WorldWideScience

Sample records for workplace obesity management

  1. Beating Obesity: Factors Associated with Interest in Workplace Weight Management Assistance in the Mining Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Tamara D; Thomas, Drew L

    2017-03-01

    Rates of overweight and obese Australians are high and continue to rise, putting a large proportion of the population at risk of chronic illness. Examining characteristics associated with preference for a work-based weight-loss program will enable employers to better target programs to increase enrolment and benefit employees' health and fitness for work. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken at two Australian mining sites. The survey collected information on employee demographics, health characteristics, work characteristics, stages of behavior change, and preference for workplace assistance with reaching a healthy weight. A total of 897 employees participated; 73.7% were male, and 68% had a body mass index in the overweight or obese range. Employees at risk of developing obesity-related chronic illnesses (based on high body mass index) were more likely to report preference for weight management assistance than lower risk employees. This indicates that, even in the absence of workplace promotion for weight management, some at risk employees want workplace assistance. Employees who were not aware of a need to change their current nutrition or physical activity behaviors were less likely to seek assistance. This indicates that practitioners need to communicate the negative effects of excess weight and promote the benefits of a healthy lifestyle to increase the likelihood of weight management. Weight management programs should provide information, motivation. and trouble-shooting assistance to meet the needs of at-risk mining employees, including those who are attempting to change and maintain behaviors to achieve a healthy weight and be suitably fit for work.

  2. Managing Workplace Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Andrew Patrick

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Diversity management is a process intended to create and maintain a positive work environment where the similarities and differences of individuals are valued. The literature on diversity management has mostly emphasized on organization culture; its impact on diversity openness; human resource management practices; institutional environments and organizational contexts to diversity-related pressures, expectations, requirements, and incentives; perceived practices and organizational outcomes related to managing employee diversity; and several other issues. The current study examines the potential barriers to workplace diversity and suggests strategies to enhance workplace diversity and inclusiveness. It is based on a survey of 300 IT employees. The study concludes that successfully managing diversity can lead to more committed, better satisfied, better performing employees and potentially better financial performance for an organization.

  3. Workplace health: engaging business leaders to combat obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankford, Tina; Lang, Jason; Bowden, Brian; Baun, William

    2013-01-01

    This article explores how employers can be part of the solution to obesity by offering workplace wellness programs and facilitating opportunities for physical activity, access to healthier foods and beverages, and incentives for disease management and prevention to help prevent weight gain among their employees. © 2013 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  4. Beating Obesity: Factors Associated with Interest in Workplace Weight Management Assistance in the Mining Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara D. Street

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Weight management programs should provide information, motivation. and trouble-shooting assistance to meet the needs of at-risk mining employees, including those who are attempting to change and maintain behaviors to achieve a healthy weight and be suitably fit for work.

  5. A descriptive evaluation of CDC's LEAN Works! Leading employees to activity and nutrition--a Web-based employer tool for workplace obesity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, Enid C; Liss-Levinson, Rivka C; Samoly, Daniel K; Guy, Gery P; Tabrizi, Maryam J; Beckowski, Meghan S; Pei, Xiaofei; Goetzel, Ron Z

    2013-01-01

    The study aim was to determine the utility of and satisfaction with a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Web-based employer tool, CDC's LEAN Works!, which provides evidence-based recommendations and promising practices for obesity prevention and control at worksites. This study examined employers' natural usage (i.e., without any study parameters on how, when, or how much to use the Web site and its resources) and impressions of the Web site. Employers of varying sizes, industry types, and levels of maturity in offering obesity management programs and from both private and public sectors were recruited to participate in the study. A convenience sample of 29 employers enrolled to participate. Participants were followed over a 12-month period. First impressions, bimonthly use of the Web site, and final assessments were collected using self-report surveys and individual interviews. Descriptive analyses were conducted. Almost all (96%) of participants reported a positive experience with the Web site, noting it provided a wealth of information. Most reported they planned to continue to use the Web site to develop (77%), implement (92%), and evaluate (85%) their obesity management programs. Aspects of the Web site that employers found valuable included a step-by-step implementation process, templates and toolkits, specific recommendations, and promising practices. CDC's LEAN Works! is a useful resource for employers wishing to develop and implement evidence-based workplace obesity prevention programs.

  6. Managing Workplace Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Harold Andrew Patrick; Vincent Raj Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Diversity management is a process intended to create and maintain a positive work environment where the similarities and differences of individuals are valued. The literature on diversity management has mostly emphasized on organization culture; its impact on diversity openness; human resource management practices; institutional environments and organizational contexts to diversity-related pressures, expectations, requ...

  7. Diversity Management in the Workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Urbancová

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversity is a phenomenon which is increasingly manifesting itself in the globalized society; therefore, it is observable in various areas of human activity, and thus also in the labour market and work teams. Age, sex, ethnicity and nationality, creed or disabilities are among the parameters of diversity. The aim of the article is to identify and evaluate the implementation of Diversity Management in workplaces, whilst bearing in mind researched factors of diversity. The results were gained by conducting a primary survey by questionnaire in organizations (n = 315. The results showed that a total of 41.9% of selected organizations operating in the Czech Republic implement Diversity Management. The largest part of organizations operate in the tertiary sector (69.7%. The survey results show the situation concerning Diversity Management in the selected organizations and support the oppinion that Diversity Management is a current global matter and its concerns all organizations. The research parameters influenced the application of Diversity Management in organizations (Cramer’s V is from 0.176 to 0.430. One of the recommendations for organizations is that they devote more attention to this phenomenon, as qualified human resources is on the decline and adequate attention will once again need to be devoted to groups of potential workers who have hitherto been overlooked. Diversity Management represents a new opportunity for organizations to build the employer’s good brand and attract knowledge workers.

  8. Managing diversity and equality in the workplace

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sharma, Angel

    2016-01-01

    ...), and organizational capabilities in managing diversity and equality in the workplace. Firstly, performance appraisals were found to be a major source of discrimination especially due to raters influence on the actual process...

  9. Female Project Managers' Workplace Problems: a Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Thuong Thi; Skitmore, Martin

    This article examines the extent to which challenges in the workplace may cause female project managers to be in a significantly small minority. A survey of members of the Australian Institute of Project Management in Queensland is described. This compares the experiences and observations of both men and women on various issues related to technical and gender aspects in project management workplaces. The results show that although female project managers experience many problems, male project managers also experience most of the same problems. Likewise, there are also few differences between more and less experience, the level of management, and types of industries. The differences that do occur involve discrimination against women in general, differences in project management styles, and support from other project managers.

  10. Pharmacological management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Amanda; Apovian, Caroline M

    2017-04-28

    Current management of obesity includes three main arms: behavioral modification, pharmacologic therapy, and bariatric surgery. Decades prior, the only pharmacological agents available to treat obesity were approved only for short-term use (≤ 12 weeks) by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). However, in the last several years, the FDA has approved several medications for longer term treatment of obesity. This highlights the important progression that we, as a society, better appreciate now the chronicity and complexity of obesity as a disease. Also, availability of more medication options gives healthcare providers more possibilities to consider in the management of obesity. Medications for obesity can be simply categorized as FDA approved short-term use (diethylproprion, phendimetrazine, benzphetamine, and phentermine) and long-term use (orlistat, phentermine/topiramate ER, lorcaserin, naltrexone/bupropion ER and liraglutide). Additionally, type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is commonly seen in patients with obesity and necessitates consideration of pharmacological options that do not hinder patients' weight loss. Finally, weight-centric prescribing is also an important component to pharmacological management of obesity. It warrants that healthcare providers thoroughly review their patients' medication lists to determine if any of these agents could be contributing to weight gain.

  11. Managing the Multigenerational Workplace: Answers for Managers and Trainers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Sharon J.; Ladd, Patrick G.; Morris, M. Lane

    2007-01-01

    "How do I get through to this new gang of Millennial workers?" "Why can't my boss just lighten up?" Employees and managers ask questions such as these from all sides of the generational battle lines forming in workplaces today. The emerging trend of what we have called "generational diversity" in the workplace is a growing challenge for managers…

  12. Guidelines for Obesity Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Donna H

    2016-09-01

    This article addresses current best practices in obesity management, primarily through the discussion of 5 guidelines documents: those sponsored by the US National Institutes of Health and the AHA/ACC/TOS, ENDO, ASBP, AACE, and the United Kingdom's NICE. Common to all of these reports is the emphasis on addressing weight management as a pathway to prevention and optimal management of obesity-associated comorbidities (ie, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases). No one of these documents fits all needs; all have a place. Further, no one of these documents is final. As knowledge advances, all will require updating. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Managing diversity in the health care workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidhizar, R; Dowd, S; Newman Giger, J

    1999-03-01

    Cultural diversity is increasing in the United States as increasing numbers of minorities enter the United States from abroad, and cultural diversity is especially prevalent in the health care workplace. In fact, the health care professions are particularly interested in the presence of minorities among caregivers because this often enhances the cultural competence of care delivery. Nevertheless, subtle discrimination can still be found, and managers must be alert that such behavior is not tolerated. Use of the Giger-Davidhizar Cultural Assessment Model can provide managers with information needed to respond to diversity among staff appropriately.

  14. Developing disability management in the workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claidze V.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors of the article are concerned with how developing disability management in the workplace could open the possibilities for work for people with disability and can be matched with the opportunities of increasing the employment rate according to the European Disability Strategy (2010–2020 objectives as well as fighting against social exclusion and practical implementation of the United Convention on the rights of this group of people. As the statistical facts and figures show, there is a problem of inadequate employment among people with disabilities and there is a negative tendency in it. The topic of this article is related to the specific situation of disability management in the workplaces in Latvia, where there is an influence of the heritage from the past – the Soviet system, economic, legal and social issues. Interviewing experts and conducting extensive literature reviews within this context show that a considerable number of disability management problems have been possible solved in the enterprises of Latvia. On the basis of these essential findings, the areas of improvement have been identified following the European Disability Strategy. The abstract is elaborated within the framework of the Lifelong Learning Programme Leonardo da Vinci project “Ability not Disability in Employment” and financial support of the European Community.

  15. Management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, George A; Frühbeck, Gema; Ryan, Donna H; Wilding, John P H

    2016-05-07

    A modern approach to obesity acknowledges the multifactorial determinants of weight gain and the health benefits to be derived from weight loss. Foundational to any weight loss effort is lifestyle change, diet, and increased physical activity. The approach should be a high quality diet to which patients will adhere accompanied by an exercise prescription describing frequency, intensity, type, and time with a minimum of 150 min moderate weekly activity. For patients who struggle with weight loss and who would receive health benefit from weight loss, management of medications that are contributing to weight gain and use of approved medications for chronic weight management along with lifestyle changes are appropriate. Medications approved in the USA or European Union are orlistat, naltrexone/bupropion, and liraglutide; in the USA, lorcaserin and phentermine/topiramate are also available. Surgical management (gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy, and Roux-en Y gastric bypass) can produce remarkable health improvement and reduce mortality for patients with severe obesity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. People management implications of virtual workplace arrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ortlepp

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors that led to an organisation implementing a particular form of virtual workplace arrangement, namely, home-based work. The benefits and disadvantages associated with this form of work arrangement are explored from both the managers' and home-based employees' perspectives. Design/Methodology/Approach: Given the exploratory nature of the empirical study on which this paper is based, a qualitative research design was adopted so as to ensure that the data collection process was dynamic and probing in nature. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were therefore used as instruments for data collection. Findings: The research findings indicate that virtual work arrangements such as home-based work arrangements have advantages for both employers and employees. For instance, reduction of costs associated with office space and facilities, decrease in absenteeism rates, increased employee job satisfaction and improvements in employees' general quality of life. However, a number of negative experiences related to this form of virtual work arrangement are also evident, for example, feelings of isolation as well as stress related to the inability to have firm boundaries between work and family responsibilities. Implications: Based on the insights gained from the findings in the empirical study, a number of areas that need to be given specific attention when organisations are introducing virtual workplace arrangements of this nature are identified. Recommendations made in this article are important for human resource management specialists as well as core business policy makers considering different forms of organisational design. Originality/Value: Maximising the quality of production and service provided has become the prime objective in most organisations in the 21st century. Technology has made it possible for some jobs to be performed at any place at any time and has facilitated the

  17. Conflict management for managers resolving workplace, client, and policy disputes

    CERN Document Server

    Raines, Susan S

    2013-01-01

    "Raines masterfully blends the latest empirical research on workplace conflict with practical knowledge, skills, and tools to effectively manage and prevent a wide range of conflict episodes. This is a highly applicable 'top shelf book' that will assist anyone from the aspiring manager to top level management and leadership in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. It will also be a fast favorite of professors, trainers, and students of business and conflict management."- Brian Polkinghorn, Distinguished Professor, Center for Conflict Resolution, Salisbury University. "With her broad dis

  18. Diversity Management in the Canadian Workplace: Towards an Antiracism Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Vanmala Hiranandani

    2012-01-01

    Most diversity management programs in Canada maintain that enhancing workforce diversity is of tremendous significance for business organizations in today’s competitive global urban markets. Since well-meaning diversity management initiatives have been largely ineffective thus far in dealing with workplace discrimination and racism in the Canadian workplace, this paper underscores the need to decenter the focus of diversity management from a business imperative to an antidiscrimination and so...

  19. How satisfied are hospitality managers in the workplace?

    OpenAIRE

    Kruger, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    There has been a renewed interest in the satisfaction of hospitality managers in organisational research. The purpose of this research has been to examine the level of satisfaction of hospitality managers in the workplace, while controlling for selected variables of job satisfaction, overall happiness in the workplace and turnover intent, using data that were collected from 106 hospitality managers. The factors that obtained the highest mean were remuneration, job happiness and turnover inten...

  20. Emerging management strategies for obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopelman, P G

    1998-08-01

    Management strategies for obesity, which include drug therapy, are emerging as a consequence of the increasing recognition of the medical seriousness of obesity. Obesity requires appropriate and effective management by suitably trained members of a multidisciplinary team, with treatment programmes putting equal importance on weight reduction and its maintenance. Such programmes must also take into account the reduction in risk from co-morbid conditions after modest weight loss (5-10% of initial body weight). The use of an anti-obesity drug may be justified for patients at risk from obesity where dietary methods, including exercise and behaviour modification, have failed to achieve a 10% reduction in initial body weight after at least three months from the start of the episode of managed care. Anti-obesity drugs must be prescribed in an appropriate setting, with patients being reviewed on a regular basis. Essential elements for managed weight loss include, a printed management programme, appropriate equipment, specified and realistic weight-loss goals, documentation of individual patient's health risks, and clearly defined follow-up procedures with explicit guidelines for the use of drugs and notification of other doctors involved in the patient's care. The process of drug treatment necessitates a system of regular medical audit. Many health-care professionals and lay persons remain sceptical about the scientific value of anti-obesity drugs. The emergence of increasingly specific and effective agents underlines the importance of ensuring appropriate use for patients at risk from obesity.

  1. Managing Workplace Incivility: The Role of Conflict Management Styles--Antecedent or Antidote?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudel, Jeannie; Reio, Thomas G., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The workforce of the 21st century is dealing with rapid changes and increased competition across industries. Such changes place stress on management and workers alike, increasing the potential for workplace conflict and deviant workplace behaviors, including incivility. The importance of effective conflict management in the workplace has been…

  2. Workplace bullying among managers: a multifactorial perspective and understanding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ariza-Montes, J Antonio; Muniz R, Noel M; Leal-Rodríguez, Antonio L; Leal-Millán, Antonio G

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study certain factors that may be determinant in the emergence of workplace bullying among managers-employees with a recognized and privileged position to exercise power...

  3. Overweight and obesity management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Scott

    2016-06-01

    Comprehensive lifestyle interventions, including nutrition, physical activity, and behavioral therapy, are the foundation for clinical obesity management. New tools and treatment approaches help clinicians provide these interventions and support weight management in the primary care setting. Escalating treatment, such as using pharmacotherapy, medical devices, or bariatric surgery, are important considerations for appropriate patients who do not respond to lifestyle counseling. This article provides a review of obesity treatment in primary care and managed care settings. Principles of lifestyle changes for weight management, behavioral counseling, and options for pharmacotherapy, medical devices, and bariatric surgery are discussed.

  4. Pharmacologic management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Robert F

    2012-01-01

    Recent discoveries of processes that govern regulation of body weight and energy expenditure have led to development of new anti-obesity pharmacological agents. This article will inform health professionals of new anti-obesity medications that target neuronal systems within the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral humoral proteins that send signals to the CNS. An emerging theme of new therapies is to use combination medications that are directed toward several targets or leverage existing gastrointestinal satiety hormonal signals. By using combination therapies, it is anticipated that greater weight loss will be achieved compared to monotherapy. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Practical perspectives on the management of overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Robert S; Handelsman, Yehuda; Pezalla, Edmund J; Pikelny, Dan

    2014-03-01

    The prevalence of obesity, defined as a body mass index of 30 or more, has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. Obesity is associated with an increased risk of multiple conditions, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and sleep apnea. To discuss issues related to obesity in the workplace, healthcare, and managed care settings, stakeholders from these areas participated in a roundtable discussion on several topics, including the management of obesity, managed care coverage policies for obesity treatments, and potential strategies for improving patient outcomes. Participants agreed that obesity is a challenging condition to treat. Lifestyle modification, one of the most commonly recommended treatment modalities, is often inadequate on its own, as patients are unable to maintain weight loss over time. Although lifestyle modification remains important, additional tools are needed. In patients who undergo bariatric surgery, lifestyle modification is also necessary for long-term weight maintenance; however, surgery is not appropriate for all patients. Pharmacologic treatment may also be considered, but cost and managed care coverage policies have the potential to limit patient access to this treatment modality. Increased awareness and additional efforts on the part of all stakeholders are needed to improve outcomes for patients affected by obesity.

  6. Critical reflections on managing cultural diversity in workplaces in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Brezigar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on managing cultural diversity at workplaces in Slovenia. The author critically reflects on some aspects of research and studies that have been carried out both on discrimination as well as managing diversity in Slovenia between 2007 and 2013, and finds the cause of the inability of organisations to adopt policies on managing diversity in the lack of competences and skills associated with cultural sensibility. The author maintains that whereas workplaces are bound to become more and more diverse, the predominant approach towards diversity in workplaces in Slovenia tends to either dismiss (cultural diversity as inconsequential or treat it as a nuisance that needs to be dealt with, thus failing to grasp the advantages which such diversity could bring.

  7. Workplace disability management in postpolio syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, S; Takemura, J; Matsushima, Y; Chisaka, H; Hachisuka, K

    2001-12-01

    Postpolio syndrome (PPS) is generally defined as a clinical syndrome of new weakness, fatigue, and pain in individuals who have previously recovered from acute paralytic poliomyelitis. These new problems may lead to loss of employment as well as new deficits in instrumental activities in daily living (cleaning, washing, shopping, transportation, etc.), walking, climbing stairs, and personal assistance. We presented three cases of PPS with working disabilities in Japan, and stated the issues confronted with. Particularly at the workplace, PPS individuals need special supports from both rehabilitation medicine and occupational health services, including improved nutrition, achieving ideal body weight, regular and sensible exercise, frequent checkups, and modifying working conditions.

  8. Airway management and morbid obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Michael S

    2010-11-01

    Morbidly obese patients present with excess fatty tissue externally on the breast, neck, thoracic wall and abdomen and internally in the mouth, pharynx and abdomen. This excess tissue tends to make access (intubation, tracheostomy) to and patency (during sedation or mask ventilation) of the upper airway and the function of the lungs (decreased residual capacity and aggravated ventilation perfusion mismatch) worse than in lean patients. Proper planning and preparation of airway management is essential, including elevation of the patient's upper body, head and neck. Preoxygenation is mandatory in morbidly obese patients and should be followed by actions to counteract atelectasis formation. The decision as to weather to use a rapid sequence induction, an awake intubation or a standard induction with hypnotics should depend on the thorough airway examination and comorbidity and should not be based solely on whether morbid obesity is present or not. It is important to ensure sufficient depth of anaesthesia before initiating manipulation of the airway because inadequate anaesthesia depth predisposes to aspiration if airway management becomes difficult. The intubating laryngeal mask airway is more efficient in the morbidly obese patients than in lean patients and serves as a rescue device for both failed ventilation and failed intubation. In the 24 h following anaesthesia, morbidly obese patients experience frequent oxygen desaturation periods that can be counteracted by continuous positive airway pressure, noninvasive ventilation and physiotherapy.

  9. workplace safety management as correlates of wellbeing among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2017-12-28

    Dec 28, 2017 ... study investigates relationship between safety management practices and psychological wellbeing in the workplace. The study was a correlational ... Author details: Department of Psychology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. Mobile phone: ..... Happiness, health, or relationships? Managerial practices ...

  10. An Exploration of Managers' Discourses of Workplace Bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Susan L; Boutain, Doris M; Tsai, Jenny Hsin-Chun; Beaton, Randal; de Castro, Arnold B

    2015-01-01

    To identify discourses used by hospital nursing unit managers to characterize workplace bullying, and their roles and responsibilities in workplace bullying management. Nurses around the world have reported being the targets of bullying. These nurses often report that their managers do not effectively help them resolve the issue. There is scant research that examines this topic from the perspective of managers. This was a descriptive, qualitative study. Interviews were conducted with hospital nursing unit managers who were recruited via purposive and snowball sampling. Data were analyzed using Willig's Foucauldian discourse analysis. Managers characterized bullying as an interpersonal issue involving the target and the perpetrator, as an intrapersonal issue attributable to characteristics of the perpetrator, or as an ambiguous situation. For interpersonal bullying, managers described supporting target's efforts to end bullying; for intrapersonal bullying, they described taking primary responsibility; and for ambiguous situations, they described several actions, including doing nothing. Managers have different responses to different categories of bullying. Efforts need to be made to make sure they are correctly identifying and appropriately responding to incidents of workplace bullying. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Airway management and morbid obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    Morbidly obese patients present with excess fatty tissue externally on the breast, neck, thoracic wall and abdomen and internally in the mouth, pharynx and abdomen. This excess tissue tends to make access (intubation, tracheostomy) to and patency (during sedation or mask ventilation) of the upper...... in morbidly obese patients and should be followed by actions to counteract atelectasis formation. The decision as to weather to use a rapid sequence induction, an awake intubation or a standard induction with hypnotics should depend on the thorough airway examination and comorbidity and should not be based...... solely on whether morbid obesity is present or not. It is important to ensure sufficient depth of anaesthesia before initiating manipulation of the airway because inadequate anaesthesia depth predisposes to aspiration if airway management becomes difficult. The intubating laryngeal mask airway is more...

  12. Ambiguity among Managers in Small-Scale Enterprises: How to Handle Business and Workplace Health Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stig Vinberg

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive research on health in working life, few studies focus on this issue from the perspective of managers in small-scale enterprises (SSEs. To gain deeper knowledge of managers’ perceptions and strategies for dealing with workplace health management, 13 Norwegian and Swedish SSE managers were interviewed after participating in a workplace health development project. The methodical approach was based on Grounded Theory with a constructivist orientation. The main theme that emerged was ‘ambiguity in workplace health management and maintaining the business’, which was related to the categories ‘internal workplace settings’, ‘workplace surroundings’, and ‘leadership strategies’. The managers experienced ambiguity due to internal and external demands. These requirements were linked to the core challenges in dealing with multitasking leadership, financial decision-making, labour legislation, staff development and maintaining business. However, the managers developed new skills and competence and thereby a more reflexive approach and readiness to create a health-promoting workplace from being part of a development project. The implications are that managers in SSEs need to exchange experiences and discuss workplace health issues with other managers in networks. It is also important that occupational health services and social and welfare organizations use tailor-made models and strategies for supporting SSEs.

  13. Evaluating employee health risks due to hypertension and obesity: self-testing workplace health stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John T

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated employee health risks due to hypertension, pre-hypertension, overweight, and obesity through the use of self-testing workplace health stations that measure blood pressure (BP) and weight. We analyzed BP and weight data from the first 18 months after the installation of health stations in the offices of a financial services company with approximately 20,000 employees in 13 US workplace locations. Data showed that 21.7% of the employees voluntarily used a health station at least once to measure BP or weight during the first 18 months. Health station usage ranged from a high of 51.8% to a low of 5.3% at the 13 workplace locations. Among health station users, 52.5% used a health station more than once. Health station users used the health stations an average of 4.2 times (median, 2 times). Among health station users, 95.6% measured BP, 92.2% measured weight, and 87.8% measured both BP and weight. Initial BP results were: hypertension 26.7%, prehypertension 40.3%, and normal BP 32.9%. The initial body mass index (BMI) results were: obese 38%, overweight 34.7%, normal weight 25.3%, and underweight 2%. Employees with hypertension on the initial reading used the health stations more frequently than employees with pre-hypertension or normal BP. Employees with an obese BMI result on the initial reading used the health stations more frequently than employees with an overweight or normal BMI result. Many employees reduced their health risks due to hypertension, pre-hypertension, overweight, or obesity, although the health risks of many other employees were unchanged or increased. Self-testing workplace health stations that measure BP and weight provide employees with information about their health risks due to hypertension, pre-hypertension, overweight, and obesity. Self-testing workplace health stations can also be used to identify at-risk employees who may benefit from health and wellness programs.

  14. Airway management and morbid obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    airway and the function of the lungs (decreased residual capacity and aggravated ventilation perfusion mismatch) worse than in lean patients. Proper planning and preparation of airway management is essential, including elevation of the patient's upper body, head and neck. Preoxygenation is mandatory...... solely on whether morbid obesity is present or not. It is important to ensure sufficient depth of anaesthesia before initiating manipulation of the airway because inadequate anaesthesia depth predisposes to aspiration if airway management becomes difficult. The intubating laryngeal mask airway is more...

  15. Ethical Aspects of Obesity Management in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Sh Gheibi; Ghasemzadeh, N.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Childhood obesity is a growing global health problem, but in the view of medical ethics, obesity management in children is associated with challenges. Method and materials: This study is a comprehensive review in English (Cochrane Library, and PubMed) and Persian literature which pointed to the ethical aspects of pediatrics obesity management with content analysis. Results: In the childhood obesity interventions, clinical trials should be carefully designed with obtaining ...

  16. Obesity Discrimination in the Workplace: “You’re Hired!”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart W Flint

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to first identify whether obese people are discriminated against when hiring employees. Employees of workforces that vary due to the physical demand of their job, will rate hypothetical applicants on their suitability for employment using Likert-type responses to a range of questions. Applicants’ curriculum vitae will be manipulated by weight status and gender. Implicit and explicit attitudes towards obese people will also be examined using existing measures with strong psychometric properties as reported in extant research. Second, using focus group discussions with employees of either sedentary or physically active workforces, this study will explore why and in what ways obese people are discriminated against in the workplace.

  17. Diversity management in the workplace: beyond compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.S. Gwele

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Diversity management is not a numbers game. Diversity management is a holistic and strategic intervention aimed at maximizing every individual’s potential to contribute towards the realization o f the organization’s goals through capitalizing on individual talents and differences within a diverse workforce environment. Managing interpersonal relationships within a diverse workforce environment presents a number of challenges related to changes in the social, legal and economic landscape, individual expectations and values as well as the inevitable change in organizational culture (Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development 2005: 1-7. Whether or not organizations are effective in managing diversity is a function of senior managements’ commitment, and the perceived centrality of diversity management by all those who populate the institution’s workspace. Above all it should be clear to all employees, irrespective of race, gender, or vocational/professional status, that each and every one of them has something of value to contribute towards the realization of the institution’s mission and goals. It is crucial to determine clear and manageable success indicators, focusing not only on compliance with legal obligations to include and/or increase the number of employees from the underrepresented and designated groups, but also on strategic intervention strategies to be used to promote and nurture individual talent and potential toward the realization of both individual aspirations and organizational goals re-quality patient outcomes.

  18. Workplace disability management programs promoting return-to-work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gensby, Ulrik; Lund, Thomas; Kowalski, Krystyna

    is still needed. This review will evaluate the effect of workplace disability management programs promoting RTW - i.e. report on the evidence and describes and combine results from individual studies on workplace disability management programs and explain possible variations in practice....... economic and social consequences. The share of the working-age population relying on disability and sickness benefits as their main source of income has tended to increase in many OECD countries. Long-term sickness absence also represents substantial life events, where the duration of absence due to injury...... or illness increases the future risk of receiving disability pension and permanent exclusion from the labour market. In recent years the multidimensional characteristics of work disability prevention has been emphasised as a key perspective to understand the complexity in helping workers with disabling...

  19. Workplace physical exercises, obesity anthropometric indexes, blood pressure and static muscle strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Roberto Queiroga

    2014-03-01

    Current analysis compares anthropometric indexes of obesity, blood pressure and static muscle strength among workers who exercised or did not exercise themselves on the workplace. Three hundred and fifty-four workers, of whom 178 did not perform any physical exercises and 176 who did, were evaluated by means of a query on their participation in workplace exercises during the last 30 days. Their systolic (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP was measured; height, body mass and waist circumference (WC were taken; four static muscle strength tests (right and left handgrip strength, scapular strength and lumbar strength were performed. The Shapiro Wilk test revealed asymmetry in the data presented as median and interquartile variance. Mann-Whitney test was used to compare data between the two groups. Results did not reveal any difference for body mass index (BMI, WC, SBP, DBP and mean blood pressure (MBP between the groups. However, greater performance was an asset for all participants in workplace exercises for all static strength tests. There is evidence that workers who performed workplace exercises may increase muscle strength without any changes in BMI, WC and blood pressure.

  20. Behavioral therapy for management of obesity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jacob, Jubbin J; Isaac, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    .... The common components of behavioral therapy for obesity are explained. The different settings where behavioral therapy can be administered are mentioned. The review focuses on how behavioral therapy can be incorporated in the routine clinical management of obesity by primary and secondary care physicians who encounter obese patients.

  1. Strategies for managing impressions of racial identity in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Laura Morgan; Cha, Sandra E; Kim, Sung Soo

    2014-10-01

    This article deepens understanding of the workplace experiences of racial minorities by investigating racial identity-based impression management (RIM) by Asian American journalists. Racial centrality, directly or indirectly, predicted the use of 4 RIM strategies (avoidance, enhancement, affiliation, and racial humor). Professional centrality also predicted strategy use, which was related to life satisfaction and perceived career success. By shedding light on proactive strategies that individuals use to influence colleagues' impressions of their racial identity, we contribute to research on diversity in organizations, impression management, and racial identity. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Anesthetic Management of Patients with Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oznur Uludag

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has become a rapidly growing public health problem in whole world. Obesity and alterations due to obesity which include changes in metabolic, cardiovascular and pulmonary functions increase risk of perioperative mortality and morbidity. Obesity impacts anesthesia procedures significantly. Comorbid diseases such as hypertension, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, and pulmonary diseases increase risk of complications during anesthesia. In this review we evaluated important factors that should be considered during planning of anesthesia for obesity surgery and other surgeries, management of intraoperative anesthesia and postoperative analgesia, and management of complications. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(3.000: 406-419

  3. Management Education's Blind Spot: Management of Workplace Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clydesdale, Greg

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Developing interpersonal relationships is widely recognised as a key managerial capability, but business schools have been criticised for the limited attention given to the subject. The purpose of this paper is to attempt to address this deficiency in the area of teaching workplace relationships. Design/methodology/approach: The paper…

  4. Diversity Management in the Canadian Workplace: Towards an Antiracism Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanmala Hiranandani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most diversity management programs in Canada maintain that enhancing workforce diversity is of tremendous significance for business organizations in today’s competitive global urban markets. Since well-meaning diversity management initiatives have been largely ineffective thus far in dealing with workplace discrimination and racism in the Canadian workplace, this paper underscores the need to decenter the focus of diversity management from a business imperative to an antidiscrimination and social justice imperative. Within this latter perspective, the paper examines the strengths and limitations of the antiracism approach that has been implemented in various developed countries in recent years. The antiracism approach is an action-oriented strategy for institutional and systemic change that has at its core the interrogation of privilege, power disparities, and other forms of inequity within the organization. Drawing from the lessons of various initiatives that have utilized this approach, the present paper emphasizes the need for a nuanced antiracism approach in the multicultural Canadian society if diversity management is to attain its goal of greater inclusion of all individuals in informal networks and formal organizational programs.

  5. Workplace Bullying among Managers: A Multifactorial Perspective and Understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Antonio Ariza-Montes

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to study certain factors that may be determinant in the emergence of workplace bullying among managers—employees with a recognized and privileged position to exercise power—adopting the individual perspective of the subject, the bullied manager. Individual, organizational, and contextual factors integrate the developed global model, and the methodology utilized to accomplish our research objectives is based on the binary logistic regression model. A sample population of 661 managers was obtained from the micro data file of the 5th European Working Conditions Survey-2010 (European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions and utilized to conduct the present research. The results indicate that the chance for a manager to refer to him/herself as bullied increases among women that hold managerial positions and live with children under 15 at home, and among subjects that work at night, on a shift system, suffering from work stress, enjoying little satisfaction from their working conditions, and not perceiving opportunities for promotions in their organizations. The present work summarizes an array of outcomes and proposes, within the usual course of events, that workplace bullying could be reduced if job demands were limited and job resources were increased. The implications of these findings could assist directors/general directors in facilitating, to some extent, good social relationships among managers.

  6. Workplace Bullying among Managers: A Multifactorial Perspective and Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza-Montes, J. Antonio; Muniz R., Noel M.; Leal-Rodríguez, Antonio L.; Leal-Millán, Antonio G.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study certain factors that may be determinant in the emergence of workplace bullying among managers—employees with a recognized and privileged position to exercise power—adopting the individual perspective of the subject, the bullied manager. Individual, organizational, and contextual factors integrate the developed global model, and the methodology utilized to accomplish our research objectives is based on the binary logistic regression model. A sample population of 661 managers was obtained from the micro data file of the 5th European Working Conditions Survey-2010 (European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions) and utilized to conduct the present research. The results indicate that the chance for a manager to refer to him/herself as bullied increases among women that hold managerial positions and live with children under 15 at home, and among subjects that work at night, on a shift system, suffering from work stress, enjoying little satisfaction from their working conditions, and not perceiving opportunities for promotions in their organizations. The present work summarizes an array of outcomes and proposes, within the usual course of events, that workplace bullying could be reduced if job demands were limited and job resources were increased. The implications of these findings could assist directors/general directors in facilitating, to some extent, good social relationships among managers. PMID:24599041

  7. A classification of components of workplace disability management programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gensby, Ulrik; Labriola, Merete; Irvin, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents results from a Campbell systematic review on the nature and effectiveness of workplace disability management programs (WPDM) promoting return to work (RTW), as implemented and practiced by employers. A classification of WPDM program components, based on the review...... were conducted in pairs of reviewers. Studies were clustered around various dimensions of the design and context of programs. Results: 16,932 records were identified by the initial search. 599 papers were assessed for relevance. Thirteen studies met inclusion criteria. Twelve peer reviewed articles...

  8. Workplace disability management programs promoting return-to-work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gensby, Ulrik; Lund, Thomas; Kowalski, Krystyna

    This report presents a Campbell systematic review on the effectiveness of workplace disability management programs (WPDM programs) promoting return to work (RTW), as implemented and practised by employers. The objectives of this review were to assess the effects of WPDM programs, to examine...... non-randomized studies (NRS) and eleven single group ‘before and after’ studies (B & A)), including data from eleven different WPDM programs, met the inclusion criteria. There were insufficient data on the characteristics of the sample and the effect sizes were uncertain. There is a lack of evidence...

  9. Management of Obesity: Implication For Aging Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ORIAKHI UNITY

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The overall goal of this study was to provide insight into the management of obesity in aging athletes. Obesity is seen as an imbalance in energy expanded and energy intake and a leading cause of death worldwide with increasing prevalence in adults and children. It is also viewed as one of the most serious public health problems of the 21st century. It has been observed that diets, physical activities and medical options are ways of managing obesity for aging athletes. It was therefore concluded that physical activities, diets and medical management could reduce type-2 diabetes, coronary diseases, hypertension, respiratory disorders, gall bladder disease, certain types of cancers, cholesterol, disability and early death as consequences of obesity. It was recommended that developing and designing regular physical activities, diets, medical options are ways to manage obesity

  10. Employee Spirituality in the Workplace: A Cross-Cultural View for the Management of Spiritual Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jeffrey S.; Geroy, Gary D.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses six entry points to initiate discussion of employee spirituality in management education: cross-cultural management, workplace diversity, leadership, team management, organizational culture, and human resource development. (SK)

  11. Assessment of obesity management in medical examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treyzon Leo

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity is a growing international health problem that has already reached epidemic proportions, particularly within the United States where a majority of the population is overweight or obese. Effective methods of treatment are needed, and should be taught to physicians by efficient means. There exists a disconnect between the rising obesity prevalence with its high toll on medical resources, and the lack of obesity education provided to practitioners in the course of their training. One particular shortfall is the lack of representation of obesity on standardized medical examinations. Physician attitudes toward obesity are influenced by their lack of familiarity with the management of the disease. This may include dietary restriction, increasing physical activity, behavior modification, pharmacotherapy, and surgical interventions. Thus, curricular changes in the medical education of obesity could help reduce morbidity and mortality associated with this disease.

  12. Therapeutic options in the management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Richard W; Hall, Rosemary M; Parry-Strong, Amber; Wilson, John M; Krebs, Jeremy D

    2013-11-22

    In New Zealand 28.4% of adults now classify as obese, whilst a total of 63.8% are overweight or obese (BMI >25 kg/m²). This presents an ever increasing social and economic burden to individuals, families and the healthcare system. Obesity is a major risk factor for cancer, cardiovascular, metabolic, and respiratory disorders. Preventing obesity is the optimal long-term population strategy and must be a government priority. There are many approaches which could be taken to facilitate this, however it is important not to forget those who are currently overweight or obese. This review addresses the current therapeutic options in the treatment of obesity, focusing on lifestyle changes, medications, and surgery in New Zealand. It also presents a suggested algorithm for the clinician assessing and managing obese patients in New Zealand.

  13. Behavioral therapy for management of obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jubbin J Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a major public health problem and is implicated in the rising prevalence of cardiac disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus in India. Management of an obese patient includes therapeutic lifestyle changes of increasing physical activity and reducing calorie intake. This combination can result in about a 10% loss of initial body weight. To reinforce this intervention, behavioral therapy needs to be incorporated into the overall intervention under the belief that obesity is a result of maladaptive eating behaviors and exercise patterns. This review explains the principles of behavioral therapy, including the underlying assumptions and characteristics. The common components of behavioral therapy for obesity are explained. The different settings where behavioral therapy can be administered are mentioned. The review focuses on how behavioral therapy can be incorporated in the routine clinical management of obesity by primary and secondary care physicians who encounter obese patients.

  14. Behavioral therapy for management of obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Jubbin J Jacob; Rajesh Isaac

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem and is implicated in the rising prevalence of cardiac disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus in India. Management of an obese patient includes therapeutic lifestyle changes of increasing physical activity and reducing calorie intake. This combination can result in about a 10% loss of initial body weight. To reinforce this intervention, behavioral therapy needs to be incorporated into the overall intervention under the belief that obesity is a result of m...

  15. Pharmacotherapy for the management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dhiren

    2015-11-01

    In the last 30 years, obesity has rapidly increased and obesity-related comorbidities have surged. Once considered to be a problem only in developed nations, obesity has become a global epidemic. Consequently, the costs associated with managing overweight and obesity worldwide are astronomical. The objective of this mini-review is to provide an overview of current options available for obesity management, with a focus on anti-obesity pharmacotherapies. The impact of weight loss on improving obesity-related comorbidities and risk factors has been well documented. Although established clinical guidelines suggest comprehensive lifestyle modification to induce weight loss, many patients do not respond to lifestyle interventions and may not qualify for bariatric surgery. For these patients, pharmacotherapy may serve as a therapeutic option. Several anti-obesity pharmacotherapies, such as phentermine, are indicated for short-term use and are not required to demonstrate clinically meaningful weight loss (i.e., ≥5%). For long-term weight management, the FDA has approved 5 agents so far-orlistat, lorcaserin, phentermine/topiramate, naltrexone/bupropion, and liraglutide. These drugs have shown efficacy in enabling patients to achieve clinically meaningful weight loss and improving cardiometabolic parameters. Healthcare practitioners can help alleviate the obesity epidemic by tailoring these pharmacotherapies based on individual needs, comorbidities, and associated drug safety concerns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Ethical problems faced by in managing HIV in workplace].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaye, I; Mbaye, Ng; Becker, Ch; Fall, Ch; Sow, M L

    2004-01-01

    This study which was conducted between September 1999 and June 2000 among occupational physicians aimed to appreciate ethical problems faced by physicians in managing HIV infection in workplace. A questionnaire was administrated by telephone to physicians included in the list of Occupational Physicians Association. Thirty eight physicians responded among the fourty four contacted. Thirty two ie 84.21% did face HIV infection in their workplace. The frequency of meeting cases was in between 1 to 5 for 68.75%. Thirty two did order the test either to depist or to conduct eatiologic diagnosis. Informed consent were asked by twenty one physicians. Six physicians ie 18.75% did inform the employer of serologic status, among them four said having obtain employee's consent to reveal status. For them, such revalation was the basis for financial involvment of employer in the treatment, and facilitates his tolerance of absenteeism. Four physicians signaled facing dilemma when a patient did not want to inform his or her partner of his (her) serologic status. They suggested a legal authorization to reveal patients status in such circumtances.

  17. Obesity: pathophysiology and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich-Panigrahi, Tatiana; Panigrahi, Soumya; Wiechec, Emilia; Los, Marek

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is an increasingly serious socioeconomic and clinical problem. Between (1/4)-(1/3) of population in the developed countries can be classified as obese. Four major etiological factors for development of obesity are genetic determinants, environmental factors, food intake and exercise. Obesity increases the risk of the development of various pathologic conditions including: insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, endocrine problems, and certain forms of cancer. Thus, obesity is a negative determinant for longevity. In this review we provide broad overview of pathophysiology of obesity. We also discuss various available, and experimental therapeutic methods. We highlight functions of adipocytes including fat storing capacity and secretory activity resulting in numerous endocrine effects like leptin, IL-6, adiponectin, and resistin. The anti-obesity drugs are classified according to their primary action on energy balance. Major classes of these drugs are: appetite suppressants, inhibitors of fat absorption (i.e. orlistat), stimulators of thermogenesis and stimulators of fat mobilization. The appetite suppressants are further divided into noradrenergic agents, (i.e. phentermine, phendimetrazine, benzphetamine, diethylpropion), serotoninergic agents (i.e. dexfenfluramine), and mixed noradrenergic-serotoninergic agents (i.e. sibutramine). Thus, we highlight recent advances in the understanding of the central neural control of energy balance, current treatment strategies for obesity and the most promising targets for the development of novel anti-obesity drugs.

  18. European Guidelines for Obesity Management in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumuk, Volkan; Tsigos, Constantine; Fried, Martin; Schindler, Karin; Busetto, Luca; Micic, Dragan; Toplak, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic metabolic disease characterised by an increase of body fat stores. It is a gateway to ill health, and it has become one of the leading causes of disability and death, affecting not only adults but also children and adolescents worldwide. In clinical practice, the body fatness is estimated by BMI, and the accumulation of intra-abdominal fat (marker for higher metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk) can be assessed by waist circumference. Complex interactions between biological, behavioural, social and environmental factors are involved in regulation of energy balance and fat stores. A comprehensive history, physical examination and laboratory assessment relevant to the patient's obesity should be obtained. Appropriate goals of weight management emphasise realistic weight loss to achieve a reduction in health risks and should include promotion of weight loss, maintenance and prevention of weight regain. Management of co-morbidities and improving quality of life of obese patients are also included in treatment aims. Balanced hypocaloric diets result in clinically meaningful weight loss regardless of which macronutrients they emphasise. Aerobic training is the optimal mode of exercise for reducing fat mass while a programme including resistance training is needed for increasing lean mass in middle-aged and overweight/obese individuals. Cognitive behavioural therapy directly addresses behaviours that require change for successful weight loss and weight loss maintenance. Pharmacotherapy can help patients to maintain compliance and ameliorate obesity-related health risks. Surgery is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity in terms of long-term weight loss. A comprehensive obesity management can only be accomplished by a multidisciplinary obesity management team. We conclude that physicians have a responsibility to recognise obesity as a disease and help obese patients with appropriate prevention and treatment. Treatment should be based on

  19. European Guidelines for Obesity Management in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Yumuk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a chronic metabolic disease characterised by an increase of body fat stores. It is a gateway to ill health, and it has become one of the leading causes of disability and death, affecting not only adults but also children and adolescents worldwide. In clinical practice, the body fatness is estimated by BMI, and the accumulation of intra-abdominal fat (marker for higher metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk can be assessed by waist circumference. Complex interactions between biological, behavioural, social and environmental factors are involved in regulation of energy balance and fat stores. A comprehensive history, physical examination and laboratory assessment relevant to the patient's obesity should be obtained. Appropriate goals of weight management emphasise realistic weight loss to achieve a reduction in health risks and should include promotion of weight loss, maintenance and prevention of weight regain. Management of co-morbidities and improving quality of life of obese patients are also included in treatment aims. Balanced hypocaloric diets result in clinically meaningful weight loss regardless of which macronutrients they emphasise. Aerobic training is the optimal mode of exercise for reducing fat mass while a programme including resistance training is needed for increasing lean mass in middle-aged and overweight/obese individuals. Cognitive behavioural therapy directly addresses behaviours that require change for successful weight loss and weight loss maintenance. Pharmacotherapy can help patients to maintain compliance and ameliorate obesity-related health risks. Surgery is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity in terms of long-term weight loss. A comprehensive obesity management can only be accomplished by a multidisciplinary obesity management team. We conclude that physicians have a responsibility to recognise obesity as a disease and help obese patients with appropriate prevention and treatment. Treatment

  20. European Guidelines for Obesity Management in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumuk, Volkan; Tsigos, Constantine; Fried, Martin; Schindler, Karin; Busetto, Luca; Micic, Dragan; Toplak, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic metabolic disease characterised by an increase of body fat stores. It is a gateway to ill health, and it has become one of the leading causes of disability and death, affecting not only adults but also children and adolescents worldwide. In clinical practice, the body fatness is estimated by BMI, and the accumulation of intra-abdominal fat (marker for higher metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk) can be assessed by waist circumference. Complex interactions between biological, behavioural, social and environmental factors are involved in regulation of energy balance and fat stores. A comprehensive history, physical examination and laboratory assessment relevant to the patient's obesity should be obtained. Appropriate goals of weight management emphasise realistic weight loss to achieve a reduction in health risks and should include promotion of weight loss, maintenance and prevention of weight regain. Management of co-morbidities and improving quality of life of obese patients are also included in treatment aims. Balanced hypocaloric diets result in clinically meaningful weight loss regardless of which macronutrients they emphasise. Aerobic training is the optimal mode of exercise for reducing fat mass while a programme including resistance training is needed for increasing lean mass in middle-aged and overweight/obese individuals. Cognitive behavioural therapy directly addresses behaviours that require change for successful weight loss and weight loss maintenance. Pharmacotherapy can help patients to maintain compliance and ameliorate obesity-related health risks. Surgery is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity in terms of long-term weight loss. A comprehensive obesity management can only be accomplished by a multidisciplinary obesity management team. We conclude that physicians have a responsibility to recognise obesity as a disease and help obese patients with appropriate prevention and treatment. Treatment should be based on

  1. Obesity: dietary and lifestyle management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesely, Jennifer M; DeMattia, Laure G

    2014-10-01

    Lifestyle modifications should be recommended for every patient dealing with overweight or obesity. Behavior modification is the cornerstone of management. Motivational interviewing, goal setting, and self-monitoring are three techniques with proven efficacy for weight reduction. Because an energy deficit is required to promote weight loss, goal setting should be focused on achieving an overall caloric reduction. No single diet has proven to be superior to others overall in terms of weight loss outcomes. However, a low-carbohydrate (ie, ketogenic) diet has been shown to reduce insulin resistance in patients with diabetes and may be considered for this subgroup of patients. There continue to be conflicting views regarding the superiority of low glycemic index foods for weight loss. Exercise alone has not been shown to produce substantial weight loss, but it is helpful during the weight loss phase to preserve lean muscle mass, and it has a role in weight maintenance. Though sleep deprivation has been implicated in weight gain, the effect of improving sleep quality/duration on reducing excess weight has yet to be studied adequately. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  2. Exploring asthma in the workplace: A triangulation of perspectives from management, employees and people with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Denise H; Cheung, Janet M Y; Smith, Lorraine; Saini, Bandana

    2017-08-31

    People with asthma spend a significant amount of time in the workplace but little is known about the current state of disease management in such contexts. The aim of the current study is to explore the experiences, attitudes and perceptions of asthma across different stakeholders in the workplace to help inform potential recommendations for workplace asthma policies. Using purposive and convenience sampling methods, in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted in Australia with 5 human resource personnel, 10 employees with asthma and 10 employees without asthma. Interviews were guided by a schedule of questions focusing on attitudes and experiences of people with asthma in the workplace, which were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Analysis of the qualitative dataset revealed three key themes: Beliefs and Attitudes about Asthma, Asthma Solutions in the Workplace and Workplace Obstacles. Findings suggest that employees with asthma experience problems managing their asthma at work and there is a lack of workplace support in relation to asthma emergency management. Key recommendations for workplace asthma policies have been made to provide better support for employees with asthma. However, further investigation into the experience of managing asthma is required in a wider variety of occupations and work experiences to inform the development of a workplace asthma policy.

  3. The pharmacological management of obesity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The World Health Organization (WHO) defines obesity and overweight as the accumulation of excessive and abnormal body fat in such a way that it has the potential to impair the health of an individual.1 The global prevalence of overweight and obesity has dramatically increased since 1980, when the average proportion of ...

  4. [Nonsurgical management of obesity in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilliot, Didier; Roché, Gaelle; Mohebbi, Halle; Sirvaux, Marie-Aude; Böhme, Philip; Ziegler, Olivier

    2010-09-01

    General practitioners are placed in an ideal position to manage obesity. First, they have to consider the motivation of the obese patient to change his habits. When the patient is not motivated to loss weight, their role is to identify and treat co-morbidities, to evaluate the risk related to the obesity and to establish a therapeutic diagnosis to evaluate motivation and ability to change. If the patient is motivated, the therapeutic choices have to be adapted individually to each patient. An inadequate management may not only result in a failure but may increase obesity. The objectives in obesity treatment are to achieve weight loss in order to reduce health risk as far as possible, to maintain that weight loss, to restore quality of life. Goals and methods must be realistic. Even a modest weight loss (5-10 % of initial weight) will improve health indices in an obese patient. Dietary treatment and physical activity are fundamental to the management of obesity. Compliance with the diet is the major problem, especially during the phase of weight maintenance after the excess weight loss has been lost. Initial weight reduction depends on the level of energy deficit and weight maintenance on compliance to a low fat diet and a physical activity programme. Cognitive behavioural approaches should be an integral part of the management of a chronic disease. This treatment is very useful to improve body image, self-esteem, management of stress and control of disordered eating patterns. A psychotherapeutic approach is often necessary, especially when the obesity is psycho-determined. Obesity drugs should be used for carefully selected patients, as an adjunct to diet therapy and lifestyle modifications, under medical supervision. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Obesity management: Update on orlistat

    OpenAIRE

    Drew, Belinda S; Dixon, Andrew F; Dixon, John B

    2007-01-01

    Belinda S Drew, Andrew F Dixon, John B DixonCentre for Obesity Research and Education, Monash University, Melbourne, AustraliaAbstract: Over the past 20 years obesity has become a worldwide concern of frightening proportion. The World Health Organization estimates that there are over 400 million obese and over 1.6 billion overweight adults, a figure which is projected to almost double by 2015. This is not a disease restricted to adults – at least 20 million children under the age of 5 y...

  6. Nonexercise activity thermogenesis in obesity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villablanca, Pedro A; Alegria, Jorge R; Mookadam, Farouk; Holmes, David R; Wright, R Scott; Levine, James A

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is linked to cardiovascular disease. The global increase in sedentary lifestyle is an important factor contributing to the rising prevalence of the obesity epidemic. Traditionally, counseling has focused on moderate- to vigorous-intensity exercise, with disappointing results. Nonexercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) is an important component of daily energy expenditure. It represents the common daily activities, such as fidgeting, walking, and standing. These high-effect NEAT movements could result in up to an extra 2000 kcal of expenditure per day beyond the basal metabolic rate, depending on body weight and level of activity. Implementing NEAT during leisure-time and occupational activities could be essential to maintaining a negative energy balance. NEAT can be applied by being upright, ambulating, and redesigning workplace and leisure-time environments to promote NEAT. The benefits of NEAT include not only the extra calories expended but also the reduced occurrence of the metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular events, and all-cause mortality. We believe that to overcome the obesity epidemic and its adverse cardiovascular consequences, NEAT should be part of the current medical recommendations. The content of this review is based on a literature search of PubMed and the Google search engine between January 1, 1960, and October 1, 2014, using the search terms physical activity, obesity, energy expenditure, nonexercise activity thermogenesis, and NEAT. Copyright © 2015 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Financial incentive policies at workplace cafeterias for preventing obesity--a systematic review and meta-analysis (Protocol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Kimi; Ota, Erika; Shahrook, Sadequa; Mori, Rintaro

    2014-10-28

    Various studies are currently investigating ways to prevent lifestyle-related diseases and obesity among workers through interventions using incentive strategies, including price discounts for low-fat snacks and sugar-free beverages at workplace cafeterias or vending machines, and the provision of a free salad bar in cafeterias. Rather than assessing individual or group interventions, we will focus on the effectiveness of nutrition education programs at the population level, which primarily incorporate financial incentive strategies to prevent obesity. This paper describes the protocol of a systematic review that will examine the effectiveness of financial incentive programs at company cafeterias in improving dietary habits, nutrient intake, and obesity prevention. We will conduct searches in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO. Interventions will be assessed using data from randomized control trials (RCTs) and cluster RCTs. However, if few such trials exist, we will include quasi-RCTs. We will exclude controlled before-and-after studies and crossover RCTs. We will assess food-based interventions that include financial incentive strategies (discount strategies or social marketing) for workplace cafeterias, vending machines, and kiosks. Two authors will independently review studies for inclusion and will resolve differences by discussion and, if required, through consultation with a third author. We will assess the risk of bias of included studies according to the Cochrane Collaboration's "risk of bias" tool. The purpose of this paper is to outline the study protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis that will investigate the effectiveness of population-level, incentive-focused interventions at the workplace cafeteria that aim to promote and prevent obesity. This review will give an important overview of the available evidence about the effectiveness of incentive-based environmental interventions to

  8. Analysis of Workplace Health Education Performed by Occupational Health Managers in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yeon-Ha; Jung, Moon-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate workplace health education as practiced by occupational health managers based on standardized job tasks and suggest priority tasks and areas to be trained. Methods: The study was conducted between November 10, 2013 and April 30, 2014. The tool used in this study was standardized job tasks of workplace health education for occupational health managers which was developed through methodological steps. It was evaluated by 233 worksite occupational health managers. Data we...

  9. Pharmacotherapy in the Management of Pediatric Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Aaron S; Fox, Claudia K

    2017-08-01

    This review provides a rationale for the use of pharmacotherapy in pediatric weight management, summarizes results of some of the key pediatric clinical trials of approved and "off-label" obesity medications, introduces new options in the pediatric pipeline, and offers a glimpse into the future of pediatric obesity medicine. Despite the need for adjunctive treatments to enhance the outcomes of lifestyle modification therapy among youth with obesity, none of the obesity medications evaluated to date have been shown to meaningfully reduce BMI or cardiometabolic risk factors. Promising medications recently approved for the treatment of obesity in adults will soon be tested in pediatric trials, offering hope that new therapeutic options will soon be available. As new medications are approved to treat pediatric obesity, it will be important to evaluate the safety and efficacy of combination pharmacotherapy and investigate predictors of response. Application of precision medicine approaches to the field of pediatric obesity management will improve the long-term outlook for the tens of millions of youth afflicted with this serious and recalcitrant disease.

  10. Recommendations for the Management of Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Cayir, Yasemin; Isik, Memet; Akturk, Zekeriya

    2015-01-01

    AbstractObesity, which results from an imbalance between energy intake and expenditure, is one of the most important health issues of our day, and is associated with many diseases such as type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease, increased cancer risk, osteoarthritis, and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Achieving long-term weight management in the course of obesity treatment is not possible as long as significant changes in life style are not implemented. In this manuscript, we present a si...

  11. Obesity management: Update on orlistat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda S Drew

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Belinda S Drew, Andrew F Dixon, John B DixonCentre for Obesity Research and Education, Monash University, Melbourne, AustraliaAbstract: Over the past 20 years obesity has become a worldwide concern of frightening proportion. The World Health Organization estimates that there are over 400 million obese and over 1.6 billion overweight adults, a figure which is projected to almost double by 2015. This is not a disease restricted to adults – at least 20 million children under the age of 5 years were overweight in 2005 (WHO 2006. Overweight and obesity lead to serious health consequences including coronary artery disease, stroke, type-2 diabetes, heart failure, dyslipidemia, hypertension, reproductive and gastrointestinal cancers, gallstones, fatty liver disease, osteoarthritis and sleep apnea (Padwal et al 2003.Modest weight loss in the obese of between 5% and 10% of bodyweight is associated with improvements in cardiovascular risk profiles and reduced incidence of type 2 diabetes (Goldstein 1992; Avenell et al 2004; Padwal and Majumdar 2007. Orlistat, a gastric and pancreatic lipase inhibitor that reduces dietary fat absorption by approximately 30%, has been approved for use for around ten years (Zhi et al 1994; Hauptman 2000. There is now a growing body of evidence to suggest that Orlistat assists weight loss and that it may also have additional benefits. The aim of this review is to provide a brief update on the current literature studying the efficacy, safety and significance of the use of Orlistat in clinical practice.Keywords: obese, weight, diet, orlistat, hypertension, cholesterol

  12. Cultural Diversity in the Workplace: Managing a Multicultural Work Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Larry G.; Ross-Gordon, Jovita M.

