WorldWideScience

Sample records for x-ray spectral analysis

  1. Monte-Carlo error analysis in x-ray spectral deconvolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirk, D.G.; Hoffman, N.M.

    1985-01-01

    The deconvolution of spectral information from sparse x-ray data is a widely encountered problem in data analysis. An often-neglected aspect of this problem is the propagation of random error in the deconvolution process. We have developed a Monte-Carlo approach that enables us to attach error bars to unfolded x-ray spectra. Our Monte-Carlo error analysis has been incorporated into two specific deconvolution techniques: the first is an iterative convergent weight method; the second is a singular-value-decomposition (SVD) method. These two methods were applied to an x-ray spectral deconvolution problem having m channels of observations with n points in energy space. When m is less than n, this problem has no unique solution. We discuss the systematics of nonunique solutions and energy-dependent error bars for both methods. The Monte-Carlo approach has a particular benefit in relation to the SVD method: It allows us to apply the constraint of spectral nonnegativity after the SVD deconvolution rather than before. Consequently, we can identify inconsistencies between different detector channels

  2. Processing of spectral X-ray data with principal components analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, A P H; Cook, N J; Butzer, J; Schleich, N; Tlustos, L; Scott, N; Grasset, R; de Ruiter, N; Anderson, N G

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the work was to develop a general method for processing spectral x-ray image data. Principle component analysis (PCA) is a well understood technique for multivariate data analysis and so was investigated. To assess this method, spectral (multi-energy) computed tomography (CT) data was obtained using a Medipix2 detector in a MARS-CT (Medipix All Resolution System). PCA was able to separate bone (calcium) from two elements with k-edges in the X-ray spectrum used (iodine and barium) within a mouse. This has potential clinical application in dual-energy CT systems and future Medipix3 based spectral imaging where up to eight energies can be recorded simultaneously with excellent energy resolution. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Joint Spectral Analysis for Early Bright X-ray Flares of γ-Ray Bursts ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A joint spectral analysis for early bright X-ray flares that were simultaneously observed with Swift BAT and XRT are present. Both BAT and XRT lightcurves of these flares are correlated. Our joint spectral anal- ysis shows that the radiations in the two energy bands are from the same spectral component, which can ...

  4. Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-06

    Feb 6, 2014 ... Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma, produced by laser pulses of 45 fs duration, focussed up to an intensity of ∼1018 W cm-2, is carried out. The plasma conditions prevalent during the emission of X-ray spectrum were identified by comparing the experimental spectra with the ...

  5. Semiconductor detectors in current energy dispersive X-ray spectral analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betin, J; Zhabin, E; Krampit, I; Smirnov, V

    1980-04-01

    A review is presented of the properties of semiconductor detectors and of the possibilities stemming therefrom of using the detectors in X-ray spectral analysis in industries, in logging, in ecology and environmental control, in medicine, etc.

  6. Semiconductor detectors in current energy dispersive X-ray spectral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betin, J.; Zhabin, E.; Krampit, I.; Smirnov, V.

    1980-01-01

    A review is presented of the properties of semiconductor detectors and of the possibilities stemming therefrom of using the detectors in X-ray spectral analysis in industries, in logging, in ecology and environmental control, in medicine, etc. (M.S.)

  7. X-ray stars observed in LAMOST spectral survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hong-peng; Zhang, Li-yun; Han, Xianming L.; Shi, Jianrong

    2018-05-01

    X-ray stars have been studied since the beginning of X-ray astronomy. Investigating and studying the chromospheric activity from X-ray stellar optical spectra is highly significant in providing insights into stellar magnetic activity. The big data of LAMOST survey provides an opportunity for researching stellar optical spectroscopic properties of X-ray stars. We inferred the physical properties of X-ray stellar sources from the analysis of LAMOST spectra. First, we cross-matched the X-ray stellar catalogue (12254 X-ray stars) from ARXA with LAMOST data release 3 (DR3), and obtained 984 good spectra from 713 X-ray sources. We then visually inspected and assigned spectral type to each spectrum and calculated the equivalent width (EW) of Hα line using the Hammer spectral typing facility. Based on the EW of Hα line, we found 203 spectra of 145 X-ray sources with Hα emission above the continuum. For these spectra we also measured the EWs of Hβ, Hγ, Hδ and Ca ii IRT lines of these spectra. After removing novae, planetary nebulae and OB-type stars, we found there are 127 X-ray late-type stars with Hα line emission. By using our spectra and results from the literature, we found 53 X-ray stars showing Hα variability; these objects are Classical T Tauri stars (CTTs), cataclysmic variables (CVs) or chromospheric activity stars. We also found 18 X-ray stars showing obvious emissions in the Ca ii IRT lines. Of the 18 X-ray stars, 16 are CTTs and 2 are CVs. Finally, we discussed the relationships between the EW of Hα line and X-ray flux.

  8. Higher order structure analysis of nano-materials by spectral reflectance of laser-plasma soft x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma, Hirozumi; Takeichi, Akihiro; Noda, Shoji

    1995-01-01

    We have proposed a new experimental arrangement to measure spectral reflectance of nano-materials for analyzing higher order structure with laser-plasma soft x-rays. Structure modification of annealed Mo/Si multilayers and a nylon-6/clay hybrid with poor periodicity was investigated. The measurement of the spectral reflectance of soft x-rays from laser-produced plasma was found to be a useful method for the structure analysis of nano-materials, especially those of rather poor periodicity

  9. X-Ray Spectral Characteristics of Ginga Gamma-Ray Bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohmayer, T.E.; Fenimore, E.E.; Murakami, T.; Yoshida, A.

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the spectral characteristics of a sample of bright gamma-ray bursts detected with the gamma-ray burst sensors aboard the satellite Ginga. This instrument employed a proportional and scintillation counter to provide sensitivity to photons in the 2 endash 400 keV region and as such provided a unique opportunity to characterize the largely unexplored X-ray properties of gamma-ray bursts. The photon spectra of the Ginga bursts are well described by a low-energy slope, a bend energy, and a high-energy slope. In the energy range where they can be compared, this result is consistent with burst spectral analyses obtained from the BATSE experiment aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. However, below 20 keV we find evidence for a positive spectral number index in approximately 40% of our burst sample, with some evidence for a strong rolloff at lower energies in a few events. There is a correlation (Pearson's r = -0.62) between the low-energy slope and the bend energy. We find that the distribution of spectral bend energies extends below 10 keV. There has been some concern in cosmological models of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that the bend energy covers only a small dynamic range. Our result extends the observed dynamic range, and, since we observe bend energies down to the limit of our instrument, perhaps observations have not yet limited the range. The Ginga trigger range was virtually the same as that of BATSE, yet we find a different range of fit parameters. One possible explanation might be that GRBs have two break energies, one often in the 50 endash 500 keV range and the other near 5 keV. Both BATSE and Ginga fit with only a single break energy, so BATSE tends to find breaks near the center of its energy range, and we tend to find breaks in our energy range. The observed ratio of energy emitted in the X-rays relative to the gamma rays can be much larger than a few percent and, in fact, is sometimes larger than unity. The average for our 22 bursts

  10. Spectral and correlation analysis of soft X-ray signals from the Joint European Torus tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, J.; Pazsit, I.

    1997-01-01

    Tomographic methods applied to soft X-rays emitted from a fusion plasma have long been used to diagnose and interpret magnetohydrodynamic and other plasma activities. However, fluctuation analysis has recently been proposed as a complementary method to tomography. The novelty of the suggested method is that the various modes can be determined without tomographic inversion. This paper reports on the results of correlation and spectral analysis of soft X-ray data. The seven measurements analyzed were made by the Joint European Torus (JET) Joint Undertaking using their old soft X-ray measurement system. Auto power spectral densities and phase relations were evaluated from the measured signals as functions of the lines of sight. The fundamental mode m=n=1 was identified in several measurements. The corresponding frequency and toroidal rotation velocity were determined. Higher order modes were also observed and identified. Furthermore, simple model calculations were performed and the results compared with evaluated auto-spectra. (orig.)

  11. X-ray spectral meter of high voltages for X-ray apparatuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubkov, I.P.; Larchikov, Yu.V.

    1993-01-01

    Design of the X-ray spectral meter of high voltages (XRSMHV) for medical X-ray apparatuses permitting to conduct the voltage measurements without connection to current circuits. The XRSMHV consists of two main units: the detector unit based on semiconductor detector and the LP4900B multichannel analyzer (Afora, Finland). The XRSMYV was tested using the pilot plant based on RUM-20 X-ray diagnostic apparatus with high-voltage regulator. It was shown that the developed XRSMHV could be certify in the range of high constant voltages form 40 up to 120 kV with the basic relative error limits ±0.15%. The XRSMHV is used at present as the reference means for calibration of high-voltage medical X-ray equipment

  12. Different X-ray spectral evolution for black hole X-ray binaries in dual tracks of radio-X-ray correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Xiao-Feng; Wu, Qingwen; Dong, Ai-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Recently, an 'outlier' track of radio-X-ray correlation was found, which is much steeper than the former universal correlation, where dual tracks were speculated to be triggered by different accretion processes. In this work, we test this issue by exploring hard X-ray spectral evolution in four black-hole X-ray binaries with multiple, quasi-simultaneous radio and X-ray observations. First, we find that hard X-ray photon indices, Γ, are negatively and positively correlated with X-ray fluxes when the X-ray flux, F 3-9 keV , is below and above a critical flux, F X, crit , which are consistent with predictions of the advection-dominated accretion flow and the disk-corona model, respectively. Second, and most importantly, we find that the radio-X-ray correlations are also clearly different when the X-ray fluxes are higher and lower than the critical flux as defined by X-ray spectral evolution. The data points with F 3-9 keV ≳ F X, crit have a steeper radio-X-ray correlation (F X ∝F R b and b ∼ 1.1-1.4), which roughly forms the ''outlier'' track. However, the data points with anti-correlation of Γ – F 3-9 keV either stay in the universal track with b ∼ 0.61 or stay in the transition track (from the universal to 'outlier' tracks or vice versa). Therefore, our results support that the universal and ''outlier'' tracks of radio-X-ray correlations are regulated by radiatively inefficient and radiatively efficient accretion model, respectively.

  13. Effect of gold photocathode contamination on a flat spectral response X-ray diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun-lun; Zhang, Si-qun; Zhou, Shao-tong; Huang, Xian-bin; Ren, Xiao-dong; Dan, Jia-kun; Xu, Qiang

    2018-03-01

    A detector with an approximately flat spectral response is important for diagnosing intense thermal X-ray flux. A flat-spectral-response X-ray diode (FSR-XRD) utilizes a gold photocathode X-ray diode and a specially configured gold filter to give rise to a nearly flat spectral response in the photon energy range of 100-4000 eV. It has been observed that the spectral responses of several FSR-XRDs changed after a few shots of z-pinch experiments on the Primary Test Stand facility. This paper presents an analysis of the changes by fitting the spectral responses of the gold photocathodes using a model with a free parameter which characterizes the thickness of the contamination. The spectral responses of FSR-XRDs were calibrated with synchrotron radiation, and several cleaning methods were tested with the calibration. Considering the results of model and cleaning, it may be anticipated that contamination was the major reason of the response changing. Contamination worsened the flatness of the spectral response of the FSR-XRD and decreased the averaged response, hence it is important to avoid contamination. Current results indicate a requirement of further study of the contamination.

  14. Spectral structure of a polycapillary lens shaped X-ray beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogolev, A. S.; Filatov, N. A.; Uglov, S. R.; Hampai, D.; Dabagov, S. B.

    2018-04-01

    Polycapillary X-ray optics is widely used in X-ray analysis techniques to create a small secondary source, for instance, or to deliver X-rays to the point of interest with minimum intensity losses [1]. The main characteristics of the analytical devices on its base are the size and divergence of the focused or translated beam. In this work, we used the photon-counting pixel detector ModuPIX to study the parameters for polycapillary focused X-ray tube radiation as well as the energy and spatial dependences of radiation at the focus. We have characterized the high-speed spectral camera ModuPIX, which is a single Timepix device with a fast parallel readout allowing up to 850 frames per second with 256 × 256 pixels and a 55 μm pitch defined by the frame frequency. By means of the silicon monochromator the energy response function is measured in clustering mode by the energy scan over total X-ray tube spectrum.

  15. ON NEUTRAL ABSORPTION AND SPECTRAL EVOLUTION IN X-RAY BINARIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J. M.; Cackett, E. M.; Reis, R. C.

    2009-01-01

    Current X-ray observatories make it possible to follow the evolution of transient and variable X-ray binaries across a broad range in luminosity and source behavior. In such studies, it can be unclear whether evolution in the low-energy portion of the spectrum should be attributed to evolution in the source, or instead to evolution in neutral photoelectric absorption. Dispersive spectrometers make it possible to address this problem. We have analyzed a small but diverse set of X-ray binaries observed with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer across a range in luminosity and different spectral states. The column density in individual photoelectric absorption edges remains constant with luminosity, both within and across source spectral states. This finding suggests that absorption in the interstellar medium strongly dominates the neutral column density observed in spectra of X-ray binaries. Consequently, evolution in the low-energy spectrum of X-ray binaries should properly be attributed to evolution in the source spectrum. We discuss our results in the context of X-ray binary spectroscopy with current and future X-ray missions.

  16. CO-ANALYSIS OF SOLAR MICROWAVE AND HARD X-RAY SPECTRAL EVOLUTIONS. II. IN THREE SOURCES OF A FLARING LOOP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Guangli; Li Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Based on the spatially resolvable data of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and Nobeyama Radio Heliograph (NoRH), co-analysis of solar hard X-ray and microwave spectral evolution is performed in three separate sources located in one looptop (LT) and two footpoints (FPs) of a huge flaring loop in the 2003 October 24 flare. The RHESSI image spectral evolution in 10-100 keV is always fitted by the well-known soft-hard-soft (SHS) pattern in the three sources. When the total energy is divided into four intervals similar to the Yohkoh/Hard X-ray Telescope, i.e., 12.5-32.5 keV, 32.5-52.5 keV, 52.5-72.5 keV, and 72.5-97.5 keV, the SHS pattern in lower energies is converted gradually to the hard-soft-hard (HSH) pattern in higher energies in all three sources. However, the break energy in the LT and the northeast FP (∼32.5 keV) is evidently smaller than that in the southwest FP (∼72.5 keV). Regarding microwave spectral evolution of the NoRH data, the well-known soft-hard-harder pattern appeared in the southwest FP, while the HSH pattern coexisted in the LT and the northeast FP. The different features of the hard X-ray and microwave spectral evolutions in the three sources may be explained by the loop-loop interaction with another huge loop in the LT and with a compact loop in the northeast FP, where the trapping effect is much stronger than that in the southwest FP. The comparison between the LT and FP spectral indices suggests that the radiation mechanism of X-rays may be quite different in different energy intervals and sources. The calculated electron spectral indices from the predicted mechanisms of X-rays gradually become closer to those from the microwave data with increasing X-ray energies.

  17. A Hard X-Ray Power-Law Spectral Cutoff in Centaurus X-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakrabarty, Deepto; Tomsick, John A.; Grefenstette, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    The low-mass X-ray binary Cen X-4 is the brightest and closest (<1.2 kpc) quiescent neutron star transient. Previous 0.5-10 keV X-ray observations of Cen X-4 in quiescence identified two spectral components: soft thermal emission from the neutron star atmosphere and a hard power-law tail of unkno...... behavior with PSR J1023+0038, IGR J18245-2452, and XSS J12270-4859, which have shown transitions between LMXB and radio pulsar modes at a similar X-ray luminosity....

  18. CO-ANALYSIS OF SOLAR MICROWAVE AND HARD X-RAY SPECTRAL EVOLUTIONS. I. IN TWO FREQUENCY OR ENERGY RANGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Qiwu; Huang Guangli; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Solar microwave and hard X-ray spectral evolutions are co-analyzed in the 2000 June 10 and 2002 April 10 flares, and are simultaneously observed by the Owens-Valley Solar Array in the microwave band and by Yohkoh/Hard X-ray Telescope or RHESSI in the hard X-ray band, with multiple subpeaks in their light curves. The microwave and hard X-ray spectra are fitted by a power law in two frequency ranges of the optical thin part and two photon energy ranges, respectively. Similar to an earlier event in Shao and Huang, the well-known soft-hard-soft pattern of the lower energy range changed to the hard-soft-hard (HSH) pattern of the higher energy range during the spectral evolution of each subpeak in both hard X-ray flares. This energy dependence is actually supported by a positive correlation between the overall light curves and spectral evolution in the lower energy range, while it becomes an anti-correlation in the higher energy range. Regarding microwave data, the HSH pattern appears in the spectral evolution of each subpeak in the lower frequency range, which is somewhat similar to Huang and Nakajima. However, it returns back to the well-known pattern of soft-hard-harder for the overall spectral evolution in the higher frequency range of both events. This frequency dependence is confirmed by an anti-correlation between the overall light curves and spectral evolution in the lower frequency range, but it becomes a positive correlation in the higher frequency range. The possible mechanisms are discussed, respectively, for reasons why hard X-ray and microwave spectral evolutions have different patterns in different energy and frequency intervals.

  19. X-ray Beam Spectral Reconstruction Using Laplace Transform and Attenuation Curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeng, Seongjin; Lee, Sang Hoo; Kwon, Dahye; Seo, Jihye; Seo, Kyung Won

    2015-01-01

    As the use of X-ray tubes is widely spread mainly for medical diagnostic purposes or industrial applications, there is increasing demand for accurate and convenient way getting of X-ray beam spectral information. While measurement methods may provide quite accurate spectral information, these methods still require expensive detectors (example: HPGe, High Purity Germanium detector) and some conversion of measurement information into real spectrum. It is concluded that Laplace transform-based spectral reconstruction technique given in equations (1) and (2) works well for a 50-kV X-ray source. In this paper we obtained the attenuation curve by the use of MCNPX simulations. We were able to rebuild the X-ray spectrum of 50 kV through this research by Monte Carlo simulation (fitting parameters, a: 1.2921, b: 0.2342, ν: 0.6190, R-squared: 0.9930)

  20. Spectral and dual-energy X-ray imaging for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredenberg, Erik

    2018-01-01

    Spectral imaging is an umbrella term for energy-resolved X-ray imaging in medicine. The technique makes use of the energy dependence of X-ray attenuation to either increase the contrast-to-noise ratio, or to provide quantitative image data and reduce image artefacts by so-called material decomposition. Spectral imaging is not new, but has gained interest in recent years because of rapidly increasing availability of spectral and dual-energy CT and the dawn of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors. This review examines the current technological status of spectral and dual-energy imaging and a number of practical applications of the technology in medicine.

  1. X-ray spectral determination by detection of radiation scattered at different angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrea, Raul; Mainardi, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    A precise knowledge of the spectral content of an X-ray beam is of fundamental importance in areas such as X-ray fluorescence analysis by absolute methods, radiodiagnosis, radiotherapy, computed tomography, etc. A simple practical method was developed to determine X-ray spectra emitted by X-ray tubes. It is based on the scattering of the beam on a solid target and detection of this radiation at different angles. This methodology can easily be adapted to the successive attenuation of the beam procedure. Numerical parameter values of a proposed analytical function for the energy spectrum are found measuring the radiation intensity with a suitable detector (ionization chamber or plastic scintillation detector) and equating it with the convolution integral of the proposed spectrum with the incoherent scattering function. This procedure of spectra determination is enclosed in the same group of those generically referred as successive modifications of the irradiation set up used in absolute methods of X-ray fluorescence analysis. (Author) [es

  2. Methods for deconvoluting and interpreting complex gamma- and x-ray spectral regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnink, R.

    1983-06-01

    Germanium and silicon detectors are now widely used for the detection and measurement of x and gamma radiation. However, some analysis situations and spectral regions have heretofore been too complex to deconvolute and interpret by techniques in general use. One example is the L x-ray spectrum of an element taken with a Ge or Si detector. This paper describes some new tools and methods that were developed to analyze complex spectral regions; they are illustrated with examples

  3. Spectral effects on some physical coefficients of x-Ray interaction with materials of low atomic number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Kazzaz, S.A.; Youssef, M.; EL-Hadad, S.; and EL-Nadi, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray spectra were measured before and after passing through some materials of medical importance applying X-ray diffraction. The mass absorption coefficients of these materials were determined at X-ray peak voltages 27, 30 and 42 kV-p making use the measured spectrum and also by using the direct beam absorption. It has been found that the mass absorption coefficients calculated from the X-ray spectral distribution analysis are in general lower than those obtained considering the direct beam method. From the study of the atomic number and energy dependence of the mass absorption coefficients it has been found that the dependence of the coefficients calculated from the spectral distribution is good agreement with the previously studied data for monoenergetic x-ray beam. Also the roentgen - to - Rad conversion factors were determined at the different used energies and materials. The value of the mass absorption coefficients calculated from the spectral distribution is recommended for use in dose calculation

  4. X-ray time and spectral variability as probes of ultraluminous x-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasham, Dheeraj Ranga Reddy

    A long-standing debate in the field of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs: luminosities > 3x1039 ergs s-1) is whether these objects are powered by stellar-mass black holes (mass range of 3-25 solar masses) undergoing hyper-accretion/emission or if they host the long-sought after class of intermediate-mass black holes (mass range of a few 100-1000 solar masses) accreting material at sub-Eddington rates. We present X-ray time and energy spectral variability studies of ULXs in order to understand their physical environments and accurately weigh their compact objects. A sample of ULXs exhibit quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) with centroid frequencies in the range of 10-200 mHz. The nature of the power density spectra (PDS) of these sources is qualitatively similar to stellar-mass black holes when they exhibit the so-called type-C low-frequency QPOs (frequency range of 0.2-15 Hz). However, the crucial difference is that the characteristic frequencies within the PDS of ULXs, viz., the break frequencies and the centroid frequencies of the QPOs, are scaled down by a factor of approximately 10-100 compared to stellar-mass black holes. It has thus been argued that the ULX mHz QPOs are the type-C low-frequency QPO analogs of stellar-mass black holes and that the observed difference in the frequencies (a fewx0.01 Hz compared with a few Hz) is due to the presence of intermediate-mass black holes ( MULX = (QPOstellar-mass black hole }/QPOULX)xM stellar-mass black hole, where M and QPO are the mass and the QPO frequency, respectively) within these ULXs. We analyzed all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray data of ULXs NGC 5408 X-1 and M82 X-1 in order to test the hypothesis that the ULX mHz QPOs are the type-C analogs by searching for a correlation between the mHz QPO frequency and the energy spectral power-law index as type-C QPOs show such a dependence. From our multi-epoch timing and spectral analysis of ULXs NGC 5408 X-1 and M82 X-1, we found that the mHz QPOs of these sources vary

  5. Multivariate statistical analysis for x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectral imaging: Effect of image acquisition time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peebles, D.E.; Ohlhausen, J.A.; Kotula, P.G.; Hutton, S.; Blomfield, C.

    2004-01-01

    The acquisition of spectral images for x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a relatively new approach, although it has been used with other analytical spectroscopy tools for some time. This technique provides full spectral information at every pixel of an image, in order to provide a complete chemical mapping of the imaged surface area. Multivariate statistical analysis techniques applied to the spectral image data allow the determination of chemical component species, and their distribution and concentrations, with minimal data acquisition and processing times. Some of these statistical techniques have proven to be very robust and efficient methods for deriving physically realistic chemical components without input by the user other than the spectral matrix itself. The benefits of multivariate analysis of the spectral image data include significantly improved signal to noise, improved image contrast and intensity uniformity, and improved spatial resolution - which are achieved due to the effective statistical aggregation of the large number of often noisy data points in the image. This work demonstrates the improvements in chemical component determination and contrast, signal-to-noise level, and spatial resolution that can be obtained by the application of multivariate statistical analysis to XPS spectral images

  6. High spectral resolution X-ray observations of AGN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaastra, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    brief overview of some highlights of high spectral resolution X-ray observations of AGN is given, mainly obtained with the RGS of XMM-Newton. Future prospects for such observations with XMM-Newton are given.

  7. Spectral and Temporal Characteristics of X-Ray-Bright Stars in the Pleiades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Marc; Caillault, Jean-Pierre; Stauffer, John R.

    1995-01-01

    We follow up our deep ROSAT imaging survey of the Pleiades (Stauffer et al. 1994) with an analysis of the spectral and temporal characteristics of the X-ray-bright stars in the Pleiades. Raymond & Smith (1977) one and two-temperature models have been used to fit the position-sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) pulse-height spectra of the dozen or so brightest sources associated with late-type Pleiades members. The best-fit temperatures suggest hot coronal temperatures for K, M, and rapidly rotating G stars, and cooler temperatures for F and slowly rotating G stars. In order to probe the many less X-ray-luminous stars, we have generated composite spectra by combining net counts from all Pleiades members according to spectral type and rotational velocity. Model fits to the composite spectra confirm the trend seen in the individual spectral fits. Particularly interesting is the apparent dependence of coronal temperature on L(sub x)/L(sub bol). A hardness-ratio analysis also confirms some of these trends. The PSPC data have also revealed a dozen or so strong X-ray flares with peak X-ray luminosities in excess of approx. 10(exp 30) ergs/sec. We have modeled the brightest of these flares with a simple quasi-static cooling loop model. The peak temperature and emission measure and the inferred electron density and plasma volume suggest a very large scale flaring event. The PSPC data were collected over a period of approx. 18 months, allowing us to search for source variability on timescales ranging from less than a day (in the case of flares) to more than a year between individual exposures. On approximately year-long timescales, roughly 25% of the late-type stars are variable. Since the Pleiades was also intensively monitored by the imaging instruments on the Einstein Observatory, we have examined X-ray luminosity variations on the 10 yr timescale between Einstein and ROSAT and find that up to 40% of the late-type stars are X-ray variable. Since there is only marginal

  8. A HARD X-RAY POWER-LAW SPECTRAL CUTOFF IN CENTAURUS X-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarty, Deepto; Nowak, Michael A. [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Grefenstette, Brian W.; Fürst, Felix; Harrison, Fiona A.; Rana, Vikram [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Psaltis, Dimitrios [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier [Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, Université de Toulouse III - Paul Sabatier, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Christensen, Finn E. [Division of Astrophysics, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Kaspi, Victoria M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, PQ H3A 2T8 (Canada); Miller, Jon M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Wik, Daniel R.; Zhang, William W. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Wilms, Jörn, E-mail: deepto@mit.edu [Dr. Karl-Remeis-Sternwarte and Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, D-96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2014-12-20

    The low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) Cen X-4 is the brightest and closest (<1.2 kpc) quiescent neutron star transient. Previous 0.5-10 keV X-ray observations of Cen X-4 in quiescence identified two spectral components: soft thermal emission from the neutron star atmosphere and a hard power-law tail of unknown origin. We report here on a simultaneous observation of Cen X-4 with NuSTAR (3-79 keV) and XMM-Newton (0.3-10 keV) in 2013 January, providing the first sensitive hard X-ray spectrum of a quiescent neutron star transient. The 0.3-79 keV luminosity was 1.1×10{sup 33} D{sub kpc}{sup 2} erg s{sup –1}, with ≅60% in the thermal component. We clearly detect a cutoff of the hard spectral tail above 10 keV, the first time such a feature has been detected in this source class. We show that thermal Comptonization and synchrotron shock origins for the hard X-ray emission are ruled out on physical grounds. However, the hard X-ray spectrum is well fit by a thermal bremsstrahlung model with kT{sub e} = 18 keV, which can be understood as arising either in a hot layer above the neutron star atmosphere or in a radiatively inefficient accretion flow. The power-law cutoff energy may be set by the degree of Compton cooling of the bremsstrahlung electrons by thermal seed photons from the neutron star surface. Lower thermal luminosities should lead to higher (possibly undetectable) cutoff energies. We compare Cen X-4's behavior with PSR J1023+0038, IGR J18245–2452, and XSS J12270–4859, which have shown transitions between LMXB and radio pulsar modes at a similar X-ray luminosity.

  9. Spectral-Timing Analysis of Kilohetrz Quasi-Periodic Osciallations in Neutron Star Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cackett, Edward; Troyer, Jon; Peille, Philippe; Barret, Didier

    2018-01-01

    Kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations or kHz QPOs are intensity variations that occur in the X-ray band observed in neutron star low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) systems. In such systems, matter is transferred from a secondary low-mass star to a neutron star via the process of accretion. kHz QPOs occur on the timescale of the inner accretion flow and may carry signatures of the physics of strong gravity (c2 ~ GM/R) and possibly clues to constraining the neutron star equation of state (EOS). Both the timing behavior of kHz QPOs and the time-averaged spectra of these systems have been studied extensively. No model derived from these techniques has been able to illuminate the origin of kHz QPOs. Spectral-timing is an analysis technique that can be used to derive information about the nature of physical processes occurring within the accretion flow on the timescale of the kHz QPO. To date, kHz QPOs of (4) neutron star LMXB systems have been studied with spectral-timing techniques. We present a comprehensive study of spectral-timing products of kHz QPOs from systems where data is available in the RXTE archive to demonstrate the promise of this technique to gain insights regarding the origin of kHz QPOs. Using data averaged over the entire RXTE archive, we show correlated time-lags as a function of QPO frequency and energy, as well as energy-dependent covariance spectra for the various LMXB systems where spectral-timing analysis is possible. We find similar trends in all average spectral-timing products for the objects studied. This suggests a common origin of kHz QPOs.

  10. Broadband X-Ray Spectral Analysis of the Double-nucleus Luminous Infrared Galaxy Mrk 463

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Satoshi; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Oda, Saeko; Tanimoto, Atsushi; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Terashima, Yuichi; Ricci, Claudio

    2018-05-01

    We present a broadband (0.4–70 keV) X-ray spectral analysis of the luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) system Mrk 463 observed with Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), Chandra, and XMM-Newton, which contains double active galactic nuclei (AGNs; Mrk 463E and Mrk 463W) with a separation of ∼3.8 kpc. Detecting their transmitted hard X-ray >10 keV continua with NuSTAR, we confirm that Mrk 463E and Mrk 463W have AGNs with intrinsic luminosities of (1.6–2.2) × 1043 and (0.5–0.6) × 1043 erg s‑1 (2–10 keV) obscured by hydrogen column densities of 8 × 1023 and 3 × 1023 cm‑2, respectively. Both nuclei show strong reflection components from cold matter. The luminosity ratio between X-ray (2–10 keV) and [O IV] 25.89 μm of Mrk 463E is ∼5 times smaller than those of normal Seyfert galaxies, suggesting that the intrinsic SED is X-ray weak relative to the UV luminosity. In fact, the bolometric AGN luminosity of Mrk 463E estimated from L‧-band (3.8 μm), [O IV] 25.89 μm, and [Ne V] 14.32 μm lines indicate a large bolometric-to-X-ray luminosity ratio, κ 2–10 keV ≈ 110–410, and a high Eddington ratio, λ Edd ∼ 0.4–0.8. We suggest that the merger triggered a rapid growth of the black hole in Mrk 463E, which is not yet deeply “buried” by circumnuclear dust. By contrast, the L‧-band luminosity of Mrk 463W is unusually small relative to the X-ray luminosity, suggesting that the Eddington ratio is low (activity.

  11. The color of X-rays Spectral X-ray computed tomography using energy sensitive pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schioppa, Enrico Junior

    Energy sensitive X-ray imaging detectors are produced by connecting a semiconductor sensor to a spectroscopic pixel readout chip. In this thesis, the applicability of such detectors to X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is studied. A prototype Medipix based silicon detector is calibrated using X-ray fluorescence. The charge transport properties of the sensor are characterized using a high energy beam of charged particles at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Monochromatic X-rays at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are used to determined the energy response function. These data are used to implement a physics-based CT projection operator that accounts for the transmission of the source spectrum through the sample and detector effects. Based on this projection operator, an iterative spectral CT reconstruction algorithm is developed by extending an Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) method. Subsequently, a maximum likelihood based algo...

  12. Spectral properties of X-ray selected narrow emission line galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Colmenero, E.

    1998-03-01

    This thesis reports a study of the X-ray and optical properties of two samples of X-ray selected Narrow Emission Line Galaxies (NELGs), and their comparison with the properties of broad line Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). One sample (18 NELGs) is drawn from the ROSAT International X-ray Optical Survey (RIXOS), the other (19 NELGs and 33 AGN) from the ROSAT UK Deep Survey. ROSAT multi-channel X-ray spectra have been extracted and fitted with power-law, bremsstrahlung and black body models for the brighter RIXOS sources. In most cases, power-law and bremsstrahlung models provide the best results. The average spectral energy index, alpha, of the RIXOS NELGs is 0.96 +/- 0.07, similar to that of AGN (alpha~1). For the fainter RIXOS NELGs, as well as for all the UK Deep Survey sources, counts in three spectral bands have been extracted and fitted with a power-law model, assuming the Galactic value for N_H. The brighter RIXOS sources demonstrated that the results obtained by these two different extraction and fitting procedures provide consistent results. Two average X-ray spectra, one for the NELGs and another for the AGN, were created from the UK Deep Survey sources. The power-law slope of the average NELG is alpha = 0.45 +/- 0.09, whilst that of the AGN is alpha = 0.96 +/- 0.03. ROSAT X-ray surveys have shown that the fractional surface density of NELGs increases with respect to AGN at faint fluxes (case for NELGs to be major contributors to the XRB at the fainter fluxes. The analysis of optical spectroscopy, obtained on La Palma and Hawaii, shows that NELGs form a very heterogeneous group, made up of a mixture of Seyfert 2, LINER and HII-region like galaxies. Seyfert 2 galaxies are found to possess in general the steepest X-ray slopes. Ways to explain this in the context of the unified model of AGN are discussed. The FWHM of some emission lines (Halpha, Hbeta, [NII]) in the NELGs appears to increase with steepening X-ray spectral slope. In the case of the Balmer lines

  13. Instruments and techniques of undispersion X-ray spectral analysis for nickel in case of high iron contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betin, Yu.P.; Zhabin, E.G.; Komov, A.P.; Krampit, I.A.; Novikov, A.M.; Serkin, V.P.; Smirnov, V.N.; Chernov, A.I.

    1979-01-01

    Considered is one of the most complicated problems of dispersionless X-ray spectral analysis (DXRSA) for low concentrations of the element with Z+2 atomic number in presence of large contents of element with Z atomic number (from manganese to zinc) in conformity with the DXRSA. The problem is solved with the help of instruments with two-channel registration system including a selection filter, target-converter and proportional counter at excitation of secondary radiation with X-ray tube. At the developed methodics an absolute mean square error of reproduction does not exceed 0.01%, the deviation of DXRSA results on results of control analysis for slags of nickel production - not more than 0.02-0.03%. The introduction of instruments and technique has given the economic effect of 32 thousand rubles

  14. Analysis of X-ray Spectra of High-Z Elements obtained on Nike with high spectral and spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglitskiy, Yefim; Weaver, J. L.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Obenschain, S. P.; Ralchenko, Yu.

    2014-10-01

    The spectra of multi-charged ions of Hf, Ta, W, Pt, Au and Bi have been studied on Nike krypton-fluoride laser facility with the help of two kinds of X-ray spectrometers. First, survey instrument covering a spectral range from 0.5 to 19.5 angstroms which allows simultaneous observation of both M- and N- spectra of above mentioned elements with high spectral resolution. Second, an imaging spectrometer with interchangeable spherically bent Quartz crystals that added higher efficiency, higher spectral resolution and high spatial resolution to the qualities of the former one. Multiple spectral lines with X-ray energies as high as 4 keV that belong to the isoelectronic sequences of Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn were identified with the help of NOMAD package developed by Dr. Yu. Ralchenko and colleagues. In our continuous effort to support DOE-NNSA's inertial fusion program, this campaign covered a wide range of plasma conditions that result in production of relatively energetic X-rays. Work supported by the US DOE/NNSA.

  15. X-ray spectral decomposition imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-07-27

    Projection measurements are made of the transmitted X-ray beam in low and high energy regions. These are combined in a non-linear processor to produce atomic-number-dependent and density-dependent projection information. This information is used to provide cross-sectional images which are free of spectral-shift artifacts and completely define the specific material properties. The invention described herein was made in the course of work under a grant from the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

  16. Energy Calibration of the Pixels of Spectral X-ray Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Panta, Raj Kumar; Bell, Stephen T; Anderson, Nigel G; Butler, Anthony P; Butler, Philip H

    2015-01-01

    The energy information acquired using spectral X-ray detectors allows noninvasive identification and characterization of chemical components of a material. To achieve this, it is important that the energy response of the detector is calibrated. The established techniques for energy calibration are not practical for routine use in pre-clinical or clinical research environment. This is due to the requirements of using monochromatic radiation sources such as synchrotron, radio-isotopes, and prohibitively long time needed to set up the equipment and make measurements. To address these limitations, we have developed an automated technique for calibrating the energy response of the pixels in a spectral X-ray detector that runs with minimal user intervention. This technique uses the X-ray tube voltage (kVp) as a reference energy, which is stepped through an energy range of interest. This technique locates the energy threshold where a pixel transitions from not-counting (off) to counting (on). Similarly, we have deve...

  17. Spectral Properties, Generation Order Parameters, and Luminosities for Spin-powered X-Ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Yongheng

    2004-02-01

    We show the spectral properties of 15 spin-powered X-ray pulsars, and the correlation between the average power-law photon index and spin-down rate. Generation order parameters (GOPs) based on polar cap models are introduced to characterize the X-ray pulsars. We calculate three definitions of generation order parameters arising from the different effects of magnetic and electric fields on photon absorption during cascade processes, and study the relations between the GOPs and spectral properties of X-ray pulsars. There exists a possible correlation between the photon index and GOP in our pulsar sample. Furthermore, we present a method stemming from the concept of GOPs to estimate the nonthermal X-ray luminosity for spin-powered pulsars. Then X-ray luminosity is calculated in the context of our polar cap accelerator model, which is consistent with most observed X-ray pulsar data. The ratio between the X-ray luminosity estimated by our method and the pulsar's spin-down power is consistent with the LX~10-3Lsd feature.

  18. X-ray spectral components observed in the afterglow of GRB 130925A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellm, Eric C.; Barrière, Nicolas M.; Bhalerao, Varun

    2014-01-01

    We have identified spectral features in the late-time X-ray afterglow of the unusually long, slow-decaying GRB 130925A using NuSTAR, Swift/X-Ray Telescope, and Chandra. A spectral component in addition to an absorbed power law is required at >4σ significance, and its spectral shape varies between...... two observation epochs at 2 × 105 and 106 s after the burst. Several models can fit this additional component, each with very different physical implications. A broad, resolved Gaussian absorption feature of several keV width improves the fit, but it is poorly constrained in the second epoch...

  19. A singular-value decomposition approach to X-ray spectral estimation from attenuation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tominaga, Shoji

    1986-01-01

    A singular-value decomposition (SVD) approach is described for estimating the exposure-rate spectral distributions of X-rays from attenuation data measured withvarious filtrations. This estimation problem with noisy measurements is formulated as the problem of solving a system of linear equations with an ill-conditioned nature. The principle of the SVD approach is that a response matrix, representing the X-ray attenuation effect by filtrations at various energies, can be expanded into summation of inherent component matrices, and thereby the spectral distributions can be represented as a linear combination of some component curves. A criterion function is presented for choosing the components needed to form a reliable estimate. The feasibility of the proposed approach is studied in detail in a computer simulation using a hypothetical X-ray spectrum. The application results of the spectral distributions emitted from a therapeutic X-ray generator are shown. Finally some advantages of this approach are pointed out. (orig.)

  20. Synchrotron x-ray microbeam characteristics for x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Atsuo; Noma, Takashi

    1995-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis using a synchrotron x-ray microprobe has become an indispensable technique for non-destructive micro-analysis. One of the most important parameters that characterize the x-ray microbeam system for x-ray fluorescence analysis is the beam size. For practical analysis, however, the photon flux, the energy resolution and the available energy range are also crucial. Three types of x-ray microbeam systems, including monochromatic and continuum excitation systems, were compared with reference to the sensitivity, the minimum detection limit and the applicability to various types of x-ray spectroscopic analysis. 16 refs., 5 figs

  1. THE XMM-NEWTON/EPIC X-RAY LIGHT CURVE ANALYSIS OF WR 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignace, R.; Gayley, K. G.; Hamann, W.-R.; Oskinova, L. M.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Pollock, A. M. T.; McFall, M.

    2013-01-01

    We obtained four pointings of over 100 ks each of the well-studied Wolf-Rayet star WR 6 with the XMM-Newton satellite. With a first paper emphasizing the results of spectral analysis, this follow-up highlights the X-ray variability clearly detected in all four pointings. However, phased light curves fail to confirm obvious cyclic behavior on the well-established 3.766 day period widely found at longer wavelengths. The data are of such quality that we were able to conduct a search for event clustering in the arrival times of X-ray photons. However, we fail to detect any such clustering. One possibility is that X-rays are generated in a stationary shock structure. In this context we favor a corotating interaction region (CIR) and present a phenomenological model for X-rays from a CIR structure. We show that a CIR has the potential to account simultaneously for the X-ray variability and constraints provided by the spectral analysis. Ultimately, the viability of the CIR model will require both intermittent long-term X-ray monitoring of WR 6 and better physical models of CIR X-ray production at large radii in stellar winds

  2. THE XMM-NEWTON/EPIC X-RAY LIGHT CURVE ANALYSIS OF WR 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignace, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37663 (United States); Gayley, K. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52245 (United States); Hamann, W.-R.; Oskinova, L. M. [Institute for Physics and Astronomy, University Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Huenemoerder, D. P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 70 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Pollock, A. M. T. [European Space Agency XMM-Newton Science Operations Centre, European Space Astronomy Centre, Apartado 78, Villanueva de la Cañada, E-28691 Madrid (Spain); McFall, M., E-mail: ignace@etsu.edu [Department of Physics, 191 W. Woodruff Avenue, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2013-09-20

    We obtained four pointings of over 100 ks each of the well-studied Wolf-Rayet star WR 6 with the XMM-Newton satellite. With a first paper emphasizing the results of spectral analysis, this follow-up highlights the X-ray variability clearly detected in all four pointings. However, phased light curves fail to confirm obvious cyclic behavior on the well-established 3.766 day period widely found at longer wavelengths. The data are of such quality that we were able to conduct a search for event clustering in the arrival times of X-ray photons. However, we fail to detect any such clustering. One possibility is that X-rays are generated in a stationary shock structure. In this context we favor a corotating interaction region (CIR) and present a phenomenological model for X-rays from a CIR structure. We show that a CIR has the potential to account simultaneously for the X-ray variability and constraints provided by the spectral analysis. Ultimately, the viability of the CIR model will require both intermittent long-term X-ray monitoring of WR 6 and better physical models of CIR X-ray production at large radii in stellar winds.

  3. A connection between the X-ray spectral branches and the radio brightness in GX17+2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penninx, Wim; Lewin, W.H.G.; Paradijs, J. van; Klis, M. van der

    1988-01-01

    GX17 + 2(4U 1813 - 14) is a bright X-ray binary in which matter is accreting on to a neutron star from a nearby companion. X-ray bursts are sometimes observed, as well as quasiperiodic oscillations in the X-ray flux. The frequencies of the quasiperiodic oscillations depend on the spectral state of the source, which manifests itself as three distinct spectral 'branches' in an X-ray colour-colour diagram. GX17 + 2 is also a variable radio source; there is no believable optical counterpart. We report here on simultaneous X-ray and radio observations which showed a connection between the spectral branches and the radio brightness. The 6-cm and 20-cm flux density increased by factors of 30±5 and 40± 10, respectively, as the X-ray state changed from the so-called 'flaring branch' to the 'horizontal branch'. (author)

  4. Using absolute x-ray spectral measurements to infer stagnation conditions in ICF implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pravesh; Benedetti, L. R.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Hurricane, O. A.; Izumi, N.; Jarrott, L. C.; Khan, S.; Kritcher, A. L.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A. G.; Landen, O.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of the continuum x-ray spectrum emitted from the hot-spot of an ICF implosion can be used to infer a number thermodynamic properties at stagnation including temperature, pressure, and hot-spot mix. In deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) we field a number of x-ray diagnostics that provide spatial, temporal, and spectrally-resolved measurements of the radiated x-ray emission. We report on analysis of these measurements using a 1-D hot-spot model to infer thermodynamic properties at stagnation. We compare these to similar properties that can be derived from DT fusion neutron measurements. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. THE IMPACT OF ACCURATE EXTINCTION MEASUREMENTS FOR X-RAY SPECTRAL MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Randall K. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Valencic, Lynne A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Corrales, Lia, E-mail: lynne.a.valencic@nasa.gov [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, 37-241, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-02-20

    Interstellar extinction includes both absorption and scattering of photons from interstellar gas and dust grains, and it has the effect of altering a source's spectrum and its total observed intensity. However, while multiple absorption models exist, there are no useful scattering models in standard X-ray spectrum fitting tools, such as XSPEC. Nonetheless, X-ray halos, created by scattering from dust grains, are detected around even moderately absorbed sources, and the impact on an observed source spectrum can be significant, if modest, compared to direct absorption. By convolving the scattering cross section with dust models, we have created a spectral model as a function of energy, type of dust, and extraction region that can be used with models of direct absorption. This will ensure that the extinction model is consistent and enable direct connections to be made between a source's X-ray spectral fits and its UV/optical extinction.

  6. Spectral analysis and compositing techniques for the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR Shoemaker), X-ray and Gamma-Ray Spectrometers (XGRS)

    CERN Document Server

    McClanahan, T P; Nittler, L R; Boynton, W V; Bruckner, J; Squyres, S W; Evans, L G; Bhangoo, J S; Clark, P E; Floyd, S R; McCartney, E; Mikheeva, I; Starr, R D

    2001-01-01

    An X-ray and Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (XGRS) is on board the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft to determine the elemental composition of the surface of the asteroid 433 Eros. The Eros asteroid is highly oblate and irregular in shape. As a result, analysis methodologies are in many ways a divergence from comparable techniques. Complex temporal, spatial and instrument performance relationships must be accounted for during the analysis process. Field of view and asteroid surface geometry measurements must be modeled and then combined with real measurements of solar, spectral and instrument calibration information to derive scientific results. NEAR is currently orbiting 433 Eros and is in the initial phases of its primary data integration and mapping phases. Initial results have been obtained and bulk chemistry assessments have been obtained through specialized background assessment and data reduction techniques.

  7. Spectral evolution of active galactic nuclei: A unified description of the X-ray and gamma-ray backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letter, D.; Boldt, E.

    1982-01-01

    A model for spectral evolution is presented whereby active galactic nuclei (AGN) of the type observed individually have emerged from an earlier stage at zroughly-equal4 in which they are the thermal X-ray sources responsible for most of the comic X-ray background (CXB). We pursue the conjecture that these precursor objects are initially supermassive Schwarzschild black holes with accretion disks radiating near the Eddington luminosity limit. It is noted that after approx.10 8 years these central black holes are spun up to a ''canonical'' Kerr equilibriuim state (a/M = 0.998) and shown how they can lead to spectral evolution involving nonthermal emission extending to gamma-rays, at the expense of reduced thermal disk radiation. A superposition of sources in the precursor stage can thereby account for that major portion of the CXB remaining after the contributions of usual AGN are considered, while a superposition of AGN sources at z<1 can account for the gamima-ray background. Extensive X-ray measurements carried out with the HEAO 1 and HEAO 2 missions, as well as gamma-ray and optical data, are shown to compare favorably with principal features of this model. Several further observational tests are suggested for establishing the validity of this scenario for AGN spectral evolution

  8. X-Ray Spectral Analysis of the Steady States of GRS1915+105

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peris, Charith S.; Remillard, Ronald A.; Steiner, James F.; Vrtilek, Saeqa D.; Varnière, Peggy; Rodriguez, Jerome; Pooley, Guy

    2016-05-01

    We report on the X-ray spectral behavior within the steady states of GRS1915+105. Our work is based on the full data set of the source obtained using the Proportional Counter Array (PCA) on the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and 15 GHz radio data obtained using the Ryle Telescope. The steady observations within the X-ray data set naturally separated into two regions in the color-color diagram and we refer to these regions as steady-soft and steady-hard. GRS1915+105 displays significant curvature in the coronal component in both the soft and hard data within the RXTE/PCA bandpass. A majority of the steady-soft observations displays a roughly constant inner disk radius ({R}{{in}}), while the steady-hard observations display an evolving disk truncation which is correlated to the mass accretion rate through the disk. The disk flux and coronal flux are strongly correlated in steady-hard observations and very weakly correlated in the steady-soft observations. Within the steady-hard observations, we observe two particular circumstances when there are correlations between the coronal X-ray flux and the radio flux with log slopes η ˜ 0.68+/- 0.35 and η ˜ 1.12+/- 0.13. They are consistent with the upper and lower tracks of Gallo et al. (2012), respectively. A comparison of the model parameters to the state definitions shows that almost all of the steady-soft observations match the criteria of either a thermal or steep power-law state, while a large portion of the steady-hard observations match the hard-state criteria when the disk fraction constraint is neglected.

  9. A Comparison Between Spectral Properties of ULXs and Luminous X-ray Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghea, C. T.; Colbert, E. J. M.; Roberts, T. P.

    2004-05-01

    What is special about the 1039 erg s-1 limit that is used to define the ULX class? We investigate this question by analyzing Chandra X-ray spectra of 71 X-ray bright point sources from nearby galaxies. Fifty-one of these sources are ULXs (LX(0.3-8.0 keV) ≥ 1039 erg s-1), and 20 sources (our comparison sample) are less-luminous X-ray binaries with LX(0.3-8.0 keV) = 1038-39 erg s-1. Our sample objects were selected from the Chandra archive to have ≥1000 counts and thus represent the highest quality spectra in the Chandra archives for extragalactic X-ray binaries and ULXs. We fit the spectra with one-component models (e.g., cold absorption with power-law, or cold absorption with multi-colored disk blackbody) and two-component models (e.g. absorption with both a power-law and a multi colored disk blackbody). A crude measure of the spectral states of the sources are determined observationally by calibrating the strength of the disk (blackbody) and coronal (power-law) components. These results are then use to determine if spectral properties of the ULXs are statistically distinct from those of the comparison objects, which are assumed to be ``normal'' black-hole X-ray binaries.

  10. BL Lacertae: X-ray spectral evolution and a black-hole mass estimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Seifina, Elena

    2017-06-01

    We present an analysis of the spectral properties observed in X-rays from active galactic nucleus BL Lacertae using RXTE, Suzaku, ASCA, BeppoSAX, and Swift observations. The total time covered by these observations is approximately 20 yr. We show strong observational evidence that this source undergoes X-ray spectral transitions from the low hard state (LHS) through the intermediate state (IS) to the high soft state (HSS) during these observations. During the RXTE observations (1997-2001, 180 ks, for a total 145 datasets), the source was approximately 75%, 20% and only 5% of the time in the IS, LHS, and HSS, respectively. We also used Swift observations (470 datasets, for a total 800 ks), which occurred during 12 yr (2005-2016), the broadband (0.3-200 keV) data of BeppoSAX (1997-2000, 160 ks), and the low X-ray energy (0.3-10 keV) data of ASCA (1995-1999, 160 ks). Two observations of Suzaku (2006, 2013; 50 ks) in combinations with long-term RXTE and Swift data-sets fortunately allow us to describe all spectral states of BL Lac. The spectra of BL Lac are well fitted by the so-called bulk motion Comptonization (BMC) model for all spectral states. We have established the photon index saturation level, Γsat = 2.2 ± 0.1, in the Γ versus mass accretion rate (Ṁ) correlation. This Γ - Ṁ correlation allows us to estimate the black-hole (BH) mass in BL Lac to be MBH 3 × 107M⊙ for a distance of 300 Mpc. For the BH mass estimate, we use the scaling method taking stellar-mass Galactic BHs 4U 1543-47 and GX 339-4 as reference sources. The Γ - Ṁ correlation revealed in BL Lac is similar to those in a number of stellar-mass Galactic BHs and two recently studied intermediate-mass extragalactic BHs. It clearly shows the correlation along with the very extended Γ saturation at 2.2. This is robust observational evidence for the presence of a BH in BL Lac. We also reveal that the seed (disk) photon temperatures are relatively low, of order of 100 eV, which are consistent

  11. Account of spectral dependence of instrumental factor in quantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershin, N.V.; Mosichev, V.I.

    1990-01-01

    A new method for calibration of X-ray fluorescence spectrometers using scanning spectrometric channel is proposed. The method is based on a separate account of matrix and instrumental effects and needs no calibration standards for the element analysed. For calibration in the whole spectral range of XRS (0.03-1.0 nm) it is sufficient to have from 10 to 15 pure element emitters made of most wide spread elements. The method provides rapid development of quantitative analysis for the elements which are not provided with standard samples and preparation of pure element emitters for which is impossible or problematic. The practical verification of the method was made by analysing a set of 146 standard samples covering a wide group of alloys. The mean relative error of the method was 3-5 % in an analytical range of 0.1-3.0 wt %

  12. Microstructure Analysis of Bismuth Absorbers for Transition-Edge Sensor X-ray Microcalorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Daikang; Divan, Ralu; Gades, Lisa M.; Kenesei, Peter; Madden, Timothy J.; Miceli, Antonino; Park, Jun-Sang; Patel, Umeshkumar M.; Quaranta, Orlando; Sharma, Hemant; Bennett, Douglas A.; Doriese, William B.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Gard, Johnathon D.; Hays-Wehle, James P.; Morgan, Kelsey M.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Swetz, Daniel S.; Ullom, Joel N.

    2018-03-01

    Given its large X-ray stopping power and low specific heat capacity, bismuth (Bi) is a promising absorber material for X-ray microcalorimeters and has been used with transition-edge sensors (TESs) in the past. However, distinct X-ray spectral features have been observed in TESs with Bi absorbers deposited with different techniques. Evaporated Bi absorbers are widely reported to have non-Gaussian low-energy tails, while electroplated ones do not show this feature. In this study, we fabricated Bi absorbers with these two methods and performed microstructure analysis using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction microscopy. The two types of material showed the same crystallographic structure, but the grain size of the electroplated Bi was about 40 times larger than that of the evaporated Bi. This distinction in grain size is likely to be the cause of their different spectral responses.

  13. Timing and Spectral Studies of the Peculiar X-ray Binary Circinus X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saz Parkinson, Pablo M.

    2003-08-26

    Circinus X-1 (Cir X-1) is an X-ray binary displaying an array of phenomena which makes it unique in our Galaxy. Despite several decades of observation, controversy surrounds even the most basic facts about this system. It is generally classified as a Neutron Star (NS) Low Mass X-ray Binary (LMXB),though this classification is based primarily on the observation of Type I X-ray Bursts by EXOSAT in 1985. It is believed to be in a very eccentric {approx} 16.5 day orbit, displaying periodic outbursts in the radio and other frequency bands (including optical and IR) which reinforce the notion that this is in fact the orbital period. Cir X-1 lies in the plane of the Galaxy, where optical identification of the companion is made difficult due to dust obscuration. The companion is thought to be a low mass star, though a high mass companion has not currently been ruled out. In this work, the author analyzes recent observations of Cir X-1 made with the Unconventional Stellar Aspect (USA) experiment, as well as archival observations of Cir X-1 made by a variety of instruments, from as early as 1969. The fast (< 1 s) timing properties of Cir X-1 are studied by performing FFT analyses of the USA data. Quasi-Periodic Oscillations (QPOs) in the 1-50 Hz range are found and discussed in the context of recent correlations which question the leading models invoked for their generation. The energy dependence of the QPOs (rms increasing with energy) argues against them being generated in the disk and favors models in which the QPOs are related to a higher energy Comptonizing component. The power spectrum of Cir X-1 in its soft state is compared to that of Cygnus X-1 (Cyg X-1), the prototypical black hole candidate. Using scaling arguments the author argues that the mass of Cir X-1 could exceed significantly the canonical 1.4 M{circle_dot} mass of a neutron star, possibly partly explaining why this object appears so different to other neutron stars. The spectral evolution of Cir X-1 is

  14. Diagnosing x-ray power and energy of tungsten wire array z-pinch with a flat spectral response x-ray diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Kun-lun; Ren, Xiao-dong; Huang, Xian-bin; Zhang, Si-qun; Zhou, Shao-tong; Dan, Jia-kun; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Ouyang, Kai; Cai, Hong-chun; Wei, Bing; Ji, Ce; Feng, Shu-ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei-ping; Deng, Jian-jun

    2015-01-01

    Fast z-pinch is a very efficient way of converting electromagnetic energy to radiation. With an 8-10 MA current on primary test stand facility, about 1 MJ electromagnetic energy is delivered to vacuum chamber, which heats z-pinch plasma to radiate soft x-ray. To develop a pulsed high power x-ray source, we studied the applicability of diagnosing x-ray power from tungsten wire array z-pinch with a flat spectral response x-ray diode (FSR-XRD). The detector was originally developed to diagnose radiation of a hohlraum in SG-III prototype laser facility. It utilized a gold cathode XRD and a specially configured compound gold filter to yield a nearly flat spectral response in photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV. In practice, it was critical to avoid surface contamination of gold cathode. It is illustrated that an exposure of an XRD to multiple shots caused a significant change of response. Thus, in diagnosing x-ray power and energy, we used each XRD in only one shot after calibration. In a shot serial, output of FSR-XRD was compared with output of a nickel bolometer. In these shots, the outputs agreed with each other within their uncertainties which were about 12% for FSR-XRD and about 15% for bolometer. Moreover, the ratios between the FSR-XRD and the bolometer among different shots were explored. In 8 shots, the standard deviation of the ratio was 6%. It is comparable to XRD response change of 7%

  15. Study on the influence of X-ray tube spectral distribution on the analysis of bulk samples and thin films: Fundamental parameters method and theoretical coefficient algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitko, Rafal

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of X-ray tube spectral distribution is necessary in theoretical methods of matrix correction, i.e. in both fundamental parameter (FP) methods and theoretical influence coefficient algorithms. Thus, the influence of X-ray tube distribution on the accuracy of the analysis of thin films and bulk samples is presented. The calculations are performed using experimental X-ray tube spectra taken from the literature and theoretical X-ray tube spectra evaluated by three different algorithms proposed by Pella et al. (X-Ray Spectrom. 14 (1985) 125-135), Ebel (X-Ray Spectrom. 28 (1999) 255-266), and Finkelshtein and Pavlova (X-Ray Spectrom. 28 (1999) 27-32). In this study, Fe-Cr-Ni system is selected as an example and the calculations are performed for X-ray tubes commonly applied in X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), i.e., Cr, Mo, Rh and W. The influence of X-ray tube spectra on FP analysis is evaluated when quantification is performed using various types of calibration samples. FP analysis of bulk samples is performed using pure-element bulk standards and multielement bulk standards similar to the analyzed material, whereas for FP analysis of thin films, the bulk and thin pure-element standards are used. For the evaluation of the influence of X-ray tube spectra on XRF analysis performed by theoretical influence coefficient methods, two algorithms for bulk samples are selected, i.e. Claisse-Quintin (Can. Spectrosc. 12 (1967) 129-134) and COLA algorithms (G.R. Lachance, Paper Presented at the International Conference on Industrial Inorganic Elemental Analysis, Metz, France, June 3, 1981) and two algorithms (constant and linear coefficients) for thin films recently proposed by Sitko (X-Ray Spectrom. 37 (2008) 265-272)

  16. A Long Decay of X-Ray Flux and Spectral Evolution in the Supersoft Active Galactic Nucleus GSN 069

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, X. W.; Wang, S. S.; Dou, L. M.; Jiang, N.; Wang, J. X.; Wang, T. G.

    2018-04-01

    GSN 069 is an optically identified very low-mass active galactic nuclei (AGN) that shows supersoft X-ray emission. The source is known to exhibit a huge X-ray outburst, with flux increased by more than a factor of ∼240 compared to the quiescence state. We report its long-term evolution in the X-ray flux and spectral variations over a timescale of ∼decade, using both new and archival X-ray observations from the XMM-Newton and Swift. The new Swift observations detected the source in its lowest level of X-ray activity since the outburst, a factor of ∼4 lower in the 0.2–2 keV flux than that obtained with the XMM-Newton observations nearly eight years ago. Combining with the historical X-ray measurements, we find that the X-ray flux is decreasing slowly. There seemed to be spectral softening associated with the drop of X-ray flux. In addition, we find evidence for the presence of a weak, variable, hard X-ray component, in addition to the dominant thermal blackbody emission reported before. The long decay of X-ray flux and spectral evolution, as well as the supersoft X-ray spectra, suggest that the source could be a tidal disruption event (TDE), though a highly variable AGN cannot be fully ruled out. Further continued X-ray monitoring would be required to test the TDE interpretation, by better determining the flux evolution in the decay phase.

  17. Radiographic information theory: correction for x-ray spectral distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodie, I.; Gutcheck, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    A more complete computational method is developed to account for the effect of the spectral distribution of the incident x-ray fluence on the minimum exposure required to record a specified information set in a diagnostic radiograph. It is shown that an earlier, less rigorous, but simpler computational technique does not introduce serious errors provided that both a good estimate of the mean energy per photon can be made and the detector does not contain an absorption edge in the spectral range. Also shown is that to a first approximation, it is immaterial whether the detecting surface counts the number of photons incident from each pixel or measures the energy incident on each pixel. A previous result is confirmed that, for mammography, the present methods of processing data from the detector utilize only a few percent of the incident information, suggesting that techniques can be developed for obtaining mammograms at substantially lower doses than those presently used. When used with film-screen combinations, x-ray tubes with tungsten anodes should require substantially lower exposures than devices using molybdenum anodes, when both are operated at their optimal voltage

  18. Spectral tailoring of nanoscale EUV and soft x-ray multilayer optics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Qiushi; Medvedev, Viacheslav; van de Kruijs, Robbert Wilhelmus Elisabeth; Yakshin, Andrey; Louis, Eric; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray (XUV) multilayer optics have experienced significant development over the past few years, particularly on controlling the spectral characteristics of light for advanced applications like EUV photolithography, space observation, and accelerator- or lab-based XUV

  19. Spectral analysis of paramagnetic centers induced in human tooth enamel by x-rays and gamma radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillov, V. A.; Kuchuro, I. I.

    2010-03-01

    Based on study of spectral and relaxation characteristics, we have established that paramagnetic centers induced in tooth enamel by x-rays and gamma radiation are identical in nature. We show that for the same exposure dose, the intensity of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal induced by x-radiation with effective energy 34 keV is about an order of magnitude higher than the amplitude of the signal induced by gamma radiation. We have identified a three-fold attenuation of the EPR signal along the path of the x-radiation from the buccal to the lingual side of a tooth, which is evidence that the individual had undergone diagnostic x-ray examination of the dentition or skull. We have shown that the x-ray exposure doses reconstructed from the EPR spectra are an order of magnitude higher than the applied doses, while the dose loads due to gamma radiation are equal to the applied doses. The data obtained indicate that for adequate reconstruction of individual absorbed doses from EPR spectra of tooth enamel in the population subjected to the combined effect of x-radiation and accidental external gamma radiation as a result of the disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, we need to take into account the contribution to the dose load from diagnostic x-rays in examination of the teeth, jaw, or skull.

