocytes. While these cells normally protect neurons by providing nutrients and growth factors, disease specific stimuli can induce glial secretion of neurotoxins. It has been hypothesized that reducing glia-mediated inflammation could diminish neuronal loss. This hypothesis is supported by observations that chronic use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs is linked with lower incidences of neurodegenerative disease. It is possible that the NSAIDs are not potent enough to appreciably reduce chronic neuroinflammation after disease processes are fully established. Gold thiol compounds, including auranofin, comprise another class of medications effective at reducing peripheral inflammation. We have demonstrated that auranofin inhibits human microglia- and astrocyte-mediated neurotoxicity. Other drugs which are currently used to treat peripheral inflammatory conditions could be helpful in neurodegenerative disease. Three different classes of anti-inflammatory compounds, which have a potential to inhibit neuroinflammation are highlighted below.

  2. A novel screening method based on menadione mediated rapid reduction of tetrazolium salt for testing of anti-mycobacterial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upasana; Akhtar, Shamim; Mishra, Abhishek; Sarkar, Dhiman

    2011-02-01

    A microplate-based rapid, inexpensive and robust technique is developed by using tetrazolium salt 2,3-bis[2-methyloxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) and menadione to determine the viability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Mycobacterium smegmatis bacilli in microplate format. In general, XTT reduction is an extremely slow process which takes almost 24 h to produce a detectable signal. Menadione could drastically induce this reduction to an almost equal extent within a few minutes in a dose dependent manner. The reduction of XTT is directly proportional to the cell concentration in the presence of menadione. The standardized protocol used 200 μM of XTT and 60 μM of menadione in 250 μl of cell suspension grown either in aerobic or anaerobic conditions. The cell suspension of M. bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis were incubated for 40 min before reading the optical density at 470 nm whereas M. smegmatis was incubated for 20 min. Calculated Signal/Noise (S/N) ratios obtained by applying this protocol were 5.4, 6.4 and 9.4 using M. bovis BCG, M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis respectively. The calculated Z' factors were >0.8 for all mycobacterium bacilli indicating the robustness of the XTT Reduction Menadione Assay (XRMA) for rapid screening of inhibitors. The assay protocol was validated by applying 10 standard anti-tubercular agents on M. tuberculosis, M. bovis BCG and M. smegmatis. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values were found to be similar to reported values from Colony Forming Unit (CFU) and REMA (resazurin microplate assay) assays. Altogether, XRMA is providing a novel anti-tubercular screening protocol which could be useful in high throughput screening programs against different physiological stages of the bacilli. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cutaneous nociceptors lack sensitisation, but reveal μ-opioid receptor-mediated reduction in excitability to mechanical stimulation in neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Yvonne

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripheral nerve injuries often trigger a hypersensitivity to tactile stimulation. Behavioural studies demonstrated efficient and side effect-free analgesia mediated by opioid receptors on peripheral sensory neurons. However, mechanistic approaches addressing such opioid properties in painful neuropathies are lacking. Here we investigated whether opioids can directly inhibit primary afferent neuron transmission of mechanical stimuli in neuropathy. We analysed the mechanical thresholds, the firing rates and response latencies of sensory fibres to mechanical stimulation of their cutaneous receptive fields. Results Two weeks following a chronic constriction injury of the saphenous nerve, mice developed a profound mechanical hypersensitivity in the paw innervated by the damaged nerve. Using an in vitro skin-nerve preparation we found no changes in the mechanical thresholds and latencies of sensory fibres from injured nerves. The firing rates to mechanical stimulation were unchanged or reduced following injury. Importantly, μ-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5]-ol-enkephalin (DAMGO significantly elevated the mechanical thresholds of nociceptive Aδ and C fibres. Furthermore, DAMGO substantially diminished the mechanically evoked discharges of C nociceptors in injured nerves. These effects were blocked by DAMGO washout and pre-treatment with the selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist Cys2-Tyr3-Orn5-Pen7-amide. DAMGO did not alter the responses of sensory fibres in uninjured nerves. Conclusions Our findings suggest that behaviourally manifested neuropathy-induced mechanosensitivity does not require a sensitised state of cutaneous nociceptors in damaged nerves. Yet, nerve injury renders nociceptors sensitive to opioids. Prevention of action potential generation or propagation in nociceptors might represent a cellular mechanism underlying peripheral opioid-mediated alleviation of mechanical hypersensitivity in neuropathy.

  4. Reduction of voltage gated sodium channel protein in DRG by vector mediated miRNA reduces pain in rats with painful diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Munmun; Zhou, Zhigang; Hao, Shuanglin; Mata, Marina; Fink, David J

    2012-03-22

    Painful neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes. Previous studies have identified significant increases in the amount of voltage gated sodium channel isoforms Na(V)1.7 and Na(V)1.3 protein in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of rats with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes. We found that gene transfer-mediated release of the inhibitory neurotransmitters enkephalin or gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) from DRG neurons in diabetic animals reduced pain-related behaviors coincident with a reduction in Na(V)1.7 protein levels in DRG in vivo. To further evaluate the role of Na(V)α subunit levels in DRG in the pathogenesis of pain in diabetic neuropathy, we constructed a non-replicating herpes simplex virus (HSV)-based vector expressing a microRNA (miRNA) against Na(V)α subunits. Subcutaneous inoculation of the miRNA-expressing HSV vector into the feet of diabetic rats to transduce DRG resulted in a reduction in Na(V)α subunit levels in DRG neurons, coincident with a reduction in cold allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical hyperalgesia. These data support the role of increased Na(V)α protein in DRG in the pathogenesis of pain in diabetic neuropathy, and provide a proof-of-principle demonstration for the development of a novel therapy that could be used to treat intractable pain in patients with diabetic neuropathy.

  5. Thermal modification of activated carbon surface chemistry improves its capacity as redox mediator for azo dye reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, L; Pereira, R; Pereira, M F R; van der Zee, F P; Cervantes, F J; Alves, M M

    2010-11-15

    The surface chemistry of a commercial AC (AC(0)) was selectively modified, without changing significantly its textural properties, by chemical oxidation with HNO(3) (AC(HNO3)) and O(2) (AC(O2)), and thermal treatments under H(2) (AC(H2)) or N(2) (AC(N2)) flow. The effect of modified AC on anaerobic chemical dye reduction was assayed with sulphide at different pH values 5, 7 and 9. Four dyes were tested: Acid Orange 7, Reactive Red 2, Mordant Yellow 10 and Direct Blue 71. Batch experiments with low amounts of AC (0.1 g L(-1)) demonstrated an increase of the first-order reduction rate constants, up to 9-fold, as compared with assays without AC. Optimum rates were obtained at pH 5 except for MY10, higher at pH 7. In general, rates increased with increasing the pH of point zero charge (pH(pzc)), following the trend AC(HNO3) granular biomass, AC(H2) also duplicated and increase 4.5-fold the decolourisation rates of MY10 and RR2, respectively. In this last experiment, reaction rate was independent of AC concentration in the tested range 0.1-0.6 g L(-1). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Replenishment and mobilization of intracellular nitrogen pools decouples wine yeast nitrogen uptake from growth

    OpenAIRE

    SANCHO FORNER, MARTA; Alicia Gutiérrez; BELTRAN CASELLAS, GEMMA; José Manuel Guillamon; Jonas Warringer

    2016-01-01

    Wine yeast capacity to take up nitrogen from the environment and catabolize it to support population growth, fermentation, and aroma production is critical to wine production. Under nitrogen restriction, yeast nitrogen uptake is believed to be intimately coupled to reproduction with nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) suggested mediating this link. We provide a time- and strain-resolved view of nitrogen uptake, population growth, and NCR activity in wine yeasts. Nitrogen uptake was found to ...

  7. DOC-dynamics in a small headwater catchment as driven by redox fluctuations and hydrological flow paths – are DOC exports mediated by iron reduction/oxidation cycles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-H. Knorr

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic carbon (DOC exports from many catchments in Europe and North-America are steadily increasing. Several studies have sought to explain this observation. As possible causes, a decrease in acid rain or sulfate deposition, concomitant reductions in ionic strength and increasing temperatures were identified. DOC often originates from riparian wetlands; but here, despite higher DOC concentrations, ionic strength in pore waters usually exceeds that in surface waters. In the catchment under study, DOC concentrations were synchronous with dissolved iron concentrations in pore and stream water. This study aims at testing the hypothesis that DOC exports are mediated by iron reduction/oxidation cycles. Following the observed hydrographs, δ18O of water and DOC fluorescence, the wetlands were identified as the main source of DOC. Antecedent biogeochemical conditions, i.e., water table levels in the wetlands, influenced the discharge patterns of nitrate, iron and DOC during an event. The correlation of DOC with pH was positive in pore waters, but negative in surface waters; it was negative for DOC with sulfate in pore waters, but only weak in surface waters. Though, the positive correlation of DOC with iron was universal for pore and surface water. The decline of DOC and iron concentrations in transition from anoxic wetland pore water to oxic stream water suggests a flocculation of DOC with oxidising iron, leading to a drop in pH in the stream during high DOC fluxes. The pore water did not per se differ in pH. There is, thus, a need to consider processes more thoroughly of DOC mobilisation in wetlands when interpreting DOC exports from catchments. The coupling of DOC with iron fluxes suggested that increased DOC exports could at least, in part, be caused by increasing activities in iron reduction, possibly due to increases in temperature, increasing wetness of riparian wetlands, or by a shift from sulfate dominated to iron

  8. Identification of the microbes mediating Fe reduction in a deep saline aquifer and their influence during managed aquifer recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Myoung-Soo; Cho, Kyungjin; Jeong, Dawoon; Lee, Seunghak

    2016-03-01

    In this study, indigenous microbes enabling Fe reduction under saline groundwater conditions were identified, and their potential contribution to Fe release from aquifer sediments during managed aquifer recharge (MAR) was evaluated. Sediment and groundwater samples were collected from a MAR feasibility test site in Korea, where adjacent river water will be injected into the confined aquifer. The residual groundwater had a high salinity over 26.0 psu, as well as strong reducing conditions (dissolved oxygen, DOaquifer were found to be Citrobacter sp. However, column experiments to simulate field operation scenarios indicated that additional Fe release would be limited during MAR, as the dominant microbial community in the sediment would shift from Citrobacter sp. to Pseudomonas sp. and Limnohabitans sp. as river water injection alters the pore water chemistry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Flavoprotein-mediated tellurite reduction: structural basis and applications to the synthesis of tellurium-containing nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Arenas-Salinas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The tellurium oxyanion tellurite (TeO32- is extremely harmful for most organisms. It has been suggested that a potential bacterial tellurite resistance mechanism would consist of an enzymatic, NAD(PH-dependent, reduction to the less toxic form elemental tellurium (Te0. To date, a number of enzymes such as catalase, type II NADH dehydrogenase and terminal oxidases from the electron transport chain, nitrate reductases, and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3, among others, have been shown to display tellurite-reducing activity. This activity is generically referred to as tellurite reductase (TR. Bioinformatic data resting on some of the abovementioned enzymes enabled the identification of common structures involved in tellurite reduction including vicinal catalytic cysteine residues and the FAD/NAD(P+-binding domain, which is characteristic of some flavoproteins. Along this line, thioredoxin reductase (TrxB, alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpF, glutathione reductase (GorA, mercuric reductase (MerA, NADH: flavorubredoxin reductase (NorW, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, and the putative oxidoreductase YkgC from Escherichia coli or environmental bacteria were purified and assessed for TR activity. All of them displayed in vitro TR activity at the expense of NADH or NADPH oxidation. In general, optimal reducing conditions occurred around pH 9-10 and 37 °C.Enzymes exhibiting strong TR activity produced Te-containing nanostructures (TeNS. While GorA and AhpF generated TeNS of 75 nm average diameter, E3 and YkgC produced larger structures (> 100 nm. Electron-dense structures were observed in cells over-expressing genes encoding TrxB, GorA and YkgC.

  10. Actin and Endocytosis in Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Bruce L.; Eskin, Julian A.; Wendland, Beverly

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis, the process whereby the plasma membrane invaginates to form vesicles, is essential for bringing many substances into the cell and for membrane turnover. The mechanism driving clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) involves > 50 different protein components assembling at a single location on the plasma membrane in a temporally ordered and hierarchal pathway. These proteins perform precisely choreographed steps that promote receptor recognition and clustering, membrane remodeling, and force-generating actin-filament assembly and turnover to drive membrane invagination and vesicle scission. Many critical aspects of the CME mechanism are conserved from yeast to mammals and were first elucidated in yeast, demonstrating that it is a powerful system for studying endocytosis. In this review, we describe our current mechanistic understanding of each step in the process of yeast CME, and the essential roles played by actin polymerization at these sites, while providing a historical perspective of how the landscape has changed since the preceding version of the YeastBook was published 17 years ago (1997). Finally, we discuss the key unresolved issues and where future studies might be headed. PMID:25657349

  11. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mollinedo, Faustino, E-mail: fmollin@usal.es [Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular del Cáncer, Centro de Investigación del Cáncer, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas - Universidad de Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain)

    2012-10-10

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na + , K + , and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Evidence of chemical stimulation of hepatic metabolism by an experimental acetanilide (FOE 5043) indirectly mediating reductions in circulating thyroid hormone levels in the male rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, W R; Becker, B D; Wahle, B S; Moore, K D; Dass, P D; Lake, S G; Van Goethem, D L; Stuart, B P; Sangha, G K; Thyssen, J H

    1996-02-01

    N-(4-Fluorophenyl)-N-(1-methylethyl)-2-[[5-(trifluoromethyl)-1,3, 4-thiadiazol-2-yl]oxy]acetamide (FOE 5043) is a new acetanilide-type herbicide undergoing regulatory testing. Previous work in this laboratory suggested that FOE 5043-induced reductions in serum thyroxine (T4) levels were mediated via an extrathyroidal site of action. The possibility that the alterations in circulating T4 levels were due to chemical induction of hepatic thyroid hormone metabolism was investigated. Treatment with FOE 5043 at a rate of 1000 ppm as a dietary admixture was found to significantly increase the clearance of [125I]T4 from the serum, suggesting an enhanced excretion of the hormone. In the liver, the activity of hepatic uridine glucuronosyl transferase, a major pathway of thyroid hormone biotransformation in the rat, increased in a statistically significant and dose-dependent manner; conversely, hepatic 5'-monodeiodinase activity trended downward with dose. Bile flow as well as the hepatic uptake and biliary excretion of [125I]T4 were increased following exposure to FOE 5043. Thyroidal function, as measured by the discharge of iodide ion in response to perchlorate, and pituitary function, as measured by the capacity of the pituitary to secrete thyrotropin in response to an exogenous challenge by hypothalamic thyrotropin releasing hormone, were both unchanged from the controlled response. These data suggest that the functional status of the thyroid and pituitary glands has not been altered by treatment with FOE 5043 and that reductions in circulating levels of T4 are being mediated indirectly through an increase in the biotransformation and excretion of thyroid hormone in the liver.

  14. Schwann Cell-Mediated Preservation of Vision in Retinal Degenerative Diseases via the Reduction of Oxidative Stress: A Possible Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudzadeh, Raziyeh; Heidari-Keshel, Saeed; Lashay, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    After injury to the central nervous system (CNS), regeneration is often inadequate, except in the case of remyelination. This remyelination capacity of the CNS is a good example of a stem/precursor cell-mediated renewal process. Schwann cells have been found to act as remyelinating agents in the peripheral nervous system (PNS), but several studies have highlighted their potential role in remyelination in the CNS too. Schwann cells are able to protect and support retinal cells by secreting growth factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor. Retinal degenerative diseases can be highly debilitating, and they are a major concern in countries with an ageing populations. One of the leading causes of permanent loss of vision in the West is a retinal degenerative disease known as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In the United States, nearly 1.75 million people over the age of 40 have advanced AMD, and it is estimated that this number will increase to approximately 3 million people by 2020. One of the most common pathways involved in the initiation and development of retinal diseases is the oxidative stress pathway. In patients with diabetes, Schwann cells have been shown to be able to secrete large amounts of antioxidant enzymes that protect the PNS from the oxidative stress that results from fluctuations in blood glucose levels. This antioxidant ability may be involved in the mechanism by which Schwann cells are able to promote reconstruction in the CNS, especially in individuals with retinal injuries and degenerative diseases.

  15. Seasonal carbohydrate dynamics and growth in Douglas-fir trees experiencing chronic, fungal-mediated reduction in functional leaf area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffell, Brandy J; Meinzer, Frederick C; Woodruff, David R; Shaw, David C; Voelker, Steven L; Lachenbruch, Barbara; Falk, Kristen

    2014-03-01

    Stored non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) could play an important role in tree survival in the face of a changing climate and associated stress-related mortality. We explored the effects of the stomata-blocking and defoliating fungal disease called Swiss needle cast on Douglas-fir carbohydrate reserves and growth to evaluate the extent to which NSCs can be mobilized under natural conditions of low water stress and restricted carbon supply in relation to potential demands for growth. We analyzed the concentrations of starch, sucrose, glucose and fructose in foliage, twig wood and trunk sapwood of 15 co-occurring Douglas-fir trees expressing a gradient of Swiss needle cast symptom severity quantified as previous-year functional foliage mass. Growth (mean basal area increment, BAI) decreased by ∼80% and trunk NSC concentration decreased by 60% with decreasing functional foliage mass. The ratio of relative changes in NSC concentration and BAI, an index of the relative priority of storage versus growth, more than doubled with increasing disease severity. In contrast, twig and foliage NSC concentrations remained nearly constant with decreasing functional foliage mass. These results suggest that under disease-induced reductions in carbon supply, Douglas-fir trees retain NSCs (either actively or due to sequestration) at the expense of trunk radial growth. The crown retains the highest concentrations of NSC, presumably to maintain foliage growth and shoot extension in the spring, partially compensating for rapid foliage loss in the summer and fall.

  16. Genetics of Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querol, Amparo; Fernández-Espinar, M. Teresa; Belloch, Carmela

    The use of yeasts in biotechnology processes dates back to ancient days. Before 7000 BC, beer was produced in Sumeria. Wine was made in Assyria in 3500 BC, and ancient Rome had over 250 bakeries, which were making leavened bread by 100 BC. And milk has been made into Kefyr and Koumiss in Asia for many centuries (Demain, Phaff, & Kurtzman, 1999). However, the importance of yeast in the food and beverage industries was only realized about 1860, when their role in food manufacturing became evident.

  17. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric; Suominen, Pirkko

    2010-12-07

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains. ##STR00001##

  18. Curcumin increases the sensitivity of Paclitaxel-resistant NSCLC cells to Paclitaxel through microRNA-30c-mediated MTA1 reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yimin; Wang, Jun; Liu, Lei; Yu, Lequn; Zhao, Nian; Zhou, Xingju; Lu, Xudong

    2017-04-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer is one of the most lethal cancers in the worldwide. Although Paclitaxel-based combinational therapies have long been used as a standard treatment in aggressive non-small-cell lung cancers, Paclitaxel resistance emerges as a major clinical problem. It has been demonstrated that Curcumin from Curcuma longa as a traditional Chinese medicine can inhibit cancer cell proliferation. However, the role of Curcumin in Paclitaxel-resistant non-small-cell lung cancer cells is not clear. In this study, we investigated the effect of Curcumin on the Paclitaxel-resistant non-small-cell lung cancer cells and found that Curcumin treatment markedly increased the sensitivity of Paclitaxel-resistant non-small-cell lung cancer cells to Paclitaxel. Mechanically, the study revealed that Curcumin could reduce the expression of metastasis-associated gene 1 (MTA1) gene through upregulation of microRNA-30c in Paclitaxel-resistant non-small-cell lung cancer cells. During the course, MTA1 reduction sensitized Paclitaxel-resistant non-small-cell lung cancer cells and enhanced the effect of Paclitaxel. Taken together, our studies indicate that Curcumin increases the sensitivity of Paclitaxel-resistant non-small-cell lung cancer cells to Paclitaxel through microRNA-30c-mediated MTA1 reduction. Curcumin might be a potential adjuvant for non-small-cell lung cancer patients during Paclitaxel treatment.

  19. Oxidative Stress and Programmed Cell Death in Yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrugia, Gianluca; Balzan, Rena

    2012-01-01

    Yeasts, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have long served as useful models for the study of oxidative stress, an event associated with cell death and severe human pathologies. This review will discuss oxidative stress in yeast, in terms of sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS), their molecular targets, and the metabolic responses elicited by cellular ROS accumulation. Responses of yeast to accumulated ROS include upregulation of antioxidants mediated by complex transcriptional changes, activation of pro-survival pathways such as mitophagy, and programmed cell death (PCD) which, apart from apoptosis, includes pathways such as autophagy and necrosis, a form of cell death long considered accidental and uncoordinated. The role of ROS in yeast aging will also be discussed.

  20. De novo biosynthesis of vanillin in fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Esben H; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Kock, Gertrud R; Bünner, Camilla M; Kristensen, Charlotte; Jensen, Ole R; Okkels, Finn T; Olsen, Carl E; Motawia, Mohammed S; Hansen, Jørgen

    2009-05-01

    Vanillin is one of the world's most important flavor compounds, with a global market of 180 million dollars. Natural vanillin is derived from the cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid (Vanilla planifolia), but most of the world's vanillin is synthesized from petrochemicals or wood pulp lignins. We have established a true de novo biosynthetic pathway for vanillin production from glucose in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, also known as fission yeast or African beer yeast, as well as in baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Productivities were 65 and 45 mg/liter, after introduction of three and four heterologous genes, respectively. The engineered pathways involve incorporation of 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase from the dung mold Podospora pauciseta, an aromatic carboxylic acid reductase (ACAR) from a bacterium of the Nocardia genus, and an O-methyltransferase from Homo sapiens. In S. cerevisiae, the ACAR enzyme required activation by phosphopantetheinylation, and this was achieved by coexpression of a Corynebacterium glutamicum phosphopantetheinyl transferase. Prevention of reduction of vanillin to vanillyl alcohol was achieved by knockout of the host alcohol dehydrogenase ADH6. In S. pombe, the biosynthesis was further improved by introduction of an Arabidopsis thaliana family 1 UDP-glycosyltransferase, converting vanillin into vanillin beta-D-glucoside, which is not toxic to the yeast cells and thus may be accumulated in larger amounts. These de novo pathways represent the first examples of one-cell microbial generation of these valuable compounds from glucose. S. pombe yeast has not previously been metabolically engineered to produce any valuable, industrially scalable, white biotech commodity.

  1. Yeast Infection during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disrupt the pH balance of the vagina. Common yeast infection symptoms include vaginal itching and a white, thick discharge that looks ... and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/candidiasis.htm. Accessed Aug. 27, ... Vagina, Cervix, Toxic Shock Syndrome, Endometritis, and Salpingitis. In: ...

  2. Polysome Profile Analysis - Yeast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíšek, M.; Valášek, Leoš Shivaya

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 530, č. 2013 (2013), s. 173-181 ISSN 0076-6879 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : grow yeast cultures * polysome profile analysis * sucrose density gradient centrifugation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.194, year: 2013

  3. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Suominen, Pirkko; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric

    2013-02-12

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. A yeast strain engineered to metabolize arabinose through a novel pathway is also disclosed. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains.

  4. Binding kinetics of magnetic nanoparticles on latex beads and yeast cells studied by magnetorelaxometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberbeck, Dietmar; Bergemann, Christian; Hartwig, Stefan; Steinhoff, Uwe; Trahms, Lutz

    2005-01-01

    The ion exchange mediated binding of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) to modified latex spheres and yeast cells was quantified using magnetorelaxometry. By fitting subsequently recorded relaxation curves, the kinetics of the binding reactions was extracted. The signal of MNP with weak ion exchanger groups bound to latex and yeast cells scales linearly with the concentration of latex beads or yeast cells whereas that of MNP with strong ion exchanger groups is proportional to the square root of concentration. The binding of the latter leads to a much stronger aggregation of yeast cells than the former MNP

  5. Regional Brain Volumes Moderate, but Do Not Mediate, the Effects of Group-Based Exercise Training on Reductions in Loneliness in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Diane K; Daugherty, Ana M; Burzynska, Agnieszka Z; Fanning, Jason; Awick, Elizabeth A; Chaddock-Heyman, Laura; Kramer, Arthur F; McAuley, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Despite the prevalence of and negative health consequences associated with perceived loneliness in older adults, few studies have examined interactions among behavioral, psychosocial, and neural mechanisms. Research suggests that physical activity and improvements in perceived social support and stress are related to reductions in loneliness. Yet, the influence of brain structure on these changes is unknown. The present study examined whether change in regional brain volume mediated the effects of changes in social support and stress on change in perceived loneliness after an exercise intervention. We also examined the extent to which baseline brain volumes moderated the relationship between changes in social support, stress, and loneliness. Methods: Participants were 247 older adults (65.4 ± 4.6 years-old) enrolled in a 6-month randomized controlled trial comprised of four exercise conditions: Dance ( n = 69), Strength/Stretching/Stability ( n = 70), Walk ( n = 54), and Walk Plus ( n = 54). All groups met for 1 h, three times weekly. Participants completed questionnaires assessing perceived social support, stress, and loneliness at baseline and post-intervention. Regional brain volumes (amygdala, prefrontal cortex [PFC], hippocampus) before and after intervention were measured with automatic segmentation of each participant's T1-weighted structural MRI. Data were analyzed in a latent modeling framework. Results: Perceived social support increased ( p = 0.003), while stress ( p loneliness ( p = 0.001) decreased over the intervention. Increased social support directly (-0.63, p loneliness. Changes in amygdala, PFC, and hippocampus volumes were unrelated to change in psychosocial variables (all p ≥ 0.44). However, individuals with larger baseline amygdalae experienced greater decreases in loneliness due to greater reductions in stress (0.35, p = 0.02). Further, individuals with larger baseline PFC volumes experienced greater reductions in stress due

  6. Regional Brain Volumes Moderate, but Do Not Mediate, the Effects of Group-Based Exercise Training on Reductions in Loneliness in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane K. Ehlers

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite the prevalence of and negative health consequences associated with perceived loneliness in older adults, few studies have examined interactions among behavioral, psychosocial, and neural mechanisms. Research suggests that physical activity and improvements in perceived social support and stress are related to reductions in loneliness. Yet, the influence of brain structure on these changes is unknown. The present study examined whether change in regional brain volume mediated the effects of changes in social support and stress on change in perceived loneliness after an exercise intervention. We also examined the extent to which baseline brain volumes moderated the relationship between changes in social support, stress, and loneliness.Methods: Participants were 247 older adults (65.4 ± 4.6 years-old enrolled in a 6-month randomized controlled trial comprised of four exercise conditions: Dance (n = 69, Strength/Stretching/Stability (n = 70, Walk (n = 54, and Walk Plus (n = 54. All groups met for 1 h, three times weekly. Participants completed questionnaires assessing perceived social support, stress, and loneliness at baseline and post-intervention. Regional brain volumes (amygdala, prefrontal cortex [PFC], hippocampus before and after intervention were measured with automatic segmentation of each participant's T1-weighted structural MRI. Data were analyzed in a latent modeling framework.Results: Perceived social support increased (p = 0.003, while stress (p < 0.001, and loneliness (p = 0.001 decreased over the intervention. Increased social support directly (−0.63, p < 0.01 and indirectly, through decreased stress (−0.10, p = 0.02, predicted decreased loneliness. Changes in amygdala, PFC, and hippocampus volumes were unrelated to change in psychosocial variables (all p ≥ 0.44. However, individuals with larger baseline amygdalae experienced greater decreases in loneliness due to greater reductions in stress (0.35, p = 0

  7. Yeast ecology of Kombucha fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Ai Leng; Heard, Gillian; Cox, Julian

    2004-09-01

    Kombucha is a traditional fermentation of sweetened tea, involving a symbiosis of yeast species and acetic acid bacteria. Despite reports of different yeast species being associated with the fermentation, little is known of the quantitative ecology of yeasts in Kombucha. Using oxytetracycline-supplemented malt extract agar, yeasts were isolated from four commercially available Kombucha products and identified using conventional biochemical and physiological tests. During the fermentation of each of the four products, yeasts were enumerated from both the cellulosic pellicle and liquor of the Kombucha. The number and diversity of species varied between products, but included Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Candida stellata, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulaspora delbrueckii and Zygosaccharomyces bailii. While these yeast species are known to occur in Kombucha, the enumeration of each species present throughout fermentation of each of the four Kombucha cultures demonstrated for the first time the dynamic nature of the yeast ecology. Kombucha fermentation is, in general, initiated by osmotolerant species, succeeded and ultimately dominated by acid-tolerant species.

  8. Multiple pathways for vacuolar sorting of yeast proteinase A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westphal, V; Marcusson, E G; Winther, Jakob R.

    1996-01-01

    The sorting of the yeast proteases proteinase A and carboxypeptidase Y to the vacuole is a saturable, receptor-mediated process. Information sufficient for vacuolar sorting of the normally secreted protein invertase has in fusion constructs previously been found to reside in the propeptide...

  9. Determination of Proteinaceous Selenocysteine in Selenized Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Bierla

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A method for the quantitation of proteinaceous selenocysteine (SeCys in Se-rich yeast was developed. The method is based on the reduction of the Se-Se and S-Se bridges with dithiotretiol, derivatization with iodoacetamide (carbamidomethylation, followed by HPLC-ICP MS. The chromatographic conditions were optimized for the total recovery of the proteinaceous selenocysteine, the minimum number of peaks in the chromatogram (reduction of derivatization products of other Se-species present and the baseline separation. A typical chromatogram of a proteolytic digest of selenized yeast protein consisted of up to five peaks (including SeMet, carbamidomethylated (CAM-SeCys, and Se(CAM2 identified by retention time matching with available standards and electrospray MS. Inorganic selenium non-specifically attached to proteins and selenomethionine could be quantified (in the form of Se(CAM2 along with SeCys. Selenocysteine, selenomethionine, inorganic selenium, and the water soluble-metabolite fraction accounted for the totality of selenium species in Se-rich yeast.

  10. Highly sensitive electrochemical detection of DNA hybridisation by coupling the chemical reduction of a redox label to the electrode reaction of a solution phase mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoensawat, Umphan; Rijiravanich, Patsamon; Somasundrum, Mithran; Surareungchai, Werasak

    2014-11-21

    We have described a highly sensitive method for detecting DNA hybridisation using a redox-labeled stem loop probe. The redox labels were poly(styrene-co-acrylic) (PSA) spheres of 454 nm diameter, modified by methylene blue (MB) deposited alternatively with poly(sodium 4-styrene sulphonate) (PSS) in a layer-by-layer process. Each PSA sphere carried approx. 3.7 × 10(5) molecules of MB, as determined optically. DIG-tagged stem loop probes were immobilised on screen printed electrodes bearing anti-DIG antibodies. Binding with the target enabled straightening of the stem loop, which made attachment to the MB-coated PSA spheres possible. For measuring the current from the direct reduction of MB by differential pulse voltammetry, a 30 mer DNA target common to 70 strains of Escherichia coli was calibrated across the range 1.0 fM to 100 pM (gradient = 3.2 × 10(-8) A (log fM)(-1), r(2) = 0.95, n = 60), with an LOD of ∼58 fM. By using Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) as a solution phase mediator for the MB reduction, we were able to lower the LOD to ∼39 aM (gradient = 5.95 × 10(-8) A (log aM)(-1), r(2) = 0.96, n = 30), which corresponds to the detection of 0.76 ag (∼50 molecules) in the 2 μL analyte sample. We hypothesise that the lowering of the LOD was due to the fact that not all the MB labels were able to contact the electrode surface.

  11. Yeast glycolipid biosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezierska, Sylwia; Claus, Silke; Van Bogaert, Inge

    2017-10-25

    Various yeasts, both conventional and exotic ones, are known to produce compounds useful to mankind. Ethanol is the most known of these compounds, but more complex molecules such as amphiphilic biosurfactants can also be derived from eukaryotic microorganisms at an industrially and commercially relevant scale. Among them, glycolipids are the most promising, due to their attractive properties and high product titers. Many of these compounds can be considered as secondary metabolites with a specific function for the host. Hence, a dedicated biosynthetic process enables regulation and combines pathways delivering the lipidic moiety and the hydrophilic carbohydrate part of the glycolipid. In this Review, we will discuss the biosynthetic and regulatory aspects of the yeast-derived sophorolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids, and cellobiose lipids, with special emphasis on the relation between glycolipid synthesis and the general lipid metabolism. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  12. Genetically engineered yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    A genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprising an active fermentation pathway producing 3-HP expresses an exogenous gene expressing the aminotransferase YhxA from Bacillus cereus AH1272 catalysing a transamination reaction between beta-alanine and pyruvate to produce malonate semialde......A genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprising an active fermentation pathway producing 3-HP expresses an exogenous gene expressing the aminotransferase YhxA from Bacillus cereus AH1272 catalysing a transamination reaction between beta-alanine and pyruvate to produce malonate...... semialdehyde. The yeast may also express a 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase (HIBADH) and a 3-hydroxypropanoate dehydrogenase (3-HPDH) and aspartate 1-decarboxylase. Additionally the yeast may express pyruvate carboxylase and aspartate aminotransferase....

  13. Tapping into yeast diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Justin C

    2012-11-01

    Domesticated organisms demonstrate our capacity to influence wild species but also provide us with the opportunity to understand rapid evolution in the context of substantially altered environments and novel selective pressures. Recent advances in genetics and genomics have brought unprecedented insights into the domestication of many organisms and have opened new avenues for further improvements to be made. Yet, our ability to engineer biological systems is not without limits; genetic manipulation is often quite difficult. The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is not only one of the most powerful model organisms, but is also the premier producer of fermented foods and beverages around the globe. As a model system, it entertains a hefty workforce dedicated to deciphering its genome and the function it encodes at a rich mechanistic level. As a producer, it is used to make leavened bread, and dozens of different alcoholic beverages, such as beer and wine. Yet, applying the awesome power of yeast genetics to understanding its origins and evolution requires some knowledge of its wild ancestors and the environments from which they were derived. A number of surprisingly diverse lineages of S. cerevisiae from both primeval and secondary forests in China have been discovered by Wang and his colleagues. These lineages substantially expand our knowledge of wild yeast diversity and will be a boon to elucidating the ecology, evolution and domestication of this academic and industrial workhorse.

  14. How do yeast sense mitochondrial dysfunction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry A. Knorre

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Apart from energy transformation, mitochondria play important signaling roles. In yeast, mitochondrial signaling relies on several molecular cascades. However, it is not clear how a cell detects a particular mitochondrial malfunction. The problem is that there are many possible manifestations of mitochondrial dysfunction. For example, exposure to the specific antibiotics can either decrease (inhibitors of respiratory chain or increase (inhibitors of ATP-synthase mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Moreover, even in the absence of the dysfunctions, a cell needs feedback from mitochondria to coordinate mitochondrial biogenesis and/or removal by mitophagy during the division cycle. To cope with the complexity, only a limited set of compounds is monitored by yeast cells to estimate mitochondrial functionality. The known examples of such compounds are ATP, reactive oxygen species, intermediates of amino acids synthesis, short peptides, Fe-S clusters and heme, and also the precursor proteins which fail to be imported by mitochondria. On one hand, the levels of these molecules depend not only on mitochondria. On the other hand, these substances are recognized by the cytosolic sensors which transmit the signals to the nucleus leading to general, as opposed to mitochondria-specific, transcriptional response. Therefore, we argue that both ways of mitochondria-to-nucleus communication in yeast are mostly (if not completely unspecific, are mediated by the cytosolic signaling machinery and strongly depend on cellular metabolic state.

  15. Yeast modulation of human dendritic cell cytokine secretion: an in vitro study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida M Smith

    Full Text Available Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The concept of individual microorganisms influencing the makeup of T cell subsets via interactions with intestinal dendritic cells (DCs appears to constitute the foundation for immunoregulatory effects of probiotics, and several studies have reported probiotic strains resulting in reduction of intestinal inflammation through modulation of DC function. Consequent to a focus on Saccharomyces boulardii as the fundamental probiotic yeast, very little is known about hundreds of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in terms of their interaction with the human gastrointestinal immune system. The aim of the present study was to evaluate 170 yeast strains representing 75 diverse species for modulation of inflammatory cytokine secretion by human DCs in vitro, as compared to cytokine responses induced by a S. boulardii reference strain with probiotic properties documented in clinical trials. Furthermore, we investigated whether cytokine inducing interactions between yeasts and human DCs are dependent upon yeast viability or rather a product of membrane interactions regardless of yeast metabolic function. We demonstrate high diversity in yeast induced cytokine profiles and employ multivariate data analysis to reveal distinct clustering of yeasts inducing similar cytokine profiles in DCs, highlighting clear species distinction within specific yeast genera. The observed differences in induced DC cytokine profiles add to the currently very limited knowledge of the cross-talk between yeasts and human immune cells and provide a foundation for selecting yeast strains for further characterization and development toward potentially novel yeast probiotics. Additionally, we present data to support a hypothesis that the interaction between yeasts and human DCs does not solely depend on yeast viability, a concept which may suggest a need for further classifications

  16. Yeast Modulation of Human Dendritic Cell Cytokine Secretion: An In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ida M.; Christensen, Jeffrey E.; Arneborg, Nils; Jespersen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The concept of individual microorganisms influencing the makeup of T cell subsets via interactions with intestinal dendritic cells (DCs) appears to constitute the foundation for immunoregulatory effects of probiotics, and several studies have reported probiotic strains resulting in reduction of intestinal inflammation through modulation of DC function. Consequent to a focus on Saccharomyces boulardii as the fundamental probiotic yeast, very little is known about hundreds of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in terms of their interaction with the human gastrointestinal immune system. The aim of the present study was to evaluate 170 yeast strains representing 75 diverse species for modulation of inflammatory cytokine secretion by human DCs in vitro, as compared to cytokine responses induced by a S. boulardii reference strain with probiotic properties documented in clinical trials. Furthermore, we investigated whether cytokine inducing interactions between yeasts and human DCs are dependent upon yeast viability or rather a product of membrane interactions regardless of yeast metabolic function. We demonstrate high diversity in yeast induced cytokine profiles and employ multivariate data analysis to reveal distinct clustering of yeasts inducing similar cytokine profiles in DCs, highlighting clear species distinction within specific yeast genera. The observed differences in induced DC cytokine profiles add to the currently very limited knowledge of the cross-talk between yeasts and human immune cells and provide a foundation for selecting yeast strains for further characterization and development toward potentially novel yeast probiotics. Additionally, we present data to support a hypothesis that the interaction between yeasts and human DCs does not solely depend on yeast viability, a concept which may suggest a need for further classifications beyond the current

  17. Sexual differentiation in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egel, R; Nielsen, O; Weilguny, D

    1990-01-01

    The regulation of sexual reproduction in yeast constitutes the highest level of differentiation observed in these unicellular organisms. The various ramifications of this system involve DNA rearrangement, transcriptional control, post-translational modification (such as protein phosphorylation) a......) and receptor/signal processing. A few basic similarities are common to both fission and budding yeasts. The wiring of the regulatory circuitry, however, varies considerably between these divergent yeast groups....

  18. Entropy analysis in yeast DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jongkwang; Kim, Sowun; Lee, Kunsang; Kwon, Younghun

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the language structure in yeast 16 chromosomes. In order to find it, we use the entropy analysis for codons (or amino acids) of yeast 16 chromosomes, developed in analysis of natural language by Montemurro et al. From the analysis, we can see that there exists a language structure in codons (or amino acids) of yeast 16 chromosomes. Also we find that the grammar structure of amino acids of yeast 16 chromosomes has a deep relationship with secondary structure of protein.

  19. Genomics and the making of yeast biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hittinger, Chris Todd; Rokas, Antonis; Bai, Feng-Yan; Boekhout, Teun; Gonçalves, Paula; Jeffries, Thomas W; Kominek, Jacek; Lachance, Marc-André; Libkind, Diego; Rosa, Carlos A; Sampaio, José Paulo; Kurtzman, Cletus P

    2015-01-01

    Yeasts are unicellular fungi that do not form fruiting bodies. Although the yeast lifestyle has evolved multiple times, most known species belong to the subphylum Saccharomycotina (syn. Hemiascomycota, hereafter yeasts). This diverse group includes the premier eukaryotic model system, Saccharomyces

  20. Prolactin-induced neuroprotection against glutamate excitotoxicity is mediated by the reduction of [Ca2+]i overload and NF-κB activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero-Segura, Nadia A.; Flores-Soto, Edgar; García de la Cadena, Selene; Coronado-Mares, Isabel; Gomez-Verjan, Juan C.; Ferreira, Diana G.; Cabrera-Reyes, Erika Alejandra; Lopes, Luísa V.; Massieu, Lourdes

    2017-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a peptidic hormone that displays pleiotropic functions in the organism including different actions in the brain. PRL exerts a neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity produced by glutamate (Glu) or kainic acid in both in vitro and in vivo models. It is well known that Glu excitotoxicity causes cell death through apoptotic or necrotic pathways due to intracellular calcium ([Ca2+] i) overload. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess the molecular mechanisms by which PRL maintains cellular viability of primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons exposed to Glu excitotoxicity. We determined cell viability by monitoring mitochondrial activity and using fluorescent markers for viable and dead cells. The intracellular calcium level was determined by a fluorometric assay and proteins involved in the apoptotic pathway were determined by immunoblot. Our results demonstrated that PRL afforded neuroprotection against Glu excitotoxicity, as evidenced by a decrease in propidium iodide staining and by the decrease of the LDH activity. In addition, the MTT assay shows that PRL maintains normal mitochondrial activity even in neurons exposed to Glu. Furthermore, the Glu-induced intracellular [Ca2+]i overload was attenuated by PRL. These data correlate with the reduction found in the level of active caspase-3 and the pro-apoptotic ratio (Bax/Bcl-2). Concomitantly, PRL elicited the nuclear translocation of the transcriptional factor NF-κB, which was detected by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that PRL prevents Glu excitotoxicity by a mechanism involving the restoration of the intracellular calcium homeostasis and mitochondrial activity, as well as an anti-apoptotic action possibly mediated by the activity of NF-κB. Overall, the current results suggest that PRL could be of potential therapeutic advantage in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28475602

  1. Controlled extracellular biosynthesis of ZnS quantum dots by sulphate reduction bacteria in the presence of hydroxypropyl starch as a mediator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shiyue; Zhang, Mi; Guo, Xingming; Yue, Lei; Wang, Jia; Shao, Ziqiang; Xin, Baoping

    2017-06-01

    Metal sulphide quantum dots (QDs) have broad applications. Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have been recognized as synthesizers of metal sulphides, with the characteristics of a high-production efficiency and easy product harvest. However, SRB are incapable of synthesizing metal sulphide QDs. In the present study, cheap hydroxypropyl starch (HPS) was used to assist SRB in manufacturing the ZnS QDs. The results exhibited that the HPS accelerated the growth of SRB and reduction of SO4 2+ into S2-, while it blocked the precipitation between S2- and Zn2+ to control the nucleation and growth of ZnS, resulting in the formation of ZnS QDs. When the HPS concentration increased from 0.2 to 1.6 g/L, the average crystal size (ACS) of ZnS QDs dropped from 5.95 to 3.34 nm, demonstrating the controlled biosynthesis of ZnS QDs. The ZnS QDs were coated or adhered to by both HPS and proteins, which played an important role in the controlled biosynthesis of ZnS QDs. The remarkable blue shift of the narrow UV absorption peak was due to the quantum confinement effect. The sequential variation in the colour of the photoluminescence spectrum (PL) from red to yellow suggested a tunable PL of the ZnS QDs. The current work demonstrated that SRB can fabricate the formation of ZnS QDs with a controlled size and tunable PL at a high-production rate of approximately 8.7 g/(L × week) through the simple mediation of HPS, with the yield being 7.46 times the highest yield in previously reported studies. The current work is of great importance to the commercialization of the biosynthesis of ZnS QDs.

