WorldWideScience

Sample records for work hours retirement

  1. From early retirement to working beyond retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, A. de

    2016-01-01

    Many developed countries are confronted with ageing populations, due to the increase in life expectancy and long-term decline in fertility rates. As a consequence, the ratio of the retired elderly to the active working population increases. This puts a pressure on the social security system, and

  2. Working hours and productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collewet, Marion; Sauermann, Jan

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies the link between working hours and productivity using daily information on working hours and performance of a sample of call centre agents. We exploit variation in the number of hours worked by the same employee across days and weeks due to central scheduling, enabling us to

  3. Frontiers of research on work and retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekerdt, David J

    2010-01-01

    The shifting boundary between work and retirement and the always-emergent features of retirement practice create a wide opportunity for scholarship and research. After an overview of the scope of retirement research, this article articulates 4 areas that deserve special attention in the present historical circumstance: studies of the form and timing of retirement exits, the labor market for older workers, the quality of pensions, and the experience of retired life. The field should be wary of prescribing regimes of behavior for late careers and retirement that many people are unsuited to fulfill.

  4. Advice from working women with retired partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Eileen L; Adorno, Gail

    2016-01-01

    in the 21st century, as more women are employed full-time and couples increasingly share egalitarian values, more women continue employment after their partners have voluntarily retired. However, we know very little about the experiences of this growing population of women. We asked working women with retired partners to share their advice for other women who may face this developmental transition. Open-ended responses from 97 women were analyzed to identify pertinent issues and themes. Four primary content areas were identified: time management, division of household labor, financial planning, and communication. Communication between partners was both a topic of concern as well as the solution suggested to resolve conflicts or differences that may arise when women live with a retired partner. It is expected that future changes in the workforce and improvements in the gender balance within relationships will continue to impact experiences for working women with retired partners.

  5. Staggered Bargaining and Hours Worked

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Danthine; Stephane Auray

    2004-01-01

    A matching model with labor/leisure choice and staggered bargaining is used to explain (i)differences in GDP per hour and GDP per capita, (ii) differences in employment, (iii) differences in the proportion of part-time work across countries. The model predicts that the higher the level of rigidity in wages and hours the lower are GDP per capita, employment, part-time work and hours worked, but the higher is GDP per hours worked. In addition, it predicts that a country with a high level of rig...

  6. Bargaining frictions and hours worked

    OpenAIRE

    Stéphane AURAY; Danthine, Samuel

    2005-01-01

    A matching model with labor/leisure choice and bargaining frictions is used to explain (i) differences in GDP per hour and GDP per capita, (ii) differences in employment, (iii) differences in the proportion of part-time work across countries. The model predicts that the higher the level of rigidity in wages and hours the lower are GDP per capita, employment, part-time work and hours worked, but the higher is GDP per hours worked. In addition, it predicts that a country with a high level of ri...

  7. Flexible work schedules, older workers, and retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenthaler, J K; Brenner, A M

    2000-01-01

    Older workers in the United States indicate that they would prefer flexible work arrangements rather than abrupt retirement, yet management has done very little to make this possible. A review of two bodies of literature from the late 1980s is presented: social science writings including sociological, gerontological, and economic literature, and business and management literature. There is a clash between the way jobs are traditionally scheduled and the needs of growing numbers of older workers. Workers continue to be subject to obstacles to phased retirement due to the structuring of health care and pension benefits, downsizing, organizational inflexibility, and "corporate culture." Thus, general views among social scientists regarding the desirability of flexible schedules toward retirement will not produce real changes unless management becomes committed to such changes and they are securely embedded in company policies.

  8. Psychosocial work environment and retirement age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Sannie Vester; Jensen, Per H.; Bjorner, Jakob Bue

    2016-01-01

    influence in job, low possibilities for development, low role clarity, perceived age discrimination, low recognition from management, low workplace justice, poor trust in management, poor leadership quality, and poor predictability. No significant association with early retirement was found for work pace......, quantitative demands, emotional demands, role conflicts, social community between colleagues, and trust between colleagues. Conclusion Older employees with high job satisfaction, influence, possibilities for development, positive management relations, and jobs with no age discrimination remained longer...

  9. "Mental retirement?" Trajectories of work engagement preceding retirement among older workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wind, Astrid; Leijten, Fenna Rm; Hoekstra, Trynke; Geuskens, Goedele A; Burdorf, Alex; van der Beek, Allard J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Before actual retirement, employees may already distance themselves from work, which could be referred to as "mental retirement". However, trajectories of work motivation, ie, work engagement, have not been studied yet. The present study aimed to (i) identify different trajectories of work engagement among older workers approaching the retirement age, and (ii) examine their associations with actual retirement. Methods In total 3171 employees aged 55-62 years, who participated in the Dutch Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation were included in this study. Participants completed questionnaires in 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013. Latent class growth mixture modeling was performed to identify groups of employees with similar three-year trajectories in work engagement. Logistic regression analyses were performed to study whether trajectory membership was associated with retirement. Results Of the 3171 employees, 16.2% made a transition from work to (early) retirement (N=513). Four trajectories of work engagement were identified: steady high (76.3%), steady low (12.7%), decreasing (6.2%), and increasing (4.8%). A steady low work engagement trajectory was associated with retirement [odds ratio (OR) 1.46], compared to a steady high work engagement trajectory. Although not statistically significant, an increasing work engagement trajectory seemed to be associated with retirement as well (OR 1.60). Conclusions This study did not support the concept of mental retirement before actual retirement, ie, a decrease in work engagement among those facing retirement. However, as one in eight employees did experience steady low work engagement in the years before retirement, interventions promoting work motivation are recommended to support the employability of these employees.

  10. Mental retirement? Trajectories of work engagement preceding retirement among older workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, A. de; Leijten, F.R.M.; Hoekstra, T.; Geuskens, G.A.; Burdorf, L.; Beek, A.J. van der

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Before actual retirement, employees may already distance themselves from work, which could be referred to as "mental retirement". However, trajectories of work motivation, ie, work engagement, have not been studied yet. The present study aimed to (i) identify different trajectories of

  11. Activities in Retirement: Individual Experience of Silver Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Maxin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available One consequence of demographic change is a longer average remaining lifetime after retirement. Many people, however, remain able and willing to continue work after reaching the statutory retirement age. Given the predicted shortage of skilled workers in the future, post-retirement activities have the potential to contribute to both organisations and society. This article elaborates the prerequisites for productivity in retirement age and the changed nature of retirement at present.It also quantifies the extent to which activities are continued at retirement age. Paid employment still occurs beyond the applicable retirement age, whereby with increasing age, self-employed persons and assistant family members make up the lion’s share of the statistics. An empirical study shows the concrete situation of active retirees and the prerequisites for post-retirement activities. At the explorative level, individual experiences of the transition into retirement, the reasons for and the framework of post-retirement activities, motivational factors in job design, and physical and intellectual demands before and after retirement are characterised. The qualitative data indicate that retirement entails changes towards more flexible structures in everyday life. Decisive reasons for taking up post-retirement activities are the desire to help, pass on knowledge or remain active; personal development and contact with others; and gaining appreciation and recognition. Flexible job design and freedom to make decisions constitute major elements in shaping post-retirement working activities. Offering autonomy, skill variety, and task significance is important for the design of post-retirement activities. The paper closes with identifying relevant research fields and the concrete need to take action at individual,  organisational, and societal levels. All in all, the transition from working life to retirement should be made flexible enough to do greater justice to the

  12. Work or retirement: Exploration of the experiences of Iranian retired nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobahar, Monir; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Alhani, Fatemah; Khoshknab, Masood Fallahi

    2015-01-01

    According to recent studies, the level of international interest in bridge employment, as return to work after retirement, has been growing. This study aimed to explore the experiences of retired nurses in Iran with regard to making a decision about whether or not to seek bridge employment. A qualitative study using a content analysis approach was conducted in an urban area of Iran. Semi-structured interviews were held with 20 Iranian male and female retired nurses chosen using purposive sampling. During the data analysis, two main themes were identified as the participants' thoughts supporting the decision of seeking bridge employment. The first theme was entitled motivational factors with categories of ``serving the society,'' ``maintaining and promoting health,'' ``tendency toward flexible work,'' and ``maintaining the role and activity.'' The second theme was entitled forcing factors with categories of ``ardent desire to work (pluralistic ignorance)'' and ``financial need.' ' While some Iranian retired nurses were not motivated to seek work for health reasons, most preferred to return to work after retirement. They were motivated to seek bridge employment out of a desire to serve the society, to promote their own physical and mental health, to continue to use their expertise and maintain the worker role, and because of financial needs and perceived societal expectations. Nurses seeking employment later in life tended to look for job flexibility and less stressful work. Therefore, the management of bridge employment by healthcare system authorities can be useful in making use of the invaluable experiences of retired nurses.

  13. Retirement and Fixed Costs to Work: An Empirical Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolodziejczyk, Christophe

    In this paper we study consumption around the age of retirement. We consider a model where consumption and leisure are non-separable and retirement is endogenous. We consider the case where non-separabilities come from the existence of fixed costs to work. We show that the existence of unobserved...

  14. Progressive Retirement Programme and Part-time work as a pre-retirement measure

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following discussion at the Standing Concertation Committee at its meeting on 25 January 2006, the Director-General has approved the extension of the Progressive Retirement Programme with effect from 1 April 2006 until 31 March 2007; of the Part-time work scheme as a pre-retirement measure for the year 2006, i.e. until 31 December 2006. Human Resources Department Tel. 72808/74128

  15. Progressive Retirement Programme and Part-time work as a pre-retirement measure

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2004-01-01

    Following discussion at the Standing Concertation Committee at its meeting on 8 November 2004, the Director-General has approved the extension of the Progressive Retirement Programme with effect from 1 April 2005 until 31 March 2006; of the Part-time work scheme as a pre-retirement measure with effect from 1 January 2005 until 31 December 2005. Human Resources Department Tel. 72808/74128

  16. Extended working hours: Impacts on workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Mitchell; T. Gallagher

    2010-01-01

    Some logging business owners are trying to manage their equipment assets by increasing the scheduled machine hours. The intent is to maximize the total tons produced by a set of equipment. This practice is referred to as multi-shifting, double-shifting, or extended working hours. One area often overlooked is the impact that working non-traditional hours can have on...

  17. Reluctance to Retire: A Qualitative Study on Work Identity, Intergenerational Conflict, and Retirement in Academic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Michelle Pannor; Williams, Sarah A

    2016-09-01

    Some professions foster expectations that individuals cultivate their work identity above all other aspects of life. This can be problematic when individuals are confronted with the expectation that they will readily terminate this identity in later-career stages as institutions seek to cycle in new generations. This study examines the relationship between work identity and retirement by examining multiple generations of academic physicians. This study used a multimethod qualitative design that included document analysis, participant observation, focus groups, and in-depth interviews with academic physicians from one of the oldest departments of medicine in North America. This study illustrates how participants were predisposed and then groomed through institutional efforts to embrace a career trajectory that emphasized work above all else and fostered negative sensibilities about retirement. Participants across multiple generations described a lack of work-life balance and a prioritization of their careers above nonwork commitments. Assertions that less experienced physicians were not as dedicated to medicine and implicit assumptions that later-career physicians should retire emerged as key concerns. Strong work identity and tensions between different generations may confound concerns about retirement in ways that complicate institutional succession planning and that demonstrate how traditional understandings of retirement are out of date. Findings support the need to creatively reconsider the ways we examine relations between work identity, age, and retirement in ways that account for the recent extensions in the working lives of professionals. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Long working hours and cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, Katriina; Nyberg, Solja T.; Madsen, Ida E. H.

    2016-01-01

    ; n lung cancer: 247; n breast cancer: 833; and n prostate cancer: 534). We found no clear evidence for an association between working hours and the overall cancer risk. Working hours were also unrelated the risk of incident colorectal, lung or prostate cancers. Working greater than or equal to55 h...... per week was associated with 1.60-fold (95% confidence interval 1.12–2.29) increase in female breast cancer risk independently of age, socioeconomic position, shift- and night-time work and lifestyle factors, but this observation may have been influenced by residual confounding from parity......Background: Working longer than the maximum recommended hours is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but the relationship of excess working hours with incident cancer is unclear. Methods: This multi-cohort study examined the association between working hours and cancer risk...

  19. Masculinities, work, and retirement among older men who experience depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliffe, John L; Rasmussen, Brian; Bottorff, Joan L; Kelly, Mary T; Galdas, Paul M; Phinney, Alison; Ogrodniczuk, John S

    2013-12-01

    The high incidence of depression among older men has been linked to numerous factors. In this qualitative descriptive study of 30 older, Canadian-based men who experienced depression, we explored the connections between participants' depression, masculinities, work, and retirement. Our analyses revealed three thematic findings. The recursive relationship between depression and work was reflected in depression impeding and emerging from paid work, whereby men's careers and work achievements were negatively impacted by depression amid assertions that unfulfilling work could also invoke depression. Lost or unrealized empires highlighted the centrality of wealth accumulation and negative impact of many participants' unfulfilled paid work aspirations. Retirement as loss and the therapeutic value of work reflected how masculine ideals influenced men to continue working to avoid the losses they associated with retirement. The findings confirm the need to support men's work-related transitions by affirming a diversity of masculine identities beyond traditional workman/breadwinner roles.

  20. Registrar working hours in Cape Town

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicky

    In the past surgical registrars were expected to work unusual- ly long hours. This was thought to provide better patient care, and to result in better registrar training. Junior doctors in the USA worked between 95 and 136 hours per week.1. The paradigm changed in 1984 after the death of Libby Zion in a New York hospital ...

  1. Missing work after retirement: The role of life histories in the retirement adjustment process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, M.; Henkens, K.; Kalmijn, M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Although the process of adjustment to retirement is often assumed to be related to experiences earlier in life, quantitative empirical insights regarding these relationships are limited. This study aims to improve our understanding of adjustment to the loss of the work role, by

  2. Missing work after retirement: the role of life histories in the retirement adjustment process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, M.; Henkens, K.; Kalmijn, M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Although the process of adjustment to retirement is often assumed to be related to experiences earlier in life, quantitative empirical insights regarding these relationships are limited. This study aims to improve our understanding of adjustment to the loss of the work role, by

  3. The Effect of Catastrophic Health Expenditure on Work After Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homaie Rad, Enayatollah; Rashidian, Arash; Arab, Mohamad; Souri, Ali

    2017-03-01

    Several factors can force retirees to go to paid work. Catastrophic health-care expenditure (CHCE) is one of the driving forces for retirees to go to paid work. This cross-sectional study was based on 6,307 Iran retirees' data. Xu method was used to calculate CHCE, and a logit model was estimated to show the association between CHCE and bridge employment. Other control variables were added to the model. The findings showed that there was positive relationship between CHCE and bridge employment. Retirement pension had negative relationship with work after retirement. Prevalence of work after retirement was higher in people who lived in rural region and increased due to increase in household size. The financial constraint was the main pushing factor for the retiree to go to paid work. Thus, covering retirees with health insurances and identifying and listing diseases that may face the retirees with CHCE are some possible efforts to decrease CHCE.

  4. Impact of working hours on work-life balance

    OpenAIRE

    Holly, Sarah; Mohnen, Alwine

    2012-01-01

    To examine the influence of working hours on employees' satisfaction, this article uses a large, representative set of panel data from German households (GSOEP). The results show that high working hours and overtime in general do not lead to decreased satisfaction. Rather, increasing working hours and overtime have positive effects on life and job satisfaction, whereas the desire to reduce working hours has a negative impact on satisfaction. In 2009, nearly 60% of employees wanted to reduce t...

  5. Social connectedness and the transition from work to retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancee, Bram; Radl, Jonas

    2012-07-01

    Although there are numerous studies on the role of social connections in early working life, research that examines how social connectedness matters in the later stages of a career is scarce. The present study analyzes to what extent social connectedness affects the timing of the transition from work to retirement. We draw on data from the German Socioeconomic Panel Study (GSOEP) from the years 1985-2009 (N = 10,225), and we apply techniques of event history analysis. Social connectedness includes social gatherings with friends, relatives, and neighbors (informal participation) as well as engagement in voluntary and civic associations and local politics (formal participation). The findings demonstrate that social connectedness matters for the transition from work to retirement, but its impact depends on the type of participation. Whereas informal participation results in earlier retirement, formal participation delays labor force withdrawal. The findings suggest a trade-off between informal participation and work in later life, which leads people with frequent social contacts to opt for early retirement. By contrast, the fact that formal participation is associated with postponed retirement points to employment benefits of volunteering and civic engagement among older workers.

  6. The role of ability, motivation, and opportunity to work in the transition from work to early retirement : testing and optimizing the Early Retirement Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, A. de; Geuskens, G.A.; Ybema, J.F.; Bongers, P.M.; Beek, A.J. van der

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Determinants in the domains health, job characteristics, skills, and social and financial factors may influence early retirement through three central explanatory variables, namely, the ability, motivation, and opportunity to work. Based on the literature, we created the Early Retirement

  7. The role of ability, motivation, and opportunity to work in the transition from work to early retirement - testing and optimizing the Early Retirement Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wind, Astrid; Geuskens, Goedele A; Ybema, Jan Fekke; Bongers, Paulien M; van der Beek, Allard J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Determinants in the domains health, job characteristics, skills, and social and financial factors may influence early retirement through three central explanatory variables, namely, the ability, motivation, and opportunity to work. Based on the literature, we created the Early Retirement

  8. The role of ability, motivation, and opportunity to work in the transition from work to early retirement - testing and optimizing the Early Retirement Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wind, A.; Geuskens, G.A.; Ybema, J.F.; Bongers, P.M.; van der Beek, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Determinants in the domains health, job characteristics, skills, and social and financial factors may influence early retirement through three central explanatory variables, namely, the ability, motivation, and opportunity to work. Based on the literature, we created the Early Retirement

  9. Long working hours and alcohol use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Jokela, Markus; Nyberg, Solja T

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify the association between long working hours and alcohol use. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies and unpublished individual participant data. DATA SOURCES: A systematic search of PubMed and Embase databases in April 2014 for published studies......, supplemented with manual searches. Unpublished individual participant data were obtained from 27 additional studies. REVIEW METHODS: The search strategy was designed to retrieve cross sectional and prospective studies of the association between long working hours and alcohol use. Summary estimates were...... countries. The pooled maximum adjusted odds ratio for the association between long working hours and alcohol use was 1.11 (95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.18) in the cross sectional analysis of published and unpublished data. Odds ratio of new onset risky alcohol use was 1.12 (1.04 to 1...