  20. Spectral properties of blazars. I. Objects observed in the far-ultraviolet. II. An X-ray observed sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Maraschi, L.; Treves, A.; Tanzi, E. G.; Milano Universita, Italy; CNR, Istituto di Fisica Cosmica, Milan, Italy)

    1986-01-01

    All blazars observed with the IUE are studied and shown to form a well-defined subgroup according to their spectral properties. These properties are discussed with respect to theoretical models and are compared with those of quasars. Radio, ultraviolet, and X-ray fluxes are used to construct composite spectral indices, and systematic differences between X-ray selected and otherwise selected objects are discussed. It is confirmed that X-ray selected objects have flatter overall spectra, and are therefore weaker radio emitters relative to their X-ray emission than objects selected otherwise. It is found that X-ray selected blazars have the same average X-ray luminosity as blazars selected otherwise and are underluminous at UV and radio frequencies. This finding is used to argue that the radio-weak, X-ray selected BL Lac objects are, in terms of space density, the dominant members of the blazar population. The results are interpreted in the framework of synchrotron emission models involving relativistic plasma jets. 134 references

  1. Spectral properties of blazars. I. Objects observed in the far-ultraviolet. II. An X-ray observed sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghisellini, G.; Maraschi, L.; Treves, A.; Tanzi, E. G.

    1986-11-01

    All blazars observed with the IUE are studied and shown to form a well-defined subgroup according to their spectral properties. These properties are discussed with respect to theoretical models and are compared with those of quasars. Radio, ultraviolet, and X-ray fluxes are used to construct composite spectral indices, and systematic differences between X-ray selected and otherwise selected objects are discussed. It is confirmed that X-ray selected objects have flatter overall spectra, and are therefore weaker radio emitters relative to their X-ray emission than objects selected otherwise. It is found that X-ray selected blazars have the same average X-ray luminosity as blazars selected otherwise and are underluminous at UV and radio frequencies. This finding is used to argue that the radio-weak, X-ray selected BL Lac objects are, in terms of space density, the dominant members of the blazar population. The results are interpreted in the framework of synchrotron emission models involving relativistic plasma jets. 134 references.

  2. Modification of the TASMIP x-ray spectral model for the simulation of microfocus x-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisniega, A.; Vaquero, J. J., E-mail: juanjose.vaquero@uc3m.es [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid ES28911 (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Madrid ES28007 (Spain); Desco, M. [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid ES28911 (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Madrid ES28007 (Spain); Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental (CIBERSAM), Madrid ES28029 (Spain)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The availability of accurate and simple models for the estimation of x-ray spectra is of great importance for system simulation, optimization, or inclusion of photon energy information into data processing. There is a variety of publicly available tools for estimation of x-ray spectra in radiology and mammography. However, most of these models cannot be used directly for modeling microfocus x-ray sources due to differences in inherent filtration, energy range and/or anode material. For this reason the authors propose in this work a new model for the simulation of microfocus spectra based on existing models for mammography and radiology, modified to compensate for the effects of inherent filtration and energy range. Methods: The authors used the radiology and mammography versions of an existing empirical model [tungsten anode spectral model interpolating polynomials (TASMIP)] as the basis of the microfocus model. First, the authors estimated the inherent filtration included in the radiology model by comparing the shape of the spectra with spectra from the mammography model. Afterwards, the authors built a unified spectra dataset by combining both models and, finally, they estimated the parameters of the new version of TASMIP for microfocus sources by calibrating against experimental exposure data from a microfocus x-ray source. The model was validated by comparing estimated and experimental exposure and attenuation data for different attenuating materials and x-ray beam peak energy values, using two different x-ray tubes. Results: Inherent filtration for the radiology spectra from TASMIP was found to be equivalent to 1.68 mm Al, as compared to spectra obtained from the mammography model. To match the experimentally measured exposure data the combined dataset required to apply a negative filtration of about 0.21 mm Al and an anode roughness of 0.003 mm W. The validation of the model against real acquired data showed errors in exposure and attenuation in

  3. Modification of the TASMIP x-ray spectral model for the simulation of microfocus x-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisniega, A.; Vaquero, J. J.; Desco, M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The availability of accurate and simple models for the estimation of x-ray spectra is of great importance for system simulation, optimization, or inclusion of photon energy information into data processing. There is a variety of publicly available tools for estimation of x-ray spectra in radiology and mammography. However, most of these models cannot be used directly for modeling microfocus x-ray sources due to differences in inherent filtration, energy range and/or anode material. For this reason the authors propose in this work a new model for the simulation of microfocus spectra based on existing models for mammography and radiology, modified to compensate for the effects of inherent filtration and energy range. Methods: The authors used the radiology and mammography versions of an existing empirical model [tungsten anode spectral model interpolating polynomials (TASMIP)] as the basis of the microfocus model. First, the authors estimated the inherent filtration included in the radiology model by comparing the shape of the spectra with spectra from the mammography model. Afterwards, the authors built a unified spectra dataset by combining both models and, finally, they estimated the parameters of the new version of TASMIP for microfocus sources by calibrating against experimental exposure data from a microfocus x-ray source. The model was validated by comparing estimated and experimental exposure and attenuation data for different attenuating materials and x-ray beam peak energy values, using two different x-ray tubes. Results: Inherent filtration for the radiology spectra from TASMIP was found to be equivalent to 1.68 mm Al, as compared to spectra obtained from the mammography model. To match the experimentally measured exposure data the combined dataset required to apply a negative filtration of about 0.21 mm Al and an anode roughness of 0.003 mm W. The validation of the model against real acquired data showed errors in exposure and attenuation in

  4. Miniature x-ray point source for alignment and calibration of x-ray optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.H.; Boyle, M.J.; Glaros, S.S.

    1977-01-01

    A miniature x-ray point source of high brightness similar to that of Rovinsky, et al. is described. One version of the x-ray source is used to align the x-ray optics on the Argus and Shiva laser systems. A second version is used to determine the spatial and spectral transmission functions of the x-ray optics. The spatial and spectral characteristics of the x-ray emission from the x-ray point source are described. The physical constraints including size, intensity and thermal limitations, and useful lifetime are discussed. The alignment and calibration techniques for various x-ray optics and detector combinations are described

  5. Computer analysis of the X-ray images of renal concretions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumov, N.; Zozikov, B.; Yanakiev, I.; Varlev, H.; Dimitrov, I.; Baltadjiev, D.; Dimitrova, St.; Shimanov, V.; Sultanov, A.; Pazderov, R.

    1997-01-01

    An investigation aimed to assessing the possibilities of computerized analysis of renal concretions is described. The results of comparative study of digitized X-ray images of concretions and data retrieved from radio-spectral microprobe analysis are presented. The obtained data confirm the author's hypothesis set forth, claiming that it is possible to define the composition and structure of renal concretions using specially developed software (Videoexpert 2.0). Excellent results are obtained even from native X-rays where the concernment is still within the patient's body. Roentgen computerized analysis is recommended in making decision on therapeutic approach towards calculi in urological and radiographic practice. 5 refs., 5 figs

  6. High Spectral Resolution Observation of the Soft Diffuse X-ray Background in the Direction of the Galactic Anti-Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, Dallas; Eckart, Mega E.; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Jaeckel, Felix; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; McCammon, Dan; Morgan, Kelsey M.; Porter, Frederick S.; Szymkowiak, Andrew E.

    2018-01-01

    High spectral resolution observations in the soft x-rays are necessary for understanding and modelling the hot component of the interstellar medium and its contribution to the Soft X-ray Background (SXRB). This extended source emission cannot be resolved with most wavelength dispersive spectrometers, making energy dispersive microcalorimeters the ideal choice for these observations. We present here the analysis of the most recent sounding rocket flight of the University of Wisconsin-Madison/Goddard Space Flight Center X-ray Quantum Calorimeter (XQC), a large area silicon thermistor microcalorimeter. This 111 second observation integrates a nearly 1 steradian field of view in the direction of the galactic anti-center (l, b = 165°, -5°) and features ~5 eV spectral resolution below 1 keV. Direct comparison will also be made to the previous, high-latitude observations.

  7. A SEARCH FOR SPECTRAL HYSTERESIS AND ENERGY-DEPENDENT TIME LAGS FROM X-RAY AND TeV GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF Mrk 421

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abeysekara, A. U.; Flinders, A.; Archambault, S.; Feng, Q.; Archer, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M.; Bird, R.; Buchovecky, M.; Cardenzana, J. V; Eisch, J. D.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Finley, J. P.; Falcone, A.; Fleischhack, H.

    2017-01-01

    Blazars are variable emitters across all wavelengths over a wide range of timescales, from months down to minutes. It is therefore essential to observe blazars simultaneously at different wavelengths, especially in the X-ray and gamma-ray bands, where the broadband spectral energy distributions usually peak. In this work, we report on three “target-of-opportunity” observations of Mrk 421, one of the brightest TeV blazars, triggered by a strong flaring event at TeV energies in 2014. These observations feature long, continuous, and simultaneous exposures with XMM-Newton (covering the X-ray and optical/ultraviolet bands) and VERITAS (covering the TeV gamma-ray band), along with contemporaneous observations from other gamma-ray facilities (MAGIC and Fermi -Large Area Telescope) and a number of radio and optical facilities. Although neither rapid flares nor significant X-ray/TeV correlation are detected, these observations reveal subtle changes in the X-ray spectrum of the source over the course of a few days. We search the simultaneous X-ray and TeV data for spectral hysteresis patterns and time delays, which could provide insight into the emission mechanisms and the source properties (e.g., the radius of the emitting region, the strength of the magnetic field, and related timescales). The observed broadband spectra are consistent with a one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model. We find that the power spectral density distribution at ≳4 × 10 −4 Hz from the X-ray data can be described by a power-law model with an index value between 1.2 and 1.8, and do not find evidence for a steepening of the power spectral index (often associated with a characteristic length scale) compared to the previously reported values at lower frequencies.

  8. A SEARCH FOR SPECTRAL HYSTERESIS AND ENERGY-DEPENDENT TIME LAGS FROM X-RAY AND TeV GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF Mrk 421

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeysekara, A. U.; Flinders, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Archambault, S.; Feng, Q. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Archer, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Bird, R.; Buchovecky, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Cardenzana, J. V; Eisch, J. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Chen, X. [Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Cui, W.; Finley, J. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Falcone, A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Fleischhack, H. [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Collaboration: VERITAS Collaboration; MAGIC Collaboration; and others

    2017-01-01

    Blazars are variable emitters across all wavelengths over a wide range of timescales, from months down to minutes. It is therefore essential to observe blazars simultaneously at different wavelengths, especially in the X-ray and gamma-ray bands, where the broadband spectral energy distributions usually peak. In this work, we report on three “target-of-opportunity” observations of Mrk 421, one of the brightest TeV blazars, triggered by a strong flaring event at TeV energies in 2014. These observations feature long, continuous, and simultaneous exposures with XMM-Newton (covering the X-ray and optical/ultraviolet bands) and VERITAS (covering the TeV gamma-ray band), along with contemporaneous observations from other gamma-ray facilities (MAGIC and Fermi -Large Area Telescope) and a number of radio and optical facilities. Although neither rapid flares nor significant X-ray/TeV correlation are detected, these observations reveal subtle changes in the X-ray spectrum of the source over the course of a few days. We search the simultaneous X-ray and TeV data for spectral hysteresis patterns and time delays, which could provide insight into the emission mechanisms and the source properties (e.g., the radius of the emitting region, the strength of the magnetic field, and related timescales). The observed broadband spectra are consistent with a one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model. We find that the power spectral density distribution at ≳4 × 10{sup −4} Hz from the X-ray data can be described by a power-law model with an index value between 1.2 and 1.8, and do not find evidence for a steepening of the power spectral index (often associated with a characteristic length scale) compared to the previously reported values at lower frequencies.

  9. Multielemental X-ray radiometric analysis of ferromanganese concretions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metelev, A.Yu.; Grigor'ev, A.I.; Rakita, K.A.; Mamaenko, M.V.; Ivanenko, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Ferromanganese concretions are promising mineral resources of the ocean. Most often, they are analyzed by atomic-absorption, spectra, X-ray spectral, neutron-activation, and X-ray radiometric methods. Note that X-ray radiometric analysis (XRRA) allows the sufficiently rapid determination of a great number of elements in ferromanganese concretions. The possibility of using XRRA with saturated and thin layers was shown; however, the data on the precision and accuracy of the technique was not given. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the basic performance characteristics of the multielemental X-ray radiometric analysis of ferromanganese concretions (Pacific Ocean). Determinations for K,Ca and Ti content were made using a 55 Fe source and for Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, and Mo contents by using a 109 Cd source. The precision and accuracy of the method was investigated by using reference concretions; it was found the confidence intervals overlap for all of the elements except Ca and Pb. The relative standard deviation was 1-5%, indicating the high precision of the method. The described technique is successfully used on research vessels of the Far East Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences and in South Pacific Ocean geological expeditions of PO open-quotes Dal'morgeologiyaclose quotes

  10. X-ray and nuclear methods for comparative analysis of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryashov, V.I.; Gundorina, S.F.; Frontas'eva, M.V.; Saidmuradov, Zh.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray and instrumental neutron activation methods, and in some cases methods of photon activation (X-ray spectral analysis with proton activation and analysis on the basis of (p, n) reaction) were used to obtain elementary content of different water samples. The possibility of getting space-time dependences of trace elementary concentrations in water (and under certain conditions in atmosphere) is shown. These data are to be used at a complex investigation of sanitary norms of water systems. The advantages of abovementined methods are discussed for obtaining different elementary content in water in different ways

  11. Radionuclide X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cechak, T.

    1994-01-01

    The author's achievements in the title field are summarized and discussed. The following topics are dealt with: (i) principles of radionuclide X-ray fluorescence analysis; (ii) mathematical methods in X-ray fluorescence analysis; (iii) Ross differential filters; (iv) application of radionuclide X-ray fluorescence analysis in the coal industry (with emphasis on the determination of the ash content, sulfur content, and arsenic content of coal); and (v) evaluation of the X-ray fluorescence analyzer from the radiological safety point of view. (P.A.)

  12. JEM-X observations of the Be/X-ray binary EXO 2030+375

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunez, S.M.; Reig, P.; Blay, P.

    2003-01-01

    We have used data from the Joint European Monitor (JEM-X) to perform an X-ray spectral and timing analysis of the 42-s transient pulsar EXO 2030+375 during an X-ray outburst. X-ray pulsations are clearly detected with an average pulse period of 41.66+/-0.05 s and an average pulse fraction of 60...

  13. Frequency filter of seed x-ray by use of x-ray laser medium. Toward the generation of the temporally coherent x-ray laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Noboru; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Kishimoto, Maki; Sukegawa, Kouta; Tanaka, Momoko; Ochi, Yoshihiro; Nishikino, Masaharu; Nagashima, Keisuke; Kato, Yoshiaki; Renzhong, Tai

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate the characteristics of a higher-order harmonics light as a seed X-ray amplified through a laser-produced X-ray amplifier. The narrow spectral bandwidth of the X-ray amplifier works as the frequency filter of the seed X-ray, resulting in that only the temporally coherent X-ray is amplified. Experimental investigation using the 29th-order harmonic light of the Ti:sapphire laser at a wavelength of 26.9 nm together with a neon-like manganese X-ray laser medium shows evident spectral narrowing of the seed X-ray and amplification without serious diffraction effects on the propagation of the amplified X-ray beam. This implies that the present combination is potential to realize temporally coherent X-ray lasers, with an expected duration of approximately 400 fs. (author)

  14. Quantitative X-ray spectral microanalysis of bioorganic films by means of a crystal-diffraction spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogorelov, A.G.; Pogorelova, V.N.; Khrenova, E.V.; Gol'dshtejn, D.V.; Aksirov, A.M.; Kantor, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    The details of the quantitative X-ray spectral microanalysis performed with a wave dispersive spectrometer are described. Hydration of biological tissues, light element composition, low concentration of analyzed elements and their nonuniform distribution are the specific features of bioorganic film and tissue section. This paper is aimed to discuss the general approaches to both preparation technique and quantitative analysis principles [ru

  15. On the Nature of the mHz X-ray Quasi-Periodic Oscillations from Ultraluminous X-ray source M82 X-1: Search for Timing-Spectral Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1, we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and its hardness ratio (5-10 keV/3-5 keV), an indicator of the energy spectral power-law index. When stellar-mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibit type-C low-frequency QPOs (0.2-15 Hz), the centroid frequency of the QPO is known to correlate with the energy spectral index. The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of M82 X-1's mHz QPOs as type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass.We resolved the count rates and the hardness ratios of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling.We detected QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which M82 X-1's hardness ratio varied from 0.42 to 0.47. Our primary results are (1) that we do not detect any correlation between the mHz QPO frequency and the hardness ratio (a substitute for the energy spectral power-law index) and (2) similar to some accreting X-ray binaries, we find that M82 X-1's mHz QPO frequency increases with its X-ray count rate (Pearson's correlation coefficient = +0.97). The apparent lack of a correlation between the QPO centroid frequency and the hardness ratio poses a challenge to the earlier claims that the mHz QPOs of M82 X-1 are the analogs of the type-C low-frequency QPOs of StMBHs. On the other hand, it is possible that the observed relation between the hardness ratio and the QPO frequency represents the saturated portion of the correlation seen in type-C QPOs of StMBHs-in which case M82 X-1's mHz QPOs can still be analogous to type-C QPOs.

  16. Deep Chandra Survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud. II. Timing Analysis of X-Ray Pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, JaeSub; Antoniou, Vallia; Zezas, Andreas; Drake, Jeremy J.; Plucinsky, Paul P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Haberl, Frank [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbach straße, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Sasaki, Manami [Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Sternwartstrasse 7, 96049 Bamberg (Germany); Laycock, Silas, E-mail: jaesub@head.cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, MA 01854 (United States)

    2017-09-20

    We report the timing analysis results of X-ray pulsars from a recent deep Chandra survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We analyzed a total exposure of 1.4 Ms from 31 observations over a 1.2 deg{sup 2} region in the SMC under a Chandra X-ray Visionary Program. Using the Lomb–Scargle and epoch-folding techniques, we detected periodic modulations from 20 pulsars and a new candidate pulsar. The survey also covered 11 other pulsars with no clear sign of periodic modulation. The 0.5–8 keV X-ray luminosity ( L {sub X} ) of the pulsars ranges from 10{sup 34} to 10{sup 37} erg s{sup −1} at 60 kpc. All of the Chandra sources with L {sub X} ≳ 4 × 10{sup 35} erg s{sup −1} exhibit X-ray pulsations. The X-ray spectra of the SMC pulsars (and high-mass X-ray binaries) are in general harder than those of the SMC field population. All but SXP 8.02 can be fitted by an absorbed power-law model with a photon index of Γ ≲ 1.5. The X-ray spectrum of the known magnetar SXP 8.02 is better fitted with a two-temperature blackbody model. Newly measured pulsation periods of SXP 51.0, SXP 214, and SXP 701, are significantly different from the previous XMM-Newton and RXTE measurements. This survey provides a rich data set for energy-dependent pulse profile modeling. Six pulsars show an almost eclipse-like dip in the pulse profile. Phase-resolved spectral analysis reveals diverse spectral variations during pulsation cycles: e.g., for an absorbed power-law model, some exhibit an (anti)-correlation between absorption and X-ray flux, while others show more intrinsic spectral variation (i.e., changes in photon indices).

  17. X-ray scattering in X-ray fluorescence spectra with X-ray tube excitation - Modelling, experiment, and Monte-Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodoroaba, V.-D.; Radtke, M.; Vincze, L.; Rackwitz, V.; Reuter, D.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray scattering may contribute significantly to the spectral background of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra. Based on metrological measurements carried out with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) having attached a well characterised X-ray source (polychromatic X-ray tube) and a calibrated energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) the accuracy of a physical model for X-ray scattering is systematically evaluated for representative samples. The knowledge of the X-ray spectrometer efficiency, but also of the spectrometer response functions makes it possible to define a physical spectral background of XRF spectra. Background subtraction relying on purely mathematical procedures is state-of-the-art. The results produced by the analytical model are at least as reliable as those obtained by Monte-Carlo simulations, even without considering the very challenging contribution of multiple scattering. Special attention has been paid to Compton broadening. Relevant applications of the implementation of the analytical model presented in this paper are the prediction of the limits of detection for particular cases or the determination of the transmission of X-ray polycapillary lenses.

  18. SPECTRAL-TIMING ANALYSIS OF THE LOWER kHz QPO IN THE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY AQUILA X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troyer, Jon S.; Cackett, Edward M., E-mail: jon.troyer@wayne.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, 666 W. Hancock St, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2017-01-10

    Spectral-timing products of kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) systems, including energy- and frequency-dependent lags, have been analyzed previously in 4U 1608-52, 4U 1636-53, and 4U 1728-34. Here, we study the spectral-timing properties of the lower kHz QPO of the neutron star LMXB Aquila X-1 for the first time. We compute broadband energy lags as well as energy-dependent lags and the covariance spectrum using data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer . We find characteristics similar to those of previously studied systems, including soft lags of ∼30 μ s between the 3.0–8.0 keV and 8.0–20.0 keV energy bands at the average QPO frequency. We also find lags that show a nearly monotonic trend with energy, with the highest-energy photons arriving first. The covariance spectrum of the lower kHz QPO is well fit by a thermal Comptonization model, though we find a seed photon temperature higher than that of the mean spectrum, which was also seen in Peille et al. and indicates the possibility of a composite boundary layer emitting region. Lastly, we see in one set of observations an Fe K component in the covariance spectrum at 2.4- σ confidence, which may raise questions about the role of reverberation in the production of lags.

  19. MANTiS: a program for the analysis of X-ray spectromicroscopy data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerotic, Mirna; Mak, Rachel; Wirick, Sue; Meirer, Florian; Jacobsen, Chris

    2014-09-01

    Spectromicroscopy combines spectral data with microscopy, where typical datasets consist of a stack of images taken across a range of energies over a microscopic region of the sample. Manual analysis of these complex datasets can be time-consuming, and can miss the important traits in the data. With this in mind we have developed MANTiS, an open-source tool developed in Python for spectromicroscopy data analysis. The backbone of the package involves principal component analysis and cluster analysis, classifying pixels according to spectral similarity. Our goal is to provide a data analysis tool which is comprehensive, yet intuitive and easy to use. MANTiS is designed to lead the user through the analysis using story boards that describe each step in detail so that both experienced users and beginners are able to analyze their own data independently. These capabilities are illustrated through analysis of hard X-ray imaging of iron in Roman ceramics, and soft X-ray imaging of a malaria-infected red blood cell.

  20. Small-angle scattering of polychromatic X-rays: effects of bandwidth, spectral shape and high harmonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Sen; Luo, Sheng-Nian

    2018-02-16

    Polychromatic X-ray sources can be useful for photon-starved small-angle X-ray scattering given their high spectral fluxes. Their bandwidths, however, are 10–100 times larger than those using monochromators. To explore the feasibility, ideal scattering curves of homogeneous spherical particles for polychromatic X-rays are calculated and analyzed using the Guinier approach, maximum entropy and regularization methods. Monodisperse and polydisperse systems are explored. The influence of bandwidth and asymmetric spectra shape are exploredviaGaussian and half-Gaussian spectra. Synchrotron undulator spectra represented by two undulator sources of the Advanced Photon Source are examined as an example, as regards the influence of asymmetric harmonic shape, fundamental harmonic bandwidth and high harmonics. The effects of bandwidth, spectral shape and high harmonics on particle size determination are evaluated quantitatively.

  1. Small-angle scattering of polychromatic X-rays: effects of bandwidth, spectral shape and high harmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sen; Luo, Sheng Nian

    2018-03-01

    Polychromatic X-ray sources can be useful for photon-starved small-angle X-ray scattering given their high spectral fluxes. Their bandwidths, however, are 10-100 times larger than those using monochromators. To explore the feasibility, ideal scattering curves of homogeneous spherical particles for polychromatic X-rays are calculated and analyzed using the Guinier approach, maximum entropy and regularization methods. Monodisperse and polydisperse systems are explored. The influence of bandwidth and asymmetric spectra shape are explored via Gaussian and half-Gaussian spectra. Synchrotron undulator spectra represented by two undulator sources of the Advanced Photon Source are examined as an example, as regards the influence of asymmetric harmonic shape, fundamental harmonic bandwidth and high harmonics. The effects of bandwidth, spectral shape and high harmonics on particle size determination are evaluated quantitatively.

  2. Fundamental parameters method for quantitative energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirel, H.; Zararsiz, A.

    1986-01-01

    In this study, the requirement of the standart material in photon excited energy distributed X-ray fluorescence analysis has been removed. The interaction of X-rays with matter has been taken into account. A computer program has been developed by using the fundamental parameters of X-ray fluorescence technique and the spectral intensity 'K' of pure elements at saturation thickness has been obtained. For experimental purpose a convenient source-target-detector geometry has been designed. In order to excite the samples,Cd-109 radioisotope source has been used. The peak intensities has been obtained in a vacum chamber by counting the emitted X-rays. The calculation of concentration has been performed for double mixed samples correcting the effects of absorption and enchancement factors. The results were in conformity with their certificate values. (author)

  3. Spectral tailoring of nanoscale EUV and soft x-ray multilayer optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiushi; Medvedev, Viacheslav; van de Kruijs, Robbert; Yakshin, Andrey; Louis, Eric; Bijkerk, Fred

    2017-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray (XUV) multilayer optics have experienced significant development over the past few years, particularly on controlling the spectral characteristics of light for advanced applications like EUV photolithography, space observation, and accelerator- or lab-based XUV experiments. Both planar and three dimensional multilayer structures have been developed to tailor the spectral response in a wide wavelength range. For the planar multilayer optics, different layered schemes are explored. Stacks of periodic multilayers and capping layers are demonstrated to achieve multi-channel reflection or suppression of the reflective properties. Aperiodic multilayer structures enable broadband reflection both in angles and wavelengths, with the possibility of polarization control. The broad wavelength band multilayer is also used to shape attosecond pulses for the study of ultrafast phenomena. Narrowband multilayer monochromators are delivered to bridge the resolution gap between crystals and regular multilayers. High spectral purity multilayers with innovated anti-reflection structures are shown to select spectrally clean XUV radiation from broadband X-ray sources, especially the plasma sources for EUV lithography. Significant progress is also made in the three dimensional multilayer optics, i.e., combining micro- and nanostructures with multilayers, in order to provide new freedom to tune the spectral response. Several kinds of multilayer gratings, including multilayer coated gratings, sliced multilayer gratings, and lamellar multilayer gratings are being pursued for high resolution and high efficiency XUV spectrometers/monochromators, with their advantages and disadvantages, respectively. Multilayer diffraction optics are also developed for spectral purity enhancement. New structures like gratings, zone plates, and pyramids that obtain full suppression of the unwanted radiation and high XUV reflectance are reviewed. Based on the present achievement

  4. Relation between X-Ray and γ-Ray Emissions for Fermi Blazars ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Using γ-ray band data detected by Fermi Large Area Tele- scope (LAT) and X-ray band data for 78 blazars, we find a medium cor- relation between X-ray and γ-ray fluxes in the average state. A medium anticorrelation is also found between X-ray (1 KeV) mean spectral index αx and γ-ray mean spectral index αγ for ...

  5. X-ray studies, spectral characterization and thermal behaviour of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP04)3]. H20, I, was synthesized by reacting Zn2+ ions with tris-(2-aminoethyl) amine phosphate [C6H21N4][P04].5H20. The compound was characterized by powder x-ray diffraction analysis, energy dispersive analysis by x-ray and infrared ...

  6. Preparation of specimens for analysis by: X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banos L, L.

    2004-01-01

    Specimen preparation is one of the most important requirements in the analysis of samples by X-ray Diffraction and X-ray Fluorescence. This statement is especially true for samples containing different types of materials. There are many forms of specimen suitable for X-ray analysis and the type of the sample as received will generally determine the method of pretreatment. It is convenient to refer to the material received for analysis as the sample, and that, which is actually analyzed as the specimen. The powder Diffraction method assumes that the particles in the specimen are ideally random orientation and that there are enough crystallites in the specimen to achieve a representative intensity distribution for these crystallites. X ray Fluorescence is essentially a comparative method of analysis, it is vital that all standards and unknowns be presented to the spectrometer in a reproducible and identical manner. (Author) 3 refs., 6 figs

  7. Revelations of X-ray spectral analysis of the enigmatic black hole binary GRS 1915+105

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peris, Charith; Remillard, Ronald A.; Steiner, James; Vrtilek, Saeqa Dil; Varniere, Peggy; Rodriguez, Jerome; Pooley, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Of the black hole binaries discovered thus far, GRS 1915+105 stands out as an exceptional source primarily due to its wild X-ray variability, the diversity of which has not been replicated in any other stellar-mass black hole. Although extreme variability is commonplace in its light-curve, about half of the observations of GRS1915+105 show fairly steady X-ray intensity. We report on the X-ray spectral behavior within these steady observations. Our work is based on a vast RXTE/PCA data set obtained on GRS 1915+105 during the course of its entire mission and 10 years of radio data from the Ryle Telescope, which overlap the X-ray data. We find that the steady observations within the X-ray data set naturally separate into two regions in a color-color diagram, which we refer to as steady-soft and steady-hard. GRS 1915+105 displays significant curvature in the Comptonization component within the PCA band pass suggesting significantly heating from a hot disk present in all states. A new Comptonization model 'simplcut' was developed in order to model this curvature to best effect. A majority of the steady-soft observations display a roughly constant inner radius; remarkably reminiscent of canonical soft state black hole binaries. In contrast, the steady-hard observations display a growing disk truncation that is correlated to the mass accretion rate through the disk, which suggests a magnetically truncated disk. A comparison of X-ray model parameters to the canonical state definitions show that almost all steady-soft observations match the criteria of either thermal or steep power law state, while the thermal state observations dominate the constant radius branch. A large portion (80%) of the steady-hard observations matches the hard state criteria when the disk fraction constraint is neglected. These results suggest that within the complexity of this source is a simpler underlying basis of states, which map to those observed in canonical black hole binaries. When

  8. Improving Soft X-Ray Spectral Irradiance Models for Use Throughout the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eparvier, F. G.; Thiemann, E.; Woods, T. N.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the effects of solar variability on planetary atmospheres has been hindered by the lack of accurate models and measurements of the soft x-ray (SXR) spectral irradiance (0-6 nm). Most measurements of the SXR have been broadband and are difficult to interpret due to changing spectral distribution under the pass band of the instruments. Models that use reference spectra for quiet sun, active region, and flaring contributions to irradiance have been made, but with limited success. The recent Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat made spectral measurements in the 0.04 - 3 nm range from June 2016 to May 2017, observing the Sun at many different levels of activity. In addition, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) has observed the Sun since May 2010, in both broad bands (including a band at 0-7 nm) and spectrally resolved (6-105 nm at 0.1 nm resolution). We will present an improved model of the SXR based on new reference spectra from MinXSS and SDO-EVE. The non-flaring portion of the model is driven by broadband SXR measurements for determining activity level and relative contributions of quiet and active sun. Flares are modeled using flare temperatures from the GOES X-Ray Sensors. The improved SXR model can be driven by any sensors that provide a measure of activity level and flare temperature from any vantage point in the solar system. As an example, a version of the model is using the broadband solar irradiance measurements from the MAVEN EUV Monitor at Mars will be presented.

  9. Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence and extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.R.; Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Kraner, H.W.; Chao, E.C.T.; Minkin, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The advent of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has led to a significant increase in activity in many areas of science dealing with the interaction of x-rays with matter. Synchrotron radiation provides intense, linearly polarized, naturally collimated, continuously tunable photon beams, which are used to determine not only the elemental composition of a complex, polyatomic, dilute material but also the chemical form of the elements with improved accuracy. Examples of the application of synchrotron radiation include experiments in synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (SXRF) analysis and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis. New synchrotron radiation x-ray microprobes for elemental analysis in the parts per billion range are under construction at several laboratories. 76 references, 24 figures

  10. Generation of doublet spectral lines at self-seeded X-ray FELs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Self-seeding schemes, consisting of two undulators with a monochromator in between, aim to reduce the bandwidth of SASE X-ray FELs. We recently proposed to use a new method of monochromatization exploiting a single crystal in Braggtransmission geometry for self-seeding in the hard X-ray range. The obvious and technically possible extension is to use such kind of monochromator setup with two -or more- crystals arranged in a series to spectrally filter the SASE radiation at two -or more- closely-spaced wavelengths within the FEL gain band. This allows for the production of doublet- or multiplet-spectral lines. Applications exist over a broad range of hard X-ray wavelengths involving any process where there is a large change in cross section over a narrow wavelength range, as in multiple wavelength anomalous diffraction techniques (MAD). In this paper we consider the simultaneous operation of the LCLS hard X-ray FEL at two closely spaced wavelengths. We present simulation results for the LCLS baseline, and we show that this method can produce fully coherent radiation shared between two longitudinal modes. Mode spacing can be easily tuned within the FEL gain band, i.e. within 10 eV. An interesting aspect of the proposed scheme is a way of modulating the electron bunch at optical frequencies without a seed quantum laser. In fact, the XFEL output intensity contains an oscillating ''mode-beat'' component whose frequency is related to the frequency difference between the pair of longitudinal modes considered. Thus, at saturation one obtains FEL-induced modulations of energy loss and energy spread in the electron bunch at optical frequency. These modulations can be converted into density modulation at the same optical frequency with the help of a weak chicane installed behind the baseline undulator. Powerful coherent radiation can then be generated with the help of an optical transition radiation (OTR) station,which have important applications. In this paper we briefly

  11. Generation of doublet spectral lines at self-seeded X-ray FELs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2010-11-01

    Self-seeding schemes, consisting of two undulators with a monochromator in between, aim to reduce the bandwidth of SASE X-ray FELs. We recently proposed to use a new method of monochromatization exploiting a single crystal in Braggtransmission geometry for self-seeding in the hard X-ray range. The obvious and technically possible extension is to use such kind of monochromator setup with two -or more- crystals arranged in a series to spectrally filter the SASE radiation at two -or more- closely-spaced wavelengths within the FEL gain band. This allows for the production of doublet- or multiplet-spectral lines. Applications exist over a broad range of hard X-ray wavelengths involving any process where there is a large change in cross section over a narrow wavelength range, as in multiple wavelength anomalous diffraction techniques (MAD). In this paper we consider the simultaneous operation of the LCLS hard X-ray FEL at two closely spaced wavelengths. We present simulation results for the LCLS baseline, and we show that this method can produce fully coherent radiation shared between two longitudinal modes. Mode spacing can be easily tuned within the FEL gain band, i.e. within 10 eV. An interesting aspect of the proposed scheme is a way of modulating the electron bunch at optical frequencies without a seed quantum laser. In fact, the XFEL output intensity contains an oscillating ''mode-beat'' component whose frequency is related to the frequency difference between the pair of longitudinal modes considered. Thus, at saturation one obtains FEL-induced modulations of energy loss and energy spread in the electron bunch at optical frequency. These modulations can be converted into density modulation at the same optical frequency with the help of a weak chicane installed behind the baseline undulator. Powerful coherent radiation can then be generated with the help of an optical transition radiation (OTR) station,which have important applications. In this paper we briefly

  12. Spectral information interpretation of X-ray analysis based on expert system approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drakunov, Yu.M.; Lezin, A.N.; Pukha, N.P.; Silachev, I.Yu.

    2000-01-01

    An expert subprogram for automated identification for element composition of the samples of different nature according to the result of energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis is elaborated, The flowchart of the subprogram is presented, brief description of expert system structure and its algorithm is given. (author)

  13. Choice and preparation of standard samples for X-ray spectral microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilenko, I.S.; Surzhko, V.F.

    1989-01-01

    Choice, preparation and certification of standard samples for X-ray spectral microanalysis are considered. Requirements for standard samples in terms of concentration and volume, porosity, corrosion, conductivity distribution are formulated. Stages of sample preparation process, including composition choice, heat treatment, section production, certification, are considered in detail. The choice of composition is based on studying phase equilibrium diagrams, subdivided into 6 types

  14. The 1.5 Ms Observing Campaign on IRAS 13224-3809: X-ray Spectral Analysis I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J.; Parker, M. L.; Fabian, A. C.; Alston, W. N.; Buisson, D. J. K.; Cackett, E. M.; Chiang, C.-Y.; Dauser, T.; Gallo, L. C.; García, J. A.; Harrison, F. A.; Lohfink, A. M.; De Marco, B.; Kara, E.; Miller, J. M.; Miniutti, G.; Pinto, C.; Walton, D. J.; Wilkins, D. R.

    2018-03-01

    We present a detailed spectral analysis of the recent 1.5 Ms XMM-Newton observing campaign on the narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy IRAS 13224-3809, taken simultaneously with 500 ks of NuSTAR data. The X-ray lightcurve shows three flux peaks, registering at about 100 times the minimum flux seen during the campaign, and rapid variability with a time scale of kiloseconds. The spectra are well fit with a primary powerlaw continuum, two relativistic-blurred reflection components from the inner accretion disk with very high iron abundance, and a simple blackbody-shaped model for the remaining soft excess. The spectral variability is dominated by the power law continuum from a corona region within a few gravitational radii from the black hole. Additionally, blueshifted Ne X, Mg XII, Si XIV and S XVI absorption lines are identified in the stacked low-flux spectrum, confirming the presence of a highly ionized outflow with velocity up to v = 0.263 and 0.229 c. We fit the absorption features with xstar models and find a relatively constant velocity outflow through the whole observation. Finally, we replace the bbody and supersolar abundance reflection models by fitting the soft excess successfully with the extended reflection model relxillD, which allows for higher densities than the standard relxill model. This returns a disk electron density ne > 1018.7 cm-3 and lowers the iron abundance from Z_Fe=24^{+3}_{-4}Z_⊙ with ne ≡ 1015 cm-3 to Z_Fe=6.6^{+0.8}_{-2.1}Z_⊙.

  15. High spectral resolution measurements of a solar flare hard X-ray burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, R.P.; Schwartz, R.A.; NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD)

    1987-01-01

    Observations are reported of an intense solar flare hard X-ray burst on June 27, 1980, made with a balloon-borne array of liquid nitrogen-cooled Ge detector which provided unprecedented spectral resolution (no more than 1 keV FWHM). The hard X-ray spectra throughout the impulsive phase burst fitted well to a double power-law form, and emission from an isothermal 0.1-1 billion K plasma can be specifically excluded. The temporal variations of the spectrum indicate that the hard X-ray burst is made up of two superposed components: individual spikes lasting about 3-15 sec, which have a hard spectrum and a break energy of 30-65 keV; and a slowly varying component characterized by a soft spectrum with a constant low-energy slope and a break energy which increases from 25 kev to at least 100 keV through the event. The double power-law shape indicates that DC electric field acceleration, similar to that occurring in the earth's auroral zone, may be the source of the energetic electrons which produce the hard X-ray emission. 39 references

  16. Spectral encoding method for measuring the relative arrival time between x-ray/optical pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bionta, M. R.; Hartmann, N.; Weaver, M.; French, D.; Glownia, J. M.; Bostedt, C.; Chollet, M.; Ding, Y.; Fritz, D. M.; Fry, A. R.; Krzywinski, J.; Lemke, H. T.; Messerschmidt, M.; Schorb, S.; Zhu, D.; White, W. E.; Nicholson, D. J.; Cryan, J. P.; Baker, K.; Kane, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    The advent of few femtosecond x-ray light sources brings promise of x-ray/optical pump-probe experiments that can measure chemical and structural changes in the 10–100 fs time regime. Widely distributed timing systems used at x-ray Free-Electron Laser facilities are typically limited to above 50 fs fwhm jitter in active x-ray/optical synchronization. The approach of single-shot timing measurements is used to sort results in the event processing stage. This has seen wide use to accommodate the insufficient precision of active stabilization schemes. In this article, we review the current technique for “measure-and-sort” at the Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The relative arrival time between an x-ray pulse and an optical pulse is measured near the experimental interaction region as a spectrally encoded cross-correlation signal. The cross-correlation provides a time-stamp for filter-and-sort algorithms used for real-time sorting. Sub-10 fs rms resolution is common in this technique, placing timing precision at the same scale as the duration of the shortest achievable x-ray pulses

  17. High Spectral Resolution, High Cadence, Imaging X-ray Microcalorimeters for Solar Physics - Phase 2 Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microcalorimeter x-ray instruments are non-dispersive, high spectral resolution, broad-band, high cadence imaging spectrometers. We have been developing these...

  18. X-ray Emission Line Spectroscopy of Nearby Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daniel

    What are the origins of the diffuse soft X-ray emission from non-AGN galaxies? Preliminary analysis of XMM-Newton RGS spectra shows that a substantial fraction of the emission cannot arise from optically-thin thermal plasma, as commonly assumed, and may originate in charge exchange at the interface with neutral gas. We request the support for a comprehensive observing, data analysis, and modeling program to spectroscopically determine the origins of the emission. First, we will use our scheduled XMM-Newton AO-10 368 ks observations of the nearest compact elliptical galaxy M32 to obtain the first spectroscopic calibration of the cumulative soft X-ray emission from the old stellar population and will develop a spectral model for the charge exchange, as well as analysis tools to measure the spatial and kinematic properties of the X-ray line- emitting plasma. Second, we will characterize the truly diffuse emission from the hot plasma and/or its interplay with the neutral gas in a sample of galactic spheroids and active star forming/starburst regions in nearby galaxies observed by XMM-Newton. In particular, we will map out the spatial distributions of key emission lines and measure (or tightly constrain) the kinematics of hot plasma outflows for a few X-ray-emitting regions with high-quality RGS data. For galaxies with insufficient counting statistics in individual emission lines, we will conduct a spectral stacking analysis to constrain the average properties of the X-ray-emitting plasma. We will use the results of these X-ray spectroscopic analyses, together with complementary X-ray CCD imaging/spectral data and observations in other wavelength bands, to test the models of the emission. In addition to the charge exchange, alternative scenarios such as resonance scattering and relic AGN photo-ionization will also be examined for suitable regions. These studies are important to the understanding of the relationship between the diffuse soft X-ray emission and various

  19. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Miaja-Avila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  20. REVISITING THE SHORT-TERM X-RAY SPECTRAL VARIABILITY OF NGC 4151 WITH CHANDRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junfeng; Fabbiano, G.; Elvis, M.; Zezas, A.; Karovska, M.; Risaliti, G.

    2010-01-01

    We present new X-ray spectral data for the Seyfert 1 nucleus in NGC 4151 observed with Chandra for ∼200 ks. A significant ACIS pileup is present, resulting in a nonlinear count rate variation during the observation. With pileup corrected spectral fitting, we are able to recover the spectral parameters and find consistency with those derived from unpiled events in the ACIS readout streak and outer region from the bright nucleus. The absorption corrected 2-10 keV flux of the nucleus varied between 6 x 10 -11 erg s -1 cm -2 and 10 -10 erg s -1 cm -2 (L 2-10 k eV ∼ 1.3-2.1 x 10 42 erg s -1 ). Similar to earlier Chandra studies of NGC 4151 at a historical low state, the photon indices derived from the same absorbed power-law model are Γ ∼ 0.7-0.9. However, we show that Γ is highly dependent on the adopted spectral models. Fitting the power-law continuum with a Compton reflection component gives Γ ∼ 1.1. By including passage of non-uniform X-ray obscuring clouds, we can reproduce the apparent flat spectral states with Γ ∼ 1.7, typical for Seyfert 1 active galactic nuclei. The same model also fits the hard spectra from previous ASCA 'long look' observation of NGC 4151 in the lowest flux state. The spectral variability during our observation can be interpreted as variations in intrinsic soft continuum flux relative to a Compton reflection component that is from distant cold material and constant on short timescale, or variations of partially covering absorber in the line of sight toward the nucleus. An ionized absorber model with ionization parameter log ξ ∼ 0.8-1.1 can also fit the low-resolution ACIS spectra. If the partial covering model is correct, adopting a black hole mass M BH ∼4.6x10 7 M sun we constrain the distance of the obscuring cloud from the central black hole to be r ∼< 9 lt-day, consistent with the size of the broad emission line region of NGC 4151 from optical reverberation mapping.

  1. Long-term gamma-ray spectral variability of Cygnus X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, J.C.; Mahoney, W.A.; Wheaton, WM.A.; Jacobson, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    Data from HEAO 3 observations of 0.05-10-MeV gamma-ray emission from Cyg X-1 during two 90-d periods (in fall 1979 and spring 1980) are compiled in tables and graphs and analyzed statistically to determine the temporal and spectral variability. It is found that a steady increase in 100-keV emission is accompanied by a decrease (and eventual disappearance) of MeV emission. The mechanisms which could theoretically be responsible for these phenomena are discussed. 28 references

  2. NuSTAR HARD X-RAY SURVEY OF THE GALACTIC CENTER REGION. I. HARD X-RAY MORPHOLOGY AND SPECTROSCOPY OF THE DIFFUSE EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Perez, Kerstin; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Canipe, Alicia M. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Krivonos, Roman; Tomsick, John A.; Barrière, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hong, Jaesub [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ponti, Gabriele [Max-Planck-Institut f. extraterrestrische Physik, HEG, Garching (Germany); Bauer, Franz [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Alexander, David M. [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Baganoff, Frederick K. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusets Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Barret, Didier [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space—National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Forster, Karl [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Giommi, Paolo, E-mail: kaya@astro.columbia.edu [ASI Science Data Center, Via del Politecnico snc I-00133, Roma (Italy); and others

    2015-12-01

    We present the first sub-arcminute images of the Galactic Center above 10 keV, obtained with NuSTAR. NuSTAR resolves the hard X-ray source IGR J17456–2901 into non-thermal X-ray filaments, molecular clouds, point sources, and a previously unknown central component of hard X-ray emission (CHXE). NuSTAR detects four non-thermal X-ray filaments, extending the detection of their power-law spectra with Γ ∼ 1.3–2.3 up to ∼50 keV. A morphological and spectral study of the filaments suggests that their origin may be heterogeneous, where previous studies suggested a common origin in young pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). NuSTAR detects non-thermal X-ray continuum emission spatially correlated with the 6.4 keV Fe Kα fluorescence line emission associated with two Sgr A molecular clouds: MC1 and the Bridge. Broadband X-ray spectral analysis with a Monte-Carlo based X-ray reflection model self-consistently determined their intrinsic column density (∼10{sup 23} cm{sup −2}), primary X-ray spectra (power-laws with Γ ∼ 2) and set a lower limit of the X-ray luminosity of Sgr A* flare illuminating the Sgr A clouds to L{sub X} ≳ 10{sup 38} erg s{sup −1}. Above ∼20 keV, hard X-ray emission in the central 10 pc region around Sgr A* consists of the candidate PWN G359.95–0.04 and the CHXE, possibly resulting from an unresolved population of massive CVs with white dwarf masses M{sub WD} ∼ 0.9 M{sub ⊙}. Spectral energy distribution analysis suggests that G359.95–0.04 is likely the hard X-ray counterpart of the ultra-high gamma-ray source HESS J1745–290, strongly favoring a leptonic origin of the GC TeV emission.

  3. The gravitational microlens influence on X-ray spectral line generated by an AGN accretion disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović L.Č.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of gravitational microlensing on the X-ray spectral line profiles originated from a relativistic accretion disc has been studied. Using a disc model, we show that microlensing can induce noticeable changes in the line shapes when the Einstein ring radius associated with the microlens is of a size comparable to that of the accretion disc. Taking into account the relatively small size of the X-ray accretion disc, we found that compact objects (of about a Solar mass which belong to the bulge of the host galaxy can produce significant changes in the X-ray line profile of AGN.

  4. LONG-TERM X-RAY VARIABILITY STUDY OF IC342 FROM XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mak, Daisy S. Y.; Pun, Chun S. J.; Kong, Albert K. H.

    2011-01-01

    We presented the results of an analysis of four XMM-Newton observations of the starburst galaxy IC342 taken over a four-year span from 2001 to 2005, with an emphasis on investigating the long-term flux and spectral variability of the X-ray point sources. We detected a total of 61 X-ray sources within 35' x 30' of the galaxy down to a luminosity of (1-2) x 10 37 erg s -1 depending on the local background. We found that 39 of the 61 detected sources showed long-term variability, in which 26 of them were classified as X-ray transients. We also found 19 sources exhibiting variations in hardness ratios or undergoing spectral transitions among observations, and were identified as spectral variables. In particular, eight of the identified X-ray transients showed spectral variability in addition to flux variability. The diverse patterns of variability observed are indicative of a population of X-ray binaries. We used X-ray colors, flux and spectral variability, and in some cases the optical or radio counterparts to classify the detected X-ray sources into several stellar populations. We identified a total of 11 foreground stars, 1 supersoft source (SSS), 3 quasisoft sources (QSSs), and 2 supernova remnants (SNRs). The identified SSS/QSSs are located near or on the spiral arms, associated with young stellar populations; the 2 SNRs are very close to the starburst nucleus where current star formation activities are dominated. We also discovered a spectral change in the nuclear source of IC342 for the first time by a series of X-ray spectrum analysis.

  5. Instrumental aspects of tube-excited energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, F.; Nullens, H.; Espen, P. van

    1983-01-01

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry is an attractive and widely used method for sensitive multi-element analysis. The method suffers from the extreme density of spectral components in a rather limited energy range which implies the need for computer based spectrum analysis. The method of iterative least squares analysis is the most powerful tool for this. It requires a systematic and accurate description of the spectral features. Other important necessities for accurate analysis are the calibration of the spectrometer and the correction for matrix absorption effects in the sample; they can be calculated from available physical constants. Ours and similar procedures prove that semi-automatic analyses are possible with an accuracy of the order of 5%. (author)

  6. X-ray spectral analysis of niobium hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khabeev, I.A.; Belkina, V.A.; Makarova, R.V.; Mel' nikova, R.A.; Smagunova, A.N.

    1986-02-01

    The authors have derived an x-ray method of determining Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/, TiO/sub 2/, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Nb/sub 2/O/sub 5/, C1 and SiO2 with a KRF-18 quantometer. The method should provide accuracy in determining these elements characterized by relative derivations. The main components of niobium hydroxide were ground for improved determination. The method allows one to analyze a sample in 30 min. In a six hour working day, an assistant can analyze up to 25 samples. The time required for one sample in the chemical method is about 30 hours.

  7. Effect of Electric Voltage and Current of X-ray Chamber on the Element inthe Zirconium Alloy Analysis X-ray by X-ray Fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusuf-Nampira; Narko-Wibowo, L; Rosika-Krisnawati; Nudia-Barenzani

    2000-01-01

    The using of x-ray fluorescence in the chemical analysis depend heavilyon the parameters of x-ray chamber, for examples : electric voltage andelectric current. That parameter give effect in the result of determine ofSn, Cr, Fe and Ni in the zirconium alloy. 20 kV electric voltages are used onthe Mo x-ray chamber shall product x-ray of zirconium in the sample materialcan give effect in the stability of the analysis result (deviation more than5%). The result of analysis of elements in the zirconium alloy shall givedeviation less than 5% when using of electric voltage of the x-ray chamberless than 19 kV. The sensitivity of analysis can be reached by step upelectric current of x-ray chamber. (author)

  8. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  9. Soft X-Ray Observations of a Complete Sample of X-Ray--selected BL Lacertae Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Eric S.; Stocke, John T.; Wang, Q. Daniel; Morris, Simon L.

    1996-01-01

    We present the results of ROSAT PSPC observations of the X-ray selected BL Lacertae objects (XBLs) in the complete Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey (EM MS) sample. None of the objects is resolved in their respective PSPC images, but all are easily detected. All BL Lac objects in this sample are well-fitted by single power laws. Their X-ray spectra exhibit a variety of spectral slopes, with best-fit energy power-law spectral indices between α = 0.5-2.3. The PSPC spectra of this sample are slightly steeper than those typical of flat ratio-spectrum quasars. Because almost all of the individual PSPC spectral indices are equal to or slightly steeper than the overall optical to X-ray spectral indices for these same objects, we infer that BL Lac soft X-ray continua are dominated by steep-spectrum synchrotron radiation from a broad X-ray jet, rather than flat-spectrum inverse Compton radiation linked to the narrower radio/millimeter jet. The softness of the X-ray spectra of these XBLs revives the possibility proposed by Guilbert, Fabian, & McCray (1983) that BL Lac objects are lineless because the circumnuclear gas cannot be heated sufficiently to permit two stable gas phases, the cooler of which would comprise the broad emission-line clouds. Because unified schemes predict that hard self-Compton radiation is beamed only into a small solid angle in BL Lac objects, the steep-spectrum synchrotron tail controls the temperature of the circumnuclear gas at r ≤ 1018 cm and prevents broad-line cloud formation. We use these new ROSAT data to recalculate the X-ray luminosity function and cosmological evolution of the complete EMSS sample by determining accurate K-corrections for the sample and estimating the effects of variability and the possibility of incompleteness in the sample. Our analysis confirms that XBLs are evolving "negatively," opposite in sense to quasars, with Ve/Va = 0.331±0.060. The statistically significant difference between the values for X-ray

  10. SU-F-I-75: Half-Value Layer Thicknesses and Homogeneity Coefficients for Fluoroscopic X-Ray Beam Spectra Incorporating Spectral Filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunderle, K [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Godley, A; Shen, Z; Dong, F [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Rakowski, J [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation is to quantify various first half-value-layers (HVLs), second HVLs and homogeneity coefficients (HCs) for a state-of-the-art fluoroscope utilizing spectral (copper) filtration. Methods: A Radcal (Monrovia, Ca) AccuPro dosimeter with a 10×6-6 calibrated ionization chamber was used to measure air kerma for radiographic x-ray exposures made on a Siemens (Erlangen, Germany) Artis ZeeGo fluoroscope operated in the service mode. The ionization chamber was centered in the x-ray beam at 72 cm from the focal spot with a source-to-image-distance of 120 cm. The collimators were introduced to limit the x-ray field to approximately 5 cm × 5 cm at the ionization chamber plane. Type-1100 aluminum filters, in 0.5 mm increments, were used to determine the HVL. Two HVL calculation methods were used, log-linear interpolation and Lambert-W interpolation as described by Mathieu [Med Phys, 38(8), 4546 (2011)]. Multiple measurements were made at 60, 80, 100, 120 kVp at spectral filtration thicknesses of 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 mm. Results: First HVL, second HVL, and HCs are presented for the fluoroscopic x-ray beam spectra indicated above, with nearly identical results from the two interpolation methods. Accuracy of the set kVp was also determined and deviated less than 2%. First HVLs for fluoroscopic x-ray beam spectra without spectral filtration determined in our study were 7%–16% greater than previously published data by Fetterly et al. [Med Phys, 28, 205 (2001)]. However, the FDA minimum HVL requirements changed since that publication, requiring larger HVLs as of 2006. Additionally, x-ray tube and generator architecture have substantially changed over the last 15 years providing different beam spectra. Conclusion: X-ray beam quality characteristics for state-of-the-art fluoroscopes with spectral filtration have not been published. This study provides reference data which will be useful for defining beam qualities encountered on

  11. C IV EMISSION AND THE ULTRAVIOLET THROUGH X-RAY SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF RADIO-QUIET QUASARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruczek, Nicholas E.; Richards, Gordon T.; Deo, Rajesh P.; Krawczyk, Coleman M.; Gallagher, S. C.; Hall, Patrick B.; Hewett, Paul C.; Leighly, Karen M.; Proga, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    In the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV), two of the parameters that best characterize the range of emission-line properties in quasar broad emission-line regions are the equivalent width and the blueshift of the C IV λ1549 line relative to the quasar rest frame. We explore the connection between these emission-line properties and the UV through X-ray spectral energy distribution (SED) for radio-quiet (RQ) quasars. Our sample consists of a heterogeneous compilation of 406 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (at z > 1.54) and Palomar-Green survey (at z < 0.4) that have well-measured C IV emission-line and X-ray properties (including 164 objects with measured Γ). We find that RQ quasars with both strong C IV emission and small C IV blueshifts can be classified as 'hard-spectrum' sources that are (relatively) strong in the X-ray as compared to the UV. On the other hand, RQ quasars with both weak C IV emission and large C IV blueshifts are instead 'soft-spectrum' sources that are (relatively) weak in the X-ray as compared to the UV. This work helps to further bridge optical/soft X-ray 'eigenvector 1' relationships to the UV and hard X-ray. Based on these findings, we argue that future work should consider systematic errors in bolometric corrections (and thus accretion rates) that are derived from a single mean SED. Detailed analysis of the C IV emission line may allow for SED-dependent corrections to these quantities.

  12. Fundamentals of energy dispersive X-ray analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Russ, John C; Kiessling, R; Charles, J

    1984-01-01

    Fundamentals of Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of dispersive X-ray analysis. It presents descriptions, equations, and graphs to enable the users of these techniques to develop an intuitive and conceptual image of the physical processes involved in the generation and detection of X-rays. The book begins with a discussion of X-ray detection and measurement, which is accomplished by one of two types of X-ray spectrometer: energy dispersive or wavelength dispersive. The emphasis is on energy dispersive spectrometers, given their rather wid

  13. X-ray Microprobe for Fluorescence and Diffraction Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ice, G.E.

    2005-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (see unit 1.1) and x-ray excited fluorescence analysis are powerful techniques for the nondestructive measurement of crystal structure and chemical composition. X-ray fluorescence analysis is inherently nondestructive with orders of magnitude lower power deposited for the same detectable limit as with fluorescence excited by charged particle probes (Sparks, 1980). X-ray diffraction analysis is sensitive to crystal structure with orders-of-magnitude greater sensitivity to crystallographic strain than electron probes (Rebonato, et al. 1989). When a small-area x-ray microbeam is used as the probe, chemical composition (Z>14), crystal structure, crystalline texture, and crystalline strain distributions can be determined. These distributions can be studied both at the surface of the sample and deep within the sample (Fig. 1). Current state-of-the-art can achieve an ∼1 mm-D x-ray microprobe and an ∼0.1 mm-D x-ray microprobe has been demonstrated (Bilderback, et al., 1994). Despite their great chemical and crystallographic sensitivities, x-ray microprobe techniques have until recently been restricted by inefficient x-ray focusing optics and weak x-ray sources; x-ray microbeam analysis was largely superseded by electron techniques in the 50's. However, interest in x-ray microprobe techniques has now been revived (Howells, et al., 1983; Ice and Sparks, 1984; Chevallier, et al., 1997; Riekel 1992; Thompson, el al., 1992; and Making and Using... 1997) by the development of efficient x-ray focusing optics and ultra-high intensity synchrotron x-ray sources (Buras and Tazzari, 1984; Shenoy, et al., 1988). These advances have increased the achievable microbeam flux by more than 11 orders of magnitude (Fig. 2) (Ice, 1997); the flux in a tunable 1 mm-D beam on a 'so called' 3rd-generation synchrotron source such as the APS can exceed the flux in a fixed-energy mm2 beam on a conventional source. These advances make x-ray microfluorescence and x-ray

  14. Quality control of X-ray films with blue spectral sensitivity: comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrasco, F.; Ruiz Cruces, R.; Sendra, F.; Diez de los rios, A.

    1994-01-01

    In this work, seven X-ray films with blue-ultraviolet spectral sensitivity have been studied by means of light sensitometry, x-ray sensitometry and spatial resolution test. Three screens of different composition and speed were use. Only the films HPX44 and RG showed a high base plus for (>0,30), the remaining films maintained their values between 0,21 and 0,26. When blue light sensitometry was substituted by green light sensitometry, base plus fog practically did not show variations and gradient and speed changed less than 4% and 10% respectively. Speed and Gradient must be calculated from the relation between exposition and optical density, avoiding parameters referred to type optical density of a given step of the wedge. Two films with high speed (RG and HPX 44), four films with medium speed (Curix RP2, NewRX, Cronex 4 and X-Omat S) and one film with low speed but high resolution (Cronex 7) have been found. The obtained results present useful comparative data to select and adequate film according to the characteristic of the x-ray examination and the available screens. (Author)

  15. Calibration data Analysis Package (CAP): An IDL based widget application for analysis of X-ray calibration data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishali, S.; Narendranath, S.; Sreekumar, P.

    An IDL (interactive data language) based widget application developed for the calibration of C1XS (Narendranath et al., 2010) instrument on Chandrayaan-1 is modified to provide a generic package for the analysis of data from x-ray detectors. The package supports files in ascii as well as FITS format. Data can be fitted with a list of inbuilt functions to derive the spectral redistribution function (SRF). We have incorporated functions such as `HYPERMET' (Philips & Marlow 1976) including non Gaussian components in the SRF such as low energy tail, low energy shelf and escape peak. In addition users can incorporate additional models which may be required to model detector specific features. Spectral fits use a routine `mpfit' which uses Leven-Marquardt least squares fitting method. The SRF derived from this tool can be fed into an accompanying program to generate a redistribution matrix file (RMF) compatible with the X-ray spectral analysis package XSPEC. The tool provides a user friendly interface of help to beginners and also provides transparency and advanced features for experts.

  16. XAssist: A System for the Automation of X-ray Astrophysics Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, A.

    2004-08-01

    XAssist is a NASA AISR-funded project for the automation of X-ray astrophysics. It is capable of data reprocessing, source detection, and preliminary spatial, temporal and spectral analysis for each source with sufficient counts. The bulk of the system is written in Python, which in turn drives underlying software (CIAO for Chandra data, etc.). Future work will include a GUI (mainly for beginners and status monitoring) and the exposure of at least some functionality as web services. The latter will help XAssist to eventually become part of the VO, making advanced queries possible, such as determining the X-ray fluxes of counterparts to HST or SDSS sources (including the use of unpublished X-ray data), and add the ability of ``on-the-fly'' X-ray processing. Pipelines are running on Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of galaxies to demonstrate XAssist's capabilities, and the results are available online (in real time) at http://www.xassist.org. XAssist itself as well as various associated projects are available for download.

  17. X-Rays from NGC 3256: High-Energy Emission in Starburst Galaxies and Their Contribution to the Cosmic X-Ray Background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, Edward C.; Lehnert, Matthew D.; Helfand, David J.

    1999-01-01

    The infrared-luminous galaxy NGC 3256 is a classic example of a merger-induced nuclear starburst system. We find here that it is the most X-ray-luminous star-forming galaxy yet detected (L 0.5-10keV =1.6x10 42 ergs s-1). Long-slit optical spectroscopy and a deep, high-resolution ROSAT X-ray image show that the starburst is driving a ''superwind'' which accounts for ∼20% of the observed soft X-ray emission. Analysis of X-ray spectral data from ASCA indicates this gas has a characteristic temperature of kT≅0.3 keV. Our model for the broadband X-ray emission of NGC 3256 contains two additional components: a warm thermal plasma (kT≅0.8 keV) associated with the central starburst, and a hard power-law component with an energy index of α X ≅0.7. We discuss the energy budget for the two thermal plasmas and find that the input of mechanical energy from the starburst is more than sufficient to sustain the observed level of emission. We also examine possible origins for the power-law component, concluding that neither a buried AGN nor the expected population of high-mass X-ray binaries can account for this emission. Inverse Compton scattering, involving the galaxy's copious flux of infrared photons and the relativistic electrons produced by supernovae, is likely to make a substantial contribution to the hard X-ray flux. Such a model is consistent with the observed radio and IR fluxes and the radio and X-ray spectral indices. We explore the role of X-ray-luminous starbursts in the production of the cosmic X-ray background radiation. The number counts and spectral index distribution of the faint radio source population, thought to be dominated by star-forming galaxies, suggest that a significant fraction of the hard X-ray background could arise from starbursts at moderate redshift. (c) (c) 1999. The American Astronomical Society

  18. X-Ray Spectral Properties of Seven Heavily Obscured Seyfert 2 Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesi, S.; Ajello, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Comastri, A. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Cusumano, G.; Parola, V. La; Segreto, A., E-mail: smarche@clemson.edu [INAF—Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, Via U. La Malfa 153, I-90146 Palermo (Italy)

    2017-02-10

    We present the combined Chandra and Swift -BAT spectral analysis of seven Seyfert 2 galaxies selected from the Swift -BAT 100 month catalog. We selected nearby ( z ≤ 0.03) sources lacking a ROSAT counterpart that never previously been observed with Chandra in the 0.3–10 keV energy range, and targeted these objects with 10 ks Chandra ACIS-S observations. The X-ray spectral fitting over the 0.3–150 keV energy range allows us to determine that all the objects are significantly obscured, with N{sub H} ≥ 10{sup 23} cm{sup −2} at a >99% confidence level. Moreover, one to three sources are candidate Compton-thick Active Galactic Nuclei (CT-AGNs; i.e., N{sub H}≥10{sup 24} cm{sup −2}). We also test the recent spectral curvature method developed by Koss et al. to find candidate CT-AGNs, finding a good agreement between our results and their predictions. Because the selection criteria we adopted were effective in detecting highly obscured AGNs, further observations of these and other Seyfert 2 galaxies selected from the Swift -BAT 100 month catalog will allow us to create a statistically significant sample of highly obscured AGNs, therefore providing a better understanding of the physics of the obscuration processes.

