WorldWideScience

Sample records for wort reduces neuropathic

  1. The Reducing Capacity of Thioredoxin on Oxidized Thiols in Boiled Wort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murmann, Anne N.; Hägglund, Per; Svensson, Birte

    2017-01-01

    Free thiol-containing proteins are suggested to work as antioxidants in beer, but the majority of thiols in wort are present in their oxidized form as disulfides and are therefore not active as antioxidants. Thioredoxin, a disulfide-reducing protein, is released into the wort from some yeast...... and fluorescence detection of thiol-derivatives. When boiled wort was incubated with all components of the thioredoxin system at pH 7.0 and 25 °C for 60 min under anaerobic conditions, the free thiol concentration increased from 25 to 224 μM. At pH values similar to wort (pH 5.7) and beer (pH 4.5), the thioredoxin...... system was also capable of increasing the free thiol concentration, although with lower efficiency to 187 and 170 μM, respectively. The presence of sulfite, an important antioxidant in beer secreted by the yeast during fermentation, was found to inactivate thioredoxin by sulfitolysis. Reduction...

  2. St. John's wort impairs glucose tolerance by reducing insulin response in healthy men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, Tore Bjerregaard; Damkier, Per; Christensen, Mette Marie Hougaard

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine if the over-the-counter herbal medicinal plant St. John's wort affects glucose tolerance in healthy men. To do this, we included 10 healthy men who were examined by a 2-hr oral glucose tolerance test on three occasions; A: Baseline, B: After 21 days...

  3. St. John's Wort (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The herb St. John's Wort is believed to be helpful in relieving mild to moderate depression, but should only be taken under a physician's supervision. St. John's Wort may clash with other medications or foods ...

  4. The L-kynurenine-probenecid combination reduces neuropathic pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda-Farias, J B; Pérez-Severiano, F; González-Esquivel, D F; Barragán-Iglesias, P; Bravo-Hernández, M; Cervantes-Durán, C; Aguilera, P; Ríos, C; Granados-Soto, V

    2013-10-01

    l-Kynurenine has antinociceptive effects in acute and inflammatory pain. This study determined the effect of l-kynurenine and its metabolite (kynurenic acid) on rats subjected to neuropathic pain. L5/L6 spinal nerve ligation induced tactile allodynia as measured with von Frey filaments using the up-down method. High-performance liquid chromatography and Western blot analysis determined kynurenic acid levels and expression of kynurenine amino transferase II (KAT II), respectively. l-Kynurenine (50-200 mg/kg, i.p.) or probenecid (100 mg/kg, i.p.) did not affect allodynia in neuropathic rats. In contrast, l-kynurenine (50-200 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with probenecid (100 mg/kg, i.p.), an inhibitor of organic anion transport, reversed allodynia. Furthermore, intrathecal kynurenic acid (1-30 μg) reversed allodynia. Probenecid (100 mg/kg, i.p.) supplementation enhanced the maximal antiallodynic effect of intrathecal kynurenic acid (10 μg). Only the combined administration of l-kynurenine (200 mg/kg)/probenecid (100 mg/kg) increased the kynurenic acid concentration in cerebrospinal fluid. KAT II is expressed in dorsal root ganglia and dorsal spinal cord. KAT II expression was unchanged by the spinal nerve ligation or l-kynurenine/probenecid combination. The kynurenine/probenecid combination did not affect motor activity. l-Kynurenine produces its antiallodynic effect in the central nervous system through kynurenic acid. This effect may result from blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. KAT II is expressed in dorsal root ganglion and dorsal spinal cord. Combined l-kynurenine and probenecid therapy has the potential to reduce neuropathic pain in humans. © 2013 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  5. Targeting CYP2J to reduce paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisignano, Marco; Angioni, Carlo; Park, Chul-Kyu; Meyer Dos Santos, Sascha; Jordan, Holger; Kuzikov, Maria; Liu, Di; Zinn, Sebastian; Hohman, Stephan W; Schreiber, Yannick; Zimmer, Béla; Schmidt, Mike; Lu, Ruirui; Suo, Jing; Zhang, Dong-Dong; Schäfer, Stephan M G; Hofmann, Martine; Yekkirala, Ajay S; de Bruin, Natasja; Parnham, Michael J; Woolf, Clifford J; Ji, Ru-Rong; Scholich, Klaus; Geisslinger, Gerd

    2016-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathic pain (CIPNP) is a severe dose- and therapy-limiting side effect of widely used cytostatics that is particularly difficult to treat. Here, we report increased expression of the cytochrome-P450-epoxygenase CYP2J6 and increased concentrations of its linoleic acid metabolite 9,10-EpOME (9,10-epoxy-12Z-octadecenoic acid) in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) of paclitaxel-treated mice as a model of CIPNP. The lipid sensitizes TRPV1 ion channels in primary sensory neurons and causes increased frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in spinal cord nociceptive neurons, increased CGRP release from sciatic nerves and DRGs, and a reduction in mechanical and thermal pain hypersensitivity. In a drug repurposing screen targeting CYP2J2, the human ortholog of murine CYP2J6, we identified telmisartan, a widely used angiotensin II receptor antagonist, as a potent inhibitor. In a translational approach, administration of telmisartan reduces EpOME concentrations in DRGs and in plasma and reverses mechanical hypersensitivity in paclitaxel-treated mice. We therefore suggest inhibition of CYP2J isoforms with telmisartan as a treatment option for paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain.

  6. Anfang und Wort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Warzecha

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Dieser Text versucht, die Beziehungen unter dem Anfang von jedem, besonders von schöpferischer Tätigkeit, und dem Wort zu begreifen. Auf Grund der zwei bekannten biblischen Texten (Joh 1, 1 und Gen 1, 1, sowie auch der anderen hat es sich ergeben, dass die Wirkung des Menschen in Verbindung mit Gott steht, auch wenn der Verfasser sich dessen nicht bewusst ist. Und noch mehr – eine genaue Analyse des Joh 1,1 zeigt, dass Fundament und Anfang des menschlichen Tätigkeit Christus ist, der im Neuen Testament auch ein Anfang genannt wird (Kol 1, 17; Offb 21, 6; 22, 13. Eine Ergänzung und Erklärung dieser Bemerkung sind die Worte des Johannes Paul II, der dabei die Idee der Menschwerdung des Wortes und der Inspiration des Heiligen Geistes entwickelt.

  7. St. John's Wort

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dietary Supplements. 2nd ed. New York, NY: Informa Healthcare; 2010:727-737. Borrelli F, Izzo AA. Herb-drug interactions with St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum) : an update on clinical observations . The AAPS Journal. 2009;11(4):2009;11(4):710-727. ...

  8. R-flurbiprofen reduces neuropathic pain in rodents by restoring endogenous cannabinoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Bishay

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: R-flurbiprofen, one of the enantiomers of flurbiprofen racemate, is inactive with respect to cyclooxygenase inhibition, but shows analgesic properties without relevant toxicity. Its mode of action is still unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that R-flurbiprofen reduces glutamate release in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord evoked by sciatic nerve injury and thereby alleviates pain in sciatic nerve injury models of neuropathic pain in rats and mice. This is mediated by restoring the balance of endocannabinoids (eCB, which is disturbed following peripheral nerve injury in the DRGs, spinal cord and forebrain. The imbalance results from transcriptional adaptations of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH and NAPE-phospholipase D, i.e. the major enzymes involved in anandamide metabolism and synthesis, respectively. R-flurbiprofen inhibits FAAH activity and normalizes NAPE-PLD expression. As a consequence, R-Flurbiprofen improves endogenous cannabinoid mediated effects, indicated by the reduction of glutamate release, increased activity of the anti-inflammatory transcription factor PPARgamma and attenuation of microglia activation. Antinociceptive effects are lost by combined inhibition of CB1 and CB2 receptors and partially abolished in CB1 receptor deficient mice. R-flurbiprofen does however not cause changes of core body temperature which is a typical indicator of central effects of cannabinoid-1 receptor agonists. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that R-flurbiprofen improves the endogenous mechanisms to regain stability after axonal injury and to fend off chronic neuropathic pain by modulating the endocannabinoid system and thus constitutes an attractive, novel therapeutic agent in the treatment of chronic, intractable pain.

  9. Frutalin reduces acute and neuropathic nociceptive behaviours in rodent models of orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasceno, Marina B M V; de Melo Júnior, José de Maria A; Santos, Sacha Aubrey A R; Melo, Luana T M; Leite, Laura Hévila I; Vieira-Neto, Antonio E; Moreira, Renato de A; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina de O; Campos, Adriana R

    2016-08-25

    Orofacial pain is a highly prevalent clinical condition, yet difficult to control effectively with available drugs. Much attention is currently focused on the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive properties of lectins. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of frutalin (FTL) using rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic orofacial pain. Acute pain was induced by formalin, glutamate or capsaicin (orofacial model) and hypertonic saline (corneal model). In one experiment, animals were pretreated with l-NAME and naloxone to investigate the mechanism of antinociception. The involvement of the lectin domain in the antinociceptive effect of FTL was verified by allowing the lectin to bind to its specific ligand. In another experiment, animals pretreated with FTL or saline were submitted to the temporomandibular joint formalin test. In yet another, animals were submitted to infraorbital nerve transection to induce chronic pain, followed by induction of thermal hypersensitivity using acetone. Motor activity was evaluated with the rotarod test. A molecular docking was performed using the TRPV1 channel. Pretreatment with FTL significantly reduced nociceptive behaviour associated with acute and neuropathic pain, especially at 0.5 mg/kg. Antinociception was effectively inhibited by l-NAME and d-galactose. In line with in vivo experiments, docking studies indicated that FTL may interact with TRPV1. Our results confirm the potential pharmacological relevance of FTL as an inhibitor of orofacial nociception in acute and chronic pain mediated by TRPA1, TRPV1 and TRPM8 receptor. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. Topical combinations aimed at treating microvascular dysfunction reduce allodynia in rat models of CRPS-I and neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragavendran, J Vaigunda; Laferrière, André; Xiao, Wen Hua; Bennett, Gary J; Padi, Satyanarayana S V; Zhang, Ji; Coderre, Terence J

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that various chronic pain syndromes exhibit tissue abnormalities caused by microvasculature dysfunction in the blood vessels of skin, muscle, or nerve. We tested whether topical combinations aimed at improving microvascular function would relieve allodynia in animal models of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) and neuropathic pain. We hypothesized that topical administration of either α(2)-adrenergic (α(2)A) receptor agonists or nitric oxide (NO) donors combined with either phosphodiesterase (PDE) or phosphatidic acid (PA) inhibitors would effectively reduce allodynia in these animal models of chronic pain. Single topical agents produced significant dose-dependent antiallodynic effects in rats with chronic postischemia pain, and the antiallodynic dose-response curves of PDE and PA inhibitors were shifted 2.5- to 10-fold leftward when combined with nonanalgesic doses of α(2)A receptor agonists or NO donors. Topical combinations also produced significant antiallodynic effects in rats with sciatic nerve injury, painful diabetic neuropathy, and chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy. These effects were shown to be produced by a local action, lasted up to 6 hours after acute treatment, and did not produce tolerance over 15 days of chronic daily dosing. The present results support the hypothesis that allodynia in animal models of CRPS-I and neuropathic pain is effectively relieved by topical combinations of α(2)A or NO donors with PDE or PA inhibitors. This suggests that topical treatments aimed at improving microvascular function may reduce allodynia in patients with CRPS-I and neuropathic pain. This article presents the synergistic antiallodynic effects of combinations of α(2)A or NO donors with PDE or PA inhibitors in animal models of CRPS-I and neuropathic pain. The data suggest that effective clinical treatment of chronic neuropathic pain may be achieved by therapies that alleviate microvascular dysfunction in affected

  11. Beer and wort proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iimure, Takashi; Kihara, Makoto; Sato, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Proteome analysis provides a way to identify proteins related to the quality traits of beer. A number of protein species in beer and wort have been identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with enzyme digestion such as trypsin, followed by mass spectrometry analyses and/or liquid chromatography mass/mass spectrometry. In addition, low molecular weight polypeptides in beer have been identified by the combination of non-enzyme digestion and mass analyses. These data sets of various molecular weight polypeptides (i.e., proteomes) provide a platform for analyzing protein functions in beer. Several novel proteins related to beer quality traits such as foam stability and haze formation have been identified by analyzing these proteomes. Some of the proteins have been applied to the development of efficient protein or DNA markers for trait selection in malting barley breeding. In this chapter, recent proteome studies of beer and wort are reviewed, and the methods and protocols of beer and wort proteome analysis are described.

  12. Adoptive transfer of M2 macrophages reduces neuropathic pain via opioid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannell, Maria; Labuz, Dominika; Celik, Melih Ö; Keye, Jacqueline; Batra, Arvind; Siegmund, Britta; Machelska, Halina

    2016-10-07

    During the inflammation which occurs following nerve damage, macrophages are recruited to the site of injury. Phenotypic diversity is a hallmark of the macrophage lineage and includes pro-inflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 populations. Our aim in this study was to investigate the ability of polarized M0, M1, and M2 macrophages to secrete opioid peptides and to examine their relative contribution to the modulation of neuropathic pain. Mouse bone marrow-derived cells were cultured as unstimulated M0 macrophages or were stimulated into an M1 phenotype using lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ or into an M2 phenotype using interleukin-4. The macrophage phenotypes were verified using flow cytometry for surface marker analysis and cytokine bead array for cytokine profile assessment. Opioid peptide levels were measured by radioimmunoassay and enzyme immunoassay. As a model of neuropathic pain, a chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve was employed. Polarized M0, M1, and M2 macrophages (5 × 10 5 cells) were injected perineurally twice, on days 14 and 15 following CCI or sham surgery. Mechanical and heat sensitivity were measured using the von Frey and Hargreaves tests, respectively. To track the injected macrophages, we also transferred fluorescently stained polarized cells and analyzed the surface marker profile of endogenous and injected cells in the nerves ex vivo. Compared to M0 and M1 cells, M2 macrophages contained and released higher amounts of opioid peptides, including Met-enkephalin, dynorphin A (1-17), and β-endorphin. M2 cells transferred perineurally at the nerve injury site reduced mechanical, but not heat hypersensitivity following the second injection. The analgesic effect was reversed by the perineurally applied opioid receptor antagonist naloxone methiodide. M2 cells did not affect sensitivity following sham surgery. Neither M0 nor M1 cells altered mechanical and heat sensitivity in CCI or sham-operated animals. Tracing the

  13. The Edible Brown Seaweed Ecklonia cava Reduces Hypersensitivity in Postoperative and Neuropathic Pain Models in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Goo Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The current study was designed to investigate whether edible brown seaweed Ecklonia cava extracts exhibits analgesic effects in plantar incision and spared nerve injury (SNI rats. To evaluate pain-related behavior, we performed the mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT and thermal hypersensitivity tests measured by von Frey filaments and a hot/cold plate analgesia meter. Pain-related behavior was also determined through analysis of ultrasonic vocalization. The results of experiments showed MWT values of the group that was treated with E. cava extracts by 300 mg/kg significantly increased; on the contrary, number of ultrasonic distress vocalization of the treated group was reduced at 6 h and 24 h after plantar incision operation (62.8%, p < 0.05. Moreover, E. cava 300 mg/kg treated group increased the paw withdrawal latency in hot-and cold-plate tests in the plantar incision rats. After 15 days of continuous treatment with E. cava extracts at 300 mg/kg, the treated group showed significantly alleviated SNI-induced hypersensitivity response by MWT compared with the control group. In conclusion, these results suggest that E. cava extracts have potential analgesic effects in the case of postoperative pain and neuropathic pain in rats.

  14. Neurotrophin-3 significantly reduces sodium channel expression linked to neuropathic pain states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Gerwing, Tracy D; Stucky, Cheryl L; McComb, Geoffrey W; Verge, Valerie M K

    2008-10-01

    Neuropathic pain resulting from chronic constriction injury (CCI) is critically linked to sensitization of peripheral nociceptors. Voltage gated sodium channels are major contributors to this state and their expression can be upregulated by nerve growth factor (NGF). We have previously demonstrated that neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) acts antagonistically to NGF in modulation of aspects of CCI-induced changes in trkA-associated nociceptor phenotype and thermal hyperalgesia. Thus, we hypothesized that exposure of neurons to increased levels of NT-3 would reduce expression of Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 in DRG neurons subject to CCI. In adult male rats, Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 mRNAs are expressed at high levels in predominantly small to medium size neurons. One week following CCI, there is reduced incidence of neurons expressing detectable Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 mRNA, but without a significant decline in mean level of neuronal expression, and similar findings observed immunohistochemically. There is also increased accumulation/redistribution of channel protein in the nerve most apparent proximal to the first constriction site. Intrathecal infusion of NT-3 significantly attenuates neuronal expression of Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 mRNA contralateral and most notably, ipsilateral to CCI, with a similar impact on relative protein expression at the level of the neuron and constricted nerve. We also observe reduced expression of the common neurotrophin receptor p75 in response to CCI that is not reversed by NT-3 in small to medium sized neurons and may confer an enhanced ability of NT-3 to signal via trkA, as has been previously shown in other cell types. These findings are consistent with an analgesic role for NT-3.

  15. Neurotrophin-3 significantly reduces sodium channel expression linked to neuropathic pain states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Gerwing, Tracy D.; Stucky, Cheryl L.; McComb, Geoffrey W.; Verge, Valerie M. K.

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain resulting from chronic constriction injury (CCI) is critically linked to sensitization of peripheral nociceptors. Voltage gated sodium channels are major contributors to this state and their expression can be upregulated by nerve growth factor (NGF). We have previously demonstrated that neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) acts antagonistically to NGF in modulation of aspects of CCI-induced changes in trkA-associated nociceptor phenotype and thermal hyperalgesia. Thus, we hypothesized that exposure of neurons to increased levels of NT-3 would reduce expression of Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 in DRG neurons subject to CCI. In adult male rats, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 mRNAs are expressed at high levels in predominantly small to medium size neurons. One week following CCI, there is reduced incidence of neurons expressing detectable Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 mRNA, but without a significant decline in mean level of neuronal expression, and similar findings observed immunohistochemically. There is also increased accumulation/redistribution of channel protein in the nerve most apparent proximal to the first constriction site. Intrathecal infusion of NT-3 significantly attenuates neuronal expression of Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 mRNA contralateral and most notably, ipsilateral to CCI, with a similar impact on relative protein expression at the level of the neuron and constricted nerve. We also observe reduced expression of the common neurotrophin receptor p75 in response to CCI that is not reversed by NT-3 in small to medium sized neurons and may confer an enhanced ability of NT-3 to signal via trkA, as has been previously shown in other cell types. These findings are consistent with an analgesic role for NT-3. PMID:18601922

  16. Net effect of wort osmotic pressure on fermentation course, yeast vitality, beer flavor, and haze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigler, K; Matoulková, D; Dienstbier, M; Gabriel, P

    2009-04-01

    The net effect of increased wort osmolarity on fermentation time, bottom yeast vitality and sedimentation, beer flavor compounds, and haze was determined in fermentations with 12 degrees all-malt wort supplemented with sorbitol to reach osmolarity equal to 16 degrees and 20 degrees. Three pitchings were performed in 12 degrees/12 degrees/12 degrees, 16 degrees/16 degrees/12 degrees, and 20 degrees/20 degrees/12 degrees worts. Fermentations in 16 degrees and 20 degrees worts decreased yeast vitality measured as acidification power (AP) by a maximum of 10%, lowered yeast proliferation, and increased fermentation time. Repitching aggravated these effects. The 3rd "back to normal" pitching into 12 degrees wort restored the yeast AP and reproductive abilities while the extended fermentation time remained. Yeast sedimentation in 16 degrees and 20 degrees worts was delayed but increased about two times at fermentation end relative to that in 12 degrees wort. Third "back-to-normal" pitching abolished the delay in sedimentation and reduced its extent, which became nearly equal in all variants. Beer brewed at increased osmolarity was characterized by increased levels of diacetyl and pentanedione and lower levels of dimethylsulfide and acetaldehyde. Esters and higher alcohols displayed small variations irrespective of wort osmolarity or repitching. Increased wort osmolarity had no appreciable effect on the haze of green beer and accelerated beer clarification during maturation. In all variants, chill haze increased with repitching.

  17. Exogenous induction of HO-1 alleviates vincristine-induced neuropathic pain by reducing spinal glial activation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Zhu, Ming-Di; Jiang, Bao-Chun; Yang, Tian; Gao, Yong-Jing

    2015-07-01

    Chemotherapy drugs such as vincristine can produce painful peripheral neuropathy for which is still lack of effective treatment. Recent studies have demonstrated that neuroinflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) was shown to mediate the resolution of inflammation. In this study, we investigated the contribution of HO-1 in the modulation of vincristine-induced pain and the mechanisms implicated. Injection of vincristine induced persistent mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in mice. The expression of HO-1 mRNA and protein was increased in 2 weeks in the spinal cord. Immunostaining showed that HO-1 was mainly expressed in neurons of spinal cord dorsal horn in naïve animals, but induced in astrocytes and microglia after vincristine injection. Intraperitoneal injection of HO-1 inducer increased HO-1 expression in the spinal cord and attenuated vincristine-induced pain. Persistent induction of HO-1 by intraspinal injection of HO-1-expressing lentivirus alleviated vincristine-induced pain for more than 2 weeks. Furthermore, vincristine induced activation of glial cells (astrocytes and microglia), phosphorylation of MAPKs (JNK, ERK, and p38), and production of TNF-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the spinal cord, which were all reduced by intrathecal injection of HO-1 inducer. Taken together, our data provide the first evidence that induction of HO-1 attenuates vincristine-induced neuropathic pain via inhibition of glia-mediated neuroinflammation in the spinal cord. This suggests that exogenously induced HO-1 may have potential as therapy in chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Phenolic content, physical and sensory properties of breads made with different types of barley wort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiano, Antonietta; Viggiani, Ilaria; Terracone, Carmela; Romaniello, Roberto; Del Nobile, Matteo Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    Barley wort, an intermediate product of beer brewing, is rich in phenolic compounds. The aim of this work was to evaluate the possibility of increasing the antioxidant content of bread by replacing water with three types of wort: two of them withdrawn at the end of the mashing operation during the production of a Pilsner and a Double Malt Pilsner beer respectively; the other collected at an intermediate stage of mashing of the Pilsner beer. The chemical, physical and sensory properties of the wort-added breads were compared with those of a control bread. All three worts led to increased phenolic content, volume and specific volume of the breads and induced significant changes in 11 of 23 sensory descriptors. The highest phenolic contents were detected in breads made either with the Pilsner wort withdrawn at an intermediate stage of mashing or with the Double Malt Pilsner wort. The former also gave the highest increase in volume and specific volume but significantly reduced the scores for crunchiness, firmness and cohesiveness. The latter led to lower increases in volume and specific volume, but less significant changes in the sensory properties were associated with its use. Worts can be conveniently used to increase the antioxidant content of bread. However, different types of wort can modify to different extents the physical and sensory properties of the product. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Systematic administration of B vitamins attenuates neuropathic hyperalgesia and reduces spinal neuron injury following temporary spinal cord ischaemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C-Z; Liu, Y-P; Liu, S; Yan, M; Hu, S-J; Song, X-J

    2014-01-01

    B vitamins have been demonstrated to be effective in treating chronic pain due to peripheral nerve injury. We investigated whether B vitamins could alleviate neuropathic pain and reduce neuron injury following temporary ischaemia in a rat model of spinal cord ischaemia-reperfusion injury (SCII). SCII was produced by transiently blocking the unilateral lumbar arteries in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Behavioural and neurochemical signs of neuropathic pain and spinal neuron injury were analysed with and without B vitamin treatment. SCII caused behavioural thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia and neurochemical alterations, including increased expression of the vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1) and induction of c-Fos, as well as activation of the astrocytes and microglial cells in the spinal cord. Repetitive systemic administration of vitamin B complex (B1/B6/B12 at 33/33/0.5 mg/kg, i.p., daily, for 7-14 consecutive days) significantly reduced thermal hyperalgesia and the increased expression of VR1 and c-Fos, as well as activation of the astrocytes and microglial cells. SCII caused a dramatic decrease of the expression of the rate-limiting enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 (GAD65), which synthesizes γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the axonal terminals, and β-III-tubulin, and also caused loss of Nissl bodies in the spinal cord. These alterations were largely prevented and rescued by the B vitamin treatment. These findings support the idea that the B vitamins are capable of neuroprotection and antinociception during spinal cord injury due to temporary ischaemia. Rescuing the loss of inhibitory GABAergic tone may reduce spinal central sensitization and contribute to B vitamin-induced analgesia. © 2013 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  20. Effects of processing methods on sorghum wort filtration | Igyor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brewing parameters measured were filtration rate, specific gravity, viscosity, reducing sugars, hot water extract, soluble extract level, fermentable extract level, and fermentability level. Results revealed that though the sorghum worts had faster filtration rate than barley in infusion at 65°C, other brewing parameters were all ...

  1. A Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor-Positive Allosteric Modulator Reduces Neuropathic Pain in the Mouse with No Psychoactive Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatowska-Jankowska, Bogna M; Baillie, Gemma L; Kinsey, Steven; Crowe, Molly; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Owens, Robert A; Damaj, Imad M; Poklis, Justin; Wiley, Jenny L; Zanda, Matteo; Zanato, Chiara; Greig, Iain R; Lichtman, Aron H; Ross, Ruth A

    2015-12-01

    The CB1 receptor represents a promising target for the treatment of several disorders including pain-related disease states. However, therapeutic applications of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and other CB1 orthosteric receptor agonists remain limited because of psychoactive side effects. Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) offer an alternative approach to enhance CB1 receptor function for therapeutic gain with the promise of reduced side effects. Here we describe the development of the novel synthetic CB1 PAM, 6-methyl-3-(2-nitro-1-(thiophen-2-yl)ethyl)-2-phenyl-1H-indole (ZCZ011), which augments the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological actions of the CB1 orthosteric agonists CP55,940 and N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA). ZCZ011 potentiated binding of [(3)H]CP55,940 to the CB1 receptor as well as enhancing AEA-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding in mouse brain membranes and β-arrestin recruitment and ERK phosphorylation in hCB1 cells. In the whole animal, ZCZ011 is brain penetrant, increased the potency of these orthosteric agonists in mouse behavioral assays indicative of cannabimimetic activity, including antinociception, hypothermia, catalepsy, locomotor activity, and in the drug discrimination paradigm. Administration of ZCZ011 alone was devoid of activity in these assays and did not produce a conditioned place preference or aversion, but elicited CB1 receptor-mediated antinociceptive effects in the chronic constriction nerve injury model of neuropathic pain and carrageenan model of inflammatory pain. These data suggest that ZCZ011 acts as a CB1 PAM and provide the first proof of principle that CB1 PAMs offer a promising strategy to treat neuropathic and inflammatory pain with minimal or no cannabimimetic side effects.

  2. Activation of Spinal α2-Adrenoceptors Using Diluted Bee Venom Stimulation Reduces Cold Allodynia in Neuropathic Pain Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk-Yun Kang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cold allodynia is an important distinctive feature of neuropathic pain. The present study examined whether single or repetitive treatment of diluted bee venom (DBV reduced cold allodynia in sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI rats and whether these effects were mediated by spinal adrenergic receptors. Single injection of DBV (0.25 or 2.5 mg/kg was performed into Zusanli acupoint 2 weeks post CCI, and repetitive DBV (0.25 mg/kg was injected for 2 weeks beginning on day 15 after CCI surgery. Single treatment of DBV at a low dose (0.25 mg/kg did not produce any anticold allodynic effect, while a high dose of DBV (2.5 mg/kg significantly reduced cold allodynia. Moreover, this effect of high-dose DBV was completely blocked by intrathecal pretreatment of idazoxan (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist, but not prazosin (α1-adrenoceptor antagonist or propranolol (nonselective β-adrenoceptor antagonist. In addition, coadministration of low-dose DBV (0.25 mg/kg and intrathecal clonidine (α2-adrenoceptor agonist synergically reduced cold allodynia. On the other hand, repetitive treatments of low-dose DBV showing no motor deficit remarkably suppressed cold allodynia from 7 days after DBV treatment. This effect was also reversed by intrathecal idazoxan injection. These findings demonstrated that single or repetitive stimulation of DBV could alleviate CCI-induced cold allodynia via activation of spinal α2-adrenoceptor.

  3. Neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Re

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is the expression of a dysfunction or primary lesion of a nerve in the peripheral or central nervous system, or both, rather than the biological signal transmitted by the nerve following peripheral nociceptor activation. It represents about 20% of all painful syndromes, with an estimated prevalence of 1.5%, however is actual incidence is hard to pinpoint due to the difficulties encountered in distinguishing it from chronic pain, of which it represents a significant percentage, on account of the not infrequent concurrence of conditions. It is crucial to recognise the variety of symptoms with which it can present: these can be negative and positive and, in turn, motor, sensitive and autonomic. In public health terms, it is important to emphasise that the diagnosis of neuropathic pain does not in most cases require sophisticated procedures and does not therefore weigh on health expenditure. In clinical practice, a validated scale (the LANSS is mentioned is useful for identifying patients presenting neuropathic pain symptoms. Therapy is based on three categories of medication: tricyclic antidepressants, anti-epileptics and opioids at high doses: neuropathic pain has a bad reputation for often resisting common therapeutic approaches and responding less well that nociceptor pain to monotherapy. Therapeutic strategies are all the more adequate the more they are based on symptoms and therefore on the pain generation mechanisms, although the recommendations are dictated more by expert opinions that double-blind randomised trials.

  4. Administration of four different doses of gabapentin reduces awakening from breakthrough pain and adverse effects in outpatients with neuropathic pain during the initial titration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jong-Yeun; Lee, Won Il; Shin, Woo-Kyung; Kim, Cheul Hong; Baik, Seong-Wan; Kim, Kyung-Hoon

    2013-07-01

    Gabapentin is a safe and well-tolerated anticonvulsant with a wide therapeutic index, and it is used for neuropathic pain. The aim of this study was to compare previous dosing methods with the administration of four different doses of gabapentin while maintaining the same maximum daily dose for the safe administration of high doses of the medication. THE SUBJECTS WERE OUTPATIENTS WITH VARIOUS NEUROPATHIC PAIN SYNDROMES, WITH AT LEAST TWO OF THE FOLLOWING SYMPTOMS: allodynia, burning pain, shooting pain, or hyperalgesia. The TID group received equal doses of gabapentin 3 times per day, while the QID group received 4 different doses of gabapentin per day. The pain score, frequency of breakthrough pain (BTP), severity and the duration of pain, sleep disturbance due to nocturnal pain, and adverse effects were recorded each day. The average daily pain score and sleep disturbance were significantly reduced in the QID group between days 3 and 10 of the experiment. The adverse effects of the medication were also reduced in the QID group. However, the frequency of BTP and severity and duration of pain were not significantly different between two groups. Administration of 4 different doses of gabapentin during the initial titration in outpatients with neuropathic pain resulted in a significant reduction in awakening from breakthrough pain and a reduction in the adverse effects of the medication.

  5. A comparison of customised and prefabricated insoles to reduce risk factors for neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration: a participant-blinded randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paton Joanne S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration may be prevented if the mechanical stress transmitted to the plantar tissues is reduced. Insole therapy is one practical method commonly used to reduce plantar loads and ulceration risk. The type of insole best suited to achieve this is unknown. This trial compared custom-made functional insoles with prefabricated insoles to reduce risk factors for ulceration of neuropathic diabetic feet. Method A participant-blinded randomised controlled trial recruited 119 neuropathic participants with diabetes who were randomly allocated to custom-made functional or prefabricated insoles. Data were collected at issue and six month follow-up using the F-scan in-shoe pressure measurement system. Primary outcomes were: peak pressure, forefoot pressure time integral, total contact area, forefoot rate of load, duration of load as a percentage of stance. Secondary outcomes were patient perceived foot health (Bristol Foot Score, quality of life (Audit of Diabetes Dependent Quality of Life. We also assessed cost of supply and fitting. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. Results There were no differences between insoles in peak pressure, or three of the other four kinetic measures. The custom-made functional insole was slightly more effective than the prefabricated insole in reducing forefoot pressure time integral at issue (27% vs. 22%, remained more effective at six month follow-up (30% vs. 24%, p=0.001, but was more expensive (UK £656 vs. £554, p Conclusion The custom-made insoles are more expensive than prefabricated insoles evaluated in this trial and no better in reducing peak pressure. We recommend that where clinically appropriate, the more cost effective prefabricated insole should be considered for use by patients with diabetes and neuropathy. Trial registration Clinical trials.gov (NCT00999635. Note: this trial was registered on completion.

  6. Novel epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG derivative as a new therapeutic strategy for reducing neuropathic pain after chronic constriction nerve injury in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Xifró

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is common in peripheral nerve injury and often fails to respond to ordinary medication. Here, we investigated whether the two novel epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG polyphenolic derivatives, compound 23 and 30, reduce the neuropathic pain in mice chronic constriction nerve injury (CCI. First, we performed a dose-response study to evaluate nociceptive sensation after administration of EGCG and its derivatives 23 and 30, using the Hargreaves test at 7 and 21 days after injury (dpi. We daily administered EGCG, 23 and 30 (10 to 100 mg/Kg; i.p. during the first week post-CCI. None of the doses of compound 23 caused significant pain diminution, whereas 50mg/kg was optimal for both EGCG and 30 to delay the latency of paw withdrawal. With 50 mg/Kg, we showed that EGCC prevented the thermal hyperalgesia from 7 to 21 dpi and compound 30 from 14 to 56 dpi. To evaluate the molecular mechanisms underpinning why EGCG and compound 30 differentially prevented the thermal hyperalgesia, we studied several biochemical parameters in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord at 14 and 56 dpi. We showed that the effect observed with EGCG and compound 30 was related to the inhibition of fatty acid synthase (FASN, a known target of these polyphenolic compounds. Additionally, we observed that EGCG and compound 30 reduced the expression of CCI-mediated inflammatory proteins and the nuclear localization of nuclear factor-kappa B at 14 dpi, but not at 56 dpi. We also strongly detected a decrease of synaptic plasma membrane levels of N-methyl-D-asparte receptor 2B in CCI-mice treated with compound 30 at 56 dpi. Altogether, compound 30 reduced the chronic thermal hyperalgesia induced by CCI better than the natural compound EGCG. Thus, our findings provide a rationale for the preclinical development of compound 30 as an agent to treat neuropathic pain.

  7. Single Administration of Melatonin Modulates the Nitroxidergic System at the Peripheral Level and Reduces Thermal Nociceptive Hypersensitivity in Neuropathic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsani, Elisa; Buffoli, Barbara; Bonazza, Veronica; Reiter, Russel J; Rezzani, Rita; Rodella, Luigi F

    2017-10-14

    Neuropathic pain is a severe condition with unsatisfactory treatments. Melatonin, an indolamine, seems to be a promising molecule suitable for this purpose due to its well-known anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antioxidant effects, as well as its modulation of the nitroxidergic system. Nevertheless, the data on its mechanism of action and potentialities are currently insufficient in this pathology, especially at the peripheral level. Thus, this work evaluated the effect of a single administration of melatonin in an established mononeuropathy pain model that monitors the behaviour and the changes in the nitroxidergic system in dorsal root ganglia and skin, which are affected by nervous impairment. Experiments were carried out on Sprague Dawley rats subdivided into the sham operated (control) and the chronic constriction injured animals, a model of peripheral neuropathic pain on sciatic nerve. Single administrations of melatonin (5-10 mg/kg) or vehicle were injected intraperitoneally on the 14th day after surgery, when the mononeuropathy was established. The animals were behaviourally tested for thermal hyperalgesia. The dorsal root ganglia and the plantar skin of the hind-paws were removed and processed for the immunohistochemical detection of neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthases. The behavioural results showed an increase of withdrawal latency during the plantar test as early as 30 min after melatonin administration. The immunohistochemical results indicated a modulation of the nitroxidergic system both at dorsal root ganglia and skin level, permitting speculate on a possible mechanism of action. We showed that melatonin may be a possible therapeutic strategy in neuropathic pain.

  8. Single Administration of Melatonin Modulates the Nitroxidergic System at the Peripheral Level and Reduces Thermal Nociceptive Hypersensitivity in Neuropathic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Borsani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is a severe condition with unsatisfactory treatments. Melatonin, an indolamine, seems to be a promising molecule suitable for this purpose due to its well-known anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antioxidant effects, as well as its modulation of the nitroxidergic system. Nevertheless, the data on its mechanism of action and potentialities are currently insufficient in this pathology, especially at the peripheral level. Thus, this work evaluated the effect of a single administration of melatonin in an established mononeuropathy pain model that monitors the behaviour and the changes in the nitroxidergic system in dorsal root ganglia and skin, which are affected by nervous impairment. Experiments were carried out on Sprague Dawley rats subdivided into the sham operated (control and the chronic constriction injured animals, a model of peripheral neuropathic pain on sciatic nerve. Single administrations of melatonin (5–10 mg/kg or vehicle were injected intraperitoneally on the 14th day after surgery, when the mononeuropathy was established. The animals were behaviourally tested for thermal hyperalgesia. The dorsal root ganglia and the plantar skin of the hind-paws were removed and processed for the immunohistochemical detection of neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthases. The behavioural results showed an increase of withdrawal latency during the plantar test as early as 30 min after melatonin administration. The immunohistochemical results indicated a modulation of the nitroxidergic system both at dorsal root ganglia and skin level, permitting speculate on a possible mechanism of action. We showed that melatonin may be a possible therapeutic strategy in neuropathic pain.

  9. Neuropathic pain: targeting the melatonin MT 2 receptor | Smith ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neuropathic pain affects a large proportion of the population and reduces a person's ability to perform optimally. In South Africa, there are a host of factors that hinder the correct diagnosis and treatment of neuropathic pain. Patients suffering from neuropathic pain are treated suboptimally with NSAIDS and opioids as ...

  10. Neuropathic pain: targeting the melatonin MT receptor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neuropathic pain is considered to be a major health problem and affects a significant number of patients, thus leading to a rise in healthcare costs and reduced productivity.1 Neuropathic pain can occur from injury to any point along a neuronal pathway, from the terminal of the peripheral nociceptors, to the cortical neurons ...

  11. St. John's Wort (Hypericum Perforatum) and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tone in laboratory animals, and could potentially cause uterine contractions. While one small study found higher rates of miscarriage in pregnancies where the mothers were taking St. John’s Wort compared to another antidepressant or no antidepressant, the rates ... Health ...

  12. Neuropathic pain in primary care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    neuropathic pain syndromes.10. Opioid analgesics. In response to severe or persistent pain, interneurons in the dorsal horn release endogenous opioids that work to reduce perceived pain. These endogenous substances. (enkephalins, endorphins and dynorphins) play a major role in the mechanism of pain reduction and ...

  13. Evaluation of the fermentation of high gravity thick sugar beet juice worts for efficient bioethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Sugar beet and intermediates of sugar beet processing are considered to be very attractive feedstock for ethanol production due to their content of fermentable sugars. In particular, the processing of the intermediates into ethanol is considerably facilitated because it does not require pretreatment or enzymatic treatment in contrast to production from starch raw materials. Moreover, the advantage of thick juice is high solid substance and saccharose content which eliminates problems with the storability of this feedstock. Results The objective of this study were to investigate bioethanol production from thick juice worts and the effects of their concentration, the type of mineral supplement, as well as the dose of yeast inoculum on fermentation dynamics and ethanol yield. The obtained results show that to ensure efficient ethanolic fermentation of high gravity thick juice worts, one needs to use a yeast strain with high ethanol tolerance and a large amount of inoculum. The highest ethanol yield (94.9 ± 2.8% of the theoretical yield) and sugars intake of 96.5 ± 2.9% were obtained after the fermentation of wort with an extract content of 250 g/kg supplemented with diammonium hydrogen phosphate (0.3 g/L of wort) and inoculated with 2 g of Ethanol Red dry yeast per L of wort. An increase in extract content in the fermentation medium from 250 g/L to 280 g/kg resulted in decreased efficiency of the process. Also the distillates originating from worts with an extract content of 250 g/kg were characterized by lower acetaldehyde concentration than those obtained from worts with an extract content of 280 g/kg. Conclusions Under the favorable conditions determined in our experiments, 38.9 ± 1.2 L of 100% (v/v) ethyl alcohol can be produced from 100 kg of thick juice. The obtained results show that the selection of process conditions and the yeast for the fermentation of worts with a higher sugar content can improve the economic performance of the

  14. THE INFLUENCE OF FIRST WORT PART AND AFTERWORTS ON SACCHARIFICATION OF WORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Líšková

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false SK X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Wort is a basic product of mashing, which forms the first intermediate in beer production and constitute the base of its final value. For qualitative value wort has the greatest impact grist per brew, which is a description of materials, they bring to brew extract and determine its the volume and concentration. The main component grist per brew for light and dark beers is stored pale malt and possibly a smaller proportion of adjuncts. The aim of our work was to assess the qualitative parameters of malt in terms of content extract and its impact on the amount of produced the first wort part and afterwort and their qualitative values expressed in % saccharification and volumes. We measured 3 types of malts with the content of the extract 75.2%, 76.1%, 77.2% in the original sample, which determined mainly reached saccharification of first part wort and other afterwort parts one and two. In terms attained of saccharification it was necessary to use on sparge of spent grains at afterwort number two only the amount of water, which would be not affect the total saccharification of wort and its qualitative parameters.doi:10.5219/114 

  15. Ankle joint mobilization reduces axonotmesis-induced neuropathic pain and glial activation in the spinal cord and enhances nerve regeneration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Daniel F; Mazzardo-Martins, Leidiane; Gadotti, Vinícius M; Nascimento, Francisney P; Lima, Denise A N; Speckhann, Breno; Favretto, Gisela A; Bobinski, Franciane; Cargnin-Ferreira, Eduardo; Bressan, Elisângela; Dutra, Rafael C; Calixto, João B; Santos, Adair R S

    2011-11-01

    An important issue in physical rehabilitation is how to protect from or to reduce the effects of peripheral nerve injury. In the present study, we examined whether ankle joint mobilization (AJM) would reduce neuropathic pain and enhance motor functional recovery after nerve injury. In the axonotmesis model, AJM during 15 sessions every other day was conducted in rats. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and motor performance deficit were measured for 5 weeks. After 5 weeks, we performed morphological analysis and quantified the immunoreactivity for CD11b/c and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), markers of glial activation, in the lumbar spinal cord. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and motor performance deficit were found in the Crush+Anesthesia (Anes) group (P<0.001), which was significantly decreased after AJM (P<0.001). In the morphological analysis, the Crush+Anes group presented reduced myelin sheath thickness (P<0.05), but the AJM group presented enhanced myelin sheath thickness (P<0.05). Peripheral nerve injury increased the immunoreactivity for CD11b/c and GFAP in the spinal cord (P<0.05), and AJM markedly reduced CD11b/c and GFAP immunoreactivity (P<0.01). These results show that AJM in rats produces an antihyperalgesic effect and peripheral nerve regeneration through the inhibition of glial activation in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. These findings suggest new approaches for physical rehabilitation to protect from or reduce the effects of nerve injury. Copyright © 2011 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Swallow-wort (Vincetoxicum spp.) biological control update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pale swallow-wort (Vincetoxicum rossicum = Cynanchum rossicum) and black swallow-wort (V. nigrum = C. louiseae) are herbaceous, perennial, viney milkweeds introduced from Europe (Apocynaceae-subfamily Asclepiadoideae). Both species are becoming increasingly invasive in a variety of natural and manag...

  17. Topical application of disodium isostearyl 2-O-L-ascorbyl phosphate, an amphiphilic ascorbic acid derivative, reduces neuropathic hyperalgesia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Kazumasa; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Matsunami, Maho; Shibayama, Hiroharu; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2012-06-01

    Ca(v) 3.2 T-type calcium channels, targeted by H(2) S, are involved in neuropathic hyperalgesia in rats and ascorbic acid inhibits Ca(v) 3.2 channels. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of intraplantar (i.pl.) administration of ascorbic acid or topical application of disodium isostearyl 2-O-L-ascorbyl phosphate (DI-VCP), a skin-permeable ascorbate derivative on hyperalgesia induced by NaHS, an H(2) S donor, and on neuropathic hyperalgesia. In rats mechanical hyperalgesia was evoked by i.pl. NaHS, and neuropathic hyperalgesia was induced by L5 spinal nerve cutting (L5SNC) or by repeated administration of paclitaxel, an anti-cancer drug. Dermal ascorbic acid levels were determined colorimetrically. The NaHS-evoked Ca(v) 3.2 channel-dependent hyperalgesia was inhibited by co-administered ascorbic acid. Topical application of DI-VCP, but not ascorbic acid, prevented the NaHS-evoked hyperalgesia, and also increased dermal ascorbic acid levels. Neuropathic hyperalgesia induced by L5SNC or paclitaxel was reversed by i.pl. NNC 55-0396, a selective T-type calcium channel blocker, ascorbic acid or DI-VCP, and by topical DI-VCP, but not by topical ascorbic acid. The effects of i.pl. ascorbic acid and topical DI-VCP in the paclitaxel-treated rats were characterized by the faster onset and greater magnitude, compared with their effects in the L5SNC rats. Dermal ascorbic acid levels in the hindpaw significantly decreased after paclitaxel treatment, but not L5SNC, which was reversed by topical DI-VCP. Ascorbic acid, known to inhibit Ca(v) 3.2 channels, suppressed neuropathic hyperalgesia. DI-VCP ointment for topical application may be of benefit in the treatment of neuropathic pain. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  18. Topical application of disodium isostearyl 2-O-L-ascorbyl phosphate, an amphiphilic ascorbic acid derivative, reduces neuropathic hyperalgesia in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Kazumasa; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Matsunami, Maho; Shibayama, Hiroharu; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Cav3.2 T-type calcium channels, targeted by H2S, are involved in neuropathic hyperalgesia in rats and ascorbic acid inhibits Cav3.2 channels. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of intraplantar (i.pl.) administration of ascorbic acid or topical application of disodium isostearyl 2-O-L-ascorbyl phosphate (DI-VCP), a skin-permeable ascorbate derivative on hyperalgesia induced by NaHS, an H2S donor, and on neuropathic hyperalgesia. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH In rats mechanical hyperalgesia was evoked by i.pl. NaHS, and neuropathic hyperalgesia was induced by L5 spinal nerve cutting (L5SNC) or by repeated administration of paclitaxel, an anti-cancer drug. Dermal ascorbic acid levels were determined colorimetrically. KEY RESULTS The NaHS-evoked Cav3.2 channel-dependent hyperalgesia was inhibited by co-administered ascorbic acid. Topical application of DI-VCP, but not ascorbic acid, prevented the NaHS-evoked hyperalgesia, and also increased dermal ascorbic acid levels. Neuropathic hyperalgesia induced by L5SNC or paclitaxel was reversed by i.pl. NNC 55–0396, a selective T-type calcium channel blocker, ascorbic acid or DI-VCP, and by topical DI-VCP, but not by topical ascorbic acid. The effects of i.pl. ascorbic acid and topical DI-VCP in the paclitaxel-treated rats were characterized by the faster onset and greater magnitude, compared with their effects in the L5SNC rats. Dermal ascorbic acid levels in the hindpaw significantly decreased after paclitaxel treatment, but not L5SNC, which was reversed by topical DI-VCP. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Ascorbic acid, known to inhibit Cav3.2 channels, suppressed neuropathic hyperalgesia. DI-VCP ointment for topical application may be of benefit in the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:22229645

  19. Expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease 3 is reduced in ischemic but not neuropathic ulcers from patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menghini, R; Uccioli, L; Vainieri, E; Pecchioli, C; Casagrande, V; Stoehr, R; Cardellini, M; Porzio, O; Rizza, S; Federici, M

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration remains one of the most common and most serious consequences of diabetes. Persistently high levels of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) contribute to wound chronicity. Our aim was to assess the concentrations of MMPs and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) in neuropathic and ischemic diabetic foot ulcers by analyzing biopsy samples. In this study, biopsies were taken from 35 diabetic foot ulcers of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and distinguished in neuropathic (n = 14) or ischemic (n = 21). Zymography assay was utilized for the analysis of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity. TACE activity was evaluated by a specific fluorimetric assay. mRNA levels of MMPs as well as TIMPs were detected using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The activity of MMP9 and A Disintegrin and A MetalloProtease Domain 17/TNF-Alpha Converting Enzyme (ADAM17/TACE) was significantly increased in ischemic compared to neuropathic biopsies. No differences were detected between both groups for the mRNA levels of MMPs as well as of ADAMs. However, TIMP3 mRNA expression was decreased in ischemic samples. The combination of increased activity of MMP9 and ADAM17/TACE with decreased concentrations of TIMP-3 mRNA expression in ischemic diabetic foot ulcers compared to neuropathic samples suggests that the increased proteolytic environment may represent a causative factor in the ulcer progression. New treatment strategies for healing diabetic foot ulcers could be directed toward increasing levels of TIMP3.

  20. Orofacial neuropathic pain induced by oxaliplatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jennifer; Erol, Ferhat; Viatchenko-Karpinski, Viacheslav; Kanda, Hirosato

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain induced by chemotherapy drugs such as oxaliplatin is a dose-limiting side effect in cancer treatment. The mechanisms underlying chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain are not fully understood. KCNQ2 channels are low-threshold voltage-gated K+ channels that play a role in controlling neuronal excitability. Downregulation of KCNQ2 channels has been proposed to be an underlying mechanism of sensory hypersensitivity that leads to neuropathic pain. However, it is currently unknown whether KCNQ channels may be downregulated by chemotherapy drugs in trigeminal ganglion neurons to contribute to the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced orofacial neuropathic pain. In the present study, mechanical sensitivity in orofacial regions is measured using the operant behavioral test in rats treated with oxaliplatin. Operant behaviors in these animals show the gradual development of orofacial neuropathic pain that manifests with orofacial mechanical allodynia. Immunostaining shows strong KCNQ2 immunoreactivity in small-sized V2 trigeminal ganglion neurons in controls, and the numbers of KCNQ2 immunoreactivity positive V2 trigeminal ganglion neurons are significantly reduced in oxaliplatin-treated animals. Immunostaining is also performed in brainstem and shows strong KCNQ2 immunoreactivity at the trigeminal afferent central terminals innervating the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus (Vc) in controls, but the KCNQ2 immunoreactivity intensity is significantly reduced in oxaliplatin-treated animals. We further show with the operant behavioral test that oxaliplatin-induced orofacial mechanical allodynia can be alleviated by the KCNQ2 potentiator retigabine. Taken together, these findings suggest that KCNQ2 downregulation may be a cause of oxaliplatin-induced orofacial neuropathic pain and KCNQ2 potentiators may be useful for alleviating the neuropathic pain. PMID:28741430

  1. [Toothache with a neuropathic background].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatchaturian, V; de Wijer, A; Kalaykova, S I; Steenks, M H

    2015-03-01

    A 48-year old woman in good general health was referred to the orofacial pain clinic in a centre for special dentistry with a toothache in the premolar region of the left maxillary quadrant. The complaints had existed for 15 years and various dental treatments, including endodontic treatments, apical surgery, extraction and splint therapy, had not helped to alleviate the complaints. As a result of the fact that anti-epileptic drugs were able to reduce the pain it was concluded that this 'toothache' satisfied the criteria of an atypical odontalgia: 'toothache' with a neuropathic background.

  2. Melanocortins and Neuropathic Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrinten, Dorien Henriëtte

    2003-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (pain initiated by a lesion or dysfunction of the nervous system) is characterised by symptoms such as allodynia (pain due to a stimulus that does not normally provoke pain) and hyperalgesia (an increased response to a stimulus that is normally painful). It constitutes a major

  3. THE USE OF FLUORIDE CONTAINING MINERAL WATER IN WORT PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunka Yonkova

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to study the quality of wort produced using fluoride containing mineral water. The results show that the mineral water has a negative impact on the enzymatic destruction of starch, proteins, color intensity and pH of the wort. The changes of pH during mashing process using tap and mineral water was studied. The lower acidity of wort obtained using mineral water didn’t change during the brewing process. The fluoride content of beer is lower than 5 mg.L-1 when wort is produced using mineral and tap water in 1:1 ratio and citric acid for pH correction. At the same time, the final degree of fermentation, α-amine nitrogen content and the intensity of color of produced wort are close to the control sample. The changes in fluoride ion concentration are monitored using ion-selective potentiometry. The fluoride content is decreased from 5.7 to 4.75 mg.L-1, the most intense change is observed during the mashing process.

  4. The potential role of neuropathic mechanisms in dry eye syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmonnies, Charles W

    Dry eye syndromes can involve both nociceptive and neuropathic symptoms. Nociceptive symptoms are the normal physiological responses to noxious stimuli. Neuropathic symptoms are caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system and can be the result of hypersensitisation of peripheral or central corneal and conjunctival somatosensory nerves. For example, inflammation could induce neuroplastic peripheral sensitisation of the ocular surface or lid wiper and exacerbate nociceptive symptoms. Neuropathic symptoms may explain the incommensurate relation between signs and symptoms in some dry eye syndromes although absence of signs of a dry eye syndrome may also be a consequence of inappropriate methods used when examining for them. Involvement of neuropathic mechanisms may also help explain dry eye symptoms which occur in association with reduced corneal sensitivity. This review includes a discussion of the potential for ocular symptoms involving neuropathic mechanisms to contribute to psychosocial problems such as depression, stress, anxiety and sleep disorders as well as for these types of psychosocial problems to contribute to neuropathic mechanisms and dry eye syndromes. Failure to consider the possibility that neuropathic mechanisms can contribute to dry eye syndromes may reduce accuracy of diagnosis and the suitability of treatment provided. Dry eye symptoms in the absence of commensurate evidence of tear dysfunction, and unsatisfactory response to tear dysfunction therapies should prompt consideration of neuropathic mechanisms being involved. Symptoms which persist after local anaesthetic instillation are more likely to be neuropathic in origin. Reducing inflammation may help limit any associated neuroplastic hypersensitivity. Copyright © 2016 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Antiallodynic effects of acupuncture in neuropathic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Myeoung Hoon; Choi, Ji Soo; Bai, Sun Joon; Shim, Insop; Lee, Hye-Jung; Choi, Sun Mi; Lee, Bae Hwan

    2006-06-30

    Peripheral nerve injury often results in abnormal neuropathic pain such as allodynia or hyperalgesia. Acupuncture, a traditional Oriental medicine, has been used to relieve pain and related symptoms. However, the efficiency of acupuncture in relieving neuropathic pain is not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-allodynic effects of acupuncture through behavioral and electrophysiological examinations. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to neuropathic surgery consisting of a tight ligation and transection of the left tibial and sural nerves, under pentobarbital anesthesia. The acupuncture experiment consisted of four different groups, one treated at each of three different acupoints (Zusanli (ST36), Yinlingquan (SP9), and a sham-acupoint) and a control group. Behavioral tests for mechanical allodynia and cold allodynia were performed for up to two weeks postoperatively. Extracellular electrophysiological recordings were made from the dorsal roots using platinum wire electrodes. Mechanical and cold allodynia were significantly reduced after acupuncture treatment at the Zusanli and Yinlingquan acupoints, respectively. Electrophysiological neural responses to von Frey and acetone tests were also reduced after acupuncture at the same two acupoints. These results suggest that acupuncture may be beneficial in relieving neuropathic pain.

  6. EFFECTS OF MILLET MALT WORT ON BREWER'S YEAST

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    unconverted starch was detem1ined using AOAC method (1980) by addition of 0.2M iodine solution to the liquor. Total acidity measured as acetic acid was determined by titrating the wort to end point with sodium hydroxide using phenolphthalein indicator (Pearson, 1976). The alcohol percent (V/V) was determined by the ...

  7. Determination of free fatty acids in beer wort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravi, Elisabetta; Benedetti, Paolo; Marconi, Ombretta; Perretti, Giuseppe

    2014-05-15

    The importance of free fatty acids (FFAs) in wort has been known for a long time because of their influence on beer quality and yeast metabolism. Lipids have a beneficial effect on yeast growth during fermentation as well as negative effects on beer quality. Lipids content of beer affects the ability to form a stable head of foam and plays an important role in beer staling. Moreover, the ratio of unsaturated and saturated fatty acids seems to be related to gushing problems. A novel, simple, and reliable procedure for quantitative analysis of FFAs in wort was developed and validated. The determination of FFAs in wort was achieved via liquid-liquid cartridge extraction, purification of FFA fraction by solid phase extraction, boron trifluoride in methanol methylation, and injection into GC-FID system. The proposed method has high accuracy (<0.3%, expressed as the bias), high precision (<1.2%, RSD), and recoveries ranging from 74% to 98%. The method was tested on two different wort samples (9° and 12° Plato). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Optimisation of wort production from rice malt using enzymes and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Commercially, rice malt has never been successfully used in brewing because of its low free α-amino nitrogen (FAN) content. This study was designed to optimise rice malt replacement for barley malt in wort production and to improve FAN by adding α-amylase and protease. The response surface methodology (RSM) ...

  9. A treatment algorithm for neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namaka, Mike; Gramlich, Colin R; Ruhlen, Dana; Melanson, Maria; Sutton, Ian; Major, Joanne

    2004-07-01

    Neuropathic pain is a chronic pain syndrome caused by drug-, disease-, or injury-induced damage or destruction of sensory neurons within the dorsal root ganglia of the peripheral nervous system. Characteristic clinical symptoms include the feeling of pins and needles; burning, shooting, and/or stabbing pain with or without throbbing; and numbness. Neuronal hyperexcitability represents the hallmark cellular mechanism involved in the underlying pathophysiology of neuropathic pain. Although the primary goal is to alleviate pain, clinicians recognize that even the most appropriate treatment strategy may be, at best, only able to reduce pain to a more tolerable level. The purpose of this review is to propose a treatment algorithm for neuropathic pain that health care professionals can logically follow and adapt to the specific needs of each patient. The algorithm is intended to serve as a general guide to assist clinicians in optimizing available therapeutic options. A comprehensive review of the literature using the PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane, and Toxnet databases was conducted to design and develop a novel treatment algorithm for neuropathic pain that encompasses agents from several drug classes, including antidepressants, antiepileptic drugs, topical antineuralgic agents, narcotics, and analgesics, as well as various treatment options for refractory cases. Any of the agents in the first-line drug classes (tricyclic antidepressants, antiepileptic drugs, topical antineuralgics, analgesics) may be used as a starting point in the treatment of neuropathic pain. If a patient does not respond to treatment with at least 3 different agents within a drug class, agents from a second drug class may be tried. When all first-line options have been exhausted, narcotic analgesics or refractory treatment options may provide some benefit. Patients who do not respond to monotherapy with any of the first- or second-line agents may respond to combination therapy or may be candidates for

  10. Role of cannabinoids in the management of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Fontelles, M Isabel; Goicoechea García, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of pain, particularly neuropathic pain, is one of the therapeutic applications of cannabis and cannabinoids that is currently under investigation and that stimulates interest among clinicians and basic researchers. Animal pain models, including models of acute, antinociceptive, inflammatory and neuropathic pain, have demonstrated the antinociceptive efficacy of cannabinoids without causing serious alterations in animal behaviour. These data, together with the historic and current empiric use of cannabinoids, support the interest in the analysis of their effectiveness in treating neuropathic pain. The evaluation of controlled trials that focus on the effect of cannabinoids on neuropathic pain reveals that this class of drugs is able to significantly reduce pain perception. Nevertheless, this effect is generally weak and clinical relevance remains under evaluation. Moreover, there is a lack of controlled trials and, in particular, comparisons with other drugs generally used in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Despite the fact that further research is required to achieve a definitive assessment, current data obtained from basic research and from analysis of the available controlled trials indicate that cannabinoids can be accepted as a useful option in the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  11. Pharmacological Regulation of Neuropathic Pain Driven by Inflammatory Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norikazu Kiguchi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain can have a major effect on quality of life but current therapies are often inadequate. Growing evidence suggests that neuropathic pain induced by nerve damage is caused by chronic inflammation. Upon nerve injury, damaged cells secrete pro-inflammatory molecules that activate cells in the surrounding tissue and recruit circulating leukocytes to the site of injury. Among these, the most abundant cell type is macrophages, which produce several key molecules involved in pain enhancement, including cytokines and chemokines. Given their central role in the regulation of peripheral sensitization, macrophage-derived cytokines and chemokines could be useful targets for the development of novel therapeutics. Inhibition of key pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines prevents neuroinflammation and neuropathic pain; moreover, recent studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of pharmacological inhibition of inflammatory (M1 macrophages. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands and T helper type 2 cytokines that reduce M1 macrophages are able to relieve neuropathic pain. Future translational studies in non-human primates will be crucial for determining the regulatory mechanisms underlying neuroinflammation-associated neuropathic pain. In turn, this knowledge will assist in the development of novel pharmacotherapies targeting macrophage-driven neuroinflammation for the treatment of intractable neuropathic pain.

  12. Neuropathic pain management in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hyde, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    There are difficulties in assessing, managing, and evaluating neuropathic pain in dying children, particularly those with neurological impairment. Neuropathic pain in children often presents differently to how it presents in the adult population. Comprehensive assessment as well as pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions are crucial to its successful management and frequently require input from an interdisciplinary team. Notwithstanding the need for further research, this paper brings together research papers, reviews, and clinical guidelines to present an exploration of existing evidence regarding care for children with neuropathic pain and their families.

  13. The application of triticale malt as the substitute for barley malt in wort production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grujić Olgica S.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was the investigation of wort production for beer by the application of triticale malt, as the partial substitute for barley malt in grist. For wort production, three series of experiments were carried out in which malts were produced from three different triticale varieties taken from experimental fields Rimski Sancevi location (Serbia, crop 2006. Experiments were carried out on laboratory scale by applying infusion procedure for wort production. The obtained results indicate that the application of triticale malt gave worts that had good analytical quality parameters.

  14. Topical application of St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfle, Ute; Seelinger, Günter; Schempp, Christoph M

    2014-02-01

    St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) has been intensively investigated for its antidepressive activity, but dermatological applications also have a long tradition. Topical St. John's wort preparations such as oils or tinctures are used for the treatment of minor wounds and burns, sunburns, abrasions, bruises, contusions, ulcers, myalgia, and many others. Pharmacological research supports the use in these fields. Of the constituents, naphthodianthrones (e.g., hypericin) and phloroglucinols (e.g., hyperforin) have interesting pharmacological profiles, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and antimicrobial activities. In addition, hyperforin stimulates growth and differentiation of keratinocytes, and hypericin is a photosensitizer which can be used for selective treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer. However, clinical research in this field is still scarce. Recently, sporadic trials have been conducted in wound healing, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and herpes simplex infections, partly with purified single constituents and modern dermatological formulations. St. John's wort also has a potential for use in medical skin care. Composition and stability of pharmaceutical formulations vary greatly depending on origin of the plant material, production method, lipophilicity of solvents, and storage conditions, and this must be regarded with respect to practical as well as scientific purposes. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. PHARMACOTHERAPY IN ELDERLY NEUROPATHIC PAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Eko P

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of pain increases with age. Neuropathic pain are common in elderly patients and pose challenges in both their diagnosis and treatment. The most common neuropathic pain in elderly are radiculopathy due to foraminal or spinal stenosis, diabetic neuropathy, and postherpetic neuralgia. Pain in the elderly is often unrecognized and undertreated. The main problem with pain in older adults relates to impaired quality of life secondary to pain which may be expressed by depression (in...

  16. Orthotic management of the neuropathic foot: an interdisciplinary care perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Christopher; Major, Matthew J; Kuffel, Charles; Hines, Kevin; Cole, Pamela

    2015-02-01

    Clinical management of the patient with neuropathic foot is becoming commonplace in orthotic clinics worldwide. The presentations that can result from neuropathic foot are diverse, requiring clinicians to understand the pathomechanics of ulceration, infection, and Charcot joint arthropathy to provide effective interventions. The purpose of this clinical perspective is to provide a review of the literature regarding clinical concepts associated with orthotic management of neuropathic foot. Literature review and clinical case study. Relevant literature were reviewed and summarized, and a clinical case study synthesizing reviewed concepts was presented. Given the multifactorial nature of the neuropathic foot, treatments must be multifaceted and patient-specific to effectively address the underlying disease processes. While systemic issues such as peripheral arterial disease are treated by physicians, local issues such as foot deformity are managed by orthotists. Orthotic interventions commonly include custom footwear to reduce the risk of ulceration through creation of a protective environment or targeted plantar offloading. Patient and caregiver education to encourage management compliance is equally as important to ensure successful treatment. Patients with neuropathic foot benefit from an interdisciplinary care approach which engages physicians, wound care practitioners, and orthotists to treat and manage systemic and local problems. Addressing this pathology through interdisciplinary care may positively affect the patient's health status while lowering associated healthcare costs through improved treatment efficacy. The commonality of neuropathic foot and associated complications including ulceration, infection, and Charcot joint arthropathy requires that the patient care team have a fundamental understanding of these pathologies and common treatment modalities. We review orthotic treatment modalities to assist clinicians with the management of patients with

  17. Leaf anthracnose, a new disease of swallow-worts from Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black swallow-wort Vincetoxicum nigrum (L.) Moench (synonym=Cynanchum louiseae Kartesz & Gandhi) and pale swallow-wort Vincetoxicum rossicum (Kleopow) Borhidi (synonym=Cynanchum rossicum (Kleopow) Borhidi) are invasive plants belonging to the family Apocynaceae and are the targets of biological cont...

  18. New biological information on the invasive swallow-worts (Vincetoxicum spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincetoxicum nigrum (L.) Moench [Cynanchum louiseae Kartesz & Gandhi] (black swallow-wort) and V. rossicum (Kleopow) Barbar. [Cynanchum rossicum (Kleopow) Borhidi] (pale swallow-wort) are herbaceous perennial vines in the Apocynaceae native to Europe. Both species are considered invasive in their in...

  19. Leaf anthracnose, a new disease of swallow-worts caused by Colletotrichum lineola from Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black swallow-wort Vincetoxicum nigrum (L.) Moench and pale swallow-wort Vincetoxicum rossicum (Kleopow) Borhidi (family Apocynaceae subfamily Asclepiadoideae) are invasive plants and are the targets of biological control efforts to control their spread in the USA. In 2010, diseased leaves of a rela...

  20. Puerarin Alleviates Neuropathic Pain by Inhibiting Neuroinflammation in Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain responds poorly to drug treatments, and partial relief is achieved in only about half of the patients. Puerarin, the main constituent of Puerariae Lobatae Radix, has been used extensively in China to treat hypertension and tumor. The current study examined the effects of puerarin on neuropathic pain using two most commonly used animal models: chronic constriction injury (CCI and diabetic neuropathy. We found that consecutive intrathecal administration of puerarin (4–100 nM for 7 days inhibited the mechanical and thermal nociceptive response induced by CCI and diabetes without interfering with the normal pain response. Meanwhile, in both models puerarin inhibited the activation of microglia and astroglia in the spinal dorsal horn. Puerarin also reduced the upregulated levels of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB and other proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α, in the spinal cord. In summary, puerarin alleviated CCI- and diabetes-induced neuropathic pain, and its effectiveness might be due to the inhibition of neuroinflammation in the spinal cord. The anti-inflammation effect of puerarin might be related to the suppression of spinal NF-κB activation and/or cytokines upregulation. We conclude that puerarin has a significant effect on alleviating neuropathic pain and thus may serve as a therapeutic approach for neuropathic pain.

  1. Postmastectomy neuropathic pain: results of microsurgical lymph nodes transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Corinne; Pham, Duc Nhat Minh; Assouad, Jalal; Badia, Alain; Foucault, Christophe; Riquet, Marc

    2008-10-01

    Postmastectomy chronic pain may be divided into widespread and regional pain. Almost half patients with regional pain, which is more likely related to neuropathic phenomena, do not benefit any pain relief from medication. Our purpose was to report results on pain relief obtained by axillary lymph nodes autotransplantation. Six patients presented with chronic regional neuropathic pains and upper limb lymphedema after breast cancer surgery and radiation therapy. Despite medication, pain was intolerable and daily activity dramatically reduced. Lymph nodes were harvested in the femoral region, transferred to the axillary region and transplanted by microsurgical procedures. Lymphedema resolved in 5 out of 6 patients. Pain was relieved in all, permitting return to work and daily activity; analgesic medication was discontinued. This procedure proved efficient and may be advocated in case of neuropathic pain when discussing lymphedema management.

  2. Neurosurgery for Chronic Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Y Park

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurosurgery can play a role in the management of patients with refractory chronic neuropathic pain. However, selecting patients as candidates for surgery and choosing the most appropriate surgical procedure is challenging, and surgical interventions often have limited efficacy. When considering surgery, neuroaugmentative or neuromodulative procedures (eg, peripheral, spinal, motor cortex or deep brain stimulation are generally preferred over ablative procedures as initial modalities. With better understanding of specific pain mechanisms, surgery will have more to offer patients with chronic neuropathic pain.

  3. The oxidative response in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, E.C.T.H.; Bahrami, S.; Kozlov, A.V.; Kurvers, H.A.J.M.; Laak, H.J. ter; Nohl, H.; Redl, H.; Goris, R.J.A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the chronic constriction injury model of rat neuropathic pain, oxidative stress as well as antioxidants superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione (GSH) are important determinants of neuropathological and behavioral consequences. Studies of the chronic constriction injury model

  4. Neuropathic pain in primary care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medications that are used to treat neuropathic pain include over-the-counter analgesics, anticonvulsants, tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), topical anaesthetic agents, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), antiarrhythmics and opioids.7,15,18 This varied armamentarium reflects the heterogeneity of the patient group ...

  5. Strong Manual Acupuncture Stimulation of “Huantiao” (GB 30) Reduces Pain-Induced Anxiety and p-ERK in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-mei Shao; Zui Shen; Jing Sun; Fang Fang; Jun-fan Fang; Yuan-yuan Wu; Jian-qiao Fang

    2015-01-01

    Persistent neuropathic pain is associated with anxiety. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) plays an important role in pain-induced anxiety. Acupuncture is widely used for pain and anxiety. However, little is known about which acupuncture technique is optimal on pain-induced anxiety and the relationship between acupuncture effect and p-ERK. The rat model was induced by L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Male adult SD rats we...

  6. Antiallodynic Effects of Acupuncture in Neuropathic Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Cha, Myeoung Hoon; Choi, Ji Soo; Bai, Sun Joon; Shim, Insop; Lee, Hye-Jung; Choi, Sun Mi; Lee, Bae Hwan

    2006-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury often results in abnormal neuropathic pain such as allodynia or hyperalgesia. Acupuncture, a traditional Oriental medicine, has been used to relieve pain and related symptoms. However, the efficiency of acupuncture in relieving neuropathic pain is not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-allodynic effects of acupuncture through behavioral and electrophysiological examinations. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to neuropathic surgery consisting...