    1990-01-01

    The influx of minorities into the workplace requires attention to their participation in workplace training, to race relations and organizational culture, and to potential communication difficulties. Human resource professionals must address cultural diversity issues as they affect the attainment of organizational goals. (SK)

  13. Obesity management: update on orlistat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Belinda S; Dixon, Andrew F; Dixon, John B

    2007-01-01

    Over the past 20 years obesity has become a worldwide concern of frightening proportion. The World Health Organization estimates that there are over 400 million obese and over 1.6 billion overweight adults, a figure which is projected to almost double by 2015. This is not a disease restricted to adults - at least 20 million children under the age of 5 years were overweight in 2005 (WHO 2006). Overweight and obesity lead to serious health consequences including coronary artery disease, stroke, type-2 diabetes, heart failure, dyslipidemia, hypertension, reproductive and gastrointestinal cancers, gallstones, fatty liver disease, osteoarthritis and sleep apnea (Padwal et al 2003). Modest weight loss in the obese of between 5% and 10% of bodyweight is associated with improvements in cardiovascular risk profiles and reduced incidence of type 2 diabetes (Goldstein 1992; Avenell et al 2004; Padwal and Majumdar 2007). Orlistat, a gastric and pancreatic lipase inhibitor that reduces dietary fat absorption by approximately 30%, has been approved for use for around ten years (Zhi et al 1994; Hauptman 2000). There is now a growing body of evidence to suggest that Orlistat assists weight loss and that it may also have additional benefits. The aim of this review is to provide a brief update on the current literature studying the efficacy, safety and significance of the use of Orlistat in clinical practice.

  14. Management and Leadership Approaches to Health Promotion and Sustainable Workplaces: A Scoping Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrea Eriksson; Arne Orvik; Margaretha Strandmark; Anita Nordsteien; Steffen Torp

    2017-01-01

    .... The aim of this scoping review was to map out if and how whole-system approaches to workplace health promotion with a focus on management, leadership, and economic efficiency have been used in Nordic...

  15. Management of obesity in adult Asian Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, S; Misra, A

    The prevalence of obesity in India is increasing and ranges from 8% to 38% in rural and 13% to 50% in urban areas. Obesity is a risk factor for development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hypertension, dyslipidemia, coronary heart disease and many cancers. In Asian Indians excess abdominal and hepatic fat is associated with increased risk for T2DM and cardiovascular disease. There is higher risk for development of obesity related non-communicable diseases at lower body mass index levels, compared to white Caucasians. Despite being a commonly encountered medical problem, obesity poses challenges in treatment. Many Indian physicians find themselves to be lacking time and expertise to prepare an appropriate obesity management plan and patients experience continuous weight gain over time despite being under regular medical supervision. In this article, we outline approaches to obesity management in 'real life mode' and in context to Asian Indian patients. Copyright © 2017 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Personality and workplace impression management: correlates and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdage, Joshua S; Wiltshire, Jocelyn; Lee, Kibeom

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated the role of personality in understanding impression management (IM) behaviors. We hypothesized that the HEXACO model of personality could provide an intricate understanding of the dispositional bases of IM behaviors, as well as coworkers' ability to accurately perceive the IM of those they work with. Using 2 samples (N = 176 and N = 366), we found that the common core underlying 5 IM behaviors possesses a strong negative relationship with the personality trait of Honesty-Humility, such that individuals low in this trait were more likely to report using all IM behaviors. Furthermore, we found that the unique variance associated with specific IM behaviors can be understood using other traits included in the HEXACO personality model, including Emotionality, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness. In a subset of the data (N = 100), we examined self-coworker convergence in IM and personality. We found that while coworkers are adequate at judging traditional personality traits, the self-coworker convergence for all 5 IM behaviors, as well as the personality trait of Honesty-Humility, were not significant. This adds to a growing body of evidence that coworkers may not be good at accurately perceiving IM or Honesty-Humility in the workplace. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. Obesity management: what brings success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössner, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The upward trend in obesity prevalence across regions and continents is a worldwide concern. Today a majority of the world’s population live in a country where being overweight or obese causes more deaths than being underweight. Only a portion of those qualifying for treatment will get the health care they need. Still, a minor weight loss of 5–10% seems to be sufficient to provide a clinically significant health benefit in terms of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Diet, exercise and behavior modifications remain the current cornerstones of obesity treatment. Weight-loss drugs play a minor role. Drugs which were available and reasonably effective have been withdrawn because of side effects. The fact that the ‘old’ well known, but pretty unexciting tools remain the basic armamentarium causes understandable concern and disappointment among both patients and therapists. Hence, bariatric surgery has increasingly been recognized and developed, as it offers substantial weight loss and prolonged weight control. The present review highlights the conventional tools to counter obesity, lifestyle modification, pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery, including some of the barriers to successful weight loss: (1) unrealistic expectations of success; (2) high attrition rates; (3) cultural norms of self-acceptance in terms of weight and beliefs of fat being healthy; (4) neighborhood attributes such as a lack of well-stocked supermarkets and rather the presence of convenience stores with low-quality foods; and (5) the perception of the neighborhood as less safe and with low walkability. Prevention is the obvious key. Cost-effective societal interventions such as a tax on unhealthy food and beverages, front-of-pack traffic light nutrition labeling and prohibition of advertising of junk food and beverages to children are also discussed. PMID:23320052

  18. Obesity management: what brings success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerros, Ylva Trolle; Rössner, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The upward trend in obesity prevalence across regions and continents is a worldwide concern. Today a majority of the world's population live in a country where being overweight or obese causes more deaths than being underweight. Only a portion of those qualifying for treatment will get the health care they need. Still, a minor weight loss of 5-10% seems to be sufficient to provide a clinically significant health benefit in terms of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Diet, exercise and behavior modifications remain the current cornerstones of obesity treatment. Weight-loss drugs play a minor role. Drugs which were available and reasonably effective have been withdrawn because of side effects. The fact that the 'old' well known, but pretty unexciting tools remain the basic armamentarium causes understandable concern and disappointment among both patients and therapists. Hence, bariatric surgery has increasingly been recognized and developed, as it offers substantial weight loss and prolonged weight control. The present review highlights the conventional tools to counter obesity, lifestyle modification, pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery, including some of the barriers to successful weight loss: (1) unrealistic expectations of success; (2) high attrition rates; (3) cultural norms of self-acceptance in terms of weight and beliefs of fat being healthy; (4) neighborhood attributes such as a lack of well-stocked supermarkets and rather the presence of convenience stores with low-quality foods; and (5) the perception of the neighborhood as less safe and with low walkability. Prevention is the obvious key. Cost-effective societal interventions such as a tax on unhealthy food and beverages, front-of-pack traffic light nutrition labeling and prohibition of advertising of junk food and beverages to children are also discussed.

  19. Pharmacological management of obesity in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Cassie L; Harris, John Brock; Harris, Kira B

    2015-02-01

    To review current evidence of pharmacological options for managing pediatric obesity and provide potential areas for future research. A MEDLINE search (1966 to October 2014) was conducted using the following keywords: exenatide, liraglutide, lorcaserin, metformin, obesity, orlistat, pediatric, phentermine, pramlintide, topiramate, weight loss, and zonisamide. Identified articles were evaluated for inclusion, with priority given to randomized controlled trials with orlistat, metformin, glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists, topiramate, and zonisamide in human subjects and articles written in English. References were also reviewed for additional trials. Whereas lifestyle modification is considered first-line therapy for obese pediatric patients, severe obesity may benefit from pharmacotherapy. Orlistat is the only Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved medication for pediatric obesity and reduced body mass index (BMI) by 0.5 to 4 kg/m(2), but gastrointestinal (GI) adverse effects may limit use. Metformin has demonstrated BMI reductions of 0.17 to 1.8 kg/m(2), with mild GI adverse effects usually managed with dose titration. Exenatide reduced BMI by 1.1 to 1.7 kg/m(2) and was well-tolerated with mostly transient or mild GI adverse effects. Topiramate and zonisamide reduced weight when used in the treatment of epilepsy. Future studies should examine efficacy and safety of pharmacological agents in addition to lifestyle modifications for pediatric obesity. Lifestyle interventions remain the treatment of choice in pediatric obesity, but concomitant pharmacotherapy may be beneficial in some patients. Orlistat should be considered as second-line therapy for pediatric obesity. Evidence suggests that other diabetes and antiepileptic medications may also provide weight-loss benefits, but safety should be further evaluated. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Managing workplace health promotion in municipal organizations: The perspective of senior managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Robert; Åkerlind, Ingemar; Sandmark, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    Previous research indicates that companies manage workplace health in various ways, but more in-depth empirical knowledge of how workplace health promotion (WHP) is managed in public sector organizations is needed. The aim of this study was to explore how WHP is managed and incorporated into the general management system in two large Swedish municipal organizations. A qualitative descriptive approach was used. Fourteen senior managers were purposefully selected and interviewed using semi-structured interviews. Documents were used as supplementary data. All data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The management of WHP was described as a set of components that together contribute to the organization's capacity for WHP. The informants described WHP as dominated by fitness programmes and as following a problem-solving cycle, in which the annual employee survey emerged as an important managerial tool. Achieving feasible WHP measures and appropriate follow-ups were described as challenges. The provision of leadership competence for WHP and use of supportive resources were described as additional components. The WHP management approach needs to be broadened to include work environment and organizational factors. Further integration with occupational health and safety and the general management system in the organizations is also needed.

  1. Design and management of lighting in modern workplace

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, K. K. Y.

    2006-01-01

    Change is omnipresent in the modern workplace. Property and infrastructure inherited from the past is therefore increasingly constraint businesses and building users, and requires the provision of higher flexible arrangement to alleviate the impact of change on the workplace. Flexible measures for property and infrastructure usually requires a vast amount of capital investments. And greater emphasis is placed on the capital cost rather than operating cost. Consequently, innovative solutions f...

  2. Management and Leadership Approaches to Health Promotion and Sustainable Workplaces: A Scoping Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Eriksson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Whole-system approaches linking workplace health promotion to the development of a sustainable working life have been advocated. The aim of this scoping review was to map out if and how whole-system approaches to workplace health promotion with a focus on management, leadership, and economic efficiency have been used in Nordic health promotion research. In addition, we wanted to investigate, in depth, if and how management and/or leadership approaches related to sustainable workplaces are addressed. Eighty-three articles were included in an analysis of the studies’ aims and content, research design, and country. For a further in-depth qualitative content analysis we excluded 63 articles in which management and/or leadership were only one of several factors studied. In the in-depth analysis of the 20 remaining studies, four main categories connected to sustainable workplaces emerged: studies including a whole system understanding; studies examining success factors for the implementation of workplace health promotion; studies using sustainability for framing the study; and studies highlighting health risks with an explicit economic focus. Aspects of sustainability were, in most articles, only included for framing the importance of the studies, and only few studies addressed aspects of sustainable workplaces from the perspective of a whole-system approach. Implications from this scoping review are that future Nordic workplace health promotion research needs to integrate health promotion and economic efficiency to a greater extent, in order to contribute to societal effectiveness and sustainability.

  3. Detrimental effects of workplace bullying: impediment of self-management competence via psychological distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele eGiorgi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Emotional intelligence has been linked to various positive outcomes, such as organizational effectiveness, commitment, morale and health. In addition, longitudinal studies demonstrate that the competencies of emotional intelligence may change and be developed over time. Researchers have argued that work relationships are important for the development of emotional competence, but their usefulness depends on the quality of the relationship. Workplace bullying is considered to be one of the most stressful phenomena in the workplace and an example of a dysfunctional and toxic relationship that has detrimental effects on an individual’s physical and psychological health. Hence, the objective of the present study was to analyze the relationship linking workplace bullying, psychological distress and the self-management competence of emotional intelligence. More specifically, we tested part of the model presented by Cherniss and Goleman (2001 in which researchers argued that individual emotional intelligence is a result of relationships at work. In addition, we extended the model by proposing that the relationship between exposure to workplace bullying and the competence of self-management is explained by psychological distress. Data analysis of 326 participants from two private sector organizations in Italy demonstrated that psychological distress fully mediated the relationship between workplace bullying and the emotional intelligence ability of self-management. The present study’s findings point to the idea that, not only may emotional intelligence assist in handling exposure to workplace bullying, but exposure to workplace bullying may impede emotional intelligence via psychological distress.

  4. Detrimental Effects of Workplace Bullying: Impediment of Self-Management Competence via Psychological Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Gabriele; Perminienė, Milda; Montani, Francesco; Fiz-Perez, Javier; Mucci, Nicola; Arcangeli, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Emotional intelligence has been linked to various positive outcomes, such as organizational effectiveness, commitment, morale, and health. In addition, longitudinal studies demonstrate that the competencies of emotional intelligence may change and be developed over time. Researchers have argued that work relationships are important for the development of emotional competence, but their usefulness depends on the quality of the relationship. Workplace bullying is considered to be one of the most stressful phenomena in the workplace and an example of a dysfunctional and toxic relationship that has detrimental effects on an individual's physical and psychological health. Hence, the objective of the present study was to analyze the relationship linking workplace bullying, psychological distress and the self-management competence of emotional intelligence. More specifically, we tested part of the model presented by Cherniss and Goleman (2001) in which researchers argued that individual emotional intelligence is a result of relationships at work. In addition, we extended the model by proposing that the relationship between exposure to workplace bullying and the competence of self-management is explained by psychological distress. Data analysis of 326 participants from two private sector organizations in Italy demonstrated that psychological distress fully mediated the relationship between workplace bullying and the emotional intelligence ability of self-management. The present study's findings point to the idea that, not only may emotional intelligence assist in handling exposure to workplace bullying, but exposure to workplace bullying may impede emotional intelligence via psychological distress.

  5. Weight management for children with severe obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-28

    In areas where weight management services are not established, an integrated approach is required to sustain results. This article in Primary Health Care suggests using a stepped care approach using a model such as SHINE (Self, Help, Independence, Nutrition and Exercise). This model can be used to provide a holistic and integrative care pathway for children and young people with severe obesity.

  6. Novel Endoscopic Management of Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargent, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic procedures have been well-documented in the obesity field, but have not yet reached a sufficient level of evidence as stand-alone methods for treating obesity. It is unclear if they should take over. Although expanding, the array of bariatric surgical techniques does not fully meet the current needs, and there are not enough resources for increasing surgery. Surgery is avoided by a majority of patients, so that less aggressive procedures are necessary. For the time being, relevant endoscopic methods include intra-gastric balloons, gastric partitioning (Endo-plication), and the metabolic field (Endo-barrier). Surgical novelties and basic research are also important contributors owing to their potential combination with endoscopy. Conditions have been listed for implementation of bariatric endoscopy, because innovation is risky, expensive, and faces ethical challenges. A scientific background is being built (e.g., hormonal studies). Some techniques require additional study, while others are not ready but should be priorities. Steps and goals include the search for conceptual similarities and the respect of an ethical frame. Minimally invasive bariatric techniques are not ready for prime time, but they are already being successful as re-do procedures. A time-frame for step-strategies can be defined, and more investments from the industry are mandatory. PMID:26855921

  7. Pediatricians' weight assessment and obesity management practices

    OpenAIRE

    Galvan Kate; Walker-Gallego Edward; Fernandez Susan; Golnari Golnaz; Donohue Michael; Huang Jeannie S; Briones Christina; Tamai Jennifer; Becerra Karen

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Clinician adherence to obesity screening guidelines from United States health agencies remains suboptimal. This study explored how personal and career demographics influence pediatricians' weight assessment and management practices. Methods A web-based survey was distributed to U.S. pediatricians. Respondents were asked to identify the weight status of photographed children and about their weight assessment and management practices. Associations between career and personal...

  8. Participatory Approaches to Workplace Safety Management: Bridging the Gap Between Behavioral Safety and Participatory Ergonomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Kristen A; Alvero, Alicia M

    2018-02-08

    Many researchers and practitioners argue the importance of end-user involvement in workplace safety management, but the research literature and practices remain fractured across orientations. The primary aim of this paper is to bridge the gap between two major participatory safety management approaches: behavioral safety and participatory ergonomics. First, an overview and brief history of participative management is presented to provide context for its application to workplace safety. Next, behavioral safety and participatory ergonomics are separately examined in terms of their origins and core elements. Finally, based on this examination, unifying elements between behavioral safety and participatory ergonomics will be presented to provide a comprehensive account of participatory safety management.

  9. [Options for stress management in obesity treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeglédi, Edit

    2016-02-14

    Overeating and physical inactivity are of great importance in the etiology of obesity. Psychological factors are often found in the background of life style. Chronic stress can contribute to physical inactivity and behaviors that hinder the keeping of a diet (e.g., irregular eating pattern, emotional eating). Results of randomized controlled trials show that relaxation can reduce emotional eating, improve cognitive restraint, and thereby reduce weight. However, stress management is more than relaxation. It consists of adaptive emotion-focused and problem-focused coping strategies and skills to improve relationships. Deflection skills may help in replacing emotional eating with other behaviors. Cognitive restructuring, saying no, and problem solving help to prevent or manage conflicts and difficulties otherwise would result in overeating due to distress. Developing stress management skills may result in greater compliance with the treatment. The techniques presented in the study can be easily applied by general practitioners or specialists, and provide tools for optimizing obesity treatment.

  10. Managing Democracy in the Workplace for Sustainable Productivity in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikpo, Arikpo B.; Etor, Robert B.; Usang, Ewa

    2007-01-01

    Democracy engenders freedom for all, human rights, participation based on equality, shared values, the rule of law, due process, good governance and transparency. In the workplace, it would include freedom of expression, association, participation, access to available information and the right of workers to understand what goes on where they work.…

  11. Obesity: Pathophysiology and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadde, Kishore M; Martin, Corby K; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf; Heymsfield, Steven B

    2018-01-02

    Obesity continues to be among the top health concerns across the globe. Despite our failure to contain the high prevalence of obesity, we now have a better understanding of its pathophysiology, and how excess adiposity leads to type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Lifestyle modification is recommended as the cornerstone of obesity management, but many patients do not achieve long-lasting benefits due to difficulty with adherence as well as physiological and neurohormonal adaptation of the body in response to weight loss. Fortunately, 5 drug therapies-orlistat, lorcaserin, liraglutide, phentermine/topiramate, and naltrexone/bupropion-are available for long-term weight management. Additionally, several medical devices are available for short-term and long-term use. Bariatric surgery yields substantial and sustained weight loss with resolution of type 2 diabetes, although due to the high cost and a small risk of serious complications, it is generally recommended for patients with severe obesity. Benefit-to-risk balance should guide treatment decisions. Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Managing menstruation in the workplace: an overlooked issue in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Marni; Chandraratna, Sahani; Cavill, Sue; Mahon, Therese; Phillips-Howard, Penelope

    2016-06-06

    The potential menstrual hygiene management barriers faced by adolescent girls and women in workplace environments in low- and middle-income countries has been under addressed in research, programming and policy. Despite global efforts to reduce poverty among women in such contexts, there has been insufficient attention to the water and sanitation related barriers, specifically in relation to managing monthly menstruation, that may hinder girls' and women's contributions to the workplace, and their health and wellbeing. There is an urgent need to document the specific social and environmental barriers they may be facing in relation to menstrual management, to conduct a costing of the implications of inadequate supportive workplace environments for menstrual hygiene management, and to understand the implications for girls' and women's health and wellbeing. This will provide essential evidence for guiding national policy makers, the private sector, donors and activists focused on advancing girls' and women's rights.

  13. Pediatricians' weight assessment and obesity management practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galvan Kate

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinician adherence to obesity screening guidelines from United States health agencies remains suboptimal. This study explored how personal and career demographics influence pediatricians' weight assessment and management practices. Methods A web-based survey was distributed to U.S. pediatricians. Respondents were asked to identify the weight status of photographed children and about their weight assessment and management practices. Associations between career and personal demographic variables and pediatricians' weight perceptions, weight assessment and management practices were evaluated using univariate and multivariate modeling. Results 3,633 pediatric medical providers correctly identified the weight status of children at a median rate of 58%. The majority of pediatric clinicians were white, female, and of normal weight status with more than 10 years clinical experience. Experienced pediatric medical providers were less likely than younger colleagues to correctly identify the weight status of pictured children and were also less likely to know and use BMI criteria for assessing weight status. General pediatricians were more likely than subspecialty practitioners to provide diverse interventions for weight management. Non-white and Hispanic general practitioners were more likely than counterparts to consider cultural approaches to weight management. Conclusion Pediatricians' perceptions of children's weight and their weight assessment and management practices are influenced by career and personal characteristics. Objective criteria and clinical guidelines should be uniformly applied by pediatricians to screen for and manage pediatric obesity.

  14. Diversity management in the Canadian workplace: Towards an anti-racism approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiranandani, Vanmala Sunder

    2012-01-01

    Most diversity management programs in Canada maintain that enhancing workforce diversity is of tremendous significance for business organizations in today’s competitive global urban markets. Since well-meaning diversity management initiatives have been largely ineffective thus far in dealing...... with workplace discrimination and racism in the Canadian workplace, this paper underscores the need to decenter the focus of diversity management from a business imperative to an antidiscrimination and social justice imperative. Within this latter perspective, the paper examines the strengths and limitations...

  15. The inclusive workplace: an ecosystems approach to diversity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, M E

    2000-07-01

    This article's main argument is that organizations need to expand their notion of diversity to include not only the organization itself, but also the larger systems that constitute its environment. The concept of "the inclusive workplace," introduced here, refers to a work organization that is not only accepting and using the diversity of its own work force, but also is active in the community, participates in state and federal programs to include working poor people, and collaborates across cultural and national boundaries with a focus on global mutual interests. Using an ecosystems perspective, the article outlines a value-based model and a practice-based model of the inclusive workplace as they pertain to the different organizational levels, from the micro to the macro. Finally, implications for the social work profession are drawn with specific case examples for each system level.

  16. Justification of Natural Lighting Management for Workplaces with Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, A. V.; Erunova, A. V.; Kalinina, A. S.

    2017-11-01

    The article is devoted to the study of the influence of the orientation of light apertures (windows) on the distribution of illumination in a room inside the workplaces equipped with displays. The measurements of natural light were carried out in two similar rooms, in the first room the windows are oriented to the north and in the second - to the south. The normative illumination value in a workplace equipped with a personal computer or display must be between 300 and 500 lux. However, during the daytime, the value of natural illumination at the workplace can exceed the normalized value by several times, and in the morning and evening hours is not sufficient. Such distribution of illumination involves the use a combined lighting control system (with daylight time control and switching on artificial lighting in the morning and evening hours). In the article it is justified that the orientation of the windows in the room does not have a significant effect on the distribution of illumination throughout the room which makes it possible not to take into account the restrictions concerning the orientation of the room’s light apertures when combined lighting control systems are used.

  17. Role of Obesity in Asthma: Mechanisms and Management Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Hayley A; Wood, Lisa G; Gibson, Peter G

    2017-08-01

    Obesity is a commonly reported comorbidity in asthma, particularly in severe asthma. Obese asthmatics are highly symptomatic with a poor quality of life, despite using high-dose inhaled corticosteroids. While the clinical manifestations have been documented, the aetiologies of obese-asthma remain unclear. Several potential mechanisms have been proposed, including poor diet quality, physical inactivity and consequent accrual of excess adipose tissue. Each of these factors independently activates inflammatory pathways, potentially exerting effects in the airways. Because the origins of obesity are multifactorial, it is now believed there are multiple obese-asthma phenotypes, with varied aetiologies and clinical consequences. In this review, we will describe the clinical implications of obesity in people with asthma, our current understanding of the mechanisms driving this association and describe recently proposed obese-asthma phenotypes. We will then discuss how asthma management is complicated by obesity, and provide graded recommendations for the management of obesity in this population.

  18. Diversity in a respectful workplace: diversity management and harassment/discrimination-free workplace

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    At the department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO), diversity management is a managerial approach that capitalizes on the benefits of attracting, developing and retaining a diverse workforce in order to reach excellence...

  19. Unmet needs in obesity management: From guidelines to clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritten, Angela; LaManna, Jacqueline

    2017-10-01

    Despite the rather slow acceptance of obesity as a disease state, several obesity staging systems and weight-management guidelines have been developed and are in use, along with an ever-growing number of treatment options. Many primary care clinicians, including nurse practitioners (NPs), are at the forefront of clinical efforts to assist individuals with obesity, but face challenges due to lack of alignment and consensus among the various staging systems and guidelines. This is further complicated by shortfalls in clinical training related to obesity management and increasing complexities in reimbursement for obesity-related services. Unmet needs in the management of obesity thus stretch from guidelines to clinic. This article examines the principal barriers to effective management of individuals with obesity and considers how concerns might be overcome, with particular emphasis on the role of the NP. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  20. Analysis of Workplace Health Education Performed by Occupational Health Managers in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon-Ha; Jung, Moon-Hee

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate workplace health education as practiced by occupational health managers based on standardized job tasks and suggest priority tasks and areas to be trained. The study was conducted between November 10, 2013 and April 30, 2014. The tool used in this study was standardized job tasks of workplace health education for occupational health managers which was developed through methodological steps. It was evaluated by 233 worksite occupational health managers. Data were analyzed using SPSS 21.0. Predicting variables of workplace health education performance were the "analysis and planning" factor, type of enterprise, and form of management. Healthcare professionals and occupational health managers who managed the nonmanufacturing industry showed high importance and low performance level in "analysis and planning" factor. "Analysis and planning" skill is priority training area for healthcare professionals and occupational health managers who managed nonmanufacturing industry. It is necessary to develop a training curriculum for occupational health managers that include improving analysis of worksites and plans for a health education program. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. New pharmacological approaches for obesity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Clausen, Christian F; Padwal, Raj S; Sharma, Arya M

    2013-08-01

    Obesity, which results from an imbalance between calorie intake and expenditure, now affects over 500 million individuals worldwide. Lifestyle and behavioural interventions aimed at reducing calorie intake and/or increasing energy expenditure have limited long-term effectiveness due to complex and persistent hormonal, metabolic and neurochemical adaptations that defend against weight loss and promote weight regain. Surgical treatments for obesity, although highly effective, are unavailable or unsuitable for the majority of individuals with excess adiposity. Accordingly, few effective treatment options are available to most individuals with obesity. In the past, the use of antiobesity drugs, seemingly the logical choice to fill this therapeutic gap, has been limited because of a lack of efficacy, poor long-term adherence rates and serious adverse effects. In 2012, the FDA approved two new medications-lorcaserin and phentermine-topiramate controlled release-and is currently reviewing the resubmission of naltrexone sustained release-bupropion sustained release. This Review presents the available data on the efficacy and safety of these three medications and discusses future perspectives and challenges related to pharmacological weight management.

  2. [Recent advances in the management of obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rorive, M; De Flines, J; Paquot, N; De Roover, A; Scheen, A J

    2007-01-01

    The management of an obese patient aims not only at obtaining a durable weight loss, but also at attenuating various associated risk factors. This latter objective may already be obtained with a rather moderate weight reduction (5-10% of initial body weight). The first step should favour life-style changes (diet and physical exercise), eventually together with a psychological support. In case of insufficient success, a pharmacological approach may be considered, in addition to life-style advices. Pharmacotherapy currently includes drugs that act on the central nervous system to decrease appetite (sibutramine), in the gastrointestinal tract to diminish fat absorption (orlistat) or at both central and peripheral sites (rimonabant). In case of extreme obesity or severe obesity associated with comorbidities, refractory to medical approaches, bariatric surgery may represent the only solution to obtain a major and sustained weight loss, together with a significant improvement of associated risk factors. Gastroplasty, especially laparoscopic gastric banding, has become very popular in our country. However, because of several limitations, it is increasingly replaced by derivative procedures, especially gastric bypass. In all cases, a multidisciplinary, integrated and individualized approach should be recommended, using realistic goals and targeting long-term weight reduction and improved health.

  3. Management of psychosocial risks in European workplaces: drivers and barriers in a national and cultural context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, S. van den; Bakhuys Roozeboom, M.M.C.; Eekhout, I.; Houtman, I.L.D.

    2017-01-01

    Management of psychosocial risks in European workplaces; drivers and barriers in a national and cultural context. General objective of the project commissioned by the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA) is to support policy makers in stimulating successful psychosocial risk (PSR)

  4. Equality in the Workplace. An Equal Opportunities Handbook for Trainers. Human Resource Management in Action Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Helen

    This workbook, which is intended as a practical guide for human resource managers, trainers, and others concerned with developing and implementing equal opportunities training programs in British workplaces, examines issues in and methods for equal opportunities training. The introduction gives an overview of current training trends and issues.…

  5. The impact of workplaces and self-management practices on the productivity of knowledge workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palvalin, M.O.; van der Voordt, Theo; Jylhä, T.E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the impact of workplaces, which support concentration and communication, and self-management practices on individual and team productivity. The underlying hypothesis is that the impact of these variables on the two levels of productivity (individual and team)

  6. Views of the Workplace as a Health Promotion Arena among Managers of Small Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiman, Virginia; Lydell, Marie; Nyholm, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Several studies have shown that workplace health promotion leads to better health, increased productivity, as well as reduced absenteeism and presenteeism among employees. The objective of this study was to describe how managers in small companies (10-19 employees) perceive their company as an arena for promoting employees' health.…

  7. A survey on management perspectives of the state of workplace health and safety practices in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbakaya, C F; Onyoyo, H A; Lwaki, S A; Omondi, O J

    1999-07-01

    A baseline survey was conducted in 1995 on management perspectives of occupational health and safety (OHS) structures and practices in Kenya. This was achieved by interviewing management and supervisory staff attending 1 week multi-disciplinary courses that were organized by the Federation of Kenya Employers (FKE) and the International Labour Office (ILO) at hotel venues in Kenya. The purpose of the survey was to gain some insight into work safety conditions in Kenya and to assess the potential for a new OHS manual to meet existing knowledge gaps. The manual was locally developed in 1993/4 by Kenyan OHS experts in collaboration with colleagues from the Swedish National Institute for Working Life. Results of the survey from 65 participants indicated that most workplace managers were not familiar with the Kenyan work safety legislation. Work injuries were largely attributable to working with dangerous machinery. Occupational diseases and HIV/AIDS were cited as other causes of workplace morbidity and mortality. Although most respondents (70%) were satisfied with their work safety conditions, only 37% said their workplaces were annually audited by labour inspectors while 45% said injured workers were not treated well by management. Many workplaces (65%) violated the mandatory legal requirement on the establishment of health and safety committees. The OHS resource person and course content were rated highly by most respondents (96%). The foregoing results provided the basis of a needs analysis for future OHS programs in Kenya.

  8. A Phenomenological Study of Nurse Manager Interventions Related to Workplace Bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarbek, Anita J; Johnson, Sandra; Dawson, Christina M

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to acquire nurse managers' perspectives as to the scope of workplace bullying, which interventions were deemed as effective and ineffective, and what environmental characteristics cultivated a healthy, caring work environment. Research has linked workplace bullying among RNs to medical errors, unsafe hospital environments, and negative patient outcomes. Limited research had been conducted with nurse managers to discern their perspectives. Six nurse managers from hospital settings participated in in-depth, semistructured interviews. Ray's theory of bureaucratic caring guided the study. These themes emerged: (a) awareness, (b) scope of the problem, (c) quality of performance, and (d) healthy, caring environment. Findings indicated mandated antibullying programs were not as effective as individual manager interventions. Systems must be in place to hold individuals accountable for their behavior. Communication, collective support, and teamwork are essential to create environments that lead to the delivery of safe, optimum patient care.

  9. The Public Manager 2.0 : Preparing the Social Media Generation for a Networked Workplace

    OpenAIRE

    Mergel, Ines

    2012-01-01

    This article provides the design of a new student-centered information management course to teach the effective use of social media technologies in the public sector as part of public affairs programs. The goal of this “Government 2.0” course is to provide students with analytical and technological skills to navigate the challenges future public managers are facing in a networked workplace. Social media technologies, such as wikis, blogs, microblogging services, or social networking sites, ha...

  10. Weight management in obesity ? past and present

    OpenAIRE

    Haslam, D

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims To describe the treatment of obesity from ancient times to present day. Methods Articles reporting the development of anti?obesity therapies were identified through a search for ?anti?obesity? AND ?pharmacotherapy? AND ?development? within the title or abstract on PubMed and ?obesity? in ClinicalTrials.gov. Relevant articles and related literature were selected for inclusion. Results Stone?age miniature obese female statuettes indicate the existence and cultural significance of ...

  11. Essential people management skills necessary in today's workplace ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This presentation will show how technical managers can achieve greater success if provided with adequate people skills. Most times, managers are trained in the technical aspects of their field, however, the success of any organization often rests on the understanding of related people and management issues, rather than ...

  12. 76 FR 76609 - Implementation of Office of Management and Budget Guidance on Drug-Free Workplace Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ... 421 7 CFR Part 3021 RIN 0505AA14 Implementation of Office of Management and Budget Guidance on Drug-Free Workplace Requirements AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, USDA. ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY... rule on drug-free workplace requirements for financial assistance, currently located within part 3021...

  13. Exercise in weight management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, P; Després, J P

    2001-08-01

    adaptation of adipose tissue metabolism to aerobic exercise training. Physical training helps counteract the permissive and affluent environment that predisposes reduced-obese subjects to regain weight. An exercise program using weight resistance modalities may also be included safely, and it improved program retention in a multidisciplinary weight management program that was designed for obese children. Thirty to 45 minutes of physical activity of moderate intensity, performed 3 to 5 days a week, should be encouraged. All adults should set a long-term goal to accumulate at least 30 minutes or more of moderate-intensity physical activity on most, and preferably all days. Public health interventions promoting walking are likely to be the most successful. Indeed, walking is unique because of its safety, accessibility, and popularity. It is noteworthy that there is a clear dissociation between the adaptation of cardiorespiratory fitness and the improvements in the metabolic risk profile that can be induced by endurance training programs. It appears that as long as the increase in energy expenditure is sufficient, low-intensity endurance exercise is likely to generate beneficial metabolic effects that would be essentially similar to those produced by high-intensity exercise. The clinician should therefore focus on the improvement of the metabolic profile rather than on weight loss alone. Realistic goals should be set between the clinician and the patient, with a weight loss of approximately of 0.5 to 1 pound per week. It should be kept in mind that since it generally takes years to become overweight or obese, a weight loss pattern of 0.5 or 1 pound per week will require time and perseverance to reach the proposed target. However, the use of physical activity as a method to lose weight seems inversely related to patients' age and BMI and directly related to the level of education. Thus, public health interventions helping these groups to become physically active remain a

  14. A "Mental-Health-at-the-Workplace" Educational Workshop Reduces Managers' Stigma Toward Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Johannes; Mendel, Rosmarie; Reichhart, Tatjana; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Kissling, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Stigma and discrimination are important factors hindering people with mental health conditions to stay employed or successfully make their careers. We surveyed 580 German managers before and after visiting a "mental-health-at-the-workplace" educational workshop using the Depression Stigma Scale. The workshop significantly reduced stigma toward depression. Managers at baseline already exhibited lower stigma toward depression compared with the general population. In addition, female gender and higher education predicted lower stigma, which is in line with findings from other studies. We conclude that an educational workshop giving practical guidance regarding "mental-health-at-the-workplace" reduces managers' stigma toward depression and improves knowledge regarding depression, its course, and its treatment.

  15. A model for managing cold-related health and safety risks at workplaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risikko, Tanja; Mäkinen, Tiina M; Påsche, Arvid; Toivonen, Liisa; Hassi, Juhani

    2003-05-01

    Cold conditions increase health and safety risks at work in several ways. The effects of cold have not been sufficiently taken into consideration in occupational safety and health practices. A systematic model and methods were developed for managing cold-related health and safety risks at workplaces. The development work was performed, in a context-bound manner, in pilot industries and workplaces. The model can be integrated into the company's occupational health and safety management system, such as OHSAS 18001. The cold risks are identified and assessed by using a checklist. The preventive measures are systematically planned in a written form specifically produced for cold workplaces. It includes the organisational and technical preventive measures, protective clothing and personal protective equipment, as well as training and information of the personnel. According to the model, all the workers, foremen, occupational safety personnel and occupational health care personnel are trained to recognise the cold risks and to conduct preventive actions. The developed model was evaluated in the context of cold outdoor (construction) and indoor work (fish processing), and by occupational health and safety professionals. According to the feedback, the model and methods were easy to use after a one-day introduction session. The continuum between the cold risk assessment and management worked well, although there was some overlap in the documentation. The cold risk management model and its methods form an essential part of ISO CD 15743 Strategy for risk assessment, management and work practice in cold environments.

  16. Workplace safety management as correlates of wellbeing among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Significant proportion of Nigerians working in manufacturing firms do not enjoy the desirable level of wellbeing when it comes to safety and health. Safety management practices of industries have implications for employees' wellbeing and productivity. This study investigates relationship between safety management ...

  17. Human Resource Management And The Search For The Happy Workplace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.E. Peccei (Riccardo)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractRiccardo Peccei (1945, Totino, Italy, D.Phil Sociology, Oxford University 1984) is Reader in Organisational Behaviour (OB) and Human Resource Management (HRM) in the Department of Management at King’s College London. His research interests include the study of the impact of HRM on

  18. Exploring how Conflict Management Training Changes Workplace Conflicts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Elisabeth Naima

    2012-01-01

    While many organisations offer conflict management training to both staff and management, there has been little research investigating the changes resulting from such training. Using an interpretive framework of analysis, a qualitative case study was conducted to understand how 'sensemakings' about...... conflicts change when enacted from the perspective of staff and management in a non-profit organisation that participated in conflict management training. The case study was constructed as a longitudinal investigation with ethnographic fieldwork as the primary method of inquiry. The training worked....... Some conflicts did not change through training, where the perpetual structural bases of the conflicts remained intact. Insights from the study call attention to the embedding of conflict in the organisation's social fabric. As a practical implication of the study, trainers in conflict management...

  19. Connecting Gender, Race, Class, and Immigration Status to Disease Management at the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemberg, Marie-Anne S.; Tsai, Jenny Hsin-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chronic diseases are the leading causes of death in the United States. Chronic disease management occurs within all aspects of an individual's life, including the workplace. Though the social constructs of gender, race, class, and immigration status within the workplace have been considered, their connection to disease management among workers has been less explicitly explored. Using a sample of immigrant hotel housekeepers, we explored the connections between these four social constructs and hypertension management. Methods This qualitative research study was guided by critical ethnography methodology. Twenty-seven hotel room cleaners and four housemen were recruited (N = 31) and invited to discuss their experiences with hypertension and hypertension management within the context of their work environments. Results Being a woman worker within the hotel industry was perceived to negatively influence participants’ experience with hypertension and hypertension management. In contrast, being a woman played a protective role outside the workplace. Being an immigrant played both a positive and a negative role in hypertension and its management. Being black and from a low socioeconomic class had only adverse influences on participants’ experience with hypertension and its management. Conclusion Being a woman, black, lower class, and an immigrant simultaneously contribute to immigrant hotel housekeepers’ health and their ability to effectively manage their hypertension. The connection between these four constructs (gender, race, class, and immigration status) and disease management must be considered during care provision. Hotel employers and policy stakeholders need to consider those constructs and how they impact workers’ well-being. More studies are needed to identify what mitigates the associations between the intersectionality of these constructs and immigrant workers’ health and disease management within their work environment. PMID:27695659

  20. Connecting Gender, Race, Class, and Immigration Status to Disease Management at the Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemberg, Marie-Anne S; Tsai, Jenny Hsin-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Chronic diseases are the leading causes of death in the United States. Chronic disease management occurs within all aspects of an individual's life, including the workplace. Though the social constructs of gender, race, class, and immigration status within the workplace have been considered, their connection to disease management among workers has been less explicitly explored. Using a sample of immigrant hotel housekeepers, we explored the connections between these four social constructs and hypertension management. This qualitative research study was guided by critical ethnography methodology. Twenty-seven hotel room cleaners and four housemen were recruited (N = 31) and invited to discuss their experiences with hypertension and hypertension management within the context of their work environments. Being a woman worker within the hotel industry was perceived to negatively influence participants' experience with hypertension and hypertension management. In contrast, being a woman played a protective role outside the workplace. Being an immigrant played both a positive and a negative role in hypertension and its management. Being black and from a low socioeconomic class had only adverse influences on participants' experience with hypertension and its management. Being a woman, black, lower class, and an immigrant simultaneously contribute to immigrant hotel housekeepers' health and their ability to effectively manage their hypertension. The connection between these four constructs (gender, race, class, and immigration status) and disease management must be considered during care provision. Hotel employers and policy stakeholders need to consider those constructs and how they impact workers' well-being. More studies are needed to identify what mitigates the associations between the intersectionality of these constructs and immigrant workers' health and disease management within their work environment.

  1. Behavioral management of the obese patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite countless diets, exercise regimens, drugs, and behavior modification strategies, the prevalence of obesity continues its relentless increase in both developed and developing nations. Although many necessary components to treat obesity have been identified, behavior modification remains the b...

  2. Managers' duty to maintain good workplace communications skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Fiona

    2011-06-01

    Communication is a fundamental element of care at every level of nursing practice. It is important, therefore, for nurse managers to create environments that promote and encourage good communication, and help nurses to develop their communication skills formally and informally. This article discusses the effects of communication on the quality of care. It examines nurses' professional duty to maintain good communication skills and how managers can help them do this. It also discusses nurse managers' communication skills in the context of leadership style, conflict resolution and self-awareness. Finally, it considers the notion of shared governance as good practice.

  3. Attitudes and Reported Practice for Obesity Management in Korea After Introduction of Anti-obesity Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hye Soon; Park, Jee-Young; Cho, Hong-Jun

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate current clinical assessments and management of obesity in the primary care setting in Korea since anti-obesity agents have become available. A questionnaire was sent to eligible primary care physicians selected from a national probability sample in two specialties: family physicians and internists. Of 939 randomly selected physicians, 452 (48.1%) replied. We found that 51.8% of physicians were aware of the definition of obesity, and 33.8% were aware of the definit...

  4. Managing workplace stress in community pharmacy organisations: lessons from a review of the wider stress management and prevention literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Sally; Johnson, Sheena; Hassell, Karen

    2017-03-27

    Workplace stress in community pharmacy is increasing internationally due, in part, to pharmacists' expanding roles and escalating workloads. Whilst the business case for preventing and managing workplace stress by employers is strong, there is little evidence for the effectiveness of organisational stress management interventions in community pharmacy settings. To identify and synthesise existing evidence for the effectiveness of organisational solutions to workplace stress from the wider organisational literature which may be adaptable to community pharmacies. A secondary synthesis of existing reviews. Publications were identified through keyword searches of electronic databases and the internet; inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied; data about setting, intervention, method of evaluation, effectiveness and conclusions (including factors for success) were extracted and synthesised. Eighteen reviews of the stress management and prevention literature were identified. A comprehensive list of organisational interventions to prevent or manage workplace stress, ordered by prevalence of evidence of effectiveness, was produced, together with an ordered list of the benefits both to the individual and employing organisation. An evidence-based model of best practice was derived specifying eight factors for success: top management support, context-specific interventions, combined organisational and individual interventions, a participative approach, clearly delineated tasks and responsibilities, buy-in from middle management, change agents as facilitators and change in organisational culture. This literature review provides community pharmacy organisations with evidence from which to develop effective and successful stress management strategies to support pharmacists and pharmacy staff. Well-designed trials of stress management interventions in community pharmacy organisations are still required. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  5. Human Resource Management And The Search For The Happy Workplace

    OpenAIRE

    Peccei, Riccardo

    2004-01-01

    textabstractRiccardo Peccei (1945, Totino, Italy, D.Phil Sociology, Oxford University 1984) is Reader in Organisational Behaviour (OB) and Human Resource Management (HRM) in the Department of Management at King’s College London. His research interests include the study of the impact of HRM on organisational performance and employee well-being, the transformation of work and employment relations in the service sector, and the nature and consequences of employee empowerment, partnership and par...

  6. Employee perceptions of the management of cultural diversity and workplace transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal S. Zulu

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses managerial perceptions of the management of cultural diversity and workplace transformation in three production companies in Gauteng. A sample comprising 668 employees was drawn from a population of 1 259 (53% response rate using simple random sampling and data were collected through self-developed questionnaires and personal interviews. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The results indicate that whilst the South African Transformation (SAT Agenda has propelled change in the political and economic spheres, similar developments have not been realised in the South African labour market. Hence, based on the findings, recommendations are made to enhance the management of cultural diversity and workplace transformation, and the need for urgent government intervention, through legislative amendments, is emphasised.

  7. Weight management in obesity - past and present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, D

    2016-03-01

    To describe the treatment of obesity from ancient times to present day. Articles reporting the development of anti-obesity therapies were identified through a search for 'anti-obesity' AND 'pharmacotherapy' AND 'development' within the title or abstract on PubMed and 'obesity' in ClinicalTrials.gov. Relevant articles and related literature were selected for inclusion. Stone-age miniature obese female statuettes indicate the existence and cultural significance of obesity as long as 30,000 years ago. Records from Ancient Egyptian and Biblical eras through Greco-Roman to Medieval times indicate that obesity was present throughout the major periods of history, although peoples of previous centuries would probably have experienced overweight and obesity as exceptional rather than normal. Health risks of obesity were noted by the Greek physician Hippocrates (460-377 BCE) when the earliest anti-obesity recommendations on diet, exercise, lifestyle and use of emetics and cathartics were born. These recommendations remained largely unchanged until the early 20th century, when spreading urbanisation, increasingly sedentary jobs and greater availability of processed foods produced a sharp rise in obesity. This led to the need for new, more effective, ways to lose weight, to address comorbidities associated with obesity, and to attain the current cultural ideal of slimness. Drug companies of the 1940s and 1950s produced a series of anti-obesity pharmacotherapies in short succession, based largely on amphetamines. Increased regulation of drug development in the 1960s and new efficacy requirements for weight-loss drugs led to rapid reduction in anti-obesity therapies available by the early 1990s. In the last two decades, several new and emerging therapies have been approved or are in development to provide safe, long-term pharmacological agents for the treatment of obesity. © 2016 The Authors. International Journal of Clinical Practice Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A study of influences of the workers' compensation and injury management regulations on aviation safety at a workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Devinder K; Nikraz, Hamid; Chen, Yongqing

    2016-01-01

    As the aviation industries developed, so too did the recognition that there must be an effective regulatory framework to address issues related to the workers' compensation and rehabilitation. All employees would like to work and return home safely from their workplace. Therefore, the efficient management of workplace injury and disease reduces the cost of aviation operations and improves flight safety. Workers' compensation and injury management laws regulate a majority of rehabilitation and compensation issues, but achieving an injury-free workplace remains a major challenge for the regulators. This paper examines the clauses of the workers' compensation and injury management laws of Western Australia related to workplace safety, compensation, and rehabilitations of the injured workers. It also discusses various provisions of common law under the relevant workers' health injury management legislations.

  9. Understanding Approaches for Managing Diversity in the Workplace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravazzani, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    approach for managing diversity in Italy and the contingent factors at play. Design/methodology/approach – The paper presents data from a survey conducted among 90 Italian companies, and two focus groups consisting of experts and managers. Findings – The most common approach among Italian companies...... approaches, allowing accurate detection thanks to the development of several practice-based indicators. Its application to real settings shows its descriptive and predictive potential, linking the research model approaches to explanatory factors. Its findings are useful to scholars and practitioners in other......Purpose – This paper aims to enhance understanding of how companies actually implement diversity management, and of factors that may explain their approach. It does this by framing a tripartite model that articulates a combination of indicators, and by using this model to investigate the prevalent...

  10. Employment discrimination against obese women in obesity clinic's patients perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara-Gołębiowska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The workplace is one of many areas of life where obese people are unfairly treated. According to the literature obese women are particularly susceptible to discrimination in employment. There is a lack of polish researches of this subject. The main objective of this study was to analyze personal, subjective experiences related to weight bias and discrimination against obese people in the workplace of obese Polish women. The study was carried out in a hospital clinic for obesity management. A total of 420 women with BMI>30, aged 21 to 72, participated in group interviews focused on the weight bias and discrimination against obese people in the workplace. In the group of clinically obese women, 5.3% of subjects had experienced employment discrimination and 10.5% had been victims of verbal and social abuse in the workplace. The most common psycho-physical consequences of the weight stigma were emotional problems, lack of motivation and overeating in response to stress. Weight-based discrimination in the workplace poses a problem in Poland. The weight stigma and occupational discrimination lead to psycho-physical discomfort which exacerbates overeating and obesity.

  11. Combined strategies in the management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, John B; Dixon, Maureen E

    2006-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic relapsing disease requiring a similar long term approach to management as that of other chronic conditions. Management needs to be multifaceted aiming to achieve sustainable behavioural changes to physical activity and diet to alter the patient and family microenvironment to one favouring better weight control. A range of therapies including specific diets, calorie counting, meal replacements, very low calorie diets, pharmacotherapy, intragastric balloons and surgery can provide very useful additional benefit. Use of these should be guided by the extent of weight loss required to reduce BMI to an acceptable level with regard to the patient's ethnicity, risk and comorbid conditions. Patients need to set goals that are optimistic, but realistic, and understand the benefits of sustained modest weight loss and the likelihood of weight regain requiring repeat episodes of weight loss. Practitioners need to be informed about the efficacy of current therapies and their combinations to enhance choice of suitable methods for achieving the optimal weight loss required by the patient. They will also need to anticipate trigger points for renewed periods of weight loss in the event of weight regain, as relapse is likely but not a reason for abandoning the battle.

  12. Understanding Approaches for Managing Diversity in the Workplace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravazzani, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to enhance understanding of how companies actually implement diversity management, and of factors that may explain their approach. It does this by framing a tripartite model that articulates a combination of indicators, and by using this model to investigate the prevalen...... countries, and to anyone who is interested in learning more about Italy (or who conducts business there). Keywords: diversity management; equal opportunities; corporate social responsibility; legitimacy; Italy Article Classification: Research paper...... in Italy, where interest in diversity is growing due to the increased participation of women and immigrants in the labor market and the initiatives inspired by the EU and multinational companies. In addition, the research model used in this study integrates existing typologies of diversity management...... approaches, allowing accurate detection thanks to the development of several practice-based indicators. Its application to real settings shows its descriptive and predictive potential, linking the research model approaches to explanatory factors. Its findings are useful to scholars and practitioners in other...

  13. Obesity in Nigeria: Current trends and management | Akpa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the study is to review the current knowledge on the problems associated with obesity, as well as the measures and strategies that have evolved in its management. A review of the literature on the subject of obesity, its epidemiology, risk factors, clinical complications and treatment (using Medline computer ...

  14. Anaesthetic management of a super morbidly obese patient for total ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... very drowsy and had moderate to severe respiratory depression. She was arousable but had an obstructive sleep apnoea. Surgery was carried out successfully Conclusion: A better understanding of the pathophysiology and complications that accompany obesity is needed to manage an obese patient under anaesthesia.

  15. Medically managing obesity: Offering hope or a disincentive to change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Jane; Arulgnanaseelan, Juliet

    2017-01-01

    As weight loss in primary care remains minimal, Health Professionals are advised to medically manage obesity-related risk factors including blood pressure and cholesterol. This experimental study evaluated the impact of medically managing risk factors on obese patients' motivation to change their behaviour. A vignette study with two arms: successful medical management (ie risk factors have improved) vs failed medical management (ie no change) set in three General Practices in the South of England. Overweight and obese patients (n=170) rated their behavioural intentions and beliefs after reading a vignette describing an overweight patient who had received either successful or failed medical management of their risk factors (blood pressure and cholesterol). Following successful medical management overweight and obese patients reported increased intentions to lose weight and a greater understanding of their condition. Medical management may change patient's understanding of their weight problem and motivate them to lose weight. Successful management relating to improvements in blood pressure and cholesterol may offer renewed hope and motivate obese patients to change their behaviour. This could be used as a teachable moment to encourage patients to see that obesity need not be an inevitable part of their lives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Role of Individual Differences and Situational Variables in the Use of Workplace Sexual Identity Management Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Louren; Leuty, Melanie E

    2016-07-01

    Examination of individual difference variables have been largely ignored within research on the use of workplace sexual identity management strategies. The current study examined personality traits (extraversion, openness, and neuroticism), facets of sexual identity development (identity confusion, internalized heterosexism), and situational variables (e.g., perceptions of workplace climate and heterosexism) in explaining the use of management strategies, as well as possible interactions between individual and situational factors. Perceptions of the workplace climate toward lesbian and gay individuals significantly related to the use each of the management strategies, and Internalized Heterosexism was found to significantly predict the use of the Explicitly Out strategy. Most interactions between individual difference and situational variables were not supported, with the exception of an interaction between workplace heterosexism and internalized homophobia in explaining the use of the Explicitly Out strategy.

  17. Utility leaders must manage change in the workplace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, R.; Gering, D.

    1997-04-01

    Like most other industries in the United States, the utility industry is undergoing profound changes. Furthermore, the industry is in a far more precarious position than almost all other businesses. Deregulation, a changing labor pool, competition and years of unbridled growth are some of the extraordinary factors impacting the industry. Perhaps the greatest challenge of all rests with the utility industry`s top management. To lead their organizations from government anointed monopolies to rightful market leaders demands major intellectual and physical adjustments. Given this most difficult position, executives must learn to embrace change as a constant business opportunity and develop skills to constructively channel and manage change. The challenge to utilities is deceptively clear - to be competitive in a consumer and service driven environment. Unfortunately, the actions necessary to accomplish this daunting task are not that clear. The authors offer that this transition does not have to be as ominous as it may seem, provided one develops and employs a good plan and the open minds necessary to navigate these tricky waters.

  18. Obesity, periodontal and general health: Relationship and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen Dahiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a multifaceted subject. It has increased at an alarming rate in recent years. Being overweight increases the likelihood of a patient having associated health and social problems which may affect dental services and dental management. A review of the literature on obesity and periodontal disease suggested that they both confound each other and obesity itself has been recognized as a major risk factor for periodontal disease. It has been found that adverse effects of obesity on the periodontium may be mediated through pro-inflammatory cytokines and various other bioactive substances. This article tries to focus on the possible role of obesity and obesity-related diseases like diabetes and coronary heart diseases (CHD, as a potential contributor to periodontal disease and vice versa. The meanings of these associations can be useful for various diagnostic and treatment planning purposes.

  19. Prevention and management of maternal obesity in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Alexopoulou

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays obesity is one of the most important nutritional problems with features contemporary epidemic which concerns not only the developed but also the developing countries. Obesity during pregnancy associate with maternal and perinatal risks that make the management of obesity, before and during pregnancy imperative. The best and most effective treatment of obesity in pregnancy is prevention. A healthy diet and regular exercise of pregnant woman is crucial for the normal development of pregnancy. Moreover every obese pregnant woman should be informed about the importance of calorie - intake regulation and weight reduction both before and after pregnancy. Additional therapeutic options are bariatric surgical procedures that a woman can have before pregnancy and anticoagulation therapy during pregnancy. This article attempts brief review on the current scientific knowledge that exists about the role of nutrition and physical activity in controlling the weight of obese pregnant women and its beneficial contribution to the health of both the mother and the newborn.

  20. Management of cardiovascular diseases in patients with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavie, Carl J; Arena, Ross; Alpert, Martin A; Milani, Richard V; Ventura, Hector O

    2017-07-27

    The management of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in patients with obesity presents numerous challenges. Obesity has a negative effect on almost all of the major CVD risk factors, and adversely influences cardiovascular structure and function. Patients who are overweight or obese have a higher incidence of almost all CVDs compared with patients who are of normal weight. However, those who are overweight or obese seem to have a better short-term and medium-term prognosis after major CVD events and interventional procedures or cardiac surgeries than leaner patients, a phenomenon termed the 'obesity paradox'. In considering the mechanisms underlying this paradox, we review evidence of the deleterious consequences of obesity in patients with coronary heart disease, and the limited data on the benefits of weight loss in patients with CVD. Additional studies are needed on the efficacy of purposeful weight loss on cardiovascular outcomes to determine the ideal body composition for patients with CVD.

  1. Lifestyle changes in the management of adulthood and childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orio, Francesco; Tafuri, Domenico; Ascione, Antonio; Marciano, Francesca; Savastano, Silvia; Colarieti, Giorgio; Orio, Marcello; Colao, Annamaria; Palomba, Stefano; Muscogiuri, Giovanna

    2016-12-01

    Adulthood and childhood obesity is rapidly becoming an epidemic problem and it has a short and long-term impact on health. Short-term consequences are mostly represented by psychological effects; in fact obese children have more chances to develop psychological or psychiatric problems than non-obese children. The main long-term effect is represented by the fact that childhood obesity continues into adulthood obesity and this results in negative effects in young adult life, since obesity increases the risk to develop morbidity and premature mortality. The obesity-related diseases are mostly represented by hypertension, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular diseases. Medical treatment should be discouraged in childhood because of the side effects and it should be only reserved for obese children with related medical complications. Lifestyle changes should be encouraged in both adulthood and childhood obesity. This review focuses on the management of obesity both in adulthood and in childhood, paying particular attention to lifestyle changes that should be recommended.

  2. [The workplace injury trends in the petrochemical industry: from data analysis to risk management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Giuseppe; Martini, Benedetta

    2013-01-01

    The most recent INAIL data show that, in 2009-2011, the accident frequency rate and the severity rate of workplace injuries in the chemical industry are lower than for the total non-agricultural workforce. The chemical industry, primarily because of the complex and hazardous work processes, requires an appropriate system for assessing and monitoring specific risks.The implementation of Responsible Care, a risk management system specific for the chemical industry, in 1984, has represented a historical step in the process of critical awareness of risk management by the chemical companies. Responsible Care is a risk management system specifically designed on the risk profiles of this type of enterprise, which integrates safety, health and environment. A risk management system, suitable for the needs of a chemical company, should extend its coverage area, beyond the responsible management of products throughout the entire production cycle, to the issues of corporate responsibility.

  3. Safe procedure development to manage hazardous drugs in the workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Gaspar Carreño

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop a safety working procedure for the employees in the Intermutual Hospital de Levante (HIL in those areas of activity that deal with the handling of hazardous drugs (MP. Methods: The procedure was developed in six phases: 1 hazard definition; 2 definition and identification of processes and development of general correct work practices about hazardous drugs’ selection and special handling; 3 detection, selection and set of specific recommendations to handle with hazardous drugs during the processes of preparation and administration included in the hospital GFT; 4 categorization of risk during the preparation/administration and development of an identification system; 5 information and training of professionals; 6 implementation of the identification measures and prevention guidelines. Results: Six processes were detected handling HD. During those processes, thirty HD were identified included in the hospital GFT and a safer alternative was found for 6 of them. The HD were classified into 4 risk categories based on those measures to be taken during the preparation and administration of each of them. Conclusions: The development and implementation of specific safety-work processes dealing with medication handling, allows hospital managers to accomplish effectively with their legal obligations about the area of prevention and provides healthcare professional staff with the adequate techniques and safety equipment to avoid possible dangers and risks of some drugs.