  19. Extracting chemical information from high-resolution Kβ X-ray emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limandri, S.; Robledo, J.; Tirao, G.

    2018-06-01

    High-resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy allows studying the chemical environment of a wide variety of materials. Chemical information can be obtained by fitting the X-ray spectra and observing the behavior of some spectral features. Spectral changes can also be quantified by means of statistical parameters calculated by considering the spectrum as a probability distribution. Another possibility is to perform statistical multivariate analysis, such as principal component analysis. In this work the performance of these procedures for extracting chemical information in X-ray emission spectroscopy spectra for mixtures of Mn2+ and Mn4+ oxides are studied. A detail analysis of the parameters obtained, as well as the associated uncertainties is shown. The methodologies are also applied for Mn oxidation state characterization of double perovskite oxides Ba1+xLa1-xMnSbO6 (with 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.7). The results show that statistical parameters and multivariate analysis are the most suitable for the analysis of this kind of spectra.

  20. Saturated multikilovolt x-ray amplification with Xe clusters: single-pulse observation of Xe(L) spectral hole burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisov, Alex B; Davis, Jack; Song, Xiangyang; Koshman, Yevgeniya; Dai Yang; Boyer, Keith; Rhodes, Charles K

    2003-01-01

    Single-pulse measurements of spectral hole burning of Xe(L) 3d → 2p hollow atom transition arrays observed from a self-trapped plasma channel provide new information on the dynamics of saturated amplification in the λ ∼ 2.8-2.9 A region. The spectral hole burning on transitions in the Xe 34+ and Xe 35+ arrays reaches full suppression of the spontaneous emission and presents a corresponding width Δ h-bar ω x ∼ = 60 eV, a value adequate for efficient amplification of multikilovolt x-ray pulses down to a limiting length τ x ∼ 30 as. The depth of the suppression at 2.86 A indicates that the gain-to-loss ratio is ≥10. An independent determination of the x-ray pulse energy from damage produced on the surface of a Ti foil in the far field of the source gives a pulse energy of 20-30 μJ, a range that correlates well with the observation of the spectral hole burning and indicates an overall extraction efficiency of ∼10%. (letter to the editor)

  1. Correction for interelement effect in X-Ray fluorescence analysis of trace elements in geological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Behay, A.Z.; Attawiya, M.Y.; Khattab, F.M.

    1984-01-01

    In a trial to obtain accurate results from X-ray fluorescence technique for the analysis of trace elements in geological materials, two corrections were used for the obtained data, namely, correction for the observed x-ray intensities for absorption and/or enhancement effects due to the presence of other elements in the system and correction for spectral deconvolution to account for the overlapping lines. Significant improvement in the precision and accuracy was obtained and evaluated

  2. Canonical correlation between the gamma and X-ray data of Swift GRBs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balazs, L. G.; Horvath, I.; Meszaros, P.; Tusnady, G.; Veres, P.

    2009-01-01

    We used the canonical correlation analysis of the multivariate statistics to study the interrelation between the gamma (Fluence, 1 sec Peakflux, duration) and X-ray (early X flux, 24 hours X flux, X decay index, X spectral index, X HI column density) data. We computed the canonical correlations and variables showing that there is a significant interrelation between the gamma and X-ray data. Using the canonical variables resulted in the analysis we computed their correlations (canonical loadings) with the original ones. The canonical loadings revealed that the gamma-ray fluence and the early X-ray flux give the strongest contribution to the correlation in contrast to the X-ray decay index and spectral index. An interesting new result appears to be the strong contribution of the HI column density to the correlation. Accepting the collapsar model of long GRBs this effect may be interpreted as an indication for the ejection of an HI envelope by the progenitor in the course of producing the GRB.

  3. Observation of hohlraum-wall motion with spectrally selective x-ray imaging at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumi, N., E-mail: izumi2@llnl.gov; Meezan, N. B.; Divol, L.; Hall, G. N.; Barrios, M. A.; Jones, O.; Landen, O. L.; Kroll, J. J.; Vonhof, S. A.; Nikroo, A.; Bailey, C. G.; Hardy, C. M.; Ehrlich, R. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Hinkel, D. E.; Moody, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Jaquez, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 9212 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The high fuel capsule compression required for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion requires careful control of the X-ray drive symmetry throughout the laser pulse. When the outer cone beams strike the hohlraum wall, the plasma ablated off the hohlraum wall expands into the hohlraum and can alter both the outer and inner cone beam propagations and hence the X-ray drive symmetry especially at the final stage of the drive pulse. To quantitatively understand the wall motion, we developed a new experimental technique which visualizes the expansion and stagnation of the hohlraum wall plasma. Details of the experiment and the technique of spectrally selective x-ray imaging are discussed.

  4. Eliminating the non-Gaussian spectral response of X-ray absorbers for transition-edge sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Daikang; Divan, Ralu; Gades, Lisa M.; Kenesei, Peter; Madden, Timothy J.; Miceli, Antonino; Park, Jun-Sang; Patel, Umeshkumar M.; Quaranta, Orlando; Sharma, Hemant; Bennett, Douglas A.; Doriese, William B.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Gard, Johnathon D.; Hays-Wehle, James P.; Morgan, Kelsey M.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Swetz, Daniel S.; Ullom, Joel N.

    2017-11-01

    Transition-edge sensors (TESs) as microcalorimeters for high-energy-resolution X-ray spectroscopy are often fabricated with an absorber made of materials with high Z (for X-ray stopping power) and low heat capacity (for high resolving power). Bismuth represents one of the most compelling options. TESs with evaporated bismuth absorbers have shown spectra with undesirable and unexplained low-energy tails. We have developed TESs with electroplated bismuth absorbers over a gold layer that are not afflicted by this problem and that retain the other positive aspects of this material. To better understand these phenomena, we have studied a series of TESs with gold, gold/evaporated bismuth, and gold/electroplated bismuth absorbers, fabricated on the same die with identical thermal coupling. We show that the bismuth morphology is linked to the spectral response of X-ray TES microcalorimeters.

  5. Rapid spectral and flux time variations in a solar burst observed at various dm-mm wavelengths and at hard x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zodivaz, A.M.; Kaufmann, P.; Correia, E.; Costa, J.E.R.; Takakura, T.; Cliver, E.W.; Tapping, K.F.; Air Force Geophysics Lab., Hanscom AFB, MA; National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario)

    1986-01-01

    A solar burst was observed with high sensitivity and time resolution at cm-mm wavelengths by two different radio observatories (Itapetinga and Algonquin), with high spectral time resolution at dm-mm wavelengths by patrol instruments (Sagamore Hill), and at hard x rays (HXM Hinotori). At the onset of the major burst time structure there was a rapid rise in the spectral turnover frequency (from 5 to 15 GHz), in about 10s, coincident to a reduction of the spectral index in the optically thin part of the spectrum. The burst maxima were not time coincident at the optically thin radio frequencies and at the different hard x ray energy ranges. The profiles at higher radio frequencies exhibited better time coincidence to the high energy x rays. The hardest x ray spectrum (-3) coincided with peak radio emission at the higher frequency (44 GHz). The event appeared to be built up by a first major injection of softer particles followed by other injections of harder particles. Ultrafast time structures were identified as superimposed on the burst emission at the cm-mm high sensitivity data at x rays, with predominant repetition rates ranging from 2.0 to 3.5 Hz

  6. X-ray diffraction patterns and diffracted intensity of Kα spectral lines of He-like ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Arun; Khatri, Indu; Singh, A. K.; Sharma, Rinku; Mohan, Man

    2017-09-01

    In the present paper, we have calculated fine-structure energy levels related to the configurations 1s2s, 1s2p, 1s3s and 1s3p by employing GRASP2K code. We have also computed radiative data for transitions from 1s2p 1 P1o, 1s2p 3 P2o, 1s2p 3 P1o and 1s2s 3S1 to the ground state 1s2. We have made comparisons of our presented energy levels and transition wavelengths with available results compiled by NIST and good agreement is achieved. We have also provided X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of Kα spectral lines, namely w, x, y and z of Cu XXVIII, Kr XXXV and Mo with diffraction angle and maximum diffracted intensity which is not published elsewhere in the literature. We believe that our presented results may be beneficial in determination of the order parameter, X-ray crystallography, solid-state drug analysis, forensic science, geological and medical applications.

  7. X-Ray Spectral Diagnostics of Gamma-Ray Burst Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paerels; Kuulkers; Heise; Liedahl

    2000-05-20

    Recently, detection of discrete features in the X-ray afterglow spectra of GRB 970508 and GRB 970828 was reported. The most natural interpretation of these features is that they are redshifted Fe K emission complexes. The identification of the line emission mechanism has drastic implications for the inferred mass of radiating material and hence the nature of the burst site. X-ray spectroscopy provides a direct observational constraint on these properties of gamma-ray bursters. We briefly discuss how these constraints arise in the context of an application to the spectrum of GRB 970508.

  8. The Prompt-afterglow Connection in Gamma-ray Bursts: a Comprehensive Statistical Analysis of Swift X-ray Light-curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margutti, R.; Zaninoni, E.; Bernardini, M. G.; Chincarini, G.; Pasotti, F.; Guidorzi, C.; Angelini, Lorella; Burrows, D. N.; Capalbi, M.; Evans, P. A.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present a comprehensive statistical analysis of Swift X-ray light-curves of Gamma- Ray Bursts (GRBs) collecting data from more than 650 GRBs discovered by Swift and other facilities. The unprecedented sample size allows us to constrain the rest-frame X-ray properties of GRBs from a statistical perspective, with particular reference to intrinsic time scales and the energetics of the different light-curve phases in a common rest-frame 0.3-30 keV energy band. Temporal variability episodes are also studied and their properties constrained. Two fundamental questions drive this effort: i) Does the X-ray emission retain any kind of "memory" of the prompt ?-ray phase? ii) Where is the dividing line between long and short GRB X-ray properties? We show that short GRBs decay faster, are less luminous and less energetic than long GRBs in the X-rays, but are interestingly characterized by similar intrinsic absorption. We furthermore reveal the existence of a number of statistically significant relations that link the X-ray to prompt ?-ray parameters in long GRBs; short GRBs are outliers of the majority of these 2-parameter relations. However and more importantly, we report on the existence of a universal 3-parameter scaling that links the X-ray and the ?-ray energy to the prompt spectral peak energy of both long and short GRBs: E(sub X,iso)? E(sup 1.00+/-0.06)(sub ?,iso) /E(sup 0.60+/-0.10)(sub pk).

  9. A low power x-ray tube for use in energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataria, S.K.; Govil, Rekha; Lal, M.

    1980-01-01

    A low power X-ray tube with thin molybdenum transmission target for use in energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ENDXRF) element analysis has been indigenously built, along with its power supply. The X-ray tube has been in operation since August 1979, and it has been operated upto maximum target voltage of 35 KV and tube current upto 200 μA which is more than sufficient for trace element analysis. This X-ray tube has been used alongwith the indigenously built Si(Li) detector X-ray spectrometer with an energy resolution of 200 eV at 5.9 Kev MnKsub(α) X-ray peak for ENDXRF analysis. A simple procedure of calibration has been developed for thin samples based on the cellulose diluted, thin multielement standard pellets. Analytical sensitivities of the order of a few p.p.m. have been obtained with the experimental setup for elements with 20 < = Z < = 38 and 60 < = Z < = 90. A number of X-ray spectra for samples of environmental, biological, agricultural, industrial and metallurgical interest are presented to demonstrate the salient features of the experimental sep up. (auth.)

  10. The color of X-rays: Spectral X-ray computed tomography using energy sensitive pixel detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schioppa, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Energy sensitive X-ray imaging detectors are produced by connecting a semiconductor sensor to a spectroscopic pixel readout chip. In this thesis, the applicability of such detectors to X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is studied. A prototype Medipix based silicon detector is calibrated using X-ray

  11. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of 9 white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that was previously detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The 9 new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. Swift/XRT detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component, which we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component, which likely arises in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e. a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the alpha/beta/gamma classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new sigma classification for sources with

  12. Multilayer optics for x-ray analysis: design - fabrication - application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietsch, R.; Holz, Th.; Bruegemann, L.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The use of multilayer optics induced a decisive extension of opportunities in laboratory based X-ray analysis. With the growing number of different applications, more and more dedicated X-ray optics are required, optimized for the spectral range they are intended to be used for. Both the characteristic of the used X-ray source and the design of the multilayer optics finally define the performance of the conditioned incident beam for the application. In any case, qualified spacer and absorber materials have to be selected for the deposition of the multilayer in respect to the designated X-ray wavelength. X-ray optical devices based on uniform multilayers have the advantage of a wide acceptance angle but show chromatic aberrations. This effect can be avoided by synthesizing a multilayer with a lateral thickness gradient. The gradient ensures that any beam of a certain wavelength emitted from an infinite narrow X-ray source impinging the multilayer optics fulfills the Bragg condition. Three different types of curvature of laterally graded multilayer mirrors are used for X-ray analysis experiments: parabolic, elliptic and planar, which result in parallel, focusing and divergent beam conditions, respectively. Furthermore, the X-ray beam characteristics: intensity, monochromasy, divergence, beam width and brilliance can be additionally conditioned by combining one multilayer optics with either a different optic and/or with a crystal monochromator. The deposition of nanometer-multilayers, used as X-ray optical components, result in extraordinary requirements of the deposition process concerning precision, reproducibility and long term stability. Across a stack of more than 150 individual layers with thicknesses in the range between 1 to 10 nm, a variation of single layer thickness considerably lower than σ D = 0.1 nm and an interface roughness below σ R = 0.25 nm have to be achieved. Thickness homogeneity Δd/d -8 have to be guaranteed across macroscopic

  13. Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenneth Moya; Ian McKennaa; Thomas Keenana; Michael Cuneob

    2007-01-01

    Wired array studies are being conducted at the SNL Z accelerator to maximize the x-ray generation for inertial confinement fusion targets and high energy density physics experiments. An integral component of these studies is the characterization of the time-resolved spectral content of the x-rays. Due to potential spatial anisotropy in the emitted radiation, it is also critical to diagnose the time-evolved spectral content in a space-resolved manner. To accomplish these two measurement goals, we developed an x-ray spectrometer using a set of high-speed detectors (silicon PIN diodes) with a collimated field-of-view that converged on a 1-cm-diameter spot at the pinch axis. Spectral discrimination is achieved by placing high Z absorbers in front of these detectors. We built two spectrometers to permit simultaneous different angular views of the emitted radiation. Spectral data have been acquired from recent Z shots for the radial and polar views. UNSPEC1 has been adapted to analyze and unfold the measured data to reconstruct the x-ray spectrum. The unfold operator code, UFO2, is being adapted for a more comprehensive spectral unfolding treatment

  14. X-ray Binaries in the Central Region of M31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudolyubov, Sergey P.; Priedhorsky, W. C.; Cordova, F. A.

    2006-09-01

    We present the results of the systematic survey of X-ray sources in the central region of M31 using the data of XMM-Newton observations. The spectral properties and variability of 124 bright X-ray sources were studied in detail. We found that more than 80% of sources observed in two or more observations show significant variability on the time scales of days to years. At least 50% of the sources in our sample are spectrally variable. The fraction of variable sources in our survey is much higher than previously reported from Chandra survey of M31, and is remarkably close to the fraction of variable sources found in M31 globular cluster X-ray source population. We present spectral distribution of M31 X-ray sources, based on the spectral fitting with a power law model. The distribution of spectral photon index has two main peaks at 1.8 and 2.3, and shows clear evolution with source luminosity. Based on the similarity of the properties of M31 X-ray sources and their Galactic counterparts, we expect most of X-ray sources in our sample to be accreting binary systems with neutron star and black hole primaries. Combining the results of X-ray analysis (X-ray spectra, hardness-luminosity diagrams and variability) with available data at other wavelengths, we explore the possibility of distinguishing between bright neutron star and black hole binary systems, and identify 7% and 25% of sources in our sample as a probable black hole and neutron star candidates. Finally, we compare the M31 X-ray source population to the source populations of normal galaxies of different morphological type. Support for this work was provided through NASA Grant NAG5-12390. Part of this work was done during a summer workshop ``Revealing Black Holes'' at the Aspen Center for Physics, S. T. is grateful to the Center for their hospitality.

  15. Automated x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    A fully automated x-ray fluorescence analytical system is described. The hardware is based on a Philips PW1220 sequential x-ray spectrometer. Software for on-line analysis of a wide range of sample types has been developed for the Hewlett-Packard 9810A programmable calculator. Routines to test the system hardware are also described. (Author)

  16. Proton induced X-ray emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Rashiduzzman

    1976-09-01

    The developments in proton induced X-ray emission analysis are reviewed. Techniques for analyzing thick and thin samples of different origin are described. Discussions on the application of proton induced X-ray emission analysis in different fields, comparison of the sensitivity of this method with other analytical techniques, its limitations and possible improvements are presented

  17. Progress Towards Improved Analysis of TES X-ray Data Using Principal Component Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, S. E.; Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Fixsen, D. J.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Lee, S.-J.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The traditional method of applying a digital optimal filter to measure X-ray pulses from transition-edge sensor (TES) devices does not achieve the best energy resolution when the signals have a highly non-linear response to energy, or the noise is non-stationary during the pulse. We present an implementation of a method to analyze X-ray data from TESs, which is based upon principal component analysis (PCA). Our method separates the X-ray signal pulse into orthogonal components that have the largest variance. We typically recover pulse height, arrival time, differences in pulse shape, and the variation of pulse height with detector temperature. These components can then be combined to form a representation of pulse energy. An added value of this method is that by reporting information on more descriptive parameters (as opposed to a single number representing energy), we generate a much more complete picture of the pulse received. Here we report on progress in developing this technique for future implementation on X-ray telescopes. We used an 55Fe source to characterize Mo/Au TESs. On the same dataset, the PCA method recovers a spectral resolution that is better by a factor of two than achievable with digital optimal filters.

  18. A spectral X-ray CT simulation study for quantitative determination of iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ting; Kaftandjian, Valérie; Duvauchelle, Philippe; Zhu, Yuemin

    2018-06-01

    Iron is an essential element in the human body and disorders in iron such as iron deficiency or overload can cause serious diseases. This paper aims to explore the ability of spectral X-ray CT to quantitatively separate iron from calcium and potassium and to investigate the influence of different acquisition parameters on material decomposition performance. We simulated spectral X-ray CT imaging of a PMMA phantom filled with iron, calcium, and potassium solutions at various concentrations (15-200 mg/cc). Different acquisition parameters were considered, such as the number of energy bins (6, 10, 15, 20, 30, 60) and exposure factor per projection (0.025, 0.1, 1, 10, 100 mA s). Based on the simulation data, we investigated the performance of two regularized material decomposition approaches: projection domain method and image domain method. It was found that the former method discriminated iron from calcium, potassium and water in all cases and tended to benefit from lower number of energy bins for lower exposure factor acquisition. The latter method succeeded in iron determination only when the number of energy bins equals 60, and in this case, the contrast-to-noise ratios of the decomposed iron images are higher than those obtained using the projection domain method. The results demonstrate that both methods are able to discriminate and quantify iron from calcium, potassium and water under certain conditions. Their performances vary with the acquisition parameters of spectral CT. One can use one method or the other to benefit better performance according to the data available.

  19. X-Ray analysis and methods for nondestructive control (On the 100-anniversary of X-ray foundation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosnin, F.R.

    1995-01-01

    Brief consideration is given to the history of X-ray discovery, formation of domestic X-ray industry. Principles of operation and potentialities of X-ray diffraction analysis, gammagraphy, radioscopy, radiometric analysis are described briefly. Domestic and foreign scientists, institutes and companies who contributed much to development of methods for nondestructive control are listed

  20. High-spatial resolution and high-spectral resolution detector for use in the measurement of solar flare hard x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, U.D.; Orwig, L.E.

    1988-01-01

    In the areas of high spatial resolution, the evaluation of a hard X-ray detector with 65 micron spatial resolution for operation in the energy range from 30 to 400 keV is proposed. The basic detector is a thick large-area scintillator faceplate, composed of a matrix of high-density scintillating glass fibers, attached to a proximity type image intensifier tube with a resistive-anode digital readout system. Such a detector, combined with a coded-aperture mask, would be ideal for use as a modest-sized hard X-ray imaging instrument up to X-ray energies as high as several hundred keV. As an integral part of this study it was also proposed that several techniques be critically evaluated for X-ray image coding which could be used with this detector. In the area of high spectral resolution, it is proposed to evaluate two different types of detectors for use as X-ray spectrometers for solar flares: planar silicon detectors and high-purity germanium detectors (HPGe). Instruments utilizing these high-spatial-resolution detectors for hard X-ray imaging measurements from 30 to 400 keV and high-spectral-resolution detectors for measurements over a similar energy range would be ideally suited for making crucial solar flare observations during the upcoming maximum in the solar cycle

  1. Detection of X-ray spectral state transitions in mini-outbursts of black hole transient GRS 1739-278

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhen; Yu, Wenfei

    2017-10-01

    We report the detection of the state transitions and hysteresis effect in the two mini-outbursts of the black hole (BH) transient GRS 1739-278 following its 2014 major outburst. The X-ray spectral evolutions in these two mini-outbursts are similar to the major outburst in spite of their peak luminosities and the outburst durations are one order of magnitude lower. We found L_hard{-to-soft} and Lpeak,soft of the mini-outbursts also follow the correlation previously found in other X-ray binaries. L_hard{-to-soft} of the mini-outbursts is still higher than that of the persistent BH binary Cyg X-1, which supports that there is a link between the maximum luminosity a source can reach in the hard state and the corresponding non-stationary accretion represented by substantial rate of change in the mass accretion rate during flares/outbursts. The detected luminosity range of these two mini-outbursts is roughly in 3.5 × 10-5 to 0.015 (D/7.5 kpc)2(M/8M⊙) LEdd. The X-ray spectra of other BH transients at such low luminosities are usually dominated by a power-law component, and an anti-correlation is observed between the photon index and the X-ray luminosity below 1 per cent LEdd. So, the detection of X-ray spectral state transitions indicates that the accretion flow evolution in these two mini-outbursts of GRS 1739-278 are different from other BH systems at such low-luminosity regime.

  2. Particulate characterization by PIXE multivariate spectral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antolak, Arlyn J.; Morse, Daniel H.; Grant, Patrick G.; Kotula, Paul G.; Doyle, Barney L.; Richardson, Charles B.

    2007-01-01

    Obtaining particulate compositional maps from scanned PIXE (proton-induced X-ray emission) measurements is extremely difficult due to the complexity of analyzing spectroscopic data collected with low signal-to-noise at each scan point (pixel). Multivariate spectral analysis has the potential to analyze such data sets by reducing the PIXE data to a limited number of physically realizable and easily interpretable components (that include both spectral and image information). We have adapted the AXSIA (automated expert spectral image analysis) program, originally developed by Sandia National Laboratories to quantify electron-excited X-ray spectroscopy data, for this purpose. Samples consisting of particulates with known compositions and sizes were loaded onto Mylar and paper filter substrates and analyzed by scanned micro-PIXE. The data sets were processed by AXSIA and the associated principal component spectral data were quantified by converting the weighting images into concentration maps. The results indicate automated, nonbiased, multivariate statistical analysis is useful for converting very large amounts of data into a smaller, more manageable number of compositional components needed for locating individual particles-of-interest on large area collection media

  3. A fully Bayesian method for jointly fitting instrumental calibration and X-ray spectral models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Jin; Yu, Yaming; Van Dyk, David A.; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Drake, Jeremy; Ratzlaff, Pete; Connors, Alanna; Meng, Xiao-Li

    2014-01-01

    Owing to a lack of robust principled methods, systematic instrumental uncertainties have generally been ignored in astrophysical data analysis despite wide recognition of the importance of including them. Ignoring calibration uncertainty can cause bias in the estimation of source model parameters and can lead to underestimation of the variance of these estimates. We previously introduced a pragmatic Bayesian method to address this problem. The method is 'pragmatic' in that it introduced an ad hoc technique that simplified computation by neglecting the potential information in the data for narrowing the uncertainty for the calibration product. Following that work, we use a principal component analysis to efficiently represent the uncertainty of the effective area of an X-ray (or γ-ray) telescope. Here, however, we leverage this representation to enable a principled, fully Bayesian method that coherently accounts for the calibration uncertainty in high-energy spectral analysis. In this setting, the method is compared with standard analysis techniques and the pragmatic Bayesian method. The advantage of the fully Bayesian method is that it allows the data to provide information not only for estimation of the source parameters but also for the calibration product—here the effective area, conditional on the adopted spectral model. In this way, it can yield more accurate and efficient estimates of the source parameters along with valid estimates of their uncertainty. Provided that the source spectrum can be accurately described by a parameterized model, this method allows rigorous inference about the effective area by quantifying which possible curves are most consistent with the data.

  4. X-ray system analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    An X-ray system tester for measuring anode voltage, cathode voltage, anode current, filament current and line voltage in an X-ray system has a selector which couples one of these analog signals or one of a plurality of processing control signals entered by an operator from a control panel to a digitizing section selectively in accordance with control signals provided to the selector by a computing section. The digitizing section converts the selected signal into a train of pulses having a frequency proportional to the value of the selected signal. These pulses are counted, the counts being used by the computing section to determine the value of the selected signal. This computed value is stored in a computing memory section of the computing section. The computing section is adapted to store a plurality of the sets of signals produced during a corresponding sequence of operational intervals of the X-ray system and determines a measure of the deviation of any selected one of the stored electrical signals over the sequence of operating intervals. Each signal produced during the sequential operational intervals can be recalled to aid analysis of the operation of the X-ray system. (author)

  5. XIMPOL: a new x-ray polarimetry observation-simulation and analysis framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omodei, Nicola; Baldini, Luca; Pesce-Rollins, Melissa; di Lalla, Niccolò

    2017-08-01

    We present a new simulation framework, XIMPOL, based on the python programming language and the Scipy stack, specifically developed for X-ray polarimetric applications. XIMPOL is not tied to any specific mission or instrument design and is meant to produce fast and yet realistic observation-simulations, given as basic inputs: (i) an arbitrary source model including morphological, temporal, spectral and polarimetric information, and (ii) the response functions of the detector under study, i.e., the effective area, the energy dispersion, the point-spread function and the modulation factor. The format of the response files is OGIP compliant, and the framework has the capability of producing output files that can be directly fed into the standard visualization and analysis tools used by the X-ray community, including XSPEC which make it a useful tool not only for simulating physical systems, but also to develop and test end-to-end analysis chains.

  6. Spectral and temporal properties of the X-ray pulsar SMC X-1 at hard X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, M.; Gruber, D. E.; Kendziorra, E .; Kretschmar, P.; Maisack, M.; Mony, B.; Staubert, R.; Doebereiner, S.; Englhauser, J.; Pietsch, W.

    1993-01-01

    The binary X-ray pulsar SMC X- 1 has been observed at hard X-rays with the High Energy X-Ray Experiment (HEXE) on nine occasions between Nov. 1987 and March 1989. A thin thermal bremsstrahlung fit to the phase averaged spectrum yields a plasma temperature (14.4 +/- 1.3) keV and a luminosity above (1.1 +/- 0.1) x 10 exp 38 erg/s in the 20-80 keV band. Pulse period values have been established for three observations, confirming the remarkably stable spin-up trend of SMC X-1. In one of the three observations the pulse profile was seen to deviate from a dominant double pulsation, while at the same time the pulsed fraction was unusually large. For one observation we determined for the first time the pulsed fraction in narrow energy bands. It increases with photon energy from about 20 percent up to over 60 percent in the energy range from 20 to 80 keV.

  7. Calculation of characteristics of X-ray devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orobinskyi A. N.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Actuality of this work is related to human radiation safety during tuning and regulation of X-ray devices in the process of their development and production. The more precise the calculations for the device are, the less time is required for its tuning and regulation, and thus people are less exposed to radiation. When developing an X-ray device, it is necessary to choose an X-ray tube and filters taking into account the application domain of the device. In order to do this, one should know anode voltage, X-ray tube anode current, material and thickness of filters, i.e. to calculate these characteristics at the set quality of X-ray radiation. The known published studies do not give any solution to this problem. The scientific novelty of this work is that it establishes the interdependence between main characteristics of the X-ray device: the function of the device defines the quality of X-ray radiation (mean photon energy and air kerma power; mean photon energy depends on the X-ray anode tube voltage and spectral resolution; air kerma power depends on anode tube voltage, current of X-ray tube anode, spectral resolution, thicknesses of the filters and their materials; spectral resolution depends on thicknesses of filters and their materials; thickness of filters depends on the material of the filter (the linear coefficient of weakening of X-ray radiation. Knowledge of interdependence of basic characteristics of the X-ray devices allowes developing simple algorithm for their calculation at the values of homogeneity coefficient from 0,8 to 1, which makes it possible to choose an X-ray tube and filters with the purpose of obtaining X-ray radiation of the set quality.

  8. Spectral structure of the X-ray stimulated phosphorescence of monocrystalline ZnSe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degoda, V. Ya., E-mail: degoda@univ.kiev.ua [Taras Shevchenko Kyiv National University, Physics Department, 03680 Kyiv (Ukraine); Pavlova, N. Yu., E-mail: pavlovan7@gmail.com [The National Pedagogical Dragomanov University, Pyrogova 9, 01601 Kyiv (Ukraine); Podust, G.P., E-mail: vasylenkog379@gmail.com [Taras Shevchenko Kyiv National University, Physics Department, 03680 Kyiv (Ukraine); Sofiienko, A.O., E-mail: asofienko@gmail.com [University of Bergen, Allegaten 55, PO Box 7803, 5020 Bergen (Norway)

    2015-05-15

    This work presents the extensive experimental studies of the X-ray stimulated luminescence, conductivity, phosphorescence and electric current relaxation, and the thermally stimulated luminescence and conductivity of monocrystalline ZnSe. It was found that the luminescence emission band with a maximum at 635 nm is a combination of at least three emission bands and that the appropriate recombination centres implement both electronic and hole recombination mechanisms. We propose an energy model of the traps and recombination centres in monocrystalline ZnSe and show that the majority of the generated free electrons and holes recombine in the luminescence centres with an estimated probability of 94.3% and that only a small fraction (5.7%) of generated charge carriers are accumulated in traps during the X-ray excitation of the ZnSe sample. - Highlights: • ZnSe has intensive X-ray luminescence and phosphorescence in the spectral range from 600 nm to 1000 nm. • We measured the phosphorescence of ZnSe for different wavelengths of 591 nm, 635 nm and 679 nm. • The dominant emission band of ZnSe with a maximum at 635 nm is a combination of at least three emission bands. • We propose and verify an energy model of the traps and recombination centres in monocrystalline ZnSe.

  9. Sample analysis using gamma ray induced fluorescent X-ray emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sood, B S; Allawadhi, K L; Gandhi, R; Batra, O P; Singh, N [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Nuclear Science Labs.

    1983-01-01

    A non-destructive method for the analysis of materials using gamma ray-induced fluorescent x-ray emission has been developed. In this method, special preparation of very thin samples in which the absorption of the incident gamma rays and the emitted fluorescent x-rays is negligible, is not needed, and the absorption correction is determined experimentally. A suitable choice of the incident gamma ray energies is made to minimise enhancement effects through selective photoionization of the elements in the sample. The method is applied to the analysis of a typical sample of the soldering material using 279 keV and 59.5 keV gamma rays from /sup 203/Hg and /sup 241/Am radioactive sources respectively. The results of the analysis are found to agree well with those obtained from the chemical analysis.

  10. Application of X-ray spectroscopy in nondestructive photon activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weise, H.-P.; Segebade, Chr.

    1977-01-01

    The use of X-ray spectroscopy for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of samples activated by 30 MeV bremsstrahlung from an electron linear accelerator. Detection limits are calculated from the measured X-ray spectra and compared with those for γ-ray spectroscopy. In general, the detection limits for γ-ray and X-ray spectroscopy are comparable. Higher sensitivities for X-ray spectroscopy are observed when only low intensity γ-rays are emitted by the activation products. X-ray spectroscopy should be applied in three cases: (a) low γ-ray emission probability, (b) extremely complicated γ-ray spectrum, (c) overlapping of γ-ray lines from different elements. γ-ray spectroscopy should be preferred for the analysis of light elements for two reasons: very strong absorption of low energy X-rays (low Z) within the sample, low X-ray emission probability for the activation products of light elements. Therefore no attempt was made to use X-ray spectroscopy for the analysis of elements below Ti. Some practical applications of X-ray spectroscopy in nondestructive multielement analysis are quoted. (T.G.)

  11. New Spectral Model for Constraining Torus Covering Factors from Broadband X-Ray Spectra of Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloković, M.; Brightman, M.; Harrison, F. A.; Comastri, A.; Ricci, C.; Buchner, J.; Gandhi, P.; Farrah, D.; Stern, D.

    2018-02-01

    The basic unified model of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) invokes an anisotropic obscuring structure, usually referred to as a torus, to explain AGN obscuration as an angle-dependent effect. We present a new grid of X-ray spectral templates based on radiative transfer calculations in neutral gas in an approximately toroidal geometry, appropriate for CCD-resolution X-ray spectra (FWHM ≥ 130 eV). Fitting the templates to broadband X-ray spectra of AGNs provides constraints on two important geometrical parameters of the gas distribution around the supermassive black hole: the average column density and the covering factor. Compared to the currently available spectral templates, our model is more flexible, and capable of providing constraints on the main torus parameters in a wider range of AGNs. We demonstrate the application of this model using hard X-ray spectra from NuSTAR (3–79 keV) for four AGNs covering a variety of classifications: 3C 390.3, NGC 2110, IC 5063, and NGC 7582. This small set of examples was chosen to illustrate the range of possible torus configurations, from disk-like to sphere-like geometries with column densities below, as well as above, the Compton-thick threshold. This diversity of torus properties challenges the simple assumption of a standard geometrically and optically thick toroidal structure commonly invoked in the basic form of the unified model of AGNs. Finding broad consistency between our constraints and those from infrared modeling, we discuss how the approach from the X-ray band complements similar measurements of AGN structures at other wavelengths.

  12. Streaked, x-ray-transmission-grating spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceglio, N.M.; Roth, M.; Hawryluk, A.M.

    1981-08-01

    A free standing x-ray transmission grating has been coupled with a soft x-ray streak camera to produce a time resolved x-ray spectrometer. The instrument has a temporal resolution of approx. 20 psec, is capable of covering a broad spectral range, 2 to 120 A, has high sensitivity, and is simple to use requiring no complex alignment procedure. In recent laser fusion experiments the spectrometer successfully recorded time resolved spectra over the range 10 to 120 A with a spectral resolving power, lambda/Δlambda of 4 to 50, limited primarily by source size and collimation effects

  13. Theoretical concepts of X-ray nanoscale analysis theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Benediktovitch, Andrei; Ulyanenkov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a concise survey of modern theoretical concepts of X-ray materials analysis. The principle features of the book are: basics of X-ray scattering, interaction between X-rays and matter and new theoretical concepts of X-ray scattering. The various X-ray techniques are considered in detail: high-resolution X-ray diffraction, X-ray reflectivity, grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray residual stress analysis. All the theoretical methods presented use the unified physical approach. This makes the book especially useful for readers learning and performing data ana

  14. X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry. II. Determination of Uranium in ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermudez Polonio, J.; Crus Castillo, F. de la; Fernandez Cellini, R.

    1961-01-01

    A method of analysis of uranium in ores by X-ray spectrometry was developed, using the internal standard technique. Strontium was found to be the most suitable internal standard for general use. A Norelco Philips X-ray fluorescent spectrometer was used in this work, equipped with a lithium fluoride crystal acting as a diffraction grating analyzer. The intensity of the uranium-L α 1 spectral line is calculated and related to corresponding strontium-K α spectral line, both detected with a Scintillation Counter. (Author) 31 refs

  15. Spectral and imaging characterization of tabletop X-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, J.; Osterheld, A.L.; Moon, S.J.; Fournier, K.B.; Nilsen, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Faenov, A.Ya.; Pikuz, T.A.; Skobelev, I.Yu.; Magunov, A.I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); MISDC of VNIIFTRI, Mendeleevo (Russian Federation); Shlyaptsev, V.N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). DAS

    2001-07-01

    We have performed L-shell spectroscopy and one-dimensional (1-D) imaging of a line focus plasma from a laser-heated Fe polished slab using the tabletop COMET laser system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These plasmas are used to generate a Ne-like Fe transient gain X-ray laser that is recorded simultaneously. A spherically-curved crystal spectrometer gives high resolution X-ray spectra of the n=3-2 and n=4-2 resonance lines with 1-D spatial resolution along the line focus. Spectra are presented for different laser pulse conditions. In addition, a variety of X-ray imaging techniques are described. We discuss imaging results from a double-slit X-ray camera with a spherically-curved crystal spectrometer. We show a high resolution Fe K-{alpha} spectrum from the X-ray laser target that indicates the presence of hot electrons in the X-ray laser plasma. (orig.)

  16. VETA-I x ray test analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissenden, R. J. V.; Chartas, G.; Freeman, M. D.; Hughes, J. P.; Kellogg, E. M.; Podgorski, W. A.; Schwartz, D. A.; Zhao, P.

    1992-01-01

    This interim report presents some definitive results from our analysis of the VETA-I x-ray testing data. It also provides a description of the hardware and software used in the conduct of the VETA-I x-ray test program performed at the MSFC x-ray Calibration Facility (XRCF). These test results also serve to supply data and information to include in the TRW final report required by DPD 692, DR XC04. To provide an authoritative compendium of results, we have taken nine papers as published in the SPIE Symposium, 'Grazing Incidence X-ray/EUV Optics for Astronomy and Projection Lithography' and have reproduced them as the content of this report.

  17. X-ray analysis in the steel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourke, T.; Turner, K.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The steel industry makes extensive use of X-ray analysis at all stages of the steelmaking process. XRF and XRD techniques, together with the associated techniques of electron probe microanalysis and electron microscopy are key tools for exploration and mine site and process development where detailed grade and mineralogical data is required. In production X-ray analysis is used to monitor and control: mine product grade (eg iron ore, coal and other raw materials), steel making production processes (eg iron ore sinter, incoming raw materials), waste products (eg coal watery refuse, slags) and final products (eg paint coatings, customer complaints). The demands put on X-ray analysis by the Steel Industry are severe. Iron ore mining and steelmaking is a continuous process, hence instrumentation has to be robust and reliable. In addition, with ever tightening environmental controls there is an increasing demand for trace heavy element analysis in both raw and waste materials. Copyright (1999) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  18. Design and realization of a hard X-ray prototype imager with spectral selection for the Laser MegaJoule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennetiere, David

    2012-01-01

    In the Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) project context, measurements need to be done by diagnostics in order to achieve ignition. Amongst these diagnostics, some of the X-ray imagers will have to observe hydrodynamics instabilities on the micron balloon surface. X-ray radiography or self-emission imaging are the techniques used to obtain such imaging. None of the existing X-ray imagers designed for LMJ is currently able to record this kind of image. The X-ray imager designed during this thesis will have to achieve a high resolution image at high energy and will have to meet all the requirements subsequent to its use on a large facility like LMJ. We have studied and optimized an already existing diagnostic: EHRXI. We have extended its covered spectral range up to 12 keV. We measured its resolution that is under 5 μm in a 1 mm diameter field of view. This diagnostic has been successfully used on laser experiments in ELFIE 100 TW and OMEGA. After analyzing the performances and weaknesses of EHRXI, we were able to design a LMJ diagnostic prototype: Merssix. This microscope will achieve a resolution under 5 μm in a 500 μm diameter field of view with a covered spectral range up to 22 keV. Merssix has been specifically designed for LMJ and adapted to fit its experimental framework. Its design allows it in particular to be used for radiography in a complex X-ray producing environment. (author) [fr

  19. Use of fast Fourier transform in gamma-ray spectral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tominaga, Shoji; Nayatani, Yoshinobu; Nagata, Shojiro; Sasaki, Takashi; Ueda, Isamu.

    1978-01-01

    In order to simplify the mass data processing in a response matrix method for γ-ray spectral analysis, a method using a Fast Fourier Transform has been devised. The validity of the method has been confirmed by computer simulation for spectra of a NaI detector. First, it is shown that spectral data can be represented by Fourier series with a reduced number of terms. Then the estimation of intensities of γ-ray components is performed by a matrix operation using the compressed data of an observation spectrum and standard spectra in Fourier coefficients. The identification of γ-ray energies is also easy. Several features of the method and a general problem to be solved in relation to a response matrix method are described. (author)

  20. X-ray fluorescence method for trace analysis and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Shinjiro

    2000-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis has a long history as conventional bulk elemental analysis with medium sensitivity. However, with the use of synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence method has become a unique analytical technique which can provide tace elemental information with the spatial resolution. To obtain quantitative information of trace elemental distribution by using the x-ray fluorescence method, theoretical description of x-ray fluorescence yield is described. Moreover, methods and instruments for trace characterization with a scanning x-ray microprobe are described. (author)

  1. Analytical Approximation of Spectrum for Pulse X-ray Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavilov, S; Fofanof, O; Koshkin, G; Udod, V

    2016-01-01

    Among the main characteristics of the pulsed X-ray apparatuses the spectral energy characteristics are the most important ones: the spectral distribution of the photon energy, effective and maximum energy of quanta. Knowing the spectral characteristics of the radiation of pulse sources is very important for the practical use of them in non-destructive testing. We have attempted on the analytical approximation of the pulsed X-ray apparatuses spectra obtained in the different experimental papers. The results of the analytical approximation of energy spectrum for pulse X-ray tube are presented. Obtained formulas are adequate to experimental data and can be used by designing pulsed X-ray apparatuses. (paper)

  2. The Athena X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barret, Didier; Lam Trong, Thien; den Herder, Jan-Willem; Piro, Luigi; Barcons, Xavier; Huovelin, Juhani; Kelley, Richard; Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Paltani, Stéphane; Rauw, Gregor; RoŻanska, Agata; Wilms, Joern; Barbera, Marco; Bozzo, Enrico; Ceballos, Maria Teresa; Charles, Ivan; Decourchelle, Anne; den Hartog, Roland; Duval, Jean-Marc; Fiore, Fabrizio; Gatti, Flavio; Goldwurm, Andrea; Jackson, Brian; Jonker, Peter; Kilbourne, Caroline; Macculi, Claudio; Mendez, Mariano; Molendi, Silvano; Orleanski, Piotr; Pajot, François; Pointecouteau, Etienne; Porter, Frederick; Pratt, Gabriel W.; Prêle, Damien; Ravera, Laurent; Renotte, Etienne; Schaye, Joop; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Valenziano, Luca; Vink, Jacco; Webb, Natalie; Yamasaki, Noriko; Delcelier-Douchin, Françoise; Le Du, Michel; Mesnager, Jean-Michel; Pradines, Alice; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Dadina, Mauro; Finoguenov, Alexis; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Janiuk, Agnieszka; Miller, Jon; Nazé, Yaël; Nicastro, Fabrizio; Sciortino, Salvatore; Torrejon, Jose Miguel; Geoffray, Hervé; Hernandez, Isabelle; Luno, Laure; Peille, Philippe; André, Jérôme; Daniel, Christophe; Etcheverry, Christophe; Gloaguen, Emilie; Hassin, Jérémie; Hervet, Gilles; Maussang, Irwin; Moueza, Jérôme; Paillet, Alexis; Vella, Bruno; Campos Garrido, Gonzalo; Damery, Jean-Charles; Panem, Chantal; Panh, Johan; Bandler, Simon; Biffi, Jean-Marc; Boyce, Kevin; Clénet, Antoine; DiPirro, Michael; Jamotton, Pierre; Lotti, Simone; Schwander, Denis; Smith, Stephen; van Leeuwen, Bert-Joost; van Weers, Henk; Brand, Thorsten; Cobo, Beatriz; Dauser, Thomas; de Plaa, Jelle; Cucchetti, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    The X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) on board the Advanced Telescope for High-ENergy Astrophysics (Athena) will provide spatially resolved high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy from 0.2 to 12 keV, with 5" pixels over a field of view of 5 arc minute equivalent diameter and a spectral resolution of 2.5

  3. Weak Hard X-Ray Emission from Broad Absorption Line Quasars: Evidence for Intrinsic X-Ray Weakness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    We report NuSTAR observations of a sample of six X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. These targets, at z = 0.148-1.223, are among the optically brightest and most luminous BAL quasars known at z 330 times weaker than...... expected for typical quasars. Our results from a pilot NuSTAR study of two low-redshift BAL quasars, a Chandra stacking analysis of a sample of high-redshift BAL quasars, and a NuSTAR spectral analysis of the local BAL quasar Mrk 231 have already suggested the existence of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL...... quasars, i.e., quasars not emitting X-rays at the level expected from their optical/UV emission. The aim of the current program is to extend the search for such extraordinary objects. Three of the six new targets are weakly detected by NuSTAR with ≲ 45 counts in the 3-24 keV band, and the other three...

  4. An efficient synthesis, X-ray and spectral characterization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    -thiazolidin-2,4-dione derivatives containing biphenyl ring system derivatised with the tetrazole (9), 1,2,4-triazoles (16), and 1,3,4- oxadiazole 17, 18. The single crystal X-ray analysis of one of the compounds 9 is also described as part of the.

  5. Stimulated X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy in Transition Metal Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Thomas; Weninger, Clemens; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Zhu, Diling; Mercadier, Laurent; Majety, Vinay P.; Marinelli, Agostino; Lutman, Alberto; Guetg, Marc W.; Decker, Franz-Josef; Boutet, Sébastien; Aquila, Andy; Koglin, Jason; Koralek, Jake; DePonte, Daniel P.; Kern, Jan; Fuller, Franklin D.; Pastor, Ernest; Fransson, Thomas; Zhang, Yu; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Rohringer, Nina; Bergmann, Uwe

    2018-03-01

    We report the observation and analysis of the gain curve of amplified K α x-ray emission from solutions of Mn(II) and Mn(VII) complexes using an x-ray free electron laser to create the 1 s core-hole population inversion. We find spectra at amplification levels extending over 4 orders of magnitude until saturation. We observe bandwidths below the Mn 1 s core-hole lifetime broadening in the onset of the stimulated emission. In the exponential amplification regime the resolution corrected spectral width of ˜1.7 eV FWHM is constant over 3 orders of magnitude, pointing to the buildup of transform limited pulses of ˜1 fs duration. Driving the amplification into saturation leads to broadening and a shift of the line. Importantly, the chemical sensitivity of the stimulated x-ray emission to the Mn oxidation state is preserved at power densities of ˜1020 W /cm2 for the incoming x-ray pulses. Differences in signal sensitivity and spectral information compared to conventional (spontaneous) x-ray emission spectroscopy are discussed. Our findings build a baseline for nonlinear x-ray spectroscopy for a wide range of transition metal complexes in inorganic chemistry, catalysis, and materials science.

  6. Weak hard X-ray emission from broad absorption line quasars: evidence for intrinsic X-ray weakness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Scott, A. E.; Alexander, D. M.; Gandhi, P.; Stern, D.; Teng, S. H.; Arévalo, P.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Farrah, D.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Koss, M.; Ogle, P.; Puccetti, S.; Saez, C.

    2014-01-01

    We report NuSTAR observations of a sample of six X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. These targets, at z = 0.148-1.223, are among the optically brightest and most luminous BAL quasars known at z < 1.3. However, their rest-frame ≈2 keV luminosities are 14 to >330 times weaker than expected for typical quasars. Our results from a pilot NuSTAR study of two low-redshift BAL quasars, a Chandra stacking analysis of a sample of high-redshift BAL quasars, and a NuSTAR spectral analysis of the local BAL quasar Mrk 231 have already suggested the existence of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars, i.e., quasars not emitting X-rays at the level expected from their optical/UV emission. The aim of the current program is to extend the search for such extraordinary objects. Three of the six new targets are weakly detected by NuSTAR with ≲ 45 counts in the 3-24 keV band, and the other three are not detected. The hard X-ray (8-24 keV) weakness observed by NuSTAR requires Compton-thick absorption if these objects have nominal underlying X-ray emission. However, a soft stacked effective photon index (Γ eff ≈ 1.8) for this sample disfavors Compton-thick absorption in general. The uniform hard X-ray weakness observed by NuSTAR for this and the pilot samples selected with <10 keV weakness also suggests that the X-ray weakness is intrinsic in at least some of the targets. We conclude that the NuSTAR observations have likely discovered a significant population (≳ 33%) of intrinsically X-ray weak objects among the BAL quasars with significantly weak <10 keV emission. We suggest that intrinsically X-ray weak quasars might be preferentially observed as BAL quasars.

  7. The ultraviolet to X-ray continua of BL Lac objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, I.M.; Warwick, R.S.; McHardy, I.M.

    1988-01-01

    The results from EXOSAT observations of three X-ray bright BL Lacertae objects, Mrk 501, 1218 + 304 and Mrk 180 are presented. All three sources have soft power-law X-ray spectra with low-energy cut-offs consistent with absorption in the line-of-sight gas column density through our own galaxy. The three objects also exhibit significant spectral variability in the X-ray band on time-scales ranging from a few days to a year. In each case, X-ray flux and spectral index appear to be correlated, in the sense that the X-ray spectrum hardens as the source brightens. The intrinsic ultraviolet to X-ray spectrum of these and several other X-ray bright BL Lac objects can be modelled as a power-law continuum of energy index ∼1.0 below about 0.1 keV, above which the spectral slope steepens. (author)

  8. ANALYSIS OF A STATE CHANGING SUPERSOFT X-RAY SOURCE IN M31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Di Stefano, R.; Primini, F. A.; Liu, J.; Scoles, S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Nelson, T. [Department of Physics, 1000 Hilltop Circle, University of Maryland at Baltimore, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    We report on observations of a luminous supersoft X-ray source (SSS) in M31, r1-25, that has exhibited spectral changes to harder X-ray states. We document these spectral changes. In addition, we show that they have important implications for modeling the source. Quasisoft states in a source that has been observed as an SSS represent a newly discovered phenomenon. We show how such state changers could prove to be examples of unusual black hole or neutron star accretors. Future observations of this and other state changers can provide the information needed to determine the nature(s) of these intriguing new sources.

  9. X-ray fluorescence and gamma-ray spectrometry combined with multivariate analysis for topographic studies in agricultural soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castilhos, Natara D.B. de; Melquiades, Fábio L.; Thomaz, Edivaldo L.; Bastos, Rodrigo Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of soils play a major role in the evaluation of different geochemical signature, soil quality, discrimination of land use type, soil provenance and soil degradation. The objectives of the present study are the soil elemental characterization and soil differentiation in topographic sequence and depth, using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) as well as gamma-ray spectrometry data combined with Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The study area is an agricultural region of Boa Vista catchment which is located at Guamiranga municipality, Brazil. PCA analysis was performed with four different data sets: spectral data from EDXRF, spectral data from gamma-ray spectrometry, concentration values from EDXRF measurements and concentration values from gamma-ray spectrometry. All PCAs showed similar results, confirmed by hierarchical cluster analysis, allowing the data grouping into top, bottom and riparian zone samples, i.e. the samples were separated due to its landscape position. The two hillslopes present the same behavior independent of the land use history. There are distinctive and characteristic patterns in the analyzed soil. The methodologies presented are promising and could be used to infer significant information about the region to be studied. - Highlights: • Characterization of topographic sequence of two hillslopes from agricultural soil. • Employment of EDXRF and gamma-ray spectrometry data combined with PCA. • The combination of green analytical methodologies with chemometric studies allowed soil differentiation. • The innovative methodology is promising for direct characterization of agricultural catchments

  10. The complex ion structure of warm dense carbon measured by spectrally resolved x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, D.; Barbrel, B.; Falcone, R. W. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Vorberger, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik komplexer Systeme, Nöthnitzer Straße 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Helfrich, J.; Frydrych, S.; Ortner, A.; Otten, A.; Roth, F.; Schaumann, G.; Schumacher, D.; Siegenthaler, K.; Wagner, F.; Roth, M. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstraße 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Gericke, D. O.; Wünsch, K. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Bachmann, B.; Döppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Bagnoud, V.; Blažević, A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2015-05-15

    We present measurements of the complex ion structure of warm dense carbon close to the melting line at pressures around 100 GPa. High-pressure samples were created by laser-driven shock compression of graphite and probed by intense laser-generated x-ray sources with photon energies of 4.75 keV and 4.95 keV. High-efficiency crystal spectrometers allow for spectrally resolving the scattered radiation. Comparing the ratio of elastically and inelastically scattered radiation, we find evidence for a complex bonded liquid that is predicted by ab-initio quantum simulations showing the influence of chemical bonds under these conditions. Using graphite samples of different initial densities we demonstrate the capability of spectrally resolved x-ray scattering to monitor the carbon solid-liquid transition at relatively constant pressure of 150 GPa. Showing first single-pulse scattering spectra from cold graphite of unprecedented quality recorded at the Linac Coherent Light Source, we demonstrate the outstanding possibilities for future high-precision measurements at 4th Generation Light Sources.

  11. Image analysis in x-ray cinefluorography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikuse, J; Yasuhara, H; Sugimoto, H [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1979-02-01

    For the cinefluorographic image in the cardiovascular diagnostic system, the image quality is evaluated by means of MTF (Modulation Transfer Function), and object contrast by introducing the concept of x-ray spectrum analysis. On the basis of these results, further investigation is made of optimum X-ray exposure factors set for cinefluorography and the cardiovascular diagnostic system.

  12. Human soft tissue analysis using x-ray or gamma-ray techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theodorakou, C; Farquharson, M J

    2008-01-01

    This topical review is intended to describe the x-ray techniques used for human soft tissue analysis. X-ray techniques have been applied to human soft tissue characterization and interesting results have been presented over the last few decades. The motivation behind such studies is to provide improved patient outcome by using the data obtained to better understand a disease process and improve diagnosis. An overview of theoretical background as well as a complete set of references is presented. For each study, a brief summary of the methodology and results is given. The x-ray techniques include x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, Compton scattering, Compton to coherent scattering ratio and attenuation measurements. The soft tissues that have been classified using x-rays or gamma rays include brain, breast, colon, fat, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, prostate, skin, thyroid and uterus. (topical review)

  13. Revisiting the Short-term X-ray Spectral Variability of NGC 4151 with Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junfeng; Risaliti, G.; Fabbiano, G.; Elvis, M.; Zezas, A.; Karovska, M.

    2010-05-01

    We present new X-ray spectral data for the Seyfert 1 nucleus in NGC 4151 observed with Chandra for ~200 ks. A significant ACIS pileup is present, resulting in a nonlinear count rate variation during the observation. With pileup corrected spectral fitting, we are able to recover the spectral parameters and find consistency with those derived from unpiled events in the ACIS readout streak and outer region from the bright nucleus. The absorption corrected 2-10 keV flux of the nucleus varied between 6 × 10-11 erg s-1 cm-2 and 10-10 erg s-1 cm-2 (L 2-10 keV ~ 1.3-2.1 × 1042 erg s-1). Similar to earlier Chandra studies of NGC 4151 at a historical low state, the photon indices derived from the same absorbed power-law model are Γ ~ 0.7-0.9. However, we show that Γ is highly dependent on the adopted spectral models. Fitting the power-law continuum with a Compton reflection component gives Γ ~ 1.1. By including passage of non-uniform X-ray obscuring clouds, we can reproduce the apparent flat spectral states with Γ ~ 1.7, typical for Seyfert 1 active galactic nuclei. The same model also fits the hard spectra from previous ASCA "long look" observation of NGC 4151 in the lowest flux state. The spectral variability during our observation can be interpreted as variations in intrinsic soft continuum flux relative to a Compton reflection component that is from distant cold material and constant on short timescale, or variations of partially covering absorber in the line of sight toward the nucleus. An ionized absorber model with ionization parameter log ξ ~ 0.8-1.1 can also fit the low-resolution ACIS spectra. If the partial covering model is correct, adopting a black hole mass M_{BH}˜ 4.6× 10^7 M sun we constrain the distance of the obscuring cloud from the central black hole to be r <~ 9 lt-day, consistent with the size of the broad emission line region of NGC 4151 from optical reverberation mapping.

  14. X-ray streak crystal spectography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffman, R.L.; Brown, T.; Medecki, H.

    1983-01-01

    We have built an x-ray streaked crystal spectrograph for making time-resolved x-ray spectral measurements. This instrument can access Bragg angles from 11 0 to 38 0 and x-ray spectra from 200 eV to greater than 10 keV. We have demonstrated resolving powers, E/δE > 200 at 1 keV and time resolution less than 20 psec. A description of the instrument and an example of the data is given

  15. XOP: A graphical user interface for spectral calculations and x-ray optics utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dejus, R.J.; Sanchez del Rio, M.

    1996-01-01

    A graphical user interface, using the Interactive Data Language (IDL) widget toolkit, for calculation of spectral properties of synchrotron radiation sources and for interaction of x-rays with optical elements has been developed. The interface runs presently on three different computer architectures under the Unix operating system endash the Sun-OS, the HP-UX, and the DEC-Unix operating systems. The point-and-click interface is used as a driver program for a variety of codes from different authors written in different computer languages. The execution of codes for calculating synchrotron radiation from undulators, wigglers, and bending magnets is summarized. The computation of optical properties of materials and the x-ray diffraction profiles from crystals in different geometries are also discussed. The interface largely simplifies the use of these codes and may be used without prior knowledge of how to run a particular program. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  16. NLTE Model Atmospheres for Super-Soft X-ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Thomas; Werner, Klaus

    2009-09-01

    Spectral analysis by means of fully line-blanketed Non-LTE model atmospheres has arrived at a high level of sophistication. The Tübingen NLTE Model Atmosphere Package (TMAP) is used to calculate plane-parallel NLTE model atmospheres which are in radiative and hydrostatic equilibrium. Although TMAP is not especially designed for the calculation of burst spectra of novae, spectral energy distributions (SEDs) calculated from TMAP models are well suited e.g. for abundance determinations of Super Soft X-ray Sources like nova V4743 Sgr or line identifications in observations of neutron stars with low magnetic fields in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) like EXO 0748-676.

  17. Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-06

    Feb 6, 2014 ... the experimental spectra with the synthetic spectra generated using .... user to specify the time duration over which the ionic populations ... ied the dependence of X-ray emission spectrum as a function of laser intensity in the.

  18. Development of improved x-ray optics for analytical x-ray microbeams. CRADA final report for CRADA Number Y-1294-0283

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, D.A.; Gao, N.; Xiao, Q.F.; Ponomarev, I.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this CRADA was to develop improved glass capillary, x-ray optics for analytical x-ray microbeam applications. X-Ray Optical Systems, Inc. (XOS) designed and fabricated capillary optics and LMES tested those optics for x-ray microanalytical applications using its unique X-Ray Microprobe. Tapered capillaries with 3-microm and 8-microm output openings were fabricated and tested. The tapered capillaries had better spectral quality for x-ray microfluorescence (XRMF) analysis, than non-tapered, straight capillaries that are currently used in the system. X-ray beam count-rates for the tapered capillaries were also greater than the straight capillaries. Two monolithic, polycapillary optics were fabricated and tested. The polycapillary optics produced focal spots of 40 and 100 microm. Beam intensities for the polycapillaries were, respective, 44 and 18 times the intensities found in straight 50-microm and 100-microm capillaries. High-sensitivity scanning will be possible because of the enhanced intensity of the polycapillary optic. LMES and the DP program will benefit from improved capabilities for nondestructive x-ray microanalysis, while XOS will benefit from test results that will enhance the marketability of their products

  19. Spectral evolution of soft x-ray emission from optically thin, high electron temperature platinum plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Hara

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The soft x-ray spectra of heavy element plasmas are frequently dominated by unresolved transition array (UTA emission. We describe the spectral evolution of an intense UTA under optically thin conditions in platinum plasmas. The UTA was observed to have a peak wavelength around 4.6 nm at line-of-sight averaged electron temperatures less than 1.4 keV at electron densities of (2.5–7.5 × 1013 cm−3. The UTA spectral structure was due to emission from 4d–4f transitions in highly charged ions with average charge states of q = 20–40. A numerical simulation successfully reproduced the observed spectral behavior.

  20. Using angular dispersion and anomalous transmission to shape ultramonochromatic x rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shvyd' ko, Yuri; Stoupin, Stanislav; Shu, Deming; Khachatryan, Ruben [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Optical spectrometers, instruments that work with highly monochromatic light, are commonly rated by the spectral bandwidth, which defines the ability to resolve closely spaced spectral components. Another equally important feature is the spectral contrast, the ability to detect faint objects among these components. Here we demonstrate that a combined effect of angular dispersion (AD) and anomalous transmission (AT) of x rays in Bragg reflection from asymmetrically cut crystals can shape spectral distributions of x rays to profiles with high contrast and small bandwidths. The AD and AT x-ray optics is implemented as a five-reflection, three-crystal arrangement featuring a combination of the above-mentioned attributes so desirable for x-ray monochromators and analyzers: a spectral contrast of {approx_equal} 500, a bandwidth of {approx_equal} 0.46 meV, and a remarkably large angular acceptance of {approx_equal} 107 {mu}rad with 9.1 keV x rays. The new optics can become a foundation for the next-generation inelastic x-ray scattering spectrometers for studies of atomic dynamics.