  10. Part-time work as a pre-retirement measure

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    Following discussion at the Standing Concertation Committee at its meeting on 2 November 2007, the Director-General has approved the extension of the part-time work scheme as a pre-retirement measure for the year 2008, i.e. until 31 December 2008. Human Resources Department Tel. 74484/73903

  11. Part-time work as a pre-retirement measure

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following discussion at the Standing Concertation Committee at its meeting on 7 December 2006, the Director-General has approved the extension of the Part-time work scheme as a pre-retirement measure for the year 2007, i.e. until 31 December 2007. Human Resources Department Tel. 72808/74128

  12. Post-retirement intentions of nurses and midwives living and working in the Northern Territory of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voit, Katharina; Carson, D B

    2014-01-01

    Previous research undertaken in the Northern Territory of Australia has identified interest among nurses in engaging in the active workforce post-retirement. Relatively little is known about which nurses are interested in such engagement, and the types of work arrangements that might be of interest. This study aims to provide an enhanced understanding of the retirement plans and post-retirement employment intentions of nurses and midwives living and working in the Northern Territory (NT) of Australia. An online survey was developed to examine retirement intentions, and investigate the types and facilitators significant for post-retirement engagement. The results indicated a strong interest among nurses and midwives in engaging in post-retirement work, with 73.2% of respondents (n=207) having considered continuing in the active workforce. The most preferred types of engagement included the gradual reduction of hours in current workplaces, part-year or seasonal employment, short-term placements, job-sharing or job-rotation, mentoring, research and policy development or acting as 'Northern Territory representatives' promoting jobs to prospective nurses and midwives elsewhere in Australia. A range of facilitators for post-retirement engagement was found, including for nurses who had not currently considered such engagement. The data collected from this research also identified barriers to post-retirement employment. The most favoured facilitators were financial incentives (90.0% of respondents identified it as a facilitator for post-retirement engagement), followed by support from line management (82.0%). Regardless of whether they had considered engaging post-retirement, the largest proportion of respondents intended to leave the NT for the time of their retirement (33.7%). The most prominent barrier to post-retirement engagement was that only a smaller proportion intended to retire in the NT (24.1%). Importantly, many nurses who had not currently considered post-retirement

  13. Long working hours and alcohol use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Jokela, Markus; Nyberg, Solja T

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify the association between long working hours and alcohol use. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies and unpublished individual participant data. DATA SOURCES: A systematic search of PubMed and Embase databases in April 2014 for published studies, su...

  14. Long working hours and alcohol use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Jokela, Markus; Nyberg, Solja T

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify the association between long working hours and alcohol use. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies and unpublished individual participant data. DATA SOURCES: A systematic search of PubMed and Embase databases in April 2014 for published studies......, supplemented with manual searches. Unpublished individual participant data were obtained from 27 additional studies. REVIEW METHODS: The search strategy was designed to retrieve cross sectional and prospective studies of the association between long working hours and alcohol use. Summary estimates were...... obtained with random effects meta-analysis. Sources of heterogeneity were examined with meta-regression. RESULTS: Cross sectional analysis was based on 61 studies representing 333,693 participants from 14 countries. Prospective analysis was based on 20 studies representing 100,602 participants from nine...

  15. Shift work, long working hours, and later risk of dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Garde, AH; Ishtiak-Ahmed, K

    2017-01-01

    –1971 and 1985–1986), long working hours defined as >45 hours per week (collected in 1970–1971), socioeconomic status, sleep, stress, and cardiovascular risk factors. Information about dementia diagnoses was obtained from registers. Participants were followed until 2014 (mean length of follow-up was 17.8 years......Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of shift work and long working hours in midlife on the risk of dementia in old age. Methods: The present study comprised 4766 participants from the Copenhagen Male Study. We used information on shift work (collected in 1970......). We employed Poisson regression for the survival analyses and estimated incidence rate ratios (IRR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: We found no statistically significant association between shift work (IRR 0.86, 95% CI 0.70–1.05) or long working hours (IRR 0.97, 95% CI 0...

  16. Working hours and Work-Life Balance Satisfaction in Couples

    OpenAIRE

    Georges, Nathalie; Méda, Dominique; Trancart, Danièle

    2010-01-01

    Over the past several years, many studies have highlighted the strategic nature of working hours, the way they are determined, their regularity and their predictability to judge the qualities of a job and how family life and work life are reconciled. Our results confirm those obtained by previous studies and clarify them, while also showing that both the working hours of the persons questioned and those of their spouse constitute a central variable. We will first review the results from the a...

  17. Globalization and working time: working hours and flexibility in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgoon, B.; Raess, D.

    2009-01-01

    This article challenges popular wisdom that economic globalization uniformly increases working time in industrialized countries. International investment and trade, they argue, have uneven effects for workplace bargaining over standard hours and over work-time flexibility, such as use of temporary

  18. The impact of midlife educational, work, health and family experiences on men's early retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, M.; Henkens, C.J.I.M.; Kalmijn, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. In empirical studies on predictors of retirement, midlife experiences have often remained implicit or been neglected. This study aims to improve our understanding of retirement by examining the impact of midlife educational, work, health, and family experiences on early retirement

  19. The impact of midlife educational, work, health, and family experiences on men's early retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damman, Marleen; Henkens, Kène; Kalmijn, Matthijs

    2011-09-01

    In empirical studies on predictors of retirement, midlife experiences have often remained implicit or been neglected. This study aims to improve our understanding of retirement by examining the impact of midlife educational, work, health, and family experiences on early retirement intentions and behavior. We distinguish theoretically and empirically between financial and nonfinancial preretirement factors through which midlife experiences could affect retirement. Using panel data of 1,229 Dutch male older workers, we estimated linear regression models to explain retirement intentions and logistic regression models to explain retirement behavior. Midlife experiences in all studied life spheres are related to retirement intentions. Educational investments, job changes, late transitions into parenthood, and late divorces are associated with weaker intentions to retire early. Midlife health problems are related to stronger early retirement intentions. For midlife work and family experiences, the relationships are (partly) mediated by the preretirement financial opportunity structure. In the educational, work, and health spheres, the preretirement nonfinancial situation has a mediating effect. Only some of the predictors of retirement intentions also predicted retirement behavior. Given the destandardization of life courses, information on distal life experiences might become even more important toward understanding retirement in the future.

  20. Working conditions as risk factors for disability retirement: a longitudinal register linkage study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Early retirement due to disability is a public health and work environment problem that shortens working careers. Transition to disability retirement is based on ill-health, but working conditions are also of relevance. We examined the contributions of work arrangements, physical working conditions and psychosocial working conditions to subsequent disability retirement. Methods The data were derived from the Helsinki Health Study cohort on employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland. Information on working conditions was obtained from the baseline surveys conducted in 2000, 2001 and 2002. These data were linked with register data on disability retirement and their main diagnoses obtained from the Finnish Centre for Pensions. Follow up by the end of 2008 yielded 525 disability retirement events. The analysed data included 6525 participants and 525 disability retirement events. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated from Cox regression analysis. Results Several working conditions showed own associations with disability retirement before adjustment. After adjustment for all working conditions, the primary risk factors for all-cause disability retirement were physical workload among women (HR 2.02, 95% CI 1.57-2.59) and men (HR 2.00, 95% CI 1.18-3.38), and low job control among women (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.29-1.99). In addition, for disability retirement due to musculoskeletal causes, the risk factors were physical workload and low job control. For disability retirement due to mental causes the risk factors were computer work and low job control. Furthermore, occupational class was a risk factor for disability retirement due to all causes and musculoskeletal diseases. Conclusions Among various working conditions, those that are physically demanding and those that imply low job control are potential risk factors for disability retirement. Improving the physical working environment and enhancing control over one’s job is likely

  1. Why work beyond 65? Discourse on the Decision to Continue Working or Retire Early

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Nilsson

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examined retirement decisions among people who had left working life before 65 years of age and those working beyond 65 years in an extended working life. The results were used to make a model about their considerations, weighting and decision making, and important factors and themes in working beyond 65 years of age or retiring before 65. The interviewees seemed to have considered and weighed their own best life balance to finally result in their identity as (older worker or early retiree. They included their work situation and social surroundings in descriptions of their planning and retirement decision making. The most important themes in these descriptions were (i personal health and well-being; (ii personal finances; (iii possibilities for social inclusion; and (iv possibilities for self-crediting by meaningful activities. Those identifying themselves as older workers had possibilities in their life situation to manage their work in relation to their functional ageing and health situation; felt important to others and socially included in the workplace; and did meaningful tasks and felt empowered in their working life. Those who had left the working life before 65 years of age describe a better possibility to this outside the working life and left as soon as they acquire a sufficient pension. The results and model presented here on how people perceive their identity as older worker or early retiree will hopefully contribute to understanding retirement planning and to the formulation of strategies to extend working life.

  2. Trajectories of Work Disability and Economic Insecurity Approaching Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuey, Kim M; Willson, Andrea E

    2017-07-08

    In this article, we examine the connection between trajectories of work disability and economic precarity in late midlife. We conceptualize work disability as a possible mechanism linking early and later life economic disadvantage. We model trajectories of work disability characterized by timing and stability for a cohort of Baby Boomers (22-32 in 1981) using 32 years of data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and latent class analysis. Measures of childhood disadvantage are included as predictors of work disability trajectories, which are subsequently included in logistic regression models predicting four economic outcomes (poverty, asset poverty, home ownership, and pension ownership) at ages 54-64. Childhood disadvantage selected individuals into five distinct classes of work disability that differed in timing and stability. All of the disability trajectories were associated with an increased risk of economic insecurity in late midlife compared to the never work disabled. This study contributes to the aging literature through its incorporation of the early life origins of pathways of disability and their links to economic outcomes approaching retirement. Findings suggest work disability is anchored in early life disadvantage and is associated with economic insecurity later in life.

  3. The importance and challenges of measuring work hours

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Work hours are key components in estimating productivity growth and hourly wages as well as being a useful cyclical indicator in their own right, so measuring them correctly is important. The US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) collects data on work hours in several surveys and publishes three widely-used series that measure average weekly hours. The series tell different stories about average weekly hours and trends in those hours but qualitatively similar stories about the cyclical behavior...

  4. The role of ability, motivation, and opportunity to work in the transition from work to early retirement--testing and optimizing the Early Retirement Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wind, Astrid; Geuskens, Goedele A; Ybema, Jan Fekke; Bongers, Paulien M; van der Beek, Allard J

    2015-01-01

    Determinants in the domains health, job characteristics, skills, and social and financial factors may influence early retirement through three central explanatory variables, namely, the ability, motivation, and opportunity to work. Based on the literature, we created the Early Retirement Model. This study aims to investigate whether data support the model and how it could be improved. Employees aged 58-62 years (N=1862), who participated in the first three waves of the Dutch Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation (STREAM) were included. Determinants were assessed at baseline, central explanatory variables after one year, and early retirement after two years. Structural equation modeling was applied. Testing the Early Retirement Model resulted in a model with good fit. Health, job characteristics, skills, and social and financial factors were related to the ability, motivation and/or opportunity to work (significant β range: 0.05-0.31). Lower work ability (β=-0.13) and less opportunity to work (attitude colleagues and supervisor about working until age 65: β=-0.24) predicted early retirement, whereas the motivation to work (work engagement) did not. The model could be improved by adding direct effects of three determinants on early retirement, ie, support of colleagues and supervisor (β=0.14), positive attitude of the partner with respect to early retirement (β=0.15), and not having a partner (β=-0.13). The Early Retirement Model was largely supported by the data but could be improved. The prolongation of working life might be promoted by work-related interventions focusing on health, work ability, the social work climate, social norms on prolonged careers, and the learning environment.

  5. Working after retirement: Determinants and consequences of bridge employment, Doctoral thesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dingemans, E.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of older adults returns to the labor force after (early) retirement. As compared to other European countries, a relatively high share of the Dutch older population, namely one in four, is working after retirement in so-called bridge jobs. Ellen Dingemans worked on this topic of

  6. Predicting long-term sickness absence and early retirement pension from self-reported work ability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sell, Lea; Bültmann, Ute; Rugulies, Reiner Ernst

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the relationship between self-reported work ability and long-term term of sickness absence or early retirement from the labour market.......The aim of this paper is to examine the relationship between self-reported work ability and long-term term of sickness absence or early retirement from the labour market....

  7. When Are Teachers Motivated to Work beyond Retirement Age? The Importance of Support, Change of Work Role and Money

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, P. Matthijs; Visser, Michel S.

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates the factors influencing the motivation to continue working after retirement among a sample of Dutch teachers. Based on previous research, it was proposed that teachers will be motivated to work after their legal retirement age when organizational support, possibilities to change work roles and financial needs are high.…

  8. Gender and Relationship Status Interaction and Likelihood of Return to Work Post-Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settels, Jason; McMullin, Julie

    2017-09-01

    Population aging is an issue of mounting importance throughout the industrialized world. Concerns over labour force shortages have led to policies that prolong working life. Accordingly, present-day workforce participation patterns of older individuals are extensively varied. This study utilized the 2007 General Social Survey to examine factors associated with post-retirement paid work, focusing on the interaction between gender and relationship status, among Canadians aged 50 to 74 who had retired at least once. We find that although being in a relationship is associated with a higher likelihood of post-retirement work for men, the opposite is true for women. Our findings suggest that the gendered association between relationship status and post-retirement work results partly from the gendered associations between relationship status and one's motivation for learning and community involvement, career orientation, and sense of independence. Gendered meanings of relationship status are thus revealed through analysis of post-retirement work.

  9. Work environment factors, health, lifestyle and marital status as predictors of job change and early retirement in physically heavy occupations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, T.M.; Iversen, Lars; Poulsen, Kjeld B.

    2001-01-01

    Occupational health, work environment, retirement, uemployment, disability pension, epidemiology, follow-up, smoking, job mobility......Occupational health, work environment, retirement, uemployment, disability pension, epidemiology, follow-up, smoking, job mobility...

  10. Analysis of Office/Laboratory Staying Hour and Home Working Hour of Japanese Scientists and Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejiri, A.

    The second questionnaire for scientists and engineers was carried out in 2007, and status of Japanese scientists and engineers were analyzed and reported. A part of the data was reanalyzed from the viewpoint of work life balance. In particular, office/laboratory staying hour and home working hour were analyzed and dependences on various factors were investigated. It was found that these hours depend on gender, marital status, number of child, employment status and age. In addition, the total hours tend to be kept constant regardless of various factors.

  11. Relations of Work Identity, Family Identity, Situational Demands, and Sex with Employee Work Hours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Peng, Ann C.; Allen, Tammy D.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined relations of multiple indicators of work identity and family identity with the number of weekly hours worked by 193 married business professionals. We found that men generally worked long hours regardless of the situational demands to work long hours and the strength of their work and family identities. Women's work hours, on…

  12. The impact of work-related and personal resources on older workers' fatigue, work enjoyment and retirement intentions over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stynen, Dave; Jansen, Nicole W H; Kant, IJmert

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to examine the impact of work-related and personal resources on older workers' retirement intentions by studying the pathways (fatigue and work enjoyment) from resources to retirement intentions, the buffering role of resources for psychological job demands, in a cross-sectional and longitudinal timeframe. Longitudinal results on a subsample of full-time, older workers (n = 1642) from the Maastricht Cohort Study suggest that over four years of follow-up personal resources like personal mastery and perceived health related to less (prolonged) fatigue and more work enjoyment. Personal mastery also related to later retirement intentions. A work-related resource like decision authority related to less prolonged fatigue. (Prolonged) fatigue related to earlier retirement intentions, suggesting that fatigue may be a pathway to early retirement. Finally, little evidence was found for effect modification by resources. This prospective study indicates that work-related and personal resources may be useful for prolonging working careers. Practitioner Summary: To date, the impact of work-related and personal resources on older workers' retirement intentions is rarely studied. As this prospective study shows that resources may impact older workers' (prolonged) fatigue, work enjoyment and retirement intentions, the monitoring and fostering of resources is of importance for prolonging their working careers.

  13. Working hours and health behaviour among nurses at public hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana da Costa Fernandes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyse the differences between genders in the description in the professional, domestic and total work hours and assess its association with health-related behaviour among nurses. METHODS: this is a transversal study carried out in 18 different public hospitals in the municipality of Rio de Janeiro. The data collection procedure was based on questionnaires. All nurses working with assistance were considered eligible (n=2,279. RESULTS: men and women showed significant differences in relation to working hours. The female group showed longer domestic and total work hours when compared to the group of men. In contrast, the number of hours spent on professional work was higher among men. For the women, both the professional hours and total work hours were often associated with excessive consumption of fried food and also coffee, lack of physical exercise and also the greater occurrence of overweight and obesity. CONCLUSION: both the professional hours and the domestic work hours need to be taken into account in studies about health, self-care and also the care provided within the context of nursing workers, particularly among women. The results add weight to the need for actions for health promotion in this occupational group and the importance of assessing the impact of long working hours on the health of workers.