  4. [Out-of-hospital management characteristics of severe obese patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jbeili, C; Penet, C; Jabre, P; Kachout, L; Schvahn, S; Margenet, A; Marty, J; Combes, X

    2007-11-01

    Assessment of prehospital management difficulties in morbid obese patients. Registration in several emergency departments for medical devices usable for morbid obese patients. Descriptive clinical study and regional survey. During one year, all morbid obese patients managed by the prehospital emergency mobile unit (PEMU) were recorded. Pre hospital medical management and hospital admission difficulties were systematically recorded and analyzed. A regional survey was also performed in clinical and radiological departments, which are likely to receive these patients in emergency situations. During the period of study, 92 patients were managed by the PEMU. Medical difficulties were numerous: impossibility to measure arterial pressure in 8 patients, difficulties in peripheral line placement for 12 patients, difficult airway management in 5 of 25 (20%) patients requiring tracheal intubation. The handling of obese patients needed additional rescuer in 27 (33%) patients transported to hospital. The regional survey showed that many obese patients could not profit from several specialized diagnostic and therapeutics devices because of their weight restriction. Management of morbid obese patients in the context of the out-of-hospital emergency medicine is frequently associated with specific and major technical difficulties. Numerous diagnostic and therapeutic devices are not currently adapted to the most severe overweight patients.

  5. Obesity management in gynecologic cancer survivors: provider practices and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, Amelia M; Tergas, Ana I; Satin, Andrew J; Fader, Amanda N

    2013-05-01

    Obesity is associated with the development and risk of death from several women's cancers. The study objective was to describe and compare oncologic providers' attitudes and practices as they relate to obesity counseling and management in cancer survivors. Society of Gynecologic Oncology members (n = 924) were surveyed with the use of a web-based, electronic questionnaire. χ(2) and Fisher exact tests were used to analyze responses. Of the 240 respondents (30%), 92.9% were practicing gynecologic oncologists or fellows, and 5.1% were allied health professionals. Median age was 42 years; 50.8% of the respondents were female. Of the respondents, 42.7% reported that they themselves were overweight/obese and that ≥50% of their survivor patients were overweight/obese. Additionaly, 82% of the respondents believed that discussing weight would not harm the doctor-patient relationship. Most of the respondents (95%) agreed that addressing lifestyle modifications with survivors is important. Respondents believed that gynecologic oncologists (85.1%) and primary care providers (84.5%) were responsible for addressing obesity. More providers who were ≤42 years old reported undergoing obesity management training (P 42 years old (P = .017). After initial counseling, 81.5% of the respondents referred survivors to other providers for obesity interventions. Oncology provider respondents believe that addressing obesity with cancer survivors is important. Providers believed themselves to be responsible for initial counseling but believed that obesity interventions should be directed by other specialists. Further research is needed to identify barriers to care for obese cancer survivors and to improve physician engagement with obesity counseling in the "teachable moment" that is provided by a new cancer diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical guidelines for diagnosis and management of obesity in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainer, V; Kunesová, M; Parízková, J; Stich, V; Slabá, S; Fried, M; Málková, I

    1998-01-01

    Guidelines for the management of obesity include recommendation about diet, exercise, behavioral modification, drug therapy and bariatric surgery in the comprehensive management of an obese patient. It is emphasized that the treatment of obesity should be individually tailored according to the age of the patient, degree and phase of obesity, body fat distribution and an expression of risk factors and comorbidities. The new realistic goals in obesity management do not focus on the weight loss per se but mainly on the risk factors reduction which accompanies even modest weight loss. The system of obesity management introduced in the Czech Republic includes obesity management centres attached to major teaching hospitals, obesity out-patient clinics (led by an obesity specialist), primary care physicians and weight reduction clubs. Postgraduate training in obesity management should be recognized by health authorities as a function specialty. A time demanding therapeutic strategy in obesity management should be taken into account by both health policy makers and health insurance companies.

  7. Review of pharmacotherapy options for the management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Rebecca; Crannage, Erica

    2016-02-01

    To highlight the prevalence and impact of obesity in the United States and provide nurse practitioners (NPs) with an overview of pharmacotherapy options for treatment of overweight and obese individuals. A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted using multiple databases, including PubMed, MEDLINE, and Ovid. Keywords used to obtain relevant articles included obesity and drug, or orlistat, topiramate/phentermine, lorcaserin, bupropion/naltrexone, and liraglutide. Obesity is a prevalent disease with more than two thirds of Americans being considered overweight and one third being obese. Obesity places patients at an increased risk for many comorbidities that impact patient health as well as public health. There are currently five approved medications for the chronic management of obesity, two of which were approved in 2014. These pharmacological therapies are options to aid weight loss in patients that are obese or those who are overweight with additional risk factors. NPs can assist patients struggling with their weight. With new pharmacotherapy options, there is an opportunity to add to diet and exercise in order to achieve increased weight loss. A decrease in obesity would potentially alleviate the burden on the healthcare system, both socially and economically, and improve patient quality of life. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  8. Assessment and management of obesity in childhood and adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Louise A; Hazelton, Briony; Shrewsbury, Vanessa A

    2011-10-04

    The increased prevalence of obesity in childhood and adolescence highlights the need for effective treatment approaches. Initial assessments of these patients should include taking a careful history (investigating comorbidities, family history and potentially modifiable behaviors) and physical examination with BMI plotted on a BMI-for-age chart. The degree of investigation is dependent on the patient's age and severity of obesity, the findings on history and physical examination, and associated familial risk factors. There are several broad principles of conventional management: management of comorbidities; family involvement; taking a developmentally appropriate approach; the use of a range of behavior change techniques; long-term dietary change; increased physical activity; and decreased sedentary behaviors. Orlistat can be useful as an adjunct to lifestyle changes in severely obese adolescents and metformin can be used in older children and adolescents with clinical insulin resistance. Bariatric surgery should be considered in those who are severely obese, with recognition of the need for management in centers with multidisciplinary weight management teams and for surgery to be performed in tertiary institutions experienced in bariatric surgery. Finally, given the high prevalence and chronic nature of obesity, coordinated models of care for health-service delivery for the management of pediatric obesity are needed.

  9. Work-related stress management between workplace and occupational health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen-Amoroso, Maritta; Liira, Juha

    2016-06-13

    Work-related stress has been evaluated as one of the most important health risks in Europe. Prevention of work related stress and interventions to reduce risk factors for stress in the workplace are conducted together by the enterprise and occupational health services. The aim of the study was to examine the experiences of Finnish occupational physicians on the stress management with enterprises. From the Finnish Association of Occupational Health Physicians membership list 207 physicians responded to self-administered anonymous questionnaire. The data were analysed using SPSS 17.0. The client enterprises contacted occupational health services frequently about work-related stress. Collaboration between occupational health and enterprises was strongest in companies' own occupational health services and generally with most experienced physicians. Occupational health services and enterprises shared responsibility for managing work-related stress. Professional experience and close contact with organisation management favours successful stress management between occupational health and enterprises.

  10. The therapeutics of lifestyle management on obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, P A

    2010-11-01

    The global incidence and prevalence of obesity continue to increase, with the fastest rate of increase in the developing world. Obesity is associated with many chronic diseases including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers. Weight loss can reduce the risk of developing these diseases and can be achieved by means of surgery, pharmacotherapy and lifestyle interventions. Lifestyle interventions for prevention and treatment of obesity include diet, exercise and psychological interventions. All lifestyle interventions have a modest but significant effect on weight loss, but there is little evidence to indicate that any one intervention is more effective. There is evidence of an additive effect for adjunct therapy, and the combination of diet, exercise and behavioural interventions appears to be most effective for both the prevention and treatment of obesity. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. [INTERVENTIONS FOR PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT OF CHILD AND YOUTH OBESITY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Morente, Ma Angeles; Sánchez Ocón, Ma Teresa; Mingorance Ruiz, Ma Visitación; Pérez Robles, Angustias; Munoz de la Fuente, José Manuel; Sánchez De Arias, Celia

    2015-02-01

    To determine the current epidemiological situation, prevention and management of child and youth obesity based on the best scientific evidence available. Literature search in PubMed, Cochrane, Science Direct, ENFISPO, Lilacs and SciELO, selecting articles about child and youth obesity, its prevention and treatment. Child and youth obesity is a multifactorial chronic disease that it has been increasing, tending to stay in adolescence and adulthood with greater intensity than more early starts. The data vary from country to country, although most articles are governed by body mass index (BMI). Pediatric overweight is defined by a BMI percentiles located between 91-98 and obesity by a percentile equal or greater than 99. Its prevalence varies according to time, geography, age, gender and race. The prevalence rates of obesity in Spain are one of the highest around the world. The overweight prevalence is lower slightly and there is no difference in gender. Its implications include the metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus II. Unanimously, the combination of interventions on life and dietary habits and physical activity is important for the management of obesity and overweight. Currently, the obesity management requires a generalized approach, with changes in lifestyle, diet and physical activity. The best solution for reducing this epidemic lies in prevention rather than treatment.

  12. Challenges and Opportunities in Management of Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Acosta, Andres; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K.; Port, John D.; Camilleri, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in understanding the roles of adiposity, food intake, gastrointestinal and adipocyte-related hormones, inflammatory mediators, the gut-brain axis, and the hypothalamic nervous system in the pathophysiology of obesity, the effects of different therapeutic interventions on those pathophysiological mechanisms are controversial. There are still no low cost, safe, effective treatments for obesity and its complications. Currently, bariatric surgical approaches targeting the gastroi...

  13. Proactive and Progressive Approaches in Managing Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Robert H; Bays, Harold E; Klein, Samuel; Bade Horn, Deborah

    2016-10-01

    Despite the advice clinicians have been giving patients about the importance of restricting their food intake and increasing physical activity levels, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that 78.6 million adults in the United States (US) are still obese. With these statistics in mind, this symposium provided insights on the genetic, cultural, and environmental underpinning of obesity and discussed the latest research on pharmacotherapy, surgery, and the need to individualize treatment.

  14. The investigation and management of obesity

    OpenAIRE

    M Labib

    2003-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic condition characterised by an excess of body fat. It is a complex disorder of appetite regulation and energy metabolism controlled by specific biological factors. In the past 10 years, great progress has been made in the scientific understanding of the pathophysiology of obesity and the interactions between genetic predisposition to weight gain and the environment. This article will review the current understanding of the pathophysiology and the approach to the investigat...

  15. Workplace standing time and the incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes: a longitudinal study in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Saunders, Travis J; Tremblay, Mark S; Katzmarzyk, Peter T; Tremblay, Angelo; Bouchard, Claude

    2015-02-10

    It is increasingly recognized that standing represents a simple solution to extended periods of sitting. However, it is currently unknown whether workplace standing time is prospectively associated with a lower incidence of chronic diseases. The objective of this study was to examine the association between workplace standing time and the incidence of overweight/obesity (OW/OB) and impaired glucose tolerance/type 2 diabetes (IGT/T2D) in adults. A longitudinal analysis from the Quebec Family Study (Canada) was conducted on 293 participants, aged 18 to 65 years, followed for a mean of 6 years. Information on self-reported occupational standing time as well as several covariates was collected at both baseline and follow-up. Outcome measures included the development of OW/OB (i.e. body mass index ≥25 kg/m(2)) and IGT/T2D (i.e. 2-h postload plasma glucose level ≥7.8 mmol/L). The incidence rates of OW/OB and IGT/T2D over the 6-year follow-up period were 17.4% and 12.6%, respectively. Significant negative associations were observed between the amount of occupational standing time and the development of outcome measures. However, the associations were no longer significant after adjustment for age, sex, smoking habits, total annual family income, daily caloric intake, and submaximal working capacity. In age- and sex-adjusted logistic regression analysis, significant negative linear trends were observed across levels of standing time and the outcome variables. However, the associations were no longer significant after further adjustment for the other covariates. Finally, we observed that the change in standing time from baseline to year 6 was significantly associated with the development of outcome measures, with higher incidence rates in adults reporting a reduction in standing time at follow-up. However, the associations became non-significant after adjustment for covariates. Greater occupational standing time is not sufficient in and of itself to prevent the

  16. Working conditions and workplace health and safety promotion in home care: A mixed-method study from Swedish managers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, Gunvor; Larsson, Agneta

    2017-11-02

    Today, we can see a trend toward increased psychosocial strain at work among home-care managers and staff. The aim of this study is to describe home care managers' views on their own psychosocial working conditions and on how to promote workplace health and safety in a municipality in northern Sweden. A mixed-methods design was used, including questionnaire and qualitative focus group data. The qualitative data were analyzed by manifest content analysis. The results indicate that most managers perceived increased variety in work and opportunities for development at work, but at the same time increased demands. The managers suggested that workplace health and safety could be improved by risk assessment and improved communication, a clear communication chain by a real as well as a virtual platform for communication. In summary, workplace health and safety could be improved by risk assessments and by a physical as well as a virtual platform for communication.

  17. Embodied experiences associated with obesity and the management of bodyweight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Louise; Holm, Lotte

    2012-01-01

    In many affluent Western societies the less educated are at higher risk of developing obesity. Within a conceptual framework of sociology of embodiment, this study analyzed the embodied experiences associated with obesity and the management of body weight among women and men with different social...... backgrounds. Qualitative in depth interviews were conducted with 20 Danish middle-aged men and women who were categorized as clinically obese in a national dietary survey. The study found a devastating impact of obesity in the lives of highly educated women related to motherhood, career and wifehood which...... had experienced weight-related disease, which interrelated with less commitment to, and variation in, weight-loss activities. These findings may help to explain why obesity is least prevalent among highly educated women in Danish society as well as other western societies. A marked difference between...

  18. Effects of a 12-week, school-based obesity management program on obese primary school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Gyu Kim

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose:This study was designed to determine the effects of a school-based obesity-management program on obese primary school children. Methods:A total of 995 children (6–12 years old in a primary school were screened in March 2008, and of those, 101 obese students (44 boys and 57 girls, body mass index (BMI ?#249;5 percentile were enrolled for a study group. The school- based, obesity management program, which includes physical exercise and nutritional education, was conducted as part of an extracurricular program for 12 weeks. The measurement of height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure (BP, and bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA was performed before and after the program. Results:Height and weight increased significantly (P<0.05. The BMI and obesity index decreased significantly (P<0.01. Systolic and diastolic BP decreased significantly (P<0.01. BMI decreased in 61.4% of boys and 66.7% of girls. Protein and basal metabolic rate (BMR increased significantly on the BIA (P<0.01. Fat decreased significantly (P<0.05. The total body water (TBW and percent body fat (PBF decreased significantly (P<0.01. The changes in protein, fat, TBW, PBF, and BMR significantly correlated to the change in BMI (P<0.05. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, BMI change was significantly correlated to the changes in protein and fat content (P<0.01. Conclusion:The school-based obesity management program is a very effective way to manage obesity for obese primary school children.

  19. An EASO position statement on multidisciplinary obesity management in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumuk, Volkan; Frühbeck, Gema; Oppert, Jean Michel; Woodward, Euan; Toplak, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has proven to be a gateway to ill health. It has already reached epidemic proportions becoming one of the leading causes of death and disability in Europe and world-wide. Obesity plays a central role in the development of a number of risk factors and chronic diseases like hypertension, dyslipidaemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus inducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Therefore weight management plays a central role in controlling the respective risk factors and their consequences. Obesity is a complex condition of multifactorial origin. Biological but also psychological and social factors interfere to lead to excess body weight and its deleterious outcomes. Obesity management cannot focus any more only on weight (and BMI) reduction. More attention is to be paid to waist circumference (or waist-to-hip ratio, especially in females), the improvement in body composition (measured with body composition tracking systems like BOD POD, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry or bioelectrical impedance analysis) which is focusing on ameliorating or maintaining fat-free mass and decreasing fat mass. Management of co-morbidities, improving quality of life and well-being of obese patients are also included in treatment aims. This statement emphasises the importance of a comprehensive approach to obesity management.

  20. An EASO Position Statement on Multidisciplinary Obesity Management in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Yumuk

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has proven to be a gateway to ill health. It has already reached epidemic proportions becoming one of the leading causes of death and disability in Europe and world-wide. Obesity plays a central role in the development of a number of risk factors and chronic diseases like hypertension, dyslipidaemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus inducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Therefore weight management plays a central role in controlling the respective risk factors and their consequences. Obesity is a complex condition of multifactorial origin. Biological but also psychological and social factors interfere to lead to excess body weight and its deleterious outcomes. Obesity management cannot focus any more only on weight (and BMI reduction. More attention is to be paid to waist circumference (or waist-to-hip ratio, especially in females, the improvement in body composition (measured with body composition tracking systems like BOD POD, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry or bioelectrical impedance analysis which is focusing on ameliorating or maintaining fat-free mass and decreasing fat mass. Management of co-morbidities, improving quality of life and well-being of obese patients are also included in treatment aims. This statement emphasises the importance of a comprehensive approach to obesity management.

  1. Phentermine and topiramate for the management of obesity: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosentino G

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gina Cosentino,1 Ariane O Conrad,2 Gabriel I Uwaifo1 1Section of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2Xavier University of Louisiana College of Pharmacy, New Orleans, LA, USA Abstract: Obesity is now a major public health concern worldwide with increasing prevalence and a growing list of comorbidities and complications. The morbidity, mortality and reduced productivity associated with obesity and its complications result in a major burden to health care costs. Obesity is a complex chronic medical syndrome often with multiple different etiologic factors in individual patients. The long term successful management of obesity remains particularly challenging and invariably requires a multifaceted approach including lifestyle and behavioral modification, increased physical activity, and adjunctive pharmacotherapy. Bariatric surgery remains a last resort though at present it has the best results for achieving sustained robust weight loss. Obesity pharmacotherapy has been very limited in its role for long term obesity management because of the past history of several failed agents as well as the fact that presently available agents are few, and generally utilized as monotherapy. The recent FDA approval of the fixed drug combination of phentermine and extended release topiramate (topiramate-ER (trade name Qsymia™ marks the first FDA approved combination pharmacotherapeutic agent for obesity since the Phen-Fen combination of the 1990s. This review details the history and clinical trial basis for the use of both phentermine and topiramate in obesity therapeutics as well as the results of clinical trials of their combination for obesity treatment in humans. The initial clinical approval trials offer evidence that this fixed drug combination offers synergistic potential for effective, robust and sustained weight loss with mean weight loss of at least 10

  2. Obesity and osteoarthritis: disease genesis and nonpharmacologic weight management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messier, Stephen P

    2008-08-01

    The mechanisms by which obesity affects osteoarthritis (OA) are of great concern to osteoarthritis researchers and clinicians who manage this disease. Inflammation and joint loads are pathways commonly believed to cause or to exacerbate the disease process. This article reviews the physiologic and mechanical consequences of obesity in older adults who have knee OA, the effects of long-term exercise and weight-loss interventions, the most effective nonpharmacologic treatments for obesity, and the usefulness and feasibility of translating these results to clinical practice.

  3. Glycemic index in the management of Obesity and Metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Juanola Falgarona, Martí

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) are one of the main causes of disability and death worldwide. It has been proposed that high glycemic index (GI) and high glycemic load (GL) diets are associated with increased risks of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, MetS and cardiovascular disease. To date, evidence suggests possible benefits of the GI/GL for the prevention and management of obesity and MetS. We aimed to analyze the association between dietary GI and GL and the risk of to develop Met...

  4. A management framework for training providers to improve workplace skills development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Govender

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Deputy President, Ms Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, says a skills revolution is necessary for South Africa’s (SA skills crisis. The SA skills revolution began with the skills legislation of 1998-9 when the Departments of Labour (DOL and Education (DOE intended a seamless, integrated approach to rapid skills development. The National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS, the Sector Education and Training Providers (SETAs, the South African Qualifications Authorities (SAQA and the National Qualifications Framework (NQF were established to drive the human resource and skills development revolutionary strategy. The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of the 2001-3 research investigating an internal management framework for training providers, employers and managers to accelerate workplace skills development. Design/Methodology/Approach: An integrated, multi-method research model was employed to gather empirical evidence on skills practices. A robust quantitative survey was conducted within 600 organisations. Simultaneously, rich, descriptive data was gathered from managers and employees using a structured qualitative interview strategy. The integrated data pool was factor analysed. The research findings, conclusion and recommended framework were reported in a PhD thesis. Findings: The research findings reveal major gaps in the effectiveness of SA training providers to radically accelerate and improve workplace skills development as per national skills legislation, implementation and management criteria. Implications: If the skills revolution in SA is to succeed, training providers especially, must become less complacent, more assertive and fully equipped when participating in the skills development arena. Originality/Value: Via this research, training providers will gain critical, reflective insight into their management framework for meeting skills legislative criteria and for managing training interventions and skills projects.

  5. Effects of Integrated Health Management Intervention on Overweight and Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiting Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Overweight or obese adults aged 20~55 years and living in Beijing more than one year were randomly divided into different management groups. A one-year integrated health management intervention was applied in the health management groups. The physical indicators and metabolic indicators changed after one-year intervention on the overweight and obese adults. The annual reduction of the physical indicators was significant in all groups (p<0.05 except the weight loss in the placebo + general management group. The health management and the dietary supplement have statistically significant (p<0.001, p<0.001 effects on the annual reduction of these indicators and interactive effect between them was found on some of these indicators such as bodyweight, body mass index (BMI, body fat ratio (BFR, and hipline (p<0.05. The dietary supplement + health management group had the best annual reduction effects for the indicators among the groups. Integrated health management interventions including both dietary supplements intervention and health management could improve metabolic indicators in overweight and obese adults together with the physical indicators, suggesting the intermediated role of metabolic indictors in controlling obesity.

  6. Management of obesity in adults: European clinical practice guidelines.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsigos, C.; Hainer, V.; Basdevant, A.; FINER, N.; Fried, M; Mathus-Vliegen, E.; Micic, D.; Maislos, M; Roman, G; Schutz, Y.; Toplak, H; Zahorska-Markiewicz, B.; Obesity Management Task Force of the European Association for th

    2008-01-01

    The development of consensus guidelines for obesity is complex. It involves recommending both treatment interventions and interventions related to screening and prevention. With so many publications and claims, and with the awareness that success for the individual is short-lived, many find it difficult to know what action is appropriate in the management of obesity. Furthermore, the significant variation in existing service provision both within countries as well as across the regions of Eur...

  7. Management of childhood obesity in pediatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C L; Campanaro, L A; Squillace, M; Bollella, M

    1997-05-28

    Evaluation of obese children and adolescents in the pediatric office or clinic should include baseline assessment of weight for height and body fatness; rule out endocrine and genetic causes of obesity; and evaluate other health-risk factors, such as those for cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, and hypertension. Treatment of obesity is most successful if realistic goals are set; a balanced low-fat/high-fiber diet is stressed; a safe rate of weight loss of 1 to 2 pounds per week is achieved through a moderate reduction of caloric intake (approximately 20-25% decrease); increased physical activity is stressed as much as diet; parental support is strong; and behavior therapy is provided during the course of treatment to help both child and parent achieve the diet, exercise, and behavior goals.

  8. Factors affecting acceptance of smartphone application for management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Eunjoo; Park, Hyeoun-Ae

    2015-04-01

    The factors affecting the acceptance of mobile obesity-management applications (apps) by the public were analyzed using a mobile healthcare system (MHS) technology acceptance model (TAM). The subjects who participated in this study were Android smartphone users who had an intent to manage their weight. They used the obesity-management app for two weeks, and then completed an 18-item survey designed to determine the factors influencing the acceptance of the app. Three questions were asked pertaining to each of the following six factors: compatibility, self-efficacy, technical support and training, perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and behavior regarding intention to use. Cronbach's alpha was used to assess the reliability of the scales. Pathway analysis was also performed to evaluate the MHS acceptance model. A total of 94 subjects participated in this study. The results indicate that compatibility, perceived usefulness, and perceived ease of use significantly affected the behavioral intention to use the mobile obesity-management app. Technical support and training also significantly affected the perceived ease of use; however, the hypotheses that self-efficacy affects perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use were not supported in this study. This is the first attempt to analyze the factors influencing mobile obesity-management app acceptance using a TAM. Further studies should cover not only obesity but also other chronic diseases and should analyze the factors affecting the acceptance of apps among healthcare consumers in general.

  9. Office-based strategies for the management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Goutham

    2010-06-15

    Roughly two thirds of U.S. adults are overweight or obese. Obesity increases the risk of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, heart disease, pulmonary disease, hepatobiliary disease, cancer, and a number of psychosocial complications. Physicians often feel unprepared to handle this important problem. Practical office-based strategies include: (1) making recommendations for assisted self-management, including guidance on popular diets, (2) advising patients about commercial weight-loss programs, (3) advising patients about and prescribing medications, (4) recommending bariatric surgery, and (5) supplementing these strategies with counseling about lifestyle changes using a systematic approach. Family physicians should provide basic information about the effectiveness and safety of popular diets and commercial weight-loss programs, and refer patients to appropriate information sources. Sibutramine and orlistat, the only medications currently approved for the long-term treatment of obesity, should only be prescribed in combination with lifestyle changes. Bariatric surgery is an option for adults with a body mass index of 40 kg per m2 or higher, or for those with a body mass index of 35 kg per m2 or higher who have obesity-related comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes. The five A's behavioral counseling paradigm (ask, advise, assess, assist, and arrange) can be used as the basis for a systematic, practical approach to the management of obesity that incorporates evidence for managing common obesity-related behaviors.

  10. Obesity consults--comprehensive obesity management in 2013: understanding the shifting paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Robert F; Apovian, Caroline M; Fujioka, Ken

    2013-11-01

    Although serious health concerns are associated with obesity, losing even 5% of body weight can produce clinically relevant effects. The initial goal of obesity management is usually a 5% to 10% weight reduction. Some people will sustain weight loss with changes in diet and exercise alone; however, these patients represent the minority, and a large percentage are unable to maintain weight loss over time. Patients and providers often wish to intensify obesity treatment, and therefore interest in new medications has been considerable. Until recently, only two antiobesity medications have received Food and Drug Administration approval for long-term use. In June and July of 2012, respectively, lorcaserin and combination phentermine/topiramate extended-release were approved for obesity therapy. The first section of this article reviews mechanisms, clinical trials, benefits and risks of available medications for treating obesity. Bariatric surgery is the next step for patients with a body mass index of ≥40 kg/m(2) or ≥35 kg/m(2) with comorbidities, based on National Institutes of Health Clinical Guidelines. These procedures and their risks and benefits are reviewed in the second section. The final section presents common clinical scenarios with guidance for choosing among evidence-based recommendations for developing optimal, individualized, long-term strategies for patients with obesity. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  11. The pharmacological management of obesity | Marais | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Obesity is a growing phenomenon and a global concern. It is well-known that it plays a significant role in the development of several preventable diseases. The physiological mechanisms in regulating energy intake and expenditure are complex and remain a target area for current and future research. The absence of a ...

  12. Electronic Registry for the Management of Childhood Obesity in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassari, Penio; Papaioannou, Panagiotis; Billiris, Antonis; Karanikas, Haralampos; Eleftheriou, Stergiani; Thireos, Eleftherios; Manios, Yannis; Chrousos, George P; Charmandari, Evangelia

    2018-01-11

    Obesity in childhood and adolescence represents a major health problem in our century. In Greece, more than 30-35% of children and adolescents are either overweight or obese. Using information and communication technologies, we developed a "National Registry for the Prevention and Management of Overweight and Obesity in Childhood and Adolescence" for guidance and training of Pediatricians and General Practitioners. The application supports interoperability with other national infrastructures and multi-layered security spanning preventive, detective and administrative controls. The Patient Summary dataset includes information on medical history, family history, medications, immunizations, clinical examination and laboratory findings, and appointment booking service. The application was launched in September 2015 and is accessible by: h t t p : //app.childhood-obesity. gr/. Based on the data that the doctor registers, the system calculates a personalized therapeutic algorithm that provides information on diet, physical exercise and sleep, as well as guidance on laboratory investigations and referral to specialized centres. A pilot study performed in 1,270 children and adolescents indicated that using this system resulted in a reduction of obesity rates by 30% and overweight rates by 35% within one year. This National eHealth System appears to be effective in the management of overweight and obesity in childhood and adolescence. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Weight Management in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes and Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Mottalib, Adham; Kasetty, Megan; Mar, Jessica Y.; Elseaidy, Taha; Ashrafzadeh, Sahar; Hamdy, Osama

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are typically viewed as lean individuals. However, recent reports showed that their obesity rate surpassed that of the general population. Patients with T1D who show clinical signs of type 2 diabetes such as obesity and insulin resistance are considered to have ?double diabetes.? This review explains the mechanisms of weight gain in patients with T1D and how to manage it. Recent findings Weight management in T1D can be successfully achieve...

  14. Workplace violence in a large correctional health service in New South Wales, Australia: a retrospective review of incident management records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about workplace violence among correctional health professionals. This study aimed to describe the patterns, severity and outcomes of incidents of workplace violence among employees of a large correctional health service, and to explore the help-seeking behaviours of staff following an incident. Methods The study setting was Justice Health, a statutory health corporation established to provide health care to people who come into contact with the criminal justice system in New South Wales, Australia. We reviewed incident management records describing workplace violence among Justice Health staff. The three-year study period was 1/7/2007-30/6/2010. Results During the period under review, 208 incidents of workplace violence were recorded. Verbal abuse (71%) was more common than physical abuse (29%). The most (44%) incidents of workplace violence (including both verbal and physical abuse) occurred in adult male prisons, although the most (50%) incidents of physical abuse occurred in a forensic hospital. Most (90%) of the victims were nurses and two-thirds were females. Younger employees and males were most likely to be a victim of physical abuse. Preparing or dispensing medication and attempting to calm and/or restrain an aggressive patient were identified as ‘high risk’ work duties for verbal abuse and physical abuse, respectively. Most (93%) of the incidents of workplace violence were initiated by a prisoner/patient. Almost all of the incidents received either a medium (46%) or low (52%) Severity Assessment Code. Few victims of workplace violence incurred a serious physical injury – there were no workplace deaths during the study period. However, mental stress was common, especially among the victims of verbal abuse (85%). Few (6%) victims of verbal abuse sought help from a health professional. Conclusions Among employees of a large correctional health service, verbal abuse in the workplace was substantially more common than physical

  15. Workplace violence in a large correctional health service in New South Wales, Australia: a retrospective review of incident management records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cashmore Aaron W

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about workplace violence among correctional health professionals. This study aimed to describe the patterns, severity and outcomes of incidents of workplace violence among employees of a large correctional health service, and to explore the help-seeking behaviours of staff following an incident. Methods The study setting was Justice Health, a statutory health corporation established to provide health care to people who come into contact with the criminal justice system in New South Wales, Australia. We reviewed incident management records describing workplace violence among Justice Health staff. The three-year study period was 1/7/2007-30/6/2010. Results During the period under review, 208 incidents of workplace violence were recorded. Verbal abuse (71% was more common than physical abuse (29%. The most (44% incidents of workplace violence (including both verbal and physical abuse occurred in adult male prisons, although the most (50% incidents of physical abuse occurred in a forensic hospital. Most (90% of the victims were nurses and two-thirds were females. Younger employees and males were most likely to be a victim of physical abuse. Preparing or dispensing medication and attempting to calm and/or restrain an aggressive patient were identified as ‘high risk’ work duties for verbal abuse and physical abuse, respectively. Most (93% of the incidents of workplace violence were initiated by a prisoner/patient. Almost all of the incidents received either a medium (46% or low (52% Severity Assessment Code. Few victims of workplace violence incurred a serious physical injury – there were no workplace deaths during the study period. However, mental stress was common, especially among the victims of verbal abuse (85%. Few (6% victims of verbal abuse sought help from a health professional. Conclusions Among employees of a large correctional health service, verbal abuse in the workplace was substantially more

  16. Obesity and weight management at menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proietto, Joseph

    2017-06-01

    Many women report gaining weight as they transition through menopause. For most, the weight gain is modest and can be reduced with a conscious effort to limit energy intake and increase energy expenditure. However, many women who are already overweight and obese will gain more weight as they approach menopause. The aims of this paper are to explain the reasons for menopausal weight gain and to detail a method for achieving and sustaining a substantial weight loss. Weight gain during menopause is predominantly due to a reduction in spontaneous activity. For women who are lean, advice about controlling energy intake and increasing physical activity may be all that is required to prevent weight gain. For women who are overweight and obese rapid weight loss is best achieved with the help of a very low energy diet. This must be followed by lifelong behaviour modification with or without the help of hunger-suppressing pharmacotherapy.

  17. European Guidelines for Obesity Management in Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Volkan Yumuk; Constantine Tsigos; Martin Fried; Karin Schindler; Luca Busetto; Dragan Micic; Hermann Toplak; for the Obesity Management Task Force of the European Association for the Study of Obesity

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic metabolic disease characterised by an increase of body fat stores. It is a gateway to ill health, and it has become one of the leading causes of disability and death, affecting not only adults but also children and adolescents worldwide. In clinical practice, the body fatness is estimated by BMI, and the accumulation of intra-abdominal fat (marker for higher metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk) can be assessed by waist circumference. Complex interactions between bio...

  18. The impact of workplace incivility on the work environment, manager skill, and productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Patricia Smokler; Malecha, Ann

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the impact of workplace incivility (WPI) on staff nurses related to cost and productivity. Healthful practice environments are one of the goals of the American Organization of Nurse Executives 2010 to 2012 Strategic Plan. Healthy work environments are linked to patient safety and quality. A postal survey was sent to 2,160 staff nurses (n = 659 completed) and included the Nursing Incivility Scale and Work Limitation Questionnaire. Although almost 85% (n = 553) reported experiencing WPI in the past 12 months, nurses working in healthy work environments(defined as Magnet®, Pathway to Excellence, and/or Beacon Unit recognition) reported lower WPI scores compared with nurses working in the standard work environment (P Workplace incivility scores varied between types of unit. Nurses' perception of their manager's ability to handle WPI was negatively associated with WPI scores (P < .001). Lost productivity as a result of WPI was calculated at $11,581 per nurse per year. Not only does WPI exist at high rates, but also it is costly. Nursing leaders play a vital role ensuring a healthy work environment.

  19. Characterization of lead in US workplaces using data from OSHA's integrated management information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Scott A; Sussell, Aaron L; Li, Jia; Shire, Jeffrey D; Alarcon, Walter A; Tak, Sangwoo

    2011-05-01

    Lead hazards continue to be encountered in the workplace. OSHA's Integrated Management Information System (IMIS) is the largest available database containing sampling results in US workplaces. Personal airborne lead sampling results in IMIS were extracted for years 1979-2008. Descriptive analyses, geographical mapping, and regression modeling of results were performed. Seventy-nine percent of lead samples were in the manufacturing sector. Lead sample results were highest in the construction sector (median = 0.03 mg/m(3) ). NORA sector, year, OSHA region, number of employees at the worksite, federal/state OSHA plan, unionization, advance notification, and presence of an employee representative were statistically associated with having a lead sample result exceed the PEL. Lead concentrations within construction have been higher than any other industry. Lead hazards have been most prevalent in the north and northeastern US. IMIS data can be useful as a surveillance tool and for targeting prevention efforts toward hazardous industries. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Evaluating a novel approach to enhancing dysphagia management: workplace-based, blended e-learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilott, Irene; Bennett, Bev; Gerrish, Kate; Pownall, Sue; Jones, Amanda; Garth, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the learning effect and resource use cost of workplace-based, blended e-learning about dysphagia for stroke rehabilitation nurses. Dysphagia is a potentially life-threatening problem that compromises quality of life. In many countries, nurses play a crucial role in supporting the management of patients with swallowing problems, yet the literature reports a need for training. A single-group, pre- and post-study with mixed methods. Each blended e-learning session comprised a needs analysis, e-learning programmes, practical skills about modifying fluids and action planning to transfer learning into practice. Participants were the population of registered nurses (n = 22) and healthcare assistants (n = 10) on a stroke rehabilitation ward in a large, teaching hospital in England between August 2010-March 2011. Data collection comprised observation (34 hours), questionnaires administered at four time points to examine change in attitude, knowledge and practice, and estimating the resource use cost for the service. Nonparametric tests and content analysis were used to analyse the data. All participants achieved a nationally recognised level of competence. The learning effect was evident on the post- and follow-up measures, with some items of dysphagia knowledge and attitude achieving significance at the p ≤ 0·05 level. The most common self-reported changes in practice related to medicines management, thickening fluids and oral hygiene. The resource use cost was estimated at £2688 for 108 hours training. Workplace-based, blended e-learning was an acceptable, cost effective way of delivering essential clinical knowledge and skills about dysphagia. Dysphagia should be viewed as a patient safety issue because of the risks of malnutrition, dehydration and aspiration pneumonia. As such, it is pertinent to many members of the interdisciplinary team. Consideration should be given to including dysphagia management in initial education and continuing professional

  1. Obesity weight management and bariatric surgery case management programs: a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echols, Jennie

    2010-01-01

    The proportion of Americans with clinically severe obesity has vast implications for the nation's healthcare system since this population have twice as many chronic medical conditions as people with normal weight. Through the use of review of literature, this article (a) describes the types of weight loss programs; (b) reviews the results from studies on effectiveness of bariatric surgery; and (c) identifies recommendations for obesity and bariatric surgery case management programs. Disease management companies appear to be concentrating on general weight loss strategies associated with wellness and other condition-specific disease management products, whereas larger national healthcare companies with at-risk and insurance products offer specific bariatric surgery management products. Case management programs within healthcare systems, health management organizations, and insurance companies are frequently faced with the management of individuals with morbid obesity and, increasingly, those who are requesting or have undergone bariatric surgery. Research shows that morbid obesity is a disease that remains generally unresponsive to diet and drug therapy but appears to respond well to bariatric surgery. Research findings suggest that surgical treatment is more effective than pharmacological treatment of weight loss and the control of some comorbidities associated with obesity. The number of Americans having weight loss surgery increased by 804% between 1998 and 2004, which appears to be a driver for the recent development of obesity disease management and bariatric surgery case management programs. Although the immaturity and lack of studies citing outcomes of obesity disease and case management programs limit the identification of best practices based on outcomes, emerging practices can be identified and recommendations for case management can be formulated. In addition to primary prevention and treatment programs for obesity, this article describes program

  2. Acknowledging others as 'whole beings'. Managers' perceptions of spirituality and health in the South African workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honiball, George; Geldenhuys, Dirk; Mayer, Claude-Hélène

    2014-06-01

    This article explores the concept of spirituality within selected South African managerial work contexts. The aim of the study was to determine managers' perceptions of spirituality and health-related aspects in various South African workplaces. A phenomenological research paradigm was used, applying an in-depth qualitative research approach. The sample consisted of 12 senior managers from different organizations, including, for example, an international healthcare provider, an international auditing and consulting firm, a manufacturer of paint supplies and decorations and an ecclesiastical organization. Research methods included semi-structured interviews and observation. Data was analysed through content analysis, identifying themes, categories and codes. The findings indicate that spirituality promotes the development of health-related aspects of individuals, such as self-awareness, inner peace and the management of stress and depression. Managers emphasize that spirituality also has an impact on managing teams and teamwork, engaging in competitive behaviour, encouraging honesty and reducing selfishness. Based on the findings, a conclusion is given and practical as well as scientific recommendations are emphasized. In love lies the seed of our growth. The more we love, the closer we are to the spiritual experience. (Paulo Coelho, 1994).

  3. Medical management of obesity in Scandinavia 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonstad, Serena; Rössner, Stephan; Rissanen, Aila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preventive efforts with improved diet and more exercise have at best decelerated increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity in Scandinavia, and the complications call for more effective treatments. This review is an overview of dietary supplements, medical devices (for oral use...... in the stomach and inhibit either fat or carbohydrate absorption, result in weight losses of ~2e3% over 3e6 months, and are generally well tolerated. The pharmaceutical compound orlistat (a lipase inhibitor) produces weight loss of 1e2% with low-dose (over-the-counter) and 3% with high-dose (prescription...

  4. Obesity Management in Europe: Current Status and Objectives for the Future

    OpenAIRE

    Uerlich, Magdalena,; Yumuk, Volkan,; Finer, Nick,; Basdevant, Arnaud,; Visscher, Tommy L.S.

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Objective: This study aims at assessing the status of obesity management in the European region and identifying future goals and objectives of professionals working in the field of obesity. Methods: Presidents of all 31 EASO-affiliated (EASO = European Association for the Study of Obesity) national associations for the study of obesity were asked to invite 5 obesity experts from their country to participate in a survey. A total of 74 obesity professionals out of 23 cou...

  5. An evaluation of an aggression management training program to cope with workplace violence in the healthcare sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.K. Oostrom (Janneke); H. van Mierlo (Heleen)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Workplace violence is a major occupational hazard for healthcare workers, generating a need for effective intervention programs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an aggression management training program. The evaluation design was based on the

  6. An evaluation of an aggression management training program to cope with workplace violence in the healthcare sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.K. Oostrom (Janneke); H. van Mierlo (Heleen)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractWorkplace violence is a major occupational hazard for healthcare workers, generating a need for effective intervention programs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an aggression management training program. The evaluation design was based on the internal

  7. University Students' Views of Obesity and Weight Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonkwo, Ononuju; While, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the knowledge and views of university students regarding obesity and weight management strategies. Design: Online questionnaire-based survey of undergraduate and postgraduate university students in a large London university with a diverse student population. Method: The survey was administered online and circulated…

  8. Workplace safety and health improvements through a labor/management training and collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Bruce; Morawetz, John; Ruttenberg, Ruth; Workman, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Seven hundred thirty-nine workers at Merck's Stonewall plant in Elkton, Virginia, have a safer and healthier workplace because four of them were enthusiastic about health and safety training they received from the union's training center in Cincinnati, Ohio. What emerged was not only that all 739 plant employees received OSHA 10-hour General Industry training, but that it was delivered by "OSHA-authorized" members of the International Chemical Workers Union Council who worked at the plant. Merck created a new full-time position in its Learning and Development Department and filled it with one of the four workers who had received the initial training. Strong plant leadership promoted discussions both during the training, in evaluation, and in newly energized joint labor-management meetings following the training. These discussions identified safety and health issues needing attention. Then, in a new spirit of trust and collaboration, major improvements occurred.

  9. [Economic evaluation of a workplace occupational health nursing service: based on comparison with atmospheric environment managing engineer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hye-Sun; Lee, Bokim

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to use cost-benefit analysis of activity to clarify the economic effect of prepared nurses versus atmospheric environment managing engineers as healthcare managers. For the study 111 workplaces were surveyed, workplaces in which nurses or atmospheric environment managing engineers were employed as healthcare managers. The survey content included annual gross salaries, participation in external job training, costs in joining association covered by the company, location and year of construction of the healthcare office, various kinds of healthcare expenditures, costs in operating healthcare office, health education, and activity performance in the work of environment management. In the case of the healthcare manager being a nurse, benefit was larger than input costs at a ratio of 2.31. On the other hand, in the case of healthcare manager being an atmospheric environment managing engineer, input costs were larger than benefits (benefit-cost ratio 0.88). Results indicate that nurses are an effective healthcare human resource and can offer good quality healthcare service. Therefore companies should hire nurses and actively promote the economic efficiency of nurses in workplace.

  10. Monitoring and management of hypertension with obesity in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falkner B

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bonita Falkner Department of Medicine and Pediatrics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Largely due to the childhood obesity epidemic, there has been an increase in the prevalence of hypertension in children and adolescents. Obesity associated hypertension is the most common hypertension phenotype among adolescents. Approximately 30% of obese adolescents have elevated blood pressure (BP or hypertension. Updated definitions of elevated BP and hypertension in adolescents are now similar to definitions of BP status in adults. For adolescents ≥13 years of age, elevated BP is 120 to 129/<80 mm Hg. Hypertension, stage 1, is ≥130 to 139/80 to 89 mm Hg, and hypertension, stage 2, is ≥140/90 mm Hg. BP measurements over separate clinic visits are necessary to verify the diagnosis of elevated BP or hypertension. Ambulatory BP monitoring, when available, provides confirmatory data on BP status. Causal mechanisms for obesity associated hypertension include increased sympathetic nervous system activity, increased renal sodium retention secondary to insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia, and obesity mediated inflammation. The primary treatment for obesity associated hypertension is weight reduction with lifestyle changes in diet and physical activity. Although difficult to achieve, even modest weight reduction can be beneficial. The diet should be rich in fruits, vegetables, fiber, and low-fat dairy with reduction in salt intake. When lifestyle changes are insufficient to achieve BP control, pharmacologic therapy is indicated to achieve a goal BP of <130/80 mm Hg or <90th percentile, whichever is lower. Regular BP monitoring is necessary for ongoing management of obesity associated hypertension in adolescents. Keywords: adolescents, obesity, blood pressure, hypertension

  11. Integrated obesity care management system -implementation and research protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillargeon, Jean-Patrice; Carpentier, André; Donovan, Denise; Fortin, Martin; Grant, Andrew; Simoneau-Roy, Judith; St-Cyr-Tribble, Denise; Xhignesse, Mariane; Langlois, Marie-France

    2007-01-01

    Background Nearly 50% of Canadians are overweight and their number is increasing rapidly. The majority of obese subjects are treated by primary care physicians (PCPs) who often feel uncomfortable with the management of obesity. The current research proposal is aimed at the development and implementation of an innovative, integrated, interdisciplinary obesity care management system involving both primary and secondary care professionals. Methods We will use both action and evaluative research in order to achieve the following specific objectives. The first one is to develop and implement a preceptorship-based continuing medical education (CME) program complemented by a web site for physicians and nurses working in Family Medicine Groups (FMGs). This CME will be based on needs assessment and will be validated by one FMG using questionnaires and semi structured interviews. Also, references and teaching tools will be available for participants on the web site. Our second objective is to establish a collaborative intra and inter-regional interdisciplinary network to enable on-going expertise update and networking for FMG teams. This tool consists of a discussion forum and monthly virtual meetings of all participants. Our third objective is to evaluate the implementation of our program for its ability to train 8 FMGs per year, the access and utilization of electronic tools and the participants' satisfaction. This will be measured with questionnaires, web logging tools and group interviews. Our fourth objective is to determine the impact for the participants regarding knowledge and expertise, attitudes and perceptions, self-efficacy for the management of obesity, and changes in FMG organization for obesity management. Questionnaires and interviews will be used for this purpose. Our fifth objective is to deliver transferable knowledge for health professionals and decision-makers. Strategies and pitfalls of setting up this program will also be identified. Conclusion This

  12. Integrated obesity care management system -implementation and research protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St-Cyr-Tribble Denise

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nearly 50% of Canadians are overweight and their number is increasing rapidly. The majority of obese subjects are treated by primary care physicians (PCPs who often feel uncomfortable with the management of obesity. The current research proposal is aimed at the development and implementation of an innovative, integrated, interdisciplinary obesity care management system involving both primary and secondary care professionals. Methods We will use both action and evaluative research in order to achieve the following specific objectives. The first one is to develop and implement a preceptorship-based continuing medical education (CME program complemented by a web site for physicians and nurses working in Family Medicine Groups (FMGs. This CME will be based on needs assessment and will be validated by one FMG using questionnaires and semi structured interviews. Also, references and teaching tools will be available for participants on the web site. Our second objective is to establish a collaborative intra and inter-regional interdisciplinary network to enable on-going expertise update and networking for FMG teams. This tool consists of a discussion forum and monthly virtual meetings of all participants. Our third objective is to evaluate the implementation of our program for its ability to train 8 FMGs per year, the access and utilization of electronic tools and the participants' satisfaction. This will be measured with questionnaires, web logging tools and group interviews. Our fourth objective is to determine the impact for the participants regarding knowledge and expertise, attitudes and perceptions, self-efficacy for the management of obesity, and changes in FMG organization for obesity management. Questionnaires and interviews will be used for this purpose. Our fifth objective is to deliver transferable knowledge for health professionals and decision-makers. Strategies and pitfalls of setting up this program will also be

  13. Provider attitudes and practice patterns of obesity management with pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granara, Brittany; Laurent, Jennifer

    2017-09-01

    More than one third of American adults are obese. Extreme obesity is rapidly rising. Nine medications are approved for weight loss yet they remain underutilized with the focus primarily on lifestyle modifications. The objective was to determine current prescribing patterns and attitudes of weight loss medications in the management of obesity among primary care providers (PCPs). PCPs were surveyed to determine practice patterns, attitudes, barriers, and facilitators for prescribing weight loss medications. Ninety-four surveys were analyzed. Seventy-six percent of all PCPs did not prescribe weight loss medications for long-term weight loss and 58% of PCPs had negative perceptions of pharmacotherapy. Differences existed between prescribing patterns and attitudes of advanced practice clinicians and physicians. Safety concerns were the greatest barrier. Having 2+ comorbidities and severe obesity were facilitators for prescribing weight loss medications. Underutilization of pharmacotherapy suggests that PCPs may not have sufficient knowledge about medication safety profiles and efficacy. Delaying treatment until patients have reached a high level of morbidity may be less efficacious than earlier treatment. Education regarding effectiveness and risks of weight loss medications for obesity management is needed and earlier interventions with pharmacotherapy may prevent significant morbidity and mortality. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  14. Management of obesity in adults: European clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigos, Constantine; Hainer, Vojtech; Basdevant, Arnaud; Finer, Nick; Fried, Martin; Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth; Micic, Dragan; Maislos, Maximo; Roman, Gabriela; Schutz, Yves; Toplak, Hermann; Zahorska-Markiewicz, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    The development of consensus guidelines for obesity is complex. It involves recommending both treatment interventions and interventions related to screening and prevention. With so many publications and claims, and with the awareness that success for the individual is short-lived, many find it difficult to know what action is appropriate in the management of obesity. Furthermore, the significant variation in existing service provision both within countries as well as across the regions of Europe makes a standardised approach, even if evidence-based, difficult to implement. In formulating these guidelines, we have attempted to use an evidence-based approach while allowing flexibility for the practicing clinician in domains where evidence is currently lacking and ensuring that in treatment there is recognition of clinical judgment and of regional diversity as well as the necessity of an agreed approach by the individual and family. We conclude that i) physicians have a responsibility to recognise obesity as a disease and help obese patients with appropriate prevention and treatment, ii) treatment should be based on good clinical care and evidence-based interventions and iii) obesity treatment should focus on realistic goals and lifelong management. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Workplace Performance of Hotel and Restaurant Management Interns of West Visayas State University, Calinog Iloilo, Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymund B. Moreno, Ma. Nellie L. Mapa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the workplace performance of Hotel and Restaurant Management practicum students of West Visayas State University – Calinog Campus as perceived by the interns’ themselves and the supervisors in different hospitality establishments in Iloilo City where students were deployed for on-the-job training in relation to industry-site internship / practicum program for academic year 2013-2014.The result of the study serves as the basis for designing a proposed education or training program in enhancing the workplace performance of Hotel and Restaurant Management Students. The study surveyed 35 practicum students and 23 supervisors in different hospitality establishments in Iloilo City using survey questionnaire based from Competency Standards for hospitality related courses of the Commission on Higher Education (CHED Memorandum Order No.30 series of 2006. Findings revealed that both supervisor and student respondents agreed on the satisfactory performance of the interns in terms of Higher Order Thinking Skills and very satisfactory rating on Personal Qualities . With regard to the Basic Skills (e.g., numerical computation, oral and written communications, the students rated themselves Very Satisfactory while supervisors gave a Satisfactory rating. The same Very Satisfactory performance rating was achieved on Professional Competencies by both respondents. Of the five common competencies, Interpersonal and Technological skills of the interns were rated very satisfactory by both respondents on Interpersonal Skills and on Technological Skills. Also the same satisfactory rating was given on Information skills by both the supervisor and interns. Whereas for the Resources Skills, the interns rated themselves Very Satisfactory rating while the supervisors rated them Satisfactory. It is recommended to continue the review and upgrade industry training in the curriculum and consistently redefine the curricular focus to meet the

  16. Managing childhood obesity: when lifestyle change is not enough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearnshaw, C; Matyka, K

    2010-11-01

    The management of childhood obesity is a clinical dilemma. Paediatricians will see those children whose weight is at the severe end of the spectrum with obesity-related co-morbidities and for whom more intensive weight loss therapies may be appropriate. A literature review was performed (January 1995-January 2010) of the roles of pharmacotherapy or bariatric surgery in the management of childhood obesity. Three hundred and eighty-three abstracts were reviewed and 76 full-text articles were requested. Of these, 34 were excluded and a total of 21 pharmacotherapy papers and 22 papers on surgery were reviewed in detail. All studies involved adolescents. Pharmacotherapy: Most studies were small and of short duration, the notable exceptions being two large RCTs of sibutramine and orlistat. Sibutramine led to a mean estimated change in BMI from baseline of -3.1 kg/m(2) vs. -0.3 kg/m(2) for placebo over 12 months. Orlistat was also beneficial with a mean reduction in BMI of 0.55 vs. an increase of 0.31 kg/m(2) in the placebo group at 12 months. Bariatric surgery: Most papers presented clinical observations and there were no randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Robust selection criteria were not used and ideal candidate selection remains unclear. Most papers showed a significant benefit of surgery in severely obese adolescents in the short term but long-term data were sparse. There were a surprisingly large number of papers examining the benefits of intensive weight management in obese adolescents. The study design of many was inadequate and the role of pharmacotherapy or surgery in childhood obesity remains unclear. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. To Be or Not to Be (Stressed): The Critical Role of a Psychologically Healthy Workplace in Effective Stress Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grawitch, Matthew J; Ballard, David W; Erb, Kaitlyn R

    2015-10-01

    This article explains how key practices pertaining to the psychologically healthy workplace can be used to develop a comprehensive approach to stress management in contemporary organizations. Specifically, we demonstrate the ways in which employee involvement, recognition, work-life balance, health and safety, and growth and development practices can be used to assist in the reduction of work stress and the proactive management of strain. Although many organizations strive to establish a positive environment conducive to work and well-being, identifying where to begin can often seem like a daunting task. Currently, many stress management efforts emphasize individual-level interventions that are simply implemented alongside existing organizational practices. We propose that a broader perspective allows for a better understanding of the stress process, resulting in the ability to consider a wider range of changes to organizational processes. Combining knowledge regarding psychologically healthy workplace practices, stress management intervention levels and the personal resource allocation framework, we present a comprehensive framework for approaching workplace stress management, which can be tailored to the unique needs of various organizations, departments and employees. By adopting this broader perspective, we believe organizations can more strategically address employee stress, resulting in more effective stress management and a profound impact on stress-related outcomes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Dietary management for older subjects with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernoff, Ronni

    2005-11-01

    In recent years, obesity has been recognized as a form of malnutrition in older adults and a continuing risk factor for serious health problems. Weight reduction in older adults is not as reliable a recommendation as it is for younger adults; a decreased body mass index (BMI) seems to be associated with a higher incidence of stroke, and a normal or slightly elevated BMI has been linked to greater reserve capacity. Weight loss in older adults requires strategies that consider health status, functional ability, and rational targets. Strategies may include behavior modification, dietary alterations, exercise or physical activity, and reasonable goals that do not put the individual at nutritional risk. Studies that examine different approaches to weight reduction rarely include older subjects, so it is difficult to make judgments about various interventions (surgery, exercise, drugs, or diet) and their efficacy in this population. Fad diets may be lacking in essential nutrients and may prove to be risky for elderly people. Weight loss programs for older adults should focus on maintaining adequate intake of essential nutrients while reducing calories by controlling dietary fat intake.

  19. Nutritional Management of Overweight and Obesity in Dogs and Cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorana Teodora MATEI

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Some of the most common nutritional disorders are overweight and obesity, a proportion of approximately 59% of dogs and cats being affected. A permanent challenge for vets is weight management, including the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity. Corporeal score and body-weight loss in dogs and cats have been monitored by feeding various diets. The study was conducted on a total of 10 animals (6 dogs and 4 cats, monitoring the effect of three types of food for dogs and two types for cats suffering from overweight and obesity.  Cooked food, dry food diet and premium dry food were investigated. We determined the quality and gross chemical composition of food and we measured corporeal score, weekly weight loss percentage and the number of calories consumed daily. We also appreciated the quality of life and activity level of the animals at the beginning and at the end of the trial. Nutritional management of investigated diets for overweight and obesity in dogs and cats revealed that through the smallest caloric restriction, dry food diet presented the highest efficiency, dogs and cats loosing weight steadily without losing muscle mass. Although the satiety effect occurs when the animals reach their ideal weight, the Rebound effect was not present.

  20. Implementing information technology to improve workplace health: a web-based information needs assessment of managers in Fraser Health, British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Jag S; Anderson, Keith; Keen, Dave; Yassi, Annalee

    2005-01-01

    A web-based questionnaire-survey was administered primarily to determine what information is useful to managers in Fraser Health, of British Columbia to support decision-making for workplace health and safety. The results indicated that managers prefer electronic quarterly reports, with targets, goals, and historical trends rated as "very important." Over 85.7% "agree" that if information was readily available in the "most beneficial" format, they would be able to improve workplace health. Recommendations include that managers be presented with clear and concise workplace health reports that facilitate analysis for decision-making.

  1. Making the "new American workplace" safe and healthy: a joint labor-management-researcher approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurman, S J

    1996-04-01

    The American workplace is now in the midst of the most significant change since the advent of mass production. Whether these changes will lead to improvements in worker health and safety is not clear. This paper describes an approach to intervention and research-participatory action research (PAR)-that has the potential to redesign work organizations to improve performance while also improving health and safety. In the PAR method, researchers, managers, workers, and unions collaborate in a process of data-guided problem solving intended both to improve the system's performance and to contribute to general scientific knowledge. A case study example illustrates the use of a PAR approach in an automobile parts facility where labor, management, and researchers jointly conducted a longitudinal project aimed at reducing the major sources of stress and enhancing employee well-being. Results from the 6 year project suggest that, properly implemented, PAR has the potential to both lead to improved intervention and contribute to theoretical advances in occupational safety and health. The PAR approach to intervention research is contrasted with the total quality approach (TQA), and some suggestions are made for improving PAR research designs.