  1. Evaluation of a photon counting Medipix3RX CZT spectral x-ray detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Steven M.; Vercnocke, Andrew J.; Rundle, David S.; Butler, Philip H.; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2016-10-01

    We assessed the performance of a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based Medipix3RX x-ray detector as a candidate for micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) imaging. This technology was developed at CERN for the Large Hadron Collider. It features an array of 128 by 128, 110 micrometer square pixels, each with eight simultaneous threshold counters, five of which utilize real-time charge summing, significantly reducing the charge sharing between contiguous pixels. Pixel response curves were created by imaging a range of x-ray intensities by varying x-ray tube current and by varying the exposure time with fixed x-ray current. Photon energy-related assessments were made by flooding the detector with the tin foil filtered emission of an I-125 radioisotope brachytherapy seed and sweeping the energy threshold of each of the four charge-summed counters of each pixel in 1 keV steps. Long term stability assessments were made by repeating exposures over the course of one hour. The high properly-functioning pixel yield (99%), long term stability (linear regression of whole-chip response over one hour of acquisitions: y = -0.0038x + 2284; standard deviation: 3.7 counts) and energy resolution (2.5 keV FWHM (single pixel), 3.7 keV FWHM across the full image) make this device suitable for spectral micro-CT. The charge summing performance effectively reduced the measurement corruption caused by charge sharing which, when unaccounted for, shifts the photon energy assignment to lower energies, degrading both count and energy accuracy. Effective charge summing greatly improves the potential for calibrated, energy-specific material decomposition and K edge difference imaging approaches.

  2. Soft x-ray scattering facility at the Advanced Light Source with real-time data processing and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gann, E.; Young, A. T.; Collins, B. A.; Yan, H.; Nasiatka, J.; Padmore, H. A.; Ade, H.; Hexemer, A.; Wang, C.

    2012-04-01

    We present the development and characterization of a dedicated resonant soft x-ray scattering facility. Capable of operation over a wide energy range, the beamline and endstation are primarily used for scattering from soft matter systems around the carbon K-edge (˜285 eV). We describe the specialized design of the instrument and characteristics of the beamline. Operational characteristics of immediate interest to users such as polarization control, degree of higher harmonic spectral contamination, and detector noise are delineated. Of special interest is the development of a higher harmonic rejection system that improves the spectral purity of the x-ray beam. Special software and a user-friendly interface have been implemented to allow real-time data processing and preliminary data analysis simultaneous with data acquisition.

  3. Soft x-ray scattering facility at the Advanced Light Source with real-time data processing and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gann, E.; Collins, B. A.; Ade, H.; Young, A. T.; Nasiatka, J.; Padmore, H. A.; Hexemer, A.; Wang, C.; Yan, H.

    2012-01-01

    We present the development and characterization of a dedicated resonant soft x-ray scattering facility. Capable of operation over a wide energy range, the beamline and endstation are primarily used for scattering from soft matter systems around the carbon K-edge (∼285 eV). We describe the specialized design of the instrument and characteristics of the beamline. Operational characteristics of immediate interest to users such as polarization control, degree of higher harmonic spectral contamination, and detector noise are delineated. Of special interest is the development of a higher harmonic rejection system that improves the spectral purity of the x-ray beam. Special software and a user-friendly interface have been implemented to allow real-time data processing and preliminary data analysis simultaneous with data acquisition.

  4. The Athena X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Didier; Trong, Thein Lam; Den Herder, Jan-Willem; Piro, Luigi; Barcons, Xavier; Huovelin, Juhani; Kelley, Richard; Mas-Hesse, J. Miquel; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Paltani, Stephane; hide

    2016-01-01

    The X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) on board the Advanced Telescope for High-ENergy Astrophysics (Athena) will provide spatially resolved high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy from 0.2 to 12 keV, with 5 pixels over a field of view of 5 arc minute equivalent diameter and a spectral resolution of 2.5 eV up to 7 keV. In this paper, we first review the core scientific objectives of Athena, driving the main performance parameters of the X-IFU, namely the spectral resolution, the field of view, the effective area, the count rate capabilities, the instrumental background. We also illustrate the breakthrough potential of the X-IFU for some observatory science goals. Then we brie y describe the X-IFU design as defined at the time of the mission consolidation review concluded in May 2016, and report on its predicted performance. Finally, we discuss some options to improve the instrument performance while not increasing its complexity and resource demands (e.g. count rate capability, spectral resolution). (2016) .

  5. X-ray analysis in lung leptospira disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Shiyong; Peng Shi; He Guoman

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analysis the X-ray signs and subtype of the lung leptospira disease, and improve the undersdand, reduce the error diagnosis of this diseases. Methods: 40 cases of lung leptospira disease were evaluated about the check X-ray sings and clinical data, the check X-ray sings were dynamic observated and typed, and 40 cases had a diagnostic treatment. Results: There were various X-ray changes of lung leptospira disease. in 40 cases, 12 cases (30%) pulmonary marking, 21 cases (52%) little lesions, and 7 cases(18%) lager lesions, respectively. The patients who were correctly diagnosed made a recovery after effective treatment, the patients who were error diagnosed died because of multiple system organ damage. Conclusion: The check X-ray signs in lung leptospira disease have some characteristics. It may play an important role in improving this disease' diagnosis combining the dynamic observation of check X-ray sings with clinical data. (authors)

  6. A deep X-ray view of the bare AGN Ark 120. III. X-ray timing analysis and multiwavelength variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobban, A. P.; Porquet, D.; Reeves, J. N.; Markowitz, A.; Nardini, E.; Grosso, N.

    2018-03-01

    We present the spectral/timing properties of the bare Seyfert galaxy Ark 120 through a deep ˜420 ks XMM-Newton campaign plus recent NuSTAR observations and a ˜6-month Swift monitoring campaign. We investigate the spectral decomposition through fractional rms, covariance and difference spectra, finding the mid- to long-time-scale (˜day-year) variability to be dominated by a relatively smooth, steep component, peaking in the soft X-ray band. Additionally, we find evidence for variable Fe K emission redward of the Fe Kα core on long time-scales, consistent with previous findings. We detect a clearly defined power spectrum which we model with a power law with a slope of α ˜ 1.9. By extending the power spectrum to lower frequencies through the inclusion of Swift and Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data, we find tentative evidence of a high-frequency break, consistent with existing scaling relations. We also explore frequency-dependent Fourier time lags, detecting a negative (`soft') lag for the first time in this source with the 0.3-1 keV band lagging behind the 1-4 keV band with a time delay, τ, of ˜900 s. Finally, we analyse the variability in the optical and ultraviolet (UV) bands using the Optical/UV Monitor onboard XMM-Newton and the Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope onboard Swift and search for time-dependent correlations between the optical/UV/X-ray bands. We find tentative evidence for the U-band emission lagging behind the X-rays with a time delay of τ = 2.4 ± 1.8 d, which we discuss in the context of disc reprocessing.

  7. X-ray spectroscopy with normal and exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, I.E.

    1995-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is a powerful analytical tool for elemental analysis and also for the study of nuclear properties. In recent years these has been extensive utilization of x-ray spectral analysis for the purpose of plasma diagnostics. These studies are vital for the development of controlled nuclear fusion technology. The formation of special atoms containing particles heavier than electrons is another area in which x-ray spectra give detailed knowledge of the sizes and shapes of atomic nuclei, masses and magnetic momenta of bound particles and the nature of interaction between bound particle and the nucleus. All these aspects make x-ray spectra of uniquely rich source of information on material and nuclear properties. The present article provides some glimpses of how this information is extracted. The choice of topics is biased towards nuclear physics. The presentation is not attempted to the exhaustive and is aimed at conveying the essential physical ideas without going into technical details. (author) 6 figs

  8. Soft X-ray and cathodoluminescence measurement, optimisation and analysis at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacRae, C. M.; Wilson, N. C.; Torpy, A.; Delle Piane, C.

    2018-01-01

    Advances in field emission gun electron microprobes have led to significant gains in the beam power density and when analysis at high resolution is required then low voltages are often selected. The resulting beam power can lead to damage and this can be minimised by cooling the sample down to cryogenic temperatures allowing sub-micrometre imaging using a variety of spectrometers. Recent advances in soft X-ray emission spectrometers (SXES) offer a spectral tool to measure both chemistry and bonding and when combined with spectral cathodoluminescence the complementary techniques enable new knowledge to be gained from both mineral and materials. Magnesium and aluminium metals have been examined at both room and liquid nitrogen temperatures by SXES and the L-emission Fermi-edge has been observed to sharpen at the lower temperatures directly confirming thermal broadening of the X-ray spectra. Gains in emission intensity and resolution have been observed in cathodoluminescence for liquid nitrogen cooled quartz grains compared to ambient temperature quartz. This has enabled subtle growth features at quartz to quartz-cement boundaries to be imaged for the first time.

  9. A practical material decomposition method for x-ray dual spectral computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jingjing; Zhao, Xing

    2016-03-17

    X-ray dual spectral CT (DSCT) scans the measured object with two different x-ray spectra, and the acquired rawdata can be used to perform the material decomposition of the object. Direct calibration methods allow a faster material decomposition for DSCT and can be separated in two groups: image-based and rawdata-based. The image-based method is an approximative method, and beam hardening artifacts remain in the resulting material-selective images. The rawdata-based method generally obtains better image quality than the image-based method, but this method requires geometrically consistent rawdata. However, today's clinical dual energy CT scanners usually measure different rays for different energy spectra and acquire geometrically inconsistent rawdata sets, and thus cannot meet the requirement. This paper proposes a practical material decomposition method to perform rawdata-based material decomposition in the case of inconsistent measurement. This method first yields the desired consistent rawdata sets from the measured inconsistent rawdata sets, and then employs rawdata-based technique to perform material decomposition and reconstruct material-selective images. The proposed method was evaluated by use of simulated FORBILD thorax phantom rawdata and dental CT rawdata, and simulation results indicate that this method can produce highly quantitative DSCT images in the case of inconsistent DSCT measurements.

  10. Sensors for x-ray astronomy satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, Fumiyoshi; Kondo, Ichiro; Nishioka, Yonero; Kameda, Yoshihiko; Kubo, Masaki.

    1980-01-01

    For the purpose of observing the cosmic X-ray, the cosmic X-ray astronomy satellite (CORSA-b, named ''Hakucho'', Japanese for cygnus,) was launched Feb. 21, 1979 by Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science, University of Tokyo. The primary objectives of the satellite are: to perform panoramic survey of the space for X-ray bursts and to perform the spectral and temporal measurement of X-ray sources. The very soft X-ray sensor for X-ray observation and the horizon sensor for spacecraft attitude sensing were developed by Toshiba Corporation under technical support by University of Tokyo and Nagoya University for ''Hakucho''. The features of these sensors are outlined in this paper. (author)

  11. Application of a portable total reflection x-ray fluorescence spectrometer to a trace elemental analysis of wines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunimura, Shinsuke; Kawai, Jun

    2009-01-01

    A portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometer has been applied to a trace elemental analysis of wines. Sulfur, K, Mn, Fe, and Rb were detected. These five elements were quantified by using 1 ppm of Co as an internal standard. The quantified concentrations ranged from sub-ppm to several hundred ppm. Because of organic substances in wines, the scattering of the incident X-rays from the dry residues of wines becomes strong. Therefore, a high spectral background appears in TXRF spectra of wines. Because of this background, relative standard deviations of the quantified concentrations were from 4 to 28%. Although the high spectral background appeared in the TXRF spectra of the wines, a detection limit down to several tens of ppb was achieved. The present portable spectrometer can be applied to screening for trace elements in wines before an accurate and precise analysis using a large elemental analyzer. (author)

  12. Plasma satellites of X-ray spectral lines of ions in a plasma of solid-state targets, heated by a picosecond laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaev, V.S.; Vinogradov, V.I.; Kurilov, A.S.; Matafonov, A.P.; Lisitsa, V.S.; Gavrilenko, V.P.; Faenov, A.Ya.; Pikuz, T.A.; Skobelev, I.Yu.; Magunov, A.I.; Pikuz, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    The results of measuring the ions X-ray spectral lines by the interaction of the picosecond laser pulses with the solid-state target are presented. The spectra of the X-ray radiation were observed on the fluorine ion line. The spectral lines satellites, testifying to the availability, are identified. The position of the satellites and the distance between them make it possible to connect them with the intensive electrostatic oscillations with the amplitude, exceeding 10 8 V/cm, and the frequency close to 7 x 10 14 s -1 , substantially lower than the laser wave frequency. The experimental results are compared with the calculated data on the multicharge ions spectra [ru

  13. NEW X-RAY DETECTIONS OF WNL STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Güdel, Manuel; Schmutz, Werner; Sokal, Kimberly R.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that putatively single nitrogen-type Wolf-Rayet stars (WN stars) without known companions are X-ray sources. However, almost all WN star X-ray detections so far have been of earlier WN2-WN6 spectral subtypes. Later WN7-WN9 subtypes (also known as WNL stars) have proved more difficult to detect, an important exception being WR 79a (WN9ha). We present here new X-ray detections of the WNL stars WR 16 (WN8h) and WR 78 (WN7h). These new results, when combined with previous detections, demonstrate that X-ray emission is present in WN stars across the full range of spectral types, including later WNL stars. The two WN8 stars observed to date (WR 16 and WR 40) show unusually low X-ray luminosities (L x ) compared to other WN stars, and it is noteworthy that they also have the lowest terminal wind speeds (v ∞ ). Existing X-ray detections of about a dozen WN stars reveal a trend of increasing L x with wind luminosity L wind = (1/2)M-dot v 2 ∞ , suggesting that wind kinetic energy may play a key role in establishing X-ray luminosity levels in WN stars.

  14. NEW X-RAY DETECTIONS OF WNL STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, Stephen L. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy (CASA), University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States); Zhekov, Svetozar A. [Space and Solar-Terrestrial Research Institute, Moskovska str. 6, Sofia-1000 (Bulgaria); Guedel, Manuel [Department of Astronomy, University of Vienna, Tuerkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Schmutz, Werner [Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD), Dorfstrasse 33, CH-7260 Davos Dorf (Switzerland); Sokal, Kimberly R., E-mail: Stephen.Skinner@colorado.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that putatively single nitrogen-type Wolf-Rayet stars (WN stars) without known companions are X-ray sources. However, almost all WN star X-ray detections so far have been of earlier WN2-WN6 spectral subtypes. Later WN7-WN9 subtypes (also known as WNL stars) have proved more difficult to detect, an important exception being WR 79a (WN9ha). We present here new X-ray detections of the WNL stars WR 16 (WN8h) and WR 78 (WN7h). These new results, when combined with previous detections, demonstrate that X-ray emission is present in WN stars across the full range of spectral types, including later WNL stars. The two WN8 stars observed to date (WR 16 and WR 40) show unusually low X-ray luminosities (L{sub x} ) compared to other WN stars, and it is noteworthy that they also have the lowest terminal wind speeds (v{sub {infinity}}). Existing X-ray detections of about a dozen WN stars reveal a trend of increasing L{sub x} with wind luminosity L{sub wind} = (1/2)M-dot v{sup 2}{sub {infinity}}, suggesting that wind kinetic energy may play a key role in establishing X-ray luminosity levels in WN stars.

  15. TU-G-207-00: Emerging Applications of X-Ray Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Last few years has witnessed the development of novel of X-ray imaging modalities, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT, and X-ray acoustic/fluorescence/luminescence imaging. This symposium will present the recent advances of these emerging X-ray imaging modalities and update the attendees with knowledge in various related topics, including X-ray photon-counting detectors, X-ray physics underlying the emerging applications beyond the traditional X-ray imaging, image reconstruction for the novel modalities, characterization and evaluation of the systems, and their practical implications. In addition, the concept and practical aspects of X-ray activatable targeted nanoparticles for molecular X-ray imaging will be discussed in the context of X-ray fluorescence and luminescence CT. Learning Objectives: Present background knowledge of various emerging X-ray imaging techniques, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT and X-ray fluorescence/luminescence CT. Discuss the practical need, technical aspects and current status of the emerging X-ray imaging modalities. Describe utility and future impact of the new generation of X-ray imaging applications

  16. X-Ray Timing Analysis of Cyg X-3 Using AstroSat/LAXPC: Detection of Milli-hertz Quasi-periodic Oscillations during the Flaring Hard X-Ray State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahari, Mayukh; Misra, Ranjeev [Inter-University Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Antia, H M; Yadav, J S; Chauhan, Jai Verdhan; Chitnis, V R; Dedhia, Dhiraj; Katoch, Tilak; Madhwani, P; Shah, Parag [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Agrawal, P C [UM-DAE Center of Excellence for Basic Sciences, University of Mumbai, Kalina, Mumbai 400098 (India); Manchanda, R K [University of Mumbai, Kalina, Mumbai 400098 (India); Paul, B, E-mail: mayukh@iucaa.in [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Raman Research Institute, Bengaluru 560080 (India)

    2017-11-01

    We present here results from the X-ray timing and spectral analysis of the X-ray binary Cyg X-3 using observations from the Large Area X-ray proportional Counter on board AstroSat . Consecutive light curves observed over a period of one year show the binary orbital period of 17253.56 ± 0.19 s. Another low-amplitude, slow periodicity of the order of 35.8 ± 1.4 days is observed, which may be due to the orbital precession as suggested earlier by Molteni et al. During the rising binary phase, power density spectra from different observations during the flaring hard X-ray state show quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) at ∼5–8 mHz, ∼12–14 mHz, and ∼18–24 mHz frequencies at the minimum confidence of 99%. However, during the consecutive binary decay phase, no QPO is detected up to 2 σ significance. Energy-dependent time-lag spectra show soft lag (soft photons lag hard photons) at the mHz QPO frequency and the fractional rms of the QPO increases with the photon energy. During the binary motion, the observation of mHz QPOs during the rising phase of the flaring hard state may be linked to the increase in the supply of the accreting material in the disk and corona via stellar wind from the companion star. During the decay phase, the compact source moves in the outer wind region causing the decrease in supply of material for accretion. This may cause weakening of the mHz QPOs below the detection limit. This is also consistent with the preliminary analysis of the orbital phase-resolved energy spectra presented in this paper.

  17. Non-LTE model atmospheres for supersoft X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, T.; Werner, K.

    2010-02-01

    In the last decade, X-ray observations of hot stellar objects became available with unprecedented resolution and S/N ratio. For an adequate interpretation, fully metal-line blanketed Non-LTE model-atmospheres are necessary. The Tübingen Non-LTE Model Atmosphere Package (TMAP) can calculate such model atmospheres at a high level of sophistication. Although TMAP is not especially designed for the calculation of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) at extreme photospheric parameters, it can be employed for the spectral analysis of burst spectra of novae like V4743 Sgr or line identifications in observations of neutron stars with low magnetic fields in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) like EXO 0748-676.

  18. Three Bright X-ray Sources in NGC 1313

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert, E.; Petre, R.; Schlegel, E.

    1992-12-01

    Three bright X-ray sources were detected in a recent (April/May 1991) ROSAT PSPC observation of the nearby (D ~ 4.5 Mpc) face--on barred spiral galaxy NGC 1313. Two of the sources were at positions coincident with X-ray sources detected by Fabbiano & Trinchieri (ApJ 315, 1987) in a previous (Jan 1980) Einstein IPC observation. The position of the brightest Einstein source is near the center of NGC 1313, and the second Einstein source is ~ 7' south of the ``nuclear'' source, in the outskirts of the spiral arms. A third bright X-ray source was detected in the ROSAT observation ~ 7' southwest of the ``nuclear'' source. We present X-ray spectra and X-ray images for the three bright sources found in the ROSAT observation of NGC 1313, and compare with previous Einstein results. Spectral analysis of these sources require them to have very large soft X-ray luminosities ( ~ 10(40) erg s(-1) ) when compared with typical X-ray sources in our Galaxy. Feasible explanations for the X-ray emission are presented. The third X-ray source is positively identified with the recently discovered (Ryder et. al., ApJ 1992) peculiar type-II supernova 1978K.

  19. Characterization and error analysis of an N×N unfolding procedure applied to filtered, photoelectric x-ray detector arrays. II. Error analysis and generalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Fehl

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A five-channel, filtered-x-ray-detector (XRD array has been used to measure time-dependent, soft-x-ray flux emitted by z-pinch plasmas at the Z pulsed-power accelerator (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. The preceding, companion paper [D. L. Fehl et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 13, 120402 (2010PRABFM1098-4402] describes an algorithm for spectral reconstructions (unfolds and spectrally integrated flux estimates from data obtained by this instrument. The unfolded spectrum S_{unfold}(E,t is based on (N=5 first-order B-splines (histograms in contiguous unfold bins j=1,…,N; the recovered x-ray flux F_{unfold}(t is estimated as ∫S_{unfold}(E,tdE, where E is x-ray energy and t is time. This paper adds two major improvements to the preceding unfold analysis: (a Error analysis.—Both data noise and response-function uncertainties are propagated into S_{unfold}(E,t and F_{unfold}(t. Noise factors ν are derived from simulations to quantify algorithm-induced changes in the noise-to-signal ratio (NSR for S_{unfold} in each unfold bin j and for F_{unfold} (ν≡NSR_{output}/NSR_{input}: for S_{unfold}, 1≲ν_{j}≲30, an outcome that is strongly spectrally dependent; for F_{unfold}, 0.6≲ν_{F}≲1, a result that is less spectrally sensitive and corroborated independently. For nominal z-pinch experiments, the combined uncertainty (noise and calibrations in F_{unfold}(t at peak is estimated to be ∼15%. (b Generalization of the unfold method.—Spectral sensitivities (called here passband functions are constructed for S_{unfold} and F_{unfold}. Predicting how the unfold algorithm reconstructs arbitrary spectra is thereby reduced to quadratures. These tools allow one to understand and quantitatively predict algorithmic distortions (including negative artifacts, to identify potentially troublesome spectra, and to design more useful response functions.

  20. Discovery of Spatial and Spectral Structure in the X-Ray Emission from the Crab Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Hester, J. Jeff; Tennant, Allyn F.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Marshall, Herman L.; Karovska, Margarita; Nichols, Joy S.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.

    2000-01-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory observed the Crab Nebula and pulsar during orbital calibration. Zeroth-order images with the High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) readout by the Advanced Charge Coupled Devices (CCD) Imaging Spectrometer spectroscopy array (ACIS-S) show a striking richness of X-ray structure at a resolution comparable to that of the best ground-based visible-light observations. The HETG-ACIS-S images reveal, for the first time, an X-ray inner ring within the X-ray torus, the suggestion of a hollow-tube structure for the torus, and X-ray knots along the inner ring and (perhaps) along the inward extension of the X-ray jet. Although complicated by instrumental effects and the brightness of the Crab Nebula, the spectrometric analysis shows systematic variations of the X-ray spectrum throughout the nebula.

  1. Discovery of Spatial and Spectral Structure in the X-Ray Emission from the Crab Nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf; Hester; Tennant; Elsner; Schulz; Marshall; Karovska; Nichols; Swartz; Kolodziejczak; O'Dell

    2000-06-20

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory observed the Crab Nebula and pulsar during orbital calibration. Zeroth-order images with the High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) readout by the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer spectroscopy array (ACIS-S) show a striking richness of X-ray structure at a resolution comparable to that of the best ground-based visible-light observations. The HETG-ACIS-S images reveal, for the first time, an X-ray inner ring within the X-ray torus, the suggestion of a hollow-tube structure for the torus, and X-ray knots along the inner ring and (perhaps) along the inward extension of the X-ray jet. Although complicated by instrumental effects and the brightness of the Crab Nebula, the spectrometric analysis shows systematic variations of the X-ray spectrum throughout the nebula.

  2. Evaluation of the spectral distribution of X-ray beams from measurements on the scattered radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casnati, E.; Baraldi, C.

    1980-01-01

    Most of the phenomena activated by photons with energies below 100 keV show an apparent or real dependence on the quantum energy. Therefore, knowledge of the beam energy characteristics is of primary importance for interpretation of the irradiation results. The greatest difficulty arises from the high flux density of the beams usually employed which does not allow direct measurements of the beam. A method was developed which permits evaluation of the spectral distribution of the X-ray beam from a spectrometric measurement of the radiation scattered by a thin foil of a suitable metal. This makes possible a new and more rational approach to the measurement of X-rays in the energy range where the interaction parameters show a large photon energy dependence. The corrections required by the presence of some collateral effects, among which the most important is the coexistence of the coherent and incoherent scattering, must be evaluated. The knowledge of the spectral distribution is of immediate usefulness for studies of radiation damage in biological and other materials, for the calibration of radiation measuring instruments and for the improvement of the radiological instrumentation response which contributes to reducing the patient's dose. (H.K.)

  3. On the Nature of the Variability Power Decay towards Soft Spectral States in X-Ray Binaries. Case Study in Cyg X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Shaposhinikov, Nikolai

    2007-01-01

    A characteristic feature of the Fourier Power Density Spectrum (PDS) observed from black hole X-ray binaries in low/hard and intermediate spectral states is a broad band-limited noise, characterized by a constant below some frequency (a "break" frequency) and a power law above this frequency. It has been shown that the variability of this type can be produced by the inward diffusion of the local driving perturbations in a bounded configuration (accretion disk or corona). In the framework of this model, the perturbation diffusion time to is related to the phenomenological break frequency, while the PDS power-law slope above the "break" is determined by the viscosity distribution over the configuration. The perturbation diffusion scenario explains the decay of the power of X-ray variability observed in a number of compact sources (containing black hole and neutron star) during an evolution of theses sources from low/hard to high/soft states. We compare the model predictions with the subset of data from Cyg X-1 collected by the Rossi X-ray Time Explorer (RXTE). Our extensive analysis of the Cyg X-1 PDSs demonstrates that the observed integrated power P(sub x), decreases approximately as a square root of the characteristic frequency of the driving oscillations v(sub dr). The RXTE observations of Cyg X-1 allow us to infer P(sub dr), and t(sub o) as a function of v(sub dr). We also apply the basic parameters of observed PDSs, power-law index and low frequency quasiperiodic oscillations. to infer Reynolds (Re) number from the observations using the method developed in our previous paper. Our analysis shows that Re-number increases from values about 10 in low/hard state to that about 70 during the high/soft state. Subject headings: accretion, accretion disks-black hole physics-stars:individual (Cyg X-1) :radiation mechanisms: nonthermal-physical data and processes

  4. On the Nature of the mHz X-Ray QPOs from ULX M82 X-1: Evidence for Timing-Spectral (anti) Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1 we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and its energy spectral power-law index. These quantities are known to correlate in stellar mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibiting Type-C QPOs (approx 0.2-15 Hz). The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of its mHz QPOs as Type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of Type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass. We resolved the count rates of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling and identify observations in which M82 X-1 was at least as bright as source 5. Using only those observations, we detect QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which the energy spectral power-law index varied from 1.7-2.2. Interestingly, we find evidence for an anti-correlation (Pearsons correlation coefficient = -0.95) between the power-law index and the QPO centroid frequency. While such an anti-correlation is observed in StMBHs at high Type-C QPO frequencies (approx 5-15 Hz), the frequency range over which it holds in StMBHs is significantly smaller (factor of approx 1.5-3) than the QPO range reported here from M82 X-1 (factor of 6). However, it remains possible that contamination from source 5 can bias our result. Joint Chandra/XMM-Newton observations in the future can resolve this problem and confirm the timing-spectral anti-correlation reported here.

  5. THE X-RAY POWER SPECTRAL DENSITY FUNCTION OF THE SEYFERT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS NGC 7469

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markowitz, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present the broadband X-ray power spectral density (PSD) function of the X-ray-luminous Seyfert 1.2 NGC 7469, measured from Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer monitoring data and two XMM-Newton observations. We find significant evidence for a turnover in the 2-10 keV PSD at a temporal frequency of 2.0 +3.0 -0.8 x 10 -6 Hz or 1.0 +3.0 -0.6 x 10 -6 Hz, depending on the exact form of the break (sharply broken or slowly bending power law, respectively). The 'surrogate' Monte Carlo method of Press et al. was used to map out the probability distributions of PSD model parameters and obtain reliable uncertainties (68% confidence limits quoted here). The corresponding break timescale of 5.8 ± 3.5 days or 11.6 +17.5 -8.7 days, respectively, is consistent with the empirical relation between PSD break timescale, black hole mass, and bolometric luminosity of McHardy et al. Compared to the 2-10 keV PSD, the 10-20 keV PSD has a much flatter shape at high temporal frequencies, and no PSD break is significantly detected, suggesting an energy-dependent evolution not unlike that exhibited by several Galactic black hole systems.

  6. Soft x-ray scattering facility at the Advanced Light Source with real-time data processing and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gann, E; Young, A T; Collins, B A; Yan, H; Nasiatka, J; Padmore, H A; Ade, H; Hexemer, A; Wang, C

    2012-04-01

    We present the development and characterization of a dedicated resonant soft x-ray scattering facility. Capable of operation over a wide energy range, the beamline and endstation are primarily used for scattering from soft matter systems around the carbon K-edge (∼285 eV). We describe the specialized design of the instrument and characteristics of the beamline. Operational characteristics of immediate interest to users such as polarization control, degree of higher harmonic spectral contamination, and detector noise are delineated. Of special interest is the development of a higher harmonic rejection system that improves the spectral purity of the x-ray beam. Special software and a user-friendly interface have been implemented to allow real-time data processing and preliminary data analysis simultaneous with data acquisition. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  7. Spatial resolution in depth-controlled surface sensitive x-ray techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, W.B.; Viccaro, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    The spatial resolution along the surface normal and the total depth probed are two important parameters in depth-controlled surface sensitive X-ray techniques employing grazing incidence geometry. The two parameters are analyzed in terms of optical properties (refractive indices) of the media involved and parameters of the incident X-ray beam: beam divergence, X-ray energy, and spectral bandwidth. We derive analytical expressions of the required beam divergence and spectral bandwidth of the incident beam as a function of the two parameters. Sample calculations are made for X-ray energies between 0.1 and 100 keV and for solid Be, Cu, and Au, representing material matrices consisting of low, medium, and high atomic number elements. A brief discussion on obtaining the required beam divergence and spectral bandwidth from present X-ray sources and optics is given

  8. Modern X-ray difraction. X-ray diffractometry for material scientists, physicists, and chemicists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiess, L.; Schwarzer, R.; Behnken, H.; Teichert, G.

    2005-01-01

    The book yields a comprehensive survey over the applications of X-ray diffraction in fields like material techniques, metallurgy, electrotechniques, machine engineering, as well as micro- and nanotechniques. The necessary fundamental knowledge on X-ray diffraction are mediated foundedly and illustratively. Thereby new techniques and evaluation procedures are presented as well as well known methods. The content: Production and properties of X radiation, diffraction of X radiation, hardware for X-ray diffraction, methods of X-ray diffraction, lattice-constant determination, phase analysis, X-ray profile analysis, crystal structure analysis, X-ray radiographic stress analysis, X-ray radiographic texture analysis, crystal orientation determination, pecularities at thin films, small angle scattering

  9. SphinX MEASUREMENTS OF THE 2009 SOLAR MINIMUM X-RAY EMISSION

    OpenAIRE

    Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Gburek, S.; Siarkowski, M.; Kuzin, S.; Farnik, F.; Reale, F.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Bakala, J.; Gryciuk, M.; Podgorski, P.; Sylwester, B.

    2012-01-01

    The SphinX X-ray spectrophotometer on the CORONAS-PHOTON spacecraft measured soft X-ray emission in the 1-15 keV energy range during the deep solar minimum of 2009 with a sensitivity much greater than GOES. Several intervals are identified when the X-ray flux was exceptionally low, and the flux and solar X-ray luminosity are estimated. Spectral fits to the emission at these times give temperatures of 1.7-1.9 MK and emission measures between 4 x 10^47 cm^-3 and 1.1 x 10^48 cm^-3. Comparing Sph...

  10. Measurement of position dependence of spectral distribution in primary X-ray beam of CT system using compton spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Masao; Maeda, Koji; Maeda, Koji

    2005-01-01

    Our purpose is to acquire the diagnostic x-ray spectra of the CT system easily under clinical conditions by Compton scatter spectroscopy using a high resolution Schottky CdTe detector recently developed and to estimate the quality and quantity of these spectra compared the relative exposure measured using an ionization chamber with curves measured by the reconstructed spectra. Although the spectral broadening and the fluctuation were slightly shown, the errors of the relative exposure were under 10%. Though the experimental arrangement of this method is so easy and reconstructed algorithm is simple, these results suggested that this method is little influenced by the variation of dose rates or property of the incident x rays. We therefore propose that the Compton scatter spectroscopy with the newly developed Schottky CdTe detector is suitable for measuring the diagnostic x-ray spectra of the CT system under the clinical conditions and useful for quality assurance and quality control of the clinical x-ray CT system. (author)

  11. Nustar Detection of Hard X-Ray Phase Lags from the Accreting Pulsar GS 0834-430

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Bachetti, Matteo; Harrison, Fiona A.

    2013-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array hard X-ray telescope observed the transient Be/X-ray binary GS 0834-430 during its 2012 outburst-the first active state of this system observed in the past 19 yr. We performed timing and spectral analysis and measured the X-ray spectrum between 3-79 keV w...

  12. Development on the muonic X-ray analysis for planetary materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Kentaro

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional nondestructive element analysis using muons artificially generated by bombarding carbon nuclei with high-energy protons has become realistic. This paper explained the principle of characteristic X-ray element analysis by means of negative muon beams. Next, as the experiments demonstrating the advantages of negative muon characteristic X-rays using the high-intensity proton accelerator facility (J-PARC MUSE), it explained the following experiments: (1) measurement of the depth profile of negative muon characteristic X-ray intensity of B, C, N, O using four-layer simulated samples, (2) negative muon characteristic X-ray analysis of carbonaceous chondrites meteorite (Murchison and Allende meteorite) samples, and (3) negative muon characteristic X-ray measurement of Murchison meteorite enclosed in a glass tube. It also introduced the negative muon characteristic X-ray analysis of carbonaceous chondrite meteorite sample, Jbilet Winselwan, at MuSIC (Muon Science Innovative muon beam channel) of the Research Center for Nuclear Physics of Osaka University. MuSIC increased the negative muon beam intensity by 50 times and introduced a double strip CdTe detector capable of X-ray imaging, aiming at the practical application of three-dimensional nondestructive element analysis. (A.O.)

  13. Solar X-rays from Axions: Rest-Mass Dependent Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Zioutas, Konstantin; Semertzidis, Yannis; Papaevangelou, Thomas; Gardikiotis, Antonios; Dafni, Theopisti; Anastassopoulos, Vassilis

    2010-01-01

    The spectral shape of solar X-rays is a power law. The more active the Sun is, the less steep the distribution. This behaviour can be explained by axion regeneration to X-rays occurring ~400km deep into the photosphere. Their down-comptonization reproduces the measured spectral shape, pointing at axions with rest mass m_a~17 meV/c2, without contradicting astrophysical-laboratory limits. Directly measured soft X-ray spectra from the extremely quiet Sun during 2009 (SphinX mission), though hitherto overlooked, fitt the axion scenario.

  14. Limestone rocks analysis by X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izquierdo M, G.; Ponce R, R.; Vazquez J, J.

    1996-01-01

    By request of a private company, employing basically X-ray fluorescence analysis (X RF), was established a fast and accurate method for the analysis of the major elements in limestone rocks. Additionally, for complementing analysis was determined by ion chromatography, the chlorides appearance and by atomic absorption of sodium. By gravimetry, was determined the losses by ignition and the alpha quartz. (Author)

  15. Tissue chemical analysis with muonic X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutson, R.L.; Reidy, J.J.; Springer, K.; Daniel, H.; Knowles, H.B.

    1976-01-01

    The stopped muon channel at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) was used as a source of muons for studying the elemental composition of tissue with muonic X rays. The X ray spectra from several types of tissue were used to determine the amounts of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen present. These determinations agree with the results of more conventional chemical analysis. The results show that muonic X rays offer a non-invasive technique for determining the amounts of the more abundant elements present in selected regions of the body. (orig.) [de

  16. An X-ray view of the very faint black hole X-ray transient Swift J1357.2-0933 during its 2011 outburst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armas Padilla, M.; Wijnands, R.; Altamirano, D.; Méndez, M.; Miller, J. M.; Degenaar, N.

    We report on the X-ray spectral (using XMM-Newton data) and timing behaviour [using XMM-Newton and Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data] of the very faint X-ray transient and black hole system Swift J1357.2-0933 during its 2011 outburst. The XMM-Newton X-ray spectrum of this source can be

  17. Spectral and Temporal Properties of the Ultra-Luminous X-Ray Pulsar in M82 from 15 Years of Chandra Observations and Analysis of the Pulsed Emission Using NuSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brightman, Murray; Harrison, Fiona; Walton, Dominic J.; Fuerst, Felis; Zezas, Andreas; Bachetti, Matteo; Grefenstette, Brian; Ptak, Andrew; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Yukita, Mihoko

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery by Bachetti et al. of a pulsar in M82 that can reach luminosities of up to 10(exp 40) erg s(exp -1), a factor of approximately 100 times the Eddington luminosity for a 1.4 solar mass compact object, poses a challenge for accretion physics. In order to better understand the nature of this source and its duty cycle, and in light of several physical models that have been subsequently published, we conduct a spectral and temporal analysis of the 0.58 keV X-ray emission from this source from 15 years of Chandra observations. We analyze 19 ACIS observations where the point-spread function (PSF) of the pulsar is not contaminated by nearby sources. We fit the Chandra spectra of the pulsar with a power-law model and a disk blackbody model, subjected to interstellar absorption in M82. We carefully assess for the effect of pile-up in our observations, where four observations have a pile-up fraction of 10, which we account for during spectral modeling with a convolution model. When fitted with a power-law model, the average photon index when the source is at high luminosity (LX greater than 10(exp 39) erg s(exp -1) is equal to gamma 1.33 +/-.0.15. For the disk blackbody model, the average temperature is T(sub in) 3.24 +/- 0.65 keV, the spectral shape being consistent with other luminous X-ray pulsars. We also investigated the inclusion of a soft excess component and spectral break, finding that the spectra are also consistent with these features common to luminous X-ray pulsars. In addition, we present spectral analysis from NuSTAR over the 3-50 keV range where we have isolated the pulsed component. We find that the pulsed emission in this band is best fit by a power-law with a high-energy cutoff, where gamma is equal to 0.6 +/- 0.3 and E(sub C) is equal to 14(exp +5) (sub -3)) keV. While the pulsar has previously been identified as a transient, we find from our longer-baseline study that it has been remarkably active over the 15-year period, where for 9

  18. Long term variability of Cygnus X-1. VI. Energy-resolved X-ray variability 1999-2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grinberg, V.; Pottschmidt, K.; Böck, M.; Schmid, C.; Nowak, M.A.; Uttley, P.; Tomsick, J.A.; Rodriguez, J.; Hell, N.; Markowitz, A.; Bodaghee, A.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Rothschild, R.E.; Wilms, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present the most extensive analysis of Fourier-based X-ray timing properties of the black hole binary Cygnus X-1 to date, based on 12 years of bi-weekly monitoring with RXTE from 1999 to 2011. Our aim is a comprehensive study of timing behavior across all spectral states, including the elusive

  19. Polarization and spectral features of the hard x-ray continuum from non-thermal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesse, M.; Platz, P.

    1989-12-01

    Starting from the cross-sections for the free-free radiation obtained within the relativistic Born-Elwert theory, we calculate the spectral and polarization properties of the hard X-ray continuum (hν > 50 KeV) for plasmas containing fast electrons with an anisotropic velocity distribution. The physical and geometrical quantities of our model are oriented towards the future lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments on Tore-Supra. Our parameter space covers parallel and perpendicular temperatures, the nuclear charge of the ions (mainly Z = 14 and 28), the cut-off energy of the electrons, the radial current profile and the viewing angle. Extensive calculations open on the optimum conditions for polarization measurements and also give guide-lines for the quantitative interpretation of data under real plasma conditions. A second part of this report will treat with the operational principles and expected performances of hard X-ray polarimeters

  20. X-ray spectrometry and X-ray microtomography techniques for soil and geological samples analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubala-Kukuś, A.; Banaś, D.; Braziewicz, J.; Dziadowicz, M.; Kopeć, E.; Majewska, U.; Mazurek, M.; Pajek, M.; Sobisz, M.; Stabrawa, I.; Wudarczyk-Moćko, J.; Góźdź, S.

    2015-01-01

    A particular subject of X-ray fluorescence analysis is its application in studies of the multielemental sample of composition in a wide range of concentrations, samples with different matrices, also inhomogeneous ones and those characterized with different grain size. Typical examples of these kinds of samples are soil or geological samples for which XRF elemental analysis may be difficult due to XRF disturbing effects. In this paper the WDXRF technique was applied in elemental analysis concerning different soil and geological samples (therapeutic mud, floral soil, brown soil, sandy soil, calcium aluminum cement). The sample morphology was analyzed using X-ray microtomography technique. The paper discusses the differences between the composition of samples, the influence of procedures with respect to the preparation of samples as regards their morphology and, finally, a quantitative analysis. The results of the studies were statistically tested (one-way ANOVA and correlation coefficients). For lead concentration determination in samples of sandy soil and cement-like matrix, the WDXRF spectrometer calibration was performed. The elemental analysis of the samples was complemented with knowledge of chemical composition obtained by X-ray powder diffraction.

  1. X-ray spectrometry and X-ray microtomography techniques for soil and geological samples analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubala-Kukuś, A.; Banaś, D.; Braziewicz, J. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, ul. Świetokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Holycross Cancer Center, ul. Artwińskiego 3, 25-734 Kielce (Poland); Dziadowicz, M.; Kopeć, E. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, ul. Świetokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Majewska, U. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, ul. Świetokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Holycross Cancer Center, ul. Artwińskiego 3, 25-734 Kielce (Poland); Mazurek, M.; Pajek, M.; Sobisz, M.; Stabrawa, I. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, ul. Świetokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Wudarczyk-Moćko, J. [Holycross Cancer Center, ul. Artwińskiego 3, 25-734 Kielce (Poland); Góźdź, S. [Holycross Cancer Center, ul. Artwińskiego 3, 25-734 Kielce (Poland); Institute of Public Health, Jan Kochanowski University, IX Wieków Kielc 19, 25-317 Kielce (Poland)

    2015-12-01

    A particular subject of X-ray fluorescence analysis is its application in studies of the multielemental sample of composition in a wide range of concentrations, samples with different matrices, also inhomogeneous ones and those characterized with different grain size. Typical examples of these kinds of samples are soil or geological samples for which XRF elemental analysis may be difficult due to XRF disturbing effects. In this paper the WDXRF technique was applied in elemental analysis concerning different soil and geological samples (therapeutic mud, floral soil, brown soil, sandy soil, calcium aluminum cement). The sample morphology was analyzed using X-ray microtomography technique. The paper discusses the differences between the composition of samples, the influence of procedures with respect to the preparation of samples as regards their morphology and, finally, a quantitative analysis. The results of the studies were statistically tested (one-way ANOVA and correlation coefficients). For lead concentration determination in samples of sandy soil and cement-like matrix, the WDXRF spectrometer calibration was performed. The elemental analysis of the samples was complemented with knowledge of chemical composition obtained by X-ray powder diffraction.

  2. Proton exciting X ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xinpei

    1986-04-01

    The analyzing capability of proton exciting X ray analysis for different elements in organisms was discussed, and dealing with examples of trace element analysis in the human body and animal organisms, such as blood serum, urine, and hair. The sensitivity, accuracy, and capability of multielement analysis were discussed. Its strong points for the trace element analysis in biomedicine were explained

  3. Determination of molybdenite leaching degree by x-ray radiometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibinov, S.A.; Gladyshev, V.P.; Yarmolik, A.S.; Kim, A.Ch.; Sokur, N.P.

    1984-01-01

    A express chemical X-ray radiometric method for determination of leaching degree and analysis of molybdenite products is developed. The method comprises chemical preparation and the following X-ray radiometric determination of molyb bdenum. Total duration of the analysis is 1-1.5 h. The best reproductivity is btained at X-ray radiometric analysis as compared with the chemical one

  4. X-ray spectral study of the Th6p,5f electron states in ThO2 and ThF4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teterin, Y.A.; Nikitin, A.S.; Teterin, A.Y.; Ivanov, K.E.; Utkin, I.O.; Nerehov, V.A.; Ryzhkov, M.V.; Vukchevich, I.J.

    2002-01-01

    The study of the Th6p,5f electron states in Th, ThO 2 and ThF was carried out on the basis of the X-ray photoelectron fine spectral structure parameters in the binding energy range of 0-∼ 1000 eV, X-ray O 4,5 (Th) emission spectra of the shallow (0-∼50 eV) electrons and results of theoretical calculations. As a result, despite the absence of the Th5f electrons in thorium atoms, the Th5f atomic orbitals were established to participate in the formation of molecular orbitals in thorium dioxide and tetrafluoride. In the MO LCAO approximation this allowed to suggest the possible existence of filled Th5f electronic states in thorium compounds. On the basis of the X-ray O 4,5 (Th) emission spectral structure parameters the effective formation of the inner valence molecular orbitals in the studied compounds was confirmed. (authors)

  5. CubeX: The CubeSAT X-ray Telescope for Elemental Abundance Mapping of Airless Bodies and X-ray Pulsar Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittler, L. R.; Hong, J.; Kenter, A.; Romaine, S.; Allen, B.; Kraft, R.; Masterson, R.; Elvis, M.; Gendreau, K.; Crawford, I.; Binzel, R.; Boynton, W. V.; Grindlay, J.; Ramsey, B.

    2017-12-01

    The surface elemental composition of a planetary body provides crucial information about its origin, geological evolution, and surface processing, all of which can in turn provide information about solar system evolution as a whole. Remote sensing X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy has been used successfully to probe the major-element compositions of airless bodies in the inner solar system, including the Moon, near-Earth asteroids, and Mercury. The CubeSAT X-ray Telescope (CubeX) is a concept for a 6U planetary X-ray telescope (36U with S/C), which utilizes Miniature Wolter-I X-ray optics (MiXO), monolithic CMOS and SDD X-ray sensors for the focal plane, and a Solar X-ray Monitor (heritage from the REXIS XRF instrument on NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission). CubeX will map the surface elemental composition of diverse airless bodies by spectral measurement of XRF excited by solar X-rays. The lightweight ( 1 kg) MiXO optics provide sub-arcminute resolution with low background, while the inherently rad-hard CMOS detectors provide improved spectral resolution ( 150 eV) at 0 °C. CubeX will also demonstrate X-ray pulsar timing based deep space navigation (XNAV). Successful XNAV will enable autonomous deep navigation with little to no support from the Deep Space Network, hence lowering the operation cost for many more planetary missions. Recently selected by NASA Planetary Science Deep Space SmallSat Studies, the first CubeX concept, designed to rideshare to the Moon as a secondary spacecraft on a primary mission, is under study in collaboration with the Mission Design Center at NASA Ames Research Center. From high altitude ( 6,000 km) frozen polar circular orbits, CubeX will study > 8 regions ( 110 km) of geological interest on the Moon over one year to produce a high resolution ( 2-3 km) elemental abundance map of each region. The novel focal plane design of CubeX also allows us to evaluate the performance of absolute navigation by sequential observations of several

  6. X- and γ-ray pulsations of the nearby radio-faint PSR J1741–2054

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marelli, M.; Belfiore, A.; Caraveo, P.; De Luca, A.; Salvetti, D. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica Milano, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Saz Parkinson, P. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Sarazin, C.; Sivakoff, G. R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Camilo, F., E-mail: marelli@lambrate.inaf.it [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2014-07-20

    We report the results of a deep XMM-Newton observation of the radio-faint γ-ray pulsar J1741–2054 and its nebula together with the analysis of five years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. The X-ray spectrum of the pulsar is consistent with an absorbed power law plus a blackbody, originating at least partly from the neutron star cooling. The nebular emission is consistent with that of a synchrotron pulsar wind nebula, with hints of spatial spectral variation. We extended the available Fermi LAT ephemeris and folded the γ-ray and X-ray data. We detected X-ray pulsations from the neutron star: both the thermal and non-thermal components are ∼35%-40% pulsed, with phase-aligned maxima. A sinusoid fits the thermal-folded profile well. A 10 bin phase-resolved analysis of the X-ray emission shows softening of the non-thermal spectrum during the on-pulse phases. The radio, X-ray, and γ-ray light curves are single-peaked, not phase-aligned, with the X-ray peak trailing the γ-ray peak by more than half a rotation. Spectral considerations suggest that the most probable pulsar distance is in the 0.3-1.0 kpc range, in agreement with the radio dispersion measure.

  7. X- and γ-ray pulsations of the nearby radio-faint PSR J1741–2054

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marelli, M.; Belfiore, A.; Caraveo, P.; De Luca, A.; Salvetti, D.; Saz Parkinson, P.; Sarazin, C.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Camilo, F.

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of a deep XMM-Newton observation of the radio-faint γ-ray pulsar J1741–2054 and its nebula together with the analysis of five years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. The X-ray spectrum of the pulsar is consistent with an absorbed power law plus a blackbody, originating at least partly from the neutron star cooling. The nebular emission is consistent with that of a synchrotron pulsar wind nebula, with hints of spatial spectral variation. We extended the available Fermi LAT ephemeris and folded the γ-ray and X-ray data. We detected X-ray pulsations from the neutron star: both the thermal and non-thermal components are ∼35%-40% pulsed, with phase-aligned maxima. A sinusoid fits the thermal-folded profile well. A 10 bin phase-resolved analysis of the X-ray emission shows softening of the non-thermal spectrum during the on-pulse phases. The radio, X-ray, and γ-ray light curves are single-peaked, not phase-aligned, with the X-ray peak trailing the γ-ray peak by more than half a rotation. Spectral considerations suggest that the most probable pulsar distance is in the 0.3-1.0 kpc range, in agreement with the radio dispersion measure.

  8. What Can Simbol-X Do for Gamma-ray Binaries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, B.; Dubus, G.; Henri, G.; Hill, A. B.; Szostek, A.

    2009-05-01

    Gamma-ray binaries have been uncovered as a new class of Galactic objects in the very high energy sky (>100 GeV). The three systems known today have hard X-ray spectra (photon index ~1.5), extended radio emission and a high luminosity in gamma-rays. Recent monitoring campaigns of LSI +61°303 in X-rays have confirmed variability in these systems and revealed a spectral hardening with increasing flux. In a generic one-zone leptonic model, the cooling of relativistic electrons accounts for the main spectral and temporal features observed at high energy. Persistent hard X-ray emission is expected to extend well beyond 10 keV. We explain how Simbol-X will constrain the existing models in connection with Fermi Space Telescope measurements. Because of its unprecedented sensitivity in hard X-rays, Simbol-X will also play a role in the discovery of new gamma-ray binaries, giving new insights into the evolution of compact binaries.

  9. What Can Simbol-X Do for Gamma-ray Binaries?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerutti, B.; Dubus, G.; Henri, G.; Hill, A. B.; Szostek, A.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-ray binaries have been uncovered as a new class of Galactic objects in the very high energy sky (>100 GeV). The three systems known today have hard X-ray spectra (photon index ∼1.5), extended radio emission and a high luminosity in gamma-rays. Recent monitoring campaigns of LSI +61 deg. 303 in X-rays have confirmed variability in these systems and revealed a spectral hardening with increasing flux. In a generic one-zone leptonic model, the cooling of relativistic electrons accounts for the main spectral and temporal features observed at high energy. Persistent hard X-ray emission is expected to extend well beyond 10 keV. We explain how Simbol-X will constrain the existing models in connection with Fermi Space Telescope measurements. Because of its unprecedented sensitivity in hard X-rays, Simbol-X will also play a role in the discovery of new gamma-ray binaries, giving new insights into the evolution of compact binaries.

  10. Standard gamma-ray spectra for the comparison of spectral analysis software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, S.; Hemingway, J.; Bowles, N.

    1997-01-01

    Three sets of standard γ-ray spectra have been produced for use in assessing the performance of spectral analysis software. The origin of and rationale behind the spectra are described. Nine representative analysis systems have been tested both in terms of component performance and in terms of overall performance and the problems encountered in the analysis are discussed. (author)

  11. Standard gamma-ray spectra for the comparison of spectral analysis software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, S.; Hemingway, J.; Bowles, N. [and others

    1997-08-01

    Three sets of standard {gamma}-ray spectra have been produced for use in assessing the performance of spectral analysis software. The origin of and rationale behind the spectra are described. Nine representative analysis systems have been tested both in terms of component performance and in terms of overall performance and the problems encountered in the analysis are discussed. (author)

  12. The hard X-ray spectrum of Cyg X-1 during the transition in November 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, M.; Maurus, H.; Urbach, R.

    1976-01-01

    Some observations are reported of the hard X-ray spectrum of Cyg X-1 during a transition to the high state in November 1975, made with a balloon-borne X-ray detector. The range covered was 25 to 150 keV. The data obtained appeared to confirm the characteristic spectral time variation, and suggested a single power law spectrum from 3 to 80 keV, with an increasing spectral index during the upward transition to the high state. A power spectrum is expected if it is assumed that the universe Compton effect is the basic mechanism that produces the hard X-ray tail of Cyg X-1. Spectral time variation may be caused by a varying intensity of an inner soft photon source within a stable hot cloud. (U.K.)

  13. X-ray analysis and mapping by wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in an electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Miyoko; Takeguchi, Masaki; Furuya, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    A compact and easy-to-use wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometer using a multi-capillary X-ray lens attached to a scanning (transmission) electron microscope has been tested for thin-film analysis. B-K spectra from thin-film boron compounds (B 4 C, h-BN, and B 2 O 3 ) samples showed prominent peak shifts and detailed structural differences. Mapping images of a thin W/Si double-layer sample resolved each element clearly. Additionally, a thin SiO 2 film grown on a Si substrate was imaged with O-K X-rays. Energy and spatial resolution of the system is also discussed

  14. a Synoptic Study of AN X-Ray Nova in Outburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, Jeffrey

    Optical studies of X-ray novae in quiescence have yielded compelling evidence for black holes in binary systems. However, X-ray studies in quiescence are severely constrained by the near absence of high energy emission. Thus, further observational advances in black hole astrophysics require a substantial commitment to observe X-ray novae in outburst in just that spectral range accessible to XTE. We propose an agressive campaign of X-ray observations of the next non-pulsing X-ray nova that rises above 3 Crab at 2-10 keV. We further propose a coordinated and intensive campaign of optical and radio observations covering both hemispheres. The observations will provide a full temporal and spectral view of the outburst cycle.

  15. Photometric, Spectroscopic, and X-ray Analysis of the Cool Algol BD+05 706

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, G.; Mader, J.; Marschall, L. A.; Neuhaeuser, R.; Duffy, A. S.

    2000-12-01

    BD+05 706 is an example of a rare class of a dozen or so interacting binaries called ``cool Algols", in which both components of the system are late-type stars. By contrast, the ``classical Algols" are systems in which the star transfering mass is of late spectral type, but the mass gainer is much hotter. BD+05 706 was shown previously to be eclipsing (Marschall, Torres & Neuhaeuser 1998, BAAS, 30, 835). In this paper we report our complete analysis of BVRI light curves for the system obtained at Gettysburg College Observatory, together with spectroscopy from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics reported previously (Torres, Neuhaeuser & Wichmann 1998, AJ, 115, 2028), and X-ray observations obtained with the ROSAT satellite. Our light curve analysis indicates the presence of spots, most likely on the more massive, active component (primary), which change from season to season. Our results confirm the semi-detached nature of the system, and combined with the spectroscopy they have allowed us to obtain the most precise absolute masses and radii for any object of this class. Our X-ray light curve for BD+05 706 shows the primary eclipse clearly, but no sign of a secondary eclipse, confirming that the primary is the active star. Strong X-ray flares are also visible.

  16. Adjustment of a goniometer for X-rays optics calibration in the spectral range 1.5-20 KeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legistre, S.

    1992-10-01

    The aim of this memoir is the adjustment of a (θ, 2θ) goniometer coupled to X-rays source to calibrate mirrors (single layers like C, Ni, Au, etc... and multilayers like C/W, Si/W, etc...) in the spectral range 1.5 - 20 keV. For each kind of tested optics the adjustment of the goniometer include the procedure alignment of the different components (X-ray source, collimation slits, optics, detectors) and the first reflectivity measurements. Those measurements are compared those realized at LURE, using synchrotron radiation provided by SUPER ACO storage ring, and to a theoretical simulation

  17. Interference effects in angular and spectral distributions of X-ray Transition Radiation from Relativistic Heavy Ions crossing a radiator: Influence of absorption and slowing-down

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiks, E.I.; Pivovarov, Yu.L.

    2015-07-15

    Theoretical analysis and representative calculations of angular and spectral distributions of X-ray Transition Radiation (XTR) by Relativistic Heavy Ions (RHI) crossing a radiator are presented taking into account both XTR absorption and RHI slowing-down. The calculations are performed for RHI energies of GSI, FAIR, CERN SPS and LHC and demonstrate the influence of XTR photon absorption as well as RHI slowing-down in a radiator on the appearance/disappearance of interference effects in both angular and spectral distributions of XTR.

  18. Simulation tools for scattering corrections in spectrally resolved x-ray computed tomography using McXtrace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busi, Matteo; Olsen, Ulrik L.; Knudsen, Erik B.; Frisvad, Jeppe R.; Kehres, Jan; Dreier, Erik S.; Khalil, Mohamad; Haldrup, Kristoffer

    2018-03-01

    Spectral computed tomography is an emerging imaging method that involves using recently developed energy discriminating photon-counting detectors (PCDs). This technique enables measurements at isolated high-energy ranges, in which the dominating undergoing interaction between the x-ray and the sample is the incoherent scattering. The scattered radiation causes a loss of contrast in the results, and its correction has proven to be a complex problem, due to its dependence on energy, material composition, and geometry. Monte Carlo simulations can utilize a physical model to estimate the scattering contribution to the signal, at the cost of high computational time. We present a fast Monte Carlo simulation tool, based on McXtrace, to predict the energy resolved radiation being scattered and absorbed by objects of complex shapes. We validate the tool through measurements using a CdTe single PCD (Multix ME-100) and use it for scattering correction in a simulation of a spectral CT. We found the correction to account for up to 7% relative amplification in the reconstructed linear attenuation. It is a useful tool for x-ray CT to obtain a more accurate material discrimination, especially in the high-energy range, where the incoherent scattering interactions become prevailing (>50 keV).

  19. Spectral and Timing Nature of the Symbiotic X-Ray Binary 4U 1954+319: The Slowest Rotating Neutron Star in AN X-Ray Binary System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoto, Teruaki; Sasano, Makoto; Yamada, Shin'Ya; Tamagawa, Toru; Makishima, Kazuo; Pottschmidt, Katja; Marcu, Diana; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Fuerst, Felix; Wilms, Jorn

    2014-01-01

    The symbiotic X-ray binary (SyXB) 4U 1954+319 is a rare system hosting a peculiar neutron star (NS) and an M-type optical companion. Its approx. 5.4 hr NS spin period is the longest among all known accretion-powered pulsars and exhibited large (is approx. 7%) fluctuations over 8 yr. A spin trend transition was detected with Swift/BAT around an X-ray brightening in 2012. The source was in quiescent and bright states before and after this outburst based on 60 ks Suzaku observations in 2011 and 2012. The observed continuum is well described by a Comptonized model with the addition of a narrow 6.4 keV Fe-K alpha line during the outburst. Spectral similarities to slowly rotating pulsars in high-mass X-ray binaries, its high pulsed fraction (approx. 60%-80%), and the location in the Corbet diagram favor high B-field (approx. greater than 10(exp12) G) over a weak field as in low-mass X-ray binaries. The observed low X-ray luminosity (10(exp33)-10(exp35) erg s(exp-1)), probable wide orbit, and a slow stellar wind of this SyXB make quasi-spherical accretion in the subsonic settling regime a plausible model. Assuming a approx. 10(exp13) G NS, this scheme can explain the approx. 5.4 hr equilibrium rotation without employing the magnetar-like field (approx. 10(exp16) G) required in the disk accretion case. The timescales of multiple irregular flares (approx. 50 s) can also be attributed to the free-fall time from the Alfv´en shell for a approx. 10(exp13) G field. A physical interpretation of SyXBs beyond the canonical binary classifications is discussed.

  20. Chandra X-ray Observations of Jovian Low-latitude Emissions: Morphological, Temporal, and Spectral Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Cravens, Thomas E.; Waiate J. Hunter, Jr.; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Ford, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Chandra observed X-rays from Jupiter during 24-26 February 2003 for about 40 hours with the ACIS-S and HRC-I instruments. The analysis of Jovian low-latitude "disk" Xray emissions are presented and compared with the high-latitude "auroral" emissions. We report the first Chandra ACIS-S measured X-ray spectrum (0.3-2 keV) of Jupiter's low-latitude disk The disk X-ray emission is harder and extends to higher energies than the auroral spectrum. The temporal variation in the Jovian disk X-rays is on an average consistent with those in the solar X-rays observed by GOES, and TIMED/SSE. Contrary to the auroral X-rays, the disk emissions are uniformly distributed over Jupiter; no indication of longitudinal dependence or correlation with surface magneh field strength is visible. Also, unlike the approx. 40 +/- 20 min periodic oscillations seen in the auroral X-ray emissions, the disk emissions do not show any periodic oscillations. The disk spectrum seems to be consistent with resonant and fluorescent scattering of solar X-rays by the Jovian upper atmosphere. Jupiter's disk is found to be about 50% dimmer in soft X-rays in February 2003 compared that in December 2000, which is consistent with the decrease in solar activity. No evidence of lightning-induced X-rays is seen in the Chandra X-ray data. The Jovian disk spectra observed with Chandra-ACIS is stronger than that observed with XMM-Newton two months later during April 28-29, 2003. The XMM-Newton Xray image of Jupiter shows evidence of limb darkening on the anti-sunward side as seen from Earth, as well as an asymmetry with respect to the subsolar point: suggesting a solar driven process.

  1. Accurate X-Ray Spectral Predictions: An Advanced Self-Consistent-Field Approach Inspired by Many-Body Perturbation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yufeng; Vinson, John; Pemmaraju, Sri; Drisdell, Walter S; Shirley, Eric L; Prendergast, David

    2017-03-03

    Constrained-occupancy delta-self-consistent-field (ΔSCF) methods and many-body perturbation theories (MBPT) are two strategies for obtaining electronic excitations from first principles. Using the two distinct approaches, we study the O 1s core excitations that have become increasingly important for characterizing transition-metal oxides and understanding strong electronic correlation. The ΔSCF approach, in its current single-particle form, systematically underestimates the pre-edge intensity for chosen oxides, despite its success in weakly correlated systems. By contrast, the Bethe-Salpeter equation within MBPT predicts much better line shapes. This motivates one to reexamine the many-electron dynamics of x-ray excitations. We find that the single-particle ΔSCF approach can be rectified by explicitly calculating many-electron transition amplitudes, producing x-ray spectra in excellent agreement with experiments. This study paves the way to accurately predict x-ray near-edge spectral fingerprints for physics and materials science beyond the Bethe-Salpether equation.

  2. Topics in Astrophysical X-Ray and Gamma Ray Spectroscopy. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussard, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    A number of topics relating to astrophysical observations that have already been made or are currently planned of spectral features, mostly emission lines, in the X-ray and gamma ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum are investigated. These topics include: the production of characteristic X-ray and gamma ray lines by nonthermal ions, spectral features induced by processes occurring in strong magnetic fields, and the positron annihilation line at 0.5 MeV. The rate of X-ray production at 6.8 keV by the 2p to 1s transition in fast hydrogen- and helium-like iron ions, following both electron capture to excited levels and collisional excitation is calculated. The cross section for electron-ion Coulomb collisions in strong fields is also calculated.

  3. Simultaneous analysis of Grazing Incidence X-Ray reflectivity and X-ray standing waves from periodic multilayer systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakunin, S.N.; Makhotkin, Igor Alexandrovich; Chuyev, M.A.; Seregin, A.Y.; Pashayev, E.M.; Louis, Eric; van de Kruijs, Robbert Wilhelmus Elisabeth; Bijkerk, Frederik; Kovalchuk, M.V.