  2. Current awareness on yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-02-01

    In order to keep subscribers up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, this current awareness service is provided by John Wiley & Sons and contains newly-published material on yeasts. Each bibliography is divided into 10 sections. 1 Books, Reviews & Symposia; 2 General; 3 Biochemistry; 4 Biotechnology; 5 Cell Biology; 6 Gene Expression; 7 Genetics; 8 Physiology; 9 Medical Mycology; 10 Recombinant DNA Technology. Within each section, articles are listed in alphabetical order with respect to author. If, in the preceding period, no publications are located relevant to any one of these headings, that section will be omitted. (3 weeks journals - search completed 5th. Dec. 2001)

  3. Untangling the Roles of Anti-Apoptosis in Regulating Programmed Cell Death using Humanized Yeast Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapp, Caitlin; Portt, Liam; Khoury, Chamel; Sheibani, Sara; Eid, Rawan; Greenwood, Matthew; Vali, Hojatollah; Mandato, Craig A.; Greenwood, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Genetically programmed cell death (PCD) mechanisms, including apoptosis, are important for the survival of metazoans since it allows, among things, the removal of damaged cells that interfere with normal function. Cell death due to PCD is observed in normal processes such as aging and in a number of pathophysiologies including hypoxia (common causes of heart attacks and strokes) and subsequent tissue reperfusion. Conversely, the loss of normal apoptotic responses is associated with the development of tumors. So far, limited success in preventing unwanted PCD has been reported with current therapeutic approaches despite the fact that inhibitors of key apoptotic inducers such as caspases have been developed. Alternative approaches have focused on mimicking anti-apoptotic processes observed in cells displaying increased resistance to apoptotic stimuli. Hormesis and pre-conditioning are commonly observed cellular strategies where sub-lethal levels of pro-apoptotic stimuli lead to increased resistance to higher or lethal levels of stress. Increased expression of anti-apoptotic sequences is a common mechanism mediating these protective effects. The relevance of the latter observation is exemplified by the observation that transgenic mice overexpressing anti-apoptotic genes show significant reductions in tissue damage following ischemia. Thus strategies aimed at increasing the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins, using gene therapy or cell penetrating recombinant proteins are being evaluated as novel therapeutics to decrease cell death following acute periods of cell death inducing stress. In spite of its functional and therapeutic importance, more is known regarding the processes involved in apoptosis than anti-apoptosis. The genetically tractable yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has emerged as an exceptional model to study multiple aspects of PCD including the mitochondrial mediated apoptosis observed in metazoans. To increase our knowledge of the process of anti

  4. Nucleosome structure of the yeast CHA1 promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, José Manuel Alfonso; Holmberg, S

    1998-01-01

    conditions. Five yeast TBP mutants defective in different steps in activated transcription abolished CHA1 expression, but failed to affect induction-dependent chromatin rearrangement of the promoter region. Progressive truncations of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain caused a progressive reduction...

  5. Alteration of yeast activity by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacharkar, M.P.; Tak, B.B.; Bhati, J.

    1996-01-01

    Yeast is an important component in microbe based industrial technologies. Due to the techno-economic reasons, the fermentation technique has acquired renewed interest. The effect of γ-radiation on the fermentation reaction has been investigated. The studies show that exposure of the fermentation mixture to γ-radiation at 5 kGy enhance alcohol production, whereas irradiation at higher doses, viz., 10 kGy and 25 kGy caused a considerable reduction in the alcohol yield. Therefore, low dose irradiation of fermentation mixtures can be applied for increasing the alcohol production by about 25%. (author). 13 refs., 1 fig

  6. Inheritance of the yeast mitochondrial genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast......Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast...

  7. Yeasts preservation: alternatives for lyophilisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyanga, L.K.; Nout, M.J.R.; Smid, E.J.; Boekhout, T.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effect of two low-cost, low technology traditional methods for drying starter cultures with standard lyophilisation. Lyophilised yeast cultures and yeast cultures preserved in dry rice cakes and dry plant fibre strands were examined for viable cell counts

  8. Heterologous transporter expression for improved fatty alcohol secretion in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yating; Zhu, Zhiwei; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an attractive host for industrial scale production of biofuels including fatty alcohols due to its robustness and tolerance towards harsh fermentation conditions. Many metabolic engineering strategies have been applied to generate high fatty alcohol production...... transporters tested, human FATP1 was shown to mediate fatty alcohol export in a high fatty alcohol production yeast strain. An approximately five-fold increase of fatty alcohol secretion was achieved. The results indicate that the overall cell fitness benefited from fatty alcohol secretion and that the acyl......-CoA synthase activity of FATP1 contributed to increased cell growth as well. This is the first study that enabled an increased cell fitness for fatty alcohol production by heterologous transporter expression in yeast, and this investigation indicates a new potential function of FATP1, which has been known...

  9. Production of Food Grade Yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argyro Bekatorou

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts have been known to humans for thousands of years as they have been used in traditional fermentation processes like wine, beer and bread making. Today, yeasts are also used as alternative sources of high nutritional value proteins, enzymes and vitamins, and have numerous applications in the health food industry as food additives, conditioners and flavouring agents, for the production of microbiology media and extracts, as well as livestock feeds. Modern scientific advances allow the isolation, construction and industrial production of new yeast strains to satisfy the specific demands of the food industry. Types of commercial food grade yeasts, industrial production processes and raw materials are highlighted. Aspects of yeast metabolism, with respect to carbohydrate utilization, nutritional aspects and recent research advances are also discussed.

  10. Evolutionary History of Ascomyceteous Yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haridas, Sajeet; Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Goker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kurtzman, Cletus P.; Blackwell, Meredith; Grigoriev, Igor; Jeffries, Thomas W.

    2014-06-06

    Yeasts are important for many industrial and biotechnological processes and show remarkable diversity despite morphological similarities. We have sequenced the genomes of 16 ascomycete yeasts of taxonomic and industrial importance including members of Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina. A comparison of these with several other previously published yeast genomes have added increased confidence to the phylogenetic positions of previously poorly placed species including Saitoella complicata, Babjeviella inositovora and Metschnikowia bicuspidata. Phylogenetic analysis also showed that yeasts with alternative nuclear codon usage where CUG encodes serine instead of leucine are monophyletic within the Saccharomycotina. Most of the yeasts have compact genomes with a large fraction of single exon genes with Lipomyces starkeyi and the previously published Pneumocystis jirovecii being notable exceptions. Intron analysis suggests that early diverging species have more introns. We also observed a large number of unclassified lineage specific non-simple repeats in these genomes.

  11. De Novo Biosynthesis of Vanillin in Fission Yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and Baker's Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Esben H.; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Kock, Gertrud R.; Bünner, Camilla M.; Kristensen, Charlotte; Jensen, Ole R.; Okkels, Finn T.; Olsen, Carl E.; Motawia, Mohammed S.; Hansen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Vanillin is one of the world's most important flavor compounds, with a global market of 180 million dollars. Natural vanillin is derived from the cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid (Vanilla planifolia), but most of the world's vanillin is synthesized from petrochemicals or wood pulp lignins. We have established a true de novo biosynthetic pathway for vanillin production from glucose in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, also known as fission yeast or African beer yeast, as well as in baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Productivities were 65 and 45 mg/liter, after introduction of three and four heterologous genes, respectively. The engineered pathways involve incorporation of 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase from the dung mold Podospora pauciseta, an aromatic carboxylic acid reductase (ACAR) from a bacterium of the Nocardia genus, and an O-methyltransferase from Homo sapiens. In S. cerevisiae, the ACAR enzyme required activation by phosphopantetheinylation, and this was achieved by coexpression of a Corynebacterium glutamicum phosphopantetheinyl transferase. Prevention of reduction of vanillin to vanillyl alcohol was achieved by knockout of the host alcohol dehydrogenase ADH6. In S. pombe, the biosynthesis was further improved by introduction of an Arabidopsis thaliana family 1 UDP-glycosyltransferase, converting vanillin into vanillin β-d-glucoside, which is not toxic to the yeast cells and thus may be accumulated in larger amounts. These de novo pathways represent the first examples of one-cell microbial generation of these valuable compounds from glucose. S. pombe yeast has not previously been metabolically engineered to produce any valuable, industrially scalable, white biotech commodity. PMID:19286778

  12. Non-Saccharomyces yeasts protect against epithelial cell barrier disruption induced by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, I M; Baker, A; Arneborg, N; Jespersen, L

    2015-11-01

    The human gastrointestinal epithelium makes up the largest barrier separating the body from the external environment. Whereas invasive pathogens cause epithelial barrier disruption, probiotic micro-organisms modulate tight junction regulation and improve epithelial barrier function. In addition, probiotic strains may be able to reduce epithelial barrier disruption caused by pathogenic species. The aim of this study was to explore non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of epithelial cell barrier function in vitro. Benchmarking against established probiotic strains, we evaluated the ability of four nonpathogenic yeast species to modulate transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) across a monolayer of differentiated human colonocytes (Caco-2 cells). Further, we assessed yeast modulation of a Salmonella Typhimurium-induced epithelial cell barrier function insult. Our findings demonstrate distinct patterns of non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of epithelial cell barrier function. While the established probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii increased TER across a Caco-2 monolayer by 30%, Kluyveromyces marxianus exhibited significantly stronger properties of TER enhancement (50% TER increase). In addition, our data demonstrate significant yeast-mediated modulation of Salmonella-induced epithelial cell barrier disruption and identify K. marxianus and Metschnikowia gruessii as two non-Saccharomyces yeasts capable of protecting human epithelial cells from pathogen invasion. This study demonstrates distinct patterns of non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of epithelial cell barrier function in vitro. Further, our data demonstrate significant yeast-mediated modulation of Salmonella Typhimurium-induced epithelial cell barrier disruption and identify Kluyveromyces marxianus and Metschnikowia gruessii as two non-Saccharomyces yeasts capable of protecting human epithelial cells from pathogen invasion. This study is the first to demonstrate significant non-Saccharomyces yeast-mediated

  13. Mitochondrial fission proteins regulate programmed cell death in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fannjiang, Yihru; Cheng, Wen-Chih; Lee, Sarah J; Qi, Bing; Pevsner, Jonathan; McCaffery, J Michael; Hill, R Blake; Basañez, Gorka; Hardwick, J Marie

    2004-11-15

    The possibility that single-cell organisms undergo programmed cell death has been questioned in part because they lack several key components of the mammalian cell death machinery. However, yeast encode a homolog of human Drp1, a mitochondrial fission protein that was shown previously to promote mammalian cell death and the excessive mitochondrial fragmentation characteristic of apoptotic mammalian cells. In support of a primordial origin of programmed cell death involving mitochondria, we found that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of human Drp1, Dnm1, promotes mitochondrial fragmentation/degradation and cell death following treatment with several death stimuli. Two Dnm1-interacting factors also regulate yeast cell death. The WD40 repeat protein Mdv1/Net2 promotes cell death, consistent with its role in mitochondrial fission. In contrast to its fission function in healthy cells, Fis1 unexpectedly inhibits Dnm1-mediated mitochondrial fission and cysteine protease-dependent cell death in yeast. Furthermore, the ability of yeast Fis1 to inhibit mitochondrial fission and cell death can be functionally replaced by human Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Together, these findings indicate that yeast and mammalian cells have a conserved programmed death pathway regulated by a common molecular component, Drp1/Dnm1, that is inhibited by a Bcl-2-like function.

  14. PPARα, PPARγ and SREBP-1 pathways mediated waterborne iron (Fe)-induced reduction in hepatic lipid deposition of javelin goby Synechogobius hasta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang-Hui; Luo, Zhi; Chen, Feng; Shi, Xi; Song, Yu-Feng; You, Wen-Jing; Liu, Xu

    2017-07-01

    and up-regulating lipolysis, and PPARα, PPARγ and SREBP-1 pathways mediated the Fe-induced reduction of hepatic lipid deposition in S. hasta. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Non-Saccharomyces Yeasts during Alcoholic Fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemsawasd, Varongsiri

    The early death of non-Saccharomyces yeasts during mixed culture spontaneous wine fermentation has traditionally been attributed to the lower capacity of these yeast species to withstand high levels of ethanol, low pH, and other media properties that are a part of progressing fermentation. However......, other yeast-yeast interactions, such as cell-cell contact mediated growth arrest and/or toxininduced death may also be a significant factor in the relative fragility of these non-Saccharomyces yeasts in mixed culture fermentation. In the present work we evaluate the combined roles of cell-cell contact...... and/or antimicrobial peptides on the early death of Lachancea thermotolerans during mixed culture fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using a specially designed double compartment fermentation system, we established that both cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides contribute...

  16. Genetic study on yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortimer, R.K.

    1981-01-01

    Research during the past year has moved ahead on several fronts. A major compilation of all the genetic mapping data for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been completed. The map describes the location of over 300 genes on 17 chromosomes. A report on this work will appear in Microbiological Reviews in December 1980. Recombinant DNA procedures have been introduced into the experiments and RAD52 (one of the genes involved in recombination and repair damage), has been successfully cloned. This clone will be used to determine the gene product. Diploid cells homozygous for RAD52 have exceptionally high frequencies of mitotic loss of chromosomes. This loss is stimulated by ionizing radiation. This effect is a very significant finding. The effect has also been seen with certain other RAD mutants

  17. Lager Yeast Comes of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic fermentations have accompanied human civilizations throughout our history. Lager yeasts have a several-century-long tradition of providing fresh beer with clean taste. The yeast strains used for lager beer fermentation have long been recognized as hybrids between two Saccharomyces species. We summarize the initial findings on this hybrid nature, the genomics/transcriptomics of lager yeasts, and established targets of strain improvements. Next-generation sequencing has provided fast access to yeast genomes. Its use in population genomics has uncovered many more hybridization events within Saccharomyces species, so that lager yeast hybrids are no longer the exception from the rule. These findings have led us to propose network evolution within Saccharomyces species. This “web of life” recognizes the ability of closely related species to exchange DNA and thus drain from a combined gene pool rather than be limited to a gene pool restricted by speciation. Within the domesticated lager yeasts, two groups, the Saaz and Frohberg groups, can be distinguished based on fermentation characteristics. Recent evidence suggests that these groups share an evolutionary history. We thus propose to refer to the Saaz group as Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and to the Frohberg group as Saccharomyces pastorianus based on their distinct genomes. New insight into the hybrid nature of lager yeast will provide novel directions for future strain improvement. PMID:25084862

  18. Interaction Between Yeasts and Zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicola, Raffaele De; Walker, Graeme

    Zinc is an essential trace element in biological systems. For example, it acts as a cellular membrane stabiliser, plays a critical role in gene expression and genome modification and activates nearly 300 enzymes, including alcohol dehydrogenase. The present chapter will be focused on the influence of zinc on cell physiology of industrial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with special regard to the uptake and subsequent utilisation of this metal. Zinc uptake by yeast is metabolism-dependent, with most of the available zinc translocated very quickly into the vacuole. At cell division, zinc is distributed from mother to daughter cells and this effectively lowers the individual cellular zinc concentration, which may become zinc depleted at the onset of the fermentation. Zinc influences yeast fermentative performance and examples will be provided relating to brewing and wine fermentations. Industrial yeasts are subjected to several stresses that may impair fermentation performance. Such stresses may also impact on yeast cell zinc homeostasis. This chapter will discuss the practical implications for the correct management of zinc bioavailability for yeast-based biotechnologies aimed at improving yeast growth, viability, fermentation performance and resistance to environmental stresses

  19. Mediating Mechanisms of Theory-Based Psychosocial Determinants on Behavioral Changes in a Middle School Obesity Risk Reduction Curriculum Intervention, Choice, Control, and Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Heewon Lee; Contento, Isobel R; Koch, Pamela A; Noia, Jennifer Di

    2016-10-01

    A limited number of school-based intervention studies have explored mediating mechanisms of theory-based psychosocial variables on obesity risk behavior changes. The current study investigated how theory-based psychosocial determinants mediated changes in energy balance-related behaviors (EBRBs) among urban youth. A secondary analysis study was conducted using data from a cluster randomized controlled trial. Data from students at 10 middle schools in New York City (n = 1136) were used. The intervention, Choice, Control, and Change curriculum, was based on social cognitive and self-determination theories. Theory-based psychosocial determinants (goal intention, cognitive outcome expectations, affective outcome expectations, self-efficacy, perceived barriers, and autonomous motivation) and EBRBs were measured with self-report questionnaires. Mediation mechanisms were examined using structural equation modeling, Results: Mediating mechanisms for daily sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and purposeful stair climbing were identified. Models with best fit indices (root mean square error of approximation = 0.039/0.045, normed fit index = 0.916/0.882; comparative fit index = 0.945/0.932; Tucker-Lewis index = 0.896/0.882, respectively) suggested that goal intention and reduced perceived barriers were significant proximal mediators for reducing SSB consumption among both boys and girls or increasing physical activity by stair climbing among boys. Cognitive outcome expectations, affective outcome expectations, self-efficacy, and autonomous motivation indirectly mediated behavioral changes through goal intention or perceived barriers (p behavioral outcome variances. Theory-based psychosocial determinants targeted in Choice, Control, and Change in fact mediated behavior changes in middle school students. Strategies targeting these mediators might benefit future success of behavioral interventions. Further studies are needed to determine other

  20. Yeasts preservation: alternatives for lyophilisation

    OpenAIRE

    Nyanga, Loveness K.; Nout, Martinus J. R.; Smid, Eddy J.; Boekhout, Teun; Zwietering, Marcel H.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effect of two low-cost, low technology traditional methods for drying starter cultures with standard lyophilisation. Lyophilised yeast cultures and yeast cultures preserved in dry rice cakes and dry plant fibre strands were examined for viable cell counts during 6 months storage at 4 and 25 °C. None of the yeast cultures showed a significant loss in viable cell count during 6 months of storage at 4 °C upon lyophilisation and preservation in dry rice cak...

  1. [Distiller Yeasts Producing Antibacterial Peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyachko, E V; Morozkina, E V; Zaitchik, B Ts; Benevolensky, S V

    2015-01-01

    A new method of controlling lactic acid bacteria contamination was developed with the use of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains producing antibacterial peptides. Genes encoding the antibacterial peptides pediocin and plantaricin with codons preferable for S. cerevisiae were synthesized, and a system was constructed for their secretory expression. Recombinant S. cerevisiae strains producing antibacterial peptides effectively inhibit the growth of Lactobacillus sakei, Pediacoccus pentasaceus, Pediacoccus acidilactici, etc. The application of distiller yeasts producing antibacterial peptides enhances the ethanol yield in cases of bacterial contamination. Recombinant yeasts producing the antibacterial peptides pediocin and plantaricin can successfully substitute the available industrial yeast strains upon ethanol production.

  2. Heat-treated mineral-yeast as a potent post-irradiation radioprotector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzai, Kazunori; Ueno, Megumi; Nyui, Minako; Ikota, Nobuo; Kagiya, Tsutomu V.

    2008-01-01

    In vivo radioprotection of C3H mice by i.p. administration of Zn-, Mn-, Cu-, or Se-containing heat-treated Saccharomyces serevisiae yeast sample was examined. The 30-day survival of the group treated 30 min before 7.5 Gy whole-body X-irradiation with mineral-containing yeast powders suspended in 0.5% methylcellulose was significantly higher than that of control group. When mineral-yeast was administered immediately after irradiation, the survival rate was even higher and Zn- or Cu-yeast showed the highest rate (more than 90%). Although treatment with simple yeast showed a high survival rate (73%), it was significantly lower than that obtained by the Zn-yeast treatment. The effects of Zn-yeast were studied further. When the interval between irradiation and administration was varied, the protective activity of Zn-yeast decreased gradually by increasing the interval but was still significantly high for the administration at 10 h post-irradiation. The dose reduction factor of Zn-yeast (100 mg/kg, i.p. administration immediately after irradiation) was about 1.2. When the suspension of Zn-yeast was fractionated by centrifugation, the insoluble fraction showed a potent effect, while the soluble fraction had only a moderate effect. In conclusion, mineral-yeast, especially Zn-yeast, provides remarkable post-irradiation protection against lethal whole body X-irradiation. The activity is mainly attributable to the insoluble fraction, whereas some soluble components might contribute to the additional protective activity. (author)

  3. Stable current outputs and phytate degradation by yeast-based biofuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubenova, Yolina; Georgiev, Danail; Mitov, Mario

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we report for the first time that Candida melibiosica 2491 yeast strain expresses enhanced phytase activity when used as a biocatalyst in biofuel cells. The polarization also results in an increase of the yeast biomass. Higher steady-state electrical outputs, assigned to earlier production of an endogenous mediator, were achieved at continuous polarization under constant load. The obtained results prove that the C. melibiosica yeast-based biofuel cell could be used for simultaneous electricity generation and phytate bioremediation. In addition, the higher phytase activity obtained by interruptive polarization suggests a new method for increasing the phytase yield from microorganisms. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Fungal Meiosis and Parasexual Reproduction – Lessons from Pathogenic Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Sherwood, Racquel K.; Bennett, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Meiosis is an integral part of sexual reproduction in eukaryotic species. It performs the dual functions of halving the genetic content in the cell, as well as increasing genetic diversity by promoting recombination between chromosome homologs. Despite extensive studies of meiosis in model yeast, it is now apparent that both the regulation of meiosis and the machinery mediating recombination has significantly diverged, even between closely related species. To highlight this, we discuss new st...

  5. Sporangiospore-yeast transformation of Mucor circinelloides : Ionic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Measurement of intracellular ion concentration during sporangiospores-yeast transformation of Mucor circinelloides Tieghem in K+- mediated (0.90 to 1.10 g/l) and Na+-modulated (0.05 to 0.20 g/l) multiionic broths, pH 4.5, temperature 20°C, showed that (a), transmembrane ion flux was continuous during the growth period ...

  6. Yeast strains and methods of use thereof

    OpenAIRE

    Goddard, Matthew Robert; Gardner, Richard Clague; Anfang, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to yeast strains and, in particular, to yeast stains for use in fermentation processes. The invention also relates to methods of fermentation using the yeast strains of the invention either alone or in combination with other yeast strains. The invention thither relates to methods for the selection of yeast strains suitable for fermentation cultures by screening for various metabolic products and the use of specific nutrient sources.

  7. Biotechnical Microbiology, yeast and bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Ingrid Stampe

    1999-01-01

    This section contains the following single lecture notes: Eukaryotic Cell Biology. Kingdom Fungi. Cell Division. Meiosis and Recombination. Genetics of Yeast. Organisation of the Chromosome. Organization and genetics of the mitochondrial Geneme. Regulatio of Gene Expression. Intracellular Compart...

  8. Structural investigations of yeast mannans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rademacher, K.H.

    1983-01-01

    Cell wall mannans were isolated from 8 different Candida species and separated in oligosaccharides by partial acetolysis. After gel chromatography specific acetolysis patterns were obtained. The 13 C NMR spectra of mannans and oligosaccharides were recorded. Signals at delta = 93.1 - 105.4 were assigned to certain chemical structures. Both the spectral patterns and the acetolysis patterns of the yeast mannans can be used for the discrimination of related yeasts. (author)

  9. Oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, R; Simões-Silva, L; Garro, S; Silva, M-J; Azevedo, Á; Sampaio-Maia, B

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that placenta may harbour a unique microbiome that may have origin in maternal oral microbiome. Although the major physiological and hormonal adjustments observed in pregnant women lead to biochemical and microbiological modifications of the oral environment, very few studies evaluated the changes suffered by the oral microbiota throughout pregnancy. So, the aim of our study was to evaluate oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy and to compare it with non-pregnant women. The oral yeast colonization was assessed in saliva of 30 pregnant and non-pregnant women longitudinally over a 6-months period. Demographic information was collected, a non-invasive intra-oral examination was performed and saliva flow and pH were determined. Pregnant and non-pregnant groups were similar regarding age and level of education. Saliva flow rate did not differ, but saliva pH was lower in pregnant than in non-pregnant women. Oral yeast prevalence was higher in pregnant than in non-pregnant women, either in the first or in the third trimester, but did not attain statistical significance. In individuals colonized with yeast, the total yeast quantification (Log10CFU/mL) increase from the 1st to the 3rd trimester in pregnant women, but not in non-pregnant women. Pregnancy may favour oral yeast growth that may be associated with an acidic oral environment.

  10. Biotechnological Applications of Dimorphic Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiphode, N.; Joshi, C.; Ghormade, V.; Deshpande, M. V.

    The dimorphic yeasts have the equilibrium between spherical growth (budding) and polarized (hyphal or pseudohyphal tip elongation) which can be triggered by change in the environmental conditions. The reversible growth phenomenon has made dimorphic yeasts as an useful model to understand fungal evolution and fungal differentiation, in general. In nature dimorphism is clearly evident in plant and animal fungal pathogens, which survive and most importantly proliferate in the respective hosts. However, number of organisms with no known pathogenic behaviour also show such a transition, which can be exploited for the technological applications due to their different biochemical make up under different morphologies. For instance, chitin and chitosan production using dimorphic Saccharomyces, Mucor, Rhizopus and Benjaminiella, oil degradation and biotransformation with yeast-form of Yarrowia species, bioremediation of organic pollutants, exopolysac-charide production by yeast-phase of Aureobasidium pullulans, to name a few. Myrothecium verrucaria can be used for seed dressing in its yeast form and it produces a mycolytic enzyme complex in its hyphal-form for the biocontrol of fungal pathogens, while Beauveria bassiana and other entomopathogens kill the insect pest by producing yeast- like cells in the insect body. The form-specific expression of protease, chitinase, lipase, ornithine decarboxylase, glutamate dehydrogenases, etc. make Benjaminiella poitrasii, Basidiobolus sp., and Mucor rouxii strains important in bioremediation, nanobiotechnology, fungal evolution and other areas.

  11. Yeast ribosomal proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otaka, E.; Kobata, K.

    1978-01-01

    The cytoplasmic 80s ribosomal proteins from the cells of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were analyzed by SDS two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Seventyfour proteins were identified and consecutively numbered from 1 to 74. Upon oxidation of the 80s proteins with performic acid, ten proteins (no. 15, 20, 35, 40, 44, 46, 49, 51, 54 and 55) were dislocated on the gel without change of the total number of protein spots. Five proteins (no. 8, 14, 16, 36 and 74) were phosphorylated in vivo as seen in 32 P-labelling experiments. The large and small subunits separated in low magnesium medium were analyzed by the above gel electrophoresis. At least forty-five and twenty-eight proteins were assumed to be in the large and small subunits, respectively. All proteins found in the 80s ribosomes, except for no. 3, were detected in either subunit without appearance of new spots. The acidic protein no. 3 seems to be lost during subunit dissociation. (orig.) [de

  12. Metabolic regulation of yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiechter, A.

    1982-12-01

    Metabolic regulation which is based on endogeneous and exogeneous process variables which may act constantly or time dependently on the living cell is discussed. The observed phenomena of the regulation are the result of physical, chemical, and biological parameters. These parameters are identified. Ethanol is accumulated as an intermediate product and the synthesis of biomass is reduced. This regulatory effect of glucose is used for the aerobic production of ethanol. Very high production rates are thereby obtained. Understanding of the regulation mechanism of the glucose effect has improved. In addition to catabolite repression, several other mechanisms of enzyme regulation have been described, that are mostly governed by exogeneous factors. Glucose also affects the control of respiration in a third class of yeasts which are unable to make use of ethanol as a substrate for growth. This is due to the lack of any anaplerotic activity. As a consequence, diauxic growth behavior is reduced to a one-stage growth with a drastically reduced cell yield. The pulse chemostat technique, a systematic approach for medium design is developed and medium supplements that are essential for metabolic control are identified.

  13. Anxiety Sensitivity and Pre-Cessation Smoking Processes: Testing the Independent and Combined Mediating Effects of Negative Affect–Reduction Expectancies and Motives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Samantha G.; Leventhal, Adam M.; Schmidt, Norman B.; Zvolensky, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Anxiety sensitivity appears to be relevant in understanding the nature of emotional symptoms and disorders associated with smoking. Negative-reinforcement smoking expectancies and motives are implicated as core regulatory processes that may explain, in part, the anxiety sensitivity–smoking interrelations; however, these pathways have received little empirical attention. Method: Participants (N = 471) were adult treatment-seeking daily smokers assessed for a smoking-cessation trial who provided baseline data; 157 participants provided within-treatment (pre-cessation) data. Anxiety sensitivity was examined as a cross-sectional predictor of several baseline smoking processes (nicotine dependence, perceived barriers to cessation, severity of prior withdrawal-related quit problems) and pre-cessation processes including nicotine withdrawal and smoking urges (assessed during 3 weeks before the quit day). Baseline negative-reinforcement smoking expectancies and motives were tested as simultaneous mediators via parallel multiple mediator models. Results: Higher levels of anxiety sensitivity were related to higher levels of nicotine dependence, greater perceived barriers to smoking cessation, more severe withdrawal-related problems during prior quit attempts, and greater average withdrawal before the quit day; effects were indirectly explained by the combination of both mediators. Higher levels of anxiety sensitivity were not directly related to pre-cessation smoking urges but were indirectly related through the independent and combined effects of the mediators. Conclusions: These empirical findings bolster theoretical models of anxiety sensitivity and smoking and identify targets for nicotine dependence etiology research and cessation interventions. PMID:25785807

  14. Reductions in Negative Parenting Practices Mediate the Effect of a Family-School Intervention for Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booster, Genery D.; Mautone, Jennifer A.; Nissley-Tsiopinis, Jenelle; Van Dyke, Devin; Power, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating research has identified family behavioral interventions as an empirically supported psychosocial treatment for students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The mechanisms behind the effectiveness of these interventions, however, have been less well studied. The current study examined possible mediators of improvement…

  15. Link Between Positive Clinician-Conveyed Expectations of Treatment Effect and Pain Reduction in Knee Osteoarthritis, Mediated by Patient Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao-Wei Lo, Grace; Balasubramanyam, Ajay S; Barbo, Andrea; Street, Richard L; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E

    2016-07-01

    A prior knee osteoarthritis (OA) trial found that provider-conveyed expectations for treatment success were associated with pain improvement. We hypothesized this relationship was mediated by patient self-efficacy, since expectations of improvement may enhance one's ability to control health behaviors, and therefore health. Our aim was to examine whether self-efficacy was a mediator of the relationship observed in this trial. A secondary analysis of a 3-arm (traditional acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and wait list) trial for knee OA was conducted. Those in the acupuncture groups were equally randomized to acupuncturists trained to communicate a high or neutral expectation of treatment success (e.g., using language conveying high or unclear likelihood that acupuncture would reduce knee pain). A modified Arthritis Self-Efficacy Questionnaire and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale were administered. Linear regression analyses were used to examine whether patient self-efficacy mediated the relationship between provider communication style and knee pain at 3 months. High-expectation provider communication was associated with patient self-efficacy, β coefficient of 0.14 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.01, 0.28). Self-efficacy was associated with WOMAC pain, β coefficient of -9.29 (95% CI -11.11, -7.47), while controlling for the provider communication style. The indirect effect a × b of -1.36 for high versus neutral expectation (bootstrap 95% CI -2.80, -0.15; does not include 0), supports the conclusion that patient self-efficacy mediates the relationship between provider-communicated expectations of treatment effects and knee pain. Our findings suggest that clinician-conveyed expectations can enhance the benefit of treatments targeting knee OA symptoms, mediated by improved patient self-efficacy. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  16. Effects of Dietary Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisia Supplementation in Practical Diets of Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José E. P. Cyrino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 51-day feeding trial was carried out to determine the effects of various dietary levels of brewer’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in the growth performance, body composition and nutrient utilization in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, juveniles. Fish (7.6 ± 0.3 g were stocked into eighteen 1,000-L tanks (100 fish per tank; n = 3 and fed to apparent satiation six isonitrogenous (27% crude protein and isoenergetic (19 kJ/g diets, formulated to contain different dried yeast levels (0%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 30% or 40% diet in substitution to fishmeal. Body weight tripled at the end of the feeding trial for fish fed up to 20% dietary yeast incorporation. Daily growth coefficient (DGC, % body weight/day decreased with increasing dietary yeast level (P < 0.0001. Voluntary feed intake (VFI, %BW/day did not vary significantly with increasing yeast level. Fish fed 40% yeast showed significant reduction in protein efficiency rate, protein retention and nitrogen gain. Increasing levels of dietary yeast did not significantly affect protein or lipid digestibility. Dietary dried yeast was seemingly palatable to tilapia juveniles and was suitable up to 15% inclusion to promote growth and efficient diet utilization, without affecting body composition.

  17. Screening of intact yeasts and cell extracts to reduce Scrapie prions during biotransformation of food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyben, David; Boqvist, Sofia; Passoth, Volkmar; Renström, Lena; Allard Bengtsson, Ulrika; Andréoletti, Olivier; Kiessling, Anders; Lundh, Torbjörn; Vågsholm, Ivar

    2018-02-08

    Yeasts can be used to convert organic food wastes to protein-rich animal feed in order to recapture nutrients. However, the reuse of animal-derived waste poses a risk for the transmission of infectious prions that can cause neurodegeneration and fatality in humans and animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of yeasts to reduce prion activity during the biotransformation of waste substrates-thereby becoming a biosafety hurdle in such a circular food system. During pre-screening, 30 yeast isolates were spiked with Classical Scrapie prions and incubated for 72 h in casein substrate, as a waste substitute. Based on reduced Scrapie seeding activity, waste biotransformation and protease activities, intact cells and cell extracts of 10 yeasts were further tested. Prion analysis showed that five yeast species reduced Scrapie seeding activity by approximately 1 log10 or 90%. Cryptococcus laurentii showed the most potential to reduce prion activity since both intact and extracted cells reduced Scrapie by 1 log10 and achieved the highest protease activity. These results show that select forms of yeast can act as a prion hurdle during the biotransformation of waste. However, the limited ability of yeasts to reduce prion activity warrants caution as a sole barrier to transmission as higher log reductions are needed before using waste-cultured yeast in circular food systems.

  18. Study on the effects of near-future ocean acidification on marine yeasts: a microcosm approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Evamaria; Wichels, Antje; Erler, René; Gerdts, Gunnar

    2013-12-01

    Marine yeasts play an important role in biodegradation and nutrient cycling and are often associated with marine flora and fauna. They show maximum growth at pH levels lower than present-day seawater pH. Thus, contrary to many other marine organisms, they may actually profit from ocean acidification. Hence, we conducted a microcosm study, incubating natural seawater from the North Sea at present-day pH (8.10) and two near-future pH levels (7.81 and 7.67). Yeasts were isolated from the initial seawater sample and after 2 and 4 weeks of incubation. Isolates were classified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and representative isolates were identified by partial sequencing of the large subunit rRNA gene. From the initial seawater sample, we predominantly isolated a yeast-like filamentous fungus related to Aureobasidium pullulans, Cryptococcus sp., Candida sake, and various cold-adapted yeasts. After incubation, we found more different yeast species at near-future pH levels than at present-day pH. Yeasts reacting to low pH were related to Leucosporidium scottii, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Cryptococcus sp., and Debaryomyces hansenii. Our results suggest that these yeasts will benefit from seawater pH reductions and give a first indication that the importance of yeasts will increase in a more acidic ocean.

  19. Yeast Flocculation—Sedimentation and Flotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham G. Stewart

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Unlike most fermentation alcohol beverage production processes, brewers recycle their yeast. This is achieved by employing a yeast culture’s: flocculation, adhesion, sedimentation, flotation, and cropping characteristics. As a consequence of yeast recycling, the quality of the cropped yeast culture’s characteristics is critical. However, the other major function of brewer’s yeast is to metabolise wort into ethanol, carbon dioxide, glycerol, and other fermentation products, many of which contribute to beer’s overall flavour characteristics. This review will only focus on brewer’s yeast flocculation characteristics.

  20. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of lipomyces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ziyu; Magnuson, Jon K.; Deng, Shuang; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Culley, David E.

    2018-03-13

    This disclosure provides Agrobacterium-mediated transformation methods for the oil-producing (oleaginous) yeast Lipomyces sp., as well as yeast produced by the method. Such methods utilize Agrobacterium sp. cells that have a T-DNA binary plasmid, wherein the T-DNA binary plasmid comprises a first nucleic acid molecule encoding a first protein and a second nucleic acid molecule encoding a selective marker that permits growth of transformed Lipomyces sp. cells in selective culture media comprising an antibiotic.

  1. Produção de biossurfactante por levedura Biosurfactants production by yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizele Cardoso Fontes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosurfactants are molecules extracellularly produced by bacteria, yeast and fungi that have significant interfacial activity properties. This review focuses on relevant parameters that influence biosurfactant production by yeasts. Many works have investigated the optimization of yeast biosurfactant production, mainly within the last decade, revealing that the potential of such microorganisms is not well explored in the industrial field. The main points to increase the process viability lays on the reduction of the production costs and enhancement of biosynthesis efficiency through optimization the culture conditions (carbon and nitrogen source, pH, aeration, speed agitation and the selection of inexpensive medium components.

  2. A high-throughput method for quantifying metabolically active yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nandy, Subir Kumar; Knudsen, Peter Boldsen; Rosenkjær, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    By redesigning the established methylene blue reduction test for bacteria and yeast, we present a cheap and efficient methodology for quantitative physiology of eukaryotic cells applicable for high-throughput systems. Validation of themethod in fermenters and highthroughput systems proved....... The drop in metabolic activity associated with the diauxic shift in yeast proved more pronounced for the MBRT-derived curve compared with OD curves, consistent with a dramatic shift in the ratio between live and dead cells at this metabolic event. This method provides a tool with numerous applications, e.......g. characterizing the death phase of stationary phase cultures, or in drug screens with pathogenic yeasts....

  3. Crystal structure of the yeast nicotinamidase Pnc1p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Gang; Taylor, Alexander B; McAlister-Henn, Lee; Hart, P John

    2007-05-01

    The yeast nicotinamidase Pnc1p acts in transcriptional silencing by reducing levels of nicotinamide, an inhibitor of the histone deacetylase Sir2p. The Pnc1p structure was determined at 2.9A resolution using MAD and MIRAS phasing methods after inadvertent crystallization during the pursuit of the structure of histidine-tagged yeast isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH). Pnc1p displays a cluster of surface histidine residues likely responsible for its co-fractionation with IDH from Ni(2+)-coupled chromatography resins. Researchers expressing histidine-tagged proteins in yeast should be aware of the propensity of Pnc1p to crystallize, even when overwhelmed in concentration by the protein of interest. The protein assembles into extended helical arrays interwoven to form an unusually robust, yet porous superstructure. Comparison of the Pnc1p structure with those of three homologous bacterial proteins reveals a common core fold punctuated by amino acid insertions unique to each protein. These insertions mediate the self-interactions that define the distinct higher order oligomeric states attained by these molecules. Pnc1p also acts on pyrazinamide, a substrate analog converted by the nicotinamidase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis into a product toxic to that organism. However, we find no evidence for detrimental effects of the drug on yeast cell growth.

  4. MAP kinase pathways in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustin, M. C.; Albertyn, J.; Alexander, M.; Davenport, K.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    A cascade of three protein kinases known as a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is commonly found as part of the signaling pathways in eukaryotic cells. Almost two decades of genetic and biochemical experimentation plus the recently completed DNA sequence of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome have revealed just five functionally distinct MAPK cascades in this yeast. Sexual conjugation, cell growth, and adaptation to stress, for example, all require MAPK-mediated cellular responses. A primary function of these cascades appears to be the regulation of gene expression in response to extracellular signals or as part of specific developmental processes. In addition, the MAPK cascades often appear to regulate the cell cycle and vice versa. Despite the success of the gene hunter era in revealing these pathways, there are still many significant gaps in our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms for activation of these cascades and how the cascades regulate cell function. For example, comparison of different yeast signaling pathways reveals a surprising variety of different types of upstream signaling proteins that function to activate a MAPK cascade, yet how the upstream proteins actually activate the cascade remains unclear. We also know that the yeast MAPK pathways regulate each other and interact with other signaling pathways to produce a coordinated pattern of gene expression, but the molecular mechanisms of this cross talk are poorly understood. This review is therefore an attempt to present the current knowledge of MAPK pathways in yeast and some directions for future research in this area.