  14. Psychosocial work environment and retirement age: a prospective study of 1876 senior employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Sannie Vester; Jensen, Per H; Bjørner, Jakob Bue

    2016-08-01

    Retention of senior employees is a challenge for most developed countries. We aimed to identify psychosocial work environment factors of importance for the retention of older employees by evaluating the association between the psychosocial work environment and voluntary early retirement in a longitudinal study. Data about work environment, health, and background factors came from the DANES 2008 questionnaire survey. We followed members of the Danish early retirement scheme for up to 4 years in national registers-focusing on the age range, 60-64 years, where early retirement was possible. We used Cox proportional hazard regression to analyze the rate of early retirement. The study included 16 psychosocial work environment factors. The following 10 psychosocial factors were significant predictors of early retirement in covariate adjusted analyses: Low job satisfaction, low influence in job, low possibilities for development, low role clarity, perceived age discrimination, low recognition from management, low workplace justice, poor trust in management, poor leadership quality, and poor predictability. No significant association with early retirement was found for work pace, quantitative demands, emotional demands, role conflicts, social community between colleagues, and trust between colleagues. Older employees with high job satisfaction, influence, possibilities for development, positive management relations, and jobs with no age discrimination remained longer at the labor market. However, we found no evidence that low demands or good relations between colleagues could influence older employees' decision on early retirement.

  15. Appropriate working hours for surgical training according to Australasian trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Gregory; Harper, Simon; Loveday, Benjamin; Adams, Brandon; Civil, Ian D; Peters, Matthew

    2012-04-01

    The demands of surgical training, learning and service delivery compete with the need to minimize fatigue and maintain an acceptable lifestyle. The optimal balance of working hours is uncertain. This study aimed to define the appropriate hours to meet these requirements according to trainees. All Australian and New Zealand surgical trainees were surveyed. Roster structures, weekly working hours and weekly 'sleep loss hours' (hours to be appropriate for 'technical' and 'non-technical' training needs compared with 55 h/week (interquartile range: 50-60) regarded as appropriate for study/research needs. Working ≥65 h/week, or accruing ≥5.5 weekly 'sleep loss hours', was associated with increased fatigue, reduced ability to study, more frequent dozing while driving and impaired concentration at work. Trainees who considered they had an appropriate work-life balance worked median 55 h/week. Approximately, 60 h/week proved an appropriate balance of working hours for surgical training, although study and lifestyle demands are better met at around 55 h/week. Sleep loss is an important determinant of fatigue and its impacts, and work hours should not be considered in isolation. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  16. With long hours of work, might depression then lurk?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varma, Anshu; Marott, Jacob Louis; Stoltenberg, Christian Ditlev Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine depression as a potential negative health effect of long work hours, anticipating an exposure-response relationship.......The aim of this study was to examine depression as a potential negative health effect of long work hours, anticipating an exposure-response relationship....

  17. Work-related factors and early retirement intention: a study of the Danish eldercare sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejbæk, Camilla Sandal; Nexo, Mette A.; Borg, Vilhelm

    2012-01-01

    explained the increase of early retirement intention: (i) high job demands (four factors) and low resources (four factors); (ii) low job attitude (three factors); and (iii) high physical strain (one factor). METHODS: We included 2444 employees (aged 45-57 years) from two waves (T1 and T2) from a prospective...... at the normal retirement age (65 years or older). High physical strain [hypothesis (iii)] and low and normal affective organizational commitment [hypothesis (ii)] were associated with very early retirement intention. None of the other work-related factors associated with early retirement intention. CONCLUSIONS......: Future interventions should focus on reducing physical strain and increase or maintain affective organizational commitment among employees in the eldercare sector to postpone retirement....

  18. Impact of working hours on sleep and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, P; Fonseca, M; Pires, J F

    2017-07-01

    The number of hours people are required to work has a pervasive influence on both physical and mental health. Excessive working hours can also negatively affect sleep quality. The impact at work of mental health problems can have serious consequences for individuals' as well as for organizations' productivity. To evaluate differences in sleep quality and anxiety and depression symptoms between longer working hours group (LWHG) and regular working hours group (RWHG). To examine factors influencing weekly working hours, sleep quality and anxiety and depressive symptoms. Participants were divided into two groups, RWHG and LWHG, based on working hours, with a cut-off of 48 h per week. We used the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to assess anxiety and depression symptoms and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) to measure the quality and patterns of sleep. The response rate was 23%. Among the 429 study participants, those in the LWHG group (n = 256, 53%) had significantly more depressive and anxiety symptoms and worse sleep quality than those in RWHG (n = 223, 47%). Working time was significantly positively correlated with higher corporate position and HADS scores. Moreover, HADS scores were positively correlated with PSQI scores and negatively correlated with age. This study suggests that longer working hours are associated with poorer mental health status and increasing levels of anxiety and depression symptoms. There was a positive correlation between these symptoms and sleep disturbances.

  19. [Early retirement or prolonged working life? Aspirations of unionized professionals aged 50 years and over].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, G; Wills, T; Saba, T; St-jacques, N

    1995-01-01

    "Two opposing retirement options--early retirement or prolonged working life--are being presented in the burgeoning literature related to the ineluctable ageing of the work force. Both are allegedly proposed for economic reasons and claim to meet the expectations and needs of ageing workers. But what in reality are the retirement goals of older workers and which factors, individual and organizational, affect the decision to retire? In tackling this question, the article draws on a survey conducted among workers from 15 unions, mostly affiliated with the Quebec Council of Managers and Professionals. Based on data from 1,319 respondents, the findings indicate that the majority of professionals would prefer to retire earlier, that 60 is much more considered a normal retirement age than 65, and that only 8% of the respondents wish to continue working after 65--and this mostly out of economic necessity, not choice. The factors that underlie this preference for early retirement are then identified and discussed." (SUMMARY IN ENG AND SPA) excerpt

  20. The role of continuing training motivation for work ability and the desire to work past retirement age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Thieme

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Germany, relying on a pay-as-you-go pension system has increased regular retirement age to 67 due to its ageing population caused by decreasing birth rates and increasing life expectancy. Using data from the nationally representative "Survey on continuing in employment in pensionable age", we investigate the relevance of training motivation for work ability and the desire to work past retirement age and whether differences between social groups reflect inequalities in training participation. Results show significant positive correlations between continuing training motivation and work ability and desire to work past retirement age. Differentiated for selected respondent groups the level of qualification has a significant influence. This effect was stronger than any differences with regard to gender or employment participation. Results imply external conditions only partly explain older workers' work ability or desire to work past retirement age. Compared to inequalities in training participation, motivation for continuing training is high across analysed subgroups.

  1. Vertical and horizontal trust at work as predictors of retirement intentions: the Finnish Public Sector Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Muurinen

    Full Text Available This prospective cohort study aimed to examine the associations of trust towards the supervisor (vertical trust and trust towards co-workers (horizontal trust with retirement intentions. The participants were 14 840 women and men working in the municipal sector in 2000-12 (Finnish Public Sector Study. Trust (vertical trust towards the supervisor and horizontal trust towards co-workers and retirement intentions were assessed in repeated surveys. Multivariable multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the association between baseline trust and retirement intentions at 3.7 years of follow-up. Demographic characteristics, health, psychological distress, health risk behaviors, personality factors, and psychosocial factors were included as covariates. Of the participants, 67.0% trusted their supervisor and 54.9% trusted their co-workers. Employees who trusted their supervisor (odds ratio (OR 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.53-0.67 and employees who trusted their co-workers (odds ratio 0.62, 95% confidence interval 0.55-0.70 at baseline were less likely to have strong retirement intentions at follow-up compared to those who did not trust. These associations largely persisted after adjusting for all covariates and taking into account baseline retirement intentions. In conclusion, trust in the supervisor and co-workers predicted retirement intentions. These observational findings suggest that increasing trust in the workplace may contribute to lengthening working careers and preventing early retirement.

  2. The work and retirement decisions of older women: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, D A

    1994-01-01

    This article reviews the economic literature on the work and retirement decisions of older women. Economic studies generally find that married women respond to the financial reward for work (for example, wages) in making their work and retirement decisions, but that they do not respond to unearned income and wealth (for example, the value of lifetime Social Security benefits). Unmarried women are found to respond to all types of financial variables. Most economic studies find that the family plays only a limited role in the work and retirement decisions of women. The retirement status of the husband does influence the wife's retirement decision, but the health status of the husband does not. The presence of dependents in the household, regardless of whether they are children or parents, is not found to influence work and retirement among women. The relevance of these results to Social Security policy is discussed. There are a number of reasons to be cautious about the results. The literature to date is small; it is based on data that are deficient in some respects, and it contains studies that have methodological problems. These problems are discussed and prospects for future research are explored.

  3. The clock drawing test is an independent predictor of incident use of 24-hour care in a retirement community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavery, Laurie L; Starenchak, Scott M; Flynn, William B; Stoeff, Margaret A; Schaffner, Ruth; Newman, Anne B

    2005-07-01

    It is unclear how early cognitive impairment affects future care needs. Furthermore, the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), a commonly used screening tool in the clinical setting, tends to have a ceiling effect for early cognitive decline. One of the earliest changes in cognitive function is executive impairment. We examined the relationship between executive function, measured with a clock drawing protocol (CLOX1) designed to capture executive impairment, and incident need for increased level of care and total mortality. Residents (n = 230) in independent living at a continuing care retirement community were followed for incident need for 24-hour care (mean 2.5 years). Baseline assessment included health status and physical and cognitive function. Time to event analysis was performed to determine the association of the CLOX1 score with the outcomes. Forty percent of residents had a CLOX1 score or =12. Similarly, the event rate was 34 per 100 p-y versus 17 per 100 p-y for MMSE or =26, respectively. A CLOX1 score 24-hour care (hazard ratio 2.2; 95% confidence interval: 1.5-3.4) and death (hazard ratio 2.3; 95% confidence interval: 1.1-4.8) even after controlling for age, sex, comorbidity, and MMSE scores. The MMSE score was not an independent predictor of incident use of 24-hour care or mortality. The clock drawing test, scored for executive impairment, but not the MMSE, predicted incident use of 24-hour care and mortality in this cohort of independent older adults.

  4. Emotional exhaustion may trigger cut in working hours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppes, L.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers in the Netherlands have been examining to what extent workers are modifying their hours to cope with high levels of work-related emotional exhaustion. Findings reveal that most full-time employees would prefer a cut in their hours, with those reporting emotional exhaustion wanting a

  5. Periodic self-rostering in shift work: correspondence between objective work hours, work hour preferences (personal fit), and work schedule satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingre, M.; Äkerstedt, T.; Ekstedt, M.; Kecklund, L.G.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The main objective of the present study was to investigate relative personal fit as the association between rated needs and preferences for work hours, on the one hand, and actual work hours, on the other hand, in three groups (hospital, call-center, and police) working with periodic

  6. [Medical justification of the eight-hour shift work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro-García, Luis; Sánchez-Román, Raúl; Juárez-Pérez, Cuauhtémoc Arturo; Larios-Díaz, Enrique

    2007-01-01

    The 8-hour shift work is one of the main achievements of the organized workers. International solidarity with United States miners, who were massacred in Chicago in 1886, and the aftermath of World War I promoted the establishment of 8-hour shift work in many countries. In Mexico, the 1917 Social Rights Declaration adhered to this position under the idea that the excessive workload above the 8-hour limit had negative effects on the health of workers; nevertheless, this statement seems to be sustained only by testimonies, anecdotal opinions and/or by the logic and common sense that then prevailed. For this reason, a literature review was carried out in search for the evidence supporting this apparently immovable length of the shift work. The globalization of the economy and the tendency towards flexibility and deregulation of current contractual relationships, are the new challenges that the 8-hour shift work is facing.

  7. Nurses' extended work hours: Patient, nurse and organizational outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunaviktikul, W; Wichaikhum, O; Nantsupawat, A; Nantsupawat, R; Chontawan, R; Klunklin, A; Roongruangsri, S; Nantachaipan, P; Supamanee, T; Chitpakdee, B; Akkadechanunt, T; Sirakamon, S

    2015-09-01

    Nursing shortages have been associated with increased nurse workloads that may result in work errors, thus impacting patient, nurse and organizational outcomes. To examine for the first time in Thailand nurses' extended work hours (working more than 40 h per week) and its relationship to patient, nurse and organizational outcomes. Using multistage sampling, 1524 registered nurses working in 90 hospitals across Thailand completed demographic forms: the Nurses' Extended Work Hours Form; the Patient, Nurse, Organizational Outcomes Form; the Organizational Productivity Questionnaire and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics, Spearman's rank correlation and logistic regression. The average extended work hour of respondents was 18.82 h per week. About 80% worked two consecutive shifts. The extended work hours had a positive correlation with patient outcomes, such as patient identification errors, pressure ulcers, communication errors and patient complaints and with nurse outcomes of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Furthermore, we found a negative correlation between extended work hours and job satisfaction as a whole, intent to stay and organizational productivity. Nurses who had extended work hours of >16 h per week were significantly more likely to perceive all four adverse patient outcomes than participants working an extended ≤8 h per week. Patient outcomes were measured by respondents' self-reports. This may not always reflect the real occurrence of adverse events. Associations between extended work hours and outcomes for patients, nurses and the organization were found. The findings demonstrate that working two shifts (16 h) more than the regular work hours lead to negative outcomes for patients, nurses and the organization. Our findings add to increasing international evidence that nurses' poor working conditions result in negative outcomes for professionals, patients and health systems

  8. Organizational change, psychosocial work environment, and non-disability early retirement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinegaard, Nina; Jensen, Johan Høy; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study examines the impact of organizational change and psychosocial work environment on non-disability early retirement among senior public service employees. Methods: In January and February 2011, Danish senior public service employees aged 58–64 years (N=3254) from the Capital...... psychosocial work environment contribute to non-disability early retirement among senior public service employees, measured at work-unit level....... Region of Denmark responded to a survey assessing psychosocial work environment (ie, social capital, organizational justice, and quality of management). Work-unit organizational changes (ie, change of management, merging, demerging, and relocation) were recorded from January 2009 to March 2011. Weekly...

  9. “Friday off”: Reducing Working Hours in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Rossiter

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the pros and cons for reducing working hours in Europe. To arrive to an informed judgment we review critically the theoretical and empirical literature, mostly from economics, concerning the relation between working hours on the one hand, and productivity, employment, quality of life, and the environment, on the other. We adopt a binary economics distinction between capital and labor productiveness, and are concerned with how working hours may be reduced without harming the earning capacity of workers. There are reasons to believe that reducing working hours may absorb some unemployment, especially in the short-run, even if less than what is advocated by proponents of the proposal. Further, there may well be strong benefits for the quality of peoples’ lives. Environmental benefits are likely but depend crucially on complementary policies or social conditions that will ensure that the time liberated will not be directed to resource-intensive or environmentally harmful consumption. It is questionable whether reduced working hours are sustainable in the long-term given resource limits and climate change. We conclude that while the results of reducing working hours are uncertain, this may be a risk worth taking, especially as an interim measure that may relieve unemployment while other necessary structural changes are instituted.

  10. The emerging trend of work beyond retirement age in Germany. Increasing social inequality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofäcker, D; Naumann, E

    2015-07-01

    Population ageing, demographic change and the financial crisis has put the financial sustainability of the German pension system at risk. In reaction to these challenges, Germany recently abandoned generous early retirement policies and moved towards policies encouraging higher employment among the elderly. In this article we evaluate how these labour market and pension policies affected the retirement decisions of older workers in Germany over the last three decades. Complementing previous research on early retirement, we focus in particular on those working past the mandatory retirement age of 65 years and examine whether the composition of this group of postretirement-age workers has changed over time. We analyse pooled cross-sectional data from three rounds of the German Ageing Survey which allow us to cover the last three decades from 1980 to 2008. Estimating multinomial logit models we distinguish explanatory factors on the individual, organizational and institutional level that frame the decision to leave the labour market before the age of 65, to stop working at 65 or to work past 65. Over the last three decades, the share of German workers leaving the labour market after the mandatory retirement age of 65 has increased markedly. This trend towards working longer has changed particularly among the low educated workforce which in previous decades traditionally has exhibited a tendency to retire early. In contrast to high-skilled workers, the decision to work longer among low-educated workers is mainly driven by financial need (and is usually not in line with their desire or their ability to work for longer). Our findings suggest an increase in social inequality in retirement decisions as a result of the policy shift towards activation. We conclude by arguing for a more fine-grained understanding of the reasons why people work longer. Such research would provide valuable insights into how to design future labour market and pension reforms preventing a rise in

  11. No Correlation Between Work-Hours and Operative Volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Jane; Sillesen, Martin; Beier-Holgersen, Randi

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Since 2003, United States residents have been limited to an 80-hour workweek. This has prompted concerns of reduced educational quality, especially inadequate operating exposure. In contrast, the Danish surgical specialty-training program mandates a cap on working hours of 37 per week....... We hypothesize that there is no direct correlation between work-hours and operative volume achieved during surgical residency. To test the hypothesis, we compare Danish and US operative volumes achieved during surgical residency training. DESIGN: Retrospective comparative study. PARTICIPANTS...... find no difference in overall surgical volumes between Danes and US residents during their surgical training. When time in training was accounted for, differences between weekly surgical volumes achieved were minor, indicating a lack of direct correlation between weekly work-hours and operative volumes...

  12. The association between psychosocial work environment, attitudes towards older workers (ageism) and planned retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Sannie; Rugulies, Reiner; Løngaard, Katja; Borg, Vilhelm; Thielen, Karsten; Bjorner, Jakob Bue

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between psychosocial factors (in particular ageism) at the workplace and older workers' retirement plans, while taking health and workability of the employee into account. In the fall and winter of 2008, self-report data on work environment, health, workability and retirement plans were collected in a representative national sample (n = 3,122) of Danish employees 50 years or older. Ordinal logistic regression was used to analyse associations in a cross-sectional design. Predictor variables were standardized. In analyses adjusted for socio-demography, socio-economy, health, workability and work performance, 4 out of 6 examined psychosocial factors (ageism, lack of recognition, lack of development possibilities, lack of predictability) were significantly associated with plans of early retirement (OR: 1.10-1.13). Stratified on gender, three psychosocial factors (ageism, lack of recognition, lack of development possibilities) remained significant for men (OR: 1.15-1.25) and none for women. In particular was the association between retirement plans and ageism highly significant in the male subgroup, but no association was found in the female subgroup. Ageism, lack of recognition and lack of development possibilities are associated with older male workers' retirement plans in our analyses. Workability has the strongest association with retirement plans for both genders.

  13. Job satisfaction, work environment and successful ageing: Determinants of delaying retirement among acute care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargo-Sugleris, Michele; Robbins, Wendie; Lane, Christianne Joy; Phillips, Linda R

    2017-11-17

    To determine the relationships between job satisfaction, work environment and successful ageing and how these factors relate to Registered Nurses' intent to retire. Although little studied, retention of older nurses by delaying early retirement, before age 65, is an important topic for research. Qualitative and quantitative studies have indicated that job satisfaction work environment and successful ageing are key motivators in acute care Registered Nurses retention and/or delaying retirement. This study was designed to provide information to administrators and policy makers about retaining older, experienced RNs longer and more productively. This was a correlational, descriptive, cross-sectional study. An online survey of acute care Registered Nurses (N = 2,789) aged 40 years or older working in Florida was conducted from September - October 2013. Participants completed items related to job satisfaction, work environment, successful ageing and individual characteristics. Hypotheses derived from the modified Ellenbecker's Job Retention Model were tested using regression analysis. Job satisfaction scores were high. Highest satisfaction was with scheduling issues and co-workers; lowest with advancement opportunities. Successful ageing scores were also high with 81% reporting excellent or good health. Work environment explained 55% of the variance in job satisfaction. Years to retirement were significantly associated with successful ageing (p age (p ageing are important areas that have an impact on job satisfaction and delay of retirement in older nurses and further studies in these areas are warranted to expand on this knowledge. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The contribution from psychological, social, and organizational work factors to risk of disability retirement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knardahl, Stein; Johannessen, Håkon A.; Sterud, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Background: Previous studies indicate that psychological, social, and organizational factors at work contribute to health, motivation, absence from work, and functional ability. The objective of the study was to assess the current state of knowledge of the contribution of psychological, social...... social support from ones superior. Conclusions: Psychological and organizational factors at work contribute to disability retirement with the most robust evidence for the role of work control. We recommend the measurement of specific exposure factors in future studies......., and organizational factors to disability retirement by a systematic review and meta-analyses. Methods: Data sources: A systematic literature search for studies of retirement due to disability in Medline, Embase, and PsychINFO was performed. Reference lists of relevant articles were hand-searched for additional...

  15. Working Hours, Promotion and the Gender Gap in the Workplace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kato, Takao; Owan, Hideo; Ogawa, Hiromasa

    This paper presents a novel model of promotion within the firm which sheds new light on the interplay between working hours and the odds of subsequent promotion. The model's key feature is the coexistence of two different sources of asymmetric information: (i) the worker's cost of long working ho...

  16. Telework: Timesaving or Timeconsuming? An Investigation into Actual Working Hours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, P.; Wetzels, C.; Tijdens, K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to clarify the relationship between telework and the actual time employees put into their jobs. One of the reported threats to teleworkers' personal lives is that in order to finish their work, they not only use up saved commuting time, but also part of their non-working hours, even

  17. Work patterns, sleeping hours and excess weight in commercial drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, M K; Hege, A; Perko, M; Sönmez, S; Apostolopoulos, Y

    2015-12-01

    Work and sleep patterns for commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers often include long working hours, shift work and diminished sleep duration and quality, which have been linked to overweight, obesity and other problems. To explore possible connections between work, sleep and obesity among CMV drivers. Survey and anthropometric data were collected from male long-haul CMV drivers in central North Carolina, USA, over a period of 6 months. Drivers' body mass index (BMI) was used as a measure of total body obesity and sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) as a measure of central adiposity. Among the 260 study subjects, mean BMI was 33.1 (64% were obese or morbidly obese) and mean SAD was 32.3cm, classifying 89% of drivers as being at high or very high cardiometabolic risk. About 83% of drivers worked an irregular daily schedule, 64% worked irregular total daily hours, 32% worked irregular days of the week and 46% reported getting sleep during work nights. Significant predictors of BMI included the number of hours worked daily (P sleep quality included the extent of shift work (P sleep duration (P sleep configurations appear to affect the weight status of CMV drivers. Shift work and sleep duration are both associated with the weight status of CMV drivers, and both appear to function as indicators of their sleep quality. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Administrative Circular No. 23 (Rev. 4) - Special working hours

    CERN Multimedia

    Department Head Office - HR Department

    2016-01-01

    Administrative Circular No. 23 (Rev. 4) entitled "Special working hours", approved by the Director-General following discussion in the Standing Concertation Committee meeting on 22 March 2016, will be available on 1st September 2016 via the following link: https://cds.cern.ch/record/2208539.   This revised circular cancels and replaces Administrative Circular No. 23 (Rev. 3) also entitled "Special working hours" of January 2013. This document contains modifications to reflect the new career structure and ensuring the provision consistent with practice that compensation or remuneration of special working hours performed remotely is possible only in case of emergency.   This circular will enter into force on 1st September 2016.

  19. Long working hours as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Nyberg, Solja T.; Batty, G. David

    2017-01-01

    .003). There was no significant heterogeneity between the cohort-specific effect estimates (I2=0%, P = 0.66) and the finding remained after excluding participants with coronary heart disease or stroke at baseline or during the follow-up (N= 2006, hazard ratio= 1.36, 95% CI= 1.05-1.76, P = 0.0180). Adjustment for potential...... confounding factors, such as obesity, risky alcohol use and high blood pressure, had little impact on this association. Conclusion Individuals who worked long hours were more likely to develop atrial fibrillation than those working standard hours....

  20. Information meeting on the new provisions for working hours

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    Monday 23 June 2008 at 14:00, Council Chamber (503/1-001) At the June 2008 Finance Committee and Council meetings, the Management will submit proposals to modify Chapter III, Section 1 of the Staff Rules and Regulations on Working Hours. These provisions will touch upon areas including compensation during the annual closure, periods of stand-by duty, plus compensation and eligibility for special working hours. A general information meeting, at which E. Chiaveri, Head of HR Department, will present the new policy, will be held on Monday 23 June at 14:00 in the Council Chamber. HR Department

  1. Work Hours, Social Value of Leisure and Globalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen Drud; Nielsen, Jørgen Ulff-Møller; Montagna, Catia

    We examine how openness interacts with the coordination of consumption-leisure decisions in determining the equilibrium working hours and wage rate when there are leisure externalities (e.g., due to social interactions). The latter are modelled by allowing a worker's marginal utility of leisure t...

  2. Work Hours, Social Value of Leisure and Globalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen Drud; Molana, Hassan; Montagna, Catia

    2010-01-01

    We examine how openness interacts with the coordination of consumption-leisure decisions in determining the equilibrium working hours and wage rate when there are leisure externalities (e.g., due to social interactions). The latter are modelled by allowing a worker's marginal utility of leisure t...

  3. Work hours, social value of leisure and globalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen Drud; Molana, Hassan; Montagna, Catia

    2012-01-01

    We examine how openness interacts with the coordination of consumption-leisure decisions in determining the equilibrium working hours and wage rate when there are leisure externalities (e.g., due to social interactions). The latter are modelled by allowing a worker’s marginal utility of leisure t...

  4. Why older workers work beyond the retirement age: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranu Sewdas

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of the present study were to: 1 gain insight into reasons for working beyond the statutory retirement age from older workers’ perspectives, and 2 explore how the domains of the research framework Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation (STREAM can be applied to working beyond retirement age. Methods A qualitative research design included individual interviews (n = 15 and three focus groups (n = 18 participants conducted with older workers aged 65 years and older continuing in a paid job or self-employment. Interview participants were recruited from an existing STREAM cohort study. Focus group participants were recruited from companies and employment agencies. The data were subjected to thematic analysis. Results The most important motives for working beyond retirement age were maintaining daily routines and financial benefit. Good health and flexible work arrangements were mentioned as important preconditions. The themes emerging from the categorization of the motives and preconditions corresponded to the domains of health, work characteristics, skills and knowledge, and social and financial factors from the STREAM research framework. However, our analysis revealed one additional theme—purpose in life. Conclusion This study offers important new insights into the various preconditions and motives that influence working beyond retirement age. In addition, the five domains of the STREAM research framework, including the additional domain of ‘purpose in life’, seem to be applicable to working beyond retirement age. This knowledge contributes to the development of work-related interventions that enhance older workers’ motivation to prolong their working lives.

  5. Job demands and resources and their associations with early retirement intentions through recovery need and work enjoyment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert Schreurs

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Job characteristics play a major role in shaping employees’ early retirement decisions.Research purpose: The objective of this study was to examine the mechanisms through which job characteristics associate with early retirement intention, using the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R model as a theoretical framework.Motivation of the study: Early retirement presents a threat to existing health and pension systems, and to organisational functioning. Therefore, it is important to examine how workrelated factors contribute to early retirement decisions.Research design, approach and method: Two parallel processes were theorised to shape early retirement intention: a health impairment process (i.e. job demands → recovery need → early retirement intention and a motivational process (i.e. job resources → work enjoyment → early retirement intention. Survey data were collected from a heterogeneous sample of 1812 older workers (age > 45. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypotheses.Main findings: Job demands and job resources were both associated with work enjoyment, which was associated with early retirement intention. Recovery need did not add to the prediction of early retirement intention.Practical/managerial implications: To retain older workers, companies should promote work conditions and practices that keep older workers motivated. Good health may be a necessary condition for retaining older workers, but it does not appear to be a sufficient one.Contribution/value-add: The results suggest that – for early retirement intention – the motivational process is more prominent than the health impairment process.

  6. Depressed mood in the working population: associations with work schedules and working hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driesen, Karolien; Jansen, Nicole W H; Kant, Ijmert; Mohren, Danielle C L; van Amelsvoort, Ludovic G P M

    2010-07-01

    The impact of working time arrangements (WTA) on health has been studied extensively. Still, little is known about the interrelation between work schedules, working hours, and depressed mood. For work schedules, the underlying assumptions regarding depressed mood refer to a disturbance of social and biological rhythms, whereas for working hours, the assumptions relate to workload and work capacity. Conversely, depressed mood may urge an employee to adjust his/her work schedule and/or number of working hours/week (h/wk). The aim of this study was to assess the association between work schedule and working hours with depressed mood. Using baseline data from the Maastricht Cohort Study, depressed mood in day work was compared with depressed mood in different shiftwork schedules (n = 8843). Within day work, several categories of working h/wk were studied in association with depressed mood (n = 7217). The association between depressed mood and several aspects of overtime was assessed separately. Depressed mood was measured with a dichotomous item: "Did you feel down every day over the last two weeks?" Separate logistic regression analyses were conducted for men and women, with adjustments for potential confounders. The odds ratio (OR) for depressed mood was greater for men involved in shiftwork than for men only involved in day work (three-shift OR = 2.05 [95% confidence interval, CI 1.52-2.77]; five-shift OR = 1.34 [95% CI 1.00-1.80]; irregular-shift OR = 1.79 [95% CI 1.27-2.53]). In female employees, five-shift work was associated with a higher prevalence of depressed mood (OR = 5.96 [95% CI 2.83-12.56]). Regarding the number of working h/wk, men working working 36-40 h/wk (OR = 2.73 [95% CI 1.35-5.52]). After conducting trend analyses, a significant decreasing trend was found in men, whereas an increasing trend was found in women working a high number of hours. Furthermore, a dose-response relationship was present in men regarding the number of overtime h/wk. This

  7. Psychological, social, and mechanical work exposures and disability retirement: a prospective registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emberland, Jan S; Nielsen, Morten Birkeland; Knardahl, Stein

    2017-01-10

    Relations between several occupational psychological and social factors and disability retirement remain largely unexplored. Knowledge of which specific aspects of the work environment that affect risk of disability is a prerequisite for the success of organizational interventions aiming to prevent premature work force exit. The objective of the present study was to determine contributions to registered disability retirement by a broad range of psychological and social work exposures while taking into account effects of mechanical exposure. Written consent was obtained from 13 012 employees (96 organizations) representing a wide range of occupations, to link their survey responses to data from the Norwegian national registry of disability compensation. Median follow-up time was 5.8 years. To determine effects of self-reported work exposures on risk of disability retirement hazard ratios (HR) and 99% confidence intervals (99% CI) were calculated with Cox regression analysis. Effects of sex, age group, skill level, sickness absence in the last three years, and work exposures estimated to be confounders were accounted for. Post hoc stratification by sex was conducted to explore if identified predictors affected risk of disability retirement differently in men compared to women. Contributors to higher risk of disability retirement were "role conflict" (high level HR 1.55 99% CI 1.07 to 2.24) and "physical workload" (high level HR 1.93 99% CI 1.39 to 2.68). Contributors to lower risk of disability retirement were "positive challenge" (high level HR 0.56 99% CI 0.34 to 0.93), "fair leadership" (high level HR 0.56 99% CI 0.39 to 0.81), and "control over work intensity" (high level HR 0.62, 99% CI 0.47 to 0.82). Direction of effects was not dependent on sex in any of the five identified predictors. Several specific psychological and social work factors are independent contributors to risk of disability retirement. In order to prevent premature work force exit workplace

  8. Psychological, social, and mechanical work exposures and disability retirement: a prospective registry study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan S. Emberland

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relations between several occupational psychological and social factors and disability retirement remain largely unexplored. Knowledge of which specific aspects of the work environment that affect risk of disability is a prerequisite for the success of organizational interventions aiming to prevent premature work force exit. The objective of the present study was to determine contributions to registered disability retirement by a broad range of psychological and social work exposures while taking into account effects of mechanical exposure. Methods Written consent was obtained from 13 012 employees (96 organizations representing a wide range of occupations, to link their survey responses to data from the Norwegian national registry of disability compensation. Median follow-up time was 5.8 years. To determine effects of self-reported work exposures on risk of disability retirement hazard ratios (HR and 99% confidence intervals (99% CI were calculated with Cox regression analysis. Effects of sex, age group, skill level, sickness absence in the last three years, and work exposures estimated to be confounders were accounted for. Post hoc stratification by sex was conducted to explore if identified predictors affected risk of disability retirement differently in men compared to women. Results Contributors to higher risk of disability retirement were “role conflict” (high level HR 1.55 99% CI 1.07 to 2.24 and “physical workload” (high level HR 1.93 99% CI 1.39 to 2.68. Contributors to lower risk of disability retirement were “positive challenge” (high level HR 0.56 99% CI 0.34 to 0.93, “fair leadership” (high level HR 0.56 99% CI 0.39 to 0.81, and “control over work intensity” (high level HR 0.62, 99% CI 0.47 to 0.82. Direction of effects was not dependent on sex in any of the five identified predictors. Conclusions Several specific psychological and social work factors are independent contributors to risk of

  9. Future Work and Retirement Needs: Policy Experts and Baby Boomers Express Their Views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Rusinowitz, Lori; Wilson, Laura B.; Marks, Lori N.; Krach, Constance A.; Welch, Catherine

    1998-01-01

    Interviews conducted in 1994 with policy experts and researchers and from focus groups of adults aged 40-48 regarding the future work and retirement needs of baby boomers found that many adults are anxious but unable to plan for a financially secure future. (Author/JOW)

  10. Working Beyond Retirement in Europe. An Investigation of Individual and Societal Determinants Using SHARE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dingemans, E.; Henkens, K.; van Solinge, H.

    2016-01-01

    One of the solutions that could be used to resource the needs of an aging population is the encouragement of individuals to extend their working lives beyond retirement, often referred to as ‘bridge’ employment. Although previous studies provide important insights on the relationship between

  11. Long Working Hours and Subsequent Use of Psychotropic Medicine: A Study Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertsen, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Background Mental ill health is the most frequent cause of long-term sickness absence and disability retirement in Denmark. Some instances of mental ill health might be due to long working hours. A recent large cross-sectional study of a general working population in Norway found that not only “very much overtime”, but also “moderate overtime” (41-48 work hours/week) was significantly associated with increased levels of both anxiety and depression. These findings have not been sufficiently confirmed in longitudinal studies. Objective The objective of the study is to give a detailed plan for a research project aimed at investigating the possibility of a prospective association between weekly working hours and use of psychotropic medicine in the general working population of Denmark. Methods People from the general working population of Denmark have been surveyed, at various occasions in the time period 1995-2010, and interviewed about their work environment. The present study will link interview data from these surveys to national registers covering all inhabitants of Denmark. The participants will be followed for the first occurrence of redeemed prescriptions for psychotropic medicine. Poisson regression will be used to analyze incidence rates as a function of weekly working hours (32-40; 41-48; > 48 hours/week). The analyses will be controlled for gender, age, sample, shift work, and socioeconomic status. According to our feasibility studies, the statistical power is sufficient and the exposure is stable enough to make the study worth the while. Results The publication of the present study protocol ends the design phase of the project. In the next phase, the questionnaire data will be forwarded to Statistics Denmark where they will be linked to data on deaths, migrations, socioeconomic status, and redeemed prescriptions for psychotropic medication. We expect the analysis to be completed by the end of 2014 and the results to be published mid 2015

  12. Keep Up the Good Work! Age-Moderated Mediation Model on Intention to Retire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Dordoni

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In European nations, the aging of the workforce is a major issue which is increasingly addressed both in national and organizational policies in order to sustain older workers' employability and to encourage longer working lives. Particularly older workers' employability can be viewed an important issue as this has the potential to motivate them for their work and change their intention to retire. Based on lifespan development theories and Van der Heijden's ‘employability enhancement model’, this paper develops and tests an age-moderated mediation model (which refers to the processes that we want to test in this model, linking older workers' (55 years old and over perceptions of job support for learning (job-related factor and perceptions of negative age stereotypes on productivity (organizational factor, on the one hand, and their intention to retire, on the other hand, via their participation in employability enhancing activities, being the mediator in our model. A total of 2,082 workers aged 55 years and above were included in the analyses. Results revealed that the two proposed relationships between the predictors and intention to retire were mediated by participation in employability enhancing activities, reflecting two mechanisms through which work context affects intention to retire (namely ‘a gain spiral and a loss spiral’. Multi-Group SEM analyses, distinguishing between two age groups (55–60 and 61–65 years old, revealed different paths for the two distinguished groups of older workers. Employability mediated the relationship between perceptions of job support for learning and intention to retire in both age groups, whereas it only mediated the relationship between perceptions of negative age stereotypes and intention to retire in the 55–60 group. From our empirical study, we may conclude that employability is an important factor in the light of older workers' intention to retire. In order to motivate this category of

  13. Health and psychosocial effects of flexible working hours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Janssen

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine whether any impairments in health and social lives can be found under different kinds of flexible working hours, and whether such effects are related to specific characteristics of these working hours. METHODS: Two studies - a company based survey (N=660 and an internet survey (N=528 - have been conducted. The first one was a questionnaire study (paper and pencil on employees working under some 'typical' kinds of different flexible working time arrangements in different companies and different occupational fields (health care, manufacturing, retail, administration, call centres. The second study was an internet-based survey, using an adaptation of the questionnaire from the first study. RESULTS: The results of both studies consistently show that high variability of working hours is associated with increased impairments in health and well-being and this is especially true if this variability is company controlled. These effects are less pronounced if variability is self-controlled; however, autonomy does not compensate the effects of variability. CONCLUSIONS: Recommendations for an appropriate design of flexible working hours should be developed in order to minimize any impairing effects on health and psychosocial well-being; these recommendations should include - besides allowing for discretion in controlling one's (flexible working hours - that variability in flexible working hours should be kept low (or at least moderate, even if this variability is self-controlled.OBJETIVO: Investigar se ocorre prejuízo à saúde e à vida social com diferentes tipos de horas de trabalho flexíveis e se há relação entre estes efeitos e características específicas das horas de trabalho. MÉTODOS: Foram realizados dois estudos, uma pesquisa em uma empresa (N=660 e outra pela Internet (N=528. O primeiro estudo consistiu de um questionário (papel e lápis aplicado a funcionários sujeitos a diferentes ajustes "típicos" de horas de

  14. Cost and workforce implications of subjecting all physicians to aviation industry work-hour restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payette, Michael; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Weeks, William B

    2009-06-01

    Efforts to improve patient safety have attempted to incorporate aviation industry safety standards. We sought to evaluate the cost and workforce implications of applying aviation duty-hour restrictions to the entire practicing physician workforce. The work hours and personnel deficit for United States residents and practicing physicians that would be created by the adoption of aviation standards were calculated. Application of aviation standards to the resident workforce creates an estimated annual cost of $6.5 billion, requiring a 174% increase in the number of residents to meet the deficit. Its application to practicing physicians creates an additional annual cost of $80.4 billion, requiring a 71% increase in the physician workforce. Adding in the aviation industry's mandatory retirement age (65 years) increases annual costs by $10.5 billion. The cost per life-year saved would be $1,035,227. Application of aviation duty-hour restrictions to the United States health care system would be prohibitively costly. Alternate approaches for improving patient safety are warranted.

  15. Work and retirement among a cohort of older men in the United States, 1966-1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, M D; Grady, W R

    1990-08-01

    Multivariate increment-decrement working life tables are estimated for a cohort of older men in the United States for the period 1966-1983. The approach taken allows multiple processes to be simultaneously incorporated into a single model, resulting in a more realistic portrayal of a cohort's late-life labor force behavior. In addition, because the life table model is developed from multivariate hazard equations, we identify the effects of sociodemographic characteristics on the potentially complex process by which the labor force career is ended. In contrast to the assumed homogeneity of previous working life table analyses, the present study shows marked differences in labor force mobility and working and nonworking life expectancy according to occupation, class of worker, education, race, and marital status. We briefly discuss the implications of these findings for inequities of access to retirement, private and public pension consumption, and future changes in the retirement process.

  16. Continuing connections: the experiences of retired and senior working nurse mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Glenda; Mohan, Shantala; Jackson, Debra; Vickers, Margaret H; Wilkes, Lesley

    2010-12-01

    This paper reports the benefits and challenges of a mentoring programme through which retired and senior nurses continued to support and nurture nurses and midwives currently working in the health system. Nursing has an ageing workforce and faces significant loss of expertise because of retirements. Previously, mentoring programmes have been instituted in a range of nursing contexts and they have been a retention strategy for older nurses and midwives. Mentors and their mentees worked together towards mutually agreed on professional and personal goals. They were asked to meet or speak together a minimum of twice per month for at least six months. As part of a collective case study, 15 mentoring dyads were established. Participants and mentors took part in qualitative, semi-structured interviews about their perceptions and experiences of the mentoring programme. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed and analysed thematically. Mentors reported the mentoring experience to be rewarding experience that enabled them to re-connect with nursing-related activities and brought new challenges in retirement. They perceived the mentees were visibly helped by their support and influence. The mentors studied reinforced a positive self-concept as nurses and midwives in their mentees and assisted their development. Retired nurses and midwives in particular may have several characteristics that make them effective mentors. Potential benefits are demonstrated for nurses and midwives vulnerable to workplace adversity, especially those new to Australia who may have limited professional and social networks. For health organisations, mentoring programmes may be an innovative method of retention that engages both mid-career nurses and midwives and those recently retired. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. A review of occupational therapy's contribution to and involvement in the work-to-retirement transition process: An Australian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagers, Jackie; Franklin, Richard C; Broome, Kieran; Yau, Matthew K

    2016-08-01

    Retirement from paid work is an occupational transition, which can have a profound impact on a person's life. This review explored occupational therapy's contribution to and involvement in the work-to-retirement transition process in Australia. An integrative literature review was undertaken using seven article repository databases. PRISMA guidelines informed searches. Articles were included if participants were Australian; researchers' discussed retirement from an occupational perspective or the scope of practice of occupational therapists; and publication was from 1994 to June 2015 in a peer-reviewed journal. Articles were critically appraised and thematic analysis explored: (i) occupational perspective, (ii) occupational therapy scope of practice, (iii) theory and (iv) retirement definitions. Eight articles met the review criteria. Three occupational perspective themes were identified: retirement intention influences, retirement preparation and retirement roles and activities. No articles on the current scope of practice of occupational therapy were found. Three articles discussed potential occupational therapy approaches. Three themes on what retirement is were identified: complete cessation, gradual transition and intermittent worker. Four theory themes were identified: occupational therapy, ageing, identity and work. Occupational therapy has the potential to be involved in improving health and well-being for people in the work-to-retirement transition process. It is suggested that future research explore not only people's experiences but also the approaches of occupational therapy in assisting people through this occupational transition. The use of theory to guide Australian occupational therapy practice on retirement should also be explored. The use of consistent retirement definitions will assist in understanding research. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  18. Long Working Hours in Korea: Based on the 2014 Korean Working Conditions Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungsun Park

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Long working hours adversely affect worker safety and health. In 2004, Korea passed legislation that limited the work week to 40 hours, in an effort to improve quality-of-life and increase business competitiveness. This regulation was implemented in stages, first for large businesses and then for small businesses, from 2004 to 2011. We previously reported that average weekly working hours decreased from 2006 to 2010, based on the Korean Working Conditions Survey. Methods: In the present study, we examine whether average weekly working hours continued to decrease in 2014 based on the 2014 Korean Working Conditions Survey. Results: The results show that average weekly working hours among all groups of workers decreased in 2014 relative to previous years; however, self-employed individuals and employers (who are not covered by the new legislation in the specific service sectors worked > 60 h/wk in 2014. Conclusion: The Korean government should prohibit employees from working excessive hours and should also attempt to achieve social and public consensus regarding work time reduction to improve the safety, health, and quality-of-life of all citizens, including those who are employers and self-employed. Keywords: employee, employer, Korea, self-employed, working hours

  19. Factors associated with the self-perceived ability of nursing staff to remain working until retirement: a questionnaire survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurits, E.E.M.; de Veer, A.J.E.; van der Hoek, L.S.; Francke, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is important to learn how employers in European countries can prevent nursing staff from changing occupation or taking early retirement in order to counteract expected nursing shortages. However, to date research on nursing staff's ability to remain working until retirement age has

  20. Factors associated with the self-perceived ability of nursing staff to remain working until retirement: a questionnaire survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurits, E.E.M.; Veer, A.J.E. de; Hoek, L.S. van der; Francke, A.F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is important to learn how employers in European countries can prevent nursing staff from changing occupation or taking early retirement in order to counteract expected nursing shortages. However, to date research on nursing staff’s ability to remain working until retirement age has

  1. The Impact of Working Beyond Traditional Retirement Ages on Mental Health: Implications for Public Health and Welfare Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will Maimaris

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many people now want or need to work longer due to increased life expectancy. In some countries statutory retirement ages deny older people free access to the labour market. It has been hypothesised that exclusion from employment may have negative effects on the mental health of older people. The global financial crisis has forced some countries to propose increasing the retirement age but the implications of this for population health are unclear. This paper reviews the evidence for the mental health impacts of working beyond retirement, and discusses the implications for future public health and welfare policy. Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted of studies that examined the effect of working or volunteering beyond traditional retirement ages on mental health outcomes. Results: Of the ten studies that met the inclusion criteria, none showed a negative impact of working beyond retirement age on mental health. Four studies showed that post-retirement working has a statistically significant positive effect on a range of mental health outcomes. Discussion: This review suggests that working beyond traditional retirement ages may be beneficial for mental health in some populations. The mechanisms by which this occurs are complex but are likely to be mediated by the maintenance of productive societal roles, continued income and social support. The benefits of post-retirement employment are unlikely to be universal as such factors will have varying effects depending on individual lifestyle, self-esteem and socioeconomic status. Although our research shows that allowing older people free access to the employment market may have important health benefits, flexible retirement strategies are needed to ensure that any national policy to increase statutory retirement age does not increase health and social inequalities in the elderly.

  2. The Risk of Developing Diabetes in Association With Long Working Hours Differs by Shift Work Schedules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Bannai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The impact of long working hours on diabetes is controversial; however, shift work is known to increase the risk of diabetes. This study aimed to investigate the association between long working hours and diabetes among civil servants in Japan separately by shift work schedules. Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted from April 2003 to March 2009. A total of 3195 men aged ≥35 years who underwent an annual health checkup at baseline were analyzed by shift work schedules (2371 nonshift workers and 824 shift workers. Self-reported working hours were categorized as 35–44 and ≥45 hours per week. The incidence of diabetes was confirmed by fasting plasma glucose concentration ≥126 mg/dL and/or selfreported medical diagnosis of diabetes at the annual checkup. A Cox proportional model was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for developing diabetes associated with long working hours. Results: The median follow-up period of non-shift and shift workers was 5.0 and 4.9 years, respectively. During this period, 138 non-shift workers and 46 shift workers developed diabetes. A decreased HR was found among nonshift workers working ≥45 hours per week (HR 0.84; 95% CI, 0.57–1.24; however, shift workers working ≥45 hours per week had a significantly increased risk of diabetes (HR 2.43; 95% CI, 1.21–5.10 compared with those working 35–44 hours per week. An analysis restricted to non-clerical workers also showed similar results. Conclusions: The risk of diabetes associated with long working hours differed by shift work schedules.

  3. The Risk of Developing Diabetes in Association With Long Working Hours Differs by Shift Work Schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannai, Akira; Yoshioka, Eiji; Saijo, Yasuaki; Sasaki, Sachiko; Kishi, Reiko; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2016-09-05

    The impact of long working hours on diabetes is controversial; however, shift work is known to increase the risk of diabetes. This study aimed to investigate the association between long working hours and diabetes among civil servants in Japan separately by shift work schedules. A prospective cohort study was conducted from April 2003 to March 2009. A total of 3195 men aged ≥35 years who underwent an annual health checkup at baseline were analyzed by shift work schedules (2371 non-shift workers and 824 shift workers). Self-reported working hours were categorized as 35-44 and ≥45 hours per week. The incidence of diabetes was confirmed by fasting plasma glucose concentration ≥126 mg/dL and/or self-reported medical diagnosis of diabetes at the annual checkup. A Cox proportional model was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for developing diabetes associated with long working hours. The median follow-up period of non-shift and shift workers was 5.0 and 4.9 years, respectively. During this period, 138 non-shift workers and 46 shift workers developed diabetes. A decreased HR was found among non-shift workers working ≥45 hours per week (HR 0.84; 95% CI, 0.57-1.24); however, shift workers working ≥45 hours per week had a significantly increased risk of diabetes (HR 2.43; 95% CI, 1.21-5.10) compared with those working 35-44 hours per week. An analysis restricted to non-clerical workers also showed similar results. The risk of diabetes associated with long working hours differed by shift work schedules.

  4. Health Of Americans Who Must Work Longer To Reach Social Security Retirement Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, HwaJung; Schoeni, Robert F

    2017-10-01

    To receive full Social Security benefits, Americans born after 1937 must claim those benefits at an older age than earlier birth cohorts. Additionally, proposals to improve the fiscal position of Social Security typically include increasing the age at which workers can receive full benefits. Birth cohorts required to work longer are in worse health at ages 49-60, based on multiple measures of morbidity, than cohorts who could retire earlier. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  5. How many hours do you usually work? An analysis of the working hours questions in 26 large-scale surveys in 6 countries and the European Union.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dragstra, A.; Tijdens, K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews how working hours are asked in 26 large-scale surveys in 6 countries plus the European Union. Four dimensions of working time were investigated, notably number of working hours, timing of work, predictability and control over hours, and commuting time. Although almost all

  6. How many hours do you usually work? An analysis of the working hours questions in 26 large-scale surveys in six countries and the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijdens, K.; Dragstra, A.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews how working hours are asked for in 26 large-scale surveys in six countries plus the European Union. Four dimensions of working time were investigated, notably number of working hours, timing of work, predictability and control over hours, and commuting time. Although almost all

  7. Hour-glass ceilings: Work-hour thresholds, gendered health inequities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Huong; Strazdins, Lyndall; Welsh, Jennifer

    2017-03-01

    Long workhours erode health, which the setting of maximum weekly hours aims to avert. This 48-h limit, and the evidence base to support it, has evolved from a workforce that was largely male, whose time in the labour force was enabled by women's domestic work and care giving. The gender composition of the workforce has now changed, and many women (as well as some men) combine care-giving with paid work, a change viewed as fundamental for gender equality. However, it raises questions on the suitability of the work time limit and the extent it is protective of health. We estimate workhour-mental health thresholds, testing if they vary for men and women due to gendered workloads and constraints on and off the job. Using six waves of data from a nationally representative sample of Australian adults (24-65 years), surveyed in the Household Income Labour Dynamics of Australia Survey (N = 3828 men; 4062 women), our study uses a longitudinal, simultaneous equation approach to address endogeneity. Averaging over the sample, we find an overall threshold of 39 h per week beyond which mental health declines. Separate curves then estimate thresholds for men and women, by high or low care and domestic time constraints, using stratified and pooled samples. We find gendered workhour-health limits (43.5 for men, 38 for women) which widen further once differences in resources on and off the job are considered. Only when time is 'unencumbered' and similar time constraints and contexts are assumed, do gender gaps narrow and thresholds approximate the 48-h limit. Our study reveals limits to contemporary workhour regulation which may be systematically disadvantaging women's health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Long working hours in Korea: results of the 2010 Working Conditions Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungsun; Kwon, Oh Jun; Kim, Yangho

    2012-01-01

    Long working hours adversely affect workers' safety and health. In 2004, Korea passed legislation limiting the working week to 40 h, to improve quality-of-life and to increase business competitiveness. In the present study, we explored the characteristics of work in Korea and compared our data of the second Korean Working Conditions Survey (KWCS) with those of the first KWCS. We found that the average number of hours worked weekly has been reduced but the proportions of workers who work for more than 48 h per week has increased over the 4 yr between the two Korean surveys in all categories studied (male, female, employee, self-employed, and employer). We also found that self-employed and employers work much longer hours than do employees, who are protected by the Labor Standards Act. This was particularly true in the accommodation and food service sectors. In conclusion, Korean workers work longer than do workers of EU countries. The use of average figures masks differences in the numbers of working hours among those engaged in various types of employment, or in certain work sectors. Therefore, the Korean government should not simply monitor reductions in average weekly working hours, but should identify employees working for over 60 h weekly, and reduce their working time.

  9. Globalization and working time: Work-place hours and flexibility in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgoon, B.; Raess, D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines how economic globalization affects work-place arrangements regulating working time in industrialized countries. Exposure to foreign direct investment and trade can have off-setting effects for work-place bargaining over standard hours and work-time flexibilization, and can be

  10. Long Working Hours and Work-related Cerebro-cardiovascular Disease in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHUNG, Yun Kyung; KWON, Young-jun

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine a good discriminatory cutoff for long working hours as a surrogate of chronic overload at work, which is associated with the approval of workers’ compensation claims for work-related cerebro-cardiovascular disease (WR-CVD) in Korea. We evaluated weekly working hours for four weeks prior to the onset of disease for all manufacturing industry claimants (N=319) of WR-CVD in 2010. The discrimination of long working hours in predicting approval of worker’s compensation pertaining to WR-CVD was compared across cases. The cutoff was calculated with sensitivity, specificity, and the area under the curve with 95% CI using the receiver operating curve (ROC) method. The cutoff point was thus calculated to be 60.75 h (AUC=0.89, 95% CI [0.84–0.93]), showing a sensitivity value of 65% and specificity of 94%. This is the first study to report that long working hours could be a predictor with good discrimination and high specificity of approval of WR-CVD cases. In Korea, long working hours and widespread chronic overload at work are recognized as a social problem. Our study results suggest an appropriate cutoff for working hours as an indicator of chronic overload for the purpose of approving claims of WR-CVD. Furthermore, these results could contribute to improving the consistency of evaluation. PMID:23892901

  11. Folding Proteins at 500 ns/hour with Work Queue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Wahid, Badi'; Yu, Li; Rajan, Dinesh; Feng, Haoyun; Darve, Eric; Thain, Douglas; Izaguirre, Jesús A

    2012-10-01

    Molecular modeling is a field that traditionally has large computational costs. Until recently, most simulation techniques relied on long trajectories, which inherently have poor scalability. A new class of methods is proposed that requires only a large number of short calculations, and for which minimal communication between computer nodes is required. We considered one of the more accurate variants called Accelerated Weighted Ensemble Dynamics (AWE) and for which distributed computing can be made efficient. We implemented AWE using the Work Queue framework for task management and applied it to an all atom protein model (Fip35 WW domain). We can run with excellent scalability by simultaneously utilizing heterogeneous resources from multiple computing platforms such as clouds (Amazon EC2, Microsoft Azure), dedicated clusters, grids, on multiple architectures (CPU/GPU, 32/64bit), and in a dynamic environment in which processes are regularly added or removed from the pool. This has allowed us to achieve an aggregate sampling rate of over 500 ns/hour. As a comparison, a single process typically achieves 0.1 ns/hour.

  12. The role of ability, motivation, and opportunity to work in the transition from work to early retirement - testing and optimizing the Early Retirement Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Wind, Astrid; Geuskens, Goedele A; Ybema, Jan Fekke; Bongers, Paulien M; van der Beek, Allard J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Determinants in the domains health, job characteristics, skills, and social and financial factors may influence early retirement through three central explanatory variables, namely, the ability...

  13. Thematic content analysis of work-family interactions: Retired cosmonauts’ reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Phyllis J.; Asmaro, Deyar; Suedfeld, Peter; Gushin, Vadim

    2012-12-01

    Anecdotal evidence and qualitative research attest to the importance of work-family interactions pre-, during and post-missions. This study uses thematic content analysis to quantify characteristics of work-family interactions and how these changed by stage of cosmonauts' career, identifying the effect of space career variables (e.g., time in space and station) on such interactions during and post-career. Using a thematic scoring scheme developed for this study, we coded work-family interactions identified from interviews with 20 retired male cosmonauts. The majority of work-family interactions were ones in which work overlapped into family life and work hindered or interfered with the family situation. The most common resolution was that family adjusted to work, and the mood or tone about this outcome was almost equally divided among negative, positive and neutral. Changes in work-family interactions and their resolution over the cosmonaut's life showed that the significant interactions were most evident during the cosmonaut career. Although the cosmonaut career has high work demands, it did adjust for family when the need arose. The Russian Space Agency (RKS) eased the impact of the periodic absences, especially through regular communication sessions. Positive work-family interactions, i.e., work or family helping the opposite role, were more likely for those who had been on ISS, not Mir, and for those whose last flight was after 2000. Our data reflect retired cosmonauts' recollections of work-family interactions during their career. Examples of work overlapping into family life and work viewed as interfering with family life were possibly more salient or better remembered than work or family helping the other role.

  14. Effects of the accreditation council for graduate medical education duty hour limits on sleep, work hours, and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrigan, Christopher P; Fahrenkopf, Amy M; Lewin, Daniel; Sharek, Paul J; Barger, Laura K; Eisner, Melanie; Edwards, Sarah; Chiang, Vincent W; Wiedermann, Bernhard L; Sectish, Theodore C

    2008-08-01

    To mitigate the risks of fatigue-related medical errors, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education introduced work hour limits for resident physicians in 2003. Our goal was to determine whether work hours, sleep, and safety changed after implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education standards. We conducted a prospective cohort study in which residents from 3 large pediatric training programs provided daily reports of work hours and sleep. In addition, they completed reports of near-miss and actual motor vehicle crashes, occupational exposures, self-reported medical errors, and ratings of educational experience. They were screened for depression and burnout. Concurrently, at 2 of the centers, data on medication errors were collected prospectively by using an established active surveillance method. A total of 220 residents provided 6007 daily reports of their work hours and sleep, and 16 158 medication orders were reviewed. Although scheduling changes were made in each program to accommodate the standards, 24- to 30-hour shifts remained common, and the frequency of residents' call remained largely unchanged. There was no change in residents' measured total work hours or sleep hours. There was no change in the overall rate of medication errors, and there was a borderline increase in the rate of resident physician ordering errors, from 1.06 to 1.38 errors per 100 patient-days. Rates of motor vehicle crashes, occupational exposures, depression, and self-reported medical errors and overall ratings of work and educational experiences did not change. The mean length of extended-duration (on-call) shifts decreased 2.7% to 28.5 hours, and rates of resident burnout decreased significantly (from 75.4% to 57.0%). Total hours of work and sleep did not change after implementation of the duty hour standards. Although fewer residents were burned out, rates of medication errors, resident depression, and resident injuries and educational

  15. Organizational change, psychosocial work environment, and non-disability early retirement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinegaard, Nina; Jensen, Johan Høy; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study examines the impact of organizational change and psychosocial work environment on non-disability early retirement among senior public service employees. Methods: In January and February 2011, Danish senior public service employees aged 58–64 years (N=3254) from the Capital...... Region of Denmark responded to a survey assessing psychosocial work environment (ie, social capital, organizational justice, and quality of management). Work-unit organizational changes (ie, change of management, merging, demerging, and relocation) were recorded from January 2009 to March 2011. Weekly...... did not (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.79–1.33). Work units with lower levels of social capital (HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.05–1.41), organizational justice, (HR 1.18, 95% CI 1.04–1.32), and quality of management (HR 1.14, 95% CI 1.02–1.25) increased rate of early retirement. Conclusion: Organizational change and poor...

  16. Hours of Work and Gender Identity : Does Part-time Work make the Family Happier?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booth, A.L.; van Ours, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Taking into account inter-dependence within the family, we investigate the relationship between part-time work and happiness.We use panel data from the new Household, Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia Survey.Our analysis indicates that part-time women are more satisfied with working hours than

  17. Impact of Development and Accommodation Practices on Older Workers' Job Characteristics, Prolonged Fatigue, Work Engagement, and Retirement Intentions Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stynen, Dave; Jansen, Nicole W H; Slangen, Jos J M; Kant, IJmert

    2016-11-01

    The impact of development and accommodation practices on older workers' retirement intentions was investigated in this prospective study, together with potential pathways and the role of career stage. A subsample of full-time, older workers (n = 678) from the Maastricht Cohort Study was followed-up for 2 years. Regression analysis was conducted for three age groups. Development practices related positively with later retirement intentions in workers aged 55 to 59 years. The accommodation practice of demotion related negatively with later retirement intentions in worker aged at least 60 years. Decision latitude and work engagement were found to link development and accommodation practices with later retirement intentions in particular in workers aged 55 to 59 years. It was indicated in this prospective study that development and accommodation practices may be useful for prolonging working careers.

  18. STRESSORS IN NURSING WITH DOUBLE OR MORE WORKING HOURS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlinir Bezerra de Lima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Resumo Objetivo: investigar os principais agentes estressores nos trabalhadores de enfermagem com dupla ou mais jornada de trabalho; verificar os principais sinais e sintomas indicadores de estresse. Métodos: estudo descritivo, com abordagem quantitativa. Desenvolvido em um hospital público da região metropolitana de Fortaleza-CE. A amostra constitui-se de 30 profissionais, sendo 46,7% auxiliares de enfermagem, 33,3% enfermeiros e 20% técnicos. A coleta ocorreu de novembro a dezembro de 2008, por meio de questionário semi-estruturado. Resultados: 93,3% dos profissionais são do sexo feminino na faixa etária de 31-40 anos. O estudo revelou vários fatores levando ao estresse, com destaque para insatisfação salarial (83%, falta de lazer (73% e sobrecarga de trabalho (60%, potencialmente prejudiciais à qualidade da assistência. Conclusão: percebeu-se a escassez de tempo que os trabalhadores de enfermagem dedicam ao descanso, ao lazer, ao convívio em família e à sua qualificação profissional. Descritores: Saúde mental, Estresse Ocupacional, Enfermagem, Ambiente de trabalho.   Abstract Objective: To investigate the main stressors in nursing workers double or more working hours, check the main signs and symptoms indicative of stress. Methods: A descriptive study with quantitative approach. It was developed in a public hospital in the metropolitan region of Fortaleza. The sample consisted of 30 professionals, and 46.7% nursing auxiliaries, 33.3% nurses and 20% technical. The data was collected during November-December 2008, through semi-structured questionnaire. Results: 93.3% of professionals are women aged 31-40 years. The study revealed several factors leading to stress, especially wage dissatisfaction (83%, lack of leisure (73% and workload (60%, potentially damaging the quality of care. Conclusion: it was perceived scarcity of time that the nursing staff dedicated to rest, leisure, living with the family and their professional

  19. The effects of shift work on sleeping quality, hypertension and diabetes in retired workers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjun Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Shift work has been associated with adverse health effects by disturbing circadian rhythms. However,its potential long-term health effects and the persistent effects after leaving shifts have not been well established. METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied 26,463 workers from Tongji-Dongfeng Cohort in China. All the participants are retired employees of Dongfeng Motor Company. Information on demographics, occupational history and medical history were gathered through questionnaires. After adjusting potential confounders in the logistic regression models, shift work was associated with poor sleeping quality, diabetes and hypertension independently. We observed significant effects of shift work on poor sleeping quality, diabetes and hypertension; the ORs (95%CI are 1.18 (1.09-1.27, 1.10 (1.03-1.17 and 1.05 (1.01-1.09 respectively. In the further analysis, we found elevated ORs (95%CI for participants with poor sleeping quality, the ORs (95%CI are 1.34 (1.08-1.60, 1.13 (1.05-1.21, 1.05 (1.03-1.07 and 1.05 (1.01-1.09 for 1-4, 5-9, 10-19, ≥20 years of shift work respectively. However, with the extension of leaving shift work duration, the effects of shift work on sleep quality gradually reduced. CONCLUSIONS: Shift work may be an independent risk factor for sleeping quality, diabetes and hypertension even in retired workers. Applicable intervention strategies are needed for prevention of sleep loss, diabetes, and hypertension for shift workers.

  20. The Effects of Shift Work on Sleeping Quality, Hypertension and Diabetes in Retired Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanjun; Liu, Yuewei; Huang, Xiji; Rong, Yi; He, Meian; Wang, Youjie; Yuan, Jing; Wu, Tangchun; Chen, Weihong

    2013-01-01

    Background Shift work has been associated with adverse health effects by disturbing circadian rhythms. However,its potential long-term health effects and the persistent effects after leaving shifts have not been well established. Methods and Results We studied 26,463 workers from Tongji-Dongfeng Cohort in China. All the participants are retired employees of Dongfeng Motor Company. Information on demographics, occupational history and medical history were gathered through questionnaires. After adjusting potential confounders in the logistic regression models, shift work was associated with poor sleeping quality, diabetes and hypertension independently. We observed significant effects of shift work on poor sleeping quality, diabetes and hypertension; the ORs (95%CI) are 1.18 (1.09–1.27), 1.10 (1.03–1.17) and 1.05 (1.01–1.09) respectively. In the further analysis, we found elevated ORs (95%CI) for participants with poor sleeping quality, the ORs (95%CI) are 1.34 (1.08–1.60), 1.13 (1.05–1.21), 1.05 (1.03–1.07) and 1.05 (1.01–1.09) for 1–4, 5–9, 10–19, ≥20 years of shift work respectively. However, with the extension of leaving shift work duration, the effects of shift work on sleep quality gradually reduced. Conclusions Shift work may be an independent risk factor for sleeping quality, diabetes and hypertension even in retired workers. Applicable intervention strategies are needed for prevention of sleep loss, diabetes, and hypertension for shift workers. PMID:23976988

  1. Workplace flexibility, work hours, and work-life conflict: finding an extra day or two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, E Jeffrey; Erickson, Jenet Jacob; Holmes, Erin K; Ferris, Maria

    2010-06-01

    This study explores the influence of workplace flexibility on work-life conflict for a global sample of workers from four groups of countries. Data are from the 2007 International Business Machines Global Work and Life Issues Survey administered in 75 countries (N = 24,436). We specifically examine flexibility in where (work-at-home) and when (perceived schedule flexibility) workers engage in work-related tasks. Multivariate results indicate that work-at-home and perceived schedule flexibility are generally related to less work-life conflict. Break point analyses of sub-groups reveal that employees with workplace flexibility are able to work longer hours (often equivalent to one or two 8-hr days more per week) before reporting work-life conflict. The benefit of work-at-home is increased when combined with schedule flexibility. These findings were generally consistent across all four groups of countries, supporting the case that workplace flexibility is beneficial both to individuals (in the form of reduced work-life conflict) and to businesses (in the form of capacity for longer work hours). However, work-at-home appears less beneficial in countries with collectivist cultures. (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. Working hours associated with unintentional sleep at work among airline pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Cristina Marqueze

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE Tto identify factors associated with unintentional sleep at work of airline pilots. METHODS This is a cross-sectional epidemiological study conducted with 1,235 Brazilian airline pilots, who work national or international flights. Data collection has been performed online. We carried out a bivariate and multiple logistic regression analysis, having as dependent variable unintentional sleep at work. The independent variables were related to biodemographic data, characteristics of the work, lifestyle, and aspects of sleep. RESULTS The prevalence of unintentional sleep while flying the airplane was 57.8%. The factors associated with unintentional sleep at work were: flying for more than 65 hours a month, frequent technical delays, greater need for recovery after work, work ability below optimal, insufficient sleep, and excessive sleepiness. CONCLUSIONS The occurrence of unintentional sleep at work of airline pilots is associated with factors related to the organization of the work and health.

  3. A life course perspective on working beyond retirement-results from a longitudinal study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, A. de; Pas S. van der; Beek, A.J. van der

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a societal need that workers prolong their working lives. By adopting a life course perspective, this study aimed to investigate the influence of work motives and motivation, health, job characteristics, skills, and financial and social situation on working beyond retirement, and

  4. Exploring the relationship between compressed work hours satisfaction and absenteeism in front-line service work

    OpenAIRE

    Deery, Stephen; Walsh, Janet; Zatzick, Christopher D.; Hayes, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    There has been an upsurge of interest in compressed workweek schedules because of the opportunities they provide for enhanced organizational efficiency and more balanced work and life roles for employees. This study tested a moderated mediation model of the effects of compressed work hours satisfaction on absenteeism with the purpose of exploring both the mediation effects of emotional exhaustion and physical health and the moderating effects of sex on this relationship. It utilized data draw...

  5. Shift and night work and long working hours--a systematic review of safety implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Anthony Sverre; Sigstad Lie, Jenny-Anne

    2011-05-01

    In order to devise effective preventive strategies, it is important to study workplace stressors that might increase the risk of workplace accidents - both affecting workers themselves as well as causing harm to third-parties. The aim of this report is to provide a systematic, updated overview and scientific review of empirical research regarding accidents in relation to long work hours and shift work, primarily based on epidemiological studies. The search for articles was part of a large review study on the effects of work hours on various health outcomes, safety, and performance. The search strategy included 5 international scientific databases, and nearly 7000 articles were initially identified using our search string. Following the application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, 443 publications were found and evaluated using a pre-defined scoring system. Of these, 43 concerned safety and accidents but only 14 were considered to be of high quality (total score 2 or 3 on a scale from 0-3) and therefore used for this study. Both shift work and long working hours present a substantial and well-documented detrimental effect on safety - all the studies that are included in this review have one or more significant findings in this respect. The trends are quite coherent although the increases in accident rates are mostly from 50% to 100%. In epidemiological terms, this may be seen as rather small differences. The use of such data is therefore only of importance if the accident incidence is high or if accidents may have large effects. The findings are most relevant to safety-critical activities such as the transport and health sectors. Work periods >8 hours carry an increased risk of accidents that cumulates, so that the increased risk of accidents at around 12 hours is twice the risk at 8 hours. Shift work including nights carries a substantial increased risk of accidents, whereas "pure" night work may bring some protection against this effect due to

  6. Organizational change, psychosocial work environment, and non-disability early retirement: a prospective study among senior public employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breinegaard, Nina; Jensen, Johan Høy; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2017-05-01

    Objective This study examines the impact of organizational change and psychosocial work environment on non-disability early retirement among senior public service employees. Methods In January and February 2011, Danish senior public service employees aged 58-64 years (N=3254) from the Capital Region of Denmark responded to a survey assessing psychosocial work environment (ie, social capital, organizational justice, and quality of management). Work-unit organizational changes (ie, change of management, merging, demerging, and relocation) were recorded from January 2009 to March 2011. Weekly data on non-disability early retirement transfer were obtained from the DREAM register database, which holds weekly information about all public benefit payments in Denmark. Hazard ratios (HR) for early retirement following employees' 60 th birthday were estimated with Cox regression adjusted for age, gender, and socioeconomic status. Results Exposure to change of management [HR 1.37, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.13-1.66], mergers (HR 1.23, 95% CI 1.02-1.48), and relocation of work unit (HR 1.24, 95% CI 1.01-1.54) increased rate of non-disability early retirement, while demerging of work unit did not (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.79-1.33). Work units with lower levels of social capital (HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.05-1.41), organizational justice, (HR 1.18, 95% CI 1.04-1.32), and quality of management (HR 1.14, 95% CI 1.02-1.25) increased rate of early retirement. Conclusion Organizational change and poor psychosocial work environment contribute to non-disability early retirement among senior public service employees, measured at work-unit level.

  7. Vital working hour schemes: The dynamic balance between various interests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, G.A.; Jansen, B.; van Amelsvoort, L.G.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    "Balancing Interests", the theme of the 17th International Symposium on Shift Work and Working Time held in Hoofddorp, The Netherlands (September 2005), refers to the ambition to reach an optimal balance between the various aspects of shift work. Economic, ergonomic, physical, and psychosocial

  8. Games at work: the recreational use of computer games during working hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, Leonard

    2009-08-01

    The present study investigated the recreational use of video and computer games in the workplace. In an online survey, 833 employed users of online casual games reported on their use of computer games during working hours. The data indicate that playing computer games in the workplace elicits substantial levels of recovery experience. Recovery experience associated with gameplay was the strongest predictor for the use of games in the workplace. Furthermore, individuals with higher levels of work-related fatigue reported stronger recovery experience during gameplay and showed a higher tendency to play games during working hours than did persons with lower levels of work strain. Additionally, the social situation at work was found to have a significant influence on the use of games. Persons receiving less social support from colleagues and supervisors played games at work more frequently than did individuals with higher levels of social support. Furthermore, job control was positively related to the use of games at work. In sum, the results of the present study illustrate that computer games have a significant recovery potential. Implications of these findings for research on personal computer use during work and for games research in general are discussed.

  9. Long working hours and cancer risk: a multi-cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heikkila, K.; Nyberg, S.T.; Madsen, I.E.; Vroome, E. de; Alfredsson, L.; Bjorner, J.B.; Borritz, M.; Burr, H.; Erbel, R.; Ferrie, J.E.; Fransson, E.; Geuskens, G.A.; Hooftman, W.E.; Houtman, I.L.; Jöckel, K.H.; Knutsson, A.; Koskenvuo, M.; Lunau, T.; Nielsen, M.L.; Nordin, M.; Oksanen, T.; Pejtersen, J.H.; Pentti, J.; Shipley, M.J.; Steptoe, A.; Suominen, S.B.; Theorell, T.; Vahtera, J.; Westerholm, P.J.M.; Westerlund, H.; Dragano, N.; Rugulies, R.; Kawachi, I.; Batty, G.D.; Singh-Manoux, A.; Virtanen, M.; Kivimäki, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Working longer than the maximum recommended hours is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but the relationship of excess working hours with incident cancer is unclear. Methods: This multi-cohort study examined the association between working hours and cancer risk

  10. 29 CFR 5.8 - Liquidated damages under the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Liquidated damages under the Contract Work Hours and Safety... APPLICABLE TO NONCONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS SUBJECT TO THE CONTRACT WORK HOURS AND SAFETY STANDARDS ACT) Davis... and Safety Standards Act. (a) The Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act requires that laborers...

  11. 48 CFR 52.222-4 - Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act-Overtime Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.222-4 Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act—Overtime Compensation. As prescribed in 22.305, insert the following clause: Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards... Contractor that are subject to the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act. (d) Payrolls and basic...

  12. 48 CFR 22.403-3 - Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Standards for Contracts Involving Construction 22.403-3 Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act. The Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act (40 U.S.C. 3701 et seq.) requires that certain contracts (see... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contract Work Hours and...

  13. Multinationals versus domestic firms: wages, working hours and industrial relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Klaveren, M.; Tijdens, K.

    2011-01-01

    This Working Paper aims to present and discuss recent evidence on the effect of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) on wages, working conditions and industrial relations. It presents a. an overview of the available literature on the effects of FDI on wages, particularly in developed countries; b. the

  14. Baby boomers in the United States: Factors associated with working longer and delaying retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiuwen Sue; Wang, Xuanwen; Ringen, Knut; Sokas, Rosemary

    2017-04-01

    This study estimated the self-reported probability of working full-time past age 62 (P62) or age 65 (P65) among four cohorts of Americans born between 1931 and 1959. Data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) were analyzed. Respondents in four age cohorts were selected for comparison. Multivariable linear regression models were used to assess cohort differences in P62 and P65 while adjusting for covariates. P62 and P65 increased among boomers despite worsened self-rated health compared to the two preceding cohorts, with 37% and 80% increases among mid-boomers in construction trades. Cohort differences in P62 and P65 remained after controlling for covariates. Changes in pensions, income inequity, and education were significantly associated with work expectations, but SSA policy was not. Baby boomers expect to work longer than their predecessors. Efforts to improve work quality and availability for older workers are urgently needed, particularly in physically demanding occupations. Am. J. Ind. Med. 60:315-328, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Working overtime hours: Relations with fatigue, work motivation, and the quality of work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, D.G.J.; Linden, D. van der; Smulders, P.G.W.; Kompier, M.A.J.; Veldhoven, M.J.P.M. van; Yperen, N.W. van

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: We sought to better understand the relationship between overtime and mental fatigue by taking into account work motivation and the quality of overtime work and studying theoretically derived subgroups. Methods: We conducted a survey-study among a representative sample of the Dutch

  16. Working Overtime Hours: Relations with fatigue, work motivation, and the quality of work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, D.G.J.; Linden, D. van der; Smulders, P.G.W.; Kompier, M.A.J.; Veldhoven, M.J.P.M. van; Yperen, N.W. van

    2004-01-01

    Objectives - We sought to better understand the relationship between overtime and mental fatigue by taking into account work motivation and the quality of overtime work and studying theoretically derived subgroups. Methods - We conducted a survey-study among a representative sample of the Dutch

  17. Flexible Retirement and the New Swedish Partial-Pension Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratthall, Kenneth

    1976-01-01

    On July 1, 1976 a new National Partial Pension Scheme came into effect in Sweden, which will allow older workers (60-65) to reduce their working hours and draw partial pensions as a preparation for full retirement. (Editor)

  18. Working hours and cardiovascular disease in Korean workers: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Inchul; Rhie, Jeongbae; Kim, Inah; Ryu, Innshil; Jung, Pil Kyun; Park, Yoo Seok; Lim, Yong-Su; Kim, Hyoung-Ryoul; Park, Shin-Goo; Im, Hyoung-June; Lee, Mi-Young; Won, Jong-Uk

    2014-01-01

    Long working hours can negatively impact a worker's health. The objective of this study was to examine the association between working hours and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and compare the degree of risk based on CVD subtypes in Korean workers. This study was a case-control study of the patients registered in the Occupational Cardiovascular Diseases Surveillance 2010. The cases included 348 patients diagnosed with a CVD (123 cerebral infarction, 69 intracerebral hemorrhage, 57 subarachnoid hemorrhage, 99 acute myocardial infarction). Controls were 769 participants with no history of CVDs matched for gender, age, type of occupation, and region. Participants' working hours in the previous week and the average working hours over the past three months were assessed to examine short-term and long-term effects. After adjusting for confounding factors, the odds ratios (ORs) for CVDs in the short-term were 2.66 (95% Confidence interval (CI) :1.78-3.99) for working ≤40 hours, 1.85 (95% CI: 1.22-2.81) for working 50.1-60 hours and 4.23 (95% CI: 2.81-6.39) for working >60 hours compared with the 40.1-50-hour working group. The ORs in the long-term were 2.90 (95% CI: 1.86-4.52) for working ≤40 hours, 1.73 (95% CI: 1.03-2.90) for working 48.1-52 hours and 3.46 (95% CI: 2.38-5.03) for working >52 hours compared with the 40.1-48-hour working group. Long working hours are related to an increased risk of CVDs, and the degree of risk differs based on CVD subtype. Short working hours are also related to an increased risk for CVDs. More prospective studies targeting specific disease risks are required.

  19. Work hours, sleep patterns and fatigue among merchant marine personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanquist, T F; Raby, M; Forsythe, A; Carvalhais, A B

    1997-12-01

    A field study of work and sleep patterns among commercial merchant marine personnel is reported. Data collected over a 10-30-d period from 141 subjects aboard eight ships included information concerning work-rest schedules, sleep timing, alertness on the job and critical fatigue. The data indicate that watchstanders on the 4-on, 8-off schedule show considerable disruption in their sleep. The average sleep duration for all mariners is 6.6 h; watchstanders obtain their sleep in fragmented periods that are frequently less than 5 h in duration. Analysis of critical fatigue shows an incidence of 1-24% across personnel and measures. Of particular concern are the watchstanders on the 04.00-08.00 schedule, who sleep less than 4 h per 24-h period 22% of the time. Potential countermeasures, including changes in scheduling and staffing are proposed.

  20. Senior dental students' career intentions, work-life balance and retirement plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, F M J; Drummond, J R; Carson, L; Theaker, E D

    2007-09-08

    To gather information from senior dental students about their future career plans, with particular emphasis on work-life balance issues, their attitudes towards the NHS and retirement plans. Senior dental students at the Universities of Dundee and Manchester were asked to complete a voluntary anonymous questionnaire. In all 141 questionnaires were completed, 42 by students in Manchester and 114 in Dundee. On qualification nearly all surveyed intend to work full time but after five years one quarter (26%) of females intend to work part time. This is significantly (p professional life. More than half of the sample intend to take time out of dentistry until their children attended primary school (female 63%, male 38%) and 6% (female 6%, male 8%) until secondary school. Many of our findings suggest that future generations of dentists may have a pattern of professional life that will have the effect of reducing their clinical commitment, although it is not possible to determine how significant an effect this will have on the workforce. It may, however, be appropriate to take career intention into account when workforce planning.

  1. Work hours, weight status, and weight-related behaviors: a study of metro transit workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannan Peter J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Associations between hours worked per week and Body Mass Index (BMI, food intake, physical activity, and perceptions of eating healthy at work were examined in a sample of transit workers. Methods Survey data were collected from 1086 transit workers. Participants reported hours worked per week, food choices, leisure-time physical activity and perceptions of the work environment with regard to healthy eating. Height and weight were measured for each participant. Multivariate linear and logistic regressions were conducted to examine associations between work hours and behavioral variables. Associations were examined in the full sample and stratified by gender. Results Transit workers working in the highest work hour categories had higher BMI and poorer dietary habits, with results differing by gender. Working 50 or more hours per week was associated with higher BMI among men but not women. Additionally, working 50 or more hours per week was significantly associated with higher frequency of accessing cold beverage, cold food, and snack vending machines among men. Working 40 or more hours per week was associated with higher frequency of accessing cold food vending machines among women. Reported frequency of fruit and vegetable intake was highest among women working 50 or more hours per week. Intake of sweets, sugar sweetened beverages, and fast food did not vary with work hours in men or women. Physical activity and perception of ease of eating healthy at work were not associated with work hours in men or women. Conclusions Long work hours were associated with more frequent use of garage vending machines and higher BMI in transit workers, with associations found primarily among men. Long work hours may increase dependence upon food availability at the worksite, which highlights the importance of availability of healthy food choices.

  2. Working hours, work-life conflict and health in precarious and "permanent" employment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Bohle

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The expansion of precarious employment in OECD countries has been widely associated with negative health and safety effects. Although many shiftworkers are precariously employed, shiftwork research has concentrated on full-time workers in continuing employment. This paper examines the impact of precarious employment on working hours, work-life conflict and health by comparing casual employees to full-time, "permanent" employees working in the same occupations and workplaces. METHODS: Thirty-nine convergent interviews were conducted in two five-star hotels. The participants included 26 full-time and 13 casual (temporary employees. They ranged in age from 19 to 61 years and included 17 females and 22 males. Working hours ranged from zero to 73 hours per week. RESULTS: Marked differences emerged between the reports of casual and full-time employees about working hours, work-life conflict and health. Casuals were more likely to work highly irregular hours over which they had little control. Their daily and weekly working hours ranged from very long to very short according to organisational requirements. Long working hours, combined with low predictability and control, produced greater disruption to family and social lives and poorer work-life balance for casuals. Uncoordinated hours across multiple jobs exacerbated these problems in some cases. Health-related issues reported to arise from work-life conflict included sleep disturbance, fatigue and disrupted exercise and dietary regimes. CONCLUSIONS:This study identified significant disadvantages of casual employment. In the same hotels, and doing largely the same jobs, casual employees had less desirable and predictable work schedules, greater work-life conflict and more associated health complaints than "permanent" workers.OBJETIVOS: O crescimento do número de empregos precários em países da OECD está largamente associado a efeitos negativos à saúde e segurança. Embora muitos

  3. Effects of new ways of working on work hours and work location, health and job-related outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijp, Hylco H; Beckers, Debby G J; van de Voorde, Karina; Geurts, Sabine A E; Kompier, Michiel A J

    2016-01-01

    New ways of working (NWW) is a type of work organization that is characterized by temporal and spatial flexibility, often combined with extensive use of information and communication technologies (ICT) and performance-based management. In a three-wave intervention study, we examined the effects of NWW on both the organization of work (changes in control over time and place of work; working hours and work location; and other key job characteristics), and on employees' outcomes (work-nonwork balance; health and well-being; and job-related outcomes). We applied a quasi-experimental design within a large Dutch financial company (N = 2,912). We studied an intervention group (n = 2,391) and made comparisons with a reference group (n = 521). There were three study waves: (i) one/two months before, and (ii) 4 months and (iii) 10 months after implementation of NWW. Repeated measures analyses of covariance (involving 361 participants from the intervention group and 80 participants from the reference group) showed a large and significant shift from hours worked at the office to hours worked at home after implementation of NWW. Accordingly, commuting time was reduced. Employees remained working on week days and during day time. Psychosocial work-characteristics, work-nonwork balance, stress, fatigue, and job-related outcomes remained favourable and largely unaffected, but the health score in the intervention group decreased (medium effect). These findings suggest that the implementation of NWW does not necessarily lead to changes in psychosocial work characteristics, well-being or job-related outcomes.

  4. Physiological and psychological impacts of extended work hours in logging operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana Mitchell; Tom Gallagher

    2007-01-01

    A study was initiated in 2006 to develop an understanding of the considerations of using extended work hours in the logging industry in the southeastern United States. Through semistructured interviews, it was obvious that loggers were individually creating ways of successfully implementing extended working hours without understanding the impacts that extended working...

  5. Increasing part-time working hours in the Netherlands. Identifying policy recommendations through Group Model Building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenbergh, I.L.; Fokkinga, B.L.A.

    2013-01-01

    With 73% of women and 19% of men working part-time,the Netherlands is known as the champion of part-time work. In order to increase especially the working hours of women with small part-time jobs (less than 20 hours per week) the Dutch government installed a thinktank of employers, employees

  6. The association between psychosocial work environment, attitudes towards older workers (ageism) and planned retirement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Sannie; Rugulies, Reiner; Løngaard, Katja

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between psychosocial factors (in particular ageism) at the workplace and older workers' retirement plans, while taking health and workability of the employee into account.......The aim of this study was to examine the association between psychosocial factors (in particular ageism) at the workplace and older workers' retirement plans, while taking health and workability of the employee into account....

  7. When policy meets physiology: the challenge of reducing resident work hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockley, Steven W; Landrigan, Christopher P; Barger, Laura K; Czeisler, Charles A

    2006-08-01

    Considerable controversy exists regarding optimal work hours for physicians and surgeons in training. In a series of studies, we assessed the effect of extended work hours on resident sleep and health as well as patient safety. In a validated nationwide survey, we found that residents who had worked 24 hours or longer were 2.3 times more likely to have a motor vehicle crash following that shift than when they worked hours, and that the monthly risk of a crash increased by 16.2% after each extended duration shift. We also found in a randomized trial that interns working a traditional on-call schedule slept 5.8 hours less per week, had twice as many attentional failures on duty overnight, and made 36% more serious medical errors and nearly six times more serious diagnostic errors than when working on a schedule that limited continuous duty to 16 hours. While numerous opinions have been published opposing reductions in extended work hours due to concerns regarding continuity of patient care, reduced educational opportunities, and traditionally-defined professionalism, there are remarkably few objective data in support of continuing to schedule medical trainees to work shifts > 24 hours. An evidence-based approach is needed to minimize the well-documented risk that current work hour practices confer on resident health and patient safety while optimizing education and continuity of care.