    2012-01-01

    Structural analysis of periodic multilayers with small period thickness (~4 nm) is a challenging task, especially when thicknesses of intermixed interfaces become comparable to individual layer thicknesses. In general, angular dependent X-ray fluorescence measurements, excited by the X-ray standing

  4. Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of Austrian wine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, X.; Kregsamer, P.; Wobrauschek, P.; Streli, C.

    2006-01-01

    The concentration of major, minor and trace elements in Austrian wine was determined by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence using gallium as internal standard. A multi-elemental analysis was possible by pipetting 6 μl of wine directly on the reflector and drying. Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis was performed with Atomika EXTRA II A (Cameca) X-rays from a Mo tube with a high-energy cut-off at 20 keV in total-reflection geometry. The results showed that it was possible to identify only by the elemental analysis as fingerprint the vineyards and year of vintage among 11 different wines

  5. Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of Austrian wine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, X. [Atominstitut der Osterreichischen Universitaeten, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Kregsamer, P. [Atominstitut der Osterreichischen Universitaeten, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Wobrauschek, P. [Atominstitut der Osterreichischen Universitaeten, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Streli, C. [Atominstitut der Osterreichischen Universitaeten, 1020 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: streli@ati.ac.at

    2006-11-15

    The concentration of major, minor and trace elements in Austrian wine was determined by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence using gallium as internal standard. A multi-elemental analysis was possible by pipetting 6 {mu}l of wine directly on the reflector and drying. Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis was performed with Atomika EXTRA II A (Cameca) X-rays from a Mo tube with a high-energy cut-off at 20 keV in total-reflection geometry. The results showed that it was possible to identify only by the elemental analysis as fingerprint the vineyards and year of vintage among 11 different wines.

  6. The X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) for Athena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravera, Laurent; Barret, Didier; Willem den Herder, Jan; Piro, Luigi; Cledassou, Rodolphe; Pointecouteau, Etienne; Peille, Philippe; Pajot, Francois; Arnaud, Monique; Pigot, Claude; hide

    2014-01-01

    Athena is designed to implement the Hot and Energetic Universe science theme selected by the European Space Agency for the second large mission of its Cosmic Vision program. The Athena science payload consists of a large aperture high angular resolution X-ray optics (2 m2 at 1 keV) and twelve meters away, two interchangeable focal plane instruments: the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) and the Wide Field Imager. The X-IFU is a cryogenic X-ray spectrometer, based on a large array of Transition Edge Sensors (TES), oering 2.5 eV spectral resolution, with approximately 5" pixels, over a field of view of 5' in diameter. In this paper, we present the X-IFU detector and readout electronics principles, some elements of the current design for the focal plane assembly and the cooling chain. We describe the current performance estimates, in terms of spectral resolution, effective area, particle background rejection and count rate capability. Finally, we emphasize on the technology developments necessary to meet the demanding requirements of the X-IFU, both for the sensor, readout electronics and cooling chain.

  7. NuSTAR hard X-ray observations of the Jovian magnetosphere during Juno perijove and apojove intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, W.; Mori, K.; Hailey, C. J.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Grefenstette, B.; Jackman, C. M.; Hord, B. J.; Ray, L. C.

    2017-12-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is the first focusing hard X-ray telescope operating in the 3-79 keV band with sub-arcminute angular resolution (18" FWHM). For the first time, NuSTAR provides sufficient sensitivity to detect/resolve hard X-ray emission from Jupiter above 10 keV, since the in-situ Ulysses observation failed to detect X-ray emission in the 27-48 keV band [Hurley et al. 1993]. The initial, exploratory NuSTAR observation of Jupiter was performed in February 2015 with 100 ksec exposure. NuSTAR detected hard X-ray emission (E > 10 keV) from the south polar region at a marginally significance of 3 sigma level [Mori et al. 2016, AAS meeting poster]. This hard X-ray emission is likely an extension of the non-thermal bremsstrahlung component detected up to 7 keV by XMM-Newton [Branduardi-Raymont et al. 2007]. The Ulysses non-detection suggests there should be a spectral cutoff between 7 and 27 keV. Most intriguingly, the NuSTAR detection of hard X-ray emission from the south aurora is in contrast to the 2003 XMM-Newton observations where soft X-ray emission below 8 keV was seen from both the north and south poles [Gladstone et al. 2002]. Given the marginal, but tantalizing, hard X-ray detection of the southern Jovian aurora, a series of NuSTAR observations with total exposure of nearly half a million seconds were approved in the NuSTAR GO and DDT program. These NuSTAR observations coincided with one Juno apojove (in June 2017) and three perijoves (in May, July and September 2017), also joining the multi-wavelength campaigns of observing Jupiter coordinating with Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray telescope (below 10 keV) and HST. We will present NuSTAR imaging, spectral and timing analysis of Jupiter. NuSTAR imaging analysis will map hard X-ray emission in comparison with soft X-ray and UV images. In addition to investigating any distinctions between the soft and hard X-ray morphology of the Jovian aurorae, we will probe whether hard X-ray

  8. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubar, Oleg [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Geloni, Gianluca [European X-ray Free-Electron Laser, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Madsen, Anders [European X-ray Free-Electron Laser, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Shvyd’ko, Yuri, E-mail: shvydko@aps.anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Sutter, John [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-12

    This article explores novel opportunities for ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) at high-repetition-rate self-seeded XFELs. These next-generation light sources are promising a more than three orders of magnitude increase in average spectral flux compared with what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. In combination with the advanced IXS spectrometer described here, this may become a real game-changer for ultra-high-resolution X-ray spectroscopies, and hence for the studies of dynamics in condensed matter systems. Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm{sup −1} spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm{sup −1} are required to close the gap in energy–momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 10{sup 12} photons s{sup −1} in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS.

  9. THE SPECTRAL INDEX PROPERTIES OF FERMI BLAZARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, J. H.; Yang, J. H.; Yuan, Y. H.; Wang, J.; Gao, Y., E-mail: jhfan_cn@yahoo.com.cn [Center for Astrophysics, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2012-12-20

    In this paper, a sample of 451 blazars (193 flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), 258 BL Lacertae objects) with corresponding X-ray and Fermi {gamma}-ray data is compiled to investigate the correlation both between the X-ray spectral index and the {gamma}-ray spectral index and between the spectral index and the luminosity, and to compare the spectral indexes {alpha}{sub X}, {alpha}{sub {gamma}}, {alpha}{sub X{gamma}}, and {alpha}{sub {gamma}X{gamma}} for different subclasses. We also investigated the correlation between the X-ray and the {gamma}-ray luminosity. The following results have been obtained. Our analysis indicates that an anti-correlation exists between the X-ray and the {gamma}-ray spectral indexes for the whole sample. However, when we considered the subclasses of blazars (FSRQs, the low-peaked BL Lacertae objects (LBLs) and the high-peaked BL Lacertae objects (HBLs)) separately, there is not a clear relationship for each subclass. Based on the Fermi-detected sources, we can say that the HBLs are different from FSRQs, while the LBLs are similar to FSRQs.

  10. X-ray structure analysis of soil compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillaev, T.; Kalonov, M.; Kuziev, Sh.; Khatamov, Sh.; Suvanov, M.

    1998-01-01

    The analytic characteristics of techniques developed to analyse soil structure by means of X-ray diffraction method are presented. Presence of 8 minerals in Fergana valley soils have been established. It is shown that X-ray structure analysis of soils gives rise to new original possibilities to determine not only their structure but also quantative content and type of chemical compound of element in soil. (author)

  11. X-ray fluorescent elemental analysis. Ch. 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryshev, V.; Kulipanov, G.; Skrinsky, A.

    1991-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis (XFA) is used worldwide to define a quantitative content of the elements as well as to visualize the distribution of elements in different regions (element mapping). Utilization of synchrotron radiation (SR) to excite X-ray fluorescence enables the XFA method to be qualitatively improved. This chapter reviews the experimental work in especially the last decade (author). 71 refs.; 24 figs.; 3 tabs

  12. Image Analysis for X-ray Imaging of Food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einarsdottir, Hildur

    for quality and safety evaluation of food products. In this effort the fields of statistics, image analysis and statistical learning are combined, to provide analytical tools for determining the aforementioned food traits. The work demonstrated includes a quantitative analysis of heat induced changes......X-ray imaging systems are increasingly used for quality and safety evaluation both within food science and production. They offer non-invasive and nondestructive penetration capabilities to image the inside of food. This thesis presents applications of a novel grating-based X-ray imaging technique...... and defect detection in food. Compared to the complex three dimensional analysis of microstructure, here two dimensional images are considered, making the method applicable for an industrial setting. The advantages obtained by grating-based imaging are compared to conventional X-ray imaging, for both foreign...

  13. Multi-layer x-ray screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabatin, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Rare earth oxyhalide phosphors activated with thulium ion are employed in X-ray intensifying screens having modified ultraviolet emission characteristics which reduce crossover effects without significant reduction in film speed and further increases screen brightness. Relatively low concentration levels of the thulium activator ion have been found to shift the ultraviolet emission of said phosphor when excited by X-rays to lower wavelengths in both the ultraviolet and near-ultraviolet spectral regions

  14. X-ray refractometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tur'yanskij, A.G.; Pirshin, I.V.

    2001-01-01

    Paper introduces a new circuit of X-ray refractometer to study angular and spectral features of refracted radiation within hard X-ray range. Refractometer incorporates two goniometers, two crystal-analyzers and three radiation detectors. The maximum distance between radiation source focal point and a receiving slit of the second goniometer is equal to 1.4 m. For the first time one obtained refraction patterns of fine-film specimens including C/Si stressed structure. Paper describes a new technique of refractometry via specimen oscillation at fixed position of a detecting device. Paper presents the measurement results of oscillation refraction patterns for specimens of melted quartz and ZnSe single crystal [ru

  15. Comprehensive spectral analysis of Cyg X-1 using RXTE data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahid, Rizwan; Jaaffrey, S. N. A.; Misra, Ranjeev

    2012-01-01

    We analyze a large number (> 500) of pointed Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of Cyg X-1 and model the spectrum of each one. A subset of the observations for which there is a simultaneous reliable measure of the hardness ratio by the All Sky Monitor shows that the sample covers nearly all the spectral shapes of Cyg X-1. Each observation is fitted with a generic empirical model consisting of a disk black body spectrum, a Comptonized component whose input photon shape is the same as the disk emission, a Gaussian to represent the iron line and a reflection feature. The relative strength, width of the iron line and the reflection parameter are in general correlated with the high energy photon spectral index Γ. This is broadly consistent with a geometry where for the hard state (low Γ ∼ 1.7) there is a hot inner Comptonizing region surrounded by a truncated cold disk. The inner edge of the disk moves inwards as the source becomes softer till finally in the soft state (high Γ > 2.2) the disk fills the inner region and active regions above the disk produce the Comptonized component. However, the reflection parameter shows non-monotonic behavior near the transition region (Γ ∼ 2), which suggests a more complex geometry or physical state of the reflector. In addition, the inner disk temperature, during the hard state, is on average higher than in the soft one, albeit with large scatter. These inconsistencies could be due to limitations in the data and the empirical model used to fit them. The flux of each spectral component is well correlated with Γ, which shows that unlike some other black hole systems, Cyg X-1 does not show any hysteresis behavior. In the soft state, the flux of the Comptonized component is always similar to the disk one, which confirms that the ultra-soft state (seen in other brighter black hole systems) is not exhibited by Cyg X-1. The rapid variation of the Compton amplification factor with Γ naturally explains the absence of

  16. X-ray spectra of PG quasars. II - the X-ray-ultraviolet excess of PG 1211 + 143

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtold, J.; Czerny, B.; Elvis, M.; Fabbiano, G.; Green, R.F.; Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA; Kitt Peak National Observatory, Tucson, AZ)

    1987-01-01

    Observations of the quasar PG 1211 + 143 are presented and its continuum is modelled in terms of an accretion disk and an underlying power law. The X-ray spectrum in the Einstein imaging proportional counter band is well described by a power law with the very steep spectral index 2.2 + or - 0.4. The overall continuum spectral energy distribution can be described as a power law with alpha roughly 1.2 from the infrared to about 1 keV, with the optical, ultraviolet, and soft X-rays forming a large excess above this power law. If the soft X-ray excess is attributed to emission from a physically thin, optically thick accretion disk, then the implied accretion rate is super-Eddington, from which it is concluded that the application of this simple model is not valid. The observed broad-line ratios in PG 1211 + 143 imply broad-line cloud densities that are somewhat higher than those usually derived for quasars. 82 references

  17. Characteristics of charge coupled devices over X-ray spectral band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishenskij, V O; Volkov, G S; Zajtsev, V I; Zazhivikhin, V V [Troitsk Institute for Thermonuclear and Innovation Investigations (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The results of theoretical and experimental investigation of the sensitivity and spatial resolution of charge coupled devices (CCD) influenced by X-ray quanta are reported. Both a calculation model of the interaction process between the X-ray radiation and the CCD-structure and experimental results of investigation of the CCD characteristics are presented. The theoretical model of interaction between X-ray radiation and CCD is suggested. In accordance with the model, the calculations of CCD sensitivity and spatial resolution, depending on the X-ray energy, are performed. The results of comparison of the calculated and experimental data obtained for linear CCD (LCCD) are presented. The CCD has a maximum sensitivity of approx. (1-2.5) . 10{sup 7} V.cm{sup 2}/J for quanta of energies of 0.5-8 keV. The CCD spatial resolution varies from 15-20 {mu}m (CCD gate size) for quanta of energies less then 4 keV and deteriorates up to 150 {mu}m for harder radiation (20-50 keV). CCD usage as space-resolving detectors for high-power installation diagnostics is presented. Other fields of CCD application for X-ray detection are discussed. Advantages of CCD in comparison with the traditional X-ray films is discussed from this point of view. (author). 4 figs., 3 refs.

  18. Soft x-ray streak cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stradling, G.L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is a discussion of the development and of the current state of the art in picosecond soft x-ray streak camera technology. Accomplishments from a number of institutions are discussed. X-ray streak cameras vary from standard visible streak camera designs in the use of an x-ray transmitting window and an x-ray sensitive photocathode. The spectral sensitivity range of these instruments includes portions of the near UV and extends from the subkilovolt x- ray region to several tens of kilovolts. Attendant challenges encountered in the design and use of x-ray streak cameras include the accommodation of high-voltage and vacuum requirements, as well as manipulation of a photocathode structure which is often fragile. The x-ray transmitting window is generally too fragile to withstand atmospheric pressure, necessitating active vacuum pumping and a vacuum line of sight to the x-ray signal source. Because of the difficulty of manipulating x-ray beams with conventional optics, as is done with visible light, the size of the photocathode sensing area, access to the front of the tube, the ability to insert the streak tube into a vacuum chamber and the capability to trigger the sweep with very short internal delay times are issues uniquely relevant to x-ray streak camera use. The physics of electron imaging may place more stringent limitations on the temporal and spatial resolution obtainable with x-ray photocathodes than with the visible counterpart. Other issues which are common to the entire streak camera community also concern the x-ray streak camera users and manufacturers

  19. Development of a micro-X-ray fluorescence system based on polycapillary X-ray optics for non-destructive analysis of archaeological objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lin; Ding, Xunliang; Liu, Zhiguo; Pan, Qiuli; Chu, Xuelian

    2007-08-01

    A new micro-X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) system based on rotating anode X-ray generator and polycapillary X-ray optics has been set up in XOL Lab, BNU, China, in order to be used for analysis of archaeological objects. The polycapillary X-ray optics used here can focus the primary X-ray beam down to tens of micrometers in diameter that allows for non-destructive and local analysis of sub-mm samples with minor/trace level sensitivity. The analytical characteristics and potential of this micro-XRF system in archaeological research are discussed. Some described uses of this instrument include studying Chinese ancient porcelain.

  20. Development of a micro-X-ray fluorescence system based on polycapillary X-ray optics for non-destructive analysis of archaeological objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Lin [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, Institute of Low Energy Nuclear Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing, 100875 (China)], E-mail: chenglin@bnu.edu.cn; Ding Xunliang; Liu Zhiguo; Pan Qiuli; Chu Xuelian [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, Institute of Low Energy Nuclear Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing, 100875 (China)

    2007-08-15

    A new micro-X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) system based on rotating anode X-ray generator and polycapillary X-ray optics has been set up in XOL Lab, BNU, China, in order to be used for analysis of archaeological objects. The polycapillary X-ray optics used here can focus the primary X-ray beam down to tens of micrometers in diameter that allows for non-destructive and local analysis of sub-mm samples with minor/trace level sensitivity. The analytical characteristics and potential of this micro-XRF system in archaeological research are discussed. Some described uses of this instrument include studying Chinese ancient porcelain.

  1. Correlative Spectral Analysis of Gamma-Ray Bursts using Swift-BAT and GLAST-GBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamatikos, Michael; Sakamoto, Taka; Band, David L.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the preliminary results of spectral analysis simulations involving anticipated correlated multi-wavelength observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) using Swift's Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope's (GLAST) Burst Monitor (GLAST-GBM), resulting in joint spectral fits, including characteristic photon energy (E peak ) values, for a conservative annual estimate of ∼30 GRBs. The addition of BAT's spectral response will (i) complement in-orbit calibration efforts of GBM's detector response matrices, (ii) augment GLAST's low energy sensitivity by increasing the ∼20-100 keV effective area, (iii) facilitate ground-based follow-up efforts of GLAST GRBs by increasing GBM's source localization precision, and (iv) help identify a subset of non-triggered GRBs discovered via off-line GBM data analysis. Such multi-wavelength correlative analyses, which have been demonstrated by successful joint-spectral fits of Swift-BAT GRBs with other higher energy detectors such as Konus-WIND and Suzaku-WAM, would enable the study of broad-band spectral and temporal evolution of prompt GRB emission over three energy decades, thus potentially increasing science return without placing additional demands upon mission resources throughout their contemporaneous orbital tenure over the next decade.

  2. Correlative Spectral Analysis of Gamma-Ray Bursts using Swift-BAT and GLAST-GBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamatikos, Michael; Sakamoto, Takanori; Band, David L.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the preliminary results of spectral analysis simulations involving anticipated correlated multi-wavelength observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) using Swift's Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope's (GLAST) Burst Monitor (GLAST-GBM), resulting in joint spectral fits, including characteristic photon energy (E peak ) values, for a conservative annual estimate of ∼30 GRBs. The addition of BAT/s spectral response will (i) complement in-orbit calibration efforts of GBM's detector response matrices, (ii) augment GLAST's low energy sensitivity by increasing the ∼20-100 keV effective area, (iii) facilitate ground-based follow-up efforts of GLAST GRBs by increasing GBM's source localization precision, and (iv) help identify a subset of non-triggered GRBs discovered via off-line GBM data analysis. Such multi-wavelength correlative analyses, which have been demonstrated by successful joint-spectral fits of Swift-BAT GRBs with other higher energy detectors such as Konus-WIND and Suzaku-WAM, would enable the study of broad-band spectral and temporal evolution of prompt GRB emission over three energy decades, thus potentially increasing science return without placing additional demands upon mission resources throughout their contemporaneous orbital tenure over the next decade

  3. X-Ray Optics: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, William W.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray astronomy started with a small collimated proportional counter atop a rocket in the early 1960s. It was immediately recognized that focusing X-ray optics would drastically improve both source location accuracy and source detection sensitivity. In the past 5 decades, X-ray astronomy has made significant strides in achieving better angular resolution, large photon collection area, and better spectral and timing resolutions, culminating in the three currently operating X-ray observatories: Chandra, XMM/Newton, and Suzaku. In this talk I will give a brief history of X-ray optics, concentrating on the characteristics of the optics of these three observatories. Then I will discuss current X-ray mirror technologies being developed in several institutions. I will end with a discussion of the optics for the International X-ray Observatory that I have been developing at Goddard Space Flight Center.

  4. Quantitative analysis with energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataria, S.K.; Kapoor, S.S.; Lal, M.; Rao, B.V.N.

    1977-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of samples using radioisotope excited energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence system is described. The complete set-up is built around a locally made Si(Li) detector x-ray spectrometer with an energy resolution of 220 eV at 5.94 KeV. The photopeaks observed in the x-ray fluorescence spectra are fitted with a Gaussian function and the intensities of the characteristic x-ray lines are extracted, which in turn are used for calculating the elemental concentrations. The results for a few typical cases are presented. (author)

  5. 1.2. X-ray phase analysis of borosilicate raw material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.; Kurbonov, A.S.; Mamatov, E.D.

    2015-01-01

    Present article is devoted to X-ray phase analysis of borosilicate raw material. The thermo gram of initial borosilicate ore was considered. The X-ray pattern of initial danburite of Ak-Arhar Deposit was considered as well. The X-ray pattern of danburite of Ak-Arhar Deposit after pre-baking was studied. The X-ray pattern of initial danburite concentrate was studied as well.

  6. Spectral filter for splitting a beam with electromagnetic radiation having wavelengths in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) or soft X-Ray (Soft X) and the infrared (IR) wavelength range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, F.A.; Bijkerk, Frederik; van den Boogaard, Toine; van den Boogaard, A.J.R.; van der Meer, R.

    2012-01-01

    Spectral filter for splitting the primary radiation from a generated beam with primary electromagnetic radiation having a wavelength in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV radiation) or soft X-ray (soft X) wavelength range and parasitic radiation having a wavelength in the infrared wavelength range (IR

  7. Characteristics of proportional counters used in X-ray radiometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamikonyan, S.V.; Martishchenko, L.G.; Mel'ttser, L.V.

    1972-01-01

    Counters with extended (up to 10 cm 2 ) apertres have been described and the results obtained are presented. CPM-15 and CPM-16 counters are intended for sensoring and spectral analysis of X-rays in the range of 2.5 to 23 and 2.5 to 15 keV, respectively. The only difference is in the gas composition. The CPM-15 counter is filled with 90 per cent xenon plus 10 per cent methane used as a quenching dopant. The CPM-16 is filled with 90 per cent argon and 10 per cent methane. The life time is 10 10 pulses at 1800 V for CPM-16 and at 2200 V for CPM-15

  8. Broadband X-ray spectra of the ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg IX X-1 observed with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Fuerst, F.; Madsen, K. K.; Rana, V.; Stern, D. [Space Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Miller, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); Bachetti, M.; Barret, D.; Webb, N. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, F. E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Fabian, A. C.; Parker, M. L. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Hailey, C. J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Ptak, A.; Zhang, W. W., E-mail: dwalton@srl.caltech.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-09-20

    We present results from the coordinated broadband X-ray observations of the extreme ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg IX X-1 performed by NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku in late 2012. These observations provide the first high-quality spectra of Holmberg IX X-1 above 10 keV to date, extending the X-ray coverage of this remarkable source up to ∼30 keV. Broadband observations were undertaken at two epochs, between which Holmberg IX X-1 exhibited both flux and strong spectral variability, increasing in luminosity from L {sub X} = (1.90 ± 0.03) × 10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1} to L {sub X} = (3.35 ± 0.03) × 10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1}. Neither epoch exhibits a spectrum consistent with emission from the standard low/hard accretion state seen in Galactic black hole binaries, which would have been expected if Holmberg IX X-1 harbors a truly massive black hole accreting at substantially sub-Eddington accretion rates. The NuSTAR data confirm that the curvature observed previously in the 3-10 keV bandpass does represent a true spectral cutoff. During each epoch, the spectrum appears to be dominated by two optically thick thermal components, likely associated with an accretion disk. The spectrum also shows some evidence for a nonthermal tail at the highest energies, which may further support this scenario. The available data allow for either of the two thermal components to dominate the spectral evolution, although both scenarios require highly nonstandard behavior for thermal accretion disk emission.

  9. Characterizing X-Ray and Radio Emission in the Black Hole X-Ray Binary V404 Cygni During Quiescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Vikram; Loh, Alan; Corbel, Stephane; Tomsick, John A.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Walton, Dominic J.; Barret, Didier; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present results from multi-wavelength simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the black hole X-ray binary V404 Cyg in quiescence. Our coverage with NuSTAR provides the very first opportunity to study the X-ray spectrum of V404 Cyg at energies above 10 keV. The unabsorbed broadband (0.3-30 keV) quiescent luminosity of the source is 8.9 x 10(exp 32) erg per sec for a distance of 2.4 kpc. The source shows clear variability on short timescales (an hour to a couple of hours) in the radio, soft X-ray, and hard X-ray bands in the form of multiple flares. The broadband X-ray spectra obtained from XMM-Newton and NuSTAR can be characterized with a power-law model having a photon index of gamma = 2.12 +/- 0.07 (90% confidence errors); however, residuals at high energies indicate spectral curvature significant at a 3 sigma confidence level with the e-folding energy of the cutoff as 20(sub -7)(sup +20) keV. Such curvature can be explained using synchrotron emission from the base of a jet outflow. Radio observations using the VLA reveal that the spectral index evolves on very fast timescales (as short as 10 minutes), switching between optically thick and thin synchrotron emission, possibly due to instabilities in the compact jet or stochastic instabilities in the accretion rate. We explore different scenarios to explain this very fast variability.

  10. A hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography system for enhanced material identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaomei; Wang, Qian; Ma, Jinlei; Zhang, Wei; Li, Po; Fang, Zheng

    2017-08-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) can distinguish different materials according to their absorption characteristics. The hyperspectral X-ray CT (HXCT) system proposed in the present work reconstructs each voxel according to its X-ray absorption spectral characteristics. In contrast to a dual-energy or multi-energy CT system, HXCT employs cadmium telluride (CdTe) as the x-ray detector, which provides higher spectral resolution and separate spectral lines according to the material's photon-counter working principle. In this paper, a specimen containing ten different polymer materials randomly arranged was adopted for material identification by HXCT. The filtered back-projection algorithm was applied for image and spectral reconstruction. The first step was to sort the individual material components of the specimen according to their cross-sectional image intensity. The second step was to classify materials with similar intensities according to their reconstructed spectral characteristics. The results demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed material identification process and indicated that the proposed HXCT system has good prospects for a wide range of biomedical and industrial nondestructive testing applications.

  11. X-ray optics and X-ray microscopes: new challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susini, J.

    2004-01-01

    Soon after the discovery of X-rays in 1895 by W. Roentgen, it became rapidly clear that the methods traditionally used in the visible light regime, namely refraction, diffraction and reflection were difficult to apply for X-ray optics. The physical origins of these difficulties are closely linked to the very nature of interaction of X-rays with matter. The small deviation δ of the refractive index of condensed matter from unity makes it difficult to extend refraction-based optics from the optical spectral region to the X-ray region because the refraction angle is proportional to δ. Similarly it is very challenging to extend diffraction-based focusing techniques to X-rays because the diffraction angle scales inversely with wavelength. Finally, the use of reflection-based optics is also limited by the very small critical angle for total reflection. All those fundamental limitations prevented for almost one century, the development of X-ray microscopy whereas electron microscopy became a standard tool. In the past twenty years, interests for X-ray microscopy revived, mainly because of several major advances in X-ray sources and X-ray optics. X-ray microscopy techniques are now emerging as powerful and complementary tools for submicron investigations. Soft X-ray microscopes offer traditionally the possibility to form direct images of thick hydrated biological material in near-native environment, at a spatial resolution well beyond that achievable with visible light microscopy. Natural contrast is available in the soft X-ray region, in the so-called ''water-window'', due to the presence of absorption edges of the major constituents (C,N,O). Recent advances in manufacturing techniques have enlarged the accessible energy range of micro-focussing optics and offer new applications in a broad range of disciplines. X-ray microscopy in the 1 - 30 keV energy range is better suited for fluorescence to map trace elements, tomography for 3D imaging and micro-diffraction. The

  12. Twenty-seventh annual conference applications of x-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, G.J.; Ruud, C.O.

    1978-01-01

    Abstracts are presented of papers given at the conference. Topics covered include: special techniques in powder diffraction; specimen handling; x-ray fluorescence applications; applications of XRD and x-ray imaging; progress in the reduction of matrix effects in XRF; evaluation of XRD patterns; XRF innovations; XRD stress analysis and mathematical data analysis

  13. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaelis, W.; Prange, A.

    1987-01-01

    In the past few years, total reflection X-ray flourescence analysis (TXRF) has found an increasing number of assignments and applications. Experience of trace element analysis using TXRF and examples of applications are already widespread. Therefore, users of TXRF had the opportunity of an intensive exchange of their experience at the 1st workshop on total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis which took place on May 27th and 28th 1986 at the GKSS Research Centre at Geesthacht. In a series of lectures and discussions dealing with the analytical principle itself, sample preparation techniques and applications as well as comuter programs for spectrum evaluation, the present state of development and the range of applications were outlined. 3 studies out of a total of 14 were included separately in the INIS and ENERGY databases. With 61 figs., 12 tabs [de

  14. Clusters of galaxies as tools in observational cosmology : results from x-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weratschnig, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. They can be used as ideal tools to study large scale structure formation (e.g. when studying merger clusters) and provide highly interesting environments to analyse several characteristic interaction processes (like ram pressure stripping of galaxies, magnetic fields). In this dissertation thesis, we have studied several clusters of galaxies using X-ray observations. To obtain scientific results, we have applied different data reduction and analysis methods. With a combination of morphological and spectral analysis, the merger cluster Abell 514 was studied in much detail. It has a highly interesting morphology and shows signs for an ongoing merger as well as a shock. using a new method to detect substructure, we have analysed several clusters to determine whether any substructure is present in the X-ray image. This hints towards a real structure in the distribution of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) and is evidence for ongoing mergers. The results from this analysis are extensively used with the cluster of galaxies Abell S1136. Here, we study the ICM distribution and compare its structure with the spatial distribution of star forming galaxies. Cluster magnetic fields are another important topic of my thesis. They can be studied in Radio observations, which can be put into relation with results from X-ray observations. using observational data from several clusters, we could support the theory that cluster magnetic fields are frozen into the ICM. (author)

  15. X-ray instrumentation: monochromators and mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, A.R.D.

    1983-01-01

    The main type of X-ray monochromators used with Synchrotron Radiation are discussed in relation to the energy resolution and to the spectral contamination, as well special systems for applications which require simultaneously high flux and resolution. The characteristics for X-ray mirrors necessaries for its utilization with synchrotron radiation are also analized, as conformators of the beam geometry and spectrum. (L.C.) [pt

  16. X-ray qualitative analysis of low concentration phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brusilovskii, B.A.; Khaet, L.G.

    1993-01-01

    The identification of low concentration phases (LCP) situated at the detection limit of x-ray analysis have not been examined sufficiently. The authors have developed a method of qualitative x-ray analysis of LCPs of the first order (carbides and certain intermetallic compounds) in a multiphase system. X-ray examination of the LCPs consists of analysis of a priori information and formation of the information data on the basis of the profile of the diffraction line with subsequent processing using the F-criterion (Fischer's criterion). If the phase is not detected, consecutive analysis with build up of information is pursued. Results are presented of a successive qualitative phase analysis of a region of quenched layer of a roll situated 10 mm from the surface. Carbide phases were identified in the quenched layer of the roll up to 15 mm deep and in the transition zone 15-35 mm. The proposed method was justified physically and statistically, recommendations for practice were given, and the method was tested and is regarded as promising for detecting weak lines in qualitative diffractometric analysis. 12 refs., 3 tabs

  17. X-ray spectral variability of Seyfert 2 galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-García, L.; Masegosa, J.; González-Martín, O.; Márquez, I.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Variability across the electromagnetic spectrum is a property of active galactic nuclei (AGN) that can help constrain the physical properties of these galaxies. Nonetheless, the way in which the changes happen and whether they occur in the same way in every AGN are still open questions. Aims: This is the third in a series of papers with the aim of studying the X-ray variability of different families of AGN. The main purpose of this work is to investigate the variability pattern(s) in a sample of optically selected Seyfert 2 galaxies. Methods: We use the 26 Seyfert 2s in the Véron-Cetty and Véron catalog with data available from Chandra and/or XMM-Newton public archives at different epochs, with timescales ranging from a few hours to years. All the spectra of the same source were simultaneously fitted, and we let different parameters vary in the model. Whenever possible, short-term variations from the analysis of the light curves and/or long-term UV flux variations were studied. We divided the sample into Compton-thick and Compton-thin candidates to account for the degree of obscuration. When transitions between Compton-thick and thin were obtained for different observations of the same source, we classified it as a changing-look candidate. Results: Short-term variability at X-rays was studied in ten cases, but variations are not found. From the 25 analyzed sources, 11 show long-term variations. Eight (out of 11) are Compton-thin, one (out of 12) is Compton-thick, and the two changing-look candidates are also variable. The main driver for the X-ray changes is related to the nuclear power (nine cases), while variations at soft energies or related to absorbers at hard X-rays are less common, and in many cases these variations are accompanied by variations in the nuclear continuum. At UV frequencies, only NGC 5194 (out of six sources) is variable, but the changes are not related to the nucleus. We report two changing-look candidates, MARK 273 and NGC 7319

  18. Quantitative X ray analysis system. User's manual and guide to X ray fluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This guide covers trimmed and re-arranged version 3.6 of the Quantitative X ray Analysis System (QXAS) software package that includes the most frequently used methods of quantitative analysis. QXAS is a comprehensive quantitative analysis package that has been developed by the IAEA through research and technical contracts. Additional development has also been carried out in the IAEA Laboratories in Seibersdorf where QXAS was extensively tested. New in this version of the manual are the descriptions of the Voigt-profile peak fitting, the backscatter fundamental parameters' and emission-transmission methods of chemical composition analysis, an expanded chapter on the X ray fluorescence physics, and completely revised and increased number of practical examples of utilization of the QXAS software package. The analytical data accompanying this manual were collected in the IAEA Seibersdorf Laboratories in the years 2006/2007

  19. Digital image analysis of X-ray television with an image digitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Yasuo; Akaike, Hisahiko; Ogawa, Hitoshi; Kyuma, Yukishige

    1995-01-01

    When video signals of X-ray fluoroscopy were transformed from analog-to-digital ones with an image digitizer, their digital characteristic curves, pre-sampling MTF's and digital Wiener spectral could be measured. This method was advant ageous in that it was able to carry out data sampling because the pixel values inputted could be verified on a CRT. The system of image analysis by this method is inexpensive and effective in evaluating the image quality of digital system. Also, it is expected that this method can be used as a tool for learning the measurement techniques and physical characteristics of digital image quality effectively. (author)

  20. Capacity of X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wobrauschek, P.; Kregsamer, P.

    1997-01-01

    X-Ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) is a powerful analytical tool for the qualitative and quantitative determination of chemical elements in a sample. Two different detection principles are accepted widely: wavelength dispersive and energy dispersive. Various sources for XRF are discussed: X-ray tubes, accelerators for particle induced XRF, radioactive isotopes, and the use of synchrotron radiation. Applications include environmental, technical, medical, fine art, and forensic studies. Due to the demands of research and application special techniques like total reflection XRF (TXRF) were developed with ultimately achievable detection limits in the femtogram region. The elements detectable by XRF range from Be to U. (author)

  1. X-ray microanalysis of single and cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wroblewski, J.; Roomans, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    X-ray microanalysis of single or cultured cells is often a useful alternative or complement to the analysis of the corresponding tissue. It also allows the analysis of individual cells in a cell population. Preparation for X-ray microanalysis poses a number of typical problems. Suspensions of single cells can be prepared by either of two pathways: (1) washing - mounting - drying, or (2) centrifugation - freezing or fixation - sectioning. The washing step in the preparation of single or cultured cells presents the most severe problems. Cultured cells are generally grown on a substrate that is compatible with both the analysis and the culture, washed and dried. In some cases, sectioning of cultured cell monolayers has been performed. Special problems in quantitative analysis occur in those cases where the cells are analyzed on a thick substrate, since the substrate contributes to the spectral background

  2. The fundamental parameter method applied to X-ray fluorescence analysis with synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantenburg, F. J.; Beier, T.; Hennrich, F.; Mommsen, H.

    1992-05-01

    Quantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis applying the fundamental parameter method is usually restricted to monochromatic excitation sources. It is shown here, that such analyses can be performed as well with a white synchrotron radiation spectrum. To determine absolute elemental concentration values it is necessary to know the spectral distribution of this spectrum. A newly designed and tested experimental setup, which uses the synchrotron radiation emitted from electrons in a bending magnet of ELSA (electron stretcher accelerator of the university of Bonn) is presented. The determination of the exciting spectrum, described by the given electron beam parameters, is limited due to uncertainties in the vertical electron beam size and divergence. We describe a method which allows us to determine the relative and absolute spectral distributions needed for accurate analysis. First test measurements of different alloys and standards of known composition demonstrate that it is possible to determine exact concentration values in bulk and trace element analysis.

  3. High-energy x-ray microscopy with multilayer reflectors (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    A knowledge of the spatial distribution of the x rays emitted by the hot plasma region is a key element in the study of the physical processes occurring in laser-produced plasmas and complements other diagnostics such as spectroscopy and temporal studies. X-ray microscopy with reflection microscopes offers the most direct means of obtaining this information. Until recently, the two types of microscopes that had been developed for this purpose, the Kirkpatrick--Baez and the Wolter, operated at relatively low energies (about 4--5 keV) and had very little spectral selectivity, relying on filters for coarse spectral resolution. With the development of x-ray reflecting multilayer mirrors, the energy response of such microscopes can be extended to 10 keV or higher, with good spectral selectivity. In addition, it is possible to reduce some of the optical aberrations to obtain improved spatial resolution. This paper describes some of the recent progress in making and evaluating x-ray reflectors, and outlines the optical design considerations for multilayer-coated microscopes. Results from a prototype multilayer K--B microscope are presented

  4. Uranium concentrate analysis by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Guerra, J.P.; Bayon, A.; Roca, R.

    1978-01-01

    The determination of As, Ca, Fe, Mo, P, S, Si. Th, V and U in uranium concentrates by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy has been studied. As and U are determined in nitric solutions and for the rest of elements analysis is performed by a bead fusion technique using Li 2 B 4 O 7 and Li 2 CO 3 as fluxes. Although the uranium matrix minimizes the absorption and enhancement effects, because of the content variations of this element it is advisable to operate at a constant level of U 3 O 8 . Despite the high matrix absorption and the large dilution of the samples, sensitivity and speed are found to be satisfactory as the result of the use of a high sensitivity automatic spectrometer. The spectral interferences of Mo on S and P, and of Pb on As have been particularly considered. (author) [es

  5. A guide for approval of x-ray fluorescence analysis devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This guide has been written to assist manufacturers, distributors and users of x-ray fluorescence analysis devices in the preparation of a submission to the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) in support of a request for approval of an x-ray fluorescence analysis device. Prior to the issuance of a Radioisotope licence authorizing the use or possession of an x-ray fluorescence analysis device in Canada, the design and construction of the device must be approved by the AECB. The AECB assessment is limited to the radiation safety aspects of use and packaging for transportation

  6. ACCURATE MODELING OF X-RAY EXTINCTION BY INTERSTELLAR GRAINS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, John; Draine, B. T.

    2016-01-01

    Interstellar abundance determinations from fits to X-ray absorption edges often rely on the incorrect assumption that scattering is insignificant and can be ignored. We show instead that scattering contributes significantly to the attenuation of X-rays for realistic dust grain size distributions and substantially modifies the spectrum near absorption edges of elements present in grains. The dust attenuation modules used in major X-ray spectral fitting programs do not take this into account. We show that the consequences of neglecting scattering on the determination of interstellar elemental abundances are modest; however, scattering (along with uncertainties in the grain size distribution) must be taken into account when near-edge extinction fine structure is used to infer dust mineralogy. We advertise the benefits and accuracy of anomalous diffraction theory for both X-ray halo analysis and near edge absorption studies. We present an open source Fortran suite, General Geometry Anomalous Diffraction Theory (GGADT), that calculates X-ray absorption, scattering, and differential scattering cross sections for grains of arbitrary geometry and composition

  7. ACCURATE MODELING OF X-RAY EXTINCTION BY INTERSTELLAR GRAINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, John; Draine, B. T., E-mail: jah5@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: draine@astro.princeton.edu [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Interstellar abundance determinations from fits to X-ray absorption edges often rely on the incorrect assumption that scattering is insignificant and can be ignored. We show instead that scattering contributes significantly to the attenuation of X-rays for realistic dust grain size distributions and substantially modifies the spectrum near absorption edges of elements present in grains. The dust attenuation modules used in major X-ray spectral fitting programs do not take this into account. We show that the consequences of neglecting scattering on the determination of interstellar elemental abundances are modest; however, scattering (along with uncertainties in the grain size distribution) must be taken into account when near-edge extinction fine structure is used to infer dust mineralogy. We advertise the benefits and accuracy of anomalous diffraction theory for both X-ray halo analysis and near edge absorption studies. We present an open source Fortran suite, General Geometry Anomalous Diffraction Theory (GGADT), that calculates X-ray absorption, scattering, and differential scattering cross sections for grains of arbitrary geometry and composition.

  8. Theory and optical design of x-ray echo spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2017-08-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a space-domain counterpart of neutron spin echo, is a recently proposed inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) technique. X-ray echo spectroscopy relies on imaging IXS spectra and does not require x-ray monochromatization. Due to this, the echo-type IXS spectrometers are broadband, and thus have a potential to simultaneously provide dramatically increased signal strength, reduced measurement times, and higher resolution compared to the traditional narrow-band scanning-type IXS spectrometers. The theory of x-ray echo spectrometers presented earlier [Yu. Shvyd'ko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 080801 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.080801] is developed here further with a focus on questions of practical importance, which could facilitate optical design and assessment of the feasibility and performance of the echo spectrometers. Among others, the following questions are addressed: spectral resolution, refocusing condition, echo spectrometer tolerances, refocusing condition adjustment, effective beam size on the sample, spectral window of imaging and scanning range, impact of the secondary source size on the spectral resolution, angular dispersive optics, focusing and collimating optics, and detector's spatial resolution. Examples of optical designs and characteristics of echo spectrometers with 1-meV and 0.1-meV resolutions are presented.

  9. X-ray emission spectroscopy. X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despujols, J.

    1992-01-01

    Principles of X-ray emission spectrometry are first recalled, then wave-length dispersive and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer are described. They are essentially designed for qualitative and quantitative analysis of elements (Z>10). Sample preparation, calibration, corrections, interferences, accuracy are reviewed. Examples of use in different industries are given. (71 refs.)

  10. Experimental studies of x-ray laser spectral profiles: Observation of gain narrowing and saturation behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, J.A.; MacGowan, B.J.; Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L.; Mrowka, S.; Underwood, J.H.; Batson, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    We discuss our recent measurements of the spectral width of the 206.38 Angstrom x-ray laser transition in Ne-like Se. These measurements used a high-resolution grating spectrometer and were performed over a wide range of laser amplifier lengths. The data have enabled us to extrapolate the intrinsic line width and to observe the effects of gain-narrowing and saturation on the line profile. We find an intrinsic width which is 1.4 times the Doppler width, we observe gain-narrowing in intermediate length amplifiers, and we observe no re-broadening in long, saturated amplifiers. These results suggest that collisional line-broadening has a significant effect on the line profile and saturation behavior of this laser. We discuss modeling we have performed in order to simulate the experimental data, and we discuss future experimental and theoretical efforts we believe are necessary in order to understand line broadening and line transfer issues in x-ray laser plasmas

  11. Characteristics of a molybdenum X-pinch X-ray source as a probe source for X-ray diffraction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchini, F.; Chauvin, C.; Combes, P.; Sol, D.; Loyen, A.; Roques, B.; Grunenwald, J.; Bland, S. N.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray emission from a molybdenum X-pinch has been investigated as a potential probe for the high pressure states made in dynamic compression experiments. Studies were performed on a novel 300 kA, 400 ns generator which coupled the load directly to a low inductance capacitor and switch combination. The X-pinch load consisted of 4 crossed molybdenum wires of 13 μm diameter, crossed at an angle of 62°. The load height was 10 mm. An initial x-ray burst generated at the wire crossing point, radiated in the soft x-ray range (hυ < 10 keV). This was followed, 2–5 ns later, by at least one harder x-ray burst (hυ > 10 keV) whose power ranged from 1 to 7 MW. Time integrated spectral measurements showed that the harder bursts were dominated by K-alpha emission; though, a lower level, wide band continuum up to at least 30 keV was also present. Initial tests demonstrated that the source was capable of driving Laue diffraction experiments, probing uncompressed samples of LiF and aluminium

  12. Kharkov X-ray Generator Based On Compton Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbakov, A.; Zelinsky, A.; Mytsykov, A.; Gladkikh, P.; Karnaukhov, I.; Lapshin, V.; Telegin, Y.; Androsov, V.; Bulyak, E.; Botman, J.I.M.; Tatchyn, R.; Lebedev, A.

    2004-01-01

    Nowadays X-ray sources based on storage rings with low beam energy and Compton scattering of intense laser beams are under development in several laboratories. An international cooperative project of an advanced X-ray source of this type at the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) is described. The status of the project is reviewed. The design lattice of the storage ring and calculated X-ray beam parameters are presented. The results of numerical simulation carried out for proposed facility show a peak spectral X-ray intensity of about 1014 can be produced

  13. INTEGRAL hard X-ray spectra of the cosmic X-ray background and Galactic ridge emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türler, M.; Chernyakova, M.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.; Lubiński, P.; Neronov, A.; Produit, N.; Walter, R.

    2010-03-01

    Aims: We derive the spectra of the cosmic X-ray background (CXB) and of the Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE) in the ~20-200 keV range from the data of the IBIS instrument aboard the INTEGRAL satellite obtained during the four dedicated Earth-occultation observations in early 2006. Methods: We analyze the modulation of the IBIS/ISGRI detector counts induced by the passage of the Earth through the field of view of the instrument. Unlike previous studies, we do not fix the spectral shape of the various contributions, but model instead their spatial distribution and derive for each of them the expected modulation of the detector counts. The spectra of the diffuse emission components are obtained by fitting the normalizations of the model lightcurves to the observed modulation in different energy bins. Because of degeneracy, we guide the fits with a realistic choice of the input parameters and a constraint for spectral smoothness. Results: The obtained CXB spectrum is consistent with the historic HEAO-1 results and falls slightly below the spectrum derived with Swift/BAT. A 10% higher normalization of the CXB cannot be completely excluded, but it would imply an unrealistically high albedo of the Earth. The derived spectrum of the GRXE confirms the presence of a minimum around 80 keV with improved statistics and yields an estimate of ~0.6 M⊙ for the average mass of white dwarfs in the Galaxy. The analysis also provides updated normalizations for the spectra of the Earth's albedo and the cosmic-ray induced atmospheric emission. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the potential of INTEGRAL Earth-occultation observations to derive the hard X-ray spectra of three fundamental components: the CXB, the GRXE and the Earth emission. Further observations would be extremely valuable to confirm our results with improved statistics.

  14. Parameters estimation for X-ray sources: positions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avni, Y.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that the sizes of the positional error boxes for x-ray sources can be determined by using an estimation method which we have previously formulated generally and applied in spectral analyses. It is explained how this method can be used by scanning x-ray telescopes, by rotating modulation collimators, and by HEAO-A (author)

  15. Description of CORSET: a computer program for quantitative x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stohl, F.V.

    1980-08-01

    Quantitative x-ray fluorescence analysis requires a method of correcting for absorption and secondary fluorescence effects due to the sample matrix. The computer program CORSET carries out these corrections without requiring a knowledge of the spectral distribution of the x-ray source, and only requires one standard per element or one standard containing all the elements. Sandia's version of CORSET has been divided into three separate programs to fit Sandia's specific requirements for on-line analysis in a melt facility. The melt facility is used to fabricate new alloys with very variable compositions and requires very rapid analyses during a run. Therefore, the standards must be analyzed several days in advance. Program DAT1 is used to set up a permanent file consisting of all the data related to the standards. Program UNINT is used to set up a permanent file with the intensities, background counts and counting times of the unknowns. Program CORSET uses the files created in UNINT and DAT1 to carry out the analysis. This report contains descriptions, listings, and sample runs for these programs. The accuracy of the analyses carried out with these three programs is about 1 to 2% relative with an elemental concentration of about 10 wt %

  16. X-ray grating spectrometer for opacity measurements in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range at the LULI 2000 laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverdin, Charles; Thais, Frédéric; Loisel, Guillaume; Busquet, M; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S; Blenski, T; Caillaud, T; Ducret, J E; Foelsner, W; Gilles, D; Gilleron, F; Pain, J C; Poirier, M; Serres, F; Silvert, V; Soullie, G; Turck-Chieze, S; Villette, B

    2012-10-01

    An x-ray grating spectrometer was built in order to measure opacities in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range with an average spectral resolution ∼ 50. It has been used at the LULI-2000 laser facility at École Polytechnique (France) to measure the Δn = 0, n = 3 transitions of several elements with neighboring atomic number: Cr, Fe, Ni, and Cu in the same experimental conditions. Hence a spectrometer with a wide spectral range is required. This spectrometer features one line of sight looking through a heated sample at backlighter emission. It is outfitted with one toroidal condensing mirror and several flat mirrors cutting off higher energy photons. The spectral dispersion is obtained with a flatfield grating. Detection consists of a streak camera sensitive to soft x-ray radiation. Some experimental results showing the performance of this spectrometer are presented.

  17. X-ray grating spectrometer for opacity measurements in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range at the LULI 2000 laser facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reverdin, Charles; Caillaud, T.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J. C.; Silvert, V.; Soullie, G.; Villette, B.; Thais, Frédéric; Loisel, Guillaume; Blenski, T.; Poirier, M.; Busquet, M.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Serres, F.; Ducret, J. E.; Foelsner, W.; Gilles, D.; Turck-Chieze, S.

    2012-01-01

    An x-ray grating spectrometer was built in order to measure opacities in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range with an average spectral resolution ∼ 50. It has been used at the LULI-2000 laser facility at École Polytechnique (France) to measure the Δn = 0, n = 3 transitions of several elements with neighboring atomic number: Cr, Fe, Ni, and Cu in the same experimental conditions. Hence a spectrometer with a wide spectral range is required. This spectrometer features one line of sight looking through a heated sample at backlighter emission. It is outfitted with one toroidal condensing mirror and several flat mirrors cutting off higher energy photons. The spectral dispersion is obtained with a flatfield grating. Detection consists of a streak camera sensitive to soft x-ray radiation. Some experimental results showing the performance of this spectrometer are presented.

  18. X-ray grating spectrometer for opacity measurements in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range at the LULI 2000 laser facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reverdin, Charles; Caillaud, T.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J. C.; Silvert, V.; Soullie, G.; Villette, B. [CEA, DAM, DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France); Thais, Frederic; Loisel, Guillaume; Blenski, T.; Poirier, M. [CEA, DSM, IRAMIS, Service Photons, Atomes et Molecules, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Busquet, M. [ARTEP Inc, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042 (United States); Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Serres, F. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Ducret, J. E. [CELIA, UMR5107, CEA, CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, 33400 Talence (France); Foelsner, W. [Max Planck Instituet fuer Quantum Optik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Gilles, D.; Turck-Chieze, S. [CEA, DSM, IRFU, Service d' astrophysique, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2012-10-15

    An x-ray grating spectrometer was built in order to measure opacities in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range with an average spectral resolution {approx} 50. It has been used at the LULI-2000 laser facility at Ecole Polytechnique (France) to measure the {Delta}n = 0, n = 3 transitions of several elements with neighboring atomic number: Cr, Fe, Ni, and Cu in the same experimental conditions. Hence a spectrometer with a wide spectral range is required. This spectrometer features one line of sight looking through a heated sample at backlighter emission. It is outfitted with one toroidal condensing mirror and several flat mirrors cutting off higher energy photons. The spectral dispersion is obtained with a flatfield grating. Detection consists of a streak camera sensitive to soft x-ray radiation. Some experimental results showing the performance of this spectrometer are presented.

  19. X-ray absorption spectroscopy using a self-seeded soft X-ray free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroll, Thomas; Kern, Jan; Kubin, Markus; Ratner, Daniel; Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin D.; Löchel, Heike; Krzywinski, Jacek; Lutman, Alberto; Ding, Yuantao; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Moeller, Stefan; Turner, Joshua J.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Nordlund, Dennis L.; Rehanek, Jens; Weniger, Christian; Firsov, Alexander; Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Hill, Ethan; Borovik, Andrew; Erko, Alexei; Föhlisch, Alexander; Mitzner, Rolf; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Wernet, Philippe; Bergmann, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 Optical Society of America. X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) enable unprecedented new ways to study the electronic structure and dynamics of transition metal systems. L-edge absorption spectroscopy is a powerful technique for such studies and the feasibility of this method at XFELs for solutions and solids has been demonstrated. However, the required x-ray bandwidth is an order of magnitude narrower than that of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), and additional monochromatization is needed. Here we compare L-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of a prototypical transition metal system based on monochromatizing the SASE radiation of the linac coherent light source (LCLS) with a new technique based on self-seeding of LCLS. We demonstrate how L-edge XAS can be performed using the self-seeding scheme without the need of an additional beam line monochromator. We show how the spectral shape and pulse energy depend on the undulator setup and how this affects the x-ray spectroscopy measurements.

  20. Solar X-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urnov, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    In the popular form the consideration is given to the modern state tasks and results of X-ray spectrometry of solar bursts. The operation of X-ray spectroheliograph is described. Results of spectral and polarization measurings of X-ray radiation of one powerful solar burst are presented. The conclusion has been drawn that in the process of burst development three characteristic stages may be distingwished: 1) the initial phase; just in this period processes which lead to observed consequences-electromagnetic and corpuscular radiation are born; 2) the impulse phase, or the phase of maximum, is characterised by sharp increase of radiation flux. During this phase the main energy content emanates and some volumes of plasma warm up to high temperatures; 3) the phase of burst damping, during which plasma cools and reverts to the initial condition

  1. Kinematic X-Ray Analysis Apparatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Brinkgreve, P.

    1983-01-01

    In an X-ray analysis apparatus, a moving mechanism is provided by a main guide member along which a main slide device can be displaced. Rotatably connected with the main slide device is a detector guide member along which a detection slide device is displaced. The main slide device, as well as the

  2. Ultrabright multikilovolt coherent tunable x-ray source at λ ∼ 2.71-2.93 A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisov, Alex B; Song Xiangyang; Frigeni, Fabrizio; Koshman, Yevgeniya; Dai Yang; Boyer, Keith; Rhodes, Charles K

    2003-01-01

    Detailed molecular structural information of the living state is of enormous significance to the medical and biological communities. Since hydrated biologically active structures are small delicate complex three-dimensional (3D) entities, it is essential to have molecular scale spatial resolution, high contrast, distortionless, direct 3D modalities of visualization of naturally functioning specimens in order to faithfully reveal their full molecular architectures. An x-ray holographic microscope equipped with an x-ray laser as the illuminator would be uniquely capable of providing these images. A quantitative interlocking concordance of physical evidence, that includes (a) the observation of strong enhancement of selected spectral components of several Xe q+ hollow-atom transition arrays (q = 31, 32, 34, 35, 36, 37) radiated axially from confined plasma channels, (b) the measurement of line narrowing that is spectrally correlated with the amplified transitions, (c) evidence for spectral hole-burning in the spontaneous emission, a manifestation of saturated amplification, that corresponds spectrally with the amplified lines, and (d) the detection of an intense narrow (δθ x ∼ 0.2 mrad) directed beam of radiation, (1) experimentally demonstrates in the λ ∼ 2.71-2.93 A range (h-bar ω x ∼ = 4230-4570 eV) the operation of a new concept capable of producing the ideal conditions for amplification of multikilovolt x-rays and (2) proves the feasibility of a compact x-ray illuminator that can cost-effectively achieve the mission of biological x-ray microholography. The measurements also (α) establish the property of tunability in the quantum energy over a substantial fraction of the spectral region exhibiting amplification (Δ h-bar ω x ∼ 345 eV) and (β) demonstrate the coherence of the x-ray output through the observation of a canonical spatial mode pattern. An analysis of the physical scaling revealed by these results indicates that the capability of the x-ray

  3. Spectral state transitions of the Ultraluminous X-ray Source IC 342 X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, H.; Kaaret, P.; Lang, C.; Feng, H.; Grisé, F.; Miller, N.; Cseh, D.; Corbel, S.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    2014-10-01

    We observed the Ultraluminous X-ray Source (ULX) IC 342 X-1 simultaneously in X-ray and radio with Chandra and the JVLA to investigate previously reported unresolved radio emission coincident with the ULX. The Chandra data reveal a spectrum that is much softer than observed previously and is well modelled by a thermal accretion disc spectrum. No significant radio emission above the rms noise level was observed within the region of the ULX, consistent with the interpretation as a thermal state though other states cannot be entirely ruled out with the current data. We estimate the mass of the black hole using the modelled inner disc temperature to be 30 M_{⊙} ≲ M√{cosi}≲ 200 M_{⊙} based on a Shakura-Sunyaev disc model. Through a study of the hardness and high-energy curvature of available X-ray observations, we find that the accretion state of X-1 is not determined by luminosity alone.

  4. HIGH-RESOLUTION X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY REVEALS THE SPECIAL NATURE OF WOLF-RAYET STAR WINDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oskinova, L. M.; Hamann, W.-R. [Institute for Physics and Astronomy, University Potsdam, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Gayley, K. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52245 (United States); Huenemoerder, D. P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 70 Vassar St., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Ignace, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37663 (United States); Pollock, A. M. T., E-mail: lida@astro.physik.uni-potsdam.de [European Space Agency XMM-Newton Science Operations Centre, European Space Astronomy Centre, Apartado 78, Villanueva de la Canada, 28691 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-03-10

    We present the first high-resolution X-ray spectrum of a putatively single Wolf-Rayet (WR) star. 400 ks observations of WR 6 by the XMM-Newton telescope resulted in a superb quality high-resolution X-ray spectrum. Spectral analysis reveals that the X-rays originate far out in the stellar wind, more than 30 stellar radii from the photosphere, and thus outside the wind acceleration zone where the line-driving instability (LDI) could create shocks. The X-ray emitting plasma reaches temperatures up to 50 MK and is embedded within the unshocked, 'cool' stellar wind as revealed by characteristic spectral signatures. We detect a fluorescent Fe line at Almost-Equal-To 6.4 keV. The presence of fluorescence is consistent with a two-component medium, where the cool wind is permeated with the hot X-ray emitting plasma. The wind must have a very porous structure to allow the observed amount of X-rays to escape. We find that neither the LDI nor any alternative binary scenario can explain the data. We suggest a scenario where X-rays are produced when the fast wind rams into slow 'sticky clumps' that resist acceleration. Our new data show that the X-rays in single WR star are generated by some special mechanism different from the one operating in the O-star winds.

  5. Spectral analysis of the structure of ultradispersed diamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uglov, V. V.; Shimanski, V. I.; Rusalsky, D. P.; Samtsov, M. P.

    2008-07-01

    The structure of ultradispersed diamonds (UDD) is studied by spectral methods. The presence of diamond crystal phase in the UDD is found based on x-ray analysis and Raman spectra. The Raman spectra also show sp2-and sp3-hybridized carbon. Analysis of IR absorption spectra suggests that the composition of functional groups present in the particles changes during the treatment.

  6. Flat Field Anomalies in an X-Ray CCD Camera Measured Using a Manson X-Ray Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael Haugh

    2008-01-01

    The Static X-ray Imager (SXI) is a diagnostic used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the position of the X-rays produced by lasers hitting a gold foil target. It determines how accurately NIF can point the laser beams and is critical to proper NIF operation. Imagers are located at the top and the bottom of the NIF target chamber. The CCD chip is an X-ray sensitive silicon sensor, with a large format array (2k x 2k), 24 (micro)m square pixels, and 15 (micro)m thick. A multi-anode Manson X-ray source, operating up to 10kV and 2mA, was used to characterize and calibrate the imagers. The output beam is heavily filtered to narrow the spectral beam width, giving a typical resolution E/ΔE ∼ 12. The X-ray beam intensity was measured using an absolute photodiode that has accuracy better than 1% up to the Si K edge and better than 5% at higher energies. The X-ray beam provides full CCD illumination and is flat, within ±1.5% maximum to minimum. The spectral efficiency was measured at 10 energy bands ranging from 930 eV to 8470 eV. The efficiency pattern follows the properties of Si. The maximum quantum efficiency is 0.71. We observed an energy dependent pixel sensitivity variation that showed continuous change over a large portion of the CCD. The maximum sensitivity variation was >8% at 8470 eV. The geometric pattern did not change at lower energies, but the maximum contrast decreased and was less than the measurement uncertainty below 4 keV. We were also able to observe debris on the CCD chip. The debris showed maximum contrast at the lowest energy used, 930 eV, and disappeared by 4 keV. The Manson source is a powerful tool for characterizing the imaging errors of an X-ray CCD imager. These errors are quite different from those found in a visible CCD imager

  7. Understanding the spectral and timing behaviour of a newly discovered transient X-ray pulsar Swift J0243.6+6124

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaisawal, Gaurava K.; Naik, Sachindra; Chenevez, Jérôme

    2018-01-01

    We present the results obtained from timing and spectral studies of the newly discovered accreting X-ray binary pulsar Swift J0243.6+6124 using Nuclear Spectroscopy Telescope Array observation in 2017 October at a flux level of ~280 mCrab. Pulsations at 9.854 23(5) s were detected in the X......-ray light curves of the pulsar. Pulse profiles of the pulsar were found to be strongly energy dependent. A broad profile at lower energies was found to evolve into a double-peaked profile in ≥ 30 keV. The 3-79 keV continuum spectrum of the pulsar was well described with a negative and positive exponential...

  8. X-ray trace element analysis with positive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, R.H.

    1973-01-01

    A new trace element analysis having the advantage that many elements may be detected in a single measurement, based on positive charged particle induced X-ray florescence and on the production of X-rays by heavy ions, is described. Because of the large cross-sections for the production of discrete X-ray and the low yield of continuum radiation, positive charged particle X-ray florescence is a competitive, fast, analytic tool. In the experiment a beam of positive charged particles from an accelerator was directed toward a target. X-rays induced by the bombardment were detected by a Si(Li) detector the ouput from which was amplified and sorted in a multichannel analyzer. For rapid data handling and analysis, the multichannel analyzer or ADC unit was connected to an on-line computer. A large variety of targets prepared in collaboration with the oceanographers have been studied and spectra obtained for different particles having the same velocity are presented to show that the yield of discrete X-rays increases at least as rapidly as Z 2 . While protons of several MeV appear to be already competitive further advantage may be gained by heavy ions at lower energies since the continuum is reduced while the peak ''signals'' retain strength due to the Z 2 dependence. (S.B.)

  9. SphinX MEASUREMENTS OF THE 2009 SOLAR MINIMUM X-RAY EMISSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Gburek, S.; Siarkowski, M.; Bakała, J.; Gryciuk, M.; Podgorski, P.; Sylwester, B.; Kuzin, S.; Farnik, F.; Reale, F.; Phillips, K. J. H.