  2. Associations between the workplace-effort in psychosocial risk management and the employee-rating of the psychosocial work environment - a multilevel study of 7565 employees in 1013 workplaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Sannie Vester; Madsen, Ida Elisabeth Huitfeldt; Flyvholm, Mari-Ann; Hasle, Peter

    2017-07-01

    This study examined the association between the workplace-effort in psychosocial risk management and later employee-rating of the psychosocial work environment. The study is based on data from two questionnaire surveys - one including 1013 workplaces and one including 7565 employees from these workplaces. The association was analyzed using multi-level linear regression. The association for five different trade-groups and for five different psychosocial work environment domains was examined. Limited but statistically significant better employee-ratings of the psychosocial work environment in the respective domains were observed among Danish workplaces that prioritized "development possibilities for employees," "recognition of employees," "employees influence on own work tasks," good "communication at the workplace," and "help to prevent work overload." Danish workplaces with a high effort in psychosocial risk management in the preceding year had a small but significantly more positive rating of the psychosocial work environment by the employees. However, future studies are needed to establish the causality of the associations.

  3. Associations between the workplace-effort in psychosocial risk management and the employee-rating of the psychosocial work environment – a multilevel study of 7565 employees in 1013 workplaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Sannie Vester; Madsen, Ida Elisabeth Huitfeldt; Flyvholm, Mari-Ann; Hasle, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Aims: This study examined the association between the workplace-effort in psychosocial risk management and later employee-rating of the psychosocial work environment. Method: The study is based on data from two questionnaire surveys – one including 1013 workplaces and one including 7565 employees from these workplaces. The association was analyzed using multi-level linear regression. The association for five different trade-groups and for five different psychosocial work environment domains was examined. Results: Limited but statistically significant better employee-ratings of the psychosocial work environment in the respective domains were observed among Danish workplaces that prioritized “development possibilities for employees,” “recognition of employees,” “employees influence on own work tasks,” good “communication at the workplace,” and “help to prevent work overload.” Conclusion: Danish workplaces with a high effort in psychosocial risk management in the preceding year had a small but significantly more positive rating of the psychosocial work environment by the employees. However, future studies are needed to establish the causality of the associations. PMID:28393650

  4. Obesity Management in Europe: Current Status and Objectives for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uerlich, Magdalena F; Yumuk, Volkan; Finer, Nick; Basdevant, Arnaud; Visscher, Tommy L S

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at assessing the status of obesity management in the European region and identifying future goals and objectives of professionals working in the field of obesity. Presidents of all 31 EASO-affiliated (EASO = European Association for the Study of Obesity) national associations for the study of obesity were asked to invite 5 obesity experts from their country to participate in a survey. A total of 74 obesity professionals out of 23 countries participated. Questions addressed the development of guidelines, the status of obesity management, and goals and objectives for the future in obesity management. Further, EASO's three vice-presidents participated in in-depth, semi-structured interviews, in which they were asked to provide their reflection on the survey data. Most countries define obesity as a clinical and chronic disease, but various differences in obesity management standards exist across Europe. Existing guidelines mainly focus on the acute treatment of obesity rather than on long-term approaches. Multidisciplinary approaches for obesity management and the collaboration between general practitioners and hospitals as well as between professionals at the local level and networks of obesity management centers need to be improved across Europe. Good practices and evidence are available. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  5. Obesity Management in Europe: Current Status and Objectives for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uerlich, Magdalena F.; Yumuk, Volkan; Finer, Nick; Basdevant, Arnaud; Visscher, Tommy L.S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aims at assessing the status of obesity management in the European region and identifying future goals and objectives of professionals working in the field of obesity. Methods Presidents of all 31 EASO-affiliated (EASO = European Association for the Study of Obesity) national associations for the study of obesity were asked to invite 5 obesity experts from their country to participate in a survey. A total of 74 obesity professionals out of 23 countries participated. Questions addressed the development of guidelines, the status of obesity management, and goals and objectives for the future in obesity management. Further, EASO's three vice-presidents participated in in-depth, semi-structured interviews, in which they were asked to provide their reflection on the survey data. Results Most countries define obesity as a clinical and chronic disease, but various differences in obesity management standards exist across Europe. Existing guidelines mainly focus on the acute treatment of obesity rather than on long-term approaches. Conclusion Multidisciplinary approaches for obesity management and the collaboration between general practitioners and hospitals as well as between professionals at the local level and networks of obesity management centers need to be improved across Europe. Good practices and evidence are available. PMID:27553443

  6. Obesity Management in Europe: Current Status and Objectives for the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena F. Uerlich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims at assessing the status of obesity management in the European region and identifying future goals and objectives of professionals working in the field of obesity. Methods: Presidents of all 31 EASO-affiliated (EASO = European Association for the Study of Obesity national associations for the study of obesity were asked to invite 5 obesity experts from their country to participate in a survey. A total of 74 obesity professionals out of 23 countries participated. Questions addressed the development of guidelines, the status of obesity management, and goals and objectives for the future in obesity management. Further, EASO's three vice-presidents participated in in-depth, semi-structured interviews, in which they were asked to provide their reflection on the survey data. Results: Most countries define obesity as a clinical and chronic disease, but various differences in obesity management standards exist across Europe. Existing guidelines mainly focus on the acute treatment of obesity rather than on long-term approaches. Conclusion: Multidisciplinary approaches for obesity management and the collaboration between general practitioners and hospitals as well as between professionals at the local level and networks of obesity management centers need to be improved across Europe. Good practices and evidence are available.

  7. Weight Management in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes and Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottalib, Adham; Kasetty, Megan; Mar, Jessica Y; Elseaidy, Taha; Ashrafzadeh, Sahar; Hamdy, Osama

    2017-08-23

    Patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are typically viewed as lean individuals. However, recent reports showed that their obesity rate surpassed that of the general population. Patients with T1D who show clinical signs of type 2 diabetes such as obesity and insulin resistance are considered to have "double diabetes." This review explains the mechanisms of weight gain in patients with T1D and how to manage it. Weight management in T1D can be successfully achieved in real-world clinical practice. Nutrition therapy includes reducing energy intake and providing a structured nutrition plan that is lower in carbohydrates and glycemic index and higher in fiber and lean protein. The exercise plan should include combination stretching as well as aerobic and resistance exercises to maintain muscle mass. Dynamic adjustment of insulin doses is necessary during weight management. Addition of anti-obesity medications may be considered. If medical weight reduction is not achieved, bariatric surgery may also be considered.

  8. Guidelines for dietary management of menopausal women with simple obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Brończyk-Puzoń

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of obesity affects all age groups. It is also observed among menopausal women. Menopause is the time in a woman’s life when, as a consequence of hormonal changes occurring in the body, the risk of overweight and obesity increases significantly and, therefore, so does the risk of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Excess body weight in menopausal women may also be of social and psychological importance since the occurring symptoms may considerably decrease quality of life and sexual activity of these women. Reduction of body weight in obese menopausal women should play a vital role in treatment of this group of patients. Therefore, adequate management seems to be essential, and it should involve dietary, pharmacological and/or surgical treatment, depending on the patient’s needs. Following a rational weight loss plan provided by a dietician under medical supervision may contribute to improvement of the health condition and quality of life. It is recommended to observe the guidelines on dietary management described in this article by adjusting a diet plan individually. The following work constitutes a review of articles from 2004-2014 which are available in the PubMed medical knowledge base and the Polish Medical Bibliography (Polska Bibliografia Lekarska. For this purpose, the following controlled vocabulary has been used: menopausal woman, menopausal diet, menopausal weight gain, menopausal weight loss, dietary management in menopause.

  9. Tackling obesity: the challenge of obesity management for practice nurses in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katie; Wood, Fiona; Kinnersley, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Nurses in primary care, who see a large proportion of the population, are well placed to discuss weight with patients and offer management advice. Interventions to promote weight loss have shown that there are effective ways of making small changes for patients. To use qualitative semi-structured interviews to explore how practice nurses manage obesity within primary care and to identify good practice and explore barriers to achieving effective management. Eighteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with practice nurses within two local health board areas in South Wales. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed qualitatively using a thematic approach. Nurses described two roles. One role was providing obesity management to patients who had co-morbid conditions and were seen regularly in chronic disease clinics. All nurses perceived that these patients needed their weight addressing routinely. The other role was to broach the subject with overweight but healthy patients. Nurses were of divided opinion whether to address obesity with these patients and what primary care had to offer. Weight management advice, when given, lacked consistency of approach. Broaching the subject of weight opportunistically with healthy but overweight patients may require a deeper appreciation of their motivations for change and discussion beyond future health risks. These patients also need clearer follow up to monitor their progress with weight loss. All overweight patients also need clearer guidance tailored to their own particular circumstances as to how to lose weight. For patients being counselled about their weight, interventions that promote consistency of advice are advocated to improve care.

  10. Nutritional approaches for managing obesity-associated metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botchlett, Rachel; Woo, Shih-Lung; Liu, Mengyang; Pei, Ya; Guo, Xin; Li, Honggui; Wu, Chaodong

    2017-06-01

    Obesity is an ongoing pandemic and serves as a causal factor of a wide spectrum of metabolic diseases including diabetes, fatty liver disease, and cardiovascular disease. Much evidence has demonstrated that nutrient overload/overnutrition initiates or exacerbates inflammatory responses in tissues/organs involved in the regulation of systemic metabolic homeostasis. This obesity-associated inflammation is usually at a low-grade and viewed as metabolic inflammation. When it exists continuously, inflammation inappropriately alters metabolic pathways and impairs insulin signaling cascades in peripheral tissues/organs such as adipose tissue, the liver and skeletal muscles, resulting in local fat deposition and insulin resistance and systemic metabolic dysregulation. In addition, inflammatory mediators, e.g., proinflammatory cytokines, and excessive nutrients, e.g., glucose and fatty acids, act together to aggravate local insulin resistance and form a vicious cycle to further disturb the local metabolic pathways and exacerbate systemic metabolic dysregulation. Owing to the critical role of nutrient metabolism in controlling the initiation and progression of inflammation and insulin resistance, nutritional approaches have been implicated as effective tools for managing obesity and obesity-associated metabolic diseases. Based on the mounting evidence generated from both basic and clinical research, nutritional approaches are commonly used for suppressing inflammation, improving insulin sensitivity, and/or decreasing fat deposition. Consequently, the combined effects are responsible for improvement of systemic insulin sensitivity and metabolic homeostasis. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  11. Parent Involvement Intervention in Developing Weight Management Skills for both Parents and Overweight/Obese Children

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hee Soon; Park, Jiyoung; Park, Kye-yeong; Lee, Myung-Nam; Ham, Ok Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to evaluate a parent involvement intervention for childhood obesity intended to increase parents' skills in managing children's weight-related behavior and to improve child-parent relationships. Many studies reported on parental influence on childhood obesity, emphasizing parent involvement in prevention and management of childhood obesity. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted. Forty-two parents of overweight/obese children were recruit...

  12. The Lucent-Takes-Heart cardiovascular health management program. Successful workplace screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guico-Pabia, Christine J; Cioffi, Laura; Shoner, Lawrence G

    2002-08-01

    This prospective, pre- and post-evaluation of a worksite cardiovascular health management program consisted of employee education, measurement of cardiovascular risk factors, and onsite individual counseling for all employees, along with follow up screening for high risk participants. Of 1,099 employees (16.4% of those eligible) who participated in the initial screening, 596 (54.2%) were classified as high risk. A total of 167 (28.0%) high risk participants completed the 6 month follow up screening. Most high risk participants in the 6 month follow up screening reported they had increased their exercise (64.7%), improved their diet (71.3%), and visited a physician (61.7%). A minority of the participants (16.8%) began new cardiovascular medications, and 2.4% were diagnosed with diabetes. In addition, there were statistically significant decreases in the percentages of participants with elevated systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and total cholesterol to high density lipoprotein ratio. Almost all (99.7%) of the 909 participants (82.7% of all participants) who completed the satisfaction survey were satisfied or very satisfied with the overall program. Screening in the workplace can identify individuals at high risk for cardiovascular disease. In this study, more than half of the participants were classified as high risk. Most high risk individuals who attended the 6 month follow up screening had improved their cardiovascular health, but attrition remains a challenge for worksite programs.

  13. Turn It Off: An action research study of top management influence on energy conservation in the workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally V Russell

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of an intervention study that aimed to encourage workplace energy conservation behavior by office-based employees. Taking a co-production approach we worked with the participating organization to design and implement an intervention that used the influence of top management commitment and prompts to encourage workplace energy reduction. Whilst past research has shown top management is related to workplace pro-environmental behavior, this study extends this work by examining a field-based intervention over a longitudinal period. The efficacy of the intervention was measured using observational and self-reported data over a period of six months. Results showed that there were significant changes in objective and self-reported energy conservation behavior, perceived top management commitment, organizational culture, norms, and knowledge regarding energy conservation behavior over the course of the study. The findings also demonstrated that the intervention was most successful for those behaviors where employees have individual responsibility. Implications for future research and practice are discussed.

  14. Alcohol and drug use in the workplace : managing the human factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKibbon, D. [Kelly Luttmer and Associates Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    The importance of implementing comprehensive drug and alcohol policies in the workplace was discussed with particular emphasis on the procedures which are needed to ensure that employers meet due diligence requirements regarding alcoholism and drug abuse. A study of workplace substance abuse issues in Alberta revealed that 80 per cent of the Alberta workforce uses alcohol, 27 per cent use cold medication, and 6.5 per cent use illicit drugs. The impact of drug and alcohol use in the workplace was also reviewed. Under the Canadian human rights legislation an employer cannot terminate an employee for having a medical illness including alcoholism or drug addiction. The issue of drug testing and when to drug screen was also discussed. It was suggested that addressing substance abuse in the workplace through policy procedures and practices can reduce costs related to lost productivity, absenteeism, workers` compensation claims, staff turnover, health benefit premiums and legal liabilities. 3 refs.

  15. Constant negotiating: managing work-related musculoskeletal disorders while remaining at the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Young, Joanne; Solberg, Shirley; Gaudine, Alice

    2014-02-01

    We used grounded theory to explore processes and strategies used by workers affected by work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) while they remained in the workplace, and we developed a theory to describe the overall process. Participants included 25 workers affected by WMSDs who were currently employed in various workplaces in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. The theoretical model has five main phases: (a) becoming concerned, (b) getting medical help, (c) dealing with the workplace, (d) making adjustments to lifestyle, and (e) taking charge, each with separate subphases. Constant negotiating was the core variable that explained the overall process, with workers engaged in negotiations with others in occupational, health, and social contexts. Using a two-dimensional figure, we illustrate the negotiation strategies workers used. We discuss implications for health care, workplaces, education, and research for creating a culture of understanding and respect for injured workers who wish to remain working after developing WMSDs.

  16. A management framework for training providers to improve skills development in the workplace

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    D.Ed. A skills revolution was launched in the South African workplace by the Department of Labour in 1998. Various skills development legislation were introduced to meet international standards, redress skills imbalances, curb skills shortages and improve the general skills in the current workforce. Training providers were the drivers of workplace training, yet are now displaced by skills authorities, such as the SET As, the ETQAs and SAQA. While the custody of skills development is placed...

  17. From Wounded Warrior To Civilian Employee: A Workplace Reference Guide For Managers And Supervisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    workplace flexibility strategies such as telework , flexi-place, and flextime, including the availability of these flexibilities for people requiring...could include but are not limited to telework , temporary light duty assignments, and job reassignment. 11Model Strategies for Recruitment and Hiring...this information. 12 Telework  The Federal government is a leader in the use of innovative workplace flexibilities, including telework . Flexible

  18. The technology boom: a new era in obesity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, L Anne; Duhé, Abby F; Frost, Elizabeth A; Redman, Leanne M

    2014-05-01

    As technology continues to develop rapidly, the incidence of obesity also continues to climb at an alarming rate. The increase in available technology is thought to be a contributor in the obesogenic environment, yet at the same time technology can also be used to intervene and improve health and health behaviors. This article reviews the components of effective weight management programs and the novel role that technology, such as SMS, websites, and smartphone apps, is playing to improve the success of such programs. Use of these modern technologies can now allow for individualized treatment recommendations to be delivered to individuals remotely, increased self-monitoring/tracking of health-related data, broader and more rapid dissemination of health information/recommendations, and increased patient-dietician/physician contact. The use of technology in weight management programs results in improved long-term weight management, and in most cases improved cost-effectiveness. Rather than blaming increased food intake and sedentary lifestyle on technology, rapidly developing and innovative technologies should be used to our advantage and deployed to combat the obesity epidemic. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  19. Naltrexone ER/Bupropion ER: A Review in Obesity Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, Sarah L; Keating, Gillian M

    2015-07-01

    Oral naltrexone extended-release/bupropion extended-release (naltrexone ER/bupropion ER; Contrave(®), Mysimba(™)) is available as an adjunct to a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity in adults with an initial body mass index (BMI) of ≥ 30 kg/m(2) (i.e. obese) or a BMI of ≥ 27 kg/m(2) (i.e. overweight) in the presence of at least one bodyweight-related comorbidity, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension or dyslipidaemia. In 56-week phase III trials in these patient populations, oral naltrexone ER/bupropion ER 32/360 mg/day was significantly more effective than placebo with regard to percentage bodyweight reductions from baseline and the proportion of patients who achieved bodyweight reductions of ≥ 5 and ≥ 10%. Significantly greater improvements in several cardiometabolic risk factors were also observed with naltrexone ER/bupropion ER versus placebo, as well as greater improvements in glycated haemoglobin levels in obese or overweight adults with type 2 diabetes. Naltrexone ER/bupropion ER was generally well tolerated in phase III trials, with nausea being the most common adverse event. Thus, naltrexone ER/bupropion ER 32/360 mg/day as an adjunct to a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity, is an effective and well tolerated option for chronic bodyweight management in obese adults or overweight adults with at least one bodyweight-related comorbidity.

  20. Relationships between obesity management and depression management in a university-based family medicine center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Emily R; Theeke, Laurie; Minchau, Elizabeth; Mallow, Jennifer; Lucke-Wold, Noelle; Wampler, Jason

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe and examine relationships among sociodemographics, obesity, and depression management in Appalachian adults. This study was conducted in a primary care center and used a cross-sectional, quantitative, nonexperimental descriptive, and predictive design. Data were obtained from a random sample of 240 adult records that were stratified by gender. Analysis included exploration of all variables for descriptive information followed by bivariate analyses to determine significant relationships between variables, and regression analysis using variables with significant relation to obesity and depression management. Obesity was prevalent (48%) though less than 1% had documented diagnosis. Over 98% of the 65 participants diagnosed with depression did not have documentation of use of a depression screening tool. Diagnosis of depression correlated significantly with elevated body mass index (BMI) and diagnosis of obesity. Gender bias was evident with males having more documentation of weight-loss discussions and planning, and women receiving more referrals to behavioral health for counseling. Innovations to enhance the diagnosis of obesity could lead to consistent provider-led management. Implementation studies of valid depression screening tools in the electronic medical record could enhance the identification of depressive symptoms and could promote health equity. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  1. A qualitative evidence synthesis on the management of male obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Daryll; Douglas, Flora; Hoddinott, Pat; van Teijlingen, Edwin; Stewart, Fiona; Robertson, Clare; Boyers, Dwayne; Avenell, Alison

    2015-10-12

    To investigate what weight management interventions work for men, with which men, and under what circumstances. Realist synthesis of qualitative studies. Sensitive searches of 11 electronic databases from 1990 to 2012 supplemented by grey literature searches. Studies published between 1990 and 2012 reporting qualitative research with obese men, or obese men in contrast to obese women and lifestyle or drug weight management were included. The studies included men aged 16 years or over, with no upper age limit, with a mean or median body mass index of 30 kg/m(2) in all settings. 22 studies were identified, including 5 qualitative studies linked to randomised controlled trials of weight maintenance interventions and 8 qualitative studies linked to non-randomised intervention studies, and 9 relevant UK-based qualitative studies not linked to any intervention. Health concerns and the perception that certain programmes had 'worked' for other men were the key factors that motivated men to engage with weight management programmes. Barriers to engagement and adherence with programmes included: men not problematising their weight until labelled 'obese'; a lack of support for new food choices by friends and family, and reluctance to undertake extreme dieting. Retaining some autonomy over what is eaten; flexibility about treats and alcohol, and a focus on physical activity were attractive features of programmes. Group interventions, humour and social support facilitated attendance and adherence. Men were motivated to attend programmes in settings that were convenient, non-threatening and congruent with their masculine identities, but men were seldom involved in programme design. Men's perspectives and preferences within the wider context of family, work and pleasure should be sought when designing weight management services. Qualitative research is needed with men to inform all aspects of intervention design, including the setting, optimal recruitment processes and

  2. "If You Don't Do Parking Management .. Forget Your Behaviour Change, It's Not Going to Work.": Health and Transport Practitioner Perspectives on Workplace Active Travel Promotion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Petrunoff

    Full Text Available After having conducted two studies of the effectiveness of workplace travel plans for promoting active travel, we investigated health and transport practitioners' perspectives on implementing workplace travel plans to share some of the lessons learnt. The objectives of this study were to describe perceived elements of effective workplace travel plans, barriers and enablers to workplace travel planning, their experiences of working with the other profession on travel plan implementation, their recommendations for workplace travel planning, and also to explore similarities and differences in transport and health practitioner perspectives.Fourteen health and ten transport practitioners who had prior involvement in workplace travel plan programs were purposefully selected from workplaces in Australia. We conducted 20 in-depth interviews since data saturation had been reached at this point, and data were subject to framework analysis.Perceived essential elements of effective workplace travel plans included parking management; leadership, organisational commitment and governance; skills and other resources like a dedicated travel plan coordinator; and, pre-conditions including supportive transport infrastructure in the surrounds. Recommendations for promoting travel plans included supportive government policy, focusing on business benefits and working at different scales of implementation (e.g. single large worksites and business precincts. Health and transport practitioner perspectives differed, with transport practitioners believing that parking management is the key action for managing travel demand at a worksite.Health practitioners implementing travel plans may require training including concepts of travel demand management, and support from transport planners on parking management strategies. Promoting an understanding of the shared travel behaviour change skills of transport and health practitioners may assist further collaboration. For take

  3. "If You Don't Do Parking Management .. Forget Your Behaviour Change, It's Not Going to Work.": Health and Transport Practitioner Perspectives on Workplace Active Travel Promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrunoff, Nick; Rissel, Chris; Wen, Li Ming

    2017-01-01

    After having conducted two studies of the effectiveness of workplace travel plans for promoting active travel, we investigated health and transport practitioners' perspectives on implementing workplace travel plans to share some of the lessons learnt. The objectives of this study were to describe perceived elements of effective workplace travel plans, barriers and enablers to workplace travel planning, their experiences of working with the other profession on travel plan implementation, their recommendations for workplace travel planning, and also to explore similarities and differences in transport and health practitioner perspectives. Fourteen health and ten transport practitioners who had prior involvement in workplace travel plan programs were purposefully selected from workplaces in Australia. We conducted 20 in-depth interviews since data saturation had been reached at this point, and data were subject to framework analysis. Perceived essential elements of effective workplace travel plans included parking management; leadership, organisational commitment and governance; skills and other resources like a dedicated travel plan coordinator; and, pre-conditions including supportive transport infrastructure in the surrounds. Recommendations for promoting travel plans included supportive government policy, focusing on business benefits and working at different scales of implementation (e.g. single large worksites and business precincts). Health and transport practitioner perspectives differed, with transport practitioners believing that parking management is the key action for managing travel demand at a worksite. Health practitioners implementing travel plans may require training including concepts of travel demand management, and support from transport planners on parking management strategies. Promoting an understanding of the shared travel behaviour change skills of transport and health practitioners may assist further collaboration. For take-up by

  4. Childhood obesity and insulin resistance: how should it be managed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Mandy; Garnett, Sarah P; Baur, Louise A

    2014-12-01

    Concomitant with the rise in global pediatric obesity in the past decades, there has been a significant increase in the number of children and adolescents with clinical signs of insulin resistance. Given insulin resistance is the important link between obesity and the associated metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular risk, clinicians should be aware of high risk groups and treatment options. As there is no universally accepted biochemical definition of insulin resistance in children and adolescents, identification and diagnosis of insulin resistance usually relies on clinical features such as acanthosis nigricans, polycystic ovary syndrome, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Treatment for reducing insulin resistance and other obesity-associated comorbidities should focus on changes in health behaviors to achieve effective weight management. Lifestyle interventions incorporating dietary change, increased physical activity, and decreased sedentary behaviors, with the involvement of family and adoption of a developmentally appropriate approach, should be used as the first line treatment. Current evidence suggests that the primary objective of dietary interventions should be to reduce total energy intake and a combination of aerobic and resistance training should be encouraged. Metformin can be used in conjunction with a lifestyle intervention program in obese adolescents with clinical insulin resistance to achieve weight loss and to improve insulin sensitivity. Ongoing evaluation and research are required to explore optimal protocol and long-term effectiveness of lifestyle interventions, as well as to determine whether the improvements in insulin sensitivity induced by lifestyle interventions and weight loss will lead to a clinical benefit including reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  5. Managing overweight and obesity in adults to reduce cardiovascular disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbert, Jon O; Elrashidi, Muhamad Y; Jensen, Michael D

    2014-10-01

    Obesity is a leading preventable cause of death and disability worldwide. Obesity increases the risk for clinically identifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) as well as a host of other metabolic, sleep, and orthopedic disorders. Coordinated and systematic interventions are needed to manage obesity and reduce these risks. The Obesity 2 Expert Panel updated the previous guidelines and produced the "Guideline for the Management of Overweight and Obesity in Adults." The Panel used data from publications from years 1999 to 2011 to address five critical questions, provide evidence statements, and recommend creation of a treatment algorithm to guide decision making about clinical care. The current review discusses the evidence statements pertaining to CVD risk in the assessment and management of patients who are overweight and obese. We summarize the FDA-approved medications for the treatment of overweight and obesity and their impact on CVD risk and risk factors, as well as ongoing clinical trials which will further inform clinical practice.

  6. Cardiovascular and Metabolic Complications - Diagnosis and Management in Obese Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikram, Naval K

    2017-12-08

    The world at present is facing a burden of rising prevalence of obesity in children and adolescents. The developing countries are particularly facing the dual burden on under-nutrition and obesity. This is associated with appearance and clustering of cardiometabolic abnormalities at an early age with development of chronic complications early and possible decrease in life span of these children and adolescents. In adults this clustering has been termed as 'metabolic syndrome' with definitions that can be used universally. However, in children and adolescents there is no consensus on a uniform definition of metabolic syndrome that can be applicable across the age groups and various ethnicities. Further, as childhood is a period of growth and development, changes in body composition and insulin sensitivity that occur with puberty may influence the thresholds of components used to define metabolic syndrome. Children of South Asian ethnicity appear to be more predisposed to develop abnormalities of metabolic syndrome, possible due to their adverse body fat patterning and genetic influences. The definition of pediatric metabolic syndrome proposed by International Diabetes Federation is useful across different ethnicities. Presence of at least one component of metabolic syndrome should lead to detailed screening for other components and complications. A multimodality approach including therapeutic lifestyle changes targeted at the individual, family and community is essential for management. Pharmacotherapy for individual components may be required if initial management strategies fail to achieve the goals.

  7. Occupational management in the workplace and impact on injury claims, duration, and cost: a prospective longitudinal cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemstra ME

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mark E Lemstra Alliance Health Medical Clinic, Moose Jaw, SK, Canada Abstract: Few workplaces have prospectively reviewed workplace and worker issues simultaneously and assessed their impact on Workers’ Compensation Board (WCB claims. In January of 2014, each worker in a large workplace in Saskatchewan, Canada, was prospectively followed for 1 year to determine factors that impact injury claim incidence, recovery, and costs. In total, 207 out of 245 workers agreed to complete the baseline survey (84.5%. In 2014, 82.5% of workers had self-reported pain, but only 35.5% submitted a WCB claim. Binary logistic regression was used to compare those with pain who did not submit a WCB injury claim to those with pain who did initiate a WCB claim. Independent risk factors associated with WCB claim incidence included depressed mood (odds ratio [OR] =2.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44–9.78 and lower job satisfaction (OR =1.70, 95% CI 1.08–10.68. Higher disability duration was independently associated with higher depressed mood (OR =1.60, 95% CI 1.05–4.11 and poor recovery expectation (OR =1.31, 95% CI 1.01–5.78. Higher cost disability claims were independently associated with higher depressed mood (OR =1.51, 95% CI 1.07–6.87 and pain catastrophizing (OR =1.11, 95% CI 1.02–8.11. Self-reported pain, physically assessed injury severity, and measured ergonomic risk of workstation did not significantly predict injury claim incidence, duration, or costs. In January 2015, the workplace implemented a new occupational prevention and management program. The injury incidence rate ratio reduced by 58% from 2014 to 2015 (IRR =1.58, 95% CI =1.28–1.94. The ratio for disability duration reduced by 139% from 2014 to 2015 (RR =2.39, 95% CI =2.16–2.63. Costs reduced from $114,149.07 to $56,528.14 per year. In summary, WCB claims are complex. Recognizing that nonphysical factors, such as depressed mood, influence injury claim incidence, recovery, and

  8. Drug mechanisms to help in managing resistant hypertension in obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. Jansen (Pieter); A.H.J. Danser (Jan); W. Spiering (Wilko); A.H. van den Meiracker (Anton)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObesity is a major risk factor for the development of hypertension. Because the prevalence of obesity is increasing worldwide, the prevalence of obesity hypertension is also increasing. Importantly, hypertension in obesity is commonly complicated by dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes

  9. Criteria for EASO-collaborating centres for obesity management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsigos, Constantine; Hainer, Vojtech; Basdevant, Arnaud; Finer, Nick; Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth; Micic, Dragan; Maislos, Maximo; Roman, Gabriela; Schutz, Yves; Toplak, Hermann; Yumuk, Volkan; Zahorska-Markiewicz, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is recognised as a global epidemic and the most prevalent metabolic disease world-wide. Specialised obesity services, however, are not widely available in Europe, and obesity care can vary enormously across European regions. The European Association for the Study of Obesity (EASO,

  10. A Case Study to Explore the Impact of Knowledge Management Systems on Workplace Diversity Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The ongoing debate over the definition and application of workplace diversity policies results in a wide range of viewpoints. There are a number of theoreticians who feel that if diversity is more than avoidance of discrimination, that the traditional body of anti-discrimination programs such as the Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) efforts…

  11. Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty (the Apollo method): a new approach to obesity management

    OpenAIRE

    Gontrand López-Nava-Breviere; Inmaculada Bautista-Castaño; Juan Pedro Fernández-Corbelle; Marta Trell

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many obese patients cannot lose weight or reject conventional obesity management. Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty (the Apollo method) is a pioneering coadjuvant, interventionist technique for the integral management of obesity. Objectives: The goals of this study were to report safety and efficacy results obtained at 6 months in patients undergoing endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty. Material and methods: A prospective study was performed in 55 patients (13 males, 42 females) who were ...

  12. Drug Mechanisms to Help in Managing Resistant Hypertension in Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen, Pieter; Danser, Jan; Spiering, Wilko; Meiracker, Anton

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObesity is a major risk factor for the development of hypertension. Because the prevalence of obesity is increasing worldwide, the prevalence of obesity hypertension is also increasing. Importantly, hypertension in obesity is commonly complicated by dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus and hence imposes a high cardiovascular disease risk. Furthermore, obesity is strongly associated with resistant hypertension. Activation of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiote...

  13. The prevalence and nature of sexual harassment in the workplace: A model for early identification and effective management thereof

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ramsaroop

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the prevalence and nature of sexual harassment and, assesses the impact of supervisory relations, levels of interaction, appearance and personality and types of behaviour. The study was undertaken at a tertiary institution using a sample of 74 employees, drawn by means of simple random sampling. Data was collected using a self-developed questionnaire, which was statistically tested and, analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The results indicate that the sub-dimensions of the study impact significantly on sexual harassment. Based on the findings, a model for early identification and effective management of sexual harassment in the workplace was generated.

  14. The role of disease management in the treatment and prevention of obesity with associated comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Jeanette; Buckman, Ellen

    2007-06-01

    Nearly two thirds of the US population is overweight or obese and those numbers are climbing. Many organizations are beginning to recognize overweight and obesity as severe health threats and to acknowledge that treatment can serve as an important first step in addressing this epidemic. Through its Obesity with Co-morbidities Initiative, the Disease Management Association of America (DMAA) seeks to raise awareness and improve understanding of the role disease management (DM) can play in the treatment and management of obesity with comorbidities. Among the objectives of the Obesity with Co-morbidities Initiative was to develop standard definitions of obesity and obesity with comorbidities and to conduct qualitative research among key DM stakeholders. The first project undertaken and completed by the Obesity with Associated Co-morbidities Steering Committee and work group was to define the term "obesity" for consistent usage within the DM community for the purposes of population-based interventions. As part of this initiative, DMAA partnered with Synovate, a global market research firm, to conduct focus groups and in-depth interviews in order to collect qualitative data on attitudes and practices related to obesity treatment and coverage among key industry stakeholders, including health plans, disease management organizations, employers, and the business community. The findings indicated that obesity was widely recognized as a serious issue, but there remained varying opinions regarding responsibility, health and productivity costs, coverage, and best treatment methods among the participants. DMAA will continue this initiative through 2007 and will continue to develop a knowledge base of obesity guidelines and management practices, create valuable tools and resources including an online resource center, and facilitate partnerships with other organizations involved in the management and prevention of obesity.

  15. Obesity and asthma: pathophysiology and implications for diagnosis and management in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanan, Sveta; Tapp, Hazel; McWilliams, Andrew; Dulin, Michael

    2014-11-01

    The effects of obesity on asthma diagnosis, control, and exacerbation severity are increasingly recognized; however, the underlying pathophysiology of this association is poorly understood. Mainstream clinical practice has yet to adopt aggressive management of obesity as a modifiable risk factor in asthma care, as is the case with a risk factor like tobacco or allergen exposure. This review summarizes existing data that support the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the association between obesity and asthma, as well as the current and future state of treatment for the obese patient with asthma. Our review suggests that evidence of chronic inflammatory response linking obesity and asthma indicates a need to address obesity during asthma management, possibly using patient-centered approaches such as shared decision making. There is a need for research to better understand the mechanisms of asthma in the obese patient and to develop new therapies specifically targeted to this unique patient population. © 2014 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  16. Obesity and heart failure: epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Martin A; Lavie, Carl J; Agrawal, Harsh; Aggarwal, Kul B; Kumar, Senthil A

    2014-10-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for heart failure (HF) in both men and women. The mortality risk of overweight and class I and II obese adults with HF is lower than that of normal weight or underweight adults with HF of comparable severity, a phenomenon referred to as the obesity paradox. Severe obesity produces hemodynamic alterations that predispose to changes in cardiac morphology and ventricular function, which may lead to the development of HF. The presence of systemic hypertension, sleep apnea, and hypoventilation, comorbidities that occur commonly with severe obesity, may contribute to HF in such patients. The resultant syndrome is known as obesity cardiomyopathy. Substantial weight loss in severely obese persons is capable of reversing most obesity-related abnormalities of cardiac performance and morphology and improving the clinical manifestations of obesity cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Workplace violence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossche, S. van den

    2014-01-01

    Workplace violence refers to incidents where workers are abused, threatened or assaulted, either by people from within or outside their workplace. Workplace violence may have severe negative consequences for the workers affected, their co-workers and families; as well as for organisations and the

  18. Cognitive-behavioral approaches in the management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisotsky, Willo; Swencionis, Charles

    2003-02-01

    Many of the behavioral interventions designed to promote dietary change in individuals include medical assessment, initial assessment of diet history, assessing readiness, establishing dietary goals, self-monitoring, stimulus control training, training in problem solving, relapse prevention training, enlisting social support, nutrition education, dietary therapy, and ongoing contact to maintain progress. The comprehensive nature of a cognitive-behavioral weight management program is of value in modifying behaviors that are linked to adverse health effects and psychological distresses, without necessarily causing a drastic weight loss in obese individuals. The behavioral treatments for overweight and obesity directly modify behaviors that bear on health and illness, such as improving dietary choices, decreasing sedentary behaviors, and increasing habitual physical activity and exercises. Cognitive-behavioral treatment can be used to help overweight adolescents become more assertive in coping with the adverse social stigma of being overweight, enhance their self-esteem, and reduce their dissatisfaction with body image regardless of their weight loss. Cognitive-behavioral treatments seem to be more effective in children when delivered before puberty than they are for adults.

  19. Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity means having too much body fat. It is different from being overweight, which means weighing too ... what's considered healthy for his or her height. Obesity happens over time when you eat more calories ...

  20. Nurse empowerment from a middle-management perspective: nurse managers' and assistant nurse managers' workplace empowerment views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Loretta C; Rodriguez, Lori

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have explored empowerment as an important condition for nursing staff but little current research focuses on empowerment from a middle-management perspective. The purpose of this study was to assess the empowerment of a middle-management group made up of only nurse managers (NMs) and assistant nurse managers (ANMs) in an acute-care hospital setting. A questionnaire was distributed online to a convenience sample of NMs (n = 11) and ANMs (n = 31) working in an ethnically diverse acute-care hospital. Overall, this middle-management group did not feel empowered. Empowerment as perceived by middle management is crucial for carrying out leadership duties and, in turn, empowering frontline staff. Even though the work is challenging, resources and support, among other constructs of empowerment, must be improved to increase the empowerment of middle management. Nursing administration must understand the importance of an empowered middle management so that middle management can lead effectively and facilitate the delivery of safe, high-quality patient care.

  1. Alcohol and drug abuse in the workplace - managing the human factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKibbon, D.; Glass, H. [Kelly Luttmer and Associates Ltd., (Canada)

    1998-09-01

    The impact of drugs and alcohol in the workplace was reviewed. The policies and procedures which are required to ensure that employers meet due diligence requirements were discussed. Under the Canadian human rights legislation an employer cannot terminate an employee for having a medical illness including alcoholism or drug addiction. The implementation of a comprehensive drug and alcohol policy was said to be important to demonstrate to employees that the organization is ready to take a proactive and supportive role in addressing this health concern. The issue of drug testing and when to drug screen was also discussed. It was suggested that addressing substance abuse in the workplace through policies, procedures and practices can reduce costs related to lost productivity, absenteeism, workers` compensation claims, staff turnover, health benefit premiums and legal liabilities.

  2. Development, implementation and management of a drug testing program in the workplace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burtis, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    To combat the rising use of drugs in the workplace many American companies have implemented drug testing programs and are testing employees and job applicants for use of illegal drugs. In addition, on September 15, 1986, Executive Order No.12564 was issued by President Reagan, which requires all federal agencies to develop programs and policies, one of the goals of which is to achieve a drug-free federal workplace. Included in this Executive Order is the requirement that federal agencies implement drug testing has become a prevalent practice as a means to detect and deter drug use in the workplace. Before a drug testing program is implemented, it is imperative that policies and procedures are developed that (1) ensure the accuracy of test results, (2) protect the validity and integrity of the specimen, (3) guarantee due process, and (4) maintain confidentiality. To make certain that these prerequisites were met in the government drug testing programs, the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) was directed to develop technical and scientific guidelines for conducting such programs. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Immunological characteristics and management considerations in obese patients with asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ather, Jennifer L; Poynter, Matthew E; Dixon, Anne E

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with severe, poorly controlled asthma that does not respond as well to therapy as asthma in leaner asthmatics. Important insights gained from animal models of obesity and asthma suggests that different forms of obesity may lead to different manifestations of airway disease: obesity is associated with both innate increased airway reactivity and altered responses to aeroallergen and pollutant challenges. In humans, at least two broad groups of obese asthmatics have been recognized: one that is likely unique to obesity and another that is likely lean allergic asthma much complicated by obesity. This article will discuss what we have learned about the immunological and pathophysiological basis of asthma in obesity from animal and human studies, and how this might guide therapy. PMID:25914932

  4. Identification, evaluation, and management of obesity in an academic primary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Sarah Harvey; Holubkov, Richard; Reis, Evelyn Cohen

    2004-08-01

    The rapidly increasing prevalence of obesity among children is one of the most challenging dilemmas facing pediatricians today. While the medical community struggles to develop effective strategies for the treatment of this epidemic, timely identification of obesity by pediatric health care providers remains the crucial initial step in the management of obesity. Direct assessment of pediatric clinicians' performance in identifying and managing obesity in clinical practice has not been conducted to date. The objective of this study was to determine rates of identification of obesity by pediatric residents, nurse practitioners, and faculty members in an academic primary care setting and to describe the actions taken by these providers in their evaluation and management of obesity. A retrospective medical record review of all health supervision visits for children 3 months to 16 years of age, examined between December 1, 2001, and February 28, 2002, was performed. For children 120% of the 50th percentile of weight-for-height was defined as obese. For children > or =5 years of age, a body mass index of >95th percentile for age and gender was defined as obese. A large, primary care practice located in a tertiary-care, academic, pediatric hospital, which serves a predominantly urban, minority (70% African American), Medical Assistance-insured (90%) population. Primary care providers, including pediatric residents, nurse practitioners, and faculty physicians. Of the 2515 visits reviewed, a total of 244 patients met the study definition of obesity, yielding an estimated prevalence of obesity visits of 9.7% among health supervision visits for children 3 months to 16 years of age. This prevalence of obesity visits cannot be used to estimate the population prevalence of obesity, given the skewed distribution of visits toward very young children. For all children who met the study definition of obesity, providers documented obesity in their assessments in only 53% of the

  5. Obesity: Prevalence, Theories, Medical Consequences, Management, and Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassar Erika

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity and its associated disorders are a growing epidemic across the world. Many genetic, physiological, and behavioral factors play a role in the etiology of obesity. Diet and exercise are known to play a valuable role in the treatment and prevention of obesity and associated disorders such as hypertension, heart disease, and diabetes. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to examine the prevalence, etiology, consequences, and treatment of obesity.

  6. Improving Awareness, Identification, and Management of Sarcopenic Obesity in Cancer Survivors: An Evidence-Based Toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Sarah; Astroth, Kim; Kumar, Pankaj

    2016-10-01

    Sarcopenic obesity, the dual condition of decreased muscle mass with increased fat mass, can affect morbidity, mortality, and quality of life in adult cancer survivors. The purpose of this project was to determine the effects of the use of an educational toolbox on advanced practice nurses' (APNs') confidence in identifying and managing adult cancer survivors at risk for sarcopenic obesity. APNs in an outpatient practice who care for adult cancer survivors received an educational toolbox with strategies to identify and manage adult cancer survivors at risk for sarcopenic obesity. APNs reported being more confident in their ability to identify adult patients with cancer at risk for sarcopenic obesity and in their ability to manage these patients compared to prior to the intervention. Educational resources provided an effective tool for identifying and managing patients at risk for sarcopenic obesity.

  7. Parents' views and experiences of childhood obesity management in primary care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Katrina M; Salisbury, Chris; Shield, Julian P H

    2012-08-01

    Primary care has been viewed as an appropriate setting for childhood obesity management. Little is known about parents' views and experiences of obesity management within this clinical setting. These views and experiences need to be explored, as they could affect treatment success. To explore parents' views and experiences of primary care as a treatment setting for childhood obesity. In-depth interviews were held with 15 parents of obese children aged 5-10 years, to explore their views and experiences of primary care childhood obesity management. Parents were contacted via a hospital-based childhood obesity clinic, general practices and Mind, Exercise, Nutrition … Do it! (MEND) groups based in Bristol, England. The interviews were audio-taped transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Parents viewed primary care as an appropriate setting in which to treat childhood obesity but were reluctant to consult due to a fear of being blamed for their child's weight and a concern about their child's mental well-being. They also questioned whether practitioners had the knowledge, time and resources to effectively manage childhood obesity. Parents varied in the extent to which they had found consulting a practitioner helpful, and their accounts suggested that GPs and school nurses offer different types of support. Parents need to be reassured that practitioners will address their child's weight in a non-judgemental sensitive manner and are able to treat childhood obesity effectively. A multidisciplinary team approach might benefit a child, as different practitioners may vary in the type of care they provide.

  8. Quality of life and psychological well?being in obesity management: improving the odds of success by managing distress

    OpenAIRE

    Vallis, M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Obesity is increasing in prevalence and placing an ever?greater burden on individuals and healthcare resources alike. Obesity management is complex and, for many, elusive. Aims and methods This paper reviews the major factors that influence psychological well?being in individuals with obesity and describes the means by which their impact on distress and other aspects of quality of life (QoL) can be quantified. The goal is to enable healthcare providers to set reasonable, ac...

  9. Pharmacologic Approaches to Weight Management: Recent Gains and Shortfalls in Combating Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Katherine H; Kumar, Rekha B; Igel, Leon I; Aronne, Louis J

    2016-07-01

    Obesity is a growing epidemic in the USA with over one third of adults presently classified as obese. Obesity-related comorbidities include many leading causes of preventable death such as heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and certain types of cancer. Modest weight loss of 5-10 % of body weight is sufficient to produce clinically relevant improvements in cardiovascular disease risk factors among patients with overweight and obesity. Until recently, there were limited pharmacologic options approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat obesity. Phentermine/topiramate ER and lorcaserin were approved in 2012, and naltrexone SR/bupropion SR and liraglutide 3.0 mg were approved in 2014. This article reviews recent literature in the field of Obesity Medicine and highlights important findings from clinical trials. Future directions in the pharmacologic management of obesity are presented along with new diabetes medications that promote weight loss and reduce cardiovascular mortality.

  10. Management of Hypertension and Diabetes in Obesity: Non-Pharmacological Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Pappachan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has become a global epidemic over the past few decades because of unhealthy dietary habits and reduced physical activity. Hypertension and diabetes are quite common among obese individuals and there is a linear relationship between the degree of obesity and these diseases. Lifestyle interventions like dietary modifications and regular exercise are still important and safe first-line measures for treatment. Recently, bariatric surgery has emerged as an important and very effective treatment option for obese individuals especially in those with comorbidities like hypertension and diabetes. Though there are few effective drugs for the management of obesity, their efficacy is only modest, and they should always be combined with lifestyle interventions for optimal benefit. In this paper we aim to outline the non-pharmacological measures for the management of hypertension and diabetes in obesity.

  11. Differences in the management of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia between obesity classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-St John, D R J; Palazón-Bru, A; Gil-Guillén, V F; Sepehri, A; Navarro-Cremades, F; Orozco-Beltrán, D; Carratalá-Munuera, C; Cortés, E; Rizo-Baeza, M M

    2016-01-01

    We did not find any paper that assessed clinical inertia in obese patients. Therefore, no paper has compared the clinical inertia rates between morbidly and nonmorbidly obese patients. A cross-sectional observational study was carried out. We analysed 8687 obese patients ⩾40 years of age who attended their health-care center for a checkup as part of a preventive program. The outcome was morbid obesity. Secondary variables were as follows: failure in the management of high blood pressure (HBP), high blood cholesterol (HBC) and high fasting blood glucose (HFBG); gender; personal history of hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, smoking and cardiovascular disease; and age (years). We analysed the association between failures and morbid obesity by calculating the adjusted odds ratio (OR). Of 8687 obese patients, 421 had morbid obesity (4.8%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 4.4-5.3%). The prevalence rates for failures were as follows: HBP, 34.7%; HBC, 35.2%; and HFBG, 12.4%. Associated factors with morbid obesity related with failures were as follows: failure in the management of HBP (OR=1.42, 95% CI: 1.15-1.74, P=0.001); failure in the management of HBC (OR=0.73, 95% CI: 0.58-0.91, P=0.004); and failure in the management of HFBG (OR=2.24, 95% CI: 1.66-3.03, Pmanagement for HBP and HFBG, and better management for HBC. It would be interesting to integrate alarm systems to avoid this problem.

  12. Mobile applications for obesity and weight management: current market characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, C K; Lean, M E J

    2017-01-01

    Mobile-Health (mHealth) is the fastest-developing eHealth sector, with over 100 000 health applications (apps) currently available. Overweight/obesity is a problem of wide public concern that is potentially treatable/preventable through mHealth. This study describes the current weight-management app-market. Five app stores (Apple, Google, Amazon, Windows and Blackberry) in UK, US, Russia, Japan and Germany, Italy, France, China, Australia and Canada were searched for keywords: 'weight', 'calorie', 'weight-loss', 'slimming', 'diet', 'dietitian' and 'overweight' in January/February 2016 using App-Annie software. The 10 most downloaded apps in the lifetime of an app were recorded. Developers' lists and the app descriptions were searched to identify any professional input with keywords 'professional', 'dietitian' and 'nutritionist'. A total of 28 905 relevant apps were identified as follows: Apple iTunes=8559 (4634, 54% paid), Google Play=1762 (597, 33.9% paid), Amazon App=13569 (4821, 35.5% paid), Windows=2419 (819, 17% paid) and Blackberry=2596 (940, 36% paid). The 28 905 identified apps focused mainly on physical activity (34%), diet (31%), and recording/monitoring of exercise, calorie intake and body weight (23%). Only 17 apps (0.05%) were developed with identifiable professional input. Apps on weight management are widely available and very popular but currently lack professional content expertise. Encouraging app development based on evidence-based online approaches would assure content quality, allowing healthcare professionals to recommend their use.

  13. Rats' urinary metabolomes reveal the potential roles of functional foods and exercise in obesity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Mohamed A; Ammar, N M; Kholeif, T E; Metwally, N S; El-Sheikh, N M; Wessjohann, Ludger A; Abdel-Hamid, A Z

    2017-03-22

    The complexity of the metabolic changes in obese individuals still presents a challenge for the understanding of obesity-related metabolic disruptions and for obesity management. In this study, a gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) based metabolomics approach targeting urine metabolism has been applied to assess the potential roles of functional foods and exercise for obesity management in rats. Male albino rats diagnosed as obese via histopathology and biochemical assays were administered functional foods in common use for obesity management including pomegranate, grapefruit, and red cabbage juice extracts in parallel with swimming exercise. Urine samples were collected from these rats, and likewise from healthy control animals, for metabolite analysis using (GC-MS) coupled to multivariate data analysis. The results revealed a significant elevation in oxalate and phosphate levels in obese rat urine concurrent with lower lactate levels as compared to the control group. Furthermore, and to pinpoint the bioactive agents in the administered functional foods, ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) was employed for secondary metabolite profiling. The different phenolic classes found in the examined functional foods, viz. ellagitannins in pomegranate, flavanones in grapefruit and flavonols in red cabbage, are likely to mediate their anti-obesity effects. The results indicate that these functional foods and exercise were quite effective in reverting obesity-related metabolic disruptions back to normal status, as revealed by orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA).

  14. Orlistat: a review of its use in the management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henness, Sheridan; Perry, Caroline M

    2006-01-01

    Orlistat (Xenical) is a reversible inhibitor of gastric and pancreatic lipases. In conjunction with a hypocaloric diet and moderate exercise, orlistat is an effective drug for use in the management of obesity in adults with or without comorbidities. Recent data have shown that orlistat is also effective as a component of weight management strategies in obese adolescents. In addition to its well established efficacy in achieving modest weight loss, orlistat has been shown to improve glycaemic parameters in obese adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus as well as some features of the metabolic syndrome. Orlistat is generally well tolerated. Thus, orlistat is an option for the treatment of obese patients with or without type 2 diabetes and also has a role in the management of obese patients with the metabolic syndrome, associated comorbidities or concomitant disorders.

  15. Obesity-related hypertension: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotchen, Theodore A

    2010-11-01

    The prevalence of obesity, including childhood obesity, is increasing worldwide. Weight gain is associated with increases in arterial pressure, and it has been estimated that 60-70% of hypertension in adults is attributable to adiposity. Centrally located body fat, associated with insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, is a more potent determinant of blood pressure elevation than peripheral body fat. Obesity-related hypertension may be a distinct hypertensive phenotype with distinct genetic determinants. Mechanisms of obesity-related hypertension include insulin resistance, sodium retention, increased sympathetic nervous system activity, activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone, and altered vascular function. In overweight individuals, weight loss results in a reduction of blood pressure, however, this effect may be attenuated in the long term. An increasing number of community-based programs (including school programs and worksite programs) are being developed for the prevention and treatment of obesity. Assessment and treatment of the obese hypertensive patient should address overall cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. There are no compelling clinical trial data to indicate that any one class of antihypertensive agents is superior to others, and in general the principles of pharmacotherapy for obese hypertensive patients are not different from nonobese patients. Future research directions might include: (i) development of effective, culturally sensitive strategies for the prevention and treatment of obesity; (ii) clinical trials to identify the most effective drug therapies for reducing CVD in obese, hypertensive patients; (iii) continued search for the genetic determinants of the obese, hypertensive phenotype.

  16. Workplace Counselling in Nigeria: Problems and Prospects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... counsellor competency problem, workplace counselling as a victimization tool, management of client information, workplace counselling as an excuse or avoidance route, making workplaces mental-health friendly, display of care, preventive mechanism, a risk management tool, and a medium of organizational change.

  17. Behavior Modification for Obesity: The Evaluation of Exercise, Contingency Management, and Program Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Stalonas, Peter M., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Investigated behavioral programs for obesity. Exercise and self-managed contingency components were compared using obese subjects who were evaluated after treatment and follow-up. Significant weight loss was observed at termination. The influence of exercise at follow-up was noticeable. Subjects engaged in behaviors, yet behaviors were not related…

  18. A systematic review of the clinical effectiveness of orlistat used for the management of obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Meara, S.; Riemsma, R.; Shirran, L.; Mather, L.; ter Riet, G.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the clinical effectiveness of orlistat used for the management of obesity. Nineteen electronic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials evaluating the effectiveness of orlistat for weight loss or maintenance of weight loss in overweight or obese

  19. Workplace learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warring, Niels

    2005-01-01

    In November 2004 the Research Consortium on workplace learning under Learning Lab Denmark arranged the international conference “Workplace Learning – from the learner’s perspective”. The conference’s aim was to bring together researchers from different countries and institutions to explore...... and discuss recent developments in our understanding of workplace and work-related learning. The conference had nearly 100 participants with 59 papers presented, and among these five have been selected for presentation is this Special Issue....

  20. White Paper AGA: POWER - Practice Guide on Obesity and Weight Management, Education, and Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Andres; Streett, Sarah; Kroh, Mathew D; Cheskin, Lawrence J; Saunders, Katherine H; Kurian, Marina; Schofield, Marsha; Barlow, Sarah E; Aronne, Louis

    2017-05-01

    The epidemic of obesity continues at alarming rates, with a high burden to our economy and society. The American Gastroenterological Association understands the importance of embracing obesity as a chronic, relapsing disease and supports a multidisciplinary approach to the management of obesity. Because gastrointestinal disorders resulting from obesity are more frequent and often present sooner than type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, gastroenterologists have an opportunity to address obesity and provide an effective therapy early. Patients who are overweight or obese already fill gastroenterology clinics with gastroesophageal reflux disease and its associated risks of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal cancer, gallstone disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and colon cancer. Obesity is a major modifiable cause of diseases of the digestive tract that frequently goes unaddressed. As internists, specialists in digestive disorders, and endoscopists, gastroenterologists are in a unique position to play an important role in the multidisciplinary treatment of obesity. This American Gastroenterological Association paper was developed with content contribution from Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons, The Obesity Society, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, endorsed with input by American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, and Obesity Medicine Association, and describes POWER: Practice Guide on Obesity and Weight Management, Education and Resources. Its objective is to provide physicians with a comprehensive, multidisciplinary process to guide and personalize innovative obesity care for safe and effective weight management. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Monitoring and management of hypertension with obesity in adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Falkner, Bonita

    2017-01-01

    Bonita Falkner Department of Medicine and Pediatrics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Largely due to the childhood obesity epidemic, there has been an increase in the prevalence of hypertension in children and adolescents. Obesity associated hypertension is the most common hypertension phenotype among adolescents. Approximately 30% of obese adolescents have elevated blood pressure (BP) or hypertension. Updated definitions of elevated BP and hypertension in adolesc...

  2. An EASO Position Statement on Multidisciplinary Obesity Management in Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Volkan Yumuk; Gema Frühbeck; Jean Michel Oppert; Euan Woodward; Hermann Toplak

    2014-01-01

    for the Executive Committee of the European Association for the Study of Obesity; International audience; Obesity has proven to be a gateway to ill health. It has already reached epidemic proportions becoming one of the leading causes of death and disability in Europe and worldwide. Obesity plays a central role in the development of a number of risk factors and chronic diseases like hypertension, dyslipidaemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus inducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. There...

  3. New pharmacological treatments for the management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Ryan T; Edakkanambeth Varayil, Jithinraj; Ebbert, Jon O

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is quickly becoming the leading preventable cause of death in the USA. Over 60 obesity-related comorbidities exist which increase the complexity and cost of medical care in obese patients. Even a moderate weight loss of 5 % can reduce morbidity associated with these conditions. Lifestyle modification through caloric restriction and enhanced exercise and physical activity remain the first line treatment for obesity. The development of pharmacologic agents for the treatment of obesity has been challenged by both lack of efficacy and serious adverse side effects leading to their removal from market. Two new agents were recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to complement lifestyle modification in obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)) and overweight patients (BMI ≥27 kg/m(2) and one obesity-related comorbidity). Lorcaserin is a novel serotonin 5-HT2C selective agonist which has been shown in three phase III studies to significantly reduce weight and cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes. Phentermine/topiramate extended release (ER) is a novel combination of two agents which have individually been shown to significantly reduce weight. The combination agent phentermine/topiramate ER has been shown to reduce weight in overweight and obese subjects in a number of studies. This article reviews the pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and safety of these new agents compared to past and other presently available medications for the treatment of obesity.

  4. A protocol for the HeadCoach trial: the development and evaluation of an online mental health training program for workplace managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayed, Aimée; Bryan, Bridget T; Petrie, Katherine; Deady, Mark; Milner, Allison; LaMontagne, Anthony D; Calvo, Rafael A; Mackinnon, Andrew; Christensen, Helen; Mykletun, Arnstein; Glozier, Nicholas; Harvey, Samuel B

    2018-01-29

    Within high income countries, mental health is now the leading cause of long term sickness absence in the workplace. Managers are in a position to make changes and decisions that have a positive effect on the wellbeing of staff, the recovery of employees with mental ill health, and potentially prevent future mental health problems. However, managers report addressing workplace mental health issues as challenging. The aim of the HeadCoach trial is to evaluate the effectiveness of a newly developed online training intervention to determine whether it is able to build managers' confidence to better support individuals within their teams who are experiencing mental ill health, and the confidence to promote manager behaviour likely to result in a more mentally healthy workplace. We will conduct a cluster randomised control trial (RCT) to evaluate the effect of HeadCoach, an online training intervention for managers with a focus on the mental health of their employees, compared to a waitlist control. The target sample is 168 managers, and their direct employees. Managers and employees will be assessed at baseline and at 4-month follow up. Managers will have an additional, intermediate assessment 6-weeks post-baseline. The primary outcome is change from baseline in managers' self-reported confidence when dealing with mental health issues within their team and promoting a mentally healthy workplace. The difference between the intervention and waitlist control groups will be assessed using linear mixed effects repeated measures (MMRM) analysis of variance (ANOVA). Secondary managerial outcomes include mental health literacy, attitudes towards mental health issues in the workplace and managerial behaviour in dealing with mental health matters with their staff. Employee outcomes will be perceived level of manager support, engagement, psychological distress, and rates of sickness absence and presenteeism. To our knowledge this will be the first RCT of a purely online training

  5. Dutch General Practitioners' weight management policy for overweight and obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloek, Corelien Jj; Tol, Jacqueline; Veenhof, Cindy; van der Wulp, Ineke; Swinkels, Ilse Cs

    2014-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) can play an important role in both the prevention and management of overweight and obesity. Current general practice guidelines in the Netherlands allow room for GPs to execute their own weight management policy. To examine GPs' current weight management policy and the factors associated with this policy. 800 Dutch GPs were asked to complete a questionnaire in December 2012. The questionnaire items were based on the Dutch Obesity Standard for GPs. The data were analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression analyses in 2013. In total, 307 GPs (39.0%) responded. Most respondents (82.9%) considered weight management as part of their responsibility for providing care. GPs aged <48 years discussed weight less frequent. Next, weight is less frequently discussed with patients without weight-related comorbidities or with moderately overweight patients compared to obese patients. On average, 47.7% of the GPs reported to refer obese patients to a weight management professional, preferably a dietitian (98.3%). GPs with a BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2) were less likely to refer obese patients. In addition, GPs who had frequent contact with a dietitian were more likely to refer obese patients. In the context of General Practice and preventive medicine, GPs' discussion of weight and the variety of obesity-determinants with their moderately overweight patients deserves more attention, especially from younger GPs. Strengthening interdisciplinary collaboration between GPs and dietitians could increase the referral percentage for dietary treatment.

  6. Capsaicinoids: a spicy solution to the management of obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, A; Arguin, H; Panahi, S

    2016-08-01

    Capsaicin is the molecule that is responsible for the pungency of hot peppers. It stimulates the sympathoadrenal system that mediates the thermogenic and anorexigenic effects of capsaicinoids. Capsaicinoids have been found to accentuate the impact of caloric restriction on body weight loss. Some studies have also shown that capsinoids, the non-pungent analogs of capsaicinoids, increase energy expenditure. Capsaicin supplementation attenuates or even prevents the increase in hunger and decrease in fullness as well as the decrease in energy expenditure and fat oxidation, which normally result from energy restriction. These effects may postpone the occurrence of resistance to lose fat during a weight loss program and facilitate the maintenance of body weight in a postobese state. Evidence also highlights the plausibility of an indirect effect of capsaicin on energy balance via its analgesic effects, which may improve sleep and ultimately facilitate the regulation of energy balance. Although capsaicin intake appears to be a safe practice, further studies will be needed to ascertain the safety of regular long-term consumption. Taken together, these observations reinforce the idea that consumption of capsaicinoids and capsinoids may be helpful to facilitate obesity management.

  7. Manage at work: a randomized, controlled trial of a self-management group intervention to overcome workplace challenges associated with chronic physical health conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, William S; Besen, Elyssa; Pransky, Glenn; Boot, Cécile R L; Nicholas, Michael K; McLellan, Robert K; Tveito, Torill H

    2014-05-28

    The percentage of older and chronically ill workers is increasing rapidly in the US and in many other countries, but few interventions are available to help employees overcome the workplace challenges of chronic pain and other physical health conditions. While most workers are eligible for job accommodation and disability compensation benefits, other workplace strategies might improve individual-level coping and problem solving to prevent work disability. In this study, we hypothesize that an employer-sponsored group intervention program employing self-management principles may improve worker engagement and reduce functional limitation associated with chronic disorders. In a randomized controlled trial (RCT), workers participating in an employer-sponsored self-management group intervention will be compared with a no-treatment (wait list) control condition. Volunteer employees (n = 300) will be recruited from five participating employers and randomly assigned to intervention or control. Participants in the intervention arm will attend facilitated group workshop sessions at work (10 hours total) to explore methods for improving comfort, adjusting work habits, communicating needs effectively, applying systematic problem solving, and dealing with negative thoughts and emotions about work. Work engagement and work limitation are the principal outcomes. Secondary outcomes include fatigue, job satisfaction, self-efficacy, turnover intention, sickness absence, and health care utilization. Measurements will be taken at baseline, 6-, and 12-month follow-up. A process evaluation will be performed alongside the randomized trial. This study will be most relevant for organizations and occupational settings where some degree of job flexibility, leeway, and decision-making autonomy can be afforded to affected workers. The study design will provide initial assessment of a novel workplace approach and to understand factors affecting its feasibility and effectiveness

  8. [Workplace mobbing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soljan, Ivana; Josipović-Jelić, Zeljka; Jelić Kis, I Anita

    2008-03-01

    Workplace mobbing is a hostile and unethical communication, systematically aimed from one or more individuals towards mostly one individual, who are forced into a helpless position and are held in it by constant bullying. This article describes some of the most important characteristics of mobbing: offensive behaviour, organizational and non-organizational causes of this behaviour, the victim and the consequences. Modern business environment is complex, dynamic, volatile, and requires better ability to adjust. Constant changes are a part of organizational reality, but they also produce an ideal environment for all kinds of conflicts. Conflicts are inevitable in every organization, but the task of its management is to identify them and resolve before they affect the workforce, productivity and costs. The idea is to avert psychological abuse and aberrant behaviour such as mobbing which that may cause physical and mental disorders. Mobbing is a problem of the modern society; as a violation of human rights it is relatively new and unrecognised in Croatia. Abuse is mostly psychological: it affects the victim's health and life, quality of work, productivity, profitability, and may lead to significant economic losses in the community. Mobbing can be averted by joint forces that would involve employee and management, medical and legal professionals, and even community as a whole. The more an organization pursues excellence based on trust and business ethics, the higher the probability that mobbing will be averted or stopped.

  9. Current updates in the medical management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Areej; Raza, Shahzad; Khan, Yusra; Aksoy, Tulay; Khan, Monis; Weinberger, Yitzchak; Goldman, Joel

    2012-05-01

    Obesity is a chronic medical condition that is expected to become an indirect but leading cause of mortality and morbidity. Obesity results in type 2 diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, coronary heart disease. These factors contribute to cardiovascular disease that is a leading cause of death. Therefore, the approach to obesity therapy should be designed to reduce cardiovascular disease risk and mortality. Diet and lifestyle changes remain the cornerstones of therapy for obesity, but the resultant weight loss is often small. For more effective weight loss, individuals have shown to benefit from anti-obesity medications. Anti-Obesity therapy is considered for individuals with a body mass index greater than 30 kg/m2 or ranging from 25 to 30 kg/m2, or individuals with co-morbid conditions. Recent anti-obese medications affect biological mechanisms that suppress appetite and absorb nutrients to regulate body weight. In this review, we discuss the FDA approved anti-obesity drugs and recent patents which include phentermine/topiramate, pramlintide, lorcaserin, AOD9604, oleoyl-estrone, trk-beta antagonists and melanin concentrating hormone that can reduce adiposity at the molecular level.

  10. Child and adolescent obesity: causes and consequences, prevention and management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burniat, Walter

    2002-01-01

    ... by William Dietz and a forward-looking 'future perspectives' conclusion by Philip James embrace an international team of authors, all with experience of the issues posed by obesity in the young. Aimed at doctors, and all health-care professionals, it will be of interest to all those concerned about the increasing prevalence of obesity in children and ...

  11. Management of Obesity: The Surgical Perspective | Dodiyi-Manuel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Obesity which is one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide continues to increase with its associated complications. Bariatric surgeries have been described as the preferred method of treatment for morbid obesity. The objective of this review is to give an overview of bariatric surgical procedures and the ...

  12. The implications of obesity for cardiac arrhythmia mechanisms and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Rajeev K; Mahajan, Rajiv; Lau, Dennis H; Sanders, Prashanthan

    2015-02-01

    The ever-increasing prevalence of obesity poses a significant burden on the health care system with escalating socioeconomic consequences. At the individual level, obesity is well recognized to increase morbidity and mortality. Not only is obesity an established cardiovascular risk factor, it also increases the risk of sudden cardiac death and atrial fibrillation. Studies have shown that increased adiposity itself and the accompanying metabolic consequences of weight gain contribute to an abnormal arrhythmogenic substrate. In this review, we focus on the diverse mechanisms underlying cardiac arrhythmias related to obesity. In particular, we highlight the pathogenic role of adipose depots leading to increased atrial fibrillation and the effect of weight reduction in decreasing atrial fibrillation burden in obese individuals. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Epigenetics and obesity cardiomyopathy: From pathophysiology to prevention and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingmei; Ren, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Uncorrected obesity has been associated with cardiac hypertrophy and contractile dysfunction. Several mechanisms for this cardiomyopathy have been identified, including oxidative stress, autophagy, adrenergic and renin-angiotensin aldosterone overflow. Another process that may regulate effects of obesity is epigenetics, which refers to the heritable alterations in gene expression or cellular phenotype that are not encoded on the DNA sequence. Advances in epigenome profiling have greatly improved the understanding of the epigenome in obesity, where environmental exposures during early life result in an increased health risk later on in life. Several mechanisms, including histone modification, DNA methylation and non-coding RNAs, have been reported in obesity and can cause transcriptional suppression or activation, depending on the location within the gene, contributing to obesity-induced complications. Through epigenetic modifications, the fetus may be prone to detrimental insults, leading to cardiac sequelae later in life. Important links between epigenetics and obesity include nutrition, exercise, adiposity, inflammation, insulin sensitivity and hepatic steatosis. Genome-wide studies have identified altered DNA methylation patterns in pancreatic islets, skeletal muscle and adipose tissues from obese subjects compared with non-obese controls. In addition, aging and intrauterine environment are associated with differential DNA methylation. Given the intense research on the molecular mechanisms of the etiology of obesity and its complications, this review will provide insights into the current understanding of epigenetics and pharmacological and non-pharmacological (such as exercise) interventions targeting epigenetics as they relate to treatment of obesity and its complications. Particular focus will be on DNA methylation, histone modification and non-coding RNAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Primary care physicians′ knowledge and perceived barriers in the management of overweight and obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulaziz M Sebiany

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the level of knowledge of primary health care physicians and the barriers perceived in the management of overweight and obesity in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. Setting: Primary health care centers in Dammam and Al-Khobar cities, Saudi Arabia. Design: A cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: One hundred and forty-nine physicians were surveyed. Data were collected with a specially made anonymous, self-administrated, structured questionnaire with a Cronbach alpha reliability of 0.85, and content validity by five experts was used to measure the knowledge and barriers from several different aspects of care provided by primary health care centers to the overweight and obese. Results: One hundred and thirty (87% physicians responded. More than two-thirds of the respondents considered themselves as key players in the management of obesity. However, only one-third believed that they were well prepared to treat obesity. Eighty-three per cent of the respondents had a negative attitude toward the concept of overweight and obesity. It was noted that 76.9% of physicians advised patients to control their weight with sport and exercise together with low calorie diet. Sixty percent of the respondents used body mass index to diagnose obesity. Seventy-two percent of respondents did not use weight reduction medications to treat obesity. Lack of training, poor administrative support, and time constraints were identified as barriers in managing overweight and obesity. Conclusion: Respondents were aware of the magnitude of overweight and obesity as a major public health problem in Saudi Arabia, and they were also aware of the correct definition of overweight and obesity, as well as its effect in increasing mortality. Better training is required to improve some areas of awareness and management of the conditions.

  15. Impact of an integrated obesity management system on patient's care - research protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillargeon, Jean-Patrice; St-Cyr-Tribble, Denise; Xhignesse, Marianne; Grant, Andrew; Brown, Christine; Langlois, Marie-France

    2014-01-01

    The majority of obese subjects are treated by primary care physicians (PCPs) who often feel uncomfortable with the management of obesity. In a previous study, we successfully developed, implemented and evaluated an obesity management system based on training and coaching of health professionals of family medicine groups (FMGs) by a team of experts in obesity management. Using a pre/post design, this study suggested a positive impact on health professionals' perceptions and reported obesity care. The current research project is aimed at evaluating the impact on obesity screening and care of this integrated obesity management system. We hypothesize that our program combining preceptorships with a virtual community and on-site coaching will improve: (1) management and weight loss of obese/overweight subjects treated by PCPs for hypertension, type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance; and (2) screening and initial management of obesity among a regular follow-up group of patients of PCPs who practice in FMGs. Ten FMGs will be approached for a practice monitoring project and will be randomised to receive the intervention developed in our previous project or will only be provided clinical practice guidelines. In the participating FMGs, we will enrol 22 patients per FMG with weight related targeted disease and 24 patients with regular follow-up. These patients will be evaluated for the care they received regarding screening and/or management of obesity using medical chart reviews, and will fill out a questionnaire on their lifestyle and satisfaction. They will also be examined for anthropometric measures, vital signs, blood markers for chronic diseases and physical fitness. The same patients will be assessed again after 18 months. The impact of the program on health professionals will be evaluated at baseline, and at 1 year. Qualitative data will also be collected from both professional and patient participants. Direct and indirect costs and QALYs will be evaluated

  16. Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, J

    1985-01-01

    While recognizing that many factors may contribute to the causation of ischaemic heart disease, this project attempts an in-depth examination of just one of them--obesity. The author has endeavoured to discover if there are sex differences in the incidence of obesity and whether or not obesity is related to age. Whilst recognizing the limitations of the small sample used in this project some tentative conclusions/speculations will be outlined. Some attempt has been made to discover if the average person is aware of what is meant by the term 'obesity' and if they see themselves as having this problem. Because of an intuition that people may become obese due to bad eating habits and ignorance about the nutritional value of certain foodstuffs, subjects were asked to list the calorific value of certain foods and their responses are discussed. A further attempt was made to ascertain whether the respondents had ever gone on a diet and if so, the type of diet and the success or otherwise of this measure. The subjects were further questioned to discover their level of knowledge regarding the possibility of certain disorders arising as a consequence of obesity and asked to outline what action they would take if they were faced with these consequences. Some conclusions have been drawn regarding the actions which would be taken when faced with crippling consequences. Finally, an attempt has been made to discover if some psychosocial states contributed to the causation of obesity or whether obesity leads to some psychosocial problems.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Vascular risks and management of obesity in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney J Jolliffe

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Courtney J Jolliffe1, Ian Janssen1,21School of Physical and Health Education, 2Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions in many countries. Pediatric obesity is associated with the development of cardiovascular (CV risk factors including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and the metabolic syndrome. It is also associated with an increased risk of CV disease (CVD in adulthood. Moreover, obesity and CVD risk factors in obese youth tend to track into adulthood, further increasing the risk of adult CVD. Consequently, the treatment and prevention of childhood overweight and obesity has become a public health priority. Proper nutrition and increased physical activity are the main focus of these efforts; however, few studies have shown positive results. Treatment options for obesity in youth also include pharmacotherapy and surgery. While pharmacotherapy appears promising, additional evidence is needed, especially with respect to the long-term impact, before it becomes a widespread treatment option in the pediatric population.Keywords: childhood, obesity, overweight, cardiovascular risk factors, prevention, treatment

  18. Resistance training program for fatigue management in the workplace: exercise protocol in a cluster randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Gustavo Santos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatigue is a multifactorial condition that leads to disease and loss in production, and it affects a large number of workers worldwide. This study aims to demonstrate a resistance exercise protocol that individuals will perform during the work schedule, and to evaluate the effectiveness of this exercises program for fatigue control. Methods/Design This is a cluster randomized controlled trial with two arms and is assessor blinded. A total of 352 workers of both sexes, aged 18–65 years, from a medium-sized dairy plant were enrolled in this study. Participants will be recruited from 13 production sectors according to the eligibility criteria and will be randomized by clusters to either the Progressive Resistance Exercise (PRE intervention group or the Compensatory Workplace Exercise (CWE comparative group. A resistance exercise program will be implemented for both groups. The groups will receive instructions on self-management, breaks, adjustments to workstations, and the benefits of physical exercise. The PRE group will perform resistance exercises with gradual loads in an exercise room, and the CWE group will perform exercise at their workstations using elastic bands. The exercise sessions will be held 3 times a week for 20 min. The primary outcome measures will be symptoms of physical and mental fatigue, and muscular fatigue based on a one-repetition maximum (1RM. The secondary outcome measures will be level of physical activity, musculoskeletal symptoms, physical condition, perceived exposure, and productivity. The workers will be assessed at baseline and after a 4-month program. A linear mixed model will be applied on an intention-to-treat basis. Discussion This intervention is expected to reduce symptoms of fatigue in the workers. The exercise program is indicating in the workplace, although there are few studies describing the effects of exercise on the control of fatigue in the workplace. Emphasis will be placed on

  19. Emotion in the library workplace

    CERN Document Server

    Matteson, Miriam; Hines, Samantha Schmehl

    2017-01-01

    Authors explore application of the study of emotion in the library workplace and look at future trends in the area. Library managers will take away knowledge about how the library workplace can and should operate with consideration toward emotion, and will glean ideas for implementation with their own staff and services.

  20. Convenience Store Workplace Literacy Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Duzer, Carol; Mansoor, Inaam

    The Convenience Store Workplace Literacy Curriculum was developed for English-as-a-Second-Language classes offered by the Southland Corporation, 7-Eleven stores, through a national workplace literacy grant. It is based on an analysis of the tasks and interactions common to a convenience store worksite. Store employees, managers, field consultants,…

  1. The Toll of Workplace Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killoren, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Bullying may be more common than most people think. According to a study commissioned by the Workplace Bullying Institute, one in three employees experience bullying in the workplace either as a victim or as a witness suffering collateral damage. Bullying is a serious problem. Directors, managers, and staff members need to ensure that it does not…

  2. Union Roles in Workplace Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Stephen Michael

    1993-01-01

    Discusses roles for labor unions in resolving workforce deficiencies, suggesting that labor, management, and government must work together to develop cooperative training initiatives. Describes labor's historic role in basic and workplace literacy training, lists skills workers need in the "new" workplace, describes exemplary union-management…

  3. EXPECTATIONS OF EMPLOYEES ON THE EFFECTS OF THE WORKPLACE HEALTH MANAGEMENT AS A PART OF AN INTERNAL DIVERSITY MANAGEMENT - AN EXPLORATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Reich

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The expectations of employees on the effects of actions of the Workplace Health Management (WHM as a part of the Human Resource Management are relevant for a successful implementation within the companies. The diversity approach can be able to improve the cooperation among different groups of employees. In this relation the measures of the WHM can support the existing Diversity Management efforts of a company. A successful Diversity Management has to meet the expectations of the employees. Therefore the Management needs to know what the employees expect from measures to be implemented in order to improve the performance of the companies. The theoretical framework of the Diversity Management in general, the Work Health Management (WHM measures and the results of a survey carried out among Hungarian employees and their expectations on a WHM are depicted within this paper. As important diversity groups the expectation on effects of the WHM actions on the groups of disabled / able-bodied employees and the groups of younger / older employees are examined. For all groups the cooperation exchange within the own work-unit and in the company as a whole is surveyed. As a result for all groups the most recommendable actions, in consideration of the employees, could be determined.

  4. Cognitive-Behavioral Strategies to Increase the Adherence to Exercise in the Management of Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Dalle Grave

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity plays a major role in the development and management of obesity. High levels of physical activity provide an advantage in maintaining energy balance at a healthy weight, but the amount of exercise needed to produce weight loss and weight loss maintenance may be difficult to achieve in obese subjects. Barriers to physical activity may hardly be overcome in individual cases, and group support may make the difference. The key role of cognitive processes in the failure/success of weight management suggests that new cognitive procedures and strategies should be included in the traditional behavioral treatment of obesity, in order to help patients build a mindset of long-term weight control. We reviewed the role of physical activity in the management of obesity, and the principal cognitive-behavioral strategies to increase adherence to exercise. Also in this area, we need to move from the traditional prescriptive approach towards a multidisciplinary intervention.

  5. Serum metabolomics reveals the mechanistic role of functional foods and exercise for obesity management in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Naglaa M; Farag, Mohamed A; Kholeif, Tahani E; Metwally, Nadia S; El-Sheikh, Nora M; El Gendy, Abdel Nasser; Abdel-Hamid, Abdel-Hamid Z

    2017-08-05

    Obesity is one of the independent risk factors for several health problems, leading to metabolic perturbations and for which analytical approaches i.e., "metabolomics" is needed to monitor the underlying metabolic changes. In this study, obesity associated changes were assessed via serum metabolites analysis of obese rats fed on high fat diet. Obese rats were subsequently treated with different functional foods used for obesity management including pomegranate, grapefruit, and red cabbage in parallel to swimming exercise. Serum samples were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) followed by multivariate data analysis to classify samples and determine if such treatments can help revert obesity related metabolic changes back to normal status. Results led to the identification of several novel metabolites biomarkers for obesity related to lipids, amino acids and central tricarboxylic acid (TCA) pathways. Distinct variations in metabolite levels were recorded in obese rats compared to normal ones including l-aspartic, l-alanine, l-glutamine, l-glycine, phenylethanolamine, α-aminobutyric acid and β-hydroxybutyric acid. Metabolomics approach developed herein provides novel insight onto the metabolic disturbances associated with obesity, which will assist in future drug design that can help mitigate against such changes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of Workplace Health Education Performed by Occupational Health Managers in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon-Ha Kim, RN, PhD

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: “Analysis and planning” skill is priority training area for healthcare professionals and occupational health managers who managed nonmanufacturing industry. It is necessary to develop a training curriculum for occupational health managers that include improving analysis of worksites and plans for a health education program.

  7. The Obesity Paradox in Kidney Disease: How to Reconcile It With Obesity Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Obesity, a risk factor for de novo chronic kidney disease (CKD, confers survival advantages in advanced CKD. This so-called obesity paradox is the archetype of the reverse epidemiology of cardiovascular risks, in addition to the lipid, blood pressure, adiponectin, homocysteine, and uric acid paradoxes. These paradoxical phenomena are in sharp contradistinction to the known epidemiology of cardiovascular risks in the general population. In addition to advanced CKD, the obesity paradox has also been observed in heart failure, chronic obstructive lung disease, liver cirrhosis, and metastatic cancer, as well as in elderly individuals. These are populations in whom protein−energy wasting and inflammation are strong predictors of early death. Both larger muscle mass and higher body fat provide longevity in these patients, whereas thinner body habitus and weight loss are associated with higher mortality. Muscle mass appears to be superior to body fat in conferring an even greater survival. The obesity paradox may be the result of a time discrepancy between competing risk factors, that is, overnutrition as the long-term killer versus undernutrition as the short-term killer. Hemodynamic stability of obesity, lipoprotein defense against circulating endotoxins, protective cytokine profiles, toxin sequestration of fat mass, and antioxidation of muscle may play important roles. Despite claims that the obesity paradox is a statistical fallacy and a result of residual confounding, the consistency of data and other causality clues suggest a high biologic plausibility. Examining the causes and consequences of the obesity paradox may help uncover important pathophysiologic mechanisms leading to improved outcomes in patients with CKD.

  8. The Obesity Paradox in Kidney Disease: How to Reconcile it with Obesity Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Rhee, Connie M; Chou, Jason; Ahmadi, S Foad; Park, Jongha; Chen, Joline Lt; Amin, Alpesh N

    2017-03-01

    Obesity, a risk factor for de novo chronic kidney disease (CKD), confers survival advantages in advanced CKD. This so-called obesity paradox is the archetype of the reverse epidemiology of cardiovascular risks, in addition to the lipid, blood pressure, adiponectin, homocysteine, and uric acid paradoxes. These paradoxical phenomena are in sharp contradistinction to the known epidemiology of cardiovascular risks in the general population. In addition to advanced CKD, the obesity paradox has also been observed in heart failure, chronic obstructive lung disease, liver cirrhosis, and metastatic cancer, as well as in the elderly. These are populations in whom protein-energy wasting and inflammation are strong predictors of early death. Both larger muscle mass and higher body fat provide longevity in these patients, whereas thinner body habitus and weight loss are associated with higher mortality. Muscle mass appears to be superior to body fat in conferring an even greater survival. The obesity paradox may be the result of a time discrepancy between competing risk factors, i.e., overnutrition as the long-term killer versus undernutrition as the short-term killer. Hemodynamic stability of obesity, lipoprotein defense against circulating endotoxins, protective cytokine profiles, toxin sequestration of fat mass, and antioxidation of muscle may play important roles. Despite claims that obesity paradox is a statistical fallacy and a result of residual confounding, the consistency of data and other causality clues suggest a high biologic plausibility. Examining the causes and consequences of the obesity paradox may help discover important pathophysiologic mechanisms leading to improved outcomes in patients with CKD.

  9. Spotlight on orlistat in the management of patients with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Monique P; Scott, Lesley J

    2005-01-01

    Orlistat is an inhibitor of gastrointestinal lipases and, therefore, prevents the absorption of dietary fat. This agent reduced weight in obese adults and adolescents with or without co-morbidities (including type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, metabolic syndrome) who received up to 4 years of therapy in conjunction with a hypocaloric diet. In obese patients, orlistat in combination with a hypocaloric diet improved metabolic risk factors and reduced the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, this agent was cost effective in patients with obesity, particularly those with type 2 diabetes. Orlistat is generally well tolerated, with gastrointestinal adverse events being most commonly reported. Orlistat, in addition to lifestyle and dietary intervention, is thus an attractive option for the treatment of patients with obesity, especially those with associated co-morbidities or at risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

  10. Avoiding Management Errors in Patients with Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manthous, Constantine A; Mokhlesi, Babak

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity hypoventilation syndrome and obstructive sleep apnea are increasing rapidly in the United States in parallel with the obesity epidemic. As the pathogenesis of this chronic illness is better understood, effective evidence-based therapies are being deployed to reduce morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, patients with obesity hypoventilation still fall prey to at least four avoidable types of therapeutic errors, especially at the time of hospitalization for respiratory or cardiovascular decompensation: (1) patients with obesity hypoventilation syndrome may develop acute hypercapnia in response to administration of excessive supplemental oxygen; (2) excessive diuresis for peripheral edema using a loop diuretic such as furosemide exacerbates metabolic alkalosis, thereby worsening daytime hypoventilation and hypoxemia; (3) excessive or premature pharmacological treatment of psychiatric illnesses can exacerbate sleep-disordered breathing and worsen hypercapnia, thereby exacerbating psychiatric symptoms; and (4) clinicians often erroneously diagnose obstructive lung disease in patients with obesity hypoventilation, thereby exposing them to unnecessary and potentially harmful medications, including β-agonists and corticosteroids. Just as literary descriptions of pickwickian syndrome have given way to greater understanding of the pathophysiology of obesity hypoventilation, clinicians might exercise caution to consider these potential pitfalls and thus avoid inflicting unintended and avoidable complications.

  11. Lowered testosterone in male obesity: mechanisms, morbidity and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fui, Mark Ng Tang; Dupuis, Philippe; Grossmann, Mathis

    2014-01-01

    With increasing modernization and urbanization of Asia, much of the future focus of the obesity epidemic will be in the Asian region. Low testosterone levels are frequently encountered in obese men who do not otherwise have a recognizable hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT) axis pathology. Moderate obesity predominantly decreases total testosterone due to insulin resistance-associated reductions in sex hormone binding globulin. More severe obesity is additionally associated with reductions in free testosterone levels due to suppression of the HPT axis. Low testosterone by itself leads to increasing adiposity, creating a self-perpetuating cycle of metabolic complications. Obesity-associated hypotestosteronemia is a functional, non-permanent state, which can be reversible, but this requires substantial weight loss. While testosterone treatment can lead to moderate reductions in fat mass, obesity by itself, in the absence of symptomatic androgen deficiency, is not an established indication for testosterone therapy. Testosterone therapy may lead to a worsening of untreated sleep apnea and compromise fertility. Whether testosterone therapy augments diet- and exercise-induced weight loss requires evaluation in adequately designed randomized controlled clinical trials. PMID:24407187

  12. Lowered testosterone in male obesity: Mechanisms, morbidity and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Ng Tang Fui

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available With increasing modernization and urbanization of Asia, much of the future focus of the obesity epidemic will be in the Asian region. Low testosterone levels are frequently encountered in obese men who do not otherwise have a recognizable hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT axis pathology. Moderate obesity predominantly decreases total testosterone due to insulin resistance-associated reductions in sex hormone binding globulin. More severe obesity is additionally associated with reductions in free testosterone levels due to suppression of the HPT axis. Low testosterone by itself leads to increasing adiposity, creating a self-perpetuating cycle of metabolic complications. Obesity-associated hypotestosteronemia is a functional, non-permanent state, which can be reversible, but this requires substantial weight loss. While testosterone treatment can lead to moderate reductions in fat mass, obesity by itself, in the absence of symptomatic androgen defi ciency, is not an established indication for testosterone therapy. Testosterone therapy may lead to a worsening of untreated sleep apnea and compromise fertility. Whether testosterone therapy augments diet- and exercise-induced weight loss requires evaluation in adequately designed randomized controlled clinical trials.

  13. Lowered testosterone in male obesity: mechanisms, morbidity and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fui, Mark Ng Tang; Dupuis, Philippe; Grossmann, Mathis

    2014-01-01

    With increasing modernization and urbanization of Asia, much of the future focus of the obesity epidemic will be in the Asian region. Low testosterone levels are frequently encountered in obese men who do not otherwise have a recognizable hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT) axis pathology. Moderate obesity predominantly decreases total testosterone due to insulin resistance-associated reductions in sex hormone binding globulin. More severe obesity is additionally associated with reductions in free testosterone levels due to suppression of the HPT axis. Low testosterone by itself leads to increasing adiposity, creating a self-perpetuating cycle of metabolic complications. Obesity-associated hypotestosteronemia is a functional, non-permanent state, which can be reversible, but this requires substantial weight loss. While testosterone treatment can lead to moderate reductions in fat mass, obesity by itself, in the absence of symptomatic androgen defi ciency, is not an established indication for testosterone therapy. Testosterone therapy may lead to a worsening of untreated sleep apnea and compromise fertility. Whether testosterone therapy augments diet- and exercise-induced weight loss requires evaluation in adequately designed randomized controlled clinical trials.

  14. New medications for obesity management: changing the landscape of obesity treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulghassoul-Pietrzykowska, Nadia; Franceschelli, Jennifer; Still, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Despite being one of the most prevalent chronic diseases, obesity was not recognized as such until very recently. Although linked to ubiquitous diseases like diabetes, hypertension, coronary artery disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and many others, targeted treatments are few. Diet, exercise, and behavior modification are the pillars of weight loss. When they alone do not achieve the required weight reduction, medications may be used for patients with a BMI above 30 or above 27 if obesity-related comorbidities are present. The spectrum of pharmacologic agents aimed at obesity treatment will be reviewed. Two medications, phentermine and orlistat, have been the only agents approved many years ago and now still standing. Others have come and gone, removed from the market by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) because of harmful side-effects. However, in the last few years, new drugs have started to emerge. Since 2012, two new medications phentermine-topiramate extended-release combination and lorcaserin have been FDA approved, while at least one more, naltrexone SR/bupropion SR combination is expected to be re-evaluated by the FDA in 2014. Treating obesity is crucial as it will ultimately result in the prevention of many related chronic diseases and will decrease morbidity and mortality. Weight loss medications are a valuable part of the clinician's toolbox in the treatment of obesity and should be used when appropriate. Having a variety of medications would be a great asset to accommodate various patients' needs and pre-existing medical conditions.

  15. Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, C W

    1987-01-01

    Obesity is not a single disease, but a variety of conditions resulting from different mechanisms and associated with various types and degrees of risks. To determine who should lose weight, how much weight should be lost, and how to undertake weight loss, the following types of information are needed: personal-demographic data, developmental patterns, family history, energy balance, body composition/fat distribution, psychological/behavioral measures, endocrine/metabolic measures, complications and associated conditions. Weight reduction should be undertaken by women with morbid obesity, with complications secondary to the obesity, with a strong family history of conditions associated with obesity, or with increased abdomen:hip ratios. In contrast, women who have excess weight localized in the hips and thighs and no personal or family history of associated conditions may not benefit from dietary restriction. Low calorie diets result in adaptive changes, "designed" to prolong survival in the face of famine. These include changes in water balance, metabolic rate, and appetite. Metabolic rate declines, allowing the individual to burn fewer and fewer calories. Each time a woman diets she tends to lose weight less rapidly than the time before. "Restrained eating" predisposes binge eating. Indeed, bulimia rarely occurs in the absence of prior caloric restrictions. Current medical definitions of obesity do not consider these nuances. Existing definitions "over-diagnose" obesity in women, in general, and in older women and nonwhite women, in particular. For example, by existing standards, more than 60 percent of black women more than 45 years of age are considered obese. In contrast, the health risks of similar degrees of obesity are substantially greater for men than for women. Part of the problems lies in the fact that many women have pear-shaped fat distribution,a pattern which is not associated with increased health risks.Current cultural definitions of obesity for

  16. Increasing general practitioners' confidence and self-efficacy in managing obesity: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgiss, Elizabeth; Haesler, Emily; Elmitt, Nicholas; van Weel, Chris; Douglas, Kirsty

    2017-01-27

    Internationally, general practitioners (GPs) are being encouraged to take an active role in the care of their patients with obesity, but as yet there are few tools for them to implement within their clinics. This study assessed the self-efficacy and confidence of GPs before and after implementing a weight management programme in their practice. Nested mixed methods study within a 6-month feasibility trial. 4 urban general practices and 1 rural general practice in Australia. All vocationally registered GPs in the local region were eligible and invited to participate; 12 GPs were recruited and 11 completed the study. The Change Programme is a structured GP-delivered weight management programme that uses the therapeutic relationship between the patient and their GP to provide holistic and person-centred care. It is an evidence-based programme founded on Australian guidelines for the management of obesity in primary care. Self-efficacy and confidence of the GPs when managing obesity was measured using a quantitative survey consisting of Likert scales in conjunction with pro forma interviews. In line with social cognitive theory, GPs who experienced performance mastery during the pilot intervention had an increase in their confidence and self-efficacy. In particular, confidence in assisting and arranging care for patients was improved as demonstrated in the survey and supported by the qualitative data. Most importantly from the qualitative data, GPs described changing their usual practice and felt more confident to discuss obesity with all of their patients. A structured management tool for obesity care in general practice can improve GP confidence and self-efficacy in managing obesity. Enhancing GP 'professional self-efficacy' is the first step to improving obesity management within general practice. ACTRN12614001192673; Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Management of obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in children: consensus and controversy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Fleischman

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Amy Fleischman, Erinn T RhodesDivision of Endocrinology, Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA, United StatesAbstract: Childhood obesity has become a national and international epidemic. The prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes in youth have been increasing, and type 2 diabetes is one of the most challenging complications of obesity in childhood. Comprehensive lifestyle interventions that include attention to dietary change, increased physical activity and behavior change appear to be required for the successful treatment of pediatric obesity. In particular, aspects of behavioral interventions that have been identified as contributing to effectiveness have included intensity, parent/family participation, addressing healthy dietary change, promoting physical activity, and involving behavioral management principles such as goal setting. A multidisciplinary team approach is required for successful management of type 2 diabetes in youth as well. As with many therapies in pediatrics, clinical trials and support for treatments of obesity and type 2 diabetes in youth lag behind adult data. Pediatric recommendations may be extrapolated from adult data and are often based on consensus guidelines. Type 2 diabetes in children is most commonly managed with lifestyle modification and medications, metformin and/or insulin, the only medications currently approved for use in children. However, many opportunities exist for ongoing research to clarify optimal management for obesity and type 2 diabetes in youth.Keywords: children, obesity, type 2 diabetes, metformin, insulin, bariatric surgery

  18. Why do parents enrol in a childhood obesity management program?: a qualitative study with parents of overweight and obese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Kamila; Vidgen, Helen

    2017-02-02

    Despite the high prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity enrolment to weight management programs remains difficult, time consuming, costly and has limited effectiveness. The aim of this paper was to explore parents' perspectives on factors that influence their decision to enrol in a program to address their child's weight. Semi-structured qualitative telephone interviews were undertaken with 21 parents of primary school aged children above the healthy weight range who had enrolled in a healthy lifestyle program. Questions were developed and analysed using the Theory of Planned Behaviour. They addressed parental reasons for enrolment, expectations of the program and apprehensions regarding enrolling. Prior to deciding to enrol, parents tended to be aware of the child's weight status, had attempted to address it themselves and had sought help from a number of people including health professionals. Parental decision to enrol was influenced by their evaluation of their previous attempts and their child's emotional state. Awareness of their child's weight status is an important first step in parents taking action at this health issue however it is unlikely to be sufficient on its own. Parental decision to join a childhood obesity management program can be complex and is likely to be made after numerous and unsuccessful attempts to address the child's weight. Strategies to encourage parents to enrol in programs should include activities beyond awareness of weight status. Health professionals should use contact time with parents to raise awareness of the child's weight status and to provide encouragement to address overweight and obesity. Parents must be supported in their attempts to address their child's overweight and obesity whether they choose to manage it themselves or within a program.

  19. Why do parents enrol in a childhood obesity management program?: a qualitative study with parents of overweight and obese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Davidson

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the high prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity enrolment to weight management programs remains difficult, time consuming, costly and has limited effectiveness. The aim of this paper was to explore parents’ perspectives on factors that influence their decision to enrol in a program to address their child’s weight. Methods Semi-structured qualitative telephone interviews were undertaken with 21 parents of primary school aged children above the healthy weight range who had enrolled in a healthy lifestyle program. Questions were developed and analysed using the Theory of Planned Behaviour. They addressed parental reasons for enrolment, expectations of the program and apprehensions regarding enrolling. Results Prior to deciding to enrol, parents tended to be aware of the child’s weight status, had attempted to address it themselves and had sought help from a number of people including health professionals. Parental decision to enrol was influenced by their evaluation of their previous attempts and their child’s emotional state. Conclusions Awareness of their child’s weight status is an important first step in parents taking action at this health issue however it is unlikely to be sufficient on its own. Parental decision to join a childhood obesity management program can be complex and is likely to be made after numerous and unsuccessful attempts to address the child’s weight. Strategies to encourage parents to enrol in programs should include activities beyond awareness of weight status. Health professionals should use contact time with parents to raise awareness of the child’s weight status and to provide encouragement to address overweight and obesity. Parents must be supported in their attempts to address their child’s overweight and obesity whether they choose to manage it themselves or within a program.

  20. Workplace Incivility and Conflict Management Styles: Predicting Job Performance, Organizational Commitment and Turnover Intent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reio, Thomas G., Jr.; Trudel, Jeannie

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relations among conflict management styles and target and instigator incivility and job performance, organizational commitment, and turnover intent. Data from 270 employees suggested that experiencing and instigating uncivil behavior occurred frequently. Using an integrative conflict management style…

  1. Traditional Project Management and the Visual Workplace Environment to Improve Project Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichera, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    A majority of large IT projects fail to meet scheduled deadlines, are over budget and do not satisfy the end user. Many projects fail in spite of utilizing traditional project management techniques. Research of project management has not identified the use of a visual workspace as a feature affecting or influencing the success of a project during…

  2. The use of lorcaserin in the management of obesity: a critical appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Bai

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Bo Bai, Yu WangDepartment of Pharmacology and Pharmacy, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Obesity is a chronic disease with a high prevalence in both developed and developing countries. Effective management of this worldwide epidemic will have a significant impact on the health care system globally. Lifestyle interventions, such as restricting calorie consumption and increasing physical activity, remain a major component of weight-reduction programs. The development of pharmacotherapy for the management of obesity is still at the infancy stage. Side effects have been the key issue for anti-obesity drugs previously withdrawn from the market. The focus of this review, lorcaserin, is a selective serotonin receptor agonist that is currently undergoing Phase III evaluations. The efficacy of this drug in reducing body weight and improving metabolic parameters of obese patients has been demonstrated in two recent clinical trials. The available evidence indicates that this drug does not show unwanted effects on heart valves or pulmonary artery pressure, and the treatment improves the risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Despite these promising results, additional experimental and clinical studies are critical for the approval of lorcaserin as a new anti-obesity monodrug therapy by the US Food and Drug Administration.Keywords: obesity, anti-obesity drug, 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor agonist, clinical trial

  3. Benchmarking of workplace performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Voordt, Theo; Jensen, Per Anker

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to present a process model of value adding corporate real estate and facilities management and to discuss which indicators can be used to measure and benchmark workplace performance.

    In order to add value to the organisation, the work environment has to provide value for

  4. Making the Workplace Work

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-01

    This podcast demonstrates the importance of workplace support in managing diabetes in a corporate diabetes program.  Created: 11/1/2007 by National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a joint program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.   Date Released: 11/8/2007.

  5. Outcomes of weight management in obese pet dogs: what can we do better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Alexander J

    2016-08-01

    Obesity is arguably the biggest health and welfare issue affecting pet dogs. Although successful weight loss has health benefits, current strategies are far from ideal. Many obese dogs that start a weight programme fail to lose weight, or subsequently regain the weight they have lost. Given that current weight loss strategies are not perfect, clinicians need to focus carefully on tailoring the programme, perhaps setting a pragmatic target for weight loss, so as to ensure the benefits are maximised. This review will summarise key findings from recent clinical research into pet obesity, and present a framework for improving success, by better tailoring weight management regimens and end points to the individual.

  6. Quality of life and psychological well-being in obesity management: improving the odds of success by managing distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallis, M

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is increasing in prevalence and placing an ever-greater burden on individuals and healthcare resources alike. Obesity management is complex and, for many, elusive. This paper reviews the major factors that influence psychological well-being in individuals with obesity and describes the means by which their impact on distress and other aspects of quality of life (QoL) can be quantified. The goal is to enable healthcare providers to set reasonable, achievable, maintainable weight loss targets that will improve the psychological well-being and QoL of individuals living with obesity. PubMed and Web of Science searches were conducted to identify literature that addresses the key question: How can distress over obesity be measured and taken into account when tailoring weight loss interventions for a particular patient? 'Distress over obesity' is a key parameter that illustrates the psychological consequences of excess weight. Healthcare providers can draw on a range of obesity-specific and non-specific assessment tools to quantify distress as well as the other contributions of obesity to QoL and mental/emotional health. When physicians consider the psychological/QoL aspects of obesity and how these change with successful weight loss, it becomes possible to set achievable, realistic weight loss goals and develop a manageable plan to achieve them. Any future developments that make it easier to achieve these goals should be made widely available to all patients in need, in order to help them turn a vicious cycle of failure into a virtuous cycle of success. © 2016 The Authors. International Journal of Clinical Practice Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... concerned about weight-related health problems, see your doctor or health care provider. You and your provider can evaluate your health risks and discuss your weight-loss options. Although there are genetic, behavioral and hormonal influences on body weight, obesity occurs when you take ...

  8. Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgen, Camilla Schmidt; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2014-01-01

    A new report provides compelling evidence of the high prevalence of overweight and obesity throughout the world. The prevalence has increased since 1980, but at different rates across ages, times and locations. Studies exploring the causes of these differences could aid development of effective...

  9. Dutch general practitioners’ weight management policy for overweight and obese patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloek, C.J.J.; Tol, J.; Veenhof, C.; Wulp, I. van der; Swinkels, I.C.S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: General practitioners (GPs) can play an important role in both the prevention and management of overweight and obesity. Current general practice guidelines in the Netherlands allow room for GPs to execute their own weight management policy. Objective: To examine GPs’ current weight

  10. The local implementation of a chronic disease management model for childhood overweight and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink-Melis, Willy J; Derksen, Elze R E; Westerman, Marjan J; Renders, Carry M; Seidell, Jacob C; Visscher, Tommy L S

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is to determine opportunities and barriers regarding the management of overweight and obese children in daily practice, and to show the value of using focus groups when developing an action plan for childhood overweight management in a local context. METHODS: Seven

  11. Obesity and asthma: Pathophysiology and implications for diagnosis and management in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Mohanan, Sveta; Tapp, Hazel; McWilliams, Andrew; Dulin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The effects of obesity on asthma diagnosis, control, and exacerbation severity are increasingly recognized; however, the underlying pathophysiology of this association is poorly understood. Mainstream clinical practice has yet to adopt aggressive management of obesity as a modifiable risk factor in asthma care, as is the case with a risk factor like tobacco or allergen exposure. This review summarizes existing data that support the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the association betwee...

  12. The search for compounds that stimulate thermogenesis in obesity management: from pharmaceuticals to functional food ingredients

    OpenAIRE

    Dulloo, Abdull G.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of managing obesity through the stimulation of thermogenesis is currently a focus of considerable attention by the pharmaceutical, nutraceutical and functional food industries. This paper first reviews the landmark discoveries that have fuelled the search for thermogenic anti-obesity products that range from single-target drugs to multi-target functional foods. It subsequently analyses the thermogenic and fat-oxidizing potentials of a wide array of bioactive food ingredients which...

  13. The Maternal Obesity Management (MOM) Trial Protocol: a lifestyle intervention during pregnancy to minimize downstream obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Kristi B; Ferraro, Zachary M; Goldfield, Gary; Keely, Erin; Stacey, Dawn; Hadjiyannakis, Stasia; Jean-Philippe, Sonia; Walker, Mark; Barrowman, Nicholas J

    2013-05-01

    Maternal obesity and/or high gestational weight gain (GWG) are associated with downstream child obesity. Pregnancy represents a critical period for prevention as women are highly motivated and more receptive to behavior change. This pilot study was developed to test the feasibility of intervening with the mother, specifically keeping her GWG within the Institute of Medicine (IOM) limits, with the intended target of preventing obesity in her child downstream. We are testing the practicality of delivering a structured physical activity and nutrition intervention to pregnant women during gestation and then following mom and baby to 24 months of age. This study is a two-arm, parallel group, randomized controlled trial being conducted in Ottawa. Pregnant women, with pregravid BMI >18.5, between 12 and 20 weeks gestation are randomized to one of two groups: intervention (n=30) who receive the MOM trial Handbook (guide to healthy gestation) plus a structured physical activity and nutrition program, or a standard clinical care control group (n=30). The intervention lasts 25-28 weeks (6 months) depending on anticipated delivery date, with follow-up assessment on mother and child at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months post-delivery. Pregnancy, a critical time of growth, development and physiological change, provides an opportunity for early lifestyle intervention. The goal of identifying an effective lifestyle program for the gestational period that leads to healthy fetal development and subsequently normal weight offspring, less likely to develop obesity and its co-morbidities, is unique and could possibly attenuate the inter-generational cycle of obesity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Guidelines for dietary management of menopausal women with simple obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Brończyk-Puzoń; Dariusz Piecha; Justyna Nowak; Aneta Koszowska; Karolina Kulik-Kupka; Anna Dittfeld; Barbara Zubelewicz-Szkodzińska

    2015-01-01

    The problem of obesity affects all age groups. It is also observed among menopausal women. Menopause is the time in a woman’s life when, as a consequence of hormonal changes occurring in the body, the risk of overweight and obesity increases significantly and, therefore, so does the risk of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Excess body weight in menopausal women may also be of social and psychological importance since the occurring symptoms may considerably decrease quality of life and s...

  15. Obesity: Risk factors, complications, and strategies for sustainable long-term weight management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruh, Sharon M

    2017-10-01

    The aims of this article are to review the effects of obesity on health and well-being and the evidence indicating they can be ameliorated by weight loss, and consider weight-management strategies that may help patients achieve and maintain weight loss. Narrative review based on literature searches of PubMed up to May 2016 with no date limits imposed. Search included terms such as "obesity," "overweight," "weight loss," "comorbidity," "diabetes," cardiovascular," "cancer," "depression," "management," and "intervention." Over one third of U.S. adults have obesity. Obesity is associated with a range of comorbidities, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and cancer; however, modest weight loss in the 5%-10% range, and above, can significantly improve health-related outcomes. Many individuals struggle to maintain weight loss, although strategies such as realistic goal-setting and increased consultation frequency can greatly improve the success of weight-management programs. Nurse practitioners have key roles in establishing weight-loss targets, providing motivation and support, and implementing weight-loss programs. With their in-depth understanding of the research in the field of obesity and weight management, nurse practitioners are well placed to effect meaningful changes in weight-management strategies deployed in clinical practice. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  16. Workplace violence investigations and activation of the threat management teams in a multinational corporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek-Asa, Corinne; Casteel, Carri; Rugala, Eugene; Romano, Steve; Ramirez, Marizen

    2013-11-01

    We examined threat management investigations conducted by a large multinational company. The company provided a database, removing any identifiers, of investigations by the corporate Threat Management Teams in 2009 and 2010. Rates were calculated using worker population data. During the 2-year study period, the company investigated threat management cases at a rate of 13.9 per 10,000 employees per year. Cases that activated a Threat Management Team were more likely to lead to corrective action (odds ratio = 2.0; 95% confidence interval = 1.08 to 3.87) and referral to the Employee Assistance Program (odds ratio = 4.8; 95% confidence interval = 3.00 to 7.77), but were not related to likelihood of termination. When the multidisciplinary teams were involved, cases were more likely to result in some type of action but were not more likely to lead to termination.

  17. Internal audits of psychosocial risks at workplaces with certified OHS management systems

    OpenAIRE

    Helbo, Anne; Hohnen, Pernille; Hasle, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Psychosocial risks are widely recognized as a major challenge at work, a challenge that most organizationsfind difficult to manage in practice. The OHSAS 18001 standard provides a framework for the managementof occupational health and safety risks, including psychosocial risks. However, suchoccupational health and safety management (OHSM) systems tend to have difficulties in adequatelyaddressing psychosocial risks at work. A crucial element in the OHSM system is internal audits. We haveinvest...

  18. Role of low-glycemic index diet in management of childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, A P S; Chan, R S M; Nelson, E A S; Chan, J C N

    2011-07-01

    Conventional dietary recommendation for obesity management is a low-fat energy-restricted diet, which however, only have modest and non-sustained effects on weight reduction. Alternative dietary interventions, including low-glycemic index (GI) diet, have been proposed. Glycemic index is a measure of blood glucose excursion per unit of carbohydrate. Foods with high GI are rapidly digested, absorbed and transformed into glucose. These processes cause accelerated and transient surges in blood glucose and insulin, earlier return of hunger sensation and excessive caloric intake. Conversely, low-GI diet decreases blood glucose and insulin excursion, promotes greater fat oxidation, decreases lipogenesis and increases satiety. Modern food-processing technology has produced many food products with high GI which may contribute to the burgeoning epidemic of obesity especially in children/adolescents. Epidemiological and clinical trials suggest a role for low-GI diet in the management of childhood obesity and associated cardio-metabolic risks although results are not always consistent. In this article, we shall review the physiological basis and current evidence for and against low-GI diet in obesity management, with particular focus in children and adolescents. © 2010 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2010 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  19. Growing Concerns With Workplace Incivility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Natasha Renee; Rogers, Bonnie

    2017-11-01

    Workplace incivility (WPI) is a growing issue across all public and private sectors. Occupational and environmental health nurses can educate employees and management about WPI, its risk factors and characteristics, and ways to reduce incidents of WPI.

  20. A systematic review of childhood obesity in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region: Health impact and management

    OpenAIRE

    Nesrine S. Farrag; Cheskin, Lawrence J.; Mohamed K. Farag

    2017-01-01

    Childhood obesity has serious consequences both immediately and in adulthood. The rates of obesity in children and adolescents are rising rapidly in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. We systematically searched the literature to explore adverse effects associated with childhood obesity in this region and the management efforts for dealing with it. Inclusion criteria were: English-language, non-basic-science focused articles that used any of the standard obesity definitions and we...

  1. Intensive gestational glycemic management and childhood obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemette, L; Durksen, A; Rabbani, R; Zarychanski, R; Abou-Setta, A M; Duhamel, T A; McGavock, J M; Wicklow, B

    2017-07-01

    Hyperglycemia in pregnancy is associated with increased risk of offspring childhood obesity. Treatment reduces macrosomia; however, it is unclear if this effect translates into a reduced risk of childhood obesity. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intensive glycemic management in pregnancy in preventing childhood obesity. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL and ClinicalTrials.gov up to February 2016 and conference abstracts from 2010 to 2015. Two reviewers independently identified randomized controlled trials evaluating intensive glycemic management interventions for hyperglycemia in pregnancy and included four of the 383 citations initially identified. Two reviewers independently extracted study data and evaluated internal validity of the studies using the Cochrane Collaboration's Risk of Bias tool. Data were pooled using random-effects models. Statistical heterogeneity was quantified using the I(2) test. The primary outcome was age- and sex-adjusted childhood obesity. Secondary outcomes included childhood weight and waist circumference and maternal hypoglycemia during the trial (safety outcome). The four eligible trials (n=767 children) similarly used lifestyle and insulin to manage gestational hyperglycemia, but only two measured offspring obesity and waist circumference and could be pooled for these outcomes. We found no association between intensive gestational glucose management and childhood obesity at 7-10 years of age (relative risk 0.89, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.65 to 1.22; two trials; n=568 children). Waist circumference also did not differ between treatment and control arms (mean difference, -2.68 cm; 95% CI, -8.17 to 2.81 cm; two trials; n=568 children). Intensive gestational glycemic management is not associated with reduced childhood obesity in offspring, but randomized data is scarce. Long-term follow-up of trials should be prioritized and

  2. Successful childhood obesity management in primary care in Canada: what are the odds?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kuhle

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. The management of a child presenting with obesity in a primary care setting can be viewed as a multi-step behavioral process with many perceived and actual barriers for families and primary care providers. In order to achieve the goal of behavior change and, ultimately, clinically meaningful weight management outcomes in a child who is considered obese, all steps in this process should ideally be completed. We sought to review the evidence for completing each step, and to estimate the population effect of secondary prevention of childhood obesity in Canada.Methods. Data from the 2009/2010 Canadian Community Health Survey and from a review of the literature were used to estimate the probabilities for completion of each step. A flow chart based on these probabilities was used to determine the proportion of children with obesity that would undergo and achieve clinically meaningful weight management outcomes each year in Canada.Results. We estimated that the probability of a child in Canada who presents with obesity achieving clinically meaningful weight management outcomes through secondary prevention in primary care is around 0.6% per year, with a range from 0.01% to 7.2% per year. The lack of accessible and effective weight management programs appeared to be the most important bottleneck in the process.Conclusions. In order to make progress towards supporting effective pediatric obesity management, efforts should focus on population-based primary prevention and a systems approach to change our obesogenic society, alongside the allocation of resources toward weight management approaches that are comprehensively offered, equitably distributed and robustly evaluated.

  3. Management of obesity in adults: European clinical practice guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsigos, Constantine; Hainer, Vojtech; Basdevant, Arnaud; Finer, Nick; Fried, Martin; Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth; Micic, Dragan; Maislos, Maximo; Roman, Gabriela; Schutz, Yves; Toplak, Hermann; Zahorska-Markiewicz, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    The development of consensus guidelines for obesity is complex. It involves recommending both treatment interventions and interventions related to screening and prevention. With so many publications and claims, and with the awareness that success for the individual is short-lived, many find it

  4. Obesity in Childhood Cancer Survivors: Call for Early Weight Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang Fang; Parsons, Susan K

    2015-09-01

    A high prevalence of obesity and cardiometabolic conditions has been increasingly recognized in childhood cancer survivors. In particular, survivors of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been found to be at risk of becoming overweight or obese early in treatment, with increases in weight maintained throughout treatment and beyond. Nutrition plays an important role in the etiology of obesity and cardiometabolic conditions and is among the few modifiable factors that can prevent or delay the early onset of these chronic conditions. However, nutritional intake in childhood cancer survivors has not been adequately examined and the evidence is built on data from small cohorts of survivors. In addition, the long-term impact of cancer diagnosis and treatment on survivors' nutritional intake as well as how survivors' nutritional intake is associated with chronic health conditions have not been well quantified in large-scale studies. Promoting family-based healthy lifestyles, preferably at a sensitive window of unhealthy weight gain, is a priority for preventing the early onset of obesity and cardiometabolic conditions in childhood cancer survivors. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  5. [Possibilities of mobile applications for managing obesity according to professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Martínez, Alicia; Tort, Elena; Medina, F Xavier; Saigí-Rubió, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    Given the increasing use and importance of mobile telephone applications (apps) in the health setting, this study aimed to ascertain the views of health professionals involved in the treatment of obesity about their current needs and gaps in their requirements, their willingness to use mobile apps, and the features these devices should have for the treatment of obesity. A qualitative study was conducted through semi-structured interviews with experts treating obesity. The experts believed that apps could be useful to interact or deal with patients. However, their willingness to use apps contrasts with the current limited use of these devices. Practitioners felt that apps could partly compensate for the lack of daily contact between patients and professionals and could increase interaction with patients, achieving more favourable weight control results, especially with regard to improved adherence and motivation. In terms of the functionality and requirements of such apps, the main elements to be included were records of weight, physical activity and food consumption. Adding apps to the existing treatment of overweight and obesity still requires further definition of its functions. Additionally, further investigation is needed into both the role and involvement of professionals in the design process and during treatment. Copyright © 2015 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Can Future Managers and Business Executives be Influenced to Behave more Ethically in the Workplace? The Impact of Approaches to Learning on Business Students’ Cheating Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Ballantine, Joan A.; Guo, Xin; Larres, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    This study considers the potential for influencing business students to become ethical managers by directing their undergraduate learning environment. In particular, the relationship between business students’ academic cheating, as a predictor of workplace ethical behavior, and their approaches to learning is explored. The three approaches to learning identified from the students’ approaches to learning literature are deep approach, represented by an intrinsic interest in and a desire to unde...

  7. Diet and exercise in management of obesity and overweight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fock, Kwong Ming; Khoo, Joan

    2013-12-01

    According to World Health Organization, in 2010 there were over 1 billion overweight adults worldwide with 400 million adults who were obese. Obesity is a major risk factor for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disorders, obstructive sleep apnea, and cancers (prostate, colorectal, endometrial, and breast). Obese people may present to the gastroenterologists with gastroesophageal reflux, non-alcoholic fatty liver, and gallstones. It is important, therefore, to recognize and treat obesity. The main cause of obesity is an imbalance between calories consumed and calories expended, although in a small number of cases, genetics and diseases such as hypothyroidism, Cushing's disease, depression, and use of medications such as antidepressants and anticonvulsants are responsible for fat accumulation in the body. The main treatment for obesity is dieting, augmented by physical exercise and supported by cognitive behavioral therapy. Calorie-restriction strategies are one of the most common dietary plans. Low-calorie diet refers to a diet with a total dietary calorie intake of 800-1500, while very low-calorie diet has less than 800 calories daily. These dietary regimes need to be balanced in macronutrients, vitamins, and minerals. Fifty-five percent of the dietary calories should come from carbohydrates, 10% from proteins, and 30% from fats, of which 10% of total fat consist of saturated fats. After reaching the desired body weight, the amount of dietary calories consumed can be increased gradually to maintain a balance between calories consumed and calories expended. Regular physical exercise enhances the efficiency of diet through increase in the satiating efficiency of a fixed meal, and is useful for maintaining diet-induced weight loss. A meta-analysis by Franz found that by calorie restriction and exercise, weight loss of 5-8.5 kg was observed 6 months after intervention. After 48 months, a mean of 3-6 kg was maintained. In conclusion, there is evidence

  8. Management of Peptic Ulcer Bleeding in Different Case Volume Workplaces: Results of a Nationwide Inquiry in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Rácz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to conduct a national survey to evaluate the recent endoscopic treatment and drug therapy of peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB patients and to compare practices in high and low case volume Hungarian workplaces. A total of 62 gastroenterology units participated in the six-month study. A total of 3033 PUB cases and a mean of 8.15±3.9 PUB cases per month per unit were reported. In the 23 high case volume units (HCV, there was a mean of 12.9±5.4 PUB cases/month, whereas in the 39 low case volume units (LCV, a mean of 5.3±2.9 PUB cases/month were treated during the study period. In HCV units, endoscopic therapies for Forrest Ia, Ib, and IIa ulcers were significantly more often used than in LCV units (86% versus 68%; P=0.001. Among patients with stigmata of recent haemorrhage (Forrest I, II, bolus + continuous infusion PPI was given significantly more frequently in HCV than in LCV units (49.6% versus 33.2%; P=0.001. Mortality in HCV units was less than in LCV units (2.7% versus 4.3%; P=0.023. The penetration of evidence-based recommendations for PUB management is stronger in HCV units resulting lower mortality.

  9. Investigating Why and for Whom Management Ethnic Representativeness Influences Interpersonal Mistreatment in the Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Alex P; Avery, Derek R; Dawson, Jeremy F; King, Eden B

    2017-06-15

    Preliminary research suggests that employees use the demographic makeup of their organization to make sense of diversity-related incidents at work. The authors build on this work by examining the impact of management ethnic representativeness-the degree to which the ethnic composition of managers in an organization mirrors or is misaligned with the ethnic composition of employees in that organization. To do so, they integrate signaling theory and a sense-making perspective into a relational demography framework to investigate why and for whom management ethnic representativeness may have an impact on interpersonal mistreatment at work. Specifically, in three complementary studies, the authors examine the relationship between management ethnic representativeness and interpersonal mistreatment. First, they analyze the relationship between management ethnic representativeness and perceptions of harassment, bullying, and abuse the next year, as moderated by individuals' ethnic similarity to others in their organizations in a sample of 60,602 employees of Britain's National Health Service. Second, a constructive replication investigates perceived behavioral integrity as an explanatory mechanism that can account for the effects of representativeness using data from a nationally representative survey of working adults in the United States. Third and finally, online survey data collected at two time points replicated these patterns and further integrated the effects of representativeness and dissimilarity when they are measured using both objective and subjective strategies. Results support the authors' proposed moderated mediation model in which management ethnic representation is negatively related to interpersonal mistreatment through the mediator of perceived behavioral integrity, with effects being stronger for ethnically dissimilar employees. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Obesity.

    OpenAIRE

    Callaway, C W

    1987-01-01

    Obesity is not a single disease, but a variety of conditions resulting from different mechanisms and associated with various types and degrees of risks. To determine who should lose weight, how much weight should be lost, and how to undertake weight loss, the following types of information are needed: personal-demographic data, developmental patterns, family history, energy balance, body composition/fat distribution, psychological/behavioral measures, endocrine/metabolic measures, complicatio...

  11. Management of obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in children: consensus and controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischman, Amy; Rhodes, Erinn T

    2009-11-27

    Childhood obesity has become a national and international epidemic. The prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes in youth have been increasing, and type 2 diabetes is one of the most challenging complications of obesity in childhood. Comprehensive lifestyle interventions that include attention to dietary change, increased physical activity and behavior change appear to be required for the successful treatment of pediatric obesity. In particular, aspects of behavioral interventions that have been identified as contributing to effectiveness have included intensity, parent/family participation, addressing healthy dietary change, promoting physical activity, and involving behavioral management principles such as goal setting. A multidisciplinary team approach is required for successful management of type 2 diabetes in youth as well. As with many therapies in pediatrics, clinical trials and support for treatments of obesity and type 2 diabetes in youth lag behind adult data. Pediatric recommendations may be extrapolated from adult data and are often based on consensus guidelines. Type 2 diabetes in children is most commonly managed with lifestyle modification and medications, metformin and/or insulin, the only medications currently approved for use in children. However, many opportunities exist for ongoing research to clarify optimal management for obesity and type 2 diabetes in youth.

  12. Conceptual Model of Weight Management in Overweight and Obese African-American Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Suzanne M; Magwood, Gayenell S; Nemeth, Lynne S; Jenkins, Carolyn M

    2017-04-01

    Weight management of overweight and obese (OWO) African-American females (AAFs) is a poorly defined concept, leading to ineffective treatment of overweight and obesity, prevention of health sequelae, and risk reduction. A conceptual model of the phenomenon of weight management in OWO AAFs was developed through dimensional analysis of the literature. Constructs were identified and sorted into the dimensions of perspective, context, conditions, process, and consequences and integrated into an explanatory matrix. Through dimensional analysis, weight management in OWO AAFs was characterized as a multidimensional concept, defined from the perspective of weight loss in community-dwelling AAFs. Behaviors associated with weight management are strongly influenced by intrinsic factors and extrinsic conditions, which influence engagement in the processes and consequences of weight management. The resulting conceptual model of weight management in OWO AAFs provides a framework for research interventions applicable in a variety of settings. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A Foundation for Understanding Knowledge Sharing: Organizational Culture, Informal Workplace Learning, Performance Support, and Knowledge Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Shirley J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper serves as an exploration into some of the ways in which organizations can promote, capture, share, and manage the valuable knowledge of their employees. The problem is that employees typically do not share valuable information, skills, or expertise with other employees or with the entire organization. The author uses research as well as…

  14. ePortfolios in the Workplace for Human Capital Management: A Multiple Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    This study researches whether the ePortfolio is a suitable instrument for human capital management in the business environment. The implementation of ePortfolio systems in five different organizations is analyzed. It considers whether ePortfolio implementations were successful, and relevant critical success factors were identified. For the latter…

  15. Canine and feline obesity: a review of pathophysiology, epidemiology, and clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loftus JP

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available John P Loftus, Joseph J Wakshlag Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinary Medical Center, Ithaca, NY, USAAbstract: Canine and feline obesity rates have reached pandemic proportions and are similar to those in humans, with approximately 30%–40% of dogs and cats being overweight to obese. Obesity has been associated with other health problems, including osteoarthritis, renal disease, skin disease, insulin resistance, and neoplasia in dogs, while in cats obesity is associated with dermatological issues, diabetes mellitus, neoplasia, and urolithiasis. The health issues appear to be slightly different across the two species, which may be due to some inherent differences in the hormonal milieu involved in obesity that differs between the dog and the cat. In this review, we discuss the complicated nature of the pathogenesis of obesity, the hormonal stimulus for orexigenic and anorexigenic behavior, adipose tissue as an endocrine organ, and most importantly, clinical management of the number one disease in canine and feline medicine.Keywords: obesity, canine, feline, veterinary

  16. Osteosarcopenic obesity in women: impact, prevalence, and management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JafariNasabian P

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pegah JafariNasabian,1 Julia E Inglis,1 Owen J Kelly,2 Jasminka Z Ilich1 1Department of Nutrition, Food and Exercise Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, 2Abbott Nutrition, Columbus, OH, USA Abstract: Osteosarcopenic obesity syndrome (OSO has recently been identified as a condition encompassing osteopenia/osteoporosis, sarcopenia and obesity. OSO is especially deleterious in older adults (even if they are not obese by conventional measures, due to age-related redistribution of fat and its infiltration into bone and muscle. Osteoporosis and bone fractures in elderly increase the risk of sarcopenia, which, through decreased mobility, increases the risk of more falls and fractures, creating a vicious cycle. Obesity plays a dual role: to a certain extent, it promotes bone and muscle gains through mechanical loading; in contrast, increased adiposity is also a source of pro-inflammatory cytokines and other endocrine factors that impair bone and muscle. As the elderly population increases, changes in lifestyle to delay the onset of OSO, or prevent OSO, are warranted. Among these changes, dietary patterns and physical activity modifications are the first ones to be implemented. The typical Western diet (and lifestyle promotes several chronic diseases including OSO, by facilitating a pro-inflammatory state, largely via the imbalance in omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio and low-fiber and high-processed food consumption. Nutritional modifications to prevent and/or alleviate the OSO syndrome include adequate intake of protein, calcium, magnesium and vitamin D and increasing consumptions of foods containing omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and fiber. Certain types of physical activity, often decreased in overweight/obese women and in elderly, might preserve bone and muscle, as well as help in reducing body fat accrual and fat infiltration. Habitual daily activities and some alternative modes of exercise may be more appropriate for older

  17. The role of endoscopic therapy in obesity management: intragastric balloons and aspiration therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nitin; Sullivan, Shelby; Thompson, Christopher C

    2017-01-01

    Weight management is increasingly incorporating endoscopic bariatric therapy (EBT). As the global burden of obesity and its comorbidities has increased, it is evident that novel therapeutic approaches will be necessary to address the obesity epidemic. EBTs offer greater efficacy than diet and lifestyle modification and lower invasiveness than bariatric surgery. The US Food and Drug Administration has approved two intragastric balloons and aspiration therapy for the treatment of obesity: Apollo Orbera is indicated for the treatment of Class I and Class II obesity, Re Shape Integrated Dual Balloon system is indicated for the same range with a comorbidity, and Aspire Bariatrics AspireAssist is approved for patients with a body mass index of 35-55 kg/m 2 . These devices have proven safe and effective in clinical trials and are gaining commercial acceptance in the USA; the Orbera has been used extensively outside the USA for over 20 years. These devices will need to be delivered in the context of a multidisciplinary weight loss program, integrating comprehensive care of obesity. Patient selection is important, and ensuring appropriate patient expectations and understanding of alternatives such as pharmacologic therapy and surgery is essential. With several EBTs on the horizon, patients with obesity will have an even broader array of safe and effective options for weight management in the future.

  18. The 5As team intervention: bridging the knowledge gap in obesity management among primary care practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunleye, Ayodele; Osunlana, Adedayo; Asselin, Jodie; Cave, Andrew; Sharma, Arya Mitra; Campbell-Scherer, Denise Lynn

    2015-12-22

    Despite opportunities for didactic education on obesity management, we still observe low rates of weight management visits in our primary care setting. This paper describes the co-creation by front-line interdisciplinary health care providers and researchers of the 5As Team intervention to improve obesity prevention and management in primary care. We describe the theoretical foundations, design, and core elements of the 5AsT intervention, and the process of eliciting practitioners' self-identified knowledge gaps to inform the curricula for the 5AsT intervention. Themes and topics were identified through facilitated group discussion and a curriculum relevant to this group of practitioners was developed and delivered in a series of 12 workshops. The research question and approach were co-created with the clinical leadership of the PCN; the PCN committed internal resources and a practice facilitator to the effort. Practice facilitation and learning collaboratives were used in the intervention For the content, front-line providers identified 43 topics, related to 13 themes around obesity assessment and management for which they felt the need for further education and training. These needs included: cultural identity and body image, emotional and mental health, motivation, setting goals, managing expectations, weight-bias, caregiver fatigue, clinic dynamics and team-based care, greater understanding of physiology and the use of a systematic framework for obesity assessment (the "4Ms" of obesity). The content of the 12 intervention sessions were designed based on these themes. There was a strong innovation values fit with the 5AsT intervention, and providers were more comfortable with obesity management following the intervention. The 5AsT intervention, including videos, resources and tools, has been compiled for use by clinical teams and is available online at http://www.obesitynetwork.ca/5As_Team . Primary care interdisciplinary practitioners perceive important

  19. Hypertension and obesity after pediatric kidney transplantation: management based on pathophysiology: A mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice G John

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension after pediatric renal transplant is a common and important risk factor for graft loss and patient survival. The mechanism of post kidney transplant hypertension is complex and multifactorial. Control of blood pressure in renal transplant patients is important but often times blood pressures remain uncontrolled. The management of hypertension and obesity in pediatric kidney transplant patients is based on the pathophysiology. Compared to the general pediatric hypertensive population, special attention needs to be focused on the additional impact of immunosuppressive medications side effects and interactions, recurrent disease, and donor and recipient comorbidities such as obesity on blood pressure control with thoughtful consideration of the risk of graft failure. In general, there is a need for prospective studies in pediatric kidney transplant patients to understand the pathophysiology of hypertension and obesity and the appropriate approach to achieve a balance between the primary need to avoid rejection and the need to lower blood pressure and prevent obesity.

  20. Hypothalamic obesity in children: pathophysiology to clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliloglu, Belma; Bereket, Abdullah

    2015-05-01

    Hypothalamic obesity (HyOb) is a complex neuroendocrine disorder caused by damage to the hypothalamus, which results in disruption of energy regulation. The key hypothalamic areas of energy regulation are the ARC (arcuate nucleus), the VMH (ventromedial hypothalamus), the PVN (paraventriculer nuclei) and the LHA (lateral hypothalamic area). These pathways can be disrupted mechanically by hypothalamic tumors, neurosurgery, inflammatory disorders, radiotherapy and trauma or functionally as such seen in genetic diseases. Rapid weight gain and severe obesity are the most striking features of HyOb and caused by hyperphagia, reduced basal metabolic rate (BMR) and decreased physical activity. HyOb is usually unresponsive to diet and exercise. Although, GLP-1 and its anologs seem to be a new agent, there is still no curative treatment. Thus, prevention is of prime importance and the clinicians should be alert and vigilant in patients at risk for development of HyOb.

  1. Treatment and management of obesity: is surgical intervention the answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbold, Angela; Lord, Sue

    2012-04-01

    Obesity is rapidly becoming a major health concern and could be considered equal to smoking as a preventable cause of premature death. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE 2006) estimated that 1.1 billion people are overweight, a number rivalling those who are underweight globally. Recent statistics for England from the National Health Service (NHS 2011) report that in 2009/10 there were 7,214 bariatric surgical procedures performed on people of varying ages.

  2. Research protocol: Management of obesity in patients with low health literacy in primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruqi, Nighat; Stocks, Nigel; Spooner, Catherine; El Haddad, Nouhad; Harris, Mark F

    2015-01-01

    Socioeconomically disadvantaged adults are both more likely to be obese and have lower levels of health literacy. Our trial evaluates the implementation and effectiveness of primary care nurses acting as prevention navigators to support obese patients with low health literacy to lose weight. A pragmatic cluster randomised trial will be conducted. Twenty practices in socioeconomically deprived areas, 10 each in Sydney and Adelaide, will be recruited and randomised to intervention and control groups. Twenty to 40 eligible obese patients aged 40-70 years with a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2) and with low health literacy will be enrolled per practice. The intervention is based on the '5As' of the chronic disease model approach - Assess, Advise, Agree, Assist and Arrange - and the recommendations of the 2013 Clinical practice guidelines for the management of overweight and obesity in adults, adolescents and children in Australia. In the intervention practices, patients will be invited to attend a health check with the prevention navigator who will assess the patient's risk and provide brief advice, assistance with goal setting and referral navigation. Provider training and educational meetings will be held. The providers' attitudes to obesity, confidence in treating obesity and preventive care they provide to obese people with low health literacy will be evaluated through questionnaires and interviews. Patients' self-assessment of lifestyle risk factors, perception of preventive care received in general practice, health-related quality of life, and health literacy will be assessed in telephone interviews. Patients' anthropometric measures will be recorded and their health service usage will be determined via linkage to the Australian government-held medical and pharmaceutical data. Our trial will provide evidence for the effectiveness of practice nurses as prevention navigators to support better weight management for obese patients with low health literacy. This trial is

  3. Cardiovascular risk factor screening and management of obese patients at an outpatient pediatric cardiology center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Margaret; Sood, Arun; Kwon, Soyang; Ariza, Adolfo J

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate documentation of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and obesity management by pediatric cardiologists. Review of medical records of obese (≥95th body mass index percentile) 2-17 year-old children presenting to outpatient pediatric cardiology over 1 year. Subjects were categorized as: heart disease (HD) with increased risk for atherosclerosis; HD with average risk for atherosclerosis; or no HD. Data were evaluated on documentation of the assessment of seven CV risk factors [including recognition of elevated blood pressure (BP)] and management of obesity. Multivariable logistic regression (LR) examined physician documentation of obesity intervention by risk groups, including age and gender. Data on 730 subjects were analyzed; 16 % had HD with increased risk for atherosclerosis, 41 % had HD with average risk for atherosclerosis, and 43 % had no HD. Documentation of risk factor assessment was highest for physical inactivity (53 %) and recognition of obesity (47 %). Other factors (child dyslipidemia, diet, dysglycemia, and cigarette exposure) were documented less frequently. Elevated BP was found in 144 patients (20 %); 53/144 (37 %) had documentation of elevated BP recognition. An obesity intervention was documented in 62 % of records and did not significantly differ between risk groups. In the multivariate LR, physician documentation of obesity intervention did not significantly differ between risk groups. Complete assessment of CV risk factors in obese patients is low. The number of risk factors assessed was similar among patients with HD with average risk of atherosclerosis and HD with increased risk of atherosclerosis. Increased care coordination between cardiologists and primary care providers may lead to uniform, comprehensive CV risk assessment.

  4. Workplace incivility: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolfazl Vagharseyyedin, Seyyed

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the meaning of the concept 'workplace incivility' and promote consistency in its application in nursing research and practice. The methodology introduced by Walker and Avant was used to analyze this concept. A total number of 50 studies that had essentially addressed the concept of incivility in employees' work environment was selected. Ambiguous intent, violation of mutual respect, low intensity and lack of physical assault were identified as the defining attributes of workplace incivility. The necessary antecedent of workplace incivility consisted of the presence of two or more people, with one or more as the source of the incivility, and another or others as its target in the workplace. Moreover, certain individual and organisational factors were the potential antecedents of workplace incivility. Possible negative outcomes for victims, witnesses, organisations, society and perpetrators of such behaviours, such as increased cost for the organisation, reduced citizenship performance, psychological distress and anxiety were identified as outcomes of workplace incivility. Results of the current concept analysis can guide nurse managers to design interventions so that the occurrence of workplace incivility can be reduced. Further studies can focus on testing the psychometric properties of the existing workplace incivility scales, especially uncivil behaviours experienced by nurses across different societies or cultures.

  5. THE PERCEPTION OF PHYSIOTHERAPISTS OF KARACHI IN THEIR ROLE TO REHABILITATE AND MANAGE OBESITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Sarfraz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physiotherapists as providers of primary health care are well placed in promoting physical activity and lifestyles changes, but the role and practice of physiotherapist towards its promotion among obese individuals has not been fully investigated. The objective of this study is to examine perceptions of Karachi physiotherapists regarding their role in management of obesity, the learning needs for, and hurdles facing by them in the rehabilitation. Methods: It was cross-sectional survey that has been conducted among 100 Physiotherapists from three tertiary care hospitals & universities of Karachi from April to June 2013. There has been used Self-administered questionnaire and sampling was Convenient Purposive sampling in qualitative research. Descriptive statistics were calculated for all variables using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 17. Questionnaire was intended to determine physiotherapist’s perceptions of their role and consisted of questions about respondent’s demographics profile, practice and domains related to management of obesity and associated conditions. Result: In this study 93% of participants agreed that physiotherapists has role in the management of patients with obesity by developing exercise interventions.95% plays role in functional mobility and 94%in cardio respiratory training programme. In this study participants were found less aware about weight loss management. Barrier found in patient treatment is due to lack of patient motivation. Conclusion: This study revealed physiotherapist played important role in patient rehabilitation management with obesity, especially in a area of mobility and exercise prescription for conditions associated with obesity. In future there is need to take into account the different perspectives of physical therapy and with a larger sample size representing all four states of Pakistan.

  6. Combating Obesity at Community Health Centers (COACH): a quality improvement collaborative for weight management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Abigail E; John, Priya M; Vable, Anusha M; Campbell, Amanda; Heuer, Loretta; Schaefer, Cynthia; Vinci, Lisa; Drum, Melinda L; Chin, Marshall H; Quinn, Michael T; Burnet, Deborah L

    2013-01-01

    Community health centers (CHCs) seek effective strategies to address obesity. MidWest Clinicians' Network partnered with [an academic medical center] to test feasibility of a weight management quality improvement (QI) collaborative. MidWest Clinicians' Network members expressed interest in an obesity QI program. This pilot study aimed to determine whether the QI model can be feasibly implemented with limited resources at CHCs to improve weight management programs. Five health centers with weight management programs enrolled with CHC staff as primary study participants; this study did not attempt to measure patient outcomes. Participants attended learning sessions and monthly conference calls to build QI skills and share best practices. Tailored coaching addressed local needs. Topics rated most valuable were patient recruitment/retention strategies, QI techniques, evidence-based weight management, motivational interviewing. Challenges included garnering provider support, high staff turnover, and difficulty tracking patient-level data. This paper reports practical lessons about implementing a weight management QI collaborative in CHCs.

  7. Challenges in the surgical management of spine trauma in the morbidly obese patient: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Hannah E; Limb, Rebecca; Chan, Patrick; Fitzgerald, Mark; Bradley, William Pierre Litherland; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V

    2013-07-01

    The treatment of morbidly obese individuals with spine trauma presents unique challenges to spine surgeons and trauma staff. This study aims to increase awareness of current limitations in the surgical management of spine trauma in morbidly obese individuals, and to illustrate practical solutions. Six morbidly obese patients were treated surgically for spine trauma over a 2-year period at a single trauma center in Australia. All patients were involved in high-speed motor vehicle accidents and had multisystem injuries. All weighed in excess of 265 pounds (120 kg) with a body mass index ≥ 40 (range 47.8-67.1). Cases were selected according to the considerable challenges they presented in all aspects of their management. Best medical and surgical care may be compromised and outcome adversely affected in morbidly obese patients with spine trauma. The time taken to perform all aspects of care is usually extended, often by many hours. Customized orthotics may be required. Imaging quality is often compromised and patients may not fit into scanners. Surgical challenges include patient positioning, surgical access, confirmation of the anatomical level, and obtaining adequate instrument length. Postoperative nursing care, wound healing, and venous thromboembolism prophylaxis are also significant issues. Management pathways and hospital guidelines should be developed to optimize the treatment of morbidly obese patients, but innovative solutions may be required for individual cases.

  8. Organizational risk management and nurses' perceptions of workplace risk associated with sharps including needlestick injuries in nurses in New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kable, Ashley K; Guest, Maya; McLeod, Mary

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to determine nurse reported organizational risk management and nurses' perceptions of workplace risk associated with sharps-related injuries. A cross-sectional survey was carried out on a sample of nurses from the New South Wales Nurses' Association, Australia in 2007 (n =7423), and there were 1301 eligible participants. Overall, 73% participants reported that organizational policies were followed in the event of a "sharps including needlestick" injury. Participants reported working in sharps safety oriented organizations, routine hepatitis B vaccination, sharps disposal containers at point-of-use locations and availability of safety engineered devices in their organizations. Sharps including needlestick injury data were not routinely provided to staff, many nurses reported recapping and just one-third had recently attended sharps injury prevention training. Nurses' perceptions of risk associated with sharps including needlestick injury were variable. Health-care organizations are responsible for provision of safe workplaces and work practices, policies, workplace culture and prevention strategies, and appropriate responses when nurses are injured. These results have been used to propose recommendations to improve some of these risk management strategies. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Managerial and Organizational Discourses of Workplace Bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Susan L; Boutain, Doris M; Tsai, Jenny H-C; de Castro, Arnold B

    2015-09-01

    To explore how workplace bullying is addressed by hospital nursing unit managers and organizational policies. Although workplace bullying is costly to organizations, nurses report that managers do not consistently address the issue. This study used discourse analysis to analyze interview data and policy documents. There were differences in the manner in which managers and the policy documents labeled bullying-type behaviors and discussed the roles and responsibilities of staff and managers. Policies did not clearly delineate how managers should respond to workplace bullying. These differences can allow management variation, not sanctioned by policy. Unclear policy language can also offer insufficient guidance to managers, resulting in differential enforcement of policies.

  10. Obesity as a Possible Risk Factor for Lost-time Injury in Registered Nurses: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Jordan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Time-loss injuries are still a major occurrence in Canada, injuring thousands of Canadian workers each year. With obesity rates on the rise across the country, as well as around the world, it is important that the possible effects of obesity in the workplace be fully understood, especially those effects linked to lost-time injuries. The aim of this paper was to evaluate predictors of workplace lost-time injuries and how they may be related to obesity or high body mass index by examining factors associated with lost-time injuries in the health care sector, a well-studied industry with the highest number of reported time loss injuries in Canada. A literature review focusing on lost-time injuries in Registered Nurses (RNs was conducted using the keywords and terms: lost time injury, workers' compensation, occupational injury, workplace injury, injury, injuries, work, workplace, occupational, nurse, registered nurse, RN, health care, predictors, risk factors, risk, risks, cause, causes, obese, obesity, and body mass index. Data on predictors or factors associated with lost-time injuries in RNs were gathered and organized using Loisel's Work Disability Prevention Management Model and extrapolated upon using existing literature surrounding obesity in the Canadian workplace.

  11. Changing Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on the changing workplace and its relationship to human resource development (HRD). In "Globalization, Immigration and Quality of Life Dynamics for Reverse Brain Drains" (Ben-Chieh Liu, Maw Lin Lee, Hau-Lien), the factors responsible for the brain drain from Taiwan to the United States…

  12. Liquid Workplaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofma, Christian Casper; Avital, Michel; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    2017-01-01

    Recently, virtual realities or immersive virtual environments (IVEs) has gained increasing attention. Yet, IS-researchers have paid little attention to the implications of IVEs in a work context. The objective of this paper is thus to understand how the use of IVEs may impact our workplace, and how...

  13. are Workplace

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJM Venter

    did not fall within the scope of collective bargaining. ... This article explores the position regarding workplace forums in South Africa and whether it is time ... Africa) should take the region's particular socio-economic profile into account and ... [n]otwithstanding the right [to] bargain collectively, the law generally limits collective.

  14. Service learning in a pediatric weight management program to address childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Fengyi; Goebel, Laurie A; Satkamp, Nicole; Beauchamp, Rachel; Kurrasch, Julie M; Smith, Asia R; Maguire, Julia M

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes an inter-professional service learning collaboration and reflects benefits and considerations when incorporating a family-oriented approach in the community-based pediatric weight management program. Because obesity has tremendous consequences on a nation's health and economy, a pediatrician in a community health network has utilized an inter-professional team to implement a pediatric weight management program targeting children between the ages of 8 and 15 years. The team incorporates a culturally sensitive curriculum using a family-oriented approach for obesity prevention and intervention. Physicians, registered dietitians, occupational therapists, nurse practitioners, and mental health professionals assist participants in adopting a healthier lifestyle by addressing physical and psychosocial issues related to obesity, developing a nutrition plan, making healthier food choices, and finding fun ways to be more physically active. Graduate occupational therapy students work closely with the team members to assist delivery of interactive activities and behavior intervention.

  15. Internal audits of psychosocial risks at workplaces with certified OHS management systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Anne; Hohnen, Pernille; Hasle, Peter

    2016-01-01

    , such occupational health and safety management (OHSM) systems tend to have difficulties in adequately addressing psychosocial risks at work. A crucial element in the OHSM system is internal audits. We have investigated how two Danish municipalities have transformed the general audit guidelines into internal audit...... practices capable of targeting the psychosocial risks. The results show that the municipalities experienced difficulties in transforming the general audit guidelines into practical models, and we found that this led to significant variations in audit practices. The explanation for these difficulties can...... be found both in the nature of the psychosocial risks and in implementation constraints. Compared to traditional safety audits, auditing psychosocial risks appears to require different methods and auditor competencies, a factor that the OHSAS 18001 standard does not explicitly take into account...

  16. Assessment and management of severely obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Neil; Wales, Jerry

    2016-12-01

    Approximately 3% of children and adolescents in the UK have severe obesity. The incidence of cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension, hyperinsulinism and hyperlipidaemia approaches 20% in such individuals. Lifestyle intervention programmes and pharmacotherapy are effective in some individuals, but the relapse rate is high. In exceptional cases, bariatric surgery is effective. This review outlines the scale of the problem, highlights those at risk and discusses referral, current services, appropriate screening and therapeutic interventions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Obesity and Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Preparing for Surgery Stories Resources About Risks Obesity Explore this page: Obesity How does being overweight ... What you can do to reduce your risk? Obesity More than one-third of Americans are obese ...

  18. Workplace Communication Practices and Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirilova, Marta; Angouri, Jo

    2017-01-01

    This chapter addresses the issue of communication policy in the workplace. Modern workplaces are multinational and multilingual. Both white and blue collar employees interact in languages other than their L1 as part of their daily reality at work. At the same time a number of workplaces have...... introduced a ‘one language policy’ as a strategy to manage linguistic diversity as well as to encourage integration and, allegedly, shared decision making. Research has repeatedly shown, however, that this is a political and ideological decision rather than a purely linguistic one. Languages have different...

  19. “If You Don’t Do Parking Management .. Forget Your Behaviour Change, It’s Not Going to Work.”: Health and Transport Practitioner Perspectives on Workplace Active Travel Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissel, Chris; Wen, Li Ming

    2017-01-01

    Objectives After having conducted two studies of the effectiveness of workplace travel plans for promoting active travel, we investigated health and transport practitioners’ perspectives on implementing workplace travel plans to share some of the lessons learnt. The objectives of this study were to describe perceived elements of effective workplace travel plans, barriers and enablers to workplace travel planning, their experiences of working with the other profession on travel plan implementation, their recommendations for workplace travel planning, and also to explore similarities and differences in transport and health practitioner perspectives. Materials and Methods Fourteen health and ten transport practitioners who had prior involvement in workplace travel plan programs were purposefully selected from workplaces in Australia. We conducted 20 in-depth interviews since data saturation had been reached at this point, and data were subject to framework analysis. Results Perceived essential elements of effective workplace travel plans included parking management; leadership, organisational commitment and governance; skills and other resources like a dedicated travel plan coordinator; and, pre-conditions including supportive transport infrastructure in the surrounds. Recommendations for promoting travel plans included supportive government policy, focusing on business benefits and working at different scales of implementation (e.g. single large worksites and business precincts). Health and transport practitioner perspectives differed, with transport practitioners believing that parking management is the key action for managing travel demand at a worksite. Conclusions Health practitioners implementing travel plans may require training including concepts of travel demand management, and support from transport planners on parking management strategies. Promoting an understanding of the shared travel behaviour change skills of transport and health practitioners may

  20. A systematic review of the clinical effectiveness of orlistat used for the management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, S; Riemsma, R; Shirran, L; Mather, L; ter Riet, G

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the clinical effectiveness of orlistat used for the management of obesity. Nineteen electronic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials evaluating the effectiveness of orlistat for weight loss or maintenance of weight loss in overweight or obese patients. Each included trial was assessed for methodological quality. Statistical pooling was performed when trials were considered to be sufficiently similar. Twenty-three trials were eligible for inclusion. Placebo-controlled trials recruiting patients with uncomplicated obesity reported statistically significant differences in favour of orlistat for weight loss and changes in obesity-related risk factors at all time points. Trials in obese patients with defined risk factors at baseline showed similar results, however, smaller effect sizes were observed in patients with type 2 diabetes. The effectiveness of orlistat relative to other anti-obesity drugs is currently unclear. When orlistat was added to simvastatin, this proved to be more effective for weight loss than either drug used individually. Orlistat use is associated with a higher incidence of gastrointestinal adverse events compared with placebo. In conclusion, orlistat is more effective than placebo in promoting weight loss, maintenance of weight loss, and improving cardiovascular risk factor profiles. Baseline parameters of patients seen in clinical practice should be taken into account when considering treatment.

  1. The role of physical activity and exercise in obesity and weight management: Time for critical appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petri Wiklund

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of overweight and obesity has increased dramatically during last 3 decades with devastating consequences to public health. Recommended strategies to reduce obesity have focused on healthier diet and physical activity (PA. Clearly, these approaches have not been successful, but whether this is due to failure to restrict energy intake or to maintain high levels of energy expenditure has been the subject of great controversy. Consequently, there has been a great deal of confusion about the role of PA and exercise in obesity and weight management. In this article, the theoretical basis for considering reduced PA and energy expenditure as the cause of obesity is appraised. Further, the role of PA in food intake and weight control is examined. The idea that obesity is caused by consistent decline in daily energy expenditure is not supported either by objective measures of energy expenditure or physiological theory of weight gain alone. However, since voluntary exercise is the most important discretionary component of total daily energy expenditure, it can affect energy balance. Therefore, PA and exercise hold potential as part of the solution for the ongoing obesity epidemic.

  2. Effects of Workplace Parent Management Training on Marital and Job Satisfaction among Iranian Working Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Mousavi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundShifting the focus of parent management training (PMT to parents and discussing implications for maximizing the outcomes of PMT for the entire family is new and promising.ObjectiveWe aimed to examine the efficacy of work place PMT on job and marital satisfaction among staff members of an academic center.MethodsWe held 8 PMT sessions (1.5 h each for 20 staff members who were parents to children in the age range of 2–12 years. Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS and Occupational Descriptive Index [Health and Safety Executive (HSE] were used for baseline and post-intervention data gathering. DAS higher scores indicate higher marital adjustment satisfaction and higher HSE scores indicate higher occupational stress. To analyze changes in HSE and DAS scores over time, paired t-test and Wilcoxon signed rank test were used, respectively.ResultsAll DAS subscales show significant increased from baseline to the final session except for affectional expression which was not significant. We found no significant changes in total or subscale HSE scores among participants.ConclusionFindings of this study underscore the role of psycho-education usage in work environment and provide evidence about the importance of designing interventions concerning working parents. Implications of PMT are discussed in the text.

  3. Managing complex workplace stress in health care organizations: leaders' perceived legitimacy conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellve, Lotta; Wikström, Ewa

    2009-12-01

    To conceptualize how health care leaders' strategies to increase their influence in their psychosocial work environment are experienced and handled, and may be supported. The complex nature of the psychosocial work environment with increased stress creates significant challenges for leaders in today's health care organizations. Interviews with health care leaders (n = 39) were analysed in accordance with constructivist grounded theory. Compound identities, loyalty commitments and professional interests shape conditions for leaders' influence. Strategies to achieve legitimacy were either to retain clinical skills and a strong occupational identity or to take a full leadership role. Ethical stress was experienced when organizational procedural or consequential legitimacy norms were in conflict with the leaders' own values. Leadership support through socializing processes and strategic support structures may be complementary or counteractive. Support programmes need to have a clear message related to decision-making processes and should facilitate communication between top management, human resource departments and subordinate leaders. Ethical stress from conflicting legitimacy principles may be moderated by clear policies for decision-making processes, strengthened sound networks and improved communication. Supportive programmes should include: (1) sequential and strategic systems for introducing new leaders and mentoring; (2) reflective dialogue and feedback; (3) team development; and (4) decision-making policies and processes.

  4. Pediatric Obesity Management in Rural Clinics in California and the Role of Telehealth in Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Ulfat; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Romano, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine health care provider needs related to pediatric obesity management in rural California and to explore strategies to improve care through telehealth. Methods: Cross-sectional survey of health care providers who treated children and adolescents at 41 rural clinics with existing telehealth connectivity. Results: Most of the…

  5. Are Self-Management Interventions Suitable for All? Comparing Obese Versus Nonobese Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroese, Floor M.; Adriaanse, Marieke A.; De Ridder, Denise T. D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the current study was to compare obese and nonobese type 2 diabetes patients at baseline and after participating in an existing self-management intervention (i.e., "Beyond Good Intentions") on cognitive, self-care, and behavioral measures to examine whether both groups are equally prepared and able to adopt…

  6. Weight management for overweight and obese men delivered through professional football clubs: a pilot randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gray, C.M.; Hunt, K.; Mutrie, N.; Anderson, A.S.; Treweek, S.; Wyke, S.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of male obesity is increasing, but men are less likely than women to attend existing weight management programmes. We have taken a novel approach to reducing perceived barriers to weight loss for men by using professional football (soccer) clubs to encourage participation

  7. Orlistat, a new lipase inhibitor for the management of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, A M; Yanovski, J A; Calis, K A

    2000-03-01

    Orlistat, a weight-loss agent with a novel mechanism of action, recently was approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of obesity. It inhibits gastric and pancreatic lipases in the lumen of the gastrointestinal tract to decrease systemic absorption of dietary fat. In several trials lasting up to 2 years, orlistat was more effective than diet alone for weight reduction and maintenance of lost weight. Orlistat treatment also results in modest improvements in total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, blood pressure, and fasting glucose and insulin concentrations. The major adverse effects are gastrointestinal, usually occur early in therapy, and tend to decrease with continued treatment. Because orlistat may decrease the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins, a standard multiple-vitamin supplement is recommended daily during therapy to prevent abnormalities in vitamin serum concentrations. The potential for severe gastrointestinal discomfort and the modest degree of weight loss may limit the agent's clinical utility. Its long-term safety and effectiveness for weight maintenance, cost-effectiveness of treatment, and overall reduction in obesity-related morbidity and mortality remain to be determined.

  8. The use of lorcaserin in the management of obesity: a critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Bo; Wang, Yu

    2010-12-20

    Obesity is a chronic disease with a high prevalence in both developed and developing countries. Effective management of this worldwide epidemic will have a significant impact on the health care system globally. Lifestyle interventions, such as restricting calorie consumption and increasing physical activity, remain a major component of weight-reduction programs. The development of pharmacotherapy for the management of obesity is still at the infancy stage. Side effects have been the key issue for anti-obesity drugs previously withdrawn from the market. The focus of this review, lorcaserin, is a selective serotonin receptor agonist that is currently undergoing Phase III evaluations. The efficacy of this drug in reducing body weight and improving metabolic parameters of obese patients has been demonstrated in two recent clinical trials. The available evidence indicates that this drug does not show unwanted effects on heart valves or pulmonary artery pressure, and the treatment improves the risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Despite these promising results, additional experimental and clinical studies are critical for the approval of lorcaserin as a new anti-obesity monodrug therapy by the US Food and Drug Administration.

  9. The search for compounds that stimulate thermogenesis in obesity management: from pharmaceuticals to functional food ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulloo, A G

    2011-10-01

    The concept of managing obesity through the stimulation of thermogenesis is currently a focus of considerable attention by the pharmaceutical, nutraceutical and functional food industries. This paper first reviews the landmark discoveries that have fuelled the search for thermogenic anti-obesity products that range from single-target drugs to multi-target functional foods. It subsequently analyses the thermogenic and fat-oxidizing potentials of a wide array of bioactive food ingredients which are categorized under methylxanthines, polyphenols, capsaicinoids/capsinoids, minerals, proteins/amino acids, carbohydrates/sugars and fats/fatty acids. The main outcome of this analysis is that the compounds or combination of compounds with thermogenic and fat-oxidizing potentials are those that possess both sympathomimetic stimulatory activity and acetyl-coA carboxylase inhibitory property, and are capable of targeting both skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue. The thermogenic potentials of products so far tested in humans range from marginal to modest, i.e. 2-5% above daily energy expenditure. With an increasing number of bioactive food ingredients awaiting screening in humans, there is hope that this thermogenic potential could be safely increased to 10-15% above daily energy expenditure - which would have clinically significant impact on weight management, particularly in the prevention of obesity and in improving the long-term prognosis of post-slimming weight maintenance. © 2011 The Author. obesity reviews © 2011 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  10. Predicting success: factors associated with weight change in obese youth undertaking a weight management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Kimberley A; Ware, Robert S; Batch, Jennifer A; Truby, Helen

    2013-01-01

    To explore which baseline physiological and psychosocial variables predict change in body mass index (BMI) z-score in obese youth after 12 weeks of a dietary weight management study. Participants were obese young people participating in a dietary intervention trial in Brisbane Australia. The outcome variable was change in BMI z-score. Potential predictors considered included demographic, physiological and psychosocial parameters of the young person, and demographic characteristics of their parents. A multivariable regression model was constructed to examine the effect of potential predictive variables. Participants (n = 88) were predominantly female (69.3%), and had a mean(standard deviation) age of 13.1(1.9) years and BMI z-score of 2.2(0.4) on presentation. Lower BMI z-score (p resistance (p = 0.04) at baseline, referral from a paediatrician (p = 0.02) and being more socially advantaged (p = 0.046) were significantly associated with weight loss. Macronutrient distribution of diet and physical activity level did not contribute. Early intervention in obesity treatment in young people improves likelihood of success. Other factors such as degree of insulin resistance, social advantage and referral source also appear to play a role. Assessing presenting characteristics and factors associated with treatment outcome may allow practicing clinicians to individualise a weight management program or determine the 'best-fit' treatment for an obese adolescent. © 2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity . Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Implementation and evaluation of the 5As framework of obesity management in primary care: design of the 5As Team (5AsT) randomized control trial

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell-Scherer, Denise L.; Asselin, Jodie; Osunlana, Adedayo M; Fielding, Sheri; Anderson, Robin; Christian F. Rueda-Clausen; Johnson, Jeffrey A; Ogunleye, Ayodele A.; Cave, Andrew; Manca, Donna; Sharma, Arya M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity is a pressing public health concern, which frequently presents in primary care. With the explosive obesity epidemic, there is an urgent need to maximize effective management in primary care. The 5As of Obesity Management™ (5As) are a collection of knowledge tools developed by the Canadian Obesity Network. Low rates of obesity management visits in primary care suggest provider behaviour may be an important variable. The goal of the present study is to increase frequency and ...

  12. GENDER ISSUES IN WORKPLACE VIOLENCE

    OpenAIRE

    STAICULESCU Ana Rodica

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a response to the problem of workplace gender violence and the power relationships between males and females in organizational theory. Victimization based on gender is afflicting society as a whole, but is also relevant to the construction of social attitudes at the workplace. Thus, we will present how the context of work relationships can be affected by acts of verbal and physical intimidation engaged by gender inequality and what are the consequences for managers. Moreover, we...

  13. Managing social awkwardness when caring for morbidly obese patients in intensive care: A focused ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Caz; de Vries, Kay; Coombs, Maureen

    2016-06-01

    Critically ill morbidly obese patients pose considerable healthcare delivery and resource utilisation challenges in the intensive care setting. These are resultant from specific physiological responses to critical illness in this population and the nature of the interventional therapies used in the intensive care environment. An additional challenge arises for this population when considering the social stigma that is attached to being obese. Intensive care staff therefore not only attend to the physical and care needs of the critically ill morbidly obese patient but also navigate, both personally and professionally, the social terrain of stigma when providing care. To explore the culture and influences on doctors and nurses within the intensive care setting when caring for critically ill morbidly obese patients. A focused ethnographic approach was adopted to elicit the 'situated' experiences of caring for critically ill morbidly obese patients from the perspectives of intensive care staff. Participant observation of care practices and interviews with intensive care staff were undertaken over a four month period. Analysis was conducted using constant comparison technique to compare incidents applicable to each theme. An 18 bedded tertiary intensive care unit in New Zealand. Sixty-seven intensive care nurses and 13 intensive care doctors involved with the care and management of seven critically ill patients with a body mass index ≥40kg/m(2). Interactions between intensive care staff and morbidly obese patients were challenging due to the social stigma surrounding obesity. Social awkwardness and managing socially awkward moments were evident when caring for morbidly obese patients. Intensive care staff used strategies of face-work and mutual pretence to alleviate feelings of discomfort when engaged in aspects of care and caring. This was a strategy used to prevent embarrassment and distress for both the patients and staff. This study has brought new understandings

  14. Practical Recommendations of the Obesity Management Task Force of the European Association for the Study of Obesity for the Post-Bariatric Surgery Medical Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Busetto

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery is today the most effective long-term therapy for the management of patients with severe obesity, and its use is recommended by the relevant guidelines of the management of obesity in adults. Bariatric surgery is in general safe and effective, but it can cause new clinical problems and is associated with specific diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic needs. For clinicians, the acquisition of special knowledge and skills is required in order to deliver appropriate and effective care to the post-bariatric patient. In the present recommendations, the basic notions needed to provide first-level adequate medical care to post-bariatric patients are summarised. Basic information about nutrition, management of co-morbidities, pregnancy, psychological issues as well as weight regain prevention and management is derived from current evidences and existing guidelines. A short list of clinical practical recommendations is included for each item. It remains clear that referral to a bariatric multidisciplinary centre, preferably the one performing the original procedure, should be considered in case of more complex clinical situations.

  15. Workplace bullying: concerns for nurse leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Susan L; Rea, Ruth E

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe nurses' experiences with and characteristics related to workplace bullying. Although the concept of workplace bullying is gaining attention, few studies have examined workplace bullying among nurses. This was a descriptive study using a convenience sample of 249 members of the Washington State Emergency Nurses Association. The Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised was used to measure workplace bullying. Of the sample, 27.3% had experienced workplace bullying in the last 6 months. Most respondents who had been bullied stated that they were bullied by their managers/directors or charge nurses. Workplace bullying was significantly associated with intent to leave one's current job and nursing. In seeking remedies to the problem of workplace bullying, nurse leaders need to focus on why this bullying occurs and on ways to reduce its occurrence. This is a critical issue, since it is linked with nurse attrition.

  16. The effectiveness of a stress-management intervention program in the management of overweight and obesity in childhood and adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrou, Stavroula; Nicolaides, Nicolas C; Papageorgiou, Ifigenia; Papadopoulou, Pinelopi; Terzioglou, Elena; Chrousos, George P; Darviri, Christina; Charmandari, Evangelia

    Obesity in childhood and adolescence represents a major health problem of our century, and accounts for a significant increase in morbidity and mortality in adulthood. In addition to the increased consumption of calories and lack of exercise, accumulating evidence suggests that childhood obesity is strongly associated with prolonged and excessive activation of the stress system. The aim of our study was to assess the effectiveness of a stress-management intervention program, which included progressive muscle relaxation, diaphragmatic breathing, guided imagery and cognitive restructuring, in overweight and obese children and adolescents. Forty-nine children and adolescents (mean age ± SEM: 11.15 ± 1.48 years) were prospectively recruited to participate in this randomized controlled study. Of those, 23 participants were assigned into the intervention group, while 26 participants represented the control group. Anthropometric measurements were recorded at the beginning and at the end of the study, and participants were asked to complete the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders (S.C.A.R.E.D.), the Child Depression Inventory (C.D.I.), the Child Behavior Checklist (C.B.C.L.) and the Youth Self Report (Y.S.R.). The applied stress-management methods resulted in a significant reduction in the body mass index (BMI) in the intervention group compared with the control group [ΔBMI=1.18 vs 0.10 kg/m 2 (panxiety, and reduced the internalizing and externalizing problems in the intervention group. Our study demonstrated that the application of an 8-week stress management program could facilitate weight loss in Greek overweight and obese children and adolescents. Further larger studies are required to evaluate the effectiveness of stress-management methods in overweight and obese subjects.

  17. What do pharmacological approaches to obesity management offer? Linking pharmacological mechanisms of obesity management agents to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrup, A; Lundsgaard, C

    1998-01-01

    Obesity is characterised by pathophysiological defects affecting both sides of the energy balance equation. Individuals with a predisposition to obesity have impaired appetite control when diets are fat-rich and energy dense. They also exhibit a lower than expected resting metabolic rate (RMR). A low RMR, in concert with a sedentary lifestyle, contributes to a low total energy output, which may lead to obesity if continued over a period of years. A low metabolic rate seems to be genetically determined, and is partly caused by low sympathetic nervous system activity. Classical treatment programmes for obesity do not provide a satisfactory long-term outcome for the majority of patients. Patients who achieve only a small weight loss during dietary therapy, and have a tendency to weight regain, are characterised by lower energy expenditure, lower sympathetic activity, and a reduced ability to mobilise fat stores, compared with patients who are more successful at losing weight. It is reasonable to improve or normalise these traits by supporting the dietary approach with pharmacological manipulation of central and peripheral pathways. Agents which stimulate adrenergic neurons are particularly suitable because they offer mechanisms for inhibiting hunger and for stimulating energy expenditure, lipolysis and fat oxidation. Sympathomimetic compounds can reduce appetite and increase energy expenditure. Energy expenditure can be increased by 5-10% via stimulation of a combination of beta-adrenoceptors; beta3-adrenoceptors may predominate during chronic therapy. This increased energy expenditure increases the relative proportion of fat oxidation; as this is not fully compensated by increased energy intake, a negative energy balance occurs. This mechanism may be responsible for the long-term weight loss efficiency of agents like ephedrine/caffeine and sibutramine. Pharmacotherapy can be used to support short-term induction of weight loss or long-term weight maintenance. In the

  18. Endoscopic Sleeve Gastroplasty - A New Tool to Manage Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Deepanshu; Bhandari, Bharat Singh; Arora, Ankit; Singhal, Shashideep

    2017-11-01

    Obesity is a growing pandemic across the world. Dietary restrictions and behavior modifications alone have a limited benefit. Bariatric surgery, despite being the current gold standard, has limited acceptance by patients due to cost and associated morbidity. In our review, we have discussed nine original studies describing endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty (ESG). A total of 172 subjects successfully underwent ESG. Of 65 subjects with follow up data, 95.4% (62/65) had intact gastric sleeve confirmed via esophagogastroduodenoscopy or oral contrast study at the end of study specific follow up interval (the longest being 6 months). Individual studies reported a technical success rate for intact gastric sleeve from as low as 50% to as high as 100%. A statistically significant p ESG an attractive option to consider among other bariatric therapies.

  19. Intragastric Balloon for Management of Severe Obesity: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorke, Ekua; Switzer, Noah Jacob; Reso, Artan; Shi, Xinhe; de Gara, Christopher; Birch, Daniel; Gill, Richdeep; Karmali, Shahzeer

    2016-09-01

    Older models of intragastric balloons (IGBs) had unacceptably high complication rates and inconsequential weight loss. With FDA approval of newer models, we aimed to systematically examine the literature regarding the efficacy of IGB therapy for obesity. A comprehensive electronic database search was completed. Title searching was restricted to the following keywords: bariatric, gastric, gastric bypass, gastric band, sleeve gastrectomy, and intragastric balloon. Twenty-six primary studies (n = 6101) were included. At balloon removal, mean change in weight and BMI were 15.7 ± 5.3 kg and 5.9 ± 1.0 kg/m(2). The most common complications were nausea/vomiting (23.3 %) and abdominal pain (19.9 %). Serious complications were rare: mortality (0.05 %) and gastric perforation (0.1 %). IGBs are associated with marked short-term weight loss with limited serious complications.

  20. Maintenance of Lost Weight and Long-Term Management of Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kevin D; Kahan, Scott

    2018-01-01

    Weight loss can be achieved through a variety of modalities, but long-term maintenance of lost weight is much more challenging. Obesity interventions typically result in early weight loss followed by a weight plateau and progressive regain. This review describes current understanding of the biological, behavioral, and environmental factors driving this near-ubiquitous body weight trajectory and the implications for long-term weight management. Treatment of obesity requires ongoing clinical attention and weight maintenance-specific counseling to support sustainable healthful behaviors and positive weight regulation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Management of the unholy trinity diabetes-obesity-hypertension (diabesotension).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2012-11-20

    Diabetes, obesity and hypertension are common conditions and their concurrence is more common than would have been expected: 15% of the developed world suffer from the triad of "diabesotension". The pathophysiology involves characteristic neurohormonal profiles that collectively suggest the consideration of diabesotension as a distinct clinical entity. Diabesotensive patients have double the risk of suffering from the micro and macrovascular complications of each of the conditions alone. Therefore, it is critical to reduce their overall risk and provide them with special attention. Studies have shown that the number needed to treat in diabesotension is lower compared to non-obese. Appropriate treatment goals should be set. With regards to hypertension, recent clinical trials point to 130-135/80-85 mmHg. Lifestyle modifications are critical, therefore DASH and Mediterranean diet should be recommended along with a physical training program. Weight reduction strategies often fail and bariatric surgery should be considered. All antihypertensive drug-classes are adequate to treat uncomplicated diabesotension and it is not mandatory to include RAAS blockers as first-line therapy. However, as second line, for high risk patients and patients with nephropathy - a RAAS blocker is indicated. Combination therapy is almost always prescribed in the course of the disease. In the absence of compelling indications, a RAAS blocker with a calcium-channels blocker is preferred as it provides benefits beyond blood pressure control. Resistant hypertension is common, and secondary causes should be looked for, particularly sleep apnea. A novel procedure such as renal denervation is a promising option due to its antihypertensive and metabolic benefits. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Peri-operative management of the obese surgical patient 2015: Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland Society for Obesity and Bariatric Anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, C E; Margarson, M P; Shearer, E; Redman, J W; Lucas, D N; Cousins, J M; Fox, W T A; Kennedy, N J; Venn, P J; Skues, M; Gabbott, D; Misra, U; Pandit, J J; Popat, M T; Griffiths, R

    2015-07-01

    Guidelines are presented for the organisational and clinical peri-operative management of anaesthesia and surgery for patients who are obese, along with a summary of the problems that obesity may cause peri-operatively. The advice presented is based on previously published advice, clinical studies and expert opinion. © 2015 The Authors. Anaesthesia published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  3. Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty (the Apollo method: a new approach to obesity management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gontrand López-Nava-Breviere

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many obese patients cannot lose weight or reject conventional obesity management. Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty (the Apollo method is a pioneering coadjuvant, interventionist technique for the integral management of obesity. Objectives: The goals of this study were to report safety and efficacy results obtained at 6 months in patients undergoing endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty. Material and methods: A prospective study was performed in 55 patients (13 males, 42 females who were subjected to the Apollo technique; mean age was 43.5 years (range 25-60 and mean BMI was 37.7 kg/m² (range 30-48. All received multidisciplinary follow-up for weight loss. Weight changes and presence of complications were assessed. Through the endoscope a triangular pattern suture is performed consisting of approximately 3-6 transmural (mucosa to serosa stitches, using a cinch device to bring them nearer and form a plication. Results: A total of 6-8 plications are used to provide a tubular or sleeve-shaped restriction to the gastric cavity. No major complications developed and patients were discharged at 24 hours following the procedure. Endoscopic and radiographic follow-up at 6 months post-procedure showed a well preserved tubular form to the stomach. After 6 months patients had lost 18.9 kg and 55.3% of excess weight. Conclusions: Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty, together with dietary and psycho-behavioral changes, is a safe, effective technique in the coadjuvant management of obese patients.

  4. Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty (the Apollo method): a new approach to obesity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Nava Breviere, Gontrand; Bautista-Castaño, Inmaculada; Fernández-Corbelle, Juan Pedro; Trell, Marta

    2016-04-01

    Many obese patients cannot lose weight or reject conventional obesity management. Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty (the Apollo method) is a pioneering coadjuvant, interventionist technique for the integral management of obesity. The goals of this study were to report safety and efficacy results obtained at 6 months in patients undergoing endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty. A prospective study was performed in 55 patients (13 males, 42 females) who were subjected to the Apollo technique; mean age was 43.5 years (range 25-60) and mean BMI was 37.7 kg/m2 (range 30-48). All received multidisciplinary follow-up for weight loss. Weight changes and presence of complications were assessed. Through the endoscope a triangular pattern suture is performed consisting of approximately 3-6 transmural (mucosa to serosa) stitches, using a cinch device to bring them nearer and form a plication. A total of 6-8 plications are used to provide a tubular or sleeve-shaped restriction to the gastric cavity. No major complications developed and patients were discharged at 24 hours following the procedure. Endoscopic and radiographic follow-up at 6 months post-procedure showed a well preserved tubular form to the stomach. After 6 months patients had lost 18.9 kg and 55.3% of excess weight. Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty, together with dietary and psycho-behavioral changes, is a safe, effective technique in the coadjuvant management of obese patients.

  5. Weight Management Advice for Clients with Overweight or Obesity: Allied Health Professional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne J. Snodgrass

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity is increasing. The potential for allied health professionals to intervene through the provision of lifestyle advice is unknown. This study aimed to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of health professionals in the provision of dietary and physical activity advice for clients with overweight or obesity. Dietitians, exercise physiologists, nurses, occupational therapists, physiotherapists and psychologists (n = 296 working in New South Wales were surveyed using paper-based and online methods. The majority of health professionals (71% believed that providing weight management advice was within their scope of practice; 81% provided physical activity advice but only 57% provided dietary advice. Other than dietitians, few had received training in client weight management during their professional qualification (14% or continuing education (16%. Providing dietary advice was associated with: believing it was within their scope of practice (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.9–7.9, p < 0.01, training during their entry-level qualification (OR 7.2, 3.2–16.4, p < 0.01 and having departmental guidelines (OR 4.7, 2.1–10.9, p < 0.01. Most health professionals are willing to provide lifestyle advice to clients with overweight or obesity but few have received required training. Developing guidelines and training for in client weight management may potentially impact on rising obesity levels.

  6. [Cognitive behavioral treatment in the integral management of obesity in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Morán, Martha; Mendoza-Ávila, Eduardo; Cumplido-Fuentes, Agustín; Simental-Mendía, Luis E; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Gabriela; Sánchez-Lazcano, Gloria Janeth; Ramírez-Bonilla, Paulina; Cumplido-González, Guadalupe; Ortiz-Martínez, Guadalupe; Pinedo-Rodríguez, Gustavo Alan; Meza-Villa, Ángel; Ortiz-Ramos, Alma Fátima; Puerta-Mota, Gerardo; Guerrero-Romero, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Obesity in children and adolescents is associated to a morbidity that has increased significantly. It has become a public health problem around the world. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the efficacy of the cognitive behavioral treatment strategy in the comprehensive management of obesity in adolescents. Double blind, randomized, and controlled intervention study, of four months of follow-up, with a total of 115 obese adolescents, aged 12 to 16 years. The intervention group received cognitive behavioral treatment strategy, as well as advise on diet and exercise. At the same time, the control group only received advise on diet and exercise. The percentage of adolescents who showed adherence to diet was 73.7 % versus 41.4 %, (p = 0.0009) and to exercise, 61.4 % versus 19.0 %, (p cognitive behavioral treatment strategy improves adherence and decreases desertion of the weight reduction program in adolescents.