  7. Diagnostic challenges of neuropathic tooth pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matwychuk, Michael J

    2004-09-01

    This article presents the clinical characteristics, epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of 2 neuropathic conditions: trigeminal neuralgia and atypical odontalgia. A case report highlights the complexities involved in diagnosing neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain is chronic, diverse in quality, difficult to localize and it occurs in the absence of obvious pathology. To avoid multiple, ineffective dental treatments, general practitioners must be familiar with the signs of nonodontogenic sources of tooth pain.

  8. Inflammatory mediators of neuropathic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira Júnior, José Oswaldo de; Portella Junior,Caio Sander Andrade; Cohen, Cláudia Panossian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pro-inflammatory chemical mediators and algogenic substances seem to be confused by the sharing of their actions and by interactions in painful and inflammatory presentation. This study aimed at presenting a review of major inflammatory chemical mediators and place them in neuropathic pain pathophysiology. CONTENTS: Inflammation is the homeostatic response of vascularized tissues to remove harmful agents and restore their normal functions. Nervous system ...

  9. Effects of wort gravity and nitrogen level on fermentation performance of brewer's yeast and the formation of flavor volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hongjie; Zhao, Haifeng; Yu, Zhimin; Zhao, Mouming

    2012-03-01

    Normal gravity wort and high gravity wort with different nitrogen levels were used to examine their effects on the fermentation performance of brewer's yeast and the formation of flavor volatiles. Results showed that both the wort gravity and nitrogen level had significant impacts on the growth rate, viability, flocculation, and gene expression of brewer's yeast and the levels of flavor volatiles. The sugar (glucose, maltose, and maltotriose) consumption rates and net cell growth decreased when high gravity worts were used, while these increased with increasing nitrogen level. Moreover, high gravity resulted in lower expression levels of ATF1, BAP2, BAT1, HSP12, and TDH, whereas the higher nitrogen level caused higher expression levels for these genes. Furthermore, the lower nitrogen level resulted in increases in the levels of higher alcohols and esters at high wort gravity. All these results demonstrated that yeast physiology and flavor balance during beer brewing were significantly affected by the wort gravity and nitrogen level.

  10. The risk-benefit profile of commonly used herbal therapies: Ginkgo, St. John's Wort, Ginseng, Echinacea, Saw Palmetto, and Kava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Edzard

    2002-01-01

    Because use of herbal remedies is increasing, a risk-benefit profile of commonly used herbs is needed. This article provides a clinically oriented overview of the efficacy and safety of ginkgo, St. John's wort, ginseng, echinacea, saw palmetto, and kava. Wherever possible, assessments are based on systematic reviews of randomized clinical trials. Encouraging data support the efficacy of some of these popular herbal medicinal products, and the potential for doing good seems greater than that for doing harm. The published evidence suggests that ginkgo is of questionable use for memory loss and tinnitus but has some effect on dementia and intermittent claudication. St. John's wort is efficacious for mild to moderate depression, but serious concerns exist about its interactions with several conventional drugs. Well-conducted clinical trials do not support the efficacy of ginseng to treat any condition. Echinacea may be helpful in the treatment or prevention of upper respiratory tract infections, but trial data are not fully convincing. Saw palmetto has been shown in short-term trials to be efficacious in reducing the symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Kava is an efficacious short-term treatment for anxiety. None of these herbal medicines is free of adverse effects. Because the evidence is incomplete, risk-benefit assessments are not completely reliable, and much knowledge is still lacking.

  11. Cortical stimulation and neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Cagnoni Ramos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of physiological and behavioral data on motor cortex stimulation (MCS and its role in persistent neuropathic pain. MCS has been widely used in clinical medicine as a tool for the management of pain that does not respond satisfactorily to any kind of conventional analgesia. Some important mechanisms involved in nociceptive modulation still remains unclear. The aim of this study was to describe the mechanisms involved in neuropathic pain and introduce the effectiveness of electrical stimulation of the motor cortex used in the treatment of this disease. The ascending pain pathways are activated by peripheral receptors, in which there is the transduction of a chemical, physical or mechanical stimulus as a nerve impulse, where this impulse is transmitted to the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, which connects with second-order neurons and ascends to different locations in the central nervous system where the stimulus is perceived as pain. Because MCS has been proved to modulate this pathway in the motor cortex, it has been studied to mimic its effects in clinical practice and improve the treatments used for chronic pain. MCS has gained much attention in recent years due to its action in reversing chronic neuropathic pain, this being more effective than electrical stimulation at different locations and related pain nuclei.

  12. Cortical stimulation and neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Cagnoni Ramos

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2015v28n2p1 This paper is a review of physiological and behavioral data on motor cortex stimulation (MCS and its role in persistent neuropathic pain. MCS has been widely used in clinical medicine as a tool for the management of pain that does not respond satisfactorily to any kind of conventional analgesia. Some important mechanisms involved in nociceptive modulation still remains unclear. The aim of this study was to describe the mechanisms involved in neuropathic pain and introduce the effectiveness of electrical stimulation of the motor cortex used in the treatment of this disease. The ascending pain pathways are activated by peripheral receptors, in which there is the transduction of a chemical, physical or mechanical stimulus as a nerve impulse, where this impulse is transmitted to the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, which connects with second-order neurons and ascends to different locations in the central nervous system where the stimulus is perceived as pain. Because MCS has been proved to modulate this pathway in the motor cortex, it has been studied to mimic its effects in clinical practice and improve the treatments used for chronic pain. MCS has gained much attention in recent years due to its action in reversing chronic neuropathic pain, this being more effective than electrical stimulation at different locations and related pain nuclei.

  13. Neuropathic pain in cancer patients treated with bortezomib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expósito Vizcaíno, S; Casanova-Mollà, J; Escoda, L; Galán, S; Miró, J

    The neuropathic pain is the most habitual problem in the neuropathy induced by chemotherapy (NIQ) and the one that more interferes in the quality of life of the patients. His precocious detection turns out to be fundamental to reduce or to eliminate the problems that from this one stem. The aims of this study were: 1) determine the incident and NIQ's characteristics and neuropathic pain in patients with mieloma multiple (MM) treated with bortezomib, and 2) to evaluate the impact of the neuropathic pain in the activities of the daily life (AVD). All the patients diagnosed of MM candidates for treatment with bortezomib attended in the Hospital Joan XXIII during 2013, took part. The participants were interviewed individually and were reporting on the presence, the characteristics and the impact of the pain, as well as of the adverse effects of the bortezomib. There took part 22 persons, of which NIQ presented the half, being the degree 2 the predominant one. The most habitual location of the neuropathic pain was hands and feet; it was appearing in a spontaneous and progressive way deteriorating in rest and during the night, with predominance of positive symptoms. The impact of the pain was reflected in all the AVD. The principal limitation was the disability to enjoy the life. The peripheral neuropathy occupied the first place in order of subjective importance for the patient followed by the fatigue and the constipation. A proper assessment and early detection of neuropathic pain is critical to minimizing its impact on the quality of life of patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. AAPT Diagnostic Criteria for Central Neuropathic Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widerstrom-Noga, Eva; Loeser, John D.; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2017-01-01

    . This article focuses on central neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury, stroke, and multiple sclerosis, but the AAPT framework can be extended to central pain due to other causes such as traumatic brain injury. The classification of central neuropathic pain is organized according to the AAPT...

  15. Duloxetine in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Boomershine CS; Scholz BA; Ormseth MJ

    2011-01-01

    Michelle J Ormseth, Beth A Sholz, Chad S BoomershineDivision of Rheumatology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Diabetic neuropathy affects up to 70% of diabetics, and diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP) is the most common and debilitating of the diabetic neuropathies. DPNP significantly reduces quality of life and increases management costs in affected patients. Despite the impact of DPNP, management is poor with one-quarter of patients receiving no tr...

  16. Definition diagnosis and treatment of neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Schestatsky

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic Pain is defined as pain caused by lesion or dysfunction of the nervous system, as a result of abnormal activation of the nociceptive pathway (small fibers and spinothalamic tracts. The most common causes of this syndrome are the following: diabetes, post-herpetic neuralgia, trigeminal neuralgia, complex regional pain syndrome, stroke, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, among others. In the last few years, the Neuropathic Pain, has been receiving special attention for two main reasons: 1 therapeutical refractoriness of a variety of pain syndromes with predominant neuropathic characteristics and 2 the development of diagnostic tools for Neuropathic Pain complaints. The present paper provides relevant information on the understanding and recognition of Neuropathic Pain, as well as therapeutic evidence-based-medicine approaches.

  17. Interventional therapy for neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Yang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain (NP is a common clinical refractory pain for which there are limited methods to treat. In this article, based on typical diseases, such as postherpetic neuralgia (PHN, trigeminal neuralgia, complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS, lower back pain with radiculopathy and failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS, phantom pain, the general treatment principle and method for NP are expatiated. Interventional methods for NP, including intraspinal block, radiofrequeney rhizotomy of trigeminal neuralgia, selective nerve root block, spinal cord stimulation (SCS and motor cortex stimulation (MCS are introduced, especially their indications, complications and matters needing attention.

  18. Diagnostic tools for neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Xiang-jun

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain (NP is a kind of chronic, severe and persistent pain syndrome. Due to the underlying mechanisms, the treatment for NP differs from that of nociceptive pain. An accurate diagnosis of NP is very important. However, the present diagnostic process which mainly depends on clinical and neurophysiological assessments is quite time-consuming and low efficient. In recent years, various screening tools and drug efficacy assessments for NP have been developed and validated. They become very useful in the diagnosis and treatment of NP, as well as in epidemiological study. These tools are also very useful in elucidating the underlying mechanism of NP.

  19. Intrathecal ziconotide for neuropathic pain: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauck, Richard L; Wallace, Mark S; Burton, Allen W; Kapural, Leonardo; North, James M

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a considerable burden that affects activities of daily living. The management of neuropathic pain can be challenging because of multiple etiologies and complex manifestations. Ziconotide is a nonopioid intrathecal (IT) analgesic option for patients with neuropathic pain refractory to conventional treatments. The objective of this article is to review the published literature on ziconotide for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Relevant publications were identified through searches of all years of 6 databases, which included PubMed, EMBASE, and CINAHL. Search terms used were ziconotide, SNX-111, MVIIA, Prialt, and neuropathic pain. Publications were included if ziconotide was intrathecally administered (either alone or in combination with other IT agents) to treat neuropathic pain of any etiology and if pain assessment was an outcome measure. Data extracted included study design, IT drug doses, pain outcome measures, and adverse events (AEs). Twenty-eight articles met the inclusion criteria: 5 were preclinical studies and 23 were clinical studies. In the preclinical studies, ziconotide demonstrated antiallodynic effects on neuropathic pain. Data from double-blind, placebo-controlled (DBPC) trials indicated that patients with neuropathic pain reported a mean percent improvement in pain score with ziconotide monotherapy that ranged from 15.7% to 31.6%. A low starting dose and slow titration of ziconotide resulted in an improved safety profile in the aforementioned trials. Common AEs associated with ziconotide include nausea and/or vomiting, dizziness, confusion, urinary retention, and somnolence. Evidence from DBPC trials, open-label studies, case series, and case studies suggests that ziconotide, as either monotherapy or in combination with other IT drugs, is a potential therapeutic option for patients with refractory neuropathic pain. Additional studies are needed to establish the long-term efficacy and safety of ziconotide for neuropathic pain.

  20. EFFECT OF MILLING SOFTNESS ON BASIC TECHNOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF WORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ján Mareček

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Crushing the malted grain in the process of milling enables extractive substances of malt to become available for water which accelerates dissolving and other chemical and physical processes during the time of mashing. The aim of this work was at the basis of performed analyses to evaluate to what extent the grist composition with regard to different proportion of meal fraction affects the amount of extract and other technological parameters of malt. Analyzed malt was made from four varieties of malting barley as are Nitran, Ebson, Malz and Xanadu coming from the harvest year 2009. Composition of malt grist in great extent influenced the entire process of mashing, lautering and the amount of extract. The highest values of extract were measured by all varieties at the variant III. with the highest content (50% of the softest fraction meal + powder meal. The difference between variant I. with 10% content of the softest fraction and variant III. with 50% content, was already 3%. The most significant increase of this parameter was found out by varieties Ebson and Malz. Mashing and lautering parameters have not been significantly influenced by the milling variants. More significant differences were found out with regard to wort turbidity. Only variety Malz showed out the turbidity up to 4 EBC units, measured by turbidity meter under the angle 90°. The highest turbidity was measured by variant I. with the lowest proportion of the fraction meal + powder meal.doi:10.5219/111

  1. Effect of malt milling for wort extract content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Géczi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Beer manufacturing is one of the most ancient procedures of food manufacturing. The four (in many cases much more ingredients, the great numbers of technological steps and variations of technological parameters (temperature, time, pressure etc. have a major influence on both type and quality of the final product. As a result of this, studying beer brewing may offer a great deal of possibilities for numerous researches, scientific examinations, and can provide useful informations for the manufacturing companies as well. At the „Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra" we examined an entire beer brewing process in October 2013, utilising the Ahlborn sensors, which were integrated in the instruments. Simultaneously, in Gödöllő at the Szent István University, we analysed the effect of malt milling on extract yield and the filterability of wort. We used the brewing parameters (temperature, time, volume ratios, which were experienced in the microbrewery and published in professional literature. Our results verify the conclusions drawn in the professional literature, however they point out the importance of grinding. Results performed on the yields with different grain-constitution might directly be utilised for the specialists of recently in Slovakia and Hungary spreading small-scale, handicraft, and homemade beer brewing.

  2. The quality of information on websites selling St. John's wort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakor, Vijeta; Leach, Matthew J; Gillham, David; Esterman, Adrian

    2011-06-01

    Health consumers are increasingly using the Internet to access information about health care, to self-diagnose, and to purchase medication. The use of the Internet to purchase herbal products is of particular interest because of the high level of consumer expenditure on herbal medicines, and the misperception by some consumers that herbal products are natural, and thus absent of any contraindications, drug interactions and adverse effects. It is possible that consumers may purchase herbal medicines via the Internet without consulting health professionals and therefore, use these medicines in an unsafe manner. To examine the quality of e-commerce websites that sell herbal products; specifically, websites where St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) can be purchased. Cross-sectional survey of 54 selected websites, including online pharmacies, online health food stores and manufacturers of herbal medicines. A modified version of the DISCERN instrument was used to assess the quality of websites. The majority of websites rated poorly with a concerning lack of information about the interaction between hypericum and warfarin, anti-depressants and oral contraceptives. Most sites also failed to provide sufficient information about the contraindications and adverse effects of hypericum treatment. The results of this study strongly support the need for improved consumer education about herbal medicine, as well as the application of more stringent standards to websites that sell medications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. PKC-mediated potentiation of morphine analgesia by St. John's Wort in rodents and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeotti, Nicoletta; Farzad, Mersedeh; Bianchi, Enrica; Ghelardini, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Our purpose was to combine the use of morphine with clinically available inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC), finally potentiating morphine analgesia in humans. Thermal tests were performed in rodents and humans previously administered with acute or chronic morphine combined or not with increasing doses of the PKC-blocker St. John's Wort (SJW) or its main component hypericin. Phosphorylation of the γ subunit of PKC enzyme was assayed by western blotting in the periaqueductal grey matter (PAG) from rodents co-administered with morphine and hypericin and was prevented in rodent PAG by SJW or hypericin co-administration with morphine, inducing a potentiation of morphine analgesia in thermal pain. The score of pain assessment in healthy volunteers were decreased by 40% when morphine was co-administered with SJW at a dose largely below those used to obtain an antidepressant or analgesic effect in both rodents and humans. The SJW/hypericin potentiating effect lasted in time and preserved morphine analgesia in tolerant mice. Our findings indicate that, in clinical practice, SJW could reduce the dose of morphine obtaining the same analgesic effect. Therefore, SJW and one of its main components, hypericin, appear ideal to potentiate morphine-induced analgesia.

  4. [Bigeminy--the result of interaction between digoxin and St. John's wort].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andelić, Sladana

    2003-01-01

    A case of an by digoxin under unusual circumstances is reported. An 80-year-old man, previously on long-term digoxin treatment, started consuming St John's wort herbal tea (2,000 ml/daily) because of frequent episodes of depression. After the cessation of consuming herbal tea containing Hypericum perforatum, digoxin poisoning developed in our patient. Electrocardiography revealed nodal bradicardia 36/min and bigeminy. Manifested symptoms were the consequence of interaction between digoxin and Hypericum perforatum which were consumed simultaneously, and the cessation of consuming St John's wort herbal tea afterwards. Therapy was the same as in the standard digitalis poisoning. Consumers of St John's wort combined with medical products are advised not to discontinue tea consumption on their own, without consulting their physician.

  5. Bigeminy: A result of digoxin and St John’s wort interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelić Slađana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of an by digoxin under unusual circumstances is reported. An 80-year-old man, previously on long-term digoxin treatment, started consuming St John’s wort herbal tea (2 000 ml/daily because of frequent episodes of depression. After the cessation of consuming herbal tea containing Hypericum perforatum, digoxin poisoning developed in our patient. Electrocardiography revealed nodal bradicardia 36/min and bigeminy. Manifested symptoms were the consequence of interaction between digoxin and Hypericum perforatum which were consumed simultaneously, and the cessation of consuming St John’s wort herbal tea afterwards. Therapy was the same as in the standard digitalis poisoning. Consumers of St John’s wort combined with medical products are advised not to discontinue tea consumption on their own, without consulting their physician.

  6. The Role of St Johns Wort (Hypericum Perforatum and Orphanin Interaction on Depression Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sena Yalcin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum/ Cantarion has been well-studied which has been showed to have antidepressant, antiviral, and antibacterial effects. St Johns Wort gained popularity as an alternative treatment for mild to moderate depression. On the other hand, the neuropeptide, orphanin FQ/nociceptin (OFQ/N, is expressed in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissue. In the brain, OFQ/N has been investigated in relation to stress, anxiety, learning and memory, and addiction. The purpose opf this article is to review the current pharmacological, and clinical papers on St. John's wort, to provide information on orphanin FQ/nociceptin and finally to evaluate probable interaction between two. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(4.000: 531-541

  7. PHARMACOTHERAPY IN ELDERLY NEUROPATHIC PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Eko P

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The incidence of pain increases with age. Neuropathic pain are common in elderly patients and pose challenges in both their diagnosis and treatment. The most common neuropathic pain in elderly are radiculopathy due to foraminal or spinal stenosis, diabetic neuropathy, and postherpetic neuralgia. Pain in the elderly is often unrecognized and undertreated. The main problem with pain in older adults relates to impaired quality of life secondary to pain which may be expressed by depression (including increased suicide risk, anxiety, sleep disruption, appetite disturbance, and weight loss, cognitive impairment, and limitations in the performance of daily activities. Pain management in elderly patients requires a different perspective from that of younger patients. Causes, comorbidities, and responses to both pain and its treatment differ between young healthy and older patients. Effective pain management in elderly patients should include both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic strategies. Pharmacological approaches are the first line of pain management in older person for neuropathic pain. Pharmacologic strategies call for administration of nonopioid analgesics, opioid analgesics, and adjuvant medication. Polypharmacy, drug-drug and drug-disease interactions, age-associated changes in drug metabolism, and the high frequency of adverse drug reactions need to be carefully considered in using medications in this population /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso

  8. EZH2 regulates spinal neuroinflammation in rats with neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ruchi; Weng, Han-Rong

    2017-05-04

    Alteration in gene expression along the pain signaling pathway is a key mechanism contributing to the genesis of neuropathic pain. Accumulating studies have shown that epigenetic regulation plays a crucial role in nociceptive process in the spinal dorsal horn. In this present study, we investigated the role of enhancer of zeste homolog-2 (EZH2), a subunit of the polycomb repressive complex 2, in the spinal dorsal horn in the genesis of neuropathic pain in rats induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation. EZH2 is a histone methyltransferase, which catalyzes the methylation of histone H3 on K27 (H3K27), resulting in gene silencing. We found that levels of EZH2 and tri-methylated H3K27 (H3K27TM) in the spinal dorsal horn were increased in rats with neuropathic pain on day 3 and day 10 post nerve injuries. EZH2 was predominantly expressed in neurons in the spinal dorsal horn under normal conditions. The number of neurons with EZH2 expression was increased after nerve injury. More strikingly, nerve injury drastically increased the number of microglia with EZH2 expression by more than sevenfold. Intrathecal injection of the EZH2 inhibitor attenuated the development and maintenance of mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats with nerve injury. Such analgesic effects were concurrently associated with the reduced levels of EZH2, H3K27TM, Iba1, GFAP, TNF-α, IL-1β, and MCP-1 in the spinal dorsal horn in rats with nerve injury. Our results highly suggest that targeting the EZH2 signaling pathway could be an effective approach for the management of neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hindfoot Arthrodesis for Neuropathic Deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Ju Huang

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Acquired neurologic disorders of the foot lead to arthrosis, deformities, instabilities, and functional disabilities. Hindfoot arthrodesis is the current option available for irreducible or nonbraceable deformities of neuropathic feet. However, the role of ankle arthrodesis in these patients has been questioned because of high nonunion and complication rates. From 1990 to 2001, 17 cases of acquired neuropathic foot deformities were treated by four tibiotalocalcaneal (TTC arthrodeses and 13 ankle arthrodeses. TTC arthrodesis was performed on cases with combined ankle and subtalar arthritis or cases whose deformities or instabilities could not be corrected by ankle fusion alone. There was no nonunion of TTC arthrodesis and seven ununited ankle arthrodeses were salvaged by two TTC-attempted arthrodeses and five revision ankle-attempted arthrodeses. Eventually in these cases, there was one nonunion in TTC arthrodesis and one nonunion in revision ankle arthrodesis. The final fusion rate was 88% (15 of 17 cases with average union time of 6.9 months (range, 2.5–18 months. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle hind-foot functional scores were evaluated: one was excellent (5.8%, seven were good (41%, eight were fair (53.3%, and one was poor (5.8% in terms of total functional outcome. We conclude that TTC arthrodesis is indicated for cases with ankle and subtalar involvement and ankle arthrodesis is an alternative for cases with intact subtalar joint. We recommend revision ankle arthrodesis if the ankle fails to fuse and the bone stock of the talus is adequate. TTC arthrodesis is reserved for ankles with poor bone stock of the talus with fragmentation.

  10. Antiallodynic Effects of Acupuncture in Neuropathic Rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cha, Myeoung Hoon; Choi, Ji Soo; Bai, Sun Joon; Shim, Insop; Lee, Hye-Jung; Choi, Sun Mi; Lee, Bae Hwan

    2006-01-01

    .... However, the efficiency of acupuncture in relieving neuropathic pain is not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-allodynic effects of acupuncture through behavioral and electrophysiological examinations...

  11. Antidepressants in the treatment of neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, Søren H.; Otto, Marit; Finnerup, Nanna Brix

    2005-01-01

    presynaptic reuptake of the biogenic amines serotonin and noradrenaline, but other mechanisms such as N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and ion channel blockade probably also play a role in their pain-relieving effect. The effect of tricyclic antidepressants in neuropathic pain in man has been demonstrated......Neuropathic pain is due to lesion or dysfunction of the peripheral or central nervous system. Tricyclic antidepressants and anticonvulsants have long been the mainstay of treatment of this type of pain. Tricyclic antidepressants may relieve neuropathic pain by their unique ability to inhibit...... in numerous randomised, controlled trials, and a few trials have shown that serotonin noradrenaline and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants also relieve neuropathic pain although with lower efficacy. Tricyclic antidepressants will relieve one in every 2-3 patients with peripheral...

  12. Molecular Hydrogen Attenuates Neuropathic Pain in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Masanori; Satoh, Yasushi; Otsubo, Yukiko; Kazama, Tomiei

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains intractable and the development of new therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Accumulating evidence indicates that overproduction of oxidative stress is a key event in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. However, repeated intra-peritoneal or intrathecal injections of antioxidants are unsuitable for continuous use in therapy. Here we show a novel therapeutic method against neuropathic pain: drinking water containing molecular hydrogen (H2) as antioxidant. The effect of hydrogen on neuropathic pain was investigated using a partial sciatic nerve ligation model in mice. As indicators of neuropathic pain, temporal aspects of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were analysed for 3 weeks after ligation. Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were measured using the von Frey test and the plantar test, respectively. When mice were allowed to drink water containing hydrogen at a saturated level ad libitum after ligation, both allodynia and hyperalgesia were alleviated. These symptoms were also alleviated when hydrogen was administered only for the induction phase (from day 0 to 4 after ligation). When hydrogen was administered only for the maintenance phase (from day 4 to 21 after ligation), hyperalgesia but not allodynia was alleviated. Immunohistochemical staining for the oxidative stress marker, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, showed that hydrogen administration suppressed oxidative stress induced by ligation in the spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglion. In conclusion, oral administration of hydrogen water may be useful for alleviating neuropathic pain in a clinical setting. PMID:24941001

  13. Medical management of trigeminal neuropathic pains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2010-06-01

    Although trigeminal neuralgia has traditionally been considered the prime neuralgic condition in the face region, other forms of neuropathic pain are now being more frequently recognized and require recognition and a different management approach. This review principally covers medical management of trigeminal neuralgia; but also included is glossopharyngeal neuralgia, trigeminal neuropathic pain (atypical odontalgia) and burning mouth syndrome. Systematic reviews and guidelines will be discussed. An update will be provided of drug therapy for these relatively rare facial pains. Trigeminal neuralgia continues to be best managed using anticonvulsant drugs, the primary ones being carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine; baclofen may be helpful and, of the newly emerging drugs, pregabalin has potential. Glossopharyngeal neuralgia remains managed in the same way as trigeminal neuralgia. Trigeminal neuropathic pain is probably best managed according to guidelines used for the management of neuropathic pain, which include the use of tricyclic antidepressants, gabapentin, pregabalin, duloxetine, venalafaxine and topical lidocaine. Burning mouth syndrome is a neuropathic pain managed initially with topical clonazepam and then with other neuropathic drugs. Patients need to be involved in their management.

  14. Neuropathic pain due to fibromatosis: Does anticancer treatment help?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mathew

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Desmoid fibromatosis, although histologically benign, infiltrates local structures. The involvement of neural structures can lead to difficult neuropathic pain and the escalating use of analgesics. We report a patient with desmoid fibromatosis of the chest wall causing brachial plexus infiltration. As the tumor was locally invasive and unresectable, he was treated with radiation therapy and oral tamoxifen. On follow-up, there was significant pain relief, sustained reduction in the tumor size, and reduced analgesic requirement. Antineoplastic treatments like local radiation therapy and targeted systemic therapy with hormones or other agents can be considered in the management of selected unresectable desmoid fibromatosis to improve symptom control and reduce polypharmacy.

  15. Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Healthy Men Treated with St. John's Wort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, Tore Bjerregaard; Damkier, Per; Christensen, Mette Marie Hougaard

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine if the over-the-counter herbal medicinal plant St. John's wort affects glucose tolerance in healthy men. To do this, we included 10 healthy men who were examined by a 2-hr oral glucose tolerance test on three occasions; A: Baseline, B: After 21 days...

  16. Impact of Hypena opulenta on invasive swallow-worts (Vincetoxicum spp.) under different light environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pale and black swallow-wort (Vincetoxicum rossicum and V. nigrum; Apocynaceae, subfamily Asclepiadoideae) are European viny milkweeds that have become invasive in many habitats in the northeastern U.S.A. and southeastern Canada. A defoliating moth from the Ukraine, Hypena opulenta (Christoph) (Lepid...

  17. Towards biological control of swallow-worts: the good, the bad and the ugly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Native from Eurasia, the ugly swallow-worts (Vincetoxicum rossicum and V. nigrum - Apocynaceae) invaded forested landscapes and prevent native plant regeneration in eastern North America. We first aimed to understand where do the invasive populations of both species come from, then we evaluated the ...

  18. Impact of Abrostola asclepiadis and plant competition on invasive swallow-worts (Vincetoxicum spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pale and black swallow-wort (Vincetoxicum rossicum and V. nigrum; Apocynaceae, subfamily Asclepiadoideae) are perennial vines from Europe that have become invasive in various terrestrial habitats in the northeastern USA and southeastern Canada. A classical weed biological control program has been in...

  19. The Invasive Swallow-worts: What Do We Know About Their Biology and Management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The swallow-worts [Vincetoxicum rossicum (Kleopow) Barbar. and V. nigrum (L.) Moench] are nonnative, perennial, herbaceous vines in the Apocynaceae that are invading natural areas in the northeastern U.S.A. and southeastern Canada. The species form dense monospecific stands across a wide range of mo...

  20. Nanoparticulated formulations of St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum L. as smart drug delivery system combating depression incited in mice models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violet Dhayabaran

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Context: Hypericum perforatum L., commonly known as St. John’s wort, is practised as an alternative medicine against depression. Conversely, its remedial efficacy is indulged by various adverse effects that are recuperated in formulating nanoscaled commercial capsules encased by the biopolymer chitosan. A potential application of nanoencapsulation with regards to polymer enhances a slow controlled release of the targeted drug to achieve the desired delay until the right stimulus is obtained. Aims: To value synthesizing biopolymeric nanocomposites encapsulating St. John’s wort commercial capsules substantiating it with a study of animal model of depression to endorse the effect of nanocapsulated drug as an effective brain drug. Methods: The nanoparticulated suspension was prepared by ionic gelation technique and characterized to attest its antidepressant activity by in vivo studies. Results: The drug binding efficiency was endorsed by FT-IR studies and the nanoparticles were characterized by an average particle size of 211.4 nm with a positive zeta potential of 45.9 mV. The animal despair studies on depression induced mice models displayed a significant difference in the immobility time during force swimming and tail suspension test. The commercial capsules were administed orally (p.o., 50 and 100 mg/kg. The animal despair studies were substantiated with affirmative biochemical assessments like SOD, CAT, GPx, GSH and LPO and compared with control groups. Conclusions: The outcomes of this work manifest the calibre of St. John’s wort nanocomposites in a lower dosage that can alleviate depression and reduce side effects.

  1. Strong Manual Acupuncture Stimulation of “Huantiao” (GB 30 Reduces Pain-Induced Anxiety and p-ERK in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-mei Shao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent neuropathic pain is associated with anxiety. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC plays an important role in pain-induced anxiety. Acupuncture is widely used for pain and anxiety. However, little is known about which acupuncture technique is optimal on pain-induced anxiety and the relationship between acupuncture effect and p-ERK. The rat model was induced by L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL. Male adult SD rats were randomly divided into control, SNL, strong manual acupuncture (sMA, mild manual acupuncture (mMA, and electroacupuncture (EA group. Bilateral “Huantiao” (GB 30 were stimulated by sMA, mMA, and EA, respectively. The pain withdrawal thresholds (PWTs and anxiety behavior were measured, and p-ERK protein expression and immunoreactivity cells in ACC were detected. PWTs increased significantly in both sMA and EA groups. Meanwhile, anxiety-like behavior was improved significantly in the sMA and mMA groups. Furthermore, the overexpression of p-ERK induced by SNL was downregulated by strong and mild manual acupuncture. Therefore, strong manual acupuncture on bilateral “Huantiao” (GB 30 could be a proper therapy relieving both pain and pain-induced anxiety. The effect of different acupuncture techniques on pain-induced anxiety may arise from the regulation of p-ERK in ACC.

  2. Strong Manual Acupuncture Stimulation of "Huantiao" (GB 30) Reduces Pain-Induced Anxiety and p-ERK in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xiao-Mei; Shen, Zui; Sun, Jing; Fang, Fang; Fang, Jun-Fan; Wu, Yuan-Yuan; Fang, Jian-Qiao

    2015-01-01

    Persistent neuropathic pain is associated with anxiety. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) plays an important role in pain-induced anxiety. Acupuncture is widely used for pain and anxiety. However, little is known about which acupuncture technique is optimal on pain-induced anxiety and the relationship between acupuncture effect and p-ERK. The rat model was induced by L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Male adult SD rats were randomly divided into control, SNL, strong manual acupuncture (sMA), mild manual acupuncture (mMA), and electroacupuncture (EA) group. Bilateral "Huantiao" (GB 30) were stimulated by sMA, mMA, and EA, respectively. The pain withdrawal thresholds (PWTs) and anxiety behavior were measured, and p-ERK protein expression and immunoreactivity cells in ACC were detected. PWTs increased significantly in both sMA and EA groups. Meanwhile, anxiety-like behavior was improved significantly in the sMA and mMA groups. Furthermore, the overexpression of p-ERK induced by SNL was downregulated by strong and mild manual acupuncture. Therefore, strong manual acupuncture on bilateral "Huantiao" (GB 30) could be a proper therapy relieving both pain and pain-induced anxiety. The effect of different acupuncture techniques on pain-induced anxiety may arise from the regulation of p-ERK in ACC.

  3. [Prevalence and aetiopathogenesis of neuropathic pain in elderly cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezón-Gutiérrez, Luis; Custodio-Cabello, Sara; Khosravi-Shahi, Parham

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of neuropathic pain is difficult to estimate as most studies evaluating chronic pain do not differentiate neuropathic from nociceptive pain. There are only a few studies of neuropathic pain in the elderly, specifically in the oncology population. This article is a non-systematic review of the relevant evidence on the prevalence and aetiopathogenesis of neuropathic cancer pain in the elderly. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of wort aeration on fermentation, maturation and volatile components of beer produced on an industrial scale

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kucharczyk, Krzysztof; Tuszyński, Tadeusz

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of the initial beer wort aeration on the process of fermentation, maturation, content of the volatile components of beer and abundance and vitality of yeast biomass...

  5. Effect of St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum) on obesity, lipid metabolism and uterine epithelial proliferation in ovariectomized rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    You, Mi-Kyoung; Rhuy, Jin; Jeong, Kyu Shik; Bang, Mi-Ae; Kim, Myung-Seok; Kim, Hyeon-A

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the potential of St. John's Wort ( ) to prevent obesity and abnormalities in lipid metabolism induced by ovariectomy in a rat model without stimulatory activity on uterus. Ovariectomized (OVX...

  6. The Effectiveness of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Knee Osteoarthritis with Neuropathic Pain Component: A Randomized Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemile Sevgi Polat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of our study was to assess the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS in knee osteoarthritis with neuropathic pain component. Materials and Methods: The patients were assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS for pain severity, Western Ontario and McMaster osteoarthritis index (WOMAC for physical function and the Kellgren-Lawrence system for severity of osteoarthritis, painDETECT questionnaire for presence of neuropathic pain. Patients were divided into two groups according to painDETECT questionnaire scores. Group 1 consisted of 20 patients (39.2% with likely and possible neuropathic pain, group 2 consisted of 31 patients (60.8% with unlikely neuropathic pain. All patients received hot pack, TENS and home exercise program was given. Physical therapy agents were given for 3 weeks, 5 days a week. Assessments were evaluated in all patients before and after the treatment. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in demographic features and radiographic evaluations between the groups. The VAS, WOMAC pain and physical function scores were significantly lower after treatment in knee patients with neuropathic pain component, but there was no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: TENS is a neuropathic pain component in knee osteoarthritis patients, which is effective in reducing pain and improving physical function. The benefit of TENS therapy is that it can be used in conjunction with drug therapy, thereby reducing the drug dose and drug side effects.

  7. Impaired excitatory drive to spinal GABAergic neurons of neuropathic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Leitner

    Full Text Available Adequate pain sensitivity requires a delicate balance between excitation and inhibition in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. This balance is severely impaired in neuropathy leading to enhanced pain sensations (hyperalgesia. The underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here we explored the hypothesis that the excitatory drive to spinal GABAergic neurons might be impaired in neuropathic animals. Transgenic adult mice expressing EGFP under the promoter for GAD67 underwent either chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve or sham surgery. In transverse slices from lumbar spinal cord we performed whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from identified GABAergic neurons in lamina II. In neuropathic animals rates of mEPSC were reduced indicating diminished global excitatory input. This downregulation of excitatory drive required a rise in postsynaptic Ca(2+. Neither the density and morphology of dendritic spines on GABAergic neurons nor the number of excitatory synapses contacting GABAergic neurons were affected by neuropathy. In contrast, paired-pulse ratio of Aδ- or C-fiber-evoked monosynaptic EPSCs following dorsal root stimulation was increased in neuropathic animals suggesting reduced neurotransmitter release from primary afferents. Our data indicate that peripheral neuropathy triggers Ca(2+-dependent signaling pathways in spinal GABAergic neurons. This leads to a global downregulation of the excitatory drive to GABAergic neurons. The downregulation involves a presynaptic mechanism and also applies to the excitation of GABAergic neurons by presumably nociceptive Aδ- and C-fibers. This then leads to an inadequately low recruitment of inhibitory interneurons during nociception. We suggest that this previously unrecognized mechanism of impaired spinal inhibition contributes to hyperalgesia in neuropathy.

  8. Anticonvulsants for neuropathic pain and detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covington, E C

    1998-01-01

    It is now well demonstrated that several anticonvulsants have a role in the treatment of neuropathic pain and also in withdrawal from benzodiazepines, sedatives, and perhaps alcohol. Valproic acid, carbamazepine, gabapentin, clonazepam, and lamotrigine are appropriate treatments for neuropathic pain, effective to a degree dependent on the underlying pathophysiology. While less effective than newer agents, there are situations in which phenytoin remains useful. Currently, a limited understanding of both the processes responsible for pain and the specific effects of each agent prevents prediction of individual response to these drugs, often necessitating trials of several drugs before the best one is found. It is interesting that the anticonvulsant drugs most useful for neuropathic pain are the same ones effective in sedative withdrawal, bipolar disorder, and several anxiety disorders. Issues of neural hypersensitivity and kindling, therefore, may prove to be unifying concepts for these conditions.

  9. St. John's Wort Hypericum perforatum L.: Supercritical extraction, antimicrobial and antidepressant activity of extract and some component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glišić Sandra B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available St. John's Wort, the Hypericum perforatum L. is one of the most analyzed plant species today. Plant was characterized with a wide ecological spectrum and is a plant with beautiful yellow flowers. St. John's Wort was used and still is in used in traditional medicine all over the World. Many bioactive components from St. John's Wort like hypericine, hyperforine, qercetrine and essential oil, were isolated and have been used in medicine. The most popular use of Hipericum extract is as an antidepressant for the medicinal treatment of mild and high depression. The medical use of hyperforine in photodynamic therapy for cancer treatment has now been intensively analyzed. The extract of St. John's Wort showed high antimicrobial, even on pathogenic microorganisms as well as antiviral activity. The use of bioactive components from St. John's Wort depends on the possibility to isolate them in the pure state. It seems that supercritical extraction with carbon dioxide might to be the best solution for obtaining pure extract as well as some of the components present in the essential oil and extract of St. John's Wort. Such a conclusion is supported by the many results of recently performed and published in scientific journals.

  10. Polysaccharides of St. John’s Wort Herb Stimulate NHDF Proliferation and NEHK Differentiation via Influence on Extracellular Structures and Signal Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Abakuks

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available St. John's Wort herb extracts often contain undesirable or volitional polysaccharides. As polysaccharides exhibit structure-dependent biological functions in the present study water-soluble polysaccharides were extracted from herb material, fractionated by anion exchange chromatography into four main polysaccharide fractions (denominated as Hp1, Hp2, Hp3 and Hp4 and characterized by HPAEC-PAD, CE, IR and GC-MS. Biological activity on human skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts was assessed by investigation of their effect on proliferation, metabolism, cytotoxicity, apoptosis and differentiation. The underlying mechanisms were investigated in gene expression studies. Polysaccharide fraction Hp1 was mainly composed of β-D-glucose. Hp2, Hp3 and Hp4 contained pectic structures and arabinogalactan proteins varying in composition and quantity. Polysaccharides of Hp1 induced the keratinocyte differentiation by inhibiting the gene expression of the epidermal growth factor and insulin receptor. While the collagen secretion of fibroblasts was stimulated by each polysaccharide fraction only Hp1 stimulated the synthesis. The fibroblast proliferation was reduced by Hp1 and increased by Hp4. This effect was related to the influence on genes that referred to oxidative stress, metabolism, transcription processes and extracellular proteins. In conclusion polysaccharides have been shown as biologically active ingredients of aqueous St. John's Wort extracts with a relation between their structural characteristics and function.

  11. Localized neuropathic pain: an expert consensus on local treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pickering G

    2017-09-01

    advantage of both plasters is that they have proven efficacy and may reduce the risk of adverse events such as cognitive impairment, confusion, somnolence, dizziness and constipation that are often associated with systemic neuropathic pain treatment and reduce the quality of life. Topical modalities also may be used in combination with other drugs and analgesics with limited drug–drug interactions. Keywords: neuropathic pain, topical, localized, medicated plaster, patch, review

  12. Effects of Mead Wort Heat Treatment on the Mead Fermentation Process and Antioxidant Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Czabaj

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of mead wort heat treatment on the mead fermentation process and antioxidant activity were tested. The experiment was conducted with the use of two different honeys (multiflorous and honeydew collected from the Lower Silesia region (Poland. Heat treatment was performed with the use of a traditional technique (gently boiling, the more commonly used pasteurization, and without heat treatment (control. During the experiment fermentation dynamics were monitored using high performance liquid chromatography with refractive index detection (HPLC-RID. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC and total phenolic content (TPC were estimated for worts and meads using UV/Vis spectrophotometric analysis. The formation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF was monitored by HPLC analyses. Heat treatment had a great impact on the final antioxidant capacity of meads.

  13. Use of neuropathic pain questionnaires in predicting persistent postoperative neuropathic pain following lumbar discectomy for radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamji, Mohammed F; Shcharinsky, Alina

    2015-10-09

    OBJECT Failed-back surgery syndrome has been historically used to describe extremity neuropathic pain in lumbar disease despite structurally corrective spinal surgery. It is unclear whether specific preoperative pain characteristics can help determine which patients may be susceptible to such postoperative disabling symptoms. METHODS This prospective study analyzed surgical microdiscectomy patients treated for lumbar, degenerative, painful radiculopathy. Clinical parameters included general demographics, preoperative and postoperative clinical examination status, self-reported pain and disability scores, and neuropathic pain scores. The screening tests for neuropathic pain were the Douleur Neuropathique 4 and Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs, with correlation tested for ordinal score and screen positivity. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to define predictors of postoperative symptomatology. RESULTS Twelve percent of the 250 patients with radiculopathy who underwent microdiscectomy experienced persistent postoperative neuropathic pain (PPNP) with only modest, if any, relief of leg pain. The condition was highly associated with abnormal preoperative screen results for neuropathic pain, but not sex, smoking status, or preoperative pain severity (α = 0.05). Good correlation was seen between the 2 screening tests used in this study for both absolute ordinal score (Spearman ρ = 0.84; p < 0.001) and the threshold for terming the patient as having neuropathic pain features (Spearman ρ = 0.48; p < 0.001). Younger age at treatment also correlated with a higher likelihood of developing PPNP (p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS This population exhibited a low overall frequency of PPNP. Higher neuropathic pain screening scores correlated strongly with likelihood of significant postoperative leg pain. Further work is required to develop more accurate prognostication tools for radiculopathy patients undergoing structural spinal surgery.

  14. Topical ambroxol for the treatment of neuropathic pain. An initial clinical observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, K-U; Weiser, T

    2015-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is difficult to treat, and the available options are often inadequate. The expectorant ambroxol also acts as a strong local anaesthetic and blocks sodium channels about 40 times more potently than lidocaine. It preferentially inhibits the channel subtype Nav 1.8, which is expressed especially in nociceptive C-fibres. In view of the low toxicity of ambroxol, it seemed reasonable to try using it for the treatment of neuropathic pain that failed to respond to other standard options. The medical records of seven patients with severe neuropathic pain and pain reduction following topical ambroxol treatment are reported retrospectively. As standard therapies had not proved sufficient, a topical ambroxol 20% cream was repeatedly applied by the patients in the area of neuropathic pain. The reasons for neuropathic pain were postherpetic neuralgia (2 ×), mononeuropathy multiplex, phantom pain, deafferentation pain, postoperative neuralgia and foot neuropathy of unknown origin. The individual mean pain intensity reported was between 4 and 6/10 (NRS), maximum pain at 6-10/10 (NRS). The pain reduction achieved individually following ambroxol cream was 2-8 points (NRS) within 5-30 min and lasted for 3-8 h. Pain attacks were reduced in all five patients presenting with this problem. Four patients with no improvement after lidocaine 5% and one patient with no response to capsaicin 8% nevertheless experienced a pain reduction with topical ambroxol. No patient reported any side effects or skin changes during a treatment that has since been continued for up to 4 years. Ambroxol acts as a strong local anaesthetic and preferentially inhibits the nociceptively relevant sodium channel subtype Nav 1.8. For the first time, we report below on a relevant pain relief following topical ambroxol 20% cream in patients with neuropathic pain. In view of the positive side effect profile, the clinical benefit in patients with pain should be investigated further.

  15. [Topical ambroxol for the treatment of neuropathic pain: A first clinical observation. German version].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, K-U; Weiser, T

    2015-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is difficult to treat and available options are frequently not sufficient. The expectorant ambroxol also works as a strong local anesthetic and blocks sodium channels about 40 times more potently than lidocaine. Ambroxol preferentially inhibits the channel subtype Nav 1.8, which is expressed particularly in nociceptive C fibers. Due to the low toxicity, topical ambroxol seemed to represent a reasonable therapeutic attempt for treatment of neuropathic pain resistant to other standard options. Medical records of 7 patients with severe neuropathic pain, in whom many attempts at treatment with approved substances were not sufficient or possible, are reported retrospectively. Patients were then treated with topical ambroxol 20% cream applied in the area of neuropathic pain. Causes of neuropathic pain were postherpetic neuralgia (2-×), mononeuropathy multiplex, phantom pain, deafferentation pain, postoperative neuralgia and an unclear allodynia of the foot. Mean pain intensity was reported as 4-6/10 on a numeric rating scale (NRS) and maximum pain intensity as 6-10/10. Pain reduction following ambroxol cream was 2-8 points (NRS) within 15-30 min and lasted 3-8 h. Pain attacks were reduced in all 5 patients presenting this problem. Topical ambroxol achieved pain reduction in 4 patients with no improvement after lidocaine 5% and 1 patient with no response to capsaicin 8%. No adverse events or skin changes have been observed, and the longest treatment duration is currently 4 years. Ambroxol acts as a strong local anesthetic and preferentially inhibits the nociceptive-relevant sodium channel subtype Nav 1.8. For the first time, we report relevant pain reduction following topical Ambroxol 20% cream in patients with neuropathic pain. Regarding the advantageous profile with rare side effects, the clinical benefit for pain patients should be further investigated.

  16. Pentoxifylline Ameliorates Mechanical Hyperalgesia in a Rat Model of Chemotherapy-Induced Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Kee; Hwang, Seon-Hee; Lee, Sing-Ong; Kim, Sung Hoon; Abdi, Salahadin

    2016-05-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain is difficult to treat. Pentoxifylline inhibits the production of inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor α(TNF- α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β). The aims of our study were to investigate the analgesic and preventive effects of pentoxifylline on paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain in rats and to identify its mechanisms of action. Controlled animal study. Neuropathic pain was induced with intraperitoneally injected paclitaxel on 4 alternate days in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Pentoxifylline was administered systemically as a single injection and a continuous infusion before or after the injection of paclitaxel. The mechanical threshold for allodynia was measured by using von Frey filaments. Protein levels and localization of inflammatory cytokines were performed by using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively. After the rats developed neuropathic pain behavior, a single intraperitoneal injection and continuous infusion of pentoxifylline ameliorated paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia. In addition, systemic infusion of pentoxifylline in the early phase of the development of pain behavior delayed the onset of paclitaxel-induced pain behavior. Paclitaxel increased the levels of the catalytic subunit α of protein kinase A, phosphorylated nuclear factor ;κB, TNF- α, and IL-1κ in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia. Pentoxifylline decreased the paclitaxel-induced TNF- α and IL-1β levels. In addition, IL-1β was expressed in neurons and satellite cells in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia after paclitaxel. Although this study was performed in the animal model by well-designed manner, clinical study will be needed to confirm the analgesic effect of pentoxifylline. Pentoxifylline alleviated chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain in rats by reducing the levels of inflammatory cytokines in dorsal root ganglia and may be effective chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain in patients.

  17. Maintaining efficacy in the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain: role of duloxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Zilliox

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lindsay Zilliox1, James W Russell1,21Department of Neurology, Neuromuscular Division, The University of Maryland School of Medicine, 2VA Maryland Health Care System, Baltimore, MD, USAIntroduction: Neuropathy is one of the most frequent complications of diabetes. Of all the symptoms associated with diabetic neuropathy, pain has the largest impact on sleep and quality of life. In the past few years further medications have been added to the available therapies for neuropathic pain. One of these medications, duloxetine hydrochloride (duloxetine, is a balanced and potent selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor.Methods: Medline was searched from January 2005 to September 2009 using the key words duloxetine and peripheral neuropathy for clinical trials limited to human research published in English and duloxetine and pharmacology in the nervous system.Results: Duloxetine has been shown to effectively reduce diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain compared to placebo at doses of 60 mg/day and 120 mg/day with minimal to moderate side effects. This effect is seen with minimal effects on glycemic control and without any clinically relevant effects on lipid control, or cardiovascular parameters. In addition, its efficacy and tolerability is comparable to other medications commonly used in the management of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, duloxetine performs favorably both in terms of quality of life and in cost utility analyses.Discussion and conclusion: This article reviewed the issues related to management of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain, the pharmacology and rationale for use of duloxetine, efficacy studies, and the safety and tolerability of treatment with duloxetine. Duloxetine is an acceptable initial or alternative treatment for patients with diabetic neuropathic pain.Keywords: duloxetine, diabetic neuropathy, neuropathic pain

  18. Effects of Saint John’s Wort and Vitamin E on Breast Cancer Chemotherapeutic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Optical Nutrients product 14772 which consists of flowering tops and leaves and is standardized to 0.3% hypericin. Other ingredients include maltodextrin...Nutrients (Foster City, CA) product #14772. The preparation contains St. John’s wort flowers and tops (Hypericum perforatum) extract, standardized to 0.3...cycle of chemotherapy, typically 3 or 4 weeks. Serum was collected before the first and second cycles of chemotherapy and cryopreserved in the dark

  19. FERMENTATION ACTIVITY OF LACTOSE-FERMENTATION YEAST IN WHEY-MALT WORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Greek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The main parameters of fermentation of whey-malt wort with the use of different strains of lactose-fermentation yeast was investigated experimentally. According to the findings of investigation of fermentive activity for different types of lactose-fermentation microorganisms in whey-malt wort it was found that the most active spirituous fermentation for all parameters was in wort fermented by microorganisms Zygosaccharomyces lactis 868-K and Saccharomyces lactis 95. High capacity for utilization of malt carbohydrates represented by easily metabolized carbohydrates of malt extract was determined. Also organoleptic analysis of fermented whey drinks derived from the renewed mixtures of dry whey and fermented malt and yeast Zygosaccharomyces lactis 868-K and Saccharomyces lactis 95 was carried out. It was found that the drink fermented with yeast Zygosaccharomyces lactis 868-K had intense refreshing flavor of rye bread with fruit tones. Intensity growth of aromatization for complex of sample with microorganisms Saccharomyces lactis 95, indicating high organoleptic indexes of the drink was observed.

  20. Contact thermography of painful diabetic neuropathic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, A W; MacFarlane, I A; Bowsher, D R

    1991-10-01

    To investigate regional differences in skin blood flow (measured by contact thermography) in the diabetic neuropathic foot and to examine the effect of foot temperature on the severity of neuropathic pain. Thirty-five diabetic patients with painful polyneuropathy (PPN) and 33 healthy age- and sex-matched control subjects comprised the study. Mean foot temperature (MFT) in PPN (mean +/- SE 28.3 +/- 0.3 degrees C) was significantly higher (P less than 0.001) than in the control subjects (25.9 +/- 0.5 degrees C), with the highest temperatures over the metatarsal areas and heel. Visual analogue scale pain score (mean +/- SD 5.3 +/- 1.9 cm) did not correlate with MFT (r = -0.14, P = 0.52). In 10 patients with PPN followed for 2-8 mo (mean 4.6), MFT fell by 1.6 degrees C (P = 0.05), but pain scores did not alter. Neuropathic pain is unaffected by alterations in skin temperature. Elevated skin temperatures at recognized sites of weight bearing (metatarsal heads and heels) are common in the diabetic neuropathic foot and may indicate tissue injury or inflammation induced by pressure trauma or increased arteriovenous shunting. Follow-up studies will determine whether thermographic hot spots are more susceptible to ulceration.

  1. Gene Therapy for Neuropathic Pain by Silencing of TNF-α Expression with Lentiviral Vectors Targeting the Dorsal Root Ganglion in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Nobuhiro; Kawai, Hiromichi; Terashima, Tomoya; Kojima, Hideto; Oka, Kazuhiro; Chan, Lawrence; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain can be a debilitating condition. Many types of drugs that have been used to treat neuropathic pain have only limited efficacy. Recent studies indicate that pro-inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) are involved in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. In the present study, we engineered a gene therapy strategy to relieve neuropathic pain by silencing TNF-α expression in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) using lentiviral vectors expressing TNF short hairpin RNA1-4 (LV-TNF-shRNA1-4) in mice. First, based on its efficacy in silencing TNF-α in vitro, we selected shRNA3 to construct LV-TNF-shRNA3 for in vivo study. We used L5 spinal nerve transection (SNT) mice as a neuropathic pain model. These animals were found to display up-regulated mRNA expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) and neuropeptide Y (NPY), injury markers, and interleukin (IL)-6, an inflammatory cytokine in the ipsilateral L5 DRG. Injection of LV-TNF-shRNA3 onto the proximal transected site suppressed significantly the mRNA levels of ATF3, NPY and IL-6, reduced mechanical allodynia and neuronal cell death of DRG neurons. These results suggest that lentiviral-mediated silencing of TNF-α in DRG relieves neuropathic pain and reduces neuronal cell death, and may constitute a novel therapeutic option for neuropathic pain. PMID:24642694

  2. THE DEPENDENCE OF GLYCEROL ACCUMULATION AND STARCH HYDROLYZATES FERMENTATION FROM WORT CONCENTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Оliynichuk S. Т.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to study the dependence of ethanol accumulation by-products and secondary products (glycerol and propionic acid during the fermentation in the case of increasing the wort concentration from 12 to 21% by weight of sugar as an example of commonly used in the alcohol industry the commercial dry yeast company “Danisco” and experimental osmophilic strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae DS-02-E, isolated from a concentrated (80% DM of rye malt wort which spontaneously fermented. The enzyme preparations “AMYLEX 4T”, “ALPHALASE AFP” and “DIAZYME SSF” were used for the liquefaction and saccharification of starch wort. The finished industrial of both yeast strains were added to the fermentation flasks in an amount of 10% by volume of the primary wort. In the mature brew the unfermented carbohydrates content was determined by colorimetric method with anthrone reagent, alcohol — by glass areometer-alcoholometer, acidity — potentiometrically, the concentration of dry matter — by areometer, glycerol content — by photocolorimetry method. In the brew distillate a volatile impurities content, namely propionic acid, was determined using gas chromatography. Statistical processing of the results of three series of experiments were carried out by calculating the arithmetical mean value of 5 measurements, their standard deviations and errors. To determine the probable differences between the mean values were used Student’s t test. Differences were considered statistically significant at P < 0.05. Reduction for accumulation of glycerol (between 38 till 53% at higher concentrations of nutrient medium in the case of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae DS-02-E as compared with commercial dry yeast, reduction the formation of unwanted by-product of fermentation — propionic acid (up to 34%, a better ability of the experimental strain to accumulate sugar of wort and to accumulate ethanol (up to 0.1–0.25% vol. were shown. It

  3. The Chemical and Antibacterial Evaluation of St. John's Wort Oil Macerates Used in Kosovar Traditional Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James T. Lyles

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypericum perforatum L. (Hypericaceae, or St. John's Wort, is a well-known medicinal herb often associated with the treatment of anxiety and depression. Additionally, an oil macerate (Oleum Hyperici of its flowering aerial parts is widely used in traditional medicine across the Balkans as a topical wound and ulcer salve. Other studies have shown that Oleum Hyperici reduces both wound size and healing time. Of its active constituents, the naphthodianthrone hypericin and phloroglucinol hyperforin are effective antibacterial compounds against various Gram-positive bacteria. However, hyperforin is unstable with light and heat, and thus should not be present in the light-aged oil macerate. Additionally, hypericin can cause phototoxic skin reactions if ingested or absorbed into the skin. Therefore, the established chemistry presents a paradox for this H. perforatum oil macerate: the hyperforin responsible for the antibacterial bioactivity should degrade in the sunlight as the traditional oil is prepared; alternately, if hypericin is present in established bioactive levels, then the oil macerate should cause photosensitivity, yet none is reported. In this research, various extracts of H. perforatum were compared to traditional oil macerates with regards to chemical composition and antibacterial activity (inhibition of growth, biofilm formation, and quorum sensing vs. several strains of Staphylococcus aureus in order to better understand this traditional medicine. It was found that four Kosovar-crafted oil macerates were effective at inhibiting biofilm formation (MBIC50 active range of 0.004–0.016% v/v, exhibited moderate inhibition of quorum sensing (QSIC50 active range of 0.064–0.512% v/v, and contained detectable amounts of hyperforin, but not hypericin. Overall, levels of hypericin were much higher in the organic extracts, and these also exhibited more potent growth inhibitory activity. In conclusion, these data confirm that oil macerates

  4. The Chemical and Antibacterial Evaluation of St. John's Wort Oil Macerates Used in Kosovar Traditional Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, James T; Kim, Austin; Nelson, Kate; Bullard-Roberts, Angelle L; Hajdari, Avni; Mustafa, Behxhet; Quave, Cassandra L

    2017-01-01

    Hypericum perforatum L. (Hypericaceae), or St. John's Wort, is a well-known medicinal herb often associated with the treatment of anxiety and depression. Additionally, an oil macerate (Oleum Hyperici) of its flowering aerial parts is widely used in traditional medicine across the Balkans as a topical wound and ulcer salve. Other studies have shown that Oleum Hyperici reduces both wound size and healing time. Of its active constituents, the naphthodianthrone hypericin and phloroglucinol hyperforin are effective antibacterial compounds against various Gram-positive bacteria. However, hyperforin is unstable with light and heat, and thus should not be present in the light-aged oil macerate. Additionally, hypericin can cause phototoxic skin reactions if ingested or absorbed into the skin. Therefore, the established chemistry presents a paradox for this H. perforatum oil macerate: the hyperforin responsible for the antibacterial bioactivity should degrade in the sunlight as the traditional oil is prepared; alternately, if hypericin is present in established bioactive levels, then the oil macerate should cause photosensitivity, yet none is reported. In this research, various extracts of H. perforatum were compared to traditional oil macerates with regards to chemical composition and antibacterial activity (inhibition of growth, biofilm formation, and quorum sensing) vs. several strains of Staphylococcus aureus in order to better understand this traditional medicine. It was found that four Kosovar-crafted oil macerates were effective at inhibiting biofilm formation (MBIC50 active range of 0.004-0.016% v/v), exhibited moderate inhibition of quorum sensing (QSIC50 active range of 0.064-0.512% v/v), and contained detectable amounts of hyperforin, but not hypericin. Overall, levels of hypericin were much higher in the organic extracts, and these also exhibited more potent growth inhibitory activity. In conclusion, these data confirm that oil macerates employed in traditional

  5. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for neuropathic pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, William; Wand, Benedict M; O'Connell, Neil E

    2017-09-14

    meaning we were unable to report on this outcome in this comparison. Similarly, we were unable to report on global impression of change or changes in analgesic use in this pooled analysis.Ten small studies compared TENS to some form of usual care. However, there was great diversity in what constituted usual care, precluding pooling of data. Most of these studies found either no difference in pain outcomes between TENS versus other active treatments or favoured the comparator intervention (very low quality evidence). We were unable to report on other primary and secondary outcomes in these single trials (health-related quality of life, global impression of change and changes in analgesic use).Of the 15 included studies, three reported adverse events which were minor and limited to 'skin irritation' at or around the site of electrode placement (very low quality evidence). Three studies reported no adverse events while the remainder did not report any detail with regard adverse events. In this review, we reported on the comparison between TENS and sham TENS. The quality of the evidence was very low meaning we were unable to confidently state whether TENS is effective for pain control in people with neuropathic pain. The very low quality of evidence means we have very limited confidence in the effect estimate reported; the true effect is likely to be substantially different. We make recommendations with respect to future TENS study designs which may meaningfully reduce the uncertainty relating to the effectiveness of this treatment modality.

  6. An Epidemiological Study of Neuropathic Pain Symptoms in Canadian Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth G. VanDenKerkhof

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The reported prevalence of neuropathic pain ranges from 6.9% to 10%; however the only Canadian study reported 17.9%. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology of neuropathic pain in Canada. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a random sample of Canadian adults. The response rate was 21.1% (1504/7134. Likely or possible neuropathic pain was defined using a neuropathic pain-related diagnosis and a positive outcome on the Self-Report Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs pain scale (S-LANSS or the Douleur Neuropathique 4 (DN4 Questions. The prevalence of likely neuropathic pain was 1.9% (S-LANSS and 3.4% (DN4 and that of possible neuropathic pain was 5.8% (S-LANSS and 8.1% (DN4. Neuropathic pain was highest in economically disadvantaged males. There is a significant burden of neuropathic pain in Canada. The low response rate and a slightly older and less educated sample than the Canadian population may have led to an overestimate of neuropathic pain. Population prevalence varies by screening tool used, indicating more work is needed to develop reliable measures. Population level screening targeted towards high risk groups should improve the sensitivity and specificity of screening, while clinical examination of those with positive screening results will further refine the estimate of prevalence.

  7. Capsaicinoids in the treatment of neuropathic pain: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppin, John F; Pappagallo, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of neuropathic pain is difficult. Oral pharmaceuticals have significant side effects, and treatment efficacy tends to be modest. The use of topical analgesics reduces the potential for systemic side effects and allows direct application of medications to the area of pain. The natural spicy substance, capsaicin, has historically been known for its topical use. Capsaicin, once applied to the skin, causes a brief initial sensitization followed by a prolonged desensitization of the local pain nerves. This occurs through stimulation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) expressing pain nerve fibers. While low-dose capsaicin has not resulted in good efficacy, the larger dose 8% topical capsaicin has had some of the best data currently available in the treatment of post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) and other neuropathic conditions. This paper discusses the data currently existing for capsaicin 8% in the treatment of PHN. It further reviews data for the low-dose capsaicin products and the current status in the development of other capsaicinoids, e.g. resiniferotoxin, and high-concentration liquid capsaicin.

  8. Neuropathic sensory symptoms: association with pain and psychological factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaygan, Maryam; Böger, Andreas; Kröner-Herwig, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Background A large number of population-based studies of chronic pain have considered neuropathic sensory symptoms to be associated with a high level of pain intensity and negative affectivity. The present study examines the question of whether this association previously found in non-selected samples of chronic pain patients can also be found in chronic pain patients with underlying pathology of neuropathic sensory symptoms. Methods Neuropathic sensory symptoms in 306 patients with chronic pain diagnosed as typical neuropathic pain, radiculopathy, fibromyalgia, or nociceptive back pain were assessed using the Pain DETECT Questionnaire. Two separate cluster analyses were performed to identify subgroups of patients with different levels of self-reported neuropathic sensory symptoms and, furthermore, to identify subgroups of patients with distinct patterns of neuropathic sensory symptoms (adjusted for individual response bias regarding specific symptoms). Results ANOVA (analysis of variance) results in typical neuropathic pain, radiculopathy, and fibromyalgia showed no significant differences between the three levels of neuropathic sensory symptoms regarding pain intensity, pain chronicity, pain catastrophizing, pain acceptance, and depressive symptoms. However, in nociceptive back pain patients, significant differences were found for all variables except pain chronicity. When controlling for the response bias of patients in ratings of symptoms, none of the patterns of neuropathic sensory symptoms were associated with pain and psychological factors. Conclusion Neuropathic sensory symptoms are not closely associated with higher levels of pain intensity and cognitive-emotional evaluations in chronic pain patients with underlying pathology of neuropathic sensory symptoms. The findings are discussed in term of differential response bias in patients with versus without verified neuropathic sensory symptoms by clinical examination, medical tests, or underlying pathology of

  9. The biodiversity of predominant lactic acid bacteria in dolo and pito wort for the production of sorghum beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawadogo-Lingani, H; Lei, V; Diawara, B; Nielsen, D S; Møller, P L; Traoré, A S; Jakobsen, M

    2007-10-01

    To quantify and identify the predominant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in dolo and pito wort processing, and to examine their biodiversity at strain level. The processing of dolo and pito wort was studied at four production sites in Burkina Faso and Ghana. The succession of dominant micro-organisms, pH and titratable acidity were determined from sorghum malt through mashing and acidification to final wort. In the sorghum malt and during mashing, the LAB counts were 5.7-7.5 log CFU g(-1). Similar levels of yeasts and gram-negative, catalase-positive bacteria were observed. These levels decreased to 3.7-4.5 log CFU g(-1) andproduction sites; however, a pronounced diversity was observed at strain level. For one site, which had implemented a cleaning procedure between batches only, Lact. fermentum was found. Lact. fermentum was found to be the dominant LAB species throughout the entire process to final dolo and pito wort, including the acidification. Lact. delbrueckii ssp. delbrueckii, Lact. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus and P. acidilactici occurred in low numbers. At strain level, a high diversity based on PFGE-RFLP was observed for Lact. fermentum within and between sites. This study for the first time gives details of the involvement of LAB in the production of dolo and pito wort, for West African traditional sorghum beer production. One species, Lact. fermentum was predominant throughout the process, and seems to harbour potential starter cultures to be selected according to technological characteristics determined at strain level.

  10. First report of blight caused by Sclerotium rolfsii on the invasive exotic weed, Vincetoxicum rossicum (pale swallow-wort) in western New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pale (Vincetoxicum rossicum) and black swallow-wort (V. nigrum) are invasive, perennial twining vines that are becoming increasingly problematic in the northeastern U.S. and southeastern Canada. Observations at one natural area heavily populated by pale swallow-wort in Monroe County, NY, revealed a ...

  11. Neuropathic pain: A personal case reflection on a critical incident

    OpenAIRE

    Duraisamy, Balaji P; Manjiri P Dighe; Muckaden, Maryann A

    2011-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a distressing symptom for the patient and a difficult symptom for the physician to treat. There is lack of evidence-based clinical guidelines for the management of malignant neuropathic pain. The case reflection is a personal account of what has been learnt from a critical incident in a particular patient in the management of neuropathic pain. Psychological issues are known to increase pain percetion and affect the quality of life. The case reflection explores problem area...

  12. Relationship between Neuropathic Pain and Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hozumi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Overweight negatively affects musculoskeletal health; hence obesity is considered a risk factor for osteoarthritis and chronic low back pain. This was conducted to determine if obesity affects neuropathic pain, usually considered unrelated to the weight-load on the musculoskeletal system. Methods. Using a cut-off body mass index value of 25, 44 patients with neuropathic pain were grouped into a “high-BMI” group and a “normal-BMI” group. Results. The numeric rating scale of the high-BMI group was significantly higher than that of the normal-weight group (P<0.05. The total NPSI scores were significantly higher (P<0.01, and the paroxysmal pain and the negative symptoms were more serious in the high-BMI group than in the normal-BMI group. The high-BMI subjects also had significantly higher SF-MPQ scores (P<0.05. However, both physical and mental health status on the SF-36 were comparable between the groups. Discussion. Neuropathic pain that did not arise from musculoskeletal damage was higher in the high-BMI patients. Paroxysmal pain was more severe, suggesting that neural damage might be aggravated by obesity-associated inflammation. These findings should have needed to be confirmed in future studies.

  13. Neuropathic orofacial pain: Facts and fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baad-Hansen, Lene; Benoliel, Rafael

    2017-06-01

    Definition and taxonomy This review deals with neuropathic pain of traumatic origin affecting the trigeminal nerve, i.e. painful post-traumatic trigeminal neuropathy (PTTN). Symptomatology The clinical characteristics of PTTN vary considerably, partly due to the type and extent of injury. Symptoms involve combinations of spontaneous and evoked pain and of positive and negative somatosensory signs. These patients are at risk of going through unnecessary dental/surgical procedures in the attempt to eradicate the cause of the pain, due to the fact that most dentists only rarely encounter PTTN. Epidemiology Overall, approximately 3% of patients with trigeminal nerve injuries develop PTTN. Patients are most often female above the age of 45 years, and both physical and psychological comorbidities are common. Pathophysiology PTTN shares many pathophysiological mechanisms with other peripheral neuropathic pain conditions. Diagnostic considerations PTTN may be confused with one of the regional neuralgias or other orofacial pain conditions. For intraoral PTTN, early stages are often misdiagnosed as odontogenic pain. Pain management Management of PTTN generally follows recommendations for peripheral neuropathic pain. Expert opinion International consensus on classification and taxonomy is urgently needed in order to advance the field related to this condition.

  14. Neuropathic pain: A personal case reflection on a critical incident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji P Duraisamy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is a distressing symptom for the patient and a difficult symptom for the physician to treat. There is lack of evidence-based clinical guidelines for the management of malignant neuropathic pain. The case reflection is a personal account of what has been learnt from a critical incident in a particular patient in the management of neuropathic pain. Psychological issues are known to increase pain percetion and affect the quality of life. The case reflection explores problem areas, defines lacunae in knowledge, and demonstrates active learning of the management of neuropathic pain through reflective practice.

  15. Neuropathic pain: a personal case reflection on a critical incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraisamy, Balaji P; Dighe, Manjiri P; Muckaden, Maryann A

    2011-05-01

    Neuropathic pain is a distressing symptom for the patient and a difficult symptom for the physician to treat. There is lack of evidence-based clinical guidelines for the management of malignant neuropathic pain. The case reflection is a personal account of what has been learnt from a critical incident in a particular patient in the management of neuropathic pain. Psychological issues are known to increase pain percetion and affect the quality of life. The case reflection explores problem areas, defines lacunae in knowledge, and demonstrates active learning of the management of neuropathic pain through reflective practice.

  16. Chronic pain in Gaucher disease: skeletal or neuropathic origin?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Devigili, Grazia; De Filippo, Michele; Ciana, Giovanni; Dardis, Andrea; Lettieri, Christian; Rinaldo, Sara; Macor, Daniela; Moro, Alessandro; Eleopra, Roberto; Bembi, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Backgound Thirteen patients complained of pain suggestive of neuropathic origin with proximal patchy distribution, six manifested severe pain paroxysmal, nine pinprick hypoesthesia and 17 thermal hypoesthesia...