    2012-01-01

    The SphinX X-ray spectrophotometer on the CORONAS-PHOTON spacecraft measured soft X-ray emission in the 1-15 keV energy range during the deep solar minimum of 2009 with a sensitivity much greater than GOES. Several intervals are identified when the X-ray flux was exceptionally low, and the flux and solar X-ray luminosity are estimated. Spectral fits to the emission at these times give temperatures of 1.7-1.9 MK and emission measures between 4 × 10 47 cm –3 and 1.1 × 10 48 cm –3 . Comparing SphinX emission with that from the Hinode X-ray Telescope, we deduce that most of the emission is from general coronal structures rather than confined features like bright points. For one of 27 intervals of exceptionally low activity identified in the SphinX data, the Sun's X-ray luminosity in an energy range roughly extrapolated to that of ROSAT (0.1-2.4 keV) was less than most nearby K and M dwarfs.

  10. SphinX Measurements of the 2009 Solar Minimum X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Gburek, S.; Siarkowski, M.; Kuzin, S.; Farnik, F.; Reale, F.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Bakała, J.; Gryciuk, M.; Podgorski, P.; Sylwester, B.

    2012-06-01

    The SphinX X-ray spectrophotometer on the CORONAS-PHOTON spacecraft measured soft X-ray emission in the 1-15 keV energy range during the deep solar minimum of 2009 with a sensitivity much greater than GOES. Several intervals are identified when the X-ray flux was exceptionally low, and the flux and solar X-ray luminosity are estimated. Spectral fits to the emission at these times give temperatures of 1.7-1.9 MK and emission measures between 4 × 1047 cm-3 and 1.1 × 1048 cm-3. Comparing SphinX emission with that from the Hinode X-ray Telescope, we deduce that most of the emission is from general coronal structures rather than confined features like bright points. For one of 27 intervals of exceptionally low activity identified in the SphinX data, the Sun's X-ray luminosity in an energy range roughly extrapolated to that of ROSAT (0.1-2.4 keV) was less than most nearby K and M dwarfs.

  11. SphinX MEASUREMENTS OF THE 2009 SOLAR MINIMUM X-RAY EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Gburek, S.; Siarkowski, M.; Bakala, J.; Gryciuk, M.; Podgorski, P.; Sylwester, B. [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, 51-622, Kopernika 11, Wroclaw (Poland); Kuzin, S. [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute (FIAN), Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Farnik, F. [Astronomical Institute, Ondrejov Observatory (Czech Republic); Reale, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Palermo, Palermo, Italy, and INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Phillips, K. J. H., E-mail: js@cbk.pan.wroc.pl [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-01

    The SphinX X-ray spectrophotometer on the CORONAS-PHOTON spacecraft measured soft X-ray emission in the 1-15 keV energy range during the deep solar minimum of 2009 with a sensitivity much greater than GOES. Several intervals are identified when the X-ray flux was exceptionally low, and the flux and solar X-ray luminosity are estimated. Spectral fits to the emission at these times give temperatures of 1.7-1.9 MK and emission measures between 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 47} cm{sup -3} and 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 48} cm{sup -3}. Comparing SphinX emission with that from the Hinode X-ray Telescope, we deduce that most of the emission is from general coronal structures rather than confined features like bright points. For one of 27 intervals of exceptionally low activity identified in the SphinX data, the Sun's X-ray luminosity in an energy range roughly extrapolated to that of ROSAT (0.1-2.4 keV) was less than most nearby K and M dwarfs.

  12. Pixel detectors for x-ray imaging spectroscopy in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treis, J; Andritschke, R; Hartmann, R; Herrmann, S; Holl, P; Lauf, T; Lechner, P; Lutz, G; Meidinger, N; Porro, M; Richter, R H; Schopper, F; Soltau, H; Strueder, L

    2009-01-01

    Pixelated semiconductor detectors for X-ray imaging spectroscopy are foreseen as key components of the payload of various future space missions exploring the x-ray sky. Located on the platform of the new Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma satellite, the eROSITA (extended Roentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array) instrument will perform an imaging all-sky survey up to an X-ray energy of 10 keV with unprecedented spectral and angular resolution. The instrument will consist of seven parallel oriented mirror modules each having its own pnCCD camera in the focus. The satellite born X-ray observatory SIMBOL-X will be the first mission to use formation-flying techniques to implement an X-ray telescope with an unprecedented focal length of around 20 m. The detector instrumentation consists of separate high- and low energy detectors, a monolithic 128 x 128 DEPFET macropixel array and a pixellated CdZTe detector respectively, making energy band between 0.5 to 80 keV accessible. A similar concept is proposed for the next generation X-ray observatory IXO. Finally, the MIXS (Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer) instrument on the European Mercury exploration mission BepiColombo will use DEPFET macropixel arrays together with a small X-ray telescope to perform a spatially resolved planetary XRF analysis of Mercury's crust. Here, the mission concepts and their scientific targets are briefly discussed, and the resulting requirements on the detector devices together with the implementation strategies are shown.

  13. Pixel detectors for x-ray imaging spectroscopy in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treis, J; Andritschke, R; Hartmann, R; Herrmann, S; Holl, P; Lauf, T; Lechner, P; Lutz, G; Meidinger, N; Porro, M; Richter, R H; Schopper, F; Soltau, H; Strueder, L [MPI Semiconductor Laboratory, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, D-81739 Munich (Germany)], E-mail: jft@hll.mpg.de

    2009-03-15

    Pixelated semiconductor detectors for X-ray imaging spectroscopy are foreseen as key components of the payload of various future space missions exploring the x-ray sky. Located on the platform of the new Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma satellite, the eROSITA (extended Roentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array) instrument will perform an imaging all-sky survey up to an X-ray energy of 10 keV with unprecedented spectral and angular resolution. The instrument will consist of seven parallel oriented mirror modules each having its own pnCCD camera in the focus. The satellite born X-ray observatory SIMBOL-X will be the first mission to use formation-flying techniques to implement an X-ray telescope with an unprecedented focal length of around 20 m. The detector instrumentation consists of separate high- and low energy detectors, a monolithic 128 x 128 DEPFET macropixel array and a pixellated CdZTe detector respectively, making energy band between 0.5 to 80 keV accessible. A similar concept is proposed for the next generation X-ray observatory IXO. Finally, the MIXS (Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer) instrument on the European Mercury exploration mission BepiColombo will use DEPFET macropixel arrays together with a small X-ray telescope to perform a spatially resolved planetary XRF analysis of Mercury's crust. Here, the mission concepts and their scientific targets are briefly discussed, and the resulting requirements on the detector devices together with the implementation strategies are shown.

  14. X-RAY STUDIES OF THE BLACK WIDOW PULSAR PSR B1957+20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, R. H. H.; Kong, A. K. H.; Takata, J.; Cheng, K. S.; Hui, C. Y.; Lin, L. C. C.

    2012-01-01

    We report on Chandra observations of the black widow pulsar, PSR B1957+20. Evidence for a binary-phase dependence of the X-ray emission from the pulsar is found with a deep observation. The binary-phase-resolved spectral analysis reveals non-thermal X-ray emission of PSR B1957+20, confirming the results of previous studies. This suggests that the X-rays are mostly due to intra-binary shock emission, which is strongest when the pulsar wind interacts with the ablated material from the companion star. The geometry of the peak emission is determined in our study. The marginal softening of the spectrum of the non-thermal X-ray tail may indicate that particles injected at the termination shock are dominated by synchrotron cooling.

  15. Elemental analysis of bronze artifacts by muonic X-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninomiya, Kazuhiko; Shinohara, Atsushi; Kubo, Michael K.; Strasser, Patrick; Nagatomo, Takashi; Kawamura, Naritoshi; Shimomura, Koichiro; Miyake, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Ishida, Katsuhiko; Higemoto, Wataru; Suzuki, Takao; Saito, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    A quantitative and multi-elemental analysis method for bulk samples based on muonic X-ray spectroscopy was applied to bronze artifacts (Tempo-Tsuho coins and a Seiun-kyo mirror). This method is based on the measurement of the characteristic high-energy muonic X-rays emitted in a sample after muon irradiation. The elemental compositions of these bronze artifacts were determined from muonic X-ray intensities in a non-destructive manner, using the relation between the muonic X-ray intensity and the elemental composition of the Cu–Sn–Pb alloy system. The analyzed values agreed well with those determined by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. We also estimated the detection limit of this method in the present experimental setup as 0.81 wt% of the background signal of the muonic X-ray spectra. (author)

  16. X-ray scattering by interstellar dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolf, D.

    1980-10-01

    This thesis reports work carried out to make a first observation of x-rays scattered by interstellar dust grains. Data about the dust, obtained at wavelengths ranging from the infrared to ultra-violet spectral regions, are discussed in order to establish a useful description of the grains themselves. This is then used to estimate the magnitude and form of the expected x-ray scattering effect which is shown to manifest itself as a diffuse halo accompanying the image of a celestial x-ray source. Two x-ray imaging experiments are then discussed. The first, specifically proposed to look for this effect surrounding a point x-ray source, was the Skylark 1611 project, and comprised an imaging proportional counter coupled to an x-ray mirror. This is described up to its final calibration when the basis for a concise model of its point response function was established. The experiment was not carried out but its objective and the experience gained during its testing were transferred to the second of the x-ray imaging experiments, the Einstein Observatory. The new instrumental characteristics are described and a model for its point response function is developed. Using this, image data for the point x-ray source GX339-4 is shown to exhibit the sought after scattering phenomenon. (author)

  17. Laboratory manual on sample preparation procedures for x-ray micro-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    X-ray micro fluorescence is a non-destructive and sensitive method for studying the microscopic distribution of different elements in almost all kinds of samples. Since the beginning of this century, x-rays and electrons have been used for the analysis of many different kinds of material. Techniques which rely on electrons are mainly developed for microscopic studies, and are used in conventional Electron Microscopy (EM) or Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), while x-rays are widely used for chemical analysis at the microscopic level. The first chemical analysis by fluorescence spectroscopy using small x-ray beams was conducted in 1928 by Glockner and Schreiber. Since then much work has been devoted to developing different types of optical systems for focusing an x-ray beam, but the efficiency of these systems is still inferior to the conventional electron optical systems. However, even with a poor optical efficiency, the x-ray microbeam has many advantages compared with electron or proton induced x-ray emission methods. These include: The analyses are non-destructive, losses of mass are negligible, and due to the low thermal loading of x-rays, materials which may be thermally degraded can be analysed; Samples can be analysed in air, and no vacuum is required, therefore specimens with volatile components such as water in biological samples, can be imaged at normal pressure and temperature; No charging occurs during analysis and therefore coating of the sample with a conductive layer is not necessary; With these advantages, simpler sample preparation procedures including mounting and preservation can be used

  18. Multiwavelength study of Chandra X-ray sources in the Antennae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. M.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Brandl, B. R.; Wilson, J. C.; Carson, J. C.; Henderson, C. P.; Hayward, T. L.; Barry, D. J.; Ptak, A. F.; Colbert, E. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    We use Wide-field InfraRed Camera (WIRC) infrared (IR) images of the Antennae (NGC 4038/4039) together with the extensive catalogue of 120 X-ray point sources to search for counterpart candidates. Using our proven frame-tie technique, we find 38 X-ray sources with IR counterparts, almost doubling the number of IR counterparts to X-ray sources that we first identified. In our photometric analysis, we consider the 35 IR counterparts that are confirmed star clusters. We show that the clusters with X-ray sources tend to be brighter, Ks≈ 16 mag, with (J-Ks) = 1.1 mag. We then use archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of the Antennae to search for optical counterparts to the X-ray point sources. We employ our previous IR-to-X-ray frame-tie as an intermediary to establish a precise optical-to-X-ray frame-tie with <0.6 arcsec rms positional uncertainty. Due to the high optical source density near the X-ray sources, we determine that we cannot reliably identify counterparts. Comparing the HST positions to the 35 identified IR star cluster counterparts, we find optical matches for 27 of these sources. Using Bruzual-Charlot spectral evolutionary models, we find that most clusters associated with an X-ray source are massive, and young, ˜ 106 yr.

  19. Optics-free x-ray FEL oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Hao, Y.; Kayran, D.; Trbojevic, D.

    2011-01-01

    There is a need for an Optics-Free FEL Oscillators (OFFELO) to further the advantages of free-electron lasers and turning them in fully coherent light sources. While SASE (Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission) FELs demonstrated the capability of providing very high gain and short pulses of radiation and scalability to the X-ray range, the spectra of SASE FELs remains rather wide (∼0.5%-1%) compared with typical short wavelengths FEL-oscillators (0.01%-0.0003% in OK-4 FEL). Absence of good optics in VUV and X-ray ranges makes traditional oscillator schemes with very high average and peak spectral brightness either very complex or, strictly speaking, impossible. In this paper, we discuss lattice of the X-ray optics-free FEL oscillator and present results of initial computer simulations of the feedback process and the evolution of FEL spectrum in X-ray OFFELO. We also discuss main limiting factors and feasibility of X-ray OFFELO.

  20. Optics-free x-ray FEL oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Hao, Y.; Kayran, D.; Trbojevic, D.

    2011-03-28

    There is a need for an Optics-Free FEL Oscillators (OFFELO) to further the advantages of free-electron lasers and turning them in fully coherent light sources. While SASE (Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission) FELs demonstrated the capability of providing very high gain and short pulses of radiation and scalability to the X-ray range, the spectra of SASE FELs remains rather wide ({approx}0.5%-1%) compared with typical short wavelengths FEL-oscillators (0.01%-0.0003% in OK-4 FEL). Absence of good optics in VUV and X-ray ranges makes traditional oscillator schemes with very high average and peak spectral brightness either very complex or, strictly speaking, impossible. In this paper, we discuss lattice of the X-ray optics-free FEL oscillator and present results of initial computer simulations of the feedback process and the evolution of FEL spectrum in X-ray OFFELO. We also discuss main limiting factors and feasibility of X-ray OFFELO.

  1. Spectral Properties of the X-ray Binary Pulsar LMC X-4 during ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    S. Naik & B. Paul Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, 400 005, India. Abstract. ... in the Large Magellanic Cloud. A spin period of 13.5 s ... In this paper we present the spectral variations of LMC X-4 during the 30.5 day long period ...

  2. Pixel detectors for x-ray imaging spectroscopy in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treis, J.; Andritschke, R.; Hartmann, R.; Herrmann, S.; Holl, P.; Lauf, T.; Lechner, P.; Lutz, G.; Meidinger, N.; Porro, M.; Richter, R. H.; Schopper, F.; Soltau, H.; Strüder, L.

    2009-03-01

    Pixelated semiconductor detectors for X-ray imaging spectroscopy are foreseen as key components of the payload of various future space missions exploring the x-ray sky. Located on the platform of the new Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma satellite, the eROSITA (extended Roentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array) instrument will perform an imaging all-sky survey up to an X-ray energy of 10 keV with unprecedented spectral and angular resolution. The instrument will consist of seven parallel oriented mirror modules each having its own pnCCD camera in the focus. The satellite born X-ray observatory SIMBOL-X will be the first mission to use formation-flying techniques to implement an X-ray telescope with an unprecedented focal length of around 20 m. The detector instrumentation consists of separate high- and low energy detectors, a monolithic 128 × 128 DEPFET macropixel array and a pixellated CdZTe detector respectively, making energy band between 0.5 to 80 keV accessible. A similar concept is proposed for the next generation X-ray observatory IXO. Finally, the MIXS (Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer) instrument on the European Mercury exploration mission BepiColombo will use DEPFET macropixel arrays together with a small X-ray telescope to perform a spatially resolved planetary XRF analysis of Mercury's crust. Here, the mission concepts and their scientific targets are briefly discussed, and the resulting requirements on the detector devices together with the implementation strategies are shown.

  3. Oil classification using X-ray scattering and principal component analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Danielle S.; Souza, Amanda S.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: dani.almeida84@gmail.com, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: amandass@bioqmed.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, Davi F.; Anjos, Marcelino J., E-mail: davi.oliveira@uerj.br, E-mail: marcelin@uerj.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica Armando Dias Tavares

    2015-07-01

    X-ray scattering techniques have been considered promising for the classification and characterization of many types of samples. This study employed this technique combined with chemical analysis and multivariate analysis to characterize 54 vegetable oil samples (being 25 olive oils)with different properties obtained in commercial establishments in Rio de Janeiro city. The samples were chemically analyzed using the following indexes: iodine, acidity, saponification and peroxide. In order to obtain the X-ray scattering spectrum, an X-ray tube with a silver anode operating at 40kV and 50 μA was used. The results showed that oils cab ne divided in tow large groups: olive oils and non-olive oils. Additionally, in a multivariate analysis (Principal Component Analysis - PCA), two components were obtained and accounted for more than 80% of the variance. One component was associated with chemical parameters and the other with scattering profiles of each sample. Results showed that use of X-ray scattering spectra combined with chemical analysis and PCA can be a fast, cheap and efficient method for vegetable oil characterization. (author)

  4. Oil classification using X-ray scattering and principal component analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Danielle S.; Souza, Amanda S.; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Oliveira, Davi F.; Anjos, Marcelino J.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray scattering techniques have been considered promising for the classification and characterization of many types of samples. This study employed this technique combined with chemical analysis and multivariate analysis to characterize 54 vegetable oil samples (being 25 olive oils)with different properties obtained in commercial establishments in Rio de Janeiro city. The samples were chemically analyzed using the following indexes: iodine, acidity, saponification and peroxide. In order to obtain the X-ray scattering spectrum, an X-ray tube with a silver anode operating at 40kV and 50 μA was used. The results showed that oils cab ne divided in tow large groups: olive oils and non-olive oils. Additionally, in a multivariate analysis (Principal Component Analysis - PCA), two components were obtained and accounted for more than 80% of the variance. One component was associated with chemical parameters and the other with scattering profiles of each sample. Results showed that use of X-ray scattering spectra combined with chemical analysis and PCA can be a fast, cheap and efficient method for vegetable oil characterization. (author)

  5. Imaging X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elvis, M.

    1990-01-01

    The launch of the High Energy Astrophysical Observatory, more appealingly called the Einstein Observatory, marked one of the most revolutionary steps taken in astrophysics this century. Its greater sensitivity compared with earlier satellites and its ability to make high spacial and spectral resolution observations transformed X-ray astronomy. This book is based on a Symposium held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, to celebrate a decade of Einstein Observatory's achievements. It discusses the contributions that this satellite has made to each area of modern astrophysics and the diversity of the ongoing work based on Einstein data. There is a guide to each of the main data bases now coming on-line to increase the availability and to preserve this valuable archive for the future. A review of NASA's next big X-ray mission, AXAF, and a visionary program for novel X-ray astronomy satellites by Riccardo Giacconi conclude this wide-ranging volume. (author)

  6. Method and apparatus for digitally based high speed x-ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warburton, W.K.; Hubbard, B.

    1997-01-01

    A high speed, digitally based, signal processing system which accepts input data from a detector-preamplifier and produces a spectral analysis of the x-rays illuminating the detector. The system achieves high throughputs at low cost by dividing the required digital processing steps between a ''hardwired'' processor implemented in combinatorial digital logic, which detects the presence of the x-ray signals in the digitized data stream and extracts filtered estimates of their amplitudes, and a programmable digital signal processing computer, which refines the filtered amplitude estimates and bins them to produce the desired spectral analysis. One set of algorithms allow this hybrid system to match the resolution of analog systems while operating at much higher data rates. A second set of algorithms implemented in the processor allow the system to be self calibrating as well. The same processor also handles the interface to an external control computer. 19 figs

  7. Fission products determination in high activity waste solution by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectral interference correction by intensity ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, I.M.

    1988-01-01

    Fission products Se, Rb, Y, Zr, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd, Te, Cd, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu and Gd were determined in simulated high activity radioactive waste solution by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry without chemical separation. Thin layer technique was employed for the sample preparation. For the L spectral lines, the absorption effect was verified by Rasberry-Heinrich, Lucas Tooth-Pyne and Lachance-Trail relations. This effect was quantified and corrected accordingly. The spectral interferences of Kα and/or Lα lines of Y, Zr, Mo, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu and Gd elements were eliminated by the intensity ratio method. The overlapping of up to three analytical lines was corrected by applying this method. The concentration influence of the interfering element on the intensity ratio values as well the efficiency of the correction method were investigated in order to assure that no systematic or residual error, resulting from the correction, affect the actual fluorescent intensity determination. The results is compared with the data obtained from measurements of free lines of spectral interference and also with those obtained by the linear equation system. Fission products determination presented a precision in the range of 0.1 to 5.0% and an accuracy of up to ± 7.0% the results are compared with those obtained by neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectrometry. Leaching data, when radioactive waste is incorporated in cement matrix, were attempted by X-ray fluorescence technique. For two years leaching period, leaching rate and diffusion coefficient data of cesium were determined. The results obtained agree with those obtained by γ-spectromety. (author) [pt

  8. X-ray binaries, part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerschlag-Hensberge, G.C.M.J.

    1977-01-01

    Optical observations of X-ray binaries and their interpretation are described. A number of early-type stars which are identified as companions of X-ray sources are photometrically and spectroscopically observed. The spectra were obtained with the coude spectrograph attached to the 1.5 m telescope of the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile. Registrations of the spectra were made with the Faul-Coradi microphotometer of the Observatory at Utrecht. To study radial velocity variations, the positions of the spectral lines were measured with the Grant comparator of the University of Groningen

  9. Cluster analysis in soft X-ray spectromicroscopy: Finding the patterns in complex specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerotic, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States)]. E-mail: lerotic@xray1.physics.sunysb.edu; Jacobsen, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Gillow, J.B. [Environmental Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Francis, A.J. [Environmental Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Wirick, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Vogt, S. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Maser, J. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2005-06-15

    Soft X-ray spectromicroscopy provides spectral data on the chemical speciation of light elements at sub-100 nanometer spatial resolution. If all chemical species in a specimen are known and separately characterized, existing approaches can be used to measure the concentration of each component at each pixel. In other situations such as in biology or environmental science, this approach may not be possible. We have previously described [M. Lerotic, C. Jacobsen, T. Schaefer, S. Vogt, Ultramicroscopy 100 (1-2) (2004) 35] the use of principle component analysis (PCA) to orthogonalize and noise-filter spectromicroscopy data, and cluster analysis (Canada) to classify the analyzed data and obtain thickness maps of representative spectra. We describe here an extension of that work employing an angle distance measure; this measure provides better classification based on spectral signatures alone in specimens with significant thickness variations. The method is illustrated using simulated data, and also to examine sporulation in the bacterium Clostridium sp.

  10. Soft x-ray interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the soft x-ray interferometry workshop held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory was to discuss with the scientific community the proposed technical design of the soft x-ray Fourier-transform spectrometer being developed at the ALS. Different design strategies for the instrument's components were discussed, as well as detection methods, signal processing issues, and how to meet the manufacturing tolerances that are necessary for the instrument to achieve the desired levels of performance. Workshop participants were encouraged to report on their experiences in the field of Fourier transform spectroscopy. The ALS is developing a Fourier transform spectrometer that is intended to operate up to 100 eV. The motivation is solely improved resolution and not the throughput (Jaquinot) or multiplex (Fellgett) advantage, neither of which apply for the sources and detectors used in this spectral range. The proposed implementation of this is via a Mach-Zehnder geometry that has been (1) distorted from a square to a rhombus to get grazing incidence of a suitable angle for 100 eV and (2) provided with a mirror-motion system to make the path difference between the interfering beams tunable. The experiment consists of measuring the emergent light intensity (I(x)) as a function of the path difference (x). The resolving power of the system is limited by the amount of path difference obtainable that is 1 cm (one million half-waves at 200 angstrom wavelength) in the design thus allowing a resolving power of one million. The free spectral range of the system is limited by the closeness with which the function I(x) is sampled. It is proposed to illuminate a helium absorption cell with roughly 1%-band-width light from a monochromator thus allowing one hundred aliases without spectral overlap even for sampling of I(x) at one hundredth of the Nyquist frequency

  11. Observation of hard X-rays line emission from Her X-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polcaro, V.F.; Bazzano, A.; la Padula, C.; Ubertini, P.; Vialetto, G.; Manchanda, R.K.; Damle, S.V.

    1982-04-01

    We present the results of a hard X-ray measurement of the binary source Her X-1, carried out with a balloon borne X-ray telescope consisting of two Multiwire Proportional Counters, having 900 cm/sup 2/ sensitive area each and spectral resolution of 15% and 24% FWHM respectively at 60 keV. The source was observed during the 'Mid-on' state. Our data confirm the previously reported high energy emission line overimposed on the low energy thermal spectrum.

  12. THE BROADBAND XMM-NEWTON AND NuSTAR X-RAY SPECTRA OF TWO ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES IN THE GALAXY IC 342

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana, Vikram; Harrison, Fiona A.; Walton, Dominic J.; Furst, Felix; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Madsen, Kristin K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier; Webb, Natalie A. [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Miller, Jon M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); Fabian, Andrew C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, Finn C. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Ptak, Andrew F.; Zhang, William W. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We present results for two ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), IC 342 X-1 and IC 342 X-2, using two epochs of XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations separated by ∼7 days. We observe little spectral or flux variability above 1 keV between epochs, with unabsorbed 0.3-30 keV luminosities being 1.04{sub −0.06}{sup +0.08}×10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1} for IC 342 X-1 and 7.40 ± 0.20 × 10{sup 39} erg s{sup –1} for IC 342 X-2, so that both were observed in a similar, luminous state. Both sources have a high absorbing column in excess of the Galactic value. Neither source has a spectrum consistent with a black hole binary in low/hard state, and both ULXs exhibit strong curvature in their broadband X-ray spectra. This curvature rules out models that invoke a simple reflection-dominated spectrum with a broadened iron line and no cutoff in the illuminating power-law continuum. X-ray spectrum of IC 342 X-1 can be characterized by a soft disk-like blackbody component at low energies and a cool, optically thick Comptonization continuum at high energies, but unique physical interpretation of the spectral components remains challenging. The broadband spectrum of IC 342 X-2 can be fit by either a hot (3.8 keV) accretion disk or a Comptonized continuum with no indication of a seed photon population. Although the seed photon component may be masked by soft excess emission unlikely to be associated with the binary system, combined with the high absorption column, it is more plausible that the broadband X-ray emission arises from a simple thin blackbody disk component. Secure identification of the origin of the spectral components in these sources will likely require broadband spectral variability studies.

  13. Development of Compton X-ray spectrometer for high energy resolution single-shot high-flux hard X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Sadaoki, E-mail: kojima-s@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: sfujioka@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Sakata, Shohei; Zhang, Zhe; Abe, Yuki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Fujioka, Shinsuke, E-mail: kojima-s@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: sfujioka@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Azechi, Hiroshi [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ozaki, Tetsuo [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Miyamoto, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takemoto, Akinori [Laboratory of Advanced Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, 3-1-2 Kouto, Kamigori-cho, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Hard X-ray spectroscopy is an essential diagnostics used to understand physical processes that take place in high energy density plasmas produced by intense laser-plasma interactions. A bundle of hard X-ray detectors, of which the responses have different energy thresholds, is used as a conventional single-shot spectrometer for high-flux (>10{sup 13} photons/shot) hard X-rays. However, high energy resolution (Δhv/hv < 0.1) is not achievable with a differential energy threshold (DET) X-ray spectrometer because its energy resolution is limited by energy differences between the response thresholds. Experimental demonstration of a Compton X-ray spectrometer has already been performed for obtaining higher energy resolution than that of DET spectrometers. In this paper, we describe design details of the Compton X-ray spectrometer, especially dependence of energy resolution and absolute response on photon-electron converter design and its background reduction scheme, and also its application to the laser-plasma interaction experiment. The developed spectrometer was used for spectroscopy of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by intense laser-plasma interactions using a 200 μm thickness SiO{sub 2} converter. The X-ray spectrum obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer is consistent with that obtained with a DET X-ray spectrometer, furthermore higher certainly of a spectral intensity is obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer than that with the DET X-ray spectrometer in the photon energy range above 5 MeV.

  14. Novel opportunities for sub-meV inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chubar, Oleg; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2015-08-01

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm -1 spectral and momentum transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm -1 are required to close the gap in energy-momentum space between high and low frequency probes. We show that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a hundred-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than possible with storage-ring based radiation sources. Wave-optics propagation shows that about 7 x 10 12 ph/s in a 90-μeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS.

  15. Astrophysical extended X-ray absorption fine-structure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, J.W.; Forrey, R.C.; Cho, K.; Department of Physics and Division of Applied Sciences, Harvard University)

    1997-01-01

    We present an astrophysical extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) analysis (AEA) tool. The AEA tool is designed to generate a numerical model of the modification to the X-ray absorption coefficient due to the EXAFS phenomenon. We have constructed a complete database (elements up to the atomic number 92) of EXAFS parameters: central atom phase shift (2δ 1 ), backscattering phase shift (φ b ), and backscattering amplitude (F). Using the EXAFS parameter data base, the AEA tool can generate a numerical model of any compound when the atomic numbers of neighboring atoms and their distances to the central X-ray-absorbing atom are given. copyright 1997 The American Astronomical Society

  16. Probing chemistry within the membrane structure of wood with soft X-ray spectral microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cody, George D.

    2000-01-01

    Scanning Transmission Soft X-ray spectral microscopy on Carbon's 1s absorption edge reveals the distribution of structural biopolymers within cell membrane regions of modern cedar and oak. Cellulose is extremely susceptible to beam damage. Spectroscopic studies of beam damage reveals that the chemical changes resulting from secondary electron impact may be highly selective and is consistent with hydroxyl eliminations and structural rearrangement of pyranose rings in alpha-cellulose to hydroxyl substituted γ pyrones. A study of acetylated cellulose demonstrates significantly different chemistry; principally massive decarboxylation. Defocusing the beam to a 2 μm spot size allows for the acquisition of 'pristine' cellulose spectra. Spectral deconvolution is used to assess the distribution of lignin and cellulose in the different regions of the cell membrane. Using the intensity of the hydroxylated aromatic carbons 1s-π * transition, the ratio of coniferyl and syringyl based lignin within the middle lamellae and secondary cell wall of oak, an angiosperm can be determined

  17. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY PULSATION FROM THE GEMINGA-LIKE PULSAR PSR J2021+4026

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, L. C. C. [General Education Center, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Hui, C. Y.; Seo, K. A., E-mail: cyhui@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hu, C. P.; Chou, Y. [Graduate Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Jhongli 32001, Taiwan (China); Wu, J. H. K.; Huang, R. H. H. [Institute of Astronomy, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Trepl, L. [Astrophysikalisches Institut und Universitaets-Sternwarte, Universitaet Jena, Schillergaesschen 2-3, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Takata, J.; Wang, Y.; Cheng, K. S. [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2013-06-10

    We report the discovery of an X-ray periodicity of {approx}265.3 ms from a deep XMM-Newton observation of the radio-quiet {gamma}-ray pulsar, PSR J2021+4026, located at the edge of the supernova remnant G78.2+2.1 ({gamma}-Cygni). The detected frequency is consistent with the {gamma}-ray pulsation determined by the observation of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope at the same epoch. The X-ray pulse profile resembles the modulation of a hot spot on the surface of the neutron star. The phase-averaged spectral analysis also suggests that the majority of the observed X-rays have thermal origins. This is the third member in the class of radio-quiet pulsars with significant pulsations detected from both X-ray and {gamma}-ray regimes.

  18. X-ray studies of BL Lacertae objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madejski, G.M.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis presents spectral x-ray data for BL Lac objects observed by the IPC and MPC aboard the Einstein Observatory and interprets that data in a context of their overall radiation spectra using synchrotron and synchrotron self-Compton models. The objects considered are: OJ 287, PKS 0735 + 178, I Zw 186, PKS 0548-322, Mkn 180, BL Lacertae, PKS 2155-304, H 0414-009 and H 0323 + 022. X-ray spectra of BL Lac objects are well described by a power law model with a low energy cutoff due to absorption within the own Galaxy. The best fit values of the energy spectral index α in the IPC (0.2-4.0 keV) band range from 0.73 to 2.35, with a mean of 1.2 and rms spread of 0.51. No single, universal index can fit the spectra of all objects. For all objects except PKS 0735 + 178, the x-ray spectrum is an extrapolation of the infrared/optical UV spectrum; in PKS 0735 + 178, the x-ray spectrum lies significantly below such an extrapolation. The overall electromagnetic distribution in those objects is interpreted as arising due to the synchrotron process in at least two spatial regions, with sizes respectively ∼10 18 cm for the radio component and ∼10 16 cm for the optical component. In objects where the x-ray spectrum lies on the extrapolation of the infrared-optical-ultraviolet spectrum, the x-ray emission is interpreted also to be due to the synchrotron process

  19. TU-G-207-03: High Spatial Resolution and High Sensitivity X-Ray Fluorescence Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, L.

    2015-01-01

    Last few years has witnessed the development of novel of X-ray imaging modalities, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT, and X-ray acoustic/fluorescence/luminescence imaging. This symposium will present the recent advances of these emerging X-ray imaging modalities and update the attendees with knowledge in various related topics, including X-ray photon-counting detectors, X-ray physics underlying the emerging applications beyond the traditional X-ray imaging, image reconstruction for the novel modalities, characterization and evaluation of the systems, and their practical implications. In addition, the concept and practical aspects of X-ray activatable targeted nanoparticles for molecular X-ray imaging will be discussed in the context of X-ray fluorescence and luminescence CT. Learning Objectives: Present background knowledge of various emerging X-ray imaging techniques, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT and X-ray fluorescence/luminescence CT. Discuss the practical need, technical aspects and current status of the emerging X-ray imaging modalities. Describe utility and future impact of the new generation of X-ray imaging applications

  20. Semiconductor X-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, Barrie Glyn

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and measuring the elemental x-rays released when materials are examined with particles (electrons, protons, alpha particles, etc.) or photons (x-rays and gamma rays) is still considered to be the primary analytical technique for routine and non-destructive materials analysis. The Lithium Drifted Silicon (Si(Li)) X-Ray Detector, with its good resolution and peak to background, pioneered this type of analysis on electron microscopes, x-ray fluorescence instruments, and radioactive source- and accelerator-based excitation systems. Although rapid progress in Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs), Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs), and Compound Semiconductor Detectors, including renewed interest in alternative materials such as CdZnTe and diamond, has made the Si(Li) X-Ray Detector nearly obsolete, the device serves as a useful benchmark and still is used in special instances where its large, sensitive depth is essential. Semiconductor X-Ray Detectors focuses on the history and development of Si(Li) X-Ray Detect...

  1. Resonant x-ray Raman scattering from atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, P.L.

    1992-01-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering and elastic x-ray scattering are fundamentally related processes. When the x-ray photon energy is near the ionization threshold for an inner shell, the inelastic channel is dominated by resonant x-ray Raman scattering. Studies of this emission not only illuminate the resonant scattering process in general, they also point to new opportunities for spectral studies of electronic structure using x-rays. Atoms in the form of a free gas provide an ideal target for testing the current theoretical understanding of resonant x-ray Raman scattering. In addition, x-ray scattering from molecular gases demonstrates the effect of bonding symmetry on the polarization and angular distribution of the scattered x-rays. Comparisons of experimental data with theory demonstrate both the successes and limitations of simple, single-electron interpretations of the scattering process

  2. TXRF, PIXE and EDXRF: a first step towards normalization of x-ray spectrometry for chemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreiros, M.A.; Costa, M.M.; Palha, M.; Pinheiro, T.; Araujo, M.F.; Silva, R.C. da

    2000-01-01

    Nowadays, many research studies rely on analytical measurements to which x-ray spectrometry techniques are particularly adequate. Because they are multi-elemental, versatile, fast and can reach low detection limits they are often applied to environmental and biomedical studies. Besides, they are able to provide reliable and accurate results. As also occurs with other analytical procedures, the quality assurance for non-routine analysis in R and D laboratories, is much less well established. when compared with routine analytical work. Thus, it is of foremost importance, to set the major quality parameters that significantly affect the quality of results. In addition, there is a need to apply the new concepts of trace ability and uncertainty to these techniques. This work reports on the reliability of TXRF, PIXE and EDXRF measurements by evaluating the uncertainty and trace ability for elemental analysis. The set of experimental and statistical procedures used to ensure the quality of results relative to the proposed objectives, as well as the methods applied to estimate the uncertainties will be presented and discussed. The sample preparation procedures, analytical calibration and spectral evaluation will be the parameters examined in this inter-laboratory study. The sample preparation procedures comprise pressure acid digestion and pelletizing for solid samples. The internal quality control for analytical calibration and spectral analysis is performed using certified reference materials and standard solutions. The goal of this work is to present a first step towards normalization of x-ray spectrometry techniques for chemical analysis. (author)

  3. A DETAILED STUDY OF NON-THERMAL X-RAY PROPERTIES AND INTERSTELLAR GAS TOWARD THE γ-RAY SUPERNOVA REMNANT RX J1713.7–3946

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, H.; Fukuda, T.; Yoshiike, S.; Sato, J.; Horachi, H.; Kuwahara, T.; Torii, K.; Hayakawa, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Inutsuka, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Tachihara, K. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Tanaka, T. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Inoue, T.; Kawamura, A.; Okuda, T.; Mizuno, N. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka 181-8588 (Japan); Yamazaki, R. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, Fuchinobe, Chuou-ku, Sagamihara 252-5258 (Japan); Onishi, T. [Department of Astrophysics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan); Mizuno, A., E-mail: sano@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); and others

    2015-02-01

    We have carried out a spectral analysis of the Suzaku X-ray data in the 0.4-12 keV range toward the shell-type very high-energy γ-ray supernova remnant (SNR) RX J1713.7–3946. The aims of this analysis are to estimate detailed X-rays spectral properties at a high angular resolution up to 2 arcmin and to compare them with the interstellar gas. The X-ray spectrum is non-thermal and used to calculate absorbing column density, photon index, and absorption-corrected X-ray flux. The photon index varies significantly from 2.1 to 2.9. It is shown that the X-ray intensity is well correlated with the photon index, especially in the west region, with a correlation coefficient of 0.81. The X-ray intensity tends to increase with the averaged interstellar gas density while the dispersion is relatively large. The hardest spectra, with photon indexes of less than 2.4, are found outside of the central 10 arcmin of the SNR, from the north to the southeast (∼430 arcmin{sup 2}) and from the southwest to the northwest (∼150 arcmin{sup 2}). The former region shows low interstellar gas density, while the latter shows high interstellar gas density. We present a discussion of possible scenarios that explain the distribution of the photon index and its relationship with the interstellar gas.

  4. Elemental analysis of coal by proton-induced x-ray emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronch, S.M.; Ehmann, W.D.; Laumer, H.W.; Gabbard, F.

    1976-01-01

    Proton-induced x-ray emission was used to determine elemental concentrations in solid coal samples. The coal samples were irradiated with 2.5 to 5.5 MeV protons. Concentrations were determined from characteristic x-ray yields taking into account matrix absorption. The precision is shown by replicate analysis and the accuracy by comparison with results obtained by other laboratories using different techniques

  5. Temporally coherent x-ray laser with the high order harmonic light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Noboru; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Kishimoto, Maki; Sukegawa, Kouta; Tanaka, Momoko; Ochi, Yoshihiro; Nishikino, Masaharu; Kawazome, Hayato; Nagashima, Keisuke

    2005-01-01

    We obtained the neon-like manganese x-ray laser with the injection of the high order harmonic light as the seed x-ray at the wavelength of 26.9 nm for the purpose of generation of the temporally coherent x-ray laser. The x-ray amplifier, which has quite narrow spectral width, selected and amplified the temporally coherent mode of the harmonic light. The temporal coherence of the mode selected harmonic light was nearly transform limited pulse, and the obtained x-ray laser with the seed x-ray expected to be nearly temporally coherent x-ray. (author)

  6. Total reflection x-ray fluorescence spectrometers for multielemental analysis: status of commercial equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala Jimenez, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    Multi-elemental analysis by total reflection x-ray fluorescence spectrometry has evolved during two decades. At the present there are commercial equipment available for the chemical analysis in all kind of biological and mineral samples. The electronic industry has also been benefited from the scientific and technological developments in the field of TXRF. The basic components of the spectrometers can be summarized as follow: a) excitation source; b) geometric arrangement (optics) for collimation and monochromatization of the primary radiation; c) x-ray detector; d) hardware and software for operation of the instrument, data acquisition and spectral deconvolution to determine the concentrations of the element present in the sample (quantitative analysis). As optional there are manufacturers offering the conventional 45 degrees geometry for direct excitation of bulky liquid or solid samples. Personal communications of the author and the commercial brochures available at the moment of writing this presentation have allowed to list the following type of components used in the TXRF spectrometers for multi-elemental analysis (the devices used in the electronic industry to analyze silicon wafers are excluded). Excitation: high power x-ray tube, output from 1300 to 2000 watts; metal ceramic low power-ray tube, output up to 50 watts. Different anodes are used but molybdenum, tungsten and copper are frequent. The excitation systems can be customized according to the requirements of the laboratory. Detector: Si-Li semi-conductor liquid nitrogen cooled; silicon solid state thermoelectrically cooled (silicon drift detector SDD and Si-PIN diode). Optics: multilayer monochromator of Si-W or Ni-C; double multilayer monochromator. Electronics: spectroscopy amplifier, analog to digital converter adapted to a PC compatible computer with software in Windows environment for the whole operation of the spectrometer and for qualy/quantitative analysis of samples are standards in the

  7. X-ray diagnostics for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Goeler, S.; Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.

    1982-12-01

    A short description of the x-ray diagnostic preparation for the TFTR tokamak is given. The x-ray equipment consists of the limiter x-ray monitoring system, the soft x-ray pulse-height-analysis-system, the soft x-ray imaging system and the x-ray crystal spectrometer. Particular attention is given to the radiation protection of the x-ray systems from the neutron environment

  8. THE FERMI –GBM THREE-YEAR X-RAY BURST CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenke, P. A. [CSPAR, SPA University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Linares, M. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, c/Vía Láctea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Connaughton, V.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M. H. [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Beklen, E. [Department of Physics, Suleyman Demirel University, 32260, Isparta (Turkey); Wilson-Hodge, C. A. [Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is an all-sky gamma-ray monitor well known in the gamma-ray burst (GRB) community. Although GBM excels in detecting the hard, bright extragalactic GRBs, its sensitivity above 8 keV and its all-sky view make it an excellent instrument for the detection of rare, short-lived Galactic transients. In 2010 March, we initiated a systematic search for transients using GBM data. We conclude this phase of the search by presenting a three-year catalog of 1084 X-ray bursts. Using spectral analysis, location, and spatial distributions we classified the 1084 events into 752 thermonuclear X-ray bursts, 267 transient events from accretion flares and X-ray pulses, and 65 untriggered gamma-ray bursts. All thermonuclear bursts have peak blackbody temperatures broadly consistent with photospheric radius expansion (PRE) bursts. We find an average rate of 1.4 PRE bursts per day, integrated over all Galactic bursters within about 10 kpc. These include 33 and 10 bursts from the ultra-compact X-ray binaries 4U 0614+09 and 2S 0918-549, respectively. We discuss these recurrence times and estimate the total mass ejected by PRE bursts in our Galaxy.

  9. Project Title: Radiochemical Analysis by High Sensitivity Dual-Optic Micro X-ray Fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havrilla, George J.; Gao, Ning

    2002-01-01

    A novel dual-optic micro X-ray fluorescence instrument will be developed to do radiochemical analysis of high-level radioactive wastes at DOE sites such as Savannah River Site and Hanford. This concept incorporates new X-ray optical elements such as monolithic polycapillaries and double bent crystals, which focus X-rays. The polycapillary optic can be used to focus X-rays emitted by the X-ray tube thereby increasing the X-ray flux on the sample over 1000 times. Polycapillaries will also be used to collect the X-rays from the excitation site and screen the radiation background from the radioactive species in the specimen. This dual-optic approach significantly reduces the background and increases the analyte signal thereby increasing the sensitivity of the analysis. A doubly bent crystal used as the focusing optic produces focused monochromatic X-ray excitation, which eliminates the bremsstrahlung background from the X-ray source. The coupling of the doubly bent crystal for monochromatic excitation with a polycapillary for signal collection can effectively eliminate the noise background and radiation background from the specimen. The integration of these X-ray optics increases the signal-to-noise and thereby increases the sensitivity of the analysis for low-level analytes. This work will address a key need for radiochemical analysis of high-level waste using a non-destructive, multi-element, and rapid method in a radiation environment. There is significant potential that this instrumentation could be capable of on-line analysis for process waste stream characterization at DOE sites

  10. Hyper-filter-fluorescer spectrometer for fusion x-ray diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    The filter-fluorescer spectrometer (FFS) is a powerful tool for measuring x-ray spectrum from high fluence x-ray sources. However, this technique is limited to energies less than 120 keV, because there are no practical absorption edges available above this energy. In this paper, we present a new method of utilizing the filter-fluorescer system for x-ray spectral measurement above 120 keV. The new apparatus is called hyper-filter-fluorescer spectrometer

  11. X-RAY EMISSION FROM J1446–4701, J1311–3430, AND OTHER BLACK WIDOW PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arumugasamy, Prakash; Pavlov, George G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Garmire, Gordon P., E-mail: pxa151@ucs.psu.edu [Huntingdon Institute for X-ray Astronomy, LLC, 10677 Franks Road, Huntingdon, PA 16652 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of detailed X-ray analysis of two black-widow pulsars (BWPs), J1446–4701 and J1311–3430. PSR J1446–4701 is a BWP with orbital parameters near the median values of the sample of known BWPs. Its X-ray emission that was detected by XMM-Newton is well characterized by a soft power-law (PL) spectrum (photon index Γ ≈ 3), and it shows no significant orbital modulations. In view of a lack of radio eclipses and an optical non-detection, the system most likely has a low orbital inclination. PSR J1311–3430 is an extreme BWP with a very compact orbit and the lowest minimum mass companion. Our Chandra data confirm the hard Γ ≈ 1.3 emission seen in previous observations. Through phase-restricted spectral analysis, we found a hint (∼2.6σ) of spectral hardening around pulsar inferior conjunction. We also provide a uniform analysis of the 12 BWPs observed with Chandra and compare their X-ray properties. Pulsars with soft, Γ > 2.5 emission seem to have lower than average X-ray and γ-ray luminosities. We do not, however, see any other prominent correlation between the pulsar’s X-ray emission characteristics and any of its other properties. The contribution of the intra-binary shock to the total X-ray emission, if any, is not discernible in this sample of pulsars with shallow observations.

  12. Radionuclide X-ray fluorescence analysis of components of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toelgyessy, J.; Havranek, E.; Dejmkova, E.

    1983-12-01

    The physical foundations and methodology are described of radionuclide X-ray fluorescence analysis. The sources are listed of air, water and soil pollution, and the transfer of impurities into biological materials is described. A detailed description is presented of the sampling of air, soil and biological materials and their preparation for analysis. Greatest attention is devoted to radionuclide X-ray fluorescence analysis of the components of the environment. (ES)

  13. X-ray imaging crystal spectroscopy for use in plasma transport research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, M. L.; Podpaly, Y. A.; Bitter, M.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Rice, J. E.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Gao, C.; Greenwald, M.; Hill, K.; Howard, N. T.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Pablant, N.; White, A. E.; Wolfe, S. M.

    2012-11-01

    This research describes advancements in the spectral analysis and error propagation techniques associated with x-ray imaging crystal spectroscopy (XICS) that have enabled this diagnostic to be used to accurately constrain particle, momentum, and heat transport studies in a tokamak for the first time. Doppler tomography techniques have been extended to include propagation of statistical uncertainty due to photon noise, the effect of non-uniform instrumental broadening as well as flux surface variations in impurity density. These methods have been deployed as a suite of modeling and analysis tools, written in interactive data language (IDL) and designed for general use on tokamaks. Its application to the Alcator C-Mod XICS is discussed, along with novel spectral and spatial calibration techniques. Example ion temperature and radial electric field profiles from recent I-mode plasmas are shown, and the impact of poloidally asymmetric impurity density and natural line broadening is discussed in the context of the planned ITER x-ray crystal spectrometer.

  14. Phase-space evolution of x-ray coherence in phase-sensitive imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2008-08-01

    X-ray coherence evolution in the imaging process plays a key role for x-ray phase-sensitive imaging. In this work we present a phase-space formulation for the phase-sensitive imaging. The theory is reformulated in terms of the cross-spectral density and associated Wigner distribution. The phase-space formulation enables an explicit and quantitative account of partial coherence effects on phase-sensitive imaging. The presented formulas for x-ray spectral density at the detector can be used for performing accurate phase retrieval and optimizing the phase-contrast visibility. The concept of phase-space shearing length derived from this phase-space formulation clarifies the spatial coherence requirement for phase-sensitive imaging with incoherent sources. The theory has been applied to x-ray Talbot interferometric imaging as well. The peak coherence condition derived reveals new insights into three-grating-based Talbot-interferometric imaging and gratings-based x-ray dark-field imaging.

  15. Spectral and spatial characteristics of x-ray film/screen combinations up to x-ray energy of 3 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, A.; Carmel, Y.; Segal, Y.; Notea, A.

    1986-01-01

    The present study is directed towards quantifying some of the parameters which define the quality of the image obtained on x-ray sensitive films and its usual accompanying intensifying screens. Both industrial (Agfa-Geveart D2,D4,D7) and medical (Kodak XAR-5) films with a variety of screens such as metallic (lead) and fluorescent (calcium tungstate, rare earth) were compared. A variety of sources were employed (radioactive, linear accelerators, flash) in order to cover the average x-ray energy spectrum from 100KeV to 3000KeV. This energy spectrum is of interest for non destructive testing, terminal ballistics and for medical purposes. The results indicate that the sensitivity of industrial x-ray films decreases with energy in the range of 100KeV to 1MeV, levels off and increases again with increasing energy. A 2.75MeV Na 24 radioactive source was used to achieve accurate calibration at the high end of the spectrum. Also, the noise level of x-ray industrial films versus film density was found to peak at a density of D=1.4. The line spread function (LSF) - or resolution - of both industrial and medical film/screen combinations were derived from the optical density of a step wedge response on the film. The noise level of medical films is twice as high compared to industrial films and their LSF is 4 to 8 times larger at x-ray energies of 3MeV. Using Pb screens in contact with common industrial x-ray films yields amplification of 2 (compared to a bare film)

  16. X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry. II Determination of Uranium in ores; Espectrometria de fluorescencia de Rayos X. II-Aplicacion a la determinacion de uranio en minerales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermudez Polonio, J; Crus Castillo, F. de la; Fernandez Cellini, R

    1961-07-01

    A method of analysis of uranium in ores by X-ray spectrometry was developed, using the internal standard technique. Strontium was found to be the most suitable internal standard for general use. A Norelco Philips X-ray fluorescent spectrometer was used in this work, equipped with a lithium fluoride crystal acting as a diffraction grating analyzer. The intensity of the uranium-L {alpha}{sub 1} spectral line is calculated and related to corresponding strontium-K{sub {alpha}} spectral line, both detected with a Scintillation Counter. (Author) 31 refs.

  17. An Expanded Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer Survey of X-Ray Variability in Seyfert 1 Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, A.; Edelson, R.

    2004-12-01

    The first seven years of RXTE monitoring of Seyfert 1 active galactic nuclei have been systematically analyzed to yield five homogeneous samples of 2-12 keV light curves, probing hard X-ray variability on successively longer durations from ~1 day to ~3.5 yr. The 2-10 keV variability on timescales of ~1 day, as probed by ASCA, is included. All sources exhibit stronger X-ray variability toward longer timescales, but the increase is greater for relatively higher luminosity sources. Variability amplitudes are anticorrelated with X-ray luminosity and black hole mass, but amplitudes saturate and become independent of luminosity or black hole mass toward the longest timescales. The data are consistent with the models of power spectral density (PSD) movement described by Markowitz and coworkers and McHardy and coworkers, whereby Seyfert 1 galaxies' variability can be described by a single, universal PSD shape whose break frequency scales with black hole mass. The best-fitting scaling relations between variability timescale, black hole mass, and X-ray luminosity imply an average accretion rate of ~5% of the Eddington limit for the sample. Nearly all sources exhibit stronger variability in the relatively soft 2-4 keV band compared to the 7-12 keV band on all timescales. There are indications that relatively less luminous or less massive sources exhibit a greater degree of spectral variability for a given increase in overall flux.

  18. Handbook Of X-ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Keith A.; Smith, R. K.; Siemiginowska, A.; Edgar, R. J.; Grant, C. E.; Kuntz, K. D.; Schwartz, D. A.

    2011-09-01

    This poster advertises a book to be published in September 2011 by Cambridge University Press. Written for graduate students, professional astronomers and researchers who want to start working in this field, this book is a practical guide to x-ray astronomy. The handbook begins with x-ray optics, basic detector physics and CCDs, before focussing on data analysis. It introduces the reduction and calibration of x-ray data, scientific analysis, archives, statistical issues and the particular problems of highly extended sources. The book describes the main hardware used in x-ray astronomy, emphasizing the implications for data analysis. The concepts behind common x-ray astronomy data analysis software are explained. The appendices present reference material often required during data analysis.

  19. Quantitative X-ray analysis of pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, M. Marrocos de

    1987-01-01

    The 'matrix-flushing' and the 'adiabatic principle' methods have been applied for the quantitative analysis through X-ray diffraction patterns of pigments and extenders mixtures, frequently used in paint industry. The results obtained have shown the usefulness of these methods, but still ask for improving their accuracy. (Author) [pt

  20. Analysis of nearly simultaneous x-ray and optical observations of active galactic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Rosemary Hill optical and EINSTEIN X-ray observations of a sample of 36 galactic nuclei (AGN) were reduced and analyzed. Seventy-two x-ray observations of these sources were reduced, nineteen of which yielded spectral information. Of these spectra observations, significant hydrogen column densities above the galactic value were required for nine of the active galactic nuclei. X-ray variability was detected in eight of the eleven sources which were observed more than once by EINSTEIN. Correlations between the x-ray and optical luminosities were investigated using the Jefferys method of least squares. This method allows for errors in both variables. The results indicate a strong correlation between the x-ray and optical luminosities for the entire sample. Division of the sample into groups with similar optical variability characteristics show that the less violently violent variable AGN are more highly correlated than the violently variable blazars. Infrared and radio observations were combined with the x-ray and optical observations of six AGN. These sources were modelled in terms of the synchrotron-self-Compton model. The turnover frequency falls between the infrared and radio data and reliable estimates of this parameter are difficult to estimate. Therefore the results were found as a function of the turnover frequency. Four sources required relativistic bulk motion or beaming. Multifrequency spectra made at different times for one individual source, 0235+164, required different amounts of beaming to satisfy the x-ray observations. Sizes of the emitting regions for the sources modelled ranged from 0.5 parsec to 1.0 parsec

  1. A Comprehensive Spectral Analysis of the X-Ray Pulsar 4U 1907+09 from Two Observations with the Suzaku X-Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, Elizabeth; Markowitz, Alex; Pottschmidt, Katja; Roth, Stefanie; Barragan, Laura; Furst, Felix; Suchy, Slawomir; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Wilms, Jorn; Rothschild, Richard

    2009-01-01

    We present results from two observations of the wind-accreting X-ray pulsar 4U 1907+09 using the Suzaku observatory, The broadband time-averaged spectrum allows us to examine the continuum emission of the source and the cyclotron resonance scattering feature at approx. 19 keV. Additionally, using the narrow CCD response of Suzaku near 6 ke V allows us to study in detail the Fe K bandpass and to quantify the Fe Kp line for this source for the first time. The source is absorbed by fully-covering material along the line of sight with a column density of N(sub H) approx. 2 x 10(exp 22)/sq cm, consistent with a wind accreting geometry, and a high Fe abundance (approx. 3 - 4 x solar). Time and phase-resolved analyses allow us to study variations in the source spectrum. In particular, dips found in the 2006 observation which are consistent with earlier observations occur in the hard X-ray bandpass, implying a variation of the whole continuum rather than occultation by intervening material, while a dip near the end of the 2007 observation occurs mainly in the lower energies implying an increase in NH along the line of sight, perhaps indicating clumpiness in the stellar wind

  2. Development and characterization of a laser-based hard x-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillman, C.

    1996-11-01

    A laser-produced plasma was generated by focusing 100 fs laser pulses, with an energy of 150 mJ, onto metal targets. The laser intensity was expected to reach 10 17 W/cm -2 . Radiation was emitted from the created plasma, with photon energies up to the MeV region. The laser-based X-ray source was optimized, with the purpose of making it a realistic source of hard X-rays (>10 keV). Dedicated equipment was developed for efficient generation and utilization of the hard X-rays. The X-ray source was characterized with respect to its spatial extent and the X-ray yield. Measurements were made of the spectral distribution, by the use of single-photon-counting detectors in different geometries, crystal spectrometers and dose measurements in combination with absorption filters. Ablation of the target material in the laser produced plasma was investigated. Imaging applications have been demonstrated, including ultrafast (picosecond) X-ray imaging, magnification imaging of up to x80, differential imaging in the spectral domain, and imaging of various biological and technical objects. The biological response of ultra-intense X-ray pulses was assessed in cell-culture exposures. The results indicate that the biological response from ultra-intense X-ray exposures is similar to the response with conventional X-ray tubes. 82 refs., 14 figs

  3. Development and characterization of a laser-based hard x-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tillman, C.

    1996-11-01

    A laser-produced plasma was generated by focusing 100 fs laser pulses, with an energy of 150 mJ, onto metal targets. The laser intensity was expected to reach 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup -2}. Radiation was emitted from the created plasma, with photon energies up to the MeV region. The laser-based X-ray source was optimized, with the purpose of making it a realistic source of hard X-rays (>10 keV). Dedicated equipment was developed for efficient generation and utilization of the hard X-rays. The X-ray source was characterized with respect to its spatial extent and the X-ray yield. Measurements were made of the spectral distribution, by the use of single-photon-counting detectors in different geometries, crystal spectrometers and dose measurements in combination with absorption filters. Ablation of the target material in the laser produced plasma was investigated. Imaging applications have been demonstrated, including ultrafast (picosecond) X-ray imaging, magnification imaging of up to x80, differential imaging in the spectral domain, and imaging of various biological and technical objects. The biological response of ultra-intense X-ray pulses was assessed in cell-culture exposures. The results indicate that the biological response from ultra-intense X-ray exposures is similar to the response with conventional X-ray tubes. 82 refs., 14 figs.

  4. Proton induced X-Ray fluorescence study as a tool trace element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Kady, Ahmed A.

    1978-01-01

    Usefulness and limitations of trace elemental analysis by high energy charged particles and photon induced X-ray have been discussed. Comparison with the well established neutron activation analysis technique is also given. Back-ground radiation due to bremsstrahlung from secondary electrons and due to charged particle bremsstrahlung have been reviewed for different projectiles. The sensitivity of elemental analysis by proton induced X-ray fluorescence have been examined by measuring the characteristic X-ray emission cross section for K and L transitions of many elements and for different proton energies and compared with theroretical values. The discussion given in this report show that with suitable proton generator and a high resolution X-ray detector, proton X-ray fluorescence technique is capable of analyzing many elements simultaneously at the part per million level and offers a rapid and reliable method for trace element analysis. Data on water, blood and tissue samples given in this report are few examples of many possible applications

  5. In vivo X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlgren, L.

    1980-02-01

    Measurements on five occupationally exposed persons have shown that it is possible to use X-ray fluorescence analysis for in vivo measurements of lead in the skeleton. The technique for calibrating in vivo X-ray fluorescence measurements of lead in bone tissue has been studied in detail and a two-component phantom simulating the bone and the soft tissue parts of the finger constructed. The technique has been used for in vivo measurements on 22 occupationally exposed persons. The minimum detectable concentration of lead in fingerbones was found to be around 20 μg x g -1 . The lead concentrations in their skeletons and blood were compared: the correlation was poor. The variations in lead concentrations in the skeleton have been studied in occupationally exposed persons and in samples from archaeological skeletons. The sensitivity and the minimum detectable concentration of cadmium in the kidney cortex in in vivo measurements has been studied by measurements on kidney models. The minimum detectable concentration was 20 μg x g -1 at a skin-kidney distance of 30 mm and 40 μg x g -1 at 40 mm. Five persons occupationally exposed were studied. (Author)

  6. Moving the Frontier of Quantum Control into the Soft X-Ray Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aquila

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The femtosecond nature of X-ray free electron laser (FEL pulses opens up exciting research possibilities in time-resolved studies including femtosecond photoemission and diffraction. The recent developments of seeding X-ray FELs extend their capabilities by creating stable, temporally coherent, and repeatable pulses. This in turn opens the possibility of spectral engineering soft X-ray pulses to use as a probe for the control of quantum dynamics. We propose a method for extending coherent control pulse-shaping techniques to the soft X-ray spectral range by using a reflective geometry 4f pulse shaper. This method is based on recent developments in asymmetrically cut multilayer optic technology and piezoelectric substrates.

  7. Development of confocal micro X-ray fluorescence instrument using two X-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Kouichi; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Ding Xunliang

    2007-01-01

    A new confocal micro X-ray fluorescence instrument was developed. This instrument has two independent micro X-ray tubes with Mo targets. A full polycapillary X-ray lens was attached to each X-ray tube. Another half polycapillary lens was attached to a silicon drift X-ray detector (SDD). The focal spots of the three lenses were adjusted to a common position. The effects of the excitation of two X-ray beams were investigated. The instrument enabled highly sensitive three-dimensional X-ray fluorescence analysis. We confirmed that the X-ray fluorescence intensity from the sample increased by applying the two independent X-ray tubes in confocal configuration. Elemental depth profiling of black wheat was demonstrated with the result that each element in the surface coat of a wheat grain showed unique distribution

  8. Crystallized solids characterization by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broll, N.

    1996-01-01

    This work deals with the crystallized solids characterization by X-ray diffraction. The powders diffraction principle is described. Then are given the different powders diffraction experimental methods. An X-ray diffraction device is essentially constituted of three parts: the X-rays source, the sample and the detector. The source is usually constituted by an X-rays tube whereas the sample can be fixed on a photographic chamber or put on a goniometer. The different photographic chambers which can be used (Debye-Scherrer, Seeman-Bohlin and Guinier) are described. The powders diffractometer the most used is a Bragg-Brentano focusing diffractometer because it allows to obtain very sharp spectral lines and an important diffracted intensity. The detectors which are the mainly used are the scintillation counters. The most important use in powders diffractometry is the identification of the different phases of a sample. The phases identification consists to compare the unknown sample spectrum at those of standard materials indexed until now. Two methods exist at present. They are explained and their limits in the phases search are given. Another use of the X-ray diffraction is the quantitative analysis. It consists to determine the concentrations of each crystal phases of a sample. The principles of these quantitative methods are given. The lattice parameters of a polycrystal material can be determined from its X-ray pattern too with a very high precision. The way to index powders patterns is given. The residual stresses of materials can also be estimated. The principle of this measured method is explained. It is at last possible to study from an X-ray pattern, the material grain orientations during the different steps of preparation and working. (O.M.). 13 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  9. In-flight calibration of Hitomi Soft X-ray Spectrometer. (1) Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Sawada, Makoto; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Angellini, Lorella; Boyce, Kevin R.; Eckart, Megan E.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Kelley, Richard L.; Koyama, Shu; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Loewenstein, Michael; McCammon, Dan; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Nakashima, Shinya; Porter, Frederick S.; Seta, Hiromi; Takei, Yoh; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Terada, Yukikatsu; Yamada, Shinya; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.