  7. Managing severe obesity: understanding and improving treatment adherence in bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Megan M; Corsica, Joyce; Bradley, Lauren; Wilson, Rebecca; Chirinos, Diana A; Vivo, Amanda

    2016-12-01

    Severe obesity (body mass index ≥40 kg/m(2)) is a chronic disease that is associated with significantly increased risk of serious and chronic health problems as well as impaired quality of life. For those with severe obesity, bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for significant and long-term weight loss and resolution of comorbid medical conditions, particularly diabetes. Long-term success is thought to depend to some degree on the patient's ability to adhere to a complex set of behaviors, including regular attendance at follow up appointments and following stringent dietary, exercise, and vitamin recommendations. Here, we summarize the current research on behavioral adherence in patients with severe obesity presenting for bariatric surgery and we highlight challenges and make recommendations for improved self-management before and after surgery.

  8. Workplace Literacy in a Total Quality Management Environment for the Manufacturing and Financial Services Industries. Final Performance Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrowicki, Linda; And Others

    A project was conducted for the following purposes: (1) improve the productivity and efficiency of 21 companies by providing workplace literacy instruction to workers lacking basic skills required for their jobs; and (2) improve the capability of educational providers to meet the basic skill needs of the manufacturing and financial services…

  9. Future management of human obesity: understanding the meaning of genetic susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins AB

    2014-12-01

    common obesity mainly by exclusion, will in the future play an increasingly important role in understanding and managing obesity, but only with parallel studies of the physiological, behavioral, and economic influences. Keywords: obesity phenotypes, obesogenic environment, genomics, pathophysiology, treatment, prevention

  10. Management and outcome of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas in obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneuve, S; Tan, H K; Eghiaian, A; Temam, S

    2011-07-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas are common lesions, related to chronic smoking and drinking behaviors. But in contrast to other cancers, effect of obesity on occurrence, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of these tumors remains to date unknown. This is a retrospective review of 111 obese patients (sex ratio=6.4, median age=54.5 year old), treated between 1999 and 2007. Risk factors, tumoral localization and staging (41% stage I-II) were the same as in general population. However, we found 26.1% difficult pan-endoscopies, 54% ACE-27 comorbidity scores ≥2 and 22.5% misstaged cervical lymphadenopathy. Treatment was based upon surgery (61%) or radiotherapy-chemotherapy (39%), and 37% of patients developed complications. Median follow up (38 months) and five-year overall survival (50%) are comparable to data in non obese patients. Although no direct relation between obesity and squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck was found, obesity causes problems in tumor assessment and increases surgical complications rate. However, final good therapeutic tolerance and overall survival rate show that these patients should be managed like normal weighted ones. Receiving optimal treatments allow them to anticipate equivalent outcome as in general population. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Challenges in the Management of Geriatric Obesity in High Risk Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn N. Porter Starr

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The global prevalence of obesity in the older adult population is growing, an increasing concern in both the developed and developing countries of the world. The study of geriatric obesity and its management is a relatively new area of research, especially pertaining to those with elevated health risks. This review characterizes the state of science for this “fat and frail” population and identifies the many gaps in knowledge where future study is urgently needed. In community dwelling older adults, opportunities to improve both body weight and nutritional status are hampered by inadequate programs to identify and treat obesity, but where support programs exist, there are proven benefits. Nutritional status of the hospitalized older adult should be optimized to overcome the stressors of chronic disease, acute illness, and/or surgery. The least restrictive diets tailored to individual preferences while meeting each patient’s nutritional needs will facilitate the energy required for mobility, respiratory sufficiency, immunocompentence, and wound healing. Complications of care due to obesity in the nursing home setting, especially in those with advanced physical and mental disabilities, are becoming more ubiquitous; in almost all of these situations, weight stability is advocated, as some evidence links weight loss with increased mortality. High quality interdisciplinary studies in a variety of settings are needed to identify standards of care and effective treatments for the most vulnerable obese older adults.

  12. Challenges in the Management of Geriatric Obesity in High Risk Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter Starr, Kathryn N.; McDonald, Shelley R.; Weidner, Julia A.; Bales, Connie W.

    2016-01-01

    The global prevalence of obesity in the older adult population is growing, an increasing concern in both the developed and developing countries of the world. The study of geriatric obesity and its management is a relatively new area of research, especially pertaining to those with elevated health risks. This review characterizes the state of science for this “fat and frail” population and identifies the many gaps in knowledge where future study is urgently needed. In community dwelling older adults, opportunities to improve both body weight and nutritional status are hampered by inadequate programs to identify and treat obesity, but where support programs exist, there are proven benefits. Nutritional status of the hospitalized older adult should be optimized to overcome the stressors of chronic disease, acute illness, and/or surgery. The least restrictive diets tailored to individual preferences while meeting each patient’s nutritional needs will facilitate the energy required for mobility, respiratory sufficiency, immunocompentence, and wound healing. Complications of care due to obesity in the nursing home setting, especially in those with advanced physical and mental disabilities, are becoming more ubiquitous; in almost all of these situations, weight stability is advocated, as some evidence links weight loss with increased mortality. High quality interdisciplinary studies in a variety of settings are needed to identify standards of care and effective treatments for the most vulnerable obese older adults. PMID:27153084

  13. Outcomes of group-based treatment program with parental involvement for the management of childhood and adolescent obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiprabhob, Jeerunda; Leewanun, Chanin; Limprayoon, Kawewan; Kiattisakthavee, Pornpimol; Wongarn, Renu; Aanpreung, Prapun; Likitmaskul, Supawadee

    2014-10-01

    An uncontrolled study was conducted to evaluate the effects of a group-based program on weight control, metabolic profiles, and obesity-related complications in obese youth. The program consisted of an initial in-patient session and five group sessions, one, two, three, six, and nine months into the study, providing participants and their parents with information about the consequences of obesity and lifestyle modifications. The severity of obesity and obesity-related complications were evaluated at baseline and 12 months after the intervention. The participants' and their parents' perceptions of the program were assessed. Of the obese youth recruited (n=126), 115 completed the study. Their percentage weight for height and percentage body fat decreased significantly (both pparents perceived the program as valuable. A group-based program is effective in managing childhood obesity, improving metabolic profiles, and alleviating certain obesity-related complications. A group-based program that provides education and raises the awareness of obese children and their parents about the consequences of obesity is an effective model for treating childhood obesity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The readiness and motivation interview for families (RMI-Family) managing pediatric obesity: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Geoff D C; Spence, Nicholas D; Browne, Nadia E; O'Connor, Kathleen; Srikameswaran, Suja; Zelichowska, Joanna; Ho, Josephine; Gokiert, Rebecca; Mâsse, Louise C; Carson, Valerie; Morrison, Katherine M; Kuk, Jennifer L; Holt, Nicholas L; Kebbe, Maryam; Gehring, Nicole D; Cesar, Melody; Virtanen, Heidi; Geller, Josie

    2017-04-11

    Experts recommend that clinicians assess motivational factors before initiating care for pediatric obesity. Currently, there are no well-established clinical tools available for assessing motivation in youth with obesity or their families. This represents an important gap in knowledge since motivation-related information may shed light on which patients might fail to complete treatment programs. Our study was designed to evaluate the measurement properties and utility of the Readiness and Motivational Interview for Families (RMI-Family), a structured interview that utilizes a motivational interviewing approach to (i) assess motivational factors in youth and their parents, and (ii) examine the degree to which motivation and motivation-related concordance between youth and parents are related to making changes to lifestyle habits for managing obesity in youth. From 2016 to 2020, this prospective study will include youth with obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥97th percentile; 13-17 years old; n = 250) and their parents (n = 250). The study will be conducted at two primary-level, multidisciplinary obesity management clinics based at children's hospitals in Alberta, Canada. Participants will be recruited and enrolled after referral to these clinics, but prior to initiating clinical care. Each youth and their parent will complete the RMI-Family (~1.5 h) at baseline, and 6- and 12-months post-baseline. Individual (i.e., youth or parent) and family-level (i.e., across youth and parent) responses to interview questions will be scored, as will aspects of interview administration (e.g., fidelity to motivational interviewing tenets). The RMI-Family will also be examined for test-retest reliability. Youth data collected at each time point will include demography, anthropometry, lifestyle habits, psychosocial functioning, and health services utilization. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between individual and family-level interview scores on the RMI

  15. Dietary Management of Obesity: Cornerstones of Healthy Eating Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smethers, Alissa D; Rolls, Barbara J

    2018-01-01

    Several dietary patterns, both macronutrient and food based, can lead to weight loss. A key strategy for weight management that can be applied across dietary patterns is to reduce energy density. Clinical trials show that reducing energy density is effective for weight loss and weight loss maintenance. A variety of practical strategies and tools can help facilitate successful weight management by reducing energy density, providing portion control, and improving diet quality. The flexibility of energy density gives patients options to tailor and personalize their dietary pattern to reduce energy intake for sustainable weight loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Self-Management Training for Chinese Obese Children at Risk for Metabolic Syndrome: Effectiveness and Implications for School Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jiying; Anderson, Laura M.; Ji, Hong

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the results of a school-based self-management intervention for Chinese obese children at risk for metabolic syndrome. Twenty-eight Chinese obese children (M age?=?10 years) and their parents participated in the study. Metabolic syndrome risk factors were measured pre- and post-intervention. The risk factors included Body Mass…

  17. Efficacy of a self-management intervention for weight control in overweight and obese adults : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinkers, Charlotte D. W.; Adriaanse, Marieke A.; Kroese, Floor M.; de Ridder, Denise T. D.

    Brief self-management interventions to engender successful weight maintenance are seldom tested in obese and overweight populations without diabetes. To test the efficacy of the intervention, aimed at improving proactive coping, in obese and overweight adults at risk for diabetes. Participants (N =

  18. Happiness in the workplace: an appreciative inquiry

    OpenAIRE

    McGonagle, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Maximising employee wellbeing is a challenge for managers at any time. The current economic climate of austerity and the resulting financial constraints within the public sector increase this challenge. Promoting happiness in the workplace is potentially relevant to improving productivity, creativity and retention of staff. Previous research on happiness in the workplace has focused on job satisfaction and employee engagement however happiness in the workplace is an understudied area and offe...

  19. Healthy eating strategies in the workplace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintiliani, Lisa; Poulsen, Signe; Sorensen, Glorian

    2010-01-01

    through research examples. Findings - Through case studies and published research, it is found that workplace dietary interventions are generally effective, especially fruit and vegetable interventions. There is less consistent evidence on the long-term effectiveness of workplace weight management...... interventions, underscoring the need for further research in this area. This paper also reports evidence that changes in the work environment, including through health and safety programs, may contribute to enhancing the effectiveness of workplace health promotion, including dietary interventions...

  20. Fat mass index performs best in monitoring management of obesity in prepubertal children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-da-Silva, Luís; Dias, Mónica Pitta-Grós; Dionísio, Elisabete; Virella, Daniel; Alves, Marta; Diamantino, Catarina; Alonso, Anabela; Cordeiro-Ferreira, Gonçalo

    2016-01-01

    An early and accurate recognition of success in treating obesity may increase the compliance of obese children and their families to intervention programs. This observational, prospective study aimed to evaluate the ability and the time to detect a significant reduction of adiposity estimated by body mass index (BMI), percentage of fat mass (%FM), and fat mass index (FMI) during weight management in prepubertal obese children. In a cohort of 60 prepubertal obese children aged 3-9 years included in an outpatient weight management program, BMI, %FM, and FMI were monitored monthly; the last two measurements were assessed using air displacement plethysmography. The outcome measures were the reduction of >5% of each indicator and the time to achieve it. The rate of detection of the outcome was 33.3% (95% CI: 25.9-41.6) using BMI, significantly lower (pFM (95% CI: 50.6-74.8) or 70.0% (95% CI: 57.5-80.1) using FMI. The median time to detect the outcome was 71 days using FMI, shorter than 88 days using %FM, and similar to 70 days using BMI. The agreement between the outcome detected by FMI and by %FM was high (kappa 0.701), but very low between the success detected by BMI and either FMI (kappa 0.231) or %FM (kappa 0.125). FMI achieved the best combination of ability and swiftness to identify reduction of adiposity during monitoring of weight management in prepubertal obese children. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Developing dimensions for a multicomponent multidisciplinary approach to obesity management: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Anita J; Dick, Bob; King, Neil A; Hills, Andrew P; Kavanagh, David J

    2017-10-16

    There have been consistent recommendations for multicomponent and multidisciplinary approaches for obesity management. However, there is no clear agreement on the components, disciplines or processes to be considered within such an approach. In this study, we explored multicomponent and multidisciplinary approaches through an examination of knowledge, skills, beliefs, and recommendations of stakeholders involved in obesity management. These stakeholders included researchers, practitioners, educators, and patients. We used qualitative action research methods, including convergent interviewing and observation, to assist the process of inquiry. The consensus was that a multicomponent and multidisciplinary approach should be based on four central meta-components (patient, practitioner, process, and environmental factors), and specific components of these factors were identified. Psychologists, dieticians, exercise physiologists and general practitioners were nominated as key practitioners to be included. A complex condition like obesity requires that multiple components be addressed, and that both patients and multiple disciplines are involved in developing solutions. Implementing cycles of continuous improvement to deal with complexity, instead of trying to control for it, offers an effective way to deal with complex, changing multisystem problems like obesity.

  2. Developing dimensions for a multicomponent multidisciplinary approach to obesity management: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita J. Cochrane

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been consistent recommendations for multicomponent and multidisciplinary approaches for obesity management. However, there is no clear agreement on the components, disciplines or processes to be considered within such an approach. In this study, we explored multicomponent and multidisciplinary approaches through an examination of knowledge, skills, beliefs, and recommendations of stakeholders involved in obesity management. These stakeholders included researchers, practitioners, educators, and patients. Methods We used qualitative action research methods, including convergent interviewing and observation, to assist the process of inquiry. Results The consensus was that a multicomponent and multidisciplinary approach should be based on four central meta-components (patient, practitioner, process, and environmental factors, and specific components of these factors were identified. Psychologists, dieticians, exercise physiologists and general practitioners were nominated as key practitioners to be included. Conclusions A complex condition like obesity requires that multiple components be addressed, and that both patients and multiple disciplines are involved in developing solutions. Implementing cycles of continuous improvement to deal with complexity, instead of trying to control for it, offers an effective way to deal with complex, changing multisystem problems like obesity.

  3. The extent and influence of Asbestos Safety Awareness training among managers who had previously commissioned an asbestos survey in their workplace buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    HICKEY, Jane; SAUNDERS, Jean; DAVERN, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A telephone survey was conducted among a sample of managers (n=30) in Ireland who had previously commissioned an asbestos survey in their workplace buildings. The aims of the telephone survey were to examine the extent to which managers had completed Asbestos Safety Awareness (ASA) training, and to assess how such training might influence (i) their instinctive thoughts on asbestos, and (ii) their approach to aspects of asbestos management within their buildings. Managers’ motivations for commissioning the asbestos survey were also identified. The study found that ASA-trained managers (n=11) were not significantly more likely to work in larger organisations or in organisations which operated an accredited management system. Though ASA-trained managers’ instinctive thoughts on asbestos were of a slightly poorer technical quality compared with those of non-ASA-trained managers, they were still significantly more cognisant of their responsibilities towards those of their employees at specific risk of asbestos exposure. Most managers (n=28) commissioned the asbestos survey to satisfy a pre-requisite of external contractors for commencing refurbishment/demolition work in their buildings. Given its potential to positively influence the occupational management of asbestos, the authors recommend the general promotion of suitably tailored ASA-training programmes among building managers and external contractors alike. PMID:25914070

  4. Mobbing in the workplace by peers and managers: mobbing experienced by nurses working in healthcare facilities in Turkey and its effect on nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Aytolan; Yildirim, Dilek

    2007-08-01

    exhibited by the participants to escape mobbing was 'to work harder and be more organized' and 'to work more carefully to avoid criticism'. In addition 10% of the participants stated that they 'consider committing suicide sometimes.' Mobbing behaviours in the workplace need to be defined and appropriate policies and procedures need to be developed and shared with all employees to prevent the development of these behaviours. In addition, managers should adopt an open managerial approach to prevent the development of these behaviours.

  5. Effective behaviour change techniques in the prevention and management of childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J; Chater, A; Lorencatto, F

    2013-10-01

    Rates of childhood obesity are increasing, and it is essential to identify the active components of interventions aiming to prevent and manage obesity in children. A systematic review of behaviour change interventions was conducted to find evidence of behaviour change techniques (BCTs) that are most effective in changing physical activity and/or eating behaviour for the prevention or management of childhood obesity. An electronic search was conducted for randomised controlled trials published between January 1990 and December 2009. Of 4309 titles and abstracts screened, full texts of 135 articles were assessed, of which 17 published articles were included in this review. Intervention descriptions were coded according to the behaviour-specific CALO-RE taxonomy of BCTs. BCTs were identified and compared across obesity management (n=9) vs prevention (n=8) trials. To assess the effectiveness of individual BCTs, trials were further divided into those that were effective (defined as either a group reduction of at least 0.13 body mass index (BMI) units or a significant difference in BMI between intervention and control groups at follow-up) vs non-effective (reported no significant differences between groups). We reliably identified BCTs utilised in effective and non-effective prevention and management trials. To illustrate the relative effectiveness of each BCT, effectiveness ratios were calculated as the ratio of the number of times each BCT was a component of an intervention in an effective trial divided by the number of times they were a component of all trials. Results indicated six BCTs that may be effective components of future management interventions (provide information on the consequences of behaviour to the individual, environmental restructuring, prompt practice, prompt identification as role model/position advocate, stress management/emotional control training and general communication skills training), and one that may be effective in prevention

  6. Implementation of a primary care physician network obesity management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowerman, S; Bellman, M; Saltsman, P; Garvey, D; Pimstone, K; Skootsky, S; Wang, H J; Elashoff, R; Heber, D

    2001-11-01

    Most primary care physicians do not treat obesity, citing lack of time, resources, insurance reimbursement, and knowledge of effective interventions as significant barriers. To address this need, a 10-minute intervention delivered by the primary care physician was coupled with individual dietary counseling sessions delivered by a registered dietitian via telephone with an automated calling system (House-Calls, Mobile, AL). Patients were seen for follow-up by their physician at weeks 4, 12, 24, 36 and 52. A total of 252 patients (202 women and 50 men) were referred by 18 primary care physicians to the program. The comorbid conditions reported for all patients at baseline included low back pain, 29% (n = 72); hypertension, 45% (n = 113); hypercholesterolemia, 41% (n = 104); type 2 diabetes, 10% (n = 26); and sleep apnea, 5% (n = 12). When offered a choice of meal plans based on foods or meal replacements, two-thirds of patients (n = 166) chose to use meal replacements (Ultra Slim-Fast; Slim-Fast Foods Co., West Palm Beach, FL) at least once daily. Baseline weights of subjects averaged 200 +/- 46 lb for women (n = 202) and 237 +/- 45 lb for men (n = 50). Patients completing 6 months in the program lost an average of 19.0 +/- 4.0 lb for women (n = 94) and 15.5 +/- 8.2 lb for men (n = 26). Physicians reported a high degree of satisfaction with the program, suggesting that a brief, effective physician-directed program with nutritionist support by telephone can be implemented in a busy primary care office.

  7. Nutritional management of a patient with obesity and pulmonary embolism: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonte, Maria Luisa; Fietchner, Lauren; Manuelli, Matteo; Cena, Hellas

    2016-10-19

    The aim of this case report is to discuss the issue of nutritional therapy in patients taking warfarin. Patients are often prescribed vitamin K free diets without nutritional counseling, leading to possible health consequences. A 52-year-old woman with obesity and hypertension was prescribed a low calorie diet by her family doctor in an effort to promote weight loss. After a pulmonary embolism, she was placed on anticoagulant therapy and on hospital discharge she was prescribed a vitamin K free diet to avoid interactions. Given poor control of her anticoagulant therapy, she was referred to our Nutritional Unit outpatients' service. This case illustrates the importance of a thorough medical nutrition assessment in the management of patients with obesity and the need for a change in the dietary approach of nutritional therapy in the management of vitamin K anticoagulant therapy. In patients taking warfarin, evidence suggest that the aim of nutritional therapy should be to keep dietary intake of vitamin K constant.

  8. The role of endoscopic therapy in obesity management: intragastric balloons and aspiration therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Nitin; Sullivan, Shelby; Thompson, Christopher C

    2017-01-01

    Nitin Kumar,1 Shelby Sullivan,2 Christopher C Thompson3 1Bariatric Endoscopy Institute, Addison, IL, 2Gastroenterology Bariatric and Metabolic Program, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO, 3Gastroenterology and Therapeutic Endoscopy, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Weight management is increasingly incorporating endoscopic bariatric therapy (EBT). As the global burden of obesity and its comorbidities has increased, it...

  9. The use of lorcaserin in the management of obesity: a critical appraisal

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yu; Bai,

    2010-01-01

    Bo Bai, Yu WangDepartment of Pharmacology and Pharmacy, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Obesity is a chronic disease with a high prevalence in both developed and developing countries. Effective management of this worldwide epidemic will have a significant impact on the health care system globally. Lifestyle interventions, such as restricting calorie consumption and increasing physical activity, remain a major c...

  10. Patient's experience with comorbidity management in primary care: a qualitative study of comorbid pain and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, E Amy; Ramirez, Michelle L; Haltzman, Brittany; Fritz, Megan; Kozak, Andrea T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to examine perceptions of those with comorbid chronic pain and obesity regarding their experience of comorbidity management in primary care settings. Chronic pain and obesity are common comorbidities frequently managed in primary care settings. Evidence suggests individuals with this comorbidity may be at risk for suboptimal clinical interactions; however, treatment experiences and preferences of those with comorbid chronic pain and obesity have received little attention. Semi-structured interviews conducted with 30 primary care patients with mean body mass index=36.8 and comorbid persistent pain. The constant comparative method was used to analyze data. Participants discussed frustration with a perceived lack of information tailored to their needs and a desire for a personalized treatment experience. Participants found available medical approaches unsatisfying and sought a more holistic approach to management. Discussions also focused around the need for providers to initiate efforts at education and motivation enhancement and to show concern for and understanding of the unique difficulties associated with comorbidity. Findings suggest providers should engage in integrated communication regarding weight and pain, targeting this multimorbidity using methods aligned with priorities discussed by patients.

  11. Outcomes of a community-based weight management programme for morbidly obese populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nield, L; Kelly, S

    2016-12-01

    Morbid obesity is an ongoing concern worldwide. There is a paucity of research reporting primary care outcomes focussed on complex and morbidly obese populations. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommends a specialist, multidisciplinary weight management team for the successful management of such populations. This is the first service evaluation reporting both primary (weight change) and secondary [body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, physical activity levels, fruit and vegetable intake, Rosenberg self-esteem score] outcomes in these patients. The present study comprised a prospective observational study of a cohort data set for patients (n = 288) attending their 3-month and 6-month (n = 115) assessment appointments at a specialist community weight management programme. Patients had a mean (SD) initial BMI of 45.5 (6.6) kg m - ²; 66% were females. Over 80% of patients attending the service lost some weight by 3 months. Average absolute weight loss was 4.11 (4.95) kg at 3 months and 6.30 (8.41) kg at 6 months, equating to 3.28% (3.82%) and 4.90% (6.26%), respectively, demonstrating a statistically significant weight change at both time points (P physical activity levels, fruit and vegetable consumption, and self-esteem levels (P < 0.001). This service was successful in aiding weight loss in morbidly obese populations. The findings of the present study support the view that weight-loss targets of 3% are realistic. © 2016 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  12. Using Intervention Mapping to develop the Parents as Agents of Change (PAC©) intervention for managing pediatric obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Geoff D C; Mushquash, Aislin R; Keaschuk, Rachel A; Ambler, Kathryn A; Newton, Amanda S

    2017-01-13

    Pediatric obesity has become increasingly prevalent over recent decades. In view of the psychosocial and physical health risks, and the high likelihood that children with obesity will grow to become adults with obesity, there is a clear need to develop evidence-based interventions that can be delivered in the health care system to optimize the health and well-being of children with obesity and their families. The aim of this paper is to describe the development, implementation, and planned evaluation of a parent-based weight management intervention designed for parents of 8-12 year olds with obesity. The principles of Intervention Mapping (IM) were used to develop an intervention called Parents as Agents of Change (PAC © ). From 2006 to 2009, an environmental scan plus qualitative (individual interviews with parents and children), quantitative (medical record reviews), and literature review data were collected to gain broad insight into family factors related to pediatric obesity and its management. Theoretical frameworks and empirical evidence guided curriculum development, which was founded primarily on the tenets of family systems theory and cognitive behavioral theory. PAC was developed as a manualized, 16-session, group-based, health care professional-led intervention for parents to address individual, family, and environmental factors related to the management of pediatric obesity. The intervention was refined based on feedback from local and international experts, and has been implemented successfully in a multi-disciplinary weight management centre in a children's hospital. IM provided a practical framework to guide the systematic development of a pediatric weight management intervention for parents of children with obesity. This logical, step-by-step process blends theory and practice and is broadly applicable in the context of obesity management intervention development and evaluation. Following intervention development, the PAC intervention was

  13. Exploring the usability of a mobile app for adolescent obesity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Grace; Dowdall, Grainne; Burls, Amanda; Perry, Ivan J; Curran, Noirin

    2014-06-27

    Obesity is a global epidemic. Behavioral change approaches towards improving nutrition, increasing physical activity level, improving sleep, and reducing sitting time are recommended as best practices in adolescent obesity management. However, access to evidence-based treatment is limited and portable technologies such as mobile apps may provide a useful platform to deliver such lifestyle interventions. No evidence-based validated app exists for obesity intervention; therefore, a novel mobile app (Reactivate) was developed for use in the Temple Street W82GO Healthy Lifestyles Program (W82GO). This study aimed to test the usability (technical effectiveness, efficiency, and user satisfaction) of the Reactivate mobile app in obese adolescents. Ten adolescents (7 males and 3 females, aged 12-17 years) who had been treated for obesity (>98th percentile for body mass index) at the Temple Street Children's University Hospital were recruited. Participants were given 8 tasks to complete in order to test the technical effectiveness of the app. A research assistant timed the user while completing each task in order to test the relative user efficiency of the app (time-on-task). The tasks fell into 5 categories and required the user to enter personal settings, find and answer surveys, create a message, use the goal setting feature, and enter details regarding their weight and height. In exploration of user satisfaction, each participant completed the standardized software usability measurement inventory (SUMI), which measures 5 aspects of user satisfaction: efficiency, effect, helpfulness, controllability, and learnability. Descriptive statistics were used to explore the mean relative user efficiency and SUMI scores. Mean age was 14.26 (SD 1.58) years. All adolescents completed each of the tasks successfully. The mean relative user efficiency scores were two to three times that of an expert user. Users responded that they would use Reactivate to monitor their growth over time

  14. Nurses′ workplace stressors and coping strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickie A Lambert

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Prior research has suggested that nurses, regardless of workplace or culture, are confronted with a variety of stressors. As the worldwide nursing shortage increases, the aged population becomes larger, there is an increase in the incidence of chronic illnesses and technology continues to advance, nurses continually will be faced with numerous workplace stressors. Thus, nurses, especially palliative care nurses, need to learn how to identify their workplace stressors and to cope effectively with these stressors to attain and maintain both their physical and mental health. This article describes workplace stressors and coping strategies, compares and contrasts cross-cultural literature on nurses′ workplace stressors and coping strategies, and delineates a variety of stress management activities that could prove helpful for contending with stressors in the workplace.

  15. Practical Review of Recognition and Management of Obesity and Lipohypertrophy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Jordan E; Stanley, Takara L; Apovian, Caroline M; Bhasin, Shalendar; Brown, Todd T; Capeau, Jaqueline; Currier, Judith S; Dube, Michael P; Falutz, Julian; Grinspoon, Steven K; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Martinez, Esteban; McComsey, Grace A; Sattler, Fred R; Erlandson, Kristine M

    2017-05-15

    Obesity and lipohypertrophy are common in treated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and contribute to morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy (ART). We present a consensus opinion on the diagnosis, clinical consequences, and treatment of excess adiposity in adults with treated HIV infection. Obesity and lipohypertrophy commonly occur among HIV-infected adults on ART and may have overlapping pathophysiologies and/or synergistic metabolic consequences. Traditional, HIV-specific, and ART-specific risk factors all contribute. The metabolic and inflammatory consequences of excess adiposity are critical drivers of non-AIDS events in this population. Although promising treatment strategies exist, further research is needed to better understand the pathophysiology and optimal treatment of obesity and lipohypertrophy in the modern ART era. Both generalized obesity and lipohypertrophy are prevalent among HIV-infected persons on ART. Aggressive diagnosis and management are key to the prevention and treatment of end-organ disease in this population and critical to the present and future health of HIV-infected persons.

  16. The use of adjustable gastric bands for management of severe and complex obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, James C A; Blazeby, Jane M; Rogers, Chris A; Welbourn, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Obesity levels in the UK have reached a sustained high and ∼4% of the population would be candidates for bariatric surgery based upon current UK NICE guidelines, which has important implications for Clinical Commissioning Groups. Summary data from Cochrane systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cohort studies. Currently, the only treatment that offers significant and durable weight loss for those with severe and complex obesity is surgery. Three operations account for 95% of all bariatric surgery in the UK, but the NHS offers surgery to only a small fraction of those who could benefit. Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (gastric banding) has potentially the lowest risk and up-front costs of the three procedures. Reliable Level 1 evidence of the relative effectiveness of the operations is lacking. As a point intervention, weight loss surgery together with the chronic disease management strategy for obesity can prevent significant future disease and mortality, and the NHS should embrace both. Better RCT evidence is needed including clinical effectiveness and economic analysis to answer the important question 'which is the best of the three operations most frequently performed?' This review considers the current evidence for gastric banding for the treatment of severe and complex obesity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese adults: clinical aspects and current management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallayova, M; Taheri, S

    2014-10-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disorder whose prevalence is strongly linked to the current epidemic of obesity in many western countries. The prevalence of NAFLD is two to four times higher in populations with pre-existing metabolic comorbidities than in the general population. The diagnosis of primary NAFLD involves establishing the presence of hepatic steatosis or steatohepatitis by imaging or histology, along with establishing the non-alcoholic nature of the disease process and excluding competing aetiologies for hepatic steatosis. Among the indirect serum biomarkers, the NAFLD fibrosis score can help to identify patients with NAFLD and with higher likelihood of having fibrosis or cirrhosis. A liver biopsy should be considered in NAFLD patients at increased risk for steatohepatitis/advanced fibrosis and in cases where a liver biopsy is necessary to exclude co-existing chronic liver diseases and other aetiologies for hepatic steatosis. The treatment and management recommendations for obesity-associated NAFLD are aimed towards weight reduction. The currently available interventions employed to promote weight loss and improve the metabolic responses in NAFLD include lifestyle modification, pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical Obesity © 2014 World Obesity.

  18. The use of adjustable gastric bands for management of severe and complex obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, James C. A.; Blazeby, Jane M.; Rogers, Chris A.; Welbourn, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity levels in the UK have reached a sustained high and ∼4% of the population would be candidates for bariatric surgery based upon current UK NICE guidelines, which has important implications for Clinical Commissioning Groups. Sources of data Summary data from Cochrane systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cohort studies. Areas of agreement Currently, the only treatment that offers significant and durable weight loss for those with severe and complex obesity is surgery. Three operations account for 95% of all bariatric surgery in the UK, but the NHS offers surgery to only a small fraction of those who could benefit. Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (gastric banding) has potentially the lowest risk and up-front costs of the three procedures. Areas of controversy Reliable Level 1 evidence of the relative effectiveness of the operations is lacking. Growing points As a point intervention, weight loss surgery together with the chronic disease management strategy for obesity can prevent significant future disease and mortality, and the NHS should embrace both. Areas timely for developing research Better RCT evidence is needed including clinical effectiveness and economic analysis to answer the important question ‘which is the best of the three operations most frequently performed?’ This review considers the current evidence for gastric banding for the treatment of severe and complex obesity. PMID:27034443

  19. Workplace bullying prevention: a critical discourse analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Susan L

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the discourses of workplace bullying prevention of hospital nursing unit managers and in the official documents of the organizations where they worked. Workplace bullying can be a self-perpetuating problem in nursing units. As such, efforts to prevent this behaviour may be more effective than efforts to stop ongoing bullying. There is limited research on how healthcare organizations characterize their efforts to prevent workplace bullying. This was a qualitative study. Critical discourse analysis and Foucault's writings on governmentality and discipline were used to analyse data from interviews with hospital nursing unit managers (n = 15) and organizational documents (n = 22). Data were collected in 2012. The discourse of workplace bullying prevention centred around three themes: prevention of workplace bullying through managerial presence, normalizing behaviours and controlling behaviours. All three are individual level discourses of workplace bullying prevention. Current research indicates that workplace bullying is a complex issue with antecedents at the individual, departmental and organizational level. However, the discourse of the participants in this study only focused on prevention of bullying by moulding the behaviours of individuals. The effective prevention of workplace bullying will require departmental and organizational initiatives. Leaders in all types of organizations can use the results of this study to examine their organizations' discourses of workplace bullying prevention to determine where change is needed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The impact of body weight management in chronic kidney disease patients with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Ling; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Yang, Mei-Fang; Yang, Wen-Ching; Wu, Ming-Ju; Lin, Tzu-Mei; Chen, Cheng-Hsu

    2013-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and obesity are important public health concerns. Because obesity may initiate and/or accelerate kidney damage, weight control may benefit CKD patients. We examined the influence of dietary management and physical exercise in 38 obese CKD patients with or without target reduction of body weight 3% or more from baseline. After a 2-month lifestyle intervention program, those with target body weight control had significant improvement of blood pressure control, as well as reduced lipid profiles, serum creatinine level (1.1 ± 0.3 vs. 0.8 ± 0.3; P < .001), estimated glomerular filtration rate (75.9 ± 21.2 vs. 104.9 ± 38.1; P < .001), and proteinuria (76.3% vs. 50.0%; P = .02). They had greater improvement in cardiorespiratory endurance in an 800-m running test (375.1 ± 64.7 vs. 327.1 ± 84.0 seconds; P = .001), better abdominal muscle strength and endurance in a timed sit-up test (13.6 ± 9.1 vs. 19.9 ± 9.2 number/minute; P = .005), and greater flexibility in a sit-and-reach test (18.8 ± 10.9 vs. 27.8 ± 10.9 cm; P < .001) comparing baseline and postintervention values. A combination of dietary management and exercise were associated with improvements in health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure and lipid control), and renal profiles in obese CKD patients. Supportive individualized programs for lifestyle change could exert beneficial effects, but long-term research with a larger patient population is needed to elucidate the optimal effective combination of dietary management and exercise. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The local implementation of a chronic disease management model for childhood overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink-Melis, Willy J; Derksen, Elze R E; Westerman, Marjan J; Renders, Carry M; Seidell, Jacob C; Visscher, Tommy L S

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine opportunities and barriers regarding the management of overweight and obese children in daily practice, and to show the value of using focus groups when developing an action plan for childhood overweight management in a local context. Seven focus groups and four semi-structured interviews were conducted with 29 professionals from nine different care disciplines and 7 parents of overweight and obese children aged 4-19 years. After thorough analysis of the focus groups, issues concerning finding the most appropriate care and realising a long-term weight management in daily practice have become clear. Some examples of these issues are: lack of awareness, reluctance to discuss and refer, mutual cooperation, contradictory advice and expectations of treatment and lack of effective support strategies. Focus groups deliver important information on local issues that are important for the development and implementation of a childhood overweight management action plan. And, besides delivering necessary information, focus groups lead to an increased awareness and willingness to improve childhood overweight management in a local context. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  2. Food Addiction: A Barrier for Effective Weight Management for Obese Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, Connie L; Laurent, Jennifer; Brock, David W

    2017-12-01

    Findings from studies of food addiction in adults suggest those with food addiction are less successful in weight-loss interventions. Little is known about food addiction in obesity treatment-seeking adolescents; therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence of food addiction and correlates of food addiction symptoms in obese adolescents entering an outpatient, weight management program. Obese adolescents (n = 26) were administered the Yale Food Addiction Scale for Children (YFAS-C), measures of appetitive responsiveness, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) before and following a 12-week, outpatient, behavioral weight management program. Descriptive statistics and correlations between YFAS-C symptoms and study variables were performed and further examined with linear regression. Baseline differences were compared between those meeting criteria for food addiction to those who did not (independent t-tests) and pre-postweight management program changes were examined (paired t-tests). 30.7% met criteria for food addiction and 50% reported ≥3 symptoms. Number of YFAS-C symptoms was correlated with appetitive responsiveness (r = 0.57, p adolescents with food addiction compared to those without (62.5% vs. 44.4%, p Adolescents with food addiction or with a higher number of food addiction symptoms may warrant additional resources to support adherence to and retention with a weight management program. Implementing screening measures for food addiction before enrolling in a weight management program may be an effective strategy to identify adolescents who may benefit from adjunct modalities.

  3. [Exploratory population study of overweight and obese subjects' perceptions: Searching for improved management practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutze, C; Pétré, B; Dardenne, N; Donneau, A-F; Streel, S; Albert, A; Scheen, A; Husson, E; Guillaume, M

    2017-06-01

    Overweight and obesity are major public health problems of growing concern. Few studies have investigated the representations and perceptions of subjects with overweight and obesity, especially in the general population, as compared to people in a medical weight loss process. The objective of this study was to fill this gap by enabling participants to express their feelings and experience about their overweight, and to assess the extent of the body mass index (BMI) as a determinant of these perceptions. A total of 4155 persons participated in an exploratory study conducted in Wallonia (Belgium). Data were collected by means of a web-based questionnaire. This study investigated the following parameters: sociodemographic and anthropometric factors, perceived health, quality of life, diet perception, enrolment in a weight loss process and weight loss target. The influence of BMI was considered, on one hand, looking at how the above variables evolve according to BMI category, secondly, as a mediation factor in the relationship between socioeconomic level and these same variables. A large majority (87.5%) of subjects were overweight (32.2%) or obese (obese class I 29.9%, class II 14.8%, class III 10.6%). Perceived health was found to deteriorate with the BMI (Ppsychological quality of life reported by the subjects decreased significantly with the BMI (Presignation and powerlessness which can seize obese individuals (especially when BMI increases). As a consequence, there is a need for more adapted weight management to achieve a genuine therapeutic alliance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. Challenges in the pharmacologic management of obesity and secondary dyslipidemia in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Mary Jayne; Jellerson, Kevin D; Snow, Michael Z; Zacchetti, Michelle L

    2013-10-01

    The rise in childhood obesity has lead to an increased number of children with lipid abnormalities and the predominance of a combined dyslipidemic pattern characterized by a moderate-to-severe elevation in triglycerides, normal-to-mild mild elevation in LDL cholesterol and reduced HDL cholesterol. Although recently published National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) guidelines represent a significant step forward in managing primary dyslipidemias in pediatric patients, there is still no general consensus regarding the pharmacologic treatment of obesity-related lipid abnormalities in children. The use of early pharmacologic intervention to control dyslipidemias and reduce cardiovascular risk in young children is only expected to increase given the steady increase in obesity and emergence of atherosclerotic disease in pre-adolescents. Despite the increasing use of lipid-lowering therapy in children over the last few years, diet and lifestyle modification remain the first line therapy. Given the challenges of instituting and maintaining lifestyle modification in pediatric patients, however, it is likely that institution of drug therapy may be required in many children. Of all the medications currently available, the fibric acid derivatives have a cholesterol lowering profile that is most likely to be effective in obese children with the high TG/low HDL phenotype and data from a recently published study of gemfibrozil in children with metabolic syndrome are promising. However, additional information regarding the short and long-term safety and efficacy of fibrate therapy in children with obesity-related lipid disorders is needed before use of these agents can be recommended.

  5. mHealth technologies in the management of obesity: a narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allman-Farinelli M

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Margaret Allman-Farinelli, Juliana Chen School of Life and Environmental Science, Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia Abstract: The global pandemic of obesity requires an urgent response. Obesity results in increased risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. The need to provide cost-effective treatment to the millions affected is evident but traditional repeated individual face-to-face management would clearly exhaust available health care services. It is for this reason that the use of mobile health (mHealth to improve population health, diet, and physical activity has become an active area of research. The aim of this review is to give a perspective of where this field of research currently stands using examples from the published literature. Smartphones provide a medium for the delivery of health information, personal coaching, monitoring of eating and physical activity behaviors and to integrate outputs from other sensors. Health and computer researchers have been developing and evaluating mHealth for the management of obesity but their efforts are relatively small. Text messaging, applications (apps and a number of multicomponent mHealth programs utilizing a variety of Smartphone functions indicate some success in weight management but the results are mixed. Apart from the ubiquitous nature of Smartphones and devices, the real-time delivery of output data provides the potential for continuous adjustment of interventions according to the changes an individual is making after each message they receive from the mHealth program. This ability to optimize interventions for individual weight management in a timely fashion is the big challenge for researchers. Personalized heath advice is the preferred option of individuals, and cooperation between computer scientists, behavioral scientists, dietitians, exercise physiologists and medical practitioners will be needed to meaningfully

  6. The development and effectiveness of a health information website designed to improve parents' self-efficacy in managing risk for obesity in preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Marilyn A; Terhorst, Lauren; Nakonechny, Amanda J; Skukla, Nimisha; El Saadawi, Gilan

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of web-based information on parental self-efficacy in managing obesity risk in preschoolers. The project included a literature review and the development and field testing of an information website that presented information on how to manage nine obesity risk factors for childhood obesity. Parents stated that they had no problems using the website, and 69% reported improved self-efficacy on at least two risk factors. Many parents access the Internet to obtain health information. A website that offers practical information on managing childhood obesity risk factors is a valuable resource for obesity prevention efforts. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Severity of obesity and management of hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia and smoking in primary care: population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, H P; Prevost, A T; Gulliford, M C

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and obesity-associated cardiovascular risk are increasing worldwide. This study aimed to determine how different levels of obesity are associated with the management of smoking, hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia in primary care. We conducted a cohort study of adults aged 30-100 years in England, sampled from the primary care electronic health records in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Prevalence, treatment and control were estimated for each risk factor by body mass index (BMI) category. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR) were estimated, allowing for age, gender, comorbidity and socioeconomic status, with normal weight as reference category. Data were analysed for 247,653 patients including 153,308 (62%) with BMI recorded, of whom 46,149 (30%) were obese. Participants were classified into simple (29,257), severe (11,059) and morbid obesity (5833) categories. Smoking declined with the increasing BMI category, but smoking cessation treatment increased. Age-standardised hypertension prevalence was twice as high in morbid obesity (men 78.6%; women 66.0%) compared with normal weight (men 37.3%; women 29.4%). Hypertension treatment was more frequent (AOR 1.75, 1.59-1.92) but hypertension control less frequent (AOR 0.63, 0.59-0.69) in morbid obesity, with similar findings for severe obesity. Hypercholesterolaemia was more frequent in morbid obesity (men 48.2%; women 36.3%) than normal weight (men 25.0%; women 20.0%). Lipid lowering therapy was more frequent in morbid obesity (AOR 1.83, 1.61-2.07) as was cholesterol control (AOR 1.19, 1.06-1.34). Increasing obesity category is associated with elevated risks from hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia. Inadequate hypertension control in obesity emerges as an important target for future interventions.

  8. Workplace bullying: an emergent issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essen, S Donovan; Esquivel, Cynthia; Jha, Pankaj

    2014-09-01

    All companies, including dentists, rely on their staff to represent their firms in the most positive and effective manner. Today's managers face a multitude of issues, and as such, they must walk a fine line of fostering a productive, harmonious and safe working environment for their employees. Over the last several decades it is apparent that on the- job sexual harassment is no longer the leading issue of employee complaints. Rather, the organization issue which was investigated is workplace bullying, also commonly referred to as employee harassment. Risk management is no longer limited to avoiding malpractice issues but also preventing litigation created by poor organizational behavior. The primary purpose of this paper is to explore the background of workplace bullying and how it affects today's managers and their employees, customers and suppliers. In other words, the scope of this paper will feature research on past studies, results and conclusions. Since workplace bullying affects all levels of a corporation, it must be stated that the concern and focus of this paper is for today's manager to understand the background and history of workplace bullying, and what they can do to foster a safe working environment and prevent the bully from creating mental and physical harm to their employees. This paper details the history of workplace bullying and how management, employees and suppliers deal with and address the issue. Lastly, this treatise looks at risk management from a manger/dentist's perspective, the assessment/conclusion summarizes the implications for managers regarding how they must handle the issue or risk harm to the employee and/or serious legal ramifications.

  9. Workplace Bullying: Curing the Cancer of the American Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendinning, Peter M.

    2001-01-01

    A literature review concluded that supervisor/supervisee relationships are critical to job satisfaction; workplace bullying in the form of a management style of aggressive and intimidating behaviors is widespread; certain types of organizations foster bullying; and bullying has high costs for the targeted employee and the organization. (Contains…

  10. Lorcaserin Use in the Management of Morbid Obesity in a Pre-Liver Transplant Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Julio A; Landaverde, Carmen; Wells, Jennifer T; Poordad, Fred

    2016-07-01

    Management of obesity and decompensated cirrhosis in those requiring liver transplantation (LT) is a challenging dilemma. Because of concerns for perioperative complications, many centers avoid transplant in those with a body mass index (BMI) greater than 40 kg/m(2) . Bariatric surgery is associated with increased risk attributable to complications of portal hypertension, including variceal rupture. Therefore, weight loss and LT options are limited. Several new classes of weight loss drugs are commercially available, including the anoretic, lorcaserin. This case illustrates the successful use of lorcaserin in a morbidly obese individual with decompensated cirrhosis evaluated for LT listing. (Hepatology 2016;64:301-302). © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  11. Reducing the load: the evolution and management of obesity and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis before liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Kymberly D

    2012-11-01

    1. Obesity is common in patients with end-stage liver disease of any cause. 2. Obesity is associated with comorbidities that can affect liver transplant candidacy, such as metabolic syndrome (diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension), cardiovascular disease, pulmonary disorders (related to obstructive sleep apnea), renal dysfunction, and malignancies. 3. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is the only indication for transplantation that is increasing in frequency, and it may soon become the leading indication. 4. There is no set body mass index above which liver transplantation is contraindicated. Transplant candidacy and outcomes depend on the cumulative comorbidities of the individual patient. 5. Weight loss is an important component of metabolic syndrome management and is recommended before liver transplantation. 6. Bariatric surgery may be considered in carefully selected patients with well-compensated cirrhosis but is not recommended in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Copyright © 2012 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  12. Parent Involvement Intervention in Developing Weight Management Skills for both Parents and Overweight/Obese Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Soon; Park, Jiyoung; Park, Kye-Yeong; Lee, Myung-Nam; Ham, Ok Kyung

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate a parent involvement intervention for childhood obesity intended to increase parents' skills in managing children's weight-related behavior and to improve child-parent relationships. Many studies reported on parental influence on childhood obesity, emphasizing parent involvement in prevention and management of childhood obesity. A randomized controlled trial was conducted. Forty-two parents of overweight/obese children were recruited from four cities and randomized to the experimental group or control group. The parental intervention was provided only to parents in the experimental group and consisted of weekly newsletters and text messages for a period of 5 weeks. Exercise classes and nutrition education were provided to all children. Lifestyle Behaviour Checklist and the Child-Parent Relationship Scale (CPRS) were used for measurement of parent outcome. For the child outcome, dietary self-efficacy, exercise frequency, and body mass index were measured. A mixed-design analysis of variance was performed with city location entered as a random effect. After the intervention, CPRS of parents and dietary self-efficacy of children showed an increase in the experimental group (p parents and dietary self-efficacy of children (p parent involvement intervention in promoting child-parent relationship and dietary self-efficacy of children. However, a 5-week parent involvement intervention was not sufficient to produce significant changes in children's body mass index. Further research is needed to investigate effects of parent involvement intervention with long-term evaluation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Manage at work: a randomized, controlled trial of a self-management group intervention to overcome workplace challenges associated with chronic physical health conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaw, W.S.; Besen, E.; Pransky, G.; Boot, C.R.L.; Nicholas, M.K.; McLellan, R.K.; Tveito, T.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The percentage of older and chronically ill workers is increasing rapidly in the US and in many other countries, but few interventions are available to help employees overcome the workplace challenges of chronic pain and other physical health conditions. While most workers are eligible

  14. Unique barriers and needs in weight management for obese women with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Jennifer M; Ridgeway, Jennifer L; Vickers, Kristin S; Hathaway, Julie C; Vincent, Ann; Oh, Terry H

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify barriers, needs, and preferences of weight management intervention for women with fibromyalgia (FM). Obesity appears in higher rates in women with fibromyalgia compared to the population at large, and no study to date has taken a qualitative approach to better understand how these women view weight management in relation to their disease and vice versa. We designed a qualitative interview study with women patients with FM and obesity. Women (N = 15) were recruited by their participation in a fibromyalgia treatment program (FTP) within the year prior. The women approached for the study met the following inclusion criteria: confirmed diagnosis of FM, age between 30 and 60 years (M = 51 ± 6.27), and body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 (M = 37.88 ± 4.87). Patients completed questionnaire data prior to their participation in focus groups (N = 3), including weight loss history, physical activity data, the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR), and the Patient Health Questionnaire 9-item (PHQ-9). Three focus group interviews were conducted to collect qualitative data. Consistent themes were revealed within and between groups. Patients expressed the complex relationships between FM symptoms, daily responsibilities, and weight management. Weight was viewed as an emotionally laden topic requiring compassionate delivery of programming from an empathetic leader who is knowledgeable about fibromyalgia. Patients view themselves as complex and different, requiring a specifically tailored weight management program for women with FM. Women with FM identify unique barriers to weight management, including the complex interrelationships between symptoms of FM and health behaviors, such as diet and exercise. They prefer a weight management program for women with FM that consists of an in-person, group-based approach with a leader but are open to a tailored conventional weight management program. Feasibility may be one of the biggest barriers

  15. Anesthetizing the obese child

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Anette; Lenz, Katja; Abildstrøm, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity is increasing. The focus of this review is the special anesthetic considerations regarding the perioperative management of obese children. With obesity the risk of comorbidity such as asthma, obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension, and diabetes increases...

  16. Answers to Clinical Questions in the Primary Care Management of People with Obesity: Pharmacologic Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Ken; Braverman-Panza, Jill

    2016-07-01

    The recent approval of liraglutide, lorcaserin, naltrexone/bupropion extended-release, and phentermine/topiramate extended-release, brings the number of medications for long-term weight loss to 5 (including orlistat). Indicated for the treatment of patients with overweight (body mass index [BMI] ≥27 kg/m2 with ≥1 weight-related comorbidity) or obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m2), these medications provide new opportunities to address this burgeoning health problem.

  17. Post-trauma support in the workplace: the current status and practice of critical incident stress management (CISM) and psychological debriefing (PD) within organizations in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regel, Stephen

    2007-09-01

    Employers' duties of care under both common and statute law include the need to take reasonable care of the health and safety of the workforce. This includes both the moral and legal duties to consider the psychological needs of personnel following exposure to traumatic events related to the workplace. While this has been recognized within many high-risk occupations such the police, fire and rescue services and the military, there is also evidence that post-trauma support in the workplace is increasingly commonly provided not only among health and social services agencies, but within many private sector organizations. Over the past decade, however, there has been considerable controversy over the provision of early psychological support to personnel in the form of critical incident stress management (CISM) processes. In particular, one aspect of CISM, the use of psychological debriefing (PD) has come under scrutiny and criticism as two studies indicated that PD was ineffective and had the potential to do harm. Inevitably, this has provoked much uncertainty and confusion among some organizations as what should be the most appropriate support. It has also led to misconceptions and misunderstandings as to the aims and purpose of PD, together with inaccuracies of terminology, for example describing PD as 'counselling'. Despite the controversy, both CISM and PD continue to be provided on a widespread basis, often utilizing a framework of voluntary peer group support. This paper intends to (i) present a review of the current status of CISM practices, including the use of PD within various organizations in the UK and (ii) provide a clear framework and understanding of the main issues and to clarify conceptual misunderstandings. The history, principles and background of the use of post-trauma support in the workplace, charting trends over the past two decades, previous research, problems with the evidence base and current thinking and practice in the field are reviewed

  18. Perceived barriers, resources, and training needs of rural primary care providers relevant to the management of childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findholt, Nancy E; Davis, Melinda M; Michael, Yvonne L

    2013-08-01

    To explore the perceived barriers, resources, and training needs of rural primary care providers in relation to implementing the American Medical Association Expert Committee recommendations for assessment, treatment, and prevention of childhood obesity. In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 rural primary care providers in Oregon. Transcribed interviews were thematically coded. Barriers to addressing childhood obesity fell into 5 categories: barriers related to the practice (time constraints, lack of reimbursement, few opportunities to detect obesity), the clinician (limited knowledge), the family/patient (family lifestyle and lack of parent motivation to change, low family income and lack of health insurance, sensitivity of the issue), the community (lack of pediatric subspecialists and multidisciplinary/tertiary care services, few community resources), and the broader sociocultural environment (sociocultural influences, high prevalence of childhood obesity). There were very few clinic and community resources to assist clinicians in addressing weight issues. Clinicians had received little previous training relevant to childhood obesity, and they expressed an interest in several topics. Rural primary care providers face extensive barriers in relation to implementing recommended practices for assessment, treatment, and prevention of childhood obesity. Particularly problematic is the lack of local and regional resources. Employing nurses to provide case management and behavior counseling, group visits, and telehealth and other technological communications are strategies that could improve the management of childhood obesity in rural primary care settings. © 2013 National Rural Health Association.

  19. Workplace Charging. Charging Up University Campuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giles, Carrie [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Ryder, Carrie [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Lommele, Stephen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This case study features the experiences of university partners in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Workplace Charging Challenge with the installation and management of plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging stations.

  20. Families' perceived benefits of home visits for managing paediatric obesity outweigh the potential costs and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Nicole D; Ball, Geoff D C; Perez, Arnaldo; Holt, Nicholas L; Neuman, Daniel; Spence, Nicholas; Mercier, Laura; Jetha, Mary

    2018-02-01

    Home visits have successfully been used to deliver various health services, but what role could they play in paediatric weight management? Low treatment initiation and high attrition prompted our multidisciplinary paediatric weight management clinic to investigate how families perceived the benefits and barriers of home visits. We focused on children with obesity aged 2-17 who were enrolled in our tertiary-level clinic in Alberta, Canada. None had received a home visit. The families were interviewed face-to-face from October 2015 to October 2016, and we used a qualitative description methodological framework and manifest content analysis. The parents were the main interviewees. Of the 56 families, 89% were interested in a home visit, 82% wanted support from a dietician and 54% from an exercise specialist. The perceived benefits of home visits included comprehensive assessment (95%), convenience (86%), tailored care (29%) and family involvement (13%), while the costs and barriers included clinicians' potential judgmental attitudes (30%), loss of privacy (19%) and distractions (10%). Some thought clinicians would find home visits inconvenient (25%), with bureaucratic challenges (14%) and sustainability issues (5%). Families felt home visits were a convenient option for managing paediatric obesity and identified important benefits and barriers that could guide such interventions. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Impact of obesity on the results of fertility-sparing management for atypical hyperplasia and grade 1 endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonthier, Clémentine; Walker, Francine; Luton, Dominique; Yazbeck, Chadi; Madelenat, Patrick; Koskas, Martin

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of obesity on reproductive and oncologic outcomes on the success of fertility-sparing management. This retrospective multicenter cohort study included women treated conservatively for atypical hyperplasia (AH) and endometrial cancer (EC) to preserve fertility. Five inclusion criteria were defined: (i) the presence of AH or grade 1 EC confirmed by two pathologists; (ii) adequate radiological examination before conservative management; (iii) available body mass index (BMI) at the beginning of treatment; and (iv) a minimum follow-up time of six months. Forty patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria (17 had EC, and 23 had AH), mean age and BMI were 33 years and 29kg/m(2) respectively. Among the 15 obese patients, after medical treatment, 10 patients responded (67%) and three relapsed, whereas in the 25 non-obese patients, 19 responded (76%) and three relapsed (p=0.72). The overall pregnancy rate and follow-up time were 35% and 35 months respectively. Among the 15 obese patients, after medical treatment, two patients became pregnant, whereas in the 25 non-obese patients, 12 became pregnant (p=0.04). Despite similar response and recurrence rates, our results suggest that fertility-sparing management for AH and EC is associated with a lower probability of pregnancy in obese patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices of public sector primary health care physicians of rural north karnataka towards obesity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somannavar, Manjunath S; Appajigol, Jayaprakash S

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus (DM), and hypertension (HTN). In an era of rapidly growing prevalence of obesity, it is important to explore the current knowledge, attitude, and practices of primary care physicians. Study participants were medical officers (MOs) of primary health centers in three districts of North Karnataka. The questionnaire was developed by a review of literature in the field and validated with five participants for scope, length, and clarity. Of the 102 participants, only 15% were aware about the burden of obesity in India. HTN, DM, and CVD were indicated as comorbidities by 73, 78, and 60 participants, respectively. Only 25 and 12 participants indicated appropriate body mass index (BMI) cut-off values for overweight and obesity diagnosis. Of the 102 participants, 54 were not aware of the guidelines for obesity management. Practices and attitudes of the participants were encouraging. Nearly all of them felt that the adults with BMI within the healthy range should be encouraged to maintain their weight and, three-fourth of them agreed that most overweight persons should be treated for weight loss and small weight loss can achieve major medical benefit. However, nearly half of the participants' responses were stereotypical as they felt only obese and overweight with comorbidities should be treated for weight loss. Two-thirds of them use BMI to diagnose overweight/obese and nearly all of them advice their patients to increase physical activity and restrict fat. Most of the participants were advising their patients to restrict sugar intake, increase fruits and vegetable consumption, reduce red meat, and avoid alcohol consumption. Present study exposed the lack of knowledge regarding obesity. However, practices and attitudes of the participants were promising. There is a need of in-service training to MOs to further improve their knowledge and practices towards management of obesity.