  5. Role of smoking intention in tobacco use reduction: A mediation analysis of an effective classroom-based prevention/cessation intervention for adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzálvez, María T; Morales, Alexandra; Orgilés, Mireia; Sussman, Steve; Espada, José P

    2018-09-01

    Although some school-based tobacco cessation and prevention programs have been proven to be effective, there remains a lack of understanding of how these programs succeed. This longitudinal study aimed to test smoking intention as a mediator of Project EX's intervention efficacy to reduce tobacco use. Using a computerized random number generator, six high schools located in the Mediterranean coast were randomly selected to participate in the program condition (Spanish version of Project EX) or the waiting-list control group with baseline, immediate-posttest, and 12-month follow-up assessments. At baseline, 685 adolescents aged 14-20 years (mean age: 14.87; SD = 0.92; 47.4% were females) were evaluated using self-administered tests of tobacco, and smoking intention. A biomarker of smoke inhalation, a measurement of exhaled carbon monoxide (ECM), was used. Mediation analyses were conducted using the PROCESS v2.12 macro for Windows. Project EX had a significant effect on smoking intention. Indirect effects indicated that Project EX reduced the ECM level, and number of cigarettes used. This is the first Spanish study that explored intention as a mediator of the long-term efficacy of Project EX to reduce tobacco use in adolescents. Results suggested that interventions that reduce consumption intention at short-term are more likely to be successful in decreasing tobacco use in the long-term. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The yeast replicative aging model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chong; Zhou, Chuankai; Kennedy, Brian K

    2018-03-08

    It has been nearly three decades since the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae became a significant model organism for aging research and it has emerged as both simple and powerful. The replicative aging assay, which interrogates the number of times a "mother" cell can divide and produce "daughters", has been a stalwart in these studies, and genetic approaches have led to the identification of hundreds of genes impacting lifespan. More recently, cell biological and biochemical approaches have been developed to determine how cellular processes become altered with age. Together, the tools are in place to develop a holistic view of aging in this single-celled organism. Here, we summarize the current state of understanding of yeast replicative aging with a focus on the recent studies that shed new light on how aging pathways interact to modulate lifespan in yeast. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. [Yeast species in vulvovaginitis candidosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemes-Nikodém, Éva; Tamási, Béla; Mihalik, Noémi; Ostorházi, Eszter

    2015-01-04

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is the most common mycosis, however, the available information about antifungal susceptibilities of these yeasts is limited. To compare the gold standard fungal culture with a new molecular identification method and report the incidence of yeast species in vulvovaginitis candidosa. The authors studied 370 yeasts isolated from vulvovaginal candidiasis and identified them by phenotypic and molecular methods. The most common species was Candida albicans (85%), followed by Candida glabrata, and other Candida species. At present there are no recommendations for the evaluation of antifungal susceptibility of pathogenic fungal species occurring in vulvovaginal candidiasis and the natural antifungal resistance of the different species is known only. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time of Flight identification can be used to differentiate the fluconazole resistant Candida dubliniensis and the sensitive Candida albicans strains.

  8. Nectar yeasts in the tall Larkspur Delphinium barbeyi (Ranunculaceae and effects on components of pollinator foraging behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert N Schaeffer

    Full Text Available Microorganisms frequently colonize the nectar of angiosperm species. Though capable of altering a suite of traits important for pollinator attraction, few studies exist that test the degree to which they mediate pollinator foraging behavior. The objective of our study was to fill this gap by assessing the abundance and diversity of yeasts associated with the perennial larkspur Delphinium barbeyi (Ranunculaceae and testing whether their presence affected components of pollinator foraging behavior. Yeasts frequently colonized D. barbeyi nectar, populating 54-77% of flowers examined depending on site. Though common, the yeast community was species-poor, represented by a single species, Metschnikowia reukaufii. Female-phase flowers of D. barbeyi were more likely to have higher densities of yeasts in comparison to male-phase flowers. Pollinators were likely vectors of yeasts, as virgin (unvisited flowers rarely contained yeasts compared to flowers open to pollinator visitation, which were frequently colonized. Finally, pollinators responded positively to the presence of yeasts. Bombus foragers both visited and probed more flowers inoculated with yeasts in comparison to uninoculated controls. Taken together, our results suggest that variation in the occurrence and density of nectar-inhabiting yeasts have the potential to alter components of pollinator foraging behavior linked to pollen transfer and plant fitness.

  9. Nectar Yeasts in the Tall Larkspur Delphinium barbeyi (Ranunculaceae) and Effects on Components of Pollinator Foraging Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Robert N.; Phillips, Cody R.; Duryea, M. Catherine; Andicoechea, Jonathan; Irwin, Rebecca E.

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms frequently colonize the nectar of angiosperm species. Though capable of altering a suite of traits important for pollinator attraction, few studies exist that test the degree to which they mediate pollinator foraging behavior. The objective of our study was to fill this gap by assessing the abundance and diversity of yeasts associated with the perennial larkspur Delphinium barbeyi (Ranunculaceae) and testing whether their presence affected components of pollinator foraging behavior. Yeasts frequently colonized D. barbeyi nectar, populating 54–77% of flowers examined depending on site. Though common, the yeast community was species-poor, represented by a single species, Metschnikowia reukaufii. Female-phase flowers of D. barbeyi were more likely to have higher densities of yeasts in comparison to male-phase flowers. Pollinators were likely vectors of yeasts, as virgin (unvisited) flowers rarely contained yeasts compared to flowers open to pollinator visitation, which were frequently colonized. Finally, pollinators responded positively to the presence of yeasts. Bombus foragers both visited and probed more flowers inoculated with yeasts in comparison to uninoculated controls. Taken together, our results suggest that variation in the occurrence and density of nectar-inhabiting yeasts have the potential to alter components of pollinator foraging behavior linked to pollen transfer and plant fitness. PMID:25272164

  10. Reductions in Traumatic Stress Following a Coping Intervention Were Mediated by Decreases in Avoidant Coping for People Living with HIV/AIDS and Childhood Sexual Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkema, Kathleen J.; Ranby, Krista W.; Meade, Christina S.; Hansen, Nathan B.; Wilson, Patrick A.; Kochman, Arlene

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether (a) Living in the Face of Trauma (LIFT), a group intervention to address coping with HIV and childhood sexual abuse (CSA), significantly reduced traumatic stress over a 1-year follow-up period more than an attention-matched support group comparison intervention; and (b) reductions in avoidant coping over time mediated…

  11. Mechanisms of uv mutagenesis in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, C.W.; Christensen, R.; Schwartz, A.

    1982-01-01

    The uv mutagenesis in yeast depends on the function of the RAD6 locus, a gene that is also responsible for a substantial fraction of wild-type resistance, suggesting that this eukaryote may possess a misrepair mechanism analogous to that proposed for Escherichia coli. The molecular mechanism responsible for RAD6 repair or recovery is not yet known, but it is different from either excision or recombination-dependent repair, processes carried out by the other two main repair pathways in yeast. RAD6-dependent mutagenesis has been found to have the following characteristics. It is associated at best with only a small fraction of RAD6-dependent repair, the majority of the sensitivity of rad6 mutants being due to their lack of nonmutagenic repair. SRS2 metabolic suppressors restore a substantial fraction of uv resistance to rad6 mutants but do not restore their uv mutability. Strains containing mutations at loci (rev, umr) that are probably more directly involved in mutagenesis are only mildly sensitive, and there is a poor correlation between their sensitivity and mutational deficiency. The uv mutagenesis appears to require a large number of gene functions, perhaps ten or more. Where examined in detail, these genes have been found to be concerned in the production of only a specific range of mutational events, not all of them. Mating experiments have shown that a substantial fraction, probably 40% or more, of uv-induced mutations are untargeted, that is, occur in lesion-free regions of DNA. The uv irradiation, therefore, produces a general reduction in the normally high fidelity with which DNA is replicated on undamaged templates. It does not appear to be necessary for the causal lesion to be present in the same chromosome as the mutation it induces. The reduction in fidelity may be the consequence of the production of a diffusible factor in uv-irradiated cells, but definite evidence supporting this proposal has not yet been obtained

  12. Cyclin C influences the timing of mitosis in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyai, Gabor; Szilagyi, Zsolt; Baraznenok, Vera; Khorosjutina, Olga; Gustafsson, Claes M

    2017-07-01

    The multiprotein Mediator complex is required for the regulated transcription of nearly all RNA polymerase II-dependent genes. Mediator contains the Cdk8 regulatory subcomplex, which directs periodic transcription and influences cell cycle progression in fission yeast. Here we investigate the role of CycC, the cognate cyclin partner of Cdk8, in cell cycle control. Previous reports suggested that CycC interacts with other cellular Cdks, but a fusion of CycC to Cdk8 reported here did not cause any obvious cell cycle phenotypes. We find that Cdk8 and CycC interactions are stabilized within the Mediator complex and the activity of Cdk8-CycC is regulated by other Mediator components. Analysis of a mutant yeast strain reveals that CycC, together with Cdk8, primarily affects M-phase progression but mutations that release Cdk8 from CycC control also affect timing of entry into S phase. © 2017 Banyai et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  13. Yeast Killer Toxin K28: Biology and Unique Strategy of Host Cell Intoxication and Killing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Becker

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The initial discovery of killer toxin-secreting brewery strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae in the mid-sixties of the last century marked the beginning of intensive research in the yeast virology field. So far, four different S. cerevisiae killer toxins (K28, K1, K2, and Klus, encoded by cytoplasmic inherited double-stranded RNA viruses (dsRNA of the Totiviridae family, have been identified. Among these, K28 represents the unique example of a yeast viral killer toxin that enters a sensitive cell by receptor-mediated endocytosis to reach its intracellular target(s. This review summarizes and discusses the most recent advances and current knowledge on yeast killer toxin K28, with special emphasis on its endocytosis and intracellular trafficking, pointing towards future directions and open questions in this still timely and fascinating field of killer yeast research.

  14. Radiation stimulation of yeast crops for increasing output of alcohol and baker yeasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlad, E.; Marsheu, P.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to stimulate by gamma radiation the existing commercial types of yeast so as to obtain yeasts that would better reflect the substrate and have improved reproductive capacity. The experiments were conducted under ordinary conditions using commercial yeasts received from one factory producing alcohol and bakery yeasts and isolated as pure cultures. Irradiating yeast cultures with small doses (up to 10 krad) was found to stimulate the reproduction and fermenting activity of yeast cells as manifested in increased accumulation of yeast biomass and greater yield of ethyl alcohol. (E.T.)

  15. Maternal dietary n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid deprivation does not exacerbate post-weaning reductions in arachidonic acid and its mediators in the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alashmali, Shoug M; Kitson, Alex P; Lin, Lin; Lacombe, R J Scott; Bazinet, Richard P

    2017-09-13

    The present study examines how lowering maternal dietary n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) (starting from pregnancy) compared to offspring (starting from post-weaning) affect the levels of n-6 and n-3 fatty acids in phospholipids (PL) and lipid mediators in the hippocampus of mice. Pregnant mice were randomly assigned to consume either a deprived or an adequate n-6 PUFA diet during pregnancy and lactation (maternal exposure). On postnatal day (PND) 21, half of the male pups were weaned onto the same diet as their dams, and the other half were switched to the other diet for 9 weeks (offspring exposure). At PND 84, upon head-focused high-energy microwave irradiation, hippocampi were collected for PL fatty acid and lipid mediator analyses. Arachidonic acid (ARA) concentrations were significantly decreased in both total PL and PL fractions, while eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) concentrations were increased only in PL fractions upon n-6 PUFA deprivation of offspring, regardless of maternal exposure. Several ARA-derived eicosanoids were reduced, while some of the EPA-derived eicosanoids were elevated by n-6 PUFA deprivation in offspring. There was no effect of diet on docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or DHA-derived docosanoids concentrations under either maternal or offspring exposure. These results indicate that the maternal exposure to dietary n-6 PUFA may not be as important as the offspring exposure in regulating hippocampal ARA and some lipid mediators. Results from this study will be helpful in the design of experiments aimed at testing the significance of altering brain ARA levels over different stages of life.

  16. Homocysteine regulates fatty acid and lipid metabolism in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visram, Myriam; Radulovic, Maja; Steiner, Sabine; Malanovic, Nermina; Eichmann, Thomas O; Wolinski, Heimo; Rechberger, Gerald N; Tehlivets, Oksana

    2018-04-13

    S -Adenosyl-l-homocysteine hydrolase (AdoHcy hydrolase; Sah1 in yeast/AHCY in mammals) degrades AdoHcy, a by-product and strong product inhibitor of S -adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet)-dependent methylation reactions, to adenosine and homocysteine (Hcy). This reaction is reversible, so any elevation of Hcy levels, such as in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), drives the formation of AdoHcy, with detrimental consequences for cellular methylation reactions. HHcy, a pathological condition linked to cardiovascular and neurological disorders, as well as fatty liver among others, is associated with a deregulation of lipid metabolism. Here, we developed a yeast model of HHcy to identify mechanisms that dysregulate lipid metabolism. Hcy supplementation to wildtype cells up-regulated cellular fatty acid and triacylglycerol content and induced a shift in fatty acid composition, similar to changes observed in mutants lacking Sah1. Expression of the irreversible bacterial pathway for AdoHcy degradation in yeast allowed us to dissect the impact of AdoHcy accumulation on lipid metabolism from the impact of elevated Hcy. Expression of this pathway fully suppressed the growth deficit of sah1 mutants as well as the deregulation of lipid metabolism in both the sah1 mutant and Hcy-exposed wildtype, showing that AdoHcy accumulation mediates the deregulation of lipid metabolism in response to elevated Hcy in yeast. Furthermore, Hcy supplementation in yeast led to increased resistance to cerulenin, an inhibitor of fatty acid synthase, as well as to a concomitant decline of condensing enzymes involved in very long-chain fatty acid synthesis, in line with the observed shift in fatty acid content and composition. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Theoretical study for the reduction of N2O with CO Mediated by alkaline-earth metal oxide cations 2MO+(M=Ca, Sr, Ba)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianhui; Leng Yanli; Wang Yongcheng

    2013-01-01

    The reaction mechanism of the reaction N 2 O( 0 Σ + ) + CO ( 1 Σ + )→N 2 ( 1 Σ g + ) + CO 2 ( 1 Σ g + ) mediated by alkaline-earth metal oxide cations 2 MO + (m=Ca, Sr, Ba) have been investigated by using the UB3LYP and CCSD (T) levels of theory. The O-atom affinities (OA) testified that only the 2 CaO + can capture O from N 2 O and transfer O to CO is thermodynamically allowed in three ions. The processes can be expressed as channels l and 2 for the reaction of N 2 O and CO mediated by 2 MO + (M=Ca, Sr, Ba). For the former, the main reaction processes in a two-step manner to products, the 2 MO + , as a catalyzer, transports an oxygen atom from N 2 O to CO. For the latter, firstly, the N 2 O interact with the 2 MO + to form IM1, then IM1 interact with the CO to form IM2', along the reaction pathway the intermediate species convert into products 2 1MO + , N 2 and CO 2 . From above results, the following conclusion was drawn. The channel 2 is kinetically and thermodynamically feasible. Our calculated results show the title reactions are accord with the experiment. (authors)

  18. Surplus yeast tank failing catastrophically

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2016-01-01

    GOOD REASON FOR CAUTION I A large surplus yeast tank shot into the air leaving the floor plate and the contents behind. Although not designed for overpressure, the tank was kept at “very slight overpressure” to suppress nuisance foaming. The brewery was unaware of the hazards of compressed air...

  19. Nucleotide excision repair in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, Patrick van

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) is a conserved DNA repair pathway capable of removing a broad spectrum of DNA damage. In human cells a defect in NER leads to the disorder Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model organism to study the mechanism of NER. The

  20. Yeast genomics on food flavours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoondermark-Stolk, Sung Ah

    2005-01-01

    The appearance and concentration of the fusel alcohol 3-methyl-1-butanol is important for the flavour of fermented foods. 3-Methyl-1-butanol is formed by yeast during the conversion of L-leucine. Identification of the enzymes and genes involved in the formation of 3-methyl-1-butanol is a major

  1. Competitive, microbially-mediated reduction of nitrate with sulfide and aromatic oil components in a low-temperature, western Canadian oil reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambo, Adewale J; Noke, Kim; Larter, Steve R; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2008-12-01

    Fields from which oil is produced by injection of sulfate-bearing water often exhibit an increase in sulfide concentration with time (souring). Nitrate added to the injection water lowers the sulfide concentration by the action of sulfide-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing bacteria (SO-NRB). However, the injected nitrate can also be reduced with oil organics by heterotrophic NRB (hNRB). Aqueous volatile fatty acids (VFAs; a mixture of acetate, propionate, and butyrate) are considered important electron donors in this regard. Injection and produced waters from a western Canadian oil field with a low in situ reservoir temperature (30 degrees C) had only 0.1-0.2 mM VFAs. Amendment of these waters with nitrate gave therefore only partial reduction. More nitrate was reduced when 2% (v/v) oil was added, with light oil giving more reduction than heavy oil. GC-MS analysis of in vitro degraded oils and electron balance considerations indicated that toluene served as the primary electron donor for nitrate reduction. The differences in the extent of nitrate reduction were thus related to the toluene content of the light and heavy oil (30 and 5 mM, respectively). Reduction of nitrate with sulfide by SO-NRB always preceded that with oil organics by hNRB, even though microbially catalyzed kinetics with either electron donor were similar. Inhibition of hNRB by sulfide is responsible for this phenomenon. Injected nitrate will thus initially be reduced with sulfide through the action of SO-NRB. However, once sulfide has been eliminated from the near-injection wellbore region, oil organics will be targeted by the action of hNRB. Hence, despite the kinetic advantage of SO-NRB, the nitrate dose required to eliminate sulfide from a reservoir depends on the concentration of hNRB-degradable oil organics, with toluene being the most important in the field under study. Because the toluene concentration is lower in heavy oilthan in light oil, nitrate injection into a heavy-oil-producing field of

  2. Non-Saccharomyces yeasts protect against epithelial cell barrier disruption induced by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Ida Mosbech; Baker, A; Arneborg, Nils

    2015-01-01

    distinct patterns of non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of epithelial cell barrier function. While the established probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii increased TER across a Caco-2 monolayer by 30%, Kluyveromyces marxianus exhibited significantly stronger properties of TER enhancement (50% TER increase....... In addition, probiotic strains may be able to reduce epithelial barrier disruption caused by pathogenic species. The aim of this study was to explore non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of epithelial cell barrier function in vitro. Benchmarking against established probiotic strains, we evaluated the ability......). In addition, our data demonstrate significant yeast-mediated modulation of Salmonella-induced epithelial cell barrier disruption and identify K. marxianus and Metschnikowia gruessii as two non-Saccharomyces yeasts capable of protecting human epithelial cells from pathogen invasion. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT...

  3. Yeasts in nectar of an early-blooming herb: sought by bumble bees, detrimental to plant fecundity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Carlos M; Pozo, María I; Medrano, Mónica

    2013-02-01

    Through their effects on physicochemical features of floral nectar, nectar-dwelling yeasts can alter pollinator behavior, but the effect of such changes on pollination success and plant reproduction is unknown. We present results of experiments testing the effects of nectar yeasts on foraging patterns of captive and free-ranging bumble bees, and also on pollination success and fecundity of the early-blooming, bumble bee-pollinated Helleborus foetidus (Ranunculaceae). Under controlled experimental conditions, inexperienced Bombus terrestris workers responded positively to the presence of yeasts in artificial sugar solutions mimicking floral nectar by visiting proportionally more yeast-containing artificial flowers. Free-ranging bumble bees also preferred yeast-containing nectar in the field. Experiments conducted in two different years consistently showed that natural and artificial nectars containing yeasts were more thoroughly removed than nectars without yeasts. Experimental yeast inoculation of the nectar of H. foetidus flowers was significantly associated with reductions in number of pollen tubes in the style, fruit set, seed set, and mass of individual seeds produced. These results provide the first direct evidence to date that nectar yeasts can modify pollinator foraging patterns, pollination success, and the quantity and quality of seeds produced by insect-pollinated plants.

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum involvement in yeast cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicanor Austriaco, O.

    2012-01-01

    Yeast cells undergo programed cell death (PCD) with characteristic markers associated with apoptosis in mammalian cells including chromatin breakage, nuclear fragmentation, reactive oxygen species generation, and metacaspase activation. Though significant research has focused on mitochondrial involvement in this phenomenon, more recent work with both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe has also implicated the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in yeast PCD. This minireview provides an overview of ER stress-associated cell death (ER-SAD) in yeast. It begins with a description of ER structure and function in yeast before moving to a discussion of ER-SAD in both mammalian and yeast cells. Three examples of yeast cell death associated with the ER will be highlighted here including inositol starvation, lipid toxicity, and the inhibition of N-glycosylation. It closes by suggesting ways to further examine the involvement of the ER in yeast cell death.

  5. Brewing characteristics of piezosensitive sake yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kazuki; Hoshino, Hirofumi; Igoshi, Kazuaki; Onozuka, Haruka; Tanaka, Erika; Hayashi, Mayumi; Yamazaki, Harutake; Takaku, Hiroaki; Iguchi, Akinori; Shigematsu, Toru

    2018-04-01

    Application of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment to food processing is expected as a non-thermal fermentation regulation technology that supresses over fermentation. However, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae used for Japanese rice wine (sake) brewing shows high tolerance to HHP. Therefore, we aimed to generate pressure-sensitive (piezosensitive) sake yeast strains by mating sake with piezosensitive yeast strains to establish an HHP fermentation regulation technology and extend the shelf life of fermented foods. The results of phenotypic analyses showed that the generated yeast strains were piezosensitive and exhibited similar fermentation ability compared with the original sake yeast strain. In addition, primary properties of sake brewed using these strains, such as ethanol concentration, sake meter value and sake flavor compounds, were almost equivalent to those obtained using the sake yeast strain. These results suggest that the piezosensitive strains exhibit brewing characteristics essentially equivalent to those of the sake yeast strain.

  6. Effects of gamma radiation on Sporothrix schenckii yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Camila M. de Sousa; Martins, Estefania Mara Nascimento; Andrade, Antero S.R. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: cmsl@cdtn.br, e-mail: estefaniabio@yahoo.com.br, e-mail: antero@cdtn.br; Resende, Maria Aparecida de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Microbiologia], e-mail: maressend@mono.icb.ufmg.br

    2009-07-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic infection caused by the fungus Sporothrix schenckii. Zoonotic transmission can occur after scratches or bites of animals, mainly cats, rodents, and armadillos. Up to the moment, no approved vaccine was reported for S. schenckii or to any important pathogenic fungi infection in humans, indicating the need to expand the research in this field and to explore new alternatives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of gamma radiation in the viability, metabolic activity and reproductive ability of S. schenckii yeast cells for further studies on the development of a vaccine for immunization of cats and dogs. The culture of S. schenckii, in solid medium, was irradiated at doses ranging from 1.0 to 9.0 kGy. After each dose the reproductive capacity, viability and protein synthesis were estimated. The results showed that a reduction of 6 log{sub 10} cycles in the number of colonies was achieved at 6.0 kGy and after 8.0 kGy no colonies could be recovered. The viability analysis indicated that yeast cells remained viable up to 9.0 kGy. The results of protein synthesis analysis showed that the yeast cells, irradiated up to 9.0 kGy, were able to synthesize proteins. Our preliminary results indicated that for the yeast cells of S. schenckii, it is possible to find an absorbed dose in which the pathogen loses its reproductive ability, while retaining its viability, a necessary condition for the development of a radioattenuated yeast vaccine. (author)

  7. Effects of gamma radiation on Sporothrix schenckii yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacerda, Camila M. de Sousa; Martins, Estefania Mara Nascimento; Andrade, Antero S.R.; Resende, Maria Aparecida de

    2009-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic infection caused by the fungus Sporothrix schenckii. Zoonotic transmission can occur after scratches or bites of animals, mainly cats, rodents, and armadillos. Up to the moment, no approved vaccine was reported for S. schenckii or to any important pathogenic fungi infection in humans, indicating the need to expand the research in this field and to explore new alternatives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of gamma radiation in the viability, metabolic activity and reproductive ability of S. schenckii yeast cells for further studies on the development of a vaccine for immunization of cats and dogs. The culture of S. schenckii, in solid medium, was irradiated at doses ranging from 1.0 to 9.0 kGy. After each dose the reproductive capacity, viability and protein synthesis were estimated. The results showed that a reduction of 6 log 10 cycles in the number of colonies was achieved at 6.0 kGy and after 8.0 kGy no colonies could be recovered. The viability analysis indicated that yeast cells remained viable up to 9.0 kGy. The results of protein synthesis analysis showed that the yeast cells, irradiated up to 9.0 kGy, were able to synthesize proteins. Our preliminary results indicated that for the yeast cells of S. schenckii, it is possible to find an absorbed dose in which the pathogen loses its reproductive ability, while retaining its viability, a necessary condition for the development of a radioattenuated yeast vaccine. (author)

  8. Adsorption of Ag (I) from aqueous solution by waste yeast: kinetic, equilibrium and mechanism studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yufeng; Wang, Dongfang; Xie, Hezhen; Won, Sung Wook; Cui, Longzhe; Wu, Guiping

    2015-01-01

    One type of biosorbents, brewer fermentation industry waste yeast, was developed to adsorb the Ag (I) in aqueous solution. The result of FTIR analysis of waste yeast indicated that the ion exchange, chelating and reduction were the main binding mechanisms between the silver ions and the binding sites on the surface of the biomass. Furthermore, TEM, XRD and XPS results suggested that Ag(0) nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of yeast. The kinetic experiments revealed that sorption equilibrium could reach within 60 min, and the removal efficiency of Ag (I) could be still over 93 % when the initial concentration of Ag (I) was below 100 mg/L. Thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption process (ΔG, ΔH and ΔS) identified that the adsorption was a spontaneous and exothermic process. The waste yeast, playing a significant role in the adsorption of the silver ions, is useful to fast adsorb Ag (I) from low concentration.

  9. High power density yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, Rahul

    Microbial fuel cells leverage whole cell biocatalysis to convert the energy stored in energy-rich renewable biomolecules such as sugar, directly to electrical energy at high efficiencies. Advantages of the process include ambient temperature operation, operation in natural streams such as wastewater without the need to clean electrodes, minimal balance-of-plant requirements compared to conventional fuel cells, and environmentally friendly operation. These make the technology very attractive as portable power sources and waste-to-energy converters. The principal problem facing the technology is the low power densities compared to other conventional portable power sources such as batteries and traditional fuel cells. In this work we examined the yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cell and developed methods to increase the power density from such fuel cells. A combination of cyclic voltammetry and optical absorption measurements were used to establish significant adsorption of electron mediators by the microbes. Mediator adsorption was demonstrated to be an important limitation in achieving high power densities in yeast-catalyzed microbial fuel cells. Specifically, the power densities are low for the length of time mediator adsorption continues to occur. Once the mediator adsorption stops, the power densities increase. Rotating disk chronoamperometry was used to extract reaction rate information, and a simple kinetic expression was developed for the current observed in the anodic half-cell. Since the rate expression showed that the current was directly related to microbe concentration close to the electrode, methods to increase cell mass attached to the anode was investigated. Electrically biased electrodes were demonstrated to develop biofilm-like layers of the Baker's yeast with a high concentration of cells directly connected to the electrode. The increased cell mass did increase the power density 2 times compared to a non biofilm fuel cell, but the power density

  10. Dicationic ionic liquid mediated fabrication of Au@Pt nanoparticles supported on reduced graphene oxide with highly catalytic activity for oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ya-Cheng; Chen, Sai-Sai; Feng, Jiu-Ju; Lin, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Weiping; Wang, Ai-Jun

    2018-05-01

    Ionic liquids as templates or directing agents have attracted great attention for shaping-modulated synthesis of advanced nanomaterials. In this work, reduced graphene oxide supported uniform core-shell Au@Pt nanoparticles (Au@Pt NPs/rGO) were fabricated by a simple one-pot aqueous approach, using N-methylimidazolium-based dicationic ionic liquid (1,1-bis(3-methylimadazoilum-1-yl)butylene bromide, [C4(Mim)2]2Br) as the shape-directing agent. The morphology evolution, structural information and formation mechanism of Au@Pt NPs anchored on rGO were investigated by a series of characterization techniques. The obtained nanocomposites displayed superior electrocatalytic features toward hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst. This approach provides a novel route for facile synthesis of nanocatalysts in fuel cells.

  11. Yeast Isolation for Bioethanol Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EKA RURIANI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We have isolated 12 yeast isolates from five different rotten fruits by using a yeast glucose chloramphenicol agar (YGCA medium supplemented with tetracycline. From pre-screening assay, four isolates exhibited higher substrate (glucose-xylose consumption efficiency in the reaction tube fermentation compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae dan Saccharomyces ellipsoids as the reference strains. Based on the fermentation process in gooseneck flasks, we observed that two isolates (K and SB showed high fermentation efficiency both in sole glucose and mixed glucose-xylose substrate. Moreover, isolates K and SB produced relatively identical level of ethanol concentration compared to the reference strains. Isolates H and MP could only produce high levels of ethanol in glucose fermentation, while only half of that amount of ethanol was detected in glucose-xylose fermentation. Isolate K and SB were identified as Pichia kudriavzeevii (100% based on large sub unit (LSU ribosomal DNA D1/D2 region.

  12. Oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Rio, Rute; Sim?es-Silva, Liliana; Garro, Sofia; Silva, M?rio-Jorge; Azevedo, ?lvaro; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that placenta may harbour a unique microbiome that may have origin in maternal oral microbiome. Although the major physiological and hormonal adjustments observed in pregnant women lead to biochemical and microbiological modifications of the oral environment, very few studies evaluated the changes suffered by the oral microbiota throughout pregnancy. So, the aim of our study was to evaluate oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy and to compare it with n...

  13. On the Efficacy and Mediation of a One-on-One HIV Risk-Reduction Intervention for African American Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemmott, John B; Jemmott, Loretta Sweet; O'Leary, Ann; Icard, Larry D; Rutledge, Scott E; Stevens, Robin; Hsu, Janet; Stephens, Alisa J

    2015-07-01

    We examined the efficacy and mediation of Being Responsible for Ourselves (BRO), an HIV/STI risk-reduction intervention for African American men who have sex with men (MSM), the population with the highest HIV-diagnosis rate in the US. We randomized African American MSM to one of two interventions: BRO HIV/STI risk-reduction, targeting condom use; or attention-matched control, targeting physical activity and healthy diet. The interventions were based on social cognitive theory, the reasoned-action approach, and qualitative research. Men reporting anal intercourse with other men in the past 90 days were eligible and completed pre-intervention, immediately post-intervention, and 6 and 12 months post-intervention surveys. Of 595 participants, 503 (85 %) completed the 12-month follow-up. Generalized-estimating-equations analysis indicated that, compared with the attention-matched control intervention, the BRO intervention did not increase consistent condom use averaged over the 6- and 12-month follow-ups, which was the primary outcome. Although BRO did not affect the proportion of condom-protected intercourse acts, unprotected sexual intercourse, multiple partners, or insertive anal intercourse, it did reduce receptive anal intercourse compared with the control, a behavior linked to incident HIV infection. Mediation analysis using the product-of-coefficients approach revealed that although BRO increased seven of nine theoretical constructs it was designed to affect, it increased only one of three theoretical constructs that predicted consistent condom use: condom-use impulse-control self-efficacy. Thus, BRO indirectly increased consistent condom use through condom-use impulse-control self-efficacy. In conclusion, although BRO increased several theoretical constructs, most of those constructs did not predict consistent condom use; hence, the intervention did not increase it. Theoretical constructs that interventions should target to increase African American MSM

  14. Yeast: A new oil producer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beopoulos Athanasios

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand of plant oils or animal fat for biodiesel and specific lipid derivatives for the oleochemical field (such as lubricants, adhesives or plastics have created price imbalance in both the alimentary and energy field. Moreover, the lack of non-edible oil feedstock has given rise to concerns on land-use practices and on oil production strategies. Recently, much attention has been paid to the exploitation of microbial oils. Most of them present lipid profiles similar in type and composition to plants and could therefore have many advantages as are no competitive with food, have short process cycles and their cultivation is independent of climate factors. Among microorganisms, yeasts seem to be very promising as they can be easily genetically enhanced, are suitable for large-scale fermentation and are devoid of endotoxins. This review will focus on the recent understanding of yeasts lipid metabolism, the succeeding genetic engineering of the lipid pathways and the recent developments on fermentation techniques that pointed out yeasts as promising alternative producers for oil or plastic.

  15. Assessment of cellular estrogenic activity based on estrogen receptor-mediated reduction of soluble-form catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT expression in an ELISA-based system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Wing-Lok Ho

    Full Text Available Xenoestrogens are either natural or synthetic compounds that mimic the effects of endogenous estrogen. These compounds, such as bisphenol-A (BPA, and phthalates, are commonly found in plastic wares. Exposure to these compounds poses major risk to human health because of the potential to cause endocrine disruption. There is huge demand for a wide range of chemicals to be assessed for such potential for the sake of public health. Classical in vivo assays for endocrine disruption are comprehensive but time-consuming and require sacrifice of experimental animals. Simple preliminary in vitro screening assays can reduce the time and expense involved. We previously demonstrated that catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT is transcriptionally regulated by estrogen via estrogen receptor (ER. Therefore, detecting corresponding changes of COMT expression in estrogen-responsive cells may be a useful method to estimate estrogenic effects of various compounds. We developed a novel cell-based ELISA to evaluate cellular response to estrogenicity by reduction of soluble-COMT expression in ER-positive MCF-7 cells exposed to estrogenic compounds. In contrast to various existing methods that only detect bioactivity, this method elucidates direct physiological effect in a living cell in response to a compound. We validated our assay using three well-characterized estrogenic plasticizers - BPA, benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP, and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP. Cells were exposed to either these plasticizers or 17β-estradiol (E2 in estrogen-depleted medium with or without an ER-antagonist, ICI 182,780, and COMT expression assayed. Exposure to each of these plasticizers (10(-9-10(-7M dose-dependently reduced COMT expression (p<0.05, which was blocked by ICI 182,780. Reduction of COMT expression was readily detectable in cells exposed to picomolar level of E2, comparable to other in vitro assays of similar sensitivity. To satisfy the demand for in vitro assays targeting different

  16. Yeast flocculation: New story in fuel ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X Q; Bai, F W

    2009-01-01

    Yeast flocculation has been used in the brewing industry to facilitate biomass recovery for a long time, and thus its mechanism of yeast flocculation has been intensively studied. However, the application of flocculating yeast in ethanol production garnered attention mainly in the 1980s and 1990s. In this article, updated research progress in the molecular mechanism of yeast flocculation and the impact of environmental conditions on yeast flocculation are reviewed. Construction of flocculating yeast strains by genetic approach and utilization of yeast flocculation for ethanol production from various feedstocks were presented. The concept of self-immobilized yeast cells through their flocculation is revisited through a case study of continuous ethanol fermentation with the flocculating yeast SPSC01, and their technical and economic advantages are highlighted by comparing with yeast cells immobilized with supporting materials and regular free yeast cells as well. Taking the flocculating yeast SPSC01 as an example, the ethanol tolerance of the flocculating yeast was also discussed.

  17. A quantitative characterization of the yeast heterotrimeric G protein cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Tau-Mu; Kitano, Hiroaki; Simon, Melvin I.

    2003-01-01

    The yeast mating response is one of the best understood heterotrimeric G protein signaling pathways. Yet, most descriptions of this system have been qualitative. We have quantitatively characterized the heterotrimeric G protein cycle in yeast based on direct in vivo measurements. We used fluorescence resonance energy transfer to monitor the association state of cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-Gα and Gβγ-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), and we found that receptor-mediated G protein activation produced a loss of fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Quantitative time course and dose–response data were obtained for both wild-type and mutant cells possessing an altered pheromone response. These results paint a quantitative portrait of how regulators such as Sst2p and the C-terminal tail of α-factor receptor modulate the kinetics and sensitivity of G protein signaling. We have explored critical features of the dynamics including the rapid rise and subsequent decline of active G proteins during the early response, and the relationship between the G protein activation dose–response curve and the downstream dose–response curves for cell-cycle arrest and transcriptional induction. Fitting the data to a mathematical model produced estimates of the in vivo rates of heterotrimeric G protein activation and deactivation in yeast. PMID:12960402

  18. Aluminium-induced reduction of plant growth in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is mediated by interrupting auxin transport and accumulation in roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengyin; Ren, Xiaoyan; Huang, Bingru; Wang, Ge; Zhou, Peng; An, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate Al3+-induced IAA transport, distribution, and the relation of these two processes to Al3+-inhibition of root growth in alfalfa. Alfalfa seedlings with or without apical buds were exposed to 0 or 100 μM AlCl3 and were foliar sprayed with water or 6 mg L−1 IAA. Aluminium stress resulted in disordered arrangement of cells, deformed cell shapes, altered cell structure, and a shorter length of the meristematic zone in root tips. Aluminium stress significantly decreased the IAA concentration in apical buds and root tips. The distribution of IAA fluorescence signals in root tips was disturbed, and the IAA transportation from shoot base to root tip was inhibited. The highest intensity of fluorescence signals was detected in the apical meristematic zone. Exogenous application of IAA markedly alleviated the Al3+-induced inhibition of root growth by increasing IAA accumulation and recovering the damaged cell structure in root tips. In addition, Al3+ stress up-regulated expression of AUX1 and PIN2 genes. These results indicate that Al3+-induced reduction of root growth could be associated with the inhibitions of IAA synthesis in apical buds and IAA transportation in roots, as well as the imbalance of IAA distribution in root tips. PMID:27435109

  19. Yeasts Diversity in Fermented Foods and Beverages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamang, Jyoti Prakash; Fleet, Graham H.

    People across the world have learnt to culture and use the essential microorganisms for production of fermented foods and alcoholic beverages. A fermented food is produced either spontaneously or by adding mixed/pure starter culture(s). Yeasts are among the essential functional microorganisms encountered in many fermented foods, and are commercially used in production of baker's yeast, breads, wine, beer, cheese, etc. In Asia, moulds are predominant followed by amylolytic and alcohol-producing yeasts in the fermentation processes, whereas in Africa, Europe, Australia and America, fermented products are prepared exclusively using bacteria or bacteria-yeasts mixed cultures. This chapter would focus on the varieties of fermented foods and alcoholic beverages produced by yeasts, their microbiology and role in food fermentation, widely used commercial starters (pilot production, molecular aspects), production technology of some common commercial fermented foods and alcoholic beverages, toxicity and food safety using yeasts cultures and socio-economy

  20. A chemical genetic screen for modulators of asymmetrical 2,2'-dimeric naphthoquinones cytotoxicity in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan Emadi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dimeric naphthoquinones (BiQ were originally synthesized as a new class of HIV integrase inhibitors but have shown integrase-independent cytotoxicity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines suggesting their use as potential anti-neoplastic agents. The mechanism of this cytotoxicity is unknown. In order to gain insight into the mode of action of binaphthoquinones we performed a systematic high-throughput screen in a yeast isogenic deletion mutant array for enhanced or suppressed growth in the presence of binaphthoquinones. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Exposure of wild type yeast strains to various BiQs demonstrated inhibition of yeast growth with IC(50s in the microM range. Drug sensitivity and resistance screens were performed by exposing arrays of a haploid yeast deletion mutant library to BiQs at concentrations near their IC(50. Sensitivity screens identified yeast with deletions affecting mitochondrial function and cellular respiration as having increased sensitivity to BiQs. Corresponding to this, wild type yeast grown in the absence of a fermentable carbon source were particularly sensitive to BiQs, and treatment with BiQs was shown to disrupt the mitochondrial membrane potential and lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Furthermore, baseline ROS production in BiQ sensitive mutant strains was increased compared to wild type and could be further augmented by the presence of BiQ. Screens for resistance to BiQ action identified the mitochondrial external NAD(PH dehydrogenase, NDE1, as critical to BiQ toxicity and over-expression of this gene resulted in increased ROS production and increased sensitivity of wild type yeast to BiQ. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In yeast, binaphthoquinone cytotoxicity is likely mediated through NAD(PH:quonine oxidoreductases leading to ROS production and dysfunctional mitochondria. Further studies are required to validate this mechanism in mammalian cells.

  1. Drosophila Regulate Yeast Density and Increase Yeast Community Similarity in a Natural Substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Stamps, Judy A.; Yang, Louie H.; Morales, Vanessa M.; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L.

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster adults and larvae, but especially larvae, had profound effects on the densities and community structure of yeasts that developed in banana fruits. Pieces of fruit exposed to adult female flies previously fed fly-conditioned bananas developed higher yeast densities than pieces of the same fruits that were not exposed to flies, supporting previous suggestions that adult Drosophila vector yeasts to new substrates. However, larvae alone had dramatic effects on yeast densit...

  2. Fear of movement/(re)injury in chronic low back pain: education or exposure in vivo as mediator to fear reduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Jeroen R; Vlaeyen, Johan W S; Onghena, Patrick; Goossens, Mariëlle E J B; Geilen, Mario; Mulder, Herman

    2005-01-01

    Clinical research of graded exposure in vivo with behavioral experiments in patients with chronic low back pain who reported fear of movement/(re)injury shows abrupt changes in self-reported pain-related fears and cognitions. The abrupt changes are more characteristics of insight learning rather than the usual gradual progression of trial and error learning. The educational session at the start of the exposure might have contributed to this insight. The current study examines the contribution of education and graded exposure versus graded activity in the reduction of pain-related fear and associated disability and physical activity. Six consecutive patients with chronic low back pain who reported substantial fear of movement/(re)injury were included in the study. After a no-treatment baseline measurement period, all the patients received a single educational session, followed again by a no-treatment period. Patients were then randomly assigned to either a graded exposure with behavioral experiments or an operant graded activity program. A diary was used to assess daily changes in pain intensity, pain-related fear, pain catastrophizing, and activity goal achievement. Standardized questionnaires of pain-related fear, pain vigilance, pain intensity, and pain disability were administered before and after each intervention and at the 6-month follow-up. An activity monitor was carried at baseline, during the interventions, and 1 week at 6-month follow-up. Randomization tests of the daily measures showed that improvements in pain-related fear and catastrophizing occurred after the education was introduced. The results also showed a further improvement when exposure in vivo followed the no-treatment period after the education and not during the operant graded activity program. Performance of relevant daily activities, however, were not affected by the educational session and improved significantly only in the exposure in vivo condition. All improvements remained at half

  3. YMDB: the Yeast Metabolome Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewison, Timothy; Knox, Craig; Neveu, Vanessa; Djoumbou, Yannick; Guo, An Chi; Lee, Jacqueline; Liu, Philip; Mandal, Rupasri; Krishnamurthy, Ram; Sinelnikov, Igor; Wilson, Michael; Wishart, David S.

    2012-01-01

    The Yeast Metabolome Database (YMDB, http://www.ymdb.ca) is a richly annotated ‘metabolomic’ database containing detailed information about the metabolome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Modeled closely after the Human Metabolome Database, the YMDB contains >2000 metabolites with links to 995 different genes/proteins, including enzymes and transporters. The information in YMDB has been gathered from hundreds of books, journal articles and electronic databases. In addition to its comprehensive literature-derived data, the YMDB also contains an extensive collection of experimental intracellular and extracellular metabolite concentration data compiled from detailed Mass Spectrometry (MS) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) metabolomic analyses performed in our lab. This is further supplemented with thousands of NMR and MS spectra collected on pure, reference yeast metabolites. Each metabolite entry in the YMDB contains an average of 80 separate data fields including comprehensive compound description, names and synonyms, structural information, physico-chemical data, reference NMR and MS spectra, intracellular/extracellular concentrations, growth conditions and substrates, pathway information, enzyme data, gene/protein sequence data, as well as numerous hyperlinks to images, references and other public databases. Extensive searching, relational querying and data browsing tools are also provided that support text, chemical structure, spectral, molecular weight and gene/protein sequence queries. Because of S. cervesiae's importance as a model organism for biologists and as a biofactory for industry, we believe this kind of database could have considerable appeal not only to metabolomics researchers, but also to yeast biologists, systems biologists, the industrial fermentation industry, as well as the beer, wine and spirit industry. PMID:22064855

  4. Experimental evolution in budding yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    I will discuss our progress in analyzing evolution in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We take two basic approaches. The first is to try and examine quantitative aspects of evolution, for example by determining how the rate of evolution depends on the mutation rate and the population size or asking whether the rate of mutation is uniform throughout the genome. The second is to try to evolve qualitatively novel, cell biologically interesting phenotypes and track the mutations that are responsible for the phenotype. Our efforts include trying to alter cell morphology, evolve multicellularity, and produce a biological oscillator.

  5. Chemostat Culture for Yeast Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Emily O; Dunham, Maitreya J

    2017-07-05

    The use of chemostat culture facilitates the careful comparison of different yeast strains growing in well-defined conditions. Variations in physiology can be measured by examining gene expression, metabolite levels, protein content, and cell morphology. In this protocol, we show how a combination of sample types can be collected during harvest from a single 20-mL chemostat in a ministat array, with special attention to coordinating the handling of the most time-sensitive sample types. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  6. Polyglutamine toxicity in yeast induces metabolic alterations and mitochondrial defects

    KAUST Repository

    Papsdorf, Katharina

    2015-09-03

    Background Protein aggregation and its pathological effects are the major cause of several neurodegenerative diseases. In Huntington’s disease an elongated stretch of polyglutamines within the protein Huntingtin leads to increased aggregation propensity. This induces cellular defects, culminating in neuronal loss, but the connection between aggregation and toxicity remains to be established. Results To uncover cellular pathways relevant for intoxication we used genome-wide analyses in a yeast model system and identify fourteen genes that, if deleted, result in higher polyglutamine toxicity. Several of these genes, like UGO1, ATP15 and NFU1 encode mitochondrial proteins, implying that a challenged mitochondrial system may become dysfunctional during polyglutamine intoxication. We further employed microarrays to decipher the transcriptional response upon polyglutamine intoxication, which exposes an upregulation of genes involved in sulfur and iron metabolism and mitochondrial Fe-S cluster formation. Indeed, we find that in vivo iron concentrations are misbalanced and observe a reduction in the activity of the prominent Fe-S cluster containing protein aconitase. Like in other yeast strains with impaired mitochondria, non-fermentative growth is impossible after intoxication with the polyglutamine protein. NMR-based metabolic analyses reveal that mitochondrial metabolism is reduced, leading to accumulation of metabolic intermediates in polyglutamine-intoxicated cells. Conclusion These data show that damages to the mitochondrial system occur in polyglutamine intoxicated yeast cells and suggest an intricate connection between polyglutamine-induced toxicity, mitochondrial functionality and iron homeostasis in this model system.

  7. Characterization of an AtCCX5 gene from Arabidopsis thaliana that involves in high-affinity K+ uptake and Na+ transport in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xinxin; Zhang, Min; Takano, Tetsuo; Liu, Shenkui

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The AtCCX5 protein coding a putative cation calcium exchanger was characterized. → AtCCX5 expressed in yeast was localized in the plasma membrane and nuclear periphery. → AtCCX5 protein did not show the same transport properties as the CAXs. → AtCCX5 protein involves in mediating high-affinity K + uptake in yeast. → AtCCX5 protein also involves in Na + transport in yeast. -- Abstract: The gene for a putative cation calcium exchanger (CCX) from Arabidopsis thaliana, AtCCX5, was cloned and its function was analyzed in yeast. Green fluorescent protein-tagged AtCCX5 expressed in yeast was localized in the plasma membrane and nuclear periphery. The yeast transformants expressing AtCCX5 were created and their growth in the presence of various cations (K + , Na + , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , Fe 2+ , Cu 2+ , Co 2+ , Cd 2+ , Mn 2+ , Ba 2+ , Ni 2+ , Zn 2+ , and Li + ) were analyzed. AtCCX5 expression was found to affect the response to K + and Na + in yeast. The AtCCX5 transformant also showed a little better growth to Zn 2+ . The yeast mutant 9.3 expressing AtCCX5 restored growth of the mutant on medium with low K + (0.5 mM), and also suppressed its Na + sensitivity. Ion uptake experiments showed that AtCCX5 mediated relatively high-affinity K + uptake and was also involved in Na + transport in yeast. Taken together, these findings suggest that the AtCCX5 is a novel transport protein involves in mediating high-affinity K + uptake and Na + transport in yeast.

  8. Development of industrial yeast for second generation bioethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, X

    2012-01-15

    in furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) reductions by this yeast have both cofactor preferences for NADH. Due to the low inhibitor tolerance, the growth of S. passalidarum was completely inhibited in the liquid fraction of pretreated corn stover and wheat straw. The inhibitor tolerance of S. passalidarum was improved by the method of genome shuffling including UV mutagenesis and protoplast fusion. The protoplast of a UV-induced furfural-resistant mutant of S. passalidarum (S. passalidarum M7) was fused with the protoplast of a robust yeast S. cerevisiae ATCC 96581. The finally selected hybrid strain (FS22) has desired phenotypes derived from both parents, namely the ability to ferment xylose from S. passalidarum and an increased tolerance to inhibitors from S. cerevisiae ATCC 96581. Phenotypic and molecular analysis indicated that S. passalidarum M7 was the dominant parental contributor to the hybrid. Rearrangement of DNA segments from the other parental strain S. cerevisiae ATCC 96581 possibly occurred in FS22. The inhibitor tolerance of the robust yeast S. cerevisiae ATCC 96581 was further improved by sequentially adapting this strain into media with increasing amounts of the liquid fraction of pretreated corn stover (CSLQ). The adapted strain completely fermented glucose in 100% CSLQ and the ethanol yield was 0.48 g/g glucose, while the parental strain was unable to ferment under this condition. Co-fermentation of this adapted strain with the selected protoplast fused hybrids (FS2 or FS22) in the pretreated wheat straw hydrolysate improved the final ethanol yield by 11% and 26%, respectively, due to partial conversion of xylose in the hydrolysate by the xylose-fermenting hybrids. Co-fermentation with one robust C6 fermenting yeast for detoxification and one C5 fermenting yeast for converting xylose into ethanol could be a viable strategy for lignocellulosic bioethanol production. (Author)

  9. Development of industrial yeast for second generation bioethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, X.

    2012-01-15

    involved in furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) reductions by this yeast have both cofactor preferences for NADH. Due to the low inhibitor tolerance, the growth of S. passalidarum was completely inhibited in the liquid fraction of pretreated corn stover and wheat straw. The inhibitor tolerance of S. passalidarum was improved by the method of genome shuffling including UV mutagenesis and protoplast fusion. The protoplast of a UV-induced furfural-resistant mutant of S. passalidarum (S. passalidarum M7) was fused with the protoplast of a robust yeast S. cerevisiae ATCC 96581. The finally selected hybrid strain (FS22) has desired phenotypes derived from both parents, namely the ability to ferment xylose from S. passalidarum and an increased tolerance to inhibitors from S. cerevisiae ATCC 96581. Phenotypic and molecular analysis indicated that S. passalidarum M7 was the dominant parental contributor to the hybrid. Rearrangement of DNA segments from the other parental strain S. cerevisiae ATCC 96581 possibly occurred in FS22. The inhibitor tolerance of the robust yeast S. cerevisiae ATCC 96581 was further improved by sequentially adapting this strain into media with increasing amounts of the liquid fraction of pretreated corn stover (CSLQ). The adapted strain completely fermented glucose in 100% CSLQ and the ethanol yield was 0.48 g/g glucose, while the parental strain was unable to ferment under this condition. Co-fermentation of this adapted strain with the selected protoplast fused hybrids (FS2 or FS22) in the pretreated wheat straw hydrolysate improved the final ethanol yield by 11% and 26%, respectively, due to partial conversion of xylose in the hydrolysate by the xylose-fermenting hybrids. Co-fermentation with one robust C6 fermenting yeast for detoxification and one C5 fermenting yeast for converting xylose into ethanol could be a viable strategy for lignocellulosic bioethanol production. (Author)

  10. Supplementary Material for: Polyglutamine toxicity in yeast induces metabolic alterations and mitochondrial defects

    KAUST Repository

    Papsdorf, Katharina; Kaiser, Christoph; Drazic, Adrian; Grö tzinger, Stefan W.; Haeß ner, Carmen; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Richter, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    -S cluster formation. Indeed, we find that in vivo iron concentrations are misbalanced and observe a reduction in the activity of the prominent Fe-S cluster containing protein aconitase. Like in other yeast strains with impaired mitochondria, non-fermentative

  11. Yeast Cells-Derived Hollow Core/Shell Heteroatom-Doped Carbon Microparticles for Sustainable Electrocatalysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Huang, X.; Zou, X.; Meng, Y.; Mikmeková, Eliška; Chen, H.; Voiry, D.; Goswami, A.; Chhowalla, M.; Asefa, T.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2015), s. 1978-1986 ISSN 1944-8244 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : yeast * heteroatom-doped carbon * oxygen reduction * ORR * hydrazine electrooxidation Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 7.145, year: 2015

  12. Unscheduled DNA synthesis in xeroderma pigmentosum cells after microinjection of yeast photoreactivating enzyme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.M. Zwetsloot; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); W. Vermeulen (Wim); A.P.M. Eker (André); D. Bootsma (Dirk)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractPhotoreactivating enzyme (PRE) from yeast causes a light-dependent reduction of UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) when injected into the cytoplasm of repair-proficieint human fibroblasts (Zwetsloot et al., 1985). This result indicates that the exogenous PRE monomerizers

  13. Hsp90 governs echinocandin resistance in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans via calcineurin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheena D Singh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is the leading fungal pathogen of humans, causing life-threatening disease in immunocompromised individuals. Treatment of candidiasis is hampered by the limited number of antifungal drugs whose efficacy is compromised by host toxicity, fungistatic activity, and the emergence of drug resistance. We previously established that the molecular chaperone Hsp90, which regulates the form and function of diverse client proteins, potentiates resistance to the azoles in C. albicans and in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic studies in S. cerevisiae revealed that Hsp90's role in azole resistance is to enable crucial cellular responses to the membrane stress exerted by azoles via the client protein calcineurin. Here, we demonstrate that Hsp90 governs cellular circuitry required for resistance to the only new class of antifungals to reach the clinic in decades, the echinocandins, which inhibit biosynthesis of a critical component of the fungal cell wall. Pharmacological or genetic impairment of Hsp90 function reduced tolerance of C. albicans laboratory strains and resistance of clinical isolates to the echinocandins and created a fungicidal combination. Compromising calcineurin function phenocopied compromising Hsp90 function. We established that calcineurin is an Hsp90 client protein in C. albicans: reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation validated physical interaction; Hsp90 inhibition blocked calcineurin activation; and calcineurin levels were depleted upon genetic reduction of Hsp90. The downstream effector of calcineurin, Crz1, played a partial role in mediating calcineurin-dependent stress responses activated by echinocandins. Hsp90's role in echinocandin resistance has therapeutic potential given that genetic compromise of C. albicans HSP90 expression enhanced the efficacy of an echinocandin in a murine model of disseminated candidiasis. Our results identify the first Hsp90 client protein in C. albicans, establish an entirely

  14. An improved, bias-reduced probabilistic functional gene network of baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insuk Lee

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic functional gene networks are powerful theoretical frameworks for integrating heterogeneous functional genomics and proteomics data into objective models of cellular systems. Such networks provide syntheses of millions of discrete experimental observations, spanning DNA microarray experiments, physical protein interactions, genetic interactions, and comparative genomics; the resulting networks can then be easily applied to generate testable hypotheses regarding specific gene functions and associations.We report a significantly improved version (v. 2 of a probabilistic functional gene network of the baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We describe our optimization methods and illustrate their effects in three major areas: the reduction of functional bias in network training reference sets, the application of a probabilistic model for calculating confidences in pair-wise protein physical or genetic interactions, and the introduction of simple thresholds that eliminate many false positive mRNA co-expression relationships. Using the network, we predict and experimentally verify the function of the yeast RNA binding protein Puf6 in 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis.YeastNet v. 2, constructed using these optimizations together with additional data, shows significant reduction in bias and improvements in precision and recall, in total covering 102,803 linkages among 5,483 yeast proteins (95% of the validated proteome. YeastNet is available from http://www.yeastnet.org.

  15. X-ray irradiation of yeast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, Alessandra; Batani, Dimitri; Previdi, Fabio; Conti, Aldo; Pisani, Francesca; Botto, Cesare; Bortolotto, Fulvia; Torsiello, Flavia; Turcu, I. C. Edmond; Allott, Ric M.; Lisi, Nicola; Milani, Marziale; Costato, Michele; Pozzi, Achille; Koenig, Michel

    1997-10-01

    Saccharomyces Cerevisiae yeast cells were irradiated using the soft X-ray laser-plasma source at Rutherford Laboratory. The aim was to produce a selective damage of enzyme metabolic activity at the wall and membrane level (responsible for fermentation) without interfering with respiration (taking place in mitochondria) and with nuclear and DNA activity. The source was calibrated by PIN diodes and X-ray spectrometers. Teflon stripes were chosen as targets for the UV laser, emitting X-rays at about 0.9 keV, characterized by a very large decay exponent in biological matter. X-ray doses to the different cell compartments were calculated following a Lambert-Bouguet-Beer law. After irradiation, the selective damage to metabolic activity at the membrane level was measured by monitoring CO2 production with pressure silicon detectors. Preliminary results gave evidence of pressure reduction for irradiated samples and non-linear response to doses. Also metabolic oscillations were evidenced in cell suspensions and it was shown that X-ray irradiation changed the oscillation frequency.

  16. Biodiesel generation from oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biodiesel generation from oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis with xylose assimilating capacity. ... Biodiesel generation from oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis with xylose assimilating capacity. C Dai, J Tao, F Xie, Y Dai, M Zhao. Abstract. This study explored a strategy to convert agricultural and forestry residues into ...

  17. The wine and beer yeast Dekkera bruxellensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifferdecker, Anna Judith; Dashko, Sofia; Ishchuk, Olena P; Piškur, Jure

    2014-09-01

    Recently, the non-conventional yeast Dekkera bruxellensis has been gaining more and more attention in the food industry and academic research. This yeast species is a distant relative of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is especially known for two important characteristics: on the one hand, it is considered to be one of the main spoilage organisms in the wine and bioethanol industry; on the other hand, it is 'indispensable' as a contributor to the flavour profile of Belgium lambic and gueuze beers. Additionally, it adds to the characteristic aromatic properties of some red wines. Recently this yeast has also become a model for the study of yeast evolution. In this review we focus on the recently developed molecular and genetic tools, such as complete genome sequencing and transformation, to study and manipulate this yeast. We also focus on the areas that are particularly well explored in this yeast, such as the synthesis of off-flavours, yeast detection methods, carbon metabolism and evolutionary history. © 2014 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Biodiesel generation from oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-09-19

    Sep 19, 2007 ... This study explored a strategy to convert agricultural and forestry residues into microbial lipid, which could be further transformed into biodiesel. Among the 250 yeast strains screened for xylose assimilating capacity, eight oleaginous yeasts were selected by Sudan Black B test. The lipid content of these 8 ...

  19. 21 CFR 73.355 - Phaffia yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... stabilized color additive mixture. Color additive mixtures for fish feed use made with phaffia yeast may... additive mixtures for coloring foods. (b) Specifications. Phaffia yeast shall conform to the following... § 501.4 of this chapter. (3) The presence of the color additive in salmonid fish that have been fed...

  20. Biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanotes in wildtype yeasts | Desuoky ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biosynthesis of the biodegradable polymers polyhydroxyalkanotes (PHAs) are studied extensively in wild type and genetically modified prokaryotic cells, however the content and structure of PHA in wild type yeasts are not well documented. The purpose of this study was to screen forty yeast isolates collected from different ...

  1. Virgin olive oil yeasts: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciafardini, Gino; Zullo, Biagi Angelo

    2018-04-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge on virgin olive oil yeasts. Newly produced olive oil contains solid particles and micro drops of vegetation water in which yeasts reproduce to become the typical microbiota of olive oil. To date, about seventeen yeast species have been isolated from different types of olive oils and their by-products, of which six species have been identified as new species. Certain yeast species contribute greatly to improving the sensorial characteristics of the newly produced olive oil, whereas other species are considered harmful as they can damage the oil quality through the production of unpleasant flavors and triacylglycerol hydrolysis. Studies carried out in certain yeast strains have demonstrated the presence of defects in olive oil treated with Candida adriatica, Nakazawaea wickerhamii and Candida diddensiae specific strains, while other olive oil samples treated with other Candida diddensiae strains were defect-free after four months of storage and categorized as extra virgin. A new acetic acid producing yeast species, namely, Brettanomyces acidodurans sp. nov., which was recently isolated from olive oil, could be implicated in the wine-vinegary defect of the product. Other aspects related to the activity of the lipase-producing yeasts and the survival of the yeast species in the flavored olive oils are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The essence of yeast quiescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Virgilio, Claudio

    2012-03-01

    Like all microorganisms, yeast cells spend most of their natural lifetime in a reversible, quiescent state that is primarily induced by limitation for essential nutrients. Substantial progress has been made in defining the features of quiescent cells and the nutrient-signaling pathways that shape these features. A view that emerges from the wealth of new data is that yeast cells dynamically configure the quiescent state in response to nutritional challenges by using a set of key nutrient-signaling pathways, which (1) regulate pathway-specific effectors, (2) converge on a few regulatory nodes that bundle multiple inputs to communicate unified, graded responses, and (3) mutually modulate their competences to transmit signals. Here, I present an overview of our current understanding of the architecture of these pathways, focusing on how the corresponding core signaling protein kinases (i.e. PKA, TORC1, Snf1, and Pho85) are wired to ensure an adequate response to nutrient starvation, which enables cells to tide over decades, if not centuries, of famine. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of a salt-induced DhAHP, a gene coding for alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, from the extremely halophilic yeast Debaryomyces hansenii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ku Maurice SB

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Debaryomyces hansenii is one of the most salt tolerant species of yeast and has become a model organism for the study of tolerance mechanisms against salinity. The goal of this study was to identify key upregulated genes that are involved in its adaptation to high salinity. Results By using forward subtractive hybridization we have cloned and sequenced DhAHP from D. hansenii that is significantly upregulated during salinity stress. DhAHP is orthologous to the alkly hydroperoxide reductase of the peroxiredoxin gene family, which catalyzes the reduction of peroxides at the expense of thiol compounds. The full-lengthed cDNA of DhAHP has 674 bp of nucleotide and contains a 516 bp open reading frame (ORF encoding a deduced protein of 172 amino acid residues (18.3 kDa. D. hansenii Ahp is a cytosolic protein that belongs to the Ahp of the 1-Cys type peroxiredoxins. Phylogentically, the DhAhp and Candida albicans Ahp11 (Swiss-Prot: Q5AF44 share a common ancestry but show divergent evolution. Silence of its expression in D. hansenii by RNAi resulted in decreased tolerance to salt whereas overexpression of DhAHP in D. hansenii and the salt-sensitive yeasts Saccharomyces cereviasiae and Pichia methanolica conferred a higher tolerance with a reduced level of reactive oxygen species. Conclusion In conclusion, for the first time our study has identified alkly hydroperoxide reductase as a key protein involved in the salt tolerance of the extremely halophilic D. hansenii. Apparently, this enzyme plays a multi-functional role in the yeast's adaptation to salinity; it serves as a peroxidase in scavenging reactive oxygen species, as a molecular chaperone in protecting essential proteins from denaturation, and as a redox sensor in regulating H2O2-mediated cell defense signaling.

  4. Comet assay on tetraploid yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rank, Jette; Syberg, Kristian; Jensen, Klara

    2009-01-01

    Tetraploid yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were used in the comet assay with the intention of developing a new, fast and easy assay for detecting environmental genotoxic agents without using higher organisms. Two DNA-damaging chemicals, H2O2 and acrylamide, together with wastewater from...... three municipal treatment plants were tested for their effect on the yeast-cell DNA. The main problem with using yeast in the comet assay is the necessity to degrade the cell wall. This was achieved by using Zymolase 100 T twice during the procedure, since Zymolase 20 T did not open the cell wall....... Analytical problems that arose due to the small amount of DNA in the yeast nuclei in haploid and diploid cells, which contain 13 Mbp and 26 Mbp DNA per cell, respectively, were solved by using tetraploid yeast cells (52 Mbp) instead. DNA damage was shown after exposure to H2O2 and acrylamide. The lowest dose...

  5. Electron transport chain in a thermotolerant yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Barajas, Jorge A; Martínez-Mora, José A; Salgado-Garciglia, Rafael; Noriega-Cisneros, Ruth; Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Cortés-Rojo, Christian; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo

    2017-04-01

    Yeasts capable of growing and surviving at high temperatures are regarded as thermotolerant. For appropriate functioning of cellular processes and cell survival, the maintenance of an optimal redox state is critical of reducing and oxidizing species. We studied mitochondrial functions of the thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus SLP1 and the mesophilic OFF1 yeasts, through the evaluation of its mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m ), ATPase activity, electron transport chain (ETC) activities, alternative oxidase activity, lipid peroxidation. Mitochondrial membrane potential and the cytoplasmic free Ca 2+ ions (Ca 2+ cyt) increased in the SLP1 yeast when exposed to high temperature, compared with the mesophilic yeast OFF1. ATPase activity in the mesophilic yeast diminished 80% when exposed to 40° while the thermotolerant SLP1 showed no change, despite an increase in the mitochondrial lipid peroxidation. The SLP1 thermotolerant yeast exposed to high temperature showed a diminution of 33% of the oxygen consumption in state 4. The uncoupled state 3 of oxygen consumption did not change in the mesophilic yeast when it had an increase of temperature, whereas in the thermotolerant SLP1 yeast resulted in an increase of 2.5 times when yeast were grown at 30 o , while a decrease of 51% was observed when it was exposed to high temperature. The activities of the ETC complexes were diminished in the SLP1 when exposed to high temperature, but also it was distinguished an alternative oxidase activity. Our results suggest that the mitochondria state, particularly ETC state, is an important characteristic of the thermotolerance of the SLP1 yeast strain.

  6. Learning and memory deficits consequent to reduction of the fragile X mental retardation protein result from metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated inhibition of cAMP signaling in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanellopoulos, Alexandros K; Semelidou, Ourania; Kotini, Andriana G; Anezaki, Maria; Skoulakis, Efthimios M C

    2012-09-19

    Loss of the RNA-binding fragile X protein [fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP)] results in a spectrum of cognitive deficits, the fragile X syndrome (FXS), while aging individuals with decreased protein levels present with a subset of these symptoms and tremor. The broad range of behavioral deficits likely reflects the ubiquitous distribution and multiple functions of the protein. FMRP loss is expected to affect multiple neuronal proteins and intracellular signaling pathways, whose identity and interactions are essential in understanding and ameliorating FXS symptoms. We used heterozygous mutants and targeted RNA interference-mediated abrogation in Drosophila to uncover molecular pathways affected by FMRP reduction. We present evidence that FMRP loss results in excess metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) activity, attributable at least in part to elevation of the protein in affected neurons. Using high-resolution behavioral, genetic, and biochemical analyses, we present evidence that excess mGluR upon FMRP attenuation is linked to the cAMP decrement reported in patients and models, and underlies olfactory associative learning and memory deficits. Furthermore, our data indicate positive transcriptional regulation of the fly fmr1 gene by cAMP, via protein kinase A, likely through the transcription factor CREB. Because the human Fmr1 gene also contains CREB binding sites, the interaction of mGluR excess and cAMP signaling defects we present suggests novel combinatorial pharmaceutical approaches to symptom amelioration upon FMRP attenuation.

  7. Bacterial vaginosis and vaginal yeast, but not vaginal cleansing, increase HIV-1 acquisition in African women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Wijgert, Janneke H H M; Morrison, Charles S; Cornelisse, Peter G A; Munjoma, Marshall; Moncada, Jeanne; Awio, Peter; Wang, Jing; Van der Pol, Barbara; Chipato, Tsungai; Salata, Robert A; Padian, Nancy S

    2008-06-01

    To evaluate interrelationships between bacterial vaginosis (BV), vaginal yeast, vaginal practices (cleansing and drying/tightening), mucosal inflammation, and HIV acquisition. A multicenter, prospective, observational cohort study was conducted, enrolling 4531 HIV-negative women aged 18 to 35 years attending family planning clinics in Zimbabwe and Uganda. Participants were tested for HIV and reproductive tract infections and were interviewed about vaginal practices every 3 months for 15 to 24 months. BV was measured by Gram stain Nugent scoring, vaginal yeast by wet mount, and mucosal inflammation by white blood cells on Gram stain. HIV incidence was 4.12 and 1.53 per 100 woman-years of follow-up in Zimbabwe and Uganda, respectively (a total of 213 incident infections). Women with BV or vaginal yeast were more likely to acquire HIV, especially if the condition was present at the same visit as the new HIV infection and the visit preceding it (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.50, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.68 to 3.72 and HR = 2.97, 95% CI: 1.67 to 5.28 for BV and yeast, respectively). These relationships did not seem to be mediated by mucosal inflammation. Vaginal drying/tightening was associated with HIV acquisition in univariate (HR = 1.49, 95% CI: 1.03 to 2.15) but not multivariate models. Vaginal cleansing was not associated with HIV acquisition. BV and yeast may contribute more to the HIV epidemic than previously thought.

  8. Physical Interactions between Yeast Pichia guilliermondii and Post-Harvest Fruit Pathogen Penicillium expansum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SRI WIDYASTUTI

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Attachment of yeast cells or bacteria on fungal hyphae have been observed in various antagonisms between microorganisms. Physical interactions between yeast Pichia guilliermondii and postharvest fruit pathogen Penicillium expansum in culture were studied in detail using light and transmission electron microscope to give better understanding on their mode of antagonism. Both organisms were co-cultured for 24-hr on potato dextrose agar. Light microscopy observations on the co-culture showed that the yeast cells attached firmly on the fungal hyphae. This attachment was inhibited by several substances such as enzymes degrading protein (protease or trypsin, a respiration inhibitor (sodium azide, an acid (hydrochloric acid or an alkali (sodium hydroxide. Although autoclaved hyphae did not affect the attachment, but boiled enzymes and autoclaved yeast cells totally abolished the attachment. These evidences suggested that the attachment might be an active process mediated by certain protein from live yeast cells. Transmission electron micrographs on the ultrastructure of the co-culture revealed that the hyphae showed abnormalities in their structure and organelles, and a degree of obvious damage. Physical interactions observed in this study could be contributed to the mechanism of antagonism between P. guilliermondii and P. expansum.

  9. Intercultural Mediation

    OpenAIRE

    Dragos Marian Radulescu; Denisa Mitrut

    2012-01-01

    The Intercultural Mediator facilitates exchanges between people of different socio-cultural backgrounds and acts as a bridge between immigrants and national and local associations, health organizations, services and offices in order to foster integration of every single individual. As the use mediation increases, mediators are more likely to be involved in cross-cultural mediation, but only the best mediators have the opportunity to mediate cross border business disputes or international poli...

  10. Microorganisms' mediated reduction of β-ketoesters

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    Oct 20, 2008 ... Whole cells usually express a multitude of enzymatic activities; therefore an ... Each microorganism was cultivated for the biomass development on specific medium ..... Ketoester reductase for conversion of keto acid esters to ...

  11. Distinct Domestication Trajectories in Top-Fermenting Beer Yeasts and Wine Yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Margarida; Pontes, Ana; Almeida, Pedro; Barbosa, Raquel; Serra, Marta; Libkind, Diego; Hutzler, Mathias; Gonçalves, Paula; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2016-10-24

    Beer is one of the oldest alcoholic beverages and is produced by the fermentation of sugars derived from starches present in cereal grains. Contrary to lager beers, made by bottom-fermenting strains of Saccharomyces pastorianus, a hybrid yeast, ale beers are closer to the ancient beer type and are fermented by S. cerevisiae, a top-fermenting yeast. Here, we use population genomics to investigate (1) the closest relatives of top-fermenting beer yeasts; (2) whether top-fermenting yeasts represent an independent domestication event separate from those already described; (3) whether single or multiple beer yeast domestication events can be inferred; and (4) whether top-fermenting yeasts represent non-recombinant or recombinant lineages. Our results revealed that top-fermenting beer yeasts are polyphyletic, with a main clade composed of at least three subgroups, dominantly represented by the German, British, and wheat beer strains. Other beer strains were phylogenetically close to sake, wine, or bread yeasts. We detected genetic signatures of beer yeast domestication by investigating genes previously linked to brewing and using genome-wide scans. We propose that the emergence of the main clade of beer yeasts is related with a domestication event distinct from the previously known cases of wine and sake yeast domestication. The nucleotide diversity of the main beer clade more than doubled that of wine yeasts, which might be a consequence of fundamental differences in the modes of beer and wine yeast domestication. The higher diversity of beer strains could be due to the more intense and different selection regimes associated to brewing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ethanol production using nuclear petite yeast mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutter, A.; Oliver, S.G. [Department of Biomolecular Sciences, UMIST, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    Two respiratory-deficient nuclear petites, FY23{Delta}pet191 and FY23{Delta}cox5a, of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were generated using polymerase-chain-reaction-mediated gene disruption, and their respective ethanol tolerance and productivity assessed and compared to those of the parental grande, FY23WT, and a mitochondrial petite, FY23{rho}{sup 0}. Batch culture studies demonstrated that the parental strain was the most tolerant to exogenously added ethanol with an inhibition constant. K{sub i}, of 2.3% (w/v) and a specific rate of ethanol production, q{sub p}, of 0.90 g ethanol g dry cells{sup -1} h{sup -1}. FY23{rho}{sup 0} was the most sensitive to ethanol, exhibiting a K{sub i} of 1.71% (w/v) and q{sub p} of 0.87 g ethanol g dry cells{sup -1} h{sup -1}. Analyses of the ethanol tolerance of the nuclear petites demonstrate that functional mitochondria are essential for maintaining tolerance to the toxin with the 100% respiratory-deficient nuclear petite, FY23{Delta}pet191, having a K{sub i} of 2.14% (w/v) and the 85% respiratory-deficient FY23{Delta}cox5a, having a K{sub i} of 1.94% (w/v). The retention of ethanol tolerance in the nuclear petites as compared to that of FY23{rho}{sup 0} is mirrored by the ethanol productivities of these nuclear mutants, being respectively 43% and 30% higher than that of the respiratory-sufficient parent strain. This demonstrates that, because of their respiratory deficiency, the nuclear petites are not subject of the Pasteur effect and so exhibit higher rates of fermentation. (orig.)

  13. Reduction redux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Lawrence

    2018-04-01

    Putnam's criticisms of the identity theory attack a straw man. Fodor's criticisms of reduction attack a straw man. Properly interpreted, Nagel offered a conception of reduction that captures everything a physicalist could want. I update Nagel, introducing the idea of overlap, and show why multiple realization poses no challenge to reduction so construed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Genomics and the making of yeast biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hittinger, Chris Todd; Rokas, Antonis; Bai, Feng-Yan; Boekhout, Teun; Gonçalves, Paula; Jeffries, Thomas W; Kominek, Jacek; Lachance, Marc-André; Libkind, Diego; Rosa, Carlos A; Sampaio, José Paulo; Kurtzman, Cletus P

    2015-12-01

    Yeasts are unicellular fungi that do not form fruiting bodies. Although the yeast lifestyle has evolved multiple times, most known species belong to the subphylum Saccharomycotina (syn. Hemiascomycota, hereafter yeasts). This diverse group includes the premier eukaryotic model system, Saccharomyces cerevisiae; the common human commensal and opportunistic pathogen, Candida albicans; and over 1000 other known species (with more continuing to be discovered). Yeasts are found in every biome and continent and are more genetically diverse than angiosperms or chordates. Ease of culture, simple life cycles, and small genomes (∼10-20Mbp) have made yeasts exceptional models for molecular genetics, biotechnology, and evolutionary genomics. Here we discuss recent developments in understanding the genomic underpinnings of the making of yeast biodiversity, comparing and contrasting natural and human-associated evolutionary processes. Only a tiny fraction of yeast biodiversity and metabolic capabilities has been tapped by industry and science. Expanding the taxonomic breadth of deep genomic investigations will further illuminate how genome function evolves to encode their diverse metabolisms and ecologies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Yeast-based biosensors: design and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniran, Adebola; Sherer, Michael; Tyo, Keith E J

    2015-02-01

    Yeast-based biosensing (YBB) is an exciting research area, as many studies have demonstrated the use of yeasts to accurately detect specific molecules. Biosensors incorporating various yeasts have been reported to detect an incredibly large range of molecules including but not limited to odorants, metals, intracellular metabolites, carcinogens, lactate, alcohols, and sugars. We review the detection strategies available for different types of analytes, as well as the wide range of output methods that have been incorporated with yeast biosensors. We group biosensors into two categories: those that are dependent upon transcription of a gene to report the detection of a desired molecule and those that are independent of this reporting mechanism. Transcription-dependent biosensors frequently depend on heterologous expression of sensing elements from non-yeast organisms, a strategy that has greatly expanded the range of molecules available for detection by YBBs. Transcription-independent biosensors circumvent the problem of sensing difficult-to-detect analytes by instead relying on yeast metabolism to generate easily detected molecules when the analyte is present. The use of yeast as the sensing element in biosensors has proven to be successful and continues to hold great promise for a variety of applications. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  16. Accelerating Yeast Prion Biology using Droplet Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Lloyd; Rotem, Assaf; Jarosz, Daniel; Datta, Manoshi; Lindquist, Susan; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    Prions are infectious proteins in a misfolded form, that can induce normal proteins to take the misfolded state. Yeast prions are relevant, as a model of human prion diseases, and interesting from an evolutionary standpoint. Prions may also be a form of epigenetic inheritance, which allow yeast to adapt to stressful conditions at rates exceeding those of random mutations and propagate that adaptation to their offspring. Encapsulation of yeast in droplet microfluidic devices enables high-throughput measurements with single cell resolution, which would not be feasible using bulk methods. Millions of populations of yeast can be screened to obtain reliable measurements of prion induction and loss rates. The population dynamics of clonal yeast, when a fraction of the cells are prion expressing, can be elucidated. Furthermore, the mechanism by which certain strains of bacteria induce yeast to express prions in the wild can be deduced. Integrating the disparate fields of prion biology and droplet microfluidics reveals a more complete picture of how prions may be more than just diseases and play a functional role in yeast.

  17. Emerging functions of multi-protein complex Mediator with special emphasis on plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Naveen; Agarwal, Pinky; Tyagi, Akhilesh

    2017-10-01

    Mediator is a multi-subunit protein complex which is involved in transcriptional regulation in yeast and other eukaryotes. As a co-activator, it connects information from transcriptional activators/repressors to transcriptional machinery including RNA polymerase II and general transcription factors. It is not only involved in transcription initiation but also has important roles to play in transcription elongation and termination. Functional attributes of different Mediator subunits have been largely defined in yeast and mammalian systems earlier, while such studies in plants have gained momentum recently. Mediator regulates various processes related to plant development and is also involved in biotic and abiotic stress response. Thus, plant Mediator, like yeast and mammalian Mediator complex, is indispensable for plant growth and survival. Interaction of its multiple subunits with other regulatory proteins and their ectopic expression or knockdown in model plant like Arabidopsis and certain crop plants are paving the way to biochemical analysis and unravel molecular mechanisms of action of Mediator in plants.

  18. Yeast cell factories on the horizon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    For thousands of years, yeast has been used for making beer, bread, and wine. In modern times, it has become a commercial workhorse for producing fuels, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals such as insulin, human serum albumin, and vaccines against hepatitis virus and human papillomavirus. Yeast has also...... been engineered to make chemicals at industrial scale (e.g., succinic acid, lactic acid, resveratrol) and advanced biofuels (e.g., isobutanol) (1). On page 1095 of this issue, Galanie et al. (2) demonstrate that yeast can now be engineered to produce opioids (2), a major class of compounds used...

  19. 21 CFR 172.590 - Yeast-malt sprout extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Yeast-malt sprout extract. 172.590 Section 172.590... CONSUMPTION Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.590 Yeast-malt sprout extract. Yeast-malt sprout... prescribed conditions: (a) The additive is produced by partial hydrolysis of yeast extract (derived from...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b) The...

  1. 21 CFR 172.898 - Bakers yeast glycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Bakers yeast glycan. 172.898 Section 172.898 Food... Multipurpose Additives § 172.898 Bakers yeast glycan. Bakers yeast glycan may be safely used in food in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Bakers yeast glycan is the comminuted, washed, pasteurized, and...

  2. Regulation of metabolism by the Mediator complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Dou Yeon; Xiaoli, Alus M; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Yang, Fajun

    2016-01-01

    The Mediator complex was originally discovered in yeast, but it is conserved in all eukaryotes. Its best-known function is to regulate RNA polymerase II-dependent gene transcription. Although the mechanisms by which the Mediator complex regulates transcription are often complicated by the context-dependent regulation, this transcription cofactor complex plays a pivotal role in numerous biological pathways. Biochemical, molecular, and physiological studies using cancer cell lines or model organisms have established the current paradigm of the Mediator functions. However, the physiological roles of the mammalian Mediator complex remain poorly defined, but have attracted a great interest in recent years. In this short review, we will summarize some of the reported functions of selective Mediator subunits in the regulation of metabolism. These intriguing findings suggest that the Mediator complex may be an important player in nutrient sensing and energy balance in mammals.

  3. A novel plant glutathione S-transferase/peroxidase suppresses Bax lethality in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Damianova, R; Atallah, M

    2000-01-01

    The mammalian inducer of apoptosis Bax is lethal when expressed in yeast and plant cells. To identify potential inhibitors of Bax in plants we transformed yeast cells expressing Bax with a tomato cDNA library and we selected for cells surviving after the induction of Bax. This genetic screen allows...... for the identification of plant genes, which inhibit either directly or indirectly the lethal phenotype of Bax. Using this method a number of cDNA clones were isolated, the more potent of which encodes a protein homologous to the class theta glutathione S-transferases. This Bax-inhibiting (BI) protein was expressed...... in Escherichia coli and found to possess glutathione S-transferase (GST) and weak glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity. Expression of Bax in yeast decreases the intracellular levels of total glutathione, causes a substantial reduction of total cellular phospholipids, diminishes the mitochondrial membrane...

  4. Subunit architecture and functional modular rearrangements of the transcriptional mediator complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Tomomori-Sato, Chieri; Sato, Shigeo; Conaway, Ronald C; Conaway, Joan W; Asturias, Francisco J

    2014-06-05

    The multisubunit Mediator, comprising ∼30 distinct proteins, plays an essential role in gene expression regulation by acting as a bridge between DNA-binding transcription factors and the RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription machinery. Efforts to uncover the Mediator mechanism have been hindered by a poor understanding of its structure, subunit organization, and conformational rearrangements. By overcoming biochemical and image analysis hurdles, we obtained accurate EM structures of yeast and human Mediators. Subunit localization experiments, docking of partial X-ray structures, and biochemical analyses resulted in comprehensive mapping of yeast Mediator subunits and a complete reinterpretation of our previous Mediator organization model. Large-scale Mediator rearrangements depend on changes at the interfaces between previously described Mediator modules, which appear to be facilitated by factors conducive to transcription initiation. Conservation across eukaryotes of Mediator structure, subunit organization, and RNA polymerase II interaction suggest conservation of fundamental aspects of the Mediator mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Immobilization of yeast cells by radiation-induced polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, T.; Kaetsu, I.