    2018-03-01

    The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument of Suzaku provided the first measurement of the non-X-ray background (NXB) of an X-ray calorimeter spectrometer, but the data set was limited. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) instrument of Hitomi was able to provide a more detailed picture of X-ray calorimeter background, with more than 360 ks of data while pointed at the Earth, and a comparable amount of blank-sky data. These data are important not only for analyzing SXS science data, but also for categorizing the contributions to the NXB in X-ray calorimeters as a class. In this paper, we present the contributions to the SXS NXB, the types and effectiveness of the screening, the interaction of the screening with the broad-band redistribution, and the residual background spectrum as a function of magnetic cut-off rigidity. The orbit-averaged SXS NXB in the range 0.3-12 keV was 4 × 10-2 counts s-1 cm-2. This very low background in combination with groundbreaking spectral resolution gave SXS unprecedented sensitivity to weak spectral lines.

  10. Small area silicon diffused junction x-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, J.T.; Pehl, R.H.; Larsh, A.E.

    1981-10-01

    The low temperature performance of silicon diffused junction detectors in the measurement of low energy x-rays is reported. The detectors have an area of 0.04 cm 2 and a thickness of 100 μm. The spectral resolutions of these detectors were found to be in close agreement with expected values indicating that the defects introduced by the high temperature processing required in the device fabrication were not deleteriously affecting the detection of low energy x-rays. Device performance over a temperature range of 77 to 150 0 K is given. These detectors were designed to detect low energy x-rays in the presence of minimum ionizing electrons. The successful application of silicon diffused junction technology to x-ray detector fabrication may facilitate the development of other novel silicon x-ray detector designs

  11. Small area silicon diffused junction X-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, J. T.; Pehl, R. H.; Larsh, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    The low-temperature performance of silicon diffused junction detectors in the measurement of low energy X-rays is reported. The detectors have an area of 0.04 sq cm and a thickness of 100 microns. The spectral resolutions of these detectors were found to be in close agreement with expected values, indicating that the defects introduced by the high-temperature processing required in the device fabrication were not deleteriously affecting the detection of low-energy X-rays. Device performance over a temperature range of 77 K to 150 K is given. These detectors were designed to detect low-energy X-rays in the presence of minimum ionizing electrons. The successful application of silicon-diffused junction technology to X-ray detector fabrication may facilitate the development of other novel silicon X-ray detector designs.

  12. Characterizing Complexity of Containerized Cargo X-ray Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guangxing [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martz, Harry [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Glenn, Steven [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Divin, Charles [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Birrer, Nat [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-08-19

    X-ray imaging can be used to inspect cargos imported into the United States. In order to better understand the performance of X-ray inspection systems, the X-ray characteristics (density, complexity) of cargo need to be quantified. In this project, an image complexity measure called integrated power spectral density (IPSD) was studied using both DNDO engineered cargos and stream-of-commerce (SOC) cargos. A joint distribution of cargo density and complexity was obtained. A support vector machine was used to classify the SOC cargos into four categories to estimate the relative fractions.

  13. Characterizing Complexity of Containerized Cargo X-ray Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Guangxing; Martz, Harry; Glenn, Steven; Divin, Charles; Birrer, Nat

    2016-01-01

    X-ray imaging can be used to inspect cargos imported into the United States. In order to better understand the performance of X-ray inspection systems, the X-ray characteristics (density, complexity) of cargo need to be quantified. In this project, an image complexity measure called integrated power spectral density (IPSD) was studied using both DNDO engineered cargos and stream-of-commerce (SOC) cargos. A joint distribution of cargo density and complexity was obtained. A support vector machine was used to classify the SOC cargos into four categories to estimate the relative fractions.

  14. Application of energy dispersive x-ray techniques for water analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funtua, I. I.

    2000-07-01

    Energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) is a class of emission spectroscopic techniques that depends upon the emission of characteristic x-rays following excitation of the atomic electron energy levels by tube or isotopic source x-rays. The technique has found wide range of applications that include determination of chemical elements of water and water pollutants. Three EDXRF systems, the isotopic source, secondary target and total reflection (TXRF) are available at the Centre for Energy research and Training. These systems have been applied for the analysis of sediments, suspensions, ground water, river and rainwater. The isotopic source is based on 55 Fe, 109 Cd and 241 Am excitations while the secondary target and the total reflection are utilizing a Mo x-ray tube. Sample preparation requirements for water analysis range from physical and chemical pre-concentration steps to direct analysis and elements from Al to U can be determined with these systems. The EDXRF techniques, TXRF in particular with its multielement capability, low detection limit and possibility of direct analysis for water have competitive edge over the traditional methods of atomic absorption and flame photometry

  15. The MicroAnalysis Toolkit: X-ray Fluorescence Image Processing Software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    The MicroAnalysis Toolkit is an analysis suite designed for the processing of x-ray fluorescence microprobe data. The program contains a wide variety of analysis tools, including image maps, correlation plots, simple image math, image filtering, multiple energy image fitting, semi-quantitative elemental analysis, x-ray fluorescence spectrum analysis, principle component analysis, and tomographic reconstructions. To be as widely useful as possible, data formats from many synchrotron sources can be read by the program with more formats available by request. An overview of the most common features will be presented.

  16. High-intensity, subkilovolt x-ray calibration facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuckuck, R.W.; Gaines, J.L.; Ernst, R.D.

    1976-01-01

    A high-intensity subkilovolt x-ray calibration source utilizing proton-induced inner-shell atomic fluorescence of low-Z elements is described. The high photon yields and low bremsstrahlung background associated with this phenomenon are ideally suited to provide intense, nearly monoenergetic x-ray beams. The proton accelerator is a 3 mA, 300 kV Cockroft-Walton using a conventional rf hydrogen ion source. Seven remotely-selectable targets capable of heat dissipation of 5 kW/cm 2 are used to provide characteristic x-rays with energies between 100 and 1000 eV. Source strengths are of the order of 10 13 to 10 14 photons/sec. Methods of reducing spectral contamination due to hydrocarbon build-up on the target are discussed. Typical x-ray spectra (Cu-L, C-K and B-K) are shown

  17. Novel opportunities for sub-meV inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubar, Oleg [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source II; Geloni, Gianluca; Madsen, Anders [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Shvyd' ko, Yuri [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source; Sutter, John [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm{sup -1} spectral and momentum transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm{sup -1} are required to close the gap in energy-momentum space between high and low frequency probes. We show that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a hundred-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than possible with storage-ring based radiation sources. Wave-optics propagation shows that about 7 x 10{sup 12} ph/s in a 90-μeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS.

  18. X-ray spectroscopy and dosimetry with a portable CdTe device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbene, Leonardo; La Manna, Angelo; Fauci, Francesco; Gerardi, Gaetano; Stumbo, Simone; Raso, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    X-ray spectra and dosimetry information are very important for quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) in medical diagnostic X-ray systems. An accurate knowledge of the diagnostic X-ray spectra would improve the patient dose optimization, without compromising image information. In this work, we performed direct diagnostic X-ray spectra measurements with a portable device, based on a CdTe solid-state detector. The portable device is able to directly measure X-ray spectra at high photon fluence rates, as typical of clinical radiography. We investigated on the spectral performances of the system in the mammographic energy range (up to ∼40 keV). Good system response to monoenergetic photons was measured (energy resolution of 5% FWHM at 22.1 keV). We measured the molybdenum X-ray spectra produced by a mammographic X-ray unit (GE Senographe DMR) at 28 kV and 30 kV under clinical conditions. The results showed the good reproducibility of the system and low pile-up distortions. Preliminary dosimetric measurements have been regarded as exposure and half value layer (HVL) values obtained from direct measurements and from measured X-ray spectral data, and a good agreement between exposure attenuation curves and the HVL values was obtained. The results indicated that the portable device is suitable for mammographic X-ray spectroscopy under clinical conditions

  19. Femtosecond profiling of shaped x-ray pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, M. C.; Grguraš, I.; Behrens, C.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J.; Bromberger, H.; Coffee, R.; Costello, J. T.; DiMauro, L. F.; Ding, Y.; Doumy, G.; Helml, W.; Ilchen, M.; Kienberger, R.; Lee, S.; Maier, A. R.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.; Messerschmidt, M.; Schorb, S.; Schweinberger, W.; Zhang, K.; Cavalieri, A. L.

    2018-03-01

    Arbitrary manipulation of the temporal and spectral properties of x-ray pulses at free-electron lasers would revolutionize many experimental applications. At the Linac Coherent Light Source at Stanford National Accelerator Laboratory, the momentum phase-space of the free-electron laser driving electron bunch can be tuned to emit a pair of x-ray pulses with independently variable photon energy and femtosecond delay. However, while accelerator parameters can easily be adjusted to tune the electron bunch phase-space, the final impact of these actuators on the x-ray pulse cannot be predicted with sufficient precision. Furthermore, shot-to-shot instabilities that distort the pulse shape unpredictably cannot be fully suppressed. Therefore, the ability to directly characterize the x-rays is essential to ensure precise and consistent control. In this work, we have generated x-ray pulse pairs via electron bunch shaping and characterized them on a single-shot basis with femtosecond resolution through time-resolved photoelectron streaking spectroscopy. This achievement completes an important step toward future x-ray pulse shaping techniques.

  20. Heavy metal ternary halides for room-temperature x-ray and gamma-ray detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhifu; Peters, John A.; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Sebastian, Maria; Wessels, Bruce W.; Im, Jino; Freeman, Arthur J.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2013-09-01

    We report our recent progress on wide bandgap ternary halide compounds CsPbBr3 and CsPbCl3 for room temperature x-ray and gamma-ray detectors. Their bandgaps are measured to be 2.24 eV and 2.86 eV, respectively. The measured mobility-lifetime products of CsPbBr3 are 1.7×10-3, 1.3×10-3 cm2/V, for electron and hole carriers, respectively, comparable to those of CdTe. We measured the room temperature spectral response of CsPbBr3 sample to Ag x-ray radiation. It has a well-resolved spectral response to the 22.4 keV Kα radiation peak and detector efficiency comparable to that of CdZnTe detector at 295 K.

  1. High Resolution, Non-Dispersive X-Ray Calorimeter Spectrometers on EBITs and Orbiting Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Frederick S.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is the primary tool for performing atomic physics with Electron beam ion trap (EBITs). X-ray instruments have generally fallen into two general categories, 1) dispersive instruments with very high spectral resolving powers but limited spectral range, limited count rates, and require an entrance slit, generally, for EBITs, defined by the electron beam itself, and 2) non-dispersive solid-state detectors with much lower spectral resolving powers but that have a broad dynamic range, high count rate ability and do not require a slit. Both of these approaches have compromises that limit the type and efficiency of measurements that can be performed. In 1984 NASA initiated a program to produce a non-dispersive instrument with high spectral resolving power for x-ray astrophysics based on the cryogenic x-ray calorimeter. This program produced the XRS non-dispersive spectrometers on the Astro-E, Astro-E2 (Suzaku) orbiting observatories, the SXS instrument on the Astro-H observatory, and the planned XMS instrument on the International X-ray Observatory. Complimenting these spaceflight programs, a permanent high-resolution x-ray calorimeter spectrometer, the XRS/EBIT, was installed on the LLNL EBIT in 2000. This unique instrument was upgraded to a spectral resolving power of 1000 at 6 keV in 2003 and replaced by a nearly autonomous production-class spectrometer, the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS), in 2007. The ECS spectrometer has a simultaneous bandpass from 0.07 to over 100 keV with a spectral resolving power of 1300 at 6 keV with unit quantum efficiency, and 1900 at 60 keV with a quantum efficiency of 30%. X-ray calorimeters are event based, single photon spectrometers with event time tagging to better than 10 us. We are currently developing a follow-on instrument based on a newer generation of x-ray calorimeters with a spectral resolving power of 3000 at 6 keV, and improved timing and measurement cadence. The unique capabilities of the x-ray

  2. X-ray counterpart candidates for six new γ-ray pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyuzin, Dmitry A.; Karpova, Anna V.; Shibanov, Yuriy A.

    2018-05-01

    Using archival X-ray data, we have found point-like X-ray counterpart candidates positionally coincident with six γ-ray pulsars discovered recently in the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope data by the Einstein@Home project. The candidates for PSRs J0002+6216, J0554+3107, J1844-0346, and J1105-6037 are detected with Swift, and those for PSRs J0359+5414 and J2017+3625 are detected with Chandra. Despite a low count statistics for some candidates, assuming plausible constraints on the absorbing column density towards the pulsars, we show that X-ray spectral properties for all of them are consistent with those observed for other pulsars. J0359+5414 is the most reliably identified object. We detect a nebula around it, whose spectrum and extent suggest that this is a pulsar wind nebula powered by the pulsar. Associations of J0002+6216 and J1844-0346 with supernova remnants CTB 1 and G28.6-0.1 are proposed.

  3. Validation of the X-ray fluorescence analysis method for coffee grain testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samaniego, Carlos

    1992-01-01

    Trace elements were qualitatively and quantitatively searched for in coffee samples for analysis were prepared in tablet from before irradiation, this latter having been performed with a Cd 109 radioactive source and with an X-ray tube; with ZnO as the secondary target. Several spectra were obtained. The areas of the spectral peaks were adjusted with the aid of AXIL computer program wich is based on the least squares method. Further on, elemental concentrations were determined by means of sensitivity and regression curves (intensity vs. concentration), methods that demanded the use of pertinent standards, concentration in organic standard certified samples furthermore, atomic absorption was also used to perform comparative checks on results

  4. Multiaxial stress analysis taking account of penetration depth of x-rays, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Yasuo; Sasaki, Toshihiko; Kuramoto, Makoto.

    1985-01-01

    In the past X-ray stress analysis in which the effect of stress gradients was taken into account within the penetration depth of X-rays, three assumptions have been made; 1) the stress gradient is linear in respect to the depth from the specimen surface, 2) the penetration depth of X-ray is a function of Sin 2 PSI and 3) the strain measured by X-rays corresponds to the weighted average strain on the intensity of the diffracted X-rays. A problem, however, still remains on the assumption of the X-ray penetration depth. We sometimes observed noticiable errors in the stage of the numerical simulation and these errors depend on the combination of stress components in a stress tensor. In the present paper, we proposed a new X-ray multiaxial stress analysis without using the assumption of the X-ray penetration depth. This analysis is also applicable to both the iso-inclination method ( OHM -goniometer) and the side inclination method (PSI-goniometer). The weighted average strain by X-rays, 1 >(phi), is expressed as a 4th degree function of cosPSI for iso-inclination method and 3rd degree for side inclination method. By rearranging this function as a sum of average strain, ( 1 >(0 0 )+ 1 >(90 0 )), and difference of average strain, ( 1 >(0 0 )- 1 >(90 0 )), we can solve the stress components with sufficient accuracy by a least squares method. The validity of this method was proved through numerical simulations and experiments. (author)

  5. Monolithic CMOS imaging x-ray spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenter, Almus; Kraft, Ralph; Gauron, Thomas; Murray, Stephen S.

    2014-07-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in collaboration with SRI/Sarnoff is developing monolithic CMOS detectors optimized for x-ray astronomy. The goal of this multi-year program is to produce CMOS x-ray imaging spectrometers that are Fano noise limited over the 0.1-10keV energy band while incorporating the many benefits of CMOS technology. These benefits include: low power consumption, radiation "hardness", high levels of integration, and very high read rates. Small format test devices from a previous wafer fabrication run (2011-2012) have recently been back-thinned and tested for response below 1keV. These devices perform as expected in regards to dark current, read noise, spectral response and Quantum Efficiency (QE). We demonstrate that running these devices at rates ~> 1Mpix/second eliminates the need for cooling as shot noise from any dark current is greatly mitigated. The test devices were fabricated on 15μm, high resistivity custom (~30kΩ-cm) epitaxial silicon and have a 16 by 192 pixel format. They incorporate 16μm pitch, 6 Transistor Pinned Photo Diode (6TPPD) pixels which have ~40μV/electron sensitivity and a highly parallel analog CDS signal chain. Newer, improved, lower noise detectors have just been fabricated (October 2013). These new detectors are fabricated on 9μm epitaxial silicon and have a 1k by 1k format. They incorporate similar 16μm pitch, 6TPPD pixels but have ~ 50% higher sensitivity and much (3×) lower read noise. These new detectors have undergone preliminary testing for functionality in Front Illuminated (FI) form and are presently being prepared for back thinning and packaging. Monolithic CMOS devices such as these, would be ideal candidate detectors for the focal planes of Solar, planetary and other space-borne x-ray astronomy missions. The high through-put, low noise and excellent low energy response, provide high dynamic range and good time resolution; bright, time varying x-ray features could be temporally and

  6. X-ray emission characteristics of foam target plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fronya, A.A.; Borisenko, N.G.; Chernodub, M.L.; Merkuliev, Yu.A.; Osipov, M.V.; Puzyrev, V.N.; Sahakyan, A.T.; Starodub, A.N.; Vasin, B.L.; Yakushev, O.F.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Experimental results of laser radiation interaction with a foam targets are presented. The spatial, temporal and energy characteristics of x-ray plasma radiation have been investigated. The pinhole-camera and Schwarzschild objective have been used for the plasma image formation in different spectral ranges. The plasma image is registered by the Schwarzschild objective in a narrow spectral range 180 - 200 A. Spectral characteristics of x-ray radiation registered by pinhole-camera have been defined by means outer filters. The use of the filters with different transmission curves allowed one the determine the localization of x-ray radiation with fixed wavelength. Spatial resolution accounts 16 μm in the pinhole-camera diagnostic channel and 2.5 μm in the Schwarzschild objective diagnostic channel. The plasma images in the intrinsic x-ray radiation show that the emission area in the transverse direction with respect to the direction of the propagating heating radiation exceeds the focal spot size. This fact indicates that the target heating in the transverse direction is due to internal energy of the created plasma. The average value of plasma electron temperature is ∼ 0.4 - 1.4 keV. Acknowledgements. The work is partly supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Researches, grant no. 10-02-00113 and by Federal Target Program 'Research and scientific-pedagogical cadres of Innovative Russia' (grant 2009-1.1-122-052-025).

  7. High spectral resolution studies of gamma ray bursts on new missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, U. D.; Acuna, M. H.; Cline, T. L.; Dennis, B. R.; Orwig, L. E.; Trombka, J. I.; Starr, R. D.

    1996-01-01

    Two new missions will be launched in 1996 and 1997, each carrying X-ray and gamma ray detectors capable of high spectral resolution at room temperature. The Argentine Satelite de Aplicaciones Cientificas (SAC-B) and the Small Spacecraft Technology Initiative (SSTI) Clark missions will each carry several arrays of X-ray detectors primarily intended for the study of solar flares and gamma-ray bursts. Arrays of small (1 cm 2 ) cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) units will provide x-ray measurements in the 10 to 80 keV range with an energy resolution of ≅6 keV. Arrays of both silicon avalanche photodiodes (APD) and P-intrinsic-N (PIN) photodiodes (for the SAC-B mission only) will provide energy coverage from 2-25 keV with ≅1 keV resolution. For SAC-B, higher energy spectral data covering the 30-300 keV energy range will be provided by CsI(Tl) scintillators coupled to silicon APDs, resulting in similar resolution but greater simplicity relative to conventional CsI/PMT systems. Because of problems with the Pegasus launch vehicle, the launch of SAC-B has been delayed until 1997. The launch of the SSTI Clark mission is scheduled for June 1996

  8. Diagnostic X-ray sources-present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behling, Rolf; Grüner, Florian

    2018-01-01

    This paper compares very different physical principles of X-ray production to spur ideation. Since more than 120 years, bremsstrahlung from X-ray tubes has been the workhorse of medical diagnostics. Generated by X-ray segments comprised of X-ray tubes and high-voltage generators in the various medical systems, X-ray photons in the spectral range between about 16 keV and 150 keV deliver information about anatomy and function of human patients and in pre-clinical animal studies. Despite of strides to employ the wave nature of X-rays as phase sensitive means, commercial diagnostic X-ray systems available until the time of writing still rely exclusively on measuring the attenuation and scattering of X-rays by matter. Significant activities in research aim at building highly brilliant short pulse X-ray sources, based on e.g. synchrotron radiation, free electron lasers and/or laser wake-field acceleration of electrons followed by wiggling with magnetic structures or Thomson scattering in bunches of light. While both approaches, non-brilliant and brilliant sources, have different scope of application, we speculate that a combination may expand the efficacy in medical application. At this point, however, severe technical and commercial difficulties hinder closing this gap. This article may inspire further development and spark innovation in this important field.

  9. Characteristics of soft X-ray lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Yi

    2007-12-01

    A soft X-lens was devised with waveguide X-ray optics of total external reflection (TER). The lens consists of a stack of 1 387 TER waveguides with inner diameter of 0.45 mm and outer diameter of 0.60 mm. With the help of plasma sources of soft X-ray radiation, high density of pure soft X-ray radiation (without plasma expansion fragments) with broad-band spectral range can be obtained at the focus of the lens. As laser-plasma is considered, the radiation density of 1.3 x 10 5 W/cm 2 is obtained, the transmission coefficient is 18.6%, the ratio of the density at the focus with and without the lens is 1000 and the radiation capture is 28.9 degree. The density of 0.5 TW/cm 2 can be obtained as far as Qiang-Guang I facility is considered. (authors)

  10. Rocket studies of solar corona and transition region. [X-Ray spectrometer/spectrograph telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, L. W.; Bruner, E. C., Jr.; Brown, W. A.; Nobles, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    The XSST (X-Ray Spectrometer/Spectrograph Telescope) rocket payload launched by a Nike Boosted Black Brant was designed to provide high spectral resolution coronal soft X-ray line information on a spectrographic plate, as well as time resolved photo-electric records of pre-selected lines and spectral regions. This spectral data is obtained from a 1 x 10 arc second solar region defined by the paraboloidal telescope of the XSST. The transition region camera provided full disc images in selected spectral intervals originating in lower temperature zones than the emitting regions accessible to the XSST. A H-alpha camera system allowed referencing the measurements to the chromospheric temperatures and altitudes. Payload flight and recovery information is provided along with X-ray photoelectric and UV flight data, transition camera results and a summary of the anomalies encountered. Instrument mechanical stability and spectrometer pointing direction are also examined.

  11. Hard X-ray observation of cygnus X-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendziorra, E.; Staubert, R.; Reppin, C.; Pietsch, W.; Truemper, J.; Voges, W.

    1979-05-01

    During a balloon observation on October 18, 1977 the high energy X-ray spectrum (20 - 90 keV) of Cyg X-3 has been measured with high statistical accuracy. It is found to be consistent with a thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum with kT = 17.5 +3.1/-2.6 keV or a power law Esup(γ) of the differential photon flux spectrum with γ=3.6 +-0.3. The extrapolation of the observed spectrum to approximately 100 MeV yields a gamma ray intensity which is at least three orders of magnitude below the intensity found by SAS-2 (Lamb et al. 1977). This indicates that the overall spectral behaviour of Cygnus X-3 is much different from that of the Crab- and Vela-pulsar. (orig.) [de

  12. X-ray fluorescence analysis of thin films at glancing-incident and -takeoff angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, K.; Sato, S.; Hirokawa, K.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a new analytical method, Glancing-Incidence and -Takeoff X-Ray Fluorescence (GIT-XRF) method for the first time. Here, we present an idea for a thin-film analysis and a surface analysis by the GIT-XRF method. In this method, the dependence of the fluorescent x-ray intensity on takeoff angle is measured at various incident angles of the primary x-ray. Compared with a total reflection x-ray fluorescence method, the GIT-XRF method allows a detailed thin-film analysis, because the thin film is cross-checked by many experimental curves. Moreover, a surface-sensitive analysis is also possible by the GIT-XRF method. (author)

  13. Spectral Resolution for Five-Element, Filtered, X-Ray Detector (XRD) Arrays Using the Methods of Backus and Gilbert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FEHL, DAVID LEE; BIGGS, F.; CHANDLER, GORDON A.; STYGAR, WILLIAM A.

    2000-01-01

    The generalized method of Backus and Gilbert (BG) is described and applied to the inverse problem of obtaining spectra from a 5-channel, filtered array of x-ray detectors (XRD's). This diagnostic is routinely fielded on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories to study soft x-ray photons ((le)2300 eV), emitted by high density Z-pinch plasmas. The BG method defines spectral resolution limits on the system of response functions that are in good agreement with the unfold method currently in use. The resolution so defined is independent of the source spectrum. For noise-free, simulated data the BG approximating function is also in reasonable agreement with the source spectrum (150 eV black-body) and the unfold. This function may be used as an initial trial function for iterative methods or a regularization model

  14. THE NuSTAR X-RAY SPECTRUM OF HERCULES X-1: A RADIATION-DOMINATED RADIATIVE SHOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, Michael T.; Wood, Kent S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Becker, Peter A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030-4444 (United States); Gottlieb, Amy M.; Marcu-Cheatham, Diana M.; Pottschmidt, Katja [Department of Physics and Center for Space Science and Technology, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Fürst, Felix [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hemphill, Paul B. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093-0424 (United States); Schwarm, Fritz-Walter; Wilms, Jörn [Dr. Karl-Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Sternwartstr, 7, D-96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2016-11-10

    We report on new spectral modeling of the accreting X-ray pulsar Hercules X-1. Our radiation-dominated radiative shock model is an implementation of the analytic work of Becker and Wolff on Comptonized accretion flows onto magnetic neutron stars. We obtain a good fit to the spin-phase-averaged 4–78 keV X-ray spectrum observed by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array during a main-on phase of the Her X-1 35 day accretion disk precession period. This model allows us to estimate the accretion rate, the Comptonizing temperature of the radiating plasma, the radius of the magnetic polar cap, and the average scattering opacity parameters in the accretion column. This is in contrast to previous phenomenological models that characterized the shape of the X-ray spectrum, but could not determine the physical parameters of the accretion flow. We describe the spectral fitting details and discuss the interpretation of the accretion flow physical parameters.

  15. Picosecond chronography at x-ray wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, P.R.; Bradley, D.J.; Roddie, A.G.; Sibbett, W.; Key, M.H.; Lamb, M.J.; Lewis, C.L.S.

    1975-01-01

    An ultrafast streak camera for vacuum U-V to X-ray radiation is described. Preliminary measurements on laser-produced plasmas are presented with time resolution down to 150 psecs and space resolution down to 40μm for 1keV X-ray emission from a plasma generated by 2GW laser pulses focussed on a Cu target. High sensitivity and wide spectral bandwidth is due to front surface photoemission at oblique incidence. Time resolution capability of 40 psec and simultaneous spatial resolution down to a few microns is theoretically possible with this system. (author)

  16. Mapping of auroral x-rays from rocket overflights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, R.A.; Barcus, J.R.; Treinish, L.A.; Vondrak, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    In March 1978, two Nike Tomahawk payloads were launched from Poker Flat, Alaska, to observe the structure of bremsstrhlung x rays and precipitating particles during both nighttime and daytime observe x rays in four spectral ranges (5--10 keV, 10--20 keV, 20--40 keV, and >40 keV). Particle contamination of the detectors was avoided with broom magnet shielding techniques. By virtue of the payloads' approximate 20 0 coning angle (about 10.5-s period), the detectors scanned wide regions on either side of the trajectory paths. This has permitted construction (using computer color graphics) of the time averaged (approx.4 min) x ray source regions near 100 km, a height consistent with Chatanika radar electron density maps obtained during each flight period. X ray image maps for both flights exhibit enhanced source regions well outside the rocket trajectory planes. For the nighttime overflight, Chatanika radar scan data and Fort Yukon riometer data were used to verify the presence of an x ray imaged enhancement of electron precipitation, approximately 30 km to the east of the rocket trajectory plane. The daytime x ray data also exhibited several regions of enhanced emission, but outside the region scanned by Chatanika radar. A comparison of the x ray emissions from the two events shows the daytime x ray spectral distributions to be significantly harder but less intense that the nighttime distributions. Furthermore, for both events, spectra compared within and nearby each enhanced emitting region exhibit characteristics of a two component spectrum, such that the bright regions show an increased flux primarily in the low-energy component. Electron fluxes measured on each of the two flights with Geiger tubes are mainly isotropic over the downward hemisphere at night but show anisotropic pitch angle characteristics by day, consistent with the concept that the enhancement of the low-energy x ray flux component is predominantly induced by electrons filling the loss cone

  17. Panel discussion on: Data analysis trends in X-ray and γ-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozel, M.F.; Buccheri, R.; Scarsi, L.

    1985-01-01

    This article is a panel discussion that included several participants. The problems of data analysis in x- and gamma-ray astronomy are discussed. Improvements achieved by consecutive gamma-ray experiments since the 1960's are reviewed. The presentation of gamma-ray data in terms of two-dimensional sky maps is examined and different representations of galactic anticenter gamma-ray sky are shown

  18. Modelling the effect of absorption from the interstellar medium on transient black hole X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckersall, A. J.; Vaughan, S.; Wynn, G. A.

    2017-10-01

    All observations of Galactic X-ray binaries are affected by absorption from gas and dust in the interstellar medium (ISM) which imprints narrow (line) and broad (photoelectric edges) features on the continuum emission spectrum of the binary. Any spectral model used to fit data from a Galactic X-ray binary must therefore take account of these features; when the absorption is strong (as for most Galactic sources) it becomes important to accurately model the ISM absorption in order to obtain unbiased estimates of the parameters of the (emission) spectrum of the binary system. In this paper, we present analysis of some of the best spectroscopic data from the XMM-Newton RGS instrument using the most up-to-date photoabsorption model of the gaseous ISM ISMabs. We calculate column densities for H, O, Ne and Fe for seven transient black hole X-ray binary systems. We find that the hydrogen column densities in particular can vary greatly from those presented elsewhere in the literature. We assess the impact of using inaccurate column densities and older X-ray absorption models on spectral analysis using simulated data. We find that poor treatment of absorption can lead to large biases in inferred disc properties and that an independent analysis of absorption parameters can be used to alleviate such issues.

  19. Proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis at Lucas Heights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, D.; Duerden, P.

    1979-02-01

    The state of the proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) work at Lucas Heights is reported together with a full description of the experimental arrangement and its use for analysis of trace elements (Z >or= 14). The fundamentals of PIXE are examined in detail with a view to understanding not only the background continuum but also the X-ray production mechanisms. Quantitative predictions for the number of X-rays detected after proton bombardment of the target have been made and these compare well with experiments

  20. Imaging escape gated MPWC for hard X-ray astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; Boccaccini, L.; La Padula, C.; Mastropietro, M.; Patriarca, R.; Polcaro, V.F.; Barbareschi, L.; Perotti, F.; Villa, G.

    1983-11-15

    A scientific forward step in the hard X-ray and soft gamma-ray astronomy will only be possible with the use of a new generation of space borne instruments. Their main characteristics have to be the two-dimensional imaging capability over a large collecting area and the fine spectral resolution in order to discriminate between the weak signal coming from cosmic sources to be detected and the strong background induced by cosmic rays, in the space environment, on the detector. To reach this goal we have developed a new hard X-ray position sensitive proportional counter operating with the escape gate technique in the range 15-150 keV, to be used together with a pseudo-random coded mask in order to obtain sky images. The detector is a high pressure (5 bar) xenon-argon-isobutane filled chamber with a spatial resolution of 30x2 mm and a spectral resolution of 5% at 60 keV on the sensitive area of 3000 cm/sup 2/.

  1. X-ray fluorescence in geology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutra, C.V.; Gomes, C.B.

    1990-01-01

    This work is about the X-ray fluorescence aplication in geology. It's showing the X-ray origin and excitation. About the instrumentation this work shows the following: X-ray tubes, colimators, analysers crystals, detectors, amplifiers, pulse height selector, and others electronic components. By X-ray fluorescente are done quantitative and qualitative geological analysis and this work shows this analysis and its detection limits. The problems determination is the example. In this work was done yet the comparative analysis of the various instrumental methods in geochemistry. (C.G.) [pt

  2. Application of X-ray fluorescence analysis in environmental research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliment, V.; Kliman, J.; Turzo, I.

    1978-01-01

    A description is presented of the X-ray fluorescence analysis principles and of its possibilities in the study of environmental pollution impact. Experiments with X-ray fluorescence analysis using 241-Am and a Ge(Li) semiconductor detector are discussed. The reproducibility of determinations in dependence on the sample preparation and the evaluation of peak surfaces of characteristic radiation is shown. The dependence of the peak surface on the elemental contents in the sample was linear. Detection limits of the investigated elements ranged in tenths of μg for 300 s measurement. (author)

  3. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis in the electron microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, DC

    2003-01-01

    This book provides an in-depth description of x-ray microanalysis in the electron microscope. It is sufficiently detailed to ensure that novices will understand the nuances of high-quality EDX analysis. Includes information about hardware design as well as the physics of x-ray generation, absorption and detection, and most post-detection data processing. Details on electron optics and electron probe formation allow the novice to make sensible adjustments to the electron microscope in order to set up a system which optimises analysis. It also helps the reader determine which microanalytical me

  4. X-ray monitoring of the radio and γ-ray loud Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 Galaxy PKS2004–447

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreikenbohm A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present preliminary results of the X-ray analysis of XMM-Newton and Swift observations as part of a multi-wavelength monitoring campaign in 2012 of the radio-loud narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy PKS 2004–447. The source was recently detected in γ-rays by Fermi/LAT among only four other galaxies of that type. The 0:5 – 10 keV X-ray spectrum is well-described by a simple absorbed powerlaw (Γ ∼ 1.6. The source brightness exhibits variability on timescales of months to years with indications for spectral variability, which follows a “bluer-when-brighter” behaviour, similar to blazars.

  5. X-ray Spectroscopy of High-Z Elements on Nike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Weaver, J. L.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Obenschain, S. P.; Ralchenko, Yu.

    2013-10-01

    Survey X-ray spectrometer covering a spectral range from 0.5 to 19.5 angstroms has been added to the spectroscopic suite of Nike diagnostics. That allows simultaneous observation of both M- and N- spectra of W, Ta and Au with high spectral resolution. Low energy test shots confirmed strong presence of 3-4 transitions of Ni-like W, Ta and Au with X-ray energies as high as 3.5 keV when above mentioned elements were used as the targets. In our continuous effort to support DOE-NNSA's inertial fusion program, the future campaign will cover a wide range of plasma conditions that result in relatively energetic X-ray production. Eventually, absolutely calibrated spectrometers of similar geometry will be fielded at NIF in cooperation with NIF diagnostic group. Work supported by US DOE, Defense Programs.

  6. X-rays from Wolf-Rayet stars observed by the Einstein observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, W.T.; Cassinelli, J.P.; Hucht, K.A. van der

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary results of three X-ray surveys are presented. Out of a sample of 20 stars, X-rays were detected from four Wolf-Rayet stars and two O8f + stars. The detected stars have about the same mean value as O stars for the X-ray to total luminosity ratio, Lsub(x)/L = 10 -7 , but exhibit a much larger variation about the mean. The spectral energy distributions are also found to be like that of O stars in that they do not exhibit large attenuation of X-rays softer than 1 keV. This indicates that for both the O stars and WR stars much of the X-ray emission is coming from hot wisps or shocks in the outer regions of the winds and not from a thin source at the base of the wind. The general spectral shape and flux level place severe restrictions on models that attribute the lack of hydrogen emission lines to extremely high temperatures of the gas in the wind. (Auth.)

  7. Flat Field Anomalies in an X-ray CCD Camera Measured Using a Manson X-ray Source (HTPD 08 paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugh, M; Schneider, M B

    2008-01-01

    The Static X-ray Imager (SXI) is a diagnostic used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the position of the X-rays produced by lasers hitting a gold foil target. The intensity distribution taken by the SXI camera during a NIF shot is used to determine how accurately NIF can aim laser beams. This is critical to proper NIF operation. Imagers are located at the top and the bottom of the NIF target chamber. The CCD chip is an X-ray sensitive silicon sensor, with a large format array (2k x 2k), 24 (micro)m square pixels, and 15 (micro)m thick. A multi-anode Manson X-ray source, operating up to 10kV and 10W, was used to characterize and calibrate the imagers. The output beam is heavily filtered to narrow the spectral beam width, giving a typical resolution E/ΔE ∼ 10. The X-ray beam intensity was measured using an absolute photodiode that has accuracy better than 1% up to the Si K edge and better than 5% at higher energies. The X-ray beam provides full CCD illumination and is flat, within ±1% maximum to minimum. The spectral efficiency was measured at 10 energy bands ranging from 930 eV to 8470 eV. We observed an energy dependent pixel sensitivity variation that showed continuous change over a large portion of the CCD. The maximum sensitivity variation occurred at 8470 eV. The geometric pattern did not change at lower energies, but the maximum contrast decreased and was not observable below 4 keV. We were also able to observe debris, damage, and surface defects on the CCD chip. The Manson source is a powerful tool for characterizing the imaging errors of an X-ray CCD imager. These errors are quite different from those found in a visible CCD imager

  8. HARD X-RAY TAIL DISCOVERED IN THE CLOCKED BURSTER GS 1826–238

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodi, J.; Jourdain, E.; Roques, J. P., E-mail: jrodi@irap.omp.eu [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France)

    2016-02-01

    The low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) neutron star (NS) GS 1826–238 was discovered by Ginga in 1988 September. Due to the presence of quasi-periodicity in the type I X-ray burst rate, the source has been a frequent target of X-ray observations for almost 30 years. Though the bursts were too soft to be detected by INTEGRAL/SPI, the persistent emission from GS 1826–238 was detected over 150 keV during the ∼10 years of observations. Spectral analysis found a significant high-energy excess above a Comptonization model that is well fit by a power law, indicating an additional spectral component. Most previously reported spectra with hard tails in LMXB NS have had an electron temperature of a few keV and a hard tail dominating above ∼50 keV with an index of Γ ∼ 2–3. GS 1826–238 was found to have a markedly different spectrum with kT{sub e} ∼ 20 keV and a hard tail dominating above ∼150 keV with an index of Γ ∼ 1.8, more similar to black hole X-ray binaries. We report on our search for long-term spectral variability over the 25–370 keV energy range and on a comparison of the GS 1826–238 average spectrum to the spectra of other LMXB NSs with hard tails.

  9. Temporal Gain Correction for X-Ray Calorimeter Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, F. S.; Chiao, M. P.; Eckart, M. E.; Fujimoto, R.; Ishisaki, Y.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Leutenegger, M. A.; McCammon, D.; Mitsuda, K.

    2016-01-01

    Calorimetric X-ray detectors are very sensitive to their environment. The boundary conditions can have a profound effect on the gain including heat sink temperature, the local radiation temperature, bias, and the temperature of the readout electronics. Any variation in the boundary conditions can cause temporal variations in the gain of the detector and compromise both the energy scale and the resolving power of the spectrometer. Most production X-ray calorimeter spectrometers, both on the ground and in space, have some means of tracking the gain as a function of time, often using a calibration spectral line. For small gain changes, a linear stretch correction is often sufficient. However, the detectors are intrinsically non-linear and often the event analysis, i.e., shaping, optimal filters etc., add additional non-linearity. Thus for large gain variations or when the best possible precision is required, a linear stretch correction is not sufficient. Here, we discuss a new correction technique based on non-linear interpolation of the energy-scale functions. Using Astro-HSXS calibration data, we demonstrate that the correction can recover the X-ray energy to better than 1 part in 104 over the entire spectral band to above 12 keV even for large-scale gain variations. This method will be used to correct any temporal drift of the on-orbit per-pixel gain using on-board calibration sources for the SXS instrument on the Astro-H observatory.

  10. Control of the Low-energy X-rays by Using MCNP5 and Numerical Analysis for a New Concept Intra-oral X-ray Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jangyong; Ji, Yunseo; Lee, Rena

    2018-05-01

    An X-ray control algorithm to modulate the X-ray intensity distribution over the FOV (field of view) has been developed by using numerical analysis and MCNP5, a particle transport simulation code on the basis of the Monte Carlo method. X-rays, which are widely used in medical diagnostic imaging, should be controlled in order to maximize the performance of the X-ray imaging system. However, transporting X-rays, like a liquid or a gas is conveyed through a physical form such as pipes, is not possible. In the present study, an X-ray control algorithm and technique to uniformize the Xray intensity projected on the image sensor were developed using a flattening filter and a collimator in order to alleviate the anisotropy of the distribution of X-rays due to intrinsic features of the X-ray generator. The proposed method, which is combined with MCNP5 modeling and numerical analysis, aimed to optimize a flattening filter and a collimator for a uniform distribution of X-rays. Their size and shape were estimated from the method. The simulation and the experimental results both showed that the method yielded an intensity distribution over an X-ray field of 6×4 cm2 at SID (source to image-receptor distance) of 5 cm with a uniformity of more than 90% when the flattening filter and the collimator were mounted on the system. The proposed algorithm and technique are not only confined to flattening filter development but can also be applied for other X-ray related research and development efforts.

  11. Characterization and error analysis of an N×N unfolding procedure applied to filtered, photoelectric x-ray detector arrays. I. Formulation and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehl, D. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Stygar, W. A.; Olson, R. E.; Ruiz, C. L.; Hohlfelder, J. J.; Mix, L. P.; Biggs, F.; Berninger, M.; Frederickson, P. O.; Frederickson, R.

    2010-12-01

    An algorithm for spectral reconstructions (unfolds) and spectrally integrated flux estimates from data obtained by a five-channel, filtered x-ray-detector array (XRD) is described in detail and characterized. This diagnostic is a broad-channel spectrometer, used primarily to measure time-dependent soft x-ray flux emitted by z-pinch plasmas at the Z pulsed-power accelerator (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA), and serves as both a plasma probe and a gauge of accelerator performance. The unfold method, suitable for online analysis, arises naturally from general assumptions about the x-ray source and spectral properties of the channel responses; a priori constraints control the ill-posed nature of the inversion. The unfolded spectrum is not assumed to be Planckian. This study is divided into two consecutive papers. This paper considers three major issues: (a) Formulation of the unfold method.—The mathematical background, assumptions, and procedures leading to the algorithm are described: the spectral reconstruction Sunfold(E,t)—five histogram x-ray bins j over the x-ray interval, 137≤E≤2300eV at each time step t—depends on the shape and overlap of the calibrated channel responses and on the maximum electrical power delivered to the plasma. The x-ray flux Funfold is estimated as ∫Sunfold(E,t)dE. (b) Validation with simulations.—Tests of the unfold algorithm with known static and time-varying spectra are described. These spectra included—but were not limited to—Planckian spectra Sbb(E,T) (25≤T≤250eV), from which noise-free channel data were simulated and unfolded. For Planckian simulations with 125≤T≤250eV and typical responses, the binwise unfold values Sj and the corresponding binwise averages ⟨Sbb⟩j agreed to ˜20%, except where Sbb≪max⁡{Sbb}. Occasionally, unfold values Sj≲0 (artifacts) were encountered. The algorithm recovered ≳90% of the x-ray flux over the wider range, 75≤T≤250eV. For lower T, the

  12. A broadband x-ray study of the Geminga pulsar with NuSTAR and XMM-Newton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mori, Kaya; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Dufour, Francois

    2014-01-01

    We report on the first hard X-ray detection of the Geminga pulsar above 10 keV using a 150 ks observation with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) observatory. The double-peaked pulse profile of non-thermal emission seen in the soft X-ray band persists at higher energies. Broadband......V. The spectral hardening in non-thermal X-ray emission as well as spectral flattening between the optical and X-ray bands argue against the conjecture that a single power law may account for multi-wavelength non-thermal spectra of middle-aged pulsars....

  13. Sensitivity Analysis of X-ray Spectra from Scanning Electron Microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Thomas Martin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Patton, Bruce W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Weber, Charles F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bekar, Kursat B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The primary goal of this project is to evaluate x-ray spectra generated within a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine elemental composition of small samples. This will be accomplished by performing Monte Carlo simulations of the electron and photon interactions in the sample and in the x-ray detector. The elemental inventories will be determined by an inverse process that progressively reduces the difference between the measured and simulated x-ray spectra by iteratively adjusting composition and geometric variables in the computational model. The intended benefit of this work will be to develop a method to perform quantitative analysis on substandard samples (heterogeneous phases, rough surfaces, small sizes, etc.) without involving standard elemental samples or empirical matrix corrections (i.e., true standardless quantitative analysis).

  14. The effect of well-characterized, very low-dose x-ray radiation on fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Katelyn; Bradley, Suzanne; Baginski, Bryana; Wilson, Joseph R; Medlin, Donald; Zheng, Leon; Wilson, R Kevin; Rusin, Matthew; Takacs, Endre; Dean, Delphine

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of low-dose radiation on fibroblast cells irradiated by spectrally and dosimetrically well-characterized soft x-rays. To achieve this, a new cell culture x-ray irradiation system was designed. This system generates characteristic fluorescent x-rays to irradiate the cell culture with x-rays of well-defined energies and doses. 3T3 fibroblast cells were cultured in cups with Mylar® surfaces and were irradiated for one hour with characteristic iron (Fe) K x-ray radiation at a dose rate of approximately 550 μGy/hr. Cell proliferation, total protein analysis, flow cytometry, and cell staining were performed on fibroblast cells to determine the various effects caused by the radiation. Irradiated cells demonstrated increased proliferation and protein production compared to control samples. Flow cytometry revealed that a higher percentage of irradiated cells were in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle compared to control counterparts, which is consistent with other low-dose studies. Cell staining results suggest that irradiated cells maintained normal cell functions after radiation exposure, as there were no qualitative differences between the images of the control and irradiated samples. The result of this study suggest that low-dose soft x-ray radiation might cause an initial pause, followed by a significant increase, in proliferation. An initial "pause" in cell proliferation could be a protective mechanism of the cells to minimize DNA damage caused by radiation exposure. The new cell irradiation system developed here allows for unprecedented control over the properties of the x-rays given to the cell cultures. This will allow for further studies on various cell types with known spectral distribution and carefully measured doses of radiation, which may help to elucidate the mechanisms behind varied cell responses to low-dose x-rays reported in the literature.

  15. PPV analysis and tension of spectral peak in an X radiation equipment for dosemeter calibration; Analise do PPV e tensao de pico espectral em um equipamento de raios-X para calibracao de dosimetros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, P.M.C.; Santana, P.C. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Anatomia e Imagem; Lacerda, M.A.S.; Silva, T.A. da, E-mail: pmco@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Dosimetry laboratories around the world try to achieve metrology consistency between the X-rays beams for therapy and diagnostic detectors calibration. One of the parameters to characterize X-ray beam is the practical peak voltage (PPV) assessment. In this work were evaluated the PPV and spectral peak voltage in the potential constant X-ray equipment, that result in a mean difference of 1.4 %. (author)

  16. XIPE, the X-ray imaging polarimetry explorer: Opening a new window in the X-ray sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffitta, Paolo; XIPE Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    XIPE, the X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer, is a candidate ESA fourth medium size mission, now in competitive phase A, aimed at time-spectrally-spatially-resolved X-ray polarimetry of a large number of celestial sources as a breakthrough in high energy astrophysics and fundamental physics. Its payload consists of three X-ray optics with a total effective area larger than one XMM mirror but with a low mass and of three Gas Pixel Detectors at their focus. The focal length is 4 m and the whole satellite fits within the fairing of the Vega launcher without the need of an extendable bench. XIPE will be an observatory with 75% of the time devoted to a competitive guest observer program. Its consortium across Europe comprises Italy, Germany, Spain, United Kingdom, Switzerland, Poland, Sweden Until today, thanks to a dedicated experiment that dates back to the '70, only the Crab Nebula showed a non-zero polarization with large significance [1] in X-rays. XIPE, with its innovative detector, promises to make significative measurements on hundreds of celestial sources.

  17. Low energy x-ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    A subkilovolt spectrometer has been produced to permit high-energy-resolution, time-dependent x-ray intensity measurements. The diffracting element is a curved mica (d = 9.95A) crystal. To preclude higher order (n > 1) diffractions, a carbon x-ray mirror that reflects only photons with energies less than approx. 1.1 keV is utilized ahead of the diffracting element. The nominal energy range of interest is 800 to 900 eV. The diffracted photons are detected by a gold-surface photoelectric diode designed to have a very good frequency response, and whose current is recorded on an oscilloscope. A thin, aluminium light barrier is placed between the diffracting crystal and the photoelectric diode detector to keep any uv generated on or scattered by the crystal from illuminating the detector. High spectral energy resolution is provided by many photocathodes between 8- and 50-eV wide placed serially along the diffracted x-ray beam at the detector position. The spectrometer was calibrated for energy and energy dispersion using the Ni Lα 1 2 lines produced in the LLNL IONAC accelerator and in third order using a molybdenum target x-ray tube. For the latter calibration the carbon mirror was replaced by one surfaced with rhodium to raise the cut-off energy to about 3 keV. The carbon mirror reflection dependence on energy was measured using one of our Henke x-ray sources. The curved mica crystal diffraction efficiency was measured on our Low-Energy x-ray (LEX) machine. The spectrometer performs well although some changes in the way the x-ray mirror is held are desirable. 16 figures

  18. F K-edge soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimura, Tetsuro; Kawai, Jun; Maeda, Kuniko; Fukushima, Akiko; Shin, S.; Motoyama, Muneyuki; Nakajima Tsuyoshi

    2001-01-01

    We measured F X-ray absorption spectra of various fluorine compounds using a synchrotron radiation at KEK-PF. The absorption spectra were measured using X-ray fluorescence yield (XFY) and total electron yield (TEY) methods. Change of the spectral shape has a relation to the metal-fluorine bond distance. By comparing with the experimental spectrum and calculated spectrum, F 2p state density is divined into up and down states. (author)

  19. Instrumental fundamental parameters and selected applications of the microfocus X-ray fluorescence analysis at a scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rackwitz, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    For a decade X-ray sources have been commercially available for the microfocus X-ray fluorescence analysis (μ-XRF) and offer the possibility of extending the analytics at a scanning electron microscope (SEM) with an attached energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). By using the μ-XRF it is possible to determine the content of chemical elements in a microscopic sample volume in a quantitative, reference-free and non-destructive way. For the reference-free quantification with the XRF the Sherman equation is referred to. This equation deduces the intensity of the detected X-ray intensity of a fluorescence peak to the content of the element in the sample by means of fundamental parameters. The instrumental fundamental parameters of the μ-XRF at a SEM/EDS system are the excitation spectrum consisting of X-ray tube spectrum and the transmission of the X-ray optics, the geometry and the spectrometer efficiency. Based on a calibrated instrumentation the objectives of this work are the development of procedures for the characterization of all instrumental fundamental parameters as well as the evaluation and reduction of their measurement uncertainties: The algorithms known from the literature for the calculation of X-ray tube spectrum are evaluated with regard to their deviations in the spectral distribution. Within this work a novel semi-empirical model is improved with respect to its uncertainties and enhanced in the low energy range as well as extended for another three anodes. The emitted X-ray tube spectrum is calculated from the detected one, which is measured at an especially developed setup for the direct measurement of X-ray tube spectra. This emitted X-ray tube spectrum is compared to the one calculated on base of the model of this work. A procedure for the determination of the most important parameters of an X-ray semi-lens in parallelizing mode is developed. The temporal stability of the transmission of X-ray full lenses, which have been in regular use at

  20. Soft x-ray transmission measurements on thin films used for XMM CCD-filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, K.-H.; Reppin, C.; Maier, H. J.; Frischke, D.; Fuchs, D.; Müller, P.

    1997-02-01

    We have been developing optical filters for ESA's X-ray astronomy project XMM (X-ray Multi Mirror Mission). Specific CCDs will be used as detectors in the focal plane on board the observatory (1). Since these detectors are sensitive from the X-ray to the near infrared spectral range, X-ray observations require optical filters, which combine a high transparency for photon energies in the soft X-ray region and a high opacity for ultraviolet and visible radiation as well. With respect to the mission goal in orbit three types of flight model filters are designed having different spectral transmittance functions. We report on one of these types, a so-called "thick" filter, which has been realized within the EQM (Electrical Qualification Model)-phase of the project. The filter features a cut-off in the extreme ultraviolet spectral range and suppresses radiation below ˜10 eV photon energy by more than 8 orders of magnitude. It has an effective aperture of 73 mm without any support structure. A 0.35 μm thick polypropylene carrier foil is coated with metallic films of Al and Sn. We describe transmission measurements in the soft X-ray photon energy range to determine the thickness of the individual layers and present the optical performance data of the filter.

  1. Analysis of sculptures using XRF and X-ray radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calza, C.; Oliveira, D. F.; Freitas, R. P.; Rocha, H. S.; Nascimento, J. R.; Lopes, R. T.

    2015-11-01

    This work reports the analysis of two sacred images on polychrome wood using X-ray Radiography and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence. The first case is the analysis of a sculpture portraying Saint Sebastian, the patron saint of Rio de Janeiro, which is considered the second most ancient sacred image of Brazil. This sculpture was made in Portugal and was transported to Brazil by Estácio Sá, founder of the city of Rio de Janeiro, in 1565. Nowadays, it is located on the main altar of the Church of Capuchin Friars. The second case is the analysis of a sculpture representing Our Lady of Conception, which is located in the D. João VI Museum (EBA/UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro). The objective of these analyses was to evaluate the general conditions of the sculptures, identifying possible problems and internal damages, areas that revealed signs of previous retouchings and the materials and pigments employed by the artists, in order to assist its restoration procedures. EDXRF measurements were carried out with a portable system, developed at the Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, consisting of a Si-PIN XR-100CR detector from Amptek and an Oxford TF3005 X-ray tube with W anode. An X-ray source, a CR System GE CR50P and IP detectors were used to perform the radiographs. The XRF analysis of the sculptures identified the original pigments in both cases and the radiographic images revealed details of the manufacture; restored regions; extensive use of lead white; presence of cracks on the wood; use of nails and spikes, etc.

  2. Producing x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallozzi, P.J.; Epstein, H.M.; Jung, R.G.; Applebaum, D.C.; Fairand, B.P.; Gallagher, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    A method of producing x-rays by directing radiant energy from a laser onto a target is described. Conversion efficiency of at least about 3 percent is obtained by providing the radiant energy in a low-power precursor pulse of approximately uniform effective intensity focused onto the surface of the target for about 1 to 30 nanoseconds so as to generate an expanding unconfined coronal plasma having less than normal solid density throughout and comprising a low-density (underdense) region wherein the plasma frequency is less than the laser radiation frequency and a higher-density (overdense) region wherein the plasma frequency is greater than the laser radiation frequency and, about 1 to 30 nanoseconds after the precursor pulse strikes the target, a higher-power main pulse focused onto the plasma for about 10 -3 to 30 nanoseconds and having such power density and total energy that the radiant energy is absorbed in the underdense region and conducted into the overdense region to heat it and thus to produce x-rays therefrom with the plasma remaining substantially below normal solid density and thus facilitating the substantial emission of x-rays in the form of spectral lines arising from nonequilibrium ionization states

  3. Time-resolved x-ray spectra of laser irradiated high-Z targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, P.H.Y.; Attwood, D.T.; Boyle, M.J.; Campbell, E.M.; Coleman, L.C.; Kornblum, H.N.

    1977-01-01

    Recent results obtained by using the Livermore 15 psec x-ray streak camera to record x-ray emission from laser-irradiated high-z targets in the 1-20 keV range are reported. Nine to eleven K-edge filter channels were used for the measurements. In the lower energy channels, a dynamic range of x-ray emission intensity of better than three orders of magnitude have been recorded. Data will be presented which describe temporally and spectrally resolved x-ray spectra of gold disk targets irradiated by laser pulses from the Argus facility, including the temporal evolution of the superthermal x-ray tail

  4. Exchange, x-ray and IR spectral behaviour of lanthanum and praseodymium exchanged zeolite X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, D.; Upreti, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    Exchange behaviour of lanthanum and praseodymium ions in zeolite X involves three steps: preferential exchange, intrazeolitic exchange and irreversible exchange. At room temperature , higher exchange has been observed with La(III) than with Pr(III) which is attributed to the smaller hydrosphere of lanthanum than praseodymium. IR spectra of these zeolites in KBr pellets show a shift in the major Si-O stretching vibration of 972 cm -1 to higher frequencies. Their x-ray diffraction patterns remain unchanged except a large decrease of the line intensities caused by the absorption of x-rays by heavy La(III) and Pr(III) ions. The present study reports the preparation and physicochemical properties of lanthanum and praseodymium exchanged zeolite X. (author). 12 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  5. X-ray emission lines from photoionized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liedahl, D.A.

    1992-11-01

    Plasma emission codes have become a standard tool for the analysis of spectroscopic data from cosmic X-ray sources. However, the assumption of collisional equilibrium, typically invoked in these codes, renders them inapplicable to many important astrophysical situations, particularly those involving X-ray photoionized nebulae, which are likely to exist in the circumsource environments of compact X-ray sources. X-ray line production in a photoionized plasma is primarily the result of radiative cascades following recombination. Through the development of atomic models of several highly-charged ions, this work extends the range of applicability of discrete spectral models to plasmas dominated by recombination. Assuming that ambient plasma conditions lie in the temperature range 10 5 --10 6 K and the density range 10 11 --10 16 cm -3 , X-ray line spectra are calculated over the wavelength range 5--45 angstrom using the HULLAC atomic physics package. Most of the work focuses on the Fe L-shell ions. Line ratios of the form (3s-2p)/(3d-2p) are shown to characterize the principal mode of line excitation, thereby providing a simple signature of photoionization. At electron densities exceeding 10 12 cm -3 , metastable state populations in the ground configurations approach their LTE value, resulting in the enrichment of the Fe L-shell recombination spectrum and a set of density-sensitive X-ray line ratios. Radiative recombination continua and emission lines produced selectively by Δn = 0 dielectronic recombination are shown to provide two classes of temperature diagnostics. Because of the extreme overionization, the recombination continua are expected to be narrow (ΔE/E much-lt 1), with ΔE = kT. Dielectronic recombination selectively drives radiative transitions that originate on states with vacancies in the 2s subshell, states that are inaccessible under pure RR population kinetics

  6. Spectral tomographic analysis of Bremsstrahlung X-rays generated in a laser-produced plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rhee, Y.-J.; Nam, S. M.; Peebles, W.; Sawada, H.; Wei, M.; Vaisseau, X.; Sasaki, T.; Giuffrida, Lorenzo; Hulin, S.; Vauzour, B.; Santos, J.J.; Batani, D.; McLean, H. S.; Patel, P. K.; Li, Y.; Yuan, D. W.; Zhang, K.; Zhong, J. Y.; Fu, C. B.; Hua, N.; Li, K.; Zhang, Y.; Zhu, J. Q.; Kim, I. J.; Jeon, J. H.; Jeong, T.M.; Choi, I.W.; Lee, H. W.; Sung, J.H.; Lee, S.K.; Nam, C.H.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 4 (2016), s. 645-654 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LQ1606; GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Bremsstrahlung X-ray * filter stack spectrometer * laser-produced plasma Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.420, year: 2016

  7. Optical and x-ray alignment approaches for off-plane reflection gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allured, Ryan; Donovan, Benjamin D.; DeRoo, Casey T.; Marlowe, Hannah R.; McEntaffer, Randall L.; Tutt, James H.; Cheimets, Peter N.; Hertz, Edward; Smith, Randall K.; Burwitz, Vadim; Hartner, Gisela; Menz, Benedikt

    2015-09-01

    Off-plane reflection gratings offer the potential for high-resolution, high-throughput X-ray spectroscopy on future missions. Typically, the gratings are placed in the path of a converging beam from an X-ray telescope. In the off-plane reflection grating case, these gratings must be co-aligned such that their diffracted spectra overlap at the focal plane. Misalignments degrade spectral resolution and effective area. In-situ X-ray alignment of a pair of off-plane reflection gratings in the path of a silicon pore optics module has been performed at the MPE PANTER beamline in Germany. However, in-situ X-ray alignment may not be feasible when assembling all of the gratings required for a satellite mission. In that event, optical methods must be developed to achieve spectral alignment. We have developed an alignment approach utilizing a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and diffraction of an ultraviolet laser. We are fabricating the necessary hardware, and will be taking a prototype grating module to an X-ray beamline for performance testing following assembly and alignment.

  8. JEM-X: The X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Niels; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Westergaard, Niels Jørgen Stenfeldt

    1999-01-01

    and identification of gamma ray sources as well as in the analysis and scientific interpretation of the combined X-ray and gamma ray data. JEM-X is a coded aperture X-ray telescope consisting of two identical detectors. Each detector has a sensitive area of 500 cm(2), and views the sky (6.6 deg FOV, FWHM) through...

  9. X-rays from stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güdel, Manuel

    2004-07-01

    Spectroscopic studies available from Chandra and XMM-Newton play a pivotal part in the understanding of the physical processes in stellar (magnetic and non-magnetic) atmospheres. It is now routinely possible to derive densities and to study the influence of ultraviolet radiation fields, both of which can be used to infer the geometry of the radiating sources. Line profiles provide important information on bulk mass motions and attenuation by neutral matter, e.g. in stellar winds. The increased sensitivity has revealed new types of X-ray sources in systems that were thought to be unlikely places for X-rays: flaring brown dwarfs, including rather old, non-accreting objects, and terminal shocks in jets of young stars are important examples. New clues concerning the role of stellar high-energy processes in the modification of the stellar environment (ionization, spallation, etc.) contribute significantly to our understanding of the "astro-ecology" in forming planetary systems. Technological limitations are evident. The spectral resolution has not reached the level where bulk mass motions in cool stars become easily measurable. Higher resolution would also be important to perform X-ray "Doppler imaging" in order to reconstruct the 3-D distribution of the X-ray sources around a rotating star. Higher sensitivity will be required to perform high-resolution spectroscopy of weak sources such as brown dwarfs or embedded pre-main-sequence sources. A new generation of satellites such as Constellation-X or XEUS should pursue these goals.

  10. Investigation of solar flares in X-ray and optical spectral region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurt, V.; Kurochka, L.N.; Zenchenko, V.M.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of hard X h radiation of 180 solar flares carried out on board of the space probes Venera-13,-14, were compared with measurements of optical and thermal X t radiation. Values of total energy release during a flare in these regions are calculated, and correlation analysis is carried out. The bond correlations found have shown that total energy of fast electrons, caused X h -flare in the flare pulse phase, and thermal energy at the end of a pulse phase are practically connected with each othesr functionally. Quantitative connection between a flare ball in H α -line and the most probable energy values, being in different radiation regions calculated in the scope of generally accepted models, is established. The total energy of an optical (cold) part of the flare, radiation energy in X-ray region and the energy introduced to the flare volume by energy particles are shown to be compared between each other

  11. The Mapping X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (MapX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, P.; Blake, D. F.; Marchis, F.; Bristow, T.; Thompson, K.

    2017-12-01

    Many planetary surface processes leave traces of their actions as features in the size range 10s to 100s of microns. The Mapping X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (MapX) will provide elemental imaging at 100 micron spatial resolution, yielding elemental chemistry at a scale where many relict physical, chemical, or biological features can be imaged and interpreted in ancient rocks on planetary bodies and planetesimals. MapX is an arm-based instrument positioned on a rock or regolith with touch sensors. During an analysis, an X-ray source (tube or radioisotope) bombards the sample with X-rays or alpha-particles / gamma-rays, resulting in sample X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). X-rays emitted in the direction of an X-ray sensitive CCD imager pass through a 1:1 focusing lens (X-ray micro-pore Optic (MPO)) that projects a spatially resolved image of the X-rays onto the CCD. The CCD is operated in single photon counting mode so that the energies and positions of individual X-ray photons are recorded. In a single analysis, several thousand frames are both stored and processed in real-time. Higher level data products include single-element maps with a lateral spatial resolution of 100 microns and quantitative XRF spectra from ground- or instrument- selected Regions of Interest (ROI). XRF spectra from ROI are compared with known rock and mineral compositions to extrapolate the data to rock types and putative mineralogies. When applied to airless bodies and implemented with an appropriate radioisotope source for alpha-particle excitation, MapX will be able to analyze biogenic elements C, N, O, P, S, in addition to the cations of the rock-forming elements >Na, accessible with either X-ray or gamma-ray excitation. The MapX concept has been demonstrated with a series of lab-based prototypes and is currently under refinement and TRL maturation.