  17. Monitoring yeast physiology during very high gravity wort fermentations by frequent analysis of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautio, Jari J; Huuskonen, Anne; Vuokko, Heikki; Vidgren, Virve; Londesborough, John

    2007-09-01

    Brewer's yeast experiences constantly changing environmental conditions during wort fermentation. Cells can rapidly adapt to changing surroundings by transcriptional regulation. Changes in genomic expression can indicate the physiological condition of yeast in the brewing process. We monitored, using the transcript analysis with aid of affinity capture (TRAC) method, the expression of some 70 selected genes relevant to wort fermentation at high frequency through 9-10 day fermentations of very high gravity wort (25 degrees P) by an industrial lager strain. Rapid changes in expression occurred during the first hours of fermentations for several genes, e.g. genes involved in maltose metabolism, glycolysis and ergosterol synthesis were strongly upregulated 2-6 h after pitching. By the time yeast growth had stopped (72 h) and total sugars had dropped by about 50%, most selected genes had passed their highest expression levels and total mRNA was less than half the levels during growth. There was an unexpected upregulation of some genes of oxygen-requiring pathways during the final fermentation stages. For five genes, expression of both the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. bayanus components of the hybrid lager strain were determined. Expression profiles were either markedly different (ADH1, ERG3) or very similar (MALx1, ILV5, ATF1) between these two components. By frequent analysis of a chosen set of genes, TRAC provided a detailed and dynamic picture of the physiological state of the fermenting yeast. This approach offers a possible way to monitor and optimize the performance of yeast in a complex process environment. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Simplified Mashing Efficiency. Novel Method for Optimization of Food Industry Wort Production with the Use of Adjuncts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szwed Łukasz P.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Malt extracts and malt concentrates have a broad range of application in food industry. Those products are obtained by methods similar to brewing worts. The possible reduction of cost can be achieved by application of malt substitutes likewise in brewing industry. As the malt concentrates for food industry do not have to fulfill strict norms for beer production it is possible to produce much cheaper products. It was proved that by means of mathematic optimization it is possible to determine the optimal share of unmalted material for cheap yet effective production of wort.

  19. Duloxetine Inhibits Microglial P2X4 Receptor Function and Alleviates Neuropathic Pain after Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Yamashita

    Full Text Available P2X4 receptors (P2X4R are a family of ATP-gated non-selective cation channels. We previously demonstrated that activation of P2X4R in spinal microglia is crucial for neuropathic pain, a highly debilitating chronic pain condition, suggesting that P2X4R is a potential therapeutic target for treating neuropathic pain. Thus, the identification of a compound that has a potent inhibitory effect on P2X4R is an important clinical challenge. In the present study, we screened a chemical library of clinically approved drugs and show for the first time that duloxetine, a serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, has an inhibitory effect on rodent and human P2X4R. In primary cultured microglial cells, duloxetine also inhibited P2X4R-, but not P2X7R-, mediated responses. Moreover, intrathecal administration of duloxetine in a model of neuropathic pain produced a reversal of nerve injury-induced mechanical allodynia, a cardinal symptom of neuropathic pain. In rats that were pretreated with a serotonin-depleting agent and a noradrenaline neurotoxin, the antiallodynic effect of duloxetine was reduced, but still remained. Based on these results, we suggest that, in addition to duloxetine's primary inhibitory action on serotonin and noradrenaline transporters, an inhibitory effect on P2X4R may be involved at least in part in an antiallodynic effect of intrathecal duloxetine in a model of neuropathic pain.

  20. Nefopam Reduces Dysesthesia after Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Ok, Young Min; Cheon, Ji Hyun; Choi, Eun Ji; Chang, Eun Jung; Lee, Ho Myung; Kim, Kyung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain, including paresthesia/dysesthesia in the lower extremities, always develops and remains for at least one month, to variable degrees, after percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD). The recently discovered dual analgesic mechanisms of action, similar to those of antidepressants and anticonvulsants, enable nefopam (NFP) to treat neuropathic pain. This study was performed to determine whether NFP might reduce the neuropathic pain component of postoperative pa...

  1. Duloxetine in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boomershine CS

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Michelle J Ormseth, Beth A Sholz, Chad S BoomershineDivision of Rheumatology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Diabetic neuropathy affects up to 70% of diabetics, and diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP is the most common and debilitating of the diabetic neuropathies. DPNP significantly reduces quality of life and increases management costs in affected patients. Despite the impact of DPNP, management is poor with one-quarter of patients receiving no treatment and many treated with medications having little or no efficacy in managing DPNP. Duloxetine is one of two drugs approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for DPNP management. Duloxetine is a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI proven safe, effective, and cost-saving in reducing DPNP symptoms at a dose of 60 mg/day. Duloxetine doses greater than 60 mg/day for DPNP management are not recommended since they are no more efficacious and associated with more side effects; addition of pregabalin or gabapentin for these patients may be beneficial. Side effects of duloxetine are generally mild and typical for the SNRI class including nausea, dizziness, somnolence, fatigue, sweating, dry mouth, constipation, and diarrhea. Given its other indications, duloxetine is a particularly good choice for DPNP treatment in patients with coexisting depression, anxiety, fibromyalgia, or chronic musculoskeletal pain. Duloxetine treatment had no clinically significant effect on glycemic control and did not increase the risk of cardiovascular events in diabetes patients. However, duloxetine use should be avoided in patients with hepatic disease or severe renal impairment. Given its safety, efficacy, and tolerability, duloxetine is an excellent choice for DPNP treatment in many patients.Keywords: duloxetine, diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain, review, treatment

  2. Neuropathic pain: a possible role for the melanocortin system?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Vrinten, D.H.; Kalkman, C.J.; Adan, R.A.H.

    2001-01-01

    In humans, damage to the nervous system can lead to a pain state referred to as neuropathic pain. Here, we give a short overview of the clinical picture and classification of neuropathic pain and highlight some of the currently known pathophysiological mechanisms involved, with special emphasis on

  3. MRI in clinically asymptomatic neuropathic leprosy feet: a baseline study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, M.; Slim, E. J.; Akkerman, E. M.; Faber, W. R.

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to analyze the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in the clinically asymptomatic neuropathic feet of leprosy patients. Since in the literature no MRI data are available concerning the asymptomatic neuropathic foot in leprosy, the interpretation of MRI examinations in

  4. Filtration, haze and foam characteristics of fermented wort mediated by yeast strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, P; Meneses, F J; Jiranek, V

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the influence of the choice of yeast strain on the haze, shelf life, filterability and foam quality characteristics of fermented products. Twelve strains were used to ferment a chemically defined wort and hopped ale or stout wort. Fermented products were assessed for foam using the Rudin apparatus, and filterability and haze characteristics using the European Brewing Convention methods, to reveal differences in these parameters as a consequence of the choice of yeast strain and growth medium. Under the conditions used, the choice of strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae effecting the primary fermentation has an impact on all of the parameters investigated, most notably when the fermentation medium is devoid of macromolecular material. The filtration of fermented products has a large cost implication for many brewers and wine makers, and the haze of the resulting filtrate is a key quality criterion. Also of importance to the quality of beer and some wines is the foaming and head retention of these beverages. The foam characteristics, filterability and potential for haze formation in a fermented product have long been known to be dependant on the raw materials used, as well as other production parameters. The choice of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain used to ferment has itself been shown here to influence these parameters.

  5. Neuropathic sensory symptoms: association with pain and psychological factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaygan M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Maryam Shaygan,1 Andreas Böger,2 Birgit Kröner-Herwig11Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Göttingen, Germany; 2Pain Management Clinic at the Red Cross Hospital, Kassel, GermanyBackground: A large number of population-based studies of chronic pain have considered neuropathic sensory symptoms to be associated with a high level of pain intensity and negative affectivity. The present study examines the question of whether this association previously found in non-selected samples of chronic pain patients can also be found in chronic pain patients with underlying pathology of neuropathic sensory symptoms.Methods: Neuropathic sensory symptoms in 306 patients with chronic pain diagnosed as typical neuropathic pain, radiculopathy, fibromyalgia, or nociceptive back pain were assessed using the Pain DETECT Questionnaire. Two separate cluster analyses were performed to identify subgroups of patients with different levels of self-reported neuropathic sensory symptoms and, furthermore, to identify subgroups of patients with distinct patterns of neuropathic sensory symptoms (adjusted for individual response bias regarding specific symptoms.Results: ANOVA (analysis of variance results in typical neuropathic pain, radiculopathy, and fibromyalgia showed no significant differences between the three levels of neuropathic sensory symptoms regarding pain intensity, pain chronicity, pain catastrophizing, pain acceptance, and depressive symptoms. However, in nociceptive back pain patients, significant differences were found for all variables except pain chronicity. When controlling for the response bias of patients in ratings of symptoms, none of the patterns of neuropathic sensory symptoms were associated with pain and psychological factors.Conclusion: Neuropathic sensory symptoms are not closely associated with higher levels of pain intensity and cognitive-emotional evaluations in chronic pain patients with underlying pathology of

  6. Fentanyl for neuropathic pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Sheena; Stannard, Cathy; Cole, Peter; Wiffen, Philip J; Knaggs, Roger; Aldington, Dominic; Moore, R Andrew

    2016-10-11

    Opioid drugs, including fentanyl, are commonly used to treat neuropathic pain, and are considered effective by some professionals. Most reviews have examined all opioids together. This review sought evidence specifically for fentanyl, at any dose, and by any route of administration. Other opioids are considered in separate reviews. To assess the analgesic efficacy of fentanyl for chronic neuropathic pain in adults, and the adverse events associated with its use in clinical trials. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, and Embase from inception to June 2016, together with the reference lists of retrieved articles, and two online study registries. We included randomised, double-blind studies of two weeks' duration or longer, comparing fentanyl (in any dose, administered by any route, and in any formulation) with placebo or another active treatment in chronic neuropathic pain. Two review authors independently searched for studies, extracted efficacy and adverse event data, and examined issues of study quality and potential bias. We did not carry out any pooled analyses. We assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE. Only one study met our inclusion criteria. Participants were men and women (mean age 67 years), with postherpetic neuralgia, complex regional pain syndrome, or chronic postoperative pain. They were experiencing inadequate relief from non-opioid analgesics, and had not previously taken opioids for their neuropathic pain. The study used an enriched enrolment randomised withdrawal design. It was adequately blinded, but we judged it at unclear risk of bias for other criteria.Transdermal fentanyl (one-day fentanyl patch) was titrated over 10 to 29 days to establish the maximum tolerated and effective dose (12.5 to 50 µg/h). Participants who achieved a prespecified good level of pain relief with a stable dose of fentanyl, without excessive use of rescue medication or intolerable adverse events ('responders

  7. Management of Neuropathic Chronic Pain with Methadone Combined with Ketamine: A Randomized, Double Blind, Active-Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, Flavia Karine; Trevisan, Gabriela; Godoy, Maria C; Rossato, Mateus Fortes; Dalmolin, Gerusa D; Silva, Mariane A; Menezes, Mirian S; Caumo, Wolnei; Ferreira, Juliano

    2017-03-01

    Methadone and ketamine are used in neuropathic pain management. However, the benefits of both drugs association are uncertain in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Our primary objective was test the hypothesis that oral methadone combined with oral ketamine is more effective than oral methadone or ketamine alone in reducing neuropathic pain. We conducted a randomized, double blind, active-controlled parallel-group clinical trial. Forty-two patients with neuropathic pain refractory to conventional therapy were randomly assigned to receive oral methadone (n = 14), ketamine (n = 14), or methadone plus ketamine (n = 14) over a 3-month period. During these 90 days, we observed pain scores using a visual analogical scale (VAS), allodynia, burning/shooting pain, and some side effects. All treatments were effective in reducing pain scores by at least 40%. However, a significant improvement in pain was observed only in the ketamine alone group compared with both the methadone or methadone/ketamine groups. No significant differences were observed among the treatment groups for the reduction of burning or shooting pain, while ketamine alone was more effective than methadone or methadone/ketamine for the reduction of allodynia. Formal assessment for awareness of the allocation was not performed, some co-intervention bias may have occurred, our results could be only relevant to the patient population investigated and the use of VAS as the primary outcome detect changes in pain intensity but not to assess neuropathic pain symptoms. This study indicates that ketamine was better than methadone or methadone/ketamine for treating neuropathic pain.Key words: Multimodal analgesia, refractory pain, NMDA receptor, opioid.

  8. Spinal cord stimulation for chronic pain of neuropathic or ischaemic origin: systematic review and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, E L; Duenas, A; Holmes, M W; Papaioannou, D; Chilcott, J

    2009-03-01

    This report addressed the question 'What is the clinical and cost-effectiveness of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in the management of chronic neuropathic or ischaemic pain?' Thirteen electronic databases [including MEDLINE (1950-2007), EMBASE (1980-2007) and the Cochrane Library (1991-2007)] were searched from inception; relevant journals were hand-searched; and appropriate websites for specific conditions causing chronic neuropathic/ischaemic pain were browsed. Literature searches were conducted from August 2007 to September 2007. A systematic review of the literature sought clinical and cost-effectiveness data for SCS in adults with chronic neuropathic or ischaemic pain with inadequate response to medical or surgical treatment other than SCS. Economic analyses were performed to model the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of SCS in patients with neuropathic or ischaemic pain. From approximately 6000 citations identified, 11 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were included in the clinical effectiveness review: three of neuropathic pain and eight of ischaemic pain. Trials were available for the neuropathic conditions failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type I, and they suggested that SCS was more effective than conventional medical management (CMM) or reoperation in reducing pain. The ischaemic pain trials had small sample sizes, meaning that most may not have been adequately powered to detect clinically meaningful differences. Trial evidence failed to demonstrate that pain relief in critical limb ischaemia (CLI) was better for SCS than for CMM; however, it suggested that SCS was effective in delaying refractory angina pain onset during exercise at short-term follow-up, although not more so than coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) for those patients eligible for that surgery. The results for the neuropathic pain model suggested that the cost-effectiveness estimates for SCS in patients with FBSS who had inadequate

  9. Tramadol SR in arthrosic and neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariconti, P; Collini, R

    2008-03-01

    Chronic pain requires adequate treatment to control the severity of pain, allowing it to be well tolerated for the long term. Slow release formulations represent a useful method for the treatment of lasting pain because they allow for more simple pain management. The aim of this study was to verify the efficacy and tolerability of tramadol SR for the treatment of two of the most common kinds of chronic pain: arthrosic and neuropathic pain. A total of 100 patients (32 M/68 F), with a mean age of 61 years (+/-12) with non-oncologic pain (71 with arthrosic pain and 29 with neuropathic pain) were enrolled in an open prospective study. In most cases, the SR formulation of tramadol was prescribed at a dose of 100-200 mg/day; the initial follow-up appointments were two to four weeks later, and then at monthly intervals. During the study, a good analgesic response was recorded in all patients, irrespective of the type of pain they suffered. In fact, the intensity of the pain decreased rapidly and clearly, from severe (mean+SD 7.66+1.6 on an 11 point numerical scale) to mild residual pain (70.5% less than the baseline; P<0.05 between the times, NS between the groups), with pain relief and sleep quality displaying parallel improvement. Thus, all parameters of efficacy improved in both groups of patients, with no clinically important differences between the responses of the subjects with arthrosis and those of the subjects with neuropathic pain (P<0.05 between the times, NS between groups). Patient compliance was high. The tolerability was excellent in 75% of the patients. In the remaining 25%, the side effects that appeared were modest, as demonstrated by the fact that the drug was suspended in just 10 cases. These results confirm that the efficacy of tramadol in the treatment of neuropathic pain is also present in the SR formulation. The safety profile is reassuring, and, fundamentally, tramadol treatment only requires identification of the optimal dose without particular

  10. Pregabalin suppresses nociceptive behavior and central sensitization in a rat trigeminal neuropathic pain model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ye; Wang, Hua; Chiang, Chen-Yu; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O.; Sessle, Barry J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether pregabalin affects nociceptive behavior and central sensitization in a trigeminal neuropathic pain model. A partial infraorbital nerve transection (p-IONX) or sham operation was performed in adult male rats. Nociceptive withdrawal thresholds were tested with von Frey filaments applied to the bilateral vibrissal pads pre-operatively and post-operatively. On post-operative day 7, the behavioral assessment was conducted before and at 30 min, 60 min, 120 min, 180 min, and 24hr after pregabalin (0.1, 1, 10, 100 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline injection. The effects of pregabalin or saline were also examined on the mechanoreceptive field and response properties of nociceptive neurons recorded in the medullary dorsal horn at post-operative day 7–10. Reduced withdrawal thresholds reflecting bilateral mechanical allodynia were observed in p-IONX rats until post-operative day 28, but not in sham-operated rats. At post-operative day 7, pregabalin significantly and dose-dependently reversed the reduced mechanical withdrawal thresholds in p-IONX rats. Pregabalin also attenuated central sensitization of the neurons, as reflected in reversal of their reduced activation threshold, increased responses to pinch/pressure, and enhanced stimulus-response function. This study provides the first documentation that pregabalin attenuates the mechanical allodynia and central sensitization that characterize this trigeminal neuropathic pain model, and supports its clinical use for treating craniofacial neuropathic pain. PMID:23374941

  11. Intake of St John's wort improves the glucose tolerance in healthy subjects who ingest metformin compared with metformin alone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, Tore Bjerregaard; Pedersen, Rasmus Steen; Damkier, Per

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Our objective was to investigate the steady-state pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interaction between the antidepressive herbal medicine St John's wort and the antidiabetic drug metformin. METHODS: We performed an open cross-over study in 20 healthy male subjects, who received 1 g...

  12. Impact of the defoliating moth Hypena opulenta on invasive swallow-worts (Vincetoxicum species) under different light environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black and pale swallow-wort (Vincetoxicum nigrum and V. rossicum, Apocynaceae: Asclepiadoideae) are twining vines from Europe that have become invasive in the northeastern USA and southeastern Canada. Hypena opulenta (Christoph) (Lepidoptera: Erebidae), a defoliating forest moth from the Ukraine, ha...

  13. Abrostola clarissa (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae), a new potential biocontrol agent for invasive swallow-worts, Vincetoxicum rossicum and V. nigrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pale and black swallow-worts (Vincetoxicum rossicum and V. nigrum; Apocynaceae, subfamily Asclepiadoideae), perennial vines native to Eurasia, are now invading natural and anthropogenic habitats in the northeastern U.S.A. and southeastern Canada, threatening natural biodiversity and increasing contr...

  14. Multimodal therapeutic assessment of peripheral nerve stimulation in neuropathic pain: five case reports with a 20-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kupers, Ron; Laere, Koen Van; Calenbergh, Frank Van

    2011-01-01

    assessment of the long-term efficacy of PNS. Home evaluations showed reduced pain ratings and improved quality-of-life during active periods of stimulation. Quantitative sensory testing confirmed the neuropathic character of the pain complaints. PNS had no significant overall effect on tactile detection...

  15. Depletion of vesicular zinc in dorsal horn of spinal cord causes increased neuropathic pain in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jo, Seung; Danscher, Gorm; Schrøder, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    pain. The animals were then sacrificed 5 days later. The ZnT3 immunoreactivity was found to have decreased significantly in dorsal horn of fourth, fifth, and sixth lumbar segments. In parallel with the depressed ZnT3 immunoreactivity the amount of vesicular zinc decreased perceptibly in superficial...... to neuropathic pain we applied Chung's rodent pain model on BALB/c mice, and traced zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3) proteins and zinc ions with immunohistochemistry and autometallography (AMG), respectively. Under anesthesia the left fifth lumbar spinal nerve was ligated in male mice in order to produced neuropathic...... gray matters of especially layer I-IV of the same segments. The transection-induced reduction of vesicular zinc in ZEN terminals of the dorsal horn was synchronic to reduced pain threshold, as measured by von Frey method. In a separate study, we observed intensive zinc selenite precipitation in somata...

  16. New Pharmacological Approaches Using Polyphenols on the Physiopathology of Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boadas-Vaello, Pere; Vela, Jose Miguel; Verdu, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Polyphenols constitute a group of a paramount importance within the natural products in the plant kingdom, with an approximate amount of 8000 phenolic structures currently known. Fruits, vegetables, whole grains and several other foods and beverages (as tea, chocolate and wine, for instance) are rich and important sources of polyphenols. The scientific literature provides pre-clinical experimental evidence on the antinociceptive effects of polyphenolic compounds, found in plant extracts, in animal models of neuropathic pain. But not only neuropathic pain is attenuated: in fact, nociceptive pain, caused by stimulation of nerve fibers (either somatic or visceral) responding only to stimuli approaching or exceeding harmful intensity thresholds (nociceptors), and also inflammatory pain, which is associated with tissue damage and infiltration of immune cells, are both reduced and alleviated by polyphenols. In the present work, the antinociceptive effects of polyphenols are reviewed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. NEUROPATHIC PAIN-INDUCED DEPRESSIVE-LIKE BEHAVIOR AND HIPPOCAMPAL NEUROGENESIS AND PLASTICITY ARE DEPENDENT ON TNFR1 SIGNALING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anna, Dellarole; Paul, Morton; Roberta, Brambilla; Winston, Walters; Spencer, Summer; Danielle, Bernardes; Mariagrazia, Grilli; R, Bethea John

    2014-01-01

    Patients suffering from neuropathic pain have a higher incidence of mood disorders such as depression. Increased expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been reported in neuropathic pain and depressive-like conditions and most of the pro-inflammatory effects of TNF are mediated by the TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1). Here we sought to investigate: 1) the occurrence of depressive-like behavior in chronic neuropathic pain and the associated forms of hippocampal plasticity, and 2) the involvement of TNFR1-mediated TNF signaling as a possible regulator of such events. Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in wild-type and TNFR1−/− mice. Anhedonia, weight loss and physical state were measured as symptoms of depression. Hippocampal neurogenesis, neuroplasticity, myelin remodeling and TNF/TNFRs expression were analyzed by immunohistochemical analysis and western blot assay. We found that neuropathic pain resulted in the development of depressive symptoms in a time dependent manner and was associated with profound hippocampal alterations such as impaired neurogenesis, reduced expression of neuroplasticity markers and myelin proteins. The onset of depressive-like behavior also coincided with increased hippocampal levels of TNF, and decreased expression of TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2), which were all fully restored after mice spontaneously recovered from pain. Notably, TNFR1−/− mice did not develop depressive-like symptoms after injury, nor were there changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and plasticity. Our data show that neuropathic pain induces a cluster of depressive-like symptoms and profound hippocampal plasticity that are dependent on TNF signaling through TNFR1. PMID:24938671

  18. The effects of music therapy on pain in patients with neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhan, Esra Akın; Uyar, Meltem; Eyigör, Can; Hakverdioğlu Yönt, Gülendam; Çelik, Serkan; Khorshıd, Leyla

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of relaxing music on pain intensity in patients with neuropathic pain. A quasi-experimental study, repeated measures design was used. Thirty patients, aged 18-70 years, with neuropathic pain and hospitalized in an Algology clinic were identified as a convenience sample. Participants received 60 minutes of music therapy. Classical Turkish music was played to patients using a media player (MP3) and headphones. Participants had pain scores taken immediately before the intervention and at the 30th and 60th minutes of the intervention. Data were collected over a 6-month period in 2012. The patients' mean pain intensity scores were reduced by music, and that decrease was progressive over the 30th and 60th minutes of the intervention, indicating a cumulative dose effect. The results of this study implied that the inclusion of music therapy in the routine care of patients with neuropathic pain could provide nurses with an effective practice for reducing patients' pain intensity. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Motor cortex electric stimulation for the treatment of neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter J. Fagundes-Pereyra

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Motor cortex stimulation (MCS is considered to be an effective treatment for chronic neuropathic pain. The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy of MCS for treating neuropathic pain. METHOD: 27 patients with chronic neuropathic pain were operated. Electrodes were implanted with the use of an stereotactic frame. Electrophysiological evaluations (motor stimulation and somatosensory evoked potentials were performed, with guidance by means of three-dimensional reconstruction of magnetic resonance images of the brain. 10 patients (37% presented central neuropathic pain (post-stroke pain and 17 others (63% presented peripheral neuropathic pain (brachial plexus avulsion, phantom limb pain or trigeminal pain. RESULTS: In 15 patients (57.7% the pain relief was 50% or more; while in ten patients (38.5%, more than 60% of the original pain was relieved. No differences were found in relation to central and peripheral neuropathic pain (p=0.90, pain location (p=0.81, presence of motor deficit (p=0.28 and pain duration (p=0.72. No major complications were observed. CONCLUSION: MCS was efficient for treating patients presenting chronic central or peripheral neuropathic pain.

  20. Anti-allodynic Effect of Nefopam and Morphine in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taraneh Moini Zanjani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Please cite this article as: Moini Zanjani T, Saghaei E, Ameli H, Sabetkasaei M. Anti-allodynic Effect of Nefopam and Morphine in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain. Novel Biomed 2013;1:16-22.Background: Neuropathic pain is a chronic pain due to a disorder in the peripheral or central nervous system with different pathophysiological mechanisms. Current treatments are not effective. Here we compared the analgesic effect of nefopam, and morphine in chronic constriction injury (CCI model of neuropathic pain.Methods: Male wistar rat (150-200g, n=8 were divided into 3 different groups: 1- Saline-treated CCI group, 2- Saline-treated sham group, and 3- Drug-treated CCI groups. In CCI model of neuropathic pain, the left sciatic nerve was exposed and 4 loose chromic gut ligatures were placed around the nerve proximal to the trifurcation. Ketamine 60mg/kg and xylazine 10 mg/kg were used for anesthesia. Nefopam (10, 20, 30mg/kg, and morphine (1, 3, 5mg/kg were injected 30 minutes before surgery and continued daily to day 14 post-ligation. Von Frey filaments for mechanical allodynia and acetone test for cold allodynia were respectively used as pain behavioral tests. Experiments were performed on day 0 (before surgery and days 1, 3, 5,7,10 and 14 post injury. Behavioral studies were performed in a quiet room between 9:00 to 11:00 AM. All experiments followed the IASP guidelines on ethical standards for investigation of experimental pain in animals.Results: Nefopam (20 and 30mg/kg blocked mechanical and cold allodynia during the experimental period, but the analgesic effects of morphine (5mg/kg lasted for 7 days.Conclusions: It seems that nefopam could effectively reduce pain behavior compared to morphine with reduced adverse effects.

  1. Acute Neuropathic Pain Assessment in Burn Injured Patients: A Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverner, Tarnia; Prince, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to measure the prevalence of acute neuropathic pain in patients with acute burn injuries and the demographic and clinical characteristics of neuropathic pain in this population. We also evaluated the proportion of patients who received twice-daily evaluation of nurses' documentation of neuropathic pain following introduction of a validated neuropathic pain assessment tool embedded within the pain chart. Retrospective, descriptive study. The sample comprised 86 patients with second- and third-degree burn injuries. The research setting was a burn injury unit in a provincial center in British Columbia, Canada. Medical records over a 1-year prior following introduction of assessment of neuropathic pain into pain charts were retrospectively reviewed, and data collection focused on evidence of nurses undertaking acute neuropathic pain assessment as well as prevalence of report of acute neuropathic pain signs among this patient group. Neuropathic pain was evaluated twice daily using the Douleur Neuropathique 4, a previously validated neuropathic pain assessment tool. Eighty percent of patients cared for received twice-daily neuropathic pain assessment. The prevalence of patients with neuropathic pain based on the Douleur Neuropathique instrument scores was 42%. Males reported neuropathic signs more than female patients, and patients with a greater than 10% body surface burn had a higher prevalence of neuropathic pain. Study findings suggest that patients with acute burn injury are at risk of neuropathic pain. We recommend that nurse assessment of neuropathic pain becomes routine during the acute injury phase.

  2. Neuropathic osteoarthropathy: iconographic essay; Osteoartropatia neurotrofica: ensaio iconografico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Joao Luiz; Rocha, Arthemizio Antonio Lopes [Hospital Santa Lucia, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Viana, Sergio Lopes [Clinica Radiologica Vila Rica, Brasilia DF (Brazil)]. E-mail: radiolog@uol.com.br

    2005-04-15

    Neuropathic osteoarthropathy is characterized by chronic, destructive and non-infectious bone and joint disease developing in patients with some level of loss of proprioception or pain insensitivity. Currently, diabetes mellitus is the most frequent cause of neuropathic osteoarthropathy. The classic appearance on X-rays is bone fragmentation, osteophytosis, joint effusion and joint instability, with preserved bone density. Although conventional X-rays is the most frequently used imaging modality for the evaluation of neuropathic osteoarthropathy and the role of the imaging methods are reviewed as a pictorial essay. (author)

  3. Comparisons of modern United States and Canadian malting barley cultivars with those from pre-prohibition: III. Wort sugar production during mashing

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted to compare wort sugar production during mashing of barley malts of pre-Prohibition varieties and modern elite cultivars. Four of the five modern cultivars utilized were significantly higher (Pbarley varieties at al...

  4. Monitoring of monosaccharides, oligosaccharides, ethanol and glycerol during wort fermentation by biosensors, HPLC and spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monošík, Rastislav; Magdolen, Peter; Stredanský, Miroslav; Šturdík, Ernest

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze sugar levels (namely maltose, maltotriose, glucose and fructose) and alcohols (ethanol and glycerol) during the fermentation process in wort samples by amperometric enzymatic biosensors developed by our research group for industrial application, HPLC and spectrophotometry, and to compare the suitability of the presented methods for determination of individual analytes. We can conclude that for the specific monitoring of maltose or maltotriose only the HPLC method was suitable. On the other hand, biosensors and spectrophotometry reflected a decrease in total sugar concentration better and were able to detect both glucose and fructose in the later stages of fermentation, while HPLC was not. This can be attributed to the low detection limits and good sensitivity of the proposed methods. For the ethanol and glycerol analysis all methods proved to be suitable. However, concerning the cost expenses and time analysis, biosensors represented the best option. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fermentation temperature and wort composition influence on diacetyl and 2, 3-pentanedione contents in beer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejin Jelena D.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione are important constituents of beer sensory properties. A new GC/MS method for diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione content determination was developed. This method was applied for the determination of diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione contents during beer fermentation (primary fermentation and maturation. Primary fermentations were carried out at different temperatures (8°C and 14°C. Primary fermentation temperature had a great influence on diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione formation and reduction. Formation and reduction rates increased with the primary fermentation temperature increasment. Diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione contents also increased with the corn grits increasment. Fermentations were carried out with Saccharomyces cerevisiae pure culture, specially prepared for each fermentation. This GC/MS method for diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione determination was valuable for analysing the influence of wort composition or fermentation conditions such as primary fermentation temperature on their formation and reduction.

  6. A preliminary report on stem cell therapy for neuropathic pain in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickers ER

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available E Russell Vickers,1 Elisabeth Karsten,2 John Flood,3 Richard Lilischkis21Sydney Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, NSW, Australia; 2Regeneus Ltd, Gordon, NSW, Australia; 3St Vincents Hospital, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaObjective: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been shown in animal models to attenuate chronic neuropathic pain. This preliminary study investigated if: i injections of autologous MSCs can reduce human neuropathic pain and ii evaluate the safety of the procedure.Methods: Ten subjects with symptoms of neuropathic trigeminal pain underwent liposuction. The lipoaspirate was digested with collagenase and washed with saline three times. Following centrifugation, the stromal vascular fraction was resuspended in saline, and then transferred to syringes for local injections into the pain fields. Outcome measures at 6 months assessed reduction in: i pain intensity measured by standard numerical rating scale from 0–10 and ii daily dosage requirements of antineuropathic pain medication.Results: Subjects were all female (mean age 55.3 years ± standard deviation [SD] 14.67; range 27–80 years with pain symptoms lasting from 4 months to 6 years and 5 months. Lipoaspirate collection ranged from 102–214 g with total cell numbers injected from 33 million to 162 million cells. Cell viability was 62%–91%. There were no systemic or local tissue side effects from the stem cell therapy (n=41 oral and facial injection sites. Clinical pain outcomes showed that at 6 months, 5/9 subjects had reduced both pain intensity scores and use of antineuropathic medication. The mean pain score pre-treatment was 7.5 (SD 1.58 and at 6 months had decreased to 4.3 (SD 3.28, P=0.018, Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Antineuropathic pain medication use showed 5/9 subjects reduced their need for medication (gabapentin, P=0.053, Student's t-test.Conclusion: This preliminary open-labeled study showed autologous administration of stem cells for neuropathic trigeminal pain

  7. Gracile neurons contribute to the maintenance of neuropathic pain in peripheral and central neuropathic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Young; Wang, Jigong; Gwak, Young Seob

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, we compared the roles of gracile neurons in mechanically-induced neuropathic pain caused by spinal injury and L5 spinal nerve ligation in rats. Behavioral and electrophysiological methods were used to measure mechanical allodynia in the hindpaws, and excitability of the gracile neurons in the medulla, respectively. In the spinal hemisection and spinal contusion models, mechanical allodynia developed in both hindpaws and lasted over a month. Three weeks following the hemisection, gracile neurons identified as wide-dynamic-range (WDR) and low-threshold (LT) neurons, showed increased neuronal activity to non-noxious mechanical stimuli compared to control groups, whereas the spinal contusion groups did not show evoked activity (*pmodel, mechanical allodynia developed at the ipsilateral (injured) side of the hindpaw. In addition, WDR neuronal activity at the ipsilateral gracile neurons showed a significant increase with non-noxious mechanical stimuli, whereas the LT neurons did not show significant changes (*pmodel, a lesion of the gracile nucleus attenuated the mechanical allodynia in spinal nerve ligation models. The present data suggest that gracile neurons contribute to the maintenance of non-noxious mechanically-induced neuropathic pain in both hemisection- and ligation-induced neuropathic pain in rats.

  8. Cervical Spinal Cord and Dorsal Nerve Root Stimulation for Neuropathic Upper Limb Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Adrian B; Parrent, Andrew G; MacDougall, Keith W

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a well-established treatment for chronic neuropathic pain in the lower limbs. Upper limb pain comprises a significant proportion of neuropathic pain patients, but is often difficult to target specifically and consistently with paresthesias. We hypothesized that the use of dorsal nerve root stimulation (DNRS), as an option along with SCS, would help us better relieve pain in these patients. All 35 patients trialed with spinal stimulation for upper limb pain between July 1, 2011, and October 31, 2013, were included. We performed permanent implantation in 23/35 patients based on a visual analogue scale pain score decrease of ≥50% during trial stimulation. Both the SCS and DNRS groups had significant improvements in average visual analogue scale pain scores at 12 months compared with baseline, and the majority of patients in both groups obtained ≥50% pain relief. The majority of patients in both groups were able to reduce their opioid use, and on average had improvements in Short Form-36 quality of life scores. Complication rates did not differ significantly between the two groups. Treatment with SCS or DNRS provides meaningful long-term relief of chronic neuropathic pain in the upper limbs.

  9. The roles of sodium channels in nociception: implications for mechanisms of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Wood, John N

    2011-07-01

    Animal models have provided useful insights into the development and treatment of neuropathic pain. New genetic data from both human studies and transgenic mouse models suggest that specific voltage-gated sodium channel subtypes are associated with specific types of pain and, as such, may be useful analgesic drug targets for a variety of pain types including neuropathic pain. Global voltage-gated sodium channel blockers such as lidocaine have proven efficacy in treating pain but can be limited by adverse effects when administered systemically. Selective sodium channel blockers targeting channels at the periphery (Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9) could potentially reduce the side effect profile. Individual isoforms of voltage-gated sodium channels have been linked to particular types of pain. Nav1.7 is a useful target for ameliorating acute mechanical pain and inflammatory pain, and strong evidence also suggests that Nav1.9 could be targeted for treating inflammatory pain. Selective blockers of Nav1.8 could also have clinical benefit for visceral pain. Although there is no association between a single sodium channel isoform and neuropathic pain, combined blockade of peripherally expressed isoforms Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 may prove useful. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Central Neuropathic Pain in a Patient with Multiple Sclerosis Treated Successfully with Topical Amitriptyline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Kopsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Central neuropathic pain in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS is a common debilitating symptom, which is mostly treated with tricyclic antidepressants or antiepileptics. Unfortunately, the use of these drugs is often limited due to adverse events. We investigated the analgesic effect of topical amitriptyline 5% and 10% cream in a patient with central neuropathic pain due to MS. The analgesic effect of topical amitriptyline cream on neuropathic pain was dose related. To evaluate whether this analgesic effect is due to the active compound or placebo, we conducted a double-blind placebo-controlled n-of-1 study with amitriptyline 5% cream and placebo. The instruction was to alternate the creams every week following the pattern ABAB, with an escape possibility of amitriptyline 10% cream. The result was a complete pain reduction after application of cream B, while most of the time cream A did not reduce the pain. The patient could correctly unblind both creams, determining B as active. She noted that in the week of using the active cream no allodynia was present, with a carryover effect of one day.

  11. Orofacial Neuropathic Pain Leads to a Hyporesponsive Barrel Cortex with Enhanced Structural Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Karine; Rivière, Sébastien; Lenkei, Zsolt; Férézou, Isabelle; Pezet, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is a long-lasting debilitating condition that is particularly difficult to treat due to the lack of identified underlying mechanisms. Although several key contributing processes have been described at the level of the spinal cord, very few studies have investigated the supraspinal mechanisms underlying chronic pain. Using a combination of approaches (cortical intrinsic imaging, immunohistochemical and behavioural analysis), our study aimed to decipher the nature of functional and structural changes in a mouse model of orofacial neuropathic pain, focusing on cortical areas involved in various pain components. Our results show that chronic neuropathic orofacial pain is associated with decreased haemodynamic responsiveness to whisker stimulation in the barrel field cortex. This reduced functional activation is likely due to the increased basal neuronal activity (measured indirectly using cFos and phospho-ERK immunoreactivity) observed in several cortical areas, including the contralateral barrel field, motor and cingulate cortices. In the same animals, immunohistochemical analysis of markers for active pre- or postsynaptic elements (Piccolo and phospho-Cofilin, respectively) revealed an increased immunofluorescence in deep cortical layers of the contralateral barrel field, motor and cingulate cortices. These results suggest that long-lasting orofacial neuropathic pain is associated with exacerbated neuronal activity and synaptic plasticity at the cortical level.

  12. Synaptic Homeostasis and Allostasis in the Dentate Gyrus Caused by Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Rui Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been generally accepted that pain can cause imbalance between excitation and inhibition (homeostasis at the synaptic level. However, it remains poorly understood how this imbalance (allostasis develops in the CNS under different pain conditions. Here, we analyzed the changes in both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission and modulation of the dentate gyrus (DG under two pain conditions with different etiology and duration. First, it was revealed that the functions of the input-output (I/O curves for evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs following the perforant path (PP stimulation were gained under both acute inflammatory and chronic neuropathic pain conditions relative to the controls. However, the functions of I/O curves for the PP-evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs differed between the two conditions, namely it was greatly gained under inflammatory condition, but was reduced under neuropathic condition in reverse. Second, both the frequency and amplitude of miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs were increased under inflammatory condition, however a decrease in frequency of mIPSCs was observed under neuropathic condition. Finally, the spike discharge of the DG granule cells in response to current injection was significantly increased by neuropathic pain condition, however, no different change was found between inflammatory pain condition and the control. These results provide another line of evidence showing homeostatic and allostatic modulation of excitatory synaptic transmission by inhibitory controls under different pathological pain conditions, hence implicating use of different therapeutic approaches to maintain the homeostasis between excitation and inhibition while treating different conditions of pathological pain.

  13. Minocycline Does Not Decrease Intensity of Neuropathic Pain Intensity, But Does Improve Its Affective Dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumitani, Masahiko; Ueda, Hiroshi; Hozumi, Jun; Inoue, Reo; Kogure, Takamichi; Yamada, Yoshitsugu; Kogure, Takamichi

    2016-01-01

    Recent understanding of the neuron-glia communication shed light on an important role of microglia to develop neuropathic pain The analgesic effect of minocycline on neuropathic pain is promising but it remains unclear in clinical settings. This study included 20 patients with neuropathic pain of varied etiologies. We administered 100 mg/day of minocycline for 1 week and then 200 mg/day for 3 weeks, as an open-label adjunct to conventional analgesics. An 11-point numerical rating scale. (NRS) and the short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ) were used to evaluate pain severity. The data were collected at baseline and after 4 weeks of therapy and analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. All except two of the patients tolerated the full dose of minocycline. There was no significant improvement in the scoring of NRS (5.6 ± 1.2 at baseline vs. 5.3 ± 1.9 at 4 weeks; P =.60). The total score of the SF-MPQ decreased significantly (17.2 ± 7.4 vs. 13.9 ± 9.6; P =.02), particularly in the affective subscale (4.4 ± 2.7 vs. 3.3 ± 3.6; P =.007) but not so in the sensory subscale (12.8 ± 5.2 vs. 10.6 ± 6.2; P =.06). We conclude that minocycline failed to decrease pain intensity but succeeded in reducing the affective dimension associated with neuropathic pain.

  14. Biochanin-A attenuates neuropathic pain in diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswarlu Chundi

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: Biochanin-A demonstrated better efficacy in reversing mechanical allodynia than mechanical hyperalgesia. Biochanin-A could be a good drug candidate for further studies to establish the mechanism of attenuation of neuropathic pain.

  15. Pharmacologic management of neuropathic pain: Evidence-based recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dworkin, Robert H.; O'Connor, Alec B.; Backonja, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Patients with neuropathic pain (NP) are challenging to manage and evidence-based clinical recommendations for pharmacologic management are needed. Systematic literature reviews, randomized clinical trials, and existing guidelines were evaluated at a consensus meeting. Medications were considered...

  16. Neuropathic pain and spasticity: intricate consequences of spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix

    2017-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: The 2016 International Spinal Cord Society Sir Ludwig Guttmann Lecture. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this review is to identify different symptoms and signs of neuropathic pain and spasticity after spinal cord injury (SCI) and to present different methods of assessing them. The objective......', 'neuropathic', 'spasticity', 'spasms' and 'spinal cord injury'. RESULTS: This review identified different domains of neuropathic pain and spasticity after SCI and methods to assess them in preclinical and clinical research. Different factors important for pain description include location, onset, pain...... of SCI, and a careful examination and characterization of the symptoms and signs, are a prerequisite for understanding the relationship between neuropathic pain and spasticity and the intricate underlying mechanisms.Spinal Cord advance online publication, 11 July 2017; doi:10.1038/sc.2017.70....

  17. Prevalence of Neuropathic Pain and the Need for Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pat Morley-Forster

    2006-01-01

    There is an unmet need for the treatment of neuropathic pain as evidenced by reports of pain despite the use of opioids and anticonvulsants, continuing psychological difficulties, lack of access to treatments and patients seeking access to complementary therapy.

  18. Methadone for neuropathic pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicol, Ewan D; Ferguson, McKenzie C; Schumann, Roman

    2017-05-17

    This review replaces an earlier review, "Methadone for chronic non-cancer pain in adults". This review serves to update the original and includes only studies of neuropathic pain. Methadone belongs to a class of analgesics known as opioids, that are considered the cornerstone of therapy for moderate-to-severe postsurgical pain and pain due to life-threatening illnesses; however, their use in neuropathic pain is controversial. Methadone has many characteristics that differentiate it from other opioids, which suggests that it may have a different efficacy and safety profile. To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse events of methadone for chronic neuropathic pain in adults. We searched the following databases: CENTRAL (CRSO), MEDLINE (Ovid), and Embase (Ovid), and two clinical trial registries. We also searched the reference lists of retrieved articles. The date of the most recent search was 30 November 2016. We included randomised, double-blind studies of two weeks' duration or longer, comparing methadone (in any dose, administered by any route, and in any formulation) with placebo or another active treatment in chronic neuropathic pain. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Two review authors independently considered trials for inclusion in the review, assessed risk of bias, and extracted data. There were insufficient data to perform pooled analyses. We assessed the overall quality of the evidence for each outcome using GRADE and created a 'Summary of findings' table. We included three studies, involving 105 participants. All were cross-over studies, one involving 19 participants with diverse neuropathic pain syndromes, the other two involving 86 participants with postherpetic neuralgia. Study phases ranged from 20 days to approximately eight weeks. All administered methadone orally, in doses ranging from 10 mg to 80 mg daily. Comparators were primarily placebo, but one study also included morphine and tricyclic antidepressants

  19. Electroacupuncture attenuates neuropathic pain after brachial plexus injury

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shenyu; Tang, Hailiang; Zhou, Junming; Gu, Yudong

    2014-01-01

    Electroacupuncture has traditionally been used to treat pain, but its effect on pain following brachial plexus injury is still unknown. In this study, rat models of an avulsion injury to the left brachial plexus root (associated with upper-limb chronic neuropathic pain) were given electroacupuncture stimulation at bilateral Quchi (LI11), Hegu (LI04), Zusanli (ST36) and Yanglingquan (GB34). After electroacupuncture therapy, chronic neuropathic pain in the rats’ upper limbs was significantly at...

  20. The potential role of neuropathic mechanisms in dry eye syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    McMonnies, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Dry eye syndromes can involve both nociceptive and neuropathic symptoms. Nociceptive symptoms are the normal physiological responses to noxious stimuli. Neuropathic symptoms are caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system and can be the result of hypersensitisation of peripheral or central corneal and conjunctival somatosensory nerves. For example, inflammation could induce neuroplastic peripheral sensitisation of the ocular surface or lid wiper and exacerbate nociceptiv...

  1. Duloxetine in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormseth, Michelle J; Scholz, Beth A; Boomershine, Chad S

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy affects up to 70% of diabetics, and diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP) is the most common and debilitating of the diabetic neuropathies. DPNP significantly reduces quality of life and increases management costs in affected patients. Despite the impact of DPNP, management is poor with one-quarter of patients receiving no treatment and many treated with medications having little or no efficacy in managing DPNP. Duloxetine is one of two drugs approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for DPNP management. Duloxetine is a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) proven safe, effective, and cost-saving in reducing DPNP symptoms at a dose of 60 mg/day. Duloxetine doses greater than 60 mg/day for DPNP management are not recommended since they are no more efficacious and associated with more side effects; addition of pregabalin or gabapentin for these patients may be beneficial. Side effects of duloxetine are generally mild and typical for the SNRI class including nausea, dizziness, somnolence, fatigue, sweating, dry mouth, constipation, and diarrhea. Given its other indications, duloxetine is a particularly good choice for DPNP treatment in patients with coexisting depression, anxiety, fibromyalgia, or chronic musculoskeletal pain. Duloxetine treatment had no clinically significant effect on glycemic control and did not increase the risk of cardiovascular events in diabetes patients. However, duloxetine use should be avoided in patients with hepatic disease or severe renal impairment. Given its safety, efficacy, and tolerability, duloxetine is an excellent choice for DPNP treatment in many patients.

  2. The effect of exercise frequency on neuropathic pain and pain-related cellular reactions in the spinal cord and midbrain in a rat sciatic nerve injury model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumizono M

    2018-02-01

    neuropathic pain was accelerated through the regulation of glial activation, BDNF expression, and the endogenous opioid system. The expression of BDNF and endogenous opioid in relation to exercise-induced alleviation of neuropathic pain differed in the HFE and LFE groups. The effects of exercise-induced alleviation of mechanical hypersensitivity were reversed by the administration of naloxone. Conclusion: The LFE and HFE program reduced neuropathic pain. Our findings indicated that aerobic exercise-induced alleviated neuropathic pain through the regulation of glial cell activation, expression of BDNF in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn, and the endogenous opioid system. Keywords: exercise, neuropathic pain, rehabilitation, glial cells, endogenous opioid

  3. Prevalence of neuropathic pain in early multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmann, Henrik; Biberacher, Viola; Tiemann, Laura; Buck, Dorothea; Loleit, Verena; Selter, Rebecca C; Knier, Benjamin; Tölle, Thomas R; Mühlau, Mark; Berthele, Achim; Hemmer, Bernhard; Ploner, Markus

    2016-08-01

    Pain is considered a frequent symptom in multiple sclerosis. Neuropathic pain is the type of pain most closely related to the pathology of multiple sclerosis and its prevalence estimates vary largely. We prospectively assessed the prevalence of neuropathic pain in patients with early multiple sclerosis and investigated the association of neuropathic pain with other clinical parameters. A total of 377 outpatients with multiple sclerosis at an early disease stage were included in this prospective study. Mean disease duration was 4.2 years, mean Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score was 1.6, 96.8% of patients were classified as having relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Neuropathic pain was assessed using the PainDETECT questionnaire (PDQ). Depression, fatigue and cognition were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Fatigue Scale for Motor and Cognitive Functions (FSMC) and the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test. PDQ scores indicative of neuropathic pain were found in 4.2% of patients. Regression analysis revealed EDSS, BDI and FMSC scores as strongest predictors of PDQ scores. Neuropathic pain appears to be less frequent in early multiple sclerosis than expected and is significantly associated with disability, depression and fatigue. The assessment and therapy of pain in multiple sclerosis should thus take into account neuropsychiatric symptoms already at early disease stages. © The Author(s), 2015.

  4. St. John's wort may relieve negative effects of stress on spatial working memory by changing synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimiuk, Emil; Holownia, Adam; Braszko, Jan J

    2011-04-01

    Beneficial effects of St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) in the treatment of stress-evoked memory impairment were recently described. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that St. John's wort alleviates stress- and corticosterone-related memory impairments by restoring levels of synaptic plasticity proteins: neuromoduline (GAP-43) and synaptophysin (SYP) in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Stressed and corticosterone-treated rats displayed a decline in the acquisition of spatial working memory (p stressed and corticosterone-injected rats (p stress and prolonged corticosterone administration on working memory measured in the BM test. The herb significantly (p working memory in comparison with control and alleviated some other negative effects of stress on cognitive functions. These findings increase our understanding of the reaction of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex to stressful assaults and provide new insight into the possible actions of H. perforatum in the treatment of patients with impaired adaptation to environmental stressors and simultaneously suffering from cognitive impairment.

  5. Evaluation of Analgesic Effects of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Allium cepa L. in Animal Model of Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Mahdipour

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Neuropathic pain is a chronic pain that affects on the patient’s quality of life. Use of herbal instead of synthetic drugs recently has been increased due to side effects of synthetic drugs and herbal effective components. Flavonoids are herbal compounds that have analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. Because Allium cepa L. has a great amount of flavonoids, this study has been designed to evaluate analgesic effects of alcoholic extract of Allium cepa L. on neuropathic pain behavior in chronic constriction injury model in rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI model in Rats. Animals were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=10 for each: Sham, CCI model, receiving red onion hydroalcoholic extract at a dose of 100 mg/kg and a group receiving gabapentin (100 mg/kg. Red onion extract and gabapentin were administered by gavage for 21 days. Using thermal hyperalgesia, mechanical and thermal allodynia tests, the analgesic effects of extract have been measured. Results: Findings of this study revealed that CCI surgery on rats induced hyperalgesia, mechanical and thermal allodynia. Daily intakes of alcoholic extract of red onion and gabapentin significantly increase the paw withdrawal latency; increase the threshold to mechanical allodynia and decrease in response to acetone. Conclusion: Oral use of alcoholic extract of Allium cepa L. reduces neuropathic pain behavior in CCI model in rats.

  6. Aloperine attenuated neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury via anti-oxidation activity and suppression of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ya-Qiong [Department of Pharmacology, Ningxia Medical university, Yinchuan 750000 (China); Jin, Shao-Ju [Department of Pharmacology, Ningxia Medical university, Yinchuan 750000 (China); Luohe Medical College, Luohe 462002, Henan Province (China); Liu, Ning [Department of Pharmacology, Ningxia Medical university, Yinchuan 750000 (China); Li, Yu-Xiang [College of Nursing, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan 750004 (China); Zheng, Jie [Department of Pharmacology, Ningxia Medical university, Yinchuan 750000 (China); Ma, Lin [Ningxia Key Lab of Craniocerebral Diseases of Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan 750004 (China); Du, Juan; Zhou, Ru [Department of Pharmacology, Ningxia Medical university, Yinchuan 750000 (China); Zhao, Cheng-Jun [Key Laboratory of Fertility Preservation and Maintenance of Ministry of Education, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan 750000 (China); Niu, Yang [Key Laboratory of Hui Ethnic Medicine Modernization, Ministry of Education, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan 750004 (China); Sun, Tao [Ningxia Key Lab of Craniocerebral Diseases of Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan 750004 (China); Yu, Jian-Qiang, E-mail: Yujq910315@163.com [Department of Pharmacology, Ningxia Medical university, Yinchuan 750000 (China); Luohe Medical College, Luohe 462002, Henan Province (China)

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Aloperine has anti-nociceptive effects on neuropathic pain induced CCI. • Aloperine reduces ROS in neuropathic pain mice. • Aloperine down-regulates the expression of NF-κB and its downstream pro-inflammatory cytokines in neuropathic pain mice. - Abstract: Objective: To investigate whether aloperine (ALO) has antinociceptive effects on neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury, whether ALO reduces ROS against neuropathic pain, and what are the mechanisms involved in ALO attenuated neuropathic pain. Methods: Mechanical and cold allodynia, thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia and spinal thermal hyperalgesia were estimated by behavior methods such as Von Frey filaments, cold-plate, radiant heat, paw pressure and tail immersion on one day before surgery and days 7, 8, 10, 12 and 14 after surgery, respectively. In addition, T-AOC, GSH-PX, T-AOC and MDA in the spinal cord (L4/5) were measured to evaluate anti-oxidation activity of ALO on neuropathic pain. Expressions of NF-κB and pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β) in the spinal cord (L4/5) were analyzed by using Western blot. Results: Administration of ALO (80 mg/kg and 40 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased paw withdrawal threshold, paw pressure, paw withdrawal latencies, tail-curling latencies, T-AOC, GSH-PX and T-SOD concentration, reduced the numbers of paw lifts and MDA concentration compared to CCI group. ALO attenuated CCI induced up-regulation of expressions of NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β at the dose of 80 mg/kg (i.p.). Pregabalin produced similar effects serving as positive control at the dose of 10 mg/kg (i.p.). Conclusion: ALO has antinociceptive effects on neuropathic pain induced by CCI. The antinociceptive effects of ALO against neuropathic pain is related to reduction of ROS, via suppression of NF-κB pathway.

  7. The Effect of Natural Mulches on Crop Performance, Weed Suppression and Biochemical Constituents of Catnip and St. John's Wort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duppong, L M; Delate, K; Liebman, M; Horton, R; Romero, F; Kraus, G; Petrich, J; Chowdbury, P K

    2004-01-01

    Because of expanding markets for high-value niche crops, opportunities have increased for the production of medicinal herbs in the USA. An experiment was conducted in 2001 and 2002 near Gilbert, IA, to study crop performance, weed suppression, and environmental conditions associated with the use of several organic mulches in the production of two herbs, catnip (Nepeta cataria L.) and St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum L. 'Helos'). Treatments were arranged in a completely randomized design and included a positive (hand-weeded) control, a negative (nonweeded) control, oat straw, a flax straw mat, and a nonwoven wool mat. Catnip plant height was significantly greater in the oat straw than the other treatments at 4 wk through 6 wk in 2001; at 4 to 8 wk in 2002, catnip plant height and width was significantly lower in the negative control compared with the other treatments. Catnip yield was significantly higher in the flax straw mat than all other treatments in 2001. In 2002, St. John's wort yields were not statistically different in any treatments. All weed management treatments had significantly fewer weeds than the non-weeded rows in 2002. Total weed density comparisons in each crop from 2 yr showed fewer weeds present in the flax straw and wool mat treatments compared with positive control plots. There was no significant weed management treatment effect on the concentration of the target compounds, nepetalactone in catnip and pseudohypericin-hypericin in St. John's wort, although there was a trend toward higher concentrations in the flax straw treatment.

  8. Neuropathic orofacial pain part 1--prevalence and pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, E R; Cousins, M J

    2000-04-01

    Neuropathic pain is defined as "pain initiated or caused by a primary lesion or dysfunction in the nervous system". Neuropathic orofacial pain has previously been known as "atypical odontalgia" (AO) and "phantom tooth pain". The patient afflicted with neuropathic oral/orofacial pain may present to the dentist with a persistent, severe pain, yet there are no clearly identifiable clinical or radiographic abnormalities. Accordingly, multiple endodontic procedures may be instigated to remove the likely anatomical source of the pain, yet the pain persists. There have been few studies and limited patient numbers investigating the condition. Two retrospective studies revealed the incidence of persistent pain following endodontic treatment to be 3-6% and 5% of patients; one author with wide experience in assessing the condition estimated its prevalence at 125,000 individuals in the USA alone. In one study, 50% of neuropathic orofacial pain patients reported persistent pain specifically following endodontic treatment. Patients predisposed to the condition may include those suffering from recurrent cluster or migraine headaches. Neuropathic pain states include postherpetic neuralgia (shingles) and phantom limb/stump pain. The aberrant developmental neurobiology leading to this pain state is complex. Neuropathic pain serves no protective function, in contrast to physiological pain that warns of noxious stimuli likely to result in tissue damage. The relevant clinical features of neuropathic pain include: (i) precipitating factors such as trauma or disease (infection), and often a delay in onset after initial injury (days-months), (ii) typical complaints such as dysaesthesias (abnormal unpleasant sensations), pain that may include burning, and paroxysmal, lancinating or sharp qualities, and pain in an area of sensory deficit, (iii) on physical examination there may be hyperalgesia, allodynia and sympathetic hyperfunction, and (iv) the pathophysiology includes deafferentation

  9. Enhanced Wort Fermentation withDe NovoLager Hybrids Adapted to High-Ethanol Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogerus, Kristoffer; Holmström, Sami; Gibson, Brian

    2018-02-15

    Interspecific hybridization is a valuable tool for developing and improving brewing yeast in a number of industry-relevant aspects. However, the genomes of newly formed hybrids can be unstable. Here, we exploited this trait by adapting four brewing yeast strains, three of which were de novo interspecific lager hybrids with different ploidy levels, to high ethanol concentrations in an attempt to generate variant strains with improved fermentation performance in high-gravity wort. Through a batch fermentation-based adaptation process and selection based on a two-step screening process, we obtained eight variant strains which we compared to the wild-type strains in 2-liter-scale wort fermentations replicating industrial conditions. The results revealed that the adapted variants outperformed the strains from which they were derived, and the majority also possessed several desirable brewing-relevant traits, such as increased ester formation and ethanol tolerance, as well as decreased diacetyl formation. The variants obtained from the polyploid hybrids appeared to show greater improvements in fermentation performance than those derived from diploid strains. Interestingly, it was not only the hybrid strains, but also the Saccharomyces cerevisiae parent strain, that appeared to adapt and showed considerable changes in genome size. Genome sequencing and ploidy analysis revealed that changes had occurred at both the chromosome and single nucleotide levels in all variants. Our study demonstrates the possibility of improving de novo lager yeast hybrids through adaptive evolution by generating stable and superior variants that possess traits relevant to industrial lager beer fermentation. IMPORTANCE Recent studies have shown that hybridization is a valuable tool for creating new and diverse strains of lager yeast. Adaptive evolution is another strain development tool that can be applied in order to improve upon desirable traits. Here, we apply adaptive evolution to newly

  10. Topical Treatments for Localized Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Roberto; Symeonidou, Z; Bartolo, M

    2017-03-01

    Topical therapeutic approaches in localized neuropathic pain (LNP) syndromes are increasingly used by both specialists and general practitioners, with a potentially promising effect on pain reduction. In this narrative review, we describe the available compounds for topical use in LNP syndromes and address their potential efficacy according to the literature. Local anaesthetics (e.g., lidocaine, bupivacaine and mepivacaine), as well as general anaesthetic agents (e.g., ketamine), muscle relaxants (e.g., baclofen), capsaicin, anti-inflammatory drugs (e.g., diclofenac), salicylates, antidepressants (e.g., amitriptyline and doxepin), α2 adrenergic agents (e.g., clonidine), or even a combination of them have been tested in various applications for the treatment of LNP. Few of them have reached a sufficient level of evidence to support systematic use as treatment options. Relatively few systemic side effects or drug-drug interactions and satisfactory efficacy seem to be the benefits of topical treatments. More well-organized and tailored studies are necessary for the further conceptualization of topical treatments for LNP.

  11. NEUROPATHIC JOINT- A LIFESAVING MODE OF MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinodkumar B. P

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available PRESENTATION OF CASE A 60-year-old gentleman came into the OPD with inability to walk, nonhealing ulcer in lateral aspect of Right ankle of 8 months’ duration, deformed ankle and foot since 2 years. On examination, unstable ankle with severe infection, serosanguinous discharge from the ulcer. Culture showed Pseudomonas sensitive to ciprofloxacin. The skin was unhealthy and black. General condition: moderately built and nourished. Facial puffiness, pedal oedema. Clinical Exam: fever, oedema over legs and face. Culture and sensitivity done and accordingly antibiotics were given. BP=180/100 (sitting Rt. arm; RBS=280; Creatinine=2.6. He was undergoing IP Care in different hospitals for treatment of infection, renal failure, cardiac diseases, mental depression, etc. Previous history- He has diabetes since 15 years, hypertensive from 10 years and having peripheral neuropathy, nephropathy and retinopathy. Pain and numbness of Rt. lower limb from past 1.5 yrs. Investigations: X-ray shows very late stage of neuropathic joint ankle with bony destruction of talus, calcaneum, medial malleolus and lateral malleolus.

  12. Surgical experience of laparoscopic retroperitoneal triple neurectomy for a patient with chronic neuropathic inguinodynia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Narita

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Laparoscopic retroperitoneal triple neurectomy is useful for treating refractory neuropathic pain. The diagnosis of neuropathic pain via thorough preoperative assessment is vital for procedure success because the procedure would not be effective for other types of pain.

  13. A local anesthetic, ropivacaine, suppresses activated microglia via a nerve growth factor-dependent mechanism and astrocytes via a nerve growth factor-independent mechanism in neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakamoto Atsuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local anesthetics alleviate neuropathic pain in some cases in clinical practice, and exhibit longer durations of action than those predicted on the basis of the pharmacokinetics of their blocking effects on voltage-dependent sodium channels. Therefore, local anesthetics may contribute to additional mechanisms for reversal of the sensitization of nociceptive pathways that occurs in the neuropathic pain state. In recent years, spinal glial cells, microglia and astrocytes, have been shown to play critical roles in neuropathic pain, but their participation in the analgesic effects of local anesthetics remains largely unknown. Results Repetitive epidural administration of ropivacaine reduced the hyperalgesia induced by chronic constrictive injury of the sciatic nerve. Concomitantly with this analgesia, ropivacaine suppressed the increases in the immunoreactivities of CD11b and glial fibrillary acidic protein in the dorsal spinal cord, as markers of activated microglia and astrocytes, respectively. In addition, epidural administration of a TrkA-IgG fusion protein that blocks the action of nerve growth factor (NGF, which was upregulated by ropivacaine in the dorsal root ganglion, prevented the inhibitory effect of ropivacaine on microglia, but not astrocytes. The blockade of NGF action also abolished the analgesic effect of ropivacaine on neuropathic pain. Conclusions Ropivacaine provides prolonged analgesia possibly by suppressing microglial activation in an NGF-dependent manner and astrocyte activation in an NGF-independent manner in the dorsal spinal cord. Local anesthetics, including ropivacaine, may represent a new approach for glial cell inhibition and, therefore, therapeutic strategies for neuropathic pain.

  14. Trigeminal nerve anatomy in neuropathic and non-neuropathic orofacial pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Sophie L; Gustin, Sylvia M; Eykman, Elizabeth N; Fowler, Gordon; Peck, Christopher C; Murray, Greg M; Henderson, Luke A

    2013-08-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia, painful trigeminal neuropathy, and painful temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are chronic orofacial pain conditions that are thought to have fundamentally different etiologies. Trigeminal neuralgia and neuropathy are thought to arise from damage to or pressure on the trigeminal nerve, whereas TMD results primarily from peripheral nociceptor activation. This study sought to assess the volume and microstructure of the trigeminal nerve in these 3 conditions. In 9 neuralgia, 18 neuropathy, 20 TMD, and 26 healthy controls, the trigeminal root entry zone was selected on high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance images and the volume (mm(3)) calculated. Additionally, using diffusion-tensor images (DTIs), the mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy values of the trigeminal nerve root were calculated. Trigeminal neuralgia patients displayed a significant (47%) decrease in nerve volume but no change in DTI values. Conversely, trigeminal neuropathy subjects displayed a significant (40%) increase in nerve volume but again no change in DTI values. In contrast, TMD subjects displayed no change in volume or DTI values. The data suggest that the changes occurring within the trigeminal nerve are not uniform in all orofacial pain conditions. These structural and volume changes may have implications in diagnosis and management of different forms of chronic orofacial pain. This study reveals that neuropathic orofacial pain conditions are associated with changes in trigeminal nerve volume, whereas non-neuropathic orofacial pain is not associated with any change in nerve volume. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Orofacial pain after invasive dental procedures: neuropathic pain in perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spierings, Egilius L H; Dhadwal, Shuchi

    2015-01-01

    The neurologist is very familiar with the painful neuropathies of the trunk and extremities but, generally, to a lesser extent with those of the head and face. Of the latter, the neurologist is particularly familiar with ophthalmic zoster and trigeminal neuralgia. This review deals with neuropathic orofacial pain: (1) to highlight its presentation; and (2) to contrast it with that of neuropathic pain elsewhere in the body, including the head, from which it seems to differ significantly. The reason for the difference is also discussed as well as its implications for the diagnosis of orofacial pain as neuropathic. In the cases of neuropathic orofacial pain presented, the pain followed invasive dental procedures, making it relatively homogenous in terms of its etiology. The cases are contrasted with those of cranial nonorofacial and of noncranial painful neuropathy. It is suggested that the presence of abnormal sensory responses to touch, in the sense of paresthesia, dysesthesia, or allodynia, is a prerequisite for the diagnosis of neuropathic pain, when other, motor or sensory, signs of nerve injury ordinarily guiding the diagnosis are lacking, as is often the case in the face.

  16. Neuropathic Minimally Invasive Surgeries (NEMESIS):: Percutaneous Diabetic Foot Surgery and Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Roslyn J

    2016-09-01

    Patients with peripheral neuropathy associated with ulceration are the nemesis of the orthopedic foot and ankle surgeon. Diabetic foot syndrome is the leading cause of peripheral neuropathy, and its prevalence continues to increase at an alarming rate. Poor wound healing, nonunion, infection, and risk of amputation contribute to the understandable caution toward this patient group. Significant metalwork is required to hold these technically challenging deformities. Neuropathic Minimally Invasive Surgeries is an addition to the toolbox of management of the diabetic foot. It may potentially reduce the risk associated with large wounds and bony correction in this patient group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Treatment of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome as a neuropathic pain condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Vas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A lady of 52 years with painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC presented with chronic pelvic pain, irritative voiding with sphincter dominance on urodynamics. 3 yrs of oral analgesics, antispasmodics and intravesical therapy was ineffective. We surmised her pain, and irritative voiding to be secondary to constant straining against a dysfunctional pelvic floor. We treated PBS/IC as a neuropathic phenomenon with a combination of neuromodulator medications and continuous caudal epidural analgesia to reduce the pain induced peripheral and central sensitisation. Botulinum toxin type A injection into pelvic floor muscles appeared to address their dysfuction. Clinical and urodynamics response was encouraging.

  18. The lager yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus removes and transforms Fusarium trichothecene mycotoxins during fermentation of brewer's wort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanail, Alexis V; Gibson, Brian; Han, Li; Peltonen, Kimmo; Ollilainen, Velimatti; Jestoi, Marika; Laitila, Arja

    2016-07-15

    An investigation was conducted to determine the fate of deoxynivalenol, deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside, HT-2 toxin and T-2 toxin, during a four-day fermentation with the lager yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus. The influence of excessive mycotoxin concentrations on yeast growth, productivity and viability were also assessed. Mycotoxins were dosed at varying concentrations to 11.5° Plato wort. Analysis of yeast revealed that presence of the toxins even at concentrations up to 10,000 μg/L had little or no effect on sugar utilisation, alcohol production, pH, yeast growth or cell viability. Of the dosed toxin amounts 9-34% were removed by the end of fermentation, due to physical binding and/or biotransformation by yeast. Deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside was not reverted to its toxic precursor during fermentation. Processing of full-scan liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) data with MetaboLynx and subsequent LC-QTOF-MS/MS measurements resulted in annotation of several putative metabolites. De(acetylation), glucosylation and sulfonation were the main metabolic pathways activated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Extraction of resinoids from St. John's wort (Hypericumperforatum L: II. Modeling of extraction kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljković Vlada B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of resinoids from St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum L was studied in a series of two papers. While the first part dealt with the effects of the operating conditions on the yield of resinoids (total extract and process optimization, the mathematical models of extraction kinetics were analyzed in the second one. The extraction was carried out using an aqueous solution of ethanol (70 and 95 % v/v at the hydromodulus (plant material to solvent ratio, w/v of 1:5 or 1:10. The plant material was disintegrated and divided into three fractions (particle mean size 0.23, 0.57 and 1.05 mm. The temperature was 25, 50 or about 80°C (boiling temperature. Three models were applied for modeling the extraction kinetics: a model based on the film theory, a model based on unsteady state diffusion through solid material and the empirical Ponomarev equation. Because of its physical basis, the relative simplicity and good fitting of the experimental data, the model based on the film theory could be proposed for mathematical modeling of solid-liquid etraction processes.

  20. St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) diminishes cognitive impairment caused by the chronic restraint stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimiuk, Emil; Walesiuk, Anna; Braszko, Jan J

    2005-03-01

    In this study we tested the hypothesis that St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) may counteract stress-induced memory impairment. Object recognition test and Morris water maze were used to determine whether administration of H. perforatum (350 mg kg(-1) for 21 days), standardized to 0.3% hypericin content, protects against non-spatial and/or spatial memory impairments due to chronic restraint stress (2h daily for 21 days). A group of rats administered the exogenous corticosterone at the dose of 5 mg kg(-1) daily for 21 days, yielding its similar plasma levels as these observed in stress was run in parallel. In the first experiment all rats were tested for recognition memory in the object recognition test. On the following day, the animals were tested in open field and elevated "plus" maze to control for the contribution of respectively, motor and emotional effects of our treatments to the memory tests. In the second experiment, new group of stressed animals was tested for spatial memory in the water maze. We observed that H. perforatum prevented the deleterious effects of both chronic restraint stress and long-term corticosterone on learning and memory as measured in both, the object recognition and the water maze tests. The herb not only prevented stress- and corticosterone-induced memory impairments, but it significantly improved recognition memory (pstress memory disorders.

  1. Estimation of Dermatological Application of Creams with St. John’s Wort Oil Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušanka Runjaić-Antić

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Oleum Hyperici, the oil extract of St. John’s Wort (SJW, is one of the oldest folk remedies, traditionally used in the topical treatment of wounds, bruises, ulcers, cuts, burns, hemorrhoids and also as an antiseptic. Considering the advantageous characteristics of emulsion applications, in the present study we have formulated three O/W creams containing 15% (w/v of SJW oil extract as an active ingredient. The aim was to estimate dermatological application of the prepared creams for the abovementioned indications. The extracts were prepared according to the prescriptions from traditional medicine, however with different vegetable oils used as an extractant, namely: Olive, palm and sunflower oil. The investigated O/W creams demonstrated significant antiinflammatory effects in an in vivo double-blind randomized study, using a sodium lauryl sulphate test. Both skin parameters assessed in the study (electrical capacitance and erythema index, were restored to the baseline value after a seven-day treatment with the tested creams. Almost all investigated SJW oil extracts and corresponding creams displayed the same antimicrobial activity against the most of the investigated microorganisms with obtained minimal inhibitory concentrations values of 1,280 µg/mL, 2,560 µg/mL or >2,560 µg/mL.

  2. Estimation of dermatological application of creams with St. John's Wort oil extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsić, Ivana; Zugić, Ana; Tadić, Vanja; Tasić-Kostov, Marija; Mišić, Dušan; Primorac, Marija; Runjaić-Antić, Dušanka

    2011-12-28

    Oleum Hyperici, the oil extract of St. John's Wort (SJW), is one of the oldest folk remedies, traditionally used in the topical treatment of wounds, bruises, ulcers, cuts, burns, hemorrhoids and also as an antiseptic. Considering the advantageous characteristics of emulsion applications, in the present study we have formulated three O/W creams containing 15% (w/v) of SJW oil extract as an active ingredient. The aim was to estimate dermatological application of the prepared creams for the abovementioned indications. The extracts were prepared according to the prescriptions from traditional medicine, however with different vegetable oils used as an extractant, namely: Olive, palm and sunflower oil. The investigated O/W creams demonstrated significant antiinflammatory effects in an in vivo double-blind randomized study, using a sodium lauryl sulphate test. Both skin parameters assessed in the study (electrical capacitance and erythema index), were restored to the baseline value after a seven-day treatment with the tested creams. Almost all investigated SJW oil extracts and corresponding creams displayed the same antimicrobial activity against the most of the investigated microorganisms with obtained minimal inhibitory concentrations values of 1,280 µg/mL, 2,560 µg/mL or >2,560 µg/mL.

  3. Upregulation of casein kinase 1ε in dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord after mouse spinal nerve injury contributes to neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong Shuqin

    2009-12-01

    marked anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effects on the neuropathic mice. In addition, primary afferent fiber-evoked spinal excitatory responses in the neuropathic mice were reduced by IC261. Conclusions These results suggest that CK1ε plays important physiological roles in neuropathic pain signaling. Therefore CK1ε is a useful target for analgesic drug development.

  4. Effect of St.John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) oily extract for the care and treatment of pressure sores; a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücel, Ali; Kan, Yüksel; Yesilada, Erdem; Akın, Onat

    2017-01-20

    Topical formulations such as oily extracts or ointments prepared with the flowering aerial parts of St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum L., Hypericaceae) have been used in the management of a wide range dermatological problems including superficial wounds and burns, bruises, contusions and many others in the worldwide traditional medicines. This is the first case study reporting the beneficial effects of an oily extract of St. John's wort in the treatment of pressure sores in a intensive care unit (ICU) patient. The oily extract of St. John's wort was applied to a volunteer patient at ICU daily for forty successive days for wound care and treatment. Healing status was monitored macroscopically by measuring the wound size and stages at certain intervals as well as histopathological evaluation of the tissue sections taken at the initial and final dates of treatment. Evaluation of the results obtained from the macroscopical and histopathological experimentation have shown that oily extract of St. John's wort provided significant efficacy for the treatment of pressure sore wounds. St. John's wort oily extract may be suggested as a cost-effective option for the prevention or treatment of pressure sores in ICU patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Neuropathic pain screening questionnaires have limited measurement properties. A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathieson, S.; Maher, C.G.; Terwee, C.B.; de Campos, T.F.; Lin, C.W.C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The Douleur Neuropathique 4 (DN4), ID Pain, Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS), PainDETECT, and Neuropathic Pain Questionnaire have been recommended as screening questionnaires for neuropathic pain. This systematic review aimed to evaluate the measurement

  6. The contribution of TRPM8 and TRPA1 channels to cold allodynia and neuropathic pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ombretta Caspani

    Full Text Available Cold allodynia is a common feature of neuropathic pain however the underlying mechanisms of this enhanced sensitivity to cold are not known. Recently the transient receptor potential (TRP channels TRPM8 and TRPA1 have been identified and proposed to be molecular sensors for cold. Here we have investigated the expression of TRPM8 and TRPA1 mRNA in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG and examined the cold sensitivity of peripheral sensory neurons in the chronic construction injury (CCI model of neuropathic pain in mice.In behavioral experiments, chronic constriction injury (CCI of the sciatic nerve induced a hypersensitivity to both cold and the TRPM8 agonist menthol that developed 2 days post injury and remained stable for at least 2 weeks. Using quantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization we examined the expression of TRPM8 and TRPA1 in DRG. Both channels displayed significantly reduced expression levels after injury with no change in their distribution pattern in identified neuronal subpopulations. Furthermore, in calcium imaging experiments, we detected no alterations in the number of cold or menthol responsive neurons in the DRG, or in the functional properties of cold transduction following injury. Intriguingly however, responses to the TRPA1 agonist mustard oil were strongly reduced.Our results indicate that injured sensory neurons do not develop abnormal cold sensitivity after chronic constriction injury and that alterations in the expression of TRPM8 and TRPA1 are unlikely to contribute directly to the pathogenesis of cold allodynia in this neuropathic pain model.

  7. Lamotrigine in the treatment of pain syndromes and neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titlic, M; Jukic, I; Tonkic, A; Josipovic-Jelic, Z; Boschi, V; Mihalj, M; Punda, A

    2008-01-01

    Anti-epileptic drugs are increasingly used in the treatment of pain syndromes and neuropathic pain. Sodium channel blockers can be effective in the treatment of pain. The object of our interest is the efficiency of lamotrigine in treating the pain. A MEDLINE search was conducted to identify pertinent studies, case reports, letters, and reviews in English published from 1986 to May 2007. The search has indicated efficiency in treating a number of painful syndromes and neuropathic pain; central pain, trigeminal neuralgia and trigeminal neuralgia in multiple sclerosis, pain in multiple sclerosis, SUNCT syndrome, cluster headache, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, neuropathic pain, allodynia, neuralgia after nerve section, postherpetic neuralgia, HIV-associated neuropathy. Further researches are required on the role of lamotrigine in treating the spinal cord injury pain, neuralgia after nerve section, postoperative analgesic requirement, and in migraine (Tab. 1, Ref. 46). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  8. Diagnosis and medical treatment of neuropathic pain in leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogerio Del Arco

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to identify the difficulties in diagnosing and treating neuropathic pain caused by leprosy and to understand the main characteristics of this situation. Methods: 85 patients were treated in outpatient units with reference to leprosy and the accompanying pain. We used a questionnaire known as the Douleur Neuropathic 4 test and we conducted detailed neurological exams. As a result, 42 patients were excluded from the study for not having proved their pain. Results: Out of the 37 patients that experienced pain, 22 (59.5% had neuropathic pain (or a mixture of this pain and their existing pain and of these 90.8% considered this pain to be moderate or severe. 81.8% of the sample suffered with this pain for more than 6 months. Only 12 (54.5% of the patients had been diagnosed with neuropathic pain and in almost half of these cases, this pain had not been diagnosed. With reference to medical treatment (n=12 for neuropathic pain, 5 (41.6% responded that they became better. For the other 7 (58.4% there were no changes in relation to the pain or in some cases the pain worsened in comparison to their previous state. Statistical analysis comparing improvements in relation to the pain amongst the patients that were treated (n=12 and those that were not, showed significant differences (value p=0.020. Conclusion: we noted difficulties in diagnosing neuropathic pain for leprosy in that almost half of the patients that were studied had not had their pain diagnosed. We attributed this to some factors such as the non-adoption of the appropriate protocols which led to inadequate diagnosis and treatment that overlooked the true picture.

  9. Anti-neuropathic effects of Rosmarinus officinalis L. terpenoid fraction: relevance of nicotinic receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannelli, Lorenzo Di Cesare; Micheli, Laura; Maresca, Mario; Cravotto, Giancarlo; Bellumori, Maria; Innocenti, Marzia; Mulinacci, Nadia; Ghelardini, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Traditional uses and current results highlight the neuroprotective properties of Rosmarinus officinalis L. The compelling need for novel strategies able to relieve neuropathic pain encouraged us to analyze different rosemary leaf extracts in rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve. Ethanol, acetone, and the innovative ultrasound-hexane extractive methods were used to obtain: EE, AE, and for hexane extracts UREprel and URE. Extracts were characterized in terms of typical constituents and repeatedly administered to CCI-rats (13-days treatment, from the day of surgery). URE showed the best efficacy and potency in reducing hypersensitivity to noxious- and non-noxious stimuli and spontaneous pain. URE contained the higher quantity of the terpenoid carnosic acid (CA) and its efficacy was compared to pure CA. Histological analysis of the sciatic nerve revealed that URE prevented axon and myelin derangement, edema and inflammatory infiltrate. In the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, URE did not reduce astrocyte activation. Both the pain reliever and the neuroconservative effects of URE were significantly prevented by the nicotinic receptor (nAChR) antagonist mecamylamine. In conclusion, the hexane-ultrasound rosemary extract is able to reduce neuropathic hypersensitivity and protect nervous tissues. Effectiveness is mainly related to the terpenoid fraction by mechanisms involving nAChRs. PMID:27713514

  10. Fat Grafting for Neuropathic Pain After Severe Burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredman, Rafi; Edkins, Renee E; Hultman, Charles Scott

    2016-06-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain after burn injury is a significant problem that affects up to 29% of burn patients. Neuropathic burn scar pain is a challenge for plastic and burn surgeons, who have limited solutions. Fat grafting, with its mechanical and regenerative qualities, can improve neuropathic pain from various traumatic and postsurgical etiologies, but its effectiveness in neuropathic burn scar pain has yet to be demonstrated. In this study, the possible role of lipotransfer in treating neuropathic burn scar pain is explored, focusing on safety, graft take, and short-term efficacy. We performed an institutional review board-approved, retrospective case review of 7 patients with chronic, refractory neuropathic pain, who underwent fat grafting to burn scars. These patients had failed conventional therapy, which included pharmacologic, medical, and laser treatment of the burn scars. Each patient had 2 sessions of fat grafting, spaced 2 months apart. The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) was used to assess pain perception, with patients answering the questionnaire before and after fat grafting, to assess subjective outcomes. Six of 7 patients had improvement in neuropathic pain after fat grafting, permitting reduction in their neuropharmacologic regimen. Tinel sign, present in all patients preoperatively, was absent on examination in all patients at follow-up. Three of the 5 patients who completed PROMIS questionnaires had PROMIS scores indicating improvement in pain by 1-year follow-up. One patient had similar preoperative and postoperative PROMIS scores, and 1 patient had an increase in pain at follow-up; however, he had suffered an additional burn to the same extremity. Analysis of pooled mean PROMIS scores reflects a statistically significant improvement in subjective outcomes by 1-year follow-up. Donor-site seroma in 1 patient was the only complication, with no cases of infection, wound breakdown, or graft loss. Adipose tissue can

  11. EFNS guidelines on pharmacological treatment of neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attal, Nadine; Cruccu, G; Haanpää, M

    2006-01-01

    for the efficacy of tricyclic antidepressants, gabapentin, pregabalin and opioids, with a large number of class I trials, followed by topical lidocaine (in PHN) and the newer antidepressants venlafaxine and duloxetine (in PPN). A small number of controlled trials were performed in central pain, trigeminal...... neuralgia, other peripheral neuropathic pain states and multiple-aetiology neuropathic pains. The main peripheral pain conditions respond similarly well to tricyclic antidepressants, gabapentin, and pregabalin, but some conditions, such as HIV-associated polyneuropathy, are more refractory. There are too...

  12. Botulinum Toxin Type A for the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain in Neuro-Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Intiso

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a natural protective mechanism and has a warning function signaling imminent or actual tissue damage. Neuropathic pain (NP results from a dysfunction and derangement in the transmission and signal processing along the nervous system and it is a recognized disease in itself. The prevalence of NP is estimated to be between 6.9% and 10% in the general population. This condition can complicate the recovery from stroke, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord lesions, and several neuropathies promoting persistent disability and poor quality of life. Subjects suffering from NP describe it as burning, itching, lancing, and numbness, but hyperalgesia and allodynia represent the most bothersome symptoms. The management of NP is a clinical challenge and several non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions have been proposed with variable benefits. Botulinum toxin (BTX as an adjunct to other interventions can be a useful therapeutic tool for the treatment of disabled people. Although BTX-A is predominantly used to reduce spasticity in a neuro-rehabilitation setting, it has been used in several painful conditions including disorders characterized by NP. The underlying pharmacological mechanisms that operate in reducing pain are still unclear and include blocking nociceptor transduction, the reduction of neurogenic inflammation by inhibiting neural substances and neurotransmitters, and the prevention of peripheral and central sensitization. Some neurological disorders requiring rehabilitative intervention can show neuropathic pain resistant to common analgesic treatment. This paper addresses the effect of BTX-A in treating NP that complicates frequent disorders of the central and peripheral nervous system such as spinal cord injury, post-stroke shoulder pain, and painful diabetic neuropathy, which are commonly managed in a rehabilitation setting. Furthermore, BTX-A has an effect in relief pain that may characterize less common neurological disorders

  13. Botulinum Toxin Type A for the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain in Neuro-Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intiso, Domenico; Basciani, Mario; Santamato, Andrea; Intiso, Marta; Di Rienzo, Filomena

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a natural protective mechanism and has a warning function signaling imminent or actual tissue damage. Neuropathic pain (NP) results from a dysfunction and derangement in the transmission and signal processing along the nervous system and it is a recognized disease in itself. The prevalence of NP is estimated to be between 6.9% and 10% in the general population. This condition can complicate the recovery from stroke, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord lesions, and several neuropathies promoting persistent disability and poor quality of life. Subjects suffering from NP describe it as burning, itching, lancing, and numbness, but hyperalgesia and allodynia represent the most bothersome symptoms. The management of NP is a clinical challenge and several non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions have been proposed with variable benefits. Botulinum toxin (BTX) as an adjunct to other interventions can be a useful therapeutic tool for the treatment of disabled people. Although BTX-A is predominantly used to reduce spasticity in a neuro-rehabilitation setting, it has been used in several painful conditions including disorders characterized by NP. The underlying pharmacological mechanisms that operate in reducing pain are still unclear and include blocking nociceptor transduction, the reduction of neurogenic inflammation by inhibiting neural substances and neurotransmitters, and the prevention of peripheral and central sensitization. Some neurological disorders requiring rehabilitative intervention can show neuropathic pain resistant to common analgesic treatment. This paper addresses the effect of BTX-A in treating NP that complicates frequent disorders of the central and peripheral nervous system such as spinal cord injury, post-stroke shoulder pain, and painful diabetic neuropathy, which are commonly managed in a rehabilitation setting. Furthermore, BTX-A has an effect in relief pain that may characterize less common neurological disorders including post

  14. Sensory profiles of patients with neuropathic pain based on the neuropathic pain symptoms and signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Roy; Baron, Ralf; Bouhassira, Didier; Cabrera, Javier; Emir, Birol

    2014-02-01

    This manuscript aimed to characterize the clinical profile of various neuropathic pain (NeP) disorders and to identify whether patterns of sensory symptoms/signs exist, based on baseline responses on the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (NPSI) questionnaire and the quantitative sensory testing (QST). These post hoc analyses were based on data from 4 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical studies of pregabalin (150-600mg/day) in patients with NeP syndromes: central poststroke pain, posttraumatic peripheral pain, painful HIV neuropathy, and painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The NPSI questionnaire includes 10 different pain symptom descriptors. QST was used to detect sensory thresholds of accurately calibrated sensory stimuli and to quantify the intensity of evoked sensation. To identify symptoms/signs clusters and select the number of clusters, a principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering methods with clinical input were used. Analysis of the NPSI pain qualities and individual QST measures at baseline indicated no clear association between particular symptoms/signs profiles and etiologies. Based on NPSI symptoms, PCA identified 3 pain dimensions: provoked, deep, and pinpoint. A hierarchical cluster analysis identified 3 clusters with distinct pain characteristics profiles independent of NeP syndrome. Based on QST signs, PCA identified 2 pain dimensions: evoked by cold and evoked by touch. A hierarchical cluster analysis identified 4 clusters with distinct pain characteristics profiles. These "trans-etiological" profiles may reflect distinct pathophysiological mechanisms and therefore, potential differential responses to treatment. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Intravenous Nefopam Reduces Postherpetic Neuralgia during the Titration of Oral Medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Young Chan; Ko, Eun Sung; Cho, Jae Geun; Ok, Young Min; Jung, Gyu Yong; Kim, Kyung Hoon

    2014-01-01

    The recently known analgesic action mechanisms of nefopam (NFP) are similar to those of anticonvulsants and antidepressants in neuropathic pain treatment. It is difficult to prescribe high doses of oral neuropathic drugs without titration due to adverse effects. Unfortunately, there are few available intravenous analgesics for the immediate management of acute flare-ups of the chronic neuropathic pain. The aim of this study was to determine the additional analgesic effects for neuropathic pain of NFP and its adverse effects during the titration of oral medications for neuropathic pain among inpatients with postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). Eighty inpatients with PHN were randomly divided into either the NFP or normal saline (NS) groups. Each patient received a 3-day intravenous continuous infusion of either NFP with a consecutive dose reduction of 60, 40, and 20 mg/d, or NS simultaneously while dose titrations of oral medications for neuropathic pain gradually increased every 3 days. The efficacy of additional NFP was evaluated by using the neuropathic pain symptom inventory (NPSI) score for 12 days. Adverse effects were also recorded. The median NPSI score was significantly lower in the NFP group from days 1 to 6 of hospitalization. The representative alleviating symptoms of pain after using NFP were both spontaneous and evoked neuropathic pain. Reported common adverse effects were nausea, dizziness, and somnolence, in order of frequency. An intravenous continuous infusion of NFP reduces spontaneous and evoked neuropathic pain with tolerable adverse effects during the titration of oral medications in inpatients with PHN.

  16. Probiotics for preventing urinary tract infection in people with neuropathic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Swee-Ling; Boswell-Ruys, Claire L; Lee, Bon San B; Simpson, Judy M; Clezy, Kate R

    2017-09-08

    Neuropathic or neurogenic bladder describes a process of dysfunctional voiding as the result of injury in the brain, spinal cord or nerves innervating the bladder. People with neuropathic bladder, such as from spinal cord injury (SCI), are at significant risk of morbidity from urinary tract infections (UTI). Effective methods to prevent UTI in people with SCI have been sought for many years. Probiotics (micro-organisms that exert beneficial health effects in the host) have been recommended for bacterial interference of the urological tract to reduce colonisation by uropathogen and to manage the dual problems of infection and antibiotic resistance. This review looked at the benefits and harms of probiotics in preventing symptomatic UTI in people with neuropathic bladder compared with placebo, no therapy, or non-antibiotic prophylaxis (cranberry juice, methenamine hippurate, topical oestrogen). We searched the Cochrane Kidney and Transplant Specialised Register up to 10 March 2017 through contact with the Information Specialist using search terms relevant to this review. Studies in the Specialised Register are identified through searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE, conference proceedings, the International Clinical Trials Register (ICTRP) Search Portal, and ClinicalTrials.gov. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs and cross-over RCTs looking at the use of probiotics for the prophylaxis of UTI in people with neuropathic bladders was considered for inclusion. Men, women and children of all ages with neuropathic bladders from neurological injury such as suprapontine, supra sacral and sacral aetiologies was included. All bladder management types, including reflex voiding, time voiding, indwelling and intermittent catheterization were eligible for this review.Studies comparing probiotics to placebo, no treatment or other non-antibiotic prophylaxis was included. Studies comparing probiotics with antibiotics or in combination with antibiotics were

  17. Hedonic and motivational responses to food reward are unchanged in rats with neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okun, Alec; McKinzie, David L; Witkin, Jeffrey M; Remeniuk, Bethany; Husein, Omar; Gleason, Scott D; Oyarzo, Janice; Navratilova, Edita; McElroy, Brian; Cowen, Stephen; Kennedy, Jeffrey D; Porreca, Frank

    2016-12-01

    Rewards influence responses to acute painful stimuli, but the relationship of chronic pain to hedonic or motivational aspects of reward is not well understood. We independently evaluated hedonic qualities of sweet or bitter tastants and motivation to seek food reward in rats with experimental neuropathic pain induced by L5/6 spinal nerve ligation. Hedonic response was measured by implantation of intraoral catheters to allow passive delivery of liquid solutions, and "liking/disliking" responses were scored according to a facial reactivity scale. Spinal nerve ligation rats did not differ from controls in either "liking" or "disliking" reactions to intraoral sucrose or quinine, respectively, at postsurgery day 21, suggesting no differences in perceived hedonic value of sweet or bitter tastants. To assess possible motivational deficits during acute and chronic pain, we used fixed- and progressive-ratio response paradigms of sucrose pellet presentation in rats with transient inflammatory or chronic neuropathic pain. Assessment of response acquisition and break points under the progressive ratio schedule revealed no differences between sham and spinal nerve ligation rats for up to 120 days after injury. However, rats with inflammation showed decrements in lever pressing and break points on days 1 and 2 after complete Freund adjuvant injection that normalized by day 4, consistent with transient ongoing pain. Thus, although acute ongoing inflammatory pain may transiently reduce reward motivation, we did not detect influences of chronic neuropathic pain on hedonic or motivational responses to food rewards. Adaptations that allow normal reward responding to food regardless of chronic pain may be of evolutionary benefit to promote survival.

  18. The mechanism of neurofeedback training for treatment of central neuropathic pain in paraplegia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Muhammad Abul; Fraser, Matthew; Conway, Bernard A; Allan, David B; Vuckovic, Aleksandra

    2015-10-13

    Central neuropathic pain has a prevalence of 40% in patients with spinal cord injury. Electroencephalography (EEG) studies showed that this type of pain has identifiable signatures, that could potentially be targeted by a neuromodulation therapy. The aim of the study was to investigate the putative mechanism of neurofeedback training on central neuropathic pain and its underlying brain signatures in patients with chronic paraplegia. Patients' EEG activity was modulated from the sensory-motor cortex, electrode location C3/Cz/C4/P4 in up to 40 training sessions Results. Six out of seven patients reported immediate reduction of pain during neurofeedback training. Best results were achieved with suppressing Ɵ and higher β (20-30 Hz) power and reinforcing α power at C4. Four patients reported clinically significant long-term reduction of pain (>30%) which lasted at least a month beyond the therapy. EEG during neurofeedback revealed a wide spread modulation of power in all three frequency bands accompanied with changes in the coherence most notable in the beta band. The standardized low resolution electromagnetic tomography analysis of EEG before and after neurofeedback therapy showed the statistically significant reduction of power in beta frequency band in all tested patients. Areas with reduced power included the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex, the Anterior Cingulate Cortex and the Insular Cortex. Neurofeedback training produces both immediate and longer term reduction of central neuropathic pain that is accompanied with a measurable short and long term modulation of cortical activity. Controlled trials are required to confirm the efficacy of this neurofeedback protocol on treatment of pain. The study is a registered UKCRN clinical trial Nr 9824.

  19. Neuropathic and inflammatory antinociceptive effects and electrocortical changes produced by Salvia divinorum in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón-Arceo, Karina; González-Trujano, Ma Eva; Coffeen, Ulises; Fernández-Mas, Rodrigo; Mercado, Francisco; Almanza, Angélica; Contreras, Bernardo; Jaimes, Orlando; Pellicer, Francisco

    2017-07-12

    Salvia divinorum is a medicinal plant traditionally used in hallucinogenic ethnopharmacological practices and for its analgesic and antinflammatory properties. Its active compounds include diterpenes known as salvinorins which act as potent κ opioid receptor agonists. Given its effects in acute animal models of pain, as well as its antinflammatory attributes, we decided to investigate the analgesic effects of an SD extract in neuropathic (sciatic loose nerve ligature) and inflammatory (intra plantar carrageenan) pain models in rats. We also determined in this study the electrocorticographic changes to correlate similar hallucinogenic state and behavior as those produced in humans. Mechanical and thermonociceptive responses, plantar test and von Frey assay, respectively, were measured in adult Wistar rats 30min, 3h and 24h after the intraperitoneal administration of saline or an hydroponic SD extract. We also evaluated carbamazepine and celecoxib, as gold reference drugs, to compare its antinociceptive effects. Our results showed that administration of SD extract induced antialgesic effects in both neuropathic and inflammatory pain models. All those effects were blocked by nor-binaltorphimine (a Kappa opioid receptor antagonist). Moreover, it was observed an increase of the anterior power spectral density and a decrease in the posterior region as electrocorticographic changes. The present investigation give evidence that SD is capable to reduce algesic response associated to neuropathic and inflammatory nociception. This study support therapeutic alternatives for a disabling health problem due to the long term pain with high impact on population and personal and social implications. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The efficacy of St. John's Wort in patients with minor depressive symptoms or dysthymia--a double-blind placebo-controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randløv, C; Mehlsen, J; Thomsen, C F

    2006-01-01

    We studied the efficacy of St. John's Wort compared with placebo in patients with minor depressive symptoms or dysthymia, with the main focus on which diagnostic entities are optimally amenable to treatment with two different doses of Hypericum, and which are not.......We studied the efficacy of St. John's Wort compared with placebo in patients with minor depressive symptoms or dysthymia, with the main focus on which diagnostic entities are optimally amenable to treatment with two different doses of Hypericum, and which are not....

  1. Opioid and noradrenergic contributions of tapentadol in experimental neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meske, Diana S; Xie, Jennifer Y; Oyarzo, Janice; Badghisi, Hamid; Ossipov, Michael H; Porreca, Frank

    2014-03-06

    Tapentadol is a dual action molecule with mu opioid agonist and norepinephrine (NE) reuptake blocking activity that has recently been introduced for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. The effects of intraperitoneal (i.p.) morphine (10mg/kg), tapentadol (10 or 30 mg/kg) or duloxetine (30 mg/kg), a norepinephrine/serotonin (NE/5HT) reuptake inhibitor, were evaluated in male, Sprague-Dawley rats with spinal nerve ligation (SNL) or sham surgery. Additionally, the effects of these drugs on spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) NE levels were quantified. Response thresholds to von Frey filament stimulation decreased significantly from baseline in SNL, but not sham, operated rats. Duloxetine, tapentadol and morphine produced significant and time-related reversal of tactile hypersensitivity. Duloxetine significantly increased spinal CSF NE levels in both sham and SNL rats and no significant differences were observed in these groups. Tapentadol (10 mg/kg) produced a significant increase in spinal NE levels in SNL, but not in sham, rats. At the higher dose (30 mg/kg), tapentadol produced a significant increase in spinal CSF NE levels in both SNL and sham groups; however, spinal NE levels were elevated for an extended period in the SNL rats. This could be detected 30 min following tapentadol (30 mg/kg) in both sham and SNL groups. Surprisingly, while the dose of morphine studied reversed tactile hypersensitivity in nerve-injured rats, CSF NE levels were significantly reduced in both sham- and SNL rats. The data suggest that tapentadol elicits enhanced elevation in spinal NE levels in a model of experimental neuropathic pain offering a mechanistic correlate to observed clinical efficacy in this pain state. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cholinergic Neurotransmission in the Posterior Insular Cortex Is Altered in Preclinical Models of Neuropathic Pain: Key Role of Muscarinic M2 Receptors in Donepezil-Induced Antinociception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrier, Jérémy; Bayet-Robert, Mathilde; Dalmann, Romain; El Guerrab, Abderrahim; Aissouni, Youssef; Graveron-Demilly, Danielle; Chalus, Maryse; Pinguet, Jérémy; Eschalier, Alain; Richard, Damien; Daulhac, Laurence; Balayssac, David

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is one of the most debilitating pain conditions, yet no therapeutic strategy has been really effective for its treatment. Hence, a better understanding of its pathophysiological mechanisms is necessary to identify new pharmacological targets. Here, we report important metabolic variations in brain areas involved in pain processing in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy using HRMAS 1H-NMR spectroscopy. An increased concentration of choline has been evidenced in the posterior insular cortex (pIC) of neuropathic animal, which was significantly correlated with animals' pain thresholds. The screening of 34 genes mRNA involved in the pIC cholinergic system showed an increased expression of the high-affinity choline transporter and especially the muscarinic M2 receptors, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis in oxaliplatin-treated rats and the spared nerve injury model (SNI). Furthermore, pharmacological activation of M2 receptors in the pIC using oxotremorine completely reversed oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Consistently, systemic treatment with donepezil, a centrally active acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, prevented and reversed oxaliplatin-induced cold and mechanical allodynia as well as social interaction impairment. Intracerebral microdialysis revealed a lower level of acetylcholine in the pIC of oxaliplatin-treated rats, which was significantly increased by donepezil. Finally, the analgesic effect of donepezil was markedly reduced by a microinjection of the M2 antagonist, methoctramine, within the pIC, in both oxaliplatin-treated rats and spared nerve injury rats. These findings highlight the crucial role of cortical cholinergic neurotransmission as a critical mechanism of neuropathic pain, and suggest that targeting insular M2 receptors using central cholinomimetics could be used for neuropathic pain treatment. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our study describes a decrease in cholinergic neurotransmission in the posterior insular

  3. Ceftriaxone, a Beta-Lactam Antibiotic, Modulates Apoptosis Pathways and Oxidative Stress in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Amin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In our previous study, ceftriaxone, a beta-lactam antibiotic, elicited antinociceptive effects in the chronic constriction injury (CCI of neuropathic pain. In this study, we assessed apoptosis and oxidative stress in the spinal cord of neuropathic rats treated with ceftriaxone. Methods. 45 male Wistar rats were divided as naïve, sham, normal saline-treated CCI rats, and CCI animals treated with the effective dose of ceftriaxone. Involvement of Bax, Bcl2, and caspases 3 and 9, important contributors of programmed cell death (apoptosis, was determined using western blotting at days 3 and 7. The markers of oxidative stress including malondialdehyde (MDA and reduced glutathione (GSH were measured on days 3 and 7. Results. Increased Bax/Bcl2 ratio and cleaved active forms of caspases 3 and 9 were observed in the spinal cord of CCI rats on day 3. Ceftriaxone attenuated the increased levels of Bax and cleaved forms of caspases 3 and 9, while it increased Bcl2 levels. Bax and active forms of caspases declined by day 7. Consequently, comparison among groups showed no difference at this time. CCI enhanced MDA and decreased GSH on days 3 and 7, while ceftriaxone protected against the CCI-induced oxidative stress. Conclusion. Our results suggest that ceftriaxone, an upregulator/activator of GLT1, could concomitantly reduce oxidative stress and apoptosis and producing its new analogs lacking antimicrobial activity may represent a novel approach for neuropathic pain treatment.

  4. Inhibition of Neuropathic Pain by a Single Intraperitoneal Injection of Diazepam in the Rat: Possible Role of Neurosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Ling; Zang, Ying; Zheng, Wen-Hui; Wei, Xu-Hong; Liu, Xian-Guo

    2016-02-29

    Diazepam binds with the same high affinity to the central benzodiazepine receptor (CBR) and the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, which has been renamed translocator protein (TSPO). Both receptors could promote neurosteroid synthesis. In the present study, we investigated whether a single dose of diazepam could inhibit neuropathic pain induced by L5 spinal nerve ligation (L5 SNL), and whether CBR and TSPO mediated this effect. We found that a single intraperitoneal injection of diazepam 9 d after L5 SNL significantly depressed the established mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, which persisted until the end of the experiments. Furthermore, the effects were mimicked by a single intraperitoneal injection of Ro5-4864, a specific TSPO agonist and pregnenolone, a neurosteroid precursor. In addition, we found that the inhibitory effect of diazepam was also completely blocked by pretreatment with a specific CBR antagonist, flumazenil. The effects of diazepam or Ro5-4864 on neuropathic pain were completely blocked by pretreatment with a neurosteroid synthesis inhibitor, aminoglutethimide (AMG). Finally, any one of the three drugs, diazepam, Ro5-4864 and pregnenolone, could reduce the activation of astrocytes and the production of interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) in the L5 spinal dorsal horn 14 d after L5 SNL. These results suggest that in addition to exerting effects on CBR, diazepam may inhibit neuropathic pain via TSPO, which promotes neurosteroid formation, subsequently reducing the activation of astrocytes and production of cytokines.

  5. Potentiation of the antinociceptive effect of clomipramine by a 5-ht1A antagonist in neuropathic pain in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardid, D; Alloui, A; Brousse, G; Jourdan, D; Picard, P; Dubray, C; Eschalier, A

    2001-01-01

    The benefit of antidepressant treatment in human neuropathic pain is now well documented, but the effect is limited and slow to appear. It has been demonstrated that the association of a 5-HT1A antagonist and a serotoninergic antidepressant reduced the delay of action and increases the thymoanaleptic effect of the drug. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the combination of an antidepressant and a 5-HT1A antagonist in animal models of chronic neuropathic pain. We studied the antinociceptive effect of the co-administration of clomipramine and a 5-HT1A antagonist (WAY 100,635) in a pain test applied in normal rats and in two models of neurogenic sustained pain (mononeuropathic and diabetic rats). The results show an increase in the antinociceptive effect of acutely injected clomipramine due to WAY 100,635 in these models, which is majored when the two drugs are repeatedly injected. The 5-HT1A antagonist reduced the delay of onset and increased the maximal antinociceptive effect of clomipramine. These new findings argue for using the combination of an antidepressant and a 5-HT1A antagonist in human neuropathic pain therapy. PMID:11226143

  6. Minocycline Enhances the Effectiveness of Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ during Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Popiolek-Barczyk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ antinociception, which is mediated selectively by the N/OFQ peptide receptor (NOP, was demonstrated in pain models. In this study, we determine the role of activated microglia on the analgesic effects of N/OFQ in a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI to the sciatic nerve. Repeated 7-day administration of minocycline (30 mg/kg i.p., a drug that affects microglial activation, significantly reduced pain in CCI-exposed rats and it potentiates the analgesic effects of administered N/OFQ (2.5–5 μg i.t.. Minocycline also downregulates the nerve injury-induced upregulation of NOP protein in the dorsal lumbar spinal cord. Our in vitro study showed that minocycline reduced NOP mRNA, but not protein, level in rat primary microglial cell cultures. In [35S]GTPγS binding assays we have shown that minocycline increases the spinal N/OFQ-stimulated NOP signaling. We suggest that the modulation of the N/OFQ system by minocycline is due to the potentiation of its neuronal antinociceptive activity and weakening of the microglial cell activation. This effect is beneficial for pain relief, and these results suggest new targets for the development of drugs that are effective against neuropathic pain.

  7. Autotaxin, a synthetic enzyme of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, mediates the induction of nerve-injured neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Jerold

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recently, we reported that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA induces long-lasting mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia as well as demyelination and upregulation of pain-related proteins through one of its cognate receptors, LPA1. In addition, mice lacking the LPA1 receptor gene (lpa1-/- mice lost these nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain behaviors and phenomena. However, since lpa1-/- mice did not exhibit any effects on the basal nociceptive threshold, it is possible that nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain and its machineries are initiated by LPA via defined biosynthetic pathways that involve multiple enzymes. Here, we attempted to clarify the involvement of a single synthetic enzyme of LPA known as autotaxin (ATX in nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. Wild-type mice with partial sciatic nerve injury showed robust mechanical allodynia starting from day 3 after the nerve injury and persisting for at least 14 days, along with thermal hyperalgesia. On the other hand, heterozygous mutant mice for the autotaxin gene (atx+/-, which have 50% ATX protein and 50% lysophospholipase D activity compared with wild-type mice, showed approximately 50% recovery of nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. In addition, hypersensitization of myelinated Aβ˜ MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaafiart1ev1aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacPC6xNi=xH8viVGI8Gi=hEeeu0xXdbba9frFj0xb9qqpG0dXdb9aspeI8k8fiI+fsY=rqGqVepae9pg0db9vqaiVgFr0xfr=xfr=xc9adbaqaaeGacaGaaiaabeqaaeqabiWaaaGcbaGafqOSdiMbaGaaaaa@2D83@- or Aδ-fiber function following nerve injury was observed in electrical stimuli-induced paw withdrawal tests using a Neurometer®. The hyperalgesia was completely abolished in lpa1-/- mice, and reduced by 50% in atx+/- mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that LPA biosynthesis through ATX is the source of LPA for LPA1 receptor-mediated neuropathic pain. Therefore, targeted inhibition of ATX-mediated LPA biosynthesis as well as

  8. Nerve injury-induced changes in Homer/glutamate receptor signaling contribute to the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Ilona; Goulding, Scott P; Hu, Jia-Hua; Klugmann, Matthias; Worley, Paul F; Szumlinski, Karen K

    2013-10-01

    While group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and ionotropic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors regulate nociception, the precise molecular mechanism(s) contributing to glutamate signaling in chronic pain remain unclear. Here we not only confirmed the key involvement of Homer proteins in neuropathic pain, but also distinguished between the functional roles for different Homer family members and isoforms. Chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve induced long-lasting, time-dependent increases in the postsynaptic density expression of the constitutively expressed (CC) isoforms Homer1b/c and/or Homer2a/b in the spinal dorsal horn and supraspinal structures involved in nociception (prefrontal cortex, thalamus), that co-occurred with increases in their associated mGluRs, NR2 subunits of the NMDA receptor, and the activation of downstream kinases. Virus-mediated overexpression of Homer1c and Homer2b after spinal (intrathecal) virus injection exacerbated CCI-induced mechanical and cold hypersensitivity, however, Homer1 and Homer2 gene knockout (KO) mice displayed no changes in their neuropathic phenotype. In contrast, overexpression of the immediate early gene (IEG) Homer1a isoform reduced, while KO of Homer1a gene potentiated neuropathic pain hypersensitivity. Thus, nerve injury-induced increases in CC-Homers expression promote pain in pathological states, but IEG-Homer induction protects against both the development and maintenance of neuropathy. Additionally, exacerbated pain hypersensitivity in transgenic mice with reduced Homer binding to mGluR5 supports also an inhibitory role for Homer interactions with mGluR5 in mediating neuropathy. Such data indicate that nerve injury-induced changes in glutamate receptor/Homer signaling contribute in dynamic but distinct ways to neuropathic pain processing, which has relevance for the etiology of chronic pain symptoms and its treatment. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain

  9. Irrational drug use in neuropathic pain treatment: a twoyear data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Neuropathic pain (NeP) manifests as chronic pain and causes significant medical and economic burden for both the individual and the society. ... Aim: The present study was aimed at determining the annual cost of NeP treatment in Turkey and to assess the amount of resource loss due to irrational drug use ...

  10. Spinal cord stimulation and modulation of neuropathic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, Cecilia Cecilia Clementine

    2013-01-01

    This thesis reports on the opportunities of several new applications of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Our pilot study and consecutively performed international randomised controlled trial on effects of SCS in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy showed

  11. ARA290 : a novel treatment for neuropathic pain in sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heij, L.

    2016-01-01

    The general aim of this thesis is to investigate small fiber neuropathy in sarcoidosis and to asses whether ARA290 is a possible new agent to treat the neuropathic complaints in sarcoidosis population. The results of the various ARA290 trials in painful sarcoidosis are discussed. Painful neuropathy

  12. Chronic neuropathic pain: mechanisms, drug targets and measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna B; Sindrup, Søren H; Jensen, Troels S

    2007-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is common in many diseases or injuries of the peripheral or central nervous system, and has a substantial impact on quality of life and mood. Lesions of the nervous system may lead to potentially irreversible changes and imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory systems...

  13. Neuropathic Pain - Current Concepts | Meyer | South African Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neuropathic pain (NP) represents a common and diverse group of disorders with peripheral and/or central nervous system damage or dysfunction. Many patients report intractable and severe pain that is resistant to simple analgesics. The diagnosis of NP is primarily based on clinical evaluation rather than diagnostic tests.

  14. Valproic acid and sodium valproate for neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Dipender; Derry, Sheena; Wiffen, Philip J; Moore, R Andrew

    2011-10-05

    valproate may reduce pain in diabetic neuropathy, and divalproex sodium in post-herpetic neuralgia, but the use of 'completer' analysis may overestimate efficacy, and there were too few data for pooled analysis of efficacy or harm, or to have confidence in the results of the individual studies. There is insufficient evidence to support the use of valproic acid or sodium valproate as a first-line treatment for neuropathic pain. There is more robust evidence of greater efficacy for a small number of other drugs.

  15. 17beta-estradiol counteracts neuropathic pain: a behavioural, immunohistochemical, and proteomic investigation on sex-related differences in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacca, Valentina; Marinelli, Sara; Pieroni, Luisa; Urbani, Andrea; Luvisetto, Siro; Pavone, Flaminia

    2016-01-01

    Sex differences play a role in pain sensitivity, efficacy of analgesic drugs and prevalence of neuropathic pain, even if the underlying mechanisms are far from being understood. We demonstrate that male and female mice react differently to structural and functional changes induced by sciatic nerve ligature, used as model of neuropathic pain. Male mice show a gradual decrease of allodynia and a complete recovery while, in females, allodynia and gliosis are still present four months after neuropathy induction. Administration of 17β-estradiol is able to significantly attenuate this difference, reducing allodynia and inducing a complete recovery also in female mice. Parallel to pain attenuation, 17β-estradiol treated-mice show a functional improvement of the injured limb, a faster regenerative process of the peripheral nerve and a decreased neuropathy-induced gliosis. These results indicate beneficial effects of 17β-estradiol on neuropathic pain and neuronal regeneration and focuses on the importance of considering gonadal hormones also in clinical studies. PMID:26742647

  16. Guideline for the management of wounds in patients with lower-extremity neuropathic disease: an executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Penny Ellen; Fields-Varnado, Myra

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes the WOCN Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline for Management of Wounds in Patients with Lower Extremity Neuropathic Disease. It is intended for use by physicians, nurses, therapists, and other health care professionals who work with adults who have or are at risk for, lower-extremity neuropathic disease (LEND), and includes updated scientific literature available from January 2003 through February 2012. The full guideline contains definitions of lower extremity neuropathic disorders and disease, prevalence of the problem, relevance and significance of the disorders, as well as comprehensive information about etiology, the nervous system, pathogenesis, and the overall management goals for patients at risk for developing neuropathic foot ulcers. A detailed assessment section describes how to conduct a full clinical history and physical examination. The guideline also provides two approaches to interventions. The first focuses on prevention strategies to reduce the risk of developing LEND wounds or recurrence, including life-long foot offloading, routine dermal temperature surveillance, use of adjunctive therapies, medication management, and implementing lower extremity amputation prevention measures and patient self-care education. The second approach summarized LEND wound management strategies including wound cleansing, debridement, infection management, maintenance of intact peri-wound skin, nutrition considerations, pain and paresthesia management, edema management, offloading and management of gait and foot deformity, medication management, surgical options, adjunctive therapies, patient education, and health care provider follow-up. A comprehensive reference list, glossary of terms, and several appendices regarding an algorithm to determine wound etiology, pharmacology, Lower Extremity Amputation (LEAP) Program, diabetes foot screening and other information is available at the end of the guideline.

  17. Chemokine CXCL13 mediates orofacial neuropathic pain via CXCR5/ERK pathway in the trigeminal ganglion of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Cao, De-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Jiang, Bao-Chun; Gao, Yong-Jing

    2016-07-11

    Trigeminal nerve damage-induced neuropathic pain is a severely debilitating chronic orofacial pain syndrome. Spinal chemokine CXCL13 and its receptor CXCR5 were recently demonstrated to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of spinal nerve ligation-induced neuropathic pain. Whether and how CXCL13/CXCR5 in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) mediates orofacial pain are unknown. The partial infraorbital nerve ligation (pIONL) was used to induce trigeminal neuropathic pain in mice. The expression of ATF3, CXCL13, CXCR5, and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) in the TG was detected by immunofluorescence staining and western blot. The effect of shRNA targeting on CXCL13 or CXCR5 on pain hypersensitivity was checked by behavioral testing. pIONL induced persistent mechanical allodynia and increased the expression of ATF3, CXCL13, and CXCR5 in the TG. Inhibition of CXCL13 or CXCR5 by shRNA lentivirus attenuated pIONL-induced mechanical allodynia. Additionally, pIONL-induced neuropathic pain and the activation of ERK in the TG were reduced in Cxcr5 (-/-) mice. Furthermore, MEK inhibitor (PD98059) attenuated mechanical allodynia and reduced TNF-α and IL-1β upregulation induced by pIONL. TNF-α inhibitor (Etanercept) and IL-1β inhibitor (Diacerein) attenuated pIONL-induced orofacial pain. Finally, intra-TG injection of CXCL13 induced mechanical allodynia, increased the activation of ERK and the production of TNF-α and IL-1β in the TG of WT mice, but not in Cxcr5 (-/-) mice. Pretreatment with PD98059, Etanercept, or Diacerein partially blocked CXCL13-induced mechanical allodynia, and PD98059 also reduced CXCL13-induced TNF-α and IL-1β upregulation. CXCL13 and CXCR5 contribute to orofacial pain via ERK-mediated proinflammatory cytokines production. Targeting CXCL13/CXCR5/ERK/TNF-α and IL-1β pathway in the trigeminal ganglion may offer effective treatment for orofacial neuropathic pain.

  18. Long lasting effects of human mesenchymal stem cell systemic administration on pain-like behaviours, cellular and biomolecular modifications in neuropathic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario eSiniscalco

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neuropathic pain (NP is an incurable disease caused by a primary lesion in the nervous system. NP is a progressive nervous system disease that results from poorly defined neurophysiological and neurochemical changes. Its treatment is very difficult. Current available therapeutic drugs have a generalized nature, sometime acting only on the temporal pain properties rather than targeting the several mechanisms underlying the generation and propagation of pain.Methods. Using biomolecular and immunohistochemical methods, we investigated the effect of the systemic injection of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs on neuropathic pain relief. We used the spared nerve injury (SNI model of neuropathic pain in the mouse. Human MSCs were injected into the tail vein of the mouse. Stem cell injection was performed 4 days after sciatic nerve surgery. Neuropathic mice were monitored every 10 days starting from day 11 until 90 days after surgery. Results. Human MSCs were able to reduce pain-like behaviours, such as mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, once injected into the tail vein. An anti-nociceptive effect was detectable from day 11 post surgery (7 days post cell injection. Human MSCs were mainly able to home in the spinal cord and pre-frontal cortex of neuropathic mice. Injected hMSCs reduced the protein levels of the mouse pro-inflammatory interleukin IL-1ß and IL-17 and increased protein levels of the mouse anti-inflammatory interleukin IL-10, and the marker of alternatively activated macrophages CD106 in the spinal cord of SNI mice. Conclusions. As a potential mechanism of action of hMSCs in reducing pain, we suggest that they could exert their beneficial action through a restorative mechanism involving: i a cell-to-cell contact activation mechanism, through which spinal cord homed hMSCs are responsible for switching pro-inflammatory macrophages to anti-inflammatory macrophages; ii secretion of a broad spectrum of molecules to

  19. When population genetics meets biological control of the invasive swallow-worts (Vincetoxicum nigrum (L.) Moench and V. rossicum (Kleopow) Barbar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We explored the population genetics of two European swallow-worts belonging to the Apocynaceae that have become established in the eastern United States and Canada. Population genetic data concerning both native and introduced populations are being used to pinpoint introduced population origin, and ...

  20. St John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum L. photomedicine: hypericin-photodynamic therapy induces metastatic melanoma cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Kleemann

    Full Text Available Hypericin, an extract from St John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum L., is a promising photosensitizer in the context of clinical photodynamic therapy due to its excellent photosensitizing properties and tumoritropic characteristics. Hypericin-PDT induced cytotoxicity elicits tumor cell death by various mechanisms including apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy-related cell death. However, limited reports on the efficacy of this photomedicine for the treatment of melanoma have been published. Melanoma is a highly aggressive tumor due to its metastasizing potential and resistance to conventional cancer therapies. The aim of this study was to investigate the response mechanisms of melanoma cells to hypericin-PDT in an in vitro tissue culture model. Hypericin was taken up by all melanoma cells and partially co-localized to the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, lysosomes and melanosomes, but not the nucleus. Light activation of hypericin induced a rapid, extensive modification of the tubular mitochondrial network into a beaded appearance, loss of structural details of the endoplasmic reticulum and concomitant loss of hypericin co-localization. Surprisingly the opposite was found for lysosomal-related organelles, suggesting that the melanoma cells may be using these intracellular organelles for hypericin-PDT resistance. In line with this speculation we found an increase in cellular granularity, suggesting an increase in pigmentation levels in response to hypericin-PDT. Pigmentation in melanoma is related to a melanocyte-specific organelle, the melanosome, which has recently been implicated in drug trapping, chemotherapy and hypericin-PDT resistance. However, hypericin-PDT was effective in killing both unpigmented (A375 and 501mel and pigmented (UCT Mel-1 melanoma cells by specific mechanisms involving the externalization of phosphatidylserines, cell shrinkage and loss of cell membrane integrity. In addition, this treatment resulted in extrinsic (A375 and

  1. Pain Catastrophizing Predicts Poor Response to Topical Analgesics in Patients with Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsipora Mankovsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of neuropathic pain approaches 10% in Canada and the United States. Given the aging population and the increasing survival rates following interventions for neuropathic pain, the prevalence of neuropathic pain conditions is expected to rise significantly over the next 20 years. Although pharmacological interventions represent the dominant treatment approach for neuropathic pain, as many as 50% of patients are partially or completely refractory to the available treatments. Pain catastrophizing has been associated with heightened pain experiences in patients with neuropathic pain conditions; however, the clinical relevance of the relationship between catastrophizing and poor treatment outcomes is, to date, unclear. Accordingly, using a numerical rating scale, this study aimed to examine this relationship in patients with varied neuropathic pain conditions who completed a measure of catastrophizing before initiating a course of topical analgesic.

  2. Effects of exogenous galanin on neuropathic pain state and change of galanin and its receptors in DRG and SDH after sciatic nerve-pinch injury in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Yang, Xiangdong; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Xiuying; Liu, Huaxiang; Li, Zhenzhong

    2012-01-01

    A large number of neuroanatomical, neurophysiologic, and neurochemical mechanisms are thought to contribute to the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. However, mechanisms responsible for neuropathic pain have not been completely delineated. It has been demonstrated that neuropeptide galanin (Gal) is upregulated after injury in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal dorsal horn (SDH) where it plays a predominantly antinociceptive role. In the present study, sciatic nerve-pinch injury rat model was used to determine the effects of exogenous Gal on the expression of the Gal and its receptors (GalR1, GalR2) in DRG and SDH, the alterations of pain behavior, nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and morphology of sciatic nerve. The results showed that exogenous Gal had antinociceptive effects in this nerve-pinch injury induced neuropathic pain animal model. It is very interesting that Gal, GalR1 and GalR2 change their expression greatly in DRG and SDH after nerve injury and intrathecal injection of exougenous Gal. Morphological investigation displays a serious damage after nerve-pinch injury and an amendatory regeneration after exogenous Gal treatment. These findings imply that Gal, via activation of GalR1 and/or GalR2, may have neuroprotective effects in reducing neuropathic pain behaviors and improving nerve regeneration after nerve injury.

  3. Activation of the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin in the Rostral Ventromedial Medulla Contributes to the Maintenance of Nerve Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, a serine-threonine protein kinase, integrates extracellular signals, thereby modulating several physiological and pathological processes, including pain. Previous studies have suggested that rapamycin (an mTOR inhibitor can attenuate nociceptive behaviors in many pain models, most likely at the spinal cord level. However, the mechanisms of mTOR at the supraspinal level, particularly at the level of the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM, remain unclear. Thus, the aim of this study was to elucidate the role of mTOR in the RVM, a key relay region for the descending pain control pathway, under neuropathic pain conditions. Phosphorylated mTOR was mainly expressed in serotonergic spinally projecting neurons and was significantly increased in the RVM after spared nerve injury- (SNI- induced neuropathic pain. Moreover, in SNI rat brain slices, rapamycin infusion both decreased the amplitude instead of the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents and reduced the numbers of action potentials in serotonergic neurons. Finally, intra-RVM microinjection of rapamycin effectively alleviated established mechanical allodynia but failed to affect the development of neuropathic pain. In conclusion, our data provide strong evidence for the role of mTOR in the RVM in nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain, indicating a novel mechanism of mTOR inhibitor-induced analgesia.

  4. Inhibitory Effects of Scolopendra Pharmacopuncture on the Development and Maintenance of Neuropathic Pain in Rats: Possible Involvement of Spinal Glial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengjin; Ji, Byeong Uk; Lee, Ji Eun; Park, Min Young; Kim, Sungchul; Kim, Seung Tae; Koo, Sungtae

    2015-10-01

    Scolopendra extracts were used for pharmacopuncture at the Kidney 1 acupoint to investigate the role of Scolopendra pharmacopuncture (SPP) in both the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain induced by L5 spinal nerve ligation in rats and the contribution of spinal glial cells. A single treatment and five once-daily treatments with SPP were given to evaluate its effects on the development and maintenance stages of neuropathic pain, respectively, which was followed by behavioral tests. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting tests were also carried out. A single treatment of SPP delayed spinal nerve ligation-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia and induced a profound decrease in the expression of ionized calcium binding adaptor protein in the lumbar spinal cord. Repeated SPP treatments reliably suppressed mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at later time points, and these results correlated mainly with decreases in glial fibrillary acidic protein. Intriguingly, ionized calcium binding adaptor protein expression was also reduced after repeated SPP. These results illustrate that neuropathic pain in the development and maintenance stages is alleviated by SPP treatment, which may be ascribed principally to deactivations of microglia and astroglia, respectively. Additionally, microglial inactivation seems to be partially involved in preventing neuropathic pain in the maintenance stage. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. L-Arginine supplementation prevents allodynia and hyperalgesia in painful diabetic neuropathic rats by normalizing plasma nitric oxide concentration and increasing plasma agmatine concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondón, Lusliany J; Farges, M C; Davin, N; Sion, B; Privat, A M; Vasson, M P; Eschalier, A; Courteix, C

    2017-07-19

    Neuropathic pain is a common diabetic complication. It is characterized by symptoms of spontaneous and stimulus-evoked pain including hyperalgesia and allodynia. L-Arginine is a common precursor of many metabolites of biological interest, in particular, nitric oxide (NO), ornithine, and hence polyamines. In central nervous system, NO, glutamate, and polyamines share an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated effect. We hypothesized that a variation in arginine metabolism caused by diabetes may contribute to development and maintenance of neuropathic pain and to the worsening of clinical and biological signs of diabetes. We examined whether oral L-arginine supplementation (2.58 ± 0.13 g/l in drinking water for 3 weeks) could improve the development of neuropathic pain and the clinical, biological, and metabolic complications of diabetes in streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetic (D) rats. STZ administration induced classical symptoms of type 1 diabetes. Diabetic rats also displayed mechanical hypersensitivity, tactile, and thermal allodynia. Plasma citrulline and NO levels were increased in diabetic hyperalgesic/allodynic rats. L-Arginine supplementation failed to reduce hyperglycaemia, polyphagia, and weight loss. Moreover, it abolished hyperalgesia and allodynia by normalizing NO plasma concentration and increasing plasma agmatine concentration. L-Arginine supplementation prevented the development of mechanical hyperalgesia, tactile, and thermal allodynia in painful diabetic neuropathy with concomitant reduction of NO and increased agmatine production, offering new therapeutic opportunities for the management of diabetic neuropathic pain.

  6. [Electric stimulation acupuncture in peripheral neuropathic pain syndromes. Clinical pilot study on analgesic effectiveness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irnich, D; Winklmeier, S; Beyer, A; Peter, K

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the potential value of acupuncture in the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain. Explorative analysis should provide data for further randomised controlled trials. In an uncontrolled clinical trial electroacupuncture was given to 17 patients with chronic neuropathic pain of peripheral origin which was resistant to preceding pain therapy. Patients were treated twice weekly for 4 weeks. Assessment of outcome measurements comprised: Intensity of continuous pain (visual analogue scale, VAS), intensity of pain attacks (VAS), duration of pain attacks, number of pain attacks and changes in mood (VAS). All measures were evaluated by diary (1 week before treatment to 2 weeks after treatment and 1 week at follow up three months after treatment). Changes of global complaints and patients' beliefs in treatment (credibility assessment) were also assessed. At re-evaluation two weeks after treatment, mean continuous pain was reduced by 32.9% and intensity of pain attacks was reduced by 59%. Mean number of daily pain attacks decreased from 4.2 (SD +/- 4.6, 0.14-13.3) before treatment to 2.2 (SD +/- 3.8, 0-7.5) two weeks after treatment. Duration of pain attacks and mood showed no substantial changes. Three months after treatment, continuous pain was reduced by 15.9% and intensity of pain attacks was reduced by 44% compared to baseline. No serious adverse events were observed On the basis of this small pilot study, trial treatment by electroacupuncture seems to be justified in these patients given a lack of success of standard treatments. The apparent beneficial analgesic effects of electroacupuncture appear to warrant further investigation.

  7. Emg Signal Analysis of Healthy and Neuropathic Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ashutosh; Sayed, Tabassum; Garg, Ridhi; Shreyam, Richa

    2017-08-01

    Electromyography is a method to evaluate levels of muscle activity. When a muscle contracts, an action potential is generated and this circulates along the muscular fibers. In electromyography, electrodes are connected to the skin and the electrical activity of muscles is measured and graph is plotted. The surface EMG signals picked up during the muscular activity are interfaced with a system. The EMG signals from individual suffering from Neuropathy and healthy individual, so obtained, are processed and analyzed using signal processing techniques. This project includes the investigation and interpretation of EMG signals of healthy and Neuropathic individuals using MATLAB. The prospective use of this study is in developing the prosthetic device for the people with Neuropathic disability.

  8. Neuromodulation of neuropathic pain syndrome induced by elapidae (cobra) envenomation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stretanski, Michael F

    2009-01-01

    Objectives.  This study aims to demonstrate the utility of spinal cord stimulation in a neuropathic pain syndrome and overall decline in health and functional independence following elapid envenomation in a morbidly obese, insulin-dependent diabetic. Materials and Methods.  A two-lead, 16-electrode constant-current, independently controlled system is placed in the mid-cervical spine. Results.  Noted were a improvement in overall health status with better glycemic control and return to work status in response to adequate pain control. Conclusions.  The case serves as a model for other orphan pain cases with a seemingly esoteric etiology and adds to the existing body of literature that spinal cord stimulation and neuromodulation, in general, has a wide-ranging applicability peripheral neuropathic pain syndromes. © 2009 International Neuromodulation Society.

  9. Neuropathic pain in cancer: systematic review, performance of screening tools and analysis of symptom profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, M R; Boland, E G; Bouhassira, D; Freynhagen, R; Hardy, J; Hjermstad, M J; Mercadante, S; Pérez, C; Bennett, M I

    2017-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the methodological quality of rigorous neuropathic pain assessment tools in applicable clinical studies, and determine the performance of screening tools for identifying neuropathic pain in patients with cancer. Systematic literature search identified studies reporting use of Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS), Douleur Neuropathique en 4 (DN4) or painDETECT (PDQ) in cancer patients with a clinical diagnosis of neuropathic or not neuropathic pain. Individual patient data were requested to examine descriptor item profiles. Six studies recruited a total of 2301 cancer patients of which 1564 (68%) reported pain. Overall accuracy of screening tools ranged from 73 to 94%. There was variation in description and rigour of clinical assessment, particularly related to the rigour of clinical judgement of pain as the reference standard. Individual data from 1351 patients showed large variation in the selection of neuropathic pain descriptor items by cancer patients with neuropathic pain. LANSS and DN4 items characterized a significantly different neuropathic pain symptom profile from non-neuropathic pain in both tumour- and treatment-related cancer pain aetiologies. We identified concordance between the clinician diagnosis and screening tool outcomes for LANSS, DN4 and PDQ in patients with cancer pain. Shortcomings in relation to standardized clinician assessment are likely to account for variation in screening tool sensitivity, which should include the use of the neuropathic pain grading system. Further research is needed to standardize and improve clinical assessment in patients with cancer pain. Until the standardization of clinical diagnosis for neuropathic cancer pain has been validated, screening tools offer a practical approach to identify potential cases of neuropathic cancer pain.

  10. Bilateral Neuropathic Osteoarthropathy of the Shoulder Due to Syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiyeke, Levent; Durakbaşa, Mehmet Oǧuz; Duymuş, Tahir Mutlu

    2017-04-06

    Neuropathic osteoarthropathy, which is known as Charcot osteoarthropathy, is a degenerative arthritis that develops as a result of proprioceptive and sensory innervation loss. A 47-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department of the hospital with left shoulder pain, which was ongoing and exacerbating for 5 days. Examination of the cervical region takes a crucial part in determining shoulder pathology. Palliative therapy is the prior treatment of choice as surgical therapy has potential risks in Charcot osteoarthropathy.

  11. Bilateral neuropathic osteoarthropathy of the shoulder due to syringomyelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Adiyeke

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic osteoarthropathy, which is known as Charcot osteoarthropathy, is a degenerative arthritis that develops as a result of proprioceptive and sensory innervation loss. A 47-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department of the hospital with left shoulder pain, which was ongoing and exacerbating for 5 days. Examination of the cervical region takes a crucial part in determining shoulder pathology. Palliative therapy is the prior treatment of choice as surgical therapy has potential risks in Charcot osteoarthropathy.

  12. Spinal SIRT1 activation attenuates neuropathic pain in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijun Shao

    Full Text Available Abnormal histone acetylation occurs during neuropathic pain through an epigenetic mechanism. Silent information regulator 1 (sir2 or SIRT1, a NAD-dependent deacetylase, plays complex systemic roles in a variety of processes through deacetylating acetylated histone and other specific substrates. But the role of SIRT1 in neuropathic pain is not well established yet. The present study was intended to detect SIRT1 content and activity, nicotinamide (NAM and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD in the spinal cord using immunoblotting or mass spectroscopy over time in mice following chronic constriction injury (CCI or sham surgery. In addition, the effect of intrathecal injection of NAD or resveratrol on thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia was evaluated in CCI mice. Finally, we investigated whether SIRT1 inhibitor EX-527 could reverse the anti-nociceptive effect of NAD or resveratrol. It was found that spinal SIRT1 expression, deacetylase activity and NAD/NAM decreased significantly 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after CCI surgery as compared with sham group. In addition, daily intrathecal injection of 5 µl 800 mM NAD 1 h before and 1 day after CCI surgery or single intrathecal injection of 5 µl 90 mM resveratrol 1 h before CCI surgery produced a transient inhibitory effect on thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in CCI mice. Finally, an intrathecal injection of 5 µl 1.2 mM EX-527 1 h before NAD or resveratrol administration reversed the anti-nociceptive effect of NAD or resveratrol. These data indicate that the reduction in SIRT1 deacetylase activity may be a factor contributing to the development of neuropathic pain in CCI mice. Our findings suggest that the enhancement of spinal NAD/NAM and/or SIRT1 activity may be a potentially promising strategy for the prevention or treatment of neuropathic pain.

  13. New developments in the pharmacotherapy of neuropathic chronic pelvic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Erin T; As-Sanie, Sawsan

    2016-01-01

    Advancements in further understanding the pathophysiology of chronic pelvic pain syndromes continue to direct therapy. The mechanisms of chronic pelvic pain are often multifactorial and therefore require a multidisciplinary approach. The final treatment plan is often an accumulation of organ-specific treatment and chronic pain medications directed to the CNS and PNS. This article is a review of commonly used medications for chronic pelvic neuropathic pain disorders as well as an introduction to recent innovative developments in pain medicine. PMID:28116131

  14. Surgically-Induced Neuropathic Pain (SNPP): Understanding the Perioperative Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsook, David; Kussman, Barry D.; George, Edward; Becerra, Lino R.; Burke, Dennis W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Nerve damage takes place during surgery. As a consequence, significant numbers (10–40%) of patients experience chronic neuropathic pain termed surgically induced neuropathic pain (SNPP). Background The initiating surgery and nerve damage set off a cascade of events that includes both pain and an inflammatory response, resulting in ‘peripheral’ and ‘central sensitization’, with the latter resulting from repeated barrages of neural activity from nociceptors. In affected patients these initial events produce chemical, structural and functional changes in the peripheral (PNS) and central nervous (CNS) systems. The maladaptive changes in damaged nerves lead to peripheral manifestations of the neuropathic state – allodynia, sensory loss, shooting pains etc., that can manifest long after the effects of the surgical injury have resolved. The CNS manifestations that occur are termed ‘centralization of pain’ and affect sensory, emotional and other (e.g., cognitive) systems as well as contributing to some of the manifestations of the chronic pain syndrome (e.g., depression). Conclusions Currently there are no objective measures of pain in the peri-operative period. As such intermittent pain or continuous may take place during and after surgery. New technologies including direct measures of specific brain function of nociception and new insights into preoperative evaluation of patients including genetic predisposition appear to provide initial opportunities for decreasing the burden of SNPP until treatments with high efficacy and low side effects that either prevent or treat pain are discovered. PMID:23059501

  15. Does Duration of Neuropathic Pain Impact the Effectiveness of Pregabalin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Concepción; Latymer, Mark; Almas, Mary; Ortiz, Marie; Clair, Andrew; Parsons, Bruce; Varvara, Roxana

    2017-04-01

    Patients with chronic pain conditions such as neuropathic pain frequently experience delays in diagnosis and treatment. Ideally, all patients should be treated in a timely manner, but in those patients with more established disease it is important to know that approved treatments remain effective. This was a pooled analysis of 19 randomized placebo-controlled trials of pregabalin for peripheral neuropathic pain conditions, including diabetic peripheral neuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia, and post-traumatic/postsurgical pain. Patients were divided into 5 pain duration categories based on time since onset of pain (pregabalin; n = 2,164 placebo). Mean baseline pain scores were similar across the pain duration categories (range 6.3 to 6.5). Pregabalin significantly improved pain score at endpoint, vs. placebo, in all patients together (treatment difference [95% confidence interval], -0.59 [-0.67, -0.52], P pregabalin, vs. placebo, for all patients (45.0% vs. 30.9%, P Pregabalin significantly improves pain irrespective of the length of time since onset of neuropathic pain. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  16. Neuropathic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury: Mechanism, Assessment and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gul Mete Civelek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a devastating disease which may cause physical, psychological and social dysfunction. Neuropathic pain (NP after SCI is common, can be seen in varying degrees and is one of the most difficultly treated problems developing after SCI. With the addition of the NP to loss of function after SCI, sleep patterns, moods and daily activities of patients are adversely affected. In order to treat pain effectively, classification of pain after SCI must be done carefully and correctly. According to classification of International Pain Study Group, pain after SCI is divided into two main groups as nociceptive and neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain is defined as %u201Cpain occuring as a direct result of a disease or lesion directly affecting somato-sensorial system%u201D. NP after SCI can be classified according to anatomical region (above the level of lesion, at the level of lesion, below the level of lesion. Treatment of NP after SCI is often challenging and receiving response to treatment may take long time. Therefore, treatment of NP after SCI should be multifactorial. Treatment options include pharmochologic treatment, application of transcutanous electrical nerve stimulation, psychiatric treatment approaches, and surgical approaches in selected cases. In pharmachologic treatment, first line agents are tricyclic antidepresants, pregabalin and gabapentin. In this review, mechanisms and assessment and treatment of NP after SCI is discussed with the guide of current literature.

  17. Validation of the Greek Version of the DN4 Diagnostic Questionnaire for Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykioti, Panagiota; Zis, Panagiotis; Vadalouca, Athina; Siafaka, Ioanna; Argyra, Eriphili; Bouhassira, Didier; Stavropoulou, Evmorfia; Karandreas, Nikolaos

    2015-09-01

    The Douleur Neuropathique 4 questionnaire (DN4) was developed by the French Neuropathic Pain Group and is a simple and objective tool, primarily designed to screen for neuropathic pain. The aim of our study is to validate the DN4 in the Greek language. The study was set up as a prospective observational study. Two pain specialists independently examined patients and diagnosed them with neuropathic, nociceptive, or mixed pain, according to the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) definitions. A third and a fourth physician administered the DN4 questionnaire to the patients. Out of the 237 patients who met our inclusion criteria and had identical diagnoses regarding the type of pain, 123 were diagnosed with neuropathic, 59 with nociceptive, and 55 with mixed pain. Among patients with identical diagnoses of neuropathic or nociceptive pain, using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.92. A cutoff point of equal or greater than 4 resulted in a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 78%. Among patients suffering from pain with neuropathic element (neuropathic or mixed pain) or pain with no neuropathic element (nociceptive pain), using a ROC curve analysis, the AUC was 0.89. A cutoff point of equal or greater than 4 resulted in a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 78%. The Greek version of DN4 is a valid tool for discriminating between neuropathic and nociceptive pain conditions in daily practice. © 2014 World Institute of Pain.

  18. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS/RSD and Neuropathic Pain: Role of Intravenous Bisphosphonates as Analgesics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Yanow

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is a sequela of dysfunction, injuries, or diseases of the peripheral and/or central nervous system pain pathways, which has historically been extremely difficult to treat. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS types 1 and 2 are neuropathic pain conditions that have a long history in the medical literature but whose pathophysiology remains elusive and whose available treatment options remain few. While an exact animal model for CRPS doesn't yet exist, there are several animal models of neuropathic pain that develop behaviors of hypersensitivity, one of the hallmark signs of neuropathic pain in humans.

  19. Use of 5% lidocaine medicated plaster to treat localized neuropathic pain secondary to traumatic injury of peripheral nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correa-Illanes G

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Gerardo Correa-Illanes,1 Ricardo Roa,2 José Luis Piñeros,2 Wilfredo Calderón31Rehabilitation Department, 2Burns and Plastic Surgery Department, Hospital del Trabajador, 3Plastic Surgery Department, Hospital del Salvador, Santiago, ChileObjective: The efficacy of 5% lidocaine medicated plaster (LMP has previously been demonstrated in post-traumatic localized neuropathic pain. This study evaluated the use of LMP in localized neuropathic pain secondary to traumatic peripheral nerve injury.Patients and methods: This prospective observational study enrolled patients with traumatic injuries to peripheral nerves that were accompanied by localized neuropathic pain of more than 3 months duration. Demographic variables, pain intensity (measured using the numeric rating scale; NRS, answers to the Douleur Neuropathique 4 (DN4 questionnaire, and the size of the painful area were recorded.Results: Nineteen patients were included, aged (mean ± standard deviation 41.4 ± 15.7 years. Nerve injuries affected the upper (eight patients or lower (11 patients limbs. The mean duration of pain before starting treatment with LMP was 22.6 ± 43.5 months (median 8 months. Mean baseline values included: NRS 6.7 ± 1.6, painful area 17.8 ± 10.4 cm2 (median 18 cm2, and DN4 score 6.7 ± 1.4. The mean duration of treatment with LMP was 19.5 ± 10.0 weeks (median 17.4 weeks. Mean values after treatment were: NRS 2.8 ± 1.5 (≥3 point reduction in 79% of patients, ≥50% reduction in 57.9% of patients and painful area 2.1 ± 2.3 cm2 (median 1 cm2, ≥50% reduction in 94.7% of patients. Functional improvement after treatment was observed in 14/19 patients (73.7%.Conclusion: LMP effectively treated traumatic injuries of peripheral nerves which presented with chronic localized neuropathic pain, reducing both pain intensity and the size of the painful area.Keywords: chronic post-surgical pain, chronic post-traumatic pain, 5% lidocaine medicated plaster, neuropathic pain

  20. Evaluation and Optimization of Therapeutic Footwear for Neuropathic Diabetic Foot Patients Using In-Shoe Plantar Pressure Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Sicco A.; Haspels, Rob; Busch-Westbroek, Tessa E.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Therapeutic footwear for diabetic foot patients aims to reduce the risk of ulceration by relieving mechanical pressure on the foot. However, footwear efficacy is generally not assessed in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to assess the value of in-shoe plantar pressure analysis to evaluate and optimize the pressure-reducing effects of diabetic therapeutic footwear. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Dynamic in-shoe plantar pressure distribution was measured in 23 neuropathic diabetic foot patients wearing fully customized footwear. Regions of interest (with peak pressure >200 kPa) were selected and targeted for pressure optimization by modifying the shoe or insole. After each of a maximum of three rounds of modifications, the effect on in-shoe plantar pressure was measured. Successful optimization was achieved with a peak pressure reduction of >25% (criterion A) or below an absolute level of 200 kPa (criterion B). RESULTS In 35 defined regions, mean peak pressure was significantly reduced from 303 (SD 77) to 208 (46) kPa after an average 1.6 rounds of footwear modifications (P Footwear optimization lasted on average 53 min. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that in-shoe plantar pressure analysis is an effective and efficient tool to evaluate and guide footwear modifications that significantly reduce pressure in the neuropathic diabetic foot. This result provides an objective approach to instantly improve footwear quality, which should reduce the risk for pressure-related plantar foot ulcers. PMID:21610125

  1. Distinct TrkA and Ret modulated negative and positive neuropathic behaviors in a mouse model of resiniferatoxin-induced small fiber neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yu-Lin; Kan, Hung-Wei; Chiang, Hao; Lee, Yi-Chen; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2017-10-26

    Neurotrophic factors and their corresponding receptors play key roles in the maintenance of different phenotypic dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, the axons of which degenerate in small fiber neuropathy, leading to various neuropathic manifestations. Mechanisms underlying positive and negative symptoms of small fiber neuropathy have not been systematically explored. This study investigated the molecular basis of these seemingly paradoxical neuropathic behaviors according to the profiles of TrkA and Ret with immunohistochemical and pharmacological interventions in a mouse model of resiniferatoxin (RTX)-induced small fiber neuropathy. Mice with RTX neuropathy exhibited thermal hypoalgesia and mechanical allodynia, reduced skin innervation, and altered DRG expression profiles with decreased TrkA(+) neurons and increased Ret(+) neurons. RTX neuropathy induced the expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), and ATF3(+) neurons were colocalized with Ret but not with TrkA (P<0.001). As a neuroprotectant, 4-Methylcatechol (4MC) promoted skin reinnervation partially with correlated reversal of the neuropathic behaviors and altered neurochemical expression. Gambogic amide, a selective TrkA agonist, normalized thermal hypoalgesia, and GW441756, a TrkA kinase inhibitor, induced thermal hypoalgesia, which was already reversed by 4MC. Mechanical allodynia was reversed by a Ret kinase inhibitor, AST487, which induced thermal hyperalgesia in naïve mice. The activation of Ret signaling by XIB4035 induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hypoalgesia in RTX neuropathy mice in which the neuropathic behaviors were previously normalized by 4MC. Distinct neurotrophic factor receptors, TrkA and Ret, accounted for negative and positive neuropathic behaviors in RTX-induced small fiber neuropathy, respectively: TrkA for thermal hypoalgesia and Ret for mechanical allodynia and thermal hypoalgesia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Efficient assessment of efficacy in post-traumatic peripheral neuropathic pain patients: pregabalin in a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins TM

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Tim M Jenkins, Trevor S Smart, Frances Hackman, Carol Cooke, Keith KC TanClinical Research, Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Sandwich, Kent, UKBackground: Detecting the efficacy of novel analgesic agents in neuropathic pain is challenging. There is a critical need for study designs with the desirable characteristics of assay sensitivity, low placebo response, reliable pain recordings, low cost, short duration of exposure to test drug and placebo, and relevant and recruitable population.Methods: We designed a proof-of-concept, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study in patients with post-traumatic peripheral neuropathic pain (PTNP to evaluate whether such a study design had the potential to detect efficacious agents. Pregabalin, known to be efficacious in neuropathic pain, was used as the active analgesic. We also assessed physical activity throughout the study.Results: Twenty-five adults (20–70 years of age with PTNP for ≥3 months entered a screening week and were then randomized to one of the two following treatment sequences: (1 pregabalin followed by placebo or (2 placebo followed by pregabalin. These 2-week treatment periods were separated by a 2-week washout period. Patients on pregabalin treatment received escalating doses to a final dosage of 300 mg/day (days 5–15. In an attempt to minimize placebo response, patients received placebo treatment during the screening week and the 2-week washout period. Average daily pain scores (primary endpoint were significantly reduced for pregabalin versus placebo, with a mean treatment difference of -0.81 (95% confidence interval: -1.45 to -0.17; P = 0.015.Conclusion: The efficacy of pregabalin was similar to that identified in a large, parallel group trial in PTNP. Therefore, this efficient crossover study design has potential utility for future proof-of-concept studies in neuropathic pain.Keywords: pregabalin, post-traumatic peripheral neuropathic pain, randomized

  3. Diagnosis and medical treatment of neuropathic pain in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arco, Rogerio Del; Nardi, Susilene Maria Tonelli; Bassi, Thiago Gasperini; Paschoal, Vania Del Arco

    2016-08-08

    to identify the difficulties in diagnosing and treating neuropathic pain caused by leprosy and to understand the main characteristics of this situation. 85 patients were treated in outpatient units with reference to leprosy and the accompanying pain. We used a questionnaire known as the Douleur Neuropathic 4 test and we conducted detailed neurological exams. As a result, 42 patients were excluded from the study for not having proved their pain. Out of the 37 patients that experienced pain, 22 (59.5%) had neuropathic pain (or a mixture of this pain and their existing pain) and of these 90.8% considered this pain to be moderate or severe. 81.8% of the sample suffered with this pain for more than 6 months. Only 12 (54.5%) of the patients had been diagnosed with neuropathic pain and in almost half of these cases, this pain had not been diagnosed. With reference to medical treatment (n=12) for neuropathic pain, 5 (41.6%) responded that they became better. For the other 7 (58.4%) there were no changes in relation to the pain or in some cases the pain worsened in comparison to their previous state. Statistical analysis comparing improvements in relation to the pain amongst the patients that were treated (n=12) and those that were not, showed significant differences (value p=0.020). we noted difficulties in diagnosing neuropathic pain for leprosy in that almost half of the patients that were studied had not had their pain diagnosed. We attributed this to some factors such as the non-adoption of the appropriate protocols which led to inadequate diagnosis and treatment that overlooked the true picture. identificar as dificuldades em diagnosticar e tratar a dor neuropática causada pela hanseníase, bem como determinar as características principais dessa situação. examinaram-se 85 pacientes tratados no ambulatório de referência para hanseníase e referiam dor. Aplicou-se questionário, o teste Douleur Neuropathic 4, e criterioso exame neurológico pelo qual exclu

  4. Peripheral substance P and neurokinin-1 receptors have a role in inflammatory and neuropathic orofacial pain models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, Fernanda C; Tronco Júnior, Marcos F; Zampronio, Aleksander R; Martini, Alessandra C; Rae, Giles A; Chichorro, Juliana G

    2013-06-01

    There is accumulating evidence that substance P released from peripheral sensory neurons participates in inflammatory and neuropathic pain. In this study it was investigated the ability of substance P to induce orofacial nociception and thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia, as well as the role of NK1 receptors on models of orofacial inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Substance P injected into the upper lip at 1, 10 and 100 μg/50 μL failed to induce nociceptive behavior. Also, substance P (0.1-10 μg/50 μL) injected into the upper lip did not evoke orofacial cold hyperalgesia and when injected at 1 μg/50 μL did not induce mechanical hyperalgesia. However, substance P at this latter dose induced orofacial heat hyperalgesia, which was reduced by the pre-treatment of rats with a non-peptide NK1 receptor antagonist (SR140333B, 3mg/kg). Systemic treatment with SR140333B (3 mg/kg) also reduced carrageenan-induced heat hyperalgesia, but did not exert any influence on carrageenan-induced cold hyperalgesia. Blockade of NK1 receptors with SR140333B also reduced by about 50% both phases of the formalin response evaluated in the orofacial region. Moreover, heat, but not cold or mechanical, hyperalgesia induced by constriction of the infraorbital nerve, a model of trigeminal neuropathic pain, was abolished by pretreatment with SR140333B. Considering that substance P was peripherally injected (i.e. upper lip) and the NK1 antagonist used lacks the ability to cross the blood-brain-barrier, our results demonstrate that the peripheral SP/NK1 system participates in the heat hyperalgesia associated with inflammation or nerve injury and in the persistent pain evoked by formalin in the orofacial region. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of Melatonin and Vitamin E on Peripheral Neuropathic Pain in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Heidari

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sPrevious studies have indicated that diabetes mellitus might be accompanied by neuropathic pain. Oxidative stress is implicated as a final common pathway in development of diabetic neuropathy. Pharmacological interventions targeted at inhibiting free radical production have shown beneficial effects in diabetic neuropathy. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the possible analgesic effects of melatonin and vitamin E in diabetic rats.Materials and MethodsThis study was performed on 32 male Wistar rats divided into 4 groups: control, diabetic, melatonin-treated diabetic and vitamin E-treated diabetic. Experimental diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal streptozotocin (50 mg/kg injection. Melatonin (10 mg/kg, i.p. and vitamin E (100 mg/kg, i.p. were injected for 2 weeks after 21st day of diabetes induction. At the end of administration period, pain-related behavior was assessed using 0.5% formalin test according to two spontaneous flinching and licking responses. The levels of lipid peroxidation as well as glutathione-peroxidase and catalase activities were evaluated in lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia.ResultsFormalin-evoked flinching and total time of licking were increased in both acute and chronic phases of pain in diabetic rats as compared to control rats, whereas treatment with melatonin or vitamin E significantly reduced the pain indices. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation levels increased and glutathione-peroxidase and catalase activities decreased in diabetic rats. Both antioxidants reversed the biochemical parameters toward their control values.ConclusionThese results suggest that oxidative stress may contribute to induction of pain in diabetes and further suggest that antioxidants, melatonin and vitamin E, can reduce peripheral neuropathic pain in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

  6. Analgesic Effect of Recombinant GABAergic Cells in a Model of Peripheral Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jergova, Stanislava; Gajavelli, Shyam; Varghese, Mathew S; Shekane, Paul; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain represents a clinically challenging state with a poor response to current treatment options. Long-term management of chronic pain is often associated with the development of tolerance, addiction, and other side effects, reducing the therapeutic value of treatment. Alternative strategies based on cell therapy and gene manipulation, balancing the inhibitory and excitatory events in the spinal cord, may provide sustained pain relief in the long term. Transplantation of GABAergic cells has been successfully used to enhance inhibition and to restore physiological spinal pain processing. However, since the underlying mechanism of chronic pain development involves changes in several pain-signaling pathways, it is essential to develop an approach that targets several components of pain signaling. Recombinant cell therapy offers the possibility to deliver additional analgesic substances to the restricted area in the nervous system. The current study explores the analgesic potential of genetically modified rat embryonic GABAergic cells releasing a peptidergic NMDA receptor antagonist, Serine(1)-histogranin (SHG). Overactivation of glutamate NMDA receptors contributes to the hyperexcitability of spinal neurons observed in chronic pain models. Our approach allows us to simultaneously target spinal hyperexcitability and reduced inhibitory processes. Transplantable cells were transduced by viral vectors encoding either one or six copies of SHG cDNAs. The analgesic potential of recombinant cells after their intraspinal transplantation was evaluated in a model of peripheral nerve injury. Enhanced reduction of hypersensitivity to thermal and mechanical stimuli was observed in animals treated by recombinant cells compared to the nonrecombinant group. The recombinant peptide was detected in the spinal tissue, suggesting its successful production by transplanted cells. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using recombinant cells releasing adjunct

  7. NK cells mediate the cumulative analgesic effect of electroacupuncture in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yong-Hui; Wang, Jun-Ying; Qiao, Li-Na; Chen, Shu-Ping; Tan, Lian-Hong; Xu, Qiu-Ling; Liu, Jun-Ling

    2014-08-26

    anti-asialo-GM1 antibody, the increased thermal pain threshold following EA intervention was obviously reduced. Repeated EA interventions have a time-dependent cumulative analgesic effect in neuropathic pain rats, which is closely associated with its regulatory effects on NK cells, splenic IL-2, β-EP, and plasma IL-2, IL-1β, IFN-γ and TGF-β levels.

  8. Prevalence of Neuropathic Pain According to the IASP Grading System in Patients with Chronic Non-Malignant Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vægter, Henrik Bjarke; Andersen, Per Grunwald; Madsen, Marianne Frobøse

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective was to determine the prevalence of neuropathic pain according to the new International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) grading system. The secondary objective was to compare the system classification of neuropathic pain with the classification of neuropathic pain...

  9. Alpha lipoic acid : a new treatment for neuropathic pain in patients with diabetes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mijnhout, G. S.; Alkhalaf, A.; Kleefstra, N.; Bibo, H. J. G.

    Background: Neuropathic pain is difficult to treat. We identified those studies in the literature in which the effectiveness of alpha lipoic acid as a treatment for neuropathic pain was evaluated. Methods: Systematic literature review. The databases MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched using the

  10. Charcot Neuropathic Arthropathy of the Foot: A Literature Review and Single-Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Kucera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Charcot neuropathic osteoarthropathy of the foot is a relatively common complication of diabetic neuropathy. Incorrect diagnosis and improper treatment often result in the extremity having to be amputated. This paper summarises the current view on the etiology, diagnostics, and treatment of diabetic Charcot neuropathic osteoarthropathy, with particular focus on preserving the extremity through surgical intervention from our own experiences.

  11. Charcot Neuropathic Arthropathy of the Foot: A Literature Review and Single-Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Tomas; Shaikh, Haroun Hassan; Sponer, Pavel

    Charcot neuropathic osteoarthropathy of the foot is a relatively common complication of diabetic neuropathy. Incorrect diagnosis and improper treatment often result in the extremity having to be amputated. This paper summarises the current view on the etiology, diagnostics, and treatment of diabetic Charcot neuropathic osteoarthropathy, with particular focus on preserving the extremity through surgical intervention from our own experiences.

  12. Chronic blockade of melanocortin receptors alleviates allodynia in rats with neuropathic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Vrinten, D.H.; Adan, R.A.H.; Groen, G.J.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the involvement of the spinal cord melanocortin (MC) system in neuropathic pain. Because we recently demonstrated that MC receptor ligands acutely alter nociception in an animal model of neuropathic pain, in this study we tested whether chronic administration was also effective. We

  13. Neuropathic Pain Components in Patients with Cancer: Prevalence, Treatment, and Interference with Daily Activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterling, A.; Boveldt, N.D. te; Verhagen, C.A.; Graaf, W.T. van der; Ham, M.A.P.C. van; Drift, M.A. van der; Vissers, K.; Engels, Y.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pain and neuropathic symptoms impact quality of life of patients with cancer. To obtain more insight in the prevalence, severity, and treatment of neuropathic symptoms in patients with cancer and their interference with daily activities, we conducted a cross-sectional study at the

  14. Thalamic activity and biochemical changes in individuals with neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustin, S.M.; Wrigley, P.J.; Youssef, A.M.; McIndoe, L.; Wilcox, S.L.; Rae, C.D.; Edden, R; Siddall, P.J.; Henderson, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence relating thalamic changes to the generation and/or maintenance of neuropathic pain. We have recently reported that neuropathic orofacial pain is associated with altered thalamic anatomy, biochemistry and activity, which may result in disturbed thalamocortical oscillatory circuits. Despite this evidence, it is possible that these thalamic changes are not responsible for the presence of pain per se, but result as a consequence of the injury. To clarify this subject, we compared brain activity and biochemistry in 12 people with below-level neuropathic pain after complete thoracic spinal cord injury to 11 people with similar injuries and no neuropathic pain and 21 age and gender matched healthy controls. Quantitative arterial spinal labelling was used to measure thalamic activity and magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine changes in neuronal variability quantifying N-acetylaspartate and alterations in inhibitory function quantifying gamma amino butyric acid. This study revealed that the presence of neuropathic pain is associated with significant changes in thalamic biochemistry and neuronal activity. More specifically, the presence of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury is associated with significant reductions in thalamic N-acetylaspartate, gamma amino butyric acid content and blood flow in the region of the thalamic reticular nucleus. Spinal cord injury on its own did not account for these changes. These findings support the hypothesis that neuropathic pain is associated with altered thalamic structure and function, which may disturb central processing and play a key role in the experience of neuropathic pain. PMID:24530612

  15. Effect of Xylopic Acid on Paclitaxel-induced Neuropathic pain in rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Xylopic acid, a diterpenoid isolated from the fruits of Xylopia aethiopica has demonstrated analge-sic properties in acute pain models. It was therefore evaluated for its analgesic properties in paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain, a type of pain difficult to treat clinically. Neuropathic pain was induced in rats by injecting 2 mg ...

  16. Behavior of neuropathic pain in mice following chronic constriction injury comparing silk and catgut ligatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, S. Van Der; Cornelissen, L.; Behet, M.; Vaneker, M.; Steegers, M.; Vissers, K.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Neuropathic pain is defined as pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system and is common after surgery. Neuropathic pain can persist without an obvious injury. In this study we aim to validate a murine chronic constriction injury model

  17. Neuropathic-like pain features and cross-sectional associations in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koop, Sanne M.W.; ten Klooster, Peter M.; Vonkeman, Harald Erwin; Steunebrink, Laura Margaretha Maria; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Increasing evidence indicates that features suggestive of neuropathic pain may also be present in patients with common rheumatic conditions. The objective of this study was to examine neuropathic-like pain symptoms and associated factors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods We

  18. Food-Derived Natural Compounds for Pain Relief in Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Yeong Lim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain, defined as pain caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system, is characterized by dysesthesia, hyperalgesia, and allodynia. The number of patients with this type of pain has increased rapidly in recent years. Yet, available neuropathic pain medicines have undesired side effects, such as tolerance and physical dependence, and do not fully alleviate the pain. The mechanisms of neuropathic pain are still not fully understood. Injury causes inflammation and immune responses and changed expression and activity of receptors and ion channels in peripheral nerve terminals. Additionally, neuroinflammation is a known factor in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. During neuropathic pain development, the C-C motif chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2 acts as an important signaling mediator. Traditional plant treatments have been used throughout the world for treating diseases. We and others have identified food-derived compounds that alleviate neuropathic pain. Here, we review the natural compounds for neuropathic pain relief, their mechanisms of action, and the potential benefits of natural compounds with antagonistic effects on GPCRs, especially those containing CCR2, for neuropathic pain treatment.

  19. Neuronal CC chemokines : the distinct roles of CCL21 and CCL2 in neuropathic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biber, Knut; Boddeke, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The development of neuropathic pain in response to peripheral nerve lesion for a large part depends on microglia located at the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Thus the injured nerve initiates a response of microglia, which represents the start of a cascade of events that leads to neuropathic pain

  20. MR imaging of neuropathic feet in leprosy patients with suspected osteomyelitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, Mario; Slim, Erik J.; Heoksma, Agnes F.; van der Kleij, Ad J.; Akkerman, Erik M.; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Faber, William R.

    2002-01-01

    This study was undertaken to analyze MRI findings in leprosy patients with neuropathic feet, which are suspected of having osteomyelitis. As far as we know, there is no literature concerning osteomyelitis and MRI in neuropathic leprosy feet at present. Therefore, we have included MRI examination of

  1. An evidence-based algorithm for the treatment of neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna B; Otto, Marit; Jensen, Troels S

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this article is to discuss an evidence-based algorithm that can be implemented by the primary care physician in his/her daily clinical practice for the treatment of patients with neuropathic pain conditions. METHOD: A treatment algorithm for neuropathic pain was formulat...

  2. Ethanolic extract of Aloe vera ameliorates sciatic nerve ligation induced neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swetha Kanyadhara

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: The results of the present study validate the use of EEAV to treat neuropathic pain. This effect may be attributed to the decreased migration of neutrophils and due to the anti-oxidant properties of A. vera. Further studies to confirm the mechanism of action will help develop suitable A. vera formulations for neuropathic pain therapy .

  3. Neuropathic pain, depressive symptoms, and C-reactive protein in sciatica patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uher, Tomas; Bob, Petr

    2013-03-01

    There is evidence that neuropathic pain component in low back pain (LBP) patients is associated with higher ratings of comorbidities such as depression and anxiety disorders. In line with current findings, the purpose of this clinical study is to examine a hypothesis regarding a relationship of neuropathic pain component, depression, and other psychopathological symptoms in a specific group of LBP patients with sciatica pain. With respect to findings that depression is related to inflammatory changes, and inflammatory mediators may play a role in neuropathic pain generation, we have assessed also serum C-reactive protein (CRP). Results of the present study show that increased neuropathic pain component in sciatica patients is associated with elevated levels of depression, anxiety, alexithymia, and serum CRP levels. In conclusion, results of this study indicate that CRP levels in sciatica patients are closely associated with neuropathic pain.

  4. Slack channels expressed in sensory neurons control neuropathic pain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ruirui; Bausch, Anne E; Kallenborn-Gerhardt, Wiebke; Stoetzer, Carsten; Debruin, Natasja; Ruth, Peter; Geisslinger, Gerd; Leffler, Andreas; Lukowski, Robert; Schmidtko, Achim

    2015-01-21

    Slack (Slo2.2) is a sodium-activated potassium channel that regulates neuronal firing activities and patterns. Previous studies identified Slack in sensory neurons, but its contribution to acute and chronic pain in vivo remains elusive. Here we generated global and sensory neuron-specific Slack mutant mice and analyzed their behavior in various animal models of pain. Global ablation of Slack led to increased hypersensitivity in models of neuropathic pain, whereas the behavior in models of inflammatory and acute nociceptive pain was normal. Neuropathic pain behaviors were also exaggerated after ablation of Slack selectively in sensory neurons. Notably, the Slack opener loxapine ameliorated persisting neuropathic pain behaviors. In conclusion, Slack selectively controls the sensory input in neuropathic pain states, suggesting that modulating its activity might represent a novel strategy for management of neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/351125-11$15.00/0.

  5. A treatment algorithm for neuropathic pain: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namaka, Michael; Leong, Christine; Grossberndt, Amy; Klowak, Meghann; Turcotte, Dana; Esfahani, Farid; Gomori, Andrew; Intrater, Howard

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide an update of the neuropathic pain treatment algorithm previously published by Namaka et al. in 2004. This algorithm focuses on the strategic incorporation of the latest pain therapies while providing an update of any recent developments involving medications previously listed in the algorithm. PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane, and Toxnet databases were used to conduct all literature searches on neuropathic pain and targeted treatment strategies. Comprehensive search efforts in the identified databases included studies published between 1980 and 2009. The search term "neuropathic pain" was used along with each of the agents outlined in this review: pregabalin, paroxetine CR, duloxetine, tramadol XL, Tramacet, Sativex, and nabilone. A total of 90 studies were reviewed and selected based on level 1, 2, and 3 search strategies. Level 1 search strategies were initially aimed at evidence-based trials of large sample size (N > 100), with a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design conducted by investigators well versed in the specialty area of interest. A level 2 search was conducted for additional trials that had many, but not all, of the desirable traits of evidence-based trials. In addition, a level 3 search strategy was conducted to compare key findings stated in anecdotal reports of very small (N < 15), poorly designed trials with the results of well-designed, evidence-based trials identified in level 1 and/or level 2 searches. Based on a thorough evaluation of the literature, pregabalin, paroxetine CR, and duloxetine have been placed in the updated algorithm as first-line agents, while tramadol XL, Tramacet, Sativex, and nabilone function primarily as adjunctive agents. The updated algorithm provides a baseline framework from which clinicians can justify the medication they prescribe.

  6. Neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers – evidence-to-practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndip A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Agbor Ndip1–3, Leonard Ebah3,4, Aloysius Mbako51Department of Diabetes and Medicine, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, UK; 2Department of Medicine, Royal Bolton Hospital, Bolton, UK; 3Cardiovascular Research Group, School of Biomedicine, University of Manchester, UK; 4Department of Renal Medicine, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, UK; 5Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Wrexham Maelor Hospital, Wales, UKAbstract: Foot ulcers and their attendant complications are disquietingly high in people with diabetes, a majority of whom have underlying neuropathy. This review examines the evidence base underpinning the prevention and management of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers in order to inform best clinical practice. Since it may be impractical to ask patients not to weight-bear at all, relief of pressure through the use of offloading casting devices remains the mainstay for management of neuropathic ulcers, whilst provision of appropriate footwear is essential in ulcer prevention. Simple non-surgical debridement and application of hydrogels are both effective in preparing the wound bed for healthy granulation and therefore enhancing healing. Initial empirical antibiotic therapy for infected ulcers should cover the most common bacterial flora. There is limited evidence supporting the use of adjunctive therapies such as hyperbaric oxygen and cytokines or growth factors. In selected cases, recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor has been shown to enhance healing; however, its widespread use cannot be advised due to the availability of more cost-effective approaches. While patient education may be beneficial, the evidence base remains thin and conflicting. In conclusion, best management of foot ulcers is achieved by what is taken out of the foot (pressure, callus, infection, and slough rather than what is put on the foot (adjuvant treatment.Keywords: diabetic foot ulcers, neuropathic

  7. The Effect of Anakinra on Paclitaxel-Induced Peripheral Neuropathic Pain in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyrukluyıldız, Ufuk; Küpeli, İlke; Bedir, Zehra; Özmen, Özgür; Onk, Didem; Süleyman, Bahadır; Mammadov, Renad; Süleyman, Halis

    2016-12-01

    Paclitaxel is used in the treatment of cancer, and it may cause interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β)-related peripheral neuropathic pain. While our primary aim was to investigate the analgesic efficacy of an IL-1β antagonist, a secondary outcome was to assess whether a correlation exists between analgesic effects and antioxidant activity. A total of 24 albino Wistar male rats were divided into the following groups: paclitaxel-control, paclitaxel+50 mg kg-1 anakinra, paclitaxel+100 mg kg-1 anakinra and healthy group (HG). After the normal paw pain threshold in all animal groups was measured using a Basile algesimeter, a single dose of 2 mg kg-1 paclitaxel was intraperitoneally administered on the 1st, 3rd, 5th and 7th days. Anakinra was intraperitoneally administered following the final paclitaxel administration. The paw pain thresholds in the groups were measured before and seven days after paclitaxel administration and at the 1st and 3rd hours after anakinra administration. After the third hour of measurement, the rats were killed with high doses of ketamine, and the paw tissues were removed. Malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase and total glutathione levels were measured in claw tissues, and IL-1β gene expression was determined. The biochemical results were compared with the results of the HG; in the meanwhile the claw pain threshold results were compared with the results obtained after the last paclitaxel and the results obtained from the 1st and 3rd hours after the anakinra application. The claw paw pain threshold of the rats decreased one and three hours after anakinra administration. Further, 100 mg kg-1 anakinra had greater analgesic activity than 50 mg kg-1 anakinra. A correlation was found between the antioxidant and analgesic activities of 100 mg kg-1 anakinra. Anakinra may be useful to reduce paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain; further, 100 mg kg-1 anakinra may have greater analgesic and antioxidant activities.

  8. Validation of a high-performance size-exclusion chromatography method to determine and characterize β-glucans in beer wort using a triple-detector array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, Ivan; Marconi, Ombretta; Sileoni, Valeria; Perretti, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Beer wort β-glucans are high-molecular-weight non-starch polysaccharides of that are great interest to the brewing industries. Because glucans can increase the viscosity of the solutions and form gels, hazes, and precipitates, they are often related to poor lautering performance and beer filtration problems. In this work, a simple and suitable method was developed to determine and characterize β-glucans in beer wort using size exclusion chromatography coupled with a triple-detector array, which is composed of a light scatterer, a viscometer, and a refractive-index detector. The method performances are comparable to the commercial reference method as result from the statistical validation and enable one to obtain interesting parameters of β-glucan in beer wort, such as the molecular weight averages, fraction description, hydrodynamic radius, intrinsic viscosity, polydispersity and Mark-Houwink parameters. This characterization can be useful in brewing science to understand filtration problems, which are not always explained through conventional analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of DSP4 and desipramine in the sensorial and affective component of neuropathic pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Lidia; Mico, Juan A; Rey-Brea, Raquel; Camarena-Delgado, Carmen; Berrocoso, Esther

    2016-10-03

    Previous findings suggest that neuropathic pain induces characteristic changes in the noradrenergic system that may modify the sensorial and affective dimensions of pain. We raise the hypothesis that different drugs that manipulate the noradrenergic system can modify specific domains of pain. In the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain, the sensorial (von Frey and acetone tests) and the affective (place escape/avoidance paradigm) domains of pain were evaluated in rats 1 and 2weeks after administering the noradrenergic neurotoxin [N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride] (DSP4, 50mg/kg). In other animals, we evaluated the effect of enhancing noradrenergic tone in the 2weeks after injury by administering the antidepressant desipramine (10mg/kg/day, delivered by osmotic minipumps) during this period, a noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor. Moreover, the phosphorylation of the extracellular signal regulated kinases (p-ERK) in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) was also assessed. The ACC receives direct inputs from the main noradrenergic nucleus, the locus coeruleus, and ERK activation has been related with the expression of pain-related negative affect. These studies revealed that DSP4 almost depleted noradrenergic axons in the ACC and halved noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus along with a decrease in the affective dimension and an increased of p-ERK in the ACC. However, it did not modify sensorial pain perception. By contrast, desipramine reduced pain hypersensitivity, while completely impeding the reduction of the affective pain dimension and without modifying the amount of p-ERK. Together results suggest that the noradrenergic system may regulate the sensorial and affective sphere of neuropathic pain independently. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of a polyherbal formulation cream on diabetic neuropathic pain among patients with type 2 diabetes - A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Viswanathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Painful diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes and can severely limit patients′ daily functions. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the safety and effect of using a polyherbal formulation in reducing the symptoms of diabetic neuropathic pain in comparison with placebo among patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: A total of 50 (M:F = 33:17 consecutive type 2 diabetes patients with painful diabetic neuropathy were enrolled in this study. All these patients had either two or more symptoms of diabetic neuropathy such as pain, burning and pricking sensations and numbness in their feet. They were randomly assigned to two groups: group 1 (n = 26 patients were treated with polyherbal formulation cream and group 2 (n = 24 patients were administered placebo. The patients were followed up for six months. Changes in the symptoms of painful diabetic neuropathy of each patient were recorded at baseline, third and sixth month using the Diabetic Neuropathic Score. Results: The mean age of the patients, duration of diabetes and glycated haemoglobin (HbA 1c were similar in both groups at baseline. During follow up visits, there was a decrease in the HbA 1c levels in the study and control groups. The symptoms of painful diabetic neuropathy were also similar in both groups at baseline. A significant decrease in symptoms of neuropathic pain was observed among the group of patients treated with polyherbal formulation cream (76.9 per cent compared to the placebo-treated group (12.5 per cent (P<0.001, at the end of the final follow up. Interpretation & conclusions: In this pilot study polyherbal formulation cream was found to be effective as well as safe to treat painful diabetic neuropathy. However, its long term use needs to be evaluated for any further effectiveness and side effects.

  11. Low barometric pressure aggravates neuropathic pain in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Jun; Itano, Yuya; Funakubo, Megumi; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Mariko; Mori, Rarami

    2011-10-03

    Several clinical studies have demonstrated a consistent relationship between changes in meteorological factors, particularly barometric pressure, and pain intensity in subjects with chronic pain. We have previously demonstrated that exposure to artificially low barometric pressure (LP) intensifies pain-related behaviors in rats with neuropathic pain. In the present study, guinea pigs with unilateral L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) were placed in a pressure-controlled chamber and subjected to LP of 10 or 27hPa below the ambient pressure. The SNL surgery led to increased hindpaw withdrawal frequencies to 34-, 59-, and 239-mN von Frey filaments (VFFs). When the SNL animals were subjected to both LP exposures consecutively, the hindpaw withdrawal frequencies further increased; the effect was most significant when the animals were exposed to LP 27hPa below ambient pressure. In contrast, no change was seen in a group of sham-operated control animals. These results indicate that fluctuations in LP within the range of natural weather patterns can potentiate neuropathic pain in guinea pigs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Age-related impact of neuropathic pain on animal behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Gisèle; Jourdan, Didier; Millecamps, Magali; Chapuy, Eric; Alliot, Josette; Eschalier, Alain

    2006-11-01

    The number of old and very old persons is increasing and there is evidence that aging coincides with chronic painful conditions. Pain induces behavioural disorders that have been so far poorly identified in old and even less in very old animals. The aim of this study was to: (1) compare the evolution of pain in senescent animals (37-39 months) to old (20-22 months) and young (4-6 months) Lou/cjall rats after a chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve; (2) evaluate pain during four weeks after surgery with an experimental and an observational approach to determine how the response to noxious stimuli correlates with recorded spontaneous behaviour. Results showed that senescent animals are less sensitive to neuropathic pain than old or young rats while senescent/old rats are more sensitive to acute pain. The correlation between observational and experimental pain scores stresses the reliability of non-invasive measures for pain evaluation in senescent populations. The dichotomy between neuropathic and acute pain perceptions with age needs to be further investigated and would help to better understand the reasons of this uneven pain perception and expression with age.

  13. Acute neuropathic joint in diabetic foot: Plain radiographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Dae Young; Kang, Heung Sik; Sim, Jung Suk; Yoon, Yong Kyu; Kim, Chu Wan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-05-15

    To determine the plain film findings of acute neuropathic joint in diabetic foot. Acute neuropathic joint in diabetic foot was considered when fragmentation of the articular ends of bone and subluxation of the affected joint developed within eight weeks after clinical onset of diabetic gangrene. Eight toes of six diabetics were satisfactory to our criteria. We analyzed plain radiographic findings of the affected joint and soft tissue, interval changes in followed-up radiographs, and deformities after healing. The time interval between clinical onset of gangrene and bone destruction ranges from 2 weeks to 4 weeks(mean 2.6 weeks). Plane radiographs showed fragmentation of the articular ends, subluxation, and soft tissue swelling of the metatarsophalangeal joint or interphalangeal joint. The significant feature of these patients was rapid progression of the lesions. Clinically, all patients had diabetic gangrene in affected toes, however, there was no evidence of osteomyelitis in our series. Amputation was done in 2 cases, and lesions in 3 of the remaining 4 cases were repaired spontaneously with regression of gangrene, leaving radiological residua such as pointed-end, tapered-end, and ball and socket deformity. Rapid disorganisation of the joint with associated evidence of soft tissue gangrene in plain radiograph is believed to be valuable for the diagnosis of diabetic osteoarthropathy.

  14. Walking with Neuropathic Pain: Paradoxical Shift from Burden to Support?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Kopsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Baclofen 5% cream can be used for the treatment of neuropathic pain. We describe an unusual case of a neuropathic pain patient with spinal cord injury. A 71-year-old woman with a partial spinal cord injury lesion at L4 complained of tingling, pins and needles, and burning in her legs. She scored her pain as 6 before adding baclofen 5% cream to her pain medication (pregabalin 450 mg, acetaminophen 3000 mg, and diclofenac 150 mg daily. One month later she experienced complete pain relief, though experienced increased difficulties in walking, leading to frequent falls. Her steadier walking without stumbling and falling was more important to her than pain reduction. Thus she decided to stop using baclofen. This unusual case report discusses two important issues that relate to pain medicine and rehabilitation in patients with painful spinal cord lesions: (1 the presence of wide areas of sensory loss “covered” by the presence of painful sensations and (2 pathological sensations that can be used and integrated in the body schema to create an improved spatiovisual orientation and thus mobility. Both these aspects have to be taken into account when treating pain and design rehabilitation programs.

  15. Neuropathic orofacial pain: cannabinoids as a therapeutic avenue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Patrick; McKenna, Joseph P; McCreary, Christine; Downer, Eric J

    2014-10-01

    Neuropathic orofacial pain (NOP) exists in several forms including pathologies such as burning mouth syndrome (BMS), persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP), trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). BMS and PIFP are classically diagnosed by excluding other facial pain syndromes. TN and PHN are most often diagnosed based on a typical history and presenting pain characteristics. The pathophysiology of some of these conditions is still unclear and hence treatment options tend to vary and include a wide variety of treatments including cognitive behaviour therapy, anti-depressants, anti-convulsants and opioids; however such treatments often have limited efficacy with a great amount of inter-patient variability and poorly tolerated side effects. Analgesia is one the principal therapeutic targets of the cannabinoid system and many studies have demonstrated the efficacy of cannabinoid compounds in the treatment of neuropathic pain. This review will investigate the potential use of cannabinoids in the treatment of symptoms associated with NOP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Chronic Orofacial Pain: Burning Mouth Syndrome and Other Neuropathic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Raymond C; Ferguson, McKenzie; Herndon, Christopher M

    2017-01-01

    Chronic orofacial pain is a symptom associated with a wide range of neuropathic, neurovascular, idiopathic, and myofascial conditions that affect a significant proportion of the population. While the collective impact of the subset of the orofacial pain disorders involving neurogenic and idiopathic mechanisms is substantial, some of these are relatively uncommon. Hence, patients with these disorders can be vulnerable to misdiagnosis, sometimes for years, increasing the symptom burden and delaying effective treatment. This manuscript first reviews the decision tree to be followed in diagnosing any neuropathic pain condition, as well as the levels of evidence needed to make a diagnosis with each of several levels of confidence: definite, probable, or possible. It then examines the clinical literature related to the idiopathic and neurogenic conditions that can occasion chronic orofacial pain, including burning mouth syndrome, trigeminal neuralgia, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, post-herpetic neuralgia, and atypical odontalgia. Temporomandibular disorders also are examined as are other headache conditions, even though they are not neurologic conditions, because they are common and can mimic symptoms of the latter disorders. For each of these conditions, the paper reviews literature regarding incidence and prevalence, physiologic and other contributing factors, diagnostic signs and symptoms, and empirical evidence regarding treatments. Finally, in order to improve the quality and accuracy of clinical diagnosis, as well as the efficiency with which effective treatment is initiated and delivered, criteria are offered that can be instrumental in making a differential diagnosis. PMID:28638895

  17. Chronic Orofacial Pain: Burning Mouth Syndrome and Other Neuropathic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Raymond C; Ferguson, McKenzie; Herndon, Christopher M

    2017-03-01

    Chronic orofacial pain is a symptom associated with a wide range of neuropathic, neurovascular, idiopathic, and myofascial conditions that affect a significant proportion of the population. While the collective impact of the subset of the orofacial pain disorders involving neurogenic and idiopathic mechanisms is substantial, some of these are relatively uncommon. Hence, patients with these disorders can be vulnerable to misdiagnosis, sometimes for years, increasing the symptom burden and delaying effective treatment. This manuscript first reviews the decision tree to be followed in diagnosing any neuropathic pain condition, as well as the levels of evidence needed to make a diagnosis with each of several levels of confidence: definite, probable, or possible. It then examines the clinical literature related to the idiopathic and neurogenic conditions that can occasion chronic orofacial pain, including burning mouth syndrome, trigeminal neuralgia, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, post-herpetic neuralgia, and atypical odontalgia. Temporomandibular disorders also are examined as are other headache conditions, even though they are not neurologic conditions, because they are common and can mimic symptoms of the latter disorders. For each of these conditions, the paper reviews literature regarding incidence and prevalence, physiologic and other contributing factors, diagnostic signs and symptoms, and empirical evidence regarding treatments. Finally, in order to improve the quality and accuracy of clinical diagnosis, as well as the efficiency with which effective treatment is initiated and delivered, criteria are offered that can be instrumental in making a differential diagnosis.

  18. The combined predictive capacity of rat models of algogen-induced and neuropathic hypersensitivity to clinically used analgesics varies with nociceptive endpoint and consideration of locomotor function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munro, Gordon; Storm, Ann; Hansen, Merete K.

    2012-01-01

    Different neurobiological mechanism(s) might contribute to evoked and non-evoked pains and to limited translational drug discovery efforts. Other variables including the pain model and sensory testing method used, dose/route/preadministration time of compound(s), lack of adverse effect profiling...... and level of observer experience might also contribute. With these points in mind, we tested three mechanistically distinct analgesics in rat models of algogen-induced and neuropathic pain. In chronic constriction injury (CCI) rats evoked hindpaw mechanical hypersensitivity and spontaneous weight bearing...... by morphine (3-10 mg/kg, s.c.) and gabapentin (50-200 mg/kg, i.p.). Weight bearing deficits and cold hypersensitivity were reversed only by high doses of each drug. Surprisingly, duloxetine (10-60 mg/kg, s.c.) was largely ineffective in neuropathic rats although it partially reduced formalin...

  19. Differential effects of repeated low dose treatment with the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 in experimental models of bone cancer pain and neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Andreas; Ding, Ming; Egerod, Kristoffer Lihme

    2008-01-01

    Pain due to bone malignancies is one of the most difficult types of cancer pain to fully control and may further decrease the patients' quality of life. Animal models of chronic pain conditions resulting from peripheral inflammatory reactions or nerve injuries are responsive to treatment...... with cannabinoid agonists. However, the use of cannabinoid agonists in humans may be hampered by CNS related side effects and development of tolerance. In the present study, we investigated the effect of repeated low dose administration of the synthetic cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 on bone cancer pain...... and neuropathic pain in mice. In addition, we investigated the development of CNS related side effects and tolerance. We found that 0.5 mg/kg/day for 18 days reduced pain related behavior and expression of spinal glial fibrillary acidic protein in the bone cancer pain model but not in the neuropathic pain model...

  20. Lower-extremity dynamics of walking in neuropathic diabetic patients who wear a forefoot-offloading shoe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Sicco A; Maas, Josina C; Otterman, Nicoline M

    2017-10-02

    A forefoot-offloading shoes has a negative-heel rocker outsole and is used to treat diabetic plantar forefoot ulcers, but its mechanisms of action and their association with offloading and gait stability are not sufficiently clear. Ten neuropathic diabetic patients were tested in a forefoot-offloading shoe and subsequently in a control shoe with no specific offloading construction, both worn on the right foot (control shoe on left), while walking at 1.2m/s. 3D-instrumented gait analysis and simultaneous in-shoe plantar pressure measurements were used to explain the shoe's offloading efficacy and to define centre-of-pressure profiles and left-to-right symmetry in ankle joint dynamics (0-1, 1:maximum symmetry), as indicators for gait stability. Compared to the control shoe, peak forefoot pressures, vertical ground reaction force, plantar flexion angle, and ankle joint moment, all in terminal stance, and the proximal-to-distal centre-of-pressure trajectory were significantly reduced in the forefoot-offloading shoe (Poutsole design, forefoot-offloading shoes significantly alter a neuropathic diabetic patient's gait towards a reduced push-off power that explains the shoe's offloading efficacy. However, gait symmetry and stability are compromised, and may be factors in the low perceived walking discomfort and limited use of these shoes in clinical practice. Shoe modifications (e.g. less negative heel, a more cushioning insole) may resolve this trade-off between efficacy and usability. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Psychometric Validity and Reliability of the Thai Version of the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euasobhon, Pramote; Soonthornkes, Neranchala; Rushatamukayanunt, Pranee; Wangnamthip, Suratsawadee; Jirachaipitak, Sukunya; Maneekut, Nattawut; Laurujisawat, Janravee; Srirojanakul, Wanna

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate validity and reliability of the Thai version of the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (NPSI-T) in Thai patients with neuropathic pain. Although the Thai version of Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (NPSI-T) has been linguistically validated, the tool has to be psychometrically validated before applying to neuropathic pain patients in daily practice. Forty Thai patients with diagnosis of neuropathic pain were enrolled to the study and were evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS), the Thai version of Neuropathic Pain Diagnostic Questionnaire (DN4-T) and NPSI-T questionnaires. Four hours later the patients were asked to perform retest NPSI-T and to evaluate the understanding of each NPSI-T question. The total score of NPSI-T questionnaire was statistically correlated to visual analog scale (VAS) (Spearman's correlation coefficient = 0.599, p 0.8) and good agreement (ICC 0.6-0.8) were presented in 30% and 70% of the questionnaire, respectively. The study demonstrated validity and reliability of the NPSI-T for assessing the neuropathic pain in Thai patients.

  2. p27(SJ), a novel protein in St John's Wort, that suppresses expression of HIV-1 genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbinian-Sarkissian, N; Darbinyan, A; Otte, J; Radhakrishnan, S; Sawaya, B E; Arzumanyan, A; Chipitsyna, G; Popov, Y; Rappaport, J; Amini, S; Khalili, K

    2006-02-01

    Transcription of the HIV-1 genome is controlled by the cooperation of viral regulatory proteins and several host factors which bind to specific DNA sequences within the viral promoter spanning the long terminal repeat, (LTR). Here, we describe the identification of a novel protein, p27(SJ), present in a laboratory callus culture of Hypericum perforatum (St John's Wort) that suppresses transcription of the HIV-1 genome in several human cell types including primary culture of microglia and astrocytes. p27(SJ) associates with C/EBPbeta, a transcription factor that regulates expression of the HIV-1 genome in macrophages and monocytic cells, and the viral transactivator, Tat. The association of p27(SJ) with C/EBPbeta and Tat alters their subcellular localization, causing their accumulation in the perinuclear cytoplasmic compartment of the cells. Fusion of a nuclear localization signal to p27(SJ) forces its entry into the nucleus and diminishes the capacity of p27(SJ) to suppress Tat activity, but does not alter its ability to suppress C/EBPbeta activation of the LTR. Results from binding assays showed the inhibitory effect of p27(SJ) on C/EBPbeta interaction with DNA. Finally, our results demonstrate that expression of p27(SJ) decreases the level of viral replication in HIV-1-infected cells. These observations suggest the potential for the development of a therapeutic advance based on p27(SJ) protein to control HIV-1 transcription and replication in cells associated with HIV-1 infection in the brain.

  3. Selenium speciation in malt, wort, and beer made from selenium-biofortified two-rowed barley grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Sara; Santamaria, Oscar; Chen, Yi; McGrath, Steve P; Poblaciones, Maria J

    2014-06-25

    Selenium (Se) biofortification of barley is a suitable strategy to increase the Se concentration in grain. In the present paper, the suitability of this Se-biofortified grain for making Se-enriched beer is analyzed. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different Se fertilizer doses (0, 10, and 20 g of Se ha(-1)) and forms (sodium selenate or sodium selenite) on the Se loss during the malting and brewing processes and Se speciation in grain, malt, wort, and beer. Samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-ICP-MS for total Se and speciation. Mashing-lautering was the process with the greatest Se loss (83.8%). After malting and brewing, only 7.3% of the initial Se was retained in beer, mainly in selenite form. Even so, the fertilizer application of sodium selenate at 20 g ha(-1) increased the total Se concentration almost 6-fold in the final beer in comparison to the use of grain derived from unfertilized barley. The present paper provides evidence that the use of Se-biofortified barley grain as a raw material to produce Se-enriched beer is possible, and the results are comparable to other methods in terms of efficiency.

  4. The efficacy of nerve growth factor antibody in a mouse model of neuropathic cancer pain

    OpenAIRE

    Miyagi, Masayuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; KAMODA, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Inoue, Gen; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Uchida,Kentaro; SUZUKI, Takane; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Takaso, Masashi; Ohtori, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic cancer pain is caused by tumors compressing the spinal nerve roots and is usually difficult to treat. The aim of current study was to determine the influence of NGF antibody on pain-related markers and behavior in a mouse model of neuropathic cancer pain. Twenty mice were used to model neuropathic cancer pain by applying murine sarcoma cells to their left sciatic nerve. Ten mice were sham operated. Two weeks after surgery, the murine sarcoma-affected mice were allocated randomly i...

  5. An evidence-based algorithm for the treatment of neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Otto, Marit; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this article is to discuss an evidence-based algorithm that can be implemented by the primary care physician in his/her daily clinical practice for the treatment of patients with neuropathic pain conditions. METHOD: A treatment algorithm for neuropathic pain was formulated...... with different experimental designs and outcomes. CONCLUSION: Patients presenting with neuropathic pain are becoming a more frequent occurrence for the primary care physician as the population ages. Evidence-based treatment options allow for the most efficient and effective pharmacotherapy regimen...

  6. The effect of Sativex in neuropathic pain and spasticity in spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Sven Robert; Hansen, Rikke Bod Middelhede; Johansen, Inger Lauge

    2014-01-01

    often receive incomplete relief from present available and recommended treatment. Cannabinoids has shown efficacy on both neuropathic pain and spasticity in patients with spinal cord injury, but the studies one the topic has been too small to make a general conclusion for patients with spinal cord...... injury. Aims: To investigate the effect of Sativex (cannabinoid agonist given as an oral mucosal spray), on neuropathic pain and spasticity in patients with spinal cord injury. Methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study. We will include 30 patients with neuropathic pain...

  7. Validity and reliability of the persian (Farsi) version of the DN4 (Douleur Neuropathique 4 Questions) questionnaire for differential diagnosis of neuropathic from non-neuropathic pains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Seyed Pezhman; Fateh, Hamid R; Forogh, Bijan; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Ahadi, Tannaz; Ghaboussi, Pouya; Bouhassira, Didier; Raissi, Gholam Reza

    2014-06-01

    The aim of our study was translation and assessment of validity and reliability of the Persian version of DN4 questionnaire. The goal was to fill the gap caused by the absence of a validated instrument in Persian to facilitate discrimination of neuropathic pain. In this study, the adaptation and validation of the questionnaire was carried out in 4 steps, including translation, retranslation, semantic, and literal assessments, and a pilot study for practicability and potential perception difficulties of the final Persian version on 45 patient samples. The questionnaire validation performed on 175 patients, 112 (64%) females with the mean age of 52.53 (SD = 14.98) ranging from 22 to 87 years of age with neuropathic (N = 86) and non-neuropathic pain (NNP) (N = 89). Sensitivity, specificity, and Youden Index in cut-off point ≥ 4 were 90%, 95%, and 0.85, respectively, which are noteworthy findings among other validation studies. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the whole questionnaire was 0.852. Inter-rater agreement and test-retest reliability were significant intraclass coefficient (ICC = 0.957 and ICC = 0.918, respectively). The Persian version of DN4 questionnaire is a reliable, valid, feasible, and easily administered tool for precise discrimination neuropathic pain from NNP in Farsi. The characteristics of this test can assist practitioner to diagnose neuropathic pain accurately for both clinical and research purposes. © 2013 World Institute of Pain Pain Practice published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of World Institute of Pain.

  8. Neuropathic pain and psychological morbidity in patients with treated leprosy: a cross-sectional prevalence study in Mumbai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasry-Levy, Estrella; Hietaharju, Aki; Pai, Vivek; Ganapati, Ramaswamy; Rice, Andrew S C; Haanpää, Maija; Lockwood, Diana N J

    2011-03-08

    Neuropathic pain has been little studied in leprosy. We assessed the prevalence and clinical characteristics of neuropathic pain and the validity of the Douleur Neuropathique 4 questionnaire as a screening tool for neuropathic pain in patients with treated leprosy. The association of neuropathic pain with psychological morbidity was also evaluated. Adult patients who had completed multi-drug therapy for leprosy were recruited from several Bombay Leprosy Project clinics. Clinical neurological examination, assessment of leprosy affected skin and nerves and pain evaluation were performed for all patients. Patients completed the Douleur Neuropathique 4 and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire to identify neuropathic pain and psychological morbidity. One hundred and one patients were recruited, and 22 (21.8%) had neuropathic pain. The main sensory symptoms were numbness (86.4%), tingling (68.2%), hypoesthesia to touch (81.2%) and pinprick (72.7%). Neuropathic pain was associated with nerve enlargement and tenderness, painful skin lesions and with psychological morbidity. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 92% in diagnosing neuropathic pain. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 is a simple tool for the screening of neuropathic pain in leprosy patients. Psychological morbidity was detected in 15% of the patients and 41% of the patients with neuropathic pain had psychological morbidity.

  9. Neuropathic pain and psychological morbidity in patients with treated leprosy: a cross-sectional prevalence study in Mumbai.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estrella Lasry-Levy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neuropathic pain has been little studied in leprosy. We assessed the prevalence and clinical characteristics of neuropathic pain and the validity of the Douleur Neuropathique 4 questionnaire as a screening tool for neuropathic pain in patients with treated leprosy. The association of neuropathic pain with psychological morbidity was also evaluated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Adult patients who had completed multi-drug therapy for leprosy were recruited from several Bombay Leprosy Project clinics. Clinical neurological examination, assessment of leprosy affected skin and nerves and pain evaluation were performed for all patients. Patients completed the Douleur Neuropathique 4 and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire to identify neuropathic pain and psychological morbidity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: One hundred and one patients were recruited, and 22 (21.8% had neuropathic pain. The main sensory symptoms were numbness (86.4%, tingling (68.2%, hypoesthesia to touch (81.2% and pinprick (72.7%. Neuropathic pain was associated with nerve enlargement and tenderness, painful skin lesions and with psychological morbidity. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 92% in diagnosing neuropathic pain. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 is a simple tool for the screening of neuropathic pain in leprosy patients. Psychological morbidity was detected in 15% of the patients and 41% of the patients with neuropathic pain had psychological morbidity.

  10. Neuropathic Pain and Psychological Morbidity in Patients with Treated Leprosy: A Cross-Sectional Prevalence Study in Mumbai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasry-Levy, Estrella; Hietaharju, Aki; Pai, Vivek; Ganapati, Ramaswamy; Rice, Andrew S. C.; Haanpää, Maija; Lockwood, Diana N. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain has been little studied in leprosy. We assessed the prevalence and clinical characteristics of neuropathic pain and the validity of the Douleur Neuropathique 4 questionnaire as a screening tool for neuropathic pain in patients with treated leprosy. The association of neuropathic pain with psychological morbidity was also evaluated. Methodology/Principal Findings Adult patients who had completed multi-drug therapy for leprosy were recruited from several Bombay Leprosy Project clinics. Clinical neurological examination, assessment of leprosy affected skin and nerves and pain evaluation were performed for all patients. Patients completed the Douleur Neuropathique 4 and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire to identify neuropathic pain and psychological morbidity. Conclusions/Significance One hundred and one patients were recruited, and 22 (21.8%) had neuropathic pain. The main sensory symptoms were numbness (86.4%), tingling (68.2%), hypoesthesia to touch (81.2%) and pinprick (72.7%). Neuropathic pain was associated with nerve enlargement and tenderness, painful skin lesions and with psychological morbidity. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 92% in diagnosing neuropathic pain. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 is a simple tool for the screening of neuropathic pain in leprosy patients. Psychological morbidity was detected in 15% of the patients and 41% of the patients with neuropathic pain had psychological morbidity. PMID:21408111

  11. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH inhibitors exert pharmacological effects, but lack antinociceptive efficacy in rats with neuropathic spinal cord injury pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldric T Hama

    Full Text Available Amelioration of neuropathic spinal cord injury (SCI pain is a clinical challenge. Increasing the endocannabinoid anandamide and other fatty acid amides (FAA by blocking fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH has been shown to be antinociceptive in a number of animal models of chronic pain. However, an antinociceptive effect of blocking FAAH has yet to be demonstrated in a rat model of neuropathic SCI pain. Four weeks following a SCI, rats developed significantly decreased hind paw withdrawal thresholds, indicative of below-level cutaneous hypersensitivity. A group of SCI rats were systemically treated (i.p. with either the selective FAAH inhibitor URB597 or vehicle twice daily for seven days. A separate group of SCI rats received a single dose (p.o. of either the selective FAAH inhibitor PF-3845 or vehicle. Following behavioral testing, levels of the FAA N-arachidonoylethanolamide, N-oleoyl ethanolamide and N-palmitoyl ethanolamide were quantified in brain and spinal cord from SCI rats. Four weeks following SCI, FAA levels were markedly reduced in spinal cord tissue. Although systemic treatment with URB597 significantly increased CNS FAA levels, no antinociceptive effect was observed. A significant elevation of CNS FAA levels was also observed following oral PF-3845 treatment, but only a modest antinociceptive effect was observed. Increasing CNS FAA levels alone does not lead to robust amelioration of below-level neuropathic SCI pain. Perhaps utilizing FAAH inhibition in conjunction with other analgesic mechanisms could be an effective analgesic therapy.

  12. The roles of epigallocatechin-3-gallate in the treatment of neuropathic pain: an update on preclinical in vivo studies and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bimonte S

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sabrina Bimonte,1,* Marco Cascella,1,* Vincenzo Schiavone,2 Farrokh Mehrabi-Kermani,3 Arturo Cuomo1 1Division of Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, Istituto Nazionale Tumori – IRCCS – “Fondazione G. Pascale”, Naples, Italy; 2Division of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Hospital “Pineta Grande”, Castel Volturno, Caserta, Italy; 3Division of Neurosurgery, Hospital “Pineta Grande”, Castel Volturno, Caserta, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Neuropathic pain (NP is a complex and chronic disease caused by lesions or defects of the somatosensory nervous system. The treatments normally used for managing NP usually lack efficacy. Several animal models of NP have been engineered in order to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying NP and to find alternative molecules to use as new therapeutic agents. Preclinical in vivo studies identified the epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, a main active component of green tea (Camellia sinensis, as a possible therapeutic molecule for NP treatment due to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Interestingly, it has been shown that EGCG reduced bone cancer pain. The purpose of this article is to discuss the potential use of EGCG for control and treatment of NP, by reviewing the preclinical studies reported in the literature and by shedding light on the potential schemes based on EGCG’s application in clinical practices. Keywords: epigallocatechin-3-gallate, EGCG, natural compound, neuropathic pain, animal models of neuropathic pain, cancer bone pain

  13. A Multiplex Protein Panel Applied to Cerebrospinal Fluid Reveals Three New Biomarker Candidates in ALS but None in Neuropathic Pain Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Li Lind

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to develop and apply a novel multiplex panel of solid-phase proximity ligation assays (SP-PLA requiring only 20 μL of samples, as a tool for discovering protein biomarkers for neurological disease and treatment thereof in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. We applied the SP-PLA to samples from two sets of patients with poorly understood nervous system pathologies amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and neuropathic pain, where patients were treated with spinal cord stimulation (SCS. Forty-seven inflammatory and neurotrophic proteins were measured in samples from 20 ALS patients and 15 neuropathic pain patients, and compared to normal concentrations in CSF from control individuals. Nineteen of the 47 proteins were detectable in more than 95% of the 72 controls. None of the 21 proteins detectable in CSF from neuropathic pain patients were significantly altered by SCS. The levels of the three proteins, follistatin, interleukin-1 alpha, and kallikrein-5 were all significantly reduced in the ALS group compared to age-matched controls. These results demonstrate the utility of purpose designed multiplex SP-PLA panels in CSF biomarker research for understanding neuropathological and neurotherapeutic mechanisms. The protein changes found in the CSF of ALS patients may be of diagnostic interest.

  14. Effects of niflumic acid on γ-aminobutyric acid-induced currents in isolated dorsal root ganglion neurons of neuropathic pain rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Jie; Wang, Yang; Chen, Meng-Jie; Tian, Zhen-Pu; Lu, Bi-Han; Mao, Ke-Tao; Zhang, Liang; Zhao, Lei; Shan, Li-Ya; Li, Li; Si, Jun-Qiang

    2017-08-01

    Niflumic acid (NFA) is a type of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Neuropathic pain is caused by a decrease in presynaptic inhibition mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In the present study, a whole-cell patch-clamp technique and intracellular recording were used to assess the effect of NFA on GABA-induced inward current in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of a chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. It was observed that 1-1,000 µmol/l GABA induced a concentration-dependent inward current in DRG neurons. Compared with pseudo-operated rats, the thermal withdrawal latency (TWL) of CCI rats significantly decreased (PNFA group (50 and 300 µmol/l) were significantly longer than that of the CCI group (PNFA (5.32±3.51, 33.8±5.20, and 52.2±6.32%, respectively; PNFA, respectively (PNFA exerted a strong inhibitory effect on the peak value of GABA-induced current, and the GABA-induced response was inhibited by the same concentrations of NFA (1, 10 and 100 µmol/l) in the control and CCI groups (PNFA reduced the primary afferent depolarization (PAD) associated with neuropathic pain and mediated by the GABAA receptor. NFA may regulate neuropathic pain by inhibiting dorsal root reflexes, which are triggered PAD.

  15. An Exploratory Human Laboratory Experiment Evaluating Vaporized Cannabis in the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain from Spinal Cord Injury and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsey, Barth; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Deutsch, Reena; Zhao, Holly; Prasad, Hannah; Phan, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Using eight hour human laboratory experiments, we evaluated the analgesic efficacy of vaporized cannabis in patients with neuropathic pain related to injury or disease of the spinal cord, the majority of whom were experiencing pain despite traditional treatment. After obtaining baseline data, 42 participants underwent a standardized procedure for inhaling 4 puffs of vaporized cannabis containing either placebo, 2.9%, or 6.7% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on three separate occasions. A second dosing occurred 3 hours later; participants chose to inhale 4 to 8 puffs. This flexible dosing was utilized to attempt to reduce the placebo effect. Using an 11-point numerical pain intensity rating scale as the primary outcome, a mixed effects linear regression model demonstrated a significant analgesic response for vaporized cannabis. When subjective and psychoactive side effects (e.g., good drug effect, feeling high, etc.) were added as covariates to the model, the reduction in pain intensity remained significant above and beyond any effect of these measures (all p<0.0004). Psychoactive and subjective effects were dose dependent. Measurement of neuropsychological performance proved challenging because of various disabilities in the population studied. As the two active doses did not significantly differ from each other in terms of analgesic potency, the lower dose appears to offer the best risk-benefit ratio in patients with neuropathic pain associated with injury or disease of the spinal cord. PMID:27286745

  16. An improved behavioural assay demonstrates that ultrasound vocalizations constitute a reliable indicator of chronic cancer pain and neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj Deepitha

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On-going pain is one of the most debilitating symptoms associated with a variety of chronic pain disorders. An understanding of mechanisms underlying on-going pain, i.e. stimulus-independent pain has been hampered so far by a lack of behavioural parameters which enable studying it in experimental animals. Ultrasound vocalizations (USVs have been proposed to correlate with pain evoked by an acute activation of nociceptors. However, literature on the utility of USVs as an indicator of chronic pain is very controversial. A majority of these inconsistencies arise from parameters confounding behavioural experiments, which include novelty, fear and stress due to restrain, amongst others. Results We have developed an improved assay which overcomes these confounding factors and enables studying USVs in freely moving mice repetitively over several weeks. Using this improved assay, we report here that USVs increase significantly in mice with bone metastases-induced cancer pain or neuropathic pain for several weeks, in comparison to sham-treated mice. Importantly, analgesic drugs which are known to alleviate tumour pain or neuropathic pain in human patients significantly reduce USVs as well as mechanical allodynia in corresponding mouse models. Conclusions We show that studying USVs and mechanical allodynia in the same cohort of mice enables comparing the temporal progression of on-going pain (i.e. stimulus-independent pain and stimulus-evoked pain in these clinically highly-relevant forms of chronic pain.

  17. Synthesis and Analgesic Effects of μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on Models of Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available μ-TRTX-Hhn1b (HNTX-IV is a 35-amino acid peptide isolated from the venom of the spider, Ornithoctonus hainana. It inhibits voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7, which has been considered as a therapeutic target for pain. The goal of the present study is to elucidate the analgesic effects of synthetic μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on animal models of pain. The peptide was first synthesized and then successfully refolded/oxidized. The synthetic peptide had the same inhibitory effect on human Nav1.7 current transiently expressed in HEK 293 cells as the native toxin. Furthermore, the analgesic potentials of the synthetic peptide were examined on models of inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain. μ-TRTX-Hhn1b produced an efficient reversal of acute nociceptive pain in the abdominal constriction model, and significantly reduced the pain scores over the 40-min period in the formalin model. The efficiency of μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on both models was equivalent to that of morphine. In the spinal nerve model, the reversal effect of μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on allodynia was longer and higher than mexiletine. These results demonstrated that μ-TRTX-Hhn1b efficiently alleviated acute inflammatory pain and chronic neuropathic pain in animals and provided an attractive template for further clinical analgesic drug design.

  18. Ameliorative potential of Vernonia cinerea on chronic constriction injury of sciatic nerve induced neuropathic pain in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VENKATA R.K. THIAGARAJAN

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to investigate the ameliorative potential of ethanolic extract of whole plant of Vernonia cinerea in the chronic constriction injury (CCI of sciatic nerve induced neuropathic pain in rats. Behavioral parameters such as a hot plate, acetone drop, paw pressure, Von Frey hair and tail immersion tests were performed to assess the degree of thermal, chemical and mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia. Biochemical changes in sciatic nerve tissue were ruled out by estimating thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, reduced glutathione (GSH and total calcium levels. Ethanolic extract of Vernonia cinerea and pregabalin were administered for 14 consecutive days starting from the day of surgery. CCI of sciatic nerve has been shown to induce significant changes in behavioral, biochemical and histopathological assessments when compared to the sham control group. Vernonia cinerea attenuated in a dose dependent manner the above pathological changes induced by CCI of the sciatic nerve, which is similar to attenuation of the pregabalin pretreated group. The ameliorating effect of ethanolic extract of Vernonia cinerea against CCI of sciatic nerve induced neuropathic pain may be due to the presence of flavonoids and this effect is attributed to anti-oxidative, neuroprotective and calcium channel modulator actions of these compounds.

  19. Neuron-Glia Crosstalk and Neuropathic Pain: Involvement in the Modulation of Motor Activity in the Orofacial Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad Zakir; Unno, Shumpei; Ando, Hiroshi; Masuda, Yuji; Kitagawa, Junichi

    2017-09-26

    Neuropathic orofacial pain (NOP) is a debilitating condition. Although the pathophysiology remains unclear, accumulating evidence suggests the involvement of multiple mechanisms in the development of neuropathic pain. Recently, glial cells have been shown to play a key pathogenetic role. Nerve injury leads to an immune response near the site of injury. Satellite glial cells are activated in the peripheral ganglia. Various neural and immune mediators, released at the central terminals of primary afferents, lead to the sensitization of postsynaptic neurons and the activation of glia. The activated glia, in turn, release pro-inflammatory factors, further sensitizing the neurons, and resulting in central sensitization. Recently, we observed the involvement of glia in the alteration of orofacial motor activity in NOP. Microglia and astroglia were activated in the trigeminal sensory and motor nuclei, in parallel with altered motor functions and a decreased pain threshold. A microglial blocker attenuated the reduction in pain threshold, reduced the number of activated microglia, and restored motor activity. We also found an involvement of the astroglial glutamate-glutamine shuttle in the trigeminal motor nucleus in the alteration of the jaw reflex. Neuron-glia crosstalk thus plays an important role in the development of pain and altered motor activity in NOP.

  20. Ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide in spinal cord injury neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Sven R; Bing, Jette; Hansen, Rikke M

    2016-01-01

    , double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel multicenter study was performed to investigate the effect of ultramicronized PEA (PEA-um) as add-on therapy on neuropathic pain in individuals with SCI. A pain diary was completed and questionnaires were completed before and after the 12-week treatment...... included in the primary analysis. There was no difference in mean pain intensity between PEA-um and placebo treatment (P = 0.46, mean reductions in pain scores 0.4 (-0.1 to 0.9) vs 0.7 (0.2-1.2); difference of means 0.3 (-0.4 to 0.9)). There was also no effect of PEA-um as add-on therapy on spasticity...

  1. Neuropathic arthropathy (Charcot's joint) in dialysis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meneghello, A.; Bertoli, M.

    1984-08-01

    To the author's knowledge, uraemic neuropathy has not been previously reported as a cause of Charcot's joint. In this paper they present three cases in which the association between clinical and radiographic patterns suggest the diagnosis of neuropathic arthropathy. The features of uraemic neuropathy are stressed and the role of secondary hyperparathyroidism in the development of this type of arthropathy is discussed. The extremely severe hyperparathyroidism reported here, may cause tendon and ligament disease, especially at the site of their bone insertion. Uraemic tendon and ligament failures weaken joints and produce further instability, which may be a precipitating factor of uraemic Charcot's joint in patients undergoing chronic haemodialysis. 5 figs.

  2. Management of diabetic neuropathic foot and ankle malunions and nonunions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Stapleton

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The management of diabetic neuropathic foot and ankle malunions and/or nonunions is often complicated by the presence of broken or loosened hardware, Charcot joints, infection, osteomyelitis, avascular bone necrosis, unstable deformities, bone loss, disuse and pathologic osteopenia, and ulcerations. The author discusses a rational approach to functional limb salvage with various surgical techniques that are aimed at achieving anatomic alignment, long-term osseous stability, and adequate soft tissue coverage. Emphasis is placed on techniques to overcome the inherent challenges that are encountered when surgically managing a diabetic nonunion and/or malunion. Particular attention is directed to the management of deep infection and Charcot neuroarthropathy in the majority of the cases presented.