    1982-01-01

    Radiation-induced polymerization method was applied to the immobilization of yeast cells. The effects of irradiation, cooling and monomer, which are neccessary for polymerization, were recovered completely by subsequent aerobical incubation of yeast cells. The ethanol productive in immobilized yeast cells increased with the increase of aerobical incubation period. The growth of yeast cells in immobilized yeast cells was indicated. The maximum ethanol productivity in immobilized yeast cell system was around three times as much as that in free yeast cell system. (orig.)

  6. Thermotolerant Yeast Strains Adapted by Laboratory Evolution Show Trade-Off at Ancestral Temperatures and Preadaptation to Other Stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspeta, Luis; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    adaptive laboratory evolution, we previously isolated seven Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with improved growth at 40°C. Here, we show that genetic adaptations to high temperature caused a growth trade-off at ancestral temperatures, reduced cellular functions, and improved tolerance of other stresses...... in the ancestral strain. The latter is an advantageous attribute for acquiring thermotolerance and correlates with the reduction of yeast functions associated with loss of respiration capacity. This trait caused glycerol overproduction that was associated with the growth trade-off at ancestral temperatures....... In combination with altered sterol composition of cellular membranes, glycerol overproduction was also associated with yeast osmotolerance and improved tolerance of high concentrations of glucose and ethanol. Our study shows that thermal adaptation of yeast is suitable for improving yeast resistance...

  7. Fatty acids from oleaginous yeasts and yeast-like fungi and their potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Si-Jia; Chi, Zhe; Zhang, Yu; Li, Yan-Feng; Liu, Guang-Lei; Jiang, Hong; Hu, Zhong; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2018-02-01

    Oleaginous yeasts, fatty acids biosynthesis and regulation in the oleaginous yeasts and the fatty acids from the oleaginous yeasts and their applications are reviewed in this article. Oleaginous yeasts such as Rhodosporidium toruloides, Yarrowia lipolytica, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, and Aureobasidium melanogenum, which can accumulate over 50% lipid of their cell dry weight, have many advantages over other oleaginous microorganisms. The fatty acids from the oleaginous yeasts have many potential applications. Many oleaginous yeasts have now been genetically modified to over-produce fatty acids and their derivatives. The most important features of the oleaginous yeasts are that they have special enzymatic systems for enhanced biosynthesis and regulation of fatty acids in their lipid particles. Recently, some oleaginous yeasts such as R. toruloides have been found to have a unique fatty acids synthetase and other oleaginous yeasts such as A. melanogenum have a unique highly reducing polyketide synthase (HR-PKS) involved in the biosynthesis of hydroxyl fatty acids. It is necessary to further enhance lipid biosynthesis using metabolic engineering and explore new applications of fatty acids in biotechnology.

  8. VDAC electronics: 4. Novel electrical mechanism and thermodynamic estimations of glucose repression of yeast respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemeshko, Victor V

    2017-11-01

    Inhibition of cell respiration by high concentrations of glucose (glucose repression), known as "Crabtree effect", has been demonstrated for various cancerous strains, highly proliferating cells and yeast lines. Although significant progress in understanding metabolic events associated with the glucose repression of cell respiration has been achieved, it is not yet clear whether the Crabtree effect is the result of a limited activity of the respiratory chain, or of some glucose-mediated regulation of mitochondrial metabolic state. In this work we propose an electrical mechanism of glucose repression of the yeast S. cerevisiae, resulting from generation of the mitochondrial outer membrane potential (OMP) coupled to the direct oxidation of cytosolic NADH in mitochondria. This yeast-type mechanism of OMP generation is different from the earlier proposed VDAC-hexokinase-mediated voltage generation of cancer-type, associated with the mitochondrial outer membrane. The model was developed assuming that VDAC is more permeable to NADH than to NAD + . Thermodynamic estimations of OMP, generated as a result of NADH(2-)/NAD + (1-) turnover through the outer membrane, demonstrated that the values of calculated negative OMP match the known range of VDAC voltage sensitivity, thus suggesting a possibility of OMP-dependent VDAC-mediated regulation of cell energy metabolism. According to the proposed mechanism, we suggest that the yeast-type Crabtree effect is the result of a fast VDAC-mediated electrical repression of mitochondria due to a decrease in the outer membrane permeability to charged metabolites and owing their redistribution between the mitochondrial intermembrane space and the cytosol, both controlled by metabolically-derived OMP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Isolation and identification of radiation resistant yeasts from sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Cheon; Jeong, Yong Uk; Kim, Du Hong; Jo, Eun A

    2011-12-01

    This study was conducted to isolate radiation-resistant yeasts from sea water for development of application technology of radiation-resistant microorganism. · Isolation of 656 yeasts from sea water and selection of 2 radiation-resistant yeasts (D 10 value >3) · Identification of isolated yeasts as Filobasidium elegans sharing 99% sequence similarity · Characterization of isolated yeast with ability to repair of the DNA damage and membrane integrity to irradiation

  10. Activation of waste brewer's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for bread production

    OpenAIRE

    Popov Stevan D.; Dodić Siniša N.; Mastilović Jasna S.; Dodić Jelena M.; Popov-Raljić Jovanka V.

    2005-01-01

    The waste brewer's yeast S. cerevisiae (activated and non-activated) was compared with the commercial baker's yeast regarding the volume of developed gas in dough, volume and freshness stability of produced bread. The activation of waste brewer's yeast resulted in the increased volume of developed gas in dough by 100% compared to non-activated brewer's yeast, and the obtained bread is of more stable freshness compared to bread produced with baker's yeast. The activation of BY affects positive...

  11. Regulatory aspects of methanol metabolism in yeasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotsenko, Y.A.; Bystrykh, L.V.; Ubiyvovk, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    Formaldehyde is the first and key intermediate in the metabolism of methylotrophic yeasts since it stands at a branch point of pathways for methanol oxidation and assimilation. Methanol and, formaldehyde are toxic compounds which severely affect the growth rate, yield coefficient, etc., of yeasts. Two questions arise when considering regulation of methanol metabolism in yeasts how a nontoxic level of formaldehyde is maintained in the cell and how the formaldehyde flow is distributed into oxidation and assimilation. To answer these questions we studied the role of GSH, which spontaneously binds formaldehyde, yielding S-hydroxymethylglutathione; in vivo rates of formaldehyde dissimilation and assimilation by using [ 14 C]methanol; profiles of enzymes responsible for production and utilization of formaldehyde; and levels of metabolites affecting dissimilation and assimilation of formaldehyde. All of the experiments were carried out with the methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii KD1. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  12. Propagation of Mammalian Prions in Yeast

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harris, David A

    2006-01-01

    ...: the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This unicellular organism offers a number of potential advantages for the study of prion biology, including rapid generation time, ease of culturing, and facile genetics...

  13. Structure and function of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR LESKOVAC

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available 1. Introduction 2. Isoenzymes of YADH 3. Substrate specificity 4. Kinetic mechanism 5. Primary structure 6. The active site 7. Mutations in the yeast enzyme 8. Chemical mechanism 9. Binding of coenzymes 10. Hydride transfer

  14. yeast transformation of Mucor circinelloides Tieghe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-05-02

    May 2, 2006 ... A nested model analysis of variance of growth data of induced yeast .... Figure 2. Mean biomass and relative growth rates of M. circinelloides cultivated in treatments in ..... Pullman B (ed) Frontiers in Physicochemical Biology.

  15. Genomic Evolution of the Ascomycete Yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert; Haridas, Sajeet; Salamov, Asaf; Boundy-Mills, Kyria; Goker, Markus; Hittinger, Chris; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lopes, Mariana; Meir-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Rokas, Antonis; Rosa, Carlos; Scheuner, Carmen; Soares, Marco; Stielow, Benjamin; Wisecaver, Jennifer H.; Wolfe, Ken; Blackwell, Meredith; Kurtzman, Cletus; Grigoriev, Igor; Jeffries, Thomas

    2015-03-16

    Yeasts are important for industrial and biotechnological processes and show remarkable metabolic and phylogenetic diversity despite morphological similarities. We have sequenced the genomes of 16 ascomycete yeasts of taxonomic and industrial importance including members of Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina. Phylogenetic analysis of these and previously published yeast genomes helped resolve the placement of species including Saitoella complicata, Babjeviella inositovora, Hyphopichia burtonii, and Metschnikowia bicuspidata. Moreover, we find that alternative nuclear codon usage, where CUG encodes serine instead of leucine, are monophyletic within the Saccharomycotina. Most of the yeasts have compact genomes with a large fraction of single exon genes, and a tendency towards more introns in early-diverging species. Analysis of enzyme phylogeny gives insights into the evolution of metabolic capabilities such as methanol utilization and assimilation of alternative carbon sources.

  16. Electron beam radiation of dried fruits and nuts to reduce yeast and mold bioburden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ic, Erhan; Kottapalli, Bala; Maxim, Joseph; Pillai, Suresh D

    2007-04-01

    Dried fruits and nuts make up a significant portion of the commodities traded globally, and the presence of yeasts and molds on dried fruits and nuts can be a public health risk because of the potential for exposure to toxigenic fungi. Since current postharvest treatment technologies are rather limited for dried fruits and nuts, electron beam (E-beam) radiation experiments were performed to determine the doses required to reduce the yeast and mold bioburden of raisins, walnuts, and dates. The indigenous yeast and mold bioburden on a select number of commodities sold at retail ranged from 10(2) to 10(3) CFU/g. E-beam inactivation kinetics based on the linear model suggest that the decimal reduction dose required to eliminate 90% of the microbial population (D10-value) of these indigenous fungal populations ranges from 1.09 to 1.59 kGy. Some samples, however, exhibited inactivation kinetics that were better modeled by a quadratic model. The results indicate that different commodities can contain molds and yeasts of varying resistance to ionizing radiation. It is thus essential for the dried fruit and nut industry to determine empirically the minimum E-beam dose that is capable of reducing or eliminating the bioburden of yeasts and molds in their specific commodities.

  17. Implication of Ca2+ in the regulation of replicative life span of budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubakiyama, Ryohei; Mizunuma, Masaki; Gengyo, Anri; Yamamoto, Josuke; Kume, Kazunori; Miyakawa, Tokichi; Hirata, Dai

    2011-08-19

    In eukaryotic cells, Ca(2+)-triggered signaling pathways are used to regulate a wide variety of cellular processes. Calcineurin, a highly conserved Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, plays key roles in the regulation of diverse biological processes in organisms ranging from yeast to humans. We isolated a mutant of the SIR3 gene, implicated in the regulation of life span, as a suppressor of the Ca(2+) sensitivity of zds1Δ cells in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, we investigated a relationship between Ca(2+) signaling and life span in yeast. Here we show that Ca(2+) affected the replicative life span (RLS) of yeast. Increased external and intracellular Ca(2+) levels caused a reduction in their RLS. Consistently, the increase in calcineurin activity by either the zds1 deletion or the constitutively activated calcineurin reduced RLS. Indeed, the shortened RLS of zds1Δ cells was suppressed by the calcineurin deletion. Further, the calcineurin deletion per se promoted aging without impairing the gene silencing typically observed in short-lived sir mutants, indicating that calcineurin plays an important role in a regulation of RLS even under normal growth condition. Thus, our results indicate that Ca(2+) homeostasis/Ca(2+) signaling are required to regulate longevity in budding yeast.

  18. Adsorption of ochratoxin A from grape juice by yeast cells immobilised in calcium alginate beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farbo, Maria Grazia; Urgeghe, Pietro Paolo; Fiori, Stefano; Marceddu, Salvatore; Jaoua, Samir; Migheli, Quirico

    2016-01-18

    Grape juice can be easily contaminated with ochratoxin A (OTA), one of the known mycotoxins with the greatest public health significance. Among the different approaches to decontaminate juice from this mycotoxin, microbiological methods proved efficient, inexpensive and safe, particularly the use of yeast or yeast products. To ascertain whether immobilisation of the yeast biomass would lead to successful decontamination, alginate beads encapsulating Candida intermedia yeast cells were used in our experiments to evaluate their OTA-biosorption efficacy. Magnetic calcium alginate beads were also prepared by adding magnetite in the formulation to allow fast removal from the aqueous solution with a magnet. Calcium alginate beads were added to commercial grape juice spiked with 20 μg/kg OTA and after 48 h of incubation a significant reduction (>80%), of the total OTA content was achieved, while in the subsequent phases (72-120 h) OTA was slowly released into the grape juice by alginate beads. Biosorption properties of alginate-yeast beads were tested in a prototype bioreactor consisting in a glass chromatography column packed with beads, where juice amended with OTA was slowly flowed downstream. The adoption of an interconnected scaled-up bioreactor as an efficient and safe tool to remove traces of OTA from liquid matrices is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Selection and Characterization of Potential Baker's Yeast from Indigenous Resources of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Tika B; Timilsina, Parash Mani; Yadav, Archana; Pandey, Gyanu Raj; Joshi, Yogesh; Bhujel, Sahansila; Adhikari, Rojina; Neupane, Katyayanee

    2017-01-01

    The study aims to isolate the yeast strains that could be used effectively as baker's yeast and compare them with the commercial baker's yeast available in the market of Nepal. A total of 10 samples including locally available sources like fruits, Murcha, and a local tree "Dar" were collected from different localities of Bhaktapur, Kavre, and Syangja districts of Nepal, respectively. Following enrichment and fermentation of the samples, 26 yeast strains were isolated using selective medium Wallerstein Laboratory Nutrient Agar. From the differential tests which included morphological and microscopic observation and physiological and biochemical characterization such as nitrate reduction and lactose utilization tests, 8 strains were selected as possible Saccharomyces strain. The selected strains were further assessed for their efficient leavening ability by tests such as ethanol tolerance, osmotolerance, invertase test, and stress exclusion test. The three most potent strains ENG, MUR3B, and SUG1 isolated from grape, Murcha, and sugarcane, respectively, were used in the fermentation and baking of dough. These strains also carried a possibility of being used as industrial baker's yeast.

  20. Evaluation of Yeast Biomass (Candida utilis in a Practical Diet for Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.S. Goddard

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A yeast, Candida utilis, cultured on a substrate derived from a mixture of peat moss and fish processing waste, was substituted for fish meal in a practical diet for rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. The formulated diets were isonitrogenous (40% crude protein and isoealoric (gross energy 20 kJ per g dry matter. During a 50-day feeding trial fish tripled in weight, and there were no significant differences in the mean final weights of groups of fish fed diets in which 0%, 25% and 35% of fishmeal had been replaced by yeast biomass. Diets containing yeast were palatable, as determined by food intake, and were highly digestible for protein. Carcass analysis revealed that the fish fed with yeast biomass had slightly higher crude protein and ash contents, and lower lipid levels than those of the control group. Significant reductions were recorded in food conversion efficiency as the yeast content of the diets increased. The results indicate the potential for partial replacement of fish meal (between 25-35% by Candida utilis biomass in feeds formulated for rainbow trout.

  1. Screening for new brewing yeasts in the non-Saccharomyces sector with Torulaspora delbrueckii as model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Maximilian; Kopecká, Jana; Meier-Dörnberg, Tim; Zarnkow, Martin; Jacob, Fritz; Hutzler, Mathias

    2016-04-01

    This study describes a screening system for future brewing yeasts focusing on non-Saccharomyces yeasts. The aim was to find new yeast strains that can ferment beer wort into a respectable beer. Ten Torulaspora delbrueckii strains were put through the screening system, which included sugar utilization tests, hop resistance tests, ethanol resistance tests, polymerase chain reaction fingerprinting, propagation tests, amino acid catabolism and anabolism, phenolic off-flavour tests and trial fermentations. Trial fermentations were analysed for extract reduction, pH drop, yeast concentration in bulk fluid and fermentation by-products. All investigated strains were able to partly ferment wort sugars and showed high tolerance to hop compounds and ethanol. One of the investigated yeast strains fermented all the wort sugars and produced a respectable fruity flavour and a beer of average ethanol content with a high volatile flavour compound concentration. Two other strains could possibly be used for pre-fermentation as a bio-flavouring agent for beers that have been post-fermented by Saccharomyces strains as a consequence of their low sugar utilization but good flavour-forming properties. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Biological Demalication and Deacetification of Musts and Wines: Can Wine Yeasts Make the Wine Taste Better?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Vilela

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Grape musts sometimes reveal excess acidity. An excessive amount of organic acids negatively affect wine yeasts and yeast fermentation, and the obtained wines are characterized by an inappropriate balance between sweetness, acidity or sourness, and flavor/aroma components. An appropriate acidity, pleasant to the palate is more difficult to achieve in wines that have high acidity due to an excess of malic acid, because the Saccharomyces species in general, cannot effectively degrade malic acid during alcoholic fermentation. One approach to solving this problem is biological deacidification by lactic acid bacteria or non-Saccharomyces yeasts, like Schizosaccharomyces pombe that show the ability to degrade L-malic acid. Excessive volatile acidity in wine is also a problem in the wine industry. The use of free or immobilized Saccharomyces cells has been studied to solve both these problems since these yeasts are wine yeasts that show a good balance between taste/flavor and aromatic compounds during alcoholic fermentation. The aim of this review is to give some insights into the use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains to perform biological demalication (malic acid degradation and deacetification (reduction of volatile acidity of wine in an attempt to better understand their biochemistry and enological features.

  3. Procyanidin-rich extract of natural cocoa powder causes ROS-mediated caspase-3 dependent apoptosis and reduction of pro-MMP-2 in epithelial ovarian carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taparia, Shruti Sanjay; Khanna, Aparna

    2016-10-01

    Over the last four centuries, cocoa and chocolate have been described as having potential medicinal value. As of today, Theobroma cacao L. (Sterculiaceae) and its products are consumed worldwide. They are of great research interest because of the concentration dependent antioxidant as well as pro-oxidant properties of some of their polyphenolic constituents, specially procyanidins and flavan-3-ols such as catechin. This study was aimed at investigating the cellular and molecular changes associated with cytotoxicity, caused due pro-oxidant activity of cocoa catechins and procyanidins, in ovarian cancer cell lines. Extract of non-alkalized cocoa powder enriched with catechins and procyanidins was used to treat human epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines OAW42 and OVCAR3 at various concentrations ≤1000μg/mL. The effect of treatment on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels was determined. Apoptotic cell death, post treatment, was evaluated microscopically and using flow cytometry by means of annexin-propidium iodide (PI) dual staining. Levels of active caspase-3 as a pro-apoptotic marker and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) as an invasive potential marker were detected using Western blotting and gelatin zymography. Treatment with extract caused an increase in intracellular ROS levels in OAW42 and OVCAR3 cell lines. Bright field and fluorescence microscopy of treated cells revealed apoptotic morphology and DNA damage. Increase in annexin positive cell population and dose dependent upregulation of caspase-3 confirmed apoptotic cell death. pro-MMP2 was found to be downregulated in a dose dependent manner in cells treated with the extract. Treated cells also showed a reduction in MMP2 activity. Our data suggests that cocoa catechins and procyanidins are cytotoxic to epithelial ovarian cancer, inducing apoptotic morphological changes, DNA damage and caspase-3 mediated cell death. Downregulation of pro-MMP2 and reduction in active MMP2 levels imply a decrease

  4. Yeasts are essential for cocoa bean fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

    2014-03-17

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao) are the major raw material for chocolate production and fermentation of the beans is essential for the development of chocolate flavor precursors. In this study, a novel approach was used to determine the role of yeasts in cocoa fermentation and their contribution to chocolate quality. Cocoa bean fermentations were conducted with the addition of 200ppm Natamycin to inhibit the growth of yeasts, and the resultant microbial ecology and metabolism, bean chemistry and chocolate quality were compared with those of normal (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii and Kluyveromyces marxianus, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in the control fermentation. In fermentations with the presence of Natamycin, the same bacterial species grew but yeast growth was inhibited. Physical and chemical analyses showed that beans fermented without yeasts had increased shell content, lower production of ethanol, higher alcohols and esters throughout fermentation and lesser presence of pyrazines in the roasted product. Quality tests revealed that beans fermented without yeasts were purplish-violet in color and not fully brown, and chocolate prepared from these beans tasted more acid and lacked characteristic chocolate flavor. Beans fermented with yeast growth were fully brown in color and gave chocolate with typical characters which were clearly preferred by sensory panels. Our findings demonstrate that yeast growth and activity were essential for cocoa bean fermentation and the development of chocolate characteristics. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Transcriptional Waves in the Yeast Cell Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Oliva, Anna; Rosebrock, Adam; Ferrezuelo, Francisco; Pyne, Saumyadipta; Chen, Haiying; Skiena, Steve; Futcher, Bruce; Leatherwood, Janet

    2005-01-01

    Many genes are regulated as an innate part of the eukaryotic cell cycle, and a complex transcriptional network helps enable the cyclic behavior of dividing cells. This transcriptional network has been studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) and elsewhere. To provide more perspective on these regulatory mechanisms, we have used microarrays to measure gene expression through the cell cycle of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast). The 750 genes with the most significant oscillat...

  6. Determination of tritium in wine yeast samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotarlea, Monica-Ionela; Paunescu Niculina; Galeriu, D; Mocanu, N.; Margineanu, R.; Marin, G.

    1998-01-01

    Analytical procedures were developed to determine tritium in wine and wine yeast samples. The content of organic compounds affecting the LSC measurement is reduced by fractioning distillation for wine samples and azeotropic distillation/fractional distillation for wine yeast samples. Finally, the water samples were normally distilled with K MO 4 . The established procedures were successfully applied for wine and wine samples from Murfatlar harvests of the years 1995 and 1996. (authors)

  7. The growth of solar radiated yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, T.

    1995-09-01

    This researcher plans to determine if solar radiation affects the growth of yeast. The irradiated yeast was obtained from a sample exposed in space during a Space Shuttle flight of September 9-20, 1994. Further, the control groups were held at: (1) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland; and (2) South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. The procedure used was based on the fact that yeast is most often used in consumable baked goods. Therefore, the yeast was incorporated into a basic Betty Crocker bread recipe. Data was collected by placing measured amounts of dough into sample containers with fifteen minute growth in height measurements collected and recorded. This researcher assumed the viability of yeast to be relative to its ability to produce carbon dioxide gas and cause the dough to rise. As all ingredients and surroundings were equal, this researcher assumed the yeast will produce the only significant difference in data collected. This researcher noted the approximate use date on all sample packages to be prior to arrival and experiment date. All dates equal, it was then assumed each would act in a similar manner of response. This assumption will allow for equally correct data collection.

  8. The growth of solar radiated yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Tyrone

    1995-01-01

    This researcher plans to determine if solar radiation affects the growth of yeast. The irradiated yeast was obtained from a sample exposed in space during a Space Shuttle flight of September 9-20, 1994. Further, the control groups were held at: (1) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland; and (2) South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. The procedure used was based on the fact that yeast is most often used in consumable baked goods. Therefore, the yeast was incorporated into a basic Betty Crocker bread recipe. Data was collected by placing measured amounts of dough into sample containers with fifteen minute growth in height measurements collected and recorded. This researcher assumed the viability of yeast to be relative to its ability to produce carbon dioxide gas and cause the dough to rise. As all ingredients and surroundings were equal, this researcher assumed the yeast will produce the only significant difference in data collected. This researcher noted the approximate use date on all sample packages to be prior to arrival and experiment date. All dates equal, it was then assumed each would act in a similar manner of response. This assumption will allow for equally correct data collection.

  9. Radiodiagnosis of yeast alveolits (a clinicoexperimental study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amosov, I.S.; Smirnov, V.A.

    1984-01-01

    A clinicoroetgenological study was made of 115 workers engaged in the yeast production for different periods of time. Disorders of the respiration biomechanics were revealed depending on the period of service. These data were obtained as a result of the use of roentgenopneumopolygraphy. An experimental study was conducted to establish the nature of lesions in the bronchopulmonary system in allergic alveolitis. The effect of finely divided yeast dust on the bronchopulmonary system was studied on 132 guinea-pigs usinq microbronchography and morphological examination. As a result of the study it has been established that during the inhalation of yeast dust, notnceable dystrophy of the bronchi develops, the sizes of alveoli enlarge and part of them undergo emphysematous distension with the rupture of the interalveolar septa. In the course of the study, it has been shown that yeast dust is little agreessive, yeast alveolitis develops after many years of work. The clinical symptoms are non-specific and insignificant. X-ray and morphological changes are followed by the physical manifestations of yeast alveolitis

  10. Novel brewing yeast hybrids: creation and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogerus, Kristoffer; Magalhães, Frederico; Vidgren, Virve; Gibson, Brian

    2017-01-01

    The natural interspecies Saccharomyces cerevisiae × Saccharomyces eubayanus hybrid yeast is responsible for global lager beer production and is one of the most important industrial microorganisms. Its success in the lager brewing environment is due to a combination of traits not commonly found in pure yeast species, principally low-temperature tolerance, and maltotriose utilization. Parental transgression is typical of hybrid organisms and has been exploited previously for, e.g., the production of wine yeast with beneficial properties. The parental strain S. eubayanus has only been discovered recently and newly created lager yeast strains have not yet been applied industrially. A number of reports attest to the feasibility of this approach and artificially created hybrids are likely to have a significant impact on the future of lager brewing. De novo S. cerevisiae × S. eubayanus hybrids outperform their parent strains in a number of respects, including, but not restricted to, fermentation rate, sugar utilization, stress tolerance, and aroma formation. Hybrid genome function and stability, as well as different techniques for generating hybrids and their relative merits are discussed. Hybridization not only offers the possibility of generating novel non-GM brewing yeast strains with unique properties, but is expected to aid in unraveling the complex evolutionary history of industrial lager yeast.

  11. Making Sense of the Yeast Sphingolipid Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megyeri, Márton; Riezman, Howard; Schuldiner, Maya; Futerman, Anthony H

    2016-12-04

    Sphingolipids (SL) and their metabolites play key roles both as structural components of membranes and as signaling molecules. Many of the key enzymes and regulators of SL metabolism were discovered using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and based on the high degree of conservation, a number of mammalian homologs were identified. Although yeast continues to be an important tool for SL research, the complexity of SL structure and nomenclature often hampers the ability of new researchers to grasp the subtleties of yeast SL biology and discover new modulators of this intricate pathway. Moreover, the emergence of lipidomics by mass spectrometry has enabled the rapid identification of SL species in yeast and rendered the analysis of SL composition under various physiological and pathophysiological conditions readily amenable. However, the complex nomenclature of the identified species renders much of the data inaccessible to non-specialists. In this review, we focus on parsing both the classical SL nomenclature and the nomenclature normally used during mass spectrometry analysis, which should facilitate the understanding of yeast SL data and might shed light on biological processes in which SLs are involved. Finally, we discuss a number of putative roles of various yeast SL species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Revaluation of Waste Yeast from Beer Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Suruceanu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Brewing yeast is an important waste product from beer production. The valorification of slurry yeast mainly consists of separation of vitamins and important nitrogen compounds. The hops compounds, one of the most important raw materials in beer technology are removed beforehand valorification. The prenylflavonoids compounds from hops are important bioactive compounds that can be revaluation with proper technology. Revaluation of prenylflavonoids from waste yeast into dietary supplement, identification and quantification of xanthohumol by HPLC method. Waste yeast from brewery pilot plant of USAMV Cluj Napoca it was dried by atomization and the powder was analyzed on xanthohumol content by HPLC method. For quantification a calibration curve it was used. The process of drying by atomisation lead to a powder product. It was used malt dextrin powder for stabilisation. The final product it was encapsulated. The xanthohumol content of powdered yeast it was 1.94 µg/ml. In conclusion the slurry yeast from beer production it is an important source of prenylflavonoids compounds.

  13. Flor Yeast: New Perspectives Beyond Wine Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Moreno-Garcia, Jaime; Zara, Severino; Zara, Giacomo; Garcia-Martinez, Teresa; Mauricio, Juan C.; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Coi, Anna L.; Bou Zeidan, Marc; Dequin, Sylvie; Moreno, Juan; Budroni, Marilena

    2016-01-01

    The most important dogma in white-wine production is the preservation of the wine aroma and the limitation of the oxidative action of oxygen. In contrast, the aging of Sherry and Sherry-like wines is an aerobic process that depends on the oxidative activity of flor strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Under depletion of nitrogen and fermentable carbon sources, these yeast produce aggregates of floating cells and form an air–liquid biofilm on the wine surface, which is also known as velum or flor. This behavior is due to genetic and metabolic peculiarities that differentiate flor yeast from other wine yeast. This review will focus first on the most updated data obtained through the analysis of flor yeast with -omic tools. Comparative genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics of flor and wine yeast strains are shedding new light on several features of these special yeast, and in particular, they have revealed the extent of proteome remodeling imposed by the biofilm life-style. Finally, new insights in terms of promotion and inhibition of biofilm formation through small molecules, amino acids, and di/tri-peptides, and novel possibilities for the exploitation of biofilm immobilization within a fungal hyphae framework, will be discussed. PMID:27148192

  14. Spermidine cures yeast of prions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun H. Speldewinde

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Prions are self-perpetuating amyloid protein aggregates which underlie various neurodegenerative diseases in mammals. The molecular basis underlying their conversion from a normally soluble protein into the prion form remains largely unknown. Studies aimed at uncovering these mechanism(s are therefore essential if we are to develop effective therapeutic strategies to counteract these disease-causing entities. Autophagy is a cellular degradation system which has predominantly been considered as a non-selective bulk degradation process which recycles macromolecules in response to starvation conditions. We now know that autophagy also serves as a protein quality control mechanism which selectively degrades protein aggregates and damaged organelles. These are commonly accumulated in various neurodegenerative disorders including prion diseases. In our recent study [Speldewinde et al. Mol. Biol. Cell. (2015] we used the well-established yeast [PSI+]/Sup35 and [PIN­+]/Rnq1 prion models to show that autophagy prevents sporadic prion formation. Importantly, we found that spermidine, a polyamine that has been used to increase autophagic flux, acts as a protective agent which prevents spontaneous prion formation.

  15. Ddb1 controls genome stability and meiosis in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Christian Henrik; Fleck, Oliver; Hansen, H. A.

    2005-01-01

    The human UV-damaged DNA-binding protein Ddb1 associates with cullin 4 ubiquitin ligases implicated in nucleotide excision repair (NER). These complexes also contain the signalosome (CSN), but NER-relevant ubiquitination targets have not yet been identified. We report that fission yeast Ddb1......, Cullin 4 (Pcu4), and CSN subunits Csn1 and Csn2 are required for degradation of the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) inhibitor protein Spd1. Ddb1-deficient cells have >20-fold increased spontaneous mutation rate. This is partly dependent on the error-prone translesion DNA polymerases. Spd1 deletion...... substantially reduced the mutation rate, suggesting that insufficient RNR activity accounts for ~50% of observed mutations. Epistasis analysis indicated that Ddb1 contributed to mutation avoidance and tolerance to DNA damage in a pathway distinct from NER. Finally, we show that Ddb1/Csn1/Cullin 4-mediated Spd1...

  16. ACTIVITY OF SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE ENZYME IN YEAST SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blažena Lavová

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS with reactive nitrogen species (RNS are known to play dual role in biological systems, they can be harmful or beneficial to living systems. ROS can be important mediators of damage to cell structures, including proteins, lipids and nucleic acids termed as oxidative stress. The antioxidant enzymes protect the organism against the oxidative damage caused by active oxygen forms. The role of superoxide dismutase (SOD is to accelerate the dismutation of the toxic superoxide radical, produced during oxidative energy processes, to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen. In this study, SOD activity of three yeast strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae was determined. It was found that SOD activity was the highest (23.7 U.mg-1 protein in strain 612 after 28 hours of cultivation. The lowest SOD activity from all tested strains was found after 56 hours of cultivation of strain Gyöng (0.7 U.mg-1 protein.

  17. Mediation Analysis with Multiple Mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWeele, T J; Vansteelandt, S

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the causal inference literature on mediation have extended traditional approaches to direct and indirect effects to settings that allow for interactions and non-linearities. In this paper, these approaches from causal inference are further extended to settings in which multiple mediators may be of interest. Two analytic approaches, one based on regression and one based on weighting are proposed to estimate the effect mediated through multiple mediators and the effects through other pathways. The approaches proposed here accommodate exposure-mediator interactions and, to a certain extent, mediator-mediator interactions as well. The methods handle binary or continuous mediators and binary, continuous or count outcomes. When the mediators affect one another, the strategy of trying to assess direct and indirect effects one mediator at a time will in general fail; the approach given in this paper can still be used. A characterization is moreover given as to when the sum of the mediated effects for multiple mediators considered separately will be equal to the mediated effect of all of the mediators considered jointly. The approach proposed in this paper is robust to unmeasured common causes of two or more mediators.

  18. THE ROLE FUNGI AND YEAST IN MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.; Abe, M.; Johnson, B.; Simpson, W.; Mckinsey, P.

    2010-01-26

    Fungi and yeast have been characterized as important components in the bioremediation of organic contaminants in soil and water including polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); however, research into their ability to metabolize these compounds in extreme environments has been limited. In this work forty-three fungi and yeasts were isolated from a PAH-contaminated sludge waste lagoon in Poland. The lagoon was part of a monitored natural attenuation (MNA) study where natural reduction of PAHs and associated toxicity over time in non-disturbed areas of the sludge lagoon indicated MNA activity. The microorganisms were initially isolated on minimal medium containing naphthalene as the sole carbon and energy source. Fungal isolates were then maintained on MEA and identified based on microscopic examination and BIOLOG{reg_sign}. The analysis identified several of the fungal isolates as belonging to the genera Penicillium, Paecilomyces, Aspergillus, and Eupenicillium. Yeasts included Candida parapsilosis and C. fluvialitis. Further microbial characterization revealed that several isolates were capable of rowing on acidified media of pH 4, 3, and 2.5. Over twenty percent of the fungi demonstrated growth as low as pH 2.5. Of the 43 isolates examined, 24 isolates exhibited growth at 5 C. Nine of the fungal isolates exhibiting growth at 5 C were then examined for metabolic activity using a respirometer testing metabolic activity at pH 3. Microcosm studies confirmed the growth of the fungi on PAH contaminated sediment as the sole carbon and energy source with elevated metabolic rates indicating evidence of MNA. Our findings suggest that many of the Poland fungal isolates may be of value in the bioremediation processes in acidic waste sites in northern climates typical of Northern Europe.

  19. NetPhosYeast: prediction of protein phosphorylation sites in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingrell, C.R.; Miller, Martin Lee; Jensen, O.N.

    2007-01-01

    sites compared to those in humans, suggesting the need for an yeast-specific phosphorylation site predictor. NetPhosYeast achieves a correlation coefficient close to 0.75 with a sensitivity of 0.84 and specificity of 0.90 and outperforms existing predictors in the identification of phosphorylation sites...

  20. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YFR015C, YFR015C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available yeast homolog; expression induced by glucose limitation, nitrogen starvation, environmental stress, and entr...ression induced by glucose limitation, nitrogen starvation, environmental stress, and entry into stationary ...tion, nitrogen starvation, environmental stress, and entry into stationary phase Rows with this bait as bait..., the more highly expressed yeast homolog; expression induced by glucose limitation, nitrogen starvation, environmental

  1. Increasing the yeast yield in alcohol fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelc, A; Vamos, E; Varga, L; Gavalya, S; Dolanszky, F

    1964-02-01

    The yeast and ethanol yields (the latter being based on the substrate) are enhanced by adding the substrate (molasses) gradually to the suspension of inoculating yeast during the main fermentation period, passing air through the mash, ceasing both substrate addition and aeration at the end of the main period, and allowing the process to come to an end. This way 12 to 14 kg yeast (dry weight)/100 l ethanol could be obtained within 16 to 24 hours and the yeast obtained could be used as the inoculum for the next charge. For example: 11 to 16 kg yeast (or 18 to 25 l yeast suspension from the preceding charge, containing 18 to 20% dry matter) is kept in 30 to 35 l H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ (0.74 g/100 ml) for 1 hour, diluted with H/sub 2/O and 30 kg sterile molasses to 300 l, kept at 30 to 32/sup 0/ with mild aeration for 2 hours, 1900 l 30/sup 0/ H/sub 2/O added, then 1 m/sup 3/ air/m/sup 2//hour is passed through the mixture, with the addition of 270 kg sterile molasses, and a solution of 8 kg superphosphate and 5 kg (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ in 100 l H/sub 2/O, the latter being added in 5 portions over 2 hours. Molasses (600 kg) is added during the main period, maintaining the pH at 5 (H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/), and the temperature at 30/sup 0/, then aeration is ceased and the mixture kept until fermentation proceeds. The 3000 l medium contains 9.6% ethanol and 1.38% yeast, respectively.

  2. Schizosaccharomyces japonicus: the fission yeast is a fusion of yeast and hyphae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niki, Hironori

    2014-03-01

    The clade of Schizosaccharomyces includes 4 species: S. pombe, S. octosporus, S. cryophilus, and S. japonicus. Although all 4 species exhibit unicellular growth with a binary fission mode of cell division, S. japonicus alone is dimorphic yeast, which can transit from unicellular yeast to long filamentous hyphae. Recently it was found that the hyphal cells response to light and then synchronously activate cytokinesis of hyphae. In addition to hyphal growth, S. japonicas has many properties that aren't shared with other fission yeast. Mitosis of S. japonicas is referred to as semi-open mitosis because dynamics of nuclear membrane is an intermediate mode between open mitosis and closed mitosis. Novel genetic tools and the whole genomic sequencing of S. japonicas now provide us with an opportunity for revealing unique characters of the dimorphic yeast. © 2013 The Author. Yeast Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Terroir of yeasts? – Application of FTIR spectroscopy and molecular methods for strain typing of yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhards Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The site specific influence on wine (Terroir is an often by wine producers, consumers and scientists discussed topic in the world of wine. A study on grapes and (spontaneous fermentations from six different vineyards was done to investigate the biodiversity of yeasts and to answer the question if there is a terroir of yeast and how it could be influenced. Randomly isolated yeasts were identified by FTIR-spectroscopy and molecular methods on species and strain level. Vineyard specific yeast floras would be observed but they are not such important as expected. Only a few overlapping strain patterns would be identified during both vintages. The yeast flora of the winery had a huge impact on the spontaneous fermentations, but is not really constant and influenced by different factors from outside.

  4. Thermotolerant Yeast Strains Adapted by Laboratory Evolution Show Trade-Off at Ancestral Temperatures and Preadaptation to Other Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspeta, Luis; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-07-21

    A major challenge for the production of ethanol from biomass-derived feedstocks is to develop yeasts that can sustain growth under the variety of inhibitory conditions present in the production process, e.g., high osmolality, high ethanol titers, and/or elevated temperatures (≥ 40 °C). Using adaptive laboratory evolution, we previously isolated seven Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with improved growth at 40 °C. Here, we show that genetic adaptations to high temperature caused a growth trade-off at ancestral temperatures, reduced cellular functions, and improved tolerance of other stresses. Thermotolerant yeast strains showed horizontal displacement of their thermal reaction norms to higher temperatures. Hence, their optimal and maximum growth temperatures increased by about 3 °C, whereas they showed a growth trade-off at temperatures below 34 °C. Computational analysis of the physical properties of proteins showed that the lethal temperature for yeast is around 49 °C, as a large fraction of the yeast proteins denature above this temperature. Our analysis also indicated that the number of functions involved in controlling the growth rate decreased in the thermotolerant strains compared with the number in the ancestral strain. The latter is an advantageous attribute for acquiring thermotolerance and correlates with the reduction of yeast functions associated with loss of respiration capacity. This trait caused glycerol overproduction that was associated with the growth trade-off at ancestral temperatures. In combination with altered sterol composition of cellular membranes, glycerol overproduction was also associated with yeast osmotolerance and improved tolerance of high concentrations of glucose and ethanol. Our study shows that thermal adaptation of yeast is suitable for improving yeast resistance to inhibitory conditions found in industrial ethanol production processes. Yeast thermotolerance can significantly reduce the production costs of biomass

  5. Protein patterns of yeast during sporulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litske Petersen, J.G.; Kielland-Brandt, M.C.; Nilsson-Tillgren, T.

    1979-01-01

    High resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to study protein synthesis during synchronous meiosis and ascospore formation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The stained protein patterns of samples harvested at any stage between meiotic prophase and the four-spore stage in two sporulating strains showed the same approximately 250 polypeptides. Of these only a few seemed to increase or decrease in concentration during sporulation. The characteristic pattern of sporulating yeast was identical to the pattern of glucose-grown staitonary yeast cells adapted to respiration. The latter type of cells readily initiates meiosis when transferred to sporulation medium. This pattern differed from the protein patterns of exponentially growing cells in glucose or acetate presporulation medium. Five major proteins in stationary and sporulating yeast cells were not detected in either type of exponential culture. Two-dimensional autoradiograms of [ 35 S]methionine-labelled yeast proteins revealed that some proteins were preferentially labelled during sporulation, while other proteins were labelled at later stages. These patterns differed from the auroradiograms of exponentially growing yeast cells in glucose presporulation medium in a number of spots. No differences were observed when stained gels or autoradiograms of sporulating cultures and non-sporulating strains in sporulation medium were compared. (author)

  6. Staurosporine augments EGF-mediated EMT in PMC42-LA cells through actin depolymerisation, focal contact size reduction and Snail1 induction – A model for cross-modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugo, Honor J; Wafai, Razan; Blick, Tony; Thompson, Erik W; Newgreen, Donald F

    2009-01-01

    A feature of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) relevant to tumour dissemination is the reorganization of actin cytoskeleton/focal contacts, influencing cellular ECM adherence and motility. This is coupled with the transcriptional repression of E-cadherin, often mediated by Snail1, Snail2 and Zeb1/δEF1. These genes, overexpressed in breast carcinomas, are known targets of growth factor-initiated pathways, however it is less clear how alterations in ECM attachment cross-modulate to regulate these pathways. EGF induces EMT in the breast cancer cell line PMC42-LA and the kinase inhibitor staurosporine (ST) induces EMT in embryonic neural epithelial cells, with F-actin de-bundling and disruption of cell-cell adhesion, via inhibition of aPKC. PMC42-LA cells were treated for 72 h with 10 ng/ml EGF, 40 nM ST, or both, and assessed for expression of E-cadherin repressor genes (Snail1, Snail2, Zeb1/δEF1) and EMT-related genes by QRT-PCR, multiplex tandem PCR (MT-PCR) and immunofluorescence +/- cycloheximide. Actin and focal contacts (paxillin) were visualized by confocal microscopy. A public database of human breast cancers was assessed for expression of Snail1 and Snail2 in relation to outcome. When PMC42-LA were treated with EGF, Snail2 was the principal E-cadherin repressor induced. With ST or ST+EGF this shifted to Snail1, with more extreme EMT and Zeb1/δEF1 induction seen with ST+EGF. ST reduced stress fibres and focal contact size rapidly and independently of gene transcription. Gene expression analysis by MT-PCR indicated that ST repressed many genes which were induced by EGF (EGFR, CAV1, CTGF, CYR61, CD44, S100A4) and induced genes which alter the actin cytoskeleton (NLF1, NLF2, EPHB4). Examination of the public database of breast cancers revealed tumours exhibiting higher Snail1 expression have an increased risk of disease-recurrence. This was not seen for Snail2, and Zeb1/δEF1 showed a reverse correlation with lower expression values being predictive

  7. Staurosporine augments EGF-mediated EMT in PMC42-LA cells through actin depolymerisation, focal contact size reduction and Snail1 induction – A model for cross-modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Erik W

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A feature of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT relevant to tumour dissemination is the reorganization of actin cytoskeleton/focal contacts, influencing cellular ECM adherence and motility. This is coupled with the transcriptional repression of E-cadherin, often mediated by Snail1, Snail2 and Zeb1/δEF1. These genes, overexpressed in breast carcinomas, are known targets of growth factor-initiated pathways, however it is less clear how alterations in ECM attachment cross-modulate to regulate these pathways. EGF induces EMT in the breast cancer cell line PMC42-LA and the kinase inhibitor staurosporine (ST induces EMT in embryonic neural epithelial cells, with F-actin de-bundling and disruption of cell-cell adhesion, via inhibition of aPKC. Methods PMC42-LA cells were treated for 72 h with 10 ng/ml EGF, 40 nM ST, or both, and assessed for expression of E-cadherin repressor genes (Snail1, Snail2, Zeb1/δEF1 and EMT-related genes by QRT-PCR, multiplex tandem PCR (MT-PCR and immunofluorescence +/- cycloheximide. Actin and focal contacts (paxillin were visualized by confocal microscopy. A public database of human breast cancers was assessed for expression of Snail1 and Snail2 in relation to outcome. Results When PMC42-LA were treated with EGF, Snail2 was the principal E-cadherin repressor induced. With ST or ST+EGF this shifted to Snail1, with more extreme EMT and Zeb1/δEF1 induction seen with ST+EGF. ST reduced stress fibres and focal contact size rapidly and independently of gene transcription. Gene expression analysis by MT-PCR indicated that ST repressed many genes which were induced by EGF (EGFR, CAV1, CTGF, CYR61, CD44, S100A4 and induced genes which alter the actin cytoskeleton (NLF1, NLF2, EPHB4. Examination of the public database of breast cancers revealed tumours exhibiting higher Snail1 expression have an increased risk of disease-recurrence. This was not seen for Snail2, and Zeb1/δEF1 showed a reverse

  8. Functional toxicogenomic profiling expands insight into modulators of formaldehyde toxicity in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew North

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde (FA is a commercially important chemical with numerous and diverse uses. Accordingly, occupational and environmental exposure to FA is prevalent worldwide. Various adverse effects, including nasopharyngeal, sinonasal, and lymphohematopoietic cancers, have been linked to FA exposure, prompting designation of FA as a human carcinogen by U.S. and international scientific entities. Although the mechanism(s of FA toxicity have been well studied, additional insight is needed in regard to the genetic requirements for FA tolerance. In this study, a functional toxicogenomics approach was utilized in the model eukaryotic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify genes and cellular processes modulating the cellular toxicity of FA. Our results demonstrate mutant strains deficient in multiple DNA repair pathways–including homologous recombination, single strand annealing, and postreplication repair–were sensitive to FA, indicating FA may cause various forms of DNA damage in yeast. The SKI complex and its associated factors, which regulate mRNA degradation by the exosome, were also required for FA tolerance, suggesting FA may have unappreciated effects on RNA stability. Furthermore, various strains involved in osmoregulation and stress response were sensitive to FA. Together, our results are generally consistent with FA-mediated damage to both DNA and RNA. Considering DNA repair and RNA degradation pathways are evolutionarily conserved from yeast to humans, mechanisms of FA toxicity identified in yeast may be relevant to human disease and genetic susceptibility.

  9. Evaluation of different co-inoculation time of non-Saccharomyces/Saccharomyces yeasts in order to obtain reduced ethanol wines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mestre María Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Decreasing ethanol content in wines has become one of the main objectives of winemakers in different areas of the world. The use of selected wine yeasts can be considered one of the most effective and simple tools. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of co-inoculation times of selected non-Saccharomyces/Saccharomyces yeasts on the reduction of ethanol levels in wines. Hanseniaspora uvarum BHu9, Starmerella bacillaris BSb55 and Candida membranaefasciens BCm71 were co-inoculate with Saccharomyces cerevisiae under fermentative conditions. Treatments assayed were: pure fermentations of S. cerevisiae BSc203 and non-Saccharomyces yeasts BHu9, BSb55 and BCm71; -co-fermentations: A-BHu9/BSc203; B-BSb55/BSc203 and C-BCm71/BSc203. These co-inoculations were carried out under mixed (simultaneous inoculation, and sequential conditions (non-Saccharomyces yeasts inoculated at initial time and S. cerevisiae at 48, 96 and 144 h. Lower fermentative efficiencies were registered when BHu9 and BSb55 remained pure more time. Conversely, the conversion efficiency was reduced in co-inocula of BCm71/BSc203, when both yeasts interact more time. Metabolites produced during all vinification processes were within acceptable concentration ranges according to the current legislations. Conclusion Time interaction during fermentation processes of non-Saccharomyces and Saccharomyces yeasts showed influence on ethanol production, and this effect would be dependent on the co-inoculated species.

  10. Bioelectrochemical probing of intracellular redox processes in living yeast cells—application of redox polymer wiring in a microfluidic environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Arto; Coman, Vasile; Kostesha, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    utilizing a new double mediator system to map redox metabolism and screen for genetic modifications in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The function of this new double mediator system based on menadione and osmium redox polymer (PVI-Os) is demonstrated. “Wiring” of S. cerevisiae cells using PVI-Os shows...... that microfluidic bioelectrochemical assays employing the menadione–PVI-Os double mediator system provides an effective means to conduct automated microbial assays. FigureMicrofluidic platform for bioelectrochemical assays using osmium redox polymer “wired” living yeast cells...

  11. The Mediator complex and transcription regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poss, Zachary C.; Ebmeier, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    The Mediator complex is a multi-subunit assembly that appears to be required for regulating expression of most RNA polymerase II (pol II) transcripts, which include protein-coding and most non-coding RNA genes. Mediator and pol II function within the pre-initiation complex (PIC), which consists of Mediator, pol II, TFIIA, TFIIB, TFIID, TFIIE, TFIIF and TFIIH and is approximately 4.0 MDa in size. Mediator serves as a central scaffold within the PIC and helps regulate pol II activity in ways that remain poorly understood. Mediator is also generally targeted by sequence-specific, DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) that work to control gene expression programs in response to developmental or environmental cues. At a basic level, Mediator functions by relaying signals from TFs directly to the pol II enzyme, thereby facilitating TF-dependent regulation of gene expression. Thus, Mediator is essential for converting biological inputs (communicated by TFs) to physiological responses (via changes in gene expression). In this review, we summarize an expansive body of research on the Mediator complex, with an emphasis on yeast and mammalian complexes. We focus on the basics that underlie Mediator function, such as its structure and subunit composition, and describe its broad regulatory influence on gene expression, ranging from chromatin architecture to transcription initiation and elongation, to mRNA processing. We also describe factors that influence Mediator structure and activity, including TFs, non-coding RNAs and the CDK8 module. PMID:24088064

  12. Mediation Analysis with Multiple Mediators

    OpenAIRE

    VanderWeele, T.J.; Vansteelandt, S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the causal inference literature on mediation have extended traditional approaches to direct and indirect effects to settings that allow for interactions and non-linearities. In this paper, these approaches from causal inference are further extended to settings in which multiple mediators may be of interest. Two analytic approaches, one based on regression and one based on weighting are proposed to estimate the effect mediated through multiple mediators and the effects throu...

  13. Yeast genetics. A manual of methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J.F.T.; Spencer, D.M.; Bruce, I.J.

    1989-01-01

    This is a bench-top manual of methods needed both for classical genetics as related to yeasts, such as mating, sporulation, isolation of hybrids, microdissection of asci for the isolation of single-spore clones, as well as for mapping of genes and the construction of new strains by protoplast fusion. Special emphasis is on mutations in general, and on methods of isolating a number of important classes of mutants in particular. Basic techniques for the separation of chromosomes by electrophoresis, such as OFAGE, FIGE, and CHEF, are discussed, with detailed protocols for the first two. Furthermore, new methods, e.g. for the isolation of high molecular weight DNA from yeast, isolation of RNA, and techniques for transformation of yeasts, are also described in detail. (orig.) With 10 figs.

  14. Modeling diauxic glycolytic oscillations in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Bjørn Olav; Sørensen, Preben Graae

    2010-01-01

    for investigations of central metabolism dynamics of yeast cells. We have previously proposed a model for the open system comprised of the primary fermentative reactions in yeast that quantitatively describes the oscillatory dynamics. However, this model fails to describe the transient behavior of metabolic......Glycolytic oscillations in a stirred suspension of starved yeast cells is an excellent model system for studying the dynamics of metabolic switching in living systems. In an open-flow system the oscillations can be maintained indefinitely at a constant operating point where they can....... Experimental and computational results strongly suggest that regulation of acetaldehyde explains the observed behavior. We have extended the original model with regulation of pyruvate decarboxylase, a reversible alcohol dehydrogenase, and drainage of pyruvate. Using the method of time rescaling in the extended...

  15. [Urinary infection by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Emerging yeast?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhihal, B; Elhalimi, M; Ghfir, B; Mostachi, A; Lyagoubi, M; Aoufi, S

    2015-12-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a commensal yeast of the digestive, respiratory and genito-urinary tract. It is widely used as a probiotic for the treatment of post-antibiotic diarrhea. It most often occurs in immunocompromised patients frequently causing fungemia. We report the case of an adult diabetic patient who had a urinary tract infection due to S. cerevisiae. The disease started with urination associated with urinary frequency burns without fever. The diagnosis was established by the presence of yeasts on direct examination and positivity of culture on Sabouraud-chloramphenicol three times. The auxanogramme gallery (Auxacolor BioRad(®)) allowed the identification of S. cerevisiae. The patient was put on fluconazole with good outcome. This observation points out that this is an opportunistic yeast in immunocompromised patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Structural Studies of the Yeast Mitochondrial Degradosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feddersen, Ane; Jonstrup, Anette Thyssen; Brodersen, Ditlev Egeskov

    The yeast mitochondrial degradosome/exosome (mtExo) is responsible for most RNA turnover in mitochondria and has been proposed to form a central part of a mitochondrial RNA surveillance system responsible for degradation of aberrant and unprocessed RNA ([1], [2]). In contrast to the cytoplasmic...... and nuclear exosome complexes, which consist of 10-12 different nuclease subunits, the mitochondrial degradosome is composed of only two large subunits - an RNase (Dss1p) and a helicase (Suv3p), belonging the Ski2 class of DExH box RNA helicases. Both subunits are encoded on the yeast nuclear genome...... and and Suv3p from the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, have been cloned for heterologous expression in E. coli. Of the two, we have succeeded in purifying the 73kDa Suv3p by Ni2+-affinity chromatography followed by cleavage of the N-terminal His-tag, cation exchange, and gel filtration. Crystals...

  17. Flux control through protein phosphorylation in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yu; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important mechanisms regulating metabolism as it can directly modify metabolic enzymes by the addition of phosphate groups. Attributed to such a rapid and reversible mechanism, cells can adjust metabolism rapidly in response to temporal changes. The yeast...... as well as identify mechanisms underlying human metabolic diseases. Here we collect functional phosphorylation events of 41 enzymes involved in yeast metabolism and demonstrate functional mechanisms and the application of this information in metabolic engineering. From a systems biology perspective, we...... describe the development of phosphoproteomics in yeast as well as approaches to analysing the phosphoproteomics data. Finally, we focus on integrated analyses with other omics data sets and genome-scale metabolic models. Despite the advances, future studies improving both experimental technologies...

  18. Biofuels. Altered sterol composition renders yeast thermotolerant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspeta, Luis; Chen, Yun; Ghiaci, Payam

    2014-01-01

    adaptive laboratory evolution to select yeast strains with improved growth and ethanol production at ≥40°C. Sequencing of the whole genome, genome-wide gene expression, and metabolic-flux analyses revealed a change in sterol composition, from ergosterol to fecosterol, caused by mutations in the C-5 sterol......Ethanol production for use as a biofuel is mainly achieved through simultaneous saccharification and fermentation by yeast. Operating at ≥40°C would be beneficial in terms of increasing efficiency of the process and reducing costs, but yeast does not grow efficiently at those temperatures. We used...... desaturase gene, and increased expression of genes involved in sterol biosynthesis. Additionally, large chromosome III rearrangements and mutations in genes associated with DNA damage and respiration were found, but contributed less to the thermotolerant phenotype....

  19. Probiotic Properties of Non-Saccharomyces Yeasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Ida Mosbech

    to harmless luminal substances is a key feature of the intestinal immune system. In this context, dendritic cells (DCs) present in the tissues lining the human gut are central players involved in microbial sensing and shaping of appropriate adaptive immune responses. Probiotics are live microorganisms which...... when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. While the majority of probiotic microorganisms studied to date are lactic acid bacteria, research in yeasts with potentially beneficial influences on human health has mainly revolved around Saccharomyces boulardii. This yeast...... has shown a positive impact on disease outcome in clinical studies of inflammatory bowel disease, indicating an ability of S. boulardii to influence human immune responses underlying intestinal inflammation. Consequent to this focus on S. boulardii as the fundamental probiotic yeast, very little...

  20. Yeasts and yeast-like organisms associated with fruits and blossoms of different fruit trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadkertiová, Renáta; Molnárová, Jana; Vránová, Dana; Sláviková, Elena

    2012-12-01

    Yeasts are common inhabitants of the phyllosphere, but our knowledge of their diversity in various plant organs is still limited. This study focused on the diversity of yeasts and yeast-like organisms associated with matured fruits and fully open blossoms of apple, plum, and pear trees, during 2 consecutive years at 3 localities in southwest Slovakia. The occurrence of yeasts and yeast-like organisms in fruit samples was 2½ times higher and the yeast community more diverse than that in blossom samples. Only 2 species (Aureobasidium pullulans and Metschnikowia pulcherrima) occurred regularly in the blossom samples, whereas Galactomyces candidus, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Hanseniaspora uvarum, M. pulcherrima, Pichia kluyveri, Pichia kudriavzevii, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were the most frequently isolated species from the fruit samples. The ratio of the number of samples where only individual species were present to the number of samples where 2 or more species were found (consortium) was counted. The occurrence of individual species in comparison with consortia was much higher in blossom samples than in fruit samples. In the latter, consortia predominated. Aureobasidium pullulans, M. pulcherrima, and S. cerevisiae, isolated from both the fruits and blossoms, can be considered as resident yeast species of various fruit tree species cultivated in southwest Slovakia localities.

  1. New yeasts-new brews: modern approaches to brewing yeast design and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, B; Geertman, J-M A; Hittinger, C T; Krogerus, K; Libkind, D; Louis, E J; Magalhães, F; Sampaio, J P

    2017-06-01

    The brewing industry is experiencing a period of change and experimentation largely driven by customer demand for product diversity. This has coincided with a greater appreciation of the role of yeast in determining the character of beer and the widespread availability of powerful tools for yeast research. Genome analysis in particular has helped clarify the processes leading to domestication of brewing yeast and has identified domestication signatures that may be exploited for further yeast development. The functional properties of non-conventional yeast (both Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces) are being assessed with a view to creating beers with new flavours as well as producing flavoursome non-alcoholic beers. The discovery of the psychrotolerant S. eubayanus has stimulated research on de novo S. cerevisiae × S. eubayanus hybrids for low-temperature lager brewing and has led to renewed interest in the functional importance of hybrid organisms and the mechanisms that determine hybrid genome function and stability. The greater diversity of yeast that can be applied in brewing, along with an improved understanding of yeasts' evolutionary history and biology, is expected to have a significant and direct impact on the brewing industry, with potential for improved brewing efficiency, product diversity and, above all, customer satisfaction. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of beta-alanine synthase from the yeast Saccharomyces kluyveri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobritzsch, D.; Gojkovic, Zoran; Andersen, Birgit

    2003-01-01

    In eukaryotes and some bacteria, the third step of reductive pyrimidine catabolism is catalyzed by beta-alanine synthase (EC 3.5.1.6). Crystals of the recombinant enzyme from the yeast Saccharomyces kluyveri were obtained using sodium citrate as a precipitant. The crystals belong to space group P2...

  3. Increased availability of NADH in metabolically engineered baker's yeast improves transaminase-oxidoreductase coupled asymmetric whole-cell bioconversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Hägglöf, Cecilia; Weber, Nora

    2016-01-01

    yeast for transamination-reduction coupled asymmetric one-pot conversion was investigated. RESULTS: A series of active whole-cell biocatalysts were constructed by over-expressing the (S)-selective ω-transaminase (VAMT) from Capsicum chinense together with the NADH-dependent (S)-selective alcohol...

  4. Chemoselective biohydrogenation of chalcone (2{Epsilon})-3-(1,3-benzodioxole-5-yl)-1-phenyl-2-propen-1-one mediated by baker yeasts immobilized in polymeric supports; Bioidrogenacao quimioseletiva da chalcona (2{Epsilon})-3-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-il)-1-fenil-2-propen-1-ona mediada por fermentos de pao imobilizado em suportes polimericos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mundstock, Flavia L.S.; Silva, Vanessa D.; Nascimento, Maria da G., E-mail: mundstock@qmc.ufsc.b [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (DQ/UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2009-07-01

    In this study, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, baker's yeast (BY) was immobilized in poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), sodium caseinate (SC), gelatin (G) films and in agar (A) and gelatin (G) gels, and used as a biocatalyst in the biohydrogenation reaction of (2{Epsilon})-3-(1,3-benzodioxyl-5-yl)-1-phenyl-2-propen-1-one (1). The transformation of (1) into the corresponding dehydro chalcone (2) through biohydrogenation reactions was carried out in n-hexane at 25 or 35 deg C, for 4-48 h reaction. The product conversion, under different experimental conditions, was evaluated by hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance, {sup 1}H NMR.The highest conversion degrees were achieved using BY immobilized in agar gel, (29-47%), depending also on the temperature. Using BY immobilized in PEO, PVA, SC and G films, the conversion into (2) was lower (0-21%). The results show the feasibility of the use of BY immobilized in polymeric materials to reduce a,b-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. (author)

  5. Sister kinetochores are mechanically fused during meiosis I in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangapani, Krishna K; Duro, Eris; Deng, Yi; Alves, Flavia de Lima; Ye, Qiaozhen; Opoku, Kwaku N; Ceto, Steven; Rappsilber, Juri; Corbett, Kevin D; Biggins, Sue; Marston, Adèle L; Asbury, Charles L

    2014-10-10

    Production of healthy gametes requires a reductional meiosis I division in which replicated sister chromatids comigrate, rather than separate as in mitosis or meiosis II. Fusion of sister kinetochores during meiosis I may underlie sister chromatid comigration in diverse organisms, but direct evidence for such fusion has been lacking. We used laser trapping and quantitative fluorescence microscopy to study native kinetochore particles isolated from yeast. Meiosis I kinetochores formed stronger attachments and carried more microtubule-binding elements than kinetochores isolated from cells in mitosis or meiosis II. The meiosis I-specific monopolin complex was both necessary and sufficient to drive these modifications. Thus, kinetochore fusion directs sister chromatid comigration, a conserved feature of meiosis that is fundamental to Mendelian inheritance. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Apple Can Act as Anti-Aging on Yeast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Palermo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, epidemiological and biochemical studies have shown that eating apples is associated with reduction of occurrence of cancer, degenerative, and cardiovascular diseases. This association is often attributed to the presence of antioxidants such as ascorbic acid (vitamin C and polyphenols. The substances that hinder the presence of free radicals are also able to protect cells from aging. In our laboratory we used yeast, a unicellular eukaryotic organism, to determine in vivo efficacy of entire apples and their components, such as flesh, skin and polyphenolic fraction, to influence aging and oxidative stress. Our results indicate that all the apple components increase lifespan, with the best result given by the whole fruit, indicating a cooperative role of all apple components.

  7. FUNCTIONAL PROPERTIES OF YEASTS ISOLATED FROM SOME NIGERIAN TRADITIONAL FERMENTED FOODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolulope P. Alakeji

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts play important roles in confering some desirable qualities such as nutritional value in traditional fermented foods. This study was carried out to investigate the potentials of yeasts isolated from some Nigerian traditional fermented foods for functional characteristics such as growth at pH 2.5 and 2% bile salts concentration and ability to lower cholesterol in culture medium. A total of 40 yeast strains were isolated from burukutu, ogi and pito. They were characterized phenotypically. Fifteen strains were selected based on the ability to tolerate pH 2.5 and 2% bile salts and they were further identified using API 20C AUX (Biomerieux, France to be Debaryomyces hansenii (5, Candida krusei (4, Candida glabrata (2, Candida colliculosa (1, Pichia anomala (1, Pichia farinosa (1 and Pichia membranefaciens (1. At pH 2.5, C. glabrata SA2 showed the highest increase in viable cells count after 24h (6.31 log10 cfu ml-1 while the most sensitive strain was P. membranefaciens BA2 (0.70 log10 cfu ml-1. P. membranefaciens BA2 survived in 2% bile salts than other yeast strains, with viable cell increase of 0.84 log10 cfu ml-1 after 24 h while the least tolerance was observed for D. hansenii OA1 with an increase in viable cells of 7.76 log10 cfu ml-1. C. krusei OB1 exhibited the greatest reduction of cholesterol of 91.34% while the least reduction of 24.28% was observed for D. hansenii OA1 after 48h incubation. The yeast strains in this study demonstrated functional attributes which can be employed as dietary adjuncts for the development of non-dairy beverages with hypocholesterolemic attributes.

  8. Yeast Infection Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cheese-like discharge Painful urination Redness in the vagina Yeast infection of the penis may cause: Redness Scaling Rash ... on the location of your symptoms: If a vaginal yeast infection is suspected , your health care provider will perform ...

  9. Bayesian modeling of the yeast SH3 domain interactome predicts spatiotemporal dynamics of endocytosis proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffi Tonikian

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available SH3 domains are peptide recognition modules that mediate the assembly of diverse biological complexes. We scanned billions of phage-displayed peptides to map the binding specificities of the SH3 domain family in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although most of the SH3 domains fall into the canonical classes I and II, each domain utilizes distinct features of its cognate ligands to achieve binding selectivity. Furthermore, we uncovered several SH3 domains with specificity profiles that clearly deviate from the two canonical classes. In conjunction with phage display, we used yeast two-hybrid and peptide array screening to independently identify SH3 domain binding partners. The results from the three complementary techniques were integrated using a Bayesian algorithm to generate a high-confidence yeast SH3 domain interaction map. The interaction map was enriched for proteins involved in endocytosis, revealing a set of SH3-mediated interactions that underlie formation of protein complexes essential to this biological pathway. We used the SH3 domain interaction network to predict the dynamic localization of several previously uncharacterized endocytic proteins, and our analysis suggests a novel role for the SH3 domains of Lsb3p and Lsb4p as hubs that recruit and assemble several endocytic complexes.

  10. Autophagy: one more Nobel Prize for yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Zimmermann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent announcement of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, awarded to Yoshinori Ohsumi for the discoveries of mechanisms governing autophagy, underscores the importance of intracellular degradation and recycling. At the same time, it further cements yeast, in which this field decisively developed, as a prolific model organism. Here we provide a quick historical overview that mirrors both the importance of autophagy as a conserved and essential process for cellular life and death as well as the crucial role of yeast in its mechanistic characterization.

  11. Characterization of wine yeasts for ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, J.; Benitez, T.

    1986-11-01

    Selected wine yeasts were tested for their ethanol and sugar tolerance, and for their fermentative capacity. Growth (..mu..) and fermentation rates (..nu..) were increasingly inhibited by increasing ethanol and glucose concentrations, ''flor'' yeasts being the least inhibited. Except in the latter strains, the ethanol production rate was accelerated by adding the glucose stepwise. The best fermenting strains selected in laboratory medium were also the best at fermenting molasses. Invertase activity was not a limiting step in ethanol production, ..nu.. being accelerated by supplementing molasses with ammonia and biotine, and by cell recycle.

  12. The proline metabolism intermediate Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate directly inhibits the mitochondrial respiration in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Akira; Nasuno, Ryo; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2012-07-30

    The proline metabolism intermediate Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) induces cell death in animals, plants and yeasts. To elucidate how P5C triggers cell death, we analyzed P5C metabolism, mitochondrial respiration and superoxide anion generation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Gene disruption analysis revealed that P5C-mediated cell death was not due to P5C metabolism. Interestingly, deficiency in mitochondrial respiration suppressed the sensitivity of yeast cells to P5C. In addition, we found that P5C inhibits the mitochondrial respiration and induces a burst of superoxide anions from the mitochondria. We propose that P5C regulates cell death via the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Occurrence of Killer Yeast Strains in Fruit and Berry Wine Yeast Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gintare Gulbiniene

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Apple, cranberry, chokeberry and Lithuanian red grape wine yeast populations were used for the determination of killer yeast occurrence. According to the tests of the killer characteristics and immunity the isolated strains were divided into seven groups. In this work the activity of killer toxins purified from some typical strains was evaluated. The analysed strains produced different amounts of active killer toxin and some of them possessed new industrially significant killer properties. Total dsRNA extractions in 11 killer strains of yeast isolated from spontaneous fermentations revealed that the molecular basis of the killer phenomenon was not only dsRNAs, but also unidentified genetic determinants.

  14. Guidelines and recommendations on yeast cell death nomenclature

    OpenAIRE

    Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Bauer, Maria Anna; Zimmermann, Andreas; Aguilera, Andres; Austriaco, Nicanor; Sigrist, Stephan J.

    2018-01-01

    Elucidating the biology of yeast in its full complexity has major implications for science, medicine and industry. One of the most critical processes determining yeast life and physiology is cellular demise. However, the investigation of yeast cell death is a relatively young field, and a widely accepted set of concepts and terms is still missing. Here, we propose unified criteria for the definition of accidental, regulated, and programmed forms of cell death in yeast based on a series of mor...

  15. Effect of increasing growth temperature on yeast fermentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of increasing growth temperature on yeast fermentation was studied at approximately 5 oC intervals over a range of 18 – 37 oC, using one strain each of ale, lager and wine yeast. The ale and wine yeasts grew at all the temperatures tested, but lager yeast failed to grow at 37 oC. All these strains gave lower ...

  16. Reduction corporoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakky, Tariq S; Martinez, Daniel; Yang, Christopher; Carrion, Rafael E

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the first video demonstration of reduction corporoplasty in the management of phallic disfigurement in a 17 year old man with a history sickle cell disease and priapism. Surgical management of aneurysmal dilation of the corpora has yet to be defined in the literature. We preformed bilateral elliptical incisions over the lateral corpora as management of aneurysmal dilation of the corpora to correct phallic disfigurement. The patient tolerated the procedure well and has resolution of his corporal disfigurement. Reduction corporoplasty using bilateral lateral elliptical incisions in the management of aneurysmal dilation of the corpora is a safe an feasible operation in the management of phallic disfigurement.

  17. Pleiotropic functions of the yeast Greatwall-family protein kinase Rim15p: a novel target for the control of alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    Rim15p, a Greatwall-family protein kinase in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is required for cellular nutrient responses, such as the entry into quiescence and the induction of meiosis and sporulation. In higher eukaryotes, the orthologous gene products are commonly involved in the cell cycle G 2 /M transition. How are these pleiotropic functions generated from a single family of protein kinases? Recent advances in both research fields have identified the conserved Greatwall-mediated signaling pathway and a variety of downstream target molecules. In addition, our studies of S. cerevisiae sake yeast strains revealed that Rim15p also plays a significant role in the control of alcoholic fermentation. Despite an extensive history of research on glycolysis and alcoholic fermentation, there has been no critical clue to artificial modification of fermentation performance of yeast cells. Our finding of an in vivo metabolic regulatory mechanism is expected to provide a major breakthrough in yeast breeding technologies for fermentation applications.

  18. Electricity production from microbial fuel cell by using yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorasingha, A.; Souvakon, C.; Boonchom, K.

    2006-01-01

    The continuous search for methods to generate electricity from renewable sources such as water, solar energy, wind, nuclear or chemicals was discussed with particular focus on attaining the full power of the microbial fuel cell (MFC). Under ideal environmental conditions, the only byproducts of a biofuel cell would be water and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The production of energy from renewables such as biomass is important for sustainable development and reducing global emissions of CO 2 . Hydrogen can also be an important component of an energy infrastructure that reduces CO 2 emissions if the hydrogen is produced from renewable sources and used in fuel cells. Hydrogen gas can be biologically produced at high concentration from the fermentation of high sugar substrates such as glucose and sucrose. Some of the issues of MFC design were addressed, including the use of cheap substrates to derive microbial electricity. In the MFC, yeast donates electrons to a chemical electron mediator, which in turn transfers the electrons to an electrode, producing electricity. Experimental results showed that glucose yielded the highest peak voltage, but a semi-processed sugar and molasses were similar to glucose in the electricity production pattern. It was noted that this technology is only at the research stages, and more research is needed before household microbial fuel cells can be made available for producing power for prolonged periods of time. Future research efforts will focus on increasing the efficiency, finding alternatives to hazardous electron mediators and finding new microbes. 12 refs., 6 figs

  19. Guidelines and recommendations on yeast cell death nomenclature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Bauer, Maria Anna; Zimmermann, Andreas; Aguilera, Andrés; Austriaco, Nicanor; Ayscough, Kathryn; Balzan, Rena; Bar-Nun, Shoshana; Barrientos, Antonio; Belenky, Peter; Blondel, Marc; Braun, Ralf J; Breitenbach, Michael; Burhans, William C; Büttner, Sabrina; Cavalieri, Duccio; Chang, Michael; Cooper, Katrina F; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Costa, Vítor; Cullin, Christophe; Dawes, Ian; Dengjel, Jörn; Dickman, Martin B; Eisenberg, Tobias; Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Fasel, Nicolas; Fröhlich, Kai-Uwe; Gargouri, Ali; Giannattasio, Sergio; Goffrini, Paola; Gourlay, Campbell W; Grant, Chris M; Greenwood, Michael T; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Heger, Thomas; Heinisch, Jürgen; Herker, Eva; Herrmann, Johannes M; Hofer, Sebastian; Jiménez-Ruiz, Antonio; Jungwirth, Helmut; Kainz, Katharina; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Ludovico, Paula; Manon, Stéphen; Martegani, Enzo; Mazzoni, Cristina; Megeney, Lynn A; Meisinger, Chris; Nielsen, Jens; Nyström, Thomas; Osiewacz, Heinz D; Outeiro, Tiago F; Park, Hay-Oak; Pendl, Tobias; Petranovic, Dina; Picot, Stephane; Polčic, Peter; Powers, Ted; Ramsdale, Mark; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Rockenfeller, Patrick; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Schaffrath, Raffael; Segovia, Maria; Severin, Fedor F; Sharon, Amir; Sigrist, Stephan J; Sommer-Ruck, Cornelia; Sousa, Maria João; Thevelein, Johan M; Thevissen, Karin; Titorenko, Vladimir; Toledano, Michel B; Tuite, Mick; Vögtle, F-Nora; Westermann, Benedikt; Winderickx, Joris; Wissing, Silke; Wölfl, Stefan; Zhang, Zhaojie J; Zhao, Richard Y; Zhou, Bing; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido; Madeo, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Elucidating the biology of yeast in its full complexity has major implications for science, medicine and industry. One of the most critical processes determining yeast life and physiology is cel-lular demise. However, the investigation of yeast cell death is a relatively young field, and a widely

  20. Selection of oleaginous yeasts for fatty acid production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, Dennis; Biezen, van Nick; Martens, Dirk; Peters, Linda; Zilver, van de Eric; Jacobs-van Dreumel, Nicole; Wijffels, René H.; Lokman, Christien

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oleaginous yeast species are an alternative for the production of lipids or triacylglycerides (TAGs). These yeasts are usually non-pathogenic and able to store TAGs ranging from 20 % to 70 % of their cell mass depending on culture conditions. TAGs originating from oleaginous yeasts

  1. Performance of baker's yeast produced using date syrup substrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Baker's yeast was produced from three selected baker's yeast strains using date syrup as a substrate at low and high flow rate compared to those produced using molasses substrates. Performance of the produced baker's yeasts on Arabic bread quality was investigated. Baking tests showed a positive relationship between ...

  2. Triacetic acid lactone production in industrial Saccharomyces yeast strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triacetic acid lactone (TAL) is a potential platform chemical that can be produced in yeast. To evaluate the potential for industrial yeast strains to produce TAL, the g2ps1 gene encoding 2-pyrone synthase was transformed into thirteen industrial yeast strains of varied genetic background. TAL produ...

  3. 21 CFR 573.750 - Pichia pastoris dried yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pichia pastoris dried yeast. 573.750 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.750 Pichia pastoris dried yeast. (a) Identity. The food additive Pichia pastoris dried yeast may be used in feed formulations of broiler chickens as a source of protein not to...

  4. Modulation of intracellular protein degradation by SSB1-SIS1 chaperon system in yeast S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, M

    1997-06-09

    In prokaryotes, DnaK-DnaJ chaperon is involved in the protein degradation catalyzed by proteases La and ClpA/B complex as shown in E. coli. To extend this into eukaryotic cells, we examined the effects of hsp70 genes, SSA1 and SSB1, and DnaJ genes, SIS1 and YDJ1, on the growth of proteasome subunit mutants of the yeast S. cerevisiae. The results identified SSB1 and SIS1 as a pair of chaperon genes specifically involved in efficient protein turnover in the yeast, whose overexpression suppressed the growth defects caused by the proteasome mutations. Moreover, a single amino acid substitution in the putative peptide-binding site of SSB1 protein profoundly enhanced the suppression activity, indicating that the activity is mediated by the peptide-binding activity of this chaperon. Thus SSB1, with its partner DnaJ, SIS1, modulates the efficiency of protein turnover through its chaperon activity.

  5. Transcriptional reprogramming in yeast using dCas9 and combinatorial gRNA strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard Jensen, Emil; Ferreira, Raphael; Jakociunas, Tadas

    2017-01-01

    on developing synthetic biology tools for orthogonal control of transcription. Most recently, the nuclease-deficient Cas9 (dCas9) has emerged as a flexible tool for controlling activation and repression of target genes, by the simple RNA-guided positioning of dCas9 in the vicinity of the target gene...... transcription start site. In this study we compared two different systems of dCas9-mediated transcriptional reprogramming, and applied them to genes controlling two biosynthetic pathways for biobased production of isoprenoids and triacylglycerols (TAGs) in baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By testing 101...... production and increases in TAG. Taken together, we show similar performance for a constitutive and an inducible dCas9 approach, and identify multiplex gRNA designs that can significantly perturb isoprenoid production and TAG profiles in yeast without editing the genomic context of the target genes. We also...

  6. Looking for immunotolerance: a case of allergy to baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajno, G B; Passalacqua, G; Salpietro, C; Vita, D; Caminiti, L; Barberio, G

    2005-09-01

    We describe one case of baker's yeast true allergy in a boy with previously diagnosed mite-allergy and atopic dermatitis. At the age of 6, being atopic dermatitis and rhinitis well controlled by drugs, he began to experience generalized urticaria and asthma after eating pizza and bread, but only fresh from the oven. The diagnostic workup revealed single sensitization to baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), and a severe systemic reaction also occurred during the prick-by-prick procedure. After discussing with parents, no special dietary restriction was suggested but the use of autoinjectable adrenaline and on demand salbutamol. A diary of symptoms was recorded by means of a visual-analog scale. During the subsequent 2 years, the severity of symptoms was progressively reduced, and presently urticaria has disappeared. Only cough persists, invariantly after eating just-baked and yeast-containing foods. If bread, pizza and cakes are ate more than one hour after preparation, no symptom occur at all. Baker's yeast is a common component of everyday diet and it usually acts as an allergen only by the inhalatory route. We speculate that the continuous exposure to saccharomyces in foods may have lead to an immunotolerance with a progressive reduction of symptoms, whereas why the allergens is active only in ready-baked foods remains unexplained.

  7. Growth of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus fed with different levels of alcohol yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medri, V; Pereira, G V; Leonhardt, J H

    2000-02-01

    Two hundred and forty 45-day-old fingerlings of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), sexually reverted with an initial average weight of 1.25 +/- 0.14 g, distributed in a totally casualized delineation, during 330 days. The effect of the substitution of 10%, 20% and 30% of the ration by distillery yeast (Saccharomiyces cerevisae) in balanced experimental rations on the development in the breeding of tilapias did not show a harmful effect up to the maximum tested level of 30%, showing that the choice of the yeast in the ration for these fishes depends on the availability and occasional cost. The yeast provides fish with good resistance to unfavorable environmental conditions, which could be verified since there were no statistical differences among the treatments with different levels of yeast and the witness. The long growth rate in terms of length and weight can be attributed to the little available space for each specimen, not obeying the limit of populational density, as well as reduction of food ingestion, which coincide with the winter season, above of the absence of natural feeding.

  8. Selection of non-Saccharomyces yeast strains for reducing alcohol levels in wine by sugar respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirós, Manuel; Rojas, Virginia; Gonzalez, Ramon; Morales, Pilar

    2014-07-02

    Respiration of sugars by non-Saccharomyces yeasts has been recently proposed for lowering alcohol levels in wine. Development of industrial fermentation processes based on such an approach requires, amongst other steps, the identification of yeast strains which are able to grow and respire under the relatively harsh conditions found in grape must. This work describes the characterization of a collection of non-Saccharomyces yeast strains in order to identify candidate yeast strains for this specific application. It involved the estimation of respiratory quotient (RQ) values under aerated conditions, at low pH and high sugar concentrations, calculation of yields of ethanol and other relevant metabolites, and characterization of growth responses to the main stress factors found during the first stages of alcoholic fermentation. Physiological features of some strains of Metschnikowia pulcherrima or two species of Kluyveromyces, suggest they are suitable for lowering ethanol yields by respiration. The unsuitability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for this purpose was not due to ethanol yields (under aerated conditions they are low enough for a significant reduction in final ethanol content), but to the high acetic acid yields under these growth conditions. According to results from controlled aeration fermentations with one strain of M. pulcherrima, design of an aeration regime allowing for lowering ethanol yields though preserving grape must components from excessive oxidation, would be conceivable. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Identifying Cis-Regulatory Changes Involved in the Evolution of Aerobic Fermentation in Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhenguo; Wang, Tzi-Yuan; Tsai, Bing-Shi; Wu, Fang-Ting; Yu, Fu-Jung; Tseng, Yu-Jung; Sung, Huang-Mo; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    Gene regulation change has long been recognized as an important mechanism for phenotypic evolution. We used the evolution of yeast aerobic fermentation as a model to explore how gene regulation has evolved and how this process has contributed to phenotypic evolution and adaptation. Most eukaryotes fully oxidize glucose to CO2 and H2O in mitochondria to maximize energy yield, whereas some yeasts, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its relatives, predominantly ferment glucose into ethanol even in the presence of oxygen, a phenomenon known as aerobic fermentation. We examined the genome-wide gene expression levels among 12 different yeasts and found that a group of genes involved in the mitochondrial respiration process showed the largest reduction in gene expression level during the evolution of aerobic fermentation. Our analysis revealed that the downregulation of these genes was significantly associated with massive loss of binding motifs of Cbf1p in the fermentative yeasts. Our experimental assays confirmed the binding of Cbf1p to the predicted motif and the activator role of Cbf1p. In summary, our study laid a foundation to unravel the long-time mystery about the genetic basis of evolution of aerobic fermentation, providing new insights into understanding the role of cis-regulatory changes in phenotypic evolution. PMID:23650209

  10. Integrated control of Penicillium digitatum by the predacious yeast Saccharomycopsis crataegensis and sodium bicarbonate on oranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Pimenta

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Our investigation of integrated biological control (IBC started with an assay testing activity of the predacious yeast Saccharomycopsis crataegensis UFMG-DC19.2 against Penicillium digitatum LCP 4354, a very aggressive fungus that causes postharvest decay in oranges. Under unfavourable environmental conditions, the yeast showed a high potential for control (39.9% disease severity reduction of this fungus. This result was decisive for the next step, in which S. crataegensis was tested in association with sodium bicarbonate salt, a generally regarded as safe (GRAS substance. The yeast was able to survive at different concentrations of the salt (1%, 2% and 5%, and continued to grow for a week at the wound site, remaining viable at high population for 14 days on the fruit surface. The yeast alone reduced the severity of decay by 41.7% and sodium bicarbonate alone reduced severity of decay by 19.8%, whereas the application of both led to a delay in the development of symptoms from 2 to 10 days. Ingredients of the formulations were not aggressive to fruits since no lesions were produced in control experiments.