  12. Application of the X-ray fluorescence analysis and X-ray diffraction in geochemical studies of the Pleistocene tills from Holy Cross Mountains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubala-Kukuś, A.; Ludwikowska-Kedzia, M.; Banaś, D.; Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Pajek, M.; Wudarczyk-Moćko, J.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis methods (wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis (WDXRF) and total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF)) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) have been applied in complementary geochemical studies of the Pleistocene till samples. The XRPD technique gave information about the mineral composition of the analyzed samples while the WDXRF and TXRF studies allowed the fast elemental analysis. The till samples were collected from different regions of Holy Cross Mountains (located in central Poland) which are still not unambiguously described in the context of the geochemical studies of the Quaternary sediments. The analysis was concentrated on the geochemical composition of the till samples both for materials occurring on the surface (characterized by continuous weathering processes) and for samples taken from core borehole. The overriding purpose of these studies is determination of the local lithotype of the tills and its lithologic and petrographic diagnostic properties, including the chemical composition of clay and minerals found in the clay. In the presented work the experimental sets up, sample preparation procedure and measurements programme will be discussed in details. Finally, the elemental and mineral compositions will be presented for studied different groups of the samples. - Highlights: • XRF analysis and X-ray diffraction used in studies of the till samples. • The till samples were collected from different regions of Holy Cross Mountains. • The analysis concentrates both on the samples from surface and from core borehole. • The purpose is determination of the local lithotype of the tills. • The experimental setup, sample preparation, measurements and results are discussed

  13. Stellar winds in binary X-ray systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgregor, K. B.; Vitello, P. A. J.

    1982-01-01

    It is thought that accretion from a strong stellar wind by a compact object may be responsible for the X-ray emission from binary systems containing a massive early-type primary. To investigate the effect of X-ray heating and ionization on the mass transfer process in systems of this type, an idealized model is constructed for the flow of a radiation-driven wind in the presence of an X-ray source of specified luminosity, L sub x. It is noted that for low values of L sub x, X-ray photoionization gives rise to additional ions having spectral lines with wavelengths situated near the peak of the primary continuum flux distribution. As a consequence, the radiation force acting on the gas increases in relation to its value in the absence of X-rays, and the wind is accelerated to higher velocities. As L sub x is increased, the degree of ionization of the wind increases, and the magnitude of the radiation force is diminished in comparison with the case in which L sub x = 0. This reduction leads at first to a decrease in the wind velocity and ultimately (for L sub x sufficiently large) to the termination of radiatively driven mass loss.

  14. Research Note: Energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Energy Dispersive X-Ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique for the analysis of geological, biological and environmental samples is described. The technique has been applied in the analysis of 10 (geological, biological, environmental) standard reference materials. The accuracy and precision of the technique were attested ...

  15. Solar and Stellar X-ray Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, P. C. H.; SADE Team

    2004-05-01

    Stern et al. have shown that Yohkoh-SXT full disk X-ray irradiance shows an 11 year cycle with an max/min amplitude ratio of a factor 30. Similar cyclic X-ray variation in Sun-like stars observed by ROSAT and its predecessors is observed in only a few cases and limited to a factor two or three. We will show, by means of detailed bandpass comparisons, that this discrepancy cannot be ascribed to the differences in energy response between SXT and the stellar soft X-ray detectors. Is the Sun exceptional? After centuries of geocentric and heliocentric worldviews we find this a difficult proposition to entertain. But perhaps the Sun is a member of a small class of late-type stars with large amplitudes in their X-ray cycles. The stellar X-ray observations listed in the HEASARC catalog are too sparse to verify this hypothesis. To resolve these and related questions we have proposed a small low-cost stellar X-ray spectroscopic imager originally called SADE to obtain regular time series from late and early-type stars and accretion disks. This instrument is complimentary to the much more advanced Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories, and allows them to focus on those sources that require their full spatial and spectral resolution. We will describe the basic design and spectroscopic capability of SADE and show it meets the mission requirements.

  16. Stabilized x-ray generator power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Subimal; Purushotham, K.V.; Bose, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence analysis are very much adopted in laboratories to determine the type and structure of the constituent compounds in solid materials, chemical composition of materials, stress developed on metals etc. These experiments need X-ray beam of fixed intensity and wave length. This can only be achieved by X-ray generator having highly stabilized tube voltage and tube current. This paper describes how X-ray tube high voltage and electron beam current are stabilized. This paper also highlights generation of X-rays, diffractometry and X-ray fluorescence analysis and their wide applications. Principle of operation for stabilizing the X-ray tube voltage and current, different protection circuits adopted, special features of the mains H.V. transformer and H.T. tank are described in this report. (author)

  17. Technical Note: SPEKTR 3.0—A computational tool for x-ray spectrum modeling and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punnoose, J.; Xu, J.; Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Siewerdsen, J. H., E-mail: jeff.siewerdsen@jhu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: A computational toolkit (SPEKTR 3.0) has been developed to calculate x-ray spectra based on the tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating cubic splines (TASMICS) algorithm, updating previous work based on the tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating polynomials (TASMIP) spectral model. The toolkit includes a MATLAB (The Mathworks, Natick, MA) function library and improved user interface (UI) along with an optimization algorithm to match calculated beam quality with measurements. Methods: The SPEKTR code generates x-ray spectra (photons/mm{sup 2}/mAs at 100 cm from the source) using TASMICS as default (with TASMIP as an option) in 1 keV energy bins over beam energies 20–150 kV, extensible to 640 kV using the TASMICS spectra. An optimization tool was implemented to compute the added filtration (Al and W) that provides a best match between calculated and measured x-ray tube output (mGy/mAs or mR/mAs) for individual x-ray tubes that may differ from that assumed in TASMICS or TASMIP and to account for factors such as anode angle. Results: The median percent difference in photon counts for a TASMICS and TASMIP spectrum was 4.15% for tube potentials in the range 30–140 kV with the largest percentage difference arising in the low and high energy bins due to measurement errors in the empirically based TASMIP model and inaccurate polynomial fitting. The optimization tool reported a close agreement between measured and calculated spectra with a Pearson coefficient of 0.98. Conclusions: The computational toolkit, SPEKTR, has been updated to version 3.0, validated against measurements and existing models, and made available as open source code. Video tutorials for the SPEKTR function library, UI, and optimization tool are available.

  18. Technical Note: spektr 3.0—A computational tool for x-ray spectrum modeling and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punnoose, J.; Xu, J.; Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A computational toolkit (spektr 3.0) has been developed to calculate x-ray spectra based on the tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating cubic splines (TASMICS) algorithm, updating previous work based on the tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating polynomials (TASMIP) spectral model. The toolkit includes a matlab (The Mathworks, Natick, MA) function library and improved user interface (UI) along with an optimization algorithm to match calculated beam quality with measurements. Methods: The spektr code generates x-ray spectra (photons/mm2/mAs at 100 cm from the source) using TASMICS as default (with TASMIP as an option) in 1 keV energy bins over beam energies 20–150 kV, extensible to 640 kV using the TASMICS spectra. An optimization tool was implemented to compute the added filtration (Al and W) that provides a best match between calculated and measured x-ray tube output (mGy/mAs or mR/mAs) for individual x-ray tubes that may differ from that assumed in TASMICS or TASMIP and to account for factors such as anode angle. Results: The median percent difference in photon counts for a TASMICS and TASMIP spectrum was 4.15% for tube potentials in the range 30–140 kV with the largest percentage difference arising in the low and high energy bins due to measurement errors in the empirically based TASMIP model and inaccurate polynomial fitting. The optimization tool reported a close agreement between measured and calculated spectra with a Pearson coefficient of 0.98. Conclusions: The computational toolkit, spektr, has been updated to version 3.0, validated against measurements and existing models, and made available as open source code. Video tutorials for the spektr function library, UI, and optimization tool are available. PMID:27487888

  19. Application of synchrotron radiation to x-ray fluorescence analysis of trace elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.

    1986-08-01

    The development of synchrotron radiation x-ray sources has provided the means to greatly extend the capabilities of x-ray fluorescence analysis for determinations of trace element concentrations. A brief description of synchrotron radiation properties provides a background for a discussion of the improved detection limits compared to existing x-ray fluorescence techniques. Calculated detection limits for x-ray microprobes with micrometer spatial resolutions are described and compared with experimental results beginning to appear from a number of laboratories. The current activities and future plans for a dedicated x-ray microprobe beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented

  20. Applications for X-ray detectors in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remillard, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Position-sensitive X-Ray detectors continue to playa central role in high-energy astrophysics. The current science goals are reviewed with emphasis on requirements in terms of camera performance. Wide-field imaging techniques, including coded mask cameras, are an essential part of space programs because of the transient nature of high-priority targets, e.g. eruptions from black-hole binaries and cosmic explosions such as gamma ray bursts. Pointing X-ray telescopes are being planned with a wide range of photon energies and with collection designs that include both mirrors and coded masks. Requirements for high spectral resolution and high time resolution are driven by diverse types of X-ray sources such as msec pulsars, quasars with emission-line profiles shaped by general relativity, and X-ray binaries that exhibit quasi-periodic oscillations in the range of 40-1300 Hz. Many laboratories and universities are involved in space-qualification of new detector technologies, e.g. CZT cameras, X-ray calorimeters, new types of CCDs, and GEM detectors. Even X-ray interferometry is on the horizon of NASA's science roadmap. The difficulties in advancing new technologies for space science applications require careful coordinations between industry and science groups in order to solve science problems while minimizing risk

  1. CIAO: A Modern Data Analysis System for X-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruscione, Antonella

    2017-08-01

    It is now eighteen years after launch and Chandra continues to produce spectacular results!A portion of the success is to be attributed to the data analysis software CIAO (Chandra Interactive Analysis of Observations) that the Chandra X-Ray Center (CXC) continues to improve and release year after year.CIAO is downloaded more than 1200 times a year and it is used by a wide variety of users around the world: from novice to experienced X-ray astronomers, high school, undergraduate and graduate students, archival users (many new to X-ray or Chandra data), users with extensive resources and others from smaller countries and institutions.The scientific goals and kinds of datasets and analysis cover a wide range: observations spanning from days to years, different instrument configurations and different kinds of targets, from pointlike stars and quasars, to fuzzy galaxies and clusters, to moving solar objects. These different needs and goals require a variety of specialized software and careful and detailed documentation which is what the CIAO software provides. In general, we strive to build a software system which is easy for beginners, yet powerful for advanced users.The complexity of the Chandra data require a flexible data analysis system which provides an environment where the users can apply our tools, but can also explore and construct their own applications. The main purpose of this talk is to present CIAO as a modern data analysis system for X-ray data analysis.CIAO has grown tremendously over the years and we will highlight (a) the most recent advancements with a particular emphasis on the newly developed high-level scripts which simplify the analysis steps for the most common cases making CIAO more accessible to all users - including beginners and users who are not X-ray astronomy specialists, (b) the python-based Sherpa modelling and fitting application and the new stand-alone version openly developed and distributed on Github and (c) progress on methods to

  2. Novel X-ray imaging diagnostics of high energy nanosecond pulse accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Graham W.; Gallegos, Roque Rosauro; Hohlfelder, Robert James; Beutler, David Eric; Dudley, John; Seymour, Calvin L.G.; Bell, John D.

    2004-01-01

    Pioneering x-ray imaging has been undertaken on a number of AWE's and Sandia National Laboratories radiation effects x-ray simulators. These simulators typically yield a single very short (<50ns) pulse of high-energy (MeV endpoint energy bremsstrahlung) x-ray radiation with doses in the kilorad (krad(Si)) region. X-ray source targets vary in size from 2 to 25cm diameter, dependent upon the particular simulator. Electronic imaging of the source x-ray emission under dynamic conditions yields valuable information upon how the simulator is performing. The resultant images are of interest to the simulator designer who may configure new x-ray source converter targets and diode designs. The images can provide quantitative information about machine performance during radiation effects testing of components under active conditions. The effects testing program is a valuable interface for validation of high performance computer codes and models for the radiation effects community. A novel high-energy x-ray imaging spectrometer is described whereby the spectral energy (0.1 to 2.5MeV) profile may be discerned from the digitally recorded and viewable images via a pinhole/scintillator/CCD imaging system and knowledge of the filtration parameters. Unique images, analysis and a preliminary evaluation of the capability of the spectrometer are presented. Further, a novel time resolved imaging system is described that captures a sequence of high spatial resolution temporal images, with zero interframe time, in the nanosecond timeframe, of our source x-rays.

  3. The MEXSAS2 Sample and the Ensemble X-ray Variability of Quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serafinelli, Roberto [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Vagnetti, Fausto; Chiaraluce, Elia [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Middei, Riccardo, E-mail: roberto.serafinelli@roma2.infn.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, Rome (Italy)

    2017-10-11

    We present the second Multi-Epoch X-ray Serendipitous AGN Sample (MEXSAS2), extracted from the 6th release of the XMM Serendipitous Source Catalog (XMMSSC-DR6), cross-matched with Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar Catalogs DR7Q and DR12Q. Our sample also includes the available measurements for masses, bolometric luminosities, and Eddington ratios. Analyses of the ensemble structure function and spectral variability are presented, together with their dependences on such parameters. We confirm a decrease of the structure function with the X-ray luminosity, and find a weak dependence on the black hole mass. We introduce a new spectral variability estimator, taking errors on both fluxes and spectral indices into account. We confirm an ensemble softer when brighter trend, with no dependence of such estimator on black hole mass, Eddington ratio, redshift, X-ray and bolometric luminosity.

  4. Sub-keV, subnanosecond measurements of x-ray spectra from laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornblum, H.N.; Koppel, L.N.; Slivinsky, V.W.; Glaros, S.S.; Ahlstrom, H.G.; Larsen, J.T.

    1977-01-01

    As part of the effort to extend our x-ray diagnostic capabilities, we have made x-ray spectral measurements of laser-produced plasmas for photon energies down to 100 eV with a time response of 0.5 nsec. Fast, windowless x-ray diodes were used in conjunction with critical angle reflecting mirrors and thin filters for energy definition for two channels, 300 to 600 eV and 800 to 1300 eV. A third channel, using only an x-ray diode and filter, provided spectral information in the 100 to 300 eV region. Results from exploding pusher targets will be presented and compared with those of other diagnostic techniques and Lasnex calculations. Future expansion and modifications of the present system will be discussed

  5. Monitoring variable X-ray sources in nearby galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, A. K. H.

    2010-12-01

    In the last decade, it has been possible to monitor variable X-ray sources in nearby galaxies. In particular, since the launch of Chandra, M31 has been regularly observed. It is perhaps the only nearby galaxy which is observed by an X-ray telescope regularly throughout operation. With 10 years of observations, the center of M31 has been observed with Chandra for nearly 1 Msec and the X-ray skies of M31 consist of many transients and variables. Furthermore, the X-ray Telescope of Swift has been monitoring several ultraluminous X-ray sources in nearby galaxies regularly. Not only can we detect long-term X-ray variability, we can also find spectral variation as well as possible orbital period. In this talk, I will review some of the important Chandra and Swift monitoring observations of nearby galaxies in the past 10 years. I will also present a "high-definition" movie of M31 and discuss the possibility of detecting luminous transients in M31 with MAXI.

  6. Linear polarization observations of some X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakhovskoy, N.M.; Efimov, Yu.S.

    1975-01-01

    Multicolour linear polarization of optical radiation of the X-ray sources Sco X-1, Cyg X-2, Cyg X-1 and Her X-1 was measured at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory in 1970-1973. These observations indicate that polarization of Sco X-1 in the ultraviolet, blue and red spectral regions appears to be variable. No statistically significant variations of polarization were found for the other three sources observed. (Auth.)

  7. Great microwave bursts and hard X-rays from solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiehl, H.J.; Batchelor, D.A.; Crannell, C.J.; Dennis, B.R.; Price, P.N.

    1983-06-01

    The microwave and hard X-ray charateristics of 13 solar flares that produced microwave fluxes greater than 500 Solar Flux Units were analyzed. These Great Microwave Bursts were observed in the frequency range from 3 to 35 GHz at Berne, and simultaneous hard X-ray observations were made in the energy range from 30 to 500 keV with the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft. The principal aim of this analysis is to determine whether or not the same distribution of energetic electrons can explain both emissions. Correlations were found between respective temporal characteristics and, for the first time, between microwave and hard X-ray spectral characteristics. A single-temperature and a multi-temperature model from the literature were tested for consistency with the coincident X-ray and microwave spectra at microwave burst maximum. Four events are inconsistent with both of the models tested, and neither of the models attempts to explain the high-frequency part of the microwave spectrum. A model in which the emissions above and below the peak frequency originate in two different parts of a diverging magnetic loop is proposed. With this model the entire microwave spectrum of all but one of the events is explained

  8. Characterization and error analysis of an N×N unfolding procedure applied to filtered, photoelectric x-ray detector arrays. I. Formulation and testing

    OpenAIRE

    D. L. Fehl; G. A. Chandler; W. A. Stygar; R. E. Olson; C. L. Ruiz; J. J. Hohlfelder; L. P. Mix; F. Biggs; M. Berninger; P. O. Frederickson; R. Frederickson

    2010-01-01

    An algorithm for spectral reconstructions (unfolds) and spectrally integrated flux estimates from data obtained by a five-channel, filtered x-ray-detector array (XRD) is described in detail and characterized. This diagnostic is a broad-channel spectrometer, used primarily to measure time-dependent soft x-ray flux emitted by z-pinch plasmas at the Z pulsed-power accelerator (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA), and serves as both a plasma probe and a gauge of accelerato...

  9. Towards attosecond X-ray pulses from the FEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zholents, Alexander A.; Fawley, William M.

    2004-01-01

    The ability to study ultrafast phenomena has been recently advanced by the demonstrated production and measurement of a single, 650-attosecond (10 18 sec), VUV x-ray pulse[1] and, latter, a 250-attosecond pulse[2]. The next frontier is a production of the x-ray pulses with shorter wavelengths and in a broader spectral range. Several techniques for a generation of an isolated, attosecond duration, short-wavelength x-ray pulse based upon the ponderomotive laser acceleration [3], SASE and harmonic cascade FELs ([4] - [6]) had been already proposed. In this paper we briefly review a technique proposed in [5] and present some new results

  10. Temporal characteristic analysis of laser-modulated pulsed X-ray source for space X-ray communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Shuang; Liu, Yunpeng; Li, Huan; Tang, Xiaobin; Chen, Da

    2018-04-01

    X-ray communication (XCOM) is a new communication type and is expected to realize high-speed data transmission in some special communication scenarios, such as deep space communication and blackout communication. This study proposes a high-speed modulated X-ray source scheme based on the laser-to-X-ray conversion. The temporal characteristics of the essential components of the proposed laser-modulated pulsed X-ray source (LMPXS) were analyzed to evaluate its pulse emission performance. Results show that the LMPXS can provide a maximum modulation rate up to 100 Mbps which is expected to significantly improve the data rate of XCOM.

  11. Energy Calibration of a Silicon-Strip Detector for Photon-Counting Spectral CT by Direct Usage of the X-ray Tube Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuejin; Chen, Han; Bornefalk, Hans; Danielsson, Mats; Karlsson, Staffan; Persson, Mats; Xu, Cheng; Huber, Ben

    2015-02-01

    The variation among energy thresholds in a multibin detector for photon-counting spectral CT can lead to ring artefacts in the reconstructed images. Calibration of the energy thresholds can be used to achieve homogeneous threshold settings or to develop compensation methods to reduce the artefacts. We have developed an energy-calibration method for the different comparator thresholds employed in a photon-counting silicon-strip detector. In our case, this corresponds to specifying the linear relation between the threshold positions in units of mV and the actual deposited photon energies in units of keV. This relation is determined by gain and offset values that differ for different detector channels due to variations in the manufacturing process. Typically, the calibration is accomplished by correlating the peak positions of obtained pulse-height spectra to known photon energies, e.g. with the aid of mono-energetic x rays from synchrotron radiation, radioactive isotopes or fluorescence materials. Instead of mono-energetic x rays, the calibration method presented in this paper makes use of a broad x-ray spectrum provided by commercial x-ray tubes. Gain and offset as the calibration parameters are obtained by a regression analysis that adjusts a simulated spectrum of deposited energies to a measured pulse-height spectrum. Besides the basic photon interactions such as Rayleigh scattering, Compton scattering and photo-electric absorption, the simulation takes into account the effect of pulse pileup, charge sharing and the electronic noise of the detector channels. We verify the method for different detector channels with the aid of a table-top setup, where we find the uncertainty of the keV-value of a calibrated threshold to be between 0.1 and 0.2 keV.

  12. Optical spectroscopy of the Be/X-ray binary V850 Centauri/GX 304-1 during faint X-ray periodical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malacaria, C.; Kollatschny, W.; Whelan, E.; Santangelo, A.; Klochkov, D.; McBride, V.; Ducci, L.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Be/X-ray binaries (BeXRBs) are the most populous class of high-mass X-ray binaries. Their X-ray duty cycle is tightly related to the optical companion wind activity, which in turn can be studied through dedicated optical spectroscopic observations. Aims: We study optical spectral features of the Be circumstellar disk to test their long-term variability and their relation with the X-ray activity. Special attention has been given to the Hα emission line, one of the best tracers of the disk conditions. Methods: We obtained optical broadband medium resolution spectra from a dedicated campaign with the Anglo-Australian Telescope and the Southern African Large Telescope in 2014-2015. Data span over one entire binary orbit, and cover both X-ray quiescent and moderately active periods. We used Balmer emission lines to follow the evolution of the circumstellar disk. Results: We observe prominent spectral features, like double-peaked Hα and Hβ emission lines. The HαV/R ratio significantly changes over a timescale of about one year. Our observations are consistent with a system observed at a large inclination angle (I ≳ 60°). The derived circumstellar disk size shows that the disk evolves from a configuration that prevents accretion onto the neutron star, to one that allows only moderate accretion. This is in agreement with the contemporary observed X-ray activity. Our results are interpreted within the context of inefficient tidal truncation of the circumstellar disk, as expected for this source's binary configuration. We derived the Hβ-emitting region size, which is equal to about half of the corresponding Hα-emitting disk, and constrain the luminosity class of V850 Cen as III-V, consistent with the previously proposed class.

  13. X-ray-phase and IR-spectral study of clay rocks mineral content of the Caspian Sea Gulf depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakonov, A.N.; Mukhanova, M.U.

    2000-01-01

    Samples of clays selected from different oil fields (Sazankurak, Kemerkol, Kozha and others) and deposition depths are examined on both the X-ray diffractometers (Dron-2 and Dron-4) and the infrared-spectrometers (IR-20). In this diagnostic the American file with different minerals X-ray systematized data is used. The X-ray reflections, which are in compliance with suitable inter-plane distances and clay impurities reflex intensities are determined. With confirmation purpose for mineral content correctness obtained according X-ray-phase analysis the infrared-spectrometric method is used, in which principal attention was paid to absorption field (3,400-3,700 cm -1 ) of H 2 O and OH valency frequency vibrations

  14. Black Hole Mass Determination In the X-Ray Binary 4U 1630-47: Scaling of Spectral and Variability Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifina, Elena; Titarchuk, Lev; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a comprehensive investigation on the evolution of spectral and timing properties of the Galactic black hole candidate 4U 1630-47 during its spectral transitions. In particular, we show how a scaling of the correlation of the photon index of the Comptonized spectral component gamma with low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs), ?(sub L), and mass accretion rate, M, can be applied to the black hole mass and the inclination angle estimates.We analyze the transition episodes observed with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer and BeppoSAX satellites.We find that the broadband X-ray energy spectra of 4U 1630-47 during all spectral states can be modeled by a combination of a thermal component, a Comptonized component, and a red-skewed iron-line component. We also establish that gamma monotonically increases during transition from the low-hard state to the high-soft state and then saturates for high mass accretion rates. The index saturation levels vary for different transition episodes. Correlations of gamma versus ?(sub L) also show saturation at gamma (is) approximately 3. Gamma -M and gamma -?(sub L) correlations with their index saturation revealed in 4U 1630-47 are similar to those established in a number of other black hole candidates and can be considered as an observational evidence for the presence of a black hole in these sources. The scaling technique, which relies on XTE J1550-564, GRO 1655-40, and H1743-322 as reference sources, allows us to evaluate a black hole mass in 4U 1630-47 yielding M(sub BH) (is) approximately 10 +/- 0.1 solar masses and to constrain the inclination angle of i (is) approximately less than 70 deg.

  15. Multitaper spectral analysis of cosmic rays Sao Martinho da Serra's muon telescope and Newark's neutron monitor data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Marlos Rockenbach da; Alarcon, Walter Demetrio Gonzalez; Echer, Ezequiel; Lago, Alisson dal; Lucas, Aline de [National Institute for Space Research - INPE-MCT, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Vieira, Luis Eduardo Antunes; Guarnieri, Fernando Luis [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba - UNIVAP, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Schuch, Nelson Jorge [Southern Regional Space Research Center - CRSPE/INPE-MCT, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Munakata, Kazuoki, E-mail: marlos@dge.inpe.br, E-mail: gonzalez@dge.inpe.br, E-mail: eecher@dge.inpe.br, E-mail: dallago@dge.inpe.br, E-mail: delucas@dge.inpe.br, E-mail: levieira@univap.br, E-mail: guarnieri@univap.br, E-mail: njschuch@lacesm.ufsm.br, E-mail: kmuna00@gipac.shinshu-u.ac.jp [Physics Department, Shinshu University, Matsumoto (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    In this work we present an analysis on the correction efficiency of atmospheric effects on cosmic ray Sao Martinho da Serra's muon telescope and Newark's neutron monitor data. We use a Multitaper spectral analysis of cosmic rays time series to show the main periodicities present in the corrected and uncorrected data for the atmospheric effects. This kind of correction is very important when intends to study cosmic rays variations of extra-terrestrial origin. (author)

  16. Unification of Active Galactic Nuclei at X-rays and soft gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmann, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Through the work on X-ray and gamma-ray data of AGN I contributed significantly to the progress in the unification of AGN since I finished my PhD in 2000. The study of the evolutionary behaviour of X-ray selected N blazars (Beckmann and Wolter 2001; Beckmann et al. 2002, 2003b; Beckmann 2003) shows that their evolution is not as strongly negative as indicated by previous studies. The overall luminosity function is consistent with no evolution in the 0.1-2.4 keV band as seen by ROSAT/PSPC. There is still a difference compared to the luminosity function of FSRQ and LBL, which seem to show a positive evolution, indicating that they have been more luminous and/or numerous at cosmological distances. We indicated a scenario in order to explain this discrepancy, in which the high luminous FSRQ develop into the fainter LBL and finally into the BL Lac objects with high frequency peaks in their spectral energy distribution but overall low bolometric luminosity. Studying the variability pattern of hard X-ray selected Seyfert galaxies, we actually found differences between type 1 and type 2 objects, in the sense that type 2 seemed to be more variable (Beckmann et al. 2007a). This breaking of the unified model is caused by the different average luminosity of the absorbed and unabsorbed sources, as discussed in Sect. 4.7.3. This can be explained by a larger inner disk radius when the AGN core is most active (the so-called receding disc model). The work on the sample characteristics of hard X-ray detected AGN also led to the proof that the average intrinsic spectra of type 1 and type 2 objects are the same when reflection processes are taken into account (Beckmann et al. 2009d). This also explains why in the past Seyfert 2 objects were seen to have harder X-ray spectra than Seyfert 1, as the stronger reflection hump in the type 2 objects makes the spectra appear to be flatter, although the underlying continuum is the same. Further strong evidence for the unification scheme comes

  17. Activity in X-ray-selected late-type stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takalo, L.O.; Nousek, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    A spectroscopic study has been conducted of nine X-ray bright late-type stars selected from two Einstein X-ray surveys: the Columbia Astrophysical Laboratory Survey (five stars) and the CFA Medium Sensitivity Survey (MSS; four stars). Spectral classes were determined and radial and V sin(i) velocities were measured for the stars. Four of the Columbia Survey stars were found to be new RS CVn-type binaries. The fifth Columbia survey star was found to be an active G dwarf star without evidence for binarity. None of the four MSS stars were found to be either binaries or optically active stars. Activity in these stars was assessed by measuring the excess emission in H-alpha and the Ca II IRT (8498, 8542) lines in comparison with inactive stars of similar spectral types. A correlation was found between X-ray luminosity and V sin(i) and H-alpha line excess. The measured excess line emission in H-alpha was also correlated with V sin(i) but not with the IRT line excess. 36 references

  18. An imaging escape gated MPWC for hard X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; Boccaccini, L.; La Padula, C.; Mastropietro, M.; Patriarca, R.; Polcaro, V.F.; Barbareschi, L.; Perotti, F.; Villa, G.; Butler, R.C.; Di Cocco, G.; Spada, G.; Charalambous, P.; Dean, A.J.; Stephen, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    A scientific forward step in the hard X-ray and soft gamma-ray astronomy will only be possible with the use of a new generation of space borne instruments. Their main characteristics have to be the two-dimensional imaging capability over a large collecting area and the fine spectral resolution in order to discriminate between the weak signal coming from cosmic sources to be detected and the strong background induced by cosmic rays, in the space environment, on the detector. To reach this goal we have developed a new hard X-ray position sensitive proportional counter operating with the escape gate technique in the range 15-150 keV, to be used together with a pseudo-random coded mask in order to obtain sky images. The detector is a high pressure (5 bar) xenon-argon-isobutane filled chamber with a spatial resolution of 30x2 mm and a spectral resolution of 5% at 60 keV on the sensitive area of 3000 cm 2 . (orig.)

  19. X-RAY PROPERTIES OF INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLES IN ACTIVE GALAXIES. II. X-RAY-BRIGHT ACCRETION AND POSSIBLE EVIDENCE FOR SLIM DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Greene, Jenny E.; Ho, Luis C.

    2009-01-01

    We present X-ray properties of optically selected intermediate-mass (∼10 5 -10 6 M sun ) black holes (BHs) in active galactic nuclei (AGNs), using data from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Our observations are a continuation of a pilot study by Greene and Ho. Of the eight objects observed, five are detected with X-ray luminosities in the range L 0.5-2keV = 10 41 -10 43 erg s -1 , consistent with the previously observed sample. Objects with enough counts to extract a spectrum are well fit by an absorbed power law. We continue to find a range of soft photon indices 1 s -Γ s , consistent with previous AGN studies, but generally flatter than other narrow-line Seyfert 1 active nuclei (NLS1s). The soft photon index correlates strongly with X-ray luminosity and Eddington ratio, but does not depend on BH mass. There is no justification for the inclusion of any additional components, such as a soft excess, although this may be a function of the relative inefficiency of detecting counts above 2 keV in these relatively shallow observations. As a whole, the X-ray-to-optical spectral slope α ox is flatter than in more massive systems, even other NLS1s. Only X-ray-selected NLS1s with very high Eddington ratios share a similar α ox . This is suggestive of a physical change in the accretion structure at low masses and at very high accretion rates, possibly due to the onset of slim disks. Although the detailed physical explanation for the X-ray loudness of these intermediate-mass BHs is not certain, it is very striking that targets selected on the basis of optical properties should be so distinctly offset in their broader spectral energy distributions.

  20. Characterization and error analysis of an N×N unfolding procedure applied to filtered, photoelectric x-ray detector arrays. I. Formulation and testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Fehl

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm for spectral reconstructions (unfolds and spectrally integrated flux estimates from data obtained by a five-channel, filtered x-ray-detector array (XRD is described in detail and characterized. This diagnostic is a broad-channel spectrometer, used primarily to measure time-dependent soft x-ray flux emitted by z-pinch plasmas at the Z pulsed-power accelerator (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA, and serves as both a plasma probe and a gauge of accelerator performance. The unfold method, suitable for online analysis, arises naturally from general assumptions about the x-ray source and spectral properties of the channel responses; a priori constraints control the ill-posed nature of the inversion. The unfolded spectrum is not assumed to be Planckian. This study is divided into two consecutive papers. This paper considers three major issues: (a Formulation of the unfold method.—The mathematical background, assumptions, and procedures leading to the algorithm are described: the spectral reconstruction S_{unfold}(E,t—five histogram x-ray bins j over the x-ray interval, 137≤E≤2300  eV at each time step t—depends on the shape and overlap of the calibrated channel responses and on the maximum electrical power delivered to the plasma. The x-ray flux F_{unfold} is estimated as ∫S_{unfold}(E,tdE. (b Validation with simulations.—Tests of the unfold algorithm with known static and time-varying spectra are described. These spectra included—but were not limited to—Planckian spectra S_{bb}(E,T (25≤T≤250  eV, from which noise-free channel data were simulated and unfolded. For Planckian simulations with 125≤T≤250  eV and typical responses, the binwise unfold values S_{j} and the corresponding binwise averages ⟨S_{bb}⟩_{j} agreed to ∼20%, except where S_{bb}≪max⁡{S_{bb}}. Occasionally, unfold values S_{j}≲0 (artifacts were encountered. The algorithm recovered ≳90% of the x-ray

  1. Radio and X-Ray Observations of the 1998 Outburst of the Recurrent X-Ray Transient 4U 1630-47

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjellming, R. M.; Rupen, M. P.; Mioduszewski, A. J.; Kuulkers, E.; McCollough, M.; Harmon, B. A.; Buxton, M.; Sood, R.; Tzioumis, A.; Rayner, D.; Dieters, S.; Durouchoux, P.

    1999-03-01

    We report radio (NRAO VLA and Australia Telescope Compact Array), soft X-ray (Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer ASM), and hard X-ray (Compton Gamma Ray Observatory BATSE) observations of a 1998 outburst in the recurring X-ray transient 4U 1630-47, where radio emission was detected for the first time. The radio observations identify the position of 4U 1630-47 to within 1". Because the radio emission is optically thin with a spectral index of ~-0.8 during the rise, peak, and decay of the initial radio event, the emission is probably coming from an optically thin radio jet ejected over a period of time. The 20-100 keV emission first appeared 1998 January 28 (MJD 50841), the 2-12 keV emission first appeared 1998 February 3 (MJD 50847), and the first radio emission was detected 1998 February 12.6 (MJD 50856.6). The rise of the radio emission probably began about 1998 February 7 (MJD 50851) when the X-rays were in a very hard fluctuating-hardness state, just before changing to a softer, more stable hardness state.

  2. IGR J170626143 is an Accreting Millisecond X-Ray Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Keek, Laurens

    2017-01-01

    We present the discovery of 163.65 Hz X-ray pulsations from IGR J17062-6143 in the only observation obtained from the source with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. This detection makes IGR J17062-6143 the lowest frequency accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar presently known. The pulsations are detected in the 2-12 keV band with an overall significance of 4.3sigma and an observed pulsed amplitude of 5.54% +/-0.67% (in this band). Both dynamic power spectral and coherent phase timing analysis indicate that the pulsation frequency is decreasing during the approx. =1.2 ks observation in a manner consistent with orbital motion of the neutron star. Because the observation interval is short, we cannot precisely measure the orbital period; however, periods shorter than 17 minutes are excluded at 90% confidence. For the range of acceptable circular orbits the inferred binary mass function substantially overlaps the observed range for the AMXP population as a whole.

  3. Structure in galactic soft X-ray features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davelaar, J.

    1979-01-01

    Observations are described of the soft X-ray background in a part of the northern hemisphere in the energy range 0.06 - 3.0 keV. The X-ray instruments, placed onboard a sounding rocket, are a one-dimensional focusing collector with multi-cell proportional counters in the focal plane and eight large area counters on deployable panels. A description of the instruments and their preflight calibration is given. Precautions were taken to prevent UV sensitivity of the X-ray instruments. The observation program, which consisted of a number of pre-programmed slow scans, is outlined. The spectral date on the soft X-ray background in these and previous observations showed that at least two components of different temperature are present. A low temperature component of approximately (3-10)x10 5 is found all over the sky. Components of higher temperature approximately 3x10 6 K are found in regions of soft X-ray enhancement; The North Polar Spur has been observed in two scans at the galactic latitude b=25 0 and b=75 0 . The X-ray ridge structure is found to be strongly energy dependent. The low energy data ( 0 reveals two separate emission features on the ridge, both probably of finite extensions (approximately equal to 0 0 .5). A wider X-ray ridge (approximately equal to 10 0 ) is observed above 0.4 keV. (Auth.)

  4. The Origin of the Extra-nuclear X-ray Emission in the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 2992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert, E. J. M.; Strickland, D. K.; Veilleux, S.; Weaver, K. A.

    2004-12-01

    We present an analysis of a Chandra ACIS observation of the edge-on Seyfert galaxy NGC 2992. We find extended X-ray emission with Lx(total) in excess of 10**40 erg/s. The brightest nebula is positioned a few 100 pc from the X-ray core, and is spatially coincident with optical line and radio emission. This emission nebula may be energized by the AGN, as opposed to a nuclear starburst. The expected kpc-scale X-ray emission due to a starburst-driven wind is larger than a few 10**39 erg/s, and we present large-scale X-ray emission that may be associated with such an outflow. The extra-nuclear emission has a very soft spectrum. Chandra and XMM spectra of the total nuclear region show a very prominent ``soft excess'' below 2-3 keV. We shall discuss the spectral properties of this soft excess, and will compare with the results from the spatial analysis, and with AGN and starburst models for extranuclear X-ray nebulae.

  5. Optical metrology for analysis of lobster-eye x-ray optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irving, Thomas H.K.; Peele, Andrew G.; Nugent, Keith A.

    2003-01-01

    A new method that uses optical microscopy to determine the physical structure of lobster-eye x-ray optics is described. This approach offers the ability to predict x-ray performance without having to take an x-ray measurement. An overlapping series of images of the entrance and exit faces of an optic are obtained and examined by purpose-built software. A 24-parameter description of each channel is obtained from which a quantitative analysis of all the major optic defects, except surface roughness, is performed. Results for a planar lobster-eye optic are used to illustrate this technique and discuss its abilities as well as directions for future enhancements

  6. The feasibility of independent observations/detections of GRBs in X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudec, R.; Skulinova, M.; Pina, L.; Sveda, L.; Semencova, V.; Inneman, A.

    2009-01-01

    According to the observational statistics a large majority of all GRBs exhibit X-ray emission. In addition, a dedicated separate group of GRB, the XRFs, exists which emission dominates in the X-ray spectral range. And the third group of GRB related objects (yet hypothetical) are the group of off-axis observed GRBs (orphan afterglows). These facts justify the consideration of an independent experiment for monitoring, detection and analyses of GRBs and others fast X-ray transients in X-rays. We will present and discuss such experiment based on wide-field X-ray telescopes of Lobster Eye type. The wide field and fine sensitivity of Lobster Eye X-ray All-Sky Monitor make such instruments important tools in study of GRBs and related objects.

  7. A few approaches to remove ambiguous factors in x-ray spectrum analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sera, K.; Futatsugawa, S.

    1993-01-01

    A few attempts have been done to reduce ambiguous factors in the analysis of complex x-ray spectra. Uncertainty in peak identification and separation due to overlapping of x-ray peaks can be reduced by taking into account the response function of x-ray peaks and by using peak functions including all the x-ray sub-lines in a x-ray series. Ambiguous factors due to discontinuity of backgrounds which is sometimes followed by huge peaks can be reduced by considering contributions from the pile-up, escape and tail functions. The problem of uncertainty in the background fitting in a region of low x-ray energy, where many peaks overlap each other and determination of the background function contains much difficulties and ambiguities, can be solved by using peak functions involving tails in place of Gaussians. (author)

  8. Analysis of X-Ray (L) spectra of heavy elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Coelho, L.F. de.

    1976-08-01

    The general problem of obtaining and analysing spectra is presented, with emphasis in the comparison of methods for the analysis of gamma rays and X rays. The method proposed to obtain a standard and later the intensities of lines of an X-ray (L) spectrum is discussed. The good eesults obtained by the program RAIOXL, when simulated spectra are used, and by the program RAIXL1, when doublets are decomposed, are shown. In annex A, the listings of the programs used are presented, and in annex B a review is made of the analytical formulae used for adjustment of the pulses. (I.C.R.) [pt

  9. X-ray induced degradation of DNA in Aspergillus nidulans cells comparative analysis of UV- and X-ray induced DNA degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinchenko, V.V.; Babykin, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    Irradiating cells of Aspergillus nidulans of the wild type in the logarythmical growth phase with X-rays leads to a certain retention in DNA synthesis. This period is characterized by an insignificant fermentative DNA degradation connected with a process of its repair. There is no direct dependence between the radiation dose and the level of DNA degradation. The investigation of X-ray induced DNA degradation in a number of UVS-mutants permits to show the existence of two branches of DNA degradation - dependent and independent of the exogenic energy source. The dependence of DNA degradation on albumen synthesis prior to irradiation and after it, is demonstrated. It is supposed that the level of X-ray induced DNA degradation is determined by two albumen systems, one of which initiates degradation and the other terminates it. The comparative analysis of UV and X-ray induced DNA degradation is carried out

  10. RAPID SPECTRAL CHANGES OF CYGNUS X-1 IN THE LOW/HARD STATE WITH SUZAKU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, S.; Makishima, K. [Cosmic Radiation Laboratory, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Negoro, H. [Department of Physics, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Torii, S.; Noda, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Mineshige, S. [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2013-04-20

    Rapid spectral changes in the hard X-ray on a timescale down to {approx}0.1 s are studied by applying a ''shot analysis'' technique to the Suzaku observations of the black hole binary Cygnus X-1, performed on 2008 April 18 during the low/hard state. We successfully obtained the shot profiles, covering 10-200 keV with the Suzaku HXD-PIN and HXD-GSO detector. It is notable that the 100-200 keV shot profile is acquired for the first time owing to the HXD-GSO detector. The intensity changes in a time-symmetric way, though the hardness changes in a time-asymmetric way. When the shot-phase-resolved spectra are quantified with the Compton model, the Compton y-parameter and the electron temperature are found to decrease gradually through the rising phase of the shot, while the optical depth appears to increase. All the parameters return to their time-averaged values immediately within 0.1 s past the shot peak. We have not only confirmed this feature previously found in energies below {approx}60 keV, but also found that the spectral change is more prominent in energies above {approx}100 keV, implying the existence of some instant mechanism for direct entropy production. We discuss possible interpretations of the rapid spectral changes in the hard X-ray band.

  11. Spectroscopic analysis and dosimetry of diagnostic x-ray beams filtered by rare earth materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyndall, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    A laboratory investigation was carried out to assess the effect of various types of rare earth filter materials on the energy spectrum and concomitant reduced exposure values of diagnostic x-ray beams at 70, 80, and 90 kVp. An x-ray spectroscope was constructed and used to generate the energy spectra of beams passing through the various rare earth filter materials. Photographs were made of each spectrum, and live-time gross photon counts were recorded. Following spectral determinations, ionization chamber readings were generated for each filter material. Substantial effects on x-ray spectra and reduction of exposure values were noted. The degree of these effects were dependent on the atomic number, k-edge, and thickness of each filter. Metallic forms of rare earth materials proved to be more effective than the salt forms with erbium offering the greatest potential for reduction in exposures over the range of experimental kilovolt (peak) values

  12. The MEXSAS2 Sample and the Ensemble X-ray Variability of Quasars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Serafinelli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the second Multi-Epoch X-ray Serendipitous AGN Sample (MEXSAS2, extracted from the 6th release of the XMM Serendipitous Source Catalog (XMMSSC-DR6, cross-matched with Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar Catalogs DR7Q and DR12Q. Our sample also includes the available measurements for masses, bolometric luminosities, and Eddington ratios. Analyses of the ensemble structure function and spectral variability are presented, together with their dependences on such parameters. We confirm a decrease of the structure function with the X-ray luminosity, and find a weak dependence on the black hole mass. We introduce a new spectral variability estimator, taking errors on both fluxes and spectral indices into account. We confirm an ensemble softer when brighter trend, with no dependence of such estimator on black hole mass, Eddington ratio, redshift, X-ray and bolometric luminosity.

  13. The NuSTAR  Extragalactic Surveys: X-Ray Spectroscopic Analysis of the Bright Hard-band Selected Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappacosta, L.; Comastri, A.; Civano, F.; Puccetti, S.; Fiore, F.; Aird, J.; Del Moro, A.; Lansbury, G. B.; Lanzuisi, G.; Goulding, A.; Mullaney, J. R.; Stern, D.; Ajello, M.; Alexander, D. M.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Bauer, F. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Chen, C.-T. J.; Farrah, D.; Harrison, F. A.; Gandhi, P.; Lanz, L.; Masini, A.; Marchesi, S.; Ricci, C.; Treister, E.

    2018-02-01

    We discuss the spectral analysis of a sample of 63 active galactic nuclei (AGN) detected above a limiting flux of S(8{--}24 {keV})=7× {10}-14 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2 in the multi-tiered NuSTAR extragalactic survey program. The sources span a redshift range z=0{--}2.1 (median =0.58). The spectral analysis is performed over the broad 0.5–24 keV energy range, combining NuSTAR with Chandra and/or XMM-Newton data and employing empirical and physically motivated models. This constitutes the largest sample of AGN selected at > 10 {keV} to be homogeneously spectrally analyzed at these flux levels. We study the distribution of spectral parameters such as photon index, column density ({N}{{H}}), reflection parameter ({\\boldsymbol{R}}), and 10–40 keV luminosity ({L}{{X}}). Heavily obscured ({log}[{N}{{H}}/{{cm}}-2]≥slant 23) and Compton-thick (CT; {log}[{N}{{H}}/{{cm}}-2]≥slant 24) AGN constitute ∼25% (15–17 sources) and ∼2–3% (1–2 sources) of the sample, respectively. The observed {N}{{H}} distribution agrees fairly well with predictions of cosmic X-ray background population-synthesis models (CXBPSM). We estimate the intrinsic fraction of AGN as a function of {N}{{H}}, accounting for the bias against obscured AGN in a flux-selected sample. The fraction of CT AGN relative to {log}[{N}{{H}}/{{cm}}-2]=20{--}24 AGN is poorly constrained, formally in the range 2–56% (90% upper limit of 66%). We derived a fraction (f abs) of obscured AGN ({log}[{N}{{H}}/{{cm}}-2]=22{--}24) as a function of {L}{{X}} in agreement with CXBPSM and previous zvalues.

  14. Analysis of magnetohydrodynamic modes in tokamaks by x-ray techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauthoff, N.R.

    1977-01-01

    A brief review of recent studies of fluctuations in x-ray emission from tokamak plasmas of controlled thermonuclear fusion interest is given. The origin of the x-rays, the nature of the oscillations, and measurement and analysis techniques are discussed, with emphasis on the work performed on the ST and PLT tokamaks. Areas for future research, particularly in the region of reconstruction, are stressed

  15. Portable X-ray fluorescence analyzer of high sensitivity using X-ray tube excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatai, E.; Ando, L.

    1982-01-01

    A review of the three main methods of X-ray fluorescence analysis and their problems is given. The attainable accuracy and effectiveness of each method are discussed. The main properties of portable X-ray analyzers required by the industry are described. The results and experiences of R and D activities in ATOMKI (Debrecen, Hungary) for developing portable X-ray analyzers are presented. The only way for increasing the accuracy and decreasing the measuring time is the application of X-ray tube excitation instead of radioactive sources. The new ATOMKI equipment presently under construction and patenting uses X-ray tube excitation; it will increase the accuracy of concentration determination by one order of magnitude. (D.Gy.)

  16. Development of suitable plastic standards for X-ray fluorescence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mans, Christian [University of Applied Sciences Muenster, Department of Chemical Engineering, Advanced Analytical Chemistry, Stegerwaldstr. 39, 48565 Steinfurt (Germany)], E-mail: c.mans@fh-muenster.de; Hanning, Stephanie [University of Applied Sciences Muenster, Department of Chemical Engineering, Advanced Analytical Chemistry, Stegerwaldstr. 39, 48565 Steinfurt (Germany)], E-mail: hanning@fh-muenster.de; Simons, Christoph [University of Applied Sciences Muenster, Department of Chemical Engineering, Advanced Analytical Chemistry, Stegerwaldstr. 39, 48565 Steinfurt (Germany)], E-mail: simons@fh-muenster.de; Wegner, Anne [University of Applied Sciences Muenster, Department of Chemical Engineering, Advanced Analytical Chemistry, Stegerwaldstr. 39, 48565 Steinfurt (Germany)], E-mail: awegner@fh-muenster.de; Janssen, Anton [University of Applied Sciences Muenster, Department of Chemical Engineering, Advanced Analytical Chemistry, Stegerwaldstr. 39, 48565 Steinfurt (Germany)], E-mail: janssena@fh-muenster.de; Kreyenschmidt, Martin [University of Applied Sciences Muenster, Department of Chemical Engineering, Advanced Analytical Chemistry, Stegerwaldstr. 39, 48565 Steinfurt (Germany)], E-mail: martin.kreyenschmidt@fh-muenster.de

    2007-02-15

    For the adoption of the EU directive 'Restriction on use of certain Hazardous Substances' and 'Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment' using X-ray fluorescence analysis suitable standard materials are required. Plastic standards based on acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene terpolymer, containing the regulated elements Br, Cd, Cr, Hg and Pb were developed and produced as granulates and solid bodies. The calibration materials were not generated as a dilution from one master batch but rather the element concentrations were distributed over nine independent calibration samples. This was necessary to enable inter-elemental corrections and empirical constant mass absorption coefficients. The produced standard materials are characterized by a homogenous element distribution, which is more than sufficient for X-ray fluorescence analysis. Concentrations for all elements except for Br could be determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy after microwave assisted digestion. The concentration of Br was determined by use of Neutron Activation Analysis at Hahn-Meitner-Institute in Berlin, Germany. The correlation of the X-ray fluorescence analysis measurements with the values determined using Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy and Neutron Activation Analysis showed a very good linearity.

  17. SphinX soft X-ray spectrophotometer: Science objectives, design and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gburek, S.; Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Bakala, J.; Kordylewski, Z.; Podgorski, P.; Plocieniak, S.; Siarkowski, M.; Sylwester, B.; Trzebinski, W.; Kuzin, S. V.; Pertsov, A. A.; Kotov, Yu. D.; Farnik, F.; Reale, F.; Phillips, K. J. H.

    2011-06-01

    The goals and construction details of a new design Polish-led X-ray spectrophotometer are described. The instrument is aimed to observe emission from entire solar corona and is placed as a separate block within the Russian TESIS X- and EUV complex aboard the CORONAS-PHOTON solar orbiting observatory. SphinX uses silicon PIN diode detectors for high time resolution measurements of the solar spectra in the range 0.8-15 keV. Its spectral resolution allows for discerning more than hundred separate energy bands in this range. The instrument dynamic range extends two orders of magnitude below and above these representative for GOES. The relative and absolute accuracy of spectral measurements is expected to be better than few percent, as follows from extensive ground laboratory calibrations.

  18. X-ray verification of an optically-aligned off-plane grating module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Benjamin; McEntaffer, Randall; Tutt, James; DeRoo, Casey; Allured, Ryan; Gaskin, Jessica; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery

    2017-08-01

    The next generation of X-ray spectrometer missions are baselined to have order-of-magnitude improvements in both spectral resolving power and effective area when compared to existing X-ray spectrometer missions. Off-plane X-ray reflection gratings are capable of achieving high resolution and high diffraction efficiencies over the entire X-ray bandpass, making them an ideal technology to implement on these future missions. To achieve the high effective area desired while maintaining high spectral resolution, many off-plane gratings must be precisely aligned such that their diffraction arcs overlap at the focal plane. Methods are under development to align a number of these gratings into a grating module using optical metrology techniques in support of the Off-plane Grating Rocket Experiment (OGRE), a suborbital rocket payload scheduled to launch in late 2018. X-ray testing was performed on an aligned grating module at the Straylight Test Facility (SLTF) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to assess the current alignment methodology and its ability to meet the desired performance of OGRE. We report on the results from the test campaign at MSFC, as well as plans for future development.

  19. Study of X-ray emission in aluminium z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosch, R.

    1999-01-01

    Previous experiments, at 0.1. TX level, have shown that stability and x-ray emission of fast Z-pinches, could be strongly increased by imploding an aluminium vapor jet onto a very thin coaxial wire. We present here first results of an aluminium Z-pinch, using a similar liner, but at mega-ampere level. The pinch is driven by AMBIORIX high-power facility, a 2 TW, 0.5 Ω, 2 MA, 50 ns pulse-line generator. We study the effect of an aluminium wire and its diameter (20-50 μm) on the implosion dynamics, on x-ray yield on MHD stability of the column at stagnation. Analysis of A1 jet on A1 wire shots demonstrates that x-ray yield due to emission processes in the H- and He- like ionization stages (i.e. the K-shell) is significantly enhanced, relative to that of A1 jet only ones. The wire also leads to better symmetry of the implosion, and to better reproducibility of shots. X-ray signals exhibit two similar pulses, 10 ns in width, 15 ns spaced. To discern spectral origin of both pulses, experiments are realized with stainless steel wire (25 μm in diameter). Results show that liner and wire radial simultaneously and contribute to both pulses. Analysis of a typical A1 jet on A1 wire shot, using detailed collisional-radiative equilibrium (CRE) model is also given in this thesis. View o the pinch at stagnation as a cola-dense core surrounded by a hot-low density corona reproduces all features of the X-ray data. (author)

  20. X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new structural analysis method of determining a 3D atomic arrangement around fluorescing atoms. We developed an XFH apparatus using advanced X-ray techniques and succeeded in obtaining high-quality hologram data. Furthermore, we introduced applications to the structural analysis of a thin film and the environment around dopants and, discussed the quantitative analysis of local lattice distortion. (author)

  1. A standards-based method for compositional analysis by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry using multivariate statistical analysis: application to multicomponent alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Monika; Ahrenkiel, S P; Carapella, J J; Wanlass, M W

    2013-02-01

    Given an unknown multicomponent alloy, and a set of standard compounds or alloys of known composition, can one improve upon popular standards-based methods for energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometry to quantify the elemental composition of the unknown specimen? A method is presented here for determining elemental composition of alloys using transmission electron microscopy-based EDX with appropriate standards. The method begins with a discrete set of related reference standards of known composition, applies multivariate statistical analysis to those spectra, and evaluates the compositions with a linear matrix algebra method to relate the spectra to elemental composition. By using associated standards, only limited assumptions about the physical origins of the EDX spectra are needed. Spectral absorption corrections can be performed by providing an estimate of the foil thickness of one or more reference standards. The technique was applied to III-V multicomponent alloy thin films: composition and foil thickness were determined for various III-V alloys. The results were then validated by comparing with X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence analysis, demonstrating accuracy of approximately 1% in atomic fraction.

  2. Tomographic spectral imaging: microanalysis in 3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotula, P.G.; Keenan, M.R.; Michael, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Spectral imaging, where a series of complete x-ray spectra are typically collected from a 2D area, holds great promise for comprehensive near-surface microanalysis. There are however numerous microanalysis problems where 3D chemical information is needed as well. In the SEM, some sort of sectioning (either mechanical or with a focused ion beam (FIB) tool) followed by x-ray mapping has, in the past, been utilized in an attempt to perform 3D microanalysis. Reliance on simple mapping has the potential to miss important chemical features as well as misidentify others. In this paper we will describe the acquisition of serial-section tomographic spectral images (TSI) with a dual-beam FIB/SEM equipped with an EDS system. We will also describe the application of a modified version of our multivariate statistical analysis algorithms to TSIs. Serial sectioning was performed with a FEI DB-235 FIB/SEM. Firstly, the specimen normal was tilted to the optic axis of the FIB column and a trench was milled into the surface of the specimen. A second trench was then milled perpendicular to the first to provide visibility of the entire analysis surface to the x-ray detector. In addition, several fiducial markers were milled into the surface to allow for alignment from slice to slice. The electron column is at an angle of 52 deg to the ion column so the electron beam can 'see' the analysis surface milled by the FIB with no additional specimen tilting or rotation. Likewise the x-ray detector is at a radial angle of 45 deg to the plane of the electron and ion columns (about the electron column) and a take-off-angle of 35 deg with respect to an untilted specimen so it can 'see' the analysis surface as well with no additional sample tilting or rotation. Spectral images were acquired from regions 40 μm wide and 20μm deep for each slice. Approximately 1μm/slice was milled and 10-12 total slices were cut. Spectral images were acquired with a Thermo NORAN Vantage (Digital imaging

  3. Bremsstrahlung X rays from Jovian auroral electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, D.D.

    1990-01-01

    The spectrum of X rays from the planet Jupiter is calculated according to an auroral electron beam model. The electrons are assumed to be accelerated by a field-aligned potential drop and penetrate into the atmosphere as a Maxwellian beam of primaries which are scattered, degraded in energy, and merged with a population of ionization secondaries having a power law energy distribution. The soft X rays observed by the Einstein Observatory satelltie are due to bremsstrahlung from the sedondary electrons in the H 2 atmosphere. A good match to the X ray data is obtained if the power law spectral index of the secondary electrons, γ e , is ≅ 2, yielding a power law slope for the photon flux γ X = γ e + 1 ≅ 3. The X ray intensity is best reconciled with a beam of primaries having a characteristic energy 30-100 keV and penetrating the homopause with an auroral energy flux typically of 10-20 ergs cm -2 s -1 but no greater than 50 ergs cm -2 s -1

  4. Characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Temporal, spatial and spectral characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source based on vacuum diode with laser-produced plasma as cathode are presented. Electrons from a laser-produced aluminium plasma were accelerated towards a conical point tip titanium anode to generate K-shell x-ray radiation.

  5. X-ray Counterparts of Infrared Faint Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schartel, Norbert

    2011-10-01

    Infrared Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are radio sources with extremely faint or even absent infrared emission in deep Spitzer Surveys. Models of their spectral energy distributions, the ratios of radio to infrared flux densities and their steep radio spectra strongly suggest that IFRS are AGN at high redshifts (2IFRS, but if confirmed, the increased AGN numbers at these redshifts will account for the unresolved part of the X-ray background. The identification of X-ray counterparts of IFRS is considered to be the smoking gun for this hypothesis. We propose to observe 8 IFRS using 30ks pointed observations. X-ray detections of IFRS with different ratios of radio-to-infrared fluxes, will constrain the class-specific SED.

  6. CIAO: CHANDRA/X-RAY DATA ANALYSIS FOR EVERYONE

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Jonathan; CIAO Team

    2018-01-01

    Eighteen years after the launch of Chandra, the archive is full of scientifically rich data and new observations continue. Improvements in recent years to the data analysis package CIAO (Chandra Interactive Analysis of Observations) and its extensive accompanying documentation make it easier for astronomers without a specialist background in high energy astrophysics to take advantage of this resource.The CXC supports hundreds of CIAO users around the world at all levels of training from high school and undergraduate students to the most experienced X-ray astronomers. In general, we strive to provide a software system which is easy for beginners, yet powerful for advanced users.Chandra data cover a range of instrument configurations and types of target (pointlike, extended and moving), requiring a flexible data analysis system. In addition to CIAO tools using the familiar FTOOLS/IRAF-style parameter interface, CIAO includes applications such as the Sherpa fitting engine which provide access to the data via Python scripting.In this poster we point prospective (and existing!) users to the high level Python scripts now provided to reprocess Chandra or other X-ray mission data, determine source fluxes and upper limits, and estimate backgrounds; and to the latest documentation including the CIAO Gallery, a new entry point featuring the system's different capabilities.This work has been supported by NASA under contract NAS 8-03060 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for operation of the Chandra X-ray Center.

  7. ISMabs: A COMPREHENSIVE X-RAY ABSORPTION MODEL FOR THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatuzz, E.; Mendoza, C. [Centro de Física, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC), P.O. Box 20632, Caracas 1020A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); García, J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA, 02138 (United States); Kallman, T. R. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gorczyca, T. W., E-mail: egatuzz@ivic.gob.ve, E-mail: claudio@ivic.gob.ve, E-mail: javier@head.cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: timothy.r.kallman@nasa.gov, E-mail: thomas.gorczyca@wmich.edu [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States)

    2015-02-10

    We present an X-ray absorption model for the interstellar medium, to be referred to as ISMabs, that takes into account both neutral and ionized species of cosmically abundant elements, and includes the most accurate atomic data available. Using high-resolution spectra from eight X-ray binaries obtained with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer, we proceed to benchmark the atomic data in the model particularly in the neon K-edge region. Compared with previous photoabsorption models, which solely rely on neutral species, the inclusion of ions leads to improved spectral fits. Fit parameters comprise the column densities of abundant contributors that allow direct estimates of the ionization states. ISMabs is provided in the appropriate format to be implemented in widely used X-ray spectral fitting packages such as XSPEC, ISIS, and SHERPA.

  8. Thermal analysis on x-ray tube for exhaust process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Rao Ratnala, Srinivas; Veeresh Kumar, G. B.; Shivakumar Gouda, P. S.

    2018-02-01

    It is great importance in the use of X-rays for medical purposes that the dose given to both the patient and the operator is carefully controlled. There are many types of the X- ray tubes used for different applications based on their capacity and power supplied. In present thesis maxi ray 165 tube is analysed for thermal exhaust processes with ±5% accuracy. Exhaust process is usually done to remove all the air particles and to degasify the insert under high vacuum at 2e-05Torr. The tube glass is made up of Pyrex material, 95%Tungsten and 5%rhenium is used as target material for which the melting point temperature is 3350°C. Various materials are used for various parts; during the operation of X- ray tube these waste gases are released due to high temperature which in turn disturbs the flow of electrons. Thus, before using the X-ray tube for practical applications it has to undergo exhaust processes. Initially we build MX 165 model to carry out thermal analysis, and then we simulate the bearing temperature profiles with FE model to match with test results with ±5%accuracy. At last implement the critical protocols required for manufacturing processes like MF Heating, E-beam, Seasoning and FT.

  9. Soft X-ray induced chemical modification of polysaccharides in vascular plant cell walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cody, George D.; Brandes, Jay; Jacobsen, Chris; Wirick, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and micro carbon X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (C-XANES) can provide quantitative information regarding the distribution of the biopolymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin in vascular plant cell walls. In the case of angiosperms, flowering plants, C-XANES may also be able to distinguish variations in lignin monomer distributions throughout the cell wall. Polysaccharides are susceptible to soft X-ray irradiation induced chemical transformations that may complicate spectral analysis. The stability of a model polysaccharide, cellulose acetate, to variable doses of soft X-rays under conditions optimized for high quality C-XANES spectroscopy was investigated. The primary chemical effect of soft X-ray irradiation on cellulose acetate involves mass loss coincident with de-acetylation. A lesser amount of vinyl ketone formation also occurs. Reduction in irradiation dose via defocusing does enable high quality pristine spectra to be obtained. Radiation induced chemical modification studies of oak cell wall reveals that cellulose and hemicellulose are less labile to chemical modification than cellulose acetate. Strategies for obtaining pristine C-XANES spectra of polysaccharides are presented.

  10. Parallelization for X-ray crystal structural analysis program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (