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Sample records for workshop vienna austria

  1. Technical Workshop on Remediation of Radioactive Contamination in Agriculture, IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria, 17-18 October 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    The year 2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP) and the 30th anniversary of the accident at the Chernobyl NPP. A Technical Workshop on Remediation of Radioactive Contamination in Agriculture was coorganised by the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture and the National Agriculture and Food Research Organization of Japan (NARO) and held at the IAEA headquarters, Vienna, Austria from 17 to 18 October 2016. Over 100 experts from around the world participated in the event. All presentations and discussions focused on research results and practical experience from Japan and from countries affected by Chernobyl NPP accident. This event was a great success in promoting and sharing knowledge and experience related to remediation of radioactive contamination in food and agriculture. From an agricultural perspective, the impacts of these two major accidents are related to caesium radionuclides, specifically "1"3"7Cs, which is a relatively long lived isotope with a half-life of some thirty years. Research and technical efforts to remediate and ameliorate the impact of radioactivity on agricultural production aim to minimize and prevent contamination of foods and other commodities, and further to assist the social and economic recovery of affected rural communities by enabling sustainable production. However, these efforts are not widely appreciated outside the affected areas

  2. Statement at TM/workshop on evaluation methodology for national nuclear infrastructure development, 10 December 2008, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Y.

    2008-01-01

    In his statement at the Technical Meeting Workshop on Evaluation Methodology for National Nuclear Infrastructure Development Mr. Yuri Sokolov, IAEA Deputy Director General, Head of the Department of Nuclear Energy, thanked the co-sponsors of the workshop, namely Canada, China, France, India, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation and the United States for their continued support and the Nuclear Power Engineering Section for their dedication and hard work to implement this workshop. The evaluation methodology that is the main subject of this workshop is a component of building infrastructure for the implementation of cost-effective, safe and secure nuclear power programme. It aims to provide a tool for effective planning. The IAEA evaluation approach can be used either by a Member State wishing to review its own progress (self-assessment) or as a basis for an external review through which a Member State wishes to reassure others that its nuclear programme is effective. The IAEA can, upon a request from the Member State, provide Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review missions, INIR, conducted by international experts. These INIR missions provide a means for countries to work with the IAEA in an open and transparent way to ensure they are taking a comprehensive and integrated approach to nuclear power as promoted in the Milestones document. National self-assessments supported by INIR missions will help Member States to identify gaps and areas that need increased attention, and will help the Agency to focus the assistance on the Member States needs. Another theme of the workshop is the role of the Nuclear Energy Programme Implementing Organization (NEPIO), in studying the nuclear power option and coordinating planning among various stakeholders. During the workshop publications in preparation will be presented including one on responsibilities and capabilities of owner-operator organizations and one on workforce planning. Presentations from the

  3. FOREWORD: Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Theory meets Industry (Erwin-Schrödinger-Institute (ESI), Vienna, Austria, 12 14 June 2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Jürgen

    2008-02-01

    their application to key areas of condensed matter physics. Researchers from industry mainly focused on challenges arising from applied industrial research; contributions describing successful applications of DFT techniques to industrial problems were more scarce. Progress during the last decade has been very fast. The ESF research program has been renewed under the much bolder title 'Towards Computational Materials Design' and is now approaching the end of this second funding period. Due to the development of accurate, efficient and stable software packages for ab initio simulations, DFT-based techniques are now routinely used in many industrial laboratories worldwide. It was therefore considered timely to organize a second 'Theory meets Industry' workshop. The meeting took place between 12-14 June 2007 at the Erwin-Schrödinger-Institute (ESI) for Mathematical Physics in Vienna (Austria). It was sponsored by the Universität Wien through the VASP (Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Program) project, the Center for Computational Materials Science Vienna, the Erwin-Schrödinger-Institute and the ESF Program 'Towards Computational Materials Design'. The program of the workshop was decided by an international advisory board consisting of Ryoji Asahi (Toyota Central Research and Development Laboratory), Risto Nieminen (Helsinki University of Technology), Herve Toulhoat (Institut Français du Pétrole), Erich Wimmer (Materials Design Inc.), Chris Wolverton (Ford Motor Co. and Northwestern University) and Jürgen Hafner (Universität Wien). The 35 invited talks presented at the meeting were divided equally between researchers from academia and from industry. The contributions from academia concentrated on a wide range of new developments in DFT and post-DFT simulations (with contributions from the developers of leading software packages for ab initio simulations), as well as on applications in front-line materials research. In contrast to the first workshop nine years ago, all

  4. Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Theory meets Industry (Erwin-Schrödinger-Institute (ESI), Vienna, Austria, 12-14 June 2007).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Jürgen

    2008-02-13

    and their application to key areas of condensed matter physics. Researchers from industry mainly focused on challenges arising from applied industrial research; contributions describing successful applications of DFT techniques to industrial problems were more scarce. Progress during the last decade has been very fast. The ESF research program has been renewed under the much bolder title 'Towards Computational Materials Design' and is now approaching the end of this second funding period. Due to the development of accurate, efficient and stable software packages for ab initio simulations, DFT-based techniques are now routinely used in many industrial laboratories worldwide. It was therefore considered timely to organize a second 'Theory meets Industry' workshop. The meeting took place between 12-14 June 2007 at the Erwin-Schrödinger-Institute (ESI) for Mathematical Physics in Vienna (Austria). It was sponsored by the Universität Wien through the VASP (Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Program) project, the Center for Computational Materials Science Vienna, the Erwin-Schrödinger-Institute and the ESF Program 'Towards Computational Materials Design'. The program of the workshop was decided by an international advisory board consisting of Ryoji Asahi (Toyota Central Research and Development Laboratory), Risto Nieminen (Helsinki University of Technology), Herve Toulhoat (Institut Français du Pétrole), Erich Wimmer (Materials Design Inc.), Chris Wolverton (Ford Motor Co. and Northwestern University) and Jürgen Hafner (Universität Wien). The 35 invited talks presented at the meeting were divided equally between researchers from academia and from industry. The contributions from academia concentrated on a wide range of new developments in DFT and post-DFT simulations (with contributions from the developers of leading software packages for ab initio simulations), as well as on applications in front-line materials research. In contrast to the first workshop nine years ago

  5. The ENCCA-WP7/EuroSarc/EEC/PROVABES/EURAMOS 3rd European Bone Sarcoma Networking Meeting/Joint Workshop of EU Bone Sarcoma Translational Research Networks; Vienna, Austria, September 24-25, 2015. Workshop Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kager, L.; Whelan, J.; Dirksen, U.; Hassan, B.; Anninga, J.; Bennister, L.; Bovee, J.V.; Brennan, B.; Broto, J.M.; Brugieres, L.; Cleton-Jansen, A.M.; Copland, C.; Dutour, A.; Fagioli, F.; Ferrari, S.; Fiocco, M.; Fleuren, E.D.; Gaspar, N.; Gelderblom, H.; Gerrand, C.; Gerss, J.; Gonzato, O.; Graaf, W.T. van der; Hecker-Nolting, S.; Herrero-Martin, D.; Klco-Brosius, S.; Kovar, H.; Ladenstein, R.; Lancia, C.; Ledeley, M.C.; McCabe, M.G.; Metzler, M.; Myklebost, O.; Nathrath, M.; Picci, P.; Potratz, J.; Redini, F.; Richter, G.H.; Reinke, D.; Rutkowski, P.; Scotlandi, K.; Strauss, S.; Thomas, D; Tirado, O.M.; Tirode, F.; Vassal, G.; Bielack, S.S.

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the 3rd Joint ENCCA-WP7, EuroSarc, EEC, PROVABES, and EURAMOS European Bone Sarcoma Network Meeting, which was held at the Children's Cancer Research Institute in Vienna, Austria on September 24-25, 2015. The joint bone sarcoma network meetings bring together

  6. Report of the IPERS (International Peer Review Service) pre-review workshop for the Zaporozhye, Unit 5 nuclear power plant probabilistic safety assessment in Vienna, Austria 12 to 16 June 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of the IAEA international peer review services pre-review workshop held in Vienna, 12 to 16 June 1995, which reviewed the status of the present version of the Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for the Zaporozhye, Unit 5, nuclear power plant. 3 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  7. Third Joint GIF–IAEA Workshop on Safety Design Criteria for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors, 26-27 February 2013, Vienna, Austria. Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The main objectives of the meeting were to: • Present and share information on the work carried out by GIF, the IAEA and the Member States on the definition of safety design criteria for SFR, including safety approach and requirements on general plant design; • Present the document prepared by the GIF-SFR Task Force on Safety Design Criteria; • Present and discuss safety design concepts of SFRs under development in Member States, with particular emphasis on design measures against Design Basis Accidents and Design Extended Conditions, as well as the associated safety evaluations and supporting R&D; • Draft a room document which should be the basis of the discussion for the Panel on Safety Design Criteria of the FR13 Conference in Paris. • Discuss the results and agree on the future actions of the 3rd Joint GIF-IAEA Workshop on Safety of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors

  8. Reactor instrumentation renewal of the TRIGA reactor Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Weiss, H.; Hood, W.E.; Hyde, W.K.

    1992-01-01

    The TRIGA Mark-II reactor at the Atominstitut in Vienna, Austria is replacing its twenty-four year old instrumentation system with a microprocessor based control system supplied by General Atomics. Ageing components, new governmental safety requirements and a need for state of the art instrumentation for training students has spurred the demand for new reactor instrumentation. In Austria a government appointed expert is assigned the responsibility of reviewing the proposed installation and verifying all safety aspects. After a positive review, final assembly and checkout of the instrumentation system may commence. The instrumentation system consists of three basic modules: the control system console, the data acquisition console and the NH-1000 wide range channel. Digital communications greatly reduce interwiring requirements. Hardwired safety channels are independent of computer control, thus, the instrumentation system in no way relies on any computer intervention for safety function. In addition, both the CSC and DAC computers are continuously monitored for proper operation via watchdog circuits which are capable of shutting down the reactor in the event of computer malfunction. Safety channels include two interlocked NMP-1000 multi-range linear channels for steady state mode, an NPP-1000 linear safety channel for pulse mode and a set of three independent fuel temperature monitoring channels. The microprocessor controlled wide range NM- 1000 digital neutron monitor (fission chamber based) functions as a startup/operational channel, and provides all power level related Interlocks. The Atominstitut TRIGA reactor is configured for four modes of operation: manual mode, automatic mode (servo control), pulsing mode and square wave mode. Control of the standard control rods is via stepping motor control rod drives, which offers the operator the choice of which control rods are operated by the servo system in automatic and square wave model. (author)

  9. Opening Session – Objective and Outcomes [Inter-regional Knowledge Management Workshop on Life-cycle Management of Design Basis Information – Issues, Challenges, Approaches, Vienna (Austria), 28 October - 1 November 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosbois, John de

    2013-01-01

    Objectives of this meeting: • To better understand the main issues and challenges and different perspectives on these issues • To identify areas of common concern, opportunities for improvement and areas where collaboration may be possible; and • To review and further develop the draft document produced as a result of the prior IAEA consultancy meeting held in May 2013 in Vienna. • Recommended additions and changes to the draft document, including a summary of the shared experiences, lessons learned, differing perspectives, issues and approaches presented by the Member State during the workshop; • Obtain feedback on current initiatives related to improving DBKM (e.g. innovative or new approaches, current best practices); and • Recommendations on specific areas identified for the improvement of life cycle DBKM in Member States and suggestions on how the IAEA can help

  10. West Nile virus lineage 2 infection in a blood donor from Vienna, Austria, August 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungbauer, C; Hourfar, M K; Stiasny, K; Aberle, S W; Cadar, D; Schmidt-Chanasit, J; Mayr, W R

    2015-03-01

    Eastern Austria is neighbouring regions with ongoing West Nile virus (WNV) transmissions. Three human WNV infections had been diagnosed during the past decade in Austria. The Austrian Red Cross Blood Service (ARC-BS) started a first voluntary screening for WNV in blood donors from Eastern Austria by Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) in June 2014. This is also the most extensive WNV surveillance programme in humans in Austria so far. In August 2014, one autochthonous WNV infection was detected in a blood donor from Vienna. By now, one in 67,800 whole blood donations was found to be positive for WNV RNA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Opening Remarks [Technical Meeting/Workshop on Topical Issues on Infrastructure Development: Managing the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power Plants, Vienna (Austria), 24-27 January 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flory, D.

    2012-01-01

    States. These reports and subsequent technical analysis constituted the main basis for the Member State briefings and press briefings that were initiated by the Agency on 14 March 2011 and held daily. The IEC stayed in 24/7 mode for the longest period ever: until the third of May. In view of the accident's progression, the Agency established a number of teams under the DG, myself, and several Directors, to evaluate key issues relating to the accident, to coordinate the Agency's response, and to provide accurate and timely information to Member States, the media and the public. The Agency's laboratories also became involved early on. The Agency's Terrestrial Environment Laboratory in Seibersdorf, provided analysis, information and methodological advice to laboratories from the ALMERA network comprising at present 122 laboratories from 77 States. These in turn carried out spectroscopic measurements on nearly 100 samples taken in Japan during the various Agency missions. The Agency's marine environment laboratories in Monaco reviewed information regarding impacts to marine life and seafood resulting from the thousands of tonnes of radioactively contaminated water used to cool reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP that had been released directly into the ocean In our first involvement, we conducted seven monitoring missions, focused on environment, sea and food monitoring. We then sent an international Fact finding mission in May to identify initial lessons to be learned from the accident and share this information across the world nuclear community. The results of this mission were shared and discussed with Japanese experts and reported to the IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety held at Agency Headquarters in Vienna, Austria from 20 to 24 June 2011. This Ministerial Conference requested Director General to draft Action Plan, building on the Declaration of Ministerial Conference and conclusions and recommendations of the three Working Sessions. On 22 September 2011

  12. Statement at World Cancer Day, 4 February 2013, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text: Good afternoon, Ladies and Gentlemen, I welcome you all to this IAEA event marking World Cancer Day 2013. I am very pleased that we have with us today Professor Kutluk, President-Elect of the Union of International Cancer Control, which initiated World Cancer Day. I also welcome the distinguished Ambassador of Sudan, H.E. Mr. Mahmoud Hassan El Amin, and Dr. Munki Lee, Minister, Permanent Mission of the Republic of Korea, as well as our own Medical Director Dr. Matthias Lademann. Many events are being held around the world today to draw attention to cancer. This year, there is a special focus on dispelling common misconceptions about the disease. One of the most persistent myths about cancer is that it is mainly a disease of wealthy countries. In fact, around 70 percent of cancer deaths occur in developing countries. Another myth is that cancer is invariably a death sentence. In reality, many cancers respond well to treatment and can even be cured. Thanks to early detection and modern treatment methods, millions of men and women now live normal lives for many decades after diagnosis. Often, they die in old age of something other than cancer. Here in Austria, as in all developed countries, we take access to radiotherapy for granted. But the picture is very different in developing countries. It is estimated that there is a shortage of around 5 000 radiotherapy machines in developing countries. That means that millions of people, in Africa and elsewhere, have no access to diagnostic services or treatment. Too many die of conditions that are actually treatable. That is an immense human tragedy. The IAEA Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy - PACT - has been working hard to try to make radiotherapy services available in all countries. Through our Technical Cooperation programme, we are supporting over 130 projects in cancer diagnosis, management and treatment. We help countries to establish oncology and radiotherapy centres. We provide extensive training for

  13. The Relationships between Paranormal Belief, Creationism, Intelligent Design and Evolution at Secondary Schools in Vienna (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Erich; Turic, Katharina; Milasowszky, Norbert; Van Adzin, Katherine; Hergovich, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The present study is the first to investigate the relationships between a multiple set of paranormal beliefs and the acceptance of evolution, creationism, and intelligent design, respectively, in Europe. Using a questionnaire, 2,129 students at secondary schools in Vienna (Austria) answered the 26 statements of the Revised Paranormal Belief Scale…

  14. Intervention on budget at IAEA Board of Governors, 16 June 2009, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2009-01-01

    In his statement to the Board of Governors meeting in Vienna, Austria, IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei focused on issues of the IAEA budget in the framework of the policy of zero growth for international organizations. He stressed the importance of the Agency's work in technical cooperation to prioritise on safety, security and non-proliferation. The priorities of the Agency are the priorities of everybody. The Agency needs the money to maintain a credible programme

  15. Quality perception of organically grown tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. in Vienna, Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PK Ng’ang’a

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Austria is one of the major organic tomato producing countries for local and export marketing. These tomatoes are produced in parts of Austria especially around Vienna where their production system has to meet stringent organic quality standards in both local and international markets. These quality standards may put considerable strain on farmers and are normally formulated without famers’ participation so may not be wholly representative of the farmers’ quality interpretation. The aim of this paper is therefore to determine the Austrian organic tomatoes growers’ perception and practice of quality and challenges. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were carried out among 28 organic tomatoes farmers in Vienna, Austria. Findings suggest that quality of organic tomatoes is mainly perceived in terms of both informal values (big fruit size, long shelf life, food security and amount of income received from tomato sales as well as formal norms (non- application of chemicals, human health, damage free, sweet taste, red colour, and juiciness. There were no gendered differences in quality perception among the growers. High costs of production inputs were identified as the main challenge to attaining quality in organic tomatoes. Following these findings, there is need for effective participation of growers in formulation of standards as well as subsidizing of production inputs by the government. The Austrian tomato growers as well as local and international retailers should work closely to increase the price received by the Austrian organic tomato growers so that it more adequately covers their production costs.

  16. The Long Night of Research, Vienna International Centre (VIC), Vienna, Austria, 22 April 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jandrić, Zora; Abrahim, Aiman; Kelly, Simon; Cannavan, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    On 22 April the IAEA, along with other VIC-based organizations, took part in the biannual Long Night of Research (Lange Nacht der Forschung); an Austria-wide event coordinated by several Austrian government ministries that aims to spark interest in science and research. This was the seventh year of the Long Night of Research, and the first time the IAEA was involved. The VIC was one of around 250 exhibit locations across the country. The event gave visitors a chance to learn about the variety of nuclear applications in various fields. The Food and Environmental Protection Laboratory (FEPL) exhibition booth focused on testing for food authenticity, posing the question ‘is your food what you think it is?’. Food is an essential part of our daily lives. We need our food to be safe and we want to know what we are eating. Nuclear and related techniques can be used to control food safety and to fight food fraud – the deliberate mislabelling of food products

  17. The whip spider collection (Arachnida, Amblypygi held in the Natural History Museum Vienna, Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiter, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present data and remarks on the history and contents of the whip spider collection housed in the Natural History Museum of Vienna, Austria. The collection comprises a total of 167 specimens from 4 families, 10 genera and 27 species. It includes types of four species: Charinus ioanniticus (Kritscher, 1959, Damon brachialis Weygoldt, 1999, Phrynus parvulus (Pocock, 1902 and Paraphrynus mexicanus (Bilimek, 1867. Short notes on interesting objects and former curators are provided as well as an appendix with a list of species kept alive by Michael Seiter.

  18. INIS Training Seminar 2013, 7-11 October 2013, Vienna, Austria. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency organised an INIS Training Seminar from 7 to 11 October 2013 at its Headquarters in Vienna, Austria. The programme of the seminar concentrated on all aspects of INIS input preparation, indexing and classification, submission of non-conventional literature (NCL), searching the INIS Collection, and promotion of INIS. The training course consisted of lectures in the form of presentations, followed by discussions to allow an exchange of information and by practical sessions specifically on the topic. The course also consisted of hands-on training using computer training facilities

  19. Opening Address [Technical Meeting/Workshop on Topical Issues on Infrastructure Development: Managing the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power Plants, Vienna (Austria), 24-27 January 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    Good morning, ladies and gentlemen. I would like to express my cordial welcome to the participants of the 6th annual workshop on nuclear power infrastructure since 2006. Looking back at the development of nuclear power programmes for embarking countries since 2006, I am glad to see that many embarking countries apply the IAEA Milestones approach and have made much progress, since several countries already have entered or entering into phase 3, the construction of the first nuclear power plant. Since the last annual workshop, the most shocking event was the accident in Fukushima Daiichi in March 2011, which was caused by an earthquake and tsunami of unprecedented severity. Looking at the impact of this accident on the nuclear power, there were speculations that the expansion in interest in nuclear power, which we had experienced in recent years, could come to an end. However, it is clear now that there will be continuous and significant growth in the use of nuclear power in the next two decades, although at a slower rate than in our previous projections. Most of the growth will occur in countries that already have operating nuclear power plants, such as China, India and Russia. In countries which are considering introducing nuclear power, interest remains strong, despite Fukushima Daiichi. Most of these countries are proceeding with plans to add nuclear power to their energy mix, with the Agency's assistance. Only a few countries cancelled or revised their plans, while others have taken a ''wait and see'' approach. However, the factors that contributed to increasing interest in nuclear power before the Fukushima Daiichi accident have not changed: these include increasing global demand for energy, as well as concerns about climate change, volatile fossil fuel prices and security of energy supply. The countries strongly committed to nuclear power such as the United Arab Emirates, Turkey, Belarus, Vietnam, Jordan, Bangladesh and Poland, keep the same position even

  20. Intracranial hemorrhage and other symptoms in infants associated with human parechovirus in Vienna, Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Herbert; Prammer, Ruth; Bock, Wolfgang; Ollerieth, Robert; Bernert, Günther; Zwiauer, Karl; Aberle, Judith H; Aberle, Stephan W; Fazekas, Tamas; Holter, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    The human parechovirus (HPeV), mainly genotype 3, may cause severe illness in young infants and neonates, including sepsis-like illness and central nervous system (CNS) infection. We lack data concerning the impact and symptoms of HPeV infection in infants in Austria. The aim of the study is to evaluate the spectrum of symptoms and findings in infants with the parechovirus in Vienna and its environs. Patients younger than 3 months of age, with clinically suspected sepsis-like illness or CNS infection and a positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for HPeV, were included in the study. Medical records were analyzed retrospectively. Twenty patients were included in the study from 2009 to 2013. The most frequent manifestations were fever and neurological symptoms (89 and 80 %, respectively). Fifty percent of the infants had white blood cell counts out of range. The most notable aspect was cerebral hemorrhage in three neonates, which has not been reported earlier in association with HPeV infection. In Austria, HPeV is a relevant pathogen in sepsis-like disease in infants. The clinical presentation is similar to that described in other studies; cerebral hemorrhage is a new aspect. • Parechovirus infection can cause severe illness in infants. • Symptoms have been described to involve all organs; sepsis-like signs, fever, and irritability are most frequent. • Also in Austria, HPeV plays an important role in severe illnesses in infants. • Severe intracranial hemorrhage is described as a new finding.

  1. Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) and their relevance as disease vectors in the city of Vienna, Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebl, Karin; Zittra, Carina; Silbermayr, Katja; Obwaller, Adelheid; Berer, Dominik; Brugger, Katharina; Walter, Melanie; Pinior, Beate; Fuehrer, Hans-Peter; Rubel, Franz

    2015-02-01

    Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) are important vectors for a wide range of pathogenic organisms. As large parts of the human population in developed countries live in cities, the occurrence of vector-borne diseases in urban areas is of particular interest for epidemiologists and public health authorities. In this study, we investigated the mosquito occurrence in the city of Vienna, Austria, in order to estimate the risk of transmission of mosquito-borne diseases. Mosquitoes were captured using different sampling techniques at 17 sites in the city of Vienna. Species belonging to the Culex pipiens complex (78.8 %) were most abundant, followed by Coquillettidia richiardii (10.2 %), Anopheles plumbeus (5.4 %), Aedes vexans (3.8 %), and Ochlerotatus sticticus (0.7 %). Individuals of the Cx. pipiens complex were found at 80.2 % of the trap sites, while 58.8 % of the trap sites were positive for Cq. richiardii and Ae. vexans. Oc. sticticus was captured at 35.3 % of the sites, and An. plumbeus only at 23.5 % of the trap sites. Cx. pipiens complex is known to be a potent vector and pathogens like West Nile virus (WNV), Usutu virus (USUV), Tahyna virus (TAHV), Sindbis virus (SINV), Plasmodium sp., and Dirofilaria repens can be transmitted by this species. Cq. richiardii is a known vector species for Batai virus (BATV), SINV, TAHV, and WNV, while Ae. vexans can transmit TAHV, USUV, WNV, and Dirofilaria repens. An. plumbeus and Oc. sticticus seem to play only a minor role in the transmission of vector-borne diseases in Vienna. WNV, which is already wide-spread in Europe, is likely to be the highest threat in Vienna as it can be transmitted by several of the most common species, has already been shown to pose a higher risk in cities, and has the possibility to cause severe illness.

  2. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Eight Annual Meeting, Vienna, Austria, 15-18 April 1975. Summary Report. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-07-01

    The Eighth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Past Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, from 15 to 18 April 1975. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programmes in the field of LMPBR’s and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  3. International Scientific Studies Conference (ISS09), Vienna, Austria, 10-12 June 2009. First announcement and call for papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The results of the scientific studies carried out will be presented at the International Scientific Studies Conference - the ISS09 Conference - in Vienna, Austria. The Conference will focus on issues related to the capability and readiness of the CTBT's verification regime to detect nuclear explosions worldwide. It will also address how the verification regime has benefited from scientific and technical developments since the Treaty opened for signature in 1996.

  4. Implications from palaeoseismological investigations at the Markgrafneusiedl Fault (Vienna Basin, Austria for seismic hazard assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hintersberger

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Intraplate regions characterized by low rates of seismicity are challenging for seismic hazard assessment, mainly for two reasons. Firstly, evaluation of historic earthquake catalogues may not reveal all active faults that contribute to regional seismic hazard. Secondly, slip rate determination is limited by sparse geomorphic preservation of slowly moving faults. In the Vienna Basin (Austria, moderate historical seismicity (Imax, obs ∕ Mmax, obs = 8∕5.2 concentrates along the left-lateral strike-slip Vienna Basin Transfer Fault (VBTF. In contrast, several normal faults branching out from the VBTF show neither historical nor instrumental earthquake records, although geomorphological data indicate Quaternary displacement along those faults. Here, located about 15 km outside of Vienna, the Austrian capital, we present a palaeoseismological dataset of three trenches that cross one of these splay faults, the Markgrafneusiedl Fault (MF, in order to evaluate its seismic potential. Comparing the observations of the different trenches, we found evidence for five to six surface-breaking earthquakes during the last 120 kyr, with the youngest event occurring at around 14 ka. The derived surface displacements lead to magnitude estimates ranging between 6.2 ± 0.5 and 6.8 ± 0.4. Data can be interpreted by two possible slip models, with slip model 1 showing more regular recurrence intervals of about 20–25 kyr between the earthquakes with M ≥ 6.5 and slip model 2 indicating that such earthquakes cluster in two time intervals in the last 120 kyr. Direct correlation between trenches favours slip model 2 as the more plausible option. Trench observations also show that structural and sedimentological records of strong earthquakes with small surface offset have only low preservation potential. Therefore, the earthquake frequency for magnitudes between 6 and 6.5 cannot be constrained by the trenching records. Vertical

  5. Implications from palaeoseismological investigations at the Markgrafneusiedl Fault (Vienna Basin, Austria) for seismic hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintersberger, Esther; Decker, Kurt; Lomax, Johanna; Lüthgens, Christopher

    2018-02-01

    Intraplate regions characterized by low rates of seismicity are challenging for seismic hazard assessment, mainly for two reasons. Firstly, evaluation of historic earthquake catalogues may not reveal all active faults that contribute to regional seismic hazard. Secondly, slip rate determination is limited by sparse geomorphic preservation of slowly moving faults. In the Vienna Basin (Austria), moderate historical seismicity (Imax, obs / Mmax, obs = 8/5.2) concentrates along the left-lateral strike-slip Vienna Basin Transfer Fault (VBTF). In contrast, several normal faults branching out from the VBTF show neither historical nor instrumental earthquake records, although geomorphological data indicate Quaternary displacement along those faults. Here, located about 15 km outside of Vienna, the Austrian capital, we present a palaeoseismological dataset of three trenches that cross one of these splay faults, the Markgrafneusiedl Fault (MF), in order to evaluate its seismic potential. Comparing the observations of the different trenches, we found evidence for five to six surface-breaking earthquakes during the last 120 kyr, with the youngest event occurring at around 14 ka. The derived surface displacements lead to magnitude estimates ranging between 6.2 ± 0.5 and 6.8 ± 0.4. Data can be interpreted by two possible slip models, with slip model 1 showing more regular recurrence intervals of about 20-25 kyr between the earthquakes with M ≥ 6.5 and slip model 2 indicating that such earthquakes cluster in two time intervals in the last 120 kyr. Direct correlation between trenches favours slip model 2 as the more plausible option. Trench observations also show that structural and sedimentological records of strong earthquakes with small surface offset have only low preservation potential. Therefore, the earthquake frequency for magnitudes between 6 and 6.5 cannot be constrained by the trenching records. Vertical slip rates of 0.02-0.05 mm a-1 derived from the

  6. Parascolymia (Scleractinia: Lobophylliidae in the Central Paratethys Sea (Vienna Basin, Austria and its possible biogeographic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Reuter

    Full Text Available Palaeobiogeographical and palaeodiversity patterns of scleractinian reef corals are generally biased due to uncertain taxonomy and a loss of taxonomic characters through dissolution and recrystallization of the skeletal aragonite in shallow marine limestones. Herein, we describe a fossil lobophylliid coral in mouldic preservation from the early middle Miocene Leitha Limestone of the Central Paratethys Sea (Vienna Basin, Austria. By using grey-scale image inversion and silicone rubber casts for the visualization of the original skeletal anatomy and the detection of distinct micromorphological characters (i.e. shape of septal teeth, granulation of septocostae Parascolymia bracherti has been identified as a new species in spite of the dissolved skeleton. In the recent era, Parascolymia like all Lobophylliidae is restricted to the Indo-Pacific region, where it is represented by a single species. The new species proves the genus also in the Miocene Mediterranean reef coral province. A review of the spatio-temporal relationships of fossil corals related to Parascolymia indicates that the genus was probably rooted in the Eastern Atlantic‒Western Tethys region during the Paleocene to Eocene and reached the Indo-Pacific region not before the Oligocene. The revealed palaeobiogeographical pattern shows an obvious congruence with that of Acropora and tridacnine bivalves reflecting a gradual equatorwards retreat of the marine biodiversity center parallel to the Cenozoic climate deterioration.

  7. Socio-economic drivers of large urban biomass cogeneration: Sustainable energy supply for Austria's capital Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madlener, Reinhard; Bachhiesl, Mario

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed case study on Austria's by far largest biomass cogeneration plant. The plant is located in the city of Vienna and scheduled to be put into operation by mid-2006. Given the urban location of the plant and its significant biomass fuel input requirements, fuel delivery logistics play an important role-not only from an economic point of view, but also in relation to supply security and environmental impact. We describe and analyse the history of the project, putting particular emphasis on the main driving forces and actors behind the entire project development process. From this analysis we deduce the following main socio-economic drivers and success factors for the realisation of large bioenergy projects in urban settings: (1) a critical mass of actors; (2) a priori political consensus; (3) the existence of a problem (and problem awareness) that calls for decisive steps to be taken; (4) institutional innovation and changes in the mindset of the main decision makers; (5) favourable economic conditions; (6) change agents that are actively engaged from an early stage of development; (7) intra-firm supporters at different hierarchical levels and from different departments; and (8) targeted study tours that help to reduce uncertainty, to enable leapfrogging in project planning and design, and to build up confidence in the project's feasibility and chance of success

  8. Dilatant shear band formation and diagenesis in calcareous, arkosic sandstones, Vienna Basin (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommatzsch, Marco; Exner, Ulrike; Gier, Susanne; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The present study examines deformation bands in calcareous arkosic sands. The investigated units can be considered as an equivalent to the Matzen field in the Vienna Basin (Austria), which is one of the most productive oil reservoirs in central Europe. The outcrop exposes carbonate-free and carbonatic sediments of Badenian age separated by a normal fault. Carbonatic sediments in the hanging wall of the normal fault develop dilation bands with minor shear displacements (< 2 mm), whereas carbonate-free sediments in the footwall develop cataclastic shear bands with up to 70 cm displacement. The cataclastic shear bands show a permeability reduction up to 3 orders of magnitude and strong baffling effects in the vadose zone. Carbonatic dilation bands show a permeability reduction of 1-2 orders of magnitude and no baffling structures. We distinguished two types of deformation bands in the carbonatic units, which differ in deformation mechanisms, distribution and composition. Full-cemented bands form as dilation bands with an intense syn-kinematic calcite cementation, whereas the younger loose-cemented bands are dilatant shear bands cemented by patchy calcite and clay minerals. All analyzed bands are characterized by a porosity and permeability reduction caused by grain fracturing and cementation. The changed petrophysical properties and especially the porosity evolution are closely related to diagenetic processes driven by varying pore fluids in different diagenetic environments. The deformation band evolution and sealing capacity is controlled by the initial host rock composition. PMID:26300577

  9. Statement at Inauguration Ceremony for Vienna Center for Disarmament and Non-Proliferation, 25 February 2011, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2011-01-01

    I was a member of the Group of Governmental Experts which drafted the United Nations Study on Disarmament and Non proliferation Education in 2002. In my new role at the IAEA, I continue to attach great importance to education. I believe it is vital that we educate the people of the world about how devastating nuclear weapons are and build awareness of the importance of nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation. I have no doubt that the new Vienna Center for Disarmament and Non-Proliferation will make an important contribution in this area. The recent conclusion of the new START Treaty between the Russian Federation and the United States was a welcome development in the nuclear disarmament field. Reducing the role and numbers of nuclear weapons is a positive step towards a safe and peaceful world free of nuclear weapons which can impact positively on nuclear non-proliferation efforts. But, of course, further steps are needed. Disarmament and non-proliferation education have an essential role to play in maintaining and strengthening the momentum towards achieving a world free of nuclear weapons. The IAEA has for decades been actively involved in promoting nuclear non-proliferation education. My colleagues and I speak about nuclear non-proliferation throughout the world. We organize briefings here in Vienna for members of parliament, government officials, think tanks, academics and other groups. We host educational seminars for NGOs, diplomats and journalists on the Agency's non-proliferation activities - the latest one was held this week. The IAEA also provides opportunities for on-the-job training and work experience to students and young professionals. Indeed, several Monterey Institute graduates are currently working with us. This is an excellent example of how disarmament and non-proliferation education can contribute to promoting international peace and security. The 9/11 terrorist attacks in the United States took place during my time with Monterey in

  10. Introductory statement to the Board of Governors, 2 March 2009, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2009-01-01

    In his statement to the Board of Governors meeting in Vienna, Austria, IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei focused on issues of nuclear safety and security, nuclear power, nuclear applications, verification of nuclear non-proliferation as well as the Agency's programme and budget. Nuclear Safety and Security. Dr. ElBaradei noted that work still needs to be done to strengthen nuclear safety and security worldwide. He said the IAEA must focus on improving the Incident and Emergency Centre to enhance its accident response capabilities, and to provide more effective support for Member States, especially for new entrants to nuclear power. Nuclear Power. The Nuclear Technology Review indicates that expectations for the use of nuclear power continue to rise, with growth targets for nuclear power being raised in China and the Russian Federation. Asia remains the focus of growth in nuclear power. The Director General said, 'The ending of restrictions on India's nuclear trade should allow an acceleration of its planned expansion of nuclear power.' Dr. ElBaradei proceeded to outline plans for the establishment of non-political multinational mechanisms to assure access for all countries to nuclear fuel and reactor technology. He circulated, at the request of the Russian Federation, a proposal for a low enriched uranium reserve to be used by Member States. The proposal provides assured export licences and covers all long term costs. The Director General also reported a positive response to the Nuclear Threat Initiative's offer of $50 million for a low enriched uranium reserve, contingent on contributions of an additional $100 million by others. So far, contributions and pledges have been made by Norway ($5 million), the USA ($50 million), the United Arab Emirates ($10 million) and the European Union ($25 million). 'The ideal scenario would be to start with a nuclear fuel bank under IAEA auspices. The next step would be to agree that all new enrichment and reprocessing

  11. Introductory Statement to Board of Governors, 2 December 2010, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2010-01-01

    continue to pay close attention to cancer control in the coming years. In October, we launched the Human Health Campus, a dedicated website which will provide educational resources to health professionals working in nuclear medicine, radiation oncology, medical physics, and nutrition. The idea is to offer continuous medical education with an insight into the different aspects of modern clinical practice. In November, the International Symposium on Standards, Applications and Quality Assurance in Medical Radiation Dosimetry took place in Vienna. Nearly 400 scientists took part in this unique symposium, which provided an opportunity for the exchange of ideas, knowledge and best practices in dosimetry quality assurance. We will continue to work with Member States to find ways to better support their growing need for dosimetry audits. Elsewhere in nuclear applications, we are seeing steady growth in Member State interest in the use of nuclear techniques for water resource assessment, agricultural water management, and protecting the marine environment. These are among the most important issues for sustainable development. The Agency has a niche role in helping States to improve scientific understanding and build related capacity. There are already more than 100 technical cooperation projects related to water. During the coming year, I aim to strengthen our activities related to water and raise awareness of the Agency's role in assisting States. We will continue to work closely with other international organizations active in this field. Nuclear Energy Turning now to nuclear energy, we continue to support Member States in exploring or starting nuclear power programmes. I draw your attention to the workshop on the Introduction of Nuclear Power Programmes: Management and Evaluation of a National Nuclear Infrastructure which will be held in February 2011. This workshop is an opportunity for newcomers to share perspectives on developing nuclear power policies, including for waste

  12. Open Space between Residential Buildings as a Factor of Sustainable Development - Case Studies in Brno (Czech Republic) and Vienna (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilnarová, Pavla; Wittmann, Maxmilian

    2017-12-01

    The characteristics of open spaces between residential buildings have, as authors suppose, an impact on the sustainable development of urban areas. Spatial arrangement and accessibility of these spaces, the type and height of surrounding buildings, the quantity and character of greenery, and many more characteristics influence the quality of environment, and the quality of life of local residents. These and further characteristics of the open spaces between residential buildings influence the ecological stability of the area, its hygienic qualities, the intensity and way of using by various social groups, and also the prices of real estates. These qualities indicate the environmental, social and economic sustainability of the urban area. The proposed research methodology assessed specific indicators of sustainability within a range from 0 to 10 points. 5 points correspond to the general standard in the area, 0 points indicate degradation, and 10 points indicate the highest contribution to sustainable development. Observation methods, questionnaire survey, statistical analyses, and methods of measurement were used to determine the values of the given indicators. The paper analyses the impact of the open spaces between residential buildings on sustainability via the case studies performed in the Central European cities of Brno, Czech Republic and Vienna, Austria. Two forms of residential urban structures in the City of Brno in the Czech Republic were selected for the analysis: the closed courtyards in the urban block from the 19th century and the open spaces in the housing estates constructed under socialism in the 20th century. The question is, if the different forms of spaces between residential buildings influence the sustainability of urban area and satisfaction of inhabitants in different ways. A complementary case study in Vienna indicates that inhabitants of a housing estate in Vienna, as well as inhabitants of housing estates in Brno, highly appreciate the

  13. Introductory Statement to Board of Governors, 5 March 2012, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The Nuclear Technology Review 2012 contains interesting data on the initial impact of the Fukushima Daiichi accident on the nuclear power sector. It shows that 13 reactors were permanently retired in 2011, 12 of them as a direct result of the accident. There were seven new grid connections - the third straight year of increases. But there were only four construction starts on new reactors (three of which are reported in the NTR; the fourth was reported to us last month). Nevertheless, the Agency's updated projections suggest that the drop in construction starts will be temporary. The use of nuclear power will continue to grow in the coming decades. There were 65 reactors under construction at the end of 2011, 44 of them in Asia, which remains the centre of growth. In 2012, we will strengthen our focus on supporting national infrastructure development in Member States with firm plans to embark on nuclear power. Last November, the Agency completed a sixth Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review (INIR) mission - to Bangladesh. A seventh is planned - to Belarus - in June. In January this year, we conducted the first INIR follow-up mission, to Jordan, and held the sixth annual workshop in Vienna on Managing the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power Plants, which was attended by participants from 43 Member States. Assurance of Supply. Work is continuing on the establishment of the IAEA LEU Bank. A progress report has been circulated. Last week, the Government of Kazakhstan confirmed the site for the LEU Bank. I look forward to starting negotiations with Kazakhstan on a Host State Agreement, which will be submitted to the Board for approval. Since the last Board meeting, the Agency has received 10 million euros from the European Union - out of its pledged contribution of 25 million - and 10 million US dollars from Kuwait. I express my thanks to both.

  14. Scientific analysis of a calcified object from a post-medieval burial in Vienna, Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Michaela; Berner, Margit; Krause, Heike; Kucera, Matthias; Patzak, Beatrix

    2016-09-01

    Calcifications commonly occur in association with soft tissue inflammation. However, they are not often discussed in palaeopathological literature, frequently due to problems of identification and diagnosis. We present a calcified object (40×27×27cm) found with a middle-aged male from a post-medieval cemetery in Vienna. It was not recognized during excavation, thus its anatomical location within the body remains unknown. The object was subject to X-ray, SEM and CT scanning and compared to historic pathological objects held in the collection of the Natural History Museum Vienna. Two of closest resemblance, a thyroid adenoma and goitre were subject to similar analytical techniques for comparison. Despite similarities between all objects, the structure of the object most closely conforms to a thyroid tumor. Nevertheless, due to similar pathophysiological pathways and biochemical composition of calcified soft tissue, a secure identification outside of its anatomical context is not possible. The research further highlights the fact that recognition of such objects during excavation is crucial for a more conclusive diagnosis. Historic medical records indicate that they were common and might therefore be expected to frequently occur in cemeteries. Consequently, an increasing the dataset of calcifications would also aid in extending the knowledge about diseases in past human populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The treatment model of the guidance center for gamblers and their relatives in Vienna/Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horodecki, I

    1992-06-01

    Within 8 years, "Gamblers Anonymous" in Vienna evolved into a guidance center for gamblers and their relatives, with professional aid. It is a non-profit institution and the therapeutic team consists of one psychologist, one social-worker and one psychiatrist. The clients can remain anonymous, but about 90% of them reveal their identity. The treatment model integrating professional therapy and self-help is presented. The reasons we decided to base our work on an "addiction model" of pathological gambling are explained. All the clients consulting our center in 1990 (N=237) are described according to age, sex, types of gambling, duration of problem gambling, family status, profession, income, debts, and income/debt relationship. Finally, the treatment program of our center is presented.

  16. Seasonal variations in the tritium content of groundwaters of the Vienna Basin, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, G.H.; Payne, B.R.; Dincer, T.; Florkowski, T.; Gattinger, T.

    1967-01-01

    Monthly analyses of tritium from 22 sources of groundwater of the Vienna Basin have been made since April 1965 with a view to elucidating the complex groundwater surface water relations and ascertaining the movement of groundwaters. The sources are classified broadly into four groups: (1) Non-thermal springs including karst springs of the bordering mountains; (2) thermal springs rising along faults that border the floor of the Vienna Basin; (3) wells on the floor of the Basin; and (4) large groundwater overflows on the floor of the Basin. The following are among significant findings: All groundwaters sampled showed the effect of local recharge by high tritium precipitation in the exceptionally wet summer of 1965; Groundwater overflows thought to represent discharge from the main groundwater reservoir were generally higher in tritium than other groundwaters indicating rapid shallow circulation from nearby streams. Thermal springs believed representative of deep circulation all showed the effect of mixing with shallow waters recharged from current precipitation. All showed appreciable tritium content, even at the minimum levels. The highest tritium contents in well-waters were from the upper part of the Basin where water levels are very deep and streams lose water in crossing the alluvium. Well-waters in the area of shallow water in the lower Basin were generally lower in tritium than those of the upper Basin, but all showed the effect of recharge in the summer of 1965. Samples taken during drilling of a deep exploratory well show a decrease in tritium with depth, but even at 140 m depth the tritium content was 13 T.U. indicating relatively rapid circulation throughout thc principal aquifer. (author)

  17. Obesity prevalence and nutritional habits among Indian women: a comparison between Punjabi women living in India and Punjabi migrants in Vienna, Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Maryam; Kirchengast, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    The current study aimed to determine the prevalence of obesity and overweight among Indian women living in Punjab, India and in Vienna, Austria. A series of 115 women ageing between 17 and 80 years (x = 38.7 yrs; +/- 14.5) was enrolled in the present study. 65 women lived in the district of Jalandhar in Punjab, 50 Punjabi women lived in as migrants in Vienna Austria. Data collection comprised an anthropometric analysis including stature height, body weight and the body mass index (BMI). For classification of the weight status the Indian BMI cutoffs defined by the WHO for Asian Indians were used. Data concerning dietary patterns and lifestyle parameters were collected by structured interviews using a standardized questionnaire. Among both subgroups overweight and obesity were highly prevalent. Underweight (18.5%) was significantly more prevalent in Punjab than in Vienna (6.0 %), while overweight and obesity were more frequently found among Punjabi women in Vienna (26.0%; 54.0%) than among Punjabi women in India (9.2%; 24.6 %). Analysing lifestyle and dietary patterns it turned out that energy dense meals were preferred and fat and sugar were used frequently among both subsamples. A statistically significant relationship between dietary habits and weight status could not be proved.

  18. Introductory Statement to Board of Governors, 3 March 2014, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2014-01-01

    As we approach the third anniversary of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, the Agency continues to support Japan and to help strengthen nuclear safety throughout the world. The final reports to Japan of our international review missions on decommissioning, and on remediation of large contaminated off-site areas, have been made public. Both missions observed good progress in their respective areas. But the situation remains complex, and challenging issues must be resolved to ensure the plant's long-term stability. Progress continues to be made in implementation of the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety. The next International Experts' Meeting in two weeks' time will focus on severe accident management. The 6th Review Meeting of the Convention on Nuclear Safety will be held in Vienna from 24 March to 4 April. I hope it will have a productive outcome that will help to strengthen global nuclear safety. The Nuclear Safety Review 2014 shows that the operational safety of the world's nuclear power plants remains high. Significant progress has been made in strengthening nuclear safety in key areas such as assessments of safety vulnerabilities and strengthening the Agency's peer review services. Long-term operation of nuclear power plants is an important issue for many countries. Many of the world's nuclear power reactors have been in operation for 30 or 40 years or more. Managing these reactors safely in the long term poses challenges which need to be carefully assessed and managed

  19. Introductory statement to the Board of Governors. 8 March 2004, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2004-01-01

    The agenda for this meeting covers a broad range of issues, once again touching on all three Agency pillars - technology, safety and verification. The topics related to each of these pillars, as well as a number of management issues are discussed: Nuclear Technology (2004 Nuclear Technology Review (NTR), the third comprehensive edition covering the fundamentals of nuclear technology development, including: power applications; applications for food, water and health; and applications for environmental and industrial processes); Waste Management and Disposal; Food and Agriculture; Human Health; Environmental Applications; IAEA Collaborating Centres; Nuclear Safety, Radiation Safety, and Waste and Transport Safety; Nuclear Safety, Radiation Safety, and Waste and Transport Safety (the Nuclear Safety Review for 2003, providing an overview of current and emerging nuclear safety trends and issues); Safety Standards; Safety Missions; Research Reactor Safety; ransport Safety; Nuclear Verification; Implementation of Safeguards in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, the Islamic Republic of Iran, and Socialist People's Libyan Arab Jamahiriya; Implications for the Non-Proliferation Regime, and Additional Measures; Financing of the Technical Cooperation Fund; Security Upgrades at the Vienna International Centre

  20. Experiencing fuel poverty. Coping strategies of low-income households in Vienna/Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, Karl-Michael; Spitzer, Markus; Christanell, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Until the present day, research on fuel poverty focussing on the point of view of those concerned is few and far between. The present paper aims at filling this gap, analysing experiences with and behavioural responses to fuel poverty. It examines the day-to-day energy situation of households, which are poor/at-risk-of-poverty and/or suffering from fuel poverty in a case study conducted in the Austrian capital Vienna. Qualitative interviews provide the data for investigating the relevant factors in causing fuel poverty (among those, bad housing conditions, outdated appliances, financial problems), and provide a basis for discussion about the respective behavioural strategies of the people concerned. The results show that the ways of handling this problematic situation vary greatly and that people follow different strategies when it comes to inventing solutions for coping with the restrictions and finding ways of satisfying at least a part of their basic energy needs. Nonetheless, it also clearly surfaces that the scope of action is limited in many cases, which in turn only supports the claim that changes in the overall conditions are essential. - Highlights: ► This paper scrutinises experiences with and behavioural reactions to fuel poverty. ► Analysis of 50 qualitative interviews in Viennese low-income households. ► Low-income and/or fuel poor households face various strains. ► Ways of dealing with fuel poverty vary greatly, scope of action is limited. ► Households are very creative when it comes to coping with restricted conditions.

  1. Workshop on advanced nuclear data online services. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwerer, O.

    2000-09-01

    This report summarizes the Workshop on Advanced Nuclear Data Online Services held in Vienna, Austria, 29 November to 3 December 1999. It includes the main topics of the agenda, the list of participants, and general comments and recommendations. (author)

  2. Introductory Statement to Board of Governors, 4 June 2012, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Safety in the light of Fukushima Daiichi. Some 230 experts from 44 countries attended. Nuclear Security. As you know, the Agency is the main global platform for enhancing nuclear security. Next year, from the first to the fifth of July, we will host an International Conference on Nuclear Security: Enhancing Global Efforts here in Vienna. I encourage all Member States to participate at a high level in this important event and, by doing so, to provide input to the Agency's next Nuclear Security Plan. Nuclear Energy. Turning briefly to nuclear energy, the Agency organized the Third International Conference on Nuclear Power Plant Life Management last month in Salt Lake City in the United States. The Conference focused on good practices related to the safety aspects of plant ageing, ageing management and long term operation. Assurance of Supply. The IAEA LEU Bank project has entered into the implementation phase and we are making steady progress towards its establishment. An Agency team visited Kazakhstan last month to initiate formal negotiations on the Host State Agreement. Nuclear Verification. Safeguards Implementation Report for 2011. The Safeguards Implementation Report for 2011 has been distributed. It details our work implementing safeguards in 178 States with safeguards agreements in force. Conclusion of Safeguards Agreements and Additional Protocols. You have before you a draft comprehensive safeguards agreement and an additional protocol for Bosnia and Herzegovina. Since my last report to the Board, the Republic of Moldova has brought into force an additional protocol, and Antigua and Barbuda has amended its small quantities protocol. Application of Safeguards in Democratic People's Republic of Korea. Concerning the application of safeguards in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, I would like to update the Board on recent developments. As I previously informed the Board, I received a communication from the Director General of the General Department of Atomic

  3. Introductory statement to the Board of Governors, 06 March 2006, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2006-01-01

    Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management has increased by more than 20% in the past year. In December, representatives from over 30 Member States met here in Vienna to discuss practical steps for implementing the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors. The Agency has been supporting international efforts aimed at converting research reactors that use high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low enriched uranium (LEU). The focus on radiological protection of patients has been rising. A key area of Agency assistance has been in training major users of X-rays, such as interventional cardiologists and other medical doctors and technicians, in relevant radiation protection techniques. Regarding nuclear verification the status of safeguards agreements and additional protocols was reported. Since the end of 2002, when at the request of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) the Agency's verification activities were terminated, the Agency has been unable to verify the DPRK's nuclear activities. As I have reported before, the Agency stands ready to work with the DPRK - and other concerned parties - towards a comprehensive solution that addresses the security and other needs of the DPRK, on the one hand, and on the other hand, the needs of the international community to ensure that all nuclear activities in the DPRK are exclusively for peaceful purposes. The Agency over the last three years has been conducting intensive investigations of Iran's nuclear programme with a view to providing assurances about the peaceful nature of that programme. During these investigations, the Agency has not seen indications of diversion of nuclear material to nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices. Regrettably, however, after three years of intensive verification, there remain uncertainties with regard to both the scope and the nature of Iran's nuclear programme

  4. Introductory statement to the Board of Governors, 5 March 2007, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2007-01-01

    The agenda for the meeting includes nuclear technology, safety and verification - all three of the Agency's areas of activity. In his introductory statement to the Board of Governors, 05 March 2007, the Director General of the IAEA, discussed the status and trends concerning nuclear power which will have an increasing role as part of the global energy mix and that the growth in demand will mainly be from developing countries. He presented the 'Nuclear technology Review 2007' and an information document entitled 'Considerations to Launch a Nuclear power Programme'. To assist with subsequent steps in nuclear power planning the IAEA has established an inter-departmental nuclear power support programme. The IAEA has also produced an information document summarizing key considerations from all perspectives like safety, security, infrastructure development, technical cooperation, legal considerations and others. The Agency's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) is moving to phase 2. The IAEA is also developing common user requirements for small and medium size reactors. The 'Nuclear Safety Review for the Year 2006' provides an overview of current and emerging nuclear safety trends and issues. The newly established 'Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS)' is intended to help Member States enhance their legislative and regulatory infrastructures, and to harmonize regulatory approaches in all areas of safety. Two workshop on the shipment of radioactive material are scheduled for latin America and Asia. Concerning the issue of nuclear verification the status of safeguards agreements and additional protocols was discussed. The return of IAEA personnel to the Democratic People's Republic of Korea is envisioned to conduct all necessary monitoring and verification as agreed by the IAEA and the DPRK. The report on the implementation of the NPT safeguards agreement and relevant provisions of UN Security Council resolution 1737 in the

  5. Combined use of FRN and CSSI techniques: SWMCN Laboratory PICO experience during the European Geosciences Union (EGU) General Assembly 2015, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabit, L.; Toloza, A.; Resch, C.

    2016-01-01

    The European Geosciences Union (EGU) General Assembly 2015 that took place at the Austria Center of Vienna, from 12-17 April 2015, was a big success with 4870 oral, 8489 poster, and 705 PICO (Presenting Interactive COntent™) presentations as well as 11837 scientists attending from 108 different countries. This year again, the activities of the SWMCN Laboratory were well represented with 3 PICO presentations during the SSS12.10 session (i.e. Soil and sediment tracing techniques for understanding environmental processes)

  6. A report from the 20th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (April 10-13, 2010 - Vienna, Austria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabasseda, X

    2010-07-01

    Effective antimicrobials currently in use in Europe and throughout the world are fast losing ground as many pathogens acquire resistance to newly introduced drugs. Multidrug and panresistance have now been identified in many pathogens, as iteratively discussed throughout this year's meeting of the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID). As extensively discussed in an oral session entitled Worldwide Dissemination of Resistances by 10 specialists from across Europe and the world, important drug resistances have now been identified in Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella enterica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii and virtually all known pathogens (Roede, B.M. et al., Abst O127; Huenger, F. et al., Abst O395; Mera, R.M. et al., Abst O483). While many other issues were discussed, including the role of healthcare professionals and of hand hygiene in controlling the spread of infections (Derde, L. et al., Abst O464), microbial resistance was indeed the main topic of discussion in the many oral and poster presentations at the Austria Center in Vienna. The war against the superbugs has been declared and initiatives have been taken for tracking and destroying difficult to treat pathogens. Treatments of the diseases caused by these multidrug- and panresistant organisms continue, as manifested by new research and population surveys. However, with antimicrobial resistances as leitmotiv background music, other very recent scientific achievements and findings in diagnostics and treatment for infectious diseases took center stage in Vienna, including important information on novel drugs for infectious diseases and the use and comparative effectiveness of extant drugs, as summarized in the following report.

  7. FAO/IAEA International Symposium on Food Safety and Quality: Applications of Nuclear and Related Techniques, Vienna, Austria, 10−13 November 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Ensuring food supply integrity is of the utmost importance in relation to food security, safety and quality, consumer protection and international trade. Control measures throughout the entire food production and supply chain are essential to maintain and assure this integrity. The fundamental purpose of the controls is to support food safety and quality, because both are essential and set the foundation for food security and consumer protection as well as facilitating both domestic and international trade. The need for methods to monitor and verify food safety and quality is evidenced by the ever growing list of food product recalls and incidents such as melamine, antibiotic and dioxin contamination. Food fraud (e.g. the adulteration of beef products with horse meat), the introduction of new technologies with potential food safety implications (e.g. nanotechnology) and environmental factors (e.g. climate change) further highlight the importance of continued refinement, development and innovation to improve food control measures. Effective techniques are necessary to help assess and manage risks and protect the consumer. These include food irradiation to treat food directly, as well as other nuclear and related technologies for tracing food products in order to verify their provenance or to detect and control contaminants. To explore some of these challenges experienced by many Member States, an International Symposium on Food Safety and Quality: Applications of Nuclear and Related Techniques was held in Vienna, Austria, from 10 to 13 November 2014, under the auspices of the Food and Environmental Protection Subprogramme.

  8. Statement to Fifty-Fifth Regular Session of IAEA General Conference 2011, 19 September 2011, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Since the last General Conference, the most important single item on the IAEA agenda has been the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. This caused deep public anxiety throughout the world and damaged confidence in nuclear power. I will therefore begin my statement by reporting to you in some detail about the aftermath of the accident and the current situation at the plant. As you will recall, the accident was caused by an earthquake and tsunami of unprecedented severity, which struck the east of Japan on 11 March. The IAEA Incident and Emergency Centre went into action immediately, working around the clock to advise Japan and to share information with all Member States. A few days after the accident, I went to Japan to meet then-Prime Minister Kan. I offered the full support of the IAEA and stressed that Japan needed to demonstrate the highest transparency in its handling of the accident. On my return to Vienna, I convened a special meeting of the Board of Governors and dispatched a number of expert teams to Japan to assist in areas such as radiological monitoring and food safety. An IAEA International Fact-Finding Expert Mission subsequently undertook a 10-day mission to Japan and produced a detailed report. In June, I convened an IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety in Vienna, which many of you attended. The Conference adopted a Ministerial Declaration aimed at strengthening nuclear safety, emergency preparedness, and radiation protection of people and the environment worldwide. The Ministerial Conference was chaired by the distinguished Permanent Representative of Brazil to the IAEA, Antonio Guerreiro, who skilfully steered the work that led to the adoption of the Ministerial Declaration. I am very grateful to Ambassador Guerreiro for his outstanding contribution. The June Ministerial Declaration formed the basis of the first ever IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, which was approved by consensus by the Board of Governors

  9. Statement to Fifty-Seventh Regular Session of IAEA General Conference 2013, 16 September 2013, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2013-01-01

    On December 8, it will be 60 years since President Dwight D. Eisenhower gave his historic Atoms for Peace speech to the United Nations General Assembly in New York. He called for the establishment of an international atomic energy agency to put nuclear material to use to ''serve the peaceful pursuits of mankind''. Eisenhower's vision became a reality four years later, in 1957, when the IAEA began work here in Vienna. The Agency has worked hard to bring the benefits of peaceful nuclear technology to all parts of the globe and to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons. The world has changed enormously in the past 60 years. But the Atoms for Peace mission has lost none of its relevance. The Agency has successfully adapted to changing times and the evolving needs of Member States. will now turn to some of the issues on the agenda of the 57th General Conference. Nuclear power is the best known peaceful application of nuclear energy. The Agency's latest projections show continued growth in global use of nuclear power in the next 20 years, especially in Asia. The Agency will continue to accompany users of nuclear power, both new and experienced, at every stage of their journey. We will also work with countries which have decided to phase out nuclear power. Through the technical cooperation programme, the Agency is providing support to 125 countries or territories. We help them to develop their capacity to use nuclear technology to address development needs. Globally, health and nutrition make up the largest proportion of TC spending, followed by safety and security, and then by food and agriculture. We have been working more closely with other UN specialized agencies, such as the World Health Organization and the Food and Agriculture Organization, in order to achieve more effective implementation. The Agency pays particular attention to training skilled personnel in the use of nuclear technology. We are also making increasing use of cost effective e-learning tools. We are

  10. Statement to Fifty-Sixth Regular Session of IAEA General Conference 2012, 17 September 2012, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2012-01-01

    impact our work can have on individual lives. When I see the distinctive blue IAEA logo at the project sites, I feel as if I am among family. To take just one example: when I visited a laboratory in Peru, I was offered a cup of purple-coloured juice. I thought it was grape juice, but in fact it was made from a new type of corn, which was developed using radiation-induced mutation techniques supported by the Agency. In case you are wondering, the juice was actually delicious. This is just one of several hundred IAEA projects which have helped to increase food production in dozens of countries. Cancer in developing countries is high on the Agency's agenda. It is also my passion. I plan to strengthen our Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT). I wish to establish a Cancer Training Centre at our lab. complex in Seibersdorf, near Vienna, within the next few years. This will provide specialist training for health professionals from Member States, using advanced teaching technologies to complement the existing training offered by the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory. Alongside our safeguards laboratories, we have no fewer than eight nuclear applications laboratories in Seibersdorf. They are doing pioneering work related to human and animal health, food security and safety, agriculture, and environmental monitoring. But the laboratories have become obsolete and outdated. Space is severely limited and the equipment is not well adapted to our present needs. Following the modernization of the safeguards laboratories, which is well underway, it is time to bring the nuclear applications laboratories up to the latest international standards. My goal is to carry out a complete modernization within a few years so these laboratories can offer even better services to our Member States. At the Rio+20 Conference in June, the Agency announced the establishment of an Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre at the IAEA Environment Laboratories in Monaco. This responds to concern

  11. Il mito di Elisabetta d'Austria (Sissi come fenomeno cine-turistico e fonte di itinerari culturali nella città di Vienna / The myth of Elisabeth of Austria (Sissi as a cine-touristic phenomenon and asset for cultural itineraries in Vienna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Vitale

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Lo scopo di questo studio è quello di mettere in luce il potenziale del cinema quale strumento di sviluppo e di orientamento del turismo in un periodo altamente concorrenziale. Il caso-studio dell’utilizzo dilla figura mitica e cine-costruita e della relativa narrativa di Elisabetta d’Austria (1837-1898 divenuta “Sissi” dopo la Trilogia di Ernst Marischka, girata fra il 1955-1958, molto lontana dalla realtà storica, è significativo e rappresentativo. Il successo dei film dedicati a Sissi, seguiti da numerose altre opere teatrali, da musical, operette, cartoni animati, ha segnato l’ingresso della figura di Elisabetta nella cultura popolare che ha reso la figura storica ancor più leggendaria. Il ruolo dei film nell’attrarre visitatori a Vienna (la città è servita come set principale di questi è evidente. La popolarità dei film è stata usata per anni dagli operatori turistici e dal tourism board di Vienna per stimolare l’interesse dei turisti per la visita dei luoghi legati alla storia e alla cultura della capitale austriaca. Ma questo non ha impedito al tempo stesso di offrire la possibilità di offrire strumenti per comprendere la figura storica di Sisi. In ogni caso, l’evidenza supporta l’importanza del turismo indotto dal cinema. Partendo da una rivisitazione della letteratura focalizzata sul tema l’articolo, rivelando le strategie e i ruoli giocati dai manager del turismo indotto dal cinema, fornisce qualche utile intuizione per le organizzazioni interessate nello sviluppo turistico. The purpose of this study is to highlight the potential of movies as a tool for development and orientation of tourism in highly competitive years. The case-study of the use of the cinema’s constructed mythical figure and narrative of  Elisabeth von Wittelsbach, Empress of Austria (1837-1898, nicknamed “Sissi” after the Trilogy of Ernst Marischka of 1955-1958, very far from the historical reality, is quite significant and

  12. Workshop on nuclear structure and decay data evaluation. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronyaev, V.G.; Nichols, A.L.

    2003-01-01

    A summary is given of the aims and contents of the Workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluation, including the agenda, lists of participants and their presentations, general comments and recommendations. The 1-week workshop was organized by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section, and held in Vienna, Austria, from 18 to 22 November 2002. Workshop material, including participants' presentations, computer codes, manuals and other materials for NSDD evaluators, are freely available on CD-ROM on request. (author)

  13. From birth to adolescence: Vienna 2005 European Childhood Obesity Group International Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrobelli, A; Flodmark, C E; Lissau, I; Moreno, L A; Widhalm, K

    2005-09-01

    In the last 15 y there has been a tremendous increase in the number of studies on pediatric obesity looking at epidemiology, health-related risks, etiology, methodology and treatment. During the early 1990s, the European Childhood Obesity Group (ECOG) was born as a group of scientists' expert in the field of pediatric obesity. ECOG this year celebrates the approach to early maturity with an excited and omni-comprehensive program developing through eight different tracks. Comments on different 'key' papers in each of the eight tracks. The eight tracks were (1) Nutrition requirements and food habits, (2) physical activity, (3) prevention and political actions/strategies, (4) diabetes, (5) metabolism, (6) psychology, (7) pathology, and (8) treatment with emphasis on drugs. Looking at the overall picture of the ECOG workshop we could conclude that despite the fact that childhood obesity is a crisis facing worldwide youth, it is necessary that action to control it must be taken now. All the six relevant levels (ie, family, schools, health professionals, government, industry and media) could be involved in prevention of child and adolescent obesity.

  14. ECIR 2015 workshop on gamification for information retrieval (GamifIR'15)

    OpenAIRE

    Kazai, Gabriella; Hopfgartner, Frank; Kruschwitz, Udo; Meder, Micharl

    2015-01-01

    The second workshop on Gamification for Information Retrieval took place at ECIR 2015 in Vienna, Austria on the 29th of March. The workshop program included two invited keynote presentations, seven oral presentations of refereed papers, lots of mini discussion sessions and a fishbowl session. The presentations covered diverse topics from playing around with an eye tracker to a game with IR papers and even a game of scientific hangman, generating lively and fun discussions. The workshop was a ...

  15. In-core fuel management: Reloading techniques. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting and workshop held in Vienna, 19-21 October 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of the Technical Committee Meeting and Workshop on In-core Fuel Management - Reloading Techniques, convened by the IAEA in Vienna from 19 to 21 October 1992, was to provide an international forum to review and discuss in-core fuel management reloading techniques for light water reactors. A presentation of the history and status of reloading techniques was given by S.H. Levine, Pennsylvania State University, and papers on various computer code descriptions, methodologies and experiences of utilities and vendors for nuclear fuel reloading were presented and discussed. Optimization techniques for reloadings, expert system codes and the number of energy groups used in reloading calculations were discussed in more detail during a workshop session. Refs, figs and tabs.

  16. 1st IAEA research coordination meeting on tritium retention in fusion reactor plasma facing components. October 5-6, 1995, Vienna, Austria. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    The proceedings and results of the 1st IAEA research Coordination Meeting on ''Tritium Retention in Fusion Reactor Plasma Facing Components'' held on October 5 and 6, 1995 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna are briefly described. This report includes a summary of presentations made by the meeting participants, the results of a data survey and needs assessment for the retention, release and removal of tritium from plasma facing components, a summary of data evaluation, and recommendations regarding future work. (author). 4 tabs

  17. Proceedings of the sixth technical committee meeting organized by the IAEA and held in Vienna, Austria, 8-11 June 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The Technical Committee on Thermal Reactor Safety Research held its sixth meeting from 8-11 June 1987 at the Agency's Headquarters in Vienna. It was attended by 25 participants representing 18 countries and 2 international organizations. With respect to exchange on national research activities the committee members presented their most recent achievements in the area of nuclear safety research. A separate abstract was prepared for each of their presentations. Refs, figs and tabs

  18. Final IAEA research coordination meeting on plasma-interaction induced erosion of fusion reactor materials. October 9-11, 1995, Vienna, Austria. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    The proceedings and results of the Final IAEA Research Coordination Meeting on ''Plasma-interaction Induced Erosion of Fusion Reactor Materials'' held on October 9, 10 and 11, 1995 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna are briefly described. This report includes a summary of presentations made by the meeting participants, the results of a data survey and needs assessment for the erosion of plasma facing components and in-vessel materials, and recommendations regarding future work. (author). Refs, figs, tabs

  19. Irish Literature in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faerber, Gerda

    After a brief description of some historical and cultural interchanges between Ireland and Austria, the paper examines Irish fiction that has been translated into German and Irish plays that have been performed in Vienna over the past 25 years. The paper also describes German translations of Irish children's fiction, including classics like…

  20. International Atomic Energy Agency's advisory group meeting on safeguards related to the final disposal of waste and spent fuel, Vienna, Austria, September 12-16, 1988: Foreign trip report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, B.W.

    1988-10-01

    B.W. Moran traveled to Vienna, Austria, during the period of September 12--16, 1988, to serve as the technical advisor to the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) representatives to the International Atomic Energy Agency's Advisory Group Meeting on ''Safeguards Related to the Final Disposal of Nuclear Material in Waste and Spent Fuel.'' The goal of the US representatives to this meeting was to ensure that the advisory group's recommendations established (1) an effective IAEA safeguards approach for all radioactive waste and spent fuel management facilities and (2) a safeguards approach that is appropriate for the US Federal Waste Management System. The principal concerns of the United States on entering the advisory group meeting were: criteria for the termination of safeguards on waste should not be established, but should be referred for further study, safeguards on spent fuel should not be terminated, and safeguards studies are required before IAEA safeguards approaches for spent fuel are established. The US representatives generally recommended that consultant meetings be convened to address the technical issues after the requisite safeguards related research and development tasks have been performed. These objectives of the US representatives were achieved, and the recommendations of the advisory group generally coincided with and extended the recommendations presented in the US position paper

  1. Middle to Late Pleistocene multi-proxy record of environmental response to climate change from the Vienna Basin, Central Europe (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcher, Bernhard C.; Frank-Fellner, Christa; Lomax, Johanna; Preusser, Frank; Ottner, Franz; Scholger, Robert; Wagreich, Michael

    2017-10-01

    Tectonic basins can represent valuable archives of the environmental history. Presented here are the stratigraphy and multi-proxy analyses of two adjacent alluvial fans in the Quaternary active parts of the Vienna Basin, situated at the interface of the Atlantic, European continental and Mediterranean climate. Deposits comprise a sequence of coarse-grained fluvial deposits intercalated by laterally extensive horizons of pedogenically altered fine sediments. To establish palaeoenvironmental reconstructions, fine-grained sequences from a drill core and outcrop data were analysed according to its malacofauna, palaeopedology, susceptibility and sedimentology. The chronological framework is provided by 38 luminescence ages and supported by geomagnetic polarity investigations. Distinct warm periods each associated with a geomagnetic excursion, are recorded in three pedocomplexes formed during the Last Interglacial and two earlier interglacial periods, indicted to correlate with Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 9 and MIS 11, respectively. Environmental conditions during the early last glacial period (MIS 5, c. 100-70 ka) are reconstructed from mollusc-shell rich overbank fines deposited along a former channel belt, covered by massive sheetflood deposits during MIS 2. Analysed warm phases suggest strong variations in humidity, ranging from steppe to forest dominated environments. The study presents one of the few numerically dated Middle Pleistocene multi-proxy records and one of the most comprehensive malacological datasets covering the early phases of last glacial period of continental Europe.

  2. A report from the European Association for the Study of the Liver's 50th International Liver Congress (April 22-26 - Vienna, Austria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabasseda, X

    2015-04-01

    While Vienna's Prater park offers a varied selection of options, from theme parks to lush gardens and prairies to enjoy the sun, the nearby Messe Wien convention center was the focus of attention in April 2015 for all the scientists, researchers and clinicians interested in viral hepatitis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, hepatocellular carcinoma and a variety of other liver diseases. Treatments and potential new therapeutic strategies for these hepatopathies were discussed during the 50th International Liver Congress organized by the European Association for the Study of the Liver. Echoing epidemiological facts and a high social interest for hepatitis C virus infection, new findings with investigational and potential new therapies for the disease centered much of the attention at the conference. Nevertheless, new research was also reported related to potential improvements in how other liver diseases, particularly hepatitis B virus infection, hepatocellular carcinoma and a range of inflammatory and immune-mediated liver diseases, including rare hereditary diseases that should never be forgotten. Copyright 2015 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  3. Welcome Address by H. Liu [4. International Conference on Effective Nuclear Regulatory Systems: Sustaining Improvements Globally, Vienna (Austria), 11-15 April 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.

    2017-01-01

    In his opening remarks, Mr. Liu Hua, the President of the conference, noted that the presence of so many attendees at the conference indicated a high level of interest in effective nuclear regulation. He added that effective regulatory systems are very important in maintaining and improving global nuclear safety, and that the first conference on this topic, held ten years ago, created a valuable platform for achieving that goal. In the intervening decade, through the conferences held in Moscow, Cape Town, Ottawa and Vienna, the importance of effective regulation has become more widely recognized and key elements, including independence, transparency, openness, competence and wider international cooperation, have been identified. Mr. Liu Hua pointed to specific actions proposed for governments, regulatory bodies and stakeholders, and highlighted that many of the actions had already achieved fruitful outcomes. He also noted that many lessons had been learned and many improvements had been made in the light of the Fukushima Daiichi accident: 1. To further improve government infrastructure; 2. To further improve nuclear safety standards; 3. To further develop regulation capacity building and human resource; 4. To further enhance knowledge and experience management and transition, 5. To further foster and strengthen nuclear safety culture; 6. To further improve and rebuild public confidence

  4. Headquarters Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This film presents the IAEA safeguards system showing six inspectors at their work in the nuclear power plants Kozloduy (Bulgaria), Mihama (Japan) as well as in the reprocessing plant La Hague (France). The results of inspections are checked at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna. The film shows all modern techniques applied in the IAEA safeguards system

  5. Headquarters Vienna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-12-31

    This film presents the IAEA safeguards system showing six inspectors at their work in the nuclear power plants Kozloduy (Bulgaria), Mihama (Japan) as well as in the reprocessing plant La Hague (France). The results of inspections are checked at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna. The film shows all modern techniques applied in the IAEA safeguards system

  6. Il mito di Elisabetta d'Austria (Sissi) come fenomeno cine-turistico e fonte di itinerari culturali nella città di Vienna / The myth of Elisabeth of Austria (Sissi) as a cine-touristic phenomenon and asset for cultural itineraries in Vienna

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Vitale

    2016-01-01

    Lo scopo di questo studio è quello di mettere in luce il potenziale del cinema quale strumento di sviluppo e di orientamento del turismo in un periodo altamente concorrenziale. Il caso-studio dell’utilizzo dilla figura mitica e cine-costruita e della relativa narrativa di Elisabetta d’Austria (1837-1898) divenuta “Sissi” dopo la Trilogia di Ernst Marischka, girata fra il 1955-1958, molto lontana dalla realtà storica, è significativo e rappresentativo. Il successo dei film dedicati a Sissi, se...

  7. Report on RecSys 2015 Workshop on New Trends in Content-Based Recommender Systems (CBRecSys 2015)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Toine; Koolen, Marijn

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the CBRecSys 2015 workshop, the second edition of the workshop on new trends in content-based recommender systems, co-located with RecSys 2015 in Vienna, Austria. Content-based recommendation has been applied successfully in many different domains, but it has not seen...... venue for work dedicated to all aspects of content-based recommender systems....... the same level of attention as collaborative filtering techniques have. Nevertheless, there are many recommendation domains and applications where content and metadata play a key role, either in addition to or instead of ratings and implicit usage data. The CBRecSys workshop series provides a dedicated...

  8. "Eurotrain for Training." Proceedings of a European Congress on Continuing Education and Training (4th, Berlin, Germany; Warsaw, Poland; Prague, Czechoslovakia; Budapest, Hungary; Vienna, Austria, October 5-9, 1992).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisser, Ulrike, Ed.; Grootings, Peter, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    A "travelling" congress was conducted in five European cities (Berlin, Warsaw, Prague, Budapest, and Vienna) to promote a mutual exchange of views between east and west. The participants stressed the growing European Community interest in current examples of cooperation with neighbors in central and eastern Europe. In addition to…

  9. Reflections on the History of Science and Technology in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1972-01-01

    This text was written for a talk given by E. Broda in Vienna on the symposium “The future of Science a Technology” held within the framework of the Austrian National Day in Vienna in 1972 and it addresses amongst other Victor Weisskopf. The text is about reflections on the history of science and technology in Austria. (nowak)

  10. Report of the consultant meeting for review of procedure for NPP operational events reporting and investigation for the nuclear regulatory administration of Ukraine in Vienna, Austria 18-20 December 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipar, M.; Koltakov, V.; Rodionov, A.; Razzell, R.; Tolstykh, V.; Kriz, Z.

    1995-12-01

    In response to a request from the Nuclear Regulatory Administration of Ukraine, the IAEA carried out an expert review of the Procedure for NPP Operational Events Reporting and Investigation developed by the Scientific and Technical Centre on Nuclear and Radiation Safety of the Nuclear Regulatory Administration. This report contains the recommendations and suggestions made by experts as a result of the Consultants Meeting held in Vienna between 18-20 December 1995

  11. Universitätsbibliothek der Medizinischen Universität Wien – größte Medizinbibliothek Österreichs: Hybridbibliothek als Zukunftskonzept / University Library of the Medical University Vienna – largest Medical Library of Austria: Hybrid Library as a concept for the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartl, Margrit

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The today’s Medical University Library was established as Faculty Library of the Vienna University Library in 1986 and serves till now as the largest Medical Library in Austria. The Main Library is located in the Vienna General Hospital (University hospitals. During 1994 and 2003 it became the Austrian Central Library for Medicine. Since 2004 University Library of the newly founded Medical University of Vienna supplies literature and information for 8500 Students, 1800 scientists and 1600 doctors. The article describes the Library’s participation on projects of the Austrian Library Consortium and the Austrian Cooperation for E-media. It specifies the offers and use of the digital library (professional databases, electronic journals, document delivery, e-books but also the website and the “Van Swieten”-Blog which are the information and communication platforms of the University Library. The next part shows the supply of traditional library which consists of the Clinical Library, the Textbook Collection and the Students Reading Room. We report also on the Library for the History of Medicine, their precious medical historical holdings and their current activities connected with the digitalization of the card index. The library’s activities to the “Medizin Curriculum Wien”, trainings and tours are told in the chapter about the Teaching Library but also the Information Retrieval Service and the activities due to training, placement and projects of librarians. Another part speaks about the special activities in international projects like “subito”, “E-books on demand” and a gateway for PDAs. The Medical University Library was the first Austrian library who used the LinkOut function of PubMed. The library works on a project of “Wiedergutmachung” (NS-Provenienzforschung and a very ambitious Weblog for the remembrance of the displaced professors at the medical faculty of the University of Vienna in 1938. The last chapter

  12. International cooperation workshop. Regional workshop for CTBTO international cooperation: Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    Pursuant to the 1999 programme of work, and following the International Cooperation Workshop held in Vienna, Austria, in 1998, the Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) of the Preparatory Commission for the CTBTO (Prep Com) held a regional Workshop for CTBTO International Cooperation in Cairo. The purpose of the workshop was to identify how and by what means the Africa region can promote international cooperation in CTBT verification related technologies, and how the region can benefit from and contribute to Prep Com activity. PTS staff briefed the 40 participants from 22 African States who attended the Workshop on general aspects, including costs, of the establishment and operation of the CTBT verification system, including its four monitoring technologies. Participants were informed on opportunities for local institutions in the establishment of monitoring stations and on possible support for national and regional data centres. National experts presented their research and development activities and reviewed existing experiences on bi/multi-lateral cooperation. The main points of the discussion focused on the need to engage governments to advance signature/ratification, and further training opportunities for African states

  13. Identification of long-range transport of aerosols over Austria using EARLINET lidar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camelia, Talianu

    2018-04-01

    The aims of the study is to identify the paths of the long-range transported aerosols over Austria and their potential origin, and to estimate their properties, using lidar measurements from EARLINET stations closest to Austria from Germany and Romania and aerosol transport models. As of now, there is no lidar station in Austria. The study is part of a project to estimate the usefulness of a lidar station located in Vienna, Austria.

  14. Summary Report of a Specialized Workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Alan L. [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Dimitrious, P. [IAEA Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Kondev, F. G. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ricard-McCutchan, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-04-27

    A three-day specialised workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluations was organised and held at the headquarters of the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria, from 27 to 29 April 2015. This workshop covered a wide range of important topics and issues addressed when evaluating and maintaining the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). The primary aim was to improve evaluators’ abilities to identify and understand the most appropriate evaluation processes to adopt in the formulation of individual ENSDF data sets. Participants assessed and reviewed existing policies, procedures and codes, and round-table discussions included the debate and resolution of specific difficulties experienced by ENSDF evaluators (i.e., all workshop participants). The contents of this report constitute a record of this workshop, based on the presentations and subsequent discussions.

  15. Summary Report of a Specialized Workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, Alan L.; Dimitrious, P.; Kondev, F. G.; Ricard-McCutchan, E.

    2015-01-01

    A three-day specialised workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluations was organised and held at the headquarters of the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria, from 27 to 29 April 2015. This workshop covered a wide range of important topics and issues addressed when evaluating and maintaining the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). The primary aim was to improve evaluators' abilities to identify and understand the most appropriate evaluation processes to adopt in the formulation of individual ENSDF data sets. Participants assessed and reviewed existing policies, procedures and codes, and round-table discussions included the debate and resolution of specific difficulties experienced by ENSDF evaluators (i.e., all workshop participants). The contents of this report constitute a record of this workshop, based on the presentations and subsequent discussions.

  16. Vienna international airport noise abatement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidelinde Jelinek-Nigitz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: On the topic of sustainable aviation a study was carried out to measure the difference between the actual change in air traffic noise and the airport’s residents’ perception of the noise change at Vienna International Airport. Therefore, a questionnaire was developed in cooperation with the airport and an online survey was conducted. Design/methodology/approach: For the survey of the opinion of the affected population of the surrounding communities, a web based online questionnaire is created and distributed via various channels including e-mail, and online forums. After the basic structure of the questionnaire had been defined, the questions were developed in cooperation with employees form the environmental department of VIE, who had a sustainable influence on the questions’ order and formulation. As the survey was supposed to be answered by residents around VIE. Findings: Results of the online study show that only parts of the participants are affected by air traffic noise at VIE. Even less experienced a significant change over the last five years. About one third of the participants stated that they are affected by air traffic noise in one way or another. The majority of these people live in Lower Austria, the federal state in which the airport is located. The participants obviously judge air traffic noise during day time more importantly than air traffic noise at night. Research limitations/implications: Due to the low number of returns, no statistically relevant conclusions can be drawn, the results of the survey can be used to make some general statements. Originality/value: Economic growth and deregulation lead to growing aircraft operations. Vienna International Airport with its approximately 260,000 flight movements per year is the biggest airport in Austria and a major hub in Europe. The combination of constantly growing air transport and the resulting noise exposure, as well as the steadily increasing

  17. The U.S./IAEA Workshop on Software Sustainability for Safeguards Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper S. E.; .; Worrall, L.; Pickett, C.; Bachner, K.; Queirolo, A.

    2014-08-08

    The U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration’s Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, the U.S. Department of State, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) organized a a workshop on the subject of ”Software Sustainability for Safeguards Instrumentation.” The workshop was held at the Vienna International Centre in Vienna, Austria, May 6-8, 2014. The workshop participants included software and hardware experts from national laboratories, industry, government, and IAEA member states who were specially selected by the workshop organizers based on their experience with software that is developed for the control and operation of safeguards instrumentation. The workshop included presentations, to orient the participants to the IAEA Department of Safeguards software activities related to instrumentation data collection and processing, and case studies that were designed to inspire discussion of software development, use, maintenance, and upgrades in breakout sessions and to result in recommendations for effective software practices and management. This report summarizes the results of the workshop.

  18. The spirit of Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keblusek, E.

    1997-01-01

    Personal reflections of Mr. Emil Keblusek on the establishing the new mechanism of intensive pre-negotiations, personal explanations of intentions and expected results, what he called 'the spirit of Vienna', are described

  19. Eighth meeting of the International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors, Vienna, 30 January - 1 February 1989. Summary report. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    The Eighth Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors was held in Vienna, Austria, from 30 January - 1 February, 1989. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting

  20. First meeting of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors, Vienna, 18-21 May 1987. (Pt. 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The first meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors was held in Vienna, Austria from 18-21 May 1987. Part I of the Summary Report contains the minutes of the meeting

  1. Research on the exploration and use of geothermal energy in Austria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    The current status of geothermal exploration and utilization in Austria is reviewed. Geological characteristics of geothermal fields are discussed in general, as are exploration techniques including geological surveys, geophysical surveys, remote sensing, geochemical surveys, and test drilling. The geology of Austria is described in detail, and the economic and legal problems peculiar to Austria are discussed. Certain regions may be suitable for geothermal exploitation including the Vienna basin. Research and economic recommendations are made. Three figures one table, and thirty references are provided.

  2. Vienna wirechamber conference 98

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    This volume of the Vienna wirechamber conference 1998 contains abstracts of lectures and abstracts of poster sessions of the following topics: high energy physics, gaseous detectors, radiation detectors, calorimetry, drift chambers, wire spark chambers, tracking chambers, neutron detectors, particle detection, muon spectrometry, nuclear medicine. (Suda)

  3. Genetic homogeneity of Fascioloides magna in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husch, Christian; Sattmann, Helmut; Hörweg, Christoph; Ursprung, Josef; Walochnik, Julia

    2017-08-30

    The large American liver fluke, Fascioloides magna, is an economically relevant parasite of both domestic and wild ungulates. F. magna was repeatedly introduced into Europe, for the first time already in the 19th century. In Austria, a stable population of F. magna has established in the Danube floodplain forests southeast of Vienna. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic diversity of F. magna in Austria. A total of 26 individuals from various regions within the known area of distribution were investigated for their cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) and nicotinamide dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) gene haplotypes. Interestingly, all 26 individuals revealed one and the same haplotype, namely concatenated haplotype Ha5. This indicates a homogenous population of F. magna in Austria and may argue for a single introduction. Alternatively, genetic homogeneity might also be explained by a bottleneck effect and/or genetic drift. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Vienna Wire Chamber Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    After those of 1978 and 1980, a third Wire Chamber Conference was held from 15-18 February in the Technical University of Vienna. Eight invited speakers covered the field from sophisticated applications in biology and medicine, via software, to the state of the art of gaseous detectors. In some forty other talks the speakers tackled in more detail the topics of gaseous detectors, calorimetry and associated electronics and software

  5. Statement at World Cancer Day, 2 February 2012, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Good afternoon, Ladies and Gentlemen. Welcome to this IAEA event marking World Cancer Day 2012. The Agency's work in cancer control has been a high priority for me since I became Director General just over two years go. When I travel to developing countries, I try wherever possible to see IAEA cancer control projects in action. This is always very uplifting. In June and July last year, I visited a number of Latin American countries to discuss IAEA support for their cancer control efforts. In July, I went to the Mother Teresa Hospital in Tirana, Albania, where IAEA support has helped to significantly improve radiotherapy services and provided training for 23 health professionals to launch a breast cancer screening programme. In October, I had the opportunity to celebrate the opening of a new cancer therapy facility in Indonesia. Also in October, I travelled to Vietnam. I visited the Tran Hung Dao hospital in Hanoi and saw some of the most high-tech cancer treatment equipment in use there. The IAEA had facilitated the donation of a radiotherapy unit from India to Vietnam in May 2010. It was very impressive to witness how quickly a country's cancer control capabilities can be transformed. There are many such success stories throughout the world. But, of course, the need is great and there is still much work to be done. For example, there is a shortage of around 5 000 radiotherapy machines in low and middle income countries. This means that hundreds of thousands of patients are denied diagnosis and treatment that could save their lives. The IAEA Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy - PACT - has been working hard to try to make radiotherapy services available in all countries. The IAEA technical cooperation programme remains a major mechanism for providing assistance to Member States. The Agency is supporting over 130 projects in cancer diagnosis, management and treatment. Oncology and radiotherapy centres are being established in countries such as Afghanistan, Eritrea and Mozambique, while national capacity in radiotherapy is being strengthened in - for example - Albania and Kenya. Several regional projects are focusing on improving quality in radiotherapy services. Our Division of Human Health provides resources for health professionals throughout the world through a special website known as the Human Health Campus. It contains up-to-date material and interactive learning tools in radiotherapy, nuclear medicine, medical physics and nutrition. Ladies and Gentlemen, World Cancer Day has a special meaning this year following the adoption by the United Nations General Assembly last September of the Political Declaration on Non-Communicable Diseases. The IAEA looks forward to participating in the Action Plan of the Global Strategy for the Prevention and Control of Non-Communicable Diseases 2013-2018, led by the World Health Organization. The slogan of World Cancer Day this year is Together It Is Possible. This reflects the importance of international collaboration in the fight against the global cancer epidemic which, tragically, continues to claim the lives of over 10 million people per year. Seventy percent of those deaths are in developing countries. I am grateful for the continued support for our cancer programme from donors and partners, some of whom are with us today. The Agency's PACT programme received over one million dollars in extra-budgetary funds last year. I am especially pleased that Mr. Suleiman J Al-Herbish, Director General of the OPEC Fund for International Development (OFID), is with us today. OFID has supported very successful cancer projects in Ghana, Zambia, Uruguay, Albania, Nicaragua and Tanzania. In the last three years alone, contributions from OFID have exceeded 800 000 US dollars, while loans from OFID for cancer projects in Member States, facilitated through the Agency, have exceeded 15 million dollars. A few minutes ago, Mr Al-Herbish and I signed an agreement under which OFID will give 450 000 dollars to PACT to support projects to advance cancer control in Vietnam, with particular emphasis on women's cancers. Thank you very much, Mr. Al-Herbish. We also have the privilege to have with us Dr. Julie Torode, Deputy CEO of the Union for International Cancer Control - UICC - the largest NGO against cancer, which initiated World Cancer Day. UICC is a key PACT partner in the field and a driving force behind cancer advocacy. I am grateful to them and to all our other partners. I know that, together, we will continue to make a difference to the lives of many thousands of cancer patients and their families in the years to come. Thank you. (IAEA)

  6. States strengthen nuclear cooperation for new millennium. IAEA General Conference concludes in Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document gives information about the concluding session of the 43rd regular session of the IAEA's General Conference (27 September - 1 October 1999, Austria Center, Vienna), as well as about the most important steps taken during the week of conference

  7. Ozone modelling in Eastern Austria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stohl, A.; Wotawa, G.; Kromp-Kolb, H. [Univ. of Agriculture, Vienna (Austria). Inst. of Meteorology and Physics; Winiwater, W. [Austrian Research Centre, Seibersdorf (Austria); Baumann, R.; Spangl, W. [Federal Environmental Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1995-12-31

    High ozone concentrations are frequently observed in Eastern Austria, often exceeding local as well as international health standards, both for short-term as well as for long-term exposures. The maximum concentrations are produced in urban plumes, e.g. of the city of Vienna, whereas regional-scale transport and production of ozone is more important for the long-term concentrations. The Pannonian Ozone Project (POP) is an Austrian research initiative to model photochemical processes on a regional as well as on a local scale with a Lagrangian model to better understand the mechanisms leading to the high ozone concentrations and to develop abatement strategies. Up to now, focus has been on the regional scale. Aircraft, tethered balloon, tetroon and intensified ground measurements are carried out to validate the model. Although the major measurement campaign will be held in summer 1995, first results from a measurement campaign in summer 1994 are already available

  8. La autopista de Viena Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial, Equipo

    1979-10-01

    Full Text Available The elevated stretch of the motorway crossing the city of Vienna in a North-South direction is the largest bridge in Austria. The bridge consists of a central span, the corresponding access ramps at the ends and a junction with a district highway having six separate roadways. The design and construction of the bridge was based on the principle of using the maximum amount of prefabricated parts in order to, on the one hand, achieve a higher constructive rationalization, and on the other, minimize erection time. Owing to its being inside the city, the bridge has been fitted with adequate lighting and runoff water disposal systems.

    El tramo volado de la autopista, que cruza Viena de norte a sur, constituye el puente más grande de toda Austria. Dicho puente consta de un tramo central, las correspondientes rampas de acceso en los extremos, y un nudo de enlace con la carretera comarcal compuesto por seis calzadas distintas. En su diseño y realización se procuró utilizar el mayor número posible de elementos prefabricados para, por una parte, permitir una construcción más racionalizada y, por otra, minimizar los tiempos de ejecución. Se ha dotado a toda la obra, por estar dentro de la ciudad, de unos adecuados sistemas de iluminación y evacuación de las aguas superficiales.

  9. Epstein–Barr virus in the multiple sclerosis brain: a controversial issue—report on a focused workshop held in the Centre for Brain Research of the Medical University of Vienna, Austria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lassmann, H.; Niedobitek, G.; Aloisi, G; Middeldorp, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent epidemiological and immunological studies provide evidence for an association between Epstein-Barr virus infection and multiple sclerosis, suggesting a role of Epstein-Barr virus infection in disease induction and pathogenesis. A key question in this context is whether Epstein-Barr

  10. The Core Conversion of the TRIGA Reactor Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, M.; Bergmann, R.; Musilek, A.; Sterba, J.H.; Böck, H.; Messick, C.

    2016-01-01

    The TRIGA Reactor Vienna has operated for many years with a mixed core using Al-clad and stainless-steel (SST) clad low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel and a few SST high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements. In view of the US spent fuel return program, the average age of these fuel elements and the Austrian position not to store any spent nuclear fuel on its territory, negotiation started in April 2011 with the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The sensitive subject was to return the old TRIGA fuel and to find a solution for a possible continuation of reactor operation for the next decades. As the TRIGA Vienna is the closest nuclear facility to the IAEA headquarters, high interest existed at the IAEA to have an operating research reactor nearby, as historically close cooperation exists between the IAEA and the Atominstitut. Negotiation started before summer 2011 between the involved Austrian ministries, the IAEA and the US DOE leading to the following solution: Austria will return 91 spent fuel elements to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) while INL offers 77 very low burnt SST clad LEU elements for further reactor operation of the TRIGA reactor Vienna. The titles of these 77 new fuel elements will be transferred to Euratom in accordance with Article 86 of the Euratom-US Treaty. The fuel exchange with the old core returned to the INL, and the new core transferred to Vienna was carried out in one shipment in late 2012 through the ports of Koper/Slovenia and Trieste/Italy. This paper describes the administrative, logistic and technical preparations of the fuel exchange being unique world-wide and first of its kind between Austria and the USA performed successfully in early November 2012. (author)

  11. Electric-powered cars in Austria - status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Propper, B.

    1993-01-01

    The number of electric-powered vehicles in Austria is estimated to be 300 at the most. In this article, the reasons for such a low number is being looked at. Austria is ideally located with respect to producing electricity, as two thirds of it are produced by water-power. However, there are only three direct ways of state funding in order to reduce the cost. In the framework of a field test, the use of electric-powered vehicles for community-use is being successfully carried out in Vienna. (orig.) [de

  12. MAX-DOAS measurements of NO2 column densities in Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Stefan; Weihs, Philipp; Peters, Enno; Richter, Andreas; Ostendorf, Mareike; Schönhardt, Anja; Burrows, John P.; Schmalwieser, Alois

    2017-04-01

    In the VINDOBONA (VIenna horizontal aNd vertical Distribution OBservations Of Nitrogen dioxide and Aerosols) project, two Multi AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) systems will be set up at two different locations and altitudes in Vienna, Austria. After comparison measurements in Bremen, Germany, and Cabauw, The Netherlands, the first of the two MAX-DOAS instruments was set up at the University of Veterinary Medicine in the northeastern part of Vienna in December 2016. The instrument performs spectral measurements of visible scattered sunlight at defined horizontal and vertical viewing directions. From these measurements, column densities of NO2 and aerosols are derived by applying the DOAS analysis. First preliminary results are presented. The second MAX-DOAS instrument will be set up in April/May 2017 at the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences in the northwestern part of Vienna. Once these two instruments are measuring simultaneously, small campaigns including car DOAS zenith-sky and tower DOAS off-axis measurements are planned. The main emphasis of this project will be on the installation and operation of two MAX-DOAS instruments, the improvement of tropospheric NO2 and aerosol retrieval, and the characterization of the horizontal, vertical, and temporal variations of tropospheric NO2 and aerosols in Vienna, Austria.

  13. CTBTO international cooperation workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The International Cooperation Workshop took place in Vienna, Austria, on 16 and 17 November 1998, with the participation of 104 policy/decision makers, Research and Development managers and diplomatic representatives from 58 States Signatories to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The Workshop attempted to develop Treaty stipulations to: promote cooperation to facilitate and participate in the fullest possible exchange relating to technologies used in the verification of the Treaty; enable member states to strengthen national implementation of verification measures, and to benefit from the application of such technologies for peaceful purposes. The potential benefits arising from the CTBT monitoring, analysis and data communication systems are multifaceted, and as yet unknown. This Workshop provided the opportunity to examine some of these possibilities. An overview of the CTBT verification regime on the general aspects of the four monitoring technologies (seismic, hydro-acoustic, infrasound and radionuclides), including some of the elements that are the subject of international cooperation, were presented and discussed. Questions were raised on the potential benefits that can be derived by participating in the CTBT regime and broad-based discussions took place. Several concrete proposals on ways and means to facilitate and promote cooperation among States Signatories were suggested. The main points discussed by the participants can be summarized as follows: the purpose of the CTBT Organization is to assist member states to monitor Treaty compliance; the CTBT can be a highly effective technological tool which can generate wide-ranging data, which can be used for peaceful purposes; there are differences in the levels of technology development in the member states that is why peaceful applications should be supported by the Prep Com for the benefit of all member states, whether developed or developing, training being a key element to optimize the CTBT

  14. First record of Orthopodomyia pulcripalpis (Rondani, 1872) (Diptera: Culicidae) in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zittra, Carina; Obwaller, Adelheid G; Wimmer, Victoria; Berer, Dominik; Eigner, Barbara; Fuehrer, Hans-Peter

    2017-06-01

    During a three-year mosquito monitoring from 2014 to 2016, the strictly ornithophilic, originally Mediterranean species Orthopodomyia pulcripalpis (Rondani, 1872) was collected as single specimen for the first time in Austria in the district of Penzing in Vienna. Morphological species determination was confirmed by analysis of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene. We thus not only confirm the existence of another mosquito species in Austria, but also add a new genus to the Austrian Culicidae taxa list.

  15. Vienna Summit Declaration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-06-21

    The leaders of the European Union (EU) and the United States of America (USA) met June 2006 in Vienna to respond to the concerns of their citizens for peace, security, stability and prosperity in an increasingly globalised world. They welcome that over the past year the Transatlantic Partnership has delivered real results as shown by the political and economic Progress Reports issued during the summit (http://www.eu2006.at/en/The{sub C}ouncil{sub P}residency/EU-USSummit/index.html). They remain committed to finding common or complementary lines of action in many areas. Over the last year there have been many examples of how productive the relationship is, in the Middle East, Iran, the Western Balkans, Belarus, on the frozen conflicts, and Sudan, as well as in the efforts to promote transatlantic trade and investment under last Summit's Economic Initiative. They have decided to further strengthen the strategic Partnership by adopting a number of priority actions to support cooperation in the following four areas: Promoting peace, human rights and democracy worldwide; Confronting global challenges, including security; Fostering prosperity and opportunity; and Promoting strategic cooperation on energy and energy security, climate change and sustainable development.

  16. Vienna Summit Declaration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The leaders of the European Union (EU) and the United States of America (USA) met June 2006 in Vienna to respond to the concerns of their citizens for peace, security, stability and prosperity in an increasingly globalised world. They welcome that over the past year the Transatlantic Partnership has delivered real results as shown by the political and economic Progress Reports issued during the summit (http://www.eu2006.at/en/The_Council_Presidency/EU-USSummit/index.html). They remain committed to finding common or complementary lines of action in many areas. Over the last year there have been many examples of how productive the relationship is, in the Middle East, Iran, the Western Balkans, Belarus, on the frozen conflicts, and Sudan, as well as in the efforts to promote transatlantic trade and investment under last Summit's Economic Initiative. They have decided to further strengthen the strategic Partnership by adopting a number of priority actions to support cooperation in the following four areas: Promoting peace, human rights and democracy worldwide; Confronting global challenges, including security; Fostering prosperity and opportunity; and Promoting strategic cooperation on energy and energy security, climate change and sustainable development

  17. IAEA advisory group meeting on nuclear structure and decay data. IAEA, Vienna 21-25 April 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, A.

    1980-10-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the fourth meeting of the international nuclear structure and decay data network at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, from 21-25 April 1980. The meeting was attended by 23 Scientists from 11 Member States and 2 international organizations, concerned with the compilation, evaluation, and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. (author)

  18. A short history of neurosciences in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinger, K A

    2006-03-01

    Based on internal medicine and psychiatry and in close connection with pathology, the neurosciences in Austria began to develop in the 18(th) century, e.g. with the description of inflammation of the central nervous system by J. P. Franck (1745-1823) and the "phrenology" by F. J. Gall (1745-1823). Under the influence of the great pathologist C. Rokitansky (1804-1878), the tripode of the Vienna neurology - L. Türck (1810-1868), as initiator, Th. v. Meynert (1833-1892) the activator, and H. Obersteiner (1847-1922) as the founder of the Vienna Neurological Institute, presented basic contributions to the morphology and pathology of the nervous system. At the end of the 19(th) and in the early 20(th) century, they were followed by important publications by S. Fred (aphasia), C. Redlich (tabes dorsalis), F. Sträussler (CNS syphilis), A. Spitzer (fiber anatomy of the brain), P. Schilder (diffuse sclerosis), R. Barany (Nobel price for physiology and medicine 1914), J. Wagner v. Jauregg (Nobel price for medicine, 1927), O. Loewi (Nobel Price for Physiology and Medicine together with Sir H. Dale, 1936), A. Schüller (histiocytosis X), C. v. Economo (encephalitis lethargica and cytoarchitectonics of the human cerebral cortex), E. Pollak (Wilson disease), E. Gamper (mesencephalic subject), J. Gerstmann (Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome and Gerstmann parietal syndrome), H. Hoff with L. Schönbauer (brain tumors and surgery), and others. Major research institutions were the departments of psychiatry I and II at the University of Vienna School of Medicine (foundation 1870), unification 1911, separation into departments of neurology, psychiatry and neuropsychiatry of children and adolescents in 1971), the Obersteiner Institute in Vienna (foundation 1882, separation 1993), the university departments at Graz and Innsbruck, both founded in 1891, and other laboratories, where renouned clinicans and neuroscientists, like O. Marburg, H. Hoff, O. Pötzl, O. Kauders, F

  19. Austria Declares Intent To Join ESO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    At a press conference today at the University of Vienna's Observatory, the Austrian Science Minister Johannes Hahn announced the decision by the Austrian Government to seek membership of ESO from 1 July this year. ESO PR Photo 11/08 ESO PR Photo 11/08 Announcing Austria's Intent to Join ESO Said Minister Hahn: "With membership of ESO, Austria's scientists will receive direct access to the world's leading infrastructure in astronomy. This strengthens Austria as a place for research and provides an opportunity for young researchers to continue their work from here. With this move, Austria takes an important step in the reinforcement of Europe's science and research infrastructure." The decision constitutes a major breakthrough for Austrian scientists who have argued for membership of ESO for many years. Seeking membership in ESO also marks a step towards the further development of the European Research and Innovation Area, an important element of Europe's so-called Lisbon Strategy. "ESO welcomes the Austrian bid to join our organisation. I salute the Austrian Government for taking this important step and look forward to working closely with our Austrian friends and colleagues in the years to come," commented the ESO Director General, Tim de Zeeuw. For Austrian astronomers, ESO membership means not only unrestricted access to ESO's world-leading observational facilities including the world's most advanced optical telescope, the Very Large Telescope, and full participation in the quasi-global ALMA project, but also the possibility to participate on a par with their European colleagues in the future projects of ESO, including the realisation of ESO's Extremely Large Telescope project (E-ELT), which is currently in the design phase. All these projects require some of the most advanced technologies in key areas such as optics, detectors, lightweight structures, etc. Austrian participation in ESO opens the door for Austrian industry and major research institutes of the

  20. Gifted Education in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyringer, Sieglinde

    2013-01-01

    In Austria, gifted education and the education of highly gifted and talented children have been receiving an increasing public awareness and social acceptance over the past decade. The article highlights the existing ideas of giftedness in Austria, and it presents several initiatives having triggered and influenced this positive development. The…

  1. Cartography (and Geoinformation in Education in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjanka Lechthaler

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The basic task of cartography lies in efficient and impeccable transfer of spatial information via cartographic models of geospace. Wired and wireless communication networks serve this purpose. They offer new media possibilities of saving and transferring cartographic information and cartographic models, and therefore their use. This is related to the emphasis of research work and education, which is equally oriented toward theoretical issues and those concerning applied cartography. The paper features a review of cartographic education and accomplished qualifications at universities and professional schools (Fachhochschule in Austria and a review of newly introduced study programs of Bachelor and Master studies according to guidelines of the Bologna Declaration. The education plan for the instruction of cartography for both studies at the Vienna University of Technology is presented in detail.

  2. The activities of the IAEA laboratories Vienna. Annual report - 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, C.B.G.

    1982-03-01

    The report outlines the activities of the laboratory of the International Atomic Energy Agency at Seibersdorf in the province of Lower Austria. The report covers the following sections of the laboratory: chemistry, medical applications, dosimetry, soil science, entomology, plant breeding, electronics and measurement laboratory, isotope hydrology and the safeguards analytical laboratory. The extension to the main laboratory buildings - a new wing for medical applications and dosimetry - was fitted out and fully integrated into the laboratory by the end of the year. In July 1980 the high-level cobalt-60 dosimetry equipment (a teletherapy unit) was transferred from the old IAEA headquarters building in the centre of Vienna and installed in a specially designed annex to the new wing. A successful 8 week training course was given in the agriculture laboratory and arrangements were made for several of the course members to stay on as research fellows for several months after the course had ended

  3. Representations of eyeglasses on Gothic winged altars in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daxecker, F

    1997-01-01

    The oldest representation of eyeglasses in the German-speaking area is found on the altar of Tyrol Castle in the Museum Ferdinandeum in Innsbruck, Tyrol, on an altarpiece depicting the death of the Virgin Mary (1370-1372). Other representations of eyeglasses are found in Klosterneuburg, Lower Austria, Albrechtsaltar, collegiate collection, death of the Virgin (1439); St. Lorenzen ob Murau, daughter church St. Lorenzen, Styria, Katharinenaltar, Disputation (1455-1460); Pettau (Ptuj), Pokrajinjski Muzej, Slovenia (then belonging to the archbishopric of Salzburg), Conrad Laib, St. Bernardine of Siena with a spectacle case (1460-1465); on two altars by Michael Pacher: Pharisee, Gries near Bolzano (1471-1475), apostle mourning over the death of the Virgin Mary, and St. Luke, St. Wolfgang in Salzkammergut (1481); St. Florian, Upper Austria, collegiate collection, altar of the provost Leonhard Riesenschmid of St. Florian, death of the Virgin (1487); museum of Wilten monastery, Innsbruck, Ludwig Konraiter, St. Ottilie with reading stones and death of the Virgin Mary with reading apostle (1485-1490); Austrian Gallery Belvedere, Vienna, Master of Grossgmain, St. Augustine (1498); Austrian Gallery Belvedere, Vienna, Master of Mondsee, St. Augustine (1490-1500); Diocesan museum Graz, Styria, altar of Hirschegg, death of the Virgin (1503); Krenstetten, Lower Austria, Stefan-Altar, Disputation (1500-1520); Museum Ferdinandeum, Innsbruck, Matheis Stöberl, Jesus and the scribes with a spectacle case (early 16th century).

  4. Einstein and Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1979-01-01

    This text was written by Engelbert Broda in 1979 and is about Albert Einstein and his relation to Austria. This text is split in different sections which are amongst others: Einstein und Mach; Einstein und Boltzmann; Positivism, Atoms and Relativity; Einstein as an Austrian professor; Einstein’s visits to Austria; Einstein and Viennese friends; Einstein and Friedrich Adler; Einstein and the Austrian mentality; (nowak)

  5. Eighth meeting of the International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors Vienna, 30 January - 1 February 1989. Summary report. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    The Eighth Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors was held in Vienna, Austria, from 30 January - 1 February, 1989. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programmes in the field of Gas-Cooled Reactors and other presentations at the Meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  6. [The history of the institutionalization of medical psychology in Austria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirnsperger, Hans; Mundschütz, Reinhard; Sonneck, Gernot

    2011-01-01

    Beginning with Freudian psychoanalysis and the Zürich school of psychiatry, which in the early 20th century were the first to call for studies in medical psychology at universities, the article traces the path to the institutionalization of medical psychology in Austria especially in Vienna. Particular attention is devoted to the Academic Society for Medical Psychology (Akademischer Verein für Medizinische Psychologie) which held lectures and courses at the University of Vienna from 1926 to 1938. The Society can thus be viewed as a predecessor of the foundation of the institutes for medical psychology and psychotherapeutic clinics, starting in the late 1960s and continuing into the early 1980s.

  7. Statement by Ms Ana Maria Cetto at the Workshop on IAEA Tools for Nuclear Energy System Assessment (NESA) for Long-Term Planning and Development Vienna, 23 July 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cetto, Ana Maria

    2009-01-01

    We are all aware that energy is central to sustainable development and poverty reduction efforts. A 2006 report by the Task Force for the UN Millennium Project, 'Energy Services for the Millennium Development Goals', warns that without increased investment in the energy sector, and major improvements in the quality and quantity of energy services in developing countries, it will not be possible to meet any of the Millennium Development Goals. Demand for energy continues to grow worldwide, as countries seek to improve living standards for their populations. The bulk of this growth in demand is coming from less economically advanced countries. Currently, conventional cooperation approaches are being used by Member States and the Agency to achieve the main goal of phase I of the 'milestone book', namely getting ready to decide to launch a nuclear power programme and make an informed commitment. Most of the countries planning to introduce a nuclear programme are currently in phase I. The Agency is open to consider, for the future TC programme cycle, national projects to apply NESA tools and INPRO methodologies in an integrated approach and help Member States in the preparatory work for the call of bids and construction of their first NPP. Ladies and gentlemen, Workshops such as this one are an important means of sharing experiences and learning from each other. These days you have had the opportunity to learn more about the tools and methods that the Agency offers to support long term energy planning and nuclear energy system assessments, and today you will be providing us with feedback on applying these tools. By sharing your experiences, the lessons you have learned and the constraints you have faced, you will strengthen the Agency's ability to respond to your needs. Your comments will help us to further develop and refine the Agency's support to the sustainable development of nuclear energy

  8. Nation and the Eucharist. The Polish section at the 23rd International Eucharistic Congress in Vienna (1912

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Józef Janicki

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available First Eucharistic congresses were first established in France, which for centuries stood out among Catholic nations for its special worship of the Blessed Sacrament. The first international congress was held in 1881 in Lille. The 23rd International Eucharistic Congress took place in 11-15 September 1912 in Vienna under the auspices of Emperor Franz Joseph I of Austria. The article discusses the activity of the Polish section at the congress.

  9. The nuclear debate in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weish, P.

    1977-01-01

    This report was published during the debate about the construction of nuclear-power-plants in Austria and before the national referendum, which prevented the implementing of “Zwentendorf”, Austria´s first nuclear-power-plant. The report gives a view over the events in the discussion about Austria´s nuclear-future. (kancsar)

  10. Austria: Media Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signitzer, Benno

    1978-01-01

    Describes the Austrian broadcast industry which is dominated by foreign influences. Suggests the restoration of autonomy of Austria's media through a system of promotion of and subsidies to Austrian media efforts, as well as a decentralization of foreign influence to increase the quality and competitiveness of domestic production. (JMF)

  11. Education Policy Outlook: Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Diana Toledo; Golden, Gillian; Giovinazzo, Manon; Peterka, Judith; Ullmann, Marie

    2017-01-01

    This policy profile on education in Austria is part of the "Education Policy Outlook" series, which presents comparative analysis of education policies and reforms across OECD countries. Building on the OECD's substantial comparative and sectoral knowledge base, the series offers a comparative outlook on education policy by providing…

  12. DETECTORS: Vienna - beyond the wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krammer, Manfred; Regler, Meinhard

    1995-01-01

    In 1986, at the fourth Vienna Wire Chamber Conference, Georges Charpak, the inventor of the multiwire proportional chamber, had confidently announced ''Les funérailles des chambres à fils''. Was this the writing on the wall for the conference series as well as this type of detector technology? The demand for detector innovation, coupled with imaginative thinking on the part of the organizers, have kept the Vienna venue at the forefront of the physics calendar. An additional boost to the success of the series was certainly the Nobel Prize awarded to Georges Charpak in 1992. While the major topic naturally is still wire chambers, alternative technologies are also covered. However in fields like calorimetry or ring imaging Cherenkovs, a sample of only a few prominent detectors were presented, giving some participants the impression of a biased selection. The fact that silicon detectors, electronics and track reconstruction strategies were, with the exception of the invited talks, restricted to poster presentations led to the same conclusion. As a result the organizing committee saw that it will have to revise its brief for the next conference. The conference opened with philosophical thoughts by Nobel Prizewinner Georges Charpak. The first day at Vienna is traditionally devoted to applications of gaseous detectors outside high energy physics. L. Shektman gave an overview of wire chambers for medical imaging. Further applications in medicine and in other fields like biology and space science were described by subsequent speakers. The exciting idea of flying a spectrometer on a balloon to study the fraction of electrons and positrons in cosmic rays attracted a lot of attention. The next day covered wire chambers in general. V. Polychronakos presented applications of cathode strip chambers in muon spectrometers for experiments at CERN's LHC proton-proton detector. Certainly the challenges of LHC for detector development dominated many

  13. Etisus evamuellerae, a new xanthid crab (Decapoda, Brachyura) from the Middle Miocene of Austria and Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyžný, M.; van Bakel, B.W.M.; Guinot, D.

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of several carapaces, a new species of xanthid crab, Etisus evamuellerae, is described from the Middle Miocene of the Vienna (Austria) and Great Hungarian basins. It differs from the coeval xanthids, Xantho moldavicus and Pilodius vulgaris, in having a distinctly protruding front and comparatively longer carapace. Contrary to those two species, the new one makes up for just a small percentage in the decapod crustacean assemblages studied. PMID:25983383

  14. [Publication performances of university clinics for anesthesiology: Germany, Austria and Switzerland from 2001 to 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzer, G; Ausserer, J; Wenzel, V; Pehböck, D; Widmann, T; Lindner, K; Hamm, P; Paal, P

    2014-04-01

    This study assessed the publication performance of university departments of anesthesiology in Austria, Germany and Switzerland. The number of publications, original articles, impact factors and citations were evaluated. A search was performed in PubMed to identify publications related to anesthesiology from 2001 to 2010. All articles from anesthesiology journals listed in the fields of anesthesia/pain therapy, critical care and emergency medicine by the "journal citation report 2013" in Thomson Reuters ISI web of knowledge were included. Articles from non-anaesthesiology journals, where the stem of the word anesthesia (anes*, anaes*, anäst*, anast*) appears in the affiliation field of PubMed, were included as well. The time periods 2001-2005 and 2006-2010 were compared. Articles were allocated to university departments in Austria, Germany and Switzerland via the affiliation field. A total of 45 university departments in Austria, Germany and Switzerland and 125,979 publications from 2,863 journals (65 anesthesiology journals, 2,798 non-anesthesiology journals) were analyzed. Of the publications 23 % could not be allocated to a given university department of anesthesiology. In the observation period the university department of anesthesiology in Berlin achieved most publications (n = 479) and impact points (1,384), whereas Vienna accumulated most original articles (n = 156). Austria had the most publications per million inhabitants in 2006-2010 (n=50) followed by Switzerland (n=49) and Germany (n=35). The number of publications during the observation period decreased in Germany (0.5 %), Austria (7 %) and Switzerland (8 %). Tables 2 and 4-8 of this article are available at Springer Link under Supplemental. The research performance varied among the university departments of anesthesiology in Germany, Austria and Switzerland whereby larger university departments, such as Berlin or Vienna published most. Publication output in Germany, Austria and

  15. ALARA issues arising for safety and security of radiation sources and security screening devices - Summary and recommendations of the 12. European ALARA network workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, P.; Crouail, P.; Drouet, F.

    2010-01-01

    The 12. European ALARA Network (EAN) workshop on 'ALARA issues arising for safety and security of radiation sources and security screening devices' took place in Vienna (Austria) in October 2009. The aim of that workshop was to consider how the implementation of ALARA3, in terms of planned and emergency situations, involving worker and public doses, is affected by the introduction of security-related measures. In the case of new equipment and procedures, there was also the question of whether exposures arising from security screening devices can be justified and optimised. This workshop consisted of invited oral presentations, which highlighted the main issues, and half of the programme was devoted to discussions within working groups on specific topics. During their discussions, the working groups identified recommendations dealing with the following topics: the implementation of the Code of Conduct and HASS4 - ensuring ALARA; balancing security and safety - how to achieve an optimum solution; the management of an emergency exposure situation from an ALARA perspective; the justification and optimisation of the use of security devices. The objective of this paper is to present the main conclusions and recommendations produced during the workshop. Individual presentations (papers and slides) as well as the reports from the working groups are available to download on the EAN web site (http://www.eu-alara.net). (authors)

  16. Closing the natural cycles - using biowaste compost in organic farming in Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Eva; Rogalski, Wojciech; Maurer, Ludwig; Hartl, Wilfried

    2014-05-01

    One of the basic principles of organic farming - that organic management should fit the cycles and ecological balances in nature - is put into practice in Vienna on a large scale. In Vienna, compost produced from separately collected biowaste and greenwaste is used on more than 1000 ha of organic farmland. These municipally owned farms are managed organically, but are stockless, like the vast majority of farms in the region. The apparent need for a substitute for animal manure triggered the development of an innovative biowaste management. Together with the Municipal Department 48 responsible for waste management, which was keen for the reduction of residual waste, the Municipal Department 49 - Forestry Office and Urban Agriculture and Bio Forschung Austria developed Vienna's biowaste management model. Organic household wastes and greenwastes are source-separated by the urban population and collected in a closely monitored system to ensure high compost quality. A composting plant was constructed which today produces a total of 43000 t compost per year in a monitored open windrow process. The quality of the compost produced conforms to the EU regulation 834/2007. A large part of the compost is used as organic fertilizer on the organic farmland in Vienna, and the remainder is used in arable farming and in viticulture in the region around Vienna and for substrate production. Vienna`s biowaste management-model is operating successfully since the 1980s and has gained international recognition in form of the Best Practice-Award of the United Nations Development Programme. In order to assess the effects of biowaste compost fertilization on crop yield and on the environment, a field experiment was set up near Vienna in 1992, which is now one of the longest standing compost experiments in Europe. The results showed, that the yields increased for 7 - 10 % with compost fertilization compared to the unfertilized control and the nitrogen recovery by crops was between 4 and 6

  17. The protocol amending the 1963 Vienna Convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamm, V.

    2006-01-01

    Technically the Vienna Convention was revised by the adoption of the protocol to amend the instrument. and according to Article 19 of the protocol 'A State which is Party to this Protocol but not to the 1963 Vienna Convention shall be bound by the provisions of that Convention as amended by this Protocol in relation to other States Parties hereto, and failing an expression of a different intention by that State at the time of deposit of an instrument referred to in Article 20 shall be bound by the provisions of the 1963 Vienna Convention in relation to States which are only Parties thereto'. This solution has created a special situation, because after the entry into force of the protocol there will be living together or operating in practice 'two' Vienna Conventions, notably the convention's original text of 1963 and its new version as amended by the protocol. After the protocol has come into force, a state may only accede to the amended version, but in the inter se relations of the States Party to the 'old' Vienna Convention the provisions of that convention will remain in force until such time as they have acceded to the new protocol. This rather complicated situation is nevertheless understandable and is fully in accord with Article 40 of the 1969 Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties, which provides for the amendment of multilateral treaties. In 1989 the negotiations on the revision of the Vienna Convention had begun with the aim of strengthening the existing nuclear liability regime and of improving the situation of potential victims of nuclear accidents. The Protocol to Amend the Vienna Convention serves those purposes; it also reflects a good compromise, since it is the outcome of a negotiation process in which experts from both nuclear and non-nuclear states, from Contacting Parties and non-Contracting Parties were very active. That affords some assurance that the compromise solution reached is acceptable to all States participating in the adoption of

  18. Radon in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedmann, H.

    2000-01-01

    Several projects in Austria deal with the problem of enhanced radon exposure to the public. The Austrian Radon Project is the largest project within this task, with the aim of investigating the radon concentrations in Austrian homes. Another project concerns mitigation methods. According to the EU directive EURATOM 96/29 it is also necessary to check working places for possibly enhanced radon concentrations. These projects are and will be funded by the government. The federal government of Upper Austria sponsored a project to test the indoor air quality in kindergartens including radon measurements. Within an EU research project, the radon concentrations in Austrian springs and groundwater were systematically listed and analyzed. Additional investigations will focus on methods to improve the radon potential maps from the Austrian Radon Project by including geological and other information. (author)

  19. Physics in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehlotzky, F.

    1985-07-01

    This catalogue gives the results of an investigation on research institutes in Austria in the field of physics, including nuclear physics, which was performed by the Austrian Physical Society. The main part is on university institutes, but also other research institutes are listed. For each institute the name of the head, number of researchers, a short description of the scientific work and an overview of national and international cooperation is given. Various registers and indexes are attached. (A.N.)

  20. VFC: The Vienna Fortran Compiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried Benkner

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available High Performance Fortran (HPF offers an attractive high‐level language interface for programming scalable parallel architectures providing the user with directives for the specification of data distribution and delegating to the compiler the task of generating an explicitly parallel program. Available HPF compilers can handle regular codes quite efficiently, but dramatic performance losses may be encountered for applications which are based on highly irregular, dynamically changing data structures and access patterns. In this paper we introduce the Vienna Fortran Compiler (VFC, a new source‐to‐source parallelization system for HPF+, an optimized version of HPF, which addresses the requirements of irregular applications. In addition to extended data distribution and work distribution mechanisms, HPF+ provides the user with language features for specifying certain information that decisively influence a program’s performance. This comprises data locality assertions, non‐local access specifications and the possibility of reusing runtime‐generated communication schedules of irregular loops. Performance measurements of kernels from advanced applications demonstrate that with a high‐level data parallel language such as HPF+ a performance close to hand‐written message‐passing programs can be achieved even for highly irregular codes.

  1. Research activities related to the role of forests and forestry in climate change mitigation in Austria. COST E21 Workshop. Contribution of forests and forestry to mitigate greenhouse effects. Joensuu (Finland. 28-30 Sep 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiss P.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Forests and forestry play important roles in Austria with its close to 50/ forest cover. This paper provides details about the Austrian forest carbon inventory, discusses briefly the sources and sinks accounted under the land use, land use change and forestry articles of the Kyoto Protocol, and presents an integrated carbon model (Austrian C-Balance Model that was developed to include not only the forest sector, but other sectors that are greenhouse-gas relevant. Improvements in forest management practices are seen as important possibilities of increasing the carbon sink strength of Austrian forests, but also of pursuing other goals such as increased biodiversity and resistance to future climate-change impacts. This paper presents a process model and a carbon accounting model that are applicable for evaluating carbon impacts of changes in forest management.

  2. 8th International Workshop on Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Rasch, Dieter; Melas, Viatcheslav; Moder, Karl; Statistics and simulation

    2018-01-01

    This volume features original contributions and invited review articles on mathematical statistics, statistical simulation and experimental design. The selected peer-reviewed contributions originate from the 8th International Workshop on Simulation held in Vienna in 2015. The book is intended for mathematical statisticians, Ph.D. students and statisticians working in medicine, engineering, pharmacy, psychology, agriculture and other related fields. The International Workshops on Simulation are devoted to statistical techniques in stochastic simulation, data collection, design of scientific experiments and studies representing broad areas of interest. The first 6 workshops took place in St. Petersburg, Russia, in 1994 – 2009 and the 7th workshop was held in Rimini, Italy, in 2013.

  3. Saksa skandaal ja Austria / Heiki Suurkask

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Suurkask, Heiki, 1972-

    2000-01-01

    Saksamaa korruptsiooniskandaal. J. Haideri Vabaduspartei valitsuse koosseisus. Kumb on suurem ohu allikas? Vt. samas art. Habsburg: Austria ei ole banaanivabariik. Austria mitteametliku troonipärija arvamus

  4. Report on botanical nomenclature—Vienna 2005. XVII International Botanical Congress, Vienna: Nomenclature Section, 12–16 July 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Flann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available PrefaceThis is the official Report on the deliberations and decisions of the ten sessions of the Nomenclature Section of the XVII International Botanical Congress held in Vienna, Austria, from 12–16 July 2005. The meetings of the Section took place on these five consecutive days prior to the Congress proper. The Section meetings were hosted by the Institute of Botany, University of Vienna, Austria. Technical facilities included full electronic recording of all discussion spoken into the microphones. Text of all proposals to amend the Code was displayed on one screen allowing suggested amendments to be updated as appropriate. The team at the University of Vienna (Christopher Dixon, Jeong-Mi Park, Ovidiu Paun, Carolin A. Redernig and Dieter Reich ensured that the proceedings ran smoothly and enjoyably for all.A report of the decisions of the Section was published soon after the Congress (McNeill & al. in Taxon 54: 1057–1064. 2005. It includes a tabulation of the preliminary mail vote on the published proposals, specifying how the Section acted on each and detailing amendments and new proposals approved upon motions from the floor. It also includes the report of the Nominating Committee as well as the Congress resolution ratifying the Section’s decisions, neither reproduced here. The main result of the Section’s deliberations is the Vienna Code, which was published as Regnum Vegetabile 146, on 20 Sep 2006 (McNeill & al. in Regnum Veg. 146. 2006. It was also published online, on the same date (see http://www.iapt-taxon.org/nomen/main.php.The present report of the proceedings of the Vienna Nomenclature Section conveys, we believe, a true and lively picture of the event. It is primarily based on the MP3 electronic recordings, with, where necessary, supplementation by the comment slips submitted by most speakers and by reference to parallel tape-recording, particularly where there were gaps in the MP3 record. With these sources combined, and

  5. International Workshop on Advanced Dynamics and Model Based Control of Structures and Machines

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, Alexander; Krommer, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The papers in this volume present and discuss the frontiers in the mechanics of controlled machines and structures. They are based on papers presented at the International Workshop on Advanced Dynamics and Model Based Control of Structures and Machines held in Vienna in September 2015. The workshop continues a series of international workshops held in Linz (2008) and St. Petersburg (2010).

  6. [Primary Health Care in Austria - Tu Felix Austria nube - Concept for networking in the primary care of Upper Austria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Johannes; Rebhandl, Erwin; Hockl, Wolfgang; Stöbich, Anna-Maria

    2017-10-01

    The primary health care in rural areas in Austria is currently determined by challenges such as ageing of the population, the shift towards chronic and age-related illnesses, the specialist medical and hospital-related education and training of physicians' as well growing widespread difficulty of staffing doctor's office. The objective is to realize a general practitioner centered and team-oriented primary health care (PHC) approach by establishing networked primary health care in rural areas of Austria. Using literature research, online survey, expert interviews and expert workshops, we identified different challenges in terms of primary health care in rural areas. Further, current resources and capacities of primary health care in rural areas were identified using the example of the district of Rohrbach. Twelve design dimensions and 51 relevant measurement indicators of a PHC network were delineated and described. Based on this, 12 design approaches of PHC concept for the GP-centered and team-oriented primary health care in rural areas have been developed.

  7. School accidents in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalamon, Johannes; Eberl, Robert; Ainoedhofer, Herwig; Singer, Georg; Spitzer, Peter; Mayr, Johannes; Schober, Peter H; Hoellwarth, Michael E

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain information about the mechanisms and types of injuries in school in Austria. Children between 0 and 18 years of age presenting with injuries at the trauma outpatient in the Department of Pediatric Surgery in Graz and six participating hospitals in Austria were evaluated over a 2-year prospective survey. A total of 28,983 pediatric trauma cases were registered. Personal data, site of the accident, circumstances and mechanisms of accident and the related diagnosis were evaluated. At the Department of Pediatric Surgery in Graz 21,582 questionnaires were completed, out of which 2,148 children had school accidents (10%). The remaining 7,401 questionnaires from peripheral hospitals included 890 school accidents (12%). The male/female ratio was 3:2. In general, sport injuries were a predominant cause of severe trauma (42% severe injuries), compared with other activities in and outside of the school building (26% severe injuries). Injuries during ball-sports contributed to 44% of severe injuries. The upper extremity was most frequently injured (34%), followed by lower extremity (32%), head and neck area (26%) and injuries to thorax and abdomen (8%). Half of all school related injuries occur in children between 10 and 13 years of age. There are typical gender related mechanisms of accident: Boys get frequently injured during soccer, violence, and collisions in and outside of the school building and during craft work. Girls have the highest risk of injuries at ball sports other than soccer.

  8. First meeting of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors, Vienna, 18-21 May 1987. (Pt. 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The First Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors was held in Vienna, Austria from 18-21 May 1987. The Summary Report (Pt. 2) contains the papers which review the national programmes in the field of Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors and other presentations at the Meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 10 papers presented at this meeting. Refs, figs

  9. The laboratory activities of the IAEA laboratories, Vienna. Annual report - 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    The report presents in ten sections the work done during 1978 by the laboratory of the International Atomic Energy Agency located in Seibersdorf in the province of Lower Austria. The ten sections are: 1) metrology, 2) dosimetry, 3) chemistry, 4) safeguards analytical laboratory, 5) isotope hydrology, 6) medical applications, 7) agriculture - soils, 8) entomology, 9) plant breeding, 10) electronics and workshop. Lists of publications of the staff of the laboratory are appended

  10. The ViennaRNA web services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Andreas R; Bernhart, Stephan H; Lorenz, Ronny

    2015-01-01

    The ViennaRNA package is a widely used collection of programs for thermodynamic RNA secondary structure prediction. Over the years, many additional tools have been developed building on the core programs of the package to also address issues related to noncoding RNA detection, RNA folding kinetics, or efficient sequence design considering RNA-RNA hybridizations. The ViennaRNA web services provide easy and user-friendly web access to these tools. This chapter describes how to use this online platform to perform tasks such as prediction of minimum free energy structures, prediction of RNA-RNA hybrids, or noncoding RNA detection. The ViennaRNA web services can be used free of charge and can be accessed via http://rna.tbi.univie.ac.at.

  11. Impact Orientation in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt SPEER

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of impact orientation within the public sector constitutes an en-tirely new approach of governance. Until recently – and in many cases still so – public administration was primarily input-oriented, which means focusing on the resources (financial, personnel etc. needed to fulfil existing public tasks instead of focusing on the results and final effects which are intended to be reached ultimately by these often long ago defined assignments. As experience shows, the pressing challenge of increasing steadily the effectiveness and efficiency within public administration cannot be reached by such a one-sided and consequently limited approach. Thus, a wider and more comprehensive concept is necessary to optimize the public sector in all its dimensions. As a result of prevalent budget crises, increasing pressure of stakeholders towards public administration and generally less room for manoeuver due to a growing regulatory burden, new/adapted and more flexible ways of thinking and acting within the public sector are required. Hence, modern concepts of steering and control – not only in Europe but in a larger number of OECD countries – now tend to give more importance to the targets and effects of public administration and its activities within the societal context. This rather new concept – the so called “impact orientation” which has been introduced in Austria as core element of the Federal Budget Law Reform 2009/2013 – requires a fundamental alignment of governmental actions and a new focus on the outputs and even on the outcomes of political and administrative strategies. The results until now have been primarily “outwardly-oriented” reform concepts concentrating on the external societal effects of politico-administrative actions. However, recent research results show for Austria, that this external dimension has to be linked more closely with internal reform efforts and internal impact targets in order to

  12. Health status and utilisation of the healthcare system by homeless and non-homeless people in Vienna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Julia; Diehl, Katharina; Mutsch, Livia; Löffler, Walter; Burkert, Nathalie; Freidl, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    This case-control study describes the health situation, internal and external resources, and utilisation of healthcare facilities by a marginalised population consisting of homeless people in Vienna, Austria, compared with a non-homeless control population. Among the homeless group, participants lived in halfway houses (70%) or permanent housing (30%) in Vienna. Personal interviews were conducted in July 2010 with 66 homeless individuals, and their data were compared with data from non-homeless subjects from the Austrian Health Interview Survey using conditional logistic regression. Compared with the control group, homeless persons suffered more often from chronic diseases (P resources of homeless people, even though homeless people seek medical care at a higher rate than controls. Continuing health promotion projects for this high-risk group and the strengthening of social resources are recommended. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Proceedings, LHCSki 2016 - A First Discussion of 13 TeV Results: Obergurgl, Austria, April 10-15, 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Adam, Wolfgang; Pradler, Josef; Schieck, Jochen; Schwanda, Christoph; Waltenberger, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the LHCSki 2016 workshop "A First Discussion of 13 TeV Results" that has been held at the Obergurgl Universit\\"atszentrum, Tirol, Austria, April 10 - 15, 2016. In this workshop the consequences of the most recent results from the LHC have been discussed, with a focus also on the interplay with dark matter physics, flavor physics, and precision measurements. Contributions from the workshop speakers have been compiled into this document. Much is at stake when the...

  14. Summary of workshop 'Theory Meets Industry' - the impact of ab initio solid state calculations on industrial materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wimmer, E

    2008-01-01

    A workshop, 'Theory Meets Industry', was held on 12-14 June 2007 in Vienna, Austria, attended by a well balanced number of academic and industrial scientists from America, Europe, and Japan. The focus was on advances in ab initio solid state calculations and their practical use in industry. The theoretical papers addressed three dominant themes, namely (i) more accurate total energies and electronic excitations (ii) more complex systems, and (iii) more diverse and accurate materials properties. Hybrid functionals give some improvements in energies, but encounter difficulties for metallic systems. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are progressing, but no clear breakthrough is on the horizon. Progress in order-N methods is steady, as is the case for efficient methods for exploring complex energy hypersurfaces and large numbers of structural configurations. The industrial applications were dominated by materials issues in energy conversion systems, the quest for hydrogen storage materials, improvements of electronic and optical properties of microelectronic and display materials, and the simulation of reactions on heterogeneous catalysts. The workshop is a clear testimony that ab initio computations have become an industrial practice with increasingly recognized impact

  15. Summary of workshop 'Theory Meets Industry'—the impact of ab initio solid state calculations on industrial materials research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, E.

    2008-02-01

    A workshop, 'Theory Meets Industry', was held on 12-14 June 2007 in Vienna, Austria, attended by a well balanced number of academic and industrial scientists from America, Europe, and Japan. The focus was on advances in ab initio solid state calculations and their practical use in industry. The theoretical papers addressed three dominant themes, namely (i) more accurate total energies and electronic excitations, (ii) more complex systems, and (iii) more diverse and accurate materials properties. Hybrid functionals give some improvements in energies, but encounter difficulties for metallic systems. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are progressing, but no clear breakthrough is on the horizon. Progress in order-N methods is steady, as is the case for efficient methods for exploring complex energy hypersurfaces and large numbers of structural configurations. The industrial applications were dominated by materials issues in energy conversion systems, the quest for hydrogen storage materials, improvements of electronic and optical properties of microelectronic and display materials, and the simulation of reactions on heterogeneous catalysts. The workshop is a clear testimony that ab initio computations have become an industrial practice with increasingly recognized impact.

  16. CAS Accelerators for Medical Applications in Vösendorf, Austria

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Accelerator School

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) and MedAustron jointly organised a course on Accelerators for Medical Applications in Vösendorf, Austria between 26 May and 5 June 2015. The course was held at the Eventhotel Pyramide on the outskirts of Vienna, and was attended by 76 participants from 29 countries, coming from as far away as Canada, China, Lithuania, Thailand, Ukraine and Russia.       The intensive programme comprised 37 lectures. The emphasis was on using charged particle beams for cancer therapy and the programme began by covering the way in which particles interact with biological material, how this translates into the dose needed for treatment and how this dose is best delivered. The different accelerator options for providing the particles needed were then presented in some detail. The production of radioisotopes and how these are used for diagnostics and therapy was also covered, together with a look at novel acceleration techniques that may play a role i...

  17. Additive homeopathy in cancer patients: Retrospective survival data from a homeopathic outpatient unit at the Medical University of Vienna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Katharina; Müllner, Michael; Friehs, Helmut; Schuster, Ernst; Marosi, Christine; Muchitsch, Ilse; Frass, Michael; Kaye, Alan David

    2014-04-01

    Current literature suggests a positive influence of additive classical homeopathy on global health and well-being in cancer patients. Besides encouraging case reports, there is little if any research on long-term survival of patients who obtain homeopathic care during cancer treatment. Data from cancer patients who had undergone homeopathic treatment complementary to conventional anti-cancer treatment at the Outpatient Unit for Homeopathy in Malignant Diseases, Medical University Vienna, Department of Medicine I, Vienna, Austria, were collected, described and a retrospective subgroup-analysis with regard to survival time was performed. Patient inclusion criteria were at least three homeopathic consultations, fatal prognosis of disease, quantitative and qualitative description of patient characteristics, and survival time. In four years, a total of 538 patients were recorded to have visited the Outpatient Unit Homeopathy in Malignant Diseases, Medical University Vienna, Department of Medicine I, Vienna, Austria. 62.8% of them were women, and nearly 20% had breast cancer. From the 53.7% (n=287) who had undergone at least three homeopathic consultations within four years, 18.7% (n=54) fulfilled inclusion criteria for survival analysis. The surveyed neoplasms were glioblastoma, lung, cholangiocellular and pancreatic carcinomas, metastasized sarcoma, and renal cell carcinoma. Median overall survival was compared to expert expectations of survival outcomes by specific cancer type and was prolonged across observed cancer entities (p<0.001). Extended survival time in this sample of cancer patients with fatal prognosis but additive homeopathic treatment is interesting. However, findings are based on a small sample, and with only limited data available about patient and treatment characteristics. The relationship between homeopathic treatment and survival time requires prospective investigation in larger samples possibly using matched-pair control analysis or randomized

  18. The protocol amending the 1963 Vienna Convention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamm, V.

    1998-01-01

    In the first stage of the revision process, the only goal was to amend certain provisions of the Vienna Convention. Later, in what might be called the second stage, the question was seriously raised of establishing a new supplementary convention by which additional funds were to be provided by the international community of States. Most experts felt that the nuclear liability regime of the Vienna Convention, as amended, would really serve the interests of potential victims of nuclear incidents only if it were supported by an international supplementary fund providing additional compensation for nuclear damage to that provided by the operator. Thus, the Standing Committee started to consider the establishment, under the Vienna Convention, of a mechanism for mobilizing additional funds for compensation of nuclear damage. During the negotiations it was deemed necessary to establish a separate treaty for such a supplementary fund, and indeed, efforts were undertaken to draw up such an instrument concurrently with the revision of the Vienna Convention. (K.A.)

  19. Statement on the 20th anniversary of the Vienna International Centre, Vienna, 9 October 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1999-01-01

    In his Statement on the 20th Anniversary of the Vienna International Centre, the Director General of the IAEA presented the work of the Agency and described how it contributes to two main objectives, namely human development and security

  20. Sustainability as the integration of economics and ethics? Baden, Vienna/Austria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Erik Kloppenborg

    2000-01-01

    In this study it is argued that the corporate pursuit of sustainability calls forth attitudes in the business world which seem to integrate economic, political and moral issues. The quest for sustainability calls forth reflection and reorientation in business life concerning visions, goals, role...... in society and practices. Evidence from two cases of corporate communication seems to indicate that the "language of sustainability" implicates a certain reorientation in business life. Whether this reorientation is merely "rhetorical" rather than "real" is not discussed in this paper, but when people use...

  1. Introductory statement to the Board of Governors. 25 November 2004, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2004-01-01

    The agenda for this meeting is centred on the report of the Technical Assistance and Cooperation Committee (TACC) and issues related to nuclear verification. Each of these topics is discussed: Technical Cooperation Programme; Verification of Nuclear Non-Proliferation (Status of Comprehensive Safeguards Agreements and Additional Protocols, Review of the Safeguards Programme and Criteria, Implementation of the NPT Safeguards Agreement in the Republic of Korea, in the Islamic Republic of Iran, in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea). The Agency continues to assume growing responsibilities in nearly all areas of its work. While dealing with a broad range of issues this year, the value of a close partnership between the Secretariat and its Member States has been repeatedly demonstrated

  2. Introductory statement to the Board of Governors, 10 September 2007, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Agency continues to explore ways and means that enable Member States to make full use of nuclear technology to meet their socioeconomic needs, like the disposal of radioactive sources, water management and combating bird flu. Working with the Nuclear Energy Corporation of South Africa, the Agency has developed and pilot tested the S HARS Installation , a mobile hot cell used to condition these sources for disposal. Conditioning operations are planned in several African countries. Depending on progress there, this initiative will be expanded to Latin America and Asia. Another Agency effort has been to assist more Member States to become self-reliant in isotope hydrology. An Atlas of Isotope Hydrology for Africa has been published. The Agency also helped to adapt a new machine for isotope analysis that uses laser spectroscopy. The IAEA, together with other key players such as the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), combat bird flu. Nuclear related technologies enable diagnosis of bird flu in one or two days and stable isotope techniques are being used to help Member States trace infected migratory birds to their place of origin. The safety and security of nuclear activities around the globe remain key components of the Agency's mandate. Last year the Agency began offering an Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS), which combined a broad range of previous services. The first full scope IRRS was conducted in France in November 2006, covering all regulated nuclear and radiation facilities, activities and practices, including nuclear power plants, research reactors, fuel cycle facilities, medical practices, industrial and research activities, waste facilities, decommissioning, remediation and transport. he Agency also conducted IRRS missions to Australia and Japan in June 2007. Future missions are scheduled for Canada, Germany, Mexico, Pakistan, the Russian Federation, Spain, Ukraine and the United States of America. Following the recent earthquake that affected the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, the Agency dispatched a team of international experts at the request of the Japanese Government. Revision began early this year on the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources, known as the BSS. A first draft of the revised BSS was reviewed in July by a technical meeting, which included participation from professional technical associations and potential co-sponsor organizations in addition to Member State experts. The Agency's nuclear security programme has maintained its rapid pace of programme delivery. The international community has taken on board a variety of international instruments relevant to nuclear security. The rapid entry into force of the International Convention on the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism is a welcome step forward. However, progress on ratifying the Amendment to the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material remains slow. Out of 128 States Parties, only 11 so far have accepted the Amendment. The Agency is foreseen as playing an important role in the implementation of these instruments. To that end, we have started an effort to provide nuclear security guidance that would facilitate implementation. The part on verification of nuclear non-proliferation covers the status of Safeguards agreements and Additional Protocols, the application of safeguards in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, the implementation of the NPT safeguards agreement in the Islamic Republic of Iran and the application of IAEA safeguards in the Middle East. The IAEA has been able to verify the DPRK's shutdown of this facility, including the nuclear fuel fabrication plant, the radiochemical laboratory, the 5 megawatt experimental nuclear power plant, and the 50 megawatt nuclear power plant - as well as the 200 megawatt nuclear power plant in Taechon. The report on the implementation of Agency safeguards in the Islamic Republic of Iran makes four main points. First, the Agency has been able to verify the non-diversion of declared nuclear material in Iran. Second, Iran has provided the Agency with additional information and access needed to resolve a number of long outstanding issues. In particular, Agency questions regarding past plutonium experiments in Iran have been satisfactorily answered, and this issue has been resolved. Questions about the presence and origin of high enriched uranium particles at the Karaj Waste Storage Facility have also been resolved.Third Iran has not suspended its enrichment related activities, and is continuing with the construction and operation of the Fuel Enrichment Plant at Natanz. Iran is also continuing with its construction of the heavy water reactor at Arak. Fourth, despite repeated requests by the Board and the Security Council to Iran, the Agency has so far been unable to verify certain important aspects relevant to the scope and nature of Iran's nuclear programme. This is the first time that Iran has agreed on a plan to address all outstanding issues, with a defined timeline, and is therefore an important step in the right direction. No progress was made concerning full scope safeguards and establishment of a Nuclear Weapons Free Zone in the Middle East. Technical cooperation (TC) programme resources and delivery both showed robust growth in 2006. Finally, activities were reported on human resources giving special attention to applicants from developing, unrepresented and under-represented Member States and suitably qualified women in the Professional and higher categories, particularly in scientific and engineering fields

  3. Introductory statement to Board of Governors, 13 September 2010, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yukiya

    2010-01-01

    Last month, I had the honour of attending two very important ceremonies in my homeland in commemoration of the devastating nuclear catastrophes in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This was the first time that the ceremonies were attended by the United Nations Secretary General, the U.S. Ambassador to Japan and the IAEA Director General. I sensed a new momentum towards achieving a world free of nuclear weapons. I used the occasion of my visit to Nagasaki to make my own personal commitment to redouble my efforts to help bring about a world free of nuclear weapons. There are four elements to this commitment: First, I believe the IAEA should do what it can to facilitate the implementation of nuclear disarmament through verification. We recently received a joint letter from Secretary of State Clinton and Minister of Foreign Affairs Lavrov, on behalf of the United States and the Russian Federation, requesting IAEA assistance to independently verify implementation of their agreement on the disposal of plutonium no longer required for defence purposes. Second, the IAEA should, when requested, work to support the creation of new nuclear-weapon- free zones and continue to help in implementing agreements relevant to such zones. Third, the Agency's safeguards activities should be strengthened in order to help prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons. Fourth, the IAEA should redouble its efforts to support States in their national efforts to prevent terrorist groups from acquiring nuclear weapons. I intend to focus strongly on the goal of helping to achieve a world free of nuclear weapons, under the guidance of the Board of Governors

  4. Introductory statement to Board of Governors, 1 March 2010, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Let me highlight some recent activities of the Agency. We are finally starting the modernization of our laboratories at Seibersdorf, which is a long overdue project. On the management front, we have also carried out a restructuring which will make the laboratories more effective and efficient in serving the needs of Member States. I have given special priority to the Agency's work on cancer control. This was a focus of my first official trip as Director General, which was to Nigeria in December. It was also an important element of my discussions with UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon in New York. I will have more to say on some of these points shortly. First, I will address issues relating to nuclear energy

  5. Introductory statement to Board of Governors, 7 June 2010, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yukiya

    2010-01-01

    Since the last Board meeting, I have represented the Agency at a number of important events. n March, I addressed the International Conference on Access to Civil Nuclear Energy, which was opened by President Sarkozy in Paris. This conference illustrated the growing international interest in nuclear power as a clean and stable source of energy. The willingness of participating countries to support newcomers to nuclear power was very much in evidence. Also,the importance of the Agency's role in setting nuclear safety standards and providing security guidance was emphasized. For my part, I stressed the Agency's readiness to help interested parties, in particular developing countries, to establish a nuclear infrastructure. In April, I attended the Nuclear Security Summit in Washington, which was hosted by President Obama and attended by leaders from 47 countries. I was encouraged by the firm commitment of all participants to combat nuclear terrorism and the strong support expressed for the essential role of the Agency in nuclear security. I explained the Agency's activities in supporting national efforts to improve nuclear security, which include assistance such as supplying radiation detection devices like this. Last month, I addressed the opening session of the eighth NPT Review Conference in New York. I outlined recent activities of the Agency in the relevant areas. The Secretariat provided its customary assistance at the Conference, including two factual reports covering the main areas of IAEA activities. I warmly welcome the fact that the NPT Review Conference unanimously adopted Conclusions and Recommendations for Follow-on Actions in the three areas that relate to Agency activities. It was very encouraging that a call was made to all States parties to ensure that the Agency continues to have all the political, technical and financial support it needs to effectively meet its responsibilities. I am confident that, with the support of all of its Member States, the Agency will continue delivering excellent results in all areas of its work

  6. Introductory statement to the [IAEA] Board of Governors, 15 June 2009, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, the focus of the Agency's technical cooperation programme remained on capacity building, an area where the Agency has a unique comparative advantage, as well as on regional cooperation and partnerships with UN and other multilateral agencies. As the Technical Cooperation Report for 2008 shows, human health remained the largest area of activity last year, accounting for over a quarter of all TC spending followed by activities in food and agriculture. Safety was the third main area of activity, with the emphasis on management of radioactive waste. The Agency has received a letter from the FAO announcing that the notice of termination of the FAO/IAEA Joint Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture is being withdrawn. Last month the WHO-IAEA Programme on Cancer Control was launched. The Agency organized an International Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Energy in the 21st Century in Beijing in April, which was graciously hosted by the Chinese Government. This was the first high level nuclear power conference since the start of the global financial crisis. It was significant that no country reported any scaling back of its nuclear power expansion plans. The Director General expressed his concerns about a recurrent discussion among some Member States on whether nuclear security is a core function of the Agency. He stressed that the IAEA's Fundamental Safety Principles have long recognized that safety and security measures must be designed and implemented in an integrated manner. At a time when security risks are growing, it would be irresponsible for the Agency - and incomprehensible to the public - not to have a robust, well funded and independent nuclear security programme. Concerning the Status of Comprehensive Safeguards Agreements and Additional Protocols he reported that there are still 26 NPT non-nuclear-weapon States without comprehensive safeguards agreements for which the IAEA cannot draw any safeguards conclusions. He also reported that the DPRK informed the Agency that it had decided to cease all cooperation with the IAEA, to request IAEA personnel to remove all Agency containment and surveillance equipment from the Yongbyon facilities and to require Agency inspectors to leave the DPRK. The Agency has been able to continue to verify the non-diversion of declared nuclear material in Iran. Regrettably, however, Iran has not implemented any of the measures called for by the Security Council and by the Agency's Board of Governors. And there has been no movement by Iran on outstanding issues which need to be clarified to exclude the possibility of military dimensions to Iran's nuclear programme. Syria is urged to be fully cooperative and transparent, to provide the additional information and documentation requested by the Agency and to grant access to other locations, including those relevant for the sampling of destroyed and salvaged equipment and debris from the Dair Alzour site. The Director General informed about a proposal on establishing a low enriched uranium (LEU) reserve under Agency auspices, which I have put forward for your consideration, as well as a proposal from the Russian Federation in support of the idea of an assurance of supply mechanism. His proposal is rooted in the Agency Statute and envisages the Agency providing LEU as a fall-back service to Member States. The purpose of the IAEA LEU bank and of the Russian proposal is to provide assurance of supply over and above countries' existing rights. It does not limit countries' rights in any way but is intended to avoid a repeat of the type of disruption for political reasons seen in the past. The proposed Agency LEU bank would be a physical stockpile of LEU at the disposal of the Agency as a last-resort reserve for countries with nuclear power programmes which face a supply disruption for non-commercial reasons. The Russian initiative to set up an LEU reserve for the supply of LEU to the Agency is fully funded by the Russian Federation. It would guarantee the supply of LEU to the Agency for eligible Member States. The Director General said that it is disconcerting to note that, while Member States continue to demand more from us, many are reluctant to provide the corresponding resources and he spelled out some of the consequences which he fears if the Agency were to continue living within the constraints of an entirely inadequate budget. The IAEA's ability to maintain an independent nuclear verification system and detect possible diversion of nuclear material and undeclared nuclear activities is already at risk because, for example, its analytical laboratories are outdated and the lack of sufficient access to satellite imagery. Without additional funding, this situation can only get worse

  7. Statement to 54. regular session of IAEA General Conference 2010, 20 September 2010, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yukiya

    2010-01-01

    A year ago, I addressed the 53rd General Conference after taking my Oath of Office as Director General. I said that the Agency's contribution to addressing key global issues could be maximized only if it pursued its objectives in a balanced manner. A constant theme of my first ten months in office has been to pursue multiple objectives in regard to the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and the promotion of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, including technical cooperation, in a balanced manner. I am trying to change the widespread perception of the Agency as simply the world's 'nuclear watchdog' because it does not do justice to our extensive activities in other areas, especially in nuclear energy, nuclear applications, and technical cooperation. This year, we are focusing on cancer, which is the subject of the Scientific Forum starting tomorrow. Today, I would like to look back on the past ten months and share some thoughts on our work in the near future

  8. Statement to International Conference on Advances in Nuclear Forensics, 7 July 2014, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2014-01-01

    National authorities have primary responsibility for ensuring that such materials, and the facilities in which they are housed, are properly secured. But terrorists and criminals operate across international borders, so a coordinated international response is essential. The IAEA plays the central role in helping countries to ensure that nuclear and other radioactive materials do not fall into the wrong hands. Globally, the protection of these materials and related facilities has undoubtedly improved in the past decade. But much remains to be done. In the 20 years to 2013, our Member States reported nearly 2 400 confirmed incidents of nuclear and other radioactive material falling out of regulatory control. These are figures compiled by the IAEA Incident and Trafficking Database. Of greatest concern were 16 incidents which involved the unauthorized possession of highly enriched uranium and plutonium. As recently as 2011, there was evidence of the existence of organized networks of sellers and buyers for this material. Experience has shown that the harder law enforcement agencies look for nuclear and other radioactive material, the more they find. The question then is to determine the precise nature of material that is seized. Where did it originate? What threat does it pose? Is there more? This is where nuclear forensics comes in. By helping to determine the origin and history of seized materials, nuclear forensics provides important answers that can guide investigations. Investigators need the specialist knowledge to manage crime scenes effectively in the case of a nuclear security incident. They must establish an appropriate chain of custody in dealing with evidence and seized material must be analysed in accordance with well documented procedures. This helps to establish confidence in the conclusions of nuclear forensic investigations and can contribute to successful prosecutions of perpetrators

  9. Introductory statement to the Board of Governors. 20 November 2003, Vienna, Austria. IAEA Board of Governors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2003-01-01

    The agenda for this meeting is centred on the report of the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Committee (TACC) and issues related to nuclear verification. Each of these topics are discussed with a number of other issues of interest to the Board. The focus of TC planning efforts continues to be the achievement of meaningful and sustained benefits to recipient Member States, in which country programme frameworks are used to ensure that our programmes are in line with national needs and priorities. Verification of Nuclear Non-Proliferation deals with the Status of Comprehensive Safeguards Agreements and Additional Protocols; Implementation of the NPT Safeguards Agreement in the Islamic Republic of Iran; Implementation of Safeguards in the DPRK; Implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolutions Relating to Iraq; Supply of Low Enriched Uranium to Romanian research reactor; appointment of the new International Expert Group on Nuclear Liability; Review Meeting on the Joint Convention; Newly Reconstituted International Nuclear Safety Group. In conclusion it is stated that the Agency continues to assume growing responsibilities in nearly all areas of its work. While dealing with a broad range of issues this year, the value of a close partnership between the Secretariat and its Member States has been repeatedly demonstrated

  10. Statement on President Obama winning 2009 Nobel Peace Prize, 9 October 2009, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: I am absolutely delighted to learn that President Barack Obama has been awarded the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize. I cannot think of anyone today more deserving of this honour. In less than a year in office, he has transformed the way we look at ourselves and the world we live in and rekindled hope for a world at peace with itself. President Obama has provided outstanding leadership on moving towards a world free of nuclear weapons. He has shown an unshakeable commitment to diplomacy, mutual respect and dialogue as the best means of resolving conflicts. He has reached out across divides and made clear that he sees the world as one human family, regardless of religion, race or ethnicity. President Obama has brought a new vision of a world based on human decency, fairness and freedom which is an inspiration to us all. (IAEA)

  11. Remarks in the [IAEA] Board of Governors under agenda item 8, 10 September 2009, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2009-01-01

    Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei, Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), said that he believes in two basic values: one, that we are one human family, irrespective of colour, religion, ethnicity. That is something he experiences every day with his colleagues in the Secretariat, and with the Board of Governors. He believes therefore that every one of us is entitled to the right to live in peace, dignity and freedom. The other basic value he shares is that we can go to new heights as human beings, but we can also stoop very low. He underlines that international institutions right now are indispensable. No single challenge or crisis can be resolved by any one country alone, whether it is arms control, whether it is climate change, whether it is communicable diseases or whether it is distorted ideologies. He stresses that we can only succeed if we are able to work together and at the same time applying basic core values like fairness, equity and human solidarity. We need international cooperation to implement national policies. He said that the Agency hinges on one key element, namely credibility, and that is based on independence and impartiality. Impartiality does not mean neutrality. It means sticking to what we believe is right, it means what is enshrined in the UN Charter. It is important to stick to the big picture, to stress the linkage between poverty and violence, the linkage between non-proliferation and disarmament. This is important to understand the root causes of some of the symptoms we are facing. He ends by saying that the Agency would not be here today had it not been for the wonderful people - the staff of this organization, who have spent a lot of time working with the utmost professionalism, dedication and loyalty to this organization - acting as one. It is the key hat Member States act also as one. We have managed to do it in the Secretariat by subscribing to the higher values that connect us all

  12. Introductory remarks at the Global Threat Reduction Initiative Partners Conference (GTRI). 18 September 2004, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2004-01-01

    The security of nuclear and other radioactive material has taken on dramatically heightened significance in recent years, due to a number of factors: first, the increasing awareness that nuclear weapons related 'know-how' is no longer confined to a relatively few countries; second, the uncovering of an illicit procurement network capable of supplying nuclear designs and equipment; and third, the rise of extremist groups that have demonstrated an interest in obtaining and using nuclear and radiological weapons. Against this background, the need to protect nuclear material and facilities, and to control nuclear material and radioactive sources, has become an ever more global priority. The IAEA has been active in the field of nuclear security for many years, but the urgency and scope of our efforts underwent a 'sea-change' in the months following September 2001. International cooperation has become the hallmark of these security efforts. While nuclear security is and should remain a national responsibility, many countries still lack the programmes and the resources to respond properly to the threat of nuclear and radiological terrorism. International efforts are focused both on assisting these countries in strengthening their programmes, and on building global networks for combating cross-border threats. The Agency's work has three main points of focus: prevention, detection and response. Our first objective is to assist States in preventing any illicit or non-peaceful use of nuclear or other radioactive materials - including acts of terrorism. This requires effective physical protection of nuclear materials in use, storage and transport, as well as protection of related nuclear facilities. It demands strong State programmes for accounting and control of nuclear material. It recognizes the benefits of the conversion of research reactors to use low enriched uranium a process that requires substantial funding and, in some cases, the development of technological solutions and the return of high enriched uranium from these research reactors to the countries of origin. And it necessitates the implementation of interim protection measures at vulnerable locations. The second objective relates to detection ensuring that we have systems in place that can help countries to identify, at an early stage, illicit activity related to nuclear materials or radioactive sources. To this end, IAEA has been assisting countries in training customs officials, installing better equipment at border crossings, and creating networks of communication with national and international law enforcement organizations, to ensure that information can be shared effectively and rapidly, when required. The Agency also maintains a database on illicit trafficking in nuclear and radiological material, which can be helpful in identifying patterns of covert activity, and serves to demonstrate the existence of a market for obtaining and using radiological sources for malevolent purposes. Third, we have been working with national governments and international organizations with the objective of ensuring that, in the event that illicit activity occurs including emergencies involving acts of sabotage or acts of terrorism involving nuclear material or radioactive sources we can respond rapidly and cooperatively. To date, most cases have involved helping governments with the recovery and securing of radioactive sources

  13. Introductory statement to the Board of Governors, 14 June 2004, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Statement to the Board of Governors includes the Agency's Annual Report, the Technical Cooperation Report, the Safeguards Implementation Report, the report of the Programme and Budget Committee, and a number of specific nuclear technology, safety and verification issues. The Technical Cooperation Report deals with TC Programme Management; Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy; TC Programme Funding; TC Programme Oversight. The Nuclear Technology part is concerned with Action Plan on Decommissioning of nuclear facilities, which incorporates the recommendations from the Agency's conference on safe decommissioning for nuclear activities held in 2002 in Berlin; Status of the IAEA International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). Nuclear Safety and Security covers Nuclear Installation Safety; Transport Safety; Emergency Preparedness and Response; Global Threat Reduction Initiative. Nuclear Verification is describing the Safeguards Implementation Report and Safeguards Statement for 2003; Implementation of Safeguards in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, in the Islamic Republic of Iran; and in Iraq; Status of Safeguards Agreements and Additional Protocols; Integrated Safeguards. The Secretariat remains committed to the efficient and effective implementation of programmes that reflect the priorities of all our Member States

  14. Introductory Statement to Board of Governors, 4 March 2013, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Next Monday is the second anniversary of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan. It has been a challenging two years, especially for the people and Government of Japan, but also for the IAEA. However, the worst elements of the accident are behind us and we are now in the post-accident phase. The Agency continues to work hard to help Japan deal with the consequences of the accident. Member States are also making serious efforts to implement the lessons learned from this and from previous accidents. You have received the Nuclear Safety Review 2013 and my report on Progress in the Implementation of the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety. Both show that continuous safety improvements are being made at nuclear facilities throughout the world. At the Fukushima Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety in December, the Co-Presidents emphasized the importance of strengthening the central role of the IAEA in promoting international cooperation in nuclear safety. During that Conference, I signed a Memorandum of Cooperation with the Governor of Fukushima Prefecture. We will work together on projects on radiation monitoring, remediation, human health, and capacity building in emergency preparedness and response within the RANET framework. The first meeting to launch four radiation and waste safety projects has just take place. A fourth post-Fukushima international expert meeting took place in January. This was on the subject of Decommissionin and Remediation after a Nuclear Accident. The Emergency Preparedness and Response Expert Group held its first meeting in February and agreed on priorities for its work. The series of international IAEA expert meetings will continue this year. In addition, the Agency is organizing a Conference on Effective Regulatory Systems in Ottawa in April, hosted by the Government of Canada. We have started work on a comprehensive IAEA report on the Fukushima Daiichi accident, which we hope to finalize in 2014. This is a major undertaking and I would be grateful for the active support of all Member States. The IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety calls for Member States to make more use of IAEA peer reviews. Many have done so. However, not all Member States with nuclear power have requested operational safety review - OSART - missions in line with the Action Plan. I encourage all countries to do so. This would help to achieve a high level of safety nuclear power plants, including adequate preparedness to manage severe accidents. Of course, nuclear safety is not just about nuclear power plants and fuel cycle facilities. It is also important to protect the public and the environment from exposure to radioactive sources, and to protect medical staff and patients from unnecessary and unintended exposure to radiation. These are issues for all countries. In December, the Agency organized an international conference in Bonn, Germany on Radiation Protection in Medicine. The Conference agreed the Bonn Call for Action, which recommended practical measures to improve protection for patients and health workers against over-exposure to ionizing radiation. In October this year, an International Conference on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources will be held in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. I encourage all Member States to participate. Preparations for the IAEA International Conference on Nuclear Security in July are progressing. I am grateful to the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Hungary, His Excellency Mr. Janos Martonyi, for agreeing to serve as President of this Conference. I encourage all countries to participate at ministerial level. The Ambassador of Hungary will take the lead in coordinating open-ended consultations among Member States. The Ambassador of Brazil, who has been acting as Chairman of the Programme Committee for this Conference, will act as Co-Chair. I thank Ambassadors Csuday and Vinhas for their willingness to take on these important roles.

  15. Introductory statement to the Board of Governors, 14 June 2005, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2005-01-01

    The agenda for this meeting covers a broad range of issues, including the Agency's Annual Report, the Technical Cooperation Report, the Safeguards Implementation Report, and the report of the Programme and Budget Committee. The Agency's Technical Cooperation (TC) Programme deals with the TC Management Change Initiative and the TC Programme Funding. The Agency continues to expand its partnerships with other United Nations system organizations, international financial institutions, regional organizations and other relevant bodies, to expand the scope and achieve synergy with respect to our activities in the area of nuclear applications and technical cooperation. Results of the Paris Conference on the Future of Nuclear Power are discussed. Issues on Nuclear Safety and Security covered the convention on nuclear safety, transport safety regulations, the London conference on nuclear security, the convention on the physical protection of nuclear material and recent emergency response exercise. Nuclear Verification is describing the Safeguards Implementation Report and Safeguards Statement for 2004, the status of safeguards agreements and additional protocols, the implementation of safeguards in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, the implementation of safeguards in the Islamic republic of Iran, the small quantity protocols and the committee on Safeguards and verification. Results of the 2005 NPT Review Conference are presented as well as the report of the Programme and Budget Committee and the report of the external auditor. The Secretariat remains committed to the implementation of a programme that aims to address the increasing challenges we are facing in both areas of our activities: human security and human development. The Secretariat will do its best with your guidance and support to ensure efficient and effective implementation of the programme

  16. Eighth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 15-18 April 1975. Summary report. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-08-01

    The Summary Report of the Eighth Annual Meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors contains the minutes of the meeting (Part 1); papers which review the national programmes in the field of LMFBRs (Part 2) and the discussions on the review of national programmes (Part 3). The agenda of the meeting involved design, construction, operating experiences of demonstration fast power reactors, reprocessing of spent fuel from LMFBRs, reliability of decay heat removal systems, fuel failure mechanisms, safety of LMFBRs

  17. Concluding Statement to IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety, 24 June 2011, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: This IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety has achieved its main goal, which was to pave the way for an enhanced post-Fukushima global nuclear safety framework. The result, in the words of the Ministerial Declaration agreed by you on Monday, will be a strengthening of nuclear safety, emergency preparedness, and radiation protection of people and the environment worldwide. I am grateful to all of you for your active participation and for the constructive spirit seen throughout the week's deliberations. The Ministerial Declaration outlines a number of measures to improve nuclear safety and expresses the firm commitment of IAEA Member States to ensure that these measures are actually implemented. Collectively, our Member States have expressed their sense of urgency, as well as their determination that the lessons of Fukushima Daiichi will be learned and that the appropriate action will be taken. I am grateful to you, Mr. President, and to the Chairs of the three Working Groups, for steering the Conference to its constructive conclusions. I also thank the keynote speakers, panellists and all participants for their valuable contributions. We have seen differences of opinion in some areas, which is entirely natural, but I am struck by how much broad agreement there has been on the fundamentals. I am particularly encouraged by the fact that the proposals I made in my opening statement on Monday enjoyed widespread support. As you may recall, these were: - to strengthen IAEA Safety Standards; - to systematically review the safety of all nuclear power plants, including by expanding the IAEA's programme of expert peer reviews ; - to enhance the effectiveness of national nuclear regulatory bodies and ensure their independence; - to strengthen the global emergency preparedness and response system; and - to expand the Agency's role in receiving and disseminating information. This is not about process - it is about results. The Declaration agreed here this week must be translated into action - and it will be. This will require hard work from all Member States, and from the IAEA, in the years ahead. This week's deliberations will give me valuable guidance as I prepare the Action Plan on the way ahead, which will be submitted to the IAEA Board of Governors and General Conference in September. Important meetings on nuclear safety are already planned in the next 18 months. The primary goal is to make nuclear power plants as safe as humanly possible, as quickly as possible. But it is also important to rebuild long-term public confidence in the safety of nuclear power. For that, tangible outcomes are needed, and we must maintain our sense of urgency. We must also be fully transparent. I have been in touch with the Commission on Safety Standards to suggest that it begin reviewing IAEA standards on the basis of the views expressed by Member States this week. Likewise, I am inviting the INES Advisory Committee to consider ways of making the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale more effective as a communication and information tool. We will also press ahead with detailed proposals in other areas for which we have direct responsibility, such as implementing an expanded programme of expert peer reviews. I would like to conclude by thanking you once again for making this Ministerial Conference a success, for your support for the work of the IAEA and for your guidance. I am confident that, as a result of your work here this week, measurable and lasting improvements will be made in the safety of all nuclear power plants throughout the world. Thank you. (IAEA)

  18. Statement to IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety, 20 June 2011, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2011-01-01

    This Ministerial Conference is the first high-level global gathering on nuclear safety since the Fukushima Daiichi accident in Japan. We have a very important task before us, which is to pave the way for a post-Fukushima nuclear safety framework, based on lessons learned from that accident. This Conference is crucial for the future of nuclear power. The presence of so many ministers and over one thousand participants shows how seriously the IAEA Member States take nuclear safety. The eyes of the world will be upon us in the next few days. Public confidence in the safety of nuclear power has been badly shaken. However, nuclear power will remain important for many countries, so it is imperative that the most stringent safety measures are implemented everywhere. This is also true for countries opting to phase out their nuclear power programmes, whose plants will continue to operate for many years. We need to respond urgently to the public anxiety caused by the accident, while maintaining a firm long-term commitment to continuously improving nuclear safety. 'Business as usual' is not an option. Nuclear accidents respect no borders, so an international approach to nuclear safety is essential. The IAEA is the global body which you, our Member States, have created to help ensure that the most robust international nuclear safety framework is established, implemented and continuously updated

  19. Remarks at reception for Member States, 9 December 2009, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Dear friends and colleagues, It is a great pleasure to have this first opportunity to welcome you all since I took up my position as Director General last week. I do not wish to spoil your evening by making a long speech. But I would like to make a few remarks highlighting the areas to which I plan to give special attention in the months and years ahead. Let me say at the outset that my key objective is to address global issues related to nuclear technology, in accordance with the Statute of the IAEA. That means working for nuclear non-proliferation, enhancing nuclear safety and security, assisting Member States in meeting their energy needs, responding to concerns about climate change, helping to ensure food security and clean water and improving health care through the application of nuclear techniques. The Agency's technical cooperation programme, which aims to make the benefits of nuclear science and technology more widely available, is important to all Member States. My intention is to continue to focus on technical cooperation so that we can more effectively meet the needs of Member States, as identified by them. In this regard, the priority is capacity-building to help countries establish their own expertise in nuclear science and technology. I am planning to pay special attention in my first year to cancer control, and, next week, I will make my first official trip as Director General to Nigeria to learn first-hand about its efforts to build an effective cancer control programme, among other issues. In January, I will use my participation in the World Economic Forum in Davos to appeal for focussed global attention on the growing cancer epidemic. In September, cancer control will be the topic of the Scientific Forum. This does not mean, of course, neglecting other areas of our work, which will receive special attention in future years. I now turn to nuclear power, which is enjoying growing acceptance as a stable and clean source of energy that can help to mitigate the impact of global warming. Many Member States have made it clear that they attach great importance to launching new nuclear power programmes, or expanding existing programmes. We have already significantly re-focussed our activities to help meet the needs of newcomers to nuclear power. I plan to build on our achievements and make the assistance we provide in capacity-building and other areas as practical and recipient-friendly as possible. My hope is that, as a result of the Agency's efforts, Member States will start to see tangible progress within four years on the path towards introducing nuclear power. As far as assurances of supply of nuclear fuel are concerned, the Secretariat will facilitate follow-up discussions in light of the recent deliberations in the Board of Governors, with a view to achieving a framework acceptable to all. Enhancing nuclear safety and security will remain indispensable. I will encourage all Member States that have not yet done so to implement all of the relevant safety conventions and codes of conduct. President Obama's decision to host a summit on nuclear security in April highlights the importance of this issue. I am looking forward to attending that meeting. In the area of non-proliferation, I see my role as being to ensure that safeguards agreements are concluded and fully implemented, to provide Member States with factual and objective information and analysis, and to act in accordance with relevant resolutions of the UN Security Council and the Agency's Board of Governors. I trust the Agency will have the full cooperation of all Member States. The bringing into force, and implementation, of additional protocols are of vital importance for the Agency to be able to provide assurances about the exclusively peaceful nature of a country's nuclear programme. I hope we will pass the threshold of 100 additional protocols in force early in my tenure as Director General. The modernisation of our Safeguards Analytical Laboratories at Seibersdorf is a long overdue issue. I aim to ensure that the extension of the Clean Laboratory and installation of the Large Geometry Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer (LG-SIMS) for particle analysis will be completed by 2011. In the area of nuclear disarmament, I welcome the commitment of the United States and the Russian Federation to making significant cuts in their nuclear arsenals and am pleased that they are reporting progress in their negotiations on a replacement for the START treaty. I am hopeful that, in the next year, we will see a successful outcome of the 2010 NPT Review Conference, that progress will be made on the entry into force of the CTBT and that negotiations on a Fissile Material Cut-Off Treaty will commence. I also look forward to reading the report of the International Commission on Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament, a joint initiative of the Japanese and Australian governments. Finally, I come to the management of the Agency. The IAEA is a successful, well-run organization, which is recognised for the high quality of its management. But we must not be complacent and can never slacken in our efforts to deliver, as efficiently and effectively as possible, the services Member States expect. There is always room for improvement. I will work hard to bring out the best in our excellent staff, as well as to improve coordination and communication, both within the house and with you, the Member States. As Director General, it is my personal responsibility to ensure good management. I know I can count on guidance and support from all of you as I fulfil the challenging task you have entrusted to me of leading our day-to-day operations. Thank you for joining me this evening. Next time, I hope to see you in my new apartment, which I have just found. I wish you all a peaceful, restful and enjoyable holiday season. (author)

  20. Statement to Fifty-Eight Regular Session of IAEA General Conference, 22 September 2014, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2014-01-01

    I will begin by welcoming three new Member States which have joined the Agency since the last General Conference: the Bahamas, Brunei Darussalam and San Marino. In my visits to Member States all over the world, I become more and more convinced of the vital importance of science and technology for sustainable development. Nuclear science and technology have much to contribute to the achievement of development goals in areas such as human health, agriculture, water management, and industrial applications, as well as in energy. The nations of the world are presently considering new sustainable development goals for the years after 2015. I ask all Member States to help ensure that the importance of science and technology is explicitly recognised as a central part of the post-2015 agenda. This should include recognition of the immense benefits of peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology. I am doing what I can to build awareness in this area. A key challenge facing the world in the coming decades will be to provide reliable supplies of energy as the population grows, and, at the same time, to limit greenhouse gas emissions. Many countries believe nuclear power can help them to address this challenge. Nuclear power is one of the lowest emitters of carbon dioxide - alongside hydro- and wind-based electricity - when emissions through the entire life cycle are considered.mProgress continues to be made in improving nuclear safety throughout the world. I have seen concrete improvements in safety features at every nuclear power plant I have visited since the Fukushima Daiichi accident. The Agency and its Member States continue to implement the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, which was endorsed by the General Conference in 2011. The central role of the Agency in helping to strengthen the global nuclear security framework is widely recognized. The international nuclear security environment is constantly changing. With its broad mandate and technical capabilities, and the support of 162 Member States, the Agency is well placed to continue playing the central role in helping the world to act in unison against the threat of nuclear terrorism. The number of States with additional protocols to their comprehensive safeguards agreements in force continues to rise. It now stands at 124. I urge remaining States to conclude additional protocols as soon as possible. I also ask the 12 States without NPT safeguards agreements in force to bring such agreements into force without delay. The Agency is likely to face tough budget constraints for some years to come, reflecting financial difficulties in many countries. In response, we are doing everything possible to make prudent use of our limited resources and ensure we deliver maximum benefit to our Member States. At the same time, demand for our services continues to grow and it is not possible to meet these growing needs within existing financial means. We must therefore strike a delicate balance between the capacity of Member States to contribute and Member State needs, while seeking additional sources of funding

  1. Eighth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 15-18 April 1975. Summary report. Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-01-01

    The Summary Report of the Eighth Annual Meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors contains the minutes of the meeting (Part 1); papers which review the national programmes in the field of LMFBRs (Part 2) and the discussions on the review of national programmes (Part 3). The agenda of the meeting involved design, construction, operating experiences of demonstration fast power reactors, reprocessing of spent fuel from LMFBRs, reliability of decay heat removal systems, fuel failure mechanisms, safety of LMFBRs.

  2. Tenth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 29 March - 1 April 1977. Summary report. Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-05-01

    The Summary Report of Tenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors contains the Minutes of the Meeting (Part I); the papers which review the national programmes in the field of LMFBRs and other presentations at the Meeting (Part II); and the discussions on the review of the national programmes (Part III)

  3. Eighth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 15-18 April 1975. Summary report. Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-08-01

    The Summary Report of the Eighth Annual Meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors contains the minutes of the meeting (Part 1); papers which review the national programmes in the field of LMFBRs (Part 2) and the discussions on the review of national programmes (Part 3). The agenda of the meeting involved design, construction, operating experiences of demonstration fast power reactors, reprocessing of spent fuel from LMFBRs, reliability of decay heat removal systems, fuel failure mechanisms, safety of LMFBRs.

  4. Introductory Statement to Board of Governors, 15 September 2014, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2014-01-01

    I will begin by highlighting recent developments in nuclear safety and security. My report on Implementation of the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety shows that progress continues to be made in improving nuclear safety throughout the world. Further consideration is being given to integrating activities under the Action Plan into the Agency's regular programme of work after 2015. In the past four years, there has been growing international appreciation of the need to address nuclear security in a coordinated manner. Turning now to nuclear energy, there are 437 nuclear power reactors in operation in 30 countries today. There have been three new grid connections so far this year and 70 reactors are under construction. Thirty-three countries are considering, planning or starting nuclear power programmes. Our latest projections for global use of nuclear power show continued growth in the years to 2030, but at a slower rate than was previously expected. The new low projection is for nuclear power to grow by eight percent in the period and the high projection is for growth of 88 percent. On September 29, we will also mark the 50th anniversary of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. This unique partnership has had a significant economic impact in many Member States, improving food safety, food security and sustainable agriculture. I am confident that our strong collaboration will continue for many years to come, and that it will be further strengthened by the modernisation of the Seibersdorf laboratories. The number of States with additional protocols in force now stands at 124. I strongly hope that remaining States will conclude additional protocols as soon as possible. I also ask the 12 States without NPT safeguards agreements in force to bring such agreements into force without delay, and I call on States with the old small quantities protocols to amend or rescind them, if they have not yet done so. We will continue to engage in open, active dialogue on safeguards matters with Member States. As the Agency and Member States gain further implementation experience, we will issue periodic update reports. As my report on Application of Safeguards in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea makes clear, the nuclear programme of the DPRK remains a matter of serious concern. The Agency will continue to maintain its readiness to play an essential role in verifying the DPRK's nuclear programme. The Agency continues to verify the non-diversion of nuclear material declared by Iran under its Safeguards Agreement. However, the Agency is not in a position to provide credible assurance about the absence of undeclared nuclear material and activities in Iran, and therefore to conclude that all nuclear material in Iran is in peaceful activities. In order to resolve all outstanding issues, past and present, it is very important that Iran continues to implement, in a timely manner, all practical measures agreed under the Framework for Cooperation, and that it proposes new measures that we can agree upon for the next step. The Agency continues to undertake monitoring and verification in relation to the measures set out in the Joint Plan of Action agreed between the E3+3 and Iran, which has been extended. As my report on Application of IAEA Safeguards in the Middle East shows, there remain long-standing and fundamental differences of views among countries of the region with regard to the application of comprehensive Agency safeguards to all nuclear activities in the region. In these circumstances, it has not been possible to make further progress in fulfilling my mandate from the General Conference in this area. I will continue my consultations. As we prepare the Programme and Budget for 2016-2017, the Agency's priorities will remain unchanged: technical cooperation, including the Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT), nuclear safety and security, and ReNuAL. Nuclear energy remains a priority in accordance with the Statute

  5. Introductory Statement to Board of Governors, 2 June 2014, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Since the last meeting of the Board, two countries have applied for membership of the Agency: the Republic of Djibouti and the Union of the Comoros. A number of important reports are on the agenda of this meeting. The Agency's Annual Report for 2013 serves as the Board's report to the General Conference, as well as the Agency's report to the United Nations General Assembly and the general public. As the report shows, the Agency's programme continues to make a real difference to the lives of many people throughout the world

  6. Eighth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 15-18 April 1975. Summary report. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The Summary Report of the Eighth Annual Meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors contains the minutes of the meeting (Part 1); papers which review the national programmes in the field of LMFBRs (Part 2) and the discussions on the review of national programmes (Part 3). The agenda of the meeting involved design, construction, operating experiences of demonstration fast power reactors, reprocessing of spent fuel from LMFBRs, reliability of decay heat removal systems, fuel failure mechanisms, safety of LMFBRs

  7. Annual report 1983 of the institute for general physics of the technical university of Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The topical divisions are 1) Plasma spectroscopy and studies on atomic collisions relevant to plasmas. 2) Sputtering phenomena and laser spectroscopy. 3) Surface kinetics and surface analysis. 4) Surface structure and electronic states. 5) Sensors and measurement systems - solid state acoustics. 6) Energy research and special projects. Short characterisation of the particular projects are given also in Engish. (G.Q.)

  8. Introductory statement to the Board of Governors, 2 June 2008, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2008-01-01

    In his introductory Statement to the Board of Governors Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei, Director General of the IAEA, reports on all areas of IAEA's activity, namely technology, safety and security, and verification. The statement includes the Agency's Technical Cooperation Programmes' last year key projects about regional collaboration in sickle cell disease control mechanisms in Africa, radiation induced mutation activities to improve crops in Asia and the Pacific, a joint scientific investigation on marine pollution in the Mediterranean, and improved agricultural practices in Latin America. Regarding the issue of nuclear non-proliferation it stressed the fact that the Agency has been verifying and monitoring the shutting down and sealing of the Yongbyyon nuclear facilities since July 2007. The nuclear material produced during the disabling activities at the Nuclear Fuel fabrication Plant remains under Agency containment and surveillance as well as the one third of the spent fuel rods discharged form the 5 MW(e) Experimental Nuclear Power Plant and the two thirds remaining in the reactor core. The Agency's safeguard responsibilities towards the DPRK remain uncertain until the legal status of the DPRK vis a vis the NPT has been clarified. The Agency has been able to continue to verify the non-diversion of declared nuclear material in Iran however made no progress in clarifying the cluster of allegations and Secretariat questions relevant to possible military dimensions to Iran's nuclear programme. The Secretariat is continuing to assess the information and explanations provided by Iran, including additional information received on 23 May. However, Iran has not yet agreed to implement all the transparency measures required to clarify this cluster of allegations and questions. Following Libya's disclosure of its undeclared nuclear activities in December 2003, the Agency has continued its efforts to verify the correctness and completeness of Libya's declarations about its nuclear programme, including past undeclared activities. Libya has continued to be transparent and to provide the Agency unrestricted access, beyond what is required under its comprehensive safeguards agreement and the Additional Protocol, to those locations, information and individuals deemed necessary by the Agency. In April of this year, the Agency was provided with information claiming that an installation destroyed by Israel in Syria last September was a nuclear reactor. According to this information, the reactor was not yet operational and no nuclear material had been introduced into it. Concerning nuclear applications activities reported include food security, the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) project, and the cancer treatment project PACT. The review meeting of contracting parties to the Convention on Nuclear Safety is mentioned and information provided on the IAEA's coordination on a major test of radiation emergency plans, based on a simulated accident at the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant in Mexico, which will take place in July 2008. It closes with management issues including the introduction of an Agency-wide Information System for Programme Support (AIPS) and the International Public Sector Accounting Standards (IPSAS) followed by budget issues and the information about the Report of the Commission of Eminent Persons on the Future of the Agency which reflects on the nature and scope of the Agency's programme up to 2020 and beyond

  9. Introductory statement to the Board of Governors, 3 March 2008, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2008-01-01

    In his introductory Statement to the Board of Governors Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei, Director General of the IAEA, reports on all areas of IAEA's activity, namely technology, safety and security, and verification including the draft Nuclear Safety Review for the Year 2007 and information about the 4th review meeting of the Contracting Parties of the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The review meeting in April will have to consider two important challenges - the number of new nuclear power programmes under consideration around the world and how to bring new momentum and focus to the review process. At the request of contracting parties, the Secretariat prepared an Issues and Trends paper for countries to take into account when preparing their national reports. Concerning nuclear power the draft Nuclear Technology Review 2008 is presented which indicates that rising expectations for nuclear power are starting to translate into increased construction. Expansion and growth prospects remain centred in Asia. In 2007, the Agency's projections for the future of nuclear power were revised upwards to between 450 and 690 GW(e) of installed nuclear capacity by 2030. The Review also notes major recent consolidations and increased internationalization among the suppliers of nuclear reactor technology. Concerning the assurance of supply the Director General has been advocating for some time the establishment of a multinational mechanism to assure access for all countries to nuclear fuel and reactor technology, and simultaneously to strengthen the non-proliferation regime. The ultimate goal should be to bring sensitive aspects of the fuel cycle under multinational control, so that no one country has the exclusive capability to produce the material for nuclear weapons. A number of Member States are working on proposals. Since March 2007, the Agency's Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) has secured pledges, grants and donations amounting to over $3 million for the PACT Model Demonstration Sites and other activities. In addition, the OPEC Fund in December approved a low interest loan of $7.5 million for Ghana to expand and upgrade its cancer care, based on an assessment by the Agency and its partners. The Agency, at the request of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), has been verifying and monitoring the shutdown and sealing of the Yongbyon nuclear facilities since July 2007. Furthermore the report on Implementation of the NPT Safeguards Agreement and relevant provisions of Security Council resolutions 1737 (2006) and 1747 (2007) in the Islamic Republic of Iran was presented, Iranian's nuclear activities discussed. A background report entitled 20/20 Vision for the Future which I prepared to assist the Commission of Eminent Persons in considering their recommendations on the future of the Agency. Finally the Agency-wide Information System for Programme Support (AIPS) is presented. It is critical for increasing efficiency and effectiveness in programme delivery and will be launched in 2008

  10. Food for the Future: Meeting the Challenges With Nuclear Applications, 18 September 2012, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Distinguished Ministers, Excellencies, Ladies and Gentlemen, I am very pleased to welcome you to the 2012 IAEA Scientific Forum. I especially thank Secretary Chu, Minister Margaret Kamar, Minister Nguyen Quan and Director General Haryana for agreeing to participate in this opening session. I thank Mr. Jose Graziano da Silva, Director General of the FAO, for his video message. I also welcome the many scientists and technologists who have come to share their expertise with us. When I am asked why I decided to focus on food at this year's Scientific Forum, my answer is simple: there are nearly one billion people on this planet who do not have enough to eat. All of us have a responsibility to do everything we can to help them. The IAEA is in the unique position of being able to make nuclear technology available to developing countries. We help them to grow more food, fight animal and plant pests and diseases, and ensure the safety of food products. Nuclear technology makes a powerful and critical contribution. Working closely with our partners at the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, the IAEA supports over 200 projects in more than 100 countries. You saw some examples in the film a moment ago. I hope that this IAEA Scientific Forum will encourage countries already familiar with nuclear techniques related to food to make more use of them. And I hope more countries will take advantage of the Agency's services in this area. Ladies and Gentlemen, I would like to follow up on some of the examples of our work which you saw in the film. [HOLD UP MANDARIN] This mandarin comes from a region of Croatia where 90 percent of the people are involved in the citrus fruit industry. The value of citrus production in this area is estimated at around 30 million euros a year. However, around a third of the annual crop is destroyed by fruit flies. We therefore deployed the Sterile Insect Technique. It is essentially a form of birth control. Millions of male flies are sterilised using gamma rays. They are released into the wild, where they mate with females. Because the males are sterile, there is no reproduction. The result has been a drop of no less than 75 percent in fruit fly damage in the region concerned. Farmers are able to significantly reduce their use of insecticide, so there are also environmental benefits. This mandarin is free of fruit flies. [HOLD UP MACHINE] This device is part of an easy-to-use, portable laboratory. It is making a huge difference in controlling animal diseases such as foot-and-mouth in more than 30 countries in Africa and Asia. It was co-developed by the IAEA using isotopic and nuclear-related techniques. With this device, vets can carry out diagnostic tests on animals in remote areas. The results are known within an hour. Each test costs less than two US dollars. Vets can give immediate advice to farmers, inform the authorities if necessary and help prevent the spread of disease to neighbouring farms and other countries. [HOLD UP BARLEY] Finally, this is a variety of barley known as Centenario. It was developed using a plant-breeding technique that involves irradiation. It grows at altitudes of around 4 000 metres in the High Andes and is now Peru's leading barley variety. Centenario has more protein than other types of barley. It is tasty and resistant to frost. More importantly, it has a higher yield than other barley types and fetches twice the price at market. It is not only improving the diets of remote communities in the High Andes, it is also increasing their incomes. Ladies and Gentlemen, Clearly, the IAEA cannot solve the world's food problems on its own. But we can make an important contribution. I am proud of the way in which the IAEA is able to put sophisticated scientific techniques to use and make them available in robust, practical ways in the field. This improves the lives of many thousands of people. Over the next two days, you will hear from the people who helped to develop these products and from experts with first-hand experience of the nuclear techniques I have described. This side of the Agency's work does not get the same public attention as our activities in nuclear safeguards, nuclear safety and nuclear security. But it is just as important. I hope you will have an interesting and productive meeting. I look forward to learning about the outcome of your discussions tomorrow. Thank you. (IAEA)

  11. Statement on Second Anniversary of Fukushima Accident, 8 March 2013, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text: Two years have passed since disaster struck Japan. The Great East Japan Earthquake and the enormous tsunami of March 11, 2011 devastated large areas of land, caused great loss of human life, and crippled the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. I was deeply saddened by this tragedy in my homeland. But I was also inspired by the courage and resilience of the Japanese people, including the brave workers at Fukushima Daiichi. The International Atomic Energy Agency continues to give priority to supporting Japan's efforts to recover from the nuclear accident. We are also helping to ensure that the world learns from those events so that we can make nuclear energy as safe as humanly possible. Working together, the IAEA's 159 Member States have already made significant progress in upgrading nuclear safety. Our efforts are guided by the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, which was unanimously endorsed by our Member States in September 2011. Today, virtually all Member States with nuclear power plants have completed stress tests and taken practical steps to expand and diversify safety measures. The IAEA has expanded the expert peer reviews which we offer to our Member States, covering areas such as the operational safety of a country's nuclear power plants, the effectiveness of its regulatory system, and its emergency preparedness and response arrangements. We have thoroughly reviewed the IAEA safety standards and ways to improve them. The worst elements of the accident are behind us and we are now in the post-accident phase. We must maintain the momentum of constant improvement. I pledge that the IAEA will continue to work vigorously to help Member States to ensure nuclear safety. (IAEA)

  12. Statement to the Board of Governors. 29 November 2004, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: I refer to my introductory statement at the opening of the Board last Thursday, in which I informed you that, with one exception, the Agency had been able to complete its verification of Iran's suspension of its enrichment related and reprocessing activities. That exception related to Iran's request to 'use up to 20 sets of [centrifuge] components for R and D purposes'. At that time, I noted that we were still in discussion on this matter. On 28 November 2004, I received a letter from Iran in which it refers to the 20 sets of centrifuge components, and states that Iran 'permits the IAEA to place these sets of components under Agency surveillance'. In the letter Iran also states that it 'will not conduct any testing of these sets of components'. In that letter, Iran also informed me that, as previously indicated, it would provide the Agency with the identification numbers of these components. Today, Agency inspectors put surveillance cameras in place to monitor the 20 sets of centrifuge components. The identification numbers have also been received. As a consequence, all measures necessary for the verification of Iran's suspension of enrichment related activities are now in place. Naturally, in accordance with the draft resolution before you, I will inform Board members should the suspension not be fully sustained, or should the Agency be prevented from verifying all elements of the suspension. (IAEA)

  13. Statement at 50th Anniversary of NA Laboratories at Seibersdorf, 20 November 2012, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2012-01-01

    I am pleased to welcome you all to this celebration marking 50 years of the IAEA nuclear applications laboratories. The IAEA is unique in the UN family in having dedicated specialist laboratories that support our activities, developing innovative technologies and providing training. The laboratories are central to our efforts to fulfil one of our core responsibilities, which is to help Member States gain access to nuclear technologies for peaceful purposes. They help us to make an important contribution to tackling fundamental global problems such as food security, water and energy shortages, human and animal health and climate change. This side of the Agency's work does not get the same public attention as our activities in nuclear safeguards, nuclear safety and nuclear security. But it is just as important. As you may know, there are a total of eight nuclear applications laboratories in Seibersdorf. Five are agriculture and biotechnology labs, which we operate jointly with our partners at the UN Food and Agriculture Organization. They specialise in insect pest control, soil and water management, animal health, plant breeding and genetics, and food and environmental protection. In addition, the Dosimetry Laboratory works on quality assurance aspects of the use of radiation in medicine. The Nuclear Spectrometry and Applications Laboratory helps Member States to use nuclear techniques in environmental pollution monitoring and other areas. Finally, the Terrestrial Environment Laboratory helps countries to understand and protect the land. Nearly two thousand IAEA technical cooperation fellows and scientific visitors have passed through Seibersdorf over the past 50 years. They benefited from top-class training and expertise. They took away with them not only new knowledge and capacity, but also enduring positive memories of working in some of the most international laboratories in the world. In Seibersdorf, professional contacts and friendships are established that will last for life. I am proud of the high calibre of the scientists and engineers from many disciplines, and from many countries, who work in the laboratories. Thanks to their professionalism and ingenuity, we are able to make sophisticated scientific techniques available in robust, practical ways in the field. This improves the lives of millions of people. (IAEA)

  14. Tenth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 29 March - 1 April 1977. Summary report. Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-11-01

    The Summary Report - Part III of the Tenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors - contains the discussions on the commercial development of FBRs according to national plans, mostly related to technology problems of containment design, fuel fabrication, fuel failures, sodium pressure, fuel-sodium interaction, computer codes needed for licensing. Most of the discussions were related to the existing reactors: BN-600, BN-350, BN-1600, BOR-60, RAPSODIE, PHENIX.

  15. Welcome and Opening Remarks [INIS Training Seminar 2013, Vienna (Austria), 7-11 October 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savic, Dobrica

    2013-01-01

    The main requirement of today’s nuclear information user is no longer the quantity of information, but rather the quality, relevance, and trustworthiness of the information source. The INIS Collection meets all these criteria, therefore representing a very valuable and useful collection of published information on the peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology. It is an irreplaceable information resource for education, as well as for the nuclear industry. Today, the major opportunity to further improve the INIS Collection lies in improving the quality of our records and in increasing the number of full-text, open source documents and related grey literature. Our users want a fast and complete information service, which includes access to actual documents, not only their metadata and bibliographic descriptions. We expect that you will be able to help us achieve this strategic goal

  16. The enduring lessons of Chernobyl. International conference of the Chernobyl Forum, 6 September 2005, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2005-01-01

    The April 1986 accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant remains a defining moment in the history of nuclear energy. The lessons of this tragedy are interwoven with a recurrent theme: namely, the importance of international cooperation. With its recently released document - entitled 'Chernobyl's Legacy' - the Chernobyl Forum has solidly reinforced that theme. The major impacts of Chernobyl fall into three categories: the physical impacts, in terms of health and environmental effects; the psychological and social impacts on the affected populations; and the influence of the accident on the nuclear industry worldwide. The physical impacts mark Chernobyl as the site of the most serious nuclear accident in history. The explosions that destroyed the Unit 4 reactor core released a cloud of radionuclides that contaminated large areas of Europe and, in particular, Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine. Hundreds of thousands of people were exposed to substantial radiation doses, including workers from all three of these countries who participated in efforts to mitigate the consequences of the accident. The definitive numbers compiled in the Chernobyl Forum report are sobering: the 50 emergency rescue workers who died from acute radiation syndrome and related illnesses; the 4000 children and adolescents who contracted thyroid cancer - 9 of whom also died; and the hundreds of thousands of hectares of cropland, forests, rivers and urban centres that were contaminated by environmental fallout. But as severe as these impacts were, the situation was made even worse by conflicting information and vast exaggerations - in press coverage and pseudo-scientific accounts of the accident - reporting, for example, fatalities in the tens or hundreds of thousands. The psychological and social impacts were also devastating. Over 100 000 people were immediately evacuated, and the total number of evacuees from contaminated areas eventually reached 350 000. While some of these resettlements were essential to reduce the collective dose of radiation, the experience was of course deeply traumatic for those involved. From the time of the accident, the IAEA has been continuously involved in technical cooperation and research projects to mitigate the environmental and health consequences in affected areas. Since 1990, we have spent more than $15 million on health care and monitoring, the development of new crops and agricultural guidelines, and other projects - often in cooperation with the organizations represented here today. But these efforts have not done nearly enough to address the human needs of the most affected populations. The Agency is committed to the U N Strategy for Recovery , and we agree with the recommendations of the Chernobyl Forum report. In particular, we stand ready to assist with the development of new initiatives that would help local populations regain control over their own livelihoods through assistance with safe food production techniques, improved primary health care, and encouragement of private sector investment and development

  17. Introductory statement to the Board of Governors, 12 June 2006, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, national TC programmes were in place in 109 countries and one territory, an increase of five countries over the previous year. With a total budget of $116 million - made up of the Technical Cooperation Fund and extrabudgetary contributions, including government cost-sharing - the programme was the largest ever, showing an increase of nearly $12 million over 2004. The Agency's Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) continues to make progress. In April, a memorandum of understanding was signed with the World Health Organization's Eastern Mediterranean regional office, with a view towards working together to improve cancer prevention and treatment in that region. PACT also hosted a meeting in April that brought together leading international organizations focused on the full range of measures needed to provide comprehensive cancer control in the developing world. The participants will be meeting again to discuss specific implementation frameworks and funding strategies. Progress has also been made on projects associated with the IAEA Nobel Cancer and Nutrition Fund. Three regional training events for both topics will be organized in Asia and the Pacific, Africa and Latin America in the last quarter of this year. Fellowships in these areas are also being organized for young professionals from developing countries. For activities related to nutrition, the Agency assists in the use of stable isotopes to develop and evaluate nutritional intervention strategies. In Asia and the Pacific, the focus will be on intervention to combat under-nutrition for infants, young children, and pregnant women. In Africa, the theme will be integrating nutrition into the management of HIV/AIDS, particularly for young children. In Latin America, the focus will be on the double burden of malnutrition and obesity. Regarding cancer, the Nobel Fund will be used to establish three Regional Cancer Training Institutes in Africa, Asia and Pacific, and Latin America. In the area of safety, I am pleased to note that, with the ratification by Brazil, China and the Russian Federation, nearly all States with large nuclear programmes are now Party to the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. However, the total number of Contracting Parties is still only 42, and as such well below expectations. Given that the Joint Convention deals with radiation protection and waste disposal Member States that have not yet joined this convention should do so. In 2005, the Agency implemented comprehensive safeguards agreements in 147 States - 70 of which also had additional protocols in force or otherwise applied. For 24 of these 70 States, the Agency was able to conclude - having found no indication of the diversion of declared nuclear material, and no indication of undeclared nuclear material or activities - that all nuclear material remained in peaceful activities. Since 31 December 2002, when IAEA verification activities were terminated at the request of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), the Agency has been unable to draw any conclusions regarding the DPRK's nuclear activities. Recent efforts are wellcome that aim to reach a comprehensive agreement that would address the need of the international community to establish confidence in the exclusively peaceful nature of Iran's nuclear programme, while also simultaneously addressing Iran's security, technology and economic needs. The Advisory Committee on Safeguards and Verification has begun considering issues related to ways and means to strengthen the Agency's safeguards system. The Agency's Medium Term Strategy for 2006-2011 underlines the interest of Member States in multilateral approaches to the front and back ends of the nuclear fuel cycle, including supply issues

  18. Intervention on non-proliferation issues at IAEA Board of Governors, 17 June 2009, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2009-01-01

    The IAEA's Director General Dr. Mohamed ElBarardei reported that the IAEA has been dealing with the verification issue in North Korea for seventeen years and things have gone from bad to worse. It started to improve when there was a dialogue. When there was no dialogue, things got much worse. There was a dialogue under the agreed framework and there were no weapons, just spent fuel under an Agency freeze. When the dialogue stopped, there was a nuclear test. With the six-party framework, things started to move and there was a dismantlement and shutdown. But when the six-party talks came to a halt, there was another nuclear test and in addition there was an announcement that North Korea will also start an enrichment programme. This means that it is important to have a meaningful dialogue between parties and that they talk to each other and understand the security dimension of proliferation issues. The Director General said that he will not have anything to report at the next Board of Governors meeting since the IAEA is not in North Korea and is not part of the six party talks. Since more and more countries are going into enrichment and fuel cycle processes it is recommended that there should be total multinationalization of the fuel cycle, as part of a world free of nuclear weapons and on the basis of equality and universality. There are four pillars which have to work together: the Agency, the Security Council, multilateral dialogues and bilateral talks. What we can do can be very much influenced by the Security Council, by multilateral dialogue and by bilateral talks. The Security Council should not necessarily mean just sanctions. The Security Council is supposed to be a forum to try to find solutions. The Security Council is supposed to intervene early and do preventive measures and try to find solutions. When things are moving in the bilateral/multilateral dialogue, such as in the six-party talks, then they move here. When there is a dialogue, there is some movement. When there is no dialogue, we come to a standstill. We are completely gridlocked in both North Korea and Iran - with North Korea it is even worse, because it declared it is out of the NPT altogether. Concerning Iran there has been a confidence deficit over a number of years because of undeclared enrichment activities, even if they were experimental. There is a need to restore confidence. Iran can help the IAEA address a lot of concerns by implementing the additional protocol and by implementing the safeguards requirements on design information. Hopefully a meaningful dialog with Iran will start. On North Korea, there is no other solution than the diplomatic solution. Concerning the Syrian issue he stated that if Syria wants to prove that the allegations on a possible reactor are not accurate, the best thing it can do is to be fully transparent. Concerning the budget Dr. Mohamed ElBarardei said that he does not understand those countries which continue to insist on zero budget growth despite all the IAEA's efforts to achieve efficiency gains and savings. He is not willing to tell world public opinion that the Agency is able to deal with issues that have to do with our all very survival when he knows that the Agency is not able to

  19. Proceedings of the first technical committee meeting held in Vienna, Austria, 17-20 November 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This was the first Technical Committee meeting organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency on reactivity transient accidents as a response to recommendations made during the Chernobyl Post Accident Review Meeting (25-29 August 1986) and the subsequent Member States Experts meeting to review the IAEA expanded nuclear safety programme. The Technical Committee meeting was attended by 46 representatives from 28 countries and 1 international organization. The objectives of the Technical Committee meeting were: to review the state of knowledge and to assess the remaining safety questions relating to reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs); to share experience and information on RIA assessment and relevant fuel experiments; to formulate conclusions on what the consensus might be on safety aspects of the RIAs; and to provide recommendations for sharing the technical information and for IAEA assistance to Member States. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 17 presentations of this meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Introductory statement to the Board of Governors, 26 November 2009, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2009-01-01

    You have before you the Agency's Technical Cooperation Programme for 2010, as recommended by the TACC. This is the second year of an unusual three-year TC Programme cycle, implemented to align the Technical Cooperation Fund and Regular Budget cycles. The aim is that the programme cycles for TC and the regular budget should be synchronized from 2012. As part of the one-house approach, this would enable the technical departments to align their programmatic activities to provide support for the TC programme. The TC programme continues to evolve to address pressing challenges in a range of areas. Human health, food and agriculture and nuclear safety remain the top three priorities for Member States. Let me mention a few examples of how the Agency is helping to improve lives for people in developing countries. In Yemen, the country's first Nuclear Medicine Centre at Al-Thawra Hospital, established with the help of the Agency, has been fully operational since July 2008. It treats thousands of patients per year and also serves as a national training centre. In Latin America, the Agency is using isotopic techniques to provide tools for the diagnosis and evaluation of obesity in children. In Algeria, the Agency provided data that has enabled the country to develop national guidelines for the optimal exploitation of water resources. The Agency has been focusing on improving quality across the full TC programme cycle. Our approach emphasizes full involvement by recipient countries in the preparation of the TC programme, as well as monitoring, self-assessment and independent evaluation. Special efforts have been made to increase the number of Country Programme Frameworks. Work to increase alignment with UN activities was reflected in the signing of six new United Nations Development Assistance Framework agreements since May 2008. The Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) has become a well recognized programme in the global battle against cancer. This was illustrated in May this year by the signature of the joint WHO/IAEA Programme for Cancer Control. PACT and its partners have already implemented missions to 20 Member States. PACT has mobilized $24 million for cancer control since 2007, which is an impressive achievement. Seven PACT Model Demonstration Sites are now in operation. To date, 71 Member States have requested Agency support through PACT. I hope more funds will be forthcoming for this programme, which aims to save lives that would otherwise be lost unnecessarily. My views on the inadequacy of Agency funding are well known. I recently circulated GOV/INF/2009/10 entitled The 2010 Budget: Effect on Programme Delivery which details areas where the reduction in the approved regular budget as compared with our initial proposals will have significant impact on programme delivery. It will be felt most in the Agency's efforts to respond to requests for assistance from Member States considering or launching nuclear power programmes. I earnestly hope that Agency funding will finally be put on a sustainable basis in the coming years

  1. Introductory Statement to Board of Governors, 10 September 2012, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Mr. Chairman, I would like to begin by congratulating Rwanda on becoming the 155th Member State of the Agency. I will now update the Board on recent developments in nuclear safety and security, starting with implementation of the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety. One year after its adoption, significant progress has been made. Possible safety weak points at nuclear power plants have been identified, IAEA peer review services have been strengthened and emergency preparedness and response capabilities have been improved. We undertook a systematic review of IAEA Safety Standards, taking into account lessons learned to date from the Fukushima Daiichi accident. Three international expert meetings have been held. They covered reactor safety and spent fuel safety, transparency and communication in an emergency, and protection against extreme earthquakes and tsunamis. A fourth expert meeting, on decommissioning and remediation after a nuclear accident, will take place in January 2013. The Fukushima Monitoring Database, which is a record of radiological monitoring data received by the Agency following the accident, has been made available through the IAEA website. And we are in the process of establishing an Emergency Preparedness and Response Expert Group. Contracting Parties to the Convention on Nuclear Safety met last month to discuss the Fukushima Daiichi accident and to review the effectiveness of the Convention. They approved revisions to the guidance documents to enhance reporting and the review process, taking into account lessons from the accident. They also considered a set of action-oriented objectives for strengthening nuclear safety. A working group is being established which will consider actions to strengthen the Convention. In December, the Fukushima Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety, organised by the Government of Japan and the IAEA, will take place in Fukushima Prefecture. It will provide another opportunity to share further knowledge and lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident. A considerable amount of work remains to be done under the Action Plan. It is essential that all of us - Member States, the IAEA and other key stakeholders - maintain our sense of urgency and our commitment to implementing the Action Plan in full. We must not relax our guard or lose sight of the ultimate goal, which is to make nuclear power as safe as humanly possible throughout the world and to restore public confidence. Nuclear Security. I will now turn to nuclear security. In the year to June 30, our Illicit Trafficking Database received reports of 163 incidents involving nuclear and radioactive materials. Eleven incidents involved illegal possession of small amounts of nuclear material or attempts to sell it. Such incidents are a reminder of the need for all countries to continue to give high priority to nuclear security. The Nuclear Security Report 2012 details the Agency's activities in assisting States. We are putting more emphasis on capacity-building, for example through the development of Integrated Nuclear Security Support Plans. Increased use is being made of our peer review and advisory services. The Nuclear Security Guidance Committee, a standing body of senior experts which I established this year to promote greater Member State involvement, has reviewed a document entitled Nuclear Security Fundamentals: Objective and Essential Elements of a State's Nuclear Security Regime. It is before the Board for endorsement. Later this month, I will attend the UN Secretary-General's High-Level Event on Nuclear Terrorism in New York. I welcome the fact that Member States continue to address this issue at a very high level. I am confident that, following up on the Nuclear Security Summits in Washington and Seoul, the New York meeting will further underline the Agency's central role in strengthening global nuclear security, which is based on our unique technical competence in this area. In July 2013, the Agency will organise an International Conference on Nuclear Security. I encourage all IAEA Member States to participate in this event. Nuclear Energy Turning now to nuclear energy, it remains clear from the Agency's latest projections that nuclear power will remain an important option for many countries, despite the Fukushima Daiichi accident. Our new low projection is for nuclear power capacity to grow by nearly 25 percent from current levels to 456 gigawatts by 2030. Our high projection is 740 gigawatts, which is twice current levels. Established users such as China, India, the Republic of Korea and the Russian Federation are expected to remain the main centres of expansion. The United Arab Emirates recently became the first of the current newcomer countries to start construction of a nuclear power plant. Belarus has ordered its first reactors, while construction permits have been applied for in Turkey. In our work with all newcomer countries, the Agency puts special emphasis on ensuring the highest standards of safety. The Agency's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO), which now has 38 participant countries, has conducted successful ''Dialogue Forums'' on regional cooperation and on long-term prospects for nuclear energy in the post-Fukushima era. The International Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Energy in the 21st Century in St Petersburg, Russia, next June, which I announced previously, will focus on the role of nuclear power in sustainable development. Last month, during my visit to Finland, I had an opportunity to visit the ONKALO facility, where a repository for the final disposal of spent fuel is being built deep underground. It is an impressive site. The nuclear industry has been managing interim waste disposal successfully for more than half a century, but ONKALO is one of the most advanced final disposal projects in the world. Progress in this area, in Finland and a number of other countries, deserves to be better known.

  2. Tenth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 29 March - 1 April 1977. Summary report. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    The Summary Report - Part III of the Tenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors - contains the discussions on the commercial development of FBRs according to national plans, mostly related to technology problems of containment design, fuel fabrication, fuel failures, sodium pressure, fuel-sodium interaction, computer codes needed for licensing. Most of the discussions were related to the existing reactors: BN-600, BN-350, BN-1600, BOR-60, RAPSODIE, PHENIX

  3. Introductory statement to the Board of Governors, 9 July 2007, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: As you are aware, at the invitation of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), an Agency team visited the DPRK during the last week of June with a view to agreeing on modalities for verification and monitoring by the IAEA of the shutdown and sealing of the Yongbyon nuclear facility, as foreseen in the 'Initial Actions' agreed at the Six Party Talks in Beijing on 13 February 2007. Document GOV/2007/36 details the ad hoc monitoring and verification arrangement that was worked out between the DPRK and the Agency. I welcome the return of the DPRK to the verification process. I am particularly pleased with the active cooperation of the DPRK that the IAEA team received during the visit and I look forward to continuing to work with the DPRK as the verification process evolves as envisaged in the Initial Actions. You may recall that the Board concluded in June that, 'a successfully negotiated settlement of the Korean nuclear issue, maintaining the essential verification role of the Agency, would be a significant accomplishment for international peace and security'. In this context, I would invite the Board to take the actions recommended in document GOV/2007/36. As explained in my report, the conduct of the verification activities requested by the DPRK was not foreseen in the Agency's budget. The initial costs of these activities, estimated at Euros 1.7 million for 2007 and Euros 2.2 million for 2008, would cover inter alia the replacement of cameras and installation of containment and surveillance devices, the purchase of other needed equipment, and logistical and staff costs. I am requesting Member States therefore to provide funding for the implementation of these verification activities in 2007 and 2008. I should emphasize that, as with all our verification work under the Statute, verification in the DPRK should not have to rely on donations by individual States. I intend therefore to include the associated costs in the draft regular budget for 2009. The DPRK case clearly illustrates the need for the Agency to have an adequate reserve that can be drawn upon to enable it to respond promptly and effectively to unexpected crises or extraordinary requests, whether in the areas of verification, nuclear and radiological accidents, or other emergencies. The Agency's financial vulnerability is also demonstrated by our current cash situation, which indicates that unless some major donors pay their outstanding contributions by the end of next month, the Agency will have to draw from the Working Capital Fund in order to continue operations. And unless contributions are received by September, that Fund would be depleted. Finally, let me stress that the recent process of preparing and getting approval for the programme and budget for the next biennium has once again highlighted the urgent need for adequate resources to ensure effective delivery of the entire programme that you have requested. As I made clear during the last Board, even with the budget originally proposed by the Secretariat, the Agency remains under-funded in many critical areas, a situation which, if it remains unaddressed, will lead to a steady erosion of our ability to perform key functions, including in the verification and safety fields. To this end, and in order to remedy this unsustainable situation, I have initiated a study to examine the programmatic and budgetary requirements of the Agency over the next decade or so. It is my intention to engage a high level panel of experts to review the study and consider options for financing the requirements identified therein. Once completed, the study and the recommendations of the panel will be submitted to the Board. I believe that the study will help to clarify expectations about the Agency's mission over the medium term and how these expectations can be matched by the necessary financial and human resources in a predictable and assured manner. The Agency's critical missions in the fields of development, safety and security, and verification deserve no less. (IAEA)

  4. Introductory statement to the [IAEA] Board of Governors, 7 September 2009, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2009-01-01

    During the opening of the IAEA Board of Governors (7 September 2009), Director General Mohamed ElBaradei reported on nuclear power, nuclear applications, security and safety as well as non-proliferation issues. Concerning Nuclear Applications the Director General reported that progress is being made in establishing comprehensive cancer control programmes under the Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) and the newly established WHO-IAEA Joint Programme on Cancer Control. Dr. ElBaradei also highlighted the continued concern over the shortage of the medical isotope molybdenum-99. Concerning Nuclear Power the Director General reported that despite the global recession, and a few countries delaying nuclear power decisions, the Agency's new projections for nuclear power generating capacity in the medium term have actually been revised upward to between 511 GW(e) of generating capacity in 2030 at the low end and possibly 807 GW(e), more than double current capacity. 'The expected growth reflects the urgent need for energy, especially in the developing world, concerns about energy security, fluctuations in fossil fuel prices, the need to vigorously address climate change, as well as the good performance and safety record of nuclear power,' he said. The number of IAEA national and regional technical cooperation projects on the introduction of nuclear power has risen from 15 in 2008 to 44 this year. Concerning Nuclear Safety and Security Dr. ElBaradei also reported that nuclear trafficking is continuing unabated. Up to June of this year the Agency's Illicit Trafficking Database (ITDB) received reports of 215 incidents. 'It is vital that all Member States do their utmost to ensure that nuclear and radioactive materials are safe and secure,' he said. Concerning Non-Proliferation the Director General reported that although the Islamic Republic of Iran has cooperated with the Agency on some issues, several critical areas remain unaddressed. 'Iran has not suspended its enrichment related activities or its work on heavy water related projects as required by the Security Council, nor has Iran implemented the Additional Protocol. Likewise, Iran has not cooperated with the Agency in connection with the remaining issues, detailed fully and completely in the Agency's reports, which need to be clarified in order to exclude the possibility of there being military dimensions to Iran's nuclear programme,' he said. Also, Dr. ElBaradei answered accusations that information has been withheld from the Board of Governors about Iran's nuclear programme. 'I am dismayed by the allegations of some Member States, which have been fed to the media, that information has been withheld from the Board. These allegations are politically motivated and totally baseless. Such attempts to influence the work of the Secretariat and undermine its independence and objectivity are in violation of Article VII.F. of the IAEA Statute and should cease forthwith.' In relation to the Syrian Arab Republic, the Director General noted that Syria still refuses to cooperate with the IAEA's inquiry into the activities that were being undertaken at the now destroyed Dair Alzour site. 'I urge Syria to cooperate with the Agency in its verification activities. It is in Syria's interest to enable the Agency to corroborate its statements. I also call on other States which may possess information relevant to the Agency's verification to make such information available to the Agency.' In continuing to advocate the proposed IAEA low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel bank, Dr. ElBaradei said, 'I am convinced that the time has now come for concrete steps towards a multilateral approach to the fuel cycle, particularly in light of the new momentum for nuclear disarmament. Our ultimate aim should be the full multinationalization of the sensitive parts of the fuel cycle to guarantee the supply of nuclear fuel and consolidate efforts to achieve a world free from nuclear weapons.' Concerning Programme and Budget the Director General said the lower than proposed budgetary allocation for 2010 will have consequences for the 'scope and quality of services which we will be able to offer to Member States.' He also highlighted the lack of sufficient funds to adequately upgrade the IAEA's analytical laboratories at Seibersdorf. 'Despite extrabudgetary contributions being made available, we still remain considerably short of the funding target, particularly in relation to addressing safety and security issues associated with the nuclear material laboratory'

  5. Introductory Statement to Board of Governors, 29 November 2012, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2012-01-01

    I would like to begin by informing the Board about my visit to Ethiopia earlier this month. I visited the headquarters of the African Union to address the Second Conference of States Parties to the Pelindaba Treaty. I complimented the countries of Africa on their success in establishing a nuclear-weapon-free zone covering the entire continent. I also took the opportunity to meet the Government of Ethiopia and senior officials from the African Union to discuss their cooperation with the Agency in the peaceful uses of nuclear technology. My visit to Addis Ababa once again brought home to me the very real needs that many developing countries have in areas such as cancer treatment, control of human and animal diseases, water management, and food production and safety. The scale of their needs can sometimes appear daunting. But it is very encouraging to see the important impact which IAEA technical cooperation projects can have. Tsetse fly eradication in Southern Ethiopia is a good example of a project which is likely to have a significant impact on farmers' lives and on agricultural output in the region. Tsetse flies are not just a direct threat to animal health. They also render huge stretches of fertile land unusable because it is too risky for humans and livestock to be in infected areas. After years of difficulty, the tsetse eradication project in Southern Ethiopia has made good progress this year. Weekly releases of sterilised male tsetse flies began in April. I gained a better understanding of the size and complexity of the project when I visited the tsetse rearing and irradiation facility at Kaliti. My counterparts at the African Union stressed the importance of countries working together on common problems such as this. The tsetse fly situation differs from country to country but the same technology can be used in response. As you may know, the IAEA has been working for many years with the Pan African Tsetse and Trypanosomosis Eradication Campaign (PATTEC) to tackle this serious problem across the entire continent. The Agency is firmly committed to making this ambitious project a success. (IAEA)

  6. Introductory statement to the Board of Governors, 11 September 2006, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2006-01-01

    In his introductory Statement to the Board of Governors Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei, Director General of the IAEA, reports on all areas of IAEA's activity, namely technology, safety and security, and verification. It includes the Agency's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) which has grown to include 27 members. PACT needs funding to support its activities until it achieves the level of extrabudgetary funding needed to be self-sufficient; safety standards the quality of thereof has notably improved, and identified gaps in coverage are being addressed by new standards; safety review services use the IAEA Safety Standards as a reference point, and play an important part in evaluating their effectiveness; Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) combines a number of previous services, on topics ranging from radiation safety and transport safety to emergency preparedness and nuclear security; projects on radiological protection of patients; the Agency has undertaken to strengthen its Incident and Emergency Centre to better support Member States in dealing with both accidents and security incidents; the Agency's nuclear security programme continues to progress at a rapid pace. To assist Member States in implementing the variety of international instruments relevant to nuclear security, guidance is being developed and published as part of a new IAEA Nuclear Security Series; results of missions have provided valuable inputs for the development of Integrated Nuclear Security Support Plans (INSSPs) for individual countries; nuclear security training courses were provided, detection and monitoring equipment procured to improve the security of nuclear power plants and other installations; and assistance in protecting locations containing high activity radioactive sources; the Agency has worked with the Russian Federation and the United States of America on a tripartite initiative to secure and manage radioactive sources in countries of the former Soviet Union; the IAEA Illicit Trafficking Database now has 91 States participating. Analysis of this database is providing insight into trends, risks, and trafficking methods and routes; comprehensive safeguards agreements have entered into force for Botswana and Oman, and additional protocols have entered into force for Botswana, Fiji and the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya; the Agency has been unable to draw any conclusions regarding the Democratic People's Republic of Korea's (DPRK) nuclear activities since 31 December 2002, when Agency verification activities were terminated at the request of the DPRK; Iran had not suspended its enrichment related activities. I should note that - although the inspectors' findings indicated that there had been little qualitative or quantitative buildup of Iran's enrichment capacity at Natanz - due to the absence of the implementation of the additional protocol, the Agency is not able to assess fully Iran's enrichment related research and development activities, including the possible production of centrifuges and related equipment; all the nuclear material declared by Iran to the Agency has been accounted for - and, apart from the small quantities previously reported to the Board, there have been no further findings of undeclared nuclear material in Iran; gaps remain in the Agency's knowledge with respect to the scope and nature of Iran's current and past centrifuge enrichment programme. Because of this, and the lack of readiness of Iran to resolve these issues, the Agency is unable to make further progress in its efforts to provide assurances about the absence of undeclared nuclear material and activities in Iran; consultations continued with the States of the Middle East region on the application of full scope safeguards to all nuclear activities in the Middle East, and on the development of model agreements as a necessary step towards the establishment of a Middle East Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone; since 2004 the development of a new, multilateral approach to the nuclear fuel cycle has been called as a key measure to strengthen non-proliferation and cope with the expected expansion of nuclear power. The establishment of a framework that is equitable and accessible to all users of nuclear energy acting in accordance with agreed nuclear non-proliferation norms, will certainly be a complex endeavour, and therefore will be best addressed through a series of progressive phases, beginning with mechanisms for assurances of supply of fuel for nuclear power plants; at a Special Event at the General Conference next week, these ideas and proposals will be discussed; the open-ended working group on the target for the Technical Cooperation Fund (TCF) has submitted a proposal for consideration. This proposal reflects acceptance of the agreement reached in 2004, and proposes a modest increase to the TCF target for the years 2007 and 2008. Programme Performance Report and Medium Term Strategy were discussed

  7. Introductory statement to the Board of Governors, 19 September 2005, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2005-01-01

    The agenda for the meeting includes topics related to all areas of Agency activity - technology, safety and security, and verification. The nuclear technology part deals with nuclear power innovation through the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). The INPRO user methodology, revised on the basis of feedback from a variety of test projects, is now being applied in a number of countries. With France, Morocco and Ukraine having joined in the past year, INPRO is now 23 members strong. Nuclear Safety and Security covers radiation protection of the environment, safety of transport of radioactive materials, radioactive waste management, the Chernobyl forum and nuclear security and protection against nuclear terrorism. Since September 2001, the Agency has conducted more than 100 nuclear security field missions. Approximately 1500 individuals from all regions have received Agency training in measures related to preventing nuclear and radiological terrorism. The results of implementing the nuclear security plan are tangible: increased security awareness among responsible national officials; strengthened physical protection at nuclear facilities; recovery and enhanced security for hundreds of high intensity radioactive sources; better cooperation among international law enforcement organizations; enhanced detection capabilities at border crossings; more and better trained personnel; improved preparedness for responding to incidents; and broader participation in the Agency's Illicit Trafficking Data Base, which serves as a key mechanism for the analysis of global and regional trends. A new Nuclear Security Plan for 2006-2009 includes a detailed outline of nuclear activities to be carried out over the next four years, subject to the availability of funds. Of these planned activities, the vast majority will be funded from the Nuclear Security Fund. Parties to the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material met in July and agreed on major changes to strengthen the Convention. These changes make it legally binding for States Parties to protect nuclear facilities and material in peaceful domestic use, storage and transport. They will also provide for expanded cooperation among States on measures to recover stolen or smuggled nuclear material, to mitigate the consequences of sabotage, and to prevent and combat related offences. The part on Verification of Nuclear Non-Proliferation is describing the status of safeguards agreements and the additional protocol, the small quantities protocols, the implementation of safeguards in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, the implementation of the NPT safeguards agreement in the Islamic Republic of Iran and the application of IAEA safeguards in the Middle East

  8. Introductory statement to the Board of Governors. 13 September 2004, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2004-01-01

    The agenda for this meeting includes topics related to all areas of Agency activity - nuclear technology, nuclear, radiation, transport and waste safety, verification of nuclear non-proliferation, technical cooperation funding and the IAEA management issues. In this statement, developments since the June Board are covered. The Agency continues to assume growing responsibilities in nearly all areas of its work, including verification, safety and security, and sustainable development. In this context, the value of the close partnership between the Secretariat and its Member States, is underlined, which will hopefully continue to be forthcoming

  9. Special Characteristics of the Rust Workshop and Their Influence on My Facilitation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Maria Villas-Boas

    1987-01-01

    Evaluates the Carl Rogers Peace Project workshop held in Austria in 1985. Defines ways in which the workshop was unique. Elaborates on staff participation and the author's personal reactions. Concludes by discussing the distinctive role facilitators had in this workshop. (BR)

  10. PREFACE: Selected contributions from the 3rd Theory Meets Industry International Workshop, TMI2009 (Nagoya, Japan, 11-13 November 2009) Selected contributions from the 3rd Theory Meets Industry International Workshop, TMI2009 (Nagoya, Japan, 11-13 November 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Isao; Hafner, Jürgen; Wimmer, Erich; Asahi, Ryoji

    2010-09-01

    . Lectures and poster presentations were thus solicited from leading international academic and industrial researchers. The large audience that attended responded to the high quality of the talks with pertinent questions and lively discussions. The third workshop, TMI2009, was held over three days from 11-13 November, 2009, at the Nagoya International Center, Nagoya, Japan. Invited talks were given by 23 speakers from 9 countries from both the academic and industry sectors. The speakers were Ryoji Asahi (Toyota Central R&D Labs, Japan), Tomas Bucko (University of Vienna, Austria), Gábor Csányi (University of Cambridge, UK), Alessandro De Vita (King's College London, UK), Bernard Delley (Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland), Christophe Domain (EDF, France), George Fitzgerald (Accelrys, USA), Takeo Fujiwara (University of Tokyo, Japan), Jürgen Hafner (University of Vienna, Austria), Masaya Ishida (Sumitomo Chemicals, Japan), Werner Janse Van Rensburg (Sasol Technology, South Africa), Masanori Kohyama (AIST, Japan), Takao Kotani (Tottori University, Japan), Georg Kresse (University of Vienna, Austria), Katsuyuki Matsunaga (Kyoto University, Japan), Stefan Müller (University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany), Shin-ichiro Nakamura (Mitsubishi Chemicals, Japan), Fumiyasu Oba (Kyoto University, Japan), Tamio Oguchi (Hiroshima University, Japan), Pascal Raybaud (IFP, France), Isao Tanaka (Kyoto University/JFCC, Japan), Göran Wahnström (Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden), and Erich Wimmer (Materials Design Inc., USA). There were 40 poster presentations in total. The workshop was attended by approximately 120 participants with approximately 50 per cent from industry. The invited talks covered advances in ab initio solid-state calculations and their practical use in industry. Presentations outlining the progress made in treating large and complex systems, as well as more accurate and efficient calculation methods, were given from the theory side. Examples of the use of ab

  11. Long-distance free-space distribution of quantum entanglement over Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindenthal, M.; Resch, K.; Blauensteiner, B.; Boehm, H.; Fedrizzi, A.; Kurtsiefer, C.; Poppe, A.; Schmitt-Manderbach, T.; Taraba, M.; Ursin, R.; Walther, P.; Weier, H.; Weinfurter, H.; Zeilinger, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We have established a real-world free-space quantum channel over 7.8 km and demonstrate the distribution of entangled photons. The transmitter is placed at an observatory and the receiver on the 46th floor of an office skyscraper in Vienna, Austria. Using locally recorded time stamps and a public internet channel, coincident counts from correlated photons are demonstrated to violate a Bell inequality by 14 standard deviations. This confirms the high quality of the shared entanglement. In this experiment the horizontal freespace distance is chosen, so that the attenuation the light undergoes corresponds approximately to the attenuation from space to earth. This work is an encouraging step towards satellite-based distribution of quantum entanglement and future intra-city quantum networks. (author)

  12. Historical earthquake research in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerl, Christa

    2017-12-01

    Austria has a moderate seismicity, and on average the population feels 40 earthquakes per year or approximately three earthquakes per month. A severe earthquake with light building damage is expected roughly every 2 to 3 years in Austria. Severe damage to buildings ( I 0 > 8° EMS) occurs significantly less frequently, the average period of recurrence is about 75 years. For this reason the historical earthquake research has been of special importance in Austria. The interest in historical earthquakes in the past in the Austro-Hungarian Empire is outlined, beginning with an initiative of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the development of historical earthquake research as an independent research field after the 1978 "Zwentendorf plebiscite" on whether the nuclear power plant will start up. The applied methods are introduced briefly along with the most important studies and last but not least as an example of a recently carried out case study, one of the strongest past earthquakes in Austria, the earthquake of 17 July 1670, is presented. The research into historical earthquakes in Austria concentrates on seismic events of the pre-instrumental period. The investigations are not only of historical interest, but also contribute to the completeness and correctness of the Austrian earthquake catalogue, which is the basis for seismic hazard analysis and as such benefits the public, communities, civil engineers, architects, civil protection, and many others.

  13. Vienna: a capital transported by LPG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    For more than 30 years the Austrian capital has chosen the LPG-fuel for its public transportation systems. This choice was advised by the environmental necessity to reduce the emissions of particulates from diesel engines and by the economical will of having a competitive fuel source with respect to diesel fuel. This paper recalls first the historical evolution of Vienna's buses progressively equipped with dual-fuel engines, and since 1976 with LPG fuel engines only. Today's the LPG buses fleet represents about 80% of the Vienna Transport buses. Then, the economical (fuel consumption, investment, exploitation and maintenance costs) and environmental (particulates and CO emissions) balance-sheet of this evolution is analysed. Since 1988, the use of catalytic converters for exhaust systems has allowed a 80% reduction of NOx emissions. (J.S.)

  14. A sunken ship of the desert at the river Danube in Tulln, Austria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Galik

    Full Text Available Rescue excavations recovered a skeleton that resurrect the contemporary dramatic history of Austria in the 17th century as troops besieged Vienna in the second Osmanic-Habsburg war. Unique for Central Europe is the evidence of a completely preserved camel skeleton uncovered in a large refuse pit. The male individual of slender stature indicates a few but characteristic pathological changes revealing not a beast of burden but probably a valuable riding animal. Anatomical and morphometrical analyses suggest a hybrid confirmed by the ancient DNA analyses resulting in the presence of a dromedary in the maternal and a Bactrian camel in the paternal line.

  15. A sunken ship of the desert at the river Danube in Tulln, Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galik, Alfred; Mohandesan, Elmira; Forstenpointner, Gerhard; Scholz, Ute Maria; Ruiz, Emily; Krenn, Martin; Burger, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Rescue excavations recovered a skeleton that resurrect the contemporary dramatic history of Austria in the 17th century as troops besieged Vienna in the second Osmanic-Habsburg war. Unique for Central Europe is the evidence of a completely preserved camel skeleton uncovered in a large refuse pit. The male individual of slender stature indicates a few but characteristic pathological changes revealing not a beast of burden but probably a valuable riding animal. Anatomical and morphometrical analyses suggest a hybrid confirmed by the ancient DNA analyses resulting in the presence of a dromedary in the maternal and a Bactrian camel in the paternal line.

  16. The history and evolution of radiotherapy and radiation oncology in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogelnik, H. Dieter

    1996-01-01

    Austria has a longstanding and eventful history in the field of radiotherapy and radiation oncology. The founder of radiotherapy, Leopold Freund, began his well-documented first therapeutic irradiation on November 24, 1896, in Vienna. He also wrote the first textbook of radiotherapy in 1903. Further outstanding Viennese pioneers in the fields of radiotherapy, radiobiology, radiation physics, and diagnostic radiology include Gottwald Schwarz, Robert Kienboeck, and Guido Holzknecht. Because many of the leading Austrian radiologists had to emigrate in 1938, irreparable damage occurred at that time for the medical speciality of radiology. After World War II, the recovery in the field of radiotherapy and radiation oncology started in Austria in the early sixties. Eleven radiotherapy centers have been established since that time, and an independent society for radio-oncology, radiobiology, and medical radiophysics was founded in 1984. Finally, in March 1994, radiotherapy-radio-oncology became a separate clinical speciality

  17. K-pop Reception and Participatory Fan Culture in Austria

    OpenAIRE

    Sang-Yeon Sung

    2013-01-01

    K-pop’s popularity and its participatory fan culture have expanded beyond Asia and become significant in Europe in the past few years. After South Korean pop singer Psy’s “Gangnam Style” music video topped the Austrian chart in October 2012, the number and size of K-pop events in Austria sharply increased, with fans organizing various participatory events, including K-pop auditions, dance festivals, club meetings, quiz competitions, dance workshops, and smaller fan-culture gatherings. In the ...

  18. Descriptive models of major uranium deposits in China - Some results of the Workshop on Uranium Resource Assessment sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria, in cooperation with China National Nuclear Corporation, Beijing, and the U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado, and Reston, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, W.I.; Feng, S.; Zuyi, C.; McCammon, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    Four major types of uranium deposits occur in China: granite, volcanic, sandstone, and carbonaceous-siliceous-pelitic rock. These types are major sources of uranium in many parts of the world and account for about 95 percent of Chinese production. Descriptive models for each of these types record the diagnostic regional and local geologic features of the deposits that are important to genetic studies, exploration, and resource assessment. A fifth type of uranium deposit, metasomatite, is also modeled because of its high potential for production. These five types of uranium deposits occur irregularly in five tectonic provinces distributed from the northwest through central to southern China. ?? 1993 Oxford University Press.

  19. PREFACE: International & Interdisciplinary Workshop on Novel Phenomena in Integrated Complex Sciences: from Non-living to Living Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Kazuyoshi; Ohta, Hiroto; Murase, Masatoshi; Nishimura, Kazuo

    2012-03-01

    In this workshop recent advancements in experiments and theories were discussed on magnetism and superconductivity, emergent phenomena in biological material, chemical properties and economic problems of non-living and living systems. The aim of the workshop was to discuss old, but also new problems from a multidisciplinary perspective, and to understand the general features behind diversity in condensed matter physics, experimental chemistry and physics in biology and economic science. The workshop was broadly based, and was titled 'International & Interdisciplinary Workshop on Novel Phenomena in Integrated Complex Sciences from Non-living to Living Systems'. However, the primary focus was on magnetism and superconductivity, and NMR research into strongly correlated electrons. The meeting was held as an ICAM workshop, upon official approval in January 2010. Both young scientists and graduate students were invited. We hope that these young scientists had the chance to talk with invited speakers and organizers on their own interests. We thank the participants who contributed through their presentations, discussions and these papers to the advancement of the subject and our understanding. The proceedings are published here in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series (UK). We thank the International Advisory Committee for their advice and guidance: Evgeny Antipov Moscow State University, Russia Nicholas Curro University of California, Davis, USA Minghu Fang Zhejiang University, China Jurgen Haase University of Leipzig, Germany Takashi Imai McMaster University, Canada Peter Lemmens TU Braunschweig, Germany Herwig Michor Vienna TU, Austria Takamasa Momose University of British Columbia, Canada Raivo Stern NICPB, Estonia Louis Taillefer University of Sherbrooke, Canada Masashi Takigawa University of Tokyo, Japan This workshop was mainly organized by the International Research Unit of Integrated Complex System Science, Kyoto University, and was supported by ICAM

  20. Middle and late Badenian palaeoenvironments in the northern Vienna Basin and their potential link to the Badenian Salinity Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harzhauser, Mathias; Grunert, Patrick; Mandic, Oleg; Lukeneder, Petra; Gallardo, Ángela García; Neubauer, Thomas A.; Carnevale, Giorgio; Landau, Bernard M.; Sauer, Roman; Strauss, Philipp

    2018-04-01

    Hydrocarbon exploration in the Bernhardsthal and Bernhardsthal-Sued oil fields documents an up to 2000 m thick succession of middle and upper Badenian deposits in this part of the northern Vienna Basin (Austria). Based on palaeontological analyses of core-samples, well-log data and seismic surveys we propose an integrated stratigraphy and describe the depositional environments. As the middle/late Badenian boundary is correlated with the Langhian/Serravallian boundary, the cores capture the crucial phase of the Middle Miocene Climate Transition. The middle Badenian starts with a major transgression leading to outer neritic to upper bathyal conditions in the northern Vienna Basin, indicated by Bathysiphon-assemblages and glass-sponges. A strong palaeo-relief and rapid synsedimentary subsidence accentuated sedimentation during this phase. The middle/late Badenian boundary coincides with a major drop of relative sea level by about 200 m, resulting in a rapid shift from deeper marine depositional environments to coastal and freshwater swamps. In coeval marine settings, a more than 100 m thick unit of anhydrite-bearing clay formed. This is the first evidence of evaporite precipitation during the Badenian Salinity Crisis in the Vienna Basin. Shallow lagoonal environments with diverse and fully marine mollusc and fish assemblages were established during the subsequent late Badenian re-flooding. In composition, the mollusc fauna differs considerably from older ones and is characterized by the sudden appearance of species with eastern Paratethyan affinities.

  1. Biogas in Austria and Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbanek, A.

    Several well-functioning biogas plants in Austria and in Switzerland are briefly described. The profitability of the combination of dairy farming and pig breeding is emphasized. The whey produced by the cheese-dairies is fed to the pigs and the pigs dung is fermented to biogas.

  2. A survey of radioactivity in drinking water in Upper Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, V.; Maringer, F.J.; Maringer, F.J.; Kaineder, H.; Sperker, S.; Brettner-Messler, R.

    2006-01-01

    The University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Science Vienna, in co-operation with the environmental department of the government of Upper Austria, realizes a 3 year program (2004-2006) to investigate the radioactivity in drinking water in Upper Austria. The superior purpose of the project is to protect the population from radiation exposure by drinking water. Therefore the measurements should yield basic data for further processing (guidelines, regulations [O.N. S.5251]) and their realisation (precaution, mitigation). To get an overview of the situation water samples are taken from water supplies and consumers houses(population radiation exposure) as well as directly from springs and fountains to obtain hydrogeological-radiological basic data. The first 230 water samples (to get a general idea, distributed among the area of Upper Austria) are analyzed for different radionuclides (Rn-222, Ra-226, H-3, U-238) and alpha-beta total activity concentration by liquid scintillation technologies. On the basis of these results more samples are taken in regions with elevated activity concentrations and besides in regions of particular geological interest (e.g. Bohemian Massif granite rocks; along geological disturbances; in regions with elevated Uranium and Thorium-values in the rocks). These samples are analyzed for Radon on-site by a mobile liquid scintillation instrument (Triathler, by Hidex) and additionally in the laboratory for Ra-228, Po-210, Pb-210. So far, 145 samples have been taken in this way in about 23 communities. First results indicate that the Radon activity concentrations in some springs and fountains range to 1000 Bq/l, but after preparation of the water in the supplies the activity concentrations are usually much lower. To determine this behaviour (e.g. for different preparation facilities), samples are taken at several places within the run of the water from the spring to the consumer. Besides special attention is given to U-238, because little

  3. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    The Federal Republic of Austria is situated in the southeastern part of Central Europe. The country covers a total area of 83.350 square kilometers, the population amounts to 7.5 million inhabitants. The geographical features of Austria are dominated by the E-W-trending chain of the Alps (approximately 60% of the country). The northeastern part of the country is formed by the nonalpine mountains and hills of the Bohemian Massif. There are a large depression, the basin of Vienna, as well as parts of the Pannonian basin in the eastern part. The main hydrographic features are characterized by the river Danube and its tributaries. With the exception of a small part in the west of the country, the drainage system of which is directed to the river Rhine, all other rivers are drained by the Danube. The elevations in the Alps reach heights of up to 3 800 m. Many of the E-W striking mountain chains are higher than 2000 to 2500 m. Several major N-S trending passes over the mountains are favourable for the transportation systems (railroads, motorroads) - The kind of land use in Austria is mainly determined by the character of the landscape which is made up of mountains and valleys as well as of depressions in the eastern part of the country. In the lowlands, good farmland is available. At lower and at medium elevations, forests and grassland predominate in the Alps. At higher elevations, the Alps are covered with grasslands; a great part of the rocks has no soil cover, another part is covered by perennial snow and ice.The presence of many uranium occurrences in the Permo-Triassic sediments justifies a detailed survey of these strata. Special studies on the lithology and the formation of uranium in these rocks have been made during the last few years. They should be evaluated to point out new favourable prospective areas. The potential of Uranium which is assumed to be found in Austria is 10,000 - 50,000 t U

  4. Presa Malta – Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt, W.

    1975-11-01

    Full Text Available The Malta Dam consists of three consecutive units, united by means of pressure galleries. The upper and the lower steps are balancing tanks with a capacity of 1,800,000 and 500,000 m2, respectively. The middle step is a great vaulted dam of 200 m height, of 200 million m2 capacity, with a crest length of 600 m, and is therefore one of the largest dams in the world of its kind. This hydroelectric group will be able to provide annually approximately 900 million kW/h, by using exclusively the natural flow of the river Malta and its tributaries. For the construction of this power plant, various additional installations were necessary, such as for instance: the preparation of the quarry for the extraction of the aggregates; transport systems for the aggregates and the concrete; living quarters for approximately 700 workers, kitchen, dining-rooms, lounges, work-shops and storage rooms; purification plants and water supply installation; and finally, the numerous access roads to all the working areas.Se halla constituida por tres escalones sucesivos unidos entre sí por medio de galerías de presión. Los escalones superior e inferior son depósitos de compensación de 1.800.000 y 500.000 m2 de capacidad, respectivamente. El escalón intermedio es un gran embalse de 200 millones de m2 de volumen, cerrado con una presa-bóveda, cuyo muro tiene 200 m de altura y una corona de 600 m de longitud, siendo una de las mayores presas, de este tipo, en el mundo. El grupo formado por estas centrales eléctricas podrá producir en un año normal cerca de 900 millones de kW/h, aprovechando solamente la afluencia natural del río Malta y sus afluentes. Para la ejecución de esta obra se han necesitado numerosas instalaciones, entre las que cabe destacar: la preparación de la cantera en la que se obtienen los áridos; la central de hormigonado; los sistemas de transporte para los áridos y el hormigón; un campamento de vivienda para 700 personas, con

  5. 3rd Workshop on metal ceramic materials for functional applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korb, G [Oesterreichisches Forschungszentrum Seibersdorf, 2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)

    1998-12-31

    This workshop contains contributions about materials and processing, characterization and modeling of properties and applications of metallic ceramics and composite structures. It was held on behalf of the Taiwan-Austrian scientific collaboration in Vienna, June 4{sup th} - 6{sup th} 1997. (Suda)

  6. 3rd Workshop on metal ceramic materials for functional applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korb, G.

    1997-01-01

    This workshop contains contributions about materials and processing, characterization and modeling of properties and applications of metallic ceramics and composite structures. It was held on behalf of the Taiwan-Austrian scientific collaboration in Vienna, June 4 th - 6 th 1997. (Suda)

  7. Society News: Workshop helps new GJI authors; Free eBook for schools; EGU awards medal; AGU elects Fellow; Support your Society; New Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Early-career researchers and postgraduates are invited to attend an Author Workshop at the 2012 European Geosciences Union General Assembly in Vienna. The following were elected Fellows of the Society on 10 February 2012:

  8. Hans Asperger, National Socialism, and "race hygiene" in Nazi-era Vienna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Herwig

    2018-01-01

    Hans Asperger (1906-1980) first designated a group of children with distinct psychological characteristics as 'autistic psychopaths' in 1938, several years before Leo Kanner's famous 1943 paper on autism. In 1944, Asperger published a comprehensive study on the topic (submitted to Vienna University in 1942 as his postdoctoral thesis), which would only find international acknowledgement in the 1980s. From then on, the eponym 'Asperger's syndrome' increasingly gained currency in recognition of his outstanding contribution to the conceptualization of the condition. At the time, the fact that Asperger had spent pivotal years of his career in Nazi Vienna caused some controversy regarding his potential ties to National Socialism and its race hygiene policies. Documentary evidence was scarce, however, and over time a narrative of Asperger as an active opponent of National Socialism took hold. The main goal of this paper is to re-evaluate this narrative, which is based to a large extent on statements made by Asperger himself and on a small segment of his published work. Drawing on a vast array of contemporary publications and previously unexplored archival documents (including Asperger's personnel files and the clinical assessments he wrote on his patients), this paper offers a critical examination of Asperger's life, politics, and career before and during the Nazi period in Austria. Asperger managed to accommodate himself to the Nazi regime and was rewarded for his affirmations of loyalty with career opportunities. He joined several organizations affiliated with the NSDAP (although not the Nazi party itself), publicly legitimized race hygiene policies including forced sterilizations and, on several occasions, actively cooperated with the child 'euthanasia' program. The language he employed to diagnose his patients was often remarkably harsh (even in comparison with assessments written by the staff at Vienna's notorious Spiegelgrund 'euthanasia' institution), belying the

  9. Determination of regional Euler pole parameters for Eastern Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umnig, Elke; Weber, Robert; Schartner, Matthias; Brueckl, Ewald

    2017-04-01

    The horizontal motion of lithospheric plates can be described as rotations around a rotation axes through the Earth's center. The two possible points where this axes intersects the surface of the Earth are called Euler poles. The rotation is expressed by the Euler parameters in terms of angular velocities together with the latitude and longitude of the Euler pole. Euler parameters were calculated from GPS data for a study area in Eastern Austria. The observation network is located along the Mur-Mürz Valley and the Vienna Basin. This zone is part of the Vienna Transfer Fault, which is the major fault system between the Eastern Alps and the Carpathians. The project ALPAACT (seismological and geodetic monitoring of ALpine-PAnnonian ACtive Tectonics) investigated intra plate tectonic movements within the Austrian part in order to estimate the seismic hazard. Precise site coordinate time series established from processing 5 years of GPS observations are available for the regional network spanning the years from 2010.0 to 2015.0. Station velocities with respect to the global reference frame ITRF2008 have been computed for 23 sites. The common Euler vector was estimated on base of a subset of reliable site velocities, for stations directly located within the area of interest. In a further step a geokinematic interpretation shall be carried out. Therefore site motions with respect to the Eurasian Plate are requested. To obtain this motion field different variants are conceivable. In a simple approach the mean ITRF2008 velocity of IGS site GRAZ can be adopted as Eurasian rotational velocity. An improved alternative is to calculate site-specific velocity differences between the Euler rotation and the individual site velocities. In this poster presentation the Euler parameters, the residual motion field as well as first geokinematic interpretation results are presented.

  10. Austria; 2013 Article IV Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents details of Austria’s 2013 Article IV Consultation. Austria has been growing economically but is facing challenges in the financial sector. Full implementation of medium-term fiscal adjustment plans require specifying several measures and plans that need gradual strengthening to take expected further bank restructuring cost into account. It suggests that strong early bank intervention and resolution tools, a better designed deposit insurance system, and a bank-financed reso...

  11. [Epidemiology of obesity in Austria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorner, Thomas E

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this article was to compile all existing data regarding the prevalence of obesity in Austria in all age groups, and to perform additional analyses. Prevalence of obesity in the adult Austrian population varies between 8.3 and 19.9% in men, and 9.0 and 19.8% in women with increasing trends over time. Prevalence of obesity in children and adolescents in Austria varies between 3.1 and 9.0% in boys and between 2.2 and 7.3% in girls. Factors associated with obesity include higher age, lower educational level, profession, migration background, living in eastern parts of Austria, lack of social support, and psycho-social pressure. In women, socio-economic parameters are stronger associated with obesity compared to men. Obesity is associated with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, osteoarthritis, and low back pain, and deteriorated quality of live, in both sexes, and in men additionally with a history of heart attack, and in women additionally with anxiety/depression.

  12. Summary Report of the Workshop on the Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semkova, V.; Pritychenko, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Workshop on the Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database (EXFOR) was held at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 6 to 10 October 2014. The workshop was organized to discuss various aspects of the EXFOR compilation process including compilation rules, different techniques for nuclear reaction data measurements, software developments, etc. A summary of the presentations and discussions that took place during the workshop is reported here. (author)

  13. Summary Report of the Workshop on The Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semkova, V. [IAEA Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Pritychenko, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The Workshop on the Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database (EXFOR) was held at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 6 to 10 October 2014. The workshop was organized to discuss various aspects of the EXFOR compilation process including compilation rules, different techniques for nuclear reaction data measurements, software developments, etc. A summary of the presentations and discussions that took place during the workshop is reported here.

  14. [Methods in neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS): results of a nationwide survey in Austria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauchinger, S; Sapetschnig, I; Danda, M; Sommer, C; Resch, B; Urlesberger, B; Raith, W

    2015-08-01

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) occurs in neonates whose mothers have taken addictive drugs or were under substitution therapy during pregnancy. Incidence numbers of NAS are on the rise globally, even in Austria NAS is not rare anymore. The aim of our survey was to reveal the status quo of dealing with NAS in Austria. A questionnaire was sent to 20 neonatology departments all over Austria, items included questions on scoring, therapy, breast-feeding and follow-up procedures. The response rate was 95%, of which 94.7% had written guidelines concerning NAS. The median number of children being treated per year for NAS was 4. Finnegan scoring system is used in 100% of the responding departments. Morphine is being used most often, in opiate abuse (100%) as well as in multiple substance abuse (44.4%). The most frequent forms of morphine preparation are morphine and diluted tincture of opium. Frequency as well as dosage of medication vary broadly. 61.1% of the departments supported breast-feeding, regulations concerned participation in a substitution programme and general contraindications (HIV, HCV, HBV). Our results revealed that there is a big west-east gradient in patients being treated per year. NAS is not a rare entity anymore in Austria (up to 50 cases per year in Vienna). Our survey showed that most neonatology departments in Austria treat their patients following written guidelines. Although all of them base these guidelines on international recommendations there is no national consensus. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. EU Floods Directive implementation in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuhold Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Floods have the potential to cause fatalities, displacement of people and damage to the environment, to severely compromise economic development and to undermine the economic activities of the Community. The EU Directive on the assessment and management of flood risks [2007/60/EC] was adopted on 23 October 2007. Its aim is to reduce and manage the risks that floods pose to human health, the environment, cultural heritage and economic activity. The paper reflects on how the requirements of the FD had been achieved in Austria and how the nationwide comparability and transferability of results as well as the international coordination had been obtained. Austria as a federal state has its competences structured in different departments as well as administrational levels. Besides administrational characteristics there is also a high diversity in topographical boundary conditions from Alpine areas to lowland areas emphasising different approaches and foci of flood risk management. To harmonise the related interests a discussion and decision committee had been established. The resolutions of this committee then defined the basis for a national coordination procedure where the Federal Ministry provided a “federal blueprint” to the federal provinces. The federal provinces then incorporated their regional and local information and data. Based on this response the coordinated and nationwide comparable FRMP had been set up and had been forwarded to public information and consultation. Complementary stakeholder involvement has been ensured by information and discussion workshops throughout the entire process. The administrational and topographical characteristics to be considered in the frame of FD implementation strengthened the coordination and harmonisation across all sectors and stakeholders related to flood risk management. The FD implementation, therefore, is a holistic attempt to outline the needs for action for all sectors related to risk

  16. Ilves urges closer ties while in Austria / Ella Karapetyan

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Karapetyan, Ella

    2010-01-01

    President Toomas Hendrik Ilvese ametlik visiit Austria Vabariiki 22.11.2010 - 24.11.2010. Eesti riigipea pidas kõne Austria Majanduskojas Eesti-Austria majandusfoorumil, kohtus Alam-Austria Liidumaa parlamendi presidendi Hanz Penz'i ning Austria presidendi Heinz Fischeriga. Presidentide kohtumisel räägiti EL-i laienemispoliitikast, energiajulgeoleku probleemidest, Euroopa naabruspoliitikast ja idapartnerlusest

  17. Use of neutron beams for low and medium flux research reactors: Radiography and materials characterization. Report of a technical committee held in Vienna, 4-7 May 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The present report is the result of the Technical Committee meeting held during 4-7 May 1993 in Vienna, Austria, and includes contributions from the participants. The Physics Section of the Department of Research and Isotopes was responsible for the co-ordination and compilation of the report. The report is intended to provide guidelines to research reactor owners and operators for promoting and developing their research programmes and industrial applications for neutron radiology, related neutron inspection and analytical techniques and neutron beam irradiation. Refs, figs and tabs.

  18. Use of neutron beams for low and medium flux research reactors: Radiography and materials characterization. Report of a technical committee held in Vienna, 4-7 May 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    The present report is the result of the Technical Committee meeting held during 4-7 May 1993 in Vienna, Austria, and includes contributions from the participants. The Physics Section of the Department of Research and Isotopes was responsible for the co-ordination and compilation of the report. The report is intended to provide guidelines to research reactor owners and operators for promoting and developing their research programmes and industrial applications for neutron radiology, related neutron inspection and analytical techniques and neutron beam irradiation. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. IAEA advisory group meeting on nuclear data for radiation damage assessment and related safety aspects, Vienna, 12-16 October 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocherov, N.

    1982-01-01

    This Advisory Group Meeting on Nuclear Data for Radiation Damage Assessment and Related Safety Aspects was convened by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section, at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, from 12-16 October 1981. The meeting was attended by 34 participants from 15 countries and 2 international organizations. The main objective of the meeting was to review the requirements for and the status of nuclear data needed for radiation damage estimates in reactor structural materials and related reactor safety aspects, and to develop recommendations to the Nuclear Data Section of the IAEA for its future activities in this field. (author)

  20. Vienna Agreement law 15.986 it approve Vienna Agreement for Protection ozone layer and annex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Agreement of Vienna is approved with respect to the protection of the Layer of Ozono, definitions,general duties, research and observations systematics, co-operation in the Spheres Scientific Juridical, and information, Technological Conference, transmission from the protocols, amends, secretariat, adoption to the agreement or the protocols, adoption and amendment of controversy, signing, ratify, approve annexes, solution or vote, relation approving, adhesion, rights between the present agreement and its protocols, entrance in vigor, reserves, retirement, deposition, exchange of information [es

  1. INTERACTION BETWEEN NATIVE AND ALIEN SPECIES OF CRAYFISH IN AUSTRIA: CASE STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PÖCKL M.

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available In Austria, three indigenous crayfish species occur: the noble crayfish (Astacus astacus, the stone crayfish (Austropotamobius torrentium, and the white-clawed crayfish (Austropotamobius pallipes. It is not known if Astacus leptodactylus is autochthonous in the very eastern part of Austria, near the border with Hungary and Slovakia. In other parts of Austria the Turkish crayfish has been transplanted into several gravel pits and ponds. Up to now, the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii is not known to occur in the wild, but can be bought alive in fish markets, restaurants, and the aquarium trade. The Nearctic spiny-cheek crayfish (Orconectes limosus and the signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus have been introduced since the 1970s by crayfish farmers because these species are resistant to the crayfish plague fungus (Aphanomyces astaci. There are just a few populations of O. limosus, and the species is not spreading actively. However, P. leniusculus is widespread all over Austria, and was illegally introduced from one water body to another. It can be characterized as an aggressive, invasive North American species, spreading actively and acting as a vector of the crayfish plague. Unfortunately the habitat requirements of the native noble crayfish and the alien signal crayfish are nearly the same. Case studies are given in the following chapters: the first group of examples refers to water bodies where the alien signal crayfish is most probably the cause of displacement of the indigenous noble crayfish: 1 Hintersee, 2 Irrsee (« Zeller See », 3 north-western Lower Austria (« Waldviertel », 4 Merzenstein (aquacultural enterprise, 5 Neufelder See. The second group of examples refers to water bodies where alien and indigenous species are able to coexist: a the confluence of the main course of the Danube River, the Ölhafen and the Neue Donau in the southeast part of Vienna, b the Schönauer Wasser, a backwater of the Danube River downstream

  2. Consolidated progress report for 1975 on nuclear data activities outside the NDS service area: Austria, Belgium, Greece, Spain, Switzerland, Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-12-01

    A consolidated progress report for 1975 on nuclear data activities in the following countries and institutes is presented: Austria: Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Hochschulen, Vienna; Institut fuer Radiumforschung und Kernphysik; Oesterreichische Studiengesellschaft fuer Atomenergie, Seibersdorf; Gesellschaft zur Foerderung der Kernenergie, Graz; Belgium: University of Ghent, Ghent; University of Louvain, Louvain; Nuclear Energy Center, Mol; Greece: N.R.C. ''Demokritos'', Athens; Spain: Junta de Energia Nuclear, Madrid; Universidad Complutense, Madrid; Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid; Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia; Universidad de Valladolid; Universidad de Zaragoza; Switzerland: University of Neuchatel, Neuchatel; University of Fribourg, Fribourg; University of Zuerich, Zuerich; Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zuerich; Institute for Reactor Research, Wuerenlingen; Turkey: Cekmece Nuclear Research Center, Istanbul

  3. Austria: The INIS Austria Centre 1970-2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rössner, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    This article spotlights Austrian people and institutions that have influenced the fortunes of INIS and the INIS Centre in Austria. The work of two Austrians had a lasting influence on INIS. The first person, Ms Elisabeth Ruckenbauer, was Head of the INIS Bibliographic Control Unit at the start of INIS. She was responsible for the development and implementation of the INIS bibliographic description rules (INIS Reference Series IAEA-INIS-01 and -02). The second person having a lasting influence on INIS was Mr Alexander Nevyjel. He was Austrian INIS Liaison Officer from 1983 –2002, and Head of the INIS Subject Control Unit until 2011. During his second term of office, he developed, together with the Swiss company Convera, the Computer Assisted Indexing Software (CAI). The aim of the project was to optimize indexing. The implementation of CAI in 2004 resulted in an increase of input to the INIS database; from around 60 000 records per year to over 100 000 records per year. We are proud that Mr Nevyjel is still an active member of the INIS Austria Center and that he continues to offer his experience and expertise. The Austrian INIS Centre has resided at two scientific institutions: Seibersdorf and the Austrian Central Library for Physics and Chemistry Library, each having a specific relationship with the IAEA and INIS

  4. Development and evaluation of the operational Air-Quality forecast model for Austria ALARO-CAMx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandorfer, Claudia; Hirtl, Marcus; Krüger, Bernd C.

    2014-05-01

    The Air-Quality model for Austria (AQA) is operated at ZAMG in cooperation with the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU) in Vienna by order of the regional governments since 2005. The modeling system is currently a combination of the meteorological model ALARO and the photochemical dispersion model CAMx. Two modeling domains are used with the highest resolution (5 km) in the alpine region. Various extensions with external data sources have been conducted in the past to improve the daily forecasts of the model. Since 2013 O3- and PM10-observations from the Austrian measurement network have been assimilated daily using optimum interpolation. Dynamic chemical boundary conditions are obtained from Air-Quality forecasts provided by ECMWF in the frame of MACC-II. Additionally the latest available high resolved emission inventories for Austria are combined with TNO and EMEP data. The biogenic emissions are provided by the SMOKE model. ZAMG provides daily forecasts of O3, PM10 and NO2 to the regional governments of Austria. The evaluation of these forecasts is done for the summer 2013 with the main focus on the forecasts of ozone. The measurements of the Air-Quality stations are compared with the punctual forecasts at the sites of the station and with the area forecasts for every province of Austria. In the summer of 2013, two heat waves occurred. The first very short heat wave was in June 2013. During this period one exceedance of the alert threshold value for ozone occurred. The second heat wave took place from the end of July to the mid of August. Due to very high temperatures (new temperature record for Austria measured in Bad Deutsch-Altenburg with 40.5°C) and long dryness episodes the information threshold value has been exceeded several times in the eastern regions of Austria. The alert threshold value has been exceeded one time in this period. For the evaluation, the results for the second heat wave episode in Eastern Austria will be discussed

  5. Sewage sludge disposal in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, F.

    1997-01-01

    Sewage systems serve about 70% of the Austrian population, producing 6 million m 3 of sewage sludge per year with a dry matter content of 4-5%. At present about 52% of this sludge is disposed of in land fills, 33% is incinerated, and only about 15 % is used in agriculture. Although agricultural utilization is becoming increasingly important, several problems, especially those related to public opinion, need to be resolved before increased use will be possible. In this paper, wastewater treatment and sewage-sludge production in Austria, and problems associated with sludge disposal are discussed. (author)

  6. The U.S./IAEA Workshop on Software Sustainability for Safeguards Instrumentation: Report to the NNSA DOE Office of International Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper, Susan E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pickett, Chris A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Queirolo, Al [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bachner, Katherine M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Worrall, Louise G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-07

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) convened a workshop on Software Sustainability for Safeguards Instrumentation in Vienna, Austria, May 6-8, 2014. Safeguards instrumentation software must be sustained in a changing environment to ensure existing instruments can continue to perform as designed, with improved security. The approaches to the development and maintenance of instrument software used in the past may not be the best model for the future and, therefore, the organizers’ goal was to investigate these past approaches and to determine an optimal path forward. The purpose of this report is to provide input for the DOE NNSA Office of International Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241) and other stakeholders that can be utilized when making decisions related to the development and maintenance of software used in the implementation of international nuclear safeguards. For example, this guidance can be used when determining whether to fund the development, upgrade, or replacement of a particular software product. The report identifies the challenges related to sustaining software, and makes recommendations for addressing these challenges, supported by summaries and detailed notes from the workshop discussions. In addition the authors provide a set of recommendations for institutionalizing software sustainability practices in the safeguards community. The term “software sustainability” was defined for this workshop as ensuring that safeguards instrument software and algorithm functionality can be maintained efficiently throughout the instrument lifecycle, without interruption and providing the ability to continue to improve that software as needs arise.

  7. The U.S./IAEA Workshop on Software Sustainability for Safeguards Instrumentation: Report to the NNSA DOE Office of International Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepper, Susan E.; Pickett, Chris A.; Queirolo, Al; Bachner, Katherine M.; Worrall, Louise G.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) convened a workshop on Software Sustainability for Safeguards Instrumentation in Vienna, Austria, May 6-8, 2014. Safeguards instrumentation software must be sustained in a changing environment to ensure existing instruments can continue to perform as designed, with improved security. The approaches to the development and maintenance of instrument software used in the past may not be the best model for the future and, therefore, the organizers' goal was to investigate these past approaches and to determine an optimal path forward. The purpose of this report is to provide input for the DOE NNSA Office of International Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241) and other stakeholders that can be utilized when making decisions related to the development and maintenance of software used in the implementation of international nuclear safeguards. For example, this guidance can be used when determining whether to fund the development, upgrade, or replacement of a particular software product. The report identifies the challenges related to sustaining software, and makes recommendations for addressing these challenges, supported by summaries and detailed notes from the workshop discussions. In addition the authors provide a set of recommendations for institutionalizing software sustainability practices in the safeguards community. The term ''software sustainability'' was defined for this workshop as ensuring that safeguards instrument software and algorithm functionality can be maintained efficiently throughout the instrument lifecycle, without interruption and providing the ability to continue to improve that software as needs arise.

  8. Architectural management in the digital arena : proceedings of the CIB-W096 conference Vienna 2011, Vienna University of Technology, Austria, 13-14 October 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otter, den A.F.H.J.; Emmitt, S.; Achammer, Ch.

    2011-01-01

    Leading research into architectural design management is the CIB’s working committee W096 Architectural Management. CIB-W096 was officially established in 1993, following a conference on ‘Architectural Management’ at the University of Nottingham in the UK. Since this time the commission has been

  9. Corporate Financial Reporting in Austria : An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Lindner, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this report on corporate financial reporting in Austria is to describe the key features of Austria’s corporate financial reporting environment as well as its practical application in regard to small and medium enterprises (SMEs’) financial reporting practices in Austria. This report builds on the World Bank accounting and auditing reports on standards and codes (ROSC) method...

  10. Renewable sources of energy in Austria 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faninger, G.

    1993-07-01

    Present contribution of renewable sources of energy to the overall energy requirements in Austria. Estimated potential of renewable sources of energy in Austria: firewood and biogeneous fuels, environmental energy, combustible wastes. Ecological aspects of utilising renewable sources of energy. Market barriers and strategies for overcoming them

  11. An Analytical Comparison of the Opinions of Physicians Working in Emergency and Trauma Surgery Departments at Tabriz and Vienna Medical Universities Regarding Family Presence during Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimanpour, Hassan; Behringer, Wilhelm; Tabrizi, Jafar Sadegh; Sarahrudi, Kambiz; Golzari, Samad E J; Hajdu, Stefan; Rasouli, Maryam; Nikakhtar, Mehdi; Mehdizadeh Esfanjani, Robab

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the opinions of physicians working in the emergency and trauma surgery departments of Vienna Medical University, in Austria, and Tabriz Medical University, in Iran, regarding the presence of patients' relatives during resuscitation. In a descriptive-analytical study, the data obtained from questionnaires that had been distributed randomly to 40 specialists and residents at each of the participating universities were analyzed. The questionnaire consisted of two sections aimed at capturing the participants' demographic data, the participants' opinions regarding their support for the family's presence during resuscitation, and the multiple potential factors affecting the participants' attitudes, including health beliefs, triggers that could facilitate the procedure, self-efficacy, intellectual norms, and perceived behavioral control. The questionnaire also included a direct question (Question 16) on whether the participants approved of family presence. Each question could be answered using a Likert-type scale. The results showed that the mean scores for Question 16 were 4.31 ± 0.64 and 3.57 ± 1.31 for participants at Vienna and Tabriz universities, respectively. Moreover, physicians at Vienna University disapproved of the presence of patients' families during resuscitation to a higher extent than did those at Tabriz University (P = 0.018). Of the studied prognostic factors affecting the perspectives of Vienna Medical University's physicians, health beliefs (P = 0.000; B = 1.146), triggers (P = 0.000; B = 1.050), and norms (P = 0.000; B = 0.714) were found to be significant. Moreover, of the studied prognostic factors affecting the perspectives of Tabriz Medical University's physicians, health beliefs (P = 0.000; B = 0.875), triggers (P = 0.000; B = 1.11), self-efficacy (P = 0.001; B = 0.5), and perceived behavioral control (P = 0.03; B = 0.713) were significant. Most physicians at Vienna and Tabriz Medical universities were not open

  12. [Stabilizing the social and health status of drug dependent patients with methadone. Long-term maintainance therapy--Vienna results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loimer, N; Werner, E; Hollerer, E; Pfersmann, V; Schmid-Siegel, B; Presslich, O

    1991-01-01

    On September 25th, 1987 methadone was legalized in Austria for therapeutic use in drug addiction treatment in case of: 1. Long-term drug addiction with intravenous application of the drug, and several unsuccessful withdrawal therapies and/or 2. opiate addiction through intravenous application of the drug along with an existing HIV-1 infection. Since than, 291 patients were treated with methadone at the drug-dependency outpatient clinic of the Psychiatric Clinic of the University of Vienna. In 1990, 96 patients treated for more than one year were investigated using a standardized questionnaire. The image in which crime, prostitution, poverty, ill health all merge was broken by this decriminalization. Methadone treatment offers a first step toward social rehabilitation for drug addicts who have been living as criminals on the fringe of society.

  13. Summary of 'international symposium on nuclear fuel cycle and reactor strategy: Adjusting to new realities', Vienna, June 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, N.

    1999-01-01

    The International Symposium on Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Reactor Strategy: Adjusting to New Realities was held from 3 to 6 June 1997 in Vienna, Austria. The objective of the Symposium was to prepare for decision makers and the public, a scientific assessment of the different fuel cycle and reactor strategies with particular reference to the production, use and disposition of plutonium. Six key issue papers were prepared by six groups of international experts which summarized the international common understanding of the various fuel cycle issues including those related to technology, safety, safeguards, environmental and institutional developments. This paper summarizes the major finding of the Working Groups except for Working Group 3 which will be presented in depth in a separate paper in this Technical Committee Meeting. (author)

  14. Air pollution assessment based on elemental concentration of leaves tissue and foliage dust along an urbanization gradient in Vienna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Edina; Braun, Mihály; Vidic, Andreas; Bogyó, Dávid; Fábián, István; Tóthmérész, Béla

    2011-05-01

    Foliage dust contains heavy metal that may have harmful effects on human health. The elemental contents of tree leaves and foliage dust are especially useful to assess air environmental pollution. We studied the elemental concentrations in foliage dust and leaves of Acer pseudoplatanus along an urbanization gradient in Vienna, Austria. Samples were collected from urban, suburban and rural areas. We analysed 19 elements in both kind of samples: aluminium, barium, calcium, copper, iron, potassium, magnesium, sodium, phosphor, sulphur, strontium and zinc. We found that the elemental concentrations of foliage dust were significantly higher in the urban area than in the rural area for aluminium, barium, iron, lead, phosphor and selenium. Elemental concentrations of leaves were significantly higher in urban than in rural area for manganese and strontium. Urbanization changed significantly the elemental concentrations of foliage dust and leaves and the applied method can be useful for monitoring the environmental load. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mining in Austria in 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, P.

    1994-01-01

    The mineral production of Austria, in 1992 - as far as under the supervision of the Austrian Mine Inspectorate, run up to about 50 million t of solid minerals, 1.2 million t of oil and 1.4 billion m 3 of natural gas. 88% of the solid minerals comprised industrial minerals, 4% metals, 4% salt and 4% coal. The solid minerals were produced by 352 open pits and 15 underground mines. 3 of the operations worked both on surface and underground and one mine is a well field operation. In total around 8000 people were employed in the field of mining and mineral processing. The minerals produced represent a value of about 15 billion Austrian Schillings (about 1.25 billion US $), the major part being the industrial minerals sector with a share of 7 billion Austrian Schillings and oil and gas with around 4 billion Austrian Schillings. The industrial minerals sector does not play only in Austrian an important role, but contributes also remarkably to the world production. This comprises mainly magnesite, talc, kaolin and graphite where Austria produces more than 1% of the world production. Summarizing, it can be said that the future of the Austrian mining sector is quite prosperous, perhaps better than in some other traditional mining countries in Europe, where the change from the coal and base metals sector towards the industrial sector has not come so far. (orig.) [de

  16. Geothermal energy: an important but disregarded form of renewable energy; geological situation, projects and economy in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker-Hertkorn, S.

    2000-05-01

    This study deals with the topic geothermal energy. Although geothermal energy is an important energy sector within the area of the renewable energies, the European policy downgraded this important, promising energy sector in 1999. Normally, geothermal energy cannot be regarded as a renewable energy source because the heat content of the Earth, the gravitational heat, the source heat, frictional heat and the decay of radioactive isotopes in the further process of geologic history will eventually be exhausted. However, we are referring here to many millions of years. At the present time, geothermal energy can thus be regarded as an inexhaustible renewable energy source. This work is focused on the geothermal situation in Austria. For many people, the term 'geothermal energy' is associated with countries such as Iceland, Italy (Larderello) and New Zealand. However, in Austria there are also innovative projects in the geothermal energy sector that only very few people know about. Some of these trend-setting projects are presented here. Regarding the total situation in Austria, the geothermal potential is described specifically for the Calcareous Alpine nappe and the Vienna Basin. Furthermore, the first results concerning successful injection in Upper Austria and up to now unconsidered locations for geothermal energy plants are presented. This work attempts to present the attractiveness of geothermal energy projects to the public, thus emphasizing the importance of discussing it again on the political level. (author)

  17. Austria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leixnering, Stephan; Schikowitz, Andrea; Meyer, Renate E.

    2016-01-01

    orientation and increased networking and mediating activities between diverse actors and interests, we find hybrid forms of governance and executives’ role identities. For instance, shifting value priorities, such as emphasis of the relevance of results in general, go along with reluctant behaviour......, such as a lack of actual performance management, underscored by the perception of low management autonomy. Thus, while managerial values and principles appear as incorporated in Austrian public executives’ role identities, in order to deal with shortcomings and contradictions with the existing system, they fall...... back to familiar practices: Basically, nothing is different, but everything’s changed....

  18. Factors associated with academic success at Vienna Medical School: prospective survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischenschlager, Oskar; Haidinger, Gerald; Mitterauer, Lukas

    2005-02-01

    To identify factors relating to students' success in the study of medicine at the Medical University of Vienna. In view of Austria's tradition of open access to higher education, which results large number of students, high dropout rate, long duration of studies, factors predicting success could be helpful for student counseling. In a prospective study, 674 freshmen (50.8% of students enrolled that year) responded to a questionnaire on their sociodemographic data, family background, performance in school, economic situation, living conditions, social integration and health, learning capacity, motivations related to studies and future profession, attitudes, and the ability to cope with stress. We used the results of the compulsory test of knowledge after the first year as an outcome measure of their success. By comparing two extremes of academic success, very successful students and students who twice failed the challenging first-year exam, we were able to identify three factors relevant in predicting academic success: male sex, German as mother tongue, and good performance in secondary school. Moreover, there is evidence that maturity and intrinsic motivational structure are linked to superior academic performance. The results of this study differ from or even contradict the findings of previous retrospective studies in Austria. We suggest that a more thorough examination of the effect of gender should be undertaken in future studies. We also hope that our work will lead to the improvement in the efficiency of the German courses for foreign students. Our findings confirm the importance of success in secondary school, but also clearly indicate that it should not be the only criterion for university admission.

  19. Color changes of vienna sausage by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Tamikazu; Aoki, Shohei; Sato, Tomotaro

    1978-01-01

    Color change of vienna sausage induced by gamma irradiation was investigated. Discoloration of irradiated vienna sausage was evaluated by use of the color difference meter and sensory test. The discoloration by irradiation was influenced by oxygen contents in packing pouches. In the case of commercial vienna sausage, significant difference from unirradiated control by 99% of probability was recognized at the doses of 1.0 Mrad in nitrogen, 0.5 Mrad in air and 0.3 Mrad in oxygen, respectively. The color change of the specially prepared vienna sausage (40% pork, 40% mutton, 20% beef, and no additional preservatives) was less than that of the commercial one. The absorbance at 540 nm of extracts from vienna sausages with 80% acetone decreased with increasing irradiation dose and oxygen content. While, change in absorbance at 340 nm was practically unaffected by the oxygen concentration. These results suggest that the degradation of nitroso-heme complex by irradiation causes mainly the discoloration of vienna sausage. (auth.)

  20. Environmental risk assessment for Neodryinus typhlocybae, biological control agent against Metcalfa pruinosa, for Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudrun Strauss

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The potential environmental risks of Neodryinus typhlocybae, a parasitic wasp from North America, were evaluated with regard to its safe use as an exotic biocontrol agent for the planthopper Metcalfa pruinosa in Austria. Following an earlier host range study of N. typhlocybae conducted in the laboratory, the present study assessed the potential for establishment and spread as well as negative indirect effects on non-target organisms. The potential release sites in Austria were analysed for matching of the climatic requirements for establishment of N. typhlocybae. The two proposed release locations, Vienna and Graz, have a predominantly similar climate to the parasitoid’s region of origin, though the comparably cooler mean summer temperatures might result in a low emergence rate of the partial second generation. The natural spread potential of N. typhlocybae was reviewed and is considered to be sufficiently good for released individuals to reach nearby sites infested with M. pruinosa. However, a perceptible spreading of N. typhlocybae females only occurs a few years after release and seems to be strongly dependent on the host density. Gelis areator, a hyperparasitoid of N. typhlocybae known to occur in Austria, might have negative effects on the population of the beneficial organism. Advantages and disadvantages of chemical and biological control methods against M. pruinosa were evaluated. It is concluded that N. typhlocybae is very well suited as a biological control agent for M. pruinosa in Austria, as no adverse effects on non-target species are expected but its release offers advantages with regard to sustainable and environmentally friendly pest management.

  1. Human Capital, Values, and Attitudes of Persons Seeking Refuge in Austria in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlenberger, Judith; Rengs, Bernhard; Al Zalak, Zakarya; Goujon, Anne; Striessnig, Erich; Potančoková, Michaela; Gisser, Richard; Testa, Maria Rita; Lutz, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Since its inception in 2010, the Arab Spring has evolved into a situation of violent conflict in many countries, leading to high levels of migration from the affected region. Given the social impact of the large number of individuals applying for asylum across Europe in 2015, it is important to study who these persons are in terms of their skills, motivations, and intentions. DiPAS (Displaced Persons in Austria Survey) aims to uncover the socio-demographic characteristics of the persons seeking refuge who arrived in Austria in 2015, mainly originating from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan. Particular focus is on human capital, attitudes and values. This survey, the first of its kind in Austria and possibly in Europe, was carried out among adult displaced persons, mostly residing in Vienna, yielding 514 completed interviews. Information gathered on spouses and children allows for the analysis of 972 persons living in Austria, and of further 419 partners and children abroad. Results indicate that the surveyed population comprised mainly young families with children, particularly those coming from Syria and Iraq. Their educational level is high compared with the average level in their country of origin. A vast majority of respondents are Muslims, rating their religiosity at medium levels. Judging from stated attitudes towards gender equity, interviewed men seem to have more liberal attitudes than their compatriots. The majority of respondents do not intend to return to their home countries, mostly because of the perception of permanent threat. DiPAS provides data for political decision-making and the on-going societal dialogue. Its findings can help to inform assessments about the integration potential of the displaced population into the host society. In addition, the applied methodological technique and experiences during the fieldwork provide valuable insights on sampling asylum seekers and refugees in the current European context. PMID:27662373

  2. Human Capital, Values, and Attitudes of Persons Seeking Refuge in Austria in 2015.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Buber-Ennser

    Full Text Available Since its inception in 2010, the Arab Spring has evolved into a situation of violent conflict in many countries, leading to high levels of migration from the affected region. Given the social impact of the large number of individuals applying for asylum across Europe in 2015, it is important to study who these persons are in terms of their skills, motivations, and intentions. DiPAS (Displaced Persons in Austria Survey aims to uncover the socio-demographic characteristics of the persons seeking refuge who arrived in Austria in 2015, mainly originating from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan. Particular focus is on human capital, attitudes and values. This survey, the first of its kind in Austria and possibly in Europe, was carried out among adult displaced persons, mostly residing in Vienna, yielding 514 completed interviews. Information gathered on spouses and children allows for the analysis of 972 persons living in Austria, and of further 419 partners and children abroad. Results indicate that the surveyed population comprised mainly young families with children, particularly those coming from Syria and Iraq. Their educational level is high compared with the average level in their country of origin. A vast majority of respondents are Muslims, rating their religiosity at medium levels. Judging from stated attitudes towards gender equity, interviewed men seem to have more liberal attitudes than their compatriots. The majority of respondents do not intend to return to their home countries, mostly because of the perception of permanent threat. DiPAS provides data for political decision-making and the on-going societal dialogue. Its findings can help to inform assessments about the integration potential of the displaced population into the host society. In addition, the applied methodological technique and experiences during the fieldwork provide valuable insights on sampling asylum seekers and refugees in the current European context.

  3. The DIY Careers of Techno and Drum ‘n’ Bass DJs in Vienna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Reitsamer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available My empirical research on electronic dance music scenes in Vienna, Austria, explores an area of cultural production that unites the ideology of creativity with the aspirations of social networks and individual entrepreneurship. The model for a DJ's career is a hybrid of inspired musician, compelling performer, marketing genius and business strategist. An economically successful career depends not only on performing in clubs; DJs are also involved in music production, making records, marketing themselves through the media, organizing club nights and running labels. Social and cultural capital is invested in creative freedom, a do-it-yourself ethos, and collective enjoyment, yet these DJs tend to promote the neoliberal economic ideal of the "autonomous cultural entrepreneur" combining self-organisation and self-marketing with unregulated labour and gendered constructions of artist identity. Taking Bourdieu's work on the field of cultural production as a theoretical framework, my analysis of the DJs' modes of self-(representation suggests that the opposition Bourdieu made between art and commerce tends to blur.

  4. The Extent and Implications of the Microclimatic Conditions in the Urban Environment: A Vienna Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Vuckovic

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent challenges in the realm of urban studies concern better understanding of microclimatic conditions. Changes in urban climate affect cities at local and global scales, with consequences for human health, thermal comfort, building energy use, and anthropogenic emissions. The extent of these impacts may vary due to different morphologies and materials of the built environment. The present contribution summarizes the results of a multi-year effort concerned with the extent and implications of urban heat in Vienna, Austria. For this purpose, high-resolution weather data across six locations are obtained and analyzed. This allowed for an objective assessment of urban-level climatic circumstances across distinct low-density and high-density typologies. Subsequently, a systematic framework was developed for identification of essential properties of the built environment (geometric and material-related that are hypothesized to influence microclimate variation. Results point to a number of related (positive and negative correlations with microclimatic tendencies. Additionally, the impact of this location-specific weather data on building performance simulation results is evaluated. The results suggest that buildings' thermal performance is significantly influenced by location-specific microclimatic conditions with variation of mean annual heating load across locations of up to 16.1 kWhm−2·a−1. The use of location-independent weather data sources (e.g., standardized weather files for building performance estimations can, thus, result in considerable errors.

  5. Controlling and culturing diversity: experimental zoology before World War II and Vienna's Biologische Versuchsanstalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Cheryl A; Brauckmann, Sabine

    2015-04-01

    Founded in Vienna in 1903, the Institute for Experimental Biology pioneered the application of experimental methods to living organisms maintained for sustained periods in captivity. Its Director, the zoologist Hans Przibram, oversaw until 1938, the attempt to integrate ontogeny with studies of inheritance using precise and controlled measurements of the impact of environmental influences on the emergence of form and function. In the early years, these efforts paralleled and even fostered the emergence of experimental biology in America. But fate intervened. Though the Institute served an international community, most of its resident scientists and staff were of Jewish ancestry. Well before the Nazis entered Austria in 1938, these men and women were being fired and driven out; some, including Przibram, were eventually killed. We describe the unprecedented facilities built and the topics addressed by the several departments that made up this Institute, stressing those most relevant to the establishment and success of the Journal of Experimental Zoology, which was founded just a year later. The Institute's diaspora left an important legacy in North America, perhaps best embodied by the career of the developmental neuroscientist Paul Weiss. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Mixing heights over hilly terrain - a case study in northern austria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, K. [Central Inst. for Meteorology and Geodynamics, ZAMG, Vienna (Austria)

    1997-10-01

    Simultaneous Sodar measurements (Remtech PA2) were conducted from 10 October 1996 to 24 January 1997 at two sites in northern Austria, near the village Allensteig on top of a hill (590 m.s.l.) and in the village Lenzing (460 m.s.l.) near the lake Attersee. The two sites are 145 km apart from each other and differ much according to the complexity of the surrounding terrain, land use and altitude. Mixing height and inversions height estimations from the Sodar measurements are compared with mixing heights derived from radiosonde potential temperature profiles at the next stations Linz and Vienna using the parcel method of Stull (1991) explained by M. Piringer (this volume). The information about the static stability at different Sodar heights, which is provided by the new Sodar software in terms of vertical temperature gradients, is discussed. (au)

  7. Mineral exploration in Austria, possibilities and strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzer, H.F.

    1981-01-01

    The author reviews the present situation in Austria for mineral exploration. He considers the geological chances of finding new resources, presents a short description of commodities and finally gives proposals for a natural resources inventory. (Auth.)

  8. Air pollution assessment based on elemental concentration of leaves tissue and foliage dust along an urbanization gradient in Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, Edina; Braun, Mihaly; Vidic, Andreas; Bogyo, David; Fabian, Istvan; Tothmeresz, Bela

    2011-01-01

    Foliage dust contains heavy metal that may have harmful effects on human health. The elemental contents of tree leaves and foliage dust are especially useful to assess air environmental pollution. We studied the elemental concentrations in foliage dust and leaves of Acer pseudoplatanus along an urbanization gradient in Vienna, Austria. Samples were collected from urban, suburban and rural areas. We analysed 19 elements in both kind of samples: aluminium, barium, calcium, copper, iron, potassium, magnesium, sodium, phosphor, sulphur, strontium and zinc. We found that the elemental concentrations of foliage dust were significantly higher in the urban area than in the rural area for aluminium, barium, iron, lead, phosphor and selenium. Elemental concentrations of leaves were significantly higher in urban than in rural area for manganese and strontium. Urbanization changed significantly the elemental concentrations of foliage dust and leaves and the applied method can be useful for monitoring the environmental load. - Highlights: → We studied the elements in dust and leaves along an urbanization gradient, Austria. → We analysed 19 elements: Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Na, P, Pb, S, Sr and Zn. → Elemental concentrations were higher in urban area than in the rural area. → Studied areas were separated by CDA based on the elemental concentrations. → Dust and leaves can be useful for monitoring the environmental load. - Studying the elements (Al, Ba, Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Na, P, S, Sr, Zn) in dust and leaves along an urbanization gradient in Wien, Austria we found that the elemental concentrations of foliage dust were significantly higher in the urban area than in the rural area for Al, Ba, Fe, Pb, P and Se, and concentrations of leaves were significantly higher in urban than in rural area for Mn and Sr.

  9. Air pollution assessment based on elemental concentration of leaves tissue and foliage dust along an urbanization gradient in Vienna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Edina, E-mail: edina.simon@gmail.com [Department of Ecology, University of Debrecen, H-4010 Debrecen, P.O. Box 71 (Hungary); Braun, Mihaly [Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Debrecen, H-4010 Debrecen, P.O. Box 21 (Hungary); Vidic, Andreas [Department fuer Naturschutzbiologie, Vegetations- und Landschaftsoekologie, Universitat Wien, Althanstrasse 14, 1090 Wien (Austria); Bogyo, David [Department of Ecology, University of Debrecen, H-4010 Debrecen, P.O. Box 71 (Hungary); Fabian, Istvan [Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Debrecen, H-4010 Debrecen, P.O. Box 21 (Hungary); Tothmeresz, Bela [Department of Ecology, University of Debrecen, H-4010 Debrecen, P.O. Box 71 (Hungary)

    2011-05-15

    Foliage dust contains heavy metal that may have harmful effects on human health. The elemental contents of tree leaves and foliage dust are especially useful to assess air environmental pollution. We studied the elemental concentrations in foliage dust and leaves of Acer pseudoplatanus along an urbanization gradient in Vienna, Austria. Samples were collected from urban, suburban and rural areas. We analysed 19 elements in both kind of samples: aluminium, barium, calcium, copper, iron, potassium, magnesium, sodium, phosphor, sulphur, strontium and zinc. We found that the elemental concentrations of foliage dust were significantly higher in the urban area than in the rural area for aluminium, barium, iron, lead, phosphor and selenium. Elemental concentrations of leaves were significantly higher in urban than in rural area for manganese and strontium. Urbanization changed significantly the elemental concentrations of foliage dust and leaves and the applied method can be useful for monitoring the environmental load. - Highlights: > We studied the elements in dust and leaves along an urbanization gradient, Austria. > We analysed 19 elements: Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Na, P, Pb, S, Sr and Zn. > Elemental concentrations were higher in urban area than in the rural area. > Studied areas were separated by CDA based on the elemental concentrations. > Dust and leaves can be useful for monitoring the environmental load. - Studying the elements (Al, Ba, Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Na, P, S, Sr, Zn) in dust and leaves along an urbanization gradient in Wien, Austria we found that the elemental concentrations of foliage dust were significantly higher in the urban area than in the rural area for Al, Ba, Fe, Pb, P and Se, and concentrations of leaves were significantly higher in urban than in rural area for Mn and Sr.

  10. Housing Markets in Austria, Germany and Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Schneider; Karin Wagner

    2015-01-01

    Running counter to the sharp rise in house prices and housing wealth observed since the mid- 1990s in the vast majority of European countries, real house prices in Germany and Austria were going down in this period and did not start to rise until 2010 or 2007, respectively. This reflects national idiosyncracies in housing markets and motivated the discussion of relevant peculiarities in, and similarities among, Austria and Germany as well as Switzerland. Among the most important structural fe...

  11. The Beginnings and Development of the Collection of Historic Musical Instruments of the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrix Darmstaedter

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Collection of Historic Musical Instruments of the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna (KHM was founded during the First World War when the inventories of the collections owned by Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria-Este (1863-1914 went to the Imperial museum in Vienna after his assassination. From 1916/17 on, the renowned art historian Julius von Schlosser (1866-1938 and his successor, Hermann Julius Hermann (1869-1953, organized one of the most important collections and exhibitions exclusively dedicated to musical instruments. They assembled valuable items from the 16th century that had belonged to Archduke Ferdinand II’s (1529-1595 Cabinet of Curiosities, objects collected by members of the Obizzi dynasty in the castle of Catajo, and recently acquired historical instruments connected with the Viennese tradition of instrument making. In 1920, Schlosser wrote his fundamental catalogue on the newly established collection that  is considered to be the fi rst systematical and scientifi c publication on historic musical instruments in Austria. During the following years, he strove towards amplifying the inventory and expanding the exhibition. He transferred precious items originally belonging to the movables depot of the erstwhile court (Hofmobiliendepot and instruments left in former imperial residences, such as the castle of Laxenburg. The contribution reviews previously unpublished archived sources documenting the early history of the collection and broaches the issue of the extended exhibition in the 1920s, discusses the thematic orientations of the collection and the principles in museum didactic that consequently arose. Moreover, the position of the collection and its policy in the context of other museums with similar emphases at that time will be analyzed. La collezione di strumenti musicali antichi del Kunsthistorisches Museum a Vienna (KHM é stata fondata durante la prima guerra mondiale quando l’inventario delle collezioni dell

  12. Ragweed (Ambrosia) pollen source inventory for Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karrer, G; Skjøth, C A; Šikoparija, B; Smith, M; Berger, U; Essl, F

    2015-08-01

    This study improves the spatial coverage of top-down Ambrosia pollen source inventories for Europe by expanding the methodology to Austria, a country that is challenging in terms of topography and the distribution of ragweed plants. The inventory combines annual ragweed pollen counts from 19 pollen-monitoring stations in Austria (2004-2013), 657 geographical observations of Ambrosia plants, a Digital Elevation Model (DEM), local knowledge of ragweed ecology and CORINE land cover information from the source area. The highest mean annual ragweed pollen concentrations were generally recorded in the East of Austria where the highest densities of possible growth habitats for Ambrosia were situated. Approximately 99% of all observations of Ambrosia populations were below 745m. The European infection level varies from 0.1% at Freistadt in Northern Austria to 12.8% at Rosalia in Eastern Austria. More top-down Ambrosia pollen source inventories are required for other parts of Europe. A method for constructing top-down pollen source inventories for invasive ragweed plants in Austria, a country that is challenging in terms of topography and ragweed distribution. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Workshop report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... health: report of first EQUIST training workshop in Nigeria .... The difference between the before and after measurements was ... After the administration of the pre-workshop questionnaire the ... represent Likert rating scale of 1-5 points, where 1point = grossly .... Procedures Manual for the "Evaluating.

  14. INDICO Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Fabbrichesi, Marco

    2004-01-01

    The INtegrated DIgital COnferencing EU project has finished building a complete software solution to facilitate the MANAGEMENT OF CONFERENCES, workshops, schools or simple meetings from their announcement to their archival. Everybody involved in the organization of events is welcome to join this workshop, in order to understand the scope of the project and to see demonstrations of the various features.

  15. Proceedings of the European ISTVS Conference (6th) , OVK Symposium (4th), On ’Off Road Vehicles in Theory and Practice’ , Held at Vienna, Austria on 28-30 September 1994 in Vienna, Austria. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-30

    Kettenfahrzeuge Gestern - Heute - Morgen St. BOLLMANN ZF Friedrichshafen , Germany On Constitutive Equations Used at Analysis of Steering of Tracked Vehicles 560...Roboterbeweglichkeit im freien Gelainde M. B. BARTHA, M. EIBERT, P. LUX, C. H. SCHAEFER DASA-Domier, Verteidigung und Zivile Systeme Friedrichshafen , Germany...Faltbruicke DoFB P. SCHMIDT, S. BAUMEL Eurobridge, Mobile Bruicken GmbH, Friedrichshafen , Germany Steyr 8090 and Seppi M. Miniforst Assembly in Sivicultural

  16. Report on research in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerzabek, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    In Austria, the Cs-137 activity deposition per km 2 due to the Chernobyl fallout varies between 0,08 Ci and 2,05 Ci, the Sr-90 deposition being app. 20 to 40 times lower. The most severe problems were due to the direct contamination of early vegetables, winter cereals and pastures with iodine and cesium. A significant dose reduction was obtained by a sales ban for vegetables and a prohibition of grazing of cows in the year 1986. The feeding of cows and bulls with less contaminated fodder and the use of ammoniumhexacyanoferrate as feed additive caused a further reduction of the cesium concentration in foodstuff (30 to 70%). The Cesium migration in the Austrian soils was greatest in the first hours and days after the fallout. At special sites cesium from Chernobyl fallout was detected down to 30 cm depth. Now the Cs-migration rate is significantly below 1 cm.a -1 . Investigations of the radionuclide soil to plant transfer in the field resulted in quite low transfer factors into cereal grains (e.g.: Cs: maize: 0,0018, wheat: 0,0055; Sr: maize: 0,010, wheat: 0,10) and leaf vegetables as compared to the literature. The high mobility of cesium in special natural and seminatural environments (alpine pastures, forest) gives rise to recent problems due to contamined wild game and fungi. (Author) 8 figs., 10 tabs., 22 refs

  17. [Electropathology in Vienna, an exhibition on accident prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzak, Beatrix; Winter, Eduard; Reiter, Christian

    2013-09-01

    Since 1906, there is, apart from the period 2000-2009, in Vienna, a collection about the processes and consequences of accidents involving electricity. The purpose of this collection is to raise awareness of the dangers, and the presentation of appropriate safety devices. Both in the case of industrial accidents and leisure accidents, the risk source of electrical power is not negligible. Due to the different vulnerable groups, the availability of prevention work is difficult. The concept of the electro-pathological collection in Vienna has taken this into account.

  18. Stable isotopes in human nutrition research. Final report on an IAEA co-ordinated research programme, Vienna, Austria, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Applications of Stable Isotope Tracers in Human Nutrition Research was established by the Agency in October 1988 and was completed in 1992. At various times during this period the CRP encompassed 16 participants in 16 countries. Its general objective was to help establish competence in the use of stable isotope techniques, particularly in developing countries, and particularly with reference to applications of 2 H, 13 C, 15 N, and 18 O in human nutrition research. Thereby it was hoped that it would be possible (i) to identify centres and scientists throughout the developing world who could use stable isotopes in human nutrition research, (ii) to assess the need for methodological adaptations for isotope-based methods in developing countries, and (iii) to advance the competence of the participants in using stable isotopes as tracers of human metabolism. In addition it was expected that the CRP would make a study of some major questions which have been identified by international groups of nutrition experts, particularly in areas relating to energy and protein metabolism. This document comprises copies of the working papers submitted by all CRP participants who contributed a final report on their project. These reports include details of the rationale, methods, results and interpretations from each of the respective studies. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. International Symposium on Positive Strand RNA Viruses (2nd) Held in Vienna, Austria on June 26-30, 1989. Abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    DEAE dextran-treated chicken embryo Iosdr specific probe hybridised in -olont bluis to a fiibroblasts (CEF). VEE antigens were demonstrated in 1,1...are protein dimers but show differences reflects the destiny of the protein. The with respect to molecular organization as effect of sorting sequences...exchange and virus directly from virusinfected chick embryo homogena- had lost their capacity to bind the tes, which is the source of virus used for

  20. Looking to the future, 14 September 2009, Vienna, Austria, 53. Regular Session of the IAEA General Conference 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2009-01-01

    The IAEA Director General Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei, looking back to his first statement to the General Conference as Director General in 1998, praised the IAEA having made considerable progress in many areas, from improving access to energy, food and water for people in need, to helping to enhance the safety and security of nuclear materials and facilities. However he is troubled that so many of the issues he raised back then are still with the IAEA today - nuclear verification in the DPRK, the lack of any significant progress in nuclear disarmament and the perennial problems of inadequate Agency funding and legal authority. He used his last General Conference speech to take stock of what has been achieved in the past 12 years, to consider what lessons the IAEA needs to learn and to offer his perspective on the challenges that lie ahead. Issues discussed are nuclear power, nuclear application, technical cooperation, nuclear verification, assurance of fuel supply, nuclear safety and security, management of the IAEA and the role of the Director General. Looking to the future, he stated that it is clear that tremendous challenges, but also tremendous opportunities, lie ahead for the Agency. Nuclear disarmament is finally back on the agenda. In 50 years' time, there may be several dozen additional countries with nuclear power programmes, mostly in what today is known as the developing world. Most of the 30 countries which already have nuclear power will build additional plants. That means more work for the Agency in helping with capacity-building, quality assurance, verification, safety and security. Demand for nuclear techniques in medicine, agriculture and other areas will continue to grow. For developing countries, the Agency will remain the first port of call. The IAEA is one of the finest and most effective organizations in the world today, with staff of exceptionally high calibre. Its strength lies in its objectivity and its outstanding technical competence

  1. Statement to the Forty-ninth Regular Session of the IAEA General Conference 2005, 26 September 2005, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Director General reviewed how far the Agency has come in recent years, in terms of each of the three pillars of activity that support the Agency's mission - technology, safety and verification - and described what, in his view, should be the vision for the future. The part on Nuclear Power Technology dealt with changes in nuclear power, advances in nuclear innovation, decommissioning of nuclear facilities, waste and fuel cycle issues including multilateral approaches, uranium production and nuclear knowledge management. A major part of the Agency's scientific and technical work involves the transfer of peaceful nuclear technology in applications related to health, agriculture, water management and preservation of the environment. The part on Nuclear Safety and Security described the status of international conventions, safety standards and missions, research reactor utilization, safety and security, radiological protection of patients, safety of radioactive waste management, safety of transport of radioactive material, the Chernobyl Forum, the nuclear security and protection against nuclear terrorism, regulatory infrastructures for radiation safety and the control of radioactive sources and the conversion of HEU to LEU at research reactors. In the area of verification, the status of safeguards agreements and additional protocols, the safeguards implementation report and safeguards statement for 2004, integrated safeguards, small quantities protocols, verification activities in Iraq, implementation of safeguards in the DPRK, implementation of the NPT safeguards agreements in the Islamic Republic of Iran and application of IAEA safeguards in the Middle East were discussed. Items of the Technical Cooperation Programme included TC programme management and TC programme funding. This was followed by management of the agency, biennial budgeting, 2006-2007 programme and budgeting, agency staffing issues, public outreach and public awareness. It concluded with a few key of the agency's vision for the future, ways through both our technical cooperation and regular budget programmes, the IAEA will continue to seek to meet Member States' needs and priorities

  2. Addressing verification challenges, 16 October 2006, Vienna, Austria, Symposium on International Safeguards (16-20 October 2006)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2006-01-01

    In his talk about Verification Challenges Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei, Director General of the IAEA, welcomed the participants of the Symposium on International Safeguards. He stated that safeguards is probably the most difficult task entrusted to an international organization and that a major increase in nuclear energy around the globe is expected which means that nuclear know-how is spread to more and more countries and can be applied to both peaceful purposes and also non-peaceful purposes. More and more countries want to go in for the nuclear fuel cycle including sensitive fuel cycle activities like enrichment and reprocessing, they become so-called 'virtual nuclear weapons States. There is the need to develop a new international or multinational approach to the fuel cycle so as to avoid ending up with not just nine nuclear weapon States but another 20 or 30 States which have the capacity to develop nuclear weapons in a very short span of time. He stressed the important linkage between disarmament and non-proliferation and remembered the audience that safeguards, although very much a technical activity, operates in a politically charged environment. The IAEA's job is to make sure that countries with comprehensive safeguards are conducting all their activities exclusively for peaceful purposes. The ability to discover possible undeclared activities is a key challenge the IAEA is facing. He mentioned that the IAEA does not get all the information they would need, for example the IAEA does not get systematic information from the Nuclear Suppliers Group on exports and imports. Without the Additional Protocol the IAEA is also hampered in its ability to detect undeclared activities, e.g in the R and D activities that do not directly involve nuclear material. Another key issue are financial resources. Transparency measures in certain situations are under considerations including interviewing people, having access to documents, things that are not strictly required by the Additional Protocol but without which the IAEA cannot move forward. Environmental sampling and satellite monitoring are new tools the IAEA is now using almost routinely. New verification tools are developed in co-operation with the Member States

  3. Nuclear technology: Looking to the future. Introductory statement to the Scientific Forum, 18 September 2007, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2007-01-01

    In his opening remarks to the 8th Scientific Forum Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei, Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, stated that the IAEA has been charged with sharing the benefits of nuclear technology with all countries and peoples, while preventing the misuse of this technology for destructive ends. For fifty years the IAEA has been carried out this mission. In the 8th Scientific Forum the IAEA is turning its vision to the future. The first session of the forum will deal with nuclear power. Coupled with concerns related to the risk of climate change and the security of energy supply, this anticipated growth in energy demand is leading to predictions of a greater role for nuclear power. Innovation will play a key role in determining the extent to which nuclear energy will meet future energy needs. Advanced fuel cycles are already being developed with the aim of better energy utilization of uranium, plutonium and other actinides; developing small reactors that meet the needs of developing countries; and with built in enhanced features for safety, security, waste minimization and proliferation resistance. The Agency?s International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) is currently considering collaborative projects that would address some of these innovation needs. There are ongoing efforts to develop one or more mechanisms for the assurance of supply of nuclear fuel, and hopefully a multilateral mechanism for the management and control of the back end of the fuel cycle. The second session will focus on the use of nuclear technologies in food, agriculture and health. New developments in promising areas such as biotechnology, gene sequencing and nanotechnology, are anticipated to have a significant impact in the coming years on food and agriculture production. These initiatives will also generate benefits in human and animal health and land and water resource management. Nuclear applications stand to make key contributions to meeting these goals. The Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) aims to place cancer front and centre on the global health agenda. We have developed strong working relationships with the World Health Organization and other key agencies such as the International Network for Cancer Treatment and Research and the International Agency for Research on Cancer, whose representatives we are pleased to welcome today. Working with our partner organizations, we are establishing six model demonstration sites as multidisciplinary projects to build capacity in cancer management. These sites will also serve as longer term, larger scale fundraising platforms, the foundation of a strategy to relieve the suffering of cancer patients across the world. The third session will deal with safety and security and building robust regimes. There continues to be a clear need to build up and maintain a global safety and security regime - a regime supported by international instruments, the application of IAEA standards and guidelines, national safety and security infrastructures and an active global network for knowledge sharing. The forth session will focus on nuclear verification and its long-term view. During the last decade, safeguards experienced a remarkable transformation. It evolved from a verification system focused on declared nuclear material at declared nuclear facilities to a much more comprehensive, information driven system, able to provide credible assurance regarding the absence of undeclared nuclear material and activities in States as a whole. The strengthening of safeguards in the early 1990s introduced new methods and techniques: for example, remote monitoring or environmental sampling. The Additional Protocol extended the legal framework and provided the Agency with access to additional information and locations. The IAEA will need to constantly be on the alert for the re-emergence of clandestine nuclear procurement networks, will need more sophisticated approaches for information analysis and must plan more strategically for the continual updates to equipment and expertise

  4. Introductory statement to the Technical Assistance and Cooperation Committee of the Board of Governors. 22 November 2004, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Agency's technical cooperation (TC) programme continues to focus on putting advanced science to work to meet the economic and social needs of developing countries. This statement describes TC programme planning and management, including the recent change initiative, highlight a number of key activities, and review the current status of TC funding. The TC programme remains a principal mechanism for expanding the contribution that nuclear technologies make to development. A few areas in which the Agency's efforts are making a difference are: Food and Agriculture; Cancer Radiotherapy and PACT; Positive Influence of Model Projects on Safety and Security of Nuclear Activities; Nuclear Security. The Agency's technical cooperation programme is, at its essence, a network of partnerships - primarily partnerships between the Agency and its Member States, but also including partners from other government institutions, relevant United Nations system agencies, non-governmental organizations, and private sector donors. Working together, an important tool was created for transferring nuclear science and technology to the benefit of developing countries

  5. Seasonality of New Particle Formation in Vienna, Austria - Influence of Air Mass Origin and Aerosol Chemical Composition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wonaschütz, A.; Demattio, A.; Wagner, R.; Burkart, J.; Zíková, Naděžda; Vodička, Petr; Ludwig, W.; Steiner, G.; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Hitzenberger, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 118, OCT 2015 (2015), s. 118-126 ISSN 1352-2310 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7AMB12AT021; GA ČR(CZ) GBP503/12/G147 Grant - others:FWF(AT) P19515-N20 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : urban aerosol * aerosol chemical composition * new particle formation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.459, year: 2015

  6. Training in nuclear medicine: Based on the recommendations of IAEA/WHO Seminar, 8-12 August 1988, Vienna, Austria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Nuclear Medicine is defined as a clinical specialty that utilizes the radionuclides for diagnosis, therapy and medical research. The radionuclides are used as unsealed sources of radioactivity. The diagnostic applications include both in vivo and in vitro uses of radioisotopes. There is hardly any medical research which does not use radioactive compounds. Only clinical research is considered within the purview of nuclear medicine. The Recommendations of IAEA/WHO seminar reviewed the needs of training in nuclear medicine mainly for the physicians with special emphasis on the needs of the developing countries

  7. Statement to Sixth Review Meeting of Contracting Parties to Convention on Nuclear Safety, 4 April 2014, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Good afternoon, Dear Colleagues, Ladies and Gentlemen, I am pleased to say a few words to you at the end of the Sixth Review Meeting of the Contracting Parties to the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Convention is a very important mechanism which has contributed a lot to strengthening nuclear safety in the countries which are party to it. In the last two weeks, you have addressed some very important issues. During your productive and lively discussions, a number of challenges were identified for consideration by Contracting Parties. These included: how to achieve harmonized emergency plans and response measures; how to make better use of operating and regulatory experience and international peer review services; and how to strengthen regulators' independence, safety culture, transparency and openness. The Agency will continue to work closely with you in addressing all of these issues. The Fifth Review Conference, which took place in 2011 just after the Fukushima Daiichi accident, was the first opportunity for Contracting Parties to address the accident in an international conference. The fact that you devoted a special session to the Fukushima Daiichi accident this time demonstrates the continued resolve of the Contracting Parties to ensure that the right lessons are learned everywhere. The Agency continues to work with all our Member States to implement the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, about which you received a briefing. I know you will agree with me that it is vitally important that all the measures that have been agreed to strengthen global nuclear safety are actually implemented. Work continues on the IAEA report on the Fukushima Daiichi accident, which will be finalised this year. I understand that you decided to submit a proposal to amend the text of the Convention, addressing design and construction objectives for both existing and new nuclear power plants, to a Diplomatic Conference to be convened within one year. I am aware that a clear understanding of the underlying technical concept and measures will be required in relation to the proposed amendment. We are ready to organize the necessary work to develop this clear technical basis. I have asked the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security and the Office of Legal Affairs to start preparations for the Diplomatic Conference. We will work with the Contracting Parties on the logistics and draft rules of procedure. Sources of funding for the event and its preparation will need to be identified. I count on your cooperation to ensure close coordination between the Contracting Parties to the CNS and the Agency. I thank the members of the Working Group on Effectiveness and Transparency for all their hard work prior to this meeting, which helped so much in providing a basis for your discussions. I thank the President, Mr. Lacoste, for ably steering your discussions, and the two Vice Presidents, Mr. Sukho Lee and Mr. Khoirul Huda, for their support. And I thank all of you for your continued efforts to strengthen nuclear safety throughout the world. Thank you. (IAEA)

  8. IAEA advisory group meeting on nuclear structure and decay data for applications. Vienna, Austria, 3-7 May 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, A.

    1976-12-01

    International compilation and evaluation effort (mass chain and horizontal compilations); definition of exchange system (bibliographic data; numerical data); international files of NSD data (description, maintenance and distribution of files; flow of information; computer programmes); scope, terminology, common rules and quality control (common dictionaries; definition of terms; quality control; common evaluation rules); coordination of activities (definition of NSDD network; distribution of mass chain evaluations: publication; administrative procedures)

  9. Joint FAO/WHO food standards programme coordinating committee for Europe 16. session Vienna, Austria, 27 June - 1 July 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-02-01

    A brief paper is presented containing data on the use of irradiation processes in foodstuffs in European countries and summarizing the status of applications of food irradiation. Problem of consumer acceptance are highlighted, and the requirement for standardization of regulations to encourage international trade in irradiated food is discussed. 1 fig., 1 tab

  10. Talking points for 8. meeting of Points of Contact for Recruitment of Women, 11 March 2010, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Ladies and Gentlemen, Dear Colleagues, This is my first opportunity as Director General to share with you my views on the representation of women in the Secretariat. For many years, the proportion of Professional women at the Agency was among the lowest in the UN system - about 18%. This partially reflected the traditionally low number of women in the nuclear sciences. We can take some pride in the progress that we have made in recent years. Women now account for around 23% of Professional staff. But this is still too low. The progress seen to date is a result of joint efforts by you, the Member States, and the Secretariat. The creation of this group - the Member States Points of Contact - has been key. Sixty Member States have designated Points of Contact. This means, however, that a surprisingly large number of countries, including some Board members, have not yet joined. I encourage them to sign up today. As Director General, I would like to see more women in senior positions and I want Agency staff to be recruited from as broad a geographical distribution as possible. In my first few months in office, I have already made special efforts to recruit women to Professional positions, with some success. My first concern is naturally to recruit the best qualified person. However, in selection processes I will always give prominent consideration to the need to proactively increase the number of women working in the Secretariat. More and more women are now working in the nuclear industry as engineers, managers, inspectors, chemists, physicists and environmentalists. But I must tell you honestly: while it is difficult to find well-qualified women for P-positions in the Agency, it is particularly difficult to find suitable female candidates for more senior posts. We very much need your help in getting the message out to highly-qualified women with long experience of the nuclear sector that the Agency is a great place to work. Change will not happen overnight, but during my tenure as Director General, I hope to see a steady increase in the proportion of senior female professionals working for the Agency. In recent years, the Agency has worked hard to help staff balance the demands of work and family. Maternity and paternity leave, flexible working hours, part-time work and child care facilities have helped to make the Agency an attractive potential employer for both men and women. As Points of Contact, you can help us to identity well-qualified women candidates in your countries. You can also help to ensure that Agency vacancy notices are brought to the attention of possible candidates. In closing, let me underscore that I attach great importance to recruiting well-qualified women candidates and I look forward to working with you on this. (author)

  11. Annual congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, 31 August - 4 September, 2002, Vienna, Austria. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2002-01-01

    This supplemental issue of the journal contains all abstracts of the papers presented at the meeting of the EANM, short descriptions of the poster presentations, as well as summaries of the objectives of the educational seminars

  12. Training in nuclear medicine: Based on the recommendations of IAEA/WHO Seminar, 8-12 August 1988, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear Medicine is defined as a clinical specialty that utilizes the radionuclides for diagnosis, therapy and medical research. The radionuclides are used as unsealed sources of radioactivity. The diagnostic applications include both in vivo and in vitro uses of radioisotopes. There is hardly any medical research which does not use radioactive compounds. Only clinical research is considered within the purview of nuclear medicine. The Recommendations of IAEA/WHO seminar reviewed the needs of training in nuclear medicine mainly for the physicians with special emphasis on the needs of the developing countries

  13. Radioactive Waste: Meeting the Challenge - Science and Technology for Safe and Sustainable Solutions, 23 September 2014, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yukiya

    2014-01-01

    It is a well-established tradition at the IAEA to hold a Scientific Forum every year during the General Conference, devoted to a specific technical area of the Agency's work. In the last few years, we have focussed on nuclear techniques related to cancer, food, water, and the protection of the environment. It has been 14 years since the Scientific Forum last considered the management of radioactive waste. I thought it important to return to this subject because the peaceful use of nuclear science and technology has grown steadily in that time, as has the amount of radioactive material that needs to be managed safely. There is a widespread misperception about radioactive waste, which is that solutions for managing it safely and effectively simply do not exist. That is not correct. Well-established technologies do exist to address this issue. As I told the General Conference yesterday, radioactive waste is an issue for all countries, not just those which have nuclear power programmes. Radioactive sources are used to sterilize food and medical instruments, to diagnose and treat cancer patients, to develop crops that better resist disease, as well as in a wide range of industrial applications. Research reactors have uses that include production of radioisotopes for medical procedures. Many countries offer fuel cycle services, ranging from uranium mining to nuclear fuel fabrication and spent fuel reprocessing. As with other industrial and technological processes, all of these activities produce waste. Waste may be radioactive for just a few hours, or a few days, or for hundreds of thousands of years. To ensure that waste poses no risk to people or the environment, now and in the future, all countries using nuclear technologies have the responsibility to manage it safely

  14. Nuclear science: Physics helping the world. Introductory statement to the Scientific Forum, 27 September 2005, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2005-01-01

    This article is the opening address by the Director General of the IAEA to the 8th Scientific Forum, a venue that has become one of the highlights of our annual General Conference. 2005 has been declared the World Year of Physics, in part to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Albert Einstein's three groundbreaking papers - on the theory of relativity, the photoelectric effect, and the theory of Brownian motion. It is important to consider that many of the benefits of technology we enjoy today would have been considered near-magic only a few generations ago - and the pace of discovery is not slowing down. Given that physics is at the core of nearly all nuclear science and technology benefits, it seemed appropriate to examine, at this year's Scientific Forum, a number of the contributions that continued advances in nuclear physics are making towards sustainable development. The resulting Forum agenda is built around four such topics: Meeting Energy Needs, Developing Advanced Materials and Technologies, Advancing Radiation Medicine and Supporting Nuclear Safety

  15. Status of national programmes on fast breeder reactors. Eighteenth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 16-19 April 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    The Eighteenth Annual Meeting on the Status of National Programmes in Member States of the IAEA on Fast Breeder Reactors had been held in April 1985. The representatives of the Member States and international organizations reported status and activities in the field of fast breeder reactors development and operation. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 12 presentations of the meeting

  16. Statement to Second Extraordinary Meeting of Contracting Parties to Convention on Nuclear Safety, 27 August 2012, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text: I am pleased to address this Second Extraordinary Meeting of the Contracting Parties to the Convention on Nuclear Safety. This important meeting will be closely watched by the global nuclear community. I know you will make good use of this opportunity to consider further measures to strengthen nuclear safety throughout the world in the light of the lessons which we are still learning from the Fukushima Daiichi accident. One year after the adoption of the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, significant progress has been made in several key areas. These include the assessment of safety vulnerabilities of nuclear power plants, strengthening IAEA peer review services, improving emergency preparedness and response capabilities and reviewing IAEA safety standards. Your work this week will address the request to Contracting Parties, expressed in the Action Plan, to explore mechanisms to enhance the effective implementation of Safety Conventions and to consider proposals to amend the Convention on Nuclear Safety. You will recall that last year's Ministerial Declaration stressed 'the importance of universal adherence to, and the effective implementation and continuous review of, the relevant international instruments on nuclear safety'. The Action Plan encouraged Member States to work cooperatively to maximize the lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident and to produce concrete results as soon as possible. The IAEA has reported periodically to Member States about its work to implement the Action Plan. We have also organised a number of international expert meetings to analyse technical aspects of the accident and ensure that the right lessons are learned. The results of this Extraordinary Meeting will provide an important input to future considerations of implementation of the Action Plan. Our Member States will review implementation at the Agency's 56th General Conference next month, while the Fukushima Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety in December will provide another opportunity to share knowledge and lessons learned from Fukushima Daiichi accident. Ladies and Gentlemen, The accident may have faded from the international headlines, but it is essential that all of us - Member States, the IAEA and other key stakeholders - maintain our sense of urgency and our commitment to implementing the Action Plan in full. Much work remains to be done and we must not relax our guard. I wish you every success with your deliberations in the coming days. Thank you. (IAEA)

  17. Minutes of the 25th meeting of the International Nuclear Data Committee, IAEA, Vienna, Austria, 4-7 May 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, R.A.

    2004-11-01

    The aim of the meeting was to review the activities of the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) covering the period 2002-2003, to evaluate the NDS program of work for the two-year period of 2004-2005, and to advise on future activities (2006-2007). The presentations and deliberations in plenary and working group sessions led to many conclusions and recommendations which are given in the full report of the meeting. Conclusions of particular significance have been: Specific nuclear data compilation activities undertaken by NDS are unique. INDC members appreciated that more attention is now being devoted to the compilation of charged-particle data for EXFOR. The Committee recommends to consider further improved methods or data storage and compilation for EXFOR. Furthermore, as a result of recent geopolitical changes, especially in Europe, the relevant IAEA and NEA responsibilities need to be slightly readjusted. The Committee took note that the data dissemination and international co-ordination of data exchange represent the most important components of NDS activities, and that improvement of services has always been the top priority. The co-ordination role of NDS for NRDC and NSDD is highly appreciated, and should be further strengthened. The Committee noted with satisfaction that the data dissemination services of NDS are utilized by scientists working in all parts of the world. These requests pertain to data for all branches of nuclear applications. INDC members appreciated that continued efforts are underway in the NDS to update the general purpose libraries. The Committee finds it important that the NDS continues to maintain and update the photonuclear, RIPL, cross-section standards and FENDL-2 libraries (considering that the latter is the Reference Library for the ITER project). The Committee members briefly described on-going nuclear data projects in their countries/regions, and also spelt out nuclear data requirements in various fields. While most of these needs are already being considered by the NDS, it is recommended that the NDS expands the range of interests, according to available resources and expertise. The Committee lauds the competence and flexibility of NDS with regard to nuclear data services. A major effort of the NDS is devoted to the supply of high-quality data for energy production. However, NDS staff are now paying enhanced attention also to data for other applications, such as diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine, neutron activation analysis, ion beam analysis, etc., thus a good balance has been achieved between energy and non-energy related activities. The INDC emphasizes the central role of the NDS in the co-ordination of international nuclear data center networks and in providing excellent services to all Member States. The Committee finds the nuclear data activities to be well balanced between services and data development work

  18. The nuclear fuel cycle: Issues and challenges. Introductory statement to the Scientific Forum. 21 September 2004, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Director General remarked that in planning this year's Forum, three emerging trends were considered: first, the increasing recognition of the role of energy in sustainable development, and the rise in global electricity demand; second, the steadily growing awareness of the contribution that nuclear power is making to greenhouse gas mitigation strategies in some countries; and third, the increasing reliance placed on peaceful nuclear applications in the medical, agricultural and industrial sectors in which research reactors play a vital role.The resulting Forum agenda is focused on a number of particular aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle: advanced fuel cycle and reactor concepts; waste and spent fuel management issues; and topics related to the research reactor fuel cycle. Advanced Fuel Cycle and Reactor Concepts Civilian nuclear power now has more than half a century of experience more than 11 000 reactor-years. For a large segment of the first generation of power reactors, we are reaching the stage where choices must be made between retiring these facilities or extending their licensed lifetimes. At the same time, new advanced and innovative fuel cycles and reactor designs are being explored not only to replace the plants being retired, but also to support the expansion of nuclear power in response to growing global energy needs. Advanced fuel cycles, both 'once-through and 'closed', are being developed with a number of technical objectives, including: more efficient utilization of fissile and fertile materials; enhanced proliferation resistance through, inter alia, passive control of nuclear materials using new fuel types and configurations; greater reliance on passive safety features; and technology advances to mitigate the volume and radio-toxicity of high level and long lived wastes. These technical innovations will need to be complemented by new approaches to relevant policy and institutional issues for example, through increased harmonization of regulatory requirements and industrial codes and standards. One part of our effort is the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO), which is developing a methodology for Member State assessment of innovative nuclear energy systems. INPRO has now completed 14 case studies in seven countries to test the methodology. I would urge you to keep in mind, during your discussion of both technological and institutional innovations, how both might lend themselves to multilateral approaches that could serve to reduce the need for resource intensive national R and D infrastructures, and thereby provide the benefits of nuclear technology to a wider segment of the international community.Waste and Spent Fuel Management Issues: The cumulative inventory of stored spent fuel is estimated at 183,000 tonnes of heavy metal. The amount of reprocessed spent fuel is about 88 000 tonnes of heavy metal, which means that about one third of the spent fuel that has ever been discharged has been reprocessed. The annual discharge - the amount of new spent fuel to deal with each year is currently 10,500-11,000 tonnes of heavy metal. A variety of options exist concerning spent fuel disposition. For the once-through fuel cycle approach, spent fuel is cooled and then put in corrosion resistant containers for further storage and ultimate disposal in a geological repository although a growing number of countries are considering retrievability to be increasingly important. In the spent fuel reprocessing option, the separated fissile material is converted into new fuels, for instance mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel, for use in light water reactors. A few countries have begun moving forward towards geological disposal site selection, construction and regulatory review. Their progress in terms of both technology and engaging the public and other stakeholders will have an impact on the entire nuclear community. It will be a major milestone when the first geological repository for high level long lived radioactive waste is up and operating. The Research Reactor Fuel Cycle: For more than 50 years, research reactors have played a crucial role in nuclear science and technology, contributing to important progress on nuclear power, radioisotope production, nuclear medicine, neutron beam techniques, nuclear education and research, materials development and component testing. As the industry moves forward with technological innovation, research reactors particularly high flux reactors will play a key role in reactor physics experiments, irradiation-testing and the development of advanced fuels and structural materials for innovative power reactors. Of particular importance with respect to the fuel cycle is the effort to convert from high enriched to low enriched uranium fuel, with the goal of eventually eliminating commerce in high enriched uranium (HEU) for research reactors. Many of these reactors, however, still operate on HEU, and over a third of all stored research reactor fuel assemblies are HEU. Consequently, most of the work is yet to be done including the development and qualification of new, high density, LEU research reactor fuel that would permit additional conversions. In conclusion the Director General remarked that he looked forward to the conclusions and recommendations of the Forum

  19. Statement to the Forty-eighth Regular Session of the IAEA General Conference 2004. 20 September 2004, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Director General reviewed the Agency's activities in the past twelve months in his opening statement. The outlook for nuclear power is evolving, with increasing attention to its benefits as an environmentally clean source of electricity, but with concerns remaining related to waste disposal, safety and security. Nuclear applications related to human health, agriculture and other fields are increasingly contributing to global sustainable development initiatives, and the Agency has redoubled its efforts to support these initiatives by improving the efficiency and extending the reach of its technical cooperation programme. Global cooperation in matters of safety and security has resulted in good progress, but there is still much to be done. In the area of verification, the Agency's activities are at the centre of efforts to curb nuclear proliferation, and we have continued to prove our ability to conduct objective and credible safeguards but we still face a number of difficult and unresolved situations, and the international community has begun to focus on how to strengthen the nuclear non-proliferation regime

  20. Sharing our research progress and connecting with international researchers through the European Geosciences Union (EGU) General Assembly 2016, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabit, Lionel; Slaets, Johanna; Chen, Janet; Heiling, Maria; Toloza, Arsenio; Yan Tiezhu; Resch, Christian; Weltin, Georg; Gruber, Roman; Dercon, Gerd; Zaman, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    This year at the EGU, the SWMCN Subprogramme activities were reported in 16 presentations (oral, poster and/or PICO) covering carbon and nitrogen cycling, soil erosion, soil conservation and climate change.

  1. Workshop Proceedings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    , the main focus there is on spoken languages in their written and spoken forms. This series of workshops, however, offers a forum for researchers focussing on sign languages. For the third time, the workshop had sign language corpora as its main topic. This time, the focus was on the interaction between...... corpus and lexicon. More than half of the papers presented contribute to this topic. Once again, the papers at this workshop clearly identify the potentials of even closer cooperation between sign linguists and sign language engineers, and we think it is events like this that contribute a lot to a better...

  2. The Texts of the Agency's Agreements with the Republic of Austria. VI. Agreement Concerning the Social Insurance of Officials of the Agency. Addition to Section 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    By an exchange of Notes, dated 30 November and 20 December 1967 respectively, between the Director General of the Agency and the Federal Minister for Foreign Affairs of Austria, the following addition to Section 2 of the Agreement concerning the Social Insurance of officials of the Agency was agreed upon: 'For the purpose of this Agreement all officials shall be considered to be employed at the headquarters of die International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, regardless of their actual duty station.' This amendment entered into force on 1 January 1968

  3. Vienna convention on civil liability for nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage was adopted on 21 May 1963 and was opened for signature on the same day. It entered into force on 12 November 1977, i.e. three months after the date of deposit with the Director General of the fifth instrument of ratification, in accordance with Article 23

  4. A New Campus of Vienna University of Economics and Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsyredar Dagdanova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issues of building of modern university campuses through the example of a new campus of Vienna University of Economics and Business – a successful project that facilitates the improvement of education quality and provides conditions for harmonious development of the individual.

  5. Vienna convention on civil liability for nuclear damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-20

    The Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage was adopted on 21 May 1963 and was opened for signature on the same day. It entered into force on 12 November 1977, i.e. three months after the date of deposit with the Director General of the fifth instrument of ratification, in accordance with Article 23.

  6. Nitrogen-isotopes and multi-parameter sewage water test for identification of nitrate sources: Groundwater body Marchfeld East of Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralik, Martin

    2017-04-01

    The application of nitrogen and oxygen isotopes in nitrate allows, under favourable circumstances, to identify potential sources such as precipitation, chemical fertilisers and manure or sewage water. Without any additional tracer, the source distinction of nitrate from manure or sewage water is still difficult. Even the application of boron isotopes can in some cases not avoid ambiguous interpretation. Therefore, the Environment Agency Austria developed a new multi parametrical indicator test to allow the identification and quantification of pollution by domestic sewage water. The test analyses 8 substances well known to occur in sewage water: Acesulfame and sucralose (two artificial, calorie-free sweeteners), benzotriazole and tolyltriazole (two industrial chemicals/corrosion inhibitors), metoprolol, sotalol, carbamazepine and the metabolite 10,11-Dihydro-10,11-dihydroxycarbamazepine (pharmaceuticals) [1]. These substances are polar and degradation in the aquatic system by microbiological processes is not documented. These 8 Substances do not occur naturally which make them ideal tracers. The test can detect wastewater in the analysed water sample down to 0.1 %. This ideal coupling of these analytic tests helps to identify the nitrogen sources in the groundwater body Marchfeld East of Vienna to a high confidence level. In addition, the results allow a reasonable quantification of nitrogen sources from different types of fertilizers as well as sewage water contributions close to villages and in wells recharged by bank filtration. Recent investigations of groundwater in selected wells in Marchfeld [2] indicated a clear nitrogen contribution by wastewater leakages (sewers or septic tanks) to the total nitrogen budget. However, this contribution is shrinking and the main source comes still from agricultural activities. [1] Humer, F.; Weiss, S.; Reinnicke, S.; Clara, M.; Grath, J.; Windhofer, G. (2013): Multi parametrical indicator test for urban wastewater influence

  7. 78 FR 43226 - Xanthan Gum From Austria and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... Austria and China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject investigations... not materially injured or threatened with material injury by reason of imports from Austria of xanthan... preliminary determinations by Commerce that [[Page 43227

  8. Mapping of near surface fold structures with GPR and ERT near Steinbrunn (Northern Burgenland, Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzer, Ingrid; Chwatal, Werner; Häusler, Hermann; Scheibz, Jürgen; Steirer, Fritz

    2014-05-01

    . Therefore we assume that the mapped fold shape structures underlie almost the entire investigation area of about one square kilometre in size. Considering the very shallow facies of the Upper Pannonian deposits and compared to fold structures documented in the neighbouring coal mine of Neufeld (Häusler, 2012b), the geophysical investigations of these buckling structures support the hypothesis of a tectonic origin. Exner, U., Draganits, E., Grasemann, B., 2009. Folding in Miocene, unconsolidated clastic sediments (Vienna basin, Austria) - gravitational versus tectonic forces, Trabajos de Geología, Universidad de Oviedo, 29, 269-272, Oviedo. Grundtner, M.-L., Harzhauser, M., Mandic, O., Draganits, E., Gier, S., Exner, U., Wagreich, M., 2009. Zur Sedimentologie der Sandgrube Steinbrunn (Pannonium, Österreich), Jahrbuch der Geologischen Bundesanstalt, 149, 441-451, Wien. Häusler, H., 2012a. Contribution to the discussion of folded Pannonian strata in the Southern Vienna Basin, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 14, EGU2012-5201, EGU General Assembly 2012, Vienna. Häusler, H., 2012b. Folded Pannonian beds along the Austroalpine frame of the southern Vienna Basin, PANGEO Austria 2012 (10th anniversary), 15.-20. Sept. 2012, Abstracts, 55-56, Salzburg.

  9. Chernobyl and its consequences for Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenhofer, F.; Ecker, W.; Hojesky, H.; Junger, W.; Kienzl, K.; Nowak, H.; Riss, A.; Vychytil, P.; Zechner, J.

    1986-11-01

    First there is a short version of 16 pages. Then a detailed account is given mainly on the activities of the Federal Environment Office and the radiation burden to the population. The chapter headings are 1) The Chernobyl reactor accident 2) The meteorological situation 3) Monitoring of the radioactive contamination in Austria 4) Aims of the radiation measurement activities 5) Initial situation in Austria and first measurements 6) Environmental control 7) Food control 8) Fodder 9) Measures taken to minimise the radiation burden - a chronology 10) Comparison with nuclear tests fallout 11) Dose estimation 12) Radioactive contamination in other European countries. (G.Q.)

  10. Research reactors in Austria - Present situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Musilek, A.; Villa, M.

    2005-01-01

    In the past decades Austria operated three research reactors, the 10 MW ASTRA reactor at Seibersdorf, the 250 kW TRIGA reactor at the Atominstitut and the 1 kW Argonaut reactor at the Technical University in Graz. Since the shut down of the ASTRA on July 31th, 1999 and its immediate decommissioning reactor and the shut down of the Argonaut reactor in Graz on August 31st, 2004 only one reactor remains operational for keeping nuclear competence in Austria which is the 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor. (author)

  11. 77 FR 43857 - Xanthan Gum From Austria and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ... Austria and China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject investigations... an industry in the United States is materially injured by reason of imports from Austria and China of... Austria and China. Accordingly, effective June 5, 2012, the Commission instituted antidumping duty...

  12. Workshop meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veland, Oeystein

    2004-04-01

    1-2 September 2003 the Halden Project arranged a workshop on 'Innovative Human-System Interfaces and their Evaluation'. This topic is new in the HRP 2003-2005 programme, and it is important to get feedback from member organizations to the work that is being performed in Halden. It is also essential that relevant activities and experiences in this area from the member organizations are shared with the Halden staff and other HRP members. Altogether 25 persons attended the workshop. The workshop had a mixture of presentations and discussions, and was chaired by Dominique Pirus of EDF, France. Day one focused on the HRP/IFE activities on Human-System Interface design, including Function-oriented displays, Ecological Interface Design, Task-oriented displays, as well as work on innovative display solutions for the oil and gas domain. There were also presentations of relevant work in France, Japan and the Czech Republic. The main focus of day two was the verification and validation of human-system interfaces, with presentations of work at HRP on Human-Centered Validation, Criteria-Based System Validation, and Control Room Verification and Validation. The chairman concluded that it was a successful workshop, although one could have had more time for discussions. The Halden Project got valuable feedback and viewpoints on this new topic during the workshop, and will consider all recommendations related to the future work in this area. (Author)

  13. Application of the Vienna Classificaton for Crohn's Disease to a Single Clinician Database of 877 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available An international working party at the World Congress of Gastroenterology held in Vienna, Austria from September 6 to 11, 1998 defined a classification for Crohn's disease based on patient age at diagnosis (eg, less than 40 years of age, 40 years of age or older, disease location (eg, terminal ileum, colon, ileocolon or upper gastrointestinal tract and behaviour (eg, stricturing, penetrating. Disease location in the upper gastrointestinal tract was defined by disease being present proximal to the terminal ileum, regardless of terminal ileal or colon involvement. A 20-year, single clinician database of 877 patients from a university campus hospital was used, and comprised 492 women (56.1% and 385 men (43.9%. Of these patients, 740 (84.4% were diagnosed before age 40 years and 137 (15.6% were diagnosed by 40 years of age or older. Disease was located in the terminal ileum alone in 222 patients (25.3%, colon alone in 238 patients (27.2% and ileocolon in 304 patients (34.6%. Another 113 patients (13.1% had disease in the upper gastrointestinal tract, usually with disease also in the terminal ileum (23 patients, colon (12 patients or ileocolon (71 patients. Only seven of 877 patients had disease located in the upper gastrointestinal tract alone with no distal disease. Disease behaviour could be classified as nonstricturing and nonpenetrating in 256 patients (29.2%, stricturing in 294 patients (33.6% and penetrating in 327 patients (37.2%. Of the 877 patients with Crohn's disease, 837 were white, 38 were Asian and two were black. In this tertiary care setting of a single clinician practice in a Canadian teaching hospital at the University of British Columbia, Crohn's disease predominantly affects women, and young adults with a high rate of stricturing and penetrating complications.

  14. The new area monitoring system and the fuel database of the TRIGA Mark II reactor in Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, M.; Boeck, H.; Hofbauer, M.; Schwarz, V.

    2004-01-01

    The 250 kW TRIGA Mark-II reactor operates since March 1962 at the Atominstitut, Vienna, Austria. Its main tasks are nuclear education and training in the fields of neutron- and solid state physics, nuclear technology, reactor safety, radiochemistry, radiation protection and dosimetry, and low temperature physics and fusion research. Academic research is carried out by students in the above mentioned fields coordinated and supervised by about 70 staff members with the aim of a masters- or PhD degree in one of the above mentioned areas. After 25 years of successful operation, it was necessary to exchange the old area monitoring system with a new digital one. The purpose of the new system is the permanent control of the reactor hall, the primary and secondary cooling system and the monitoring of the ventilation system. The paper describes the development and implementation of the new area monitoring system. The second topic in this paper describes the development of the new fuel database. Since March 7th, 1962, the TRIGA Mark II reactor Vienna operates with an average of 263 MWh per year, which corresponds to a uranium burn-up of 13.7 g per year. Presently we have 81 TRIGA fuel elements in the core, 55 of them are old aluminium clad elements from the initial criticality while the rest are stainless steel clad elements which had been added later to compensate the uranium consumption. Because 67 % of the elements are older than 40 years, it was necessary to put the history of every element in a database, to get an easy access to all the relevant data for every element in our facility. (author)

  15. Reports from dissemination and feed-back workshops with presentation of Volante results from WP1 and WP2, and response from local, regional, and national stakeholders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Pia; Vesterager, Jens Peter; Kristensen, Søren Bech Pilgaard

    2014-01-01

    The report constitutes an overview of the dissemination and feed-back workshops in the Volante case study countries: Netherlands, Romania, Austria, Greece and Denmark. The workshops were conducted based on the presentation of findings from WP1 and WP2 to national, regional and local stakeholders...

  16. Entwicklung von Politikmaßnahmen durch Akteure am Beispiel des ökologischen Landbaus: Ergebnisse aus nationalen Workshops in Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz

    OpenAIRE

    Häring, Anna Maria; Vairo, Daniela; Dabbert, Stephan; Zanoli, Raffaele

    2005-01-01

    In Mai 2004 a group of stakeholders of the organic farming and general agricultural policy sector in 11 countries met for a one day-workshop to develop policy recommendations for the development of organic farming sector in each country. Results from these workshops in Germany, Switzerland and Austria are presented, compared and discussed.

  17. Network workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Evans, Robert Harry

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the background for, realisation of and author reflections on a network workshop held at ESERA2013. As a new research area in science education, networks offer a unique opportunity to visualise and find patterns and relationships in complicated social or academic network data....... These include student relations and interactions and epistemic and linguistic networks of words, concepts and actions. Network methodology has already found use in science education research. However, while networks hold the potential for new insights, they have not yet found wide use in the science education...... research community. With this workshop, participants were offered a way into network science based on authentic educational research data. The workshop was constructed as an inquiry lesson with emphasis on user autonomy. Learning activities had participants choose to work with one of two cases of networks...

  18. Photovoltaic conversion in Austria: Inventory 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faninger, G.

    1995-05-01

    On January 1, 1995 photovoltaic systems with a maxiumum capacity of about 1063 kW (peak) were installed in Austria. 48% of the photovoltaic systems are connected with the grid, 24% are stand-alone systems and about 28% are small systems (<200 W) for different applications. (author)

  19. Country policy profile - Austria. October 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-10-01

    Renewable energy policy in Austria exists on three levels: the Federal level, the regional level of the provinces (Bundeslaender) and the local level of municipalities. In Austria, electricity from renewable sources is supported mainly through a feed-in tariff. Since 2002, the Eco Electricity Act (Oekostromgesetz) sets feed-in tariffs for different renewable energy sources. The levels of feed-in tariffs are annually adapted and set in the Eco Electricity Ordinance (Oekostromverordnung). No use is made of any other instruments, such as quotas or certificates. Feed-in tariffs are basically set in annual regulations and may be set for several years. There is a special annual reduction in the feed-in tariff (8 %) for photovoltaic systems. Unless new tariffs are set, the feed-in tariff is reduced by 1 % per annum for all other technologies. Measures in individual provinces (investment funds and support programmes on state level) most notably in the renewable heat sectors are further important support schemes. The most substantial form of supporting small-scale RES heating and cooling is provided by the Environmental Assistance in Austria (UFI) programme. There are special investment incentives for solar thermal installations, heat pumps, geothermal and biomass heating plants. In Austria, the main support scheme for renewable energy sources used in transport is a quota system

  20. Radical prostatectomies in Austria, 1997–2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schatzl Georg

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The introduction of PSA testing in Austria led to a steep increase of the incidence of prostate cancer. We want to present the course of the number of newly diagnosed cases of prostate cancer in Austria since 1997, and set these numbers in relation to the total of radical prostatectomies (with resection of lymph nodes in the same time period. All numbers were retrieved from health statistics of Statistics Austria. The report period of cancer cases and of RPE comprises the years 1997–2004. All calculations were performed for totals as well as for 5-year age groups (40–89 years of age. Findings The number of prostate cancer cases rose from 1997 to 2004 by 35%, while the number of RPE rose by 94% in the same time period. The proportion of RPE in relation to new cases rose from 41% in 1997 to 59% in 2004. Conclusion A slight decrease of prostate cancer mortality can already be observed in Austria, but the question of over-treatment still awaits analysis.

  1. Country policy profile - Austria. August 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-08-01

    Renewable energy policy in Austria exists on three levels: the Federal level, the regional level of the provinces (Bundeslaender) and the local level of municipalities. In Austria, electricity from renewable sources is supported mainly through a feed-in tariff. Since 2002, the Eco Electricity Act (Oekostromgesetz) sets feed-in tariffs for different renewable energy sources. The levels of feed-in tariffs are annually adapted and set in the Eco Electricity Ordinance (Oekostromverordnung). No use is made of any other instruments, such as quotas or certificates. Feed-in tariffs are basically set in annual regulations and may be set for several years. There is a special annual reduction in the feed-in tariff for photovoltaic systems. Unless new tariffs are set, the feed-in tariff is reduced by 1 % per annum for all other technologies. Measures in individual provinces (investment funds and support programmes on state level) most notably in the renewable heat sectors are further important support schemes. The most substantial form of supporting small-scale RES heating and cooling is provided by the Environmental Assistance in Austria (UFI) programme. There are special investment incentives for solar thermal installations, heat pumps, geothermal and biomass heating plants. In Austria, the main support scheme for renewable energy sources used in transport is a quota system

  2. Early Childhood Intervention and Inclusion in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretis, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    This article assesses the situation of preschool children in Austria facing the need to implement the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability. Eligibility criteria for preventive preschool services and the necessary labeling of children as "disabled" or "at risk" are assessed as inhibiting factors within…

  3. OECD Reviews of School Resources: Austria 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusche, Deborah; Radinger, Thomas; Busemeyer, Marius R.; Theisens, Henno

    2016-01-01

    This report for Austria forms part of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Review of Policies to Improve the Effectiveness of Resource Use in Schools. The purpose of the review is to explore how school resources can be governed, distributed, utilised and managed to improve the quality, equity and efficiency of school…

  4. Novel Pestivirus Species in Pigs, Austria, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamp, Benjamin; Schwarz, Lukas; Högler, Sandra; Riedel, Christiane; Sinn, Leonie; Rebel-Bauder, Barbara; Weissenböck, Herbert; Ladinig, Andrea; Rümenapf, Till

    2017-07-01

    A novel pestivirus species was discovered in a piglet-producing farm in Austria during virologic examinations of congenital tremor cases. The emergence of this novel pestivirus species, provisionally termed Linda virus, in domestic pigs may have implications for classical swine fever virus surveillance and porcine health management.

  5. Commercial products and services of research reactors. Proceedings of a technical meeting held in Vienna 28 June - 2 July 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-07-01

    Although the number of operational research reactors is steadily decreasing, more than half of those that remain are greatly underutilized and, in most cases, underfunded. To continue to play a key role in the development of peaceful uses of nuclear technology, the remaining research reactors will need to provide useful products and services to private, national and regional customers, in some cases with adequate revenue generation for reliable, safe and secure facility management and operation. In the light of declining governmental financial support and the need for improved physical security and conversion to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, many research reactors have been challenged to generate income to offset increasing operational and maintenance costs. The renewed interest in nuclear power (and therefore in nuclear education and training), the global expansion of diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine, and the extensive use of semiconductors in electronics and in other areas have created new opportunities for research reactors, prominent among them, markets for products and services in regions and countries without such facilities. It is clear that such initiatives towards greater self-reliance will need to address such aspects as market surveys, marketing and business plans, and cost of delivery services. It will also be important to better inform present and future potential end users of research reactor services of the capabilities and products that can be provided. This publication is a compilation of material from an IAEA technical meeting on 'Commercial Products and Services of Research Reactors', held in Vienna, Austria, from 28 June to 2 July 2010. The overall objective of the meeting was to exchange information on good practices and to provide concrete examples, in technical presentations and brainstorming discussions, to promote and facilitate the development of commercial applications of research reactors. The meeting also aimed to enhance

  6. Market survey Austria. Bio-energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Austria has a well developed bioenergy infrastructure as regards solid biomass and a strong growth in the biogas and biofuel sector. The results of a SWOT analysis show the major issues for the development in each of these sectors now and in the short to medium-term future. Based on the SWOT analyses the following conclusions are formulated: (1)The development of the wood biomass sector in Austria is successful. This can be seen from the point of view of the end user, biomass for heating in single houses as well in district heating systems is very widely spread. This created opportunities for Austrian firms producing biomass technology, now having a large market and expending abroad. This development creates, however, major challenges for players from other countries like the Netherlands. It may be difficult to enter this market, unless one offers a cheaper product with the same quality or finding a niche market with a new unique product; (2) The growth of the wood biomass application for heat and electricity has led to the occurrence of another problem, a competition for wood as resource between the energy sector and other applications as pulp and paper industry. Wood imports are nowadays increasing but in the longer term Austria cannot rely on that because of the growing biomass use in neighbouring countries. Austria will therefore have to look for ways how to optimise biomass use for the energy sector and increasing the use of other fuels like straw and other forms of agricultural waste: (3) The production of biogas presents a number of new applications, production of renewable electricity, production of biogas for the transport sector as well as the possibility to inject cleaned biogas into the natural gas grid. In the short term, production of renewable electricity is the most promising for investors as feed-in tariffs are available for these projects. The other applications are still in a pilot phase but may become interesting in the coming years; (4) The

  7. [The attempts at drug therapy of cancer by Anton Störck (1731-1803). History of experimental pharmacology in the old Vienna Medical School].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweppe, K W; Probst, C

    1982-03-15

    The essay deals with the development of medical research in Vienna - especially the development of therapeutic drugs. This progress is related to the philosophical, historical, and political background of the enlightened absolutism and the reformatory efforts of van Swieten during the regency of Maria Theresia in Austria. Anton Störck's research on hemlock (Conium maculatum) is used as an example. The method of Störck's research-work is described. Furthermore it is demonstrated to what extent Störck's data, deduced from empirical examinations, are integrated in the official medical system, i.e. Boerhaave's iatromechanic system. Finally the attempt is made to correlate these processes of medical history with the scientific-historical model of Thomas Kuhn.

  8. SVM Support in the Vienna Fortran Compilation System

    OpenAIRE

    Brezany, Peter; Gerndt, Michael; Sipkova, Viera

    1994-01-01

    Vienna Fortran, a machine-independent language extension to Fortran which allows the user to write programs for distributed-memory systems using global addresses, provides the forall-loop construct for specifying irregular computations that do not cause inter-iteration dependences. Compilers for distributed-memory systems generate code that is based on runtime analysis techniques and is only efficient if, in addition, aggressive compile-time optimizations are applied. Since these optimization...

  9. The Vienna Roundabout. On the Significance of Philosophical Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Hrachovec, Herbert

    1989-01-01

    There are three sentimental centres of 20th-century philosophical geography: Todtnauberg, Frankfurt and Vienna. Their exceptional status results not only from having given rise to decisive philosophical movements but also from the weight of stories about victimization and exile lacking with regard to Paris, Berkeley and Cambridge. Each of these centres is compromised in its own way: the Schwarzwald cottage from which Heidegger emerged to take over the Rektorat of Freiburg University and to wh...

  10. Meeting of the ITER SWG-P2 in Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkau, K.; Kishimoto, H.

    1999-01-01

    The Special Working Group established under Protocol 2 to the ITER IDA Agreement (SWG-P2) met at the IAEA in Vienna in 6-9 December 1999. This report contains excerpts from the report of the ITER SWG-P2 to the ITER Council on the Joint Implementation of ITER, detailing benefits, contributions, the legal framework, siting, licensing and decommissioning as well as procurement, staffing and intellectual property rights

  11. Geophysical measurements and monitoring on the Pechgraben Landslide in Upper Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochum, Birgit; Ottowitz, David; Pfeiler, Stefan; Gruber, Stefanie; Hoyer, Stefan; Supper, Robert; Schattauer, Ingrid

    2016-04-01

    In January 2013, after an intense rainfall of about 400 mm, the historic slope movement northwest of the village of Pechgraben (municipality Großraming, Upper Austria) started to move. Already in early March the landslide with an area of about 7 hectares came to a halt. After the long-lasting rainfall (200mm) from June 1st to 3rd 2013 the Pechgraben landslide was reactivated with an extent of about 80 ha on June 6th. This landslide is therefore the largest in Austria since the last 5 years. Several million cubic meters of loose material was moving towards the settlement area. Already one day later, on June 7th, 2013, emergency measures began immediately. The Geological Survey of Austria (GBA), the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Institute of Mountain Risk Engineering (IAN), and the consultant engineering office Moser/Jaritz as well as the local fire brigade and the federal armed forces supported the Torrent and Avalanche Control with their remediation measures. In addition to the emergency measures, which consisted mainly of water diversion and material removal, a comprehensive monitoring system (GPS, inclinometer, geoelectric monitoring, airborne laserscan and aerial photogrammetry, etc.) has been created in order to document the development of the slope movement and to be able to take further measures if necessary. The geophysical part undertaken by the Geological Survey of Austria consisted of an airborne geophysical survey (EM, magnetics, gamma radiation) as well as several geoelectric profiles to understand the geology and mechanism of the landslide. To monitor the movement, we set up 5 different geoelectrical monitoring profiles, permanent inclinometers, photo monitoring, piezometers, as well as soil humidity and precipitation sensors. Hübl, J., Schraml, K., Lindner, G., Tartarotti, T., Gruber, H., Gasperl, W., Supper, R., Jochum, B., Ottowitz, D., Gruber, S., Marschallinger, R., Moser, G. (2015): Synthesebericht der H

  12. Virtual Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Lillian; Bygholm, Ann

    In relation to the Tutor course in the Mediterranean Virtual University (MVU) project, a virtual workshop “Getting experiences with different synchronous communication media, collaboration, and group work” was held with all partner institutions in January 2006. More than 25 key-tutors within MVU...

  13. K-pop Reception and Participatory Fan Culture in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Yeon Sung

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available K-pop’s popularity and its participatory fan culture have expanded beyond Asia and become significant in Europe in the past few years. After South Korean pop singer Psy’s “Gangnam Style” music video topped the Austrian chart in October 2012, the number and size of K-pop events in Austria sharply increased, with fans organizing various participatory events, including K-pop auditions, dance festivals, club meetings, quiz competitions, dance workshops, and smaller fan-culture gatherings. In the private sector, longtime fans have transitioned from participants to providers, and in the public sector, from observers to sponsors. Through in-depth interviews with event organizers, sponsors, and fans, this article offers an ethnographic study of the reception of K-pop in Europe that takes into consideration local interactions between fans and Korean sponsors, perspectives on the genre, patterns of social integration, and histories. As a case study, this research stresses the local situatedness of K-pop fan culture by arguing that local private and public sponsors and fans make the reception of K-pop different in each locality. By exploring local scenes of K-pop reception and fan culture, the article demonstrates the rapidly growing consumption of K-pop among Europeans and stresses multidirectional understandings of globalization.

  14. Highly Productive Application Development with ViennaCL for Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, K.; Weinbub, J.; Rudolf, F.

    2012-12-01

    The use of graphics processing units (GPUs) for the acceleration of general purpose computations has become very attractive over the last years, and accelerators based on many integrated CPU cores are about to hit the market. However, there are discussions about the benefit of GPU computing when comparing the reduction of execution times with the increased development effort [1]. To counter these concerns, our open-source linear algebra library ViennaCL [2,3] uses modern programming techniques such as generic programming in order to provide a convenient access layer for accelerator and GPU computing. Other GPU-accelerated libraries are primarily tuned for performance, but less tailored to productivity and portability: MAGMA [4] provides dense linear algebra operations via a LAPACK-comparable interface, but no dedicated matrix and vector types. Cusp [5] is closest in functionality to ViennaCL for sparse matrices, but is based on CUDA and thus restricted to devices from NVIDIA. However, no convenience layer for dense linear algebra is provided with Cusp. ViennaCL is written in C++ and uses OpenCL to access the resources of accelerators, GPUs and multi-core CPUs in a unified way. On the one hand, the library provides iterative solvers from the family of Krylov methods, including various preconditioners, for the solution of linear systems typically obtained from the discretization of partial differential equations. On the other hand, dense linear algebra operations are supported, including algorithms such as QR factorization and singular value decomposition. The user application interface of ViennaCL is compatible to uBLAS [6], which is part of the peer-reviewed Boost C++ libraries [7]. This allows to port existing applications based on uBLAS with a minimum of effort to ViennaCL. Conversely, the interface compatibility allows to use the iterative solvers from ViennaCL with uBLAS types directly, thus enabling code reuse beyond CPU-GPU boundaries. Out-of-the-box support

  15. Can Austria survive without nuclear power?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Promper, O.; Boeck, H.

    2007-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in the future of the Austrian power sector is the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions as Austria agreed in Kyoto to reduce greenhouse gas emissions for 13% compared to 1990. Due to the further increasing electricity demand, there is a need to build new power plants in the future. Today, the use of nuclear power for electricity production in Austria is prohibited by law. The aim of this paper is to analyse the future of the Austrian power sector concerning greenhouse gas emissions and guarantee of supply. Various scenarios taking the above conditions and different technologies taken into account are calculated. The investigated technologies include fossil fuels, renewables and nuclear power. The aim is to analyse the impact of the different scenarios on greenhouse gas emissions and supply security. (author)

  16. Tendencies in Spatial Planning in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hladká

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In Austria there is a federal system, where the power is shared between national (Bund and regional (Land governments, with each having autonomy in some spheres, and able to pass laws. Power resides with the national government, although certain responsibilities may be delegated to regional governments. In Austria the national government has no competence in spatial planning, but planning at the national level is undertaken through a joint forum which has advisory powers, and in which the national government and the Länder Austrian are equal partners. At regional level the Austrian Länder play the primary role in spatial planning. The Austrian national government has only limited responsibilities.

  17. The importance of hydropower in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobau, R.; Pirker, O.; Spolwind, R.; Weiss, B.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of hydropower-based power generation in Austria as a clean and emission-free source of electricity. The contribution made to total electricity generation is examined and figures are quoted. Hydropower is provided from both storage dams and run-of-river power stations such as those on the river Danube. The use of the various types of hydropower in connection with their economic optimisation, for example for the supply of valuable peak power, is discussed. The promotion of hydropower within the scope of European climate-protection efforts is examined. Projects concerning the augmentation of hydropower capacities are discussed and three exemplary projects are briefly described. Finally, the situation in Austria is compared with that to be found in neighbouring Switzerland.

  18. Collider workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The promise of initial results after the start of operations at CERN's SPS proton-antiproton collider and the prospects for high energy hadron collisions at Fermilab (Tevatron) and Brookhaven (ISABELLE) provided a timely impetus for the recent Topical Workshop on Forward Collider Physics', held at Madison, Wisconsin, from 10-12 December. It became the second such workshop to be held, the first having been in 1979 at the College de France, Paris. The 100 or so participants had the chance to hear preliminary results from the UA1, UA4 and UA5 experiments at the CERN SPS collider, together with other new data, including that from proton-antiproton runs at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings

  19. Environmental situation in Austria. Pt. 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzicka, E

    1981-06-01

    The presentation of the topical situation of the vegetation in Austria with special regard to the authopogeneous influences is divided into a general part and a passage on the single Bundeslaender. The general part illustrates the effects of the most frequent air pollutants, the effects of tourism and automobile traffic on vegetation from the view of environmental protection. Furthermore, a separation into the problems of agriculture on one hand, and on the problems of forestry on the other is made.

  20. Chernobyl and the consequences for Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenhofer, F.; Ecker, W.; Hojesky, H.; Junger, W.; Kienzel, K.; Nowak, H.; Riss, A.; Vychytil, P.; Zechner, J.

    1986-11-01

    In an introducing chapter the meteorological situation over Austria in the days after the Chernobyl accident is outlined. The following chapters are on measurement of contamination of environment, foodstuffs and fodder; on measures taken to minimize the radiation burden; a comparison with the fallout from nuclear weapons tests; a dose estimation to the population and finally, a comparison with contamination in some other european countries. 26 tabs., 117 figs. (qui)

  1. Workshop presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanden, Per-Olof; Edland, Anne; Reiersen, Craig; Mullins, Peter; Ingemarsson, Karl-Fredrik; Bouchard, Andre; Watts, Germaine; Johnstone, John; Hollnagel, Erik; Ramberg, Patric; Reiman, Teemu

    2009-01-01

    An important part of the workshop was a series of invited presentations. The presentations were intended to both provide the participants with an understanding of various organisational approaches and activities as well as to stimulate the exchange of ideas during the small group discussion sessions. The presentation subjects ranged from current organisational regulations and licensee activities to new organisational research and the benefits of viewing organisations from a different perspective. There were more than a dozen invited presentations. The initial set of presentations gave the participants an overview of the background, structure, and aims of the workshop. This included a short presentation on the results from the regulatory responses to the pre-workshop survey. Representatives from four countries (Sweden, Canada, Finland, and the United Kingdom) expanded upon their survey responses with detailed presentations on both regulatory and licensee safety-related organisational activities in their countries. There were also presentations on new research concerning how to evaluate safety critical organisations and on a resilience engineering perspective to safety critical organisations. Below is the list of the presentations, the slides of which being available in Appendix 2: 1 - Workshop Welcome (Per-Olof Sanden); 2 - CSNI Working Group on Human and Organisational Factors (Craig Reiersen); 3 - Regulatory expectations on justification of suitability of licensee organisational structures, resources and competencies (Anne Edland); 4 - Justifying the suitability of licensee organisational structures, resources and competencies (Karl-Fredrik Ingemarsson); 5 - Nuclear Organisational Suitability in Canada (Andre Bouchard); 6 - Designing and Resourcing for Safety and Effectiveness (Germaine Watts); 7 - Organisational Suitability - What do you need and how do you know that you've got it? (Craig Reiersen); 8 - Suitability of Organisations - UK Regulator's View (Peter

  2. Highlights of the 30th Annual Congress of the EANM, Vienna 2017: "Yes we can - make nuclear medicine great again".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanti, Stefano; Bonfiglioli, Rachele; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2018-05-03

    The 30th Annual Congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) was held in Vienna, Austria, from 21 to 25 October 2017 under the chairmanship of Professor Francesco Giammarile. As always, the Congress was a great success: more than 6,379 participants came from 90 countries from all continents. Participants were presented with an excellent programme consisting of symposia, and scientific and featured sessions, CME sessions, and plenary lectures. These lectures were devoted to nuclear medicine imaging and therapy, including hybrid imaging and molecular life sciences. Additionally, the latest technology and innovations in the field were presented, and added to the success of the Congress. This review summarizes the major scientific contributions which were selected from more than 1,900 submitted abstracts, and presented in the closing highlights session. They cover the diverse areas of nuclear medicine, with particular focus on oncology, cardiovascular science, neurology, technological innovation and novel tracers, and also other clinical sciences. A particular focus of the Congress was on targeted radionuclide-based therapies, which all show promising and great innovations. The Congress was a unique opportunity to be thoroughly updated on this research. This Highlights Lecture could only be a brief summary of the large amount of data presented and discussed during the meeting, which can be found in much greater detail in the Congress proceedings book, published as volume 44, supplement 2 of the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging in October 2017.

  3. MPC-SVM method for Vienna rectifier with PMSG used in Wind Turbine Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, June-Seok; Bak, Yeongsu; Lee, Kyo-Beum

    2016-01-01

    Using a Vienna rectifier as the machine-side rectifier of back-to-back converter is advantageous in terms of size and cost compared to three-level topologies and for this reason, the Vienna rectifier has been used in Wind Turbine Systems (WTS). This paper proposes a Model Predictive Control (MPC......) method for the Vienna rectifier used in WTS with a Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator (PMSG). The proposed MPC method considers the feasible eight-voltage vectors of the Vienna rectifier. In addition, the voltage vectors, which are the center voltage vectors of two feasible adjacent voltage vectors...

  4. Promoting Interdisciplinary Education: The Vienna Doctoral Programme on Water Resource Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöschl, Günter; Bucher, Christian; Carr, Gemma; Farnleitner, Andreas; Rechberger, Helmut; Wagner, Wolfgang; Zessner, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    An interdisciplinary approach is often described as a valuable strategy to assist in overcoming the existing and emerging challenges to water resource management. The development of educational approaches to instil a culture of interdisciplinarity in the future generation of water resource professionals will help to meet this strategic need. The Vienna Doctoral Programme on Water Resource Systems demonstrates how the adoption of an interdisciplinary education framework has been applied to a graduate programme in the water sciences. The interdisciplinary approach aims to provide doctoral research students with an understanding of the wide spectrum of processes relevant to water resource systems. This will enable them to bring together a range of ideas, strategies and methods to their current research and future careers. The education programme also aims to teach the softer skills required for successful interdisciplinary work such as the ability to communicate clearly with non-specialist professionals and the capacity to listen to and accommodate suggestions from experts in different disciplines, which have often not traditionally been grouped together. The Vienna Doctoral Programme achieves these aims through teaching an appreciation for a wide variety of approaches including laboratory analysis, field studies and numerical methods across the fields of hydrology, remote sensing, hydrogeology, structural mechanics, microbiology, water quality and resource management. Teaching takes the form of a detailed study programme on topics such as socio-economic concepts, resource and river basin management, modelling and simulation methods, health related water quality targets, urban water management, spatial data from remote sensing and basics for stochastic mechanics. Courses are also held by internationally recognised top scientists, and a guest scientist seminar series allows doctoral researchers to profit from the expertise of senior researchers from around the world

  5. Workshops som forskningsmetode

    OpenAIRE

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Levinsen, Karin Tweddell

    2017-01-01

    This paper contributes to knowledge on workshops as a research methodology, and specifically on how such workshops pertain to e-learning. A literature review illustrated that workshops are discussed according to three different perspectives: workshops as a means, workshops as practice, and workshops as a research methodology. Focusing primarily on the latter, this paper presents five studies on upper secondary and higher education teachers’ professional development and on teaching and learnin...

  6. Creating Fantastic PI Workshops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedermann, Laura B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Clark, Blythe G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Colbert, Rachel S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dagel, Amber Lynn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gupta, Vipin P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hibbs, Michael R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Perkins, David Nikolaus [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); West, Roger Derek [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this SAND report is to provide guidance for other groups hosting workshops and peerto-peer learning events at Sandia. Thus this SAND report provides detail about our team structure, how we brainstormed workshop topics and developed the workshop structure. A Workshop “Nuts and Bolts” section provides our timeline and check-list for workshop activities. The survey section provides examples of the questions we asked and how we adapted the workshop in response to the feedback.

  7. Desnarrativas: workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivânia Marques

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This is a report of a teacher workshop. It was an encounter among dialogues, pictures and possibilities of deconstruction in multiple directions. It enables studies inspiring debate in favor of images. Images are loaded with clichés and they risk breaking with the documentary/real character of photography. It leads us to think of the non-neutrality of an image and how the place is hegemonically imposed on us. It does away with blocking forces in a playful experimentation. The experimentation is extended into compositions with photographs, monotype printing, and different ways of perceiving space, dialogues, exchanges, poems and art.

  8. Workshop experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Holt

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The setting for the workshop was a heady mix of history, multiculturalism and picturesque riverscapes. Within the group there was, as in many food studies, a preponderance of female scientists (or ethnographers, but the group interacted on lively, non-gendered terms - focusing instead on an appreciation of locals food and enthusiasm for research shared by all, and points of theoretical variance within that.The food provided by our hosts was of the very highest eating and local food qualities...

  9. Neutron beam utilization at the TRIGA Mark II reactor Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, M.; Boeck, H.; Ismail, S.; Koerner, S.; Baron, M.; Hainbuchner, M.; Badurek, G.; Buchelt, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    A review is given about the research activities around the 250 kw TRIGA reactor Vienna, which are adequate to other neutron sources of comparable or bigger size. The topics selected for presentation range from neutron radiography, materials irradiation, neutron small-angle scattering, neutron activation analysis, neutron polarization to neutron interferometry. It is the aim of this presentation to stimulate programs for more efficient use around TRIGA research reactors with neutron flux densities of 1013 cm-2a-1 at the center of the reactor core. We briefly describe the experimental facilities installed at the 250 kw TRIGA reactor of the Austrian Universities in Vienna and present a great part of the current research activities performed with them. We believe that most of the techniques and experiments presented here are adequate for implementation to other reactors of similar or even higher power. Those technologies which require extremely specialized know-how not generally available at every research Inst.e will not be treated here or are just mentioned without any further details.(author)

  10. Opportunities for and limits to Academics as System builders-The case of realizing the potential of gasified biomass in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellsmark, Hans; Jacobsson, Staffan

    2009-01-01

    Gasified biomass is a technology that has the potential to partially replace fossil fuels for the production of heat, electricity, transport fuels, synthetic natural gas (BioSNG) and chemicals. In the context of climate change, biomass gasification is an attractive technology. It is, however, still in the early phase of its diffusion and much of the knowledge resides in the academic sector and in small companies-the technological innovation system (TIS) is in the process of being formed. Austria is one of the leading European countries in this field and much of the development in Austria can be traced to one prominent individual, Professor Hermann Hofbauer at the Technical University of Vienna. The purpose of this paper is to analyze how and the extent to which an individual academic, Professor Hofbauer, has influenced the formation of a TIS centred on gasified biomass in Austria. We find that his impact is multidimensional and significant but that there is also a frictional and intentional resistance that obstructs the commercialisation of the new technology. These sources of resistance go beyond the ability of an individual system builder to handle. Policy makers, therefore, need to add a strong element of system building activities that interact with and supplement those pursued by Professor Hofbauer.

  11. Challenges in Regional CTBT Monitoring: The Experience So Far From Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratt, S. R.

    2001-05-01

    The verification system being established to monitor the CTBT will include an International Monitoring System (IMS) network of 321 seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide stations, transmitting digital data to the International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna, Austria over a Global Communications Infrastructure (GCI). The IDC started in February 2000 to disseminate a wide range of products based on automatic processing and interactive analysis of data from about 90 stations from the four IMS technologies. The number of events in the seismo-acoustic Reviewed Event Bulletins (REB) was 18,218 for the year 2000, with the daily number ranging from 30 to 360. Over 300 users from almost 50 Member States are now receiving an average of 18,000 data and product deliveries per month from the IDC. As the IMS network expands (40 - 60 new stations are scheduled start transmitting data this year) and as GCI communications links bring increasing volumes of new data into Vienna (70 new GCI sites are currently in preparation), the monitoring capability of the IMS and IDC has the potential to improve significantly. To realize this potential, the IDC must continue to improve its capacity to exploit regional seismic data from events defined by few stations with large azimuthal gaps. During 2000, 25% of the events in the REB were defined by five or fewer stations. 48% were defined by at least one regional phase, and 24% were defined by at least three. 34% had gaps in azimuthal coverage of more than 180 degrees. The fraction of regional, sparsely detected events will only increase as new, sensitive stations come on-line, and the detection threshold drops. This will be offset, to some extent, because stations within the denser network that detect near-threshold events will be at closer distances, on average. Thus to address the challenges of regional monitoring, the IDC must integrate "tuned" station and network processing parameters for new stations; enhanced and/or new methods

  12. Digitalization of the exceptional building and decorative stones collection of the Natural History Museum Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrière, Ludovic; Steinwender, Christian

    2014-05-01

    The Natural History Museum Vienna (NHMV) owns one of the largest building, decorative, and ornamental stones collections in Europe. This important collection dates back to the 19th century and was initiated by curator Felix Karrer after a donation of the "Union-Baugesellschaft" (Karrer, 1892). It contains rock samples used for the construction of most of the famous buildings and monuments in Vienna and in the entire Austria and surrounding countries, as well as from other famous constructions and antique (Egyptian, Greek, Roman, etc.) monuments in the world. Decorative stones that were used for the inside parts of buildings as well as artificial materials, such as stucco, tiles, and building-materials like gravel, are also part of this collection. Unfortunately, most specimens of this collection cannot be displayed at the NHMV (i.e., only 500 specimens are visible in the display Hall I) and are therefore preserved in storage rooms, and not accessible to the public. The main objective of our project of digitalization is to share our rock collection and all treasures it contains with the large majority of interested persons, and especially to provide knowledge on these rocks for people who need this information, such as people who work in cultural, architectural, scientific, and commercial fields. So far 4,500 samples from our collection have been processed with the support of the Open Up! project (Opening up the Natural History Heritage for Europeana). Our database contains all information available on these samples (including e.g., the name of the rock, locality, historic use, heritage utilization, etc.), high-quality digital photographs (with both top and bottom sides of the samples), and scanned labels (both "old" NHMV labels and other (original) labels attached to the samples). We plan to achieve the full digitalization of our unique collection within the next two years and to develop a website to provide access to the content of our database (if adequate

  13. Recent Workshops

    CERN Multimedia

    Wickens, F. J.

    Since the previous edition of ATLAS e-news, the NIKHEF Institute in Amsterdam has hosted not just one but two workshops related to ATLAS TDAQ activities. The first in October was dedicated to the Detector Control System (DCS). Just three institutes, CERN, NIKHEF and St Petersburg, provide the effort for the central DCS services, but each ATLAS sub-detector provides effort for their own controls. Some 30 people attended, including representatives for all of the ATLAS sub-detectors, representatives of the institutes working on the central services and the project leader of JCOP, which brings together common aspects of detector controls across the LHC experiments. During the three-day workshop the common components were discussed, and each sub-detector described their experiences and plans for their future systems. Whilst many of the components to be used are standard commercial components, a key custom item for ATLAS is the ELMB (Embedded Local Monitor Board). Prototypes for this have now been extensively test...

  14. Integrated study of geophysical and biological anomalies before earthquakes (seismic and non-seismic), in Austria and Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Wolfgang; Assef, Rizkita; Faber, Robert; Ferasyi, Reza

    2015-04-01

    Earthquakes are commonly seen as unpredictable. Even when scientists believe an earthquake is likely, it is still hard to understand the indications observed, as well as their theoretical and practical implications. There is some controversy surrounding the concept of using animals as a precursor of earthquakes. Nonetheless, several institutes at University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, and Vienna University of Technology, both Vienna, Austria, and Syiah Kuala University, Banda Aceh, as well as Terramath Indonesia, Buleleng, both Indonesia, cooperate in a long-term project, funded by Red Bull Media House, Salzburg, Austria, which aims at getting some decisive step forward from anecdotal to scientific evidence of those interdependencies, and show their possible use in forecasting seismic hazard on a short-term basis. Though no conclusive research has yet been published, an idea in this study is that even if animals do not respond to specific geophysical precursors and with enough notice to enable earthquake forecasting on that basis, they may at least enhance, in conjunction with other indications, the degree of certainty we can get of a prediction of an impending earthquake. In Indonesia, indeed, before the great earthquakes of 2004 and 2005, ominous geophysical as well as biological phenomena occurred (but were realized as precursors only in retrospect). Numerous comparable stories can be told from other times and regions. Nearly 2000 perceptible earthquakes (> M3.5) occur each year in Indonesia. Also, in 2007, the government has launched a program, focused on West Sumatra, for investigating earthquake precursors. Therefore, Indonesia is an excellent target area for a study concerning possible interconnections between geophysical and biological earthquake precursors. Geophysical and atmospheric measurements and behavioral observation of several animal species (elephant, domestic cattle, water buffalo, chicken, rat, catfish) are conducted in three areas

  15. Centro escolar federal en Bludenz/Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehrer, Manfred

    1981-06-01

    Full Text Available Este centro escolar, considerado como uno de los más interesantes de Austria, se compone de cuatro cuerpos en los que se distribuyen, respectivamente, las escuelas, el gimnasio, la vivienda del conserje y el local de transformadores. En su construcción hay que destacar su adecuada flexibilidad, que permite dar cabida a las distintas funciones que en él se desarrollan, y la correcta adaptación del gran volumen edificado a las especiales características urbanas y arquitectónicas del ámbito circundante.

  16. Environmental report 2001 - Verbund Austria Power Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    A balance of the environmental activities performed by Verbund Austria Power Grid during 2001 is presented. It comprises which measures were taken to reach their environmental objectives: certification of an environmental management system according to ISO 14001 and EMAS, environmental protection, policies, water and thermoelectric power generation status ( CO 2 , SO 2 , NO x emission monitoring, energy efficiency, replacement of old equipment), reduction of the greenhouse gases emissions and nature conservation. The report is divided in 8 sections: power grid, environmental policy, environmental management, power grid layout, environmental status of the system, introduction of new technologies for environmental monitoring, environmental objectives 2001 - 2002, and data and facts 2001. (nevyjel)

  17. Protocol to amend the Vienna convention on civil liability for nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the Protocol to Amend the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage which was adopted by a Diplomatic Conference, 8-12 September 1997, and the consolidated text of the 1963 Vienna Convention as amended by the Protocol

  18. Protocol to amend the Vienna convention on civil liability for nuclear damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-22

    The document reproduces the text of the Protocol to Amend the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage which was adopted by a Diplomatic Conference, 8-12 September 1997, and the consolidated text of the 1963 Vienna Convention as amended by the Protocol

  19. Texts of the Agency's Agreements with the Republic of Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the Exchange of Letters, dated 8 January 1999 and 27 January 1999 respectively, between the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Austria and the IAEA, constituting a supplementary agreement t o the Agreement between the Republic of Austria and the IAEA regarding the Headquarters of the IAEA. The aforementioned Agreement entered into force on 8 February 1999

  20. Statistics about torrents in Lower Austria, status from May 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehrenfried Lepuschitz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This data presents analyzed data exports of Austrian torrent and avalanche cadaster (TAC in May 2015. The TAC is developed by Austrian Service for Torrent and Avalanche Control. Data are viewed from different aspects and combinations geographically in the area of Lower Austria, a province of Austria.

  1. PREFACE: 15th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2014) and 21st IAEA TM on Research Using Small Fusion Devices (RUSFD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iván Vargas-Blanco, V.; Herrera-Velázquez, J. Julio E.

    2015-03-01

    small laboratory size fusion experiments, as compared to those of the larger laboratories, to report about their latest achievements working with medium size and small scale tokamaks, stellarators, compact tori, dense plasma focus, reversed field pinches, helical devices, linear machines, and other small plasma devices. The Technical Meeting aims at stimulating new synergies which can contribute to better streamline the research outputs to the mainstream fusion research. Previous meetings in the series were held in Budapest, Hungary (1985), Nagoya, Japan (1986), Nice, France (1988), Washington DC, USA (1990), Hefei, China (1991), Wuerzburg, Germany (1992), Campinas, Brazil (1993), Madrid, Spain (1994), Ahmedabad, India (1995), Prague, Czech Republic (1996), Cairo, Egypt (1997), Tokyo, Japan (1998) in Chengdu, China (1999), São Paulo, Brazil (2002), Vienna, Austria (2003) in Mexico City, Mexico (2005), Lisbon, Portugal (2007), in Alushta, Ukraine (2008), Kurchatov, Kazakhstan (2009) and Vienna, Austria (2011). The 1st Costa Rican Summer School on Plasma Physics was held a week before the Joint LAWPP 2014 - 21st IAEA TM RUSFD, and the 2nd Latin American Workshop on Industrial Applications of Plasma Technology (AITP) was organized in parallel with the it. The objective of the AITP Workshop is to enhance the regional academic and industrial cooperation in the field of plasma assisted surface technology. The Joint LAWPP 2014 - 21st IAEA TM RUSFD was held at the Crowne Plaza Corobici Hotel in San José from 27 to 31 January 2014. The LAWPP scientific programme, which was spread along the whole week, had 15 invited speakers, 126 participants from 20 countries around the world. It included 7 plenary talks, 8 invited talks and 12 oral contributed papers were chosen out of 92 submissions. 82 contributions in 25 topics were presented in poster sessions on Monday 27, Tuesday 28 and Thursday 30 January 2014. The 21st IAEA TM RUSFD was held along the LAWPP 2014 from 27 to 29 January

  2. MICCAI Workshops

    CERN Document Server

    Nedjati-Gilani, Gemma; Venkataraman, Archana; O'Donnell, Lauren; Panagiotaki, Eleftheria

    2014-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings from two closely related workshops: Computational Diffusion MRI (CDMRI’13) and Mathematical Methods from Brain Connectivity (MMBC’13), held under the auspices of the 16th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention, which took place in Nagoya, Japan, September 2013. Inside, readers will find contributions ranging from mathematical foundations and novel methods for the validation of inferring large-scale connectivity from neuroimaging data to the statistical analysis of the data, accelerated methods for data acquisition, and the most recent developments on mathematical diffusion modeling. This volume offers a valuable starting point for anyone interested in learning computational diffusion MRI and mathematical methods for brain connectivity as well as offers new perspectives and insights on current research challenges for those currently in the field. It will be of interest to researchers and practitioners in computer science, ...

  3. National energy data profile, Austria 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    Detail information about the energy consumption, energy demand and supply, general features of energy economy and the analysis of the development of energy economy in Austria in 1992 as well as preliminary data on energy consumption in the first 6 months of 1993 is given. Statistical data about the development of energy demand by sectors, development of total final energy demand by energy carriers (articulated in coal, refined petroleum products, natural gas, other, electricity and heat), development of energy consumption in industry (articulated in coal, refined petroleum products, natural gas, other, electricity and heat) and development of energy consumption of domestic consumers (articulated in coal, refined petroleum products, natural gas, other, electricity and heat) is shown. Graphical data about (1) primary energy supply by source, (2) primary energy, economic activity and electricity, (3) indigenous energy production, (4) conventional energy resources, (5) electricity supply by source, (6) electricity consumption by sector is presented for the years 1970 - 1992. Data about the development and exploitable hydro-power potentials by rivers and the main sources of man-made emissions of air pollutants in Austria 1990 according to the results of the CORINE-inventory are added. (blahsl)

  4. Occupational Accidents with Agricultural Machinery in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogler, Robert; Quendler, Elisabeth; Boxberger, Josef

    2016-01-01

    The number of recognized accidents with fatalities during agricultural and forestry work, despite better technology and coordinated prevention and trainings, is still very high in Austria. The accident scenarios in which people are injured are very different on farms. The common causes of accidents in agriculture and forestry are the loss of control of machine, means of transport or handling equipment, hand-held tool, and object or animal, followed by slipping, stumbling and falling, breakage, bursting, splitting, slipping, fall, and collapse of material agent. In the literature, a number of studies of general (machine- and animal-related accidents) and specific (machine-related accidents) agricultural and forestry accident situations can be found that refer to different databases. From the database Data of the Austrian Workers Compensation Board (AUVA) about occupational accidents with different agricultural machinery over the period 2008-2010 in Austria, main characteristics of the accident, the victim, and the employer as well as variables on causes and circumstances by frequency and contexts of parameters were statistically analyzed by employing the chi-square test and odds ratio. The aim of the study was to determine the information content and quality of the European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW) variables to evaluate safety gaps and risks as well as the accidental man-machine interaction.

  5. Child Health Care Services in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerbl, Reinhold; Ziniel, Georg; Winkler, Petra; Habl, Claudia; Püspök, Rudolf; Waldhauser, Franz

    2016-10-01

    We describe child health care in Austria, a small country in Central Europe with a population of about 9 million inhabitants of whom approximately 1.7 million are children and adolescents under the age of 20 years. For children and adolescents, few health care indicators are available. Pediatric and adolescent health provision, such as overall health provision, follows a complex system with responsibilities shared by the Ministry of Health, 19 social insurance funds, provinces, and other key players. Several institutions are affiliated with or cooperate with the Ministry of Health to assure quality control. The Austrian public health care system is financed through a combination of income-based social insurance payments and taxes. Pediatric primary health care in Austria involves the services of general pediatricians and general practitioners. Secondary care is mostly provided by the 43 children's hospitals; tertiary care is (particularly) provided in 4 state university hospitals and 1 private university hospital. The training program of residents takes 6 years and is completed by a final examination. Every year, this training program is completed by about 60 residents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Epidemiology of Multiple Sclerosis in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhofer-Polanyi, Sabine; Cetin, Hakan; Leutmezer, Fritz; Baumgartner, Anna; Blechinger, Stephan; Dal-Bianco, Assunta; Altmann, Patrick; Bajer-Kornek, Barbara; Rommer, Paulus; Guger, Michael; Leitner-Bohn, Doris; Reichardt, Berthold; Alasti, Farideh; Temsch, Wilhelm; Stamm, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    To assess the incidence rate and prevalence ratio of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Austria. Hospital discharge diagnosis and MS-specific immunomodulatory treatment prescriptions from public health insurances, covering 98% of Austrian citizens with health insurance were used to extrapolate incidence and prevalence numbers based on the capture-recapture method. A total of 1,392,629 medication prescriptions and 40,956 hospitalizations were extracted from 2 data sources, leading to a total of 13,205 patients. The incidence rate and prevalence ratio of MS in Austria based on the capture-recapture method were 19.5/100,000 person-years (95% CI 14.3-24.7) and 158.9/100,000 (95% CI 141.2-175.9), respectively. Female to male ratio was 1.6 for incidence and 2.2 for prevalence. Incidence rates and prevalence ratios of MS in our study are within the upper range of comparable studies across many European countries as well as the United States. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Paris and Vienna nuclear liability conventions: challenges for insurers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitsma, S. M. S.

    2004-01-01

    Insurers have actively contributed to the negotiations on the revision of the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage and the Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy. In the course of these negotiations they have pointed out that some of the proposals for revision may have consequences for insurers and could prove incapable of finding insurance support. This paper aims at explaining the revision related points, which could cause problems in respect of insurability. Furthermore, the writer takes the liberty to expand its scope to more generally include developments, which have the potential to influence the availability of insurance capacity. Therefore, also the insurance implications of terrorist acts combined with share market developments of recent years will be dealt with.(author)

  8. The activities of the IAEA Laboratories, Vienna. Annual report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, C.B.G.

    1983-06-01

    The report presents the activities of the IAEA Laboratories at Seibersdorf during the year 1981, with emphasis on the twofold purpose of the Laboratories: to support the Technical Cooperation activities of the Agency, and to operate the Safeguards Analytical Laboratory (SAL). The section dealing with the IAEA Technical Cooperation reports the programs of research where methods developed in Vienna are used throughout the world. Another section deals with the advanced techniques for chemical analysis and the interlaboratory comparisons programme. The training of specialists from member states is also described. The SAL, which became a separate part of the Laboratory, and its role in the Agency's Safeguards programme is also described. Reports and publications of Laboratory members are also listed

  9. The 3d International Workshop on Computational Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnick, Stephen M.

    1994-09-01

    The Third International Workshop on Computational Electronics (IWCE) was held at the Benson Hotel in downtown Portland, Oregon, on May 18, 19, and 20, 1994. The workshop was devoted to a broad range of topics in computational electronics related to the simulation of electronic transport in semiconductors and semiconductor devices, particularly those which use large computational resources. The workshop was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Office of Naval Research and the Army Research Office, as well as local support from the Oregon Joint Graduate Schools of Engineering and the Oregon Center for Advanced Technology Education. There were over 100 participants in the Portland workshop, of which more than one quarter represented research groups outside of the United States from Austria, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. There were a total 81 papers presented at the workshop, 9 invited talks, 26 oral presentations and 46 poster presentations. The emphasis of the contributions reflected the interdisciplinary nature of computational electronics with researchers from the Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Physics communities participating in the workshop.

  10. Italy and Austria before and after study: second-hand smoke exposure in hospitality premises before and after 2 years from the introduction of the Italian smoking ban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorini, G; Moshammer, H; Sbrogiò, L; Gasparrini, A; Nebot, M; Neuberger, M; Tamang, E; Lopez, M J; Galeone, D; Serrahima, E

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to compare nicotine concentration in 28 hospitality premises (HPs) in Florence and Belluno, Italy, where a smoking ban was introduced in 2005, and in 19 HPs in Vienna, Austria, where no anti-smoking law entered into force up to now. Airborne nicotine concentrations were measured in the same HPs in winter 2002 or 2004 (pre-ban measurements) and winter 2007 (post-ban measurements). In Florence and Belluno, medians decreased significantly (P hospitality workers of 11.81 and 14.67 per 10,000, respectively. Lifetime excess lung cancer mortality risks for bar and disco-pub workers were 10-20 times higher than that calculated for restaurant workers, both in Italy and Austria. In winter 2007, it dropped to 0.01 per 10,000 in Italy, whereas in Austria it remained at the same levels. The drop of second-hand smoke exposure indicates a substantial improvement in air quality in Italian HPs even after 2 years from the ban. The nation-wide smoking ban introduced in Italy on January 10, 2005, resulted in a drop in second-hand smoke exposure in hospitality premises, whereas in Austria, where there is no similar nation-wide smoking ban, the exposure to second-hand smoke in hospitality premises remains high. Given that second-hand smoke is considered a group 1 carcinogen according to the International Agency for Research on Cancer classification, the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control strongly recommends the implementation of nation-wide smoke-free policies in order to improve the indoor air quality of hospitality premises and workplaces. Results from our study strongly supports this recommendation.

  11. Elemental composition of game meat from Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Kathrin; Kitzer, Roland; Goessler, Walter

    2016-06-01

    Concentrations of 26 elements (B, Na, Mg, P, S, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Mo, Cd, Sb, Ba, Hg, Pb, U) in wild game meat from Austria were analysed using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. All investigated animals were culled during the hunting season 2012/2013, including 10 chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra), 9 hare (Lepus europaeus), 10 pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), 10 red deer (Cervus elaphus), 12 roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and 10 wild boar (Sus scrofa). In 19 out of 61 meat samples lead concentrations were higher than 0.1 mg/kg, the maximum limit in meat as set by the European Commission (Regulation EC No 1881/2006), which is most likely caused by ammunition residues. Especially, pellet shot animals and chamois show a high risk for lead contamination. Despite ammunition residues all investigated muscle samples show no further health risk with respect to metal contamination.

  12. European atomic (nuclear) law and Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitzinger, R.

    2000-05-01

    The dissertation investigates the question, how the Austrian membership in the European Community works out to the Austrian Atomic Nonproliferation Law, which is a simple federal law. By the day of the Austrian accession to the European Community, the whole law of the European Community became part of the Austrian Legal Order. Also part of the primary right, the constitutional law of the European Community, is the contract for founding the European Atomic Energy Community, which also became part of the Austrian Legal Order. In 1978 Austria decided after the plebiscite of November the 5th against the opening of the nuclear power station in Zwentendorf. The result of this plebiscite was the Austrian Atomic Nonproliferation Law, a simple federal law from December the 15th, BGBl 676/1978. To continue their atomic politics, forbidding the use of nuclear powerstations for producing energy, after becoming a member of the European Community, Austria and the members of the European Community signed the Fourth Common Declaration at September the 23rd in 1993 for the use of the contract for founding the European Atomic Energy Community. This Common Declaration is neither a part of the accession of the contract, nor a part of the accessions to the acts of the contract of the European Community, and also not a part of the primary right of the European Community. It is only an agreement between the signatory states, which can be characterized as a part of the context. The sphere of the context, where the Fourth Common Declaration could be important, restrains to the secondary right of the European Community. This means, that the opinion on the rage of application is a decision of the executive bodies of the European Community. Consequently is to say, that the declaration, that the continuance of the Austrian Atomic Nonproliferation Law is save, can't resist an analysis in the law of nations. (author)

  13. Evaluation of groundwater droughts in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Johannes Christoph; Birk, Steffen

    2015-04-01

    Droughts are abnormally dry periods that affect various aspects of human life on earth, ranging from negative impacts on agriculture or industry, to being the cause for conflict and loss of human life. The changing climate reinforces the importance of investigations into this phenomenon. Various methods to analyze and classify droughts have been developed. These include drought indices such as the Standard Precipitation Index SPI, the Palmer Drought Severity Index PDSI or the Crop Moisture Index CMI. These and other indices consider meteorological parameters and/or their effects on soil moisture. A depletion of soil moisture triggered by low precipitation and high evapotranspiration may also cause reduced groundwater recharge and thus decreasing groundwater levels and reduced groundwater flow to springs, streams, and wetlands. However, the existing indices were generally not designed to address such drought effects on groundwater. Thus, a Standardized Groundwater level Index has recently been proposed by Bloomfied and Marchant (2013). Yet, to our knowledge, this approach has only been applied to consolidated aquifers in the UK. This work analyzes time series of groundwater levels from various, mostly unconsolidated aquifers in Austria in order to characterize the effects of droughts on aquifers in different hydrogeologic and climatic settings as well as under different usage scenarios. In particular, comparisons are made between the water rich Alpine parts of Austria, and the dryer parts situated in the East. The time series of groundwater levels are compared to other data, such as meteorological time series and written weather records about generally accepted phenomena, such as the 2003 European drought and heat wave. Thus, valuable insight is gained into the propagation of meteorological droughts through the soil and the aquifer in different types of hydrogeologic and climatic settings, which provides a prerequisite for the assessment of the aquifers' drought

  14. Austria announces new money for research infrastructure and social sciences

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Austria's Minister for Science and Research, Johannes Hahn, has announced funding for research infrastructures and the social sciences, amounting to EUR 6.9 million in total. The largest chunk of the money will go to a new data processing centre for the analysis of data from the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN). The idea is that the new centre will provide Austria with access to the key technology for solving highly complex scientific and technological problems, while strengthening Austria's domestic research infrastructure in the field of 'advanced communication networks'.

  15. Extent and application of patient diaries in Austria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heindl, Patrik; Bachlechner, Adelbert; Nydahl, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background: Diaries written for patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) are offered in many European countries. In Austria, ICU diaries have been relatively unknown, but since 2012, they have started to emerge. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the extent and application of ICU diaries...... in Austria in 2015. Method: The study had a prospective multiple methods design of survey and interviews. All ICUs in Austria were surveyed in 2015 to identify which ICUs used diaries. ICUs using diaries were selected for semi-structured key-informant telephone interviews on the application of ICU diaries...

  16. Workshop introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streeper, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has three subprograms that directly reduce the nuclear/radiological threat; Convert (Highly Enriched Uranium), Protect (Facilities), and Remove (Materials). The primary mission of the Off-Site Source Recovery Project (OSRP) falls under the 'Remove' subset. The purpose of this workshop is to provide a venue for joint-technical collaboration between the OSRP and the Nuclear Radiation Safety Service (NRSS). Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace initiative and the Soviet equivalent both promoted the spread of the paradoxical (peaceful and harmful) properties of the atom. The focus of nonproliferation efforts has been rightly dedicated to fissile materials and the threat they pose. Continued emphasis on radioactive materials must also be encouraged. An unquantifiable threat still exists in the prolific quantity of sealed radioactive sources (sources) spread worldwide. It does not appear that the momentum of the evolution in the numerous beneficial applications of radioactive sources will subside in the near future. Numerous expert studies have demonstrated the potentially devastating economic and psychological impacts of terrorist use of a radiological dispersal or emitting device. The development of such a weapon, from the acquisition of the material to the technical knowledge needed to develop and use it, is straightforward. There are many documented accounts worldwide of accidental and purposeful diversions of radioactive materials from regulatory control. The burden of securing sealed sources often falls upon the source owner, who may not have a disposal pathway once the source reaches the end of its useful life. This disposal problem is exacerbated by some source owners not having the resources to safely and compliantly store them. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) data suggests that, in the US alone, there are tens of thousands of high-activity (IAEA

  17. The SECOQC quantum key distribution network in Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peev, M.; Pacher, C.; Alléaume, R.; Barreiro, C.; Bouda, J.; Boxleitner, W.; Debuisschert, T.; Diamanti, E.; Dianati, M.; Dynes, J. F.; Fasel, S.; Fossier, S.; Fürst, M.; Gautier, J.-D.; Gay, O.; Gisin, N.; Grangier, P.; Happe, A.; Hasani, Y.; Hentschel, M.; Hübel, H.; Humer, G.; Länger, T.; Legré, M.; Lieger, R.; Lodewyck, J.; Lorünser, T.; Lütkenhaus, N.; Marhold, A.; Matyus, T.; Maurhart, O.; Monat, L.; Nauerth, S.; Page, J.-B.; Poppe, A.; Querasser, E.; Ribordy, G.; Robyr, S.; Salvail, L.; Sharpe, A. W.; Shields, A. J.; Stucki, D.; Suda, M.; Tamas, C.; Themel, T.; Thew, R. T.; Thoma, Y.; Treiber, A.; Trinkler, P.; Tualle-Brouri, R.; Vannel, F.; Walenta, N.; Weier, H.; Weinfurter, H.; Wimberger, I.; Yuan, Z. L.; Zbinden, H.; Zeilinger, A.

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, we present the quantum key distribution (QKD) network designed and implemented by the European project SEcure COmmunication based on Quantum Cryptography (SECOQC) (2004-2008), unifying the efforts of 41 research and industrial organizations. The paper summarizes the SECOQC approach to QKD networks with a focus on the trusted repeater paradigm. It discusses the architecture and functionality of the SECOQC trusted repeater prototype, which has been put into operation in Vienna in 2008 and publicly demonstrated in the framework of a SECOQC QKD conference held from October 8 to 10, 2008. The demonstration involved one-time pad encrypted telephone communication, a secure (AES encryption protected) video-conference with all deployed nodes and a number of rerouting experiments, highlighting basic mechanisms of the SECOQC network functionality. The paper gives an overview of the eight point-to-point network links in the prototype and their underlying technology: three plug and play systems by id Quantique, a one way weak pulse system from Toshiba Research in the UK, a coherent one-way system by GAP Optique with the participation of id Quantique and the AIT Austrian Institute of Technology (formerly ARCAustrian Research Centers GmbH—ARC is now operating under the new name AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH following a restructuring initiative.), an entangled photons system by the University of Vienna and the AIT, a continuous-variables system by Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and THALES Research and Technology with the participation of Université Libre de Bruxelles, and a free space link by the Ludwig Maximillians University in Munich connecting two nodes situated in adjacent buildings (line of sight 80 m). The average link length is between 20 and 30 km, the longest link being 83 km. The paper presents the architecture and functionality of the principal networking agent—the SECOQC node module, which enables the authentic

  18. The SECOQC quantum key distribution network in Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peev, M; Pacher, C; Boxleitner, W; Happe, A; Hasani, Y; Alleaume, R; Diamanti, E; Barreiro, C; Fasel, S; Gautier, J-D; Gisin, N; Bouda, J; Debuisschert, T; Fossier, S; Dianati, M; Dynes, J F; Fuerst, M; Gay, O; Grangier, P; Hentschel, M

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present the quantum key distribution (QKD) network designed and implemented by the European project SEcure COmmunication based on Quantum Cryptography (SECOQC) (2004-2008), unifying the efforts of 41 research and industrial organizations. The paper summarizes the SECOQC approach to QKD networks with a focus on the trusted repeater paradigm. It discusses the architecture and functionality of the SECOQC trusted repeater prototype, which has been put into operation in Vienna in 2008 and publicly demonstrated in the framework of a SECOQC QKD conference held from October 8 to 10, 2008. The demonstration involved one-time pad encrypted telephone communication, a secure (AES encryption protected) video-conference with all deployed nodes and a number of rerouting experiments, highlighting basic mechanisms of the SECOQC network functionality. The paper gives an overview of the eight point-to-point network links in the prototype and their underlying technology: three plug and play systems by id Quantique, a one way weak pulse system from Toshiba Research in the UK, a coherent one-way system by GAP Optique with the participation of id Quantique and the AIT Austrian Institute of Technology (formerly ARC ), an entangled photons system by University of Vienna and the AIT, a continuous-variables system by Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and THALES Research and Technology with the participation of Universite Libre de Bruxelles, and a free space link by the Ludwig Maximillians University in Munich connecting two nodes situated in adjacent buildings (line of sight 80 m). The average link length is between 20 and 30 km, the longest link being 83 km. The paper presents the architecture and functionality of the principal networking agent-the SECOQC node module, which enables the authentic classical communication required for key distillation, manages the generated key material, determines a communication path between any destinations in the network

  19. The Salcher landslide observatory: a new long-term monitoring site in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canli, Ekrem; Engels, Alexander; Glade, Thomas; Schweigl, Joachim; Bertagnoli, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Landslides pose a significant hazard in the federal district of Lower Austria. The Geological Survey of Lower Austria is responsible for detailed site investigations as well as the planning and installation of protective measures. The most landslide prone area in Lower Austria is within the Rhenodanubian Flyschzone whose materials consist of alterations of fine grained layers (clayey shales, silty shales, marls) and sandstones. It exhibits over 6200 landslides within an area of approx. 1300 km². For areas susceptible to landsliding, protection works are not feasible or simply too costly. Therefore, monitoring systems have been installed in the past, most of them, however, are not operated automatically and require field visits for data readouts. Thus, it is difficult to establish any relation between initiating and controlling factors to gain a comprehensive understanding of the underlying process mechanism that is essential for any early warning applications. In this presentation, we present the design and first results of an automated landslide monitoring system in Gresten (Lower Austria). The deep-seated, slow moving Salcher landslide extends over approx. 8000 m² and is situated adjacent to residential buildings and infrastructure. This monitoring setup is designed to run for at least a decade to account for investigations of long term sliding dynamics and pattern. Historically the Salcher landslide has shown shorter phases with accelerated movements followed by longer phases with barely any movements. Those periods of inactivity commonly exceed regular project durations, thus it is important to cover longer periods. Such slope dynamics can be investigated throughout many parts in the world, thus this monitoring might allow to understand better also landslides with infrequent movement patterns. The monitoring setup consists of surface as well as subsurface installations. All installations are connected to permanent power supply, are taking the respective

  20. e-Infrastructures Austria 2016: Bericht über das dritte Jahr des Hochschulraumstrukturmittelprojekts für den koordinierten Aufbau und die kooperative Weiterentwicklung von Repositorieninfrastrukturen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Bauer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Im letzten Jahr des vom Bundesministerium für Wissenschaft, Forschung und Wirtschaft auf drei Jahre geförderten HRSM-Projektes e-Infrastructures Austria konnten die drei Teilprojekte erfolgreich zu Ende geführt werden. An 25 Partnereinrichtungen wurden als In-Kind-Leistungen Repositorien aufgebaut bzw. sind derzeit in Planung. 2016 wurde von einer ExperInnengruppe eine Muster-Policy für Forschungsdatenmanagement; an einzelnen der Partnereinrichtungen wurden Forschungsdatenmanagementpläne erprobt. Das Ziel, Fortbildung und Vernetzung für Forschungsdatenmanagement zu ermöglichen, wurde im Berichtsjahr in Form von Workshops zu den Themen Metadaten und Langzeitarchivierung und insbesondere durch ein viertätiges Seminar für den professionellen Umgang mit Forschungsdaten erfolgreich umgesetzt. Es ist sehr erfreulich, dass mit dem Projektende von e-Infrastructures Austria das Thema Forschungsdatenmanagement nicht wieder aus dem Blickfeld der Universitäten und Forschungseinrichtungen geraten wird, sondern vielmehr – in mehreren Projekten – dieses Thema ab 2017 weiterentwickelt wird. Neben dem Folgeprojekt e-Infrastructures Austria Plus, an dem sich neun Institutionen beteiligen werden, widmen sich noch acht weitere öffentlich geförderte Projekte dem Thema Open Science. Gemeinsam bilden sie den Use Case Austria im Rahmen der European Open Science Cloud.

  1. The International Atomic Energy Agency's Laboratories Seibersdorf and Vienna. Meeting the challenges of research and international co-operation in the application of nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krippl, E.

    1999-08-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency therefore maintains a unique, multidisciplinary, analytical, research and training centre: the IAEA Laboratories, located at Seibersdorf near Vienna and at the Agency's Headquarters in the Vienna International Centre. They are organized in three branches: (i) the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory: Soil Science, Plant Breeding, Animal Production and Health, Entomology, Agrochemicals; (ii) the Physics, Chemistry and Instrumentation Laboratory: Chemistry, Instrumentation, Dosimetry, Isotope Hydrology; (iii) the Safeguards Analytical Laboratory: Isotopic Analysis, Chemical Analysis, Clean Laboratory. 'The Mission of the IAEA Laboratories is to contribute to the implementation of the Agency's programmes in food and agriculture, human health, physical and chemical sciences, water resources, industry, environment, radiation protection and safeguards verification'. Together with a General Services and Safety Section, which provides logistics, information, industrial safety and maintenance services and runs a mechanical workshop, the three groups form the 'Seibersdorf Laboratories' and are part of the IAEA Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications. The Laboratories contribute an important share to projects fostering peaceful applications of radiation and isotopes and radiation protection, and play a significant part in the nuclear verification mechanism. All activities are therefore planned and implemented in close co-operation with relevant divisions and departments of the IAEA. In specific sectors, the Laboratories also operate in conjunction with other organizations in the UN system, such as the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), and with networks of national laboratories in Member States

  2. Veza Canetti: uno sguardo al femminile sulla Vienna degli anni Venti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Bertocchi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to analyse some short stories of the Austrian Jewish writer Veza Canetti in order to demonstrate her interest for women lives in Vienna, especially in the period following Worl War I.

  3. Biblioteca y residencia para estudiantes - Viena (Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lippert, G.

    1972-02-01

    Full Text Available The recently completed Municipal Library of Vienna, includes the lending of books, reading rooms, information services, children's library, municipal library and lecture rooms. The hostel Adolf Schärf «Vindobona» is a tall building, of 33 m height, which in addition to many rooms for the communal life of students, has 54 double bedrooms, and 147 single rooms, equipped with standards of comfort comparable to those of an hotel, since the hostel is used by students in winter, and as an hotel in the summer.El conjunto terminado Casa del Libro-Biblioteca Municipal de Viena alberga los servicios de autoalquiler, salas de lectura, información, biblioteca infantil, biblioteca municipal, salas de conferencias, etc. La Residencia Hogar Adolf Schärf «Vindobona» es una torre de 33 m de altura que, además de los numerosos locales para el desarrollo de la vida en común de los estudiantes, alberga 54 habitaciones con dos camas, y 147 sencillas, equipadas todas ellas a escala hotelera, dado que el hogar es explotado por los mismos estudiantes como tal hotel durante las vacaciones.

  4. Infrasound workshop for CTBT monitoring: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christie, D.; Whitaker, R.

    1998-11-01

    It is expected that the establishment of new infrasound stations in the global IMS network by the Provisional Technical Secretariat of the CTBTO in Vienna will commence in the middle of 1998. Thus, decisions on the final operational design for IMS infrasound stations will have to be made within the next 12 months. Though many of the basic design problems have been resolved, it is clear that further work needs to be carried out during the coming year to ensure that IMS infrasound stations will operate with maximum capability in accord with the specifications determined during the May 1997 PrepCom Meeting. Some of the papers presented at the Workshop suggest that it may be difficult to design a four-element infrasound array station that will reliably detect and locate infrasound signals at all frequencies in the specified range from 0.02 to 4.0 Hz in all noise environments. Hence, if the basic design of an infrasound array is restricted to four array elements, the final optimized design may be suited only to the detection and location of signals in a more limited pass-band. Several participants have also noted that the reliable discrimination of infrasound signals could be quite difficult if the detection system leads to signal distortion. Thus, it has been emphasized that the detection system should not, if possible, compromise signal fidelity. This report contains the workshop agenda, a list of participants, and abstracts and viewgraphs from each presentation.

  5. Infrasound workshop for CTBT monitoring: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, D.; Whitaker, R.

    1998-01-01

    It is expected that the establishment of new infrasound stations in the global IMS network by the Provisional Technical Secretariat of the CTBTO in Vienna will commence in the middle of 1998. Thus, decisions on the final operational design for IMS infrasound stations will have to be made within the next 12 months. Though many of the basic design problems have been resolved, it is clear that further work needs to be carried out during the coming year to ensure that IMS infrasound stations will operate with maximum capability in accord with the specifications determined during the May 1997 PrepCom Meeting. Some of the papers presented at the Workshop suggest that it may be difficult to design a four-element infrasound array station that will reliably detect and locate infrasound signals at all frequencies in the specified range from 0.02 to 4.0 Hz in all noise environments. Hence, if the basic design of an infrasound array is restricted to four array elements, the final optimized design may be suited only to the detection and location of signals in a more limited pass-band. Several participants have also noted that the reliable discrimination of infrasound signals could be quite difficult if the detection system leads to signal distortion. Thus, it has been emphasized that the detection system should not, if possible, compromise signal fidelity. This report contains the workshop agenda, a list of participants, and abstracts and viewgraphs from each presentation

  6. IPHE Infrastructure Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-02-01

    This proceedings contains information from the IPHE Infrastructure Workshop, a two-day interactive workshop held on February 25-26, 2010, to explore the market implementation needs for hydrogen fueling station development.

  7. Workshops as a Research Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Levinsen, Karin

    2017-01-01

    This paper contributes to knowledge on workshops as a research methodology, and specifically on how such workshops pertain to e-learning. A literature review illustrated that workshops are discussed according to three different perspectives: workshops as a means, workshops as practice, and workshops as a research methodology. Focusing primarily on…

  8. "Dropbox-like" service for the University of Vienna

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The increasing popularity of dropbox and at the same time increasing awareness for data security did create the demand for an onsite "Dropbox-like" “sync and share” service at the University of Vienna. It has been decided that ownCloud would be a good start, since other academic institutions have been working on an ownCloud based solution as well. Based on ownCloud enterprise Version 6 the service is currently in test operation with campus wide availability for staff only planned for 12/2014. Major concerns were the scalability of the storage backend. So instead of using an enterprise storage solution we use Scality’s RING as backend. The RING is an object storage based solution using local storage nodes. Since the ownCloud architecture does so far not allow a RESTbased storage backend we use Scality’s FUSE connector to simulate a virtually limitless filesystem (POSIX). Based on the experiences reported by other academic facilities and our own, our main concerns have been database performance-scal...

  9. Gender and the Labour Market: Comparing Austria and Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Biffl, Gudrun

    2006-01-01

    Japan and Austria are among the OECD countries with an average labour force participation rate but an above average gender gap as far as employment opportunities and earnings are concerned. In Japan, women in the main working age have a fairly large margin of labour resources not employed in the market economy. In Austria in contrast, the proportion of unused labour resources of mature workers is high, and the gender gap is less pronounced than in Japan, which suggests that a different combin...

  10. Reconstruction of erythemal UV-doses for two stations in Austria: a comparison between alpine and urban regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Rieder

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is the reconstruction of past UV-doses for two stations in Austria, Hoher Sonnblick and Vienna, using a physical radiation transfer model. The method uses the modeled UV-dose under clear-sky conditions, cloud modification factors and a correction factor as input variables. To identify the influence of temporal resolution of input data and modification factors, an ensemble of four different modelling approaches was calculated, each with hourly or daily resolution. This is especially important because we found no other study describing the influence of the temporal resolution of input data on model performance. Following the results of the statistical analysis of the evaluation period the model with the highest temporal resolution (HMC was chosen for the reconstruction of UV-doses. A good agreement between modelled and measured values of erythemally effective UV-doses was found at both stations. In relation to the reference period 1976–1985 an increase in the erythemal UV-dose in Vienna of 11% is visible in the period 1986–1995 and an increase of 17% in the period 1996–2005 can be seen. At Hoher Sonnblick the corresponding increase is 2% and 9%. For the different seasons the strongest increase in erythemal UV-dose has been found for winter and spring season at both stations. Further the influences of total ozone and cloudiness on changes in erythemal UV-doses were analyzed. This analysis showed for both stations, that changes in total ozone had a larger influence on erythemal UV-doses than changes in cloudiness.

  11. ICP-MS Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carman, April J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Eiden, Gregory C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-11-01

    This is a short document that explains the materials that will be transmitted to LLNL and DNN HQ regarding the ICP-MS Workshop held at PNNL June 17-19th. The goal of the information is to pass on to LLNL information regarding the planning and preparations for the Workshop at PNNL in preparation of the SIMS workshop at LLNL.

  12. Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Austria - 2014 Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-03-01

    Austria's energy policy rests on three pillars – security of supply, energy efficiency and renewable energy sources. The country's decarbonisation drive has strengthened as the economy and renewable energy use have continued to grow, while fossil fuel use has decreased. Notably, Austria has more than tripled the public funding for energy research, development and demonstration since 2007. Greenhouse gas emissions from energy use, which peaked in 2005, still need to be reduced further, and the transport sector offers prime opportunities for this. In the context of EU negotiations on an energy and climate policy framework to 2030, Austria should develop a strategy that also integrates security of supply and internal market dimensions. Closer cross-border integration of both electricity and natural gas markets and systems is required to build a single European market. This calls for increased co-ordination and co-operation with neighbouring countries. Austria should also encourage investment in networks, optimise demand response and integrate variable renewable energy supply in a cost-effective and market-based manner. A well-functioning internal market can help reduce the growing concerns over energy prices and costs, both for industry and for citizens. Austria could address these concerns also by implementing more energy efficiency measures and facilitating greater retail market competition. This review analyses the energy policy challenges facing Austria and provides sectoral studies and recommendations for further policy improvements. It is intended to help guide the country towards a more secure and sustainable energy future.

  13. Characterization of HIV Transmission in South-East Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenigl, Martin; Chaillon, Antoine; Kessler, Harald H; Haas, Bernhard; Stelzl, Evelyn; Weninger, Karin; Little, Susan J; Mehta, Sanjay R

    2016-01-01

    To gain deeper insight into the epidemiology of HIV-1 transmission in South-East Austria we performed a retrospective analysis of 259 HIV-1 partial pol sequences obtained from unique individuals newly diagnosed with HIV infection in South-East Austria from 2008 through 2014. After quality filtering, putative transmission linkages were inferred when two sequences were ≤1.5% genetically different. Multiple linkages were resolved into putative transmission clusters. Further phylogenetic analyses were performed using BEAST v1.8.1. Finally, we investigated putative links between the 259 sequences from South-East Austria and all publicly available HIV polymerase sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory HIV sequence database. We found that 45.6% (118/259) of the sampled sequences were genetically linked with at least one other sequence from South-East Austria forming putative transmission clusters. Clustering individuals were more likely to be men who have sex with men (MSM; pAustria had at least one putative inferred linkage with sequences from a total of 69 other countries. In conclusion, analysis of HIV-1 sequences from newly diagnosed individuals residing in South-East Austria revealed a high degree of national and international clustering mainly within MSM. Interestingly, we found that a high number of heterosexual males clustered within MSM networks, suggesting either linkage between risk groups or misrepresentation of sexual risk behaviors by subjects.

  14. Usutu virus, Austria and Hungary, 2010-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakonyi, Tamás; Erdélyi, Károly; Brunthaler, René; Dán, Ádám; Weissenböck, Herbert; Nowotny, Norbert

    2017-10-11

    Usutu virus (USUV, Flaviviridae) was first reported in Europe in Austria in 2001, where it caused wild bird (mainly blackbird) mortality until 2005. Since 2006 no further USUV cases were diagnosed in the country. However, the virus emerged in other European countries (Hungary, Italy, Switzerland, Spain, Germany and the Czech Republic) between 2005 and 2011. In 2016, widespread USUV-associated wild bird mortality was observed in Germany, France, Belgium and the Netherlands. In this study, we report the results of passive monitoring for USUV in Austria and Hungary between 2010 and 2016. In Hungary, USUV caused sporadic cases of wild bird mortality between 2010 and 2015 (altogether 18 diagnosed cases), whereas in summer and autumn 2016 the number of cases considerably increased to 12 (ten blackbirds, one Eurasian jay and one starling). In Austria, USUV was identified in two blackbirds in 2016. Phylogenetic analyses of coding-complete genomes and partial regions of the NS5 protein gene revealed that USUVs from Hungary between 2010 and 2015 are closely related to the virus that emerged in Austria in 2001 and in Hungary in 2005, while one Hungarian sequence from 2015 and all sequences from Hungary and Austria from 2016 clustered together with USUV sequences reported from Italy between 2009 and 2010. The results of the study indicate continuous USUV circulation in the region and exchange of USUV strains between Italy, Austria and Hungary.Emerging Microbes &Infections (2017) 6, e85; doi:10.1038/emi.2017.72; published online 11 October 2017.

  15. Assessing primary care in Austria: room for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigler, Florian L; Starfield, Barbara; Sprenger, Martin; Salzer, Helmut J F; Campbell, Stephen M

    2013-04-01

    There is emerging evidence that strong primary care achieves better health at lower costs. Although primary care can be measured, in many countries, including Austria, there is little understanding of primary care development. Assessing the primary care development in Austria. A primary care assessment tool developed by Barbara Starfield in 1998 was implemented in Austria. This tool defines 15 primary care characteristics and distinguishes between system and practice characteristics. Each characteristic was evaluated by six Austrian primary care experts and rated as 2 (high), 1 (intermediate) or 0 (low) points, respectively, to their primary care strength (maximum score: n = 30). Austria received 7 out of 30 points; no characteristic was rated as '2' but 8 were rated as '0'. Compared with the 13 previously assessed countries, Austria ranks 10th of 14 countries and is classified as a 'low primary care' country. This study provides the first evidence concerning primary care in Austria, benchmarking it as weak and in need of development. The practicable application of an existing assessment tool can be encouraging for other countries to generate evidence about their primary care system as well.

  16. Near-surface geothermal potential assessment of the region Leogang - Saalbach-Hinterglemm in Salzburg, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottig, Magdalena; Rupprecht, Doris; Hoyer, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Within the EU-funded Alpine Space project GRETA (Near-surface Geothermal Resources in the Territory of the Alpine space), a potential assessment for the use of near-surface geothermal energy is being performed. The focus region for Austria is represented by the two communities Leogang and Saalbach-Hinterglemm where settlements are located in altitudes of about 800 - 1.000 m. In these communities, as well as in large parts of the alpine space region in Austria, winter sports tourism is an important economic factor. The demand for heating and domestic hot water in this region of about 6.000 inhabitants rises significantly in the winter months due to around 2 million guest nights per year. This makes clear why the focus is on touristic infrastructure like alpine huts or hotels. It is a high-altitude area with a large number of remote houses, thus district-heating is not ubiquitous - thus, near-surface geothermal energy can be a useful solution for a self-sufficient energy supply. The objective of detailed investigation within the project is, to which extent the elevation, the gradient and the orientation of the hillside influence the geothermal usability of the shallow underground. To predict temperatures in depths of up to 100 m and therefore make statements on the geothermal usability of a certain piece of land, it is necessary to attain a precise ground-temperature map which reflects the upper model boundary. As there are no ground temperature measurement stations within the region, the GBA has installed four monitoring stations. Two are located in the valley, at altitudes of about 800 m, and two in higher altitudes of about 1.200 m, one on a south- and one on a north-slope. Using a software invented by the University of Soil Sciences in Vienna a ground-temperature map will be calculated. The calculation is based on climatic data considering parameters like soil composition. Measured values from the installed monitoring stations will help to validate or to

  17. Gratkorn - A new late Middle Miocene vertebrate fauna from Styria (Late Sarmatian, Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, M.; Böhme, M.; Prieto, J.

    2009-04-01

    Integrated stratigraphic approaches provide precise correlations of global standard stages with regional Paratethys stages. Nevertheless, higher resolution stratigraphic matching of terrestrial deposits remains challenging due to the lack of a practical continental biostratigraphy. The mostly used tool for biostratigraphic correlation of non-marine deposits in the Old World is still the concept of Neogene Mammal-zones (MN-zones). However, at higher biostratigraphic resolution (reptiles (scincids, lacertids, gekkonids, anguids, varanids, colubrids, testudinids, emydids), birds (coliiformes), rodents and lagomorphs (cricetids, glirids, eomyids, sciurids, castorids), insectivores and chiropterans (erinaceids, soricids, talpids), and large mammals (suids, tragulids, moschids, cervids, ?palaeomerycids, equids, chalicotheriids, rhinos, proboscidians, carnivors). Litho- and biostratigraphy (terrestrial gastropods) as well as magnetostratigraphic data and the sequence stratigraphic and geodynamic frame indicate an age of 12-12.2 Ma (early Late Sarmatian s.str., chron 5An.1n) for the locality. Therefore, Gratkorn is one of richest and most complete fauna of the late Middle Miocene of Central Europe and will be confidentially one of the key faunas for a high-resolution continental biostratigraphy and the comprehension of the faunal succession and interchanges near the Middle/Late Miocene transition. Acknowledgements This is a preliminary overview of the Gratkorn vertebrate fauna. Several taxa are still under investigation. We are especially grateful to Gudrun Daxner-Höck, Ursula Göhlich (both Natural History Museum Vienna) and Getrud Rössner (University of Munich) for their comments to the rodents, ruminants, proboscidians and bird remains. References Böhme, M., Ilg, A., Winklhofer, M. 2008. Late Miocene "washhouse" climate in Europe.- Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 275: 393-401. Gross, M., 2008. A limnic ostracod fauna from the surroundings of the Central

  18. Edificio de Oficinas en Viena – Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lippert, Georg

    1979-05-01

    Full Text Available The main offices of Austrian Airlines are located in the outskirts of Vienna. in a large lot, 32,700 m2 in area, of which 13,000 m2 are occupied by the building, while the remaining surface are yards and landscaping. The building consists of four stories above ground and an ample basement for car park and services. The aboveground floors are distributed into numerous offices and rooms, plus a restaurant and coffee shop for guests and mess all for 800 employees and a kitchen. Outstanding in the architectural design is a 32 m-high tower conceived as a distinct element, symbolizing and suggesting from faraway the nature of the company's activities.

    Las oficinas centrales de la Austrian Airlines están emplazadas en las proximidades de Viena, en una amplia parcela de 32.700 m2, de los que la construcción ocupa 13.000, destinados los restantes a Jardines y explanadas. El edificio consta de cuatro plantas de altura máxima y un amplio sótano destinado a servicios y aparcamientos. En las plantas superiores se distribuyen numerosos despachos y oficinas, restaurante y cafetería para clientes, y comedor, con cocina, para una plantilla de 800 empleados. En el planteamiento arquitectónico destaca una torre de 32 m de altura, concebida como elemento distintivo capaz de sugerir, a distancia, la naturaleza de la actividad de la compañía.

  19. HTTR workshop (workshop on hydrogen production technology)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, Yasuaki; Takizuka, Takakazu

    2004-12-01

    Various research and development efforts have been performed to solve the global energy and environmental problems caused by large consumption of fossil fuels. Research activities on advanced hydrogen production technology by the use of nuclear heat from high temperature gas cooled reactors, for example, have been flourished in universities, research institutes and companies in many countries. The Department of HTTR Project and the Department of Advanced Nuclear Heat Technology of JAERI held the HTTR Workshop (Workshop on Hydrogen Production Technology) on July 5 and 6, 2004 to grasp the present status of R and D about the technology of HTGR and the nuclear hydrogen production in the world and to discuss about necessity of the nuclear hydrogen production and technical problems for the future development of the technology. More than 110 participants attended the Workshop including foreign participants from USA, France, Korea, Germany, Canada and United Kingdom. In the Workshop, the presentations were made on such topics as R and D programs for nuclear energy and hydrogen production technologies by thermo-chemical or other processes. Also, the possibility of the nuclear hydrogen production in the future society was discussed. The workshop showed that the R and D for the hydrogen production by the thermo-chemical process has been performed in many countries. The workshop affirmed that nuclear hydrogen production could be one of the competitive supplier of hydrogen in the future. The second HTTR Workshop will be held in the autumn next year. (author)

  20. Applied antineutrino physics workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, James C.

    2008-01-01

    This workshop is the fourth one of a series that includes the Neutrino Geophysics Conference at Honolulu, Hawaii, which I attended in 2005. This workshop was organized by the Astro-Particle and Cosmology laboratory in the recently opened Condoret building of the University of Paris. More information, including copies of the presentations, on the workshop is available on the website: www.apc.univ-paris7.fr/AAP2007/. The workshop aims at opening neutrino physics to various fields such that it can be applied in geosciences, nuclear industry (reactor and spent fuel monitoring) and non-proliferation. The workshop was attended by over 60 people from Europe, USA, Asia and Brazil. The meeting was also attended by representatives of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The workshop also included a workshop dinner on board of a river boat sailing the Seine river

  1. Annual report on the ambient air quality measurement in Austria 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spangl, W.; Nagl, C.; Schneider, J.

    2006-01-01

    A summary of the ambient air quality situation (measurements) conducted according to the Air Quality Act and the Ozone Act in Austria during 2004 is presented. The situation was assessed mainly in relation to Austrian limit and target values of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter (this is measured using two different indicators: total suspended particulates (TSP) and PM10), carbon monoxide, benzene and lead. The PM10 limit value - 35 days with average concentrations above 50 μg/m 3 - was exceeded at 27 sites. The highest exceedances were measured at traffic related sites in large cities, in particular the city of Graz, in Vienna, at industrial sites (e.g. Linz). Main sources for primary particulate matter are road traffic, domestic heating (in particular wood burning), industrial emissions, construction activities and off-road sources. For nitrogen dioxide, the short term limit value was exceeded at few traffic related sites, mainly - but not only - in larger towns. The limit value for the protection of vegetation of 30 μg/m 3 NO x was exceeded at one site in Tyrol (Kramsach). Limit values for sulfur dioxide were exceeded at three sites. Neither the limit values for carbon monoxide, lead and benzene nor the alert thresholds for nitrogen dioxide or sulfur dioxide were exceeded in this year. Deposition of total particulates limit value was exceeded at a few sites, lead and cadmium in two industrial sites. Low ozone levels were measured at most monitoring sites, the information threshold of 180 μg/m 3 ozone as one hour mean was exceeded at 21 sites on all together 9 days and the alert threshold of 240 μg/m 3 as one hour mean was not exceeded. 45 figs., 57 tabs. (nevyjel)

  2. Emergence of sandflies (Phlebotominae) in Austria, a Central European country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeppl, Wolfgang; Obwaller, Adelheid G; Weiler, Martin; Burgmann, Heinz; Mooseder, Gerhard; Lorentz, Susanne; Rauchenwald, Friedrich; Aspöck, Horst; Walochnik, Julia; Naucke, Torsten J

    2013-12-01

    The possible existence of autochthonous sandfly populations in Central Europe north of the Alps has long been excluded. However, in the past years, sandflies have been documented in Germany, Belgium, and recently, also in Austria, close to the Slovenian border. Moreover, autochthonous human Leishmania and Phlebovirus infections have been reported in Central Europe, particularly in Germany. From 2010 to 2012, sandfly trapping (740 trap nights) was performed at 53 different capture sites in Austria using battery-operated CDC miniature light traps. Sites were chosen on the basis of their climate profile in the federal states Styria, Burgenland, and Lower Austria. Sandfly specimens found were transferred to 70% ethanol for conservation. Identification was based on morphological characters of the male genitalia and the female spermathecae, respectively. Altogether, 24 specimens, 22 females and 2 males, all identified as Phlebotomus (Transphlebotomus) mascittii Grassi, 1908, were found at six different sampling sites in all three federal states investigated. The highest number of catches was made on a farm in Lower Austria. Altogether, the period of sandfly activity in Austria was shown to be much longer than presumed, the earliest capture was made on July 3rd and the latest on August 28th. Sandflies have been autochthonous in Austria in small foci probably for long, but in the course of global warming, further spreading may be expected. Although P. mascittii is only an assumed vector of Leishmania spp.-data on its experimental transmission capacity are still lacking-the wide distribution of sandflies in Austria, a country thought to be free of sandflies, further supports a potential emergence of sandflies in Central Europe. This is of medical relevance, not only with respect to the transmission of Leishmania spp. for which a reservoir is given in dogs, but also with respect to the phleboviruses.

  3. Rising prevalence of back pain in Austria: considering regional disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Großschädl, Franziska; Stolz, Erwin; Mayerl, Hannes; Rásky, Éva; Freidl, Wolfgang; Stronegger, Willibald J

    2016-01-01

    Back pain is the most common form of musculoskeletal conditions and leads to high health care costs. Information about geographic variations in highly prevalent diseases/disorders represents important implications for public health planning to face structural challenges. The present study aims to investigate regional trends in the prevalence of back pain and the role of obesity and social inequalities among Austrian adults. A secondary data analysis based on five nationally representative cross-sectional surveys (1973-2007) was carried out (N = 178,818). Back pain was measured as self-reported presence. Obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m²) was adjusted for self-report bias. For the regional analyses, Austria was divided into Western, Central and Eastern Austria. A relative index of inequality (RII) was computed to quantify the extent of social inequality. A continuous rise in back pain prevalence was observed in the three regions and among all investigated subgroups. In 2007 the age-standardised prevalence was similar in Central (36.9 %), Western (35.2 %) and Eastern Austria (34.3 %). The absolute change in back pain prevalence was highest among obese subjects in Central Austria (women: + 29.8 %, men: + 32.5 %). RIIs were unstable during the study period and in 2007 highest in Eastern Austria. Variation and trends in back pain are not attributable to geographic variation in Austria: an assumed East-West gradient in Austria has not been confirmed. Nevertheless our study confirms that back pain dramatically increased in all Austrian regions and investigated subgroups. This worrying trend should be further monitored and public health interventions should be implemented increasingly, especially among obese women and men.

  4. A golden jackal (Canis aureus) from Austria bearing Hepatozoon canis--import due to immigration into a non-endemic area?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duscher, Georg Gerhard; Kübber-Heiss, Anna; Richter, Barbara; Suchentrunk, Franz

    2013-02-01

    The protozoan Hepatozoon canis, which is transmitted via ingestion of infected ticks by canine hosts, is not endemic to mid-latitude regions in Europe. Its distribution is supposed to be linked to the occurrence of its primary tick vector Rhipicephalus sanguineus. A young male golden jackal (Canis aureus) found as road kill close to Vienna, Austria, was infected by this pathogen. Cloning and sequencing of the PCR product revealed 6 different haplotypes of H. canis. Based on the sequences, no clear relationship to the origin of infection could be traced. This is the first report of H. canis for Austria, and wild canines such as the currently found jackal may provide a source of natural spread of this parasite into non-endemic areas. This natural immigration of wild animals represents a way of pathogen introduction, which has to be considered in disease prevention in addition to human-made introduction due to animal import and export. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Open-Access-Kooperationen in Österreich: Open Access Network Austria und E-Infrastructures Austria – aktuelle Entwicklungen seit 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer, Bruno

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available [english] The Berlin Declaration on Open Access to scientific knowledge was published in October 2003. All over the world initiatives and projects were started. However, in Austria Open Access got little attention over many years. This was confirmed by a study among Austrian universities on behalf of the Council of Austrian University Libraries. Finally at the turn of the year 2012/2013 the Open Access Network Austria and the university infrastructure project E-Infrastructure Austria were started to push Open Access in Austria on a national level. So 10 years after the Berlin Declaration Austria set up the preconditions to establish sustainable Open Access.

  6. In retrospect. 7th workshop RCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knappik, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    The 7th Workshop RCA with 27 lectures and 12 poster presentation took place on 10 and 11 June 2013 in Dresden-Rossendorf. The traditional German event brought over 90 participants together from Germany, Austria, France, Switzerland and the Netherlands. This time the workshop put forward a special subject for the first time ('Obstacles and pitfalls when characterising waste packages'). A remarkable range of contributions was presented, which demonstrated the diversity and the problems of this subject matter. Medium to low radioactive waste and their final disposal was discussed. Other topics were the upcoming approval of recycling materials according to paragraph 29 StrlSchV as well as those from NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials) regarding radionuclide analytics, the range of matrices to be processed and the practical problems this causes. Although the radiological feature was the central focus, other material aspects were dealt with, above all the approval of recycling materials when nuclear power plants are dismantled, but also in research institutes, which is demanding more and more attention. The lectures by Jessica Riemer (GSI Darmstadt) on the topic 'Waste material management of a research centre with heavy ion accelerators' and Elvira Mesalic (TU Munich) on 'Determining the activity inventory of bituminized old wastes' as well as the poster by Sina Brockmann on the 'Locally resolved analysis or uranium species using a couple systems of CLSM and LIFS' were awarded prizes for being outstanding presentations. (orig.)

  7. No Borders for Tobacco Smoke in Hospitality Venues in Vienna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Neuberger

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In public places many countries banned smoking as the most important indoor source of fine airborne particulate matter. In Austria partial bans have been in force since 2009, with exemptions for the hospitality industry. From February to October 2010 we investigated PM2.5 concentrations in the breathing area of guests in well frequented Viennese establishments of all sizes, and compared these chance indoor samples with PM2.5 concentrations measured during the same half hour at the next outdoor monitoring station. The laser particle counter (OPC1.108, Grimm® used for indoor measurements had been calibrated by ß-attenuation (FH 62 I-R, Eberline®, which was used outdoors. 48% of 112 venues visited did not fully comply with the law, notwithstanding its weakness.  Highest median concentrations (in µg/m3 were found in bars (443.7, followed by nightclubs/discotheques (421.1, pubs (147.7, cafes (106.1 and restaurants (23.4. Concentrations increased with number of smokers present (p < 0.01, with medians of 282.4/241,3/67.6/6.9 µg/m³ in smoking venues/smoking rooms/adjacent non-smoking rooms/exclusive non-smoking venues. Only for the latter, a significant correlation was found with outdoor concentrations (r = 0.48, p < 0.01, while concentrations in non-smoking rooms were higher (p < 0.01 and unrelated to outdoor concentrations, but significantly dependent on concentrations in the adjacent smoking room (r = 0.64, p < 0.01. In conclusion, the partial smoking ban failed and guests of Viennese hospitality venues continue to risk disease from passive smoking, even in so-called “non-smoking rooms”, which are second-hand smoke rooms.

  8. Shallow irradiation of vienna sausage by electron beams in preventation of the slime production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Kume, Tamikazu; Ito, Hitoshi; Aoki, Shohei; Sato, Tomotaro

    1975-01-01

    Vienna sausages get spoiled by slime production or putrefaction due to the propagation of microorganisms when stored for 3 to 5 days at 10 deg C. The radiation pasteurization of vienna sausages has mainly been studied with gamma irradiation. The slime of sausages is believed to be microorganisms themselves growing on the surface of the sausages. Pasteurization of the surface of vienna sausages with electron irradiation was thus investigated. The results obtained are as follows: The vienna sausages irradiated with a dose of 0.8 to approximately 1.0 Mrad by 0.5 MeV electrons could be stored without slime production or putrefaction for more than a week at 11 deg C. The effect of pasteurization increased with energy and dose of electrons. However, the changes in the organoleptic qualities of vienna sausages were detected when irradiated with a dose of over 0.7 Mrad by 2.0 MeV electrons. Consequently, the irradiation with a dose of 1.0 Mrad by 1.0 MeV electrons was effectual in lengthening their shelf-life without deterioration of the organoleptic qualities. (author)

  9. Systems Engineering Workshops | Wind | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workshops Systems Engineering Workshops The Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop is a biennial topics relevant to systems engineering and the wind industry. The presentations and agendas are available for all of the Systems Engineering Workshops: The 1st NREL Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop

  10. Rigorous noise test and calibration check of strong-motion instrumentation at the Conrad Observatory in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, R.; Costa, G.; Lenhardt, W.; Horn, N.; Suhadolc, P.

    2012-04-01

    In the framework of the European InterregIV Italy/Austria project: "HAREIA - Historical and Recent Earthquakes in Italy and Austria" the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) and Mathematic and Geosciences Department of University of Trieste (DMG) are upgrading the transfrontier seismic network of South-Eastern Alps with new 12 accelerometric stations to enhance the strong motion instrument density near the Austria/Italy border. Various public institutions of the provinces Alto Adige (Bolzano Province), Veneto (ARPAV) and Friuli Venezia Giulia (Regional Civil Defense) in Italy and in the Austrian province of Tyrol are involved in the project. The site selection was carried out to improve the present local network geometry thus meeting the needs of public Institutions in the involved regions. In Tyrol and Alto Adige some strategic buildings (hospitals and public buildings) have been selected, whereas in Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia the sites are in the free field, mainly located near villages. The instruments will be installed in an innovative box, designed by ZAMG, that provides electric and water isolation. The common choice regarding the instrument selection has been the new Kinemetrics Basalt ® accelerograph to guarantee homogeneity with the already installed instrumentation and compatibility with the software already in use at the different seismic institutions in the area. Prior to deployment the equipment was tested at the Conrad Observatory and a common set-up has been devised. The Conrad Observatory, seismically particularly quiet, permits to analyze both the sensor and the acquisition system noise. The instruments were connected to the network and the data sent in real-time to the ZAMG data center in Vienna and the DMG data center in Trieste. The data have been collected in the database and analyzed using signal processing modules PQLX and Matlab. The data analysis of the recordings at the ultra-quiet Conrad Observatory pointed out

  11. Vulnerability of Water Resources under Climate and Land Use Change: Evaluation of Present and Future Threats for Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachtnebel, Hans-Peter; Wesemann, Johannes; Herrnegger, Mathew; Senoner, Tobias; Schulz, Karsten

    2015-04-01

    vulnerability were developed. A comparison with existing data (River Basin Management Plan and Groundwater Chemistry Regulation) shows a good agreement between the elaborated maps and observations for the present state. The Overall Vulnerability is very low and low for most parts of Austria, especially in the forested alpine region. Bigger cities like Vienna, Graz and Linz show medium vulnerabilities, due to the high water demand and low ecosystem services. Only in the north-eastern and south-eastern part of the country some water supply associations with high and very high overall vulnerability exist. Groundwater recharge is quite small in these regions and the water quality is limited due to intense agriculture and possible threats through landfills. The developed framework allows an evaluation of water quantity and quality vulnerabilities for large scales for the present and the future. Including ecosystem services and gross value added an overall vulnerability can be determined.

  12. Remarks on energy and development at IAEA Scientific Forum, 15 September 2009, Vienna, Austria. 12th Scientific Forum during the 53rd Session of the IAEA General Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2009-01-01

    My purpose this morning is to stimulate thinking about how the world might deal effectively with two major problems, energy poverty and energy insecurity. Energy poverty is widespread and persistent. Some 2.4 billion people still rely on traditional biomass fuels, and 1.6 billion people have no access to electricity. Africa suffers particularly severely. Annual electricity use in some African countries is only 50 kilowatt-hours (kWh) per person, an average of 6 watts, less than a normal light bulb. Average annual consumption in the OECD is 8600 kWh/person, roughly 170 times higher. Energy insecurity also persists. Even affluent nations have seen major blackouts and price escalation. Insecure energy markets due to political instability and price volatility are as unwelcome to producers as they are to consumers. I have argued for some time that one way of improving the way we address these problems is to create a new global energy organization to complement, not replace, existing bodies. At the moment, many institutions deal with energy, but none with a mandate that is global, comprehensive and encompasses all energy forms

  13. Water Matters - Making a Difference with Nuclear Techniques, 20 September 2011, Vienna, Austria. 14th Scientific Forum during the 55th Session of the IAEA General Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text: I am very pleased to welcome you to the 2011 IAEA Scientific Forum, which is devoted to the issue of nuclear techniques related to water. It is a special pleasure for me to be joined by such a distinguished panel in the opening session: Secretary Chu, Mr Banerjee and Vice Minister Bourrouet Vargas. I know you will be anxious to hear what these very knowledgeable speakers have to say, so I will be brief. The IAEA Scientific Forum is a valuable platform to highlight the important work which the Agency does in sustainable development. This side of the Agency's work does not get the same attention as our activities in nuclear safeguards, safety and security - but it is just as important, and of great value to the countries which benefit. Having focussed on cancer control last year, I thought nuclear techniques related to water would be an appropriate subject for this year's Forum. To quote the title of this event, Water Matters. There is virtually no area of human activity that does not depend on water. It is vital for human health, for agriculture, for industrial production, for technological development. Water is the stuff of life, but in so many parts of the world it is a source of serious problems. Many regions face acute water shortages, of which the current African drought is just the latest tragic example. One billion people have no access to adequate drinking water. Five million - mainly children - die each year due to water-borne diseases. Those numbers are expected to rise. By contrast, Pakistan is once again grappling with serious flooding, which has caused hundreds of deaths, forced millions of people from their homes and washed away vital crops. In many regions, pollution is a threat to the world's most precious natural resource - our oceans and seas. These are the source of much of our food and are vital for maintaining global climate balance. For over half a century, the IAEA has been deploying its unique expertise in using nuclear techniques to understand and manage water. In more than 90 countries, our experts work with national counterparts to find, manage and conserve freshwater supplies and protect our oceans. I am pleased that many of those national counterparts are with us today. Through the Agency's Technical Cooperation Programme we bring these techniques directly to the field, where they are used to benefit our Member States. We currently have over 100 water projects around the world that are using nuclear techniques. For example, in the Santa Elena province in Ecuador, the IAEA has worked with local partners to give over a quarter of a million people continuous access to fresh water for the first time. I saw this successful project myself in July. Together with our partners, we investigate and measure the aquifers so that wells can be drilled in the right places and long-term sustainability of water supply is assured. I am delighted that representatives from the local community are with us today. The IAEA is working with partners in Bangladesh to mitigate contamination of groundwater by natural arsenic, the worst such case in the world. The use of nuclear techniques made it possible to locate safe alternative supplies of water quickly and cheaply. In 19 African countries, where there are serious water shortages, the IAEA is helping farmers to use small-scale irrigation technology, supported by nuclear techniques, to make sure that every drop of water reaches the crops to produce greater yields. In this Scientific Forum, we are highlighting three key areas of the Agency's work that are already delivering benefits to Member States: water resource assessment, water use efficiency in agriculture, and protecting the oceans. We are fortunate to have real experts with considerable experience in all of these fields. I look forward to the active input of all of you in the next few days. Your insights and ideas will be vigorously followed up to help us improve the quality of services we offer to Member States, in cooperation with our many partners - national and international - who are represented here today. With the expertise assembled in this room, we will be better able to meet the challenges which the world faces in the area of water and to make a meaningful difference to the lives of many thousands of people. I hope you have a very successful meeting and look forward to learning of the outcome of your discussions tomorrow. Thank you. (IAEA)

  14. Opening Remarks by Mr. Yury A. Sokolov [International Conference on Opportunities and Challenges for Water Cooled Reactors in the 21. Century, Vienna (Austria), 27-30 October 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Y.A.

    2011-01-01

    On behalf of the International Atomic Energy Agency, I would like to welcome you to this important international Conference on Opportunities and Challenges for Water Cooled Reactors in the 21st Century. First, I would like to express our sincere appreciation to the European Commission, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, the World Nuclear Association and the International Electrotechnical Commission for their cooperation and the assistance provided in the organization of this conference. Challenges and opportunities, like the poles of a magnet, do not exist separately. Furthermore, what some perceive as an opportunity may be a challenge for others, and a challenge today will probably become an opportunity tomorrow. All these complexities are fully applicable to the nuclear industry and its future. Water Cooled Reactors have been the keystone of the nuclear industry in the 20th Century. As we move into the 21st Century and face new challenges such as the growth in world energy demand or the threat of global climate change, nuclear energy has been identified as one of the sources that could substantially and sustainably contribute to power the world. Many projections forecast significant growth in the use of nuclear energy both in countries currently taking advantage of it and in countries considering its use for the first time. As we look into the future with the development of advanced and innovative reactor designs and fuel cycles, it seems clear that Water Cooled Reactors will play an important role in the future too. In recent times, there has been a two prong approach on the expansion of nuclear power. - On one hand, countries with existing nuclear power programmes have made a large effort towards making the most of their current nuclear assets by capitalizing in many years of operational excellence, as well as by extending and optimizing their operational life. - On the other hand, and despite these life management efforts, there is a clear need to eventually replace current nuclear capacity and also to meet increased energy demand in an environmentally sound manner by building new nuclear power plants. These interests have motivated both countries with existing nuclear programmes and newcomer countries to consider the construction of new nuclear power plants in the 21st century, taking into account the desire to build capacity in terms of human resources, energy planning, regulatory capabilities and other infrastructure. Great attention is also directed toward making new plants simpler to operate, inspect, and maintain, thus increasing their safety and overall cost effectiveness. To support the future role of water cooled reactors, substantial design and development programmes are underway in a number of Member States to incorporate additional technology improvements into advanced nuclear power plants designs. A systematic approach and the experience of many years of successful operation have allowed designers to focus their design efforts and develop safer, more efficient and more reliable designs, and to optimize plant availability and cost through simpler operation and improved maintenance programs. This approach has also been successfully used for the optimization of all aspects of operation in currently operating plants, as their efficient and safe operation is a key factor in assuring that nuclear power will meet both the current and the future energy needs. It is also important to establish a forum to facilitate the exchange of information on building infrastructure, operational excellence and the sustainable deployment of advanced reactors because many of water cooled reactors will be built in countries with no previous nuclear power experience. IAEA has organized continuously international conferences or symposia on the operation and maintenance of existing nuclear power plants and on the development of advanced water cooled reactor technologies.

  15. Comparative international studies of osteoporosis using isotope techniques. Report of an IAEA advisory group meeting held in Vienna, Austria, 28-30 October 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    An Advisory Group Meeting convened by the IAEA in October 1992 made recommendations on the setting up of a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) using nuclear and isotopic techniques for international comparative studies of osteoporosis. The proposed CRP will be implemented by the IAEA during the period 1993-1997. The main purpose of this programme is to undertake pilot studies of bone density in selected developing country populations for the purposes of (i) determining the age of peak bone mass in each study group, and (ii) quantifying differences in bone density as functions of the age and sex of persons in the study groups, as well as quantifying differences between the study groups in different countries. The preferred technique for bone density measurements in this study is DEXA (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry). Additional measurements of trace elements in bone (and possibly also teeth) are also foreseen using neutron activation analysis and other appropriate techniques

  16. Cancer in developing countries - Facing the challenge, 20 September 2010, Vienna, Austria, 13th Scientific Forum during the 54th Session of the IAEA General Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Ladies and Gentlemen, It is a great pleasure for me to welcome you to the 2010 IAEA Scientific Forum, devoted to cancer in developing countries. I am delighted that we have been able to secure the participation of so many top cancer specialists, scientists and experts from all over the world, as well as distinguished representatives from government, the private sector and leading foundations. I am grateful to Dr Margaret Chan, Director General of the World Health Organization - our key partner in the fight against cancer - for participating by video message. We are especially honoured by the presence of the First Ladies of Egypt and Mongolia, both of whom have been outstanding advocates on behalf of cancer patients. Your support for this Scientific Forum means a lot and I thank you most warmly. During my first year as Director General of the IAEA, I have had an opportunity to visit cancer treatment centres in a number of Member States. In Egypt, I was inspired by my visit to the Children's Cancer Hospital in Cairo. The hospital was established through the good will and generosity of the people of Egypt and the selfless energy and commitment of its founders. I was particularly touched by the way in which the young patients help each other. Children who have already been through a treatment provide reassurance to others who are about to undergo it for the first time. At St Mary's Hospital in Seoul, I saw not only world-class medical care being offered to cancer patients. I was also impressed by the generosity of the Korean people, who have contributed more than $50,000 to the IAEA's cancer programme through a unique system of small donations. That money is raised through collection boxes in St Mary's Hospital and many other locations. The lesson for all of us here is obvious: we too need to work together, to share our experience, expertise and knowledge with each other and to pool our resources to ensure that cancer patients in developing countries gain access to the best modern treatment and care. When I took up my appointment as Director General in December last year, I was struck by the lack of awareness globally of just how serious a problem cancer is in developing countries. Cancer has often been seen, wrongly, as a rich person's disease. I therefore resolved to make cancer in developing countries a priority issue for my first year. On my very first overseas trip, to Nigeria, I visited the Cancer Centre and the National Hospital of Abuja. I raised the issue of cancer in developing countries in my first meeting with UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon and have continued to do so in numerous meetings with world leaders. The response has always been supportive and encouraging. I decided to devote this IAEA Scientific Forum to the subject of cancer in developing countries in the hope that bringing together the people in this room would move us a step closer to that goal. The need is great. It is not an exaggeration to say that cancer represents an imminent crisis for developing countries. Most new cancer cases and cancer deaths already occur in the developing world. Around 70 percent of cancers in developing countries are diagnosed too late for life-saving treatment. By 2030, over 13 million people worldwide will die from cancer every year. Almost 9 million of these deaths will be in developing countries. Particularly sobering is the fact that in many low-income countries, there is not a single radiation therapy machine. Millions of people who could be successfully treated die every year. Deaths from the disease disproportionately affect the poorest people in the poorest countries. I believe it is essential that cancer in developing countries should be given the recognition it deserves as a vital part of the global health agenda and that global funding for cancer control in developing countries should be increased. I very much hope that this Scientific Forum can contribute to achieving that goal. The IAEA's expertise lies in radiotherapy, nuclear medicine, radiology and medical radiation physics. Our role is unique and we have a proven record of success. We provide equipment and training, deliver know-how and technical support and help developing countries establish cancer control policies and centres. Since 1980, the IAEA has delivered over $220 million worth of cancer-related assistance to developing countries. The IAEA's Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) works with the WHO and many other partners to help developing countries establish comprehensive national cancer control programmes. In Africa, for example, we have helped some 20 Member States to establish radiotherapy capacity, enabling them to provide care for at least some of their cancer patients. But more than 80% of Africa's one billion inhabitants still have no access to basic radiotherapy and related cancer services. We at the IAEA recognise that there are limits to what we can do on our own to make improved cancer care more widely available in developing countries. With the rising number of cancer cases in developing countries, the existing radiation medicine infrastructure and available resources meet only a small proportion of the growing needs. The IAEA is a small player with modest resources and cannot act alone. But we do want to put our special expertise to work as effectively as possible, in cooperation with our partners, to help improve the lives of as many cancer patients as we can. Your input over the next two days on how we can best achieve that goal will be invaluable. Ladies and Gentlemen, I will conclude by thanking you again for your participation. It is my hope that this Scientific Forum will build new relationships and partnerships in fighting cancer in developing countries, help to mobilise new resources and leave all of us with a deeper understanding of what we can do together to help put an end to much needless suffering. Thank you. (IAEA)

  17. Introductory Statement by Won-Soo Kim [International Conference on Nuclear Security: Commitments and Actions, Vienna (Austria), 5-9 December 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Won-Soo

    2017-01-01

    We need to treat WMD risks and threats holistically. Lessons learned in one area can be emulated in another. The IAEA has learned valuable lessons through its own emergency management work and partnership with other UN agencies, including through the UN Counter-Terrorism Implementation Task Force. These lessons could be beneficial in developing response mechanisms for biological incidents.

  18. Commemoration of 50th anniversary of 'Atoms for Peace'. Ceremony for dedication of bust of Eisenhower, 4 December 2003, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Eisenhower's 'Atoms for Peace' vision, and the creation of the IAEA as a practical manifestation of that vision, came at a time when the horrifying images of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were still fresh, and when fears of the rush to acquire nuclear weapons were well-founded. 'Atoms for Peace' was a recognition of the double edged sword inherent in the atom, and invoked a solemn commitment to the ideal that nuclear science and technology should be used exclusively for peaceful purposes. In rereading Eisenhower's memorable speech to the UN General Assembly, I was struck by a number of concepts and ideas in the speech: The first is that: 'Clearly, if the people of the world are to conduct an intelligent search for peace, they must be armed with the significant facts of today's existence'; In other words, the vision of 'Atoms for Peace' must be a dynamic one, a vision that is carried out in a manner that is adjustable to current challenges. The second is the plan for implementing the vision: To encourage global investigation into the most effective peaceful uses of nuclear material; To 'allow all peoples of all nations to see that, in this enlightened age, the great powers of the earth, both of the East and of the West, are interested in human aspirations first rather than building up the armaments of war'; To open up a new channel for dialogue and develop new approaches for solving problems of global fear and insecurity; and To begin to diminish the destructive power of existing stockpiles. This 'plan for action', was clearly prescient and though a work in progress, is still as valid today as in 1953: co-operative development of peaceful technologies, active efforts to achieve nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament, clear commitment to the rights of all people to live in peace, and continued dialogue in seeking solutions for our fears and insecurities. As we celebrate the 50th anniversary of 'Atoms for Peace', it is appropriate here at the Agency - the 'brainchild' of Eisenhower and the global centre for turning this vision into reality - to rededicate ourselves to exert every effort to achieve this plan of action. Eisenhower understood the complexity of the task: 'In this quest, we must not lack patience.' We still have much work to do. But as just stated, we must not lack patience, and we must not lose faith. It is in this spirit that, on behalf of the International Atomic Energy Agency, I am honoured to accept this bust of President Dwight D. Eisenhower. (IAEA)

  19. Opening address by A. Sokolov [International Conference on the Management of Spent Fuel from Nuclear Power Reactors, Vienna (Austria), 31 May - 4 June 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Y.

    2015-01-01

    At the time of the last conference in 2006, expectations had started rising for the future of nuclear power, and they have kept rising, year by year, since then. Moreover, specific plans for new nuclear power plants have increased. The existing plants are expected to operate longer and new plants are planned in a number of countries, including both countries that already have nuclear power, such as China, India and the United Kingdom, and countries planning to build their first plant, such as Jordan, Turkey, the United Arab Emirates and some others. In addition, a large number of countries have turned to the IAEA to better understand what it would mean to have nuclear power and what infrastructure it would require. Most of the focus is on what is needed for a new country to build and start operating nuclear power plants to produce electricity — that is, the legal, regulatory, educational, operational and industrial infrastructure. Much attention has also been given to the security of the fuel supply. Are uranium resources adequate? Will the fuel supply be assured? Are there political risks that fuel supplies could be cut off, and so on? Less attention has been given so far to strategies for spent fuel management, but it must be recognized that within months of starting a new reactor, spent fuel will be discharged. Adequate capacity for storage needs to be built. Considerations need to be given to the final disposition of the fuel. Will it be seen as a resource and recycled, or will it be seen as a waste and disposed of after some 30–40 years of storage? This is a difficult issue and only a few of the present nuclear power countries have made that choice definitively. Any country embarking on nuclear power must therefore be prepared for long term storage of spent fuel and, depending on developments in the rest of the world, possibly also for ultimate disposal

  20. Welcoming Address & Opening Remarks [International Conference on Research Reactors: Safe Management and Effective Utilization, Vienna (Austria), 16-20 November 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudakov, M.

    2017-01-01

    For more than 60 years, research reactors have been centres of innovation and productivity for nuclear science and technology programmes in 67 countries around the world. Research reactors provide a multidisciplinary environment to catalyse scientific, industrial, medical and agricultural development. They are facilities for nuclear education and training of young scientists and technicians, and they can contribute to the development of nuclear power programmes. According to the IAEA Research Reactor Database, there are 246 research reactors currently in operation in 55 countries, and close to 30 new research reactor projects are at different stages of implementation. Many of the operating reactors are several decades old and face ageing management issues. These reactors must be operated and maintained with due regard to safety and security. Some reactors face challenges with sustainable supply of fresh fuel. Others are looking to improve utilization, which is linked to justifying adequate resources for operation, maintenance and refurbishment. As some of the fuel return programmes are expected to wind down in the near term, the community will need to find solutions for spent fuel and waste management. And taking into account the large number of reactors, about 140, no longer in operation, as well as ageing reactors coming to the end of their lifecycles, decommissioning is an important area of sharing experience and best practice. You will have an opportunity to discuss these and other issues over the course of the conference.

  1. Remarks at Groundbreaking Ceremony for Renovation of NA Laboratories and 50th Anniversary of Joint FAO/IAEA Division, 29 September 2014, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yukiya

    2014-01-01

    The IAEA is unique within the UN family in having no fewer than eight Nuclear Applications laboratories here in Seibersdorf. Since they opened in 1962, the laboratories have been offering training to scientists in Member States; supporting research in human health, food and other areas; and providing analytical services to national laboratories. Demand for their services has grown dramatically. Back in 1962, the Agency had 79 Member States. Today, we have 162 - and our General Conference approved the admission of four more countries last week. In the last ten years alone, both the number of Technical Cooperation projects supported by the Insect Pest Control Laboratory, and the number of radiation therapy beams checked by the Dosimetry Laboratory, have nearly doubled. The other laboratories report a similar pattern of increasing demand. This is very welcome. However, the laboratories are showing their age. The buildings are now too small. And both they, and the equipment they contain, are in urgent need of modernisation. We are unable to keep up with demand from Member States for placements for scientific fellows and have to turn many excellent candidates away. We have therefore developed a project, known as ReNuAL, to thoroughly modernise the laboratories over the next three years

  2. Draft consultants' report. Consultants' meeting on requirements regarding the harmonization of laboratory quality assurance systems, 2-5 May 1995, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The consultants were requested to advise the Agency on the realization of a harmonized approach to internationally compatible quality assurance systems. The consultants presented their viewpoint and position papers in relation to initial questions posed, reflecting the international efforts and their own experiences in analytical quality assurance. The consultants made specific recommendations concerning various aspects of the Agency's Analytical Quality Assurance Services Programme

  3. Report on attendance at a technical committee meeting on 'Recognition and evaluation of uraniferous areas' - Vienna, Austria, 17-21 November 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Backstrom, J.W.

    1976-04-01

    The energy situation has focussed attention on the potential role of uranium as a future source of increased and assured energy supplies. As a result, a large demand for uranium is forecast which cannot be satisfied merely by finding new ore bodies in known areas. New potentially favourable uranium areas must be discovered. How to select the most favourable regions for prospection, how to evaluate the uranium potential of unexplored areas, and a review of current guidelines, are dealt with in 17 papers presented to the meeting, and by three Working Groups set up specially for this purpose [af

  4. 77 FR 31371 - Public Workshop: Privacy Compliance Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... presentations, including the privacy compliance fundamentals, privacy and data security, and the privacy... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Office of the Secretary Public Workshop: Privacy Compliance... Homeland Security Privacy Office will host a public workshop, ``Privacy Compliance Workshop.'' DATES: The...

  5. Tandem mirror theory workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    The workshop was divided into three sections which were constituted according to subject matter: RF Heating, MHD Equilibrium and Stability, and Transport and Microstability. An overview from Livermore's point of view was given at the beginning of each session. Each session was assigned a secretary to take notes. These notes have been used in preparing this report on the workshop. The report includes the activities, conclusions, and recommendations of the workshop

  6. Innovative confinement concepts workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Innovative Confinement Concepts Workshop occurred in California during the week preceding the Second Symposium on Current Trends in International Fusion Research. An informal report was made to the Second Symposium. A summary of the Workshop concluded that some very promising ideas were presented, that innovative concept development is a central element of the restructured US DOE. Fusion Energy Sciences program, and that the Workshop should promote real scientific progress in fusion

  7. Emergency response workers workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agapeev, S.A.; Glukhikh, E.N.; Tyurin, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    A training workshop entitled Current issues and potential improvements in Rosatom Corporation emergency prevention and response system was held in May-June, 2012. The workshop combined theoretical training with full-scale practical exercise that demonstrated the existing innovative capabilities for radiation reconnaissance, diving equipment and robotics, aircraft, emergency response and rescue hardware and machinery. This paper describes the activities carried out during the workshop [ru

  8. S.H. and others v. Austria and circumvention tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn Cohen, I

    2012-12-01

    This commentary discusses the decision in S.H. and Others v. Austria from a political theoretical and bioethical perspective. I focus on the opinion's discussion of what I call 'circumvention tourism', travelling abroad for the purpose of circumventing domestic prohibitions, especially as to medical services. The majority opinion in the case touts Austria's allowance of circumvention tourism for reproductive technology services that are illegal on Austrian soil as a reason to find as lawful Austria's prohibition on using those services on Austrian soil. To the contrary, I show that, in many ways, permitting circumvention tourism for these services while prohibiting them domestically is deeply problematic. Copyright © 2012 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Arts@CERN | ACCELERATE Austria | 19 May | IdeaSquare

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    ​Arts@CERN welcomes you to a talk by architects Sandra Manninger and Matias Del Campo, at IdeaSquare (Point 1) on May 19 at 6:00 p.m.   Sensible Bodies - architecture, data, and desire. Sandra and Matias are the winning architects for ACCELERATE Austria. Focusing on the notion of geometry, they are at CERN during the month of May, as artists in residence. Their research highlights how to go beyond beautiful data to discover something that could be defined voluptuous data. This coagulation of numbers, algorithms, procedures and programs uses the forces of thriving nature and, passing through the calculation of a multi-core processor, knits them with human desire. Read more. ACCELERATE Austria is supported by The Department of Arts of the Federal Chancellery of Austria. Thursday, May 19 at 6:00 p.m. at IdeaSquare.  See event on Indico. 

  10. Alternate fusion fuels workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-06-01

    The workshop was organized to focus on a specific confinement scheme: the tokamak. The workshop was divided into two parts: systems and physics. The topics discussed in the systems session were narrowly focused on systems and engineering considerations in the tokamak geometry. The workshop participants reviewed the status of system studies, trade-offs between d-t and d-d based reactors and engineering problems associated with the design of a high-temperature, high-field reactor utilizing advanced fuels. In the physics session issues were discussed dealing with high-beta stability, synchrotron losses and transport in alternate fuel systems. The agenda for the workshop is attached

  11. MOOC Design Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Rikke Toft; Mor, Yishay; Warburton, Steven

    2016-01-01

    For the last two years we have been running a series of successful MOOC design workshops. These workshops build on previous work in learning design and MOOC design patterns. The aim of these workshops is to aid practitioners in defining and conceptualising educational innovations (predominantly......, but not exclusively MOOCs) which are based on an empathic user-centered view of the target learners and teachers. In this paper, we share the main principles, patterns and resources of our workshops and present some initial results for their effectiveness...

  12. Tšetšeenid, Leivo ja Austria / Priit Hõbemägi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hõbemägi, Priit, 1957-

    2004-01-01

    Eesti, Läti, Leedu ja Austria siseministrid esitasid ühise idee rajada Ukrainasse tšetšeeni põgenikele pagulaslaager. Autor selgitab, mis huvid võisid olla Eesti ja Austria siseministritel sellise idee esitamisel

  13. Design and quality assurance of control and instrumentation systems, licensing practice in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasko, Peter.

    1978-01-01

    The practicised way how licensing of control and instrumentation systems is performed in Austria, is related. As there is no national regulations in Austria for licensing nuclear power plants, it tries to adopt international regulations for its own purpose. (author)

  14. Application of the Vienna Convention and the implementation at worldwide level of nuclear liability principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Favini, J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper analyses the distinction between the status of the Vienna Convention and the status of the incorporation of the Convention's principles in national laws. Ten countries are Parties to the Vienna Convention, three others have signed it (only one of which could become a Party in the short term) and only two have established legislation. In such circumstances, and for the future, any analysis should be expanded to encompass the present and potential difficulties of the nuclear industry which has been particularly affected by the world economic and financial crisis. Also, a better understanding of the basic differences between the majority of countries which are potential parties to the Vienna Convention and the countries parties to the Paris Convention should be attained by a study on a case-by-case basis. (NEA) [fr

  15. Proceedings of the Toronto TEAM/ACES workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.

    1991-03-01

    The third TEAM Workshop of the third round was held at Ontario Hydro in Toronto 25--26 October 1990, immediately following the Conference on Electromagnetic Field Computation. This was the first Joint Workshop with ACES (Applied Computational Electromagnetics Society), whose goals are similar to TEAM, but who tend to work at higher frequencies (Antennas, Propagation, and Scattering). A fusion problem, the eddy current heating of the case of the Euratom Large Coil Project Coil, was adapted as Problem 14 at the Oxford Workshop, and a solution to that problem was presented at Toronto by Oskar Biro of the Graz (Austria) University of Technology. Individual solutions were also presented for Problems 8 (Flaw in a Plate) and 9 (Moving Coil inside a Pipe). Five new solutions were presented to Problem 13 (DC Coil in a Ferromagnetic Yoke), and Koji Fujiwara of Okayama University summarized these solutions along with the similar number presented at Oxford. The solutions agreed well in the air but disagreed in the steel. Codes with a formulation in magnetic field strength or scalar potential underestimated the flux density in the steel, and codes based on flux density or vector potential overestimated it. Codes with edge elements appeared to do better than codes with nodal elements. These results stimulated considerable discussions; in my view that was the most valuable result of the workshop

  16. New Developments on the Renewable Energy Sector in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedmidubsky, A.; Geisslhofer, A.

    1998-01-01

    Signing the Kyoto Protocol, Austria has taken on the commitment to reduce its emission of greenhouse gases by 10%. Besides the improvement of energy efficiency and energy savings, increasing the share of renewable energy is one of the most promising strategies to reduce present CO 2 emissions. One of the possibilities to strengthen market penetration of renewable energy is to introduce biomass pellets into the market. This presentation will show the present situation in Austria and the measures planned to be set to increase their utilisation. (author)

  17. [Commentary on the planned restructuring of mammography screening in Austria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vutuc, Christian; Haidinger, Gerald

    2011-08-01

    With regards to the planned reorganisation of screening mammography in Austria - from an opportunistic to an organised system - the problems related with such a change are depicted from an epidemiological point of view. We were able to demonstrate earlier that opportunistic screening mammography matches the results of controlled screening mammography in Finland and Sweden. Switching to a controlled system in Austria would - besides the need for a change in legislation - lead to enormous expenditures in terms of resources needed and moreover, it could be not evaluated for years.

  18. The potential of renewable sources of energy in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faninger, G.

    1991-11-01

    Besides hydropower and biomass, solar energy and biomass are candidates for renewable sources of energy. The demand for biomass, solar energy and ambient heat has been rising in all spheres: from 6.8% in 1983 to about 10% in 1990. The development of the market for solar and heat pump systems is continuing its positive tendency. It is expected, that solar as well as heat pump technologies could provide substantial contribution to the energy supply in Austria. The technical usable potential of renewable sources of energy in Austria is analysed. (author)

  19. Chernobyl - 30 years thereafter. Experiences and lessons learned in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maringer, Franz Josef; Hajek, Michael; Steger, Ferdinand; Hefner, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    During the severe reactor accident in Chernobyl in 1986 large amounts of radioactive materials have been released to the environment. Unfavorable atmospheric circulation conditions have transported about 2%of the released radioactive matter to Austria. The contribution describes the measures and actions for dose reduction performed in Austria. The measured cs-137 distribution is illustrated (in some areas more the 100 Bq/m2 were deposited). Experiences considering the measurements in consequence of the contamination are discussed and improvements of the emergency planning are summarized.

  20. Port competition and selection in contestable hinterlands : the case of Austria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langen, de P.W.

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with port competition and port selection for cargo to/from Austria. Austria is located centrally in Europe and seaports in at least five countries are used for imports and exports. Changes of market shares over time of different ports serving Austria are analysed. Switching of cargo

  1. 77 FR 65361 - Xanthan Gum From Austria and the People's Republic of China: Postponement of Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... Austria and the People's Republic of China: Postponement of Preliminary Determinations of Antidumping Duty...: October 26, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Karine Gziryan (Austria) or Brandon Farlander (People's... of initiation of antidumping duty investigations of xanthan gum from Austria and the People's...

  2. Strike-slip tectonics and Quaternary basin formation along the Vienna Basin fault system inferred from Bouguer gravity derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salcher, B. C.; Meurers, B.; Smit, J.; Decker, K.; HöLzel, M.; Wagreich, M.

    2012-01-01

    The Vienna Basin at the transition between the Alpine and Carpathian belt hosts a number of large Pleistocene sub-basins forming along an active continental scale strike-slip fault (Vienna Basin strike-slip fault). We utilize first-order derivatives from industrial Bouguer gravity data to unravel

  3. Optional Protocol concerning the compulsory settlement of disputes to the Vienna Convention on civil liability for nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the Optional Protocol Concerning the Compulsory Settlement of Disputes to the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage which was adopted on 21 May 1963 by the International Conference held in Vienna from 29 April to 19 May 1963. It came into force on 13 May 1999

  4. CONSTRUCTION AND REARING OF THE MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY, CERATITIS CAPITATA, GENETIC SEXING STRAINS, VIENNA-8 WITH MALES CARRYING THE MARKER SERGEANT-2 (VIENNA-8/Sr2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHOMAN, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    A trial on the construction, maintenance and adaptation of the genetic sexing strain Vienna-8/Sr2 of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wied.), has been done in the fruit fly laboratories of the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority (EAEA) in the cooperation with the laboratories of International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna. This trial was successful and this strain was maintained in the medfly laboratories of the EAEA for more than 10 generations up till now. Vienna-8/ Sr 2 is very stable strain and carries the dominant mutation called sergeant-2 (Sr 2 ) and could be used as a visible marker for the sterile male flies released in the field for controlling the Mediterranean fruit fly. This visible marker simplifies the discrimination between released sterile males and wild males caught in field monitoring traps. Males of this strain have three white stripes on the abdomen while wild males have only two stripes. The use of this genetic marker, as a replacement of the external dye marker, clearly has an immediate positive impact on the efficiency of Mediterranean fruit fly SIT programs (by using gamma radiation)

  5. Workshop of medical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This event was held in San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentine Republic from 14 th. through 18 th. November, 1988. A great part of the physicians in the area of medical physics participated in this workshop. This volume includes the papers presented at this Workshop of Medical Physics [es

  6. Workshops on Writing Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-09-30

    Sep 30, 2017 ... hands-on practice, feedback, mentoring and highly interactive sessions. The focus will be on work done as individuals and in teams. Maximum number of participants for the workshop is limited. The workshop is compulso- rily residential. Boarding and lodging free for selected candidates. Re-imbursement ...

  7. Warehouse Sanitation Workshop Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food and Drug Administration (DHHS/PHS), Washington, DC.

    This workshop handbook contains information and reference materials on proper food warehouse sanitation. The materials have been used at Food and Drug Administration (FDA) food warehouse sanitation workshops, and are selected by the FDA for use by food warehouse operators and for training warehouse sanitation employees. The handbook is divided…

  8. SPLASH'13 workshops summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, S.; Schultz, U. P.

    2013-01-01

    Following its long-standing tradition, SPLASH 2013 will host 19 high-quality workshops, allowing their participants to meet and discuss research questions with peers, to mature new and exciting ideas, and to build up communities and start new collaborations. SPLASH workshops complement the main t...

  9. PREFACE: Proceedings of the First International Workshop on the Theoretical Calculation of ELNES and XANES (TEX2008) (Nagoya, Japan, 2-4 July 2008) Proceedings of the First International Workshop on the Theoretical Calculation of ELNES and XANES (TEX2008) (Nagoya, Japan, 2-4 July 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Isao; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki

    2009-03-01

    -or-less independently by the two communities. The three-day workshop on the Theoretical Calculation of ELNES and XANES (TEX2008) was planned to help remedy this situation. It aimed to demonstrate capability of state-of-the-art theoretical techniques to explain and predict ELNES and XANES spectra, and to allow deep discussion between scientists in the two communities. It also provided an excellent opportunity to introduce experimentalists to the computational techniques available. Invited talks and poster presentations by leading scientists were given on the first day, which was followed by tutorial sessions for five computer programs on the second and third days. Excellent lectures were given by Peter Blaha (Vienna, Austria) on the WIEN2k code, Chris J Pickard (St Andrews, UK) on the CASTEP code, John J Rehr (Seattle, USA) on the FEFF8 code, Frank de Groot (Utrecht, The Netherlands) on the CTM4XAS code, and Hidekazu Ikeno (Kyoto, Japan) on the first-principles CI-multiplet code. Thanks to the enthusiastic participation of more than 100 scientists from around the world, the workshop was a complete success. The aim of this special issue in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter is to share with the readers the most up-to-date knowledge presented at the workshop. We believe this will prove useful as a reference for researchers in many different fields, as well as an overview of the current status and future directions of theoretical calculations for ELNES and XANES. TEX2008 was a satellite meeting of the First International Symposium on Advanced Microscopy and Theoretical Calculations (AMTC1) (Nagoya, Japan, 29-30 June 2008), which was held in commemoration of the establishment of the Nanostuctures Research Laboratory (NSRL) at the Japan Fine Ceramics Center (JFCC) and as a daughter event of EXPO 2005, Aichi, Japan. A Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Priority Areas 'Nano Materials Science for Atomic-Scale Modification' from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports and Technology

  10. Special waste disposal in Austria - cost benefit analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuntscher, H.

    1983-01-01

    The present situation of special waste disposal in Austria is summarized for radioactive and nonradioactive wastes. A cost benefit analysis for regulary collection, transport and disposal of industrial wastes, especially chemical wastes is given and the cost burden for the industry is calculated. (A.N.)

  11. Psychopathology in African Unaccompanied Refugee Minors in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huemer, Julia; Karnik, Niranjan; Voelkl-Kernstock, Sabine; Granditsch, Elisabeth; Plattner, Belinda; Friedrich, Max; Steiner, Hans

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the prevalence of a range of psychopathology among African unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs) in Austria. Additionally, the predictive value of war exposure on PTSD symptoms was examined. Forty-one URMs were assessed with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview for children and adolescents, the Youth Self-Report, the UCLA…

  12. Tobacco policies in Austria during the Third Reich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachinger, E; McKee, M

    2007-09-01

    The anti-smoking stance taken by Adolf Hitler, coupled with Nazi support for research on smoking and lung cancer and campaigns to discourage smoking, have encouraged pro-smoking groups to equate tobacco control activities with totalitarianism. Previous work has described the situation in Germany. To examine the situation in Austria, also part of the Reich after 1938. Iterative analysis of documents and reports about the situation in Austria in the 1930s and 1940s, supplemented by a review of Reich legal ordinances, party newspapers, health behaviour guidelines issued by Nazi party organisations and interviews with expert informants. In contrast to the situation in Germany where, albeit to a much lesser degree than is commonly believed, some anti-smoking policies were adopted, the Nazi authorities in Austria made almost no attempt to discourage smoking and the Austrian tobacco company worked closely with the Nazi authorities to ensure that supplies were maintained. Especially when looked at in the Austrian context, the much-cited link between anti-smoking policies and Nazism is a gross over-simplification. This purported link should not be used to justify the continued failure to act effectively against smoking in Germany and Austria.

  13. Austria: Persistent low fertility since the mid-1980s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henriette Engelhardt

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This chapter offers an in-depth analysis of fertility in Austria, a country which has experienced a low and relatively stable fertility level and a gradual postponement of childbearing since the mid-1980s. We begin by summarising Austrian population trends in the post-World War II period and highlighting recent relatively high migration levels. We outline the long history of sub-replacement fertility and high childlessness in Austria and look in detail at recent parity-specific developments, trends in family size, delayed childbearing and persistent fertility differences by education level, country of origin and religious affiliation. The chapter then summarises main trends in family-related behaviour, including the changing patterns of leaving parental home, the rise in cohabitation, the decline in marriage and the rise of divorce and the diversity in non-marital childbearing, which has a long tradition in many parts of the country. We discuss the development of family policies in Austria and their relationship to fertility during the past decades. Social policies in Austria provide only a limited support for a reconciliation of childrearing and employment among mothers with children below the age of three. A combination of one of the highest family spending rates among the OECD countries and the low fertility rates indicate that structural constraints (such as the availability of childcare constitute part of the explanation of low fertility.

  14. Vulnerability of crops to climate change in Northeastern Austria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Thaler, S.; Eitzinger, J.; Rischbeck, P. M.; Dubrovský, Martin; Trnka, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2010), s. 50-61 ISSN 0861-0762 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300420806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Climate change * crops * Austria * weather generator Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  15. Meeting report: Vienna 2008 Workshop of the German–Austrian Working Group for Studying Prognostic Factors in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Valent , Peter; Hofmann , Wolf-Karsten; Büsche , Guntram; Sotlar , Karl; Horny , Hans-Peter; Haase , Detlef; Haferlach , Torsten; Kern , Wolfgang; Bettelheim , Peter; Baumgartner , Christian; Sperr , Wolfgang R.; Nösslinger , Thomas; Wimazal , Friedrich; Giagounidis , Aristoteles A.; Lübbert , Michael

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Criteria, scoring systems, and treatment algorithms for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) have been updated repeatedly in recent years. This apparently results from increased awareness and early recognition of the disease, an increasing number of new diagnostic and prognostic markers and tools, and new therapeutic options that may change the course and thus prognosis in MDS. To address these challenges and to create useful new diagnostic and prognostic parameters and scores,...

  16. Autochthonous leptospirosis in South-East Austria, 2004-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenigl, Martin; Wallner, Carina; Allerberger, Franz; Schmoll, Friedrich; Seeber, Katharina; Wagner, Jasmin; Valentin, Thomas; Zollner-Schwetz, Ines; Flick, Holger; Krause, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis is one of the world's mostly spread zoonoses causing acute fever. Over years, leptospirosis has been reported to occur rarely in Austria and Germany (annual incidence of 0.06/100,000 in Germany). Only imported cases have been on the increase. Objectives of this case-series study were to retrospectively assess epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of leptospirosis illnesses in South-East Austria, to describe risk exposures for autochthonous infections, and to compare patients with imported versus autochthonous infection. During the 9-year period between 2004 and 2012, 127 adult patients (49 females, 78 males) who tested positive by rapid point-of-care test for Leptospira-specific IgM (Leptocheck®) were identified through electronic hospital databases. Follow-up telephone interviews were conducted with 82 patients. A total of 114 (89.8%) of the 127 patients enrolled had acquired leptospirosis within Austria and 13 (10.2%) had potentially imported infections. Most autochthonous cases were diagnosed during the months of June and July, whereas fewest were diagnosed during the winter months. Exposure to rodents, recreational activities in woods or wet areas, gardening, cleaning of basements or huts were the most common risk exposures found in autochthonous infection. Serogroups Australis (n = 23), Sejroe (n = 22), and Icterohaemorrhagiae (n = 11) were identified most frequently by MAT testing in autochthonous infections. Patients with imported leptospirosis were significantly younger, less likely to be icteric and had significantly lower liver transaminase levels (p = 0.004) than those with autochthonous infections. Leptospirosis is endemic in South-East Austria. In contrast to reports from other countries we found a relatively high proportion of leptospirosis cases to be female (39% vs. ∼ 10%), likely the result of differing risk exposures for South-East Austria.

  17. Multihazard risk analysis and disaster planning for emergency services as a basis for efficient provision in the case of natural hazards - case study municipality of Au, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltzkait, Anika; Pfurtscheller, Clemens

    2014-05-01

    Multihazard risk analysis and disaster planning for emergency services as a basis for efficient provision in the case of natural hazards - case study municipality of Au, Austria A. Maltzkait (1) & C. Pfurtscheller (1) (1) Institute for Interdisciplinary Mountain Research (IGF), Austrian Academy of Sciences, Innsbruck, Austria The extreme flood events of 2002, 2005 and 2013 in Austria underlined the importance of local emergency services being able to withstand and reduce the adverse impacts of natural hazards. Although for legal reasons municipal emergency and crisis management plans exist in Austria, they mostly do not cover risk analyses of natural hazards - a sound, comparable assessment to identify and evaluate risks. Moreover, total losses and operational emergencies triggered by natural hazards have increased in recent decades. Given sparse public funds, objective budget decisions are needed to ensure the efficient provision of operating resources, like personnel, vehicles and equipment in the case of natural hazards. We present a case study of the municipality of Au, Austria, which was hardly affected during the 2005 floods. Our approach is primarily based on a qualitative risk analysis, combining existing hazard plans, GIS data, field mapping and data on operational efforts of the fire departments. The risk analysis includes a map of phenomena discussed in a workshop with local experts and a list of risks as well as a risk matrix prepared at that workshop. On the basis for the exact requirements for technical and non-technical mitigation measures for each natural hazard risk were analysed in close collaboration with members of the municipal operation control and members of the local emergency services (fire brigade, Red Cross). The measures includes warning, evacuation and, technical interventions with heavy equipment and personnel. These results are used, first, to improve the municipal emergency and crisis management plan by providing a risk map, and a

  18. In retrospect. 7th workshop RCA; Nachlese. 7. Workshop RCA. Conference report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knappik, Reinhard [Verein fuer Kernverfahrenstechnik und Analytik Rossendorf e.V. (VKTA), Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany). Programmausschuss Workshop RCA

    2013-08-15

    The 7th Workshop RCA with 27 lectures and 12 poster presentation took place on 10 and 11 June 2013 in Dresden-Rossendorf. The traditional German event brought over 90 participants together from Germany, Austria, France, Switzerland and the Netherlands. This time the workshop put forward a special subject for the first time ('Obstacles and pitfalls when characterising waste packages'). A remarkable range of contributions was presented, which demonstrated the diversity and the problems of this subject matter. Medium to low radioactive waste and their final disposal was discussed. Other topics were the upcoming approval of recycling materials according to paragraph 29 StrlSchV as well as those from NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials) regarding radionuclide analytics, the range of matrices to be processed and the practical problems this causes. Although the radiological feature was the central focus, other material aspects were dealt with, above all the approval of recycling materials when nuclear power plants are dismantled, but also in research institutes, which is demanding more and more attention. The lectures by Jessica Riemer (GSI Darmstadt) on the topic 'Waste material management of a research centre with heavy ion accelerators' and Elvira Mesalic (TU Munich) on 'Determining the activity inventory of bituminized old wastes' as well as the poster by Sina Brockmann on the 'Locally resolved analysis or uranium species using a couple systems of CLSM and LIFS' were awarded prizes for being outstanding presentations. (orig.)

  19. Distribution of excess temperature from the Vienna Generating Station on the Nanticoke River. Technical report 90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, H.H.; Regier, R.J.

    1975-06-01

    Temperature and dye tracer data, collected in the Nanticoke River in the vicinity of the Delmarva Power and Light Company Vienna fossil-fuel power plant between 12 and 26 April 1974 were analyzed and interpreted in terms of the distribution of excess temperature as a function of tidal phase. Cooling water flows and plant recirculation were also determined. (U.S.)

  20. 9 CFR 319.180 - Frankfurter, frank, furter, hotdog, weiner, vienna, bologna, garlic bologna, knockwurst, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) Frankfurter, frank, furter, hot-dog, wiener, vienna, bologna, garlic bologna, knockwurst and similar cooked... accordance with the provisions of § 381.118 of this chapter. (b) Frankfurter, frank, furter, hot-dog, wiener..., lips, weasands, and spleens; and partially defatted pork fatty tissue, or partially defatted beef fatty...

  1. Triple Line-Voltage Cascaded VIENNA Converter Applied as the Medium-Voltage AC Drive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Zou

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel rectifier based on a triple line-voltage cascaded VIENNA converter (LVC-VC was proposed. Compared to the conventional cascaded H-bridge converters, the switch voltage stress is lower, and the numbers of switches and dc capacitors are fewer under similar operating conditions in the proposed new multilevel converter. The modeling and control for the LVC-VC ware presented. Based on the analysis of the operation principle of the new converter, the power factor correction of the proposed converter was realized by employing a traditional one-cycle control strategy. The minimum average value and maximum harmonic components of the dc-link voltages of the three VIENNA rectifier modules ware calculated. Three VIENNA dc-link voltages were unbalanced under the unbalanced load conditions, so the zero sequence current was injected to the three inner currents for balancing three VIENNA dc-link voltages. Simulation and the results of the experiment verified the availability of the new proposed multilevel converter and the effectiveness of the corresponding control strategy applied.

  2. Surveying the Vienna Meridian from Brno to Varaždin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljenko Solarić

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The introduction provides a brief overview of using trigonometric chains for determining meridian arc lengths in Europe, as well as their extension to trigonometric networks in order to produce contemporary accurate maps in France. After Ruđer Bošković had visited Croatian-Hungarian Queen and Roman-German Empress Maria Theresa, she ordered Jesuit Joseph Liesganig to survey the meridian from Brno (Soběšice, over Vienna and Graz to Varaždin by establishing and surveying a trigonometric chain. That distance amounts to 320 km, i.e. the difference between latitude of the starting and finishing points of the chain equaled 2° 56' 45.85''. Two baselines were measured directly between Wiener Neustadt and Neunkirchen of 6410.903 Vienna fathom (12 158.175 m and between Seyring and Glizendorf in the Moravian field (Moravské pole, Marchfeld of 6387.862 Vienna fathom (12 114.478 m. Liesganig published previous Vienna Meridian survey results in Philosophical Transactions in London in 1768 and the final results in Latin in Dimensio Graduum Meridiani Viennensis et Hungarici in 1770. His results were quickly criticized and subsequently subjected to validation. Trigonometric point Varaždin is the first and oldest trigonometric point in Croatia.

  3. The Vienna Frailty Questionnaire for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities--Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehmer-Rinderer, Barbara; Zeilinger, Elisabeth Lucia; Radaljevic, Ana; Weber, Germain

    2013-01-01

    Frailty is a theoretical concept used to track individual age-related declines. Persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) often present with pre-existing deficits that would be considered frailty markers in the general population. The previously developed Vienna Frailty Questionnaire for Persons with ID (VFQ-ID) was aimed at assessing frailty in…

  4. Josephinische Bibliothek und medizinhistorische Bestände der Universitätsbibliothek der Medizinischen Universität Wien [The Josephinian Library and the medical-historic stock of the University Library of the Medical University of Vienna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht, Harald

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available [english] The University Library of the Medical University of Vienna, founded in 2004, is the most extensive medical library in Austria. It possesses an outstanding medical-historic stock which is basically stored in its Branch Library of Medical History. This unique stock also is a historical source itself because it represents the development of the supply of the Medical Faculty of Vienna, Viennese hospitals and medical societies with scientific literature and information during the last centuries. The brunch library contains several remarkable special-collections such as the Josephinian Library, the Library of Neurology (Obersteiner-Library, the Library of the Society of Physicians in Vienna or the Library of the Austrian Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.In order to deal with its own history the University Library runs a provenance-research project to identify expropriated goods transferred to its stock during the Nazi-regime and restores them to their rightful owners. It also runs a weblog-series “Displaced 1938”, which is about displaced members of the Medical Faculty of Vienna during World . Currently it establishes a bio-bibliographical online-portal about exponents of the so called “Vienna Medical School(s” between 1750 and 1950 as well as an online bookplate database.To improve the access to large parts of the stock the ancient card indexes got digitalized (including OCR-reading and have been online since 2010. Supplementary the University Library of the Medical University of Vienna engages in the European cooperation on E-books on Demand (EOD.[german] Die Universitätsbibliothek der 2004 errichteten Medizinischen Universität Wien ist die größte medizinische Fachbibliothek in Österreich. Sie verfügt auch über bedeutende medizinhistorische Bestände, die überwiegend in der Zweigbibliothek für Geschichte der Medizin untergebracht sind und auch eine Quelle für die Entwicklung der Literatur- und

  5. Towards a Sustainable Spatial Organization of the Energy System: Backcasting Experiences from Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Knoflacher

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The transition to a sustainable energy system faces more challenges than a simple replacement of fossil energy sources by renewable ones. Since current structures do not favor sustainable energy generation and use, it is indispensable to change the existing infrastructure. A fundamental change of the energy system also requires re-organizing spatial structures and their respective institutions and governance structures. Especially in Austria, urban sprawl and unsustainable settlement structures are regarded as one of the main developments leading to increased energy demand. One of the aims within the project E-Trans 2050 was to identify socio-economic constellations that are central to the further transformation of the energy system and to focus on actors and their socio-technical framework conditions. Based on a sustainable future vision for the year 2050 a backcasting workshop was conducted to identify necessary steps for the envisaged transition to a more sustainable energy system. The results shed light on the necessary changes for a transformation towards sustainability in the specific Austrian situation. Critical issues are region-specific production of energy and its use, settlement and regional structures and values and role models, which all have a determining influence on energy demand. Combining the knowledge of extensive energy use with available energy resources in spatial planning decisions is a main challenge towards a long term sustainable energy system.

  6. PV radiometrics workshop proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    This report documents presentations and discussions held at the Photovoltaics Radiometeric Measurements Workshop conducted at Vail, Colorado, on July 24 and 25, 1995. The workshop was sponsored and financed by the Photovoltaic Module and Systems Performance and Engineering Project managed by Richard DeBlasio, Principal Investigator. That project is a component of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Photovoltaic Research and Development Program, conducted by NREL for the US Department of Energy, through the NREL Photovoltaic Engineering and Applications Branch, managed by Roland Hulstrom. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this workshop.

  7. Nuclear Innovation Workshops Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, John Howard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Allen, Todd Randall [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hildebrandt, Philip Clay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Baker, Suzanne Hobbs [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Innovation Workshops were held at six locations across the United States on March 3-5, 2015. The data collected during these workshops has been analyzed and sorted to bring out consistent themes toward enhancing innovation in nuclear energy. These themes include development of a test bed and demonstration platform, improved regulatory processes, improved communications, and increased public-private partnerships. This report contains a discussion of the workshops and resulting themes. Actionable steps are suggested at the end of the report. This revision has a small amount of the data in Appendix C removed in order to avoid potential confusion.

  8. WORKSHOPS: Radiofrequency superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    In the continual push towards higher energy particle beams, superconducting radiofrequency techniques now play a vital role, highlighted in the fifth workshop on radiofrequency superconductivity, held at DESY from 19 - 24 August 1991

  9. Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification.

  10. WORKSHOPS: Radiofrequency superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1992-01-15

    In the continual push towards higher energy particle beams, superconducting radiofrequency techniques now play a vital role, highlighted in the fifth workshop on radiofrequency superconductivity, held at DESY from 19 - 24 August 1991.

  11. GammaWorkshops Proceedings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strålberg, Elisabeth; Klemola, Seppo; Nielsen, Sven Poul

    to the GammaWorkshops. The topics included efficiency transfer, true coincidence summing corrections, self-attenuation corrections, measurement of natural radionuclides (natural decay series), combined measurement uncertainty calculations, and detection limits. These topics covered both lectures and practical...

  12. YEREVAN: Acceleration workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Sponsored by the Yerevan Physics Institute in Armenia, a Workshop on New Methods of Charged Particle Acceleration in October near the Nor Amberd Cosmic Ray Station attracted participants from most major accelerator centres in the USSR and further afield

  13. Cybernetics and Workshop Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Daniel G.

    1979-01-01

    Cybernetic sessions allow for the investigation of several variables concurrently, resulting in a large volume of input compacted into a concise time frame. Three session questions are reproduced to illustrate the variety of ideas generated relative to workshop design. (Author)

  14. Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification

  15. Appalachian Stream Mitigation Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 5 day workshop in 2011 developed for state and federal regulatory and resource agencies, who review, comment on and/or approve compensatory mitigation plans for surface coal mining projects in Appalachia

  16. Complex Flow Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-05-01

    This report documents findings from a workshop on the impacts of complex wind flows in and out of wind turbine environments, the research needs, and the challenges of meteorological and engineering modeling at regional, wind plant, and wind turbine scales.

  17. Second ICFA workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    A summary is given of the topics discussed at the second ICFA Workshop on 'Possibilities and Limitations of Accelerators and Detectors'. High energy accelerators are discussed, particularly electron-positron and proton-antiproton colliders. (W.D.L.).

  18. Workshop I: Gender Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessey, Eden; Kurup, Anitha; Meza-Montes, Lilia; Shastri, Prajval; Ghose, Shohini

    2015-12-01

    Participants in the Gender Studies workshop of the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics discussed the gender question in science practice from a policy perspective, informed by investigations from the social science disciplines. The workshop's three sessions—"Equity and Education: Examining Gender Stigma in Science," "A Comparative Study of Women Scientists and Engineers: Experiences in India and the US," and "Toward Gender Equity Through Policy: Characterizing the Social Impact of Interventions—are summarized, and the resulting recommendations presented.

  19. TPC workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) concept is now nearly ten years old and, as is evident in this workshop, is still evolving in many directions. From the liquid xenon TPC for double beta decay studies to the impressively large second generation TPC for the LEP experiment ALEPH, the surprising diversity of current applications is apparent. This workshop, the first to concentrate solely on the TPC has provided a most congenial and rewarding occasion for all TPC enthusiasts to share experience, results, and ideas

  20. Industrial Fuel Flexibility Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2006-09-01

    On September 28, 2006, in Washington, DC, ITP and Booz Allen Hamilton conducted a fuel flexibility workshop with attendance from various stakeholder groups. Workshop participants included representatives from the petrochemical, refining, food and beverage, steel and metals, pulp and paper, cement and glass manufacturing industries; as well as representatives from industrial boiler manufacturers, technology providers, energy and waste service providers, the federal government and national laboratories, and developers and financiers.

  1. 7th International k0-Users' Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borut Smodis

    2018-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The k 0 method of neutron activation analysis (k 0 -NAA) has become a well-established analytical tool for elemental analysis of various samples since its introduction in mid-1970s. To strengthen its development, applications and use, a series of regular workshops dedicated to this particular analytical method has been introduced twenty-five years ago, held in Astene, Belgium (1992); Ljubljana, Slovenia (1996); Bruges, Belgium (2001); Funchal, Portugal (2005); Belo Horizonte, Brazil (2009) and Budapest, Hungary (2013). The 7th k 0 -Users' Workshop was held at Hotel Novotel Montreal Centre, Canada, 3-8 September 2017. The meeting was organized by Polytechnique Montreal in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency. Twenty-seven participants from 16 different countries (Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Czech Republic, Egypt, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Jamaica, Peru, Slovenia, the Netherlands, Turkey, Vietnam) from all five continents discussed the latest developments and applications of k 0 -NAA. Thirty-three papers were presented in the following sessions: Fundamentals of k 0 -NAA, Nuclear Data, Neutron Flux Parameters, k 0 -NAA Methodology, Validation of k 0 -NAA, Facilities, Automatization, and k 0 -NAA Methodology and PGAA. The talks included presentations by two Keynote Speakers and one Honorary Speaker. During the workshop, scientific visits were paid to the SLOWPOKE NAA Laboratory and Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory of the Polytechnique Montreal. The upcoming 12 papers in this issue of the Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry were selected to be published from the workshop. The next, 8th k 0 -Users' Workshop is expected to be held in Ljubljana, Slovenia in 2021.

  2. Subsurface temporal variation of radon at the Conrad Geophysical Observatory, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Roman; Steinitz, Gideon; Piatibratova, Oksana

    2015-04-01

    The Conrad Observatory (COBS) housed the national geophysical observatory of Austria and is located 50 km south west of Vienna within the carbonate sequence of the "Wettersteinkalk". Parameters monitored at the facility comprise environmental data, seismic signals, gravity, geomagnetic components and also natural gamma rays. A subsurface tunnel, 150 meters long and oriented E-W is driven into the calcareous sequence at a depth of 50 meters. The tunnel is lined with a concrete carapace, ~20 cm thick. The tunnel observatory is separated from the external atmosphere by 3 tight doors, resulting in a stable temperature of 6.85±0.04°C. A gamma detector (3×3", NaI, SCA) is used measure the variation of the gamma radiation from radon in the air of the tunnel, at a resolution of 1 minute, which is accumulated to form a 15-minute count rate. The sensor is placed on a concrete block at 135 meters. Several SSNTD measurements in the tunnel indicated radon level in the level of 1.5 kBq/m^3. The background gamma radiation, due probably mainly to sources in the concrete is in the order to 2×105 counts (per 15-minutes). A long term variation of radon is reflected as an annual radon signal with large amplitude (2×105 counts) and a maximum in summer. Small to large (2×105 counts) non periodic multi-day signals lasting from two to several tens of days are superimposed. Daily periodic signals of much lower amplitude are observed, with amplitudes generally up to 4×104 counts. The amplitude of the non-periodic multi-day is coupled to amplitude of the annual signal, and the amplitude of the periodic daily signal is modulated by the multi-day variation. The source of the radon in the air of the tunnel is from the concrete lining the floor and walls of the tunnel. The variation patterns and their systematic characteristics cannot be ascribed to local variations of pressure and temperature (stable). These limitations indicate that other driver(s), external to the tunnel, are forcing

  3. Systematic measurements of the night sky brightness at 26 locations in Eastern Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posch, Thomas; Binder, Franz; Puschnig, Johannes

    2018-05-01

    We present an analysis of the zenithal night sky brightness (henceforth: NSB) measurements at 26 locations in Eastern Austria focussing on the years 2015-2016, both during clear and cloudy to overcast nights. All measurements have been performed with 'Sky Quality Meters' (SQMs). For some of the locations, simultaneous aerosol content measurements are available, such that we were able to find a correlation between light pollution and air pollution at those stations. For all locations, we examined the circalunar periodicity of the NSB, seasonal variations as well as long-term trends in the recorded light pollution. The latter task proved difficult, however, due to varying meteorological conditions, potential detector 'aging' and other effects. For several remote locations, a darkening of the overcast night sky by up to 1 magnitude is recorded - indicating a very low level of light pollution -, while for the majority of the examined locations, a brightening of the night sky by up to a factor of 15 occurs due to clouds. We present suitable ways to plot and analyze huge long-term NSB datasets, such as mean-NSB histograms, circalunar, annual ('hourglass') and cumulative ('jellyfish') plots. We show that five of the examined locations reach sufficiently low levels of light pollution - with NSB values down to 21.8 magSQM/arcsec2 - as to allow the establishment of dark sky reserves, even to the point of reaching the 'gold tier' defined by the International Dark Sky Association. Based on the 'hourglass' plots, we find a strong circalunar periodicity of the NSB in small towns and villages ( < 5.000 inhabitants), with amplitudes of up to 5 magnitudes. Using the 'jellyfish' plots, on the other hand, we demonstrate that the examined city skies brighten by up to 3 magnitudes under cloudy conditions, which strongly dominate in those cumulative data representations. Nocturnal gradients of the NSB of 0.0-0.14 magSQM/arcsec2/h are found. The long-term development of the night sky

  4. 33{sup rd} international Vienna motor symposium. Vol. 2. Second day; 33. internationales Wiener Motorensymposium. Bd. 2. Zweiter Tag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenz, Hans Peter (comp.)

    2012-11-01

    This two-volume report makes the presentations of the 33{sup rd} International Vienna Motor Symposium (April 26-27, 2012) available to a wider audience. The objective of the Vienna Motor Symposia is to examine current topics of particular interest. Among others, the work examines the above mentioned topics. Included is a CD-ROM containing the presentations in their original form and in English translation. Edited by Univ.-Prof. Dr. techn. Dipl.-Ing. H.P. Lenz, VDI, Chairman of the OeVK (Austrian Society of Automotive Engineers, Vienna).

  5. 33{sup rd} international Vienna motor symposium. Vol. 1. First day; 33. internationales Wiener Motorensymposium. Bd. 1. Erster Tag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenz, Hans Peter (comp.)

    2012-11-01

    This two-volume report makes the presentations of the 33{sup rd} International Vienna Motor Symposium (April 26-27, 2012) available to a wider audience. The objective of the Vienna Motor Symposia is to examine current topics of particular interest. Among others, the work examines the above mentioned topics. Included is a CD-ROM containing the presentations in their original form and in English translation. Edited by Univ.-Prof. Dr. techn. Dipl.-Ing. H.P. Lenz, VDI, Chairman of the OeVK (Austrian Society of Automotive Engineers, Vienna).

  6. 34{sup th} international Vienna motor symposium. Vol. 2. Second day; 34. Internationales Wiener Motorensymposium. Bd. 2. Zweiter Tag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenz, Hans Peter (comp.)

    2013-08-01

    This two-volume report makes the presentations of the 34th International Vienna Motor Symposium (April 25-26, 2013) available to a wider audience. The objective of the Vienna Motor Symposia is to examine current topics of particular interest. Among others, the work examines the above mentioned topics. Included is a CD-ROM containing the presentations in their original form and in English translation. Edited by Univ.-Prof. Dr. techn. Dipl.-Ing. H. P. Lenz, VDI, Chairman of the OeVK (Austrian Society of Automotive Engineers, Vienna).

  7. 34{sup th} international Vienna motor symposium. Vol. 1. First day; 34. Internationales Wiener Motorensymposium. Bd. 1. Erster Tag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenz, Hans Peter (comp.)

    2013-08-01

    This two-volume report makes the presentations of the 34th International Vienna Motor Symposium (April 25-26, 2013) available to a wider audience. The objective of the Vienna Motor Symposia is to examine current topics of particular interest. Among others, the work examines the above mentioned topics. Included is a CD-ROM containing the presentations in their original form and in English translation. Edited by Univ.-Prof. Dr. techn. Dipl.-Ing. H. P. Lenz, VDI, Chairman of the OeVK (Austrian Society of Automotive Engineers, Vienna).

  8. International Workshop on Current Problems in Condensed Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Current Problems in Condensed Matter

    1998-01-01

    This volume contains the papers presented at the International Workshop on the Cur­ rent Problems in Condensed Matter: Theory and Experiment, held at Cocoyoc, More­ los, Mexico, during January 5-9, 1997. The participants had come from Argentina, Austria, Chile, England, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Switzerland, and the USA. The presentations at the Workshop provided state-of-art reviews of many of the most important problems, currently under study, in condensed matter. Equally important to all the participants in the workshop was the fact that we had come to honor a friend, Karl Heinz Bennemann, on his sixty-fifth birthday. This Festschrift is just a small measure of recognition of the intellectualleadership of Professor Bennemann in the field and equally important, as a sincere tribute to his qualities as an exceptional friend, college and mentor. Those who have had the privilege to work closely with Karl have been deeply touched by Karl's inquisitive scientific mind as well as by bis k...

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in western Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allerberger, F; Kofler, H; Brezinka, C; Guggenbichler, J P; Dierich, M P

    1993-01-01

    From January to October 1992 24 Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates from clinical specimens were collected at the Federal Public Health Laboratory in Innsbruck (Austria) and screened for resistance to penicillin G, erythromycin, tetracycline, spectinomycin, ceftriaxone, cefuroxime, ciprofloxacine, and silver nitrate. Patients originated from the Austrian provinces Salzburg, Tirol, and Vorarlberg, and presented with manifest gonorrhoea. Two of 24 isolates were penicillinase-producing N. gonorrhoeae. Both strains were isolated from men who had just returned from Thailand or Kenya. The isolate from Africa was also resistant to tetracycline. Five of 24 infections were acquired abroad, sex tourism being involved in four cases. The antimicrobial resistance pattern found in gonococci in western Austria revealed that topical silver nitrate and erythromycin are equally acceptable for use in prophylaxis of neonatal ophthalmia. Penicillin is still the drug of choice in the treatment of endemic infections. If gonorrhoea has been acquired abroad, especially in Asia or Africa, ceftriaxone, spectinomycin or ciprofloxazine are recommended for therapy.

  10. Tax wedge in Croatia, Austria, Hungary, Poland and Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin Onorato

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to compare the tax burden on labour income in Croatia, Austria, Greece, Hungary and Poland in 2013. The Taxing Wages methodology has been applied to hypothetical units across a range of gross wages in order to calculate net average tax wedge, net average tax rate, as well as other relevant indicators. When it comes to single workers without children, the smallest tax wedge for workers earning less than the average gross wage was found in Croatia, while Poland had the smallest tax wedge for above-average wages. Due to a progressive PIT system, the tax wedge for a single worker in Croatia reaches 50% at 400% of the average gross wage, equalling that of Austria, Greece and Hungary. Tax wedges for couples with two children show a similar trend.

  11. Austria's Energy Perspectives - It's the Demand Side, Stupid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechner, H.

    2009-01-01

    During the last decade Austria made remarkable progress in developing renewable energy sources. But at the same time energy demand has steadily increased so that the share of renewables in the energy mix has remained more or less stable over the years. Rising energy demand and import dependence is also forecast in a business-as-usual scenario for the future. If Austria is to fulfill the EU obligatory target to increase the share of renewables up to 34% in 2020 (recently 25%) and to move on a sustainable, low-carbon track it will have to decrease energy consumption or at least stabilise it at the level of 2005. This requires considerable efforts to boost energy efficiency, especially in the building and transport sector.(author).

  12. State of the environment in Austria. Volume 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This report was presented by the Federal Minister of Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water Management to the Austrian Parliament and covers the observation period 1997-2000. It was written by experts and is divided into 20 main chapters: population and growth of built - up area, emission and air quality, global climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, water, soil, forest, nature protection, agriculture, transport, industries, eco-audit according to the EMAS regulation of the EU, waste, contaminated sites, energy consumption, noise, safe handling of chemicals, pesticides and other biocidal products, gene technology and radioecology. This environmental report gives a comprehensive information about the environment situation of Austria with a huge amount of geographical and numerical data. Due to the progress achieved in the last years in areas such as air pollution control and water protection, Austria has become one of the leading nations in the subject at international level. Those chapters which are in the INIS subject scope were treated individually. (nevyjel)

  13. Development and Current Practice in Using R at Statistics Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Templ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The popularity of R is increasing in national statistical offices not only for simulation tasks. Nowadays R is also used in the production process. A lot of new features for various tasks in official statistics have been developed over the last years and these features are freely available in the form of add-on package. In this contribution we first give an outline of the use of R at Statistics Austria. Discussed is the necessary infrastructure according to the R-installation, the teaching of employees and the support provided to the staff who use R in their daily work. In the second part, the R developments from the methods unit at Statistics Austria are summarised. The developed packages include methods for data pre-processing (e.g imputation up to packages for the final dissemination of data including packages for statistical disclosure control, estimation of indicators and the visualisation of results.

  14. Texts of the Agency's agreements with the Republic of Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the exchange of Notes, dated 6 July 1995 and 29 September 1995 respectively, between the IAEA and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Austria regarding Section 4(b) of the Headquarters Agreement which allows the IAEA 'to establish and operate such additional radio and other telecommunications facilities as may be specified by supplemental agreement...'. This further supplemental agreement entered into force on 29 September 1995

  15. [Quality Indicators of Primary Health Care Facilities in Austria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semlitsch, Thomas; Abuzahra, Muna; Stigler, Florian; Jeitler, Klaus; Posch, Nicole; Siebenhofer, Andrea

    2017-07-11

    Background The strengthening of primary health care is one major goal of the current national health reform in Austria. In this context, a new interdisciplinary concept was developed in 2014 that defines structures and requirements for future primary health care facilities. Objective The aim of this project was the development of quality indicators for the evaluation of the scheduled primary health care facilities in Austria, which are in accordance with the new Austrian concept. Methods We used the RAND/NPCRDC method for the development and selection of the quality indicators. We conducted systematic literature searches for existing measures in international databases for quality indicators as well as in bibliographic databases. All retrieved measures were evaluated and rated by an expert panel in a 2-step process regarding relevance and feasibility. Results Overall, the literature searches yielded 281 potentially relevant quality indicators, which were summarized to 65 different quality measures for primary health care. Out of these, the panel rated and accepted 30 measures as relevant and feasible for use in Austria. Five of these indicators were structure measures, 14 were process measures and the remaining 11 were outcome measures. Based on the Austrian primary health care concept, the final set of quality indicators was grouped in the 5 following domains: Access to primary health care (5), quality of care (15), continuity of care (5), coordination of care (4), and safety (1). Conclusion This set of quality measures largely covers the four defined functions of primary health care. It enables standardized evaluation of primary health care facilities in Austria regarding the implementation of the Austrian primary health care concept as well as improvement in healthcare of the population. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. E-branding of rural tourism in Carinthia, Austria

    OpenAIRE

    Kavoura, Androniki; Bitsani, Evgenia

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to create an e-branding model which could also be applied for place branding in small central rural regions of Central Europe based on the innovative methodology of rural tour marketing. It was based and went beyond the European program of transnational cooperation, INTERREG IIIB CADSES. The region of Carinthia, Austria was set as a case study for the application of interrelating scientific theories of marketing, place branding and place identity in relation to and in...

  17. Evaluation of swallowing disorders with videofluoroscopy in Austria: a survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenhuber, Edith; Schima, Wolfgang; Stadler, Alfred; Schober, Ewald; Schibany, Nadja; Denk, Doris-Maria

    2005-01-01

    Aim: The aim of our study was to assess the availability of videofluoroscopy to examine patients with swallowing disorders in Austria. Materials and methods: A questionnaire was sent to the department heads of the radiology departments of all hospitals (n=143) and to all non-hospital-based radiologic practices (n=226) throughout Austria. The survey focused on the availability of videofluoroscopic swallowing studies and on the studies performed in patients with deglutition disorders. Results: The questionnaire was completed and returned by 134 of 143 radiology departments (94%) and 65 of 226 non-hospital-based radiologists (29%). Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies were performed in 38 of 134 radiology departments (28%) and in 21 of 65 practices (32%). The method is available in all nine Austrian states (100%) and 27 of 99 districts (27%). The number of examinations performed in different states ranged from 0.7 to 19 studies/10,000 population per year. The number of videofluoroscopic examinations per department or practice in the year 2001 ranged between 5 and 690 (median, 100 examinations). To 85% of videofluoroscopy units patients were referred from otorhinolaryngology/phoniatrics-logopedics, to 69% of videofluoroscopy units referrals were also from internal medicine, from neurology in 54%, and from pediatrics in 20%. Conclusion: Despite the widespread availability of videofluoroscopy throughout Austria, its use still varies largely between different states. The data show that in general there is a wide-spread demand for videofluoroscopic swallowing studies

  18. Development and problems of pellet markets in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemestothy, K.P.; Rakos, C.

    2001-01-01

    Wood pellets became into Austrian markets in 1994. Up to then the Austrian industry had manufactured pellet fireplaces for export, but none was sold into Austria, because there were not pellets available in the Austrian markets. In spite of significant problems in the beginning and unfavourable economic conditions (decrease of oil prices) the pellet markets in Austria have increased since 1996 dynamically. Annual pellet deliveries have increased from 15 000 t/a to present 45 000 t/a. Customers and Austrian industry are interested in pellets and they believe in the future. The pellet manufacturing capacity increases continuously. In 1999 the capacity of 12 companies was 120 000 t. In 2003 the annual pellet consumption is estimated to over 100 000 tons and in 2010 about 200 000 tons. Main portion of the pellet manufactures in Austria is also used in the country by detached houses and small real estate houses. The pellet markets for large real estates are developing after the boiler manufacturers have started to produce pellet-fired equipment. The number of pellet-fired devices in 1997, sold to detached houses was 425, and in 2000 the number was 3500

  19. Efficiency, ownership, and financing of hospitals: the case of Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czypionka, Thomas; Kraus, Markus; Mayer, Susanne; Röhrling, Gerald

    2014-12-01

    While standard economic theory posits that privately owned hospitals are more efficient than their public counterparts, no clear conclusion can yet be drawn for Austria in this regard. As previous Austrian efficiency studies rely on data from the 1990s only and are based on small hospital samples, the generalizability of these results is questionable. To examine the impact of ownership type on efficiency, we apply a Data Envelopment Analysis which extends the existing literature in two respects: first, it evaluates the efficiency of the Austrian acute care sector, using data on 128 public and private non-profit hospitals from the year 2010; second, it additionally focusses on the inpatient sector alone, thus increasing the comparability between hospitals. Overall, the results show that in Austria, private non-profit hospitals outperform public hospitals in terms of technical efficiency. A multiple regression analysis confirms the significant association between efficiency and ownership type. This conclusive result contrasts some international evidence and can most likely be attributed to differences in financial incentives for public and private non-profit hospitals in Austria. Therefore, by drawing on the example of the Austrian acute care hospital sector and existing literature on the German acute care hospital sector, we also discuss the impact of hospital financing systems and their incentives on efficiency. This paper thus also aims at providing a proof of principle, pointing out the importance of the respective market conditions when internationally comparing hospital efficiency by ownership type.

  20. Endemic harvestmen and spiders of Austria (Arachnida: Opiliones, Araneae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komposch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive overview of plant, fungus and animal species of Austria revealed a total of 748 endemic and subendemic species, including, 11 harvestman and 46 spider species. Altogether two endemic harvestmen (Nemastoma bidentatum relictum, Nemastoma schuelleri and 8 endemic spiders (Abacoproeces molestus, Collinsia (caliginosa nemenziana, Mughiphantes severus, Mughiphantes styriacus, Pelecopsis alpica, Scotophaeus nanus, Troglohyphantes novicordis, Troglohyphantes tauriscus, beside 9 subendemic harvestman and 38 subendemic spider species have been recorded from Austria. Hot-spots of endemism in the Eastern Alps are the north-eastern (Ennstaler Alps and southern Calcareous Alps (Karawanken, Karnische Alps and the Central Alps (Hohe Tauern, Gurktaler Alps, Ötztaler and Stubaier Alps. Most of the endemic arachnid species occur from the nival down to the montane zone. Important habitats are rocky areas, caves and woodlands. High absolute numbers and percentages of endemics can be found within the harvestman families Cladonychiidae, Ischyropsalididae and Nemastomatidae and in the spider genera Lepthyphantes s. l. and Troglohyphantes. The conservation status of these highly endangered taxa – 85 % of the spider species and 100 % of the harvestman taxa are endangered in Austria – is poor.

  1. Prioritising integrated care initiatives on a national level. Experiences from Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Eger

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and background: Based on a policy initiative and the foundation of the Competence Centre for Integrated Care by the Austrian Social Security Institutions in 2006, the aim of the project was to identify and prioritise potential diseases and target groups for which integrated care models should be developed and implemented within the Austrian health system. The project was conducted as a cooperation between the Competence Centre for Integrated Care of the Viennese Health Insurance Fund and the Institute of Social Medicine of the Medical University Vienna to ensure the involvement of both, theory and practice. Project report: The focus of the project was to develop an evidence-based process for the identification and prioritisation of diseases and target groups for integrated care measures. As there was no evidence of similar projects elsewhere, the team set out to design the prioritisation process and formulate the selection criteria based on the work in a focus group, literature reviews and a scientific council of national and international experts. The method and criteria were evaluated by an expert workshop. Discussion: The active involvement of all stakeholders from the beginning was crucial for the success. The time constraint proved also beneficial since it allowed the project team to demand focus and cooperation from all experts and stakeholders included. Conclusion: Our experience demonstrates that, with a clear concept and model, an evidence-based prioritisation including all stakeholders can be achieved. Ultimately however, the prioritisation is a political discussion and decision. Our model can only help base these decisions on sound and reasonable assumptions.

  2. Medizin Curriculum Wien: neue Anforderungen an die Literatur- und Informationsversorgung für Studierende an der Universitätsbibliothek der Medizinischen Universität Wien / Medizin Curriculum Wien: New Demands for the Supply of Literature and Information to Students at the University Library of the Medical University of Vienna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer, Bruno

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available So far, students at medical faculties have intensively mainly used two services out of many, which specialized medical libraries have to offer: the textbook collection and the student reading room. Only towards the end of studies, in preparation of dissertations, do students take advantage of bibliographical databases and appropriate journals. During the last years, the medical curricula in many countries, including Germany and Austria, experienced considerable modifications. The reformation of the studies, which, in many cases, actually finds itself in the phase of implementation, is, in fact, a unique challenge for libraries. In support of medical studies, university lecturers and students expect information resources, library services and the relay of information competence, which should clearly surmount existing needs of the textbook collection and the student reading room, as shown in the available contribution, as example of the University Library of the Medical University of Vienna.

  3. District heat in the environmental model city Vienna; Fernwaerme in der Umweltmusterstadt Wien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wischinka, A. [Fernwaerme Wien Gesellschaft mbH, Wien (Austria)

    1998-10-01

    Thanks to the extension of its district heating system and the integration of low-emission waste incineration plants, Vienna possesses one of the most environment friendly energy systems. This makes Vienna an environmental model city. Goals for the year 2000 are: - 2,000 MW operated heat peak load, - 200,000 district-heated dwellings, - 4,000 special sales contracts, - 1,000 km network length (500 km primary network, 500 km secondary network), - heat sales of 5,000 GWh, - ATS 5 billion sales. (orig.) [Deutsch] Durch den Ausbau des Fernwaermesystems unter Einbeziehung der emissionsarmen Muellverbrennungsanlagen hat Wien eines der umweltfreundlichsten Energiesysteme. Das macht Wien zu einer Umweltmusterstadt. Die Ziele fuer das Jahr 2000 lauten: - 2 000 MW gefahrene Waermehoechstlast, - 200 000 fernwaermeversorgte Wohnungen, - 4000 Sonderabnehmer, 1 000 km Netzlaenge (500 km Primaernetz, 500 km Sekundaernetz), - 5000 GWh Waermeverkauf, - 5 Milliarden ATS Umsatz. (orig.)

  4. The Third Mission of Universities in the Development Strategy of Vienna City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela-Cornelia DAN

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vienna City is one of the most attractive cities in Europe and according to different rankings [1], [2]it is placed on the top ten in the list of cities with best living conditions, excellent education, infrastructure and good urban planning. This is the result of a systematic approach of the local government, companies, universities and public in the development and modernization of the city. Since 2000 the city has known a growth in different areas (number of researchers, number of patents, joint programs for the popularization of science etc. and evolved into a network point not only for business but also for research and innovation. In this paper we investigate the strategy of Vienna City regarding research and development and the extensive and complex role of universities in the city.

  5. Minutes of the twelfth INDC meeting, Vienna, 5-9 October 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiftah, S.

    1982-08-01

    The Twelfth Meeting of the INDC was held at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 5-9 October 1981. The meeting was attended by 13 committee members (member from Australia excused), six advisers and three observers from 14 Member States and two international organisations. The committee reviewed the nuclear data activities of the IAEA, in Member States and in nuclear data centres during the period since its Eleventh Meeting in Vienna in June 1980. It also discussed and reviewed in detail the Agency's future nuclear data programme for the period 1982-84. In general, the IAEA nuclear data programme reflects the trends discussed and detailed at the 11th INDC Meeting. The official minutes include summaries of the discussions of the agenda items, full reports of subcommittees, list of actions, together with lists of participants and subcommittee membership

  6. A national strategy for a long-term monitoring of permafrost and periglacial processes and their relationship to natural hazard prevention in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerer-Pirklbauer, Andreas; Bartsch, Annett; Gitschthaler, Christoph; Reisenhofer, Stefan; Weyss, Gernot; Riedl, Claudia; Avian, Michael

    2016-04-01

    About 2.5% (~2000 km²) of the national territory of Austria is influenced by permafrost conditions. A slightly smaller area of Austria is additionally affected by deep seasonal frost which is, however, similarly exposed to intensive physical weathering and related geomorphic processes. Currently, 23 skiing resorts, 31 water reservoirs and 42 mountain huts are either directly or indirectly influenced by permafrost and associated processes in Austria as determined from regional permafrost models. Ground thermal changes most likely affect the ground stability and infrastructure in those areas. Therefore, changes in the distribution and characteristics of permafrost and seasonal frost are of high economic and ecological importance. A range of Austrian institutions are interested in systematic permafrost monitoring (several universities, geological surveys, the Austrian torrent and avalanche control agency or several different alpine clubs). However, to date no coordinated monitoring network has been established on a national scale and a strategy for long-term permafrost/periglacial observation did not exist so far. Such a national strategy has been developed in 2015 within the permAT project funded through the StartClim2014-program. During permAT an extensive literature review and data search as well as a workshop with 40 participants (scientists, stakeholder and policy maker) were accomplished. The workshop allowed the integration of national as well as international colleagues into the strategy development. Results of permAT clearly demonstrate that the number of present permafrost/periglacial monitoring sites is far too little in Austria. Only few alpine areas of Austria are well represented by the existing monitoring activities but large areas lack such instrumentations. Furthermore, permafrost boreholes exist at only three sites in central Austria (all contribution to the GTN-P network) and there is a lack of knowledge about thermal conditions and recent changes

  7. Vienna International Centre Library Film and Video Catalogue: Peaceful applications of nuclear energy 1928-1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-31

    The catalogue lists films and videos which are available on free loan from Vienna International Centre Library for educational, non-commercial, non-profit showings involving no admission charges or appeals for funds. Much of the material listed has been donated to the IAEA by the Governments of Member States. The items are arranged in the catalogue by number. The catalogue also includes a title index and a subject index

  8. Vienna International Centre Library Film and Video Catalogue: Peaceful applications of nuclear energy 1928-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The catalogue lists films and videos which are available on free loan from Vienna International Centre Library for educational, non-commercial, non-profit showings involving no admission charges or appeals for funds. Much of the material listed has been donated to the IAEA by the Governments of Member States. The items are arranged in the catalogue by number. The catalogue also includes a title index and a subject index

  9. Declaration by the IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety in Vienna on 20 June 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    We, the Ministers of the Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), gathered in Vienna in light of the serious consequences of the nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami to direct, under the leading role of the IAEA, the process of learning and acting upon lessons to strengthen nuclear safety, emergency preparedness and radiation protection of people and the environment worldwide [es

  10. Visual examination program of the TRIGA Mark II reactor Vienna with the nuclear underwater telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Hammer, J.; Varga, K.

    1985-12-01

    The visual inspection programm carried out during a three month shut-period at the TRIGA Mark II reactor Vienna is described. Optical inspection of all welds inside the reactor tank was carried out with an underwater telescope developed by the Central Research Institute of Physics, Budapest, Hungary. It is shown that even after 23 years of reactor operation all tank internals were found to be in good condition and minor defects can be easily repaired by remote handling tools. (Author)

  11. Excerpts from the introductory statement. IAEA Board of Governors, Vienna, 22 March 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1999-01-01

    In his Introductory Statement at the IAEA Board of Governors (Vienna, 22 March 1999), the Director General of the IAEA reviewed the main recent activities of the Agency related to: safety aspects of the nuclear power, measures against illicit trafficking and for the physical protection of nuclear material, status of safeguards agreements and additional protocols, and issues concerning the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and Iraq

  12. Excerpts from the introductory statement. IAEA Board of Governors. Vienna, 20 March 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2000-01-01

    In his Introductory Statement at the IAEA Board of Governors, Vienna, 20 March 2000, the Director General of the IAEA focused on the following topics: the first Review Meeting of Parties to the Convention on Nuclear Safety, response to General Conference Resolutions, Safeguards Agreements and Additional Protocols, relations with DPRK and Iraq, Trilateral Initiative (IAEA, USA, Russian Federation) concerning the fissile material removed from nuclear weapon programmes, and IAEA's Programme and Budget for 2001

  13. Declaration by the IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety in Vienna on 20 June 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    We, the Ministers of the Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), gathered in Vienna in light of the serious consequences of the nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami to direct, under the leading role of the IAEA, the process of learning and acting upon lessons to strengthen nuclear safety, emergency preparedness and radiation protection of people and the environment worldwide

  14. Declaration by the IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety in Vienna on 20 June 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    We, the Ministers of the Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), gathered in Vienna in light of the serious consequences of the nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami to direct, under the leading role of the IAEA, the process of learning and acting upon lessons to strengthen nuclear safety, emergency preparedness and radiation protection of people and the environment worldwide [fr

  15. Beyond Vienna and Montreal: A global framework convention on greenhouse gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, D.A.; Lashof, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter discusses the need for a framework treaty analogous to the Vienna Convention and to the Montreal Protocol for greenhouse gases. Discussed are the following topics: (1) the immediate need for multilateral greenhouse gas controls, including policy implications of scientific uncertainties; (2) recent steps toward a greenhouse gas convention; (3) an environmentally meaningful plan for a greenhouse gase conventions, including the ozone precident, CO 2 targets, resource transfers, trading emissions allocations, institutional issues

  16. In Vienna about Chernobyl. Summing up the consequences of the accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latek, S.

    1996-01-01

    The Joint EC/IAEA/WHO International Conference ''One Decade after Chernobyl: Summing up the consequences of the accident'' has been held in Vienna, 8-12 April 1996. The most important subjects of the conference was: assessment of total releases and deposits, radiation doses, clinically observed effects, thyroid effects, longer term health effects, psychological and environmental consequences, social economic, institutional and political impact, nuclear safety, sarcophagus, perspective and prognosis

  17. The QED Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieper, G.W.

    1994-07-01

    On May 18--20, 1994, Argonne National Laboratory hosted the QED Workshop. The workshop was supported by special funding from the Office of Naval Research. The purpose of the workshop was to assemble of a group of researchers to consider whether it is desirable and feasible to build a proof-checked encyclopedia of mathematics, with an associated facility for theorem proving and proof checking. Among the projects represented were Coq, Eves, HOL, ILF, Imps, MathPert, Mizar, NQTHM, NuPrl, OTTER, Proof Pad, Qu-Prolog, and RRL. Although the content of the QED project is highly technical rigorously proof-checked mathematics of all sorts the discussions at the workshop were rarely technical. No prepared talks or papers were given. Instead, the discussions focused primarily on such political, sociological, practical, and aesthetic questions, such as Why do it? Who are the customers? How can one get mathematicians interested? What sort of interfaces are desirable? The most important conclusion of the workshop was that QED is an idea worthy pursuing, a statement with which virtually all the participants agreed. In this document, the authors capture some of the discussions and outline suggestions for the start of a QED scientific community.

  18. t4 Workshop Report*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleensang, Andre; Maertens, Alexandra; Rosenberg, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Suzanne; Lamb, Justin; Auerbach, Scott; Brennan, Richard; Crofton, Kevin M.; Gordon, Ben; Fornace, Albert J.; Gaido, Kevin; Gerhold, David; Haw, Robin; Henney, Adriano; Ma’ayan, Avi; McBride, Mary; Monti, Stefano; Ochs, Michael F.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Sharan, Roded; Stierum, Rob; Tugendreich, Stuart; Willett, Catherine; Wittwehr, Clemens; Xia, Jianguo; Patton, Geoffrey W.; Arvidson, Kirk; Bouhifd, Mounir; Hogberg, Helena T.; Luechtefeld, Thomas; Smirnova, Lena; Zhao, Liang; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Kanehisa, Minoru; Carmichael, Paul; Andersen, Melvin E.; Hartung, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Despite wide-spread consensus on the need to transform toxicology and risk assessment in order to keep pace with technological and computational changes that have revolutionized the life sciences, there remains much work to be done to achieve the vision of toxicology based on a mechanistic foundation. A workshop was organized to explore one key aspect of this transformation – the development of Pathways of Toxicity (PoT) as a key tool for hazard identification based on systems biology. Several issues were discussed in depth in the workshop: The first was the challenge of formally defining the concept of a PoT as distinct from, but complementary to, other toxicological pathway concepts such as mode of action (MoA). The workshop came up with a preliminary definition of PoT as “A molecular definition of cellular processes shown to mediate adverse outcomes of toxicants”. It is further recognized that normal physiological pathways exist that maintain homeostasis and these, sufficiently perturbed, can become PoT. Second, the workshop sought to define the adequate public and commercial resources for PoT information, including data, visualization, analyses, tools, and use-cases, as well as the kinds of efforts that will be necessary to enable the creation of such a resource. Third, the workshop explored ways in which systems biology approaches could inform pathway annotation, and which resources are needed and available that can provide relevant PoT information to the diverse user communities. PMID:24127042

  19. Modelling reduction of urban heat load in Vienna by modifying surface properties of roofs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žuvela-Aloise, Maja; Andre, Konrad; Schwaiger, Hannes; Bird, David Neil; Gallaun, Heinz

    2018-02-01

    The study examines the potential of urban roofs to reduce the urban heat island (UHI) effect by changing their reflectivity and implementing vegetation (green roofs) using the example of the City of Vienna. The urban modelling simulations are performed based on high-resolution orography and land use data, climatological observations, surface albedo values from satellite imagery and registry of the green roof potential in Vienna. The modelling results show that a moderate increase in reflectivity of roofs (up to 0.45) reduces the mean summer temperatures in the densely built-up environment by approximately 0.25 °C. Applying high reflectivity materials (roof albedo up to 0.7) leads to average cooling in densely built-up area of approximately 0.5 °C. The green roofs yield a heat load reduction in similar order of magnitude as the high reflectivity materials. However, only 45 % of roof area in Vienna is suitable for greening and the green roof potential mostly applies to industrial areas in city outskirts and is therefore not sufficient for substantial reduction of the UHI effect, particularly in the city centre which has the highest heat load. The strongest cooling effect can be achieved by combining the green roofs with high reflectivity materials. In this case, using 50 or 100 % of the green roof potential and applying high reflectivity materials on the remaining surfaces have a similar cooling effect.

  20. NORM and radon in Austria. Status and strategy; Norm und Radon in Oesterreich. Status und Strategie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maringer, F.J. [Bundesamt fuer Eich- und Vermessungswesen, Wien (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    The author reviews the actual radiation protection practice in Austria for NORM and radon, including possible strategies and developments. Specific topics are radiation protection technologies, metrological resources for NORM in Austria, civil engineering standards (OeNORM) for radon measurement, radon prevention for new buildings and radon cleansing for existing buildings, future assessment and legal regulation of radioactivity in construction materials. The strategic development in Austria considers the current European standard projects (EU standards) and European and international research programs.