  11. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YFR015C, YJL137C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available yeast homolog; expression induced by glucose limitation, nitrogen starvation, environmental stress, and entr...pression induced by glucose limitation, nitrogen starvation, environmental stress, and entry into stationary

  12. Functional heterologous protein expression by genetically engineered probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren E Hudson

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested the potential of probiotic organisms to be adapted for the synthesis and delivery of oral therapeutics. The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii would be especially well suited for this purpose due to its ability, in contrast to probiotic prokaryotes, to perform eukaryotic post translational modifications. This probiotic yeast thus has the potential to express a broad array of therapeutic proteins. Currently, however, use of wild type (WT S. boulardii relies on antibiotic resistance for the selection of transformed yeast. Here we report the creation of auxotrophic mutant strains of S. boulardii that can be selected without antibiotics and demonstrate that these yeast can express functional recombinant protein even when recovered from gastrointestinal immune tissues in mice. A UV mutagenesis approach was employed to generate three uracil auxotrophic S. boulardii mutants that show a low rate of reversion to wild type growth. These mutants can express recombinant protein and are resistant in vitro to low pH, bile acid salts, and anaerobic conditions. Critically, oral gavage experiments using C57BL/6 mice demonstrate that mutant S. boulardii survive and are taken up into gastrointestinal immune tissues on a similar level as WT S. boulardii. Mutant yeast recovered from gastrointestinal immune tissues furthermore retain expression of functional recombinant protein. These data show that auxotrophic mutant S. boulardii can safely express recombinant protein without antibiotic selection and can deliver recombinant protein to gastrointestinal immune tissues. These auxotrophic mutants of S. boulardii pave the way for future experiments to test the ability of S. boulardii to deliver therapeutics and mediate protection against gastrointestinal disorders.

  13. Caspase inhibitors of the P35 family are more active when purified from yeast than bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo L Brand

    Full Text Available Many insect viruses express caspase inhibitors of the P35 superfamily, which prevent defensive host apoptosis to enable viral propagation. The prototypical P35 family member, AcP35 from Autographa californica M nucleopolyhedrovirus, has been extensively studied. Bacterially purified AcP35 has been previously shown to inhibit caspases from insect, mammalian and nematode species. This inhibition occurs via a pseudosubstrate mechanism involving caspase-mediated cleavage of a "reactive site loop" within the P35 protein, which ultimately leaves cleaved P35 covalently bound to the caspase's active site. We observed that AcP35 purifed from Saccharomyces cerevisae inhibited caspase activity more efficiently than AcP35 purified from Escherichia coli. This differential potency was more dramatic for another P35 family member, MaviP35, which inhibited human caspase 3 almost 300-fold more potently when purified from yeast than bacteria. Biophysical assays revealed that MaviP35 proteins produced in bacteria and yeast had similar primary and secondary structures. However, bacterially produced MaviP35 possessed greater thermal stability and propensity to form higher order oligomers than its counterpart purified from yeast. Caspase 3 could process yeast-purified MaviP35, but failed to detectably cleave bacterially purified MaviP35. These data suggest that bacterially produced P35 proteins adopt subtly different conformations from their yeast-expressed counterparts, which hinder caspase access to the reactive site loop to reduce the potency of caspase inhibition, and promote aggregation. These data highlight the differential caspase inhibition by recombinant P35 proteins purified from different sources, and caution that analyses of bacterially produced P35 family members (and perhaps other types of proteins may underestimate their activity.

  14. The phytopathogenic virulent effector protein RipI induces apoptosis in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Meng-Ying; Sun, Yun-Hao; Li, Pai; Fu, Bei; Shen, Dong; Lu, Yong-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Virulent protein toxins secreted by the bacterial pathogens can cause cytotoxicity by various molecular mechanisms to combat host cell defense. On the other hand, these proteins can also be used as probes to investigate the defense pathway of host innate immunity. Ralstonia solanacearum, one of the most virulent bacterial phytopathogens, translocates more than 70 effector proteins via type III secretion system during infection. Here, we characterized the cytotoxicity of effector RipI in budding yeast Saccharomyce scerevisiae, an alternative host model. We found that over-expression of RipI resulted in severe growth defect and arginine (R) 117 within the predicted integrase motif was required for inhibition of yeast growth. The phenotype of death manifested the hallmarks of apoptosis. Our data also revealed that RipI-induced apoptosis was independent of Yca1 and mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathways because Δyca1 and Δaif1 were both sensitive to RipI as compared with the wild type. We further demonstrated that RipI was localized in the yeast nucleus and the N-terminal 1-174aa was required for the localization. High-throughput RNA sequencing analysis showed that upon RipI over-expression, 101 unigenes of yeast ribosome presented lower expression level, and 42 GO classes related to the nucleus or recombination were enriched with differential expression levels. Taken together, our data showed that a nuclear-targeting effector RipI triggers yeast apoptosis, potentially dependent on its integrase function. Our results also provided an alternative strategy to dissect the signaling pathway of cytotoxicity induced by the protein toxins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Functional heterologous protein expression by genetically engineered probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Lauren E; Fasken, Milo B; McDermott, Courtney D; McBride, Shonna M; Kuiper, Emily G; Guiliano, David B; Corbett, Anita H; Lamb, Tracey J

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested the potential of probiotic organisms to be adapted for the synthesis and delivery of oral therapeutics. The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii would be especially well suited for this purpose due to its ability, in contrast to probiotic prokaryotes, to perform eukaryotic post translational modifications. This probiotic yeast thus has the potential to express a broad array of therapeutic proteins. Currently, however, use of wild type (WT) S. boulardii relies on antibiotic resistance for the selection of transformed yeast. Here we report the creation of auxotrophic mutant strains of S. boulardii that can be selected without antibiotics and demonstrate that these yeast can express functional recombinant protein even when recovered from gastrointestinal immune tissues in mice. A UV mutagenesis approach was employed to generate three uracil auxotrophic S. boulardii mutants that show a low rate of reversion to wild type growth. These mutants can express recombinant protein and are resistant in vitro to low pH, bile acid salts, and anaerobic conditions. Critically, oral gavage experiments using C57BL/6 mice demonstrate that mutant S. boulardii survive and are taken up into gastrointestinal immune tissues on a similar level as WT S. boulardii. Mutant yeast recovered from gastrointestinal immune tissues furthermore retain expression of functional recombinant protein. These data show that auxotrophic mutant S. boulardii can safely express recombinant protein without antibiotic selection and can deliver recombinant protein to gastrointestinal immune tissues. These auxotrophic mutants of S. boulardii pave the way for future experiments to test the ability of S. boulardii to deliver therapeutics and mediate protection against gastrointestinal disorders.

  16. Yeast mother cell-specific aging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Breitenbach, M.; Laun, P.; Pichová, Alena; Madeo, F.; Heeren, G.; Kohlwein, S. D.; Froehlich, K. U.; Dawes, I.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 18, - (2001), s. 21 ISSN 0749-503X. [International Conference on Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology /20./. 26.08.2001-31.08.2001, Prague] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  17. Xylitol production from colombian native yeast strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isleny Andrea Vanegas Córdoba

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Xylitol is an alternative sweetener with similar characteristics to sucrose that has become of great interest, due mainly to its safe use in diabetic patients and those deficient in glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase. Its chemical production is expensive and generates undesirable by-products, whereas biotechnological process, which uses different yeasts genera, is a viable production alternative because it is safer and specific. Colombia has a privilege geographic location and offers a great microbial variety, this can be taken advantage of with academic and commercial goals. Because of this, some native microorganisms with potential to produce xylitol were screened in this work. It were isolated 25 yeasts species, from which was possible to identify 84% by the kit API 20C-AUX. Three yeasts: Candida kefyr, C. tropicalis y C. parapsilosis presented greater capacity to degrade xylose compared to the others, therefore they were selected for the later evaluation of its productive capacity. Discontinuous cellular cultures were developed in shaken flasks at 200 rpm and 35°C by 30 hours, using synthetic media with xylose as carbon source. Xylose consumption and xylitol production were evaluated by thin layer chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography. The maximal efficiency were obtained with Candida kefyr and C. tropicalis (Yp/s 0.5 y 0.43 g/g, respectively, using an initial xylose concentration of 20 g/L. Key words: Xylitol, xylose, yeasts, Candida kefyr, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis.

  18. Yeast metabolic engineering for hemicellulosic ethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer Van Vleet; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2009-01-01

    Efficient fermentation of hemicellulosic sugars is critical for the bioconversion of lignocellulosics to ethanol. Efficient sugar uptake through the heterologous expression of yeast and fungal xylose/glucose transporters can improve fermentation if other metabolic steps are not rate limiting. Rectification of cofactor imbalances through heterologous expression of...

  19. Uncommon opportunistic yeast bloodstream infections from Qatar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taj-Aldeen, S.J.; AbdulWahab, A.; Kolecka, A.; Deshmukh, A.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Boekhout, T.

    2014-01-01

    Eleven uncommon yeast species that are associated with high mortality rates irrespective of antifungal therapy were isolated from 17/187 (201 episodes) pediatric and elderly patients with fungemia from Qatar. The samples were taken over a 6-year period (January 2004-December 2010). Isolated species

  20. Ethanol fermentation with a flocculating yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Admassu, W; Korus, R A; Heimsch, R C

    1985-08-01

    A 100 cm x 5.7 cm internal diameter tower fermentor was fabricated and operated continuously for 11 months using the floc-forming yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (American Type Culture Collection 4097). Steady state operation of the system was characterized at 32/sup 0/C and pH 4.0 for glucose concentrations ranging from 105 to 215 g l/sup -1/. The height of the yeast bed in the tower was maintained at 80 cm. The high yeast density, ethanol concentration and low pH prevented bacterial contamination in the reactor. The concentration profiles of glucose and ethanol within the bed were described by a dispersion model. Modeling parameters were determined for the yeast by batch kinetics and tracer experiments. The kinetic model included ethanol inhibition and substrate limitation. A tracer study with step input of D-xylose (a non-metabolizable sugar for S. cerevisiae) determined the dispersion number (D/uL=0.16) and liquid voidage (epsilonsub(L)=0.25). Measurements taken after 6 months of continuous operation indicated that there was no significant change in fermentor performance.

  1. Analysis of RNA metabolism in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wise, Jo Ann; Nielsen, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Here we focus on the biogenesis and function of messenger RNA (mRNA) in fission yeast cells. Following a general introduction that also briefly touches on other classes of RNA, we provide an overview of methods used to analyze mRNAs throughout their life cycles....

  2. UBA domain containing proteins in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Semple, Colin A M; Ponting, Chris P

    2003-01-01

    characterised on both the functional and structural levels. One example of a widespread ubiquitin binding module is the ubiquitin associated (UBA) domain. Here, we discuss the approximately 15 UBA domain containing proteins encoded in the relatively small genome of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe...

  3. Vaginal yeast infections in diabetic women

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    could we implicate either trichomoniasis or candidiasis as causes ofthese symptoms (Table I). It is possible that in some instances yeasts may have been missed on cul- ture since it has been estimated that at least 10' cfu/m! are required for a culture to be positive.15 Gardnerella vaginalis was not sought in this study and ...

  4. Phosphorylation site on yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlinger, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified to homogeneity from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Yeast cells were disrupted in a Manton-Gaulin laboratory homogenizer. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified by fractionation with polyethylene glycol, isoelectric precipitation, ultracentrifugation and chromatography on hydroxylapatite. Final purification of the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was achieved by cation-exchange high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). No endogenous pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity was detected during the purification. However, the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was phosphorylated and inactivated with purified pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase from bovine kidney. Tryptic digestion of the 32 P-labeled complex yielded a single phosphopeptide which was purified to homogeniety. The tryptic digest was subjected to chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. Radioactive fractions were pooled, concentrated, and subjected to anion-exchange HPLC. The column was developed with a linear gradient of ammonium acetate. Final purification of the phosphopeptide was achieved by chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column developed with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. The amino acid sequence of the homogeneous peptide was determined by manual modified Edman degradation

  5. Functional differences in yeast protein disulfide isomerases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, P; Westphal, V; Tachibana, C

    2001-01-01

    PDI1 is the essential gene encoding protein disulfide isomerase in yeast. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, however, contains four other nonessential genes with homology to PDI1: MPD1, MPD2, EUG1, and EPS1. We have investigated the effects of simultaneous deletions of these genes. In several...

  6. Catalytic site interactions in yeast OMP synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Barr, Eric W.; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    2014-01-01

    45 (2006) 5330-5342]. This behavior was investigated in the yeast enzyme by mutations in the conserved catalytic loop and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) binding motif. Although the reaction is mechanistically sequential, the wild-type (WT) enzyme shows parallel lines in double reciprocal...

  7. Hybridization of Palm Wine Yeasts ( Saccharomyces Cerevisiae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haploid auxotrophic strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were selected from palm wine and propagated by protoplast fusion with Brewers yeast. Fusion resulted in an increase in both ethanol production and tolerance against exogenous ethanol. Mean fusion frequencies obtained for a mating types ranged between 8 x ...

  8. Cell biology of homologous recombination in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine Valerie; Rothstein, Rodney; Lisby, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an important pathway for error-free repair of DNA lesions, such as single- and double-strand breaks, and for rescue of collapsed replication forks. Here, we describe protocols for live cell imaging of single-lesion recombination events in the yeast Saccharomyces...

  9. A Stochastic Model of the Yeast Cell Cycle Reveals Roles for Feedback Regulation in Limiting Cellular Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Debashis; Ball, David A; Peccoud, Jean; Tyson, John J

    2016-12-01

    The cell division cycle of eukaryotes is governed by a complex network of cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs) and auxiliary proteins that govern CDK activities. The control system must function reliably in the context of molecular noise that is inevitable in tiny yeast cells, because mistakes in sequencing cell cycle events are detrimental or fatal to the cell or its progeny. To assess the effects of noise on cell cycle progression requires not only extensive, quantitative, experimental measurements of cellular heterogeneity but also comprehensive, accurate, mathematical models of stochastic fluctuations in the CDK control system. In this paper we provide a stochastic model of the budding yeast cell cycle that accurately accounts for the variable phenotypes of wild-type cells and more than 20 mutant yeast strains simulated in different growth conditions. We specifically tested the role of feedback regulations mediated by G1- and SG2M-phase cyclins to minimize the noise in cell cycle progression. Details of the model are informed and tested by quantitative measurements (by fluorescence in situ hybridization) of the joint distributions of mRNA populations in yeast cells. We use the model to predict the phenotypes of ~30 mutant yeast strains that have not yet been characterized experimentally.

  10. A Stochastic Model of the Yeast Cell Cycle Reveals Roles for Feedback Regulation in Limiting Cellular Variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashis Barik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The cell division cycle of eukaryotes is governed by a complex network of cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs and auxiliary proteins that govern CDK activities. The control system must function reliably in the context of molecular noise that is inevitable in tiny yeast cells, because mistakes in sequencing cell cycle events are detrimental or fatal to the cell or its progeny. To assess the effects of noise on cell cycle progression requires not only extensive, quantitative, experimental measurements of cellular heterogeneity but also comprehensive, accurate, mathematical models of stochastic fluctuations in the CDK control system. In this paper we provide a stochastic model of the budding yeast cell cycle that accurately accounts for the variable phenotypes of wild-type cells and more than 20 mutant yeast strains simulated in different growth conditions. We specifically tested the role of feedback regulations mediated by G1- and SG2M-phase cyclins to minimize the noise in cell cycle progression. Details of the model are informed and tested by quantitative measurements (by fluorescence in situ hybridization of the joint distributions of mRNA populations in yeast cells. We use the model to predict the phenotypes of ~30 mutant yeast strains that have not yet been characterized experimentally.

  11. Adaptive response to chronic mild ethanol stress involves ROS, sirtuins and changes in chromosome dosage in wine yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Skoneczny, Marek; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Potocki, Leszek; Rawska, Ewa; Pabian, Sylwia; Kaplan, Jakub; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-05-24

    Industrial yeast strains of economic importance used in winemaking and beer production are genomically diverse and subjected to harsh environmental conditions during fermentation. In the present study, we investigated wine yeast adaptation to chronic mild alcohol stress when cells were cultured for 100 generations in the presence of non-cytotoxic ethanol concentration. Ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and superoxide signals promoted growth rate during passages that was accompanied by increased expression of sirtuin proteins, Sir1, Sir2 and Sir3, and DNA-binding transcription regulator Rap1. Genome-wide array-CGH analysis revealed that yeast genome was shaped during passages. The gains of chromosomes I, III and VI and significant changes in the gene copy number in nine functional gene categories involved in metabolic processes and stress responses were observed. Ethanol-mediated gains of YRF1 and CUP1 genes were the most accented. Ethanol also induced nucleolus fragmentation that confirms that nucleolus is a stress sensor in yeasts. Taken together, we postulate that wine yeasts of different origin may adapt to mild alcohol stress by shifts in intracellular redox state promoting growth capacity, upregulation of key regulators of longevity, namely sirtuins and changes in the dosage of genes involved in the telomere maintenance and ion detoxification.

  12. Polyarene mediators for mediated redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnick, Frank M.; Ingersoll, David; Liang, Chengdu

    2018-01-02

    The fundamental charge storage mechanisms in a number of currently studied high energy redox couples are based on intercalation, conversion, or displacement reactions. With exception to certain metal-air chemistries, most often the active redox materials are stored physically in the electrochemical cell stack thereby lowering the practical gravimetric and volumetric energy density as a tradeoff to achieve reasonable power density. In a general embodiment, a mediated redox flow battery includes a series of secondary organic molecules that form highly reduced anionic radicals as reaction mediator pairs for the reduction and oxidation of primary high capacity redox species ex situ from the electrochemical cell stack. Arenes are reduced to stable anionic radicals that in turn reduce a primary anode to the charged state. The primary anode is then discharged using a second lower potential (more positive) arene. Compatible separators and solvents are also disclosed herein.

  13. Effect of yeast storage temperature and flour composition on fermentative activities of baker's yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejin Dušanka J.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Baker's yeast is a set of living cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It contains around 70-72% of water, 42-45% of proteins, around 40% of carbohydrates, around 7.5% of lipids (based on dry matter, and vitamin B-complex. On the basis of yeast cell analysis it can be concluded that yeast is a complex biological system which changes in time. The intensity of the changes depends on temperature. Yeast sample was stored at 4°C i 24°C for 12 days. During storage at 4°C, the content of total carbohydrates decreased from 48.81% to 37.50% (dry matter, whereas carbohydrate loss ranged from 40.81% to 29.28% at 24°C. The content of trehalose was 12.33% in the yeast sample stored at 4°C and 0.24% at 24°C. Loss of fermentative activity was 81.76% in the sample stored at 24°C for 12 days. The composition of five samples of 1st category flour was investigated. It was found that flours containing more reducing sugars and maltose enable higher fermentation activities. The flours with higher ash content (in the range 0.5-0.94% had higher contents of phytic acid. Higher ash and phytic contents in flour increased the yeast fermentative efficiency. In bakery industry, a range of ingredients has been applied to improve the product's quality such as surface active substances (emulsifiers, enzymes, sugars and fats. In the paper, the effect of some ingredients added to dough (margarine, saccharose, sodium chloride and malted barley on the yeast fermentative activity was studied. The mentioned ingredients were added to dough at different doses: 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0%, flour basis. It was found that the investigated ingredients affected the fermentative activity of yeast and improved the bread quality.

  14. Probiotic yeast inhibits VEGFR signaling and angiogenesis in intestinal inflammation.

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    Xinhua Chen

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces boulardii (Sb can protect against intestinal injury and tumor formation, but how this probiotic yeast controls protective mucosal host responses is unclear. Angiogenesis is an integral process of inflammatory responses in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD and required for mucosal remodeling during restitution. The aim of this study was to determine whether Sb alters VEGFR (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor signaling, a central regulator of angiogenesis.HUVEC were used to examine the effects of Sb on signaling and on capillary tube formation (using the ECMatrix™ system. The effects of Sb on VEGF-mediated angiogenesis were examined in vivo using an adenovirus expressing VEGF-A(164 in the ears of adult nude mice (NuNu. The effects of Sb on blood vessel volume branching and density in DSS-induced colitis was quantified using VESsel GENeration (VESGEN software.1 Sb treatment attenuated weight-loss (p<0.01 and histological damage (p<0.01 in DSS colitis. VESGEN analysis of angiogenesis showed significantly increased blood vessel density and volume in DSS-treated mice compared to control. Sb treatment significantly reduced the neo-vascularization associated with acute DSS colitis and accelerated mucosal recovery restoration of the lamina propria capillary network to a normal morphology. 2 Sb inhibited VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vivo in the mouse ear model. 3 Sb also significantly inhibited angiogenesis in vitro in the capillary tube assay in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.01. 4 In HUVEC, Sb reduced basal VEGFR-2 phosphorylation, VEGFR-2 phosphorylation in response to VEGF as well as activation of the downstream kinases PLCγ and Erk1/2.Our findings indicate that the probiotic yeast S boulardii can modulate angiogenesis to limit intestinal inflammation and promote mucosal tissue repair by regulating VEGFR signaling.

  15. Yeast cell differentiation: Lessons from pathogenic and non-pathogenic yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palková, Zdena; Váchová, Libuše

    2016-09-01

    Yeasts, historically considered to be single-cell organisms, are able to activate different differentiation processes. Individual yeast cells can change their life-styles by processes of phenotypic switching such as the switch from yeast-shaped cells to filamentous cells (pseudohyphae or true hyphae) and the transition among opaque, white and gray cell-types. Yeasts can also create organized multicellular structures such as colonies and biofilms, and the latter are often observed as contaminants on surfaces in industry and medical care and are formed during infections of the human body. Multicellular structures are formed mostly of stationary-phase or slow-growing cells that diversify into specific cell subpopulations that have unique metabolic properties and can fulfill specific tasks. In addition to the development of multiple protective mechanisms, processes of metabolic reprogramming that reflect a changed environment help differentiated individual cells and/or community cell constituents to survive harmful environmental attacks and/or to escape the host immune system. This review aims to provide an overview of differentiation processes so far identified in individual yeast cells as well as in multicellular communities of yeast pathogens of the Candida and Cryptococcus spp. and the Candida albicans close relative, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Molecular mechanisms and extracellular signals potentially involved in differentiation processes are also briefly mentioned. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Reduction Corporoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq S. Hakky

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective Here we present the first video demonstration of reduction corporoplasty in the management of phallic disfigurement in a 17 year old man with a history sickle cell disease and priapism. Introduction Surgical management of aneurysmal dilation of the corpora has yet to be defined in the literature. Materials and Methods: We preformed bilateral elliptical incisions over the lateral corpora as management of aneurysmal dilation of the corpora to correct phallic disfigurement. Results The patient tolerated the procedure well and has resolution of his corporal disfigurement. Conclusions Reduction corporoplasty using bilateral lateral elliptical incisions in the management of aneurysmal dilation of the corpora is a safe an feasible operation in the management of phallic disfigurement.

  17. Effects of indigenous yeasts on physicochemical and microbial properties of Korean soy sauce prepared by low-salt fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young-Ran; Jeong, Do-Youn; Baik, Sang-Ho

    2015-10-01

    This study deals with understanding the effects of salt reduction on both the physicochemical and microbiological properties of soy sauce fermentation and also the application of indigenous yeast starters to compensate for undesirable changes occurring in salt-reduced processes. Fermentation was tested in situ at a Korean commercial soy sauce processing unit. Salt reduction resulted in higher acidity as well as lower pH and contents of residual sugar and ethanol. Moreover, undesired flavor characteristics, due to a lack of distinctive compounds, was observed. In addition, putrefactive Staphylococcus and Enterococcus spp. were present only during salt-reduced fermentation. To control these adverse effects, a single or mixed culture of two indigenous yeasts, Torulaspora delbrueckii and Pichia guilliermondii, producing high ethanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol, respectively, were tested. Overall, all types of yeast applications inhibited undesirable bacterial growth despite salt reduction. Of the starter cultures tested, the mixed culture resulted in a balance of more complex and richer flavors with an identical flavor profile pattern to that obtained from high salt soy sauce. Hence, this strategy using functional yeast cultures offers a technological option to manufacture salt-reduced soy sauce while preserving its typical sensory characteristics without affecting safety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A cytosolic cytochrome b 5-like protein in yeast cell accelerating the electron transfer from NADPH to cytochrome c catalyzed by Old Yellow Enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Manabu; Yamano, Toshio; Kuroda, Kiyo; Nonaka, Yasuki; Tojo, Hiromasa; Fujii, Shigeru

    2005-01-01

    A 410-nm absorbing species which enhanced the reduction rate of cytochrome c by Old Yellow Enzyme (OYE) with NADPH was found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It was solubilized together with OYE by the treatment of yeast cells with 10% ethyl acetate. The purified species showed visible absorption spectra in both oxidized and reduced forms, which were the same as those of the yeast microsomal cytochrome b 5 . At least 14 amino acid residues of the N-terminal region coincided with those of yeast microsomal b 5 , but the protein had a lower molecular weight determined to be 12,600 by SDS-PAGE and 9775 by mass spectrometry. The cytochrome b 5 -like protein enhanced the reduction rate of cytochrome c by OYE, and a plot of the reduction rates against its concentration showed a sigmoidal curve with an inflexion point at 6 x 10 -8 M of the protein

  19. Complex Mediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Andersen, Peter Bøgh

    2005-01-01

    This article has its starting point in a large number of empirical findings regarding computer-mediated work. These empirical findings have challenged our understanding of the role of mediation in such work; on the one hand as an aspect of communication and cooperation at work and on the other hand...... as an aspect of human engagement with instruments of work. On the basis of previous work in activity-theoretical and semiotic human—computer interaction, we propose a model to encompass both of these aspects. In a dialogue with our empirical findings we move on to propose a number of types of mediation...... that have helped to enrich our understanding of mediated work and the design of computer mediation for such work....

  20. Between science and industry-applied yeast research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhola, Matti

    2018-03-01

    I was fortunate to enter yeast research at the Alko Research Laboratories with a strong tradition in yeast biochemistry and physiology studies. At the same time in the 1980s there was a fundamental or paradigm change in molecular biology research with discoveries in DNA sequencing and other analytical and physical techniques for studying macromolecules and cells. Since that time biotechnological research has expanded the traditional fermentation industries to efficient production of industrial and other enzymes and specialty chemicals. Our efforts were directed towards improving the industrial production organisms: minerals enriched yeasts (Se, Cr, Zn) and high glutathione content yeast, baker´s, distiller´s, sour dough and wine yeasts, and the fungal Trichoderma reesei platform for enzyme production. I am grateful for the trust of my colleagues in several leadership positions at the Alko Research Laboratories, Yeast Industry Platform and at the international yeast community.

  1. Full Data of Yeast Interacting Proteins Database (Original Version) - Yeast Interacting Proteins Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Yeast Interacting Proteins Database Full Data of Yeast Interacting Proteins Database (Origin...al Version) Data detail Data name Full Data of Yeast Interacting Proteins Database (Original Version) DOI 10....18908/lsdba.nbdc00742-004 Description of data contents The entire data in the Yeast Interacting Proteins Database...eir interactions are required. Several sources including YPD (Yeast Proteome Database, Costanzo, M. C., Hoga...ematic name in the SGD (Saccharomyces Genome Database; http://www.yeastgenome.org /). Bait gene name The gen

  2. Genome-wide assessment of the carriers involved in the cellular uptake of drugs: a model system in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanthaler, Karin; Bilsland, Elizabeth; Dobson, Paul D; Moss, Harry J; Pir, Pınar; Kell, Douglas B; Oliver, Stephen G

    2011-10-24

    The uptake of drugs into cells has traditionally been considered to be predominantly via passive diffusion through the bilayer portion of the cell membrane. The recent recognition that drug uptake is mostly carrier-mediated raises the question of which drugs use which carriers. To answer this, we have constructed a chemical genomics platform built upon the yeast gene deletion collection, using competition experiments in batch fermenters and robotic automation of cytotoxicity screens, including protection by 'natural' substrates. Using these, we tested 26 different drugs and identified the carriers required for 18 of the drugs to gain entry into yeast cells. As well as providing a useful platform technology, these results further substantiate the notion that the cellular uptake of pharmaceutical drugs normally occurs via carrier-mediated transport and indicates that establishing the identity and tissue distribution of such carriers should be a major consideration in the design of safe and effective drugs.

  3. Responses of phylloplane yeasts to UV-B (290-320 nm) radiation: interspecific differences in sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunasekera, T.S.; Paul, N.D.; Ayres, P.G.

    1997-01-01

    The sensitivity to UV-B (290–320 nm) radiation of common phylloplane yeasts from two contrasting UV-B environments was compared in the laboratory using mixtures of white light (PAR: 400–700 nm) and UV-B radiation from artificial lamp sources. Sporidiobolus salmonicolor, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Cryptococcus sp., the dominant yeasts on leaves of tea (Camellia sinensis), were isolated in Sri Lanka (SL), while Sporidiobolus sp. and Bullera alba, dominant on faba bean (Vicia faba), were isolated in the U.K. Dose responses were determined separately for each yeast. UV-B reduced colony forming units (due to cell mortality or inactivation) and colony size (due to reduced multiplication) of all yeasts. The LD 50 values and doses causing 50% reduction of cells per colony were higher for SL isolates than U.K. isolates. Results indicated that each yeast is somewhat vulnerable to UV-B doses representative of its natural habitat. The relative insensitivity of SL isolates was shown when SL and U.K. isolates were irradiated simultaneously with the same dose of UV-B. Of the two U.K. yeasts, B. alba was significantly more sensitive than Sporidiobolus sp. to UV-B. Except for R. mucilaginosa from SL, all yeasts demonstrated some photorepair in the presence of white light. White light provided relatively little protection for the U.K. isolate of Sporidiobolus sp. although it allowed increased colony size. The spectral responses of Sporidiobolus sp. (U.K.) and of B. alba (U.K.) were broadly similar. Wavelengths longer than 320 nm had no measurable effect on colony forming units. However, colony survival was significantly reduced at 310 nm and all shorter wavebands. No colonies were counted at 290 nm or below. (author)

  4. Mediator: A key regulator of plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buendía-Monreal, Manuel; Gillmor, C Stewart

    2016-11-01

    Mediator is a multiprotein complex that regulates transcription at the level of RNA pol II assembly, as well as through regulation of chromatin architecture, RNA processing and recruitment of epigenetic marks. Though its modular structure is conserved in eukaryotes, its subunit composition has diverged during evolution and varies in response to environmental and tissue-specific inputs, suggesting different functions for each subunit and/or Mediator conformation. In animals, Mediator has been implicated in the control of differentiation and morphogenesis through modulation of numerous signaling pathways. In plants, studies have revealed roles for Mediator in regulation of cell division, cell fate and organogenesis, as well as developmental timing and hormone responses. We begin this review with an overview of biochemical mechanisms of yeast and animal Mediator that are likely to be conserved in all eukaryotes, as well as a brief discussion of the role of Mediator in animal development. We then present a comprehensive review of studies of the role of Mediator in plant development. Finally, we point to important questions for future research on the role of Mediator as a master coordinator of development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Biosurfactants production by yeasts using soybean oil and glycerol as low cost substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accorsini, Fábio Raphael; Mutton, Márcia Justino Rossini; Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes Macedo; Benincasa, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Biosurfactants are bioactive agents that can be produced by many different microorganisms. Among those, special attention is given to yeasts, since they can produce many types of biosurfactants in large scale, using several kinds of substrates, justifying its use for industrial production of those products. For this production to be economically viable, the use of residual carbon sources is recommended. The present study isolated yeasts from soil contaminated with petroleum oil hydrocarbons and assessed their capacity for producing biosurfactants in low cost substrates. From a microbial consortium enriched, seven yeasts were isolated, all showing potential for producing biosurfactants in soybean oil. The isolate LBPF 3, characterized as Candida antarctica, obtained the highest levels of production - with a final production of 13.86 g/L. The isolate LBPF 9, using glycerol carbon source, obtained the highest reduction in surface tension in the growth medium: approximately 43% of reduction after 24 hours of incubation. The products obtained by the isolates presented surfactant activity, which reduced water surface tension to values that varied from 34 mN/m, obtained from the product of isolates LBPF 3 and 16 LBPF 7 (respectively characterized as Candida antarctica and Candida albicans) to 43 mN/m from the isolate LPPF 9, using glycerol as substrate. The assessed isolates all showed potential for the production of biosurfactants in conventional sources of carbon as well as in agroindustrial residue, especially in glycerol.

  6. Biosurfactants production by yeasts using soybean oil and glycerol as low cost substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Raphael Accorsini

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Biosurfactants are bioactive agents that can be produced by many different microorganisms. Among those, special attention is given to yeasts, since they can produce many types of biosurfactants in large scale, using several kinds of substrates, justifying its use for industrial production of those products. For this production to be economically viable, the use of residual carbon sources is recommended. The present study isolated yeasts from soil contaminated with petroleum oil hydrocarbons and assessed their capacity for producing biosurfactants in low cost substrates. From a microbial consortium enriched, seven yeasts were isolated, all showing potential for producing biosurfactants in soybean oil. The isolate LBPF 3, characterized as Candida antarctica, obtained the highest levels of production - with a final production of 13.86 g/L. The isolate LBPF 9, using glycerol carbon source, obtained the highest reduction in surface tension in the growth medium: approximately 43% of reduction after 24 hours of incubation. The products obtained by the isolates presented surfactant activity, which reduced water surface tension to values that varied from 34 mN/m, obtained from the product of isolates LBPF 3 and 16 LBPF 7 (respectively characterized as Candida antarctica and Candida albicans to 43 mN/m from the isolate LPPF 9, using glycerol as substrate. The assessed isolates all showed potential for the production of biosurfactants in conventional sources of carbon as well as in agroindustrial residue, especially in glycerol.

  7. Yeast Biodiversity from DOQ Priorat Uninoculated Fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Beatriz; García-Fernández, David; González, Beatriz; Izidoro, Iara; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Beltran, Gemma; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Climate, soil, and grape varieties are the primary characteristics of terroir and lead to the definition of various appellations of origin. However, the microbiota associated with grapes are also affected by these conditions and can leave a footprint in a wine that will be part of the characteristics of terroir. Thus, a description of the yeast microbiota within a vineyard is of interest not only to provide a better understanding of the winemaking process, but also to understand the source of microorganisms that maintain a microbial footprint in wine from the examined vineyard. In this study, two typical grape varieties, Grenache and Carignan, have been sampled from four different vineyards in the DOQ Priorat winegrowing region. Afterward, eight spontaneous alcoholic fermentations containing only grapes from one sampling point and of one variety were conducted at laboratory scale. The fermentation kinetics and yeast population dynamics within each fermentation experiment were evaluated. Yeast identification was performed by RFLP-PCR of the 5.8S-ITS region and by sequencing D1/D2 of the 26S rRNA gene of the isolates. The fermentation kinetics did not indicate clear differences between the two varieties of grapes or among vineyards. Approximately 1,400 isolates were identified, exhibiting high species richness in some fermentations. Of all the isolates studied, approximately 60% belong to the genus Hanseniaspora, 16% to Saccharomyces, and 11% to Candida. Other minor genera, such as Hansenula, Issatchenkia, Kluyveromyces, Saccharomycodes, and Zygosaccharomyces, were also found. The distribution of the identified yeast throughout the fermentation process was studied, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was found to be present mainly at the end of the fermentation process, while Aureobasidium pullulans was isolated primarily during the first days of fermentation in three of the eight spontaneous fermentations. This work highlights the complexity and diversity of the vineyard

  8. Relationship between ethanol and oxidative stress in laboratory and brewing yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleoanca, Iulia; Silva, Ana Rita Courelas; Pimentel, Catarina; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina; Menezes, Regina de Andrade

    2013-12-01

    Ethanol is a chemical stress factor that inhibits cellular growth and determines metabolic changes leading to reduction of cell viability during fermentation and yeast storage. To determine the effect of time, temperature and ethanol during storage of brewing yeasts we have monitored viability of cells stored for 72 h, at 6 °C or 12 °C, in the presence of various ethanol concentrations. Under the conditions tested, 6 °C is the most favourable temperature to store brewing yeast creams emphasizing the importance of a tight temperature control in the storage vessels. Because W210 is less resistant to storage in the presence of ethanol than W34/70, the optimal storage parameters obtained under our laboratory conditions vary significantly. The ale strain is sensitive to storage under ethanol concentrations higher than 5% (v/v) for more than 48 h at 6 °C whereas at the same temperature the lager strain tolerates ethanol up to 7.5% (v/v) for 72 h. Also, the viability assays indicate that the antioxidant protein Yap1 is an important factor to storage resistance of BY4741 laboratory strain. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying tolerance of brewing yeast strains to ethanol, we have performed phenotypic analysis, localization studies and have monitored the activation of antioxidant and protection genes as well as the intracellular contents of glycogen and trehalose. Overall, our data suggest that the ale strain W210 has a defective antioxidant defence system and that ethanol may induce the antioxidant defences as well as glycogen and trehalose protection mechanisms in laboratory and brewing yeast strains. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Snubber reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, D.E.; Singh, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    Many safety-related piping systems in nuclear power plants have been oversupported. Since snubbers make up a large percentage of the pipe supports or restraints used in a plant, a plant's snubber population is much larger than required to adequately restrain the piping. This has resulted in operating problems and unnecessary expenses for maintenance and inservice inspections (ISIs) of snubbers. This paper presents an overview of snubber reduction, including: the incentives for removing snubbers, a historical perspective on how piping became oversupported, why it is possible to remove snubbers, and the costs and benefits of doing so

  10. Inter-Kingdom Modification of Metabolic Behavior: [GAR+] Prion Induction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mediated by Wine Ecosystem Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda F Bisson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has evolved to dominate grape juice fermentation. A suite of cellular properties, rapid nutrient depletion, production of inhibitory compounds and the metabolic narrowing of the niche, all enable a minor resident of the initial population to dramatically increase its relative biomass in the ecosystem. This dominance of the grape juice environment is fueled by a rapid launch of glycolysis and energy generation mediated by transport of hexoses and an efficient coupling of transport and catabolism. Fermentation occurs in the presence of molecular oxygen as the choice between respiratory or fermentative growth is regulated by the availability of sugar a phenomenon known as glucose or catabolite repression. Induction of the GAR+ prion alters the expression of the major hexose transporter active under these conditions, Hxt3, reducing glycolytic capacity. Bacteria present in the grape juice ecosystem were able to induce the GAR+ prion in wine strains of S. cerevisiae. This induction reduced fermentation capacity but did not block it entirely. However, dominance factors such as the rapid depletion of amino acids and other nitrogen sources from the environment were impeded enabling greater access to these substrates for the bacteria. Bacteria associated with arrested commercial wine fermentations were able to induce the prion state, and yeast cells isolated from arrested commercial fermentations were found to be GAR+ thus confirming the ecological relevance of prion induction. Subsequent analyses demonstrated that the presence of environmental acetic acid could lead to GAR+ induction in yeast strains under certain conditions. The induction of the prion enabled yeast growth on non-preferred substrates, oxidation and reduction products of glucose and fructose, present as a consequence of bacterial energy production. In native ecosystems prion induction never exceeded roughly 50-60% of the population of yeast cells

  11. Biosurfactant production by yeasts isolated from hydrocarbon polluted environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Kamalpreet; Sangwan, Seema; Kaur, Harpreet

    2017-11-03

    Thirty-two yeast isolates were retrieved from four soil samples collected from hydrocarbon-polluted locations of Hisar, Haryana, using enrichment culture technique with 1% (v/v) diesel as carbon source. Total nine isolates showing blood agar haemolysis were screened further for biosurfactant production. Yeast isolate, YK32, gave highest 8.4-cm oil displacement which was found to be significantly higher as compared to positive control, 0.2% (w/v) SDS (6.6 cm), followed by 6.2 and 6.0 cm by isolates YK20 and YK21, respectively. Maximum emulsification index was obtained in case of isolates YK20 and YK21 measuring 53.8%, after 6 days of incubation utilizing glucose as carbon source, whereas isolate YK32 was found to be reducing surface tension up to 93 dynes/cm and presented 99.6% degree of hydrophobicity. Olive oil has supported maximum surface tension reduction in isolates YK32 and YK21 equivalent to 53 and 48 dynes/cm and gave 88.3 and 88.5% degree of hydrophobicity, respectively. Diesel was not preferred as carbon source by most of the isolates except YK28 which generated 5.5-cm oil displacement, 25% emulsification index, reduced surface tension to the level of 38 dynes/cm and presented 89% degree of hydrophobicity. Conclusively, isolates YK20, YK21, YK22 and YK32 were marked as promising biosurfactant producers and were subjected to identification. Based on microscopic examination and biochemical peculiarities, isolates YK21 and YK22 might be identified as Candida spp., whereas, isolates YK20 and YK32 might be identified as Saccharomycopsis spp. and Brettanomyces spp., respectively. Interestingly it is the first report indicating Saccharomycopsis spp. and Brettanomyces spp. as a potential biosurfactant producer.

  12. Expression of a fatty acid-binding protein in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, H.

    1991-06-01

    The unicellular eukaryotic microorganism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transformed with a plasmid containing a cDNA fragment encoding bovine heart fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP C ) under the control of the inducible yeast GAL10 promoter, expressed FABP during growth on galactose. The maximum level of immunoreactive FABP, identical in size and isoelectric point to native protein, was reached after approximately 16 hours of induction. In contrast, transcription of the gene was induced within half an hour. Both, protein and mRNA were unstable and degraded within 1 h after repression of transcription. Analysis of subcellular fractions showed that FABP was exclusively associated with the cytosol. FABP expressed in yeast cells was functional as was demonstrated by its capacity to bind long chain fatty acids in an in vitro assay. Growth of all transformants on galactose as the carbon source showed no phenotype at temperatures up to 37 deg C, but the growth of FABP-expressing cells at 37 deg C was significantly retarded. Among the biochemical effects of FABP expression on lipid metabolism is a marked reduction of chain elongation and desaturation of exogenously added 14 C-palmitic acid. This effect is most pronounced in triacylglycerols and phospholipids when cells grow at 30 deg C and 37 deg C, respectively. In an in vitro assay determining the desaturation of palmitoyl CoA by microsomal membranes cytosol with or without exo- or endogenous FABP showed the same stimulation of the reaction. The desaturation of exogenously added 14 C-stearic acid, the pattern of unlabelled fatty acids (saturated vs. unsaturated) and the distribution of exogenously added radioactive fatty acids (palmitic, stearic or oleic acid) among lipid classes was not significantly affected. Using high concentrations (1 mM) the uptake of fatty acids was first stimulated and then inhibited when FABP was expressed. (author)

  13. Descoloração redutiva de corantes azo e o efeito de mediadores redox na presença do aceptor de elétrons sulfato Reductive decolourisation of azo dyes and the effect of redox mediators in the presence of the electron acceptor sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara Carantino Costa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the impact of sulphate and the redox mediator Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS on the decolorization of the azo dyes Congo Red (CR and Reactive Black 5 (RB5. In anaerobic reactors free of extra sulphate dosage, the color removal efficiency decreased drastically when the external electron donor ethanol was removed. In presence of an extra dosage of sulphate, CR decolourisations were 47.8% (free of AQDS and 96.5% (supplemented with AQDS. The decolourisations achieved in both reactors with RB5 were lower than the ones found with CR. Finally, the biogenic sulphide contribution on azo dye reduction was negligiable.

  14. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YML064C, YLR377C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available d or autophagy-mediated degradation depending on growth conditions; interacts with Vid30p Rows with this pre...er proteasome-mediated or autophagy-mediated degradation depending on growth conditions; interacts with Vid3

  15. Mitotic recombination induced by chemical and physical agents in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, P.J.; Evans, W.E.; Parry, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The treatment of diploid cultures of yeast with ultraviolet light (uv), γ-rays, nitrous acid (na) and ethyl methane sulphonate (ems) results in increases in cell death, mitotic gene conversion and crossing-over. Acridine orange (ao) treatment, in contrast, was effective only in increasing the frequency of gene conversion. The individual mutagens were effective in the order uv>na>γ-rays>ao>ems. Prior treatment of yeast cultures in starvation medium produced a significant reduction in the yield of induced gene conversion. The results have been interpreted on the basis of a general model of mitotic gene conversion which involves the post-replication repair of induced lesions involving de novo DNA synthesis without genetic exchange. In contrast mitotic crossing-over appears to involve the action of a repair system independent from excision or post-replication repair which involves genetic exchange between homologous chromosomes

  16. The duration of mitosis and daughter cell size are modulated by nutrients in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitao, Ricardo M; Kellogg, Douglas R

    2017-11-06

    The size of nearly all cells is modulated by nutrients. Thus, cells growing in poor nutrients can be nearly half the size of cells in rich nutrients. In budding yeast, cell size is thought to be controlled almost entirely by a mechanism that delays cell cycle entry until sufficient growth has occurred in G1 phase. Here, we show that most growth of a new daughter cell occurs in mitosis. When the rate of growth is slowed by poor nutrients, the duration of mitosis is increased, which suggests that cells compensate for slow growth in mitosis by increasing the duration of growth. The amount of growth required to complete mitosis is reduced in poor nutrients, leading to a large reduction in cell size. Together, these observations suggest that mechanisms that control the extent of growth in mitosis play a major role in cell size control in budding yeast. © 2017 Leitao and Kellogg.

  17. Game dynamic model for yeast development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Wu, Zhijun

    2012-07-01

    Game theoretic models, along with replicator equations, have been applied successfully to the study of evolution of populations of competing species, including the growth of a population, the reaching of the population to an equilibrium state, and the evolutionary stability of the state. In this paper, we analyze a game model proposed by Gore et al. (Nature 456:253-256, 2009) in their recent study on the co-development of two mixed yeast strains. We examine the mathematical properties of this model with varying experimental parameters. We simulate the growths of the yeast strains and compare them with the experimental results. We also compute and analyze the equilibrium state of the system and prove that it is asymptotically and evolutionarily stable.

  18. Mapping replication origins in yeast chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, B J; Fangman, W L

    1991-07-01

    The replicon hypothesis, first proposed in 1963 by Jacob and Brenner, states that DNA replication is controlled at sites called origins. Replication origins have been well studied in prokaryotes. However, the study of eukaryotic chromosomal origins has lagged behind, because until recently there has been no method for reliably determining the identity and location of origins from eukaryotic chromosomes. Here, we review a technique we developed with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that allows both the mapping of replication origins and an assessment of their activity. Two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis and Southern hybridization with total genomic DNA are used to determine whether a particular restriction fragment acquires the branched structure diagnostic of replication initiation. The technique has been used to localize origins in yeast chromosomes and assess their initiation efficiency. In some cases, origin activation is dependent upon the surrounding context. The technique is also being applied to a variety of eukaryotic organisms.

  19. Stochasticity in the yeast mating pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong-Li, Wang; Zheng-Ping, Fu; Xin-Hang, Xu; Qi, Ouyang

    2009-01-01

    We report stochastic simulations of the yeast mating signal transduction pathway. The effects of intrinsic and external noise, the influence of cell-to-cell difference in the pathway capacity, and noise propagation in the pathway have been examined. The stochastic temporal behaviour of the pathway is found to be robust to the influence of inherent fluctuations, and intrinsic noise propagates in the pathway in a uniform pattern when the yeasts are treated with pheromones of different stimulus strengths and of varied fluctuations. In agreement with recent experimental findings, extrinsic noise is found to play a more prominent role than intrinsic noise in the variability of proteins. The occurrence frequency for the reactions in the pathway are also examined and a more compact network is obtained by dropping most of the reactions of least occurrence

  20. [Invasive yeast infections in neutropenic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Camps, Isabel; Jarque, Isidro

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal diseases caused by yeasts still play an important role in the morbidity and mortality in neutropenic patients with haematological malignancies. Although the overall incidence of invasive candidiasis has decreased due to widespread use of antifungal prophylaxis, the incidence of non-Candida albicans Candida species is increasing compared with that of C.albicans, and mortality of invasive candidiasis continues to be high. In addition, there has been an increase in invasive infections caused by an array of uncommon yeasts, including species of the genus Malassezia, Rhodotorula, Trichosporon and Saprochaete, characterised by their resistance to echinocandins and poor prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Isolation and characterization of phenol degrading yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Riddhi; Rajkumar, Shalini

    2009-04-01

    A phenol degrading yeast isolate was identified and characterized from the soil sample collected from a landfill site, in Ahmedabad, India, by plating the soil dilutions on Sabouraud's Dextrose Agar. The microscopic studies and biochemical tests indicated the isolate to be Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The phenol degrading potential of the isolate was measured by inoculation of pure culture in the mineral medium containing various phenol concentrations ranging from 100 to 800 mg l(-1 )and monitoring phenol disappearance rate at regular intervals of time. Growth of the isolate in mineral medium with various phenol concentrations was monitored by measuring the turbidity (OD(600) nm). The results showed that the isolated yeast was tolerant to phenol up to 800 mg(-1). The phenol degradation ranged from 8.57 to 100% for the concentration of phenol from 800 mg l(-1 )to 200 mg l(-1), respectively. ((c) 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim).

  2. Made for Each Other: Ascomycete Yeasts and Insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Meredith

    2017-06-01

    Fungi and insects live together in the same habitats, and many species of both groups rely on each other for success. Insects, the most successful animals on Earth, cannot produce sterols, essential vitamins, and many enzymes; fungi, often yeast-like in growth form, make up for these deficits. Fungi, however, require constantly replenished substrates because they consume the previous ones, and insects, sometimes lured by volatile fungal compounds, carry fungi directly to a similar, but fresh, habitat. Yeasts associated with insects include Ascomycota (Saccharomycotina, Pezizomycotina) and a few Basidiomycota. Beetles, homopterans, and flies are important associates of fungi, and in turn the insects carry yeasts in pits, specialized external pouches, and modified gut pockets. Some yeasts undergo sexual reproduction within the insect gut, where the genetic diversity of the population is increased, while others, well suited to their stable environment, may never mate. The range of interactions extends from dispersal of yeasts on the surface of insects (e.g., cactus- Drosophila -yeast and ephemeral flower communities, ambrosia beetles, yeasts with holdfasts) to extremely specialized associations of organisms that can no longer exist independently, as in the case of yeast-like symbionts of planthoppers. In a few cases yeast-like fungus-insect associations threaten butterflies and other species with extinction. Technical advances improve discovery and identification of the fungi but also inform our understanding of the evolution of yeast-insect symbioses, although there is much more to learn.

  3. MALDI-TOF MS as a tool to identify foodborne yeasts and yeast-like fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintilla, Raquel; Kolecka, Anna; Casaregola, Serge; Daniel, Heide M; Houbraken, Jos; Kostrzewa, Markus; Boekhout, Teun; Groenewald, Marizeth

    2018-02-02

    Since food spoilage by yeasts causes high economic losses, fast and accurate identifications of yeasts associated with food and food-related products are important for the food industry. In this study the efficiency of the matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify food related yeasts was evaluated. A CBS in-house MALDI-TOF MS database was created and later challenged with a blinded test set of 146 yeast strains obtained from food and food related products. Ninety eight percent of the strains were correctly identified with log score values>1.7. One strain, Mrakia frigida, gained a correct identification with a score value1.7. Ambiguous identifications were observed due to two incorrect reference mass spectra's found in the commercial database BDAL v.4.0, namely Candida sake DSM 70763 which was re-identified as Candida oleophila, and Candida inconspicua DSM 70631 which was re-identified as Pichia membranifaciens. MALDI-TOF MS can distinguish between most of the species, but for some species complexes, such as the Kazachstania telluris and Mrakia frigida complexes, MALDI-TOF MS showed limited resolution and identification of sibling species was sometimes problematic. Despite this, we showed that the MALDI-TOF MS is applicable for routine identification and validation of foodborne yeasts, but a further update of the commercial reference databases is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YLR377C, YLR377C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sis pathway, required for glucose metabolism; undergoes either proteasome-mediated or autophagy-mediated degradation depending...utophagy-mediated degradation depending on growth conditions; interacts with Vid30p Rows with this prey as p...d or autophagy-mediated degradation depending on growth conditions; interacts wit...me-mediated or autophagy-mediated degradation depending on growth conditions; int

  5. Phyllosphere yeasts rapidly break down biodegradable plastics

    OpenAIRE

    Kitamoto, Hiroko K; Shinozaki, Yukiko; Cao, Xiao-hong; Morita, Tomotake; Konishi, Masaaki; Tago, Kanako; Kajiwara, Hideyuki; Koitabashi, Motoo; Yoshida, Shigenobu; Watanabe, Takashi; Sameshima-Yamashita, Yuka; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Tsushima, Seiya

    2011-01-01

    The use of biodegradable plastics can reduce the accumulation of environmentally persistent plastic wastes. The rate of degradation of biodegradable plastics depends on environmental conditions and is highly variable. Techniques for achieving more consistent degradation are needed. However, only a few microorganisms involved in the degradation process have been isolated so far from the environment. Here, we show that Pseudozyma spp. yeasts, which are common in the phyllosphere and are easily ...

  6. An engineered yeast efficiently secreting penicillin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loknath Gidijala

    Full Text Available This study aimed at developing an alternative host for the production of penicillin (PEN. As yet, the industrial production of this beta-lactam antibiotic is confined to the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. As such, the yeast Hansenula polymorpha, a recognized producer of pharmaceuticals, represents an attractive alternative. Introduction of the P. chrysogenum gene encoding the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACVS in H. polymorpha, resulted in the production of active ACVS enzyme, when co-expressed with the Bacillus subtilis sfp gene encoding a phosphopantetheinyl transferase that activated ACVS. This represents the first example of the functional expression of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase in yeast. Co-expression with the P. chrysogenum genes encoding the cytosolic enzyme isopenicillin N synthase as well as the two peroxisomal enzymes isopenicillin N acyl transferase (IAT and phenylacetyl CoA ligase (PCL resulted in production of biologically active PEN, which was efficiently secreted. The amount of secreted PEN was similar to that produced by the original P. chrysogenum NRRL1951 strain (approx. 1 mg/L. PEN production was decreased over two-fold in a yeast strain lacking peroxisomes, indicating that the peroxisomal localization of IAT and PCL is important for efficient PEN production. The breakthroughs of this work enable exploration of new yeast-based cell factories for the production of (novel beta-lactam antibiotics as well as other natural and semi-synthetic peptides (e.g. immunosuppressive and cytostatic agents, whose production involves NRPS's.

  7. Chronological aging-induced apoptosis in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Fabrizio, Paola; Longo, Valter D.

    2008-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the simplest among the major eukaryotic model organisms for aging and diseases. Longevity in the chronological life span paradigm is measured as the mean and maximum survival period of populations of non-dividing yeast. This paradigm has been used successfully to identify several life-regulatory genes and three evolutionary conserved pro-aging pathways. More recently, Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been shown to age chronologically in a manner that resembles that of...

  8. Environmental influences on organotin-yeast interactions

    OpenAIRE

    White, Jane S.

    2002-01-01

    As a consequence of the widespread industrial and agricultural applications of organotin compounds, contamination of various ecosystems has occurred in recent decades. Understanding how these compounds interact with cellular membranes is essential in assessing the risks of organotin pollution. The organotins, tributyltin (TBT) and trimethyltin (TMT) and inorganic tin, Sn(IV), were investigated for their physical interactions with non-metabolising cells and protoplasts of the yeast, Candida ma...

  9. Beneficial properties of probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii

    OpenAIRE

    Tomičić Zorica M.; Čolović Radmilo R.; Čabarkapa Ivana S.; Vukmirović Đuro M.; Đuragić Olivera M.; Tomičić Ružica M.

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii is unique probiotic and biotherapeutic yeast, known to survive in gastric acidity and it is not adversely affected or inhibited by antibiotics or does not alter or adversely affect the normal microbiota. S. boulardii has been utilized worldwide as a probiotic supplement to support gastrointestinal health. The multiple mechanisms of action of S. boulardii and its properties may explain its efficacy and beneficial effects in acute and chronic gastrointestinal diseases th...

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: fission yeast [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Schizosaccharomyces_pombe_L.png Schizosaccharomyce...s_pombe_NL.png Schizosaccharomyces_pombe_S.png Schizosaccharomyces_pombe_NS.png http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schizosaccharomyces+pombe&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schizosaccharomyce...s+pombe&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schizosaccharomyce...s+pombe&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schizosaccharomyces+pombe&t=NS

  11. Pentose utilization in yeasts: Physiology and biochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeppson, H.

    1996-04-01

    The fermentive performance of bacteria, yeasts, and filamentous fungi was investigated in a pentose (xylose)-rich lignocellulosic hydrolyzate. The filamentous fungus Fusarium oxysporum and the xylose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis were found to be very sensitive to the inhibiting hydrolyzate. Recombinant xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed very poor ethanol formation from xylose; xylitol being the major product formed. The highest ethanol yields were obtained with recombinant Escherichia coli KO11, however, for maximal ethanol yield detoxification of the hydrolyzate was required. The influence of oxygen on the regulation of carbohydrate metabolism in the xylose-fermenting yeast P. stipitis CBS 6054 was investigated. A low and well-controlled level of oxygenation has been found to be required for efficient ethanol formation from xylose by the xylose-fermenting yeasts. The requirement of oxygen is frequently ascribed to the apparent redox imbalance which develops under anaerobic conditions due to the difference in co-factor utilization of the two first enzymes in the xylose metabolism, further reflected in xylitol excretion. However, a low and well controlled level of oxygenation for maximal ethanol production from glucose was also demonstrated, suggesting that the oxygen requirement is not only due to the dual co-factor utilization, but also serves other purposes. Cyanide-insensitive and salicyl hydroxamic acid-sensitive respiration (CIR) was found in P. stipitis. CIR is suggested to act as a redox sink preventing xylitol formation in P. stipitis under oxygen-limited xylose fermentations. Xylitol metabolism by P. stipitis CBS 6054 was strictly respiratory and ethanol was not formed under any conditions. The absence of ethanol formation was not due to a lack of fermentative enzymes, since the addition of glucose to xylitol-pregrown cells resulted in ethanol formation. 277 refs, 5 figs, 7 tabs

  12. Yeast Biodiversity from DOQ Priorat Uninoculated Fermentations

    OpenAIRE

    Padilla, Beatriz; Garc?a-Fern?ndez, David; Gonz?lez, Beatriz; Izidoro, Iara; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Beltran, Gemma; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Climate, soil, and grape varieties are the primary characteristics of terroir and lead to the definition of various appellations of origin. However, the microbiota associated with grapes are also affected by these conditions and can leave a footprint in a wine that will be part of the characteristics of terroir. Thus, a description of the yeast microbiota within a vineyard is of interest not only to provide a better understanding of the winemaking process, but also to understand the source of...

  13. Raman Microspectroscopy of the Yeast Vacuoles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bednárová, Lucie; Palacký, J.; Bauerová, Václava; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Pichová, Iva; Mojzeš, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 27, 5-6 (2012), s. 503-507 ISSN 0712-4813 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/0376; GA ČR GA310/09/1945 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Raman microspectroscopy * living cell * yeast * vacuole * chemical composition * polyphospate * Candida albicans Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.530, year: 2012

  14. Development of Industrial Yeast Platform Strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergdahl, Basti; Dato, Laura; Förster, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Most of the current metabolic engineering projects are carried out using laboratory strains as the starting host. Although such strains are easily manipulated genetically, their robustness does not always meet the requirements set by industrial fermentation conditions. In such conditions, the cells...... screening of the 36 industrial and laboratory yeast strains. In addition, progress in the development of molecular biology methods for generating the new strains will be presented....

  15. Cyanohydrin reactions enhance glycolytic oscillations in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Bjørn Olav; Nielsen, Astrid Gram; Tortzen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous metabolic oscillations can be induced in yeast by addition of glucose and removal of extracellular acetaldehyde (ACAx). Compared to other means of ACAx removal, cyanide robustly induces oscillations, indicating additional cyanide reactions besides ACA to lactonitrile conversion. Here......: a) by reducing [ACAx] relative to oscillation amplitude, b) by targeting multiple intracellular carbonyl compounds during fermentation, and c) by acting as a phase resetting stimulus....

  16. Enzymes of Candida tropicalis yeast biodegrading phenol

    OpenAIRE

    Koubková, Zuzana

    2011-01-01

    Effluents of industrial wastewaters from oil refineries, paper mills, dyes, ceramic factories, resins, textiles and plastic contain high concentrations of aromatic compounds, which are toxic to organisms. Degradation of these compounds to tolerant limits before releasing them into the environment is an urgent requirement. Candida tropicalis yeast is an important representative of eucaryotic microorganisms that are able to utilize phenol. During the first phase of phenol biodegradation, cytopl...

  17. Biotechnology of non-Saccharomyces yeasts-the basidiomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric A

    2013-09-01

    Yeasts are the major producer of biotechnology products worldwide, exceeding production in capacity and economic revenues of other groups of industrial microorganisms. Yeasts have wide-ranging fundamental and industrial importance in scientific, food, medical, and agricultural disciplines (Fig. 1). Saccharomyces is the most important genus of yeast from fundamental and applied perspectives and has been expansively studied. Non-Saccharomyces yeasts (non-conventional yeasts) including members of the Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes also have substantial current utility and potential applicability in biotechnology. In an earlier mini-review, "Biotechnology of non-Saccharomyces yeasts-the ascomycetes" (Johnson Appl Microb Biotechnol 97: 503-517, 2013), the extensive biotechnological utility and potential of ascomycetous yeasts are described. Ascomycetous yeasts are particularly important in food and ethanol formation, production of single-cell protein, feeds and fodder, heterologous production of proteins and enzymes, and as model and fundamental organisms for the delineation of genes and their function in mammalian and human metabolism and disease processes. In contrast, the roles of basidiomycetous yeasts in biotechnology have mainly been evaluated only in the past few decades and compared to the ascomycetous yeasts and currently have limited industrial utility. From a biotechnology perspective, the basidiomycetous yeasts are known mainly for the production of enzymes used in pharmaceutical and chemical synthesis, for production of certain classes of primary and secondary metabolites such as terpenoids and carotenoids, for aerobic catabolism of complex carbon sources, and for bioremediation of environmental pollutants and xenotoxicants. Notwithstanding, the basidiomycetous yeasts appear to have considerable potential in biotechnology owing to their catabolic utilities, formation of enzymes acting on recalcitrant substrates, and through the production of unique primary

  18. Dinitrogen and Related Chemistry of the Lanthanides: A Review of the Reductive Capture of Dinitrogen, As Well As Mono- and Di-aza Containing Ligand Chemistry of Relevance to Known and Postulated Metal Mediated Dinitrogen Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien N. Stringer

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current array of complexes of relevance to achieving lanthanide mediated nitrogen fixation. A brief history of nitrogen fixation is described, including a limited discussion of successful transition metal facilitated nitrogen fixation systems. A detailed discussion of the numerous lanthanide-nitrogen species relevant to nitrogen fixation are discussed and are related to the Chatt cycle for nitrogen fixation.

  19. In situ rheology of yeast biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnoni, Lorena I; Tarifa, María C; Lozano, Jorge E; Genovese, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the in situ rheological behavior of yeast biofilms growing on stainless steel under static and turbulent flow. The species used (Rhodototula mucilaginosa, Candida krusei, Candida kefyr and Candida tropicalis) were isolated from a clarified apple juice industry. The flow conditions impacted biofilm composition over time, with a predominance of C. krusei under static and turbulent flow. Likewise, structural variations occurred, with a tighter appearance under dynamic flow. Under turbulent flow there was an increase of 112 μm in biofilm thickness at 11 weeks (p < 0.001) and cell morphology was governed by hyphal structures and rounded cells. Using the in situ growth method introduced here, yeast biofilms were determined to be viscoelastic materials with a predominantly solid-like behavior, and neither this nor the G'0 values were significantly affected by the flow conditions or the growth time, and at large deformations their weak structure collapsed beyond a critical strain of about 1.5-5%. The present work could represent a starting point for developing in situ measurements of yeast rheology and contribute to a thin body of knowledge about fungal biofilm formation.

  20. [Mitochondria inheritance in yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fizikova, A Iu

    2011-01-01

    The review is devoted to the main mechanisms of mitochondria inheritance in yeast Saccharonmyces cerevisiae. The genetic mechanisms of functionally active mitochondria inheritance in eukaryotic cells is one of the most relevant in modem researches. A great number of genetic diseases are associated with mitochondria dysfunction. Plasticity of eukaryotic cell metabolism according to the environmental changes is ensured by adequate mitochondria functioning by means of ATP synthesis coordination, reactive oxygen species accumulation, apoptosis regulation and is an important factor of cell adaptation to stress. Mitochondria participation in important for cell vitality processes masters the presence of accurate mechanisms of mitochondria functions regulation according to environment fluctuations. The mechanisms of mitochondria division and distribution are highly conserved. Baker yeast S. cerevisiae is an ideal model object for mitochondria researches due to energetic metabolism lability, ability to switch over respiration to fermentation, and petite-positive phenotype. Correction of metabolism according to the environmental changes is necessary for cell vitality. The influence of respiratory, carbon, amino acid and phosphate metabolism on mitochondria functions was shown. As far as the mechanisms that stabilize functions of mitochondria and mtDNA are highly conserve, we can project yeast regularities on higher eukaryotes systems. This makes it possible to approximate understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of a great number of human diseases.

  1. Cleavage of the SUN-domain protein Mps3 at its N-terminus regulates centrosome disjunction in budding yeast meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Centrosomes organize microtubules and are essential for spindle formation and chromosome segregation during cell division. Duplicated centrosomes are physically linked, but how this linkage is dissolved remains unclear. Yeast centrosomes are tethered by a nuclear-envelope-attached structure called the half-bridge, whose components have mammalian homologues. We report here that cleavage of the half-bridge protein Mps3 promotes accurate centrosome disjunction in budding yeast. Mps3 is a single-pass SUN-domain protein anchored at the inner nuclear membrane and concentrated at the nuclear side of the half-bridge. Using the unique feature in yeast meiosis that centrosomes are linked for hours before their separation, we have revealed that Mps3 is cleaved at its nucleus-localized N-terminal domain, the process of which is regulated by its phosphorylation at serine 70. Cleavage of Mps3 takes place at the yeast centrosome and requires proteasome activity. We show that noncleavable Mps3 (Mps3-nc inhibits centrosome separation during yeast meiosis. In addition, overexpression of mps3-nc in vegetative yeast cells also inhibits centrosome separation and is lethal. Our findings provide a genetic mechanism for the regulation of SUN-domain protein-mediated activities, including centrosome separation, by irreversible protein cleavage at the nuclear periphery.

  2. Cleavage of the SUN-domain protein Mps3 at its N-terminus regulates centrosome disjunction in budding yeast meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Bailey A.; Han, Xuemei

    2017-01-01

    Centrosomes organize microtubules and are essential for spindle formation and chromosome segregation during cell division. Duplicated centrosomes are physically linked, but how this linkage is dissolved remains unclear. Yeast centrosomes are tethered by a nuclear-envelope-attached structure called the half-bridge, whose components have mammalian homologues. We report here that cleavage of the half-bridge protein Mps3 promotes accurate centrosome disjunction in budding yeast. Mps3 is a single-pass SUN-domain protein anchored at the inner nuclear membrane and concentrated at the nuclear side of the half-bridge. Using the unique feature in yeast meiosis that centrosomes are linked for hours before their separation, we have revealed that Mps3 is cleaved at its nucleus-localized N-terminal domain, the process of which is regulated by its phosphorylation at serine 70. Cleavage of Mps3 takes place at the yeast centrosome and requires proteasome activity. We show that noncleavable Mps3 (Mps3-nc) inhibits centrosome separation during yeast meiosis. In addition, overexpression of mps3-nc in vegetative yeast cells also inhibits centrosome separation and is lethal. Our findings provide a genetic mechanism for the regulation of SUN-domain protein-mediated activities, including centrosome separation, by irreversible protein cleavage at the nuclear periphery. PMID:28609436

  3. Radon reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    During a radon gas screening program, elevated levels of radon gas were detected in homes on Mackinac Island, Mich. Six homes on foundations with crawl spaces were selected for a research project aimed at reducing radon gas concentrations, which ranged from 12.9 to 82.3 pCi/l. Using isolation and ventilation techniques, and variations thereof, radon concentrations were reduced to less than 1 pCi/l. This paper reports that these reductions were achieved using 3.5 mil cross laminated or 10 mil high density polyethylene plastic as a barrier without sealing to the foundation or support piers, solid and/or perforated plastic pipe and mechanical fans. Wind turbines were found to be ineffective at reducing concentrations to acceptable levels. Homeowners themselves installed all materials

  4. Hsp40 function in yeast prion propagation: Amyloid diversity necessitates chaperone functional complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporn, Zachary A; Hines, Justin K

    2015-01-01

    Yeast prions are heritable protein-based elements, most of which are formed of amyloid aggregates that rely on the action of molecular chaperones for transmission to progeny. Prions can form distinct amyloid structures, known as 'strains' in mammalian systems, that dictate both pathological progression and cross-species infection barriers. In yeast these same amyloid structural polymorphisms, called 'variants', dictate the intensity of prion-associated phenotypes and stability in mitosis. We recently reported that [PSI(+)] prion variants differ in the fundamental domain requirements for one chaperone, the Hsp40/J-protein Sis1, which are mutually exclusive between 2 different yeast prions, demonstrating a functional plurality for Sis1. Here we extend that analysis to incorporate additional data that collectively support the hypothesis that Sis1 has multiple functional roles that can be accomplished by distinct sets of domains. These functions are differentially required by distinct prions and prion variants. We also present new data regarding Hsp104-mediated prion elimination and show that some Sis1 functions, but not all, are conserved in the human homolog Hdj1/DNAJB1. Importantly, of the 10 amyloid-based prions indentified to date in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the chaperone requirements of only 4 are known, leaving a great diversity of amyloid structures, and likely modes of amyloid-chaperone interaction, largely unexplored.

  5. Microbial dynamics during azo dye degradation in a UASB reactor supplied with yeast extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, S Q; Silva, D C; Lanna, M C S; Baeta, B E L; Aquino, S F

    2014-01-01

    The present work aimed to investigate the microbial dynamics during the anaerobic treatment of the azo dye blue HRFL in bench scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor operated at ambient temperature. Sludge samples were collected under distinct operational phases, when the reactor were stable (low variation of color removal), to assess the effect of glucose and yeast extract as source of carbon and redox mediators, respectively. Reactors performance was evaluated based on COD (chemical oxygen demand) and color removal. The microbial dynamics were investigated by PCR-DGGE (Polimerase Chain Reaction - Denaturing Gradient of Gel Electrophoresis) technique by comparing the 16S rDNA profiles among samples. The results suggest that the composition of microorganisms changed from the beginning to the end of the reactor operation, probably in response to the presence of azo dye and/or its degradation byproducts. Despite the highest efficiency of color removal was observed in the presence of 500 mg/L of yeast extract (up to 93%), there were no differences regarding the microbial profiles that could indicate a microbial selection by the yeast extract addition. On the other hand Methosarcina barkeri was detected only in the end of operation when the best efficiencies on color removal occurred. Nevertheless the biomass selection observed in the last stages of UASB operation is probably a result of the washout of the sludge in response of accumulation of aromatic amines which led to tolerant and very active biomass that contributed to high efficiencies on color removal.

  6. Biomedical applications of yeast- a patent view, part one: yeasts as workhorses for the production of therapeutics and vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohvand, Farzin; Shokri, Mehdi; Abdollahpour-Alitappeh, Meghdad; Ehsani, Parastoo

    2017-08-01

    Yeasts, as Eukaryotes, offer unique features for ease of growth and genetic manipulation possibilities, making it an exceptional microbial host. Areas covered: This review provides general and patent-oriented insights into production of biopharmaceuticals by yeasts. Patents, wherever possible, were correlated to the original or review articles. The review describes applications of major GRAS (generally regarded as safe) yeasts for the production of therapeutic proteins and subunit vaccines; additionally, immunomodulatory properties of yeast cell wall components were reviewed for use of whole yeast cells as a new vaccine platform. The second part of the review will discuss yeast- humanization strategies and innovative applications. Expert opinion: Biomedical applications of yeasts were initiated by utilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for production of leavened (fermented) products, and advanced to serve to produce biopharmaceuticals. Higher biomass production and expression/secretion yields, more similarity of glycosylation patterns to mammals and possibility of host-improvement strategies through application of synthetic biology might enhance selection of Pichia pastoris (instead of S. cerevisiae) as a host for production of biopharmaceutical in future. Immunomodulatory properties of yeast cell wall β-glucans and possibility of intracellular expression of heterologous pathogen/tumor antigens in yeast cells have expanded their application as a new platform, 'Whole Yeast Vaccines'.

  7. Taming wild yeast: potential of conventional and nonconventional yeasts in industrial fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steensels, Jan; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts are the main driving force behind several industrial food fermentation processes, including the production of beer, wine, sake, bread, and chocolate. Historically, these processes developed from uncontrolled, spontaneous fermentation reactions that rely on a complex mixture of microbes present in the environment. Because such spontaneous processes are generally inconsistent and inefficient and often lead to the formation of off-flavors, most of today's industrial production utilizes defined starter cultures, often consisting of a specific domesticated strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, or S. pastorianus. Although this practice greatly improved process consistency, efficiency, and overall quality, it also limited the sensorial complexity of the end product. In this review, we discuss how Saccharomyces yeasts were domesticated to become the main workhorse of food fermentations, and we investigate the potential and selection of nonconventional yeasts that are often found in spontaneous fermentations, such as Brettanomyces, Hanseniaspora, and Pichia spp.

  8. PENGARUH BERBAGAI MERK DRIED YEAST (Saccharomyces sp. DAN pH AWAL FERMENTASI TERHADAP KARAKTERISTIK WINE SALAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Bagus Wayan Gunam

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research were to find out the effect of different of dried yeast and initial pH of fermentation on the characteristic of salacca wine, and to determine the appropriate of kind of dried yeast and initial pH of fermentation to produce salacca wine with the best characteristic. This research used Randomized Block Design with factorial pattern. The first factor was the kind of dried yeast brand that consisted of 3 kinds namely Lalvin, Levure and Alcotec. The second factor consisted of 5 levels of initial pH, namely 3.5; 4; 4.5; 5; and 5.5. Each treatment was done 2 times, in order to obtain 30 trial units. The data obtained was analyzed using ANOVA followed by Duncans test. Interactions between treatments had very significant effect on the ethanol content, reduction sugar content, and pH, but had significant effect on acid total content. The best treatment was to use the Alcotec brand dried yeast with a treatment of initial pH as 4, with the following characteristics: ethanol content 12.40%, negative content of methanol, reduction sugar content 5.87%, acid total content 0.20%, pH 3.5 after the fermentation, the color was enough pure yellow, the flavor was strong enough, the taste was strong enough, and rather liked over all acceptance.

  9. Not your ordinary yeast: non-Saccharomyces yeasts in wine production uncovered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Neil P; Varela, Cristian; Pretorius, Isak S

    2014-03-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae and grape juice are 'natural companions' and make a happy wine marriage. However, this relationship can be enriched by allowing 'wild' non-Saccharomyces yeast to participate in a sequential manner in the early phases of grape must fermentation. However, such a triangular relationship is complex and can only be taken to 'the next level' if there are no spoilage yeast present and if the 'wine yeast' - S. cerevisiae - is able to exert its dominance in time to successfully complete the alcoholic fermentation. Winemakers apply various 'matchmaking' strategies (e.g. cellar hygiene, pH, SO2 , temperature and nutrient management) to keep 'spoilers' (e.g. Dekkera bruxellensis) at bay, and allow 'compatible' wild yeast (e.g. Torulaspora delbrueckii, Pichia kluyveri, Lachancea thermotolerans and Candida/Metschnikowia pulcherrima) to harmonize with potent S. cerevisiae wine yeast and bring the best out in wine. Mismatching can lead to a 'two is company, three is a crowd' scenario. More than 40 of the 1500 known yeast species have been isolated from grape must. In this article, we review the specific flavour-active characteristics of those non-Saccharomyces species that might play a positive role in both spontaneous and inoculated wine ferments. We seek to present 'single-species' and 'multi-species' ferments in a new light and a new context, and we raise important questions about the direction of mixed-fermentation research to address market trends regarding so-called 'natural' wines. This review also highlights that, despite the fact that most frontier research and technological developments are often focussed primarily on S. cerevisiae, non-Saccharomyces research can benefit from the techniques and knowledge developed by research on the former. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Black yeast-like fungi in skin and nail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunte, D M; Tarazooie, B; Arendrup, M C

    2011-01-01

    Black yeast-like fungi are rarely reported from superficial infections. We noticed a consistent prevalence of these organisms as single isolations from mycological routine specimens. To investigate the prevalence of black yeast-like fungi in skin, hair and nail specimens and to discuss...... the probability of these species to be involved in disease. Slow-growing black yeast-like fungi in routine specimens were prospectively collected and identified. A questionnaire regarding patient information was sent to physicians regarding black yeast-like fungus positive patients. A total of 20 746...... dermatological specimens were examined by culture. Black yeast-like fungi accounted for 2.2% (n = 108) of the positive cultures. Only 31.0% of the samples, culture positive for black yeast-like fungi were direct microscopy positive when compared with overall 68.8% of the culture positive specimens. The most...

  11. Yeast Genomics for Bread, Beer, Biology, Bucks and Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakharkar, Kishore R.; Sakharkar, Meena K.

    The rapid advances and scale up of projects in DNA sequencing dur ing the past two decades have produced complete genome sequences of several eukaryotic species. The versatile genetic malleability of the yeast, and the high degree of conservation between its cellular processes and those of human cells have made it a model of choice for pioneering research in molecular and cell biology. The complete sequence of yeast genome has proven to be extremely useful as a reference towards the sequences of human and for providing systems to explore key gene functions. Yeast has been a ‘legendary model’ for new technologies and gaining new biological insights into basic biological sciences and biotechnology. This chapter describes the awesome power of yeast genetics, genomics and proteomics in understanding of biological function. The applications of yeast as a screening tool to the field of drug discovery and development are highlighted and the traditional importance of yeast for bakers and brewers is discussed.

  12. A new methodology to obtain wine yeast strains overproducing mannoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirós, Manuel; Gonzalez-Ramos, Daniel; Tabera, Laura; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2010-04-30

    Yeast mannoproteins are highly glycosylated proteins that are covalently bound to the beta-1,3-glucan present in the yeast cell wall. Among their outstanding enological properties, yeast mannoproteins contribute to several aspects of wine quality by protecting against protein haze, reducing astringency, retaining aroma compounds and stimulating growth of lactic-acid bacteria. The development of a non-recombinant method to obtain enological yeast strains overproducing mannoproteins would therefore be very useful. Our previous experience on the genetic determinants of the release of these molecules by Saccharomyces cerevisiae has allowed us to propose a new methodology to isolate and characterize wine yeast that overproduce mannoproteins. The described methodology is based on the resistance of the killer 9 toxin produced by Williopsis saturnus, a feature linked to an altered biogenesis of the yeast cell wall. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Yeast hulls: effect on spontaneous fermentation in different vinification conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa López

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the addition of yeast hulls in vinification was investigated during three consecutive years. The study was carried out in the experimental winery of C.I.D.A in La Rioja (Spain with free running white grape juice of the Viura variety. Four different vinifications were studied. In two of these vinifications, stuck fermentations were detected. In all the studies, the addition of yeast hulls (yeast ghosts improved the fermentation kinetics, increasing the number of viable yeasts at the end of the exponential stage and decreasing the final content of reducing sugars. This work revealed a new effect of yeast hull addition which had not been identified previously; their selection effect on the wild yeast strain in spontaneous fermentation.

  14. Differentiation of enzymatic activity of yeasts and yeast-like microorganisms isolated from various environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Bogusławska-Wąs

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to determinate enzymatic activity of yeast-like organisms - Candida lipolytica, Rhodotorula rubra, Trichosporon beigelii, Zygosaccharomyces sp. - isolated from the Szczecin Lagoon and herring salads. We have shown that lipolytic activity was higher than protcolytic for every strain tested. The lowest activity level was found out for amylolytic hydrolases. The results also demonstrated that yeast-like organisms isolated from the Szczecin Lagoon revealed much higher average enzymatic activity compared to tbe same species isolated from herring salads, excepting C. lipolytica.

  15. Determination of the autolysis of champagne yeast by using 14C-labelled yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, I.; Oura, E.; Suomalainen, H.

    1980-01-01

    The degree of autolysis of 14 C-labelled Champagne Hautvillers yeast was studied in the function of different temperatures of storage. A linear relationship was found between the length of the storage and the degree of autolysis. The rate of autolysis increased with raising the temperature of storage. The raising of the temperature by 10 deg C was followed by a 6-7% increase in the rate of autolysis. Shaking up the yeast sediment at 20-day intervals raised the rate of autolysis by 1.5-4.2%. (author)

  16. Determination of the autolysis of champagne yeast by using /sup 14/C-labelled yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molnar, I [Orszagos Szoeleszeti es Boraszati Kutatointezet, Budapest (Hungary); Oura, E; Suomalainen, H [Research Laboratories of the State Alcohol Monopoly, Helsinki (Finland)

    1980-01-01

    The degree of autolysis of /sup 14/C-labelled Champagne Hautvillers yeast was studied in the function of different temperatures of storage. A linear relationship was found between the length of the storage and the degree of autolysis. The rate of autolysis increased with raising the temperature of storage. The raising of the temperature by 10 deg C was followed by a 6-7% increase in the rate of autolysis. Shaking up the yeast sediment at 20-day intervals raised the rate of autolysis by 1.5-4.2%.

  17. Effect of heat treatment on brewer's yeast fermentation activity

    OpenAIRE

    Kharandiuk, Tetiana; Kosiv, Ruslana; Palianytsia, Liubov; Berezovska, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    The influence of temperature treatment of brewer's yeast strain Saflager W-34/70 at temperatures of -17, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40 °C on their fermentative activity was studied. It was established that the freezing of yeast leads to a decrease of fermentation activity in directly proportional to the duration way. Fermentative activity of yeast samples can be increased by 20-24% by heat treatment at 35 °C during 15-30 minutes.

  18. Using Microsatellites to Identify Yeast Strains in Beer

    OpenAIRE

    Bruke, Alexandria; Van Brocklin, Jennifer; Rivest, Jason; Prenni, Jessica E.; Ibrahim, Hend

    2012-01-01

    Yeast is an integral part of the brewing process and is responsible for much of the taste and characteristics of beer. During the brewing process, yeast is subject to ageing and stress factors that can result in growth inhibition, decreased genetic stability, and changes in cell membrane stability. Characterization of yeast species used in industrial fermentation (e.g. S. cerevisiae) is of great importance to the brewing industry. The objective of this study was to develop an assay to identif...

  19. Yeast replicative aging: a paradigm for defining conserved longevity interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Wasko, Brian M.; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2013-01-01

    The finite replicative life span of budding yeast mother cells was demonstrated as early as 1959, but the idea that budding yeast could be used to model aging of multicellular eukaryotes did not enter the scientific mainstream until relatively recently. Despite continued skepticism by some, there are now abundant data that several interventions capable of extending yeast replicative life span have a similar effect in multicellular eukaryotes including nematode worms, fruit flies, and rodents....

  20. Yeast species associated with the spontaneous fermentation of cider.

    OpenAIRE

    Suárez, Belén; Pando, Rosa; Fernández, Norman; Querol, Amparo; Rodríguez, Roberto

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports the influence of cider-making technology (pneumatic and traditional pressing) on the dynamics of wild yeast populations. Yeast colonies isolated from apple juice before and throughout fermentation at a cider cellar of Asturias (Spain), during two consecutive years were studied. The yeast strains were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the 5.8S rRNA gene and the two flanking internal transcribed sequences (ITS). The musts obtained by ...