  3. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices of public sector primary health care physicians of rural north karnataka towards obesity management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjunath S Somannavar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD, diabetes mellitus (DM, and hypertension (HTN. In an era of rapidly growing prevalence of obesity, it is important to explore the current knowledge, attitude, and practices of primary care physicians. Materials and Methods: Study participants were medical officers (MOs of primary health centers in three districts of North Karnataka. The questionnaire was developed by a review of literature in the field and validated with five participants for scope, length, and clarity. Results/Discussion: Of the 102 participants, only 15% were aware about the burden of obesity in India. HTN, DM, and CVD were indicated as comorbidities by 73, 78, and 60 participants, respectively. Only 25 and 12 participants indicated appropriate body mass index (BMI cut-off values for overweight and obesity diagnosis. Of the 102 participants, 54 were not aware of the guidelines for obesity management. Practices and attitudes of the participants were encouraging. Nearly all of them felt that the adults with BMI within the healthy range should be encouraged to maintain their weight and, three-fourth of them agreed that most overweight persons should be treated for weight loss and small weight loss can achieve major medical benefit. However, nearly half of the participants′ responses were stereotypical as they felt only obese and overweight with comorbidities should be treated for weight loss. Two-thirds of them use BMI to diagnose overweight/obese and nearly all of them advice their patients to increase physical activity and restrict fat. Most of the participants were advising their patients to restrict sugar intake, increase fruits and vegetable consumption, reduce red meat, and avoid alcohol consumption. Conclusion: Present study exposed the lack of knowledge regarding obesity. However, practices and attitudes of the participants were promising. There is a need of in-service training to MOs to further

  4. THE IMPACT OF BODY WEIGHT MANAGEMENT IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE PATIENTS WITH OBESITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ling Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD and obesity are important public health concerns. We examined the influence of dietary management and physical exercises on renal function, lipid profiles and exercise tolerance of a group of CKD patients. We enrolled 45 obese patients with CKD from stage 1 to 3b with tailored by regular dietitian consultation, recommendations of adequate daily protein and caloric intake, and physical exercises for body weight (BW reduction. The target was BW reduction ≥ 3%. Thirty eight obese CKD patients completed the study and 24 patients reached the target. Patients who reached the target was significant larger in total body fat decrement than those who failed (3.0% vs 0.5%, p = 0.003. In addition, total muscle mass, especially on trunk and lower limbs (1.2% vs 0%, P = 0.026 was significant decreased in patients who reached the target compared to those who failed. The laboratory data disclosed the significant reduction of Chol (0.7% vs. -19.3%; P = 0.007, LDL-C ( 3.7% vs. -37.6%; P < 0.001, and UA (0% vs. -0.8%; P = 0.025 between the two groups. The cardiorespiratory endurance to complete 800 meters run (375.1 ± 64.7 sec vs. 327.1 ± 84.0 sec; P = 0.001, abdominal muscle strength and endurance by times of sit-ups (13.6 ± 9.1 number/min vs. 19.9 ± 9.2; P = 0.005, and flexibility of the lower back by sit and reach (18.8 ± 10.8 cm vs. 27.8 ± 10.9 cm; P< 0.001 of the patients who reached the target were improved significantly after 2-months of physical exercise training and education.We conclude that combination of dietary management and exercises are effective in improving health-related physical fitness, blood pressure control, dyslipidemia and renal function in overweight or obese CKD patients. Supportive individualized programs for lifestyle change could exert beneficial effects. A longitudinal study with larger sample size is warranted to elucidate the efficacy of combination of dietary management and exercises.

  5. The risk of perinatal mortality with each week of expectant management in obese pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ruofan; Schuh, Brittany L; Caughey, Aaron B

    2017-09-27

    The risk of stillbirth associated with maternal obesity increases with gestational age; however, it is unclear if earlier delivery reduces the overall perinatal mortality rate. Our objective was to compare the risk of perinatal mortality associated with each additional week of expectant management to that of immediate delivery. This was a retrospective cohort study of singleton non-anomalous births in Texas between 2006 and 2011. Analyses were stratified based on maternal pre-pregnancy BMI class. For each BMI class, we calculated the rate of neonatal death and stillbirth at each week of gestation from 34 to 41 weeks. A composite risk of perinatal mortality associated with 1 week of expectant management was estimated combining the stillbirth rate of the current week and the neonatal death rate of the following week. This was compared with the rate of neonatal death of the current week. After all exclusions, 2,149,771 births remained for analysis. In the normal weight group, stillbirth risk increased from 0.8 per 10,000 births at 34 weeks to 5.7 per 10,000 births at 42 weeks, whereas the neonatal death risk decreased from 76.5 per 10,000 births at 34 weeks to 30.4 per 10,000 births at 42 weeks, there were no differences between expectant management and delivery for any gestational week. In the obese group, stillbirth risk increased from 1.8 per 10,000 births at 34 weeks to 10.5 per 10,000 births at 42 weeks, whereas the neonatal death risk decreased from 67.7 per 10,000 births at 34 weeks to 26.2 per 10,000 births at 42 weeks, the perinatal mortality risk favored delivery at 39 weeks (RR: 1.17; 99% CI: 1.01-1.36) and not thereafter. In contrast, in the morbidly obese group, stillbirth risk increased from 8.8 per 10,000 births at 34 weeks to 83.7 per 10,000 births at 42 weeks, whereas the neonatal death risk decreased from 63.6 per 10,000 births at 34 weeks to 15.5 per 10,000 births at 42 weeks, the perinatal mortality risk favored delivery from 38 weeks (RR: 1.53; 99

  6. The Relationship Between the Occurrence of Conflicts in the Work Unit, the Conflict Management Styles in the Work Unit and Workplace Bullying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elfi Baillien

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study examines the relationship between the occurrence of conflicts in the work unit and conflict management styles in the work unit, and workplace bullying. First, we assume a positive relationship between the occurrence of conflicts and bullying; and that the conflict management styles 'fighting', 'avoiding' and 'yielding' associate positively and 'problem solving' associates negatively with bullying. Second, we expect that the work unit's conflict management styles moderate the relationship between the occurrence of conflicts and bullying. Results ('N' = 942 revealed a positive association between the occurrence of conflicts and bullying, as well as between fighting and bullying. Problem solving related negatively with bullying. Unexpectedly, we found no moderation. Our findings suggest that particularly the occurrence of conflicts relate to bullying, which may be owed to a strong negative connotation associated with (many conflicts at work or to its negative impact on the work unit's social climate. Organisations may also encourage problem solving and discourage fighting to prevent bullying.

  7. Managerial and Organizational Discourses of Workplace Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Susan L.; Boutain, Doris M.; Tsai, Jenny H.-C.; de Castro, Arnold B.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore how workplace bullying is addressed by hospital nursing unit managers and organizational policies. BACKGROUND Although workplace bullying is costly to organizations, nurses report that managers do not consistently address the issue. METHODS This study used discourse analysis to analyze interview data and policy documents. RESULTS There were differences in the manner in which managers and the policy documents labeled bullying-type behaviors and discussed the roles and responsibilities of staff and managers. Policies did not clearly delineate how managers should respond to workplace bullying. CONCLUSIONS These differences can allow management variation, not sanctioned by policy. Unclear policy language can also offer insufficient guidance to managers, resulting in differential enforcement of policies. PMID:26301552

  8. Depression in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Depression In The Workplace Depression In The Workplace Clinical depression has become one ... will die by suicide vi . Employees' Attitudes Towards Depression Often times a depressed employee will not seek ...

  9. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome, sleep apnea, overlap syndrome: perioperative management to prevent complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveendran, Raviraj; Wong, Jean; Singh, Mandeep; Wong, David T; Chung, Frances

    2017-02-01

    The prevalence of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is increasing proportional to the prevalence of obesity. Although anesthesiologists are familiar with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) - the most common SDB, anesthesiologists may not be aware of other SDB such as obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) and overlap syndrome (combination of OSA and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). The present review provides an update of information regarding the perioperative management of OHS and overlap syndrome. OHS and overlap syndrome are associated with significant comorbid conditions and more perioperative morbidity than OSA alone. Similar to OSA, most of the OHS patients are undiagnosed. An increase in serum bicarbonate level is a surrogate marker of hypercapnia. Because 90% of OHS patients have OSA, preoperative screening for OSA combined with estimation of serum bicarbonate level may detect the majority of the patients with OHS. In patients with OSA, OHS, and overlap syndrome, improvement in the perioperative outcome has been shown by initiating positive airway pressure therapy. Identification and preoperative optimization of these high-risk patients are most important. A protocol-based risk mitigation is necessary for improving the intraoperative and postoperative outcome of these patients. As a perioperative physician, anesthesiologists have a key role in the management of patients with SDB.

  10. Evaluation of a multidisciplinary Tier 3 weight management service for adults with morbid obesity, or obesity and comorbidities, based in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, A; Hughes, C A; Kumaravel, B; Bachmann, M O; Steel, N; Capehorn, M; Cheema, K

    2014-10-01

    A multidisciplinary Tier 3 weight management service in primary care recruited patients with a body mass index ≥40 kg·m(-2) , or 30 kg·m(-2) with obesity-related co-morbidity to a 1-year programme. A cohort of 230 participants was recruited and evaluated using the National Obesity Observatory Standard Evaluation Framework. The primary outcome was weight loss of at least 5% of baseline weight at 12 months. Diet was assessed using the two-item food frequency questionnaire, activity using the General Practice Physical Activity questionnaire and quality of life using the EuroQol-5D-5L questionnaire. A focus group explored the participants' experiences. Baseline mean weight was 124.4 kg and mean body mass index was 44.1 kg·m(-2) . A total of 102 participants achieved 5% weight loss at 12 months. The mean weight loss was 10.2 kg among the 117 participants who completed the 12-month programme. Baseline observation carried forward analysis gave a mean weight loss of 5.9 kg at 12 months. Fruit and vegetable intake, activity level and quality of life all improved. The dropout rate was 14.3% at 6 months and 45.1% at 1 year. Focus group participants described high levels of satisfaction. It was possible to deliver a Tier 3 weight management service for obese patients with complex co-morbidity in a primary care setting with a full multidisciplinary team, which obtained good health outcomes compared with existing services. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical Obesity published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Obesity.

  11. An Investigation of Organizational and Regulatory Discourses of Workplace Bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Susan L; Boutain, Doris M; Tsai, Jenny H-C; de Castro, Arnold B

    2015-10-01

    Organizations use policies to set standards for employee behaviors. Although many organizations have policies that address workplace bullying, previous studies have found that these policies affect neither workplace bullying for targets who are seeking assistance in ending the behaviors nor managers who must address incidents of bullying. This article presents the findings of a study that used critical discourse analysis to examine the language used in policies written by health care organizations and regulatory agencies to regulate workplace bullying. The findings suggest that the discussion of workplace bullying overlaps with discussions of disruptive behaviors and harassment. This lack of conceptual clarity can create difficulty for managers in identifying, naming, and disciplining incidents of workplace bullying. The documents also primarily discussed workplace bullying as a patient safety concern. This language is in conflict with organizations attending to worker well-being with regard to workplace bullying. © 2015 The Author(s).

  12. Improving the workplace environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gledhill, Irvy MA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Research has shown that companies with more diversity and a better workplace perform better. So what makes a good workplace in physics, where women and men can work to their full potential? In the Improving the Workplace Environment workshop...

  13. Obesity in Women: The Clinical Impact on Gastrointestinal and Reproductive Health and Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett-Blakely, Octavia; Uwakwe, Laura; Rashid, Farzana

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 36% of adult women in the United States are obese. Although obesity affects women similarly to men in terms of prevalence, there seem to be gender-specific differences in the pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of obesity. Obesity is linked to comorbid diseases involving multiple organ systems, including the gastrointestinal tract, like gastroesophageal reflux disease, fatty liver disease, and gallstones. This article focuses on obesity in women, specifically the impact of obesity on gastrointestinal diseases and reproductive health, as well as the treatment of obesity in women. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Workplace aggression: beginning a dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLemore, Monica R

    2006-08-01

    The June 2005 Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing editorial titled "Communication: Whose Problem Is It?" (Griffin-Sobel, 2005) was written to begin a dialogue about a phenomenon frequently experienced yet rarely discussed: workplace aggression, also known as disruptive behavior. Prompted by a groundbreaking study published in the American Journal of Nursing by Rosenstein and O'Daniel (2005), the editorial challenged oncology nurses to begin to fix problems of communication. After reflecting on both of the articles and considering my own experience as a nurse manager, clinician, and scholar, I decided to explore the topic as it relates to nurse-to-nurse workplace aggression. The following is a summary of interviews with nurse managers, nurse practitioners, and nurse scientists about root causes and effective strategies to manage these sometimes complicated situations. This article is meant to continue the dialogue about the very sensitive issue. Confidentiality has been maintained, and I welcome your comments.

  15. Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Works Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Updated:Dec 13, ... you boost your odds in the battle against childhood obesity. Studies have shown that children whose families eat ...

  16. Total dietary fiber composition of diets used for management of obesity and diabetes mellitus in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Tammy J; Larsen, Jennifer A; Farcas, Amy K; Nelson, Richard W; Kass, Philip H; Fascetti, Andrea J

    2014-07-01

    To determine total dietary fiber (TDF) composition of feline diets used for management of obesity and diabetes mellitus. Cross-sectional survey. Dry veterinary (n = 10), canned veterinary (12), and canned over-the-counter (3) feline diets. Percentage of TDF as insoluble dietary fiber (IDF), high-molecular-weight soluble dietary fiber (HMWSDF), and low-molecular-weight soluble dietary fiber (LMWSDF) was determined. Median measured TDF concentration was greater than reported maximum crude fiber content in dry and canned diets. Median TDF (dry-matter) concentration in dry and canned diets was 12.2% (range, 8.11% to 27.16%) and 13.8% (range, 4.7% to 27.9%), respectively. Dry and canned diets, and diets with and without a source of oligosaccharides in the ingredient list, were not different in energy density or concentrations of TDF, IDF, HMWSDF, or LMWSDF. Similarly, loaf-type (n = 11) and gravy-type (4) canned diets differed only in LMWSDF concentration. Disparities in TDF concentrations among products existed despite a lack of differences among groups. Limited differences in TDF concentration and dietary fiber composition were detected when diets were compared on the basis of carbohydrate concentration. Diets labeled for management of obesity were higher in TDF concentration and lower in energy density than diets for management of diabetes mellitus. Diets provided a range of TDF concentrations with variable concentrations of IDF, HMWSDF, and LMWSDF. Crude fiber concentration was not a reliable indicator of TDF concentration or dietary fiber composition. Because carbohydrate content is calculated as a difference, results suggested that use of crude fiber content would cause overestimation of both carbohydrate and energy content of diets.

  17. Multidisciplinary care management has a positive effect on paediatric obesity and social and individual factors are associated with better outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriere, C; Cabaussel, C; Bader, C; Barberger-Gateau, P; Barat, P; Thibault, H

    2016-11-01

    The RePPOP Aquitaine network, which was established in south-west France to prevent and treat paediatric obesity, has developed a multidisciplinary approach based on multicomponent lifestyle interventions and family-based actions. This study assessed the impact of its care management programme and investigated the factors associated with better outcomes. The impact of the RePPOP care management programme was assessed by changes in the body mass index (BMI) Z score, between baseline and the end-of-care management. We focused on 982 overweight or obese children (59.9% girls) with a mean age of 10.64 years and a range of 2.4-17.9 years. A multivariate analysis examined the independent factors associated with better outcomes. At the end-of-care management programme, 75.5% of children had decreased their BMI Z score. Initial characteristics significantly associated with better outcomes were as follows: the age at baseline between five years and 15 years of age, playing sport at a club, being followed up by RePPOP for longer than 10 months, no parental obesity and no academic difficulties. This study confirmed that multidisciplinary treatment had a significant positive effect on paediatric obesity and that social and individual factors affected the efficiency of the care management. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Prevention and management of excessive gestational weight gain: a survey of overweight and obese pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, W S; Gibson, A; Hankey, C R

    2013-01-16

    Excessive gestational weight gain is associated with adverse infant, childhood and maternal outcomes and research to develop interventions to address this issue is ongoing. The views of women on gestational weight gain and the resources they would consider helpful in addressing this are however largely unknown. This survey aimed to determine the views of newly pregnant women, living in areas of social disadvantage, on 1) their current body weight and potential gestational weight gain and 2) the resources or interventions they would consider helpful in preventing excessive gestational weight gain. A convenience sample of overweight and obese pregnant women living in Fife, UK, were invited to complete a short anonymised questionnaire at their 12 week booking visit. 428 women, BMI>25 kg/m(2), completed the questionnaire. Fifty-four per cent of respondents were obese (231) and 62% were living in areas of mild to moderate deprivation. Over three-quarters of participants felt dissatisfied with their current weight (81%). The majority of women (60%) expressed some concern about potential weight gain. Thirty-nine percent were unconcerned about weight gain during their pregnancy, including 34 women (19%) who reported having retained weight gained in earlier pregnancies. Amongst those concerned about weight gain advice on physical activity (41%) and access to sports/leisure facilities were favoured resources (36%). Fewer women (12%) felt that group sessions on healthy eating or attending a clinic for individualised advice (14%) would be helpful. "Getting time off work" was the most frequently cited barrier (48%) to uptake of resources other than leaflets. These data suggest a lack of awareness amongst overweight and obese women regarding excessive gestational weight gain. Monitoring of gestational weight gain, and approaches for its management, should be formally integrated into routine antenatal care. Barriers to the uptake of resources to address weight gain are numerous

  19. Parent preferences for telephone coaching to prevent and manage childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaine, Rachel E; Pbert, Lori; Geller, Alan C; Powers, E Michael; Mitchell, Kathleen

    2015-04-01

    To assess parent preferences for utilisation of a parent-focused, telephone-based coaching service, or 'FITLINE,' to prevent or manage childhood obesity. A cross-sectional survey of parents of children aged 2-12 years was conducted at a paediatric practice in Greater Boston, Massachusetts, USA, between July 2012 and May 2013. Parents received questionnaires with clinic visit paperwork and opted-in to the study by returning them to clinic staff or by mail. The anonymous pen-to-paper questionnaire assessed parents' potential FITLINE utilisation, preferences regarding educational content and logistics, and parent/child demographics. Simple logistical regression was used to assess associations between parent and child factors and FITLINE interest. Among n=114 participants, most parents reported being very likely (n=53, 48%) or somewhat likely (n=44, 40%) to use a FITLINE-promoting healthy habits for children if it was made available. Interest in a FITLINE was greatest among overweight or obese parents (OR 3.12, CI 1.17 to 8.30) and those with children aged shopping on a budget (91%) and how to meet children's physical activity needs (81%). Most parents preferred to obtain a FITLINE referral from a paediatrician or nurse (73%), instead of a school nurse (42%) or child-care provider (26%). Given strong interest among parents in a FITLINE and the urgency of the youth obesity epidemic, implementation of a pilot phone-based service should be strongly considered. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. A study on body-weight perception, future intention and weight-management behaviour among normal-weight, overweight and obese women in India

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Agrawal, Praween; Gupta, Kamla; Mishra, Vinod; Agrawal, Sutapa

    2014-01-01

    We examined the socio-economic differential in the self-perception of body weight, future intention for weight management and actual weight-management behaviour among normal-weight, overweight and obese women in India...

  1. Managing temptation in obesity treatment: A neurobehavioral model of intervention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelhans, Bradley M; French, Simone A; Pagoto, Sherry L; Sherwood, Nancy E

    2016-01-01

    Weight loss outcomes in lifestyle interventions for obesity are primarily a function of sustained adherence to a reduced-energy diet, and most lapses in diet adherence are precipitated by temptation from palatable food. The high nonresponse and relapse rates of lifestyle interventions suggest that current temptation management approaches may be insufficient for most participants. In this conceptual review, we discuss three neurobehavioral processes (attentional bias, temporal discounting, and the cold-hot empathy gap) that emerge during temptation and contribute to lapses in diet adherence. Characterizing the neurobehavioral profile of temptation highlights an important distinction between temptation resistance strategies aimed at overcoming temptation while it is experienced, and temptation prevention strategies that seek to avoid or minimize exposure to tempting stimuli. Many temptation resistance and temptation prevention strategies heavily rely on executive functions mediated by prefrontal systems that are prone to disruption by common occurrences such as stress, insufficient sleep, and even exposure to tempting stimuli. In contrast, commitment strategies are a set of devices that enable individuals to manage temptation by constraining their future choices, without placing heavy demands on executive functions. These concepts are synthesized in a conceptual model that categorizes temptation management approaches based on their intended effects on reward processing and degree of reliance on executive functions. We conclude by discussing the implications of our model for strengthening temptation management approaches in future lifestyle interventions, tailoring these approaches based on key individual difference variables, and suggesting high-priority topics for future research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Posture Allocation Revisited: Breaking the Sedentary Threshold of Energy Expenditure for Obesity Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Miles-Chan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing recognition that low-intensity physical activities of daily life play an important role in achieving energy balance and that their societal erosion through substitution with sedentary (mostly sitting behaviors, whether occupational or for leisure, impact importantly on the obesity epidemic. This has generated considerable interest for better monitoring, characterizing, and promoting countermeasures to sedentariness through a plethora of low-level physical activities (e.g., active workstations, standing desks, sitting breaks, amid the contention that altering posture allocation (lying, sitting, standing can modify energy expenditure to impact upon body weight regulation and health. In addressing this contention, this paper first revisits the past and more recent literature on postural energetics, with particular emphasis on potential determinants of the large inter-individual variability in the energy cost of standing and the impact of posture on fat oxidation. It subsequently analyses the available data pertaining to various strategies by which posture allocations, coupled with light physical activity, may increase energy expenditure beyond the sedentary threshold, and their relevance as potential targets for obesity management.

  3. Approach to identifying and managing atherogenic dyslipidemia: a metabolic consequence of obesity and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosomworth, N John

    2013-11-01

    To review the evidence for recognition and management of atherogenic dyslipidemia. High-quality randomized trials and meta-analyses were available to address most questions. North American and European guidelines were reviewed. Of these, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society lipid guidelines were most congruent with current literature. Atherogenic dyslipidemia is characterized by low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), high levels of triglycerides, and a high low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle number. The condition is highly associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and is poorly reflected in Framingham risk score and LDL measurements. Obesity, glucose intolerance, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome are rapidly becoming more common, and are often associated with atherogenic dyslipidemia, affecting long-term CVD risk. Recognition in the office is best achieved by non-HDL or total cholesterol-HDL ratio testing. Treatment success lies in optimizing diet and exercise. Of available medications, statins produce the most benefit and can be titrated to patient tolerance rather than to LDL target levels, which have a poor evidence base. The addition of fenofibrate can be considered in patients with high triglyceride and low HDL levels who have responded poorly to or have not tolerated statins. Growing obesity prevalence creates a CVD risk that might be missed by LDL cholesterol testing alone. Simple calculations from results of a non-fasting lipid panel produce non-HDL levels and total cholesterol-HDL ratio, both of which are superior for predicting risk in all patients. These metrics should be available in lipid panels.

  4. Bariatric surgery versus conservative management for morbidly obese patients in Spain: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Santos, Raquel; Padin, Esther Mariño; Adam, Daniel; Borisenko, Oleg; Fernandez, Sergio Estevez; Dacosta, Ester Carrera; Fernández, Sonia González; Vazquez, Juan Turnes; de Adana, Juan Carlos Ruiz; de la Cruz Vigo, Felipe

    2017-11-30

    We assessed the cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery (BS) versus conservative management (CM) for treating morbid obesity in Spain. We developed a probabilistic Markov model to estimate health outcomes, quality-adjusted life years (QALY), life years gained (LYG), and costs over lifetime and 10-year horizons. Combined common BS procedures were compared with CM. Clinical and utility inputs were obtained from the literature and resource use and costs from local sources (€2017). Over the 10-year horizon, BS led to a cost increment of €9,386 and 1.6 additional QALY (€5,966/QALY). Leading to 0.6 LYG and 4.4 QALY gains and €300/patient average cost savings over lifetime, BS could potentially significantly reduce diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk over the considered horizons. Despite short-term cost reductions, surgery delay may lead to significant clinical benefits loss. Compared to CM, BS is a more effective and less costly alternative for treating morbid obesity in Spain.

  5. Patient experiences of a bariatric group programme for managing obesity: A qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant, Mark; Khan, Sammyh S; Farrow, Claire V; Shah, Pooja; Daly, Mark; Kos, Katarina

    2017-02-01

    People with obesity experience a range of physical and psychological ill-health outcomes. This study examined patients' experiences of a group-based programme for the management of morbid obesity delivered within the UK National Health Service. The focus of the study was on the emerging dynamic of the group and patients' perceptions of its impact on health outcomes. A qualitative interview study was conducted and involved patients recruited from a Tier 3 bariatric service in South West England. Verbatim transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Twenty patients (12 females) with a BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2 participated in a semi-structured one-to-one interview. Participants had been registered with the bariatric service for at least 6 months. None of the participants had had bariatric surgery. Most participants felt that they had benefited from participating in the group programme and talked about the group as a resource for lifestyle change. Participants' narratives centred on the emergence of a sense of self based upon their participation in the group: establishing psychological connections to other patients, or shared social identity, was regarded as a key mechanism through which the programme's educational material was accessed, and underpinned the experience of social support within the group. Through interaction with other patients, involving the sharing of personal experiences and challenges, participants came to experience their weight 'problem' through a collective lens that they felt empowered them to initiate and sustain individual lifestyle change. Bariatric care groups have the potential to support lifestyle change and weight loss and may help address the psychological needs of patients. Nurturing a sense of shared social identity amongst patients with morbid obesity should be a core aim of the care pathway and may provide the foundation for successful translation of dietetic content in group programmes. Statement of contribution What is already

  6. Interventions to prevent and manage overweight or obesity in preschool children: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jiying; Robbins, Lorraine B; Wen, Fujun

    2016-01-01

    The preschool period is a pivotal time for lifestyle interventions to begin the establishment of long-term physical activity and healthy eating habits. This systematic review sought to (a) examine the effects of prevention and management interventions on overweight/obesity among children aged 2-5 years, and (b) explore factors that may influence intervention effects. A systematic review of randomized controlled studies was conducted. Six databases, including PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, ERIC, and Cochrane library, were searched for relevant studies. Data were extracted and checked by two reviewers. Each study was appraised based on 4 quality indicators adapted from the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. A narrative summary technique was used to describe the review findings. Thirty-seven articles describing 32 randomized controlled trials and 29 unique interventions were retained. Eight of 23 prevention and 4 of 6 management interventions resulted in significant weight loss, with 3 prevention and 5 management interventions showing sustained effects over 6 to 24 months. Of the 12 efficacious interventions, 10 included physical activity and nutrition components, 9 actively involved parents, and only 4 were theory-based. Interactive education was the most common strategy used for parents in prevention interventions, compared to behavioral therapy techniques in management interventions. For children, interactive education and hands-on experiences involving physical activity and healthy eating were equally used. Management interventions showed greater effects in weight loss compared to prevention interventions. Future prevention interventions in preschool children should target both parents and children, and focus on physical activity and nutrition through interactive education and hands-on experiences, although intervention effects were less than optimal. Management interventions should focus on parents as the "agents of change" for physical

  7. Outpatient evaluation, recognition, and initial management of pediatric overweight and obesity in U.S. military medical treatment facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Wayne; Arday, David R; Kelly, Joseph; Carnahan, Col David

    2017-02-01

    As childhood obesity is a concern in many communities, this study investigated outpatient evaluation and initial management of overweight and obese pediatric patients in U.S. military medical treatment facilities (MTFs). Samples of 579 overweight and 341 obese patients (as determined by body mass index [BMI]) aged 3-17 years were drawn from MTFs. All available FY2011 outpatient records were searched for documentation of BMI assessment, overweight/obesity diagnosis, and counseling. Administrative data for these patients were merged to assess coded diagnostic and counseling rates and receipt of recommended laboratory screenings. Generic BMI documentation was high, but BMI percentile assessments were found among fewer than half the patients. Diagnostic recording or recognition totaled 10.9% of overweight and 32.0% of obese. Counseling rates were higher, with 46.4% and 61.0% of overweight and obese patients, respectively, receiving weight related counseling. Among patients 10 years of age or older, rates of recommended lab screenings for diabetes, liver abnormality, and dyslipidemia were not greater than 33%. BMI percentile recording was strongly associated with diagnostic recording, and diagnostic recording was strongly associated with counseling. Improvements to electronic health records or implementation of local procedures to facilitate better diagnostic recording would likely improve adherence to clinical practice guidelines. ©2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  8. The success of sleeve gastrectomy in the management of metabolic syndrome and obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbir, Asim; Dargan, Dallan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The rapid reversal of diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia and obesity by surgical means has challenged accepted doctrines regarding the management of metabolic syndrome. Sleeve gastrectomy, which developed initially as a preparatory procedure for biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch, has seen an exponential rise in popularity as an effective lone laparoscopic bariatric procedure. Superior excess weight loss, a low complication rate, and excellent food tolerance, combined with a short hospital stay, have made this the procedure of choice for patients and surgeons across the globe. High volume centres nurture the ongoing development of experienced and specialized teams, pathways and regimens. Optimum surgical outcomes allow minimization of metabolic syndrome, reducing cardiovascular and cerebrovascular risk. PMID:25859262

  9. Physicians' perspectives on referring obese adolescents to pediatric multidisciplinary weight management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolford, Susan J; Clark, Sarah J; Gebremariam, Achamyeleh; Davis, Matthew M; Freed, Gary L

    2010-09-01

    To identify factors that might influence physicians' referrals of obese adolescents to pediatric multidisciplinary weight management (PMWM) programs. Survey of a national sample of 375 pediatricians (PDs) and 375 family physicians (FPs) explored program availability, referral history, desired services, and when in the course of treatment physicians would refer. Differences were examined via chi(2) tests. Response rate was 67%. More PDs than FPs reported having a PMWM program available (46% vs 10%, P < .01). More PDs (PD 83% vs FP 53%, P < .01) and female physicians (88% vs 65%, P < .01) reported having made a referral. Most physicians wanted coordinated diet, activity, and behavioral therapy (79%). Almost all physicians indicated they would refer when unsure of what else to do, or if requested by the patient/parent. PMWM program referrals appear limited by availability. These data also suggest physicians may be reticent to refer. Further work should examine whether this affects patient outcomes.

  10. Therapeutic alliance and obesity management in primary care - a cross-sectional pilot using the Working Alliance Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgiss, E A; Sargent, G M; Haesler, E; Rieger, E; Douglas, K

    2016-12-01

    Therapeutic alliance is a well-recognized predictor of patient outcomes within psychological therapy. It has not been applied to obesity interventions, and Bordin's theoretical framework shows particular relevance to the management of obesity in primary health care. This cross-sectional study of a weight management programme in general practice aimed to determine if therapeutic alliance was associated with patient outcomes. The Working Alliance Inventory short revised version (WAI-SR) was administered to 23 patients and 11 general practitioners (GPs) at the end of a 6-month weight management programme. Use of the WAI-SR indicated that the strength of therapeutic alliance varied between different patient-GP relationships in this pilot intervention. A robust therapeutic alliance was strongly associated with patient engagement in the weight management programme indicated by number of appointments. It was also associated with some general health and quality of life outcomes. These are promising results that require confirmation with larger studies in primary health care. The measurement of therapeutic alliance using the WAI-SR may predict patient attendance and outcomes in obesity interventions in primary healthcare settings. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  11. Stress reduction in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaola, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The modern radiology department operates within an environment of competition, increased regulation, and decreasing budgets. Functioning in this setting may lead the radiology manager to experience job related stress. Stress in the workplace has been linked to cardiovascular and musculoskeletal disorders. While there are a number of triggers for job related stress, it is important to identify the early warning signs and knee-jerk reactions. Emotional intelligence (EI) is one of several techniques that can be used to reduce job related stress. The key components of EI are self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management.

  12. Maternal Obesity Management Using Mobile Technology: A Feasibility Study to Evaluate a Text Messaging Based Complex Intervention during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hora Soltani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Maternal obesity and excessive gestational weight gain (GWG are on the rise with negative impact on pregnancy and birth outcomes. Research into managing GWG using accessible technology is limited. The maternal obesity management using mobile technology (MOMTech study aimed at evaluating the feasibility of text messaging based complex intervention designed to support obese women (BMI ≥ 30 with healthier lifestyles and limit GWG. Methods. Participants received two daily text messages, supported by four appointments with healthy lifestyle midwife, diet and activity goal setting, and self-monitoring diaries. The comparison group were obese mothers who declined to participate but consented for their routinely collected data to be used for comparison. Postnatal interviews and focus groups with participants and the comparison group explored the intervention’s acceptability and suggested improvements. Results. Fourteen women completed the study which did not allow statistical analyses. However, participants had lower mean GWG than the comparison group (6.65 kg versus 9.74 kg and few (28% versus 50% exceeded the Institute of Medicine’s upper limit of 9 kg GWG for obese women. Conclusions. MOMTech was feasible within clinical setting and acceptable intervention to support women to limit GWG. Before further trials, slight modifications are planned to recruitment, text messages, and the logistics of consultation visits.

  13. Workplace mental health training for managers and its effect on sick leave in employees: a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan-Saville, Josie S; Tan, Leona; Gayed, Aimée; Barnes, Caryl; Madan, Ira; Dobson, Mark; Bryant, Richard A; Christensen, Helen; Mykletun, Arnstein; Harvey, Samuel B

    2017-11-01

    Mental illness is one of the most rapidly increasing causes of long-term sickness absence, despite improved rates of detection and development of more effective interventions. However, mental health training for managers might help improve occupational outcomes for people with mental health problems. We aimed to investigate the effect of mental health training on managers' knowledge, attitudes, confidence, and behaviour towards employees with mental health problems, and its effect on employee sickness absence. We did a cluster randomised controlled trial of manager mental health training within a large Australian fire and rescue service, with a 6-month follow-up. Managers (clusters) at the level of duty commander or equivalent were randomly assigned (1:1) using an online random sequence generator to either a 4-h face-to-face RESPECT mental health training programme or a deferred training control group. Researchers, managers, and employees were not masked to the outcome of randomisation. Firefighters and station officers supervised by each manager were included in the study via their anonymised sickness absence records. The primary outcome measure was change in sickness absence among those supervised by each of the managers. We analysed rates of work-related sick leave and standard sick leave seperately, with rate being defined as sickness absence hours divided by the sum of hours of sickness absence and hours of attendance. This trial was registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12613001156774). 128 managers were recruited between Feb 18, 2014, and May 17, 2014. 46 (71%) of 65 managers allocated to the intervention group received the intervention, and 42 (67%) of 63 managers allocated to the control group were entered in the deferred training group. Managers and their employees were followed up and reassessed at 6 months after randomisation. 25 managers (1233 employees) in the intervention group and 19 managers (733 employees) in

  14. Women weigh in: obese African American and White women's perspectives on physicians' roles in weight management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chugh, Monica; Friedman, Asia M; Clemow, Lynn P; Ferrante, Jeanne M

    2013-01-01

    There is little qualitative research on the type of weight loss counseling patients prefer from their physicians and whether preferences differ by race. This qualitative study used semistructured, in-depth interviews of 33 moderately to severely obese white and African American women to elucidate and compare their perceptions regarding their primary care physician's approach to weight loss counseling. Data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach and a series of immersion/crystallization cycles. White and African American women seemed to internalize weight stigma differently. African American participants spoke about their pride and positive body image, whereas white women more frequently expressed self-deprecation and feelings of depression. Despite these differences, both groups of women desired similar physician interactions and weight management counseling, including (1) giving specific weight loss advice and individualized plans for weight management; (2) addressing weight in an empathetic, compassionate, nonjudgmental, and respectful manner; and (3) providing encouragement to foster self-motivation for weight loss. While both African American and white women desired specific strategies from physicians in weight management, some white women may first need assistance in overcoming their stigma, depression, and low self-esteem before attempting weight loss.

  15. Workplace bullying: a tale of adverse consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

    2015-01-01

    Workplace bullying is defined as the repetitive and systematic engagement of interpersonally abusive behaviors that negatively affect both the targeted individual and the work organization. According to the findings of 12 studies, being bullied in the workplace affects approximately 11 percent of workers. Victims are frequently blue-collar and unskilled workers. However, there also appear to be gender and milieu/management factors. Emotional/psychological consequences of workplace bullying may include increased mental distress, sleep disturbances, fatigue in women and lack of vigor in men, depression and anxiety, adjustment disorders, and even work-related suicide. Medical consequences of workplace bullying may include an increase in health complaints such as neck pain, musculoskeletal complaints, acute pain, fibromyalgia, and cardiovascular symptoms. Finally, socioeconomic consequences of workplace bullying may include absenteeism due to sick days and unemployment. Clinicians in both mental health and primary care settings need to be alert to the associations between bullying in the workplace and these potential negative consequences, as patients may not disclose workplace maltreatment due to embarrassment or fears of retribution.

  16. Impact of Obesity on the Management and Clinical Course of Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seminerio, Jennifer L; Koutroubakis, Ioannis E; Ramos-Rivers, Claudia; Hashash, Jana G; Dudekula, Anwar; Regueiro, Miguel; Baidoo, Leonard; Barrie, Arthur; Swoger, Jason; Schwartz, Marc; Weyant, Katherine; Dunn, Michael A; Binion, David G

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has been linked with a proinflammatory state and the development of inflammatory diseases. Data on the clinical course and treatment of obese patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are limited. We used an institutional IBD registry to investigate the impact of obesity on IBD severity and treatment. This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data for 3 years (2009-2011). Patients with IBD were categorized by body mass index (BMI). IBD-related quality of life, biochemical markers of inflammation, comorbidities, health care utilization, and treatment were characterized. Obesity was defined as a BMI ≥30 (type I: 30-34.9, type II: 35-39.9, and type III ≥40). Among 1494 patients with IBD, 71.9% were above their ideal BMI and 31.5% were obese. Obesity was more common in ulcerative colitis compared with patients with Crohn's disease (P = 0.04). Obese class II and class III patients were predominantly female. Obesity in IBD was associated with female gender (P obesity. There was no association between increasing BMI and annual prednisone use, emergency department visits, hospitalization, and surgery. Obesity was associated with lower milligrams per kilogram doses of purine analogs and biologics. Obesity in IBD is not associated with increased health care utilization and IBD-related surgeries. Optimal regimens for drug dosing in obese patients with IBD have yet to be defined.

  17. Global Trends in Workplace Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lung-Sheng; Lai, Chun-Chin

    2012-01-01

    The paradigm of human resource development has shifted to workplace learning and performance. Workplace can be an organization, an office, a kitchen, a shop, a farm, a website, even a home. Workplace learning is a dynamic process to solve workplace problems through learning. An identification of global trends of workplace learning can help us to…

  18. Factors Associated with High Use of a Workplace Web-Based Stress Management Program in a Randomized Controlled Intervention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, H.; Brown, C.; Hasson, D.

    2010-01-01

    In web-based health promotion programs, large variations in participant engagement are common. The aim was to investigate determinants of high use of a worksite self-help web-based program for stress management. Two versions of the program were offered to randomly selected departments in IT and media companies. A static version of the program…

  19. Ethical Infrastructure and Successful Handling of Workplace Bullying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Einarsen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Antecedents and consequences of workplace bullying are well documented. However, the mea- sures taken against workplace bullying, and the effectiveness of such measures, have received less attention. This study addresses this knowledge gap by exploring the role of ethical infrastructure in perceived successful handling of reported workplace bullying. Ethical infrastructure refers to formal and informal systems that enable ethical behavior and disable unethical behavior in organizations. A survey was sent to HR managers and elected head safety representatives (HSRs in all Norwegian municipality organizations. Overall, 216 organizations responded (response rate = 50.2 percent. The ethical infrastructure accounted for 39.4% of the variance in perceived suc- cessful handling of workplace bullying. Formal sanctions were the only unique and signi cant contributor to the perceived successful handling of workplace bullying. The results substantiate the argument that organizations’ ethical infrastructure relate to the HR managers and HSRs’ percep- tions regarding their organizations’ handling of workplace bullying.

  20. Workplace Preparedness for Terrorism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ursano, Robert J

    2006-01-01

    Comprehensive workplace preparedness for terrorism must address and integrate the psychological and behavioral aspects of terrorism preparedness and response in order to address issues of human continuity...

  1. Researching workplace learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Helms; Warring, Niels

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a theoretical and methodological framework for understanding and researching learning in the workplace. The workplace is viewed in a societal context and the learner is viewed as more than an employee in order to understand the learning process in relation to the learner......'s life history.Moreover we will explain the need to establish a 'double view' by examining learning in the workplace both as an objective and as a subjective reality. The article is mainly theoretical, but can also be of interest to practitioners who wish to understand learning in the workplace both...

  2. Workplace Ergonomics Reference Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workplace Ergonomics Reference Guide 2 nd Edition A Publication of the Computer/Electronic Accommodations Program Real Solutions for Real ... Table of Contents.................................................................................................................................. ... Checklist ........................................................................................................................... 3 Ergonomic ...

  3. Process Evaluation Results from an Environmentally Focused Worksite Weight Management Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJoy, David M.; Wilson, Mark G.; Padilla, Heather M.; Goetzel, Ron Z.; Parker, Kristin B.; Della, Lindsay J.; Roemer, Enid C.

    2012-01-01

    There is currently much interest in exploring environmental approaches to combat weight gain and obesity. This study presents process evaluation results from a workplace-based study that tested two levels of environmentally focused weight management interventions in a manufacturing setting. The moderate treatment featured a set of relatively…

  4. Preoperative Cardiac, Pulmonary and Digestive Comorbidities of Morbidly Obese Patients Undergoing Bariatric Surgery: Morbidity, Assessment and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiao; Zhang, Si-Qin; Cheng, Zhong; Li, Yang; Tian, Hao-Ming; Hu, Jian-Kun; Zhou, Zong-Guang

    2014-05-01

    To investigate a proper preoperative assessment and management of preoperative cardiac, pulmonary and digestive comorbidities in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. A general description of comorbidities in bariatric patients was reviewed and a clinical practice path in assessment and management of comorbidities was summarized. Morbidly obese patients frequently carried serious comorbidities in cardiovascular, pulmonary and digestive systems. The most common abnormalities included hypertension, left ventricular wall hypertrophy, ST and T wave abnormalities, obstructive sleep apnea, ventilatory dysfunction, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. A routine specialized preoperative evaluation could find the potential abnormality and screen the appropriate patients. Prophylactic treatments obviously reduced the morbidity of peri-operative complications Comprehensive preoperative evaluation and proper management is essential to appropriately select and prepare bariatric patients, and minimize surgical risk.

  5. [Ergonomics of the workplace in radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Lallana, A; Viteri-Ramírez, G; Saiz-Mendiguren, R; Broncano, J; Dámaso Aquerreta, J

    2011-01-01

    The replacement of conventional films and view boxes with digital images and computer monitors managed by PACS has clearly improved the diagnostic imaging workplace. The new setup has many advantages, including increased productivity brought about by decreased overall time required for image interpretation. On the other hand, the implementation of the digital workplace has increased the importance of factors like background lighting and the position of the chair, work table, mouse, keyboard, and monitor to prevent lesions that can disable the radiologist. The influence of these factors is often undervalued in the design and implementation of the radiological workplace. This article provides recommendations for the design of the radiological workplace based on ergonomics, which is the science that studies interactions among humans and other elements of a system. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Linguistic Diversity in Blue‐Collar Workplaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønsmann, Dorte; Kraft, Kamilla

    In this paper we examine the management of linguistic diversity in blue‐collar workplaces and its implications. The blue‐collar context is somewhat neglected in studies of globalisation and its consequences for the workplace. Hence, our focus here is on blue‐collar workplaces in the context...... for establishing stable linguistic practices.This study is based on data from two ethnographic studies of blue‐collar workplaces in Denmark and Norway, and it includes observational data, ethnographic interviews as well as interactional data. The latter has been analysed using conversation analysis.Our data...... these situations include drawing pictures, gesturing, referring to signs, and even speaking Danish/Norwegian regardless of the fact that interlocutors do not understand the language. Through the use of these linguistic and other semiotic resources, the barriers posed by linguistic diversity are usually overcome...

  7. Perioperative management of a morbidly obese pregnant patient undergoing cesarean section under general anesthesia - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Luiz Benevides

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: The increased prevalence of obesity in the general population extends to women of reproductive age. The aim of this study is to report the perioperative management of a morbidly obese pregnant woman, body mass index >50 kg/m2, who underwent cesarean section under general anesthesia. Case report: Pregnant woman in labor, 35 years of age, body mass index 59.8 kg/m2. Cesarean section was indicated due to the presumed fetal macrosomia. The patient refused spinal anesthesia. She was placed in the ramp position with cushions from back to head to facilitate tracheal intubation. Another cushion was placed on top of the right gluteus to create an angle of approximately 15° to the operating table. Immediately before induction of anesthesia, asepsis was carried out and sterile surgical fields were placed. Anesthesia was induced in rapid sequence, with Sellick maneuver and administration of remifentanil, propofol, and succinilcolina. Intubation was performed using a gum elastic bougie, and anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil. The interval between skin incision and fetal extraction was 21 min, with the use of a Simpson's forceps scoop to assist in the extraction. The patient gave birth to a newborn weighing 4850 g, with Apgar scores of 2 in the 1st minute (received positive pressure ventilation by mask for about 2 min and 8 in the 5th minute. The patient was extubated uneventfully. Multimodal analgesia and prophylaxis of nausea and vomiting was performed. Mother and newborn were discharged on the 4th postoperative day.

  8. Implementation of a Screening and Management of Overweight and Obesity Clinical Practice Guideline in an Ambulatory Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winik, Connie L; Bonham, C Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    Obesity is a rapidly growing health problem reaching epidemic levels around the world (World Health Organization, 2014). According to the World Health Organization, the current incident rate of obesity makes it the leading risk for deaths across the globe. The United States (USA) is amidst in this growing global epidemic. The obesity epidemic is a nondiscriminatory health problem affecting millions of individuals from a variety of backgrounds and social status. One group impacted by this disease is the US military. The health-related consequences of overweight and obesity has increased our military health care expenditures and has a direct impact on our nation's military readiness (Veterans Affairs/Department of Defense, 2014). The purpose of this Doctor of Nursing Practice project was to implement the Veterans Affairs/Department of Defense's Clinical Practice Guideline on Screening and Management of Overweight and Obesity at a military treatment facility in the Midwest. The goal of the project was to reduce the incidence rate of overweight and obese active duty military service members assigned to a military installation in the Midwest. With institutional review board approval, project implementation results were analyzed with descriptive and inferential statistics (paired t- tests). The goal to reduce the incident rate of overweight and obese by 5% was not achieved, but in turn the rate of overweight and obese increased by 1.57% over the 6-mo period. There were decreases in the normal with an increase in the overweight and obesity rate. This inverse outcome was unexpected and concerning. Based on the project's finding, there is a need to address the perceived barriers to maintaining healthy behaviors to plan future activities. An in-depth look at whether there is a knowledge deficit, a perceived lack of self-efficacy, competing life priorities preventing engagement in health promotion behaviors, or some other element influencing the motivation to change would be

  9. Parental weight perceptions: a cause for concern in the prevention and management of childhood obesity in the United Arab Emirates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla Aljunaibi

    Full Text Available Parental participation is a key factor in the prevention and management of childhood obesity, thus parental recognition of weight problems is essential. We estimated parental perceptions and their determinants in the Emirati population. We invited 1541 students (grade 1-12; 50% boys and their parents, but only 1440 (6-19 years and their parents consented. Of these, 945 Emirati nationals provided data for analysis. Anthropometric and demographic variables were measured by standard methods. CDC BMI percentile charts for age and sex were used to classify children's weight. Parental perception of their children's weight status (underweight, normal, and overweight/obese was recorded. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify independent predictors of parental perceptions of children's weight status. Of all parents, 33.8% misclassified their children's' weight status; underestimating (27.4% or overestimating (6.3%. Misclassification was highest among parents of overweight/obese children (63.5% and underweight (55.1% children. More importantly, parental perceptions of their children being overweight or obese, among truly overweight/obese children, i.e. correct identification of an overweight/obese child as such, were associated with the true child's BMI percentile (CDC with an OR of 1.313 (95% CI: 1.209-1.425; p<0.001 per percentile point, but not age, parental education, household income, and child's sex. We conclude that the majority of parents of overweight/obese children either overestimated or, more commonly, underestimated children's weight status. Predictors of accurate parental perception, in this population, include the true children's BMI, but not age, household income, and sex. Thus, parents having an incorrect perception of their child's weight status may ignore otherwise appropriate health messages.

  10. Evaluation of a multidisciplinary Tier 3 weight management service for adults with morbid obesity, or obesity and comorbidities, based in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, A; Hughes, C A; Kumaravel, B; Bachmann, M O; Steel, N; Capehorn, M; Cheema, K

    2014-01-01

    A multidisciplinary Tier 3 weight management service in primary care recruited patients with a body mass index ≥40 kg·m−2, or 30 kg·m−2 with obesity-related co-morbidity to a 1-year programme. A cohort of 230 participants was recruited and evaluated using the National Obesity Observatory Standard Evaluation Framework. The primary outcome was weight loss of at least 5% of baseline weight at 12 months. Diet was assessed using the two-item food frequency questionnaire, activity using the General Practice Physical Activity questionnaire and quality of life using the EuroQol-5D-5L questionnaire. A focus group explored the participants' experiences. Baseline mean weight was 124.4 kg and mean body mass index was 44.1 kg·m−2. A total of 102 participants achieved 5% weight loss at 12 months. The mean weight loss was 10.2 kg among the 117 participants who completed the 12-month programme. Baseline observation carried forward analysis gave a mean weight loss of 5.9 kg at 12 months. Fruit and vegetable intake, activity level and quality of life all improved. The dropout rate was 14.3% at 6 months and 45.1% at 1 year. Focus group participants described high levels of satisfaction. It was possible to deliver a Tier 3 weight management service for obese patients with complex co-morbidity in a primary care setting with a full multidisciplinary team, which obtained good health outcomes compared with existing services. PMID:25825858

  11. Management of obesity: improvement of health-care training and systems for prevention and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, William H; Baur, Louise A; Hall, Kevin; Puhl, Rebecca M; Taveras, Elsie M; Uauy, Ricardo; Kopelman, Peter

    2015-06-20

    Although the caloric deficits achieved by increased awareness, policy, and environmental approaches have begun to achieve reductions in the prevalence of obesity in some countries, these approaches are insufficient to achieve weight loss in patients with severe obesity. Because the prevalence of obesity poses an enormous clinical burden, innovative treatment and care-delivery strategies are needed. Nonetheless, health professionals are poorly prepared to address obesity. In addition to biases and unfounded assumptions about patients with obesity, absence of training in behaviour-change strategies and scarce experience working within interprofessional teams impairs care of patients with obesity. Modalities available for the treatment of adult obesity include clinical counselling focused on diet, physical activity, and behaviour change, pharmacotherapy, and bariatric surgery. Few options, few published reports of treatment, and no large randomised trials are available for paediatric patients. Improved care for patients with obesity will need alignment of the intensity of therapy with the severity of disease and integration of therapy with environmental changes that reinforce clinical strategies. New treatment strategies, such as the use of technology and innovative means of health-care delivery that rely on health professionals other than physicians, represent promising options, particularly for patients with overweight and patients with mild to moderate obesity. The co-occurrence of undernutrition and obesity in low-income and middle-income countries poses unique challenges that might not be amenable to the same strategies as those that can be used in high-income countries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Operative management of acetabulum fractures in the obese patient: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sardesai NR

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Neil R Sardesai, Michael A Miller, Julio J Jauregui, Cullen K Griffith, R Frank Henn 3rd, Jason W Nascone Department of Orthopedics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: In this review, we aim to increase our knowledge of the treatment of acetabular fractures in the obese patient population. The extremely high incidence of obesity in the USA is a looming health care concern that impacts aspects of health care in all medical specialties. There are specific concerns to the orthopedic surgeon when treating obese patients for acetabular fracture. Patients with body mass index ≥30 present particular challenges to the surgeon in terms of preexisting medical conditions, diagnostic imaging, and perioperative complications. Specifically, this patient population experiences worse functional outcomes and greater incidence of surgical site infection, intraoperative blood loss, deep venous thrombosis, post-traumatic osteoarthritis, heterotopic ossification, and increased hospital length of stay. These problems are further exacerbated in the morbidly obese, as a scaling effect exists between increasing body mass index and worsening complication profile. This is problematic given the current high incidence of morbid obesity in the USA and particularly worrisome in light of the projected increase in obesity rates for the future. Keywords: hip fractures, obesity, BMI, morbidly obese, morbid obesity, diagnostic imaging, perioperative complications, functional outcomes, super-obesity, surgical comorbidities, cost, ORIF 

  13. UNDERSTANDING HOW HEALTHY WORKPLACES ARE CREATED: IMPLICATIONS FOR DEVELOPING A NATIONAL HEALTH SERVICE HEALTHY WORKPLACE PROGRAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Katrina M; Brand, Sarah; Ashby-Pepper, Julie; Abraham, Jane; Fleming, Lora E

    2015-01-01

    The workplace is an important setting for promoting health and well-being. We sought to understand how successful workplace health and well-being programs were developed and implemented to inform the development of a program for a National Health Service (NHS) hospital. Case studies of successful healthy workplace programs with 34 semi-structured employee interviews informed 12 interviews with NHS staff. Interviews were thematically analyzed using Nvivo. Themes were fed back to participants for further clarification and validation. Healthy workplace programs were characterized by senior management endorsement; collective sense of ownership; presence of visible "quick wins"; and a sense that participation was easy and fun, not mandated. Programs evolved organically, allowing trust to be built and activities to be developed with employees. Interviews with NHS staff suggested a lack of belief in the possibility of change in their workplace due to time and workload pressures, and a sense of an "us and them" relationship with management, as well as environmental barriers. A consistent pattern of how the conditions for a healthy workplace can be created, which map onto the results from the NHS ward staff, suggest that without creating an enabling environment for health-promoting behaviors, workplace programs will have poor uptake and retention.

  14. Evaluation of a tailored intervention to improve management of overweight and obesity in primary care: study protocol of a cluster randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krause, J.; Agarwal, S.; Bodicoat, D.H.; Ring, A.; Shepherd, D.; Rogers, S.; Wensing, M.; Baker, R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the UK around 22% of men and 24% of women are obese, and there are varying but worrying levels in other European countries. Obesity is a chronic condition that carries an important health risk. National guidelines, for use in England, on the management of people who are overweight or

  15. Severe obesity and diabetes self-care attitudes, behaviours and burden : Implications for weight management from a matched case-controlled study. Results from Diabetes MILES-Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dixon, J.B.; Browne, J.L.; Mosely, K.G.; Jones, K.M.; Pouwer, F.; Speight, J.

    2014-01-01

    Aims To investigate whether diabetes self-care attitudes, behaviours and perceived burden, particularly related to weight management, diet and physical activity, differ between adults with Type 2 diabetes who are severely obese and matched non-severely obese control subjects. Methods The 1795

  16. Health-related quality of life in randomized controlled trials of lorcaserin for obesity management: what mediates improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolotkin, R L; Crosby, R D; Wang, Z

    2017-12-01

    Lorcaserin, plus diet and exercise, has demonstrated significant weight loss and improved cardiometabolic parameters vs. placebo in patients with overweight/obesity in three randomized, placebo-controlled trials. We examined whether lorcaserin is also associated with greater improvements in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and whether these improvements are wholly attributable to weight loss. Pooled data from Behavioral Modification and Lorcaserin for Overweight and Obesity Management (BLOOM), Behavioral Modification and Lorcaserin Second Study for Obesity Management (BLOSSOM) and BLOOM-Diabetes Mellitus (BLOOM-DM) trials were analysed (n = 5624). HRQOL was assessed at baseline and 52 weeks using the Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Lite (IWQOL-Lite) questionnaire. Multiple mediation analyses were conducted to evaluate the mechanisms underlying improved HRQOL. Greater HRQOL improvements were observed at 52 weeks in lorcaserin vs. placebo (P lorcaserin patients (54.1%) experienced meaningful improvements in IWQOL-Lite total score than placebo patients (48.2%) (P Lorcaserin treatment significantly improves HRQOL compared with placebo. Although BMI reduction accounts for the majority of these improvements, improvement in depressive symptoms and total cholesterol are contributing factors. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  17. An observational pilot study on the effect of Gomutra Haritaki, diet control and exercise in the management of Sthaulya (obesity).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujarathi, Ritesh A; Dwivedi, Rambabu; Vyas, Mahesh Kumar

    2014-04-01

    India is currently witnessing rising numbers of people in the middle-class who are obese. A lot of the Indian population has started relying on processed foods that contain a huge percentage of trans-fat, sugars, and other unhealthy and artificial ingredients. Obesity is considered the core of many diseases. Increased weight carries significant health risks for some cancers, diabetes, heart diseases and strokes. Junk food, alcohol and sedentary lifestyle are leading us to silent self destruction, making one in every five Indian men and women either obese or overweight. To determine the effect of Gomutra Haritaki on Sthaulya. An observational pilot study on the effect of Gomutra Haritaki, diet control and exercise in the management of Sthaulya (obesity) was conducted on 21 patients. Enrolled patients were screened on the basis of clinical findings and allocated into two groups. Trial group received Gomutra Haritaki (6 g/day in three divided doses) while control group received placebo capsules in the same dose for 8 weeks. Statistically highly significant relief was found in weight reduction (P impact of diet and exercise in the management of Sthaulya.

  18. Proactive Copyright: Workplace Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Rebecca P.; Parker, Preston

    2009-01-01

    Oftentimes, copyright is addressed in the workplace only after a blatant infringement is discovered or a cease-and-desist letter is received. Then, too, some workplaces may feel that they are immune to copyright issues due to their educational nature; while private organizations, businesses, and industry may feel that the term "fair use" will…

  19. Combating Workplace Ageism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reio, Thomas G., Jr.; Sanders-Reio, Joanne

    1999-01-01

    Age discrimination in the workplace is widespread and often based on stereotypes. Research has demonstrated that older workers learn and perform well. Adult educators should eliminate ways in which educational practices perpetuate ageism, raise awareness of it in the workplace, and help older workers continue learning. (SK)

  20. Canadian Chefs' Workplace Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier-MacBurnie, Paulette; Doyle, Wendy; Mombourquette, Peter; Young, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the formal and informal workplace learning of professional chefs. In particular, it considers chefs' learning strategies and outcomes as well as the barriers to and facilitators of their workplace learning. Design/methodology/approach: The methodology is based on in-depth, face-to-face, semi-structured…