  3. The pharmacogenomics of escitalopram in the treatment of neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Charlotte Brasch; Møller, Malik U; Sindrup, Søren Hein

    of neuropathic pain is still unsatisfactory. The effects of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), escitalopram, on pain in polyneuropathy was tested in an earlier randomized, placebo-controlled, double- blinded cross-over trial including  41 patients who were treated with 20 mg escitalopram...... and placebo. The clinical study showed a moderate, good or complete pain relief for escitalopram in 11 patients ("responders") but at only a slight or no relief  in 30 patients ("non-responders"). The difference in response to escitalopram may be caused by genetic differences between the responders...... and effect of escitalopram when dichotomizing the patients into responders and non-responders. Using quantitative assessment of pain might add more information to the association studies....

  4. Rufinamide attenuates mechanical allodynia in a model of neuropathic pain in the mouse and stabilizes voltage-gated sodium channel inactivated state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Marc R; Kirschmann, Guylène; Laedermann, Cedric J; Abriel, Hugues; Decosterd, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels dysregulation is important for hyperexcitability leading to pain persistence. Sodium channel blockers currently used to treat neuropathic pain are poorly tolerated. Getting new molecules to clinical use is laborious. We here propose a drug already marketed as anticonvulsant, rufinamide. We compared the behavioral effect of rufinamide to amitriptyline using the Spared Nerve Injury neuropathic pain model in mice. We compared the effect of rufinamide on sodium currents using in vitro patch clamp in cells expressing the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 isoform and on dissociated dorsal root ganglion neurons to amitriptyline and mexiletine. In naive mice, amitriptyline (20 mg/kg) increased withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation from 1.3 (0.6-1.9) (median [95% CI]) to 2.3 g (2.2-2.5) and latency of withdrawal to heat stimulation from 13.1 (10.4-15.5) to 30.0 s (21.8-31.9), whereas rufinamide had no effect. Rufinamide and amitriptyline alleviated injury-induced mechanical allodynia for 4 h (maximal effect: 0.10 ± 0.03 g (mean ± SD) to 1.99 ± 0.26 g for rufinamide and 0.25 ± 0.22 g to 1.92 ± 0.85 g for amitriptyline). All drugs reduced peak current and stabilized the inactivated state of voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7, with similar effects in dorsal root ganglion neurons. At doses alleviating neuropathic pain, amitriptyline showed alteration of behavioral response possibly related to either alteration of basal pain sensitivity or sedative effect or both. Side-effects and drug tolerance/compliance are major problems with drugs such as amitriptyline. Rufinamide seems to have a better tolerability profile and could be a new alternative to explore for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  5. Inflammatory Osteolysis in Diabetic Neuropathic (Charcot) Arthropathies of the Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinacore, David R; Hastings, Mary K; Bohnert, Kathryn L; Fielder, Faye A; Villareal, Dennis T; Blair, Vilray P; Johnson, Jeffrey E

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Osteolysis and low bone mineral density (BMD) are underappreciated consequences of several chronic diseases that may elevate the risk for fracture. The purpose of this study was to assess tarsal BMD associated with acute inflammation (ie, inflammatory osteolysis) in individuals with chronic diabetes mellitus (DM), peripheral neuropathy (PN), and recent-onset neuropathic (Charcot) arthropathy (NCA) of the foot. Research Design and Methods: This was a case-control study of 32 people (11 men, 21 women) with DM, PN, and NCA of the foot or ankle. The subjects with DM, PN, and NCA were compared with 64 age-, sex-, and race-matched control subjects (24 men, 40 women) without DM, PN or NCA. Within the first 3 weeks of cast immobilization, BMD was estimated in both calcanei using quantitative ultrasonometry. Acute inflammation was confirmed by comparing skin temperature differences between the feet of the subjects with DM, PN, and NCA and the feet of the control subjects. Results: Skin temperature differences averaged 6.7°F (SD=4.0°F) (involved foot minus noninvolved foot) in the feet of the subjects with DM, PN, and NCA compared with 0.0°F (SD=1.3°F) in the feet of the control subjects. Calcaneal BMD averaged 384 mg/cm2 (SD=110) in the involved feet and 467 mg/cm2 (SD=123) in the noninvolved feet of the subjects with DM, PN, and NCA and 545 mg/cm2 (SD=121) in combined right and left feet of the control subjects. Conclusions: Inflammation in individuals with DM, PN, and NCA may contribute to or exacerbate a rapid loss of BMD. Inflammatory osteolysis may be a prominent factor responsible for both the spontaneous onset of neuropathic fracture and the insidious and progressive foot deformity that is the hallmark of the chronic Charcot foot. PMID:18801857

  6. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS/RSD) and neuropathic pain: role of intravenous bisphosphonates as analgesics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yanow, Jennifer; Pappagallo, Marco; Pillai, Letha

    2008-01-01

    .... Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) types 1 and 2 are neuropathic pain conditions that have a long history in the medical literature but whose pathophysiology remains elusive and whose available treatment options remain few...

  7. Peripheral Neuropathic Pain: A mechanism-related organizing principle based on sensory profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Ralf; Maier, Christoph; Attal, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    Patients with neuropathic pain are heterogeneous in etiology, pathophysiology and clinical appearance. They exhibit a variety of pain-related sensory symptoms and signs (sensory profile). Different sensory profiles might indicate different classes of neurobiological mechanisms and hence subgroups...

  8. Effects of silymarin on neuropathic pain and formalin-induced nociception in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Vahdati Hassani

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion:Results of the present study indicated that repeated administration of silymarin prevents the formalin-induced nociceptive behavior. However, it is not effective in the treatment of sciatic neuropathic pain.

  9. TMEM16F Regulates Spinal Microglial Function in Neuropathic Pain States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Batti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is a widespread chronic pain state that results from injury to the nervous system. Spinal microglia play a causative role in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain through secretion of growth factors and cytokines. Here, we investigated the contribution of TMEM16F, a protein that functions as a Ca2+-dependent ion channel and a phospholipid scramblase, to microglial activity during neuropathic pain. We demonstrate that mice with a conditional ablation of TMEM16F in microglia do not develop mechanical hypersensitivity upon nerve injury. In the absence of TMEM16F, microglia display deficits in process motility and phagocytosis. Moreover, loss of GABA immunoreactivity upon injury is spared in TMEM16F conditional knockout mice. Collectively, these data indicate that TMEM16F is an essential component of the microglial response to injury and suggest the importance of microglial phagocytosis in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain.

  10. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS/RSD) and Neuropathic Pain: Role of Intravenous Bisphosphonates as Analgesics

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer Yanow; Marco Pappagallo; Letha Pillai

    2008-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a sequela of dysfunction, injuries, or diseases of the peripheral and/or central nervous system pain pathways, which has historically been extremely difficult to treat. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) types 1 and 2 are neuropathic pain conditions that have a long history in the medical literature but whose pathophysiology remains elusive and whose available treatment options remain few. While an exact animal model for CRPS doesn't yet exist, there are several animal ...

  11. Is neuropathic pain underdiagnosed in musculoskeletal pain conditions? The Danish PainDETECTive study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, A; Amris, K; Bliddal, H

    2010-01-01

    In all, 19-22% of the adult Danish population suffer from chronic pain - most frequently in the musculoskeletal system. Different pain management strategies depending on pain mechanism (neuropathic/nociceptive) make diagnosing the pain condition especially important.......In all, 19-22% of the adult Danish population suffer from chronic pain - most frequently in the musculoskeletal system. Different pain management strategies depending on pain mechanism (neuropathic/nociceptive) make diagnosing the pain condition especially important....

  12. Mechanisms of disease: mechanism-based classification of neuropathic pain - a critical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2006-01-01

    Classification of neuropathic pain according to etiology or localization has clear limitations. The discovery of specific molecular and cellular events following experimental nerve injury has raised the possibility of classifying neuropathic pain on the basis of the underlying neurobiological...... mechanisms. Application of this approach in the clinic is problematic, however, owing to a lack of precise tools to assess symptoms and signs, and difficulties in correlating symptoms and signs with mechanisms. Development and validation of diagnostic methods to identify mechanisms, together...

  13. Treatment of localized post-traumatic neuropathic pain in scars with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Illanes, Gerardo; Calderón, Wilfredo; Roa, Ricardo; Piñeros, José Luis; Dote, Jacqueline; Medina, David

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the use of 5% lidocaine medicated plaster (LMP) for treating painful scars resulting from burns or skin degloving. Patients and methods This was a prospective, observational case series study in individuals with painful scars <70 cm2 in area, caused by burns or skin degloving. The study included a structured questionnaire incorporating demographic variables, pain evaluation using the numeric rating scale (NRS), the DN4 questionnaire, and measurement of the painful surface area. Patients with open wounds in the painful skin or with severe psychiatric disease were excluded. Results Twenty-one men and eight women were studied, aged (mean + standard deviation) 41.4 ± 11.0 years, with painful scars located in the upper extremity (n = 9), lower extremity (n = 19), or trunk (n = 1). Eleven patients (37.9%) had an associated peripheral nerve lesion. The scars were caused by burns (n = 13), degloving (n = 7), and/or orthopedic surgery (n = 9). The duration of pain before starting treatment with lidocaine plaster was 9.7 ± 10.0 (median 6) months. The initial NRS was 6.66 ± 1.84 points, average painful area 23.0 ± 18.6 (median 15) cm2, and DN4 score 4.7 ± 2.3 points. The duration of treatment with LMP was 13.9 ± 10.2 (median 11) weeks. After treatment, the NRS was reduced by 58.2% ± 27.8% to 2.72 ± 1.65. The average painful area was reduced by 72.4% ± 24.7% to 6.5 ± 8.6 (median 5) cm2. Nineteen patients (69%) showed functional improvement following treatment. Conclusion LMP was useful for treating painful scars with a neuropathic component, producing meaningful reductions in the intensity of pain and painful surface area. This is the first time that a decrease in the painful area has been demonstrated in neuropathic pain using topical therapy, and may reflect the disease-modifying potential of LMP. PMID:22915873

  14. Analgesic Effect of Indian Gooseberry (Emblica officinalis Fruit Extracts on Postoperative and Neuropathic Pain in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wook Lim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Indian gooseberry (Emblica officinalis fruit, also known as “Amla” is one of the oldest edible fruits known in India. It has also traditionally been used to treat inflammation, and as an analgesic to treat wounds. However, experimental evidence for the analgesic effects of E. officinalis has been lacking. The present study investigated whether E. officinalis extracts exhibit analgesic effects in the plantar incision (PI and spared nerve injury (SNI pain-model rats. We evaluated the mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT using von Frey filaments, and pain-related behavior was determined after surgery based on ultrasonic vocalization (USV. The group treated with E. officinalis extracts at 300 mg/kg had significantly increased MWT values at 6 h and 24 h after the PI, and had a significantly reduced number of 22–27-kHz USVs at 6 h and 24 h after PI. Moreover, after 15 days of continuous treatment with E. officinalis extracts, the treated group showed significantly alleviated SNI-induced hypersensitivity and reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Thus, E. officinalis extracts have potential analgesic effects in both postoperative and neuropathic pain models in vivo.

  15. Effect of Gabapentin and Baclofen on Histology Study in Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fifteen A. Fajrin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain resulted from injury to nerves is often resistant to current treatments and can seriously cause chronic pain if no appropriate treatment is given. This study was designed to prove the effectiveness of gabapentin and baclofen in increasing latency time toward thermal stimulus and recovering the morphology of dorsal horn of spinal cord in neuropathic-induced chronic pain. Forty mice were divided into 8 groups i.e sham, negative control, gabapentin at three different doses (10, 30, 100 nmol and baclofen at three different doses (1, 10, 30 nmol. Neuropathic condition was induced by ligation of sciatic nerve with Partial Sciatic Nerve Ligation (PSNL method. Gabapentin and baclofen were administrated intrathecally once a day for seven days, a week after neuropathic induction. Latency time toward thermal stimulus was measured on days 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10, 12 and 14 after induction. Histology of the dorsal horn of spinal cord tissue was examined by haematoxylline-eosin staining. The results showed that intrathecal injection of gabapentin and baclofen significantly increased latency time of mice toward thermal stimulus compared with negative control. Gabapentin and baclofen are effective as treatment for neuropathic pain. They can also help the recovery process of the histology in dorsal horn in neuropathic pain.

  16. Mechanisms of Electroacupuncture-Induced Analgesia on Neuropathic Pain in Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woojin Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain remains as one of the most difficult clinical pain syndromes to treat. Electroacupuncture (EA, involving endogenous opioids and neurotransmitters in the central nervous system (CNS, is reported to be clinically efficacious in various fields of pain. Although multiple experimental articles were conducted to assess the effect of EA-induced analgesia, no review has been published to assess the efficacy and clarify the mechanism of EA on neuropathic pain. To this aim, this study was firstly designed to evaluate the EA-induced analgesic effect on neuropathic pain and secondly to guide and help future efforts to advance the neuropathic pain treatment. For this purpose, articles referring to the analgesic effect of acupuncture on neuropathic pain and particularly the work performed in our own laboratory were analyzed. Based on the articles reviewed, the role of spinal opioidergic, adrenergic, serotonergic, cholinergic, and GABAergic receptors in the mechanism of EA-induced analgesia was studied. The results of this research demonstrate that and opioid receptors, α2-adrenoreceptors, 5- and 5-HT3 serotonergic receptors, M1 muscarinic receptors, and and GABAergic receptors are involved in the mechanisms of EA-induced analgesia on neuropathic pain.

  17. Peripheral mechanisms of neuropathic pain – involvement of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-mediated demyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ueda Hiroshi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent advances in pain research provide a clear picture for the molecular mechanisms of acute pain; substantial information concerning plasticity that occurs during neuropathic pain has also become available. The peripheral mechanisms responsible for neuropathic pain are found in the altered gene/protein expression of primary sensory neurons. With damage to peripheral sensory fibers, a variety of changes in pain-related gene expression take place in dorsal root ganglion neurons. These changes, or plasticity, might underlie unique neuropathic pain-specific phenotype modifications – decreased unmyelinated-fiber functions, but increased myelinated A-fiber functions. Another characteristic change is observed in allodynia, the functional change of tactile to nociceptive perception. Throughout a series of studies, using novel nociceptive tests to characterize sensory-fiber or pain modality-specific nociceptive behaviors, it was demonstrated that communication between innocuous and noxious sensory fibers might play a role in allodynia mechanisms. Because neuropathic pain in peripheral and central demyelinating diseases develops as a result of aberrant myelination in experimental animals, demyelination seems to be a key mechanism of plasticity in neuropathic pain. More recently, we discovered that lysophosphatidic acid receptor activation initiates neuropathic pain, as well as possible peripheral mechanims of demyelination after nerve injury. These results lead to further hypotheses of physical communication between innocuous Aβ- and noxious C- or Aδ-fibers to influence the molecular mechanisms of allodynia.

  18. The Effect of Natural Mulches on Crop Performance, Weed Suppression and Biochemical Constituents of Catnip and St. John’s Wort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duppong, L. M.; Delate, K.; Liebman, M.; Horton, R.; Romero, F.; Kraus, G.; Petrich, J.; Chowdbury, P. K.

    2006-01-01

    Because of expanding markets for high-value niche crops, opportunities have increased for the production of medicinal herbs in the USA. An experiment was conducted in 2001 and 2002 near Gilbert, IA, to study crop performance, weed suppression, and environmental conditions associated with the use of several organic mulches in the production of two herbs, catnip (Nepeta cataria L.) and St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum L. ‘Helos’). Treatments were arranged in a completely randomized design and included a positive (hand-weeded) control, a negative (nonweeded) control, oat straw, a flax straw mat, and a nonwoven wool mat. Catnip plant height was significantly greater in the oat straw than the other treatments at 4 wk through 6 wk in 2001; at 4 to 8 wk in 2002, catnip plant height and width was significantly lower in the negative control compared with the other treatments. Catnip yield was significantly higher in the flax straw mat than all other treatments in 2001. In 2002, St. John’s wort yields were not statistically different in any treatments. All weed management treatments had significantly fewer weeds than the non-weeded rows in 2002. Total weed density comparisons in each crop from 2 yr showed fewer weeds present in the flax straw and wool mat treatments compared with positive control plots. There was no significant weed management treatment effect on the concentration of the target compounds, nepetalactone in catnip and pseudohypericin–hypericin in St. John’s wort, although there was a trend toward higher concentrations in the flax straw treatment. PMID:17047728

  19. Pain-related psychological distress, self-rated health and significance of neuropathic pain in Danish soldiers injured in Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duffy, J R; Warburg, Finn; Koelle, S-F T

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pain and mental health concerns are prevalent among veterans. While the majority of research has focused on chronic pain as an entity, there has been little work directed towards investigating the role of neuropathic pain in relation to psychological comorbidity. As such, we...... hypothesised that participants with signs of neuropathic pain would report higher levels of psychological distress and diminished self-rated health compared to those without a neuropathic component. METHODS: A retrospective review of standardised questionnaires (PainDETECT Questionnaire, Post-traumatic Stress...... Disorder Checklist-Civilian, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and EuroQOL Visual Analogue Scale) administered to injured soldiers. The participants were classified into three groups according to the PainDETECT questionnaire: non-neuropathic pain, possible neuropathic pain and definite neuropathic...

  20. INVESTIGATION OF HYGROSCOPIC PROPERTIES OF POWDER OF SEMIFINISHED KVASS WORT CONCENTRATE, MALT EXTRACT OF BARLEY AND CHICORY EXTRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. O. Magomedov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Food industry of Russia urgently needs both updating of the manufacturing units of equipment and the creation of new high-tech and energy-saving technologies. Nowadays powdered food products and semifinished foods gained wide popularity in the market of foods and in manufacturing. Due to the caking and low wettability of fine powdered semi-finished products, there is an urgent need for modifying their properties by instanting. This article is devoted to the study of hygroscopic properties of powdered products and semifinished products: chicory extract, barley malt extract, kvass wort concentrate obtained by spray drying with an average dispersed composition of 10-20 microns, to find optimal conditions for packaging, storage and theoretical justification of the instanting process conditions. The article provides a diagram of experimental device for the study of hygroscopic properties of food powdered semi-finished products by accelerated method with the creation of the fluidized bed and the required temperature and humidity characteristics of fluidizing agent. The principles of operation of the device and methods of the experiment carrying out are given. The results are given in the form of sorption isotherms, by which monomolecular poly-molecular and capillary forms of binding of moisture with the test products and semi-finished products are determined. Theoretical nomogram to determine the binding energy of the moisture with the semi-finished products is given. Mathematical dependences of equilibrium humidities in the studied powdered products and semi-finished products on the air relative humidity in the range of 15 to 85 % at a temperature 22 ˚C were obtained. Optimal humidity properties of the resulting products for their production and subsequent storage and for the instanting processes were determined.

  1. Factors Affecting Polyphenol Biosynthesis in Wild and Field Grown St. John’s Wort (Hypericum perforatum L. Hypericaceae/Guttiferae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni Sacchetti

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing diffusion of herbal products is posing new questions: why are products so often different in their composition and efficacy? Which approach is more suitable to increase the biochemical productivity of medicinal plants with large-scale, low-cost solutions? Can the phytochemical profile of a medicinal plant be modulated in order to increase the accumulation of its most valuable constituents? Will polyphenol-rich medicinal crops ever be traded as commodities? Providing a proactive answer to such questions is an extremely hard task, due to the large number of variables involved: intraspecific chemodiversity, plant breeding, ontogenetic stage, post-harvest handling, biotic and abiotic factors, to name but a few. An ideal path in this direction should include the definition of optimum pre-harvesting and post-harvesting conditions and the availability of specific Good Agricultural Practices centered on secondary metabolism enhancement. The first steps to be taken are undoubtedly the evaluation and the organization of scattered data regarding the diverse factors involved in the optimization of medicinal plant cultivation, in order to provide an interdisciplinary overview of main possibilities, weaknesses and drawbacks. This review is intended to be a synopsis of the knowledge on this regard focused on Hypericum perforatum L. (Hypericaceae/Guttiferae secondary metabolites of phenolic origin, with the aim to provide a reference and suggest an evolution towards the maximization of St. John's Wort bioactive constituents. Factors considered emerged not only from in-field agronomic results, but also from physiological, genetical, biotic, abiotic and phytochemical data that could be scaled up to the application level. To increase quality for final beneficiaries, growers’ profits and ultimately transform phenolic-rich medicinal crops into commodities, the emerging trend suggests an integrated and synergic approach. Agronomy and genetics will

  2. Effect of Garlic, Gingko, and St. John's Wort Extracts on the Pharmacokinetics of Fexofenadine: A Mechanistic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkanovic, Jasmina; Ward, Michael B; Gerber, Jacobus P; Milne, Robert W

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of garlic and ginkgo herbal extracts on the pharmacokinetics of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp)/organic anion-transporting polypeptides (Oatps) substrate fexofenadine. Male rats were dosed orally with garlic (120 mg/kg), ginkgo (17 mg/kg), St. John's wort (SJW; 1000 mg/kg; positive control), or Milli-Q water for 14 days. On day 15, rats either were administered fexofenadine (orally or i.v.), had their livers isolated and perfused with fexofenadine, or had their small intestines divided into four segments (SI-SIV) and analyzed for P-gp and Oatp1a5. In vivo, SJW increased the clearance of i.v. administered fexofenadine by 28%. Garlic increased the area under the curve 0-∞ and maximum plasma concentration of orally administered fexofenadine by 47% and 85%, respectively. Ginkgo and SJW had no effect on the oral absorption of fexofenadine. In the perfused liver, garlic, ginkgo, and SJW increased the biliary clearance of fexofenadine with respect to perfusate by 71%, 121%, and 234%, respectively. SJW increased the biliary clearance relative to the liver concentration by 64%. The ratio of liver to perfusate concentrations significantly increased in all treated groups. The expression of Oatp1a5 in SI was increased by garlic (88%) and SJW (63%). There were no significant changes in the expression of P-gp. Induction of intestinal Oatp1a5 by garlic may explain the increased absorption of orally administered fexofenadine. Ginkgo had no effect on the expression of intestinal P-gp or Oatp1a5. A dual inductive effect by SJW on opposing intestinal epithelial transport by Oatp1a5 and P-gp remains a possibility. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  3. The use of low-dose sodium valproate in the management of neuropathic pain: illustrative case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirapakaran, K; Aggarwal, A

    2016-07-01

    Anti-epileptic drugs are commonly used in the management of neuropathic pain. Sodium valproate, however, is an anti-epileptic drug that is not commonly used. We report four patients with neuropathic pain who responded very well to the initiation of low-dose oral sodium valproate. Low-dose sodium valproate may have a role in managing neuropathic pain, especially when other first-line agents are unsuccessful or relatively contraindicated. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  4. Time to Talk: 5 Things to Know about St. John's Wort and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... results. For example, there is limited evidence that music therapy may provide an improvement in mood. In addition, studies indicate that relaxation training is better than no treatment in reducing symptoms of depression, but is not as beneficial as psychological therapies ...

  5. Long-term outcomes of cutaneous vesicostomy in patients with neuropathic bladder caused by spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dönmez, M İrfan; Carrasco, Alonso; Saltzman, Amanda F; Vemulakonda, Vijaya; Wilcox, Duncan T

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of patients who underwent cutaneous vesicostomy for management of neuropathic bladder secondary to spina bifida. We hypothesize that vesicostomy, in select patients, is beneficial to prevent upper urinary tract deterioration (UTD), reduce febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs), and preserve renal function. We performed a retrospective chart review on patients with spina bifida who underwent cutaneous vesicostomy at our institution between 2000 and 2016. Demographic information, indication for vesicostomy, pre and postoperative laboratory/radiologic studies, incidence of febrile UTIs, and urodynamic findings were abstracted. A total of 14 patients (eight females and six males) were identified. The indication for vesicostomy was UTD in four, recurrent febrile UTIs in five, parental request in two, both UTD and recurrent febrile UTIs in two, and both UTI and parental request in one patient. Seven patients had a median of three (range one to five) febrile UTI prior to surgery for cutaneous vesicostomy. Median creatinine level before surgery was 0.26 mg/dL (range 0.16-0.97). Either unilateral or bilateral ≥SFU Grade 2 hydronephrosis was present in six patients. Median age at vesicostomy creation was 26.5 months (range 4-96). Mean functional bladder capacity assessed during preoperative urodynamic studies was 107 mL (range 20-279), and detrusor sphincter dysynergia was present in all patients. High-grade vesicoureteral reflux (grade ≥3) was present in three patients, all with UTD. Mean follow-up after vesicostomy was 62.4 ± 39.3 months. After vesicostomy, only two of the seven patients with history of febrile UTIs experienced an additional febrile UTI. The median serum creatinine level was 0.36 mg/dL (range 0.2-0.58) at last follow-up. Moreover, 11/14 patients had no hydronephrosis and just two patients had unilateral SFU grade 1 hydronephrosis (Table). Worsening UTD, recurrent febrile UTIs, and high-pressure bladder despite maximal

  6. Celastrol Attenuates Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain Mediated by Cannabinoid Receptor Type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longhe Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Celastrol, a major active ingredient of Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook. f. (thunder god vine, has exhibited a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammation, anti-cancer and immunosuppression. In the present study, we used animal models of inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain, generated by carrageenan injection and spared nerve injury (SNI, respectively, to evaluate the effect of celastrol and to address the mechanisms underlying pain processing. Intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of celastrol produced a dose-dependent inhibition of carrageenan-induced edema and allodynia. Real-time PCR analysis showed that celastrol (0.3 mg/kg, i.p. significantly reduced mRNA expressions of inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, in carrageenan-injected mice. In SNI mice, pain behavior studies showed that celastrol (1 mg/kg, i.p. effectively prevented the hypersensitivity of mechanical nociceptive response on the third day post-surgery and the seventh day post-surgery. Furthermore, the anti-hyperalgesic effects of celastrol in carrageenan-injected mice and SNI mice were reversed by SR144528 (1 mg/kg, i.p., a specific cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2 receptor antagonist, but not by SR141716 (1 mg/kg, i.p., a specific cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1 receptor antagonist. Taken together, our results demonstrate the analgesia effects of celastrol through CB2 signaling and propose the potential of exploiting celastrol as a novel candidate for pain relief.

  7. Characterizing neuropathic pain profiles: enriching interpretation of painDETECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cappelleri JC

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Joseph C Cappelleri,1 Vijaya Koduru,2 E Jay Bienen,3 Alesia Sadosky4 1Pfizer Inc, Groton, CT, USA; 2Eliassen Group, New London, CT, USA; 3Outcomes Research Consultant, New York, NY, USA; 4Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USA Purpose: To psychometrically evaluate painDETECT, a patient-reported screening questionnaire for neuropathic pain (NeP, for discriminating among sensory pain symptoms (burning, tingling/prickling, light touching, sudden pain attacks/electric shock-type pain, cold/heat, numbness, and slight pressure. Methods: The seven-item version of painDETECT provides an overall score that targets only sensory symptoms, while the nine-item version adds responses on two items to the overall score, covering pain course pattern and pain radiation. Both versions have relevance in terms of characterizing broad NeP. The nine- and seven-item versions of painDETECT were administered to subjects with confirmed NeP across six conditions identified during office visits to US community-based physicians. Responses on the sensory symptom items were dichotomized into “at least moderate” (ie, moderate, strongly, very strongly relative to the combined other responses (never, hardly noticed, slightly. Logistic regression of dichotomized variables on the total painDETECT score provided probabilities of experiencing each symptom across the range of painDETECT scores. Results: Both painDETECT versions discriminated among the symptoms with similar probabilities across the score ranges. Using these data, the probability of moderately experiencing each pain sensory item was estimated for a particular score, providing a pain profile. Additionally, the likelihood of experiencing each sensation was determined for a discrete increase in score, ie, the odds of at least a moderate sensation of burning (versus less than a moderate sensation was 1.29 for a 1-point increase, 3.52 for a 5-point increase, and 12.42 for every 10-point increase in the nine-item painDETECT score

  8. Leptin is essential for microglial activation and neuropathic pain after preganglionic cervical root avulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kai-Ting; Lin, Yi-Lo; Lin, Chi-Te; Hong, Chen-Jei; Tsai, May-Jywan; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Shih, Yang-Hsin; Lee, Yi-Yen; Cheng, Henrich; Huang, Ming-Chao

    2017-10-15

    Preganglionic cervical root avulsion (PCRA) affects both the peripheral and central nervous systems and is often associated with neuropathic pain. Unlike peripheral nerve injuries (PNI), central lesions caused by disruption of cervical roots from the spinal cord following PCRA contribute to the generation of neuropathic pain. Leptin is involved in the development of neuropathic pain after PNI by affecting neurons. However, whether leptin is involved in microglial activation leading to neuropathic pain after PCRA is unknown. Preganglionic avulsion of the left 6(th)-8(th) cervical roots was performed in C57B/6J mice and leptin-deficient mice. A leptin antagonist or leptin was administered to C57B/6J mice and leptin-deficient mice after injury, respectively. The expression pattern of spinal and supraspinal microglia was examined by immunofluorescent staining. Von Frey filaments were used to test pain sensitivity. Leptin is essential for the development of neuropathic pain after PCRA. Allodynia was absent in the leptin-deficient mice and the mice administered the leptin antagonist. We also found that leptin deficiency or the administration of its antagonist inhibited the development of microgliosis in the dorsal horn and brainstem. Furthermore, increase in the expression of CD86 and iNOS, and Wallerian degeneration were noted in the spinal cord. The administration of exogenous leptin to leptin-deficient mice reversed these effects. We concluded that leptin is involved in the proliferation and activation of microglia, which in turn enhances the development of neuropathic pain. Blocking the effects of leptin might be a target for the treatment of neuropathic pain after PCRA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Neuropathic pain in the orofacial region: The role of pain history. A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieb, W; Moreau, N; Chemla, I; Descroix, V; Boucher, Y

    2017-06-01

    Orofacial neuropathic pain is often difficult to treat, mostly because of still unclear underlying mechanisms. The occurrence of such neuropathic pain varies depending on different factors, of which preexisting preoperative pain seems to be of high importance. The aim of this study was thus to test the hypothesis that prior history of pain could indeed be considered a risk factor for the development of orofacial neuropathic pain in the same region. The study was performed in the dental department of the Groupe Hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière (GHPS) in Paris, France. We investigated the presence of prior inflammatory pain before development of orofacial neuropathic pain in 56 patients. For each patient file, the following items were collected: age, gender; medical history; diagnosis; description of the pain (at time of consultation); presence or absence of prior dental treatment; date and type of dental treatment received. 41 patients (73%) of orofacial neuropathic pain patients had a history of pain compatible with an inflammatory condition; 4% (n=2) did not report any prior pain and 23% (n=13) could not remember. Among the patients with documented history of pain prior to neuropathy, 88% (n=36) received surgical treatment; 61%, (n=25) endodontic treatment and 22%, (n=9) restorative treatment. All eventually received endodontic treatment or tooth extraction. These dental treatments are compatible with the hypothesis of prior inflammatory pain in these patients. These results support the hypothesis that prior inflammatory pain could favor the development of orofacial neuropathic pain. Prevention and treatment of inflammatory trigeminal pain may therefore play a key role in preventing future neuropathic pain development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Lower limb biomechanical characteristics of patients with neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers: the diabetes foot ulcer study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Malindu Eranga; Crowther, Robert George; Cunningham, Margaret; Lazzarini, Peter Anthony; Sangla, Kunwarjit Singh; Golledge, Jonathan

    2015-10-23

    Foot ulceration is the main precursor to lower limb amputation in patients with type 2 diabetes worldwide. Biomechanical factors have been implicated in the development of foot ulceration; however the association of these factors to ulcer healing remains less clear. It may be hypothesised that abnormalities in temporal spatial parameters (stride to stride measurements), kinematics (joint movements), kinetics (forces on the lower limb) and plantar pressures (pressure placed on the foot during walking) contribute to foot ulcer healing. The primary aim of this study is to establish the biomechanical characteristics (temporal spatial parameters, kinematics, kinetics and plantar pressures) of patients with plantar neuropathic foot ulcers compared to controls without a history of foot ulcers. The secondary aim is to assess the same biomechanical characteristics in patients with foot ulcers and controls over-time to assess whether these characteristics remain the same or change throughout ulcer healing. The design is a case-control study nested in a six-month longitudinal study. Cases will be participants with active plantar neuropathic foot ulcers (DFU group). Controls will consist of patients with type 2 diabetes (DMC group) and healthy participants (HC group) with no history of foot ulceration. Standardised gait and plantar pressure protocols will be used to collect biomechanical data at baseline, three and six months. Descriptive variables and primary and secondary outcome variables will be compared between the three groups at baseline and follow-up. It is anticipated that the findings from this longitudinal study will provide important information regarding the biomechanical characteristic of type 2 diabetes patients with neuropathic foot ulcers. We hypothesise that people with foot ulcers will demonstrate a significantly compromised gait pattern (reduced temporal spatial parameters, kinematics and kinetics) at base line and then throughout the follow-up period

  11. Detecting the neuropathic pain component in the clinical setting: a study protocol for validation of screening instruments for the presence of a neuropathic pain component

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, H.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Weel, C. van; Wolff, A.P.; Vissers, K.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The presence of nerve damage plays a key role in the development and prognosis of chronic pain states. Assessment of the presence and severity of a neuropathic pain component (NePC) is key in diagnosing chronic pain patients. Low back pain (LBP) and neck and shoulder pain (NSP) are

  12. The influence of serial repitching of Saccharomyces pastorianus on its karyotype and protein profile during the fermentation of gluten-free buckwheat and quinoa wort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deželak, Matjaž; Gebremariam, Mekonnen M; Cadež, Neža; Zupan, Jure; Raspor, Peter; Zarnkow, Martin; Becker, Thomas; Košir, Iztok Jože

    2014-08-18

    Gluten-free beer-like beverages from malted buckwheat and quinoa are somehow close to their commercial production, but rather high expenses are expected due to the relatively high price of grain, some technological adaptations of process and the need for external enzyme supplementation during mashing. One of the common and efficient cost reduction measures in the industrial scale is serial repitching of the yeast biomass, which has not been studied for the buckwheat and quinoa wort fermentation before. In that manner we have monitored possible changes in yeast's proteins and chromosomal DNA during eleven serial repitchings of the yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus strain TUM 34/70 for fermentation of the barley, buckwheat and quinoa wort. Karyotypes showed changes in regard to the raw materials used and many responsible candidate proteins are suggested which could cause these differences. Different relative expressions of some protein bands were also linked to the proteins involved in yeast stress response and proteins involved in fermentation performance. Results suggest that serial repitching of the strain TUM 34/70 seems suitable for the production of gluten-free beer-like beverages from buckwheat and quinoa. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [Ziconotide: an innovative alternative for intense chronic neuropathic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valía-Vera, J C; Villanueva, V L; Asensio-Samper, J M; López-Alarcón, M D; de Andrés, J A

    Intense chronic pain is a very important health problem, as it has a high prevalence (5-10%), a multifactorial aetiology and its management is very often a very complex affair. Treatment of severe cases sometimes requires interventional approaches, such as continuous intrathecal infusion of opioids. We report the case of a 38-year-old female with intense neuropathic pain in the lower back and the lower limbs secondary to three operations on the L5-S1 lumbar segment. After implementing several different pharmacological regimes involving both oral and implanted systems (spinal cord stimulation and subarachnoid infusion pump with different pharmacological combinations) with no clinical improvement, intrathecal infusion with ziconotide was included in the protocol. Ziconotide is the first specific neuronal blocker that acts on the calcium channel by blocking the N-type voltage-dependent calcium channels. It is a new non-opioid analgesic with approved indication in the treatment of intense chronic pain, in patients who require intrathecal analgesics and are refractory to other analgesic treatments. Therefore, we shall have to consider this drug as a therapeutic alternative in patients do not experience sufficient relief with the pharmacological agents and means currently available to treat them.

  14. Transient receptor potential channel polymorphisms are associated with the somatosensory function in neuropathic pain patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Binder

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential channels are important mediators of thermal and mechanical stimuli and play an important role in neuropathic pain. The contribution of hereditary variants in the genes of transient receptor potential channels to neuropathic pain is unknown. We investigated the frequency of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1, transient receptor potential melastin 8 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 single nucleotide polymorphisms and their impact on somatosensory abnormalities in neuropathic pain patients. Within the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (Deutscher Forscbungsverbund Neuropathischer Schmerz 371 neuropathic pain patients were phenotypically characterized using standardized quantitative sensory testing. Pyrosequencing was employed to determine a total of eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms in transient receptor potential channel genes of the neuropathic pain patients and a cohort of 253 German healthy volunteers. Associations of quantitative sensory testing parameters and single nucleotide polymorphisms between and within groups and subgroups, based on sensory phenotypes, were analyzed. Single nucleotide polymorphisms frequencies did not differ between both the cohorts. However, in neuropathic pain patients transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 710G>A (rs920829, E179K was associated with the presence of paradoxical heat sensation (p = 0.03, and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G (rs8065080, I585V with cold hypoalgesia (p = 0.0035. Two main subgroups characterized by preserved (1 and impaired (2 sensory function were identified. In subgroup 1 transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G led to significantly less heat hyperalgesia, pinprick hyperalgesia and mechanical hypaesthesia (p = 0.006, p = 0.005 and pG (rs222747, M315I to cold hypaesthesia (p = 0.002, but there was absence of associations in subgroup 2. In this study we found no evidence that genetic

  15. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS/RSD) and neuropathic pain: role of intravenous bisphosphonates as analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanow, Jennifer; Pappagallo, Marco; Pillai, Letha

    2008-02-25

    Neuropathic pain is a sequela of dysfunction, injuries, or diseases of the peripheral and/or central nervous system pain pathways, which has historically been extremely difficult to treat. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) types 1 and 2 are neuropathic pain conditions that have a long history in the medical literature but whose pathophysiology remains elusive and whose available treatment options remain few. While an exact animal model for CRPS doesn't yet exist, there are several animal models of neuropathic pain that develop behaviors of hypersensitivity, one of the hallmark signs of neuropathic pain in humans. Bisphosphonates have been used for pathologic conditions associated with abnormal bone metabolism, such as osteoporosis, Paget's disease and cancer-related bone pain for many years. More recently, results of clinical trials have indicated the potential role of bisphosphonates in the treatment of CRPS/RSD. In this paper we will review the preclinical studies regarding the use of bisphosphonates as analgesics in animal models of neuropathic pain, and also summarize the clinical trials that have been done to date. We will give an overview of bisphosphonate pharmacology and discuss several potential mechanisms by which bisphosphonates may be analgesic in CRPS/RSD and bone pain of noncancer origin.

  16. Eslicarbazepine acetate for neuropathic pain, headache, and cranial neuralgia: Evidence and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara Montero, A; Sánchez Carnerero, C I

    2017-02-16

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL), together with carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine, belongs to the dibenzazepine family. According to the latest clinical practice guidelines, tricyclic antidepressants, dual antidepressants (venlafaxine, duloxetine), and some antiepileptics (gabapentin, pregabalin) are first-line drugs for neuropathic pain; tramadol, lidocaine 5% patches, and capsaicin 8% patches are considered second-line drugs; and strong opioids constitute a third line of treatment. Such other antiepileptics as lamotrigine and lacosamide are not authorised as treatments for neuropathic pain by the regulatory agencies, but are nonetheless prescribed off-label in routine clinical practice. Carbamazepine, on the other hand, is indicated for trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgia. We conducted a literature search to gather evidence on the use of ESL for neuropathic pain, headache, and cranial neuralgia. Evidence is insufficient to recommend ESL for neuropathic pain, headache, and cranial neuralgia. Most of the available evidence comes from open and observational studies with small sample sizes and no control group; however, their favourable results call for further studies on the usefulness of ESL for neuropathic pain, headache, and cranial neuralgia. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Psychometric validation of the Portuguese version of the Neuropathic Pain Symptoms Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Andrade Daniel

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgroud It has been shown that different symptoms or symptom combinations of neuropathic pain (NeP may correspond to different mechanistic backgrounds and respond differently to treatment. The Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (NPSI is able to detect distinct clusters of symptoms (i.e. dimensions with a putative common mechanistic background. The present study described the psychometric validation of the Portuguese version (PV of the NPSI. Methods Patients were seen in two consecutive visits, three to four weeks apart. They were asked to: (i rate their mean pain intensity in the last 24 hours on an 11-point (0-10 numerical scale; (ii complete the PV-NPSI; (iii provide the list of pain medications and doses currently in use. VAS and Global Impression of Change (GIC were filled out in the second visit. Results PV-NPSI underwent test-retest reliability, factor analysis, analysis of sensitivity to changes between both visits. The PV-NPSI was reliable in this setting, with a good intra-class correlation for all items. The factorial analysis showed that the PV-NPSI inventory assessed different components of neuropathic pain. Five different factors were found. The PV-NPSI was adequate to evaluate patients with neuropathic pain and to detect clusters of NeP symptoms. Conclusions The psychometric properties of the PV-NPSI rendered it adequate to evaluate patients with both central and peripheral neuropathic pain syndromes and to detect clusters of NeP symptoms.

  18. Delphi process yielded consensus on terminology and research agenda for therapeutic footwear for neuropathic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Rutger; van der Wilden, Gelske J; Lankhorst, Gustaaf J; Boers, Maarten

    2008-08-01

    To investigate areas of consensus and disagreement among Dutch physiatrists concerning prescription of therapeutic footwear for the neuropathic foot and to develop a research agenda. Forty participants were physiatrists and experts in the field of orthopedic shoe techniques. Four postal Delphi rounds were followed by a final plenary session. Forty of the 44 invited experts participated in all postal Delphi rounds, with an overall response of 100%. They achieved consensus on the following. 1. (Dutch) Terminology for two sets of domains and dimensions for the various features of the neuropathic foot and for the shoe characteristics. 2. Application of specific shoe components: insole, shaft, outsole, tongue, and heel. In most features of the neuropathic foot, shaft and outsole domains were linked in the flexibility dimension. 3. Shoe prescriptions for various features of the neuropathic foot in at least four technical domains. Experts disagreed on application of rocker bar and shaft height. In a final conference, 31 experts agreed on a prioritized research agenda. An intensive Delphi process yielded consensus on terminology, and determined areas of consensus and disagreement for future research for the various features of the neuropathic foot and the shoe characteristics.

  19. Neural markers of neuropathic pain associated with maladaptive plasticity in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoal-Faria, Paula; Yalcin, Nilufer; Fregni, Felipe

    2015-04-01

    Given the potential use of neural markers for the development of novel treatments in spinal cord pain, we aimed to characterize the most effective neural markers of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI). A systematic PubMed review was conducted, compiling studies that were published prior to April, 2014 that examined neural markers associated with neuropathic pain after SCI using electrophysiological and neuroimaging techniques. We identified 6 studies: Four using electroencephalogram (EEG); 1 using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and FDG-PET (positron emission tomography); and 1 using MR spectroscopy. The EEG recordings suggested a reduction in alpha EEG peak frequency activity in the frontal regions of SCI patients with neuropathic pain. The MRI scans showed volume loss, primarily in the gray matter of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and by FDG-PET, hypometabolism in the medial prefrontal cortex was observed in SCI patients with neuropathic pain compared with healthy subjects. In the MR spectroscopy findings, the presence of pain was associated with changes in the prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex. When analyzed together, the results of these studies seem to point out to a common marker of pain in SCI characterized by decreased cortical activity in frontal areas and possibly increased subcortical activity. These results may contribute to planning further mechanistic studies as to better understand the mechanisms by which neuropathic pain is modulated in patients with SCI as well as clinical studies investigating best responders of treatment. © 2014 World Institute of Pain.

  20. Clinical use of pregabalin in the management of central neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanna B Finnerup

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanna B Finnerup, Troels S JensenDanish Pain Research Center, Department of Neurology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, DenmarkAbstract: Central neuropathic pain (central pain is treated with antidepressants, various anticonvulsants, opioids, and cannabinoids, but in many cases treatment is insufficient and associated with a range of side-effects. This review addresses a new treatment for neuropathic pain, the anticonvulsant pregabalin. We review the pharmacology, mode of action, pharmacokinetics, and safety of pregabalin as well as two randomized efficacy studies in central pain and a brief overview of efficacy in peripheral neuropathic pain. Pregabalin appears to have efficacy in treating central pain comparable to that in peripheral neuropathic pain as well as efficacy of other recommended drugs for central pain. Pregabalin also improves disturbed sleep and anxiety. Pregabalin is well tolerated; the most common side-effects are somnolence, dizziness, ataxia, and weight gain. Pregabalin is suitable for patients on multiple drugs although there may be additive CNS-related side-effects. Thus, pregabalin has a primary role in central pain patients.Keywords: central pain, neuropathic pain, pregabalin, pharmacology

  1. Treatment of localized neuropathic pain of different etiologies with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster – a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Likar R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rudolf Likar,1 Susanne Demschar,1 Ingo Kager,1 Stefan Neuwersch,1 Wolfgang Pipam,1 Reinhard Sittl2 1Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Hospital Klagenfurt, Klagenfurt, Austria; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Interdisciplinary Pain Centre, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of the topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in the treatment of localized neuropathic pain. Study design: This was a case series at an Austrian pain clinic, using retrospective analysis. Patients and methods: Data of 27 patients treated for localized neuropathic pain with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster were retrospectively analyzed. Assessment included changes in overall pain intensity, in intensity of different pain qualities, and of hyperalgesia and allodynia, and changes in sleep quality. Results: Patients (17 female, ten male; mean age 53.4±11.4 years presented mainly with dorsalgia (16 patients or postoperative/posttraumatic pain (seven patients; one patient suffered from both. The mean overall pain intensity prior to treatment with lidocaine medicated plaster was 8.4±1.2 on the 11-point Likert scale. In the majority of cases, the lidocaine plaster was applied concomitantly with preexisting pain medication (81.5% of the patients. During the 6-month observation period, overall mean pain intensity was reduced by almost 5 points (4.98 to 3.5±2.6. Substantial reductions were also observed for neuralgiform pain (5 points from 7.9±2.6 at baseline and burning pain (3 points from 5.2±4.1. Sleep quality improved from 4.6±2.6 at baseline to 5.5±1.8. Stratification by pain diagnosis showed marked improvements in overall pain intensity for patients with dorsalgia or postoperative/posttraumatic pain. The lidocaine plaster was well tolerated. Conclusion: Overall, topical treatment with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster was associated with effective pain relief and was well tolerated. Keywords

  2. A randomized trial evaluating Prosaptide for HIV-associated sensory neuropathies: use of an electronic diary to record neuropathic pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott R Evans

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine the efficacy and safety of Prosaptide (PRO for the treatment of painful HIV-associated sensory neuropathies (HIV-SN. DESIGN: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study in participants with sensory neuropathy. Pain modulating therapy was discontinued prior to baseline. Participants were stratified by sural sensory nerve action potential (SNAP amplitude. Participants were trained to use an electronic diary (ED to record pain. SETTING: Peripheral neuropathies are common complications of HIV infection. The pathogenesis is unknown and currently treatments are restricted to symptomatic measures. We examined PRO against placebo (PBO for treatment of painful HIV-SN and performed a post-hoc evaluation of an electronic diary (ED to record HIV-associated neuropathic pain. PARTICIPANTS: Eligible participants included adults with neurologist-confirmed painful HIV-SN. INTERVENTIONS: 2, 4, 8, or 16 mg/d PRO or PBO administered via subcutaneous (SC injection for six weeks. Neurotoxic antiretroviral drug usage was held constant. OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes from baseline in the weekly average of evaluable daily random prompts measuring pain using the Gracely pain scale and adverse events. RESULTS: 237 participants were randomized. The study was stopped after a planned futility analysis. There were no between-group differences in the frequency of adverse events or laboratory toxicities. The 6-week mean (sd Gracely pain scale changes were -0.12 (0.23, -0.24 (0.35, -0.15 (0.32, -0.18 (0.34, and -0.18 (0.32 for the 2, 4, 8, 16 mg, and PBO arms respectively. A similar variability of pain changes recorded using the ED were noted compared to previous trials that used paper collection methods. CONCLUSIONS: 6-week treatment with PRO was safe but not effective at reducing HIV-associated neuropathic pain. Use of an ED to record neuropathic pain is novel in HIV-SN, resulted in reasonable compliance in recording pain data, but did

  3. Effect of minocycline on lumbar radicular neuropathic pain: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial with amitriptyline as a comparator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanelderen, P.; Zundert, J. Van; Kozicz, L.T.; Puylaert, M.; Vooght, P. De; Mestrum, R.; Heylen, R.; Roubos, E.; Vissers, K.C.P.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Less than 50% of patients experience sufficient pain relief with current drug therapy for neuropathic pain. Minocycline shows promising results in rodent models of neuropathic pain but was not studied in humans with regard to the treatment of neuropathic pain. METHODS: In this

  4. Pharmacological correlation between the formalin test and the neuropathic pain behavior in different species with chronic constriction injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, K.C.P.; Geenen, F.; Biermans, R.; Meert, T.F.

    2006-01-01

    Research on mechanisms of drug action, and preclinical screening of molecules with a potential activity on neuropathic pain requires extensive animal work. The chronic constriction injury model is one of the best-characterized models of neuropathic pain behavior in rats, but requires extensive time

  5. Alternative treatment strategies for neuropathic pain: Role of Indian medicinal plants and compounds of plant origin-A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hasandeep; Bhushan, Sakshi; Arora, Rohit; Singh Buttar, Harpal; Arora, Saroj; Singh, Balbir

    2017-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is a complex, chronic pain state accompanied by tissue injury and nerve damage. This important health issue constitutes a challenge for the modern medicine worldwide. The management of neuropathic pain remains a major clinical challenge, pertaining to an inadequate understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms of neuropathic pain. Various classes of drugs have been reported effective for the management of neuropathic pain viz. opiates, tricyclic antidepressants, and antiepileptic agents. However, association of adverse effects with these drugs hinders their confident prescription in people with neuropathic pain. Recently, various medicinal plants have been reported effective for the management of neuropathic pain. So, it may be prudent to look beyond synthetic drugs pertaining to their unprecedented pharmacotherapeutic effects with lesser adverse effects. The extensive literature review has been carried out from databases such as Science direct, Scifinder, Wiley online library, PubMed, Research gate, Google scholar and Chemical Abstracts. The list of Traditional Indian Medicinal plants (TIMPs) and isolated compounds have been compiled which have been reported effective as an alternative therapy for the management of neuropathic pain. This helps the researchers to discover some novel therapeutic agents against neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Plantar fat-pad displacement in neuropathic diabetic patients with toe deformity: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, Sicco A.; Maas, Mario; Cavanagh, Peter R.; Michels, Robert P. J.; Levi, Marcel

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to quantify the association between claw/hammer toe deformity and changes in submetatarsal head (sub-MTH) fat-pad geometry in diabetic neuropathic feet. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Thirteen neuropathic diabetic subjects (mean age 56.2 years) with toe deformity,

  7. Full inhibition of spinal FAAH leads to TRPV1-mediated analgesic effects in neuropathic rats and possible lipoxygenase-mediated remodeling of anandamide metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Starowicz

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain elevates spinal anandamide (AEA levels in a way further increased when URB597, an inhibitor of AEA hydrolysis by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH, is injected intrathecally. Spinal AEA reduces neuropathic pain by acting at both cannabinoid CB1 receptors and transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1 channels. Yet, intrathecal URB597 is only partially effective at counteracting neuropathic pain. We investigated the effect of high doses of intrathecal URB597 on allodynia and hyperalgesia in rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI of the sciatic nerve. Among those tested, the 200 µg/rat dose of URB597 was the only one that elevated the levels of the FAAH non-endocannabinoid and anti-inflammatory substrates, oleoylethanolamide (OEA and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA, and of the endocannabinoid FAAH substrate, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, and fully inhibited thermal and tactile nociception, although in a manner blocked almost uniquely by TRPV1 antagonism. Surprisingly, this dose of URB597 decreased spinal AEA levels. RT-qPCR and western blot analyses demonstrated altered spinal expression of lipoxygenases (LOX, and baicalein, an inhibitor of 12/15-LOX, significantly reduced URB597 analgesic effects, suggesting the occurrence of alternative pathways of AEA metabolism. Using immunofluorescence techniques, FAAH, 15-LOX and TRPV1 were found to co-localize in dorsal spinal horn neurons of CCI rats. Finally, 15-hydroxy-AEA, a 15-LOX derivative of AEA, potently and efficaciously activated the rat recombinant TRPV1 channel. We suggest that intrathecally injected URB597 at full analgesic efficacy unmasks a secondary route of AEA metabolism via 15-LOX with possible formation of 15-hydroxy-AEA, which, together with OEA and PEA, may contribute at producing TRPV1-mediated analgesia in CCI rats.

  8. Mus musculus-microRNA-449a ameliorates neuropathic pain by decreasing the level of KCNMA1 and TRPA1, and increasing the level of TPTE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shan; Ma, Sichao; Wang, Yunyun; Huang, Tao; Zhu, Zhihua; Zhao, Guoqing

    2017-07-01

    Neuropathic pain is a nerve disorder characterized by the dysregulation of ion channels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. MicroRNAs (miRs) may be associated with the molecular mechanisms underlying the altered levels of ion channels; however, the molecular mechanisms remain widely unknown. To investigate these mechanisms, the present study conducted a genomic analysis of miR between a unilateral spared nerve injury (SNI) model and sham control. Differentially expressed miRs between the SNI and sham groups were selected for transfection of DRG cells, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array analysis was subsequently performed. A total of three significantly differently expressed genes were selected from the results of the PCR array and further analyzed by reverse transcription‑quantitative PCR. Genomic analysis revealed that Mus musculus miR‑449a (mmu‑miR‑449a) was reduced in the SNI groups compared with the sham controls. The PCR array indicated that mmu‑miR‑449a‑transfection reduced the mRNA expression levels of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily A member 1 (TRPA1), and calcium‑activated potassium channel subunit α‑1 (KCNMA1) and increased the level of transmembrane phosphatase with tension homology (TPTE) in the DRG cells (P<0.05). qRT‑PCR analysis further indicated that mmu‑miR‑449a transfection caused similar alterations in the mRNA expression levels of TRPA1, KCNMA1 and TPTE in DRG cells, respectively (P<0.05). Therefore, mmu‑miR‑449a may ameliorate neuropathic pain by decreasing the activity of the channel proteins TRPA1 and KCNMA1 and increasing the levels of TPTE. mmu‑miR‑449a may be a potential therapeutic molecule for the alleviation of neuropathic pain.

  9. A unusual presentation of syringomyelia as neuropathic arthropathy of elbow joint and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Dwidmuthe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic arthropathy (NA is one of the less understood and challenging condition to treat in clinical practice. Jean Martin Charcot described neuropathic joint in 1868. He has shown occurrence of NA in cases of syringomyelia and tabes dorsalis. Since then NA has been described in various other conditions. Knee and ankle joints are most commonly affected. Occurrence of neuropathic joint in upper extremity is very rare. Elbow is less commonly affected joint. We describe two cases of NA of elbow joint with unusual presentation. One patient presented with 3 month history of elbow injury with gross destruction of elbow joint. Another patient presented with acute swelling of elbow joint mimicking septic arthritis with ulnar nerve involvement. We reviewed literature to discuss etiopathogenesis, clinical presentation, and treatment available for NA of elbow joint.

  10. Unilateral neuropathic arthropathy of the shoulder secondary to syringomyelia: Diagnostic challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Datta, Saumik; Ray, Sayantan; Bhattacharjee, Rana; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic arthropathy of the shoulder is a rare disorder characterized by joint degeneration, and is associated with loss of sensory innervation. Syringomyelia is a disease in which fluid-containing cavities (syrinxes) form within the spinal cord. Here, we report a case of neuropathic arthropathy of the shoulder secondary to syringomyelia in a 40-year-old woman. X-rays of the left shoulder revealed damage to bone and joint architecture. Blood tests indicated vitamin D deficiency and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed a large syrinx from the second cervical spine to the second dorsal spine. Although neuropathic arthropathy is uncommon, it should be considered in cases of unexplained pain, discomfort, or limited range of motion of the affected joint. Symptoms related to the affected joint may precede or overshadow neurological deficits. Appropriate radiological examinations and diagnoses are imperative to prevent misdiagnosis or undetected bone and joint disorders. PMID:26677453

  11. Neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury: report of 213 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Jacobsen Teixeira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective Management of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI can be a frustrating experience for patients since it poses a therapeutic challenge. In this article the authors describe the clinical characteristics of a group of patients with pain after spinal cord injury. Methods In this retrospective study, 213 patients with SCI and neuropathic pain were assessed. We analyzed clinical characteristics, treatment options, and pain intensity for these patients. Results The main cause of SCI was spine trauma, which occurred in 169 patients, followed by tumors and infection. Complete lesions were verified in 144 patients. In our study, patients with traumatic SCI and partial lesions seem to be presented with more intense pain; however, this was not statistically significant. Conclusions Neuropathic pain is a common complaint in patients with SCI and presents a treatment challenge. Knowledge of the clinical characteristics of this group of patients may help determine the best approach to intervention.

  12. Neuropathic pain. Redefinition and a grading system for clinical and research purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treede, R.-D.; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Campbell, J.N.

    2008-01-01

    potentially tissue-damaging stimuli. Pain may also arise by activity generated within the nervous system without adequate stimulation of its peripheral sensory endings. For this type of pain, the International Association for the Study of Pain introduced the term neuropathic pain, defined as "pai...... evidence from a neurologic examination. This grading system is proposed for clinical and research purposes....... activation (e.g., by central sensitization), it has been difficult to distinguish neuropathic dysfunction from physiologic neuroplasticity. We present a more precise definition developed by a group of experts from the neurologic and pain community: pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease...... affecting the somatosensory system. This revised definition fits into the nosology of neurologic disorders. The reference to the somatosensory system was derived from a wide range of neuropathic pain conditions ranging from painful neuropathy to central poststroke pain. Because of the lack of a specific...

  13. Transanal irrigation for the treatment of neuropathic bowel dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Pereira, Pedro; Salvador, Obdulia Perez; Arcas, Julia Alonso; Martínez Urrutia, M A Jose; Romera, Roberto Lobato; Monereo, Enrique Jaureguízar

    2010-04-01

    Children with spinal cord lesions very often experience bowel dysfunction, with a significant impact on their social activities and quality of life. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of the Peristeen transanal irrigation (TI) system in patients with neuropathic bowel dysfunction (NBD). We prospectively reviewed 40 children with spina bifida and NBD who did not respond satisfactorily to conventional bowel management and were treated with the Peristeen TI system. Dysfunctional bowel symptoms, patient opinion and level of satisfaction were analysed before and during TI treatment using a specific questionnaire. Thirty-five children completed the study. Mean patient age and follow up were 12.5 years (6-25) and 12 months (4-18), respectively. Average irrigation frequency and instillation volume were once every 3 days and 616ml (200-1000), respectively. Bowel dysfunction symptoms including faecal incontinence improved significantly in all children. Patient opinion of intestinal functionality improved from 2.3±1.4 to 8.2±1.5 (P<0.0001) and mean grade of satisfaction with the Peristeen system was 7.3. Patient independence also improved from 28 to 46% and no adverse events were recorded. TI should be used as a first therapeutic approach in those children with NBD who do not respond to conservative or medical bowel management before other more invasive treatment modalities are considered. The Peristeen system is as effective as other TI methods, but it is easy to learn, safe and increases the patient's independence. Copyright © 2009 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Commiphora mukul attenuates peripheral neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury of sciatic nerve in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ashish K; Tripathi, Chakra D

    2015-04-01

    The management of neuropathic pain remains unsatisfactory till date, despite immense advances in the therapeutic strategies. Commiphora mukul (CM), also known as Commiphora wightii, is well known in the traditional Indian system of medicine, and has been used to treat ailments such as obesity, bone fractures, arthritis, inflammation, cardiovascular diseases, and lipid disorders. The present study was performed to investigate the effect of CM on peripheral neuropathic pain in rats. Neuropathic pain was induced by the chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. Following this, CM was orally administered for 2 weeks in doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, and pain assessment was performed by employing the behavioral tests for thermal hyperalgesia (hot-plate and tail-flick tests) and cold allodynia (acetone test). Following the induction of neuropathic pain, significant development of thermal hyperalgesia and cold allodynia was observed. The administration of CM (50 mg/kg) did not have any effect on the hot-plate and tail-flick tests, but significant anti-allodynic effect was observed in the acetone test. Furthermore, administration of CM (100 mg/kg) caused significant decrease in pain as observed on the tail-flick and acetone tests, but not in the hot-plate test. CM in a dose of 200 mg/kg significantly modulated neuropathic pain as observed from the increased hot-plate and tail-flick latencies, and decreased paw withdrawal duration (in acetone test). Therefore, the present study suggests that CM may be used in future as a treatment option for neuropathic pain.

  15. [Prevalence and characteristics of chronic pain with neuropathic component at Parakou in northern Benin in 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adoukonou, T; Gnonlonfoun, D; Kpozehouen, A; Adjien, C; Tchaou, B; Tognon-Tchegnonsi, F; Adechina, H; Covi, R; Houinato, D

    2014-11-01

    The burden of chronic and neuropathic pain is high making it an important public health problem. The epidemiology is not well known in the general population in sub-Saharan Africa. We aimed to determine the prevalence of chronic pain with a neuropathic component at Tititou in Parakou in northeastern Benin. A cross-sectional study was conducted from 1st April to 31 May 2012 and included 2314 people in a door-to-door survey. Chronic pain was defined as pain occurring for more than three months. Neuropathic pain was assessed with the DN4 score. A neurological exam was performed by a young physician for all people with chronic pain. During the interview, sociodemographic data, past medical history, weight and height were recorded. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to analyze the main associated factors. Among the 2314 people included in this survey, 49.7% were male. The mean age was 32.3 ± 13.1 years. Nine hundred seven reported pain occurring for more than 3 months. The prevalence of chronic pain was 39.2% (CI95%: 29.3-34.7). It was more frequent in females, older people, among diabetics, people with a history of any surgery, stroke, brain trauma, and alcoholism. The prevalence of chronic pain with a neuropathic component was 6.3% (CI95%: 5.0-7.9). The main associated factors were age, matrimonial status, professional occupation, body mass index, diabetes, history of zoster, history of any surgery, brain trauma. People with neuropathic pain often reported pain with burning (87.6%), prickling (82.8%), numbness (66.9%), tingling (63.4%), and lightning pain (48.3%). The main locations were the lower limbs and low back pain. This study suggested the high frequency of chronic neuropathic pain in the general population in Parakou compared with rates reported in western countries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Neuropathic pain in ankylosing spondylitis: a psychophysics and brain imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qi; Inman, Robert D; Davis, Karen D

    2013-06-01

    To determine whether there is a neuropathic component in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) back pain and to delineate gray matter brain abnormalities associated with AS. Seventeen patients with back pain secondary to AS who were not receiving biologic agents and 17 age- and sex-matched healthy controls consented to participate in the study and were assessed using the painDETECT instrument (scores of ≤12 indicating low probability of neuropathic pain) and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Mechanical and thermal thresholds were determined in all subjects, and brain gray matter was assessed by 3T magnetic resonance imaging. Eleven of the 17 AS patients had painDETECT scores of >12. The patients had decreased mechanical and cold sensitivity on the dorsum of their feet but did not have altered pain thresholds. Compared to controls, the AS patients exhibited cortical thinning in the primary somatosensory, insular, anterior cingulate, and anterior mid-cingulate cortices and the supplemental motor area, and increased gray matter volume in the thalamus and putamen. Scores on the painDETECT in AS patients were correlated with decreased gray matter in the primary somatosensory cortex and with increased gray matter in the motor cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, prefrontal cortex, thalamus, and striatum. The present findings indicate that neuropathic pain occurs in AS. Furthermore, abnormal brain gray matter and neural correlates of neuropathic pain are concordant with the clinical picture of AS, which includes sensorimotor and mood deficits as well as neuropathic pain symptoms. These results suggest that back pain in AS is a mixed pain condition that includes a neuropathic pain component. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  17. Pattern of neuropathic pain induced by topical capsaicin application in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötsch, Jörn; Dimova, Violeta; Hermens, Hanneke; Zimmermann, Michael; Geisslinger, Gerd; Oertel, Bruno G; Ultsch, Alfred

    2015-03-01

    Human experimental pain models are widely used to study drug effects under controlled conditions, but they require further optimization to better reflect clinical pain conditions. To this end, we measured experimentally induced pain in 110 (46 men) healthy volunteers. The quantitative sensory testing (QST) battery (German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain) was applied on untreated ("control") and topical capsaicin-hypersensitized ("test") skin. Z-transformed QST-parameter values obtained at the test site were compared with corresponding values published from 1236 patients with neuropathic pain using Bayesian statistics. Subjects were clustered for the resemblance of their QST pattern to neuropathic pain. Although QST parameter values from the untreated site agreed with reference values, several QST parameters acquired at the test site treated with topical capsaicin deviated from normal. These deviations resembled in 0 to 7 parameters of the QST pattern observed in patients with neuropathic pain. Higher degrees (50%-60%) of resemblance to neuropathic QST pattern were obtained in 18% of the subjects. Inclusion in the respective clusters was predictable at a cross-validated accuracy of 86.9% by a classification and regression tree comprising 3 QST parameters (mechanical pain sensitivity, wind-up ratio, and z-transformed thermal sensory limen) from the control sites. Thus, we found that topical capsaicin partly induced the desired clinical pattern of neuropathic pain in a preselectable subgroup of healthy subjects to a degree that fuels expectations that experimental pain models can be optimized toward mimicking clinical pain. The subjects, therefore, qualify for enrollment in analgesic drug studies that use highly selected cohorts to enhance predictivity for clinical analgesia.

  18. Chronic pain with neuropathic characteristics in diabetic patients: a French cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Bouhassira

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of distal chronic pain with neuropathic characteristics in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus and its impact on quality of life, mood, anxiety, sleep and healthcare utilization. METHODS: In total, 885 patients were screened and 766 diabetic patients (38.7% with type 1 diabetes mellitus, 44.8% women, mean age: 57.2 ± 14.9 years were enrolled consecutively over a three-month period in this observational study by 85 diabetes specialists working in a hospital department or in private practice. All the patients completed a series of questionnaires for the detection of chronic pain (i.e. daily pain for more than three months in the lower limbs and assessment of health-related quality of life (Medical Outcomes Short Form 12 scale, sleep disturbances (MOS sleep scale, depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale. Patients with chronic pain were also assessed with the 7-item DN4-interview questionnaire, the monofilament test and the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of chronic pain with neuropathic characteristics was 20.3% [95% CI 17.4-23.1]. The MNSI examination score suggested that pain was related to polyneuropathy, in 80.1% of these patients (89.5% of those with bilateral pain. Patients with chronic pain had a poorer quality of life and more sleep disturbances, anxiety and depression than patients without pain and the presence of neuropathic characteristics was predictive of such impairments. Only 38.6% of the patients had received appropriate treatment for neuropathic pain. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic pain with neuropathic characteristics concerns one in five diabetic patients, has a significant impact on quality of life and is not adequately managed. The close correlation between the DN4 questionnaire and MNSI results suggests that screening tools for neuropathic pain could be used in daily practice for the identification of

  19. The antiallodynic action of pregabalin in neuropathic pain is independent from the opioid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Mélanie; Yalcin, Ipek; Nexon, Laurent; Wurtz, Xavier; Ceredig, Rhian Alice; Daniel, Dorothée; Hawkes, Rachael Aredhel; Salvat, Eric; Barrot, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Clinical management of neuropathic pain, which is pain arising as a consequence of a lesion or a disease affecting the somatosensory system, partly relies on the use of anticonvulsant drugs such as gabapentinoids. Therapeutic action of gabapentinoids such as gabapentin and pregabalin, which act by the inhibition of calcium currents through interaction with the α2δ-1 subunit of voltage-dependent calcium channels, is well documented. However, some aspects of the downstream mechanisms are still to be uncovered. Using behavioral, genetic, and pharmacological approaches, we tested whether opioid receptors are necessary for the antiallodynic action of acute and/or long-term pregabalin treatment in the specific context of neuropathic pain. Using the cuff model of neuropathic pain in mice, we show that acute pregabalin administration at high dose has a transitory antiallodynic action, while prolonged oral pregabalin treatment leads to sustained antiallodynic action, consistent with clinical observations. We show that pregabalin remains fully effective in μ-opioid receptor, in δ-opioid receptor and in κ-opioid receptor deficient mice, either female or male, and its antiallodynic action is not affected by acute naloxone. Our work also shows that long-term pregabalin treatment suppresses tumor necrosis factor-α overproduction induced by sciatic nerve constriction in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia. We demonstrate that neither acute nor long-term antiallodynic effect of pregabalin in a context of neuropathic pain is mediated by the endogenous opioid system, which differs from opioid treatment of pain and antidepressant treatment of neuropathic pain. Our data are also supportive of an impact of gabapentinoid treatment on the neuroimmune aspect of neuropathic pain. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Antidepressants inhibit P2X4 receptor function: a possible involvement in neuropathic pain relief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozaki-Saitoh Hidetoshi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropathic pain is characterized by pain hypersensitivity to innocuous stimuli (tactile allodynia that is nearly always resistant to known treatments such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or even opioids. It has been reported that some antidepressants are effective for treating neuropathic pain. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. We have recently demonstrated that blocking P2X4 receptors in the spinal cord reverses tactile allodynia after peripheral nerve injury in rats, implying that P2X4 receptors are a key molecule in neuropathic pain. We investigated a possible role of antidepressants as inhibitors of P2X4 receptors and analysed their analgesic mechanism using an animal model of neuropathic pain. Results Antidepressants strongly inhibited ATP-mediated Ca2+ responses in P2X4 receptor-expressing 1321N1 cells, which are known to have no endogenous ATP receptors. Paroxetine exhibited the most powerful inhibition of calcium influx via rat and human P2X4 receptors, with IC50 values of 2.45 μM and 1.87 μM, respectively. Intrathecal administration of paroxetine produced a striking antiallodynic effect in an animal model of neuropathic pain. Co-administration of WAY100635, ketanserin or ondansetron with paroxetine induced no significant change in the antiallodynic effect of paroxetine. Furthermore, the antiallodynic effect of paroxetine was observed even in rats that had received intrathecal pretreatment with 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine, which dramatically depletes spinal 5-hydroxytryptamine. Conclusion These results suggest that paroxetine acts as a potent analgesic in the spinal cord via a mechanism independent of its inhibitory effect on serotonin transporters. Powerful inhibition on P2X4 receptors may underlie the analgesic effect of paroxetine, and it is possible that some antidepressants clinically used in patients with neuropathic pain show antiallodynic effects, at least in part

  1. Chronic administration of [Pyr(1)] apelin-13 attenuates neuropathic pain after compression spinal cord injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajimashhadi, Zahra; Aboutaleb, Nahid; Nasirinezhad, Farinaz

    2017-02-01

    Apelin is an endogenous ligand for apelin receptor (APJ) with analgesic effect on visceral, analgesic and proanalgesic influences on acute pains in animal models. The purpose of this study was to determine the possible analgesic effects of [Pyr(1)] apelin-13 on chronic pain after spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. Animals were randomly divided into three major groups as intact, sham and SCI. The SCI group randomly allocated to four subgroups as no treatment, vehicle-treatment (normal saline: 10μl, intrathecally) and two subgroups with intrathecal injection (i.t) of 1μg and 5μg of [Pyr(1)] apelin-13. After laminectomy at T6-T8 level, spinal cord compression injury was induced using an aneurysm clip. Vehicle or [Pyr(1)] apelin-13 injected from day1 post SCI and continued for a week on a daily basis. Pain behaviors and locomotor activity were monitored up to 8weeks. At the end of the experiments, intracardial paraformaldehyde perfusion was made under deep anesthesia in some animals for histological and immunohistochemistry evaluations. Western blot technique was also done to detect caspase-3 in fresh spinal cord tissues. SCI decreased nociceptive thresholds and locomotor scores. Administration of [Pyr(1)] apelin-13 (1μg and 5μg) improved locomotor activity and reduced pain symptoms, cavity size and caspase-3 levels. Results showed long-term beneficial effects of [Pyr(1)] apelin-13 on neuropathic pain and locomotion. Therefore, we may suggest [Pyr(1)] apelin-13 as a new option for further neuropathic pain research and a suitable candidate for ensuing clinical trials in spinal cord injury arena. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Involvement of the melanocortin-1 receptor in acute pain and pain of inflammatory but not neuropathic origin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Delaney

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Response to painful stimuli is susceptible to genetic variation. Numerous loci have been identified which contribute to this variation, one of which, MC1R, is better known as a gene involved in mammalian hair colour. MC1R is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in melanocytes and elsewhere and mice lacking MC1R have yellow hair, whilst humans with variant MC1R protein have red hair. Previous work has found differences in acute pain perception, and response to analgesia in mice and humans with mutations or variants in MC1R.We have tested responses to noxious and non-noxious stimuli in mutant mice which lack MC1R, or which overexpress an endogenous antagonist of the receptor, as well as controls. We have also examined the response of these mice to inflammatory pain, assessing the hyperalgesia and allodynia associated with persistent inflammation, and their response to neuropathic pain. Finally we tested by a paired preference paradigm their aversion to oral administration of capsaicin, which activates the noxious heat receptor TRPV1. Female mice lacking MC1R showed increased tolerance to noxious heat and no alteration in their response to non-noxious mechanical stimuli. MC1R mutant females, and females overexpressing the endogenous MC1R antagonist, agouti signalling protein, had a reduced formalin-induced inflammatory pain response, and a delayed development of inflammation-induced hyperalgesia and allodynia. In addition they had a decreased aversion to capsaicin at moderate concentrations. Male mutant mice showed no difference from their respective controls. Mice of either sex did not show any effect of mutant genotype on neuropathic pain.We demonstrate a sex-specific role for MC1R in acute noxious thermal responses and pain of inflammatory origin.

  3. Delta-opioid receptor analgesia is independent of microglial activation in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Mika

    Full Text Available The analgesic effect of delta-opioid receptor (DOR ligands in neuropathic pain is not diminished in contrast to other opioid receptor ligands, which lose their effectiveness as analgesics. In this study, we examine whether this effect is related to nerve injury-induced microglial activation. We therefore investigated the influence of minocycline-induced inhibition of microglial activation on the analgesic effects of opioid receptor agonists: morphine, DAMGO, U50,488H, DPDPE, Deltorphin II and SNC80 after chronic constriction injury (CCI to the sciatic nerve in rats. Pre-emptive and repeated administration of minocycline (30 mg/kg, i.p. over 7 days significantly reduced allodynia and hyperalgesia as measured on day 7 after CCI. The antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects of intrathecally (i.t. administered morphine (10-20 µg, DAMGO (1-2 µg and U50,488H (25-50 µg were significantly potentiated in rats after minocycline, but no such changes were observed after DPDPE (10-20 µg, deltorphin II (1.5-15 µg and SNC80 (10-20 µg administration. Additionally, nerve injury-induced down-regulation of all types of opioid receptors in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia was not influenced by minocycline, which indicates that the effects of opioid ligands are dependent on other changes, presumably neuroimmune interactions. Our study of rat primary microglial cell culture using qRT-PCR, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry confirmed the presence of mu-opioid receptors (MOR and kappa-opioid receptors (KOR, further we provide the first evidence for the lack of DOR on microglial cells. In summary, DOR analgesia is different from analgesia induced by MOR and KOR receptors because it does not dependent on injury-induced microglial activation. DOR agonists appear to be the best candidates for new drugs to treat neuropathic pain.

  4. Reflections on reducing insulin to lose weigh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Val

    Diabulimia is not a recognised medical condition, although it is thought to affect one-third of women with type 1 diabetes. Diabulimia involves deliberately omitting or reducing insulin dosages to lose weight. This article reports the reflections of women with long-duration type 1 diabetes who said that they had manipulated their insulin in the past to lose weight. Many were now dealing with serious heart and neuropathic complications, which they felt were a result of their diabulimia.

  5. Pain severity and the economic burden of neuropathic pain in the United States: BEAT Neuropathic Pain Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaefer C

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Caroline Schaefer,1 Alesia Sadosky,2 Rachael Mann,3 Shoshana Daniel,4 Bruce Parsons,2 Michael Tuchman,5 Alan Anschel,6 Brett R Stacey,7 Srinivas Nalamachu,8 Edward Nieshoff9 1Covance Market Access Services Inc., Gaithersburg, MD, 2Pfizer, Inc., New York, NY, 3Covance Market Access Services Inc., San Diego, CA, 4Covance Market Access Services Inc., Conshohocken, PA, 5Palm Beach Neurological Center, Palm Beach Gardens, FL, 6Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 7Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, 8International Clinical Research Institute, Overland Park, KS, 9Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan/Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USABackground: As with many chronic conditions, patients with neuropathic pain (NeP are high consumers of health care resources. However, limited literature exists on the economic burden of NeP, including its impact on productivity. The aim of this study was to characterize health care resource utilization, productivity, and costs associated with NeP by pain severity level in US adults.Methods: Subjects (n=624 with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy, human immunodeficiency virus-related peripheral NeP, post-trauma/post-surgical NeP, spinal cord injury with NeP, chronic low back pain with NeP, and small fiber neuropathy were recruited during routine office visits to US community-based general practitioners and specialists. Clinicians captured clinical characteristics, NeP-related medications, and health care resource utilization based on 6-month retrospective medical chart review. Subjects completed questionnaires on demographics, pain/symptoms, costs, and productivity. Brief Pain Inventory pain severity scores were used to classify subjects by mild, moderate, or severe pain. Annualized NeP-related costs (adjusted for covariates were estimated, and differences across pain severity groups were evaluated.Results: In total, 624 subjects were recruited (mean age 55.5±13.7 years; 55.4% male

  6. Was ein Wort bedeutet, kann ein Satz nicht sagen: Zur Bedeutung der Terminologiearbeit für die Technische Kommunikation und das Fachtextübersetzen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus-Dirk Schmitz

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Einleitung: Dieser Beitrag geht von einem Zitat des österreichisch-britischen Philosophen Ludwig Wittgenstein aus und bezeiht sich auf seine Aussagen über Wörter und Sätze. Zielsetzung: Analyse und Diskussion der Relevanz von WittgensteinsAussage für die Terminologiearbeit in der Technischen Kommunikation und beim Fachübersetzen. Methode: Kritische Analyse und Betrachtung. Ergebnis: Neben den terminologischen Grundbegriffen Begriff, Benennung und Gegenstand werden vor allem die Definition als Begriffsbeschreibung sowie die Kriterien zur Bildung von Benennungen untersucht. Schlussfolgerung: Das Zitat von Wittgenstein lässt viele Interpretationen zu. Für die Technische Kommunikation und das Fachübersetzen muss aber die Definition (Satz den Begriff hinter der Benennung (Wort erklären. Idealerweise ist aber die Benennung so transparent, dass dadurch schon die Begriffsklärung erfolgt.

  7. Phytochemical investigation of Crataegi folium cum flos (hawthorn leaves and flowers and Hyperici herba (st johns wort aerial parts hydroalcoholic extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra Cretu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna hydroalcoholic extract was prepared by extraction of powdered dried leaves and flowers with ethanol 70% v/v (1:10, by reflux for two hours. St Johns Wort (Hypericum perforatum hydroalcoholic extract was prepared by extraction of powdered dried flowering aerial parts with ethanol 70% v/v (1:10, by reflux for two hours. Both extracts were qualitative and quantitative analyzed. The qualitative analysis consisted in phytochemical screening and spectroanalytical profile by HPTLC and UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy. Quantitative analyses consisted in determination of total flavonoid content (as rutin by following colorimetric aluminum chloride method, and total polyphenol content (as gallic acid by Folin- Ciocalteu method. Results were evaluated statistically and presented as mean of three determinations ± SD (standard deviation. These analyses revealed their complex composition and either some similarities and differences between these two extracts.

  8. Grußwort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jähnichen, Stefan

    Vielen Dank für die Einladung zu dieser Konferenz und vielen Dank an Dr. Udo Bub. Meine ersten Grüße richte ich allerdings zunächst als Aufsichtsrat der EICT GmbH an Sie, da ich mich über die Entwicklung der EICT GmbH und über diese von der EICT organisierte Veranstaltung besonders freue. Sie bildet eine Basis für die weitere Kommunikation über ein so wichtiges Thema wie Sicherheit und für die notwendige Beachtung durch Politik und Ministerien.

  9. P2Y12 receptor upregulation in satellite glial cells is involved in neuropathic pain induced by HIV glycoprotein 120 and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhihua; Xie, Lihui; Zhou, Congfa; Yuan, Huilong; Ouyang, Shuai; Fang, Zhi; Zhao, Shanhong; Jia, Tianyu; Zou, Lifang; Wang, Shouyu; Xue, Yun; Wu, Bing; Gao, Yun; Li, Guilin; Liu, Shuangmei; Xu, Hong; Xu, Changshui; Zhang, Chunping; Liang, Shangdong

    2017-11-20

    The direct neurotoxicity of HIV and neurotoxicity of combination antiretroviral therapy medications both contribute to the development of neuropathic pain. Activation of satellite glial cells (SGCs) in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) plays a crucial role in mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. The P2Y12 receptor expressed in SGCs of the DRG is involved in pain transmission. In this study, we explored the role of the P2Y12 receptor in neuropathic pain induced by HIV envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120) combined with ddC (2',3'-dideoxycytidine). A rat model of gp120+ddC-induced neuropathic pain was used. Peripheral nerve exposure to HIV-gp120+ddC increased mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in gp120+ddC-treated model rats. The gp120+ddC treatment increased expression of P2Y12 receptor mRNA and protein in DRG SGCs. In primary cultured DRG SGCs treated with gp120+ddC, the levels of [Ca2+]i activated by the P2Y12 receptor agonist 2-(Methylthio) adenosine 5'-diphosphate trisodium salt (2-MeSADP) were significantly increased. P2Y12 receptor shRNA treatment inhibited 2-MeSADP-induced [Ca2+]i in primary cultured DRG SGCs treated with gp120+ddC. Intrathecal treatment with a shRNA against P2Y12 receptor in DRG SGCs reduced the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, decreased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK in the DRG of gp120+ddC-treated rats. Thus, downregulating the P2Y12 receptor relieved mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in gp120+ddC-treated rats.

  10. Loss of calcineurin in the spinal dorsal horn contributes to neuropathic pain, and intrathecal administration of the phosphatase provides prolonged analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miletic, Gordana; Lippitt, Jennifer A; Sullivan, Kristine M; Miletic, Vjekoslav

    2013-10-01

    Calcineurin (protein phosphatase 3) regulates synaptic plasticity in the brain. The development of neuropathic pain appears dependent on some of the same mechanisms that underlie brain synaptic plasticity. In this study, we examined whether calcineurin regulates chronic constriction injury (CCI)-elicited plasticity in the spinal dorsal horn. CCI animals exhibited mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity 7 days after ligation of the sciatic nerve. Neither control uninjured nor sham-operated animals exhibited pain behavior. Calcineurin activity and content of its Aα isoform were significantly decreased in the ipsilateral postsynaptic density (PSD) of dorsal horn neurons in CCI animals. Calcineurin activity and content in the contralateral PSD of CCI animals or either side of the dorsal horn in sham animals were not modified. The pain behavior in CCI animals was attenuated by intrathecal application of exogenous calcineurin. The treatment was long-lasting as a single injection provided analgesia for 4 days by restoring the phosphatase's activity and Aα content in the PSD. No signs of toxicity were detected up to 14 days after the single intrathecal injection. Intrathecal application of the calcineurin inhibitor FK-506 elicited pain behavior in control uninjured animals and significantly reduced calcineurin activity in the PSD. CCI may elicit neuropathic pain at least in part as a result of the loss of calcineurin-mediated dephosphorylation in the dorsal horn. Addition of the phosphatase by intrathecal injection reverses the injury-elicited loss and provides prolonged pain relief. Clinical therapy with calcineurin may prove to be a novel, effective, and safe approach in the management of well-established neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Intrathecal Ziconotide and Morphine for Pain Relief: A Case Series of Eight Patients with Refractory Cancer Pain, Including Five Cases of Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Calle Gil, Ana Bella; Peña Vergara, Isaac; Cormane Bornacelly, María Auxiliadora; Pajuelo Gallego, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Studies have shown that, at low doses and with careful titration, combination therapy with intrathecal ziconotide and morphine results in rapid control of opioid-refractory cancer pain. However, there is a lack of published data regarding the efficacy and safety of intrathecal ziconotide specifically for the treatment of neuropathic cancer pain. Case reports of ziconotide intrathecal infusion in eight patients (age 45-71 years; 75% male) with chronic, uncontrolled cancer pain during therapy with intrathecal morphine plus bupivacaine were reviewed. Neuropathic pain was confirmed in five patients. Treatment was initiated with adjunctive ziconotide when pain ≥5 on a visual analog scale persisted in spite of 3 successive 20% dose increases of intrathecal morphine. Ziconotide was initiated at 0.5-1.0 µg/day, with mean increases of 0.5 µg every 4-7 days if required (maximum dose 10 µg/day; mean dose 4.9 µg/day). Pain intensity was reduced in all patients after 3-5 days. Of the eight patients, three died for reasons unrelated to ziconotide, three discontinued treatment due to adverse effects (predominantly psychoneurological disorders), and one patient is still receiving treatment. One patient discontinued ziconotide due to confusion and delirium. Due to continued lack of pain control with intrathecal morphine, intrathecal fentanyl was initiated; however, effective pain relief was not achieved with 1500 µg/day. Ziconotide was restarted and the patient then achieved pain control. On the basis of our clinical experience, we recommend adding ziconotide to intrathecal opioid-based therapy in cancer patients with neuropathic pain inadequately controlled by intrathecal morphine alone. Eisai, Spain.

  12. Role of PAF receptor in proinflammatory cytokine expression in the dorsal root ganglion and tactile allodynia in a rodent model of neuropathic pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo Hasegawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neuropathic pain is a highly debilitating chronic pain following damage to peripheral sensory neurons and is often resistant to all treatments currently available, including opioids. We have previously shown that peripheral nerve injury induces activation of cytosolic phospholipase A(2 (cPLA(2 in injured dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons that contribute to tactile allodynia, a hallmark of neuropathic pain. However, lipid mediators downstream of cPLA(2 activation to produce tactile allodynia remain to be determined. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we provide evidence that platelet-activating factor (PAF is a potential candidate. Pharmacological blockade of PAF receptors (PAFRs reduced the development and expression of tactile allodynia following nerve injury. The expression of PAFR mRNA was increased in the DRG ipsilateral to nerve injury, which was seen mainly in macrophages. Furthermore, mice lacking PAFRs showed a reduction of nerve injury-induced tactile allodynia and, interestingly, a marked suppression of upregulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta expression in the injured DRG, crucial proinflammatory cytokines involved in pain hypersensitivity. Conversely, a single injection of PAF near the DRG of naïve rats caused a decrease in the paw withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation in a dose-dependent manner and an increase in the expression of mRNAs for TNFalpha and IL-1beta, both of which were inhibited by pretreatment with a PAFR antagonist. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that the PAF/PAFR system has an important role in production of TNFalpha and IL-1beta in the DRG and tactile allodynia following peripheral nerve injury and suggest that blocking PAFRs may be a viable therapeutic strategy for treating neuropathic pain.

  13. Pain-releasing action of platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonists in neuropathic pain animal models and the mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyama, N; Morita, K; Kitayama, T; Shiraishi, S; Uezono, Y; Nishimura, F; Kanematsu, T; Dohi, T

    2013-09-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) has been implicated in the pathology of neuropathic pain. Previous studies reported that PAF receptor (PAF-R) antagonists have varied anti-allodynia effects by route of administration and nerve injury models in rats. The present study elucidated the effectiveness of PAF antagonists against neuropathic pain in four different models of peripheral nerve injury and provided insights into the mode of anti-allodynia action. PAF antagonists, TCV-309, BN 50739 and WEB 2086 by intravenous (i.v.) and oral administration have potent and long-lasting anti-allodynia action in mice neuropathic pain models. Treatment with PAF antagonists before surgery delayed the initiation of allodynia until the effects of these treatments were abolished. Intrathecal (i.t.) injection of the PAF antagonists and siRNA against PAF receptor ameliorated allodynia. I.t. injection of the glycine receptor (GlyR)α3 siRNA reduced the anti-allodynia effect of PAF antagonists. This evidence suggests that the anti-allodynia effect of PAF antagonists is at least in part mediated by spinal relief of PAF-induced dysfunction of GlyRα3. An analysis of the mode of anti-allodynia action of TCV-309 in vivo revealed a competitive action against PAF shortly after the injection of TCV-309, converting to a non-competitive action later. The present results revealed the effectiveness in anti-allodynia of PAF antagonists in different nerve injury models, and the unique mode of action; long-lasting anti-allodynia effects mediated by spinal GlyRα3 with a competitive manner at the initial stage and the following non-competitive manner of inhibition. © 2013 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  14. Behavioral changes and trigeminal ganglion sodium channel regulation in an orofacial neuropathic pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Jonas; Jablonski, Aleksandra; Persson, Anna-Karin; Hao, Jing-Xia; Kouya, Poli Francois; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Zsuzsanna; Xu, Xiao-Jun; Fried, Kaj

    2005-12-15

    We used a photochemical method to generate a partial ischemic injury to the infraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve in rats. Following injury, rats developed a bilateral persistent hypersensitivity to mechanical stimulation in the territory innervated by the infraorbital nerve. In addition, spread of mechanical hypersensitivity beyond the facial region was noted. Heat hypersensitivity was also present, although to a lesser extent and of a shorter duration. In some rats, excessive facial grooming/scratching were observed. Morphological examination revealed a graded damage to the irradiated portion of the infraorbital nerve that was related to the duration of laser irradiation. Investigations of gene expression changes in injured trigeminal ganglion neurons of animals with behavioral signs of neuropathic pain demonstrated that the sodium channel alpha-subunit Na(v)1.3-absent in sham-operated animals-was expressed to a limited extent. mRNAs for Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 were reduced both with respect to proportions of expressing neurons and to intensities, whereas the beta 3 subunit was markedly upregulated. mRNA levels of p11, a regulatory factor that facilitates the surface expression of Na(v)1.8, were unchanged. Previous findings have shown that injury to the trigeminal nerve branches may elicit responses that differ from those of segmental spinal nerves. Despite this we conclude that the key sodium channel regulations that are reported as consequences of nerve damage in the dorsal root ganglia seem to appear also in the trigeminal ganglion. Thus, novel analgesic drugs designed to target the sodium channel subtypes involved could be of use for the treatment of orofacial pain.

  15. Pain from Dental Implant Placement, Inflammatory Pulpitis Pain, and Neuropathic Pain Present Different Somatosensory Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porporatti, André Luís; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi; Stuginski-Barbosa, Juliana; Bonfante, Estevam Augusto; Costa, Yuri Martins; Rodrigues Conti, Paulo César

    2017-01-01

    To address the two following questions: (1) What kind of somatosensory abnormalities may be characterized in patients receiving dental implants (IMP), in ongoing inflammatory dental pulpitis (IP) patients, and in neuropathic pain (atypical odontalgia [AO]) patients? and (2) What sort of sensory and neural changes may result from dental implant placement surgery and pulpectomy? A total of 60 subjects were divided into three groups: the IMP (n = 20), IP (n = 20), and AO groups (n = 20). Quantitative sensory testing (QST) was performed preoperatively (baseline) for all three groups and postoperatively at 1 month and 3 months after dental implant placement or pulpectomy (in the IMP group and IP group, respectively). Statistical analyses were completed with one-way and two-way analysis of variance and z score transformations (α = 5%). The main findings of this study indicated that: (1) Elevations in mechanical detection threshold (MDT) and in current perception threshold (CPT) related to C-fiber activation, indicating a loss of function, were found at baseline in IP patients; (2) Somatosensory abnormalities such as allodynia, reduced MDT and mechanical pain threshold (MPT), and impaired pain modulation were found in AO patients; (3) No somatosensory alterations after implant placement were found in the IMP group; and (4) Somatosensory alterations in the form of reduction in the CPT related to C-fiber activation were reported 3 months after pulpectomy in the IP group. This study showed that somatosensory abnormalities were evident in AO and IP patients, and somatosensory alterations were seen in IP patients even 3 months after pulpectomy. However, no somatosensory alterations were seen after implant placement.

  16. Antihyperalgesic effects of ashwagandha (Withania somnifera root extract) in rat models of postoperative and neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dong Wook; Kim, Jae Goo; Lim, Eun Yeong; Kim, Yun Tai

    2018-02-01

    The root of Withania somnifera, commonly known as ashwagandha, is a traditional herb in the Indian Ayurvedic system of medicine and is used as a tonic. Here, we investigated whether W. somnifera root extract exhibits analgesic effects in plantar incision (PI) and spared nerve injury (SNI) rat models. Mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) was measured by von Frey filaments, and pain-related behavior was determined after operation by ultrasonic vocalization (USV) measurements. Indeed, we examined interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels in the isolated dorsal root ganglia (DRG) following SNI in rats using an ELISA cytokine assay. MWT significantly increased 6 and 24 h after PI in rats receiving W. somnifera root extracts (100 and 300 mg/kg). Furthermore, the number of 22-27-kHz USV, which are a distress response, was significantly reduced at 6 and 24 h after PI in W. somnifera-treated rats (100 and 300 mg/kg). SNI-induced hyperalgesia and cytokine levels were significantly alleviated after treating with W. somnifera root extracts (100 and 300 mg/kg) for 15 continuous days. The main active compound, withaferin A, from the W. somnifera root extract has shown the CC chemokine family Receptor 2 (CCR2) antagonistic effects on monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)-induced Ca2+ response in CCR2 stable cell line. These results indicate that W. somnifera root extract has a potential analgesic effect in rat models for both postoperative and neuropathic pain and shows potential as a drug or supplement for the treatment of pain.

  17. Agreement and correlation between the self-report leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs and Douleur Neuropathique 4 Questions neuropathic pain screening tools in subjects with low back-related leg pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jeremy; Rabey, Martin I; Hall, Toby M

    2012-01-01

    The self-report Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (S-LANSS) and Douleur Neuropathique 4 Questions (DN4) neuropathic pain screening tools have been shown to be reliable, valid, and able to differentiate neuropathic pain from inflammatory or mixed pain syndromes. However, no studies have compared these tools to determine whether their outcomes are similar. This study evaluated agreement and correlation between the S-LANSS and DN4 in the identification of neuropathic pain in subjects with low back-related leg pain. This observational study compared S-LANSS and DN4 scores in 45 patients with low back-related leg pain. The S-LANSS and DN4 cutoff scores of 12 and 4, respectively, were used to classify subjects as positive or negative for the presence of neuropathic pain for each screening tool. The κ statistic was used to determine whether there was agreement in classification of neuropathic pain between the 2 screening tools. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to determine correlation between scores of the 2 screening tools. Neuropathic pain was identified in 15 subjects (33%) using the S-LANSS and in 19 subjects (42%) using the DN4. Agreement on neuropathic pain classification was fair, with a κ value of 0.34. There was moderate to good correlation (r = 0.62; P < .001) between scores obtained from the 2 tools. The finding of fair agreement suggests that despite the moderate to good correlation between scores, the cutoff points for the classification of neuropathic pain of the 2 tools may not be congruent. Copyright © 2012 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevalence and associations of neuropathic pain in a cohort of multi-ethnic Asian low back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kew, Yueting; Tan, Cheng-Yin; Ng, Chong-Jing; Thang, Sue-Sien; Tan, Leong-Hooi; Khoo, Yvonne Khaii; Lim, Jun-Ni; Ng, Jia-Hui; Chan, Chris Yin-Wei; Kwan, Mun-Keong; Goh, Khean-Jin

    2017-04-01

    The prevalence of neuropathic low back pain differs in different ethnic populations. The aims of the study are to determine its frequency and associations in a multi-ethnic cohort of Asian low back pain patients. This was a cross-sectional study of low back patients seen at the University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Neuropathic low back pain patients were identified using the painDETECT questionnaire and compared with non-neuropathic (unclear or nociceptive) low back pain patients, in terms of socio-demographic and clinical factors, pain severity (numerical pain rating scale, NPRS), disability (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, RMDQ), as well as anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HADS). Of 210 patients, 26 (12.4%) have neuropathic low back pain. Neuropathic pain is associated with non-Chinese ethnicity, higher body mass index and pain radiation below the knee. Patients with neuropathic pain have significantly higher NPRS and RMDQ scores, and there are more subjects with anxiety on HADS. However, there are no differences between the groups in age, gender, pain duration or underlying diagnosis of low back pain. The prevalence of neuropathic low back pain in a multi-ethnic Malaysian cohort is lower than previously reported in other populations with possible differences between ethnic groups. It is associated with greater pain severity, disability and anxiety.

  19. The Impact of Enrollment in a Specialized Interdisciplinary Neuropathic Pain Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Garven

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic pain clinics have been created because of the increasing recognition of chronic pain as a very common, debilitating condition that requires specialized care. Neuropathic pain (NeP is a multifaceted, specialized form of chronic pain that often requires input from multiple disciplines for assessment and management.

  20. Aromatherapy Massage for Neuropathic Pain and Quality of Life in Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gok Metin, Zehra; Arikan Donmez, Ayse; Izgu, Nur; Ozdemir, Leyla; Arslan, Ismail Emre

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of aromatherapy massage on neuropathic pain severity and quality of life (QoL) in patients suffering from painful diabetic neuropathy. This open-label randomized controlled clinical study was conducted in a university hospital endocrine outpatient clinic in Turkey. The study sample consisted of 46 patients, randomly allocated to an intervention group (n = 21) and a control group (n = 25). The intervention group received aromatherapy massage three times per week for a period of 4 weeks. The control group received only routine care. Data were collected from patients using the Douleur Neuropathique questionnaire, the visual analog scale, and the Neuropathic Pain Impact on Quality of Life questionnaire. Neuropathic pain scores significantly decreased in the intervention group compared with the control group in the fourth week of the study. Similarly, QoL scores significantly improved in the intervention group in the fourth week of the study. Aromatherapy massage is a simple and effective nonpharmacological nursing intervention that can be used to manage neuropathic pain and improve QoL in patients with painful neuropathy. Aromatherapy massage is a well-tolerated, feasible, and safe nonpharmacological method that can be readily integrated into clinical settings by nursing staff. The essential oils rosemary, geranium, lavender, eucalyptus, and chamomile can be safely used by nurses in the clinical setting, if applicable. However, training and experience of nurses in aromatherapy massage is critical to achieving positive results. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  1. Irrational drug use in neuropathic pain treatment: a two- year data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    pain syndrome.[2,3] Although NeP is acute in nature, it is persistent (or refractory) in most patients and manifests as chronic pain in clinical practice.[3]. The prevalence of NeP in developed countries is estimated to range ... Society of Pain Educators (ASPE) and. Neuropathic Pain Platform (SNAPS) have a special warning as ...

  2. Dynamics of circadian thalamocortical flow of information during a peripheral neuropathic pain condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helder eCardoso-Cruz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the thalamocortical loop plays a crucial role in the encoding of sensory-discriminative features of painful stimuli. However, only a few studies have addressed the changes in thalamocortical dynamics that may occur after the onset of chronic pain. Our goal was to evaluate how the induction of chronic neuropathic pain affected the flow of information within the thalamocortical loop throughout the brain states of the sleep-wake cycle. To address this issue we recorded local field potentials – LFPs – both before and after the establishment of neuropathic pain in awake freely moving adult rats chronically implanted with arrays of multielectrodes in the lateral thalamus and primary somatosensory cortex. Our results show that the neuropathic injury induced changes in the number of wake and slow-wave-sleep state episodes, and especially in the total number of transitions between brain states. Moreover, partial directed coherence – PDC – analysis revealed that the amount of information flow between cortex and thalamus in neuropathic animals decreased significantly, indicating that the overall thalamic activity had less weight over the cortical activity. However, thalamocortical LFPs displayed higher phase-locking during awake and slow-wave-sleep episodes after the nerve lesion, suggesting faster transmission of relevant information along the thalamocortical loop. The observed changes are in agreement with the hypothesis of thalamic dysfunction after the onset of chronic pain, and may result from diminished inhibitory effect of the primary somatosensory cortex over the lateral thalamus.

  3. Prevalence, causes, and treatment of neuropathic pain in dutch nursing home residents: a retrospective chart review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kollenburg, E.G. van; Lavrijsen, J.C.M.; Verhagen, S.; Zuidema, S.U.; Schalkwijk, A.; Vissers, K.C.P.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify the prevalence and causes of neuropathic pain in Dutch nursing home residents; to establish the prevalence of painful and nonpainful diabetic polyneuropathy in a subsample of individuals with diabetes mellitus and central poststroke pain (CPSP) in a subsample of individuals

  4. Prevalence, Causes, and Treatment of Neuropathic Pain in Dutch Nursing Home Residents : A Retrospective Chart Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kollenburg, Esther G. P.; Lavrijsen, Jan C. M.; Verhagen, Stans C.; Zuidema, Sytse U.; Schalkwijk, Annelies; Vissers, Kris C. P.

    Objectives To identify the prevalence and causes of neuropathic pain in Dutch nursing home residents; to establish the prevalence of painful and nonpainful diabetic polyneuropathy in a subsample of individuals with diabetes mellitus and central poststroke pain (CPSP) in a subsample of individuals

  5. Investigation of neuropathic pain in treated leprosy patients in Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haroun, O. M; Hietaharju, A.; Bizuneh, E.; Brandsma, J.W.; Tesfaye, F.; Haanpää, M.; Rice, A.S.; Lockwood, D.N.

    2012-01-01

    Pain can be a significant problem for treated leprosy patients. It can be nociceptive due to tissue inflammation occurring during episodes of immune mediated reactions, or neuropathic due to leprosy affecting the somatosensory system. There are sparse epidemiological data on the prevalence and

  6. Paracetamol (acetaminophen) with or without codeine or dihydrocodeine for neuropathic pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiffen, Philip J; Knaggs, Roger; Derry, Sheena; Cole, Peter; Phillips, Tudor; Moore, R Andrew

    2016-12-27

    Paracetamol, either alone or in combination with codeine or dihydrocodeine, is commonly used to treat chronic neuropathic pain. This review sought evidence for efficacy and harm from randomised double-blind studies. To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse events of paracetamol with or without codeine or dihydrocodeine for chronic neuropathic pain in adults. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, and Embase from inception to July 2016, together with reference lists of retrieved papers and reviews, and two online study registries. We included randomised, double-blind studies of two weeks' duration or longer, comparing paracetamol, alone or in combination with codeine or dihydrocodeine, with placebo or another active treatment in chronic neuropathic pain. Two review authors independently searched for studies, extracted efficacy and adverse event data, and examined issues of study quality and potential bias. We did not carry out any pooled analyses. We assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE. No study satisfied the inclusion criteria. Effects of interventions were not assessed as there were no included studies. We have only very low quality evidence and have no reliable indication of the likely effect. There is insufficient evidence to support or refute the suggestion that paracetamol alone, or in combination with codeine or dihydrocodeine, works in any neuropathic pain condition.

  7. Spinal cord injury induced neuropathic pain: Molecular targets and therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomberg, Dominic; Miranpuri, Gurwattan; Duellman, Tyler; Crowell, Andrew; Vemuganti, Raghu; Resnick, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Neuropathic pain, especially that resulting from spinal cord injury, is a tremendous clinical challenge. A myriad of biological changes have been implicated in producing these pain states including cellular interactions, extracellular proteins, ion channel expression, and epigenetic influences. Physiological consequences of these changes are varied and include functional deficits and pain responses. Developing therapies that effectively address the cause of these symptoms require a deeper knowledge of alterations in the molecular pathways. Matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases are two promising therapeutic targets. Matrix metalloproteinases interact with and influence many of the studied pain pathways. Gene expression of ion channels and inflammatory mediators clearly contributes to neuropathic pain. Localized and time dependent targeting of these proteins could alleviate and even prevent neuropathic pain from developing. Current therapeutic options for neuropathic pain are limited primarily to analgesics targeting the opioid pathway. Therapies directed at molecular targets are highly desirable and in early stages of development. These include transplantation of exogenously engineered cell populations and targeted gene manipulation. This review describes specific molecular targets amenable to therapeutic intervention using currently available delivery systems.

  8. Gabapentin-Induced Urinary Incontinence: A Rare Side Effect in Patients with Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Kibar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gabapentin is a first-line agent for neuropathic pain management and has a favorable safety profile. The literature includes a few cases of gabapentin-induced incontinence, and most of them involved patients with epilepsy who were between the ages of 12 and 43 years. Herein, we present three patients with neuropathic pain due to different diagnoses, and, to our knowledge, these are the oldest reported cases of urinary incontinence caused by gabapentin therapy. A 56-year-old female patient who underwent hip arthroplasty developed a sciatic nerve injury and neuropathic pain postoperatively. Ten days after she began taking gabapentin to relieve her pain, she experienced daily urinary incontinence. In another instance, a 63-year-old female patient was diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome, and seven days after the initiation of gabapentin therapy, urinary incontinence developed. In addition, a 66-year-old male patient with neuropathic pain due to cervical disc pathology complained of urinary incontinence after the onset of gabapentin therapy. After discontinuing this drug, the incontinence symptoms resolved in these patients on the seventh, the first, and the second days, respectively. Physicians who administer gabapentin should inform their patients about the potential risk of gabapentin-induced incontinence and its negative impact on quality of life.

  9. Long term clinical outcome of peripheral nerve stimulation in patients with chronic peripheral neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calenbergh, F. Van; Gybels, J.; Laere, K. Van

    2009-01-01

    of the present study was to evaluate the long-term clinical efficacy of PNS in a group of patients with peripheral neuropathic pain treated with PNS since the 1980s. METHODS: Of an original series of 11 patients, 5 patients could be invited for clinical examination, detailed assessment of clinical pain and QST...

  10. Decompression with the aid of insoles in the treatment of diabetic neuropathic ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, P; Larsen, K; Sager, P

    1976-01-01

    Thirty-seven out of 38 neuropathic ulcers in 21 diabetic patients healed during relief of external pressure obtained by properly fitted interchangeable insoles. The time required for healing was 1 to 12 months (mean 3.6 months). The presence of mild occlussive arterial disease did not influence...

  11. Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Block with Botulinum Toxin Type A for Intractable Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Eun Moon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain includes postherpetic neuralgia (PHN, painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN, and trigeminal neuralgia, and so on. Although various drugs have been tried to treat neuropathic pain, the effectiveness of the drugs sometimes may be limited for chronic intractable neuropathic pain, especially when they cannot be used at an adequate dose, due to undesirable severe side effects and the underlying disease itself. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A has been known for its analgesic effect in various pain conditions. Nevertheless, there are no data of nerve block in PHN and PDN. Here, we report two patients successfully treated with ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block using BoNT-A for intractable PHN and PDN. One patient had PHN on the left upper extremity and the other patient had PDN on a lower extremity. Due to side effects of drugs, escalation of the drug dose could not be made. We injected 50 Botox units (BOTOX®, Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA into brachial plexus and lumbar plexus, respectively, under ultrasound. Their pain was significantly decreased for about 4–5 months. Ultrasound-guided nerve block with BoNT-A may be an effective analgesic modality in a chronic intractable neuropathic pain especially when conventional treatment failed to achieve adequate pain relief.

  12. Differential transcriptional profiling of damaged and intact adjacent dorsal root ganglia neurons in neuropathic pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Reinhold

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain, caused by a lesion in the somatosensory system, is a severely impairing mostly chronic disease. While its underlying molecular mechanisms are not thoroughly understood, neuroimmune interactions as well as changes in the pain pathway such as sensitization of nociceptors have been implicated. It has been shown that not only are different cell types involved in generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain, like neurons, immune and glial cells, but, also, intact adjacent neurons are relevant to the process. Here, we describe an experimental approach to discriminate damaged from intact adjacent neurons in the same dorsal root ganglion (DRG using differential fluorescent neuronal labelling and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. Two fluorescent tracers, Fluoroemerald (FE and 1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI, were used, whose properties allow us to distinguish between damaged and intact neurons. Subsequent sorting permitted transcriptional analysis of both groups. Results and qPCR validation show a strong regulation in damaged neurons versus contralateral controls as well as a moderate regulation in adjacent neurons. Data for damaged neurons reveal an mRNA expression pattern consistent with established upregulated genes like galanin, which supports our approach. Moreover, novel genes were found strongly regulated such as corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH, providing novel targets for further research. Differential fluorescent neuronal labelling and sorting allows for a clear distinction between primarily damaged neuropathic neurons and "bystanders," thereby facilitating a more detailed understanding of their respective roles in neuropathic processes in the DRG.

  13. Intrinsic muscle atrophy and toe deformity in the diabetic neuropathic foot: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, Sicco A.; Yang, Qing X.; Wang, Jinghua H.; Smith, Michael B.; Wunderlich, Roshna; Cavanagh, Peter R.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this study were to compare intrinsic foot muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) in patients with diabetic polyneuropathy and nondiabetic control subjects and to examine the association between intrinsic muscle CSA and clawing/hammering of the toes in neuropathic feet.

  14. α2δ Modulators for management of compression neuropathic pain: A review of three case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq A Tramboo

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion: These results indicate the effectiveness of a2d modulators for management of neuropathic pain secondary to compression radiculopathy. The results also suggest a possible therapeutic superiority of LYRICA over locally available generic brands of pregabalin and gabapentin. These findings need to be further examined in randomized, controlled trials.

  15. Only half of the chronic pain after thoracic surgery shows a neuropathic component.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steegers, M.A.H.; Snik, D.M.; Verhagen, A.F.T.M.; Drift, M.A. van der; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic pain is a common complication after thoracic surgery. The cause of chronic post-thoracotomy pain is often suggested to be intercostal nerve damage. Thus chronic pain after thoracic surgery should have an important neuropathic component. The present study investigated the prevalence of the

  16. Recent Advances in Urinary Tract Reconstruction for Neuropathic Bladder in Children [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto I. Lopes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic bladder usually causes several limitations to patients’ quality of life, including urinary incontinence, recurrent urinary tract infections, and upper urinary tract damage. Its management has significantly changed over the last few years. The aim of our paper is to address some salient features of recent literature dealing with reconstructive procedures in pediatric and adolescent patients with lower urinary tract dysfunction.

  17. Use of Lidocaine Patches for Neuropathic Pain in a Comprehensive Cancer Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Ann Fleming

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are few reports of the use of the lidocaine 5% patch (L5%P for neuropathic pain (NP in the cancer patient. Within a comprehensive cancer centre, L5%P has been prescribed by the Pain and Palliative Care Service (Peter McCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia for selected patients with NP since 2001.

  18. Montelukast attenuates neuropathic pain through inhibiting p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-kappa B in a rat model of chronic constriction injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chenghua; Shi, Xiaotian; Huang, He; Zhu, Yangzi; Wu, Yuqing

    2014-05-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes and their receptors have been shown to be involved in the generation of neuropathic pain. We performed this study to determine the antagonistic effect of montelukast, a cysteinyl leukotrienes receptor antagonist, on neuropathic pain and its underlying mechanism. Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats. After CCI, rats were repeatedly administered montelukast (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/kg intraperitoneal, once daily) for a period of 14 days. Mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency were assessed before surgery and on days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 14 after CCI. The levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the spinal cord were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) were assessed by Western blot. The expression of astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein and microglia marker Iba-1 and the coexpression of p-p38MAPK and Iba-1 or NF-κB and Iba-1 were observed by immunofluorescent staining. The CCI group displayed significantly decreased mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency on days 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 compared with sham groups (P montelukast (P montelukast for 14 days, as biological markers of inflammation, the levels of IL-1β (P montelukast reduced the elevated expression of p-p38 MAPK (P =0.006, 0.015, montelukast could inhibit CCI-induced activation of microglia but not astrocytes in the spinal cord. In addition, montelukast (2.0 mg/kg) significantly decreased the number of p38MAPK and Iba-1 or NF-κBp65 and Iba-1 double-positive cells. These results suggest that montelukast could effectively attenuate neuropathic pain in CCI rats by inhibiting the activation of p38MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways in spinal microglia.

  19. Evaluation of the safety and efficacy of pregabalin in older patients with neuropathic pain: results from a pooled analysis of 11 clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlateva Gergana

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Older patients are typically underrepresented in clinical trials of medications for chronic pain. A post hoc analysis of multiple clinical studies of pregabalin in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN or postherpetic neuralgia (PHN was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pregabalin in older patients. Methods Data from 11 double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical studies of pregabalin in patients with DPN or PHN were pooled. Efficacy outcomes included change in Daily Pain Rating Scale score, ≥30% and ≥50% responders, and endpoint pain score ≤3. Safety was based on adverse events (AEs. Primary efficacy was analyzed by analysis of covariance with terms for treatment, age category, protocol, baseline pain, and treatment-by-age category interaction. Results 2516 patients (white, n = 2344 [93.2%]; men, n = 1347 [53.5%]; PHN, n = 1003 [39.9%]; pregabalin, n = 1595 were included in the analysis. Patients were grouped by age: 18 to 64 years (n = 1236, 65 to 74 years (n = 766, and ≥75 years (n = 514. Baseline mean pain and sleep interference scores were comparable across treatment and age groups. Significant improvements in endpoint mean pain were observed for all pregabalin dosages versus placebo in all age groups (p ≤ 0.0009, except for the lowest dosage (150 mg/day in the youngest age group. Clinically meaningful pain relief, defined as ≥30% and ≥50% pain response, was observed in all age groups. The most common AEs were dizziness, somnolence, peripheral edema, asthenia, dry mouth, weight gain, and infections. The relative risks for these AEs increased with pregabalin dose, but did not appear related to older age or type of neuropathic pain. Conclusions Pregabalin (150-600 mg/day significantly reduced pain in older patients (age ≥65 years with neuropathic pain and improvements in pain were comparable to those observed in younger patients. Titration of pregabalin to the

  20. Inhaled Cannabis for Chronic Neuropathic Pain: A Meta-analysis of Individual Patient Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreae, Michael H; Carter, George M; Shaparin, Naum; Suslov, Kathryn; Ellis, Ronald J; Ware, Mark A; Abrams, Donald I; Prasad, Hannah; Wilsey, Barth; Indyk, Debbie; Johnson, Matthew; Sacks, Henry S

    2015-12-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain, the most frequent condition affecting the peripheral nervous system, remains underdiagnosed and difficult to treat. Inhaled cannabis may alleviate chronic neuropathic pain. Our objective was to synthesize the evidence on the use of inhaled cannabis for chronic neuropathic pain. We performed a systematic review and a meta-analysis of individual patient data. We registered our protocol with PROSPERO CRD42011001182. We searched in Cochrane Central, PubMed, EMBASE, and AMED. We considered all randomized controlled trials investigating chronic painful neuropathy and comparing inhaled cannabis with placebo. We pooled treatment effects following a hierarchical random-effects Bayesian responder model for the population-averaged subject-specific effect. Our evidence synthesis of individual patient data from 178 participants with 405 observed responses in 5 randomized controlled trials following patients for days to weeks provides evidence that inhaled cannabis results in short-term reductions in chronic neuropathic pain for 1 in every 5 to 6 patients treated (number needed to treat = 5.6 with a Bayesian 95% credible interval ranging between 3.4 and 14). Our inferences were insensitive to model assumptions, priors, and parameter choices. We caution that the small number of studies and participants, the short follow-up, shortcomings in allocation concealment, and considerable attrition limit the conclusions that can be drawn from the review. The Bayes factor is 332, corresponding to a posterior probability of effect of 99.7%. This novel Bayesian meta-analysis of individual patient data from 5 randomized trials suggests that inhaled cannabis may provide short-term relief for 1 in 5 to 6 patients with neuropathic pain. Pragmatic trials are needed to evaluate the long-term benefits and risks of this treatment. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ziconotide infusion for severe chronic pain: case series of patients with neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermeling, Daniel P; Berger, Joseph R

    2006-03-01

    Ziconotide intrathecal infusion was recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of intractable severe chronic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain make up a significant population among those who experience chronic pain for which there are less than optimal pharmacotherapeutic options. Published clinical trials provide a global view of ziconotide efficacy and safety. A subset of patients in clinical trials obtained complete pain relief, a remarkable finding given the history of drug treatment for neuropathic pain. To provide more information regarding those who respond to ziconotide therapy, we discuss three patients with neuropathic pain who received ziconotide infusion. Two patients with longstanding neuropathic pain, one with complex regional pain syndrome (formerly known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy) of the leg and one with lumbar radiculitis, achieved temporary but complete pain relief from single 5- and 10-microg epidural test doses. In the third case, a patient with longstanding bilateral leg and foot neuropathic pain from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and antiretroviral drug therapy achieved considerable pain relief from a long-term continuous intrathecal infusion. The patients who received a single dose had mild central nervous system adverse effects such as sedation, somnolence, nausea, headache, and lightheadedness. The patient who received the intrathecal infusion experienced mild-to-severe adverse effects depending on the rate of infusion; these effects included sedation, confusion, memory impairment, slurred speech, and double vision. This patient could sense impending adverse effects and made rate adjustments or suspended infusion to avert untoward symptoms. In all three cases, patients achieved considerable pain relief that was long-lasting and persisted well after dose administration or suspension of infusion.

  2. Validation of a New Arabic Version of the Neuropathic Pain Diagnostic Questionnaire (DN4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatila, Nadwa; Pereira, Bruno; Maarrawi, Joseph; Dallel, Radhouane

    2017-01-01

    The "Douleur Neuropathique 4 (DN4) questionnaire" was developed for screening neuropathic pain. The purpose of this work was to validate the DN4 questionnaire in the standard Arabic language. First, the questionnaire was translated and semantically adapted to Arabic according to the international guidelines for cross-cultural adaptation. Second, a prospective observational study was performed to validate this questionnaire. A total of 195 patients with chronic pain (n = 99 with neuropathic pain and n = 96 without neuropathic pain) were enrolled in the study. The internal consistency Kuder-Richardson's Formula 20 for the whole DN4 questionnaire was 0.86 (P < 0.001) and the intraclass correlation coefficient 0.99 (95% CI: 0.99 to 1.00). The test-retest reliability kappa coefficient for each item ranged from 0.92 to 1.00. Using a receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, the areas under the curve were 0.94 and 0.97 for the 7-item DN4 and 10-item DN4, respectively. A cut-off score of 3 resulted in a sensitivity of 97.0% and a specificity of 82.3% for the 7-item DN4, while a cut-off score of 5 for the 10-item DN4 resulted in a sensitivity of 93.0% and a specificity of 95.8%. Tingling, numbness, and hypoesthesia to touch and to pricking were the most discriminating pain items. The sensitivity and specificity of the 7-item DN4 and 10-item DN4 were not influenced by either pain severity or educational level. In conclusion, this new Arabic version DN4 questionnaire is a simple, reliable, and valid tool for discriminating between neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain. It represents a useful tool in clinical setting and population-based studies. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  3. Neuropathic cancer pain: What we are dealing with? How to manage it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esin E

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ece Esin, Suayib Yalcin Medical Oncology Department, Hacettepe University Cancer Institute, Ankara, Turkey Abstract: Cancer pain is a serious health problem, and imposes a great burden on the lives of patients and their families. Pain can be associated with delay in treatment, denial of treatment, or failure of treatment. If the pain is not treated properly it may impair the quality of life. Neuropathic cancer pain (NCP is one of the most complex phenomena among cancer pain syndromes. NCP may result from direct damage to nerves due to acute diagnostic/therapeutic interventions. Chronic NCP is the result of treatment complications or malignancy itself. Although the reason for pain is different in NCP and noncancer neuropathic pain, the pathophysiologic mechanisms are similar. Data regarding neuropathic pain are primarily obtained from neuropathic pain studies. Evidence pertaining to NCP is limited. NCP due to chemotherapeutic toxicity is a major problem for physicians. In the past two decades, there have been efforts to standardize NCP treatment in order to provide better medical service. Opioids are the mainstay of cancer pain treatment; however, a new group of therapeutics called coanalgesic drugs has been introduced to pain treatment. These coanalgesics include gabapentinoids (gabapentin, pregabalin, antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants, duloxetine, and venlafaxine, corticosteroids, bisphosphonates, N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists, and cannabinoids. Pain can be encountered throughout every step of cancer treatment, and thus all practicing oncologists must be capable of assessing pain, know the possible underlying pathophysiology, and manage it appropriately. The purpose of this review is to discuss neuropathic pain and NCP in detail, the relevance of this topic, clinical features, possible pathology, and treatments of NCP. Keywords: neuropathy, cancer pain, coanalgesics

  4. Nitrous oxide persistently alleviates pain hypersensitivity in neuropathic rats: A dose-dependent effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Boujema, Meric; Laboureyras, Emilie; Pype, Jan; Bessière, Baptiste; Simonnet, Guy

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite numerous pharmacological approaches, there are no common analgesic drugs that produce meaningful relief for the majority of patients with neuropathic pain. Although nitrous oxide (N2O) is a weak analgesic that acts via opioid-dependent mechanisms, it is also an antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). The NMDAR plays a critical role in the development of pain sensitization induced by nerve injury. OBJECTIVE: Using the chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in male rats as a preclinical model of neuropathic pain, the first aim of the present study was to evaluate the lowest N2O concentration and the shortest time of N2O postinjury exposure that would produce persistent relief of neuropathic pain. The second aim was to compare the effects of N2O with gabapentin, a reference drug used in human neuropathic pain relief. METHODS: Changes in the nociceptive threshold were evaluated using the paw pressure vocalization test in rats. RESULTS: Among the various N2O concentrations tested, which ranged from 25% to 50%, only 50% N2O single exposure for 1 h 15 min induced a persistent (minimum of three weeks) and significant (60%) reduction in pain hypersensitivity. A single gabapentin dose (75 mg/kg to 300 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) induced an acute (1 h to 1 h 30 min) dose-dependent effect, but not a persistent effect such as that observed with N2O. CONCLUSIONS: These preclinical results suggest that N2O is advantageous for long-lasting neuropathic pain relief after sciatic nerve injury compared with other drugs used in humans such as gabapentinoids or NMDAR antagonists. The present preclinical study provides a rationale for developing comparative clinical studies. PMID:26371891

  5. Comparison of central versus peripheral delivery of pregabalin in neuropathic pain states

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Although pregabalin therapy is beneficial for neuropathic pain (NeP) by targeting the CaVα2δ-1 subunit, its site of action is uncertain. Direct targeting of the central nervous system may be beneficial for the avoidance of systemic side effects. Results We used intranasal, intrathecal, and near-nerve chamber forms of delivery of varying concentrations of pregabalin or saline delivered over 14 days in rat models of experimental diabetic peripheral neuropathy and spinal nerve ligation. As well, radiolabelled pregabalin was administered to determine localization with different deliveries. We evaluated tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at multiple time points, and then analyzed harvested nervous system tissues for molecular and immunohistochemical changes in CaVα2δ-1 protein expression. Both intrathecal and intranasal pregabalin administration at high concentrations relieved NeP behaviors, while near-nerve pregabalin delivery had no effect. NeP was associated with upregulation of CACNA2D1 mRNA and CaVα2δ-1 protein within peripheral nerve, dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and dorsal spinal cord, but not brain. Pregabalin's effect was limited to suppression of CaVα2δ-1 protein (but not CACNA2D1 mRNA) expression at the spinal dorsal horn in neuropathic pain states. Dorsal root ligation prevented CaVα2δ-1 protein trafficking anterograde from the dorsal root ganglia to the dorsal horn after neuropathic pain initiation. Conclusions Either intranasal or intrathecal pregabalin relieves neuropathic pain behaviours, perhaps due to pregabalin's effect upon anterograde CaVα2δ-1 protein trafficking from the DRG to the dorsal horn. Intranasal delivery of agents such as pregabalin may be an attractive alternative to systemic therapy for management of neuropathic pain states. PMID:22236461

  6. Pregabalin for Neuropathic Pain: Why Benefits Could Be Expected for Multiple Pain Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Setsuro; Arakawa, Akio; Hayakawa, Kazuhiro; Yoshiyama, Tamotsu

    2016-11-01

    Limited research exists to support the extrapolation of the analgesic efficacy of pregabalin from one neuropathic pain condition to another. This retrospective analysis evaluated similarities in the efficacy of pregabalin for treating neuropathic pain associated with post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN), diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), and spinal cord injury (SCI) in a Japanese population, as a basis for considering the extrapolation of these data to other neuropathic pain conditions. Data were analysed across pregabalin doses within each pain condition, from three comparable 13- to 16-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) and the corresponding 52-week, open-label extension trials of pregabalin in Japanese patients with PHN, DPN or SCI. Efficacy outcomes in the RCTs included endpoint and weekly mean pain and sleep interference scores; endpoint proportions of responders in pain; Patient Global Impression of Change scores; and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) scores or Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) assessments. Study discontinuation rates were compared between treatment groups. The extension trials assessed pain intensity, using the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire. In the RCTs for all pain conditions, significant improvements in comparison with placebo in mean pain and sleep interference scores were evident after 1 week with pregabalin and were sustained throughout the treatment periods (p pregabalin-treated patients experienced a ≥30 % reduction in pain across the RCTs (p pregabalin significantly improved six of 16 SF-36 subscale scores in the PHN and DPN trials (p pregabalin-treated patients had numerically better outcomes of HADS scores. In the extension trials, improvements in pain intensity were maintained over a 52-week period. Similarities in the pregabalin efficacy profiles, including time to onset and magnitude of response, were confirmed regardless of the neuropathic pain condition. These data support

  7. Chronic nerve injury-induced Mas receptor expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons alleviates neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanting; Qin, Yue; Liu, Tuanjiang; Hao, Dingjun

    2015-12-01

    Neuropathic pain, which is characterized by hyperalgesia, allodynia and spontaneous pain, is one of the most painful symptoms that can be experienced in the clinic. It often occurs as a result of injury to the peripheral nerves, dorsal root ganglion (DRG), spinal cord or brain. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in nociception. As an essential component of the RAS, the angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7)/Mas axis may be involved in antinociception. The aim of the present study was to explore the expression pattern of Mas in DRG neurons following chronic nerve injury and examine the effects of Mas inhibition and activation on neuropathic pain in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) rat model. The results showed, that compared with the sham group, CCI caused a time-dependent induction of Mas expression at both the mRNA and the protein levels in DRG neurons. Consistent with the results, isolated DRG neurons showed a time-dependent increase in Ang-(1-7) binding on the cell membrane following the CCI surgery, but not the sham surgery. Compared with the sham control groups, CCI significantly decreased the paw withdrawal latency and threshold, and this was markedly improved and aggravated by intrathecal injection of the selective Mas agonist Ang-(1-7) and the selective Mas inhibitor D-Pro7-Ang-(1-7), respectively. In conclusion, this study has provided the first evidence, to the best of our knowledge, that the Mas expression in DRG neurons is time-dependently induced by chronic nerve injury and that the intrathecal activation and inhibition of Mas can improve and aggravate CCI-induced neuropathic pain, respectively. This study has provided novel insights into the pathophysiological process of neuropathic pain and suggests that the Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis could be an effective therapeutic target for neuropathic pain, warranting further study.

  8. Guggulipid of Commiphora mukul, with antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic activities in both sciatic nerve and spinal nerve ligation models of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Sachin; Khilnani, Gurudas; Singhvi, Indrajeet; Singla, Shivali; Khilnani, Ajeet K

    2013-12-01

    Guggulipid is a neutral fraction of ethyl acetate extract of gum resin of the tree Commiphora mukul Engl. (Burseraceae) and used in Ayurvedic medicine for treatment of neurological disorders. The present study was undertaken to assess the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic activities of guggulipid in rats. The screening study included the CCI and L5-L6 SNL models of neuropathic pain. Guggulipid (100 and 50 mg/kg) or saline was administered intraperitoneally in a blinded, randomized manner from postoperative day (POD) 7 to 13. Paw withdrawal duration (PWD) to spontaneous pain, chemical allodynia and mechanical hyperalgesia and paw withdrawal latency (PWL) to mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were tested before surgery, before and after guggulipid or saline administration (from POD7 to 13) and after the withdrawal of treatment (from POD14 to 20). The activity profiles of the different doses of guggulipid were found to vary with time. In CCI rats, guggulipid (100 and 50 mg/kg) significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the spontaneous pain, mechanical allodynia and mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia responses and the LD50 of guggulipid was 1600 mg/kg. In SNL rats, both doses of guggulipid were found to be ineffective in reversing the spontaneous pain but showing antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic activity. The results demonstrated that guggulipid produce antinociception in the peripheral nerve injury (CCI and SNL) models of neuropathic pain. The underlying mechanisms are expected to be modulating microglial activation occurring due to peripheral nerve injury.

  9. Effect of TRPV4-p38 MAPK Pathway on Neuropathic Pain in Rats with Chronic Compression of the Dorsal Root Ganglion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Juan Qu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships among TRPV4, p38, and neuropathic pain in a rat model of chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion. Mechanical allodynia appeared after CCD surgery, enhanced via the intrathecal injection of 4α-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (4α-PDD, an agonist of TRPV4 and anisomycin (an agonist of p38, but was suppressed by Ruthenium Red (RR, an inhibitor of TRPV4 and SB203580 (an inhibitor of p38. The protein expressions of p38 and P-p38 were upregulated by 4α-PDD and anisomycin injection but reduced by RR and SB203580. Moreover, TRPV4 was upregulated by 4α-PDD and SB203580 and downregulated by RR and anisomycin. In DRG tissues, the numbers of TRPV4- or p38-positive small neurons were significantly changed in CCD rats, increased by the agonists, and decreased by the inhibitors. The amplitudes of ectopic discharges were increased by 4α-PDD and anisomycin but decreased by RR and SB203580. Collectively, these results support the link between TRPV4 and p38 and their intermediary role for neuropathic pain in rats with chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion.

  10. Baicalin ameliorates neuropathic pain by suppressing HDAC1 expression in the spinal cord of spinal nerve ligation rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Hwan Cherng

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: The present findings suggest that baicalin can ameliorate neuropathic pain by suppressing HDAC1 expression and preventing histone-H3 acetylation in the spinal cord dorsal horn of SNL rats.

  11. Modulation of Invading and Resident Inflammatory Cell Activation as a Novel Way to Mitigate Spinal Cord Injury Associated Neuropathic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    the non-psychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) on spinal cord injury neuropathic pain (SCI-NP) and associated lnllammation. Changes in thermal and...saliva plant, cannabidiol (CBD), to attenuate neuropathic pain stemming from spinal cord injury (SCI-NP). Experiments are designed to use a mouse...thermal and mechanical sensitivity following spinal cord injury while also testing whether these positive effects are mediated In part through

  12. Mechanism of dorsal column stimulation to treat neuropathic but not nociceptive pain: analysis with a computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arle, Jeffrey E; Carlson, Kristen W; Mei, Longzhi; Iftimia, Nicolae; Shils, Jay L

    2014-10-01

    Stimulation of axons within the dorsal columns of the human spinal cord has become a widely used therapy to treat refractory neuropathic pain. The mechanisms have yet to be fully elucidated and may even be contrary to standard "gate control theory." Our hypothesis is that a computational model provides a plausible description of the mechanism by which dorsal column stimulation (DCS) inhibits wide dynamic range (WDR) cell output in a neuropathic model but not in a nociceptive pain model. We created a computational model of the human spinal cord involving approximately 360,000 individual neurons and dendritic processing of some 60 million synapses--the most elaborate dynamic computational model of the human spinal cord to date. Neuropathic and nociceptive "pain" signals were created by activating topographically isolated regions of excitatory interneurons and high-threshold nociceptive fiber inputs, driving analogous regions of WDR neurons. Dorsal column fiber activity was then added at clinically relevant levels (e.g., Aβ firing rate between 0 and 110 Hz by using a 210-μsec pulse width, 50-150 Hz frequency, at 1-3 V amplitude). Analysis of the nociceptive pain, neuropathic pain, and modulated circuits shows that, in contradiction to gate control theory, 1) nociceptive and neuropathic pain signaling must be distinct, and 2) DCS neuromodulation predominantly affects the neuropathic signal only, inhibiting centrally sensitized pathological neuron groups and ultimately the WDR pain transmission cells. We offer a different set of necessary premises than gate control theory to explain neuropathic pain inhibition and the relative lack of nociceptive pain inhibition by using retrograde DCS. Hypotheses regarding not only the pain relief mechanisms of DCS were made but also regarding the circuitry of pain itself, both nociceptive and neuropathic. These hypotheses and further use of the model may lead to novel stimulation paradigms. © 2014 International Neuromodulation

  13. Evaluation of Analgesic Effects of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Allium cepa L. in Animal Model of Neuropathic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Sanaz Mahdipour; Samaneh Teimouri; Omid Reza Tamtaji; Mojgan Mohammadifar; Mohsen Taghizadeh; Sayyed Alireza Talaei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Neuropathic pain is a chronic pain that affects on the patient’s quality of life. Use of herbal instead of synthetic drugs recently has been increased due to side effects of synthetic drugs and herbal effective components. Flavonoids are herbal compounds that have analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. Because Allium cepa L. has a great amount of flavonoids, this study has been designed to evaluate analgesic effects of alcoholic extract of Allium cepa L. on neuropath...

  14. Development and validation of Arabic version of the Neuropathic Pain Questionnaire-Short Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terkawi, Abdullah Sulieman; Backonja, Miroslav Misha; Abolkhair, Abdullah; Almaharbi, Sameeh; Joy, Jaya; Foula, Farida; Alswiti, Mousa; Terkawi, Yazzed Sulieman; Al-Zhahrani, Tariq; Alghamdi, Faris Saeed; Tsang, Siny

    2017-05-01

    The Neuropathic Pain Questionnaire-Short Form (NPQ-SF) is the shortest diagnostic tool for the assessment of neuropathic pain, designed with the goal to differentiate between neuropathic and nonneuropathic pain. The aim of this study was to translate, culturally adapt, and validate the NPQ-SF questionnaire in Arabic. A systematic translation process was used to translate the original English NPQ-SF into Arabic. After the pilot study, the Arabic version was validated among patients with chronic pain in two tertiary care centers. Reliability of the translated version was examined using internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). We examined the validity of the Arabic NPQ-SF via construct validity, concurrent validity (associations with the numeric pain scale, Brief Pain Inventory, and Self-completed Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs [S-LANSS]), face validity, and diagnostic validity. To investigate the responsiveness, the translated NPQ-SF questionnaire was administered twice among the same group of patients. A total of 142 subjects (68 men, 74 women) were included in the study. Cronbach's α were 0.45 (95% CI: 0.29, 0.61) and 0.48 (95% CI: 0.33, 0.63), and the ICC was 0.78 (95% CI: 0.72, 0.85). The NPQ-SF was moderately to strongly associated with the S-LANSS questionnaire. Results showed our Arabic NPQ-SF to have good diagnostic accuracy, with area under the curve of 0.76 (95% CI: 0.67, 0.84). Results from the receiver operating characteristic analysis identified a cut-off score of ≥0.52 as the best score to distinguish between patients with or without neuropathic pain, which was higher than the recommended cut-off score (≥0) in the original study. With both sensitivity and specificity of 71%. Most patients found the NPQ-SF questionnaire to be clear and easy to understand. Our translated version of NPQ-SF is reliable and valid for use, thus providing physicians a new tool with which to evaluate

  15. Analgesic effect of total flavonoids from Sanguis draxonis on spared nerve injury rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu-Feng; Huo, Fu-Quan; Xiong, Hui; Wan, Qing; Zheng, Ya-Nan; Du, Wen-Jie; Mei, Zhi-Nan

    2015-11-15

    Sanguis draxonis (SD) is a kind of red resin obtained from the wood of Dracaena cochinchinensis (Lour.) S. C. Chen (D. cochinchinensis). The active components of total flavonoids from SD (SDF) have analgesic effect. The aim of this study is to evaluate the analgesic effects and potential mechanism of SDF on mechanical hypersensitivity induced by spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain in the rat. SNI model in rats was established and then the rats were treated with SDF intragastric administration for 14 days. Paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PMWT) in response to mechanical stimulation was measured by von Frey filaments on day 1 before operation and days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 14 after operation, respectively. After 14 days, we measured the levels of nitric oxide (NO), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) in the spinal dorsal horn. In addition, the expression of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) of the spinal dorsal horn was evaluated by western blotting and an immunofluorescence histochemical method, respectively. Intragastric administration of SDF (100, 200, 400 mg/kg) alleviated significantly SNI-induced mechanical hypersensitivity, as PMWT increased in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, SDF not only reduced the level of NO, NOS, TNF-α and IL-1β, but also upregulated the level of IL-10 in the spinal dorsal horn of SNI rats. At the same time, SDF (100, 200, 400 mg/kg) could inhibit the expression of FGFR3, GFAP and p-CREB in the spinal dorsal horn. SDF has potentially reduced mechanical hypersensitivity induced by SNI model of neuropathic pain which may be attributed to inhibition of astrocytic function (like release pro-inflammatory cytokines) and NO release as well as p-CREB activation in the spinal dorsal horn. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All

  16. Controlling neuropathic pain by adeno-associated virus driven production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flotte Terence R

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite many decades of drug development, effective therapies for neuropathic pain remain elusive. The recent recognition of spinal cord glia and glial pro-inflammatory cytokines as important contributors to neuropathic pain suggests an alternative therapeutic strategy; that is, targeting glial activation or its downstream consequences. While several glial-selective drugs have been successful in controlling neuropathic pain in animal models, none are optimal for human use. Thus the aim of the present studies was to explore a novel approach for controlling neuropathic pain. Here, an adeno-associated viral (serotype II; AAV2 vector was created that encodes the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10 (IL-10. This anti-inflammatory cytokine is known to suppress the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Upon intrathecal administration, this novel AAV2-IL-10 vector was successful in transiently preventing and reversing neuropathic pain. Intrathecal administration of an AAV2 vector encoding beta-galactosidase revealed that AAV2 preferentially infects meningeal cells surrounding the CSF space. Taken together, these data provide initial support that intrathecal gene therapy to drive the production of IL-10 may prove to be an efficacious treatment for neuropathic pain.

  17. [Experience in treatment of patients with neuropathic facial pain using ziconotide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, E A; Rasche, D

    2011-08-01

    We report on the intrathecal use of ziconotide in three patients with idiopathic facial pain after surgery of the mouth, jaw or face and one patient with neuropathic pain after damage of the lingual nerve. The therapy was successful in three patients but one patient with idiopathic facial pain had pain relief only during the test phase of ziconotide with an external pump and not after implanting the Synchromed® pump. With intrathecal morphine therapy this patient achieved good pain relief. We recommend that patients with neuropathic facial pain should be treated with ziconotide after implementation of guideline-based therapy. In the test phase the ziconotide dose should be increased by 0.6 µg/day per week after an initial dose of 0.6-1.2 µg/day to avoid side-effects.

  18. Lowering barometric pressure aggravates mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, J; Morimae, H; Seino, Y; Kobayashi, T; Suzuki, N; Mizumura, K

    1999-04-30

    To examine the effects of meteorological change on the pain-related behaviors of neuropathic rats, animals with a chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve were exposed to low barometric pressure (LP), 20 mmHg below the natural atmospheric pressure in a climate-controlled room. CCI caused a decreased hindpaw withdrawal threshold to von Frey hair (VFH) stimulation (mechanical allodynia) and prolonged duration of hindpaw withdrawal in response to pinprick stimulation (mechanical hyperalgesia). When the CCI rats were exposed to LP, both these pain-related behaviors were aggravated, whereas no change was seen in a group of controls. In the CCI rats sympathectomy inhibited this LP-induced augmentation of pain-related behaviors. These results show that LP intensifies the abnormalities in the pain-related behaviors of neuropathic rats, and that sympathetic activity contributes to the LP effect.

  19. Neuroimmune-Driven Neuropathic Pain Establishment: A Focus on Gender Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Coraggio

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of neuroinflammatory cells in the establishment of neuropathic pain has been investigated in depth in the last few years. In particular, microglia have been shown to be key players in the induction of tactile allodynia, as they release proinflammatory molecules that, in turn, sensitize nociceptive neurons within the spinal cord. However, the role of peripheral immune cells such as macrophages, infiltrating monocytes, mast cells, and T-cells has been highlighted in the last few studies, even though the data are still conflicting and need to be clarified. Intriguingly, the central (microglia and peripheral (T-cell-adaptive immune cells that orchestrate maladaptive process-driven neuropathic pain seem to be involved in a gender-dependent manner. In this review, we highlight the role of the microglia and peripheral immune cells in chronic degenerative disease associated with neuro-immune-inflammatory processes.

  20. Chronic neuropathic facial pain after intense pulsed light hair removal. Clinical features and pharmacological management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay-Escoda, Cosme; Párraga-Manzol, Gabriela; Sánchez-Torres, Alba; Moreno-Arias, Gerardo

    2015-10-01

    Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) photodepilation is usually performed as a hair removal method. The treatment is recommended to be indicated by a physician, depending on each patient and on its characteristics. However, the use of laser devices by medical laypersons is frequent and it can suppose a risk of damage for the patients. Most side effects associated to IPL photodepilation are transient, minimal and disappear without sequelae. However, permanent side effects can occur. Some of the complications are laser related but many of them are caused by an operator error or mismanagement. In this work, we report a clinical case of a patient that developed a chronic neuropathic facial pain following IPL hair removal for unwanted hair in the upper lip. The specific diagnosis was painful post-traumatic trigeminal neuropathy, reference 13.1.2.3 according to the International Headache Society (IHS). Neuropathic facial pain, photodepilation, intense pulse light.

  1. Adherence of French GPs to Chronic Neuropathic Pain Clinical Guidelines: Results of a Cross-Sectional, Randomized, “e” Case-Vignette Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Valéria Martinez; Nadine Attal; Bertrand Vanzo; Eric Vicaut; Jean Michel Gautier; Didier Bouhassira; Michel Lantéri-Minet

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The French Pain Society published guidelines for neuropathic pain management in 2010. Our aim was to evaluate the compliance of GPs with these guidelines three years later. METHODS: We used "e" case vignette methodology for this non interventional study. A national panel of randomly selected GPs was included. We used eight "e" case-vignettes relating to chronic pain, differing in terms of the type of pain (neuropathic/non neuropathic), etiology (cancer, postoperative pain...

  2. Improvement of spinal non-viral IL-10 gene delivery by D-mannose as a transgene adjuvant to control chronic neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengler, Ellen C; Alberti, Lauren A; Bowman, Brandi N; Kerwin, Audra A; Wilkerson, Jenny L; Moezzi, Daniel R; Limanovich, Eugene; Wallace, James A; Milligan, Erin D

    2014-05-21

    Peri-spinal subarachnoid (intrathecal; i.t.) injection of non-viral naked plasmid DNA encoding the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10 (pDNA-IL-10) suppresses chronic neuropathic pain in animal models. However, two sequential i.t. pDNA injections are required within a discrete 5 to 72-hour period for prolonged efficacy. Previous reports identified phagocytic immune cells present in the peri-spinal milieu surrounding the i.t injection site that may play a role in transgene uptake resulting in subsequent IL-10 transgene expression. In the present study, we aimed to examine whether factors known to induce pro-phagocytic anti-inflammatory properties of immune cells improve i.t. IL-10 transgene uptake using reduced naked pDNA-IL-10 doses previously determined ineffective. Both the synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, and the hexose sugar, D-mannose, were factors examined that could optimize i.t. pDNA-IL-10 uptake leading to enduring suppression of neuropathic pain as assessed by light touch sensitivity of the rat hindpaw (allodynia). Compared to dexamethasone, i.t. mannose pretreatment significantly and dose-dependently prolonged pDNA-IL-10 pain suppressive effects, reduced spinal IL-1β and enhanced spinal and dorsal root ganglia IL-10 immunoreactivity. Macrophages exposed to D-mannose revealed reduced proinflammatory TNF-α, IL-1β, and nitric oxide, and increased IL-10 protein release, while IL-4 revealed no improvement in transgene uptake. Separately, D-mannose dramatically increased pDNA-derived IL-10 protein release in culture supernatants. Lastly, a single i.t. co-injection of mannose with a 25-fold lower pDNA-IL-10 dose produced prolonged pain suppression in neuropathic rats. Peri-spinal treatment with D-mannose may optimize naked pDNA-IL-10 transgene uptake for suppression of allodynia, and is a novel approach to tune spinal immune cells toward pro-phagocytic phenotype for improved non-viral gene therapy.

  3. Metabolite Concentrations in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex Predict High Neuropathic Pain Impact After Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    1Present address: Department of Community Dentistry and Behavioral Science, College of Dentistry , University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. None...Dysfunctional, which shows more neuropathic pain symptoms , including frequent exacerbation of pain, electric quality of the pain, and continuous pain, than the...of the pain experience, and to activation within areas of the ACC [39]. (2) Beck Depression Inventory (BDI): The BDI [7] assesses symptoms associated

  4. Does hemiplegic shoulder pain share clinical and sensory characteristics with central neuropathic pain? A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilig, Gabi; Rivel, Michal; Doron, Dana; Defrin, Ruth

    2016-10-01

    Hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) is a common poststroke complication and is considered to be a chronic pain syndrome. It is negatively correlated with the functional recovery of the affected arm and the quality of life of the individual. It also leads to a longer length of stay in rehabilitation. Today, there is no consensus as to the underlying mechanism causing HSP, making the syndrome difficult to treat. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical and sensory profile of individuals with HSP to that of individuals with established central neuropathic pain (CNP) in order to identify common features and the presence of neuropathic components in HSP. Cross sectional controlled study. Outpatient rehabilitation clinics. Sixteen chronic HSP patients and 18 chronic CNP patients with spinal cord injury (SCI-CNP). The chronic pain characteristics, thresholds of thermal and tactile sensations and presence of pathological sensations were compared between groups, and between painful and pain free body regions within groups. Correlations were calculated between HSP intensity and sensory and musculoskeletal characteristics. Patients with HSP and patients with SCI-CNP had similar decrease of thermal sensibility in the painful compared to intact body regions and both groups presented similar rates of pathological sensations in painful regions. HSP and SCI-CNP differed however, in the quality of pain and aggravating factors. Significant correlations were found between HSP intensity and heat-pain threshold, presence of subluxation and spasticity. The similarities between HSP and SCI-CNP and the altered spinothalamic function and sensitization suggest that HSP has neuropathic components in its mechanism. Nevertheless, the unique features of HSP point towards additional possible mechanisms. The use of specific therapy options for neuropathic pain should be considered when treating patients with HSP.

  5. The efficacy of nerve growth factor antibody in a mouse model of neuropathic cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, Masayuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Inoue, Gen; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Uchida, Kentaro; Suzuki, Takane; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Takaso, Masashi; Ohtori, Seiji

    2016-11-01

    Neuropathic cancer pain is caused by tumors compressing the spinal nerve roots and is usually difficult to treat. The aim of current study was to determine the influence of NGF antibody on pain-related markers and behavior in a mouse model of neuropathic cancer pain. Twenty mice were used to model neuropathic cancer pain by applying murine sarcoma cells to their left sciatic nerve. Ten mice were sham operated. Two weeks after surgery, the murine sarcoma-affected mice were allocated randomly into treatment groups receiving either sterile saline (saline group) or an anti-nerve growth factor antibody (anti-NGF group). Three weeks after surgery (a week after treatment), the pain-related behavior of mice was evaluated using a CatWalk system. Subsequently, bilateral dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) from the L4-L6 levels and spinal cords at L4-L6 levels were resected. DRGs were immunostained for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and activating transcription factor 3 (ATF-3), and spinal cords were immunostained for ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule-1 (iba-1). Mechanical allodynia was observed in mice from the saline group and was improved in mice from the anti-NGF group. CGRP and ATF-3-immunoreactivity in DRGs and microglia expression in the spinal dorsal horn were upregulated in the saline group compared with the sham group, and they were suppressed in the anti-NGF group compared with the saline group (P<0.05). These findings suggest that anti-NGF therapy might be valuable for treating neuropathic cancer pain.

  6. Synaptic Conversion of Chloride-Dependent Synapses in Spinal Nociceptive Circuits: Roles in Neuropathic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Mark S; Przebinda, Adam S.

    2011-01-01

    Electrophysiological conversion of chloride-dependent synapses from inhibitory to excitatory function, as a result of aberrant neuronal chloride homeostasis, is a known mechanism for the genesis of neuropathic pain. This paper examines theoretically how this type of synaptic conversion can disrupt circuit logic in spinal nociceptive circuits. First, a mathematical scaling factor is developed to represent local aberration in chloride electrochemical driving potential. Using this mathematical ...

  7. Non-invasive Brain Stimulation, a Tool to Revert Maladaptive Plasticity in Neuropathic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Naro, Antonino; Milardi, Demetrio; Russo, Margherita; Terranova, Carmen; Rizzo, Vincenzo; Cacciola, Alberto; Marino, Silvia; Calabro, Rocco S.; Quartarone, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Neuromodulatory effects of non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) have been extensively studied in chronic pain. A hypothetic mechanism of action would be to prevent or revert the ongoing maladaptive plasticity within the pain matrix. In this review, the authors discuss the mechanisms underlying the development of maladaptive plasticity in patients with chronic pain and the putative mechanisms of NIBS in modulating synaptic plasticity in neuropathic pain conditions.

  8. Non-invasive Brain Stimulation, a Tool to Revert Maladaptive Plasticity in Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naro, Antonino; Milardi, Demetrio; Russo, Margherita; Terranova, Carmen; Rizzo, Vincenzo; Cacciola, Alberto; Marino, Silvia; Calabro, Rocco S; Quartarone, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Neuromodulatory effects of non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) have been extensively studied in chronic pain. A hypothetic mechanism of action would be to prevent or revert the ongoing maladaptive plasticity within the pain matrix. In this review, the authors discuss the mechanisms underlying the development of maladaptive plasticity in patients with chronic pain and the putative mechanisms of NIBS in modulating synaptic plasticity in neuropathic pain conditions.

  9. Changes of voltage-gated sodium channels in sensory nerve regeneration and neuropathic pain models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casals-Díaz, Laura; Casas, Caty; Navarro, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine changes in the expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) α-subunits after nerve injury and their relation with development of neuropathic pain. We used the crush injury model of regeneration of the sciatic nerve (Crush) and the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain in the rat. Measurements of thermal and mechanical pain thresholds were performed until 3 months after injury. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry of VGSC α-subunits were used to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression in the DRG. Both nerve injuries induced similar alterations in the VGSCs expression at 7 dpi, with upregulation of Nav1.3, and downregulation of Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9. These changes persisted until 28 days, when hyperalgesia was still present in SNI but not in Crush rats. At 90 days, mRNA expression of all analyzed α-subunits returned to basal levels in the Crush group. However, SNI rats still showed altered expression of VGSCs, and neuropathic pain responses. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 were widely expressed in IB4-positive neurons of the DRG, relevant in pain processing. The population of neurons coexpressing each α-subunit and IB4 was also affected by the injury, more markedly after the Crush. Shifts in VGSCs expression occur in parallel to neuropathic pain behavior in rats early after injury, while at later times they appear to be more related to sensory nerve degeneration and regeneration processes.

  10. Nitrous Oxide Persistently Alleviates Pain Hypersensitivity in Neuropathic Rats: A Dose-Dependent Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meric Ben Boujema

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite numerous pharmacological approaches, there are no common analgesic drugs that produce meaningful relief for the majority of patients with neuropathic pain. Although nitrous oxide (N2O is a weak analgesic that acts via opioid-dependent mechanisms, it is also an antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR. The NMDAR plays a critical role in the development of pain sensitization induced by nerve injury.

  11. Plasticity of the pain control system induced by neuropathic pain : the amygdala-medulla system

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Leonor

    2009-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Ciências da Saúde (ramo de conhecimento em Ciências Biológicas e Biomédicas) Pain is a multidimensional experience with sensory-discriminative and motivational-affective dimensions. Neuropathic pain is caused by a primary lesion or dysfunction of the nervous tissue that leads to an anomalous nociceptive processing in pain centers. It results from a process of peripheral and central sensitization and is characterized by prolonged hyperalgesia, allodynia and ...

  12. A preconditioning nerve lesion inhibits mechanical pain hypersensitivity following subsequent neuropathic injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Ann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A preconditioning stimulus can trigger a neuroprotective phenotype in the nervous system - a preconditioning nerve lesion causes a significant increase in axonal regeneration, and cerebral preconditioning protects against subsequent ischemia. We hypothesized that a preconditioning nerve lesion induces gene/protein modifications, neuronal changes, and immune activation that may affect pain sensation following subsequent nerve injury. We examined whether a preconditioning lesion affects neuropathic pain and neuroinflammation after peripheral nerve injury. Results We found that a preconditioning crush injury to a terminal branch of the sciatic nerve seven days before partial ligation of the sciatic nerve (PSNL; a model of neuropathic pain induced a significant attenuation of pain hypersensitivity, particularly mechanical allodynia. A preconditioning lesion of the tibial nerve induced a long-term significant increase in paw-withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimuli and paw-withdrawal latency to thermal stimuli, after PSNL. A preconditioning lesion of the common peroneal induced a smaller but significant short-term increase in paw-withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimuli, after PSNL. There was no difference between preconditioned and unconditioned animals in neuronal damage and macrophage and T-cell infiltration into the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs or in astrocyte and microglia activation in the spinal dorsal and ventral horns. Conclusions These results suggest that prior exposure to a mild nerve lesion protects against adverse effects of subsequent neuropathic injury, and that this conditioning-induced inhibition of pain hypersensitivity is not dependent on neuroinflammation in DRGs and spinal cord. Identifying the underlying mechanisms may have important implications for the understanding of neuropathic pain due to nerve injury.

  13. Intermittent fasting alleviates the neuropathic phenotype in a mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madorsky, Irina; Opalach, Katherine; Waber, Amanda; Verrier, Jonathan D.; Solmo, Chelsea; Foster, Thomas; Dunn, William A; Notterpek, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) neuropathies linked to the misexpression of peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) are progressive demyelinating disorders of the peripheral nervous system. In this study we asked whether dietary restriction by intermittent fasting (IF) could alleviate the neuropathic phenotype in the Trembler J (TrJ) mouse model of CMT1A. Our results show that neuropathic mice kept on a five month long IF regimen had improved locomotor performance compared to ad libitum (AL) fed littermates. The functional benefits of this dietary intervention are associated with an increased expression of myelin proteins combined with a thicker myelin sheath, less redundant basal lamina, and a reduction in aberrant Schwann cell proliferation. These morphological improvements are accompanied by a decrease in PMP22 protein aggregates, and enhanced expression of cytosolic chaperones and constituents of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. These results indicate that dietary restriction is beneficial for peripheral nerve function in TrJ neuropathic mice, as it promotes the maintenance of locomotor performance. PMID:19320048

  14. Psychological defensive profile of sciatica patients with neuropathic pain and its relationship to quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutoglu, A; Boyaci, A; Karababa, I F; Koca, I; Kaya, E; Kucuk, A; Yetisgin, A

    2015-09-01

    To identify differences between defense styles and mechanisms in sciatica patients with or without neuropathic pain and their relationship to quality of life. The study included 37 sciatica patients with neuropathic pain (SNP), 36 sciatica patients without neuropathic pain and 38 healthy subjects. Pain severity was measured using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Psychological condition was assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Defense mechanisms were assessed using a 40-item Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ-40) and quality of life was assessed using Short Form-36 (SF-36). BDI and BAI scores were significantly higher in the SNP group (p < 0.001). Idealization and immature defense styles, as well as isolation, displacement and somatization were significantly higher in the SNP group (p < 0.05). SF-36 parameters also differed significantly between the groups, with controls having the best scores and the SNP group the worst. In linear regression analysis, acting out and BDI were found to affect the pain domain of the SF-36 (p < 0.001). The acting out defensive style and BDI were independently associated with pain-related quality of life. In the SNP group, significant differences were found in the immature and neurotic styles of the defense mechanisms.

  15. The prediction of diabetic neuropathic plantar foot ulceration by liquid-crystal contact thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbow, S J; Chan, A W; Bowsher, D R; Williams, G; Macfarlane, I A

    1994-08-01

    To assess whether the development of plantar foot ulceration could be predicted from the mean plantar foot temperature (MFT), as assessed by liquid-crystal contact thermography (LCT), in patients with peripheral neuropathy. Fifty patients with painful diabetic sensorimotor neuropathy were studied prospectively. Initially, 30 patients had no significant peripheral vascular disease (PVD) (ankle:brachial systolic blood pressure ratio > 1.0). LCT was used to assess the MFT from eight standard plantar sites. Initial MFT was higher in the patients without PVD (28.2 +/- 2.9 degrees C, mean +/- SD) than in patients with PVD (25.6 +/- 1.9 degrees C, P foot ulcers. The initial MFT was significantly higher in these seven feet (30.5 +/- 2.6 degrees C) than in the 38 feet of the 19 survivors in this group (27.8 +/- 2.3 degrees C, P foot surgery for ischemic feet. LCT is a simple, inexpensive, and noninvasive method of identifying the neuropathic foot at increased risk of ulceration. Patients with high plantar foot temperatures are at increased risk of neuropathic foot ulceration. A normal or low MFT in the neuropathic foot is a marker of PVD, which confers an increased risk of ischemic foot disease.

  16. Orofacial neuropathic pain mouse model induced by Trigeminal Inflammatory Compression (TIC of the infraorbital nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Fei

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trigeminal neuropathic pain attacks can be excruciating for patients, even after being lightly touched. Although there are rodent trigeminal nerve research models to study orofacial pain, few models have been applied to studies in mice. A mouse trigeminal inflammatory compression (TIC model is introduced here which successfully and reliably promotes vibrissal whisker pad hypersensitivity. Results The chronic orofacial neuropathic pain model is induced after surgical placement of chromic gut suture in the infraorbital nerve fissure in the maxillary bone. Slight compression and chemical effects of the chromic gut suture on the portion of the infraorbital nerve contacted cause mild nerve trauma. Nerve edema is observed in the contacting infraorbital nerve bundle as well as macrophage infiltration in the trigeminal ganglia. Centrally in the spinal trigeminal nucleus, increased immunoreactivity for an activated microglial marker is evident (OX42, postoperative day 70. Mechanical thresholds of the affected whisker pad are significantly decreased on day 3 after chromic gut suture placement, persisting at least 10 weeks. The mechanical allodynia is reversed by suppression of microglial activation. Cold allodynia was detected at 4 weeks. Conclusions A simple, effective, and reproducible chronic mouse model mimicking clinical orofacial neuropathic pain (Type 2 is induced by placing chromic gut suture between the infraorbital nerve and the maxillary bone. The method produces mild inflammatory compression with significant continuous mechanical allodynia persisting at least 10 weeks and cold allodynia measureable at 4 weeks.

  17. Incidence of neuropathic pain after cooled radiofrequency ablation of sacral lateral branch nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, David; Gordin, Vitaly; Vorobeychik, Yakov

    2014-11-01

    To determine the incidence of neuropathic pain after cooled radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the sacral lateral branches for the treatment of chronic posterior sacroiliac joint complex pain. Retrospective chart review of all patients with chronic posterior sacroiliac joint complex pain who underwent cooled RFA of the sacral lateral branches in our practice between July 2011 and February 2014. Single academic pain practice at a tertiary care medical center. Thirty-six patients with chronic posterior sacroiliac joint complex pain. All charts were reviewed to determine the procedure date, unilateral or bilateral, number of levels treated, and number of individual lesions. Side effects were assessed for their presence or absence, character, intensity, duration, and whether treatment was initiated or symptoms resolved spontaneously. Forty-eight separate procedures were performed, with a total of 193 levels and 430 lesions. Three patients had transient postprocedure neuropathic pain yielding a 0.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]± 0.4%) rate of this complication per lesion. This proportion increases to 6.2% (95% CI ± 3.5%) per procedure and to 9.4% (95% CI ± 5.2%) per patient. The incidence of postprocedural neuropathic pain after cooled RFA for posterior sacroiliac joint complex denervation is low and in a similar range to that in the lumbar spine. We consider this procedure safe to be utilized by pain medicine practitioners. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Treatment of chronic intractable neuropathic pain with dronabinol: case report of two adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudich, Zvia; Stinson, Jennifer; Jeavons, Michael; Brown, Stephen C

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of dronabinol for the treatment of neuropathic pain refractory to previous treatment. We studied the response (reduction of pain intensity and functional improvement) to dronabinol (5 mg/day to 25 mg/day) in two adolescents with neuropathic pain and depression refractory to previous treatments over two and five years, respectively. Reduction in pain intensity (45%) was achieved in patient 2 and was unchanged in patient 1. Functional improvement was markedly increased in terms of academic performance, mood and sleep in both patients over four to five months, without major adverse effects. While these improvements dissipated over time, the patients were more reconnected with rehabilitation and focused less on the intrusiveness of their pain problem in their every day lives. Dronabinol appeared to be effective in improving pain affect and psychosocial functioning in the treatment of refractory neuropathic pain and may be considered as an adjuvant medication in the rehabilitation process. Well-controlled placebo studies are required for further evaluation.

  19. Bone Mineral Density During Total Contact Cast Immobilization for a Patient With Neuropathic (Charcot) Arthropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Mary K; Sinacore, David R; Fielder, Faye A; Johnson, Jeffrey E

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Diabetes mellitus (DM)-related neuropathic arthropathy of the foot is a destructive bone and joint process. The effect of cast immobilization and non–weight bearing on bone loss has not been well studied. The purpose of this case report is to describe the changes in bone mineral density (BMD) of the calcaneus in the feet of a patient with acute neuropathic arthropathy during total contact cast immobilization. Case Description The patient was a 34-year-old woman with type 1 DM, renal failure requiring dialysis, and a 7-week duration of neuropathic arthropathy of the midfoot. Intervention included total contact casting and minimal to no weight bearing for 10 weeks, with transition to therapeutic footwear. Ultrasound-derived estimates of BMD were taken of both involved and uninvolved calcanei. Outcome Bone mineral density decreased for the involved foot (from 0.25 g/cm2 to 0.20 g/cm2) and increased for the uninvolved foot (from 0.27 g/cm2 to 0.31 g/cm2) during casting. Discussion The low initial BMD and further loss during casting suggest the need for transitional bracing and a well-monitored return to full activity to minimize the risk of recurrence and progression of foot deformity. PMID:15733049

  20. Ameliorative potential of Ocimum sanctum in chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GURPREET KAUR

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate the ameliorative potential of Ocimumsanctum and its saponin rich fraction in chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats. The chronic constriction injury was induced by placing four loose ligatures around the sciatic nerve, proximal to its trifurcation. The mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, paw heat hyperalgesia and cold tail hyperalgesia were assessed by performing the pinprick, acetone, hot plate and cold tail immersion tests, respectively. Biochemically, the tissue thio-barbituric acid reactive species, super-oxide anion content (markers of oxidative stress and total calcium levels were measured. Chronic constriction injury was associated with the development of mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, heat and cold hyperalgesia along with an increase in oxidative stress and calcium levels. However, administration of Ocimumsanctum (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o. and its saponin rich fraction (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o. for 14 days significantly attenuated chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain as well as decrease the oxidative stress and calcium levels. It may be concluded that saponin rich fraction of Ocimum sanctum has ameliorative potential in attenuating painful neuropathic state, which may be attributed to a decrease in oxidative stress and calcium levels.

  1. Regional migratory osteoporosis: case report of a patient with neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartal, Esin; Sahin, Ebru; Dilek, Banu; Baydar, Meltem; Manisali, Metin; Kosay, Can; Gulbahar, Selmin

    2011-10-01

    Regional migratory osteoporosis (RMO) is an idiopathic disorder characterized by severe periarticular pain, transient and migratory arthralgia, and osteoporosis. Osteoporosis in this disease may appear in the form of local regional osteoporosis and bone marrow edema or generalized osteoporosis. It occurs most commonly in middle-aged men and late second or third trimester pregnant women. The laboratory findings of the disease are usually normal and do not demonstrate apparent anomalies. The presence of bone marrow edema on MRI is its characteristic finding. RMO can only be separated from transient osteoporosis of hip and avascular necrosis with migration to other joints. Clinically, RMO progresses in three stages: increasing pain and disability, radiological findings (osteopenia), maximalization of symptoms, and finally, the regression of the disease and radiological changes. In this case report, we present a 29-year-old woman whose symptoms had first appeared at the second trimester of pregnancy and migrated both to the other joints in the proximo-distal direction and to the adjacent bones within the same joint. She also had symptoms such as hyperalgesia, hyperesthesia and hypertrichosis along with neuropathic pain, which she described as a burning, biting, and prickling type of pain at the right leg. The neuropathic pain of the patient was resistant to medical treatment. We believe that this case was worth reporting because of the obstinate clinical course of the patient's disease and her severe neuropathic pain that was resistant to treatment.

  2. Proinsulin-expressing dendritic cells in type 2 neuropathic diabetic patients with and without foot lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambataro, Maria; Sambado, Luisa; Trevisiol, Enrica; Cacciatore, Matilde; Furlan, Anna; Stefani, Piero Maria; Seganfreddo, Elena; Durante, Elisabetta; Conte, Stefania; Della Bella, Silvia; Paccagnella, Agostino; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo

    2018-02-12

    Diabetic neuropathy is the most common complication of diabetes and is frequently associated with foot ischemia and infection, but its pathogenesis is controversial. We hypothesized that proinsulin expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is a process relevant to this condition and could represent a link among hyperglycemia, nerve susceptibility, and diabetic foot lesions. We assessed proinsulin expression by using flow cytometry in dendritic cells from control participants and patients with type 2 diabetic with or without peripheral neuropathy or accompanied by diabetic foot. Among 32 non-neuropathic and 120 neuropathic patients with type 2 diabetic, we performed leg electromyography and found average sensory sural nerve conduction velocities of 48 ± 4 and 30 ± 4 m/s, respectively ( P diabetic population, but not in nondiabetic participants, a progressively increasing level of peripheral blood dendritic cell proinsulin expression was detected, which directly correlated with circulating TNF-α levels ( P diabetes, proinsulin-expressing blood cells, possibly via their involvement in innate immunity, may play a role in diabetic peripheral neuropathy and foot lesions.-Sambataro, M., Sambado, L., Trevisiol, E., Cacciatore, M., Furlan, A., Stefani, P. M., Seganfreddo, E., Durante, E., Conte, S., Della Bella, S., Paccagnella, A., dei Tos, A. P. Proinsulin-expressing dendritic cells in type 2 neuropathic diabetic patients with and without foot lesions.

  3. [Anxiety and depression in patients with chronic pain: neuropathic and nociceptive].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Vigil, Tania; Alfaro-Ramírez del Castillo, Olga Isabel; Sánchez-Román, Sofía; Guevara-López, Uriah; Vázquez-Pineda, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    To describe and compare anxiety and depression symptoms between two group patients with neuropathic and nociceptive pain those arrive for first time to a clinic of pain. Non-experimental, exploratory and descriptive design. Seventy-eight patients that arrive the first time to a clinic of pain were evaluated; those patients were divided in two groups: neuropathic pain with 44 patients and nociceptive pain with 34 patients. To evaluate anxiety and depression we use the Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD), this scale is adapted and validated in Mexico. From the 78 patients in the study, the 76.9% were female and 23.1% were male. The age average was (56.9 +/- 16.8 year-old for neuropathic pain and 63.1 +/- 17.2 year-old for nociceptive pain). The reliability of the scale HAD was evaluated by the Chronbach's alpha analysis with an r = 0.826. There was no significance difference in anxiety and depression between types of pain, but after analyzing all of the patients we found that anxiety was more frequent than depression p < 0.0001. Independently of the algological diagnosis, patients presented almost the same affective symptoms.

  4. Targeting the Microglial Signaling Pathways: New Insights in the Modulation of Neuropathic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popiolek-Barczyk, Katarzyna; Mika, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The microglia, once thought only to be supporting cells of the central nervous system (CNS), are now recognized to play essential roles in many pathologies. Many studies within the last decades indicated that the neuro-immune interaction underlies the generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Through a large number of receptors and signaling pathways, the microglial cells communicate with neurons, astrocytes and other cells, including those of the immune system. A disturbance or loss of CNS homeostasis causes rapid responses of the microglia, which undergo a multistage activation process. The activated microglia change their cell shapes and gene expression profiles, which induce proliferation, migration, and the production of pro- or antinociceptive factors. The cells release a large number of mediators that can act in a manner detrimental or beneficial to the surrounding cells and can indirectly alter the nociceptive signals. This review discusses the most important microglial intracellular signaling cascades (MAPKs, NF-κB, JAK/STAT, PI3K/Akt) that are essential for neuropathic pain development and maintenance. Our objective was to identify new molecular targets that may result in the development of powerful tools to control the signaling associated with neuropathic pain. PMID:27281131

  5. Intermittent fasting alleviates the neuropathic phenotype in a mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madorsky, Irina; Opalach, Katherine; Waber, Amanda; Verrier, Jonathan D; Solmo, Chelsea; Foster, Thomas; Dunn, William A; Notterpek, Lucia

    2009-04-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) neuropathies linked to the misexpression of peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) are progressive demyelinating disorders of the peripheral nervous system. In this study we asked whether dietary restriction by intermittent fasting (IF) could alleviate the neuropathic phenotype in the Trembler J (TrJ) mouse model of CMT1A. Our results show that neuropathic mice kept on a five month long IF regimen had improved locomotor performance compared to ad libitum (AL) fed littermates. The functional benefits of this dietary intervention are associated with an increased expression of myelin proteins combined with a thicker myelin sheath, less redundant basal lamina, and a reduction in aberrant Schwann cell proliferation. These morphological improvements are accompanied by a decrease in PMP22 protein aggregates, and enhanced expression of cytosolic chaperones and constituents of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. These results indicate that dietary restriction is beneficial for peripheral nerve function in TrJ neuropathic mice, as it promotes the maintenance of locomotor performance.

  6. Synaptic Conversion of Chloride-Dependent Synapses in Spinal Nociceptive Circuits: Roles in Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Cooper

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrophysiological conversion of chloride-dependent synapses from inhibitory to excitatory function, as a result of aberrant neuronal chloride homeostasis, is a known mechanism for the genesis of neuropathic pain. This paper examines theoretically how this type of synaptic conversion can disrupt circuit logic in spinal nociceptive circuits. First, a mathematical scaling factor is developed to represent local aberration in chloride electrochemical driving potential. Using this mathematical scaling factor, electrophysiological symbols are developed to represent the magnitude of synaptic conversion within nociceptive circuits. When inserted into a nociceptive circuit diagram, these symbols assist in understanding the generation of neuropathic pain associated with the collapse of transmembrane chloride gradients. A more generalized scaling factor is also derived to represent the interplay of chloride and bicarbonate driving potentials on the function of GABAergic and glycinergic synapses. These mathematical and symbolic representations of synaptic conversion help illustrate the critical role that anion driving potentials play in the transduction of pain. Using these representations, we discuss ramifications of glial-mediated synaptic conversion in the genesis, and treatment, of neuropathic pain.

  7. Agreement Between the Douleur Neuropathique in 4 Questions and Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs Questionnaires to Classify Neuropathic Pain Among Patients with Leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Jamilly C V; Santos, Victor S; Gurgel, Ricardo Q; Santana, Julianne C V; Reis, Francisco P; Cuevas, Luis E; Feitosa, Vera L C

    2016-10-05

    Neuropathic pain (NP) often occurs during the course of leprosy, and screening tools to differentiate NP from non-NP are often used. However, their performance varies in different settings. The most frequently used scales are the Douleur Neuropathique in 4 questions (DN4) and the Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs (LANSS) questionnaires. Thus, we conducted a study to evaluate the agreement between DN4 and LANSS questionnaires to classify NP in 195 leprosy patients attending two reference centers in Sergipe, Brazil. The DN4 and LANSS classified 166 and 110 patients, respectively, as having NP. One hundred and seven (54.8%) were classified as NP by both questionnaires; 59 (30.2%) solely by the DN4 questionnaire and three (1.5%) solely by the LANSS. The agreement of the questionnaires was 66.2% (weak agreement, Kappa = 0.30). Although both questionnaires identified a high proportion of NP, the development of more robust instruments is necessary to ensure the accuracy of diagnosis of leprosy patients classified as having NP. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  8. Gluten-Free Sources of Fermentable Extract: Effect of Temperature and Germination Time on Quality Attributes of Teff [Eragrostis tef (zucc.) Trotter] Malt and Wort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ghionno, Lidia; Marconi, Ombretta; Lee, Eung Gwan; Rice, Christopher J; Sileoni, Valeria; Perretti, Giuseppe

    2017-06-14

    This study was conducted to evaluate the behavior of a white teff variety called Witkop during malting by using different parameters (germination temperature and duration) and to identify the best malting program. Samples were evaluated for standard quality malt and wort attributes, pasting characteristics, β-glucan and arabinoxylan content, and sugar profile. It was concluded that malting teff at 24 °C for 6 days produced acceptable malt in terms of quality attributes and sugar profile for brewing. The main attributes were 80.4% extract, 80.9% fermentability, 1.53 mPa s viscosity, 7.4 EBC-U color, 129 mg/L FAN, and 72.1 g/L of total fermentable sugars. Statistical analysis showed that pasting characteristics of teff malt were negatively correlated with some malt quality attributes, such as extract and fermentability. Witkop teff appeared to be a promising raw material for malting and brewing. However, the small grain size may lead to difficulties in handling malting process, and a bespoke brewhouse plant should be developed for the production at industrial scale.

  9. Evaluation of the cytotoxicity, mutagenicity and antimutagenicity of a natural antidepressant, Hypericum perforatum L. (St. John's wort), on vegetal and animal test systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peron, Ana Paula; Mariucci, Rosinete Gonçalves; de Almeida, Igor Vivian; Düsman, Elisângela; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio; Vicentini, Veronica Elisa Pimenta

    2013-05-06

    St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum L.) is an herbaceous plant that is native to Europe, West Asia and North Africa and that is recognized and used worldwide for the treatment of mild and moderate depression. It also has been shown to be therapeutic for the treatment of burns, bruises and swelling and can be used for its wound healing, antiviral, antimicrobial, antioxidant, analgesic, hepato-protective and anxiolytic properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential cytotoxic, mutagenic and antimutagenic action of H. Perforatum. Meristematic cells were used as the test system for Allium cepa L., and bone marrow cells from Rattus norvegicus, ex vivo, were used to calculate the mitotic index and the percentage of chromosomal aberration. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test. This medicinal plant had no cytotoxic potential in the vegetal test system evaluated. In the animal test system, none of the acute treatments, including intraperitoneal gavage and subchronic gavage, were cytotoxic or mutagenic. Moreover, this plant presented antimutagenic activity against the clastogenic action of cyclophosphamide, as confirmed in pre-treatment (76% reduction in damage), simultaneous treatment (95%) and post-treatment (97%). Thus, the results of this study suggest that the administration of H. perforatum, especially by gavage similar to oral consumption used by humans, is safe and with beneficial antimutagenic potential.

  10. Impact of Origin and Biological Source on Chemical Composition, Anticholinesterase and Antioxidant Properties of Some St. John’s Wort Species (Hypericum spp., Hypericaceae from the Central Balkans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Božin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The study shows the influence of the origin of plant material and biological source on the in vitro antioxidant (neutralization of DPPH and OH radical, nitric oxide, and inhibition of lipid peroxidation and anticholinesterase activity of chemically characterized and quantified ethanol extracts of ten St. John’s wort samples. The investigated samples were: five Hypericum perforatum species representatives collected at different localities, one commercial sample of Hyperici herba purchased at a local market and four Hypericum species autochtonous to the Balkan Peninsula (H. maculatum subsp. immaculatum, H. olympicum, H. richeri subsp. grisebachii and H. barbatum. All the examined extracts exhibited notable antioxidant potential, but in most of the cases indigenous Hypericum species expressed stronger effects compared to the original source of the drug, H. perforatum. The changes in the content of phenolic compounds, especially flavonoids, hyperforin and hypericin, related to the source of the drug affected the investigated activities. Since all of the investigated species have shown prominent inhibition of acetylcholinesterase in vitro activity, they could be further investigated as potential substances in preventing of Alzheimer’s disease.

  11. Phytochemical and Morphological Attributes of St. John’s Wort (Hypericum perforatum Affected by Organic and Inorganic Fertilizers; Humic Acid and Potassium Sulphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helaleh Sadat KABOLI FARSHCHI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was designed to evaluate the effects of organic (liquid humic acid and inorganic (potassium sulphate on phytochemical and morphological attributes of St. John’s Wort (Hypericum perforatum. Thus, a research was conducted in a factorial experiment (3×3 based on completely randomized design with three replications. Treatments consisted of potassium sulphate (Kx at three concentrations (0, 60 and 100 Kg/h which were treated before flowering and humic acid (Hx at three concentrations (0, 20 and 40 L/h which were fertigated four times of 15-days intervals. Results showed that the plant stem height, number of flowering stems and number of flowers were significantly affected by simple effect of each fertilizers (p<0.01, while their interaction effect was not significant for the plants height. The highest contents of fresh and dry weight were achieved under the highest amounts of fertilizers (K100 and H40. The highest stem height, number of flowers and number of flowering stems also belonged to these treatments. Increment of applied fertilizers led to increase of obtained essential oils, so that application of these fertilizers simultaneously increased the essential oil content up to 6-fold. Regarding the antioxidant activity, applied fertilizers at their high levels showed significant effects on decrease of EC50, which means the increment of antioxidant activity of H. perforatum.

  12. Phytochemical and Morphological Attributes of St. John’s Wort (Hypericum perforatum Affected by Organic and Inorganic Fertilizers; Humic Acid and Potassium Sulphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helaleh Sadat KABOLI FARSHCHI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was designed to evaluate the effects of organic (liquid humic acid and inorganic (potassium sulphate on phytochemical and morphological attributes of St. John’s Wort (Hypericum perforatum. Thus, a research was conducted in a factorial experiment (3×3 based on completely randomized design with three replications. Treatments consisted of potassium sulphate (Kx at three concentrations (0, 60 and 100 Kg/h which were treated before flowering and humic acid (Hx at three concentrations (0, 20 and 40 L/h which were fertigated four times of 15-days intervals. Results showed that the plant stem height, number of flowering stems and number of flowers were significantly affected by simple effect of each fertilizers (p<0.01, while their interaction effect was not significant for the plants height. The highest contents of fresh and dry weight were achieved under the highest amounts of fertilizers (K100 and H40. The highest stem height, number of flowers and number of flowering stems also belonged to these treatments. Increment of applied fertilizers led to increase of obtained essential oils, so that application of these fertilizers simultaneously increased the essential oil content up to 6-fold. Regarding the antioxidant activity, applied fertilizers at their high levels showed significant effects on decrease of EC50, which means the increment of antioxidant activity of H. perforatum.

  13. Inhibitory effect of St. John׳s Wort oil macerates on TNFα-induced NF-κB activation and their fatty acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan; Kartal, Murat; Gülpinar, Ali Rifat; Yetkin, Gülin; Orlikova, Barbora; Diederich, Marc; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2014-09-11

    The oil macerates of Hypericum perforatum L. (St. John׳s Wort=SJW) have a long history of medicinal use and SJW has been used in traditional medicine both orally and topically for centuries worldwide mainly for wound healing, ulcer and inflammation. We analyzed the fatty acid composition of 10 traditionally (home-made) and 13 commercially (ready-made) prepared SJW oil macerates by GC-MS. The acid, peroxide, iodine, saponification values, and the unsaponifiable matters of the samples were determined according to the European Pharmacopoeia. We also explored potential mechanism of wound healing effect of the samples, i.e. TNFα-induced NF-κB activation. The most home-made oil samples contained oleic acid predominantly and complied with the requirements set for olive oil by European Pharmacopoeia. However, majority of the ready-made samples appeared to have adulteration with some other oils. Moderate NF-κB inhibitory effects have been observed with some of the oil samples. This study sheds light on the fact that application of the proper traditional method to prepare olive oil macerates from Hypericum perforatum is able to get bioactive constituents in the oil. Besides, inhibition of TNFα-induced NF-κB activation appears to be a potential mechanism for topical wound healing activity of SJW oil macerates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Topical administration of a connexin43-based peptide augments healing of chronic neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers: A multicenter, randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grek, Christina L; Prasad, G M; Viswanathan, Vijay; Armstrong, David G; Gourdie, Robert G; Ghatnekar, Gautam S

    2015-01-01

    Nonhealing neuropathic foot ulcers remain a significant problem in individuals with diabetes. The gap-junctional protein connexin43 (Cx43) has roles in dermal wound healing and targeting Cx43 signalling accelerates wound reepithelialization. In a prospective, randomized, multicenter clinical trial we evaluated the efficacy and safety of a peptide mimetic of the C-terminus of Cx43, alpha connexin carboxy-terminal (ACT1), in accelerating the healing of chronic diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) when incorporated into standard of care (SOC) protocols. Adults with DFUs of at least four weeks duration were randomized to receive SOC with or without topical application of ACT1. Primary outcome was mean percent ulcer reepithelialization and safety variables included incidence of treatment related adverse events (AEs) and detection of ACT1 immunogenicity. ACT1 treatment was associated with a significantly greater reduction in mean percent ulcer area from baseline to 12 weeks (72.1% vs. 57.1%; p = 0.03). Analysis of incidence and median time-to-complete-ulcer closure revealed that ACT1 treatment was associated with a greater percentage of participants that reached 100% ulcer reepitheliazation and a reduced median time-to-complete-ulcer closure. No AEs reported were treatment related, and ACT1 was not immunogenic. Treatment protocols that incorporate ACT1 may present a therapeutic strategy that safely augments the reepithelialization of chronic DFUs. © 2015 Authors. Wound Repair and Regeneration published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Wound Healing Society.

  15. D-Aspartate Modulates Nociceptive-Specific Neuron Activity and Pain Threshold in Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain Condition in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Boccella

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available D-Aspartate (D-Asp is a free D-amino acid found in the mammalian brain with a temporal-dependent concentration based on the postnatal expression of its metabolizing enzyme D-aspartate oxidase (DDO. D-Asp acts as an agonist on NMDA receptors (NMDARs. Accordingly, high levels of D-Asp in knockout mice for Ddo gene (Ddo−/− or in mice treated with D-Asp increase NMDAR-dependent processes. We have here evaluated in Ddo−/− mice the effect of high levels of free D-Asp on the long-term plastic changes along the nociceptive pathway occurring in chronic and acute pain condition. We found that Ddo−/− mice show an increased evoked activity of the nociceptive specific (NS neurons of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord (L4–L6 and a significant decrease of mechanical and thermal thresholds, as compared to control mice. Moreover, Ddo gene deletion exacerbated the nocifensive responses in the formalin test and slightly reduced pain thresholds in neuropathic mice up to 7 days after chronic constriction injury. These findings suggest that the NMDAR agonist, D-Asp, may play a role in the regulation of NS neuron electrophysiological activity and behavioral responses in physiological and pathological pain conditions.

  16. Long-Chain Omega-3 Fatty Acids Supplementation Accelerates Nerve Regeneration and Prevents Neuropathic Pain Behavior in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela V. Silva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Fish oil (FO is the main source of long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs, which display relevant analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties. Peripheral nerve injury is driven by degeneration, neuroinflammation, and neuronal plasticity which results in neuropathic pain (NP symptoms such as allodynia and hyperalgesia. We tested the preventive effect of an EPA/DHA-concentrate fish oil (CFO on NP development and regenerative features. Swiss mice received daily oral treatment with CFO 4.6 or 2.3 g/kg for 10 days after NP was induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation. Mechanical allodynia and thermal hypernociception were assessed 5 days after injury. CFO 2.3 g/kg significantly prevented mechanical and thermal sensitization, reduced TNF levels in the spinal cord, sciatic MPO activity, and ATF-3 expression on DRG cells. CFO improved Sciatic Functional Index (SFI as well as electrophysiological recordings, corroborating the increased GAP43 expression and total number of myelinated fibers observed in sciatic nerve. No locomotor activity impairment was observed in CFO treated groups. These results point to the regenerative and possibly protective properties of a combined EPA and DHA oral administration after peripheral nerve injury, as well as its anti-neuroinflammatory activity, evidencing ω-3 PUFAs promising therapeutic outcomes for NP treatment.

  17. The antihyperalgesic effects of intrathecal bupropion, a dopamine and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Hajime; Obata, Hideaki; Nakajima, Kunie; Mieda, Rie; Saito, Shigeru

    2015-02-01

    Antidepressants are often used for the treatment of neuropathic pain, and their analgesic effects rely on increased noradrenaline and serotonin levels in the spinal cord. Clinical studies have also shown that bupropion, a dopamine and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, has strong efficacy in neuropathic pain; however, the role of spinal cord dopamine in neuropathic pain is unknown. We hypothesized that bupropion inhibits neuropathic pain by increasing noradrenaline and dopamine in the spinal cord. In the present study, we determined the efficacy and underlying mechanisms of intrathecal administration of bupropion in a rat model of neuropathic pain. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized, and right L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) was performed to produce mechanical hyperalgesia of the hindpaw. Withdrawal threshold to a paw pressure test was measured before and after intrathecal administration of bupropion, without or with intrathecal antagonists for α2-adrenoceptors and dopamine D2 receptors. In vivo microdialysis was performed in the dorsal horn of the lumbar spinal cord to measure noradrenaline and dopamine concentrations after intrathecal injection of bupropion. We also measured the noradrenaline and dopamine contents in the ipsilateral dorsal lumbar spinal cord in normal rats and in rats 2, 3, and 4 weeks after SNL. Intrathecal injection of bupropion produced a dose-dependent antihyperalgesic effect (3, 10, 30, and 100 μg, P bupropion injection) with the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist idazoxan (3, 10, and 30 μg, P bupropion (30 μg, P < 0.001 and P = 0.001, respectively). Furthermore, the noradrenaline and dopamine contents in the spinal dorsal horn were increased 2 weeks after SNL (P < 0.001 and P = 0.044, respectively) and then decreased gradually. These findings suggest that plasticity of descending inhibitory pathways such as the noradrenaline and dopamine systems contributes to the maintenance of neuropathic pain and that spinal cord noradrenaline and

  18. Contribution of microglia and astrocytes to the central sensitization, inflammatory and neuropathic pain in the juvenile rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikeda Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of pain after peripheral nerve and tissue injury involves not only neuronal pathways but also immune cells and glia. Central sensitization is thought to be a mechanism for such persistent pain, and ATP involves in the process. We examined the contribution of glia to neuronal excitation in the juvenile rat spinal dorsal horn which is subjected to neuropathic and inflammatory pain. Results In rats subjected to neuropathic pain, immunoreactivity for the microglial marker OX42 was markedly increased. In contrast, in rats subjected to inflammatory pain, immunoreactivity for the astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein was increased slightly. Optically-recorded neuronal excitation induced by single-pulse stimulation to the dorsal root was augmented in rats subjected to neuropathic and inflammatory pain compared to control rats. The bath application of a glial inhibitor minocycline and a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor SB203580 inhibited the neuronal excitation in rats subjected to neuropathic pain. A specific P2X1,2,3,4 antagonist TNP-ATP largely inhibited the neuronal excitation only in rats subjected to neuropathic pain rats. In contrast, an astroglial toxin L-alpha-aminoadipate, a gap junction blocker carbenoxolone and c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor SP600125 inhibited the neuronal excitation only in rats subjected to inflammatory pain. A greater number of cells in spinal cord slices from rats subjected to neuropathic pain showed Ca2+ signaling in response to puff application of ATP. This Ca2+ signaling was inhibited by minocycline and TNP-ATP. Conclusions These results directly support the notion that microglia is more involved in neuropathic pain and astrocyte in inflammatory pain.

  19. Prevalence of neuropathic pain among Black African patients suffering from common low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouédraogo, Dieu-Donné; Nonguierma, Victor; Napon, Christian; Kabré, Abel; Tiéno, Hervé; Guira, Oumar; Kaboré, Jean; Drabo, Joseph Y

    2012-07-01

    To study the prevalence and semiotic characteristics of neuropathic pain in the common low back pain to the Black African subject. This was a prospective cross-sectional survey carried on from April 1 2009 to August 31 2009 in consultations of rheumatology, neurology, and neurosurgery at the University Hospital Yalgado Ouédraogo in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso). All patients with a low back pain or a common lomboradiculalgie were included. DN4 questionnaire was used for the diagnosis of neuropathic pain. One hundred and seven patients have been recruited during the study period; Sixty-four (59.80%) were female (sex ratio M/F: 0.67). The average age was 34.11 ± 13.46 years of age with extremes of 20 and 79. The average duration of disease was 48.53 months with extremes of 10 days and 50 years. Eighty-seven patients (81.31%) had a disease duration, which was 3 months longer. Sixty-six patients (61.70%) had a predominant lomboradiculalgie; among the remaining 41, low back pain predominated. Average intensity of pain was 62.81 ± 22.43 (on a scale of 100). A sign of Lasèque was present in the 41 (38.30%) patients. Fifty-three (49.5%) patients had a neuropathic pain. The prevalence of neuropathy signs according to the DN4 questionnaire was as follows: burning (n = 37; 34.58%), painful cold (n = 13; 12.15%), electric shocks (n = 31; 38.97%), pins and needles (n = 34; 31.77%), tingling (n = 35; 32.71%), numbness (n = 45; 42.05%), itching (n = 18; 16.82%), touch hypoesthesia (n = 35; 32.71%), pinprick (n = 33; 30.84%), and tactile allodynia (n = 21; 19.62%). Among the studied variables, the presence of a radiculalgy was statistically associated with neuropathic pain. The lomboradiculalgie of the Black African subject associates neuropathic pain observed in half of patients. Treatment must therefore always take account of this association. However, further studies are needed before any definitive conclusion.

  20. Nerve injury evoked loss of latexin expression in spinal cord neurons contributes to the development of neuropathic pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilmar Nils Kühlein

    Full Text Available Nerve injury leads to sensitization mechanisms in the peripheral and central nervous system which involve transcriptional and post-transcriptional modifications in sensory nerves. To assess protein regulations in the spinal cord after injury of the sciatic nerve in the Spared Nerve Injury model (SNI we performed a proteomic analysis using 2D-difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE technology. Among approximately 2300 protein spots separated on each gel we detected 55 significantly regulated proteins after SNI whereof 41 were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF MS. Out of the proteins which were regulated in the DIGE analyses after SNI we focused on the carboxypeptidase A inhibitor latexin because protease dysfunctions contribute to the development of neuropathic pain. Latexin protein expression was reduced after SNI which could be confirmed by Western Blot analysis, quantitative RT-PCR and in-situ hybridisation. The decrease of latexin was associated with an increase of the activity of carboxypeptidase A indicating that the balance between latexin and carboxypeptidase A was impaired in the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury due to a loss of latexin expression in spinal cord neurons. This may contribute to the development of cold allodynia because normalization of neuronal latexin expression in the spinal cord by AAV-mediated latexin transduction or administration of a small molecule carboxypeptidase A inhibitor significantly reduced acetone-evoked nociceptive behavior after SNI. Our results show the usefulness of proteomics as a screening tool to identify novel mechanisms of nerve injury evoked hypernociception and suggest that carboxypeptidase A inhibition might be useful to reduce cold allodynia.

  1. Cannabinoid-mediated modulation of neuropathic pain and microglial accumulation in a model of murine type I diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis Connie L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the frequency of diabetes mellitus and its relationship to diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN and neuropathic pain (NeP, our understanding of underlying mechanisms leading to chronic pain in diabetes remains poor. Recent evidence has demonstated a prominent role of microglial cells in neuropathic pain states. One potential therapeutic option gaining clinical acceptance is the cannabinoids, for which cannabinoid receptors (CB are expressed on neurons and microglia. We studied the accumulation and activation of spinal and thalamic microglia in streptozotocin (STZ-diabetic CD1 mice and the impact of cannabinoid receptor agonism/antagonism during the development of a chronic NeP state. We provided either intranasal or intraperitoneal cannabinoid agonists/antagonists at multiple doses both at the initiation of diabetes as well as after establishment of diabetes and its related NeP state. Results Tactile allodynia and thermal hypersensitivity were observed over 8 months in diabetic mice without intervention. Microglial density increases were seen in the dorsal spinal cord and in thalamic nuclei and were accompanied by elevation of phosphorylated p38 MAPK, a marker of microglial activation. When initiated coincidentally with diabetes, moderate-high doses of intranasal cannabidiol (cannaboid receptor 2 agonist and intraperitoneal cannabidiol attenuated the development of an NeP state, even after their discontinuation and without modification of the diabetic state. Cannabidiol was also associated with restriction in elevation of microglial density in the dorsal spinal cord and elevation in phosphorylated p38 MAPK. When initiated in an established DPN NeP state, both CB1 and CB2 agonists demonstrated an antinociceptive effect until their discontinuation. There were no pronociceptive effects demonstated for either CB1 or CB2 antagonists. Conclusions The prevention of microglial accumulation and activation in the dorsal spinal

  2. Ganglioside GM3 synthase depletion reverses neuropathic pain and small fiber neuropathy in diet-induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menichella, Daniela M; Jayaraj, Nirupa D; Wilson, Heather M; Ren, Dongjun; Flood, Kelsey; Wang, Xiao-Qi; Shum, Andrew; Miller, Richard J; Paller, Amy S

    2016-01-01

    Small fiber neuropathy is a well-recognized complication of type 2 diabetes and has been shown to be responsible for both neuropathic pain and impaired wound healing. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that ganglioside GM3 depletion by knockdown of GM3 synthase fully reverses impaired wound healing in diabetic mice. However, the role of GM3 in neuropathic pain and small fiber neuropathy in diabetes is unknown. Determine whether GM3 depletion is able to reverse neuropathic pain and small fibers neuropathy and the mechanism of the reversal. We demonstrate that GM3 synthase knockout and the resultant GM3 depletion rescues the denervation in mouse footpad skin and fully reverses the neuropathic pain in diet-induced obese diabetic mice. In cultured dorsal root ganglia from diet-induced diabetic mice, GM3 depletion protects against increased intracellular calcium influx in vitro. These studies establish ganglioside GM3 as a new candidate responsible for neuropathic pain and small fiber neuropathy in diabetes. Moreover, these observations indicate that systemic or topically applied interventions aimed at depleting GM3 may improve both the painful neuropathy and the wound healing impairment in diabetes by protecting against nerve end terminal degeneration, providing a disease-modifying approach to this common, currently intractable medical issue. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. A retrospective database analysis of neuropathic pain and oral antidiabetic medication use and adherence among Texas adults with type 2 diabetes enrolled in Medicaid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladapo, Abiola O; Barner, Jamie C; Rascati, Karen L; Strassels, Scott A

    2012-03-01

    Adherence to oral antidiabetic (OAD) medications is essential in achieving glycemic control and slowing the progression of diabeties-related complications such as neuropathic pain. OAD medication adherence has been suboptimal and adding neuropathic pain medications may negatively affect adherence. However, little is known about adherence to neuropathic pain medications by patients with diabetes and how this may be related to OAD medication adherence. The objectives of our study were to: (1) describe painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (PDPN) and OAD medication use, (2) determine if PDPN medication adherence differs among individual PDPN medications (ie, tricyclic antidepressants, gabapentin, pregabalin, and duloxetine); and (3) determine if PDPN medication adherence is related to post-index OAD medication adherence while controlling for covariates. This retrospective prescription claims database study included continuously enrolled Texas Medicaid beneficiaries who were adult (aged 30-64 years) prescribed OAD (pre- and post-index) and PDPN (post-index) medications. Data were extracted from June 1, 2003 to October 31, 2009. The main study outcome was post-index OAD medication adherence. Primary independent variables included PDPN medication adherence and PDPN medication type. Demographic and medication use characteristics served as covariates. Adherence was measured both continuously and dichotomously (80% cut-off) using medication possession ratio (MPR). The sample's (n = 4277) overall mean MPR (SD) for PDPN medications was 75.4% (23.9%). Mean MPR differed significantly among individual PDPN medications (P medications decreased significantly (P medications, compared with adherers (ie, MPR ≥80%), were significantly less likely to be adherent to OAD medications in the post-index period (odds ratio = 0.626; 95% CI, 0.545-0.719). Overall, these data suggest that mean adherence to both PDPN and OAD medications was suboptimal (MPR medications were more adherent to

  4. Pregabalin versus gabapentin in the management of peripheral neuropathic pain associated with post-herpetic neuralgia and diabetic neuropathy: a cost effectiveness analysis for the Greek healthcare setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The anticonvulsants pregabalin and gabapentin are both indicated for the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain. The decision on which treatment provides the best alternative, should take into account all aspects of costs and outcomes associated with the two therapeutic options. The objective of this study was to examine the cost – effectiveness of the two agents in the management of patients with painful diabetic neuropathy or post – herpetic neuralgia, under the third party payer perspective in Greece. Methods The analysis was based on a dynamic simulation model which estimated and compared the costs and outcomes of pregabalin and gabapentin in a hypothetical cohort of 1,000 patients suffering from painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy (DPN) or Post-Herpetic Neuralgia (PHN). In the model, each patient was randomly allocated an average pretreatment pain score, measured using an eleven-point visual analogue scale (0 – 10) and was “run through” the model, simulating their daily pain intensity and allowing for stochastic calculation of outcomes, taking into account medical interventions and the effectiveness of each treatment. Results Pregabalin demonstrated a reduction in days with moderate to severe pain when compared to gabapentin. During the 12 weeks the pregabalin arm demonstrated a 0.1178 (SE 0.0002) QALY gain, which proved to be 0.0063 (SE 0.0003) higher than that in the gabapentin arm. The mean medication cost per patient was higher for the pregabalin arm when compared to the gabapentin arm (i.e. €134.40) over the 12 week treatment period. However, this higher cost was partially offset by the reduced direct medical costs (i.e. the cost of specialist visits, the cost of diagnostic tests and the other applied interventions). Comparing costs with respective outcomes, the ICERs for pregabalin versus gabapentin were €13 (95%CI: 8 – 18) per additional day with no or mild pain and €19,320 (95%CI: 11,743 – 26,755) per QALY gained

  5. Neuropathic pain among patients with primary knee osteoarthritis: Results of a cross-sectional study from a tertiary care center in Southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Vignesh Narayan

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Neuropathic pain (DN4 ≥4 was seen in up to 49% patients with knee OA. Centrally acting drugs such as tricyclic antidepressants or duloxetine can be used to improve the quality of life and physical function of knee OA patients with neuropathic pain.

  6. The effect of oxcarbazepine in peripheral neuropathic pain depends on pain phenotype: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phenotype-stratified study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Dyveke T; Lund, Karen; Vollert, Jan

    2014-01-01

    by hypersensitivity and preserved small nerve fibre function determined by detailed quantitative sensory testing. Ninety-seven patients with peripheral neuropathic pain due to polyneuropathy, surgical or traumatic nerve injury, or postherpetic neuralgia were randomised. The intention-to-treat population comprised 83...... efficacious for relief of peripheral neuropathic pain in patients with the irritable vs the nonirritable nociceptor phenotype....

  7. Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Christian Hedemann; Meier, Kaare; Perinpam, Larshan

    Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report......Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report...

  8. Evaluation of antidepressant-like activity of novel water-soluble curcumin formulations and St. John's wort in behavioral paradigms of despair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, S K; Akula, Kiran Kumar; Deshpande, Jayant

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin is the active principle of Curcuma longa, one of the widely used components in the traditional system of medicine in India. Despite its efficacy in experimental studies aiming at neuronal disorders like depression, curcu-min's poor water solubility challenges the production of therapeutic formulations. This study investigates the antidepressant-like activity of novel water-soluble curcumin formulations, dispensed in three different concentrations. Further, the study comparatively evaluates St. John's wort (SJW), another herbal preparation. These compounds were evaluated in the forced swimming test in mice, and the corresponding changes in the neurotransmitter levels were measured. Three water-soluble curcumin formulations, C-5, C-20 and C-50 (50-200 mg/kg p.o.) decreased the immobility period, and increased serotonin and dopamine levels in the brain tissues. A subeffective dose (50 mg/kg) of these formulations enhanced the antidepressant-like effect of classical antidepressants with varied mechanisms of action. In addition, an SJW dose of 25 mg/kg showed a significant antidepressant-like effect in all the behavioral studies and also significantly increased brain neurotransmitter levels, especially that of serotonin. The effects produced by C-5 were comparable with those of SJW and fluoxetine, respectively. In all these observations, the water-soluble formulations showed a significant antidepressant-like effect, including enhancement of neurotransmitter levels as compared to the similar dose of a conventional curcumin preparation. Thus, these formulations may be used as a novel treatment option in the management of mental depression. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Effects of tianeptine on the development and maintenance of mechanical allodynia in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Bong Ha; Shin, Jae Yun; Park, Keun Suk; Lee, Hyung Gon; Choi, Jeong Il; Yoon, Myung Ha; Kim, Woong Mo

    2016-10-28

    We validate the analgesic efficacy of tianeptine by different administration routes and timing in a rat model of neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain was induced by ligating the L5 and L6 spinal nerves in male Sprague-Dawley rats, and mechanical allodynia was assessed using von Frey filaments. The effects of orally administered tianeptine and pretreatment with tianeptine (intrathecally or intraperitoneally) on mechanical allodynia were assessed. Oral and preemptive intrathecal administration of tianeptine significantly increased the paw withdrawal threshold but preemptive intraperitoneal administration did not. Nevertheless, intraperitoneal pretreatment of tianeptine potentiated the antiallodynic effects of subsequently administered tianeptine. These findings suggest that tianeptine may be effective for preventing and treating neuropathic pain and that it can be used more widely in clinical pain practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. DDD-028: a potent potential non-opioid, non-cannabinoid analgesic for neuropathic and inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, Parthasarathi; Tracey, Heather; Chen, Zhoumou; Bandyopadhyaya, Acintya; Veeraraghavan, Sridhar; Rajagopalan, Desikan R; Salvemini, Daniela; McPhee, Ian; Viswanadha, Srikant; Rajagopalan, Raghavan

    2014-07-15

    DDD-028 (4), a novel pentacyclic pyridoindolobenzazepine derivative was evaluated in vitro for receptor binding affinity and in vivo for analgesic activity using rodent models of neuropathic and inflammatory pain. DDD-028 does not bind to opioid, cannabinoid, dopamine, or histamine receptors. DDD-028 is very active even at the low oral dose of 1-5 mg/kg in both neuropathic, (spinal nerve ligation and chronic constriction injury) and inflammatory (Complete Freund's Adjuvant Induced) models of pain. DDD-028 appears to be about 6-fold more potent than pregabalin and indomethacin. Visual observation of all the animals used in these studies indicated that DDD-028 is well tolerated without any sedation. Thus, DDD-028 seems to be a promising candidate for the treatment of neuropathic and inflammatory pain without the possible side effects or abuse potential associated with opioid or cannabinoid activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition by 1400W limits pain hypersensitivity in a neuropathic pain rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, C A; Barrett-Jolley, R; Djouhri, L; Thippeswamy, T

    2018-02-13

    Peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP) resulting from injury or dysfunction to a peripheral nerve, is a major health problem affecting 7-8% of the population. It is inadequately controlled by current drugs, and is characterized by pain hypersensitivity which is believed to be due to sensitization of peripheral and CNS neurons by various inflammatory mediators. Here we examined, in a rat model of PNP: a) whether reducing levels of nitric oxide (NO), with 1400 W, a highly selective inhibitor of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), would prevent/attenuate pain hypersensitivity, and b) the effects of 1400 W on plasma levels of several cytokines that are secreted post iNOS upregulation during chronic pain states. The L5-spinal nerve axotomy (SNA) model of PNP was used, and 1400 W (20 mg kg -1 ) administered intraperitoneally at 8 hour intervals for three days starting at 18 hours post-SNA. Changes in plasma concentrations of 12 cytokines in SNA rats treated with 1400 W were examined using multiplex ELISA. SNA rats developed behavioural signs of mechanical and heat hypersensitivity. Compared with the vehicle/control, 1400 W significantly: (a) limited development of mechanical hypersensitivity at 66 hours post-SNA, as well as heat hypersensitivity at 42 hours and at several time-points tested thereafter, and (b) increased the plasma concentrations of IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-10 in the SNA rats. The findings suggest that 1400 W may exert its analgesic effects by reducing iNOS and altering the balance between the pro-inflammatory (IL-1β and IL-1α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines and that therapies targeting NO or its enzymes may be effective for the treatment of PNP. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Quetiapine reverse paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain in mice: Role of Alpha2- adrenergic receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Abed

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy is a common adverse effect of cancer chemo -therapy. This neuropathy has a profound impact on quality of life and patient’s survival. Preventing and treating paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy is a major concern. First- and second-generation antipsychotics have shown analgesic effects both in humans and animals. Quetiapine is a novel atypical antipsychotic with low propensity to induce extrapyramidal or hyperprolactinemia side effects. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of quetiapine on the development and expression of neuropathic pain induced by paclitaxel in mice and the role of α2-adrenoceptors on its antinociception. Materials and Methods: Paclitaxel (2 mg/kg IP was injected for five consecutive days which resulted in thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical and cold allodynia. Results: Early administration of quetiapine from the 1st day until the 5th day (5, 10, and 15 mg/kg PO did not affect thermal, mechanical, and cold stimuli and could not prevent the development of neuropathic pain. In contrast, when quetiapine (10 and 15 mg/kg PO administration was started on the 6th day after the first paclitaxel injections, once the model had been established, and given daily until the 10th day, heat hyperalgesia and mechanical and cold allodynia were significantly attenuated. Also, the effect of quetiapine on heat hyperalgesia was reversed by pretreatment with yohimbine, as an alpha-2 adrenergic receptor antagonist. Conclusion: These results indicate that quetiapine, when administered after nerve injury can reverse the expression of neuropathic pain. Also, we conclude that α2-adrenoceptors participate in the antinociceptive effects of quetiapine.

  13. Effect of photobiomodulation therapy (808 nm) in the control of neuropathic pain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Ana Laura Martins; Bossini, Paulo Sérgio; do Canto De Souza, Azair Liane Matos; Sanchez, Ariane Dutra; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio

    2017-05-01

    Neuropathic pain can be defined as the pain initiated or caused by a primary lesion or dysfunction of the central or peripheral nervous system. Photobiomodulation therapy (PBM) stands out among the physical therapy resources used for analgesia. However, application parameters, especially the energy density, remain controversial in the literature. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the PBM effect, in different energy densities to control neuropathic pain in mice. Fifty (50) mice were induced to neuropathy by chronic constriction surgery of the sciatic nerve (CCI), treated with PBM (808 nm), and divided into five groups: GP (PBM simulation), GS (sham), GL10, GL20, GL40 (energy density of 10, 20, and 40 J/cm 2 , respectively). The evaluations were carried out using the hot plate test and Randall and Selitto test, before and after the CCI surgery, every 15 days during the 90 days experiment. β-Endorphin blood dosage was also tested. For both the hot plate and Randall and Selitto tests, the GL20 and GL40 groups presented reduction of the nociceptive threshold from the 30th day of treatment, the GL10 group only after day 75, and the GP group did not show any improvement throughout the experiment. The β-endorphin dosage was higher for all groups when compared to the GP group. However, only the GL20 group and GL40 presented a significant increase. This study demonstrates that PBM in higher energy density (20, 40 J/cm 2 ) is more effective in the control of neuropathic pain.

  14. Management of Ocular Neuropathic Pain With Vitamin B12 Supplements: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Rohit; Deshpande, Kalyani; Ghosh, Arkasubhra; Sethu, Swaminathan

    2015-10-01

    To report the case of a 28-year-old patient with persistent bilateral burning pain and foreign body sensation in both eyes for the past 1 year. The patient showed a poor response to 0.05% cyclosporine eye drops and frequent instillations of artificial tears. Ocular examination showed few superficial punctate epithelial defects, well-positioned laser in situ keratomileusis (performed 5 years ago with symptomless recovery) flaps, and clear interfaces bilaterally, with a tear film breakup time of 7 and 8 seconds in the right and left eyes, respectively. The results of Schirmer tests, confocal microscopy, corneal esthesiometry, and meibography were normal for both eyes. The patient was incidentally diagnosed with vitamin B12 deficiency, with a serum vitamin B12 value of 90 pg/mL (reference range, 236-911 pg/mL), during routine laboratory tests. In view of weak correlation between signs and symptoms, a putative diagnosis of ocular neuropathic pain secondary to vitamin B12 deficiency was made. Case report. The patient was treated with parenteral vitamin B12, and topical therapy was continued without any changes. The patient experienced dramatic improvement with a decrease in symptoms within 3 weeks of administering vitamin B12 supplements and was symptom-free in the absence of any topical medication 6 months after treatment. Vitamin B12 deficiency, although common in India, has not been reported to be associated with ocular symptoms, including pain and mimicking those seen in severe dry eye. Vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnosis of ocular neuropathic pain and dry eye in patients presenting with recalcitrant ocular neuropathic pain.

  15. Effects of topical Kiwifruit on healing of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Mohajeri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kiwifruit (Actindia Deliciosa is demonstrated to have antibacterial and pro-angiogenic effects. It also contains proteolytic enzymes (actinidin and ascorbic acid. In this study, the effects of Kiwifruit on neuropathic diabetic foot ulcer healing in clinical settings were evaluated. Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial of 37 patients (17 in experimental and 20 in control groups with neuropathic diabetic foot ulcer were studied in Isfahan-Iran. Patients of the control group received just the standard treatments. In the experimental group, in addition to the standard treatments, ulcers were dressed with pure extract of kiwifruit twice daily for 21 days. The ulcers were examined and evaluated based on macroscopic, microscopic and microbiological status. Pre- and post-interventions, biopsies were taken from the ulcers to perform microbiological and histological studies. Results: Mean reduction in surface area of foot ulcer in the experimental group was significantly higher than the control group (168.11 ± 22.31 vs. 88.80 ± 12.04 mm 2 respectively, P < 0.0001. The amount of collagen and granulation tissues was significantly higher in the experimental groups than the control group (P value < 0.0001. Significantly higher levels of angiogenesis and vascularization were found in the kiwifruit treated patients (P value < 0.0001. No significant antibacterial effect was observed for kiwifruit. Conclusion: Natural compounds in the kiwifruit including protein-dissolving enzymes (Actinidin improved different aspects of the wound healing process. Based on these benefits and safety aspects, we conclude that using kiwifruit is a simple, applicable and effective way for treatment of neuropathic diabetic foot ulcer.

  16. Subsequent, unplanned spine surgery and life survival of patients operated for neuropathic spine deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Marc A; Lai, Sue-Min; Burton, Douglas C

    2012-01-01

    Retrospective study of a prospectively assembled cohort. To characterize the survival from subsequent spine surgery and the life survival of patients treated surgically for severe spinal deformity due to neuropathic diseases. Survivorship analysis is widely used to study the natural history of disease processes and of treatments provided, but has very seldom been used to study patients' course after surgery for spinal deformity associated with neuropathic diseases. Patients with neuropathic spinal deformity treated with primary posterior instrumentation and arthrodesis from 1989 through 2002 were identified and studied by review of charts and radiographs, and by mail survey. Subsequent spine surgery and death events, and the time interval from surgery were identified. Fifteen variables possibly influencing survivorship were studied. There were no perioperative deaths, spinal cord injuries, or acute wound infections in the 117 eligible patients. Reoperation and life survival statuses were available for 110 patients (94%) at an average follow-up of 11.89 years (±5.3; range: 2-20.9 yr). Twelve patients (11%) had subsequent spine surgery. Survival from subsequent spine surgery was 91% at 5 years, 90% at 10 and 15 years, and 72% at 20 years. Proximal fixation problems occurred in 4 patients. Twenty-two patients (20