  8. Long working hours and pregnancy complications: women physicians survey in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Masumi; Rahman, Mahbubur; Ishiguro, Aya; Nomura, Kyoko

    2014-07-23

    Previous studies have investigated the impact of occupational risk factors on health outcomes among physicians. However, few studies have investigated the effects on pregnancy outcomes among physicians. In this study, we examined the association between working hours during pregnancy and pregnancy complications among physicians. A cross-sectional study was based on a survey conducted in 2009-2011 of 1,684 alumnae (mean age, 44 ± 8 years) who had graduated from 13 private medical schools in Japan. Data on threatened abortion (TA), preterm birth (PTB), and the number of working hours during the first trimester of pregnancy were obtained via retrospective assessments. Of the 939 physicians with a first pregnancy, 15% experienced TA and 12% experienced PTB. Women who experienced TA (mean weekly working hours: 62 h vs. 50 h, P women who worked 40 hours or less per week, women who worked 71 hours or more per week had a three-fold higher risk of experiencing TA (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.7-6.0) even after adjusting for medical specialty, maternal age, and current household income. The risk of experiencing PTB was 2.5 times higher (95% CI:1.2-5.2) in women who worked 51-70 hours and 4.2 times higher (95% CI: 1.9-9.2) in women who worked 71 hours or more even after adjusting for specialty, maternal age, and current household income. The trend in the P statistic reflecting the effect of the quartile of hours worked per week (40 hours, 41-50 hours, 51-70 hours, ≥ 71 hours) on TA or PTB was 0.0001 in the multivariate logistic regression models. These results suggest that working long hours during the first trimester of pregnancy is associated with TA and PTB.

  9. Quick returns and night work as predictors of sleep quality, fatigue, work-family balance and satisfaction with work hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, Anna; Tucker, Philip; Gustavsson, Petter; Rudman, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Quick returns (intervals of sleeps and fatigue on the subsequent shift. Recent evidence suggests that shift workers regard quick returns as being more problematic than night work. The current study explored quick returns and night work in terms of their impact on sleep, unwinding, recovery, exhaustion, satisfaction with work hours and work-family interference. Data from the 2006 cohort of Swedish nursing students within the national Longitudinal Analysis of Nursing Education (LANE) study were analysed (N = 1459). Respondents completed a questionnaire prior to graduation (response rate 69.2%) and 3 years after graduation (65.9%). The analyses examined associations between frequency of quick returns and night work and measures taken in year three, while adjusting for confounding factors (in year three and prior graduation). Frequency of quick returns was a significant predictor of poor sleep quality, short sleeps, unwinding, exhaustion, satisfaction with work hours and work-to-family interference, with higher frequency predicting more negative outcomes. Quick returns did not predict recovery after rest days. Frequency of night work did not predict any of the outcomes. In conclusion, quick returns were an important determinant of sleep, recovery and wellbeing, whereas night work did not show such an association.

  10. Work Hours of Immigrant Versus U.S.-Born Female Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sung-Heui

    2017-10-01

    This study was a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data extracted from the 2011-2012 California Health Interview Survey. Data from 8,931 full-time (i.e., 21 hours or more per week) women workers aged 18 to 85 years were analyzed to examine the nature and prevalence of immigrant female workers' work hours, overtime, and related factors in the United States compared to U.S.-born female workers. Results showed that foreign-born female workers did not work longer hours than U.S.-born female workers. Foreign-born female workers who reported poor health worked longer hours than did their U.S.-born counterparts. Foreign-born female workers who were self-employed or worked in family businesses tended to work longer hours than did those women who worked for private companies or nonprofit organizations.

  11. Changes in Sleep Duration During Transition to Statutory Retirement: A Longitudinal Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myllyntausta, Saana; Salo, Paula; Kronholm, Erkki; Aalto, Ville; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi; Stenholm, Sari

    2017-07-01

    This study examined whether sleep duration changes during the transition from full-time work to statutory retirement and, if this were the case, which preretirement factors, including sociodemographic, work, lifestyle, and health factors, predict these changes. Data from repeated surveys of the Finnish Public Sector study, linked to records of retirement, were used. The study population consisted of 5785 participants who retired on a statutory basis in 2000-2011 and who had responded to surveys on sleep duration at least once immediately before and after their retirement (mean number of repeat study waves 3.6). Linear regression analyses with generalized estimating equations were used to examine changes in sleep duration around retirement. Before retirement there was a slight decrease in sleep duration. During the 4-year retirement transition, sleep duration increased from 7 hours 0 minutes (95% confidence interval [CI] 6 hours 54 minutes to 7 hours 6 minutes) to 7 hours and 22 minutes (95% CI 7 hours 16 minutes to 7 hours 27 minutes); thus, mean increase being 22 minutes. Increase in sleep duration was greatest in those who were short sleepers, heavy drinkers, or had sleep difficulties. After the retirement transition, sleep duration remained at approximately the same level, as no significant changes were observed. This longitudinal study suggests that transition from full-time work to statutory retirement is associated with an increase in sleep duration.

  12. Gender Differences and Predictors of Work Hours in a Sample of Ontario Dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Julia C; Ahmad, Atyub; Shaw, Jodi L; Rashid, Faahim; Clancy, Alicia; David, Courtney; Figueiredo, Rafael; Quiñonez, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    To determine the influence of gender on weekly work hours of Ontario dentists. In 2012, a 52-item survey was sent to a random sample of 3000 Ontario dentists (1500 men and 1500 women) to collect information on personal, professional and sociodemographic characteristics. The resulting data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and linear regression modeling. The 867 respondents included 463 men, 401 women and 3 people whose gender was unreported, yielding a response rate of 29%.Most dentists worked full-time, with men working, on average, 2 h/week longer than women. Younger dentists worked more than older dentists. Practice ownership increased weekly work hours, and men reported ownership more often than women. Canadian-trained women worked significantly fewer hours than those trained internationally. Women were more likely than men to work part time and take parental leave and more often reported being primary caregivers and solely responsible for household chores. Women with partner support for such tasks worked more hours than those who were solely responsible. Dentists with children ≤ 3 years of age worked fewer hours than those without children; however, after controlling for spousal responsibility for caregiver duties, this effect was eliminated. More women than men reported making concessions in their career to devote time to family. Gender, age, practice ownership, training location and degree of spousal support for household and caregiving responsibilities were predictors of weekly work hours. For women specifically, training location and household and caregiving responsibilities predicted weekly work hours.

  13. Working hours associated with unintentional sleep at work among airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marqueze, Elaine Cristina; Nicola, Ana Carolina B; Diniz, Dag Hammarskjoeld M D; Fischer, Frida Marina

    2017-06-26

    Tto identify factors associated with unintentional sleep at work of airline pilots. This is a cross-sectional epidemiological study conducted with 1,235 Brazilian airline pilots, who work national or international flights. Data collection has been performed online. We carried out a bivariate and multiple logistic regression analysis, having as dependent variable unintentional sleep at work. The independent variables were related to biodemographic data, characteristics of the work, lifestyle, and aspects of sleep. The prevalence of unintentional sleep while flying the airplane was 57.8%. The factors associated with unintentional sleep at work were: flying for more than 65 hours a month, frequent technical delays, greater need for recovery after work, work ability below optimal, insufficient sleep, and excessive sleepiness. The occurrence of unintentional sleep at work of airline pilots is associated with factors related to the organization of the work and health. Identificar fatores associados aos cochilos não intencionais durante as jornadas de trabalho de pilotos da aviação regular. Estudo epidemiológico transversal conduzido com 1.235 pilotos brasileiros de avião do transporte aéreo regular, que realizavam voos nacionais ou internacionais, sendo a coleta de dados realizada on-line. Foi realizada análise de regressão logística bivariada e múltipla, tendo como variável dependente o cochilo não intencional durante o horário de trabalho. As variáveis independentes foram relacionadas a dados biodemográficos, características do trabalho, estilo de vida e aspectos do sono. A prevalência do cochilo não intencional enquanto pilotava o avião foi de 57,8%. Os fatores associados ao cochilo não intencional foram: voar por mais de 65 horas por mês, atrasos técnicos frequentes, maior necessidade de recuperação após o trabalho, capacidade para o trabalho inferior à ótima, sono insuficiente e sonolência excessiva. A ocorrência do cochilo n

  14. Bullying Behavior, Parents' Work Hours and Early Adolescents' Perceptions of Time Spent with Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie-Mizell, C. Andre; Keil, Jacqueline M.; Laske, Mary Therese; Stewart, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This research investigates the relationships among bullying behavior, mother's and father's work hours, and early adolescents' perceptions of whether they spend sufficient time with their parents. In cross-sectional models, we find maternal work hours are modestly associated with increases in bullying behavior. However, in more rigorous change…

  15. Impact of Long Farm Working Hours on Child Safety Practices in Agricultural Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlenga, Barbara; Pahwa, Punam; Hagel, Louise; Dosman, James; Pickett, William

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To characterize working hours of adult farm owner-operators and their spouses by season, and to examine associations between working hours and farm safety practices affecting children. Methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of cross-sectional survey data collected as part of an existing study of injury and its determinants.…

  16. Effects of a night-team system on resident sleep and work hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Kao-Ping; Gordon, Mary Beth; Sectish, Theodore; Landrigan, Christopher P

    2011-12-01

    In 2009, Children's Hospital Boston implemented a night-team system on general pediatric wards to reduce extended work shifts. Residents worked 5 consecutive nights for 1 week and worked day shifts for the remainder of the rotation. Of note, resident staffing at night decreased under this system. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of this system on resident sleep and work hours. We conducted a prospective cohort study in which residents on the night-team system logged their sleep and work hours on work days. These data were compared with similar data collected in 2004, when there was a traditional call system. In 2004 and 2009, mean shift length was 15.22 ± 6.86 and 12.92 ± 5.70 hours, respectively (P = .161). Daily work hours were 10.49 ± 6.85 and 8.79 ± 6.42 hours, respectively (P = .08). Nightly sleep time decreased from 6.72 ± 2.60 to 4.77 ± 2.46 hours (P team system was unexpectedly associated with decreased sleep hours. As residency programs create work schedules that are compliant with the 2011 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education duty-hour standards, resident sleep should be monitored carefully.

  17. Influence of health, lifestyle, working conditions and sociodemography on early retirement among nurses. The Danish Nurse Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Karina; Ekholm, Ola; Hundrup, Yrsa

    2007-01-01

    by Statistics Denmark. The follow-up period was from 1993 to 2002. RESULTS: Nurses who had poor self-rated health were more likely to join PEW compared with nurses who considered their health as good (HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.16-1.41). Low job influence, high workload, and physical job demands only marginally......AIMS: The aim of the study was to analyze the relationship between health, lifestyle, work-related and sociodemographic factors, and older nurses' exit from the labor market to Post-Employment Wage (PEW). PEW is an early retirement scheme to make it possible for workers to retire at the age of 60....... METHODS: The study was based on 5,538 nurses in the age of 51-59 who in 1993 completed a questionnaire on health, lifestyle, working environment, and sociodemographic factors. The survey information was combined with longitudinal data from the Danish Integrated Database for Labor Market Research compiled...

  18. Trapped in ‘Involuntary’ Work in the Late Career? Retirement Expectations versus the ‘Desire to Retire’ in Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Lindemann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In light of recent policies aiming to promote the prolongation of working life, one of the key questions is how people have adjusted their retirement expectations (i.e., realistic plans and preferences (i.e., wishes and desires. We explore which social groups plan to continue working after the statutory retirement age, and whether they wish to do it or whether it is a forced choice (‘involuntary’ work. Overall, almost all employed late career workers plan to work until or beyond retirement age in Estonia, especially men and those who have more educational and health resources. Still, results of a joint analysis of plans and wishes indicate that two groups have a higher risk of ‘involuntary’ work. First, a higher education combined with a low job satisfaction predicts staying longer in the labour despite the wish to retire as early as possible. Second, individuals who have poor health and a low job satisfaction often wish to retire as early as possible but stay in the labour market until reaching to the compulsory retirement age. Thus, policy measures increasing merely the statutory retirement age create tensions, especially among those not satisfied with their jobs. More analytical work and policy measures are needed to provide solutions at the workplace level that would enable a prolonged work career.

  19. Physiological responses to four hours of low-level repetitive work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, A Helene; Hansen, Åse Marie; Jensen, Bente R

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The study investigated physiological responses to 4 hours of standardized low-level repetitive work. It was hypothesized that accumulative effects not observed after 1 hour could be found after 4 hours of repetitive work. METHODS: Ten healthy women performed intermittent (5 seconds + 5...... the 4 hours. In accordance, the RPE recorded for the hand, forearm, and shoulder regions increased progressively. For the remaining physiological measures, no accumulative changes were found. Forearm muscle activity was higher during a mental reference task with lower exerted force than during...

  20. When work calls-associations between being contacted outside of regular working hours for work-related matters and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlinghaus, Anna; Nachreiner, Friedhelm

    2013-11-01

    Boundaries between work and private life are diminishing, but little is known on how this influences worker health. Therefore, we examined the association between work-related contacts outside of regular working hours by e-mail or phone and self-reported health in a representative sample of European employees (n = 23 760). The risk of reporting ≥1 health problem(s) was increased in workers contacted sometimes (odds ratio [OR]: 1.16, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-1.27) or often (OR: 1.23, 95% CI: 1.12-1.34) as compared with never, controlling for several demographic and workplace characteristics. Further research is needed to quantify work and nonwork patterns and their health effects.

  1. Successful Aging at Work: Annual Review, 1992-1996: The Older Worker and Transitions to Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Robert O.; DeKoekkoek, Paul D.; Neece, Wynell M.; Patterson, David W.

    1997-01-01

    A review of literature 1992-1996 examined aging, job performance, and occupational well-being; successful workplace aging; aging, health, and safety; careers; retirement; older women; and age discrimination. Four conclusions were: (1) research has begun to involve more disciplines; (2) older workers should be considered as individuals; (3)…

  2. Married women's retirement behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzebon, S; Mitchell, O S

    1989-01-01

    The Longitudinal Retirement Survey, a panel study conducted by the US Social Security Administration in 1969-79 of married women who were private sector workers in 1969 and had employed husbands, allows for the empirical analysis of the economic and family determinants of women's retirement behavior. This study tested a life cycle model of women's retirement behavior. This study tested a life cycle model of women's retirement decisions. In the sample of 139 women who were followed for 10 years, the average age at retirement was 62 years (compared with 64 years for males). 67% of the respondents retired prior to or at the same time as their husbands. The model incorporated 3 types of explanatory factors: measures of income opportunities, measures of retirement or years away from the labor force, and family responsibility measures. Evidence from the regression model suggests that a working wife's retirement decision is most strongly influenced by the husband's income, his health status, and the difference in age between the spouses. The increase in the wife's discounted income stream if she defers retirement to age 65 years has a stronger substitution than income effect, but the coefficient is not significant. Logit models, which can explicitly incorporate income and leisure information relevant to each retirement date, further confirm the greater impact of family responsibilities that economic opportunities on married women's retirement decisions. Married women seem to value nonwork years highly, especially if their spouse is older than they, but will defer retirement if their husband is in poor health. On the other hand, women's retirement choices are not affected by whether the husband is retired or the presence of dependent children. These findings contrast sharply with research indicating that economic opportunities are the predominant determinants of men's retirement decisions.

  3. Long working hours as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation: a multi-cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, G David; Kawachi, Ichiro; Jokela, Markus; Alfredsson, Lars; Bjorner, Jakob B; Borritz, Marianne; Burr, Hermann; Dragano, Nico; Fransson, Eleonor I; Heikkilä, Katriina; Knutsson, Anders; Koskenvuo, Markku; Kumari, Meena; Madsen, Ida E H; Nielsen, Martin L; Nordin, Maria; Oksanen, Tuula; Pejtersen, Jan H; Pentti, Jaana; Rugulies, Reiner; Salo, Paula; Shipley, Martin J; Suominen, Sakari; Theorell, Töres; Vahtera, Jussi; Westerholm, Peter; Westerlund, Hugo; Steptoe, Andrew; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Hamer, Mark; Ferrie, Jane E; Virtanen, Marianna; Tabak, Adam G

    2017-09-07

    Studies suggest that people who work long hours are at increased risk of stroke, but the association of long working hours with atrial fibrillation, the most common cardiac arrhythmia and a risk factor for stroke, is unknown. We examined the risk of atrial fibrillation in individuals working long hours (≥55 per week) and those working standard 35-40 h/week. In this prospective multi-cohort study from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations (IPD-Work) Consortium, the study population was 85 494 working men and women (mean age 43.4 years) with no recorded atrial fibrillation. Working hours were assessed at study baseline (1991-2004). Mean follow-up for incident atrial fibrillation was 10 years and cases were defined using data on electrocardiograms, hospital records, drug reimbursement registers, and death certificates. We identified 1061 new cases of atrial fibrillation (10-year cumulative incidence 12.4 per 1000). After adjustment for age, sex and socioeconomic status, individuals working long hours had a 1.4-fold increased risk of atrial fibrillation compared with those working standard hours (hazard ratio = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.13-1.80, P = 0.003). There was no significant heterogeneity between the cohort-specific effect estimates (I2 = 0%, P = 0.66) and the finding remained after excluding participants with coronary heart disease or stroke at baseline or during the follow-up (N = 2006, hazard ratio = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.05-1.76, P = 0.0180). Adjustment for potential confounding factors, such as obesity, risky alcohol use and high blood pressure, had little impact on this association. Individuals who worked long hours were more likely to develop atrial fibrillation than those working standard hours.

  4. Work hours regulations for house staff in psychiatry: bad or good for residency training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasminsky, Sonya; Lomonaco, Allison; Auchincloss, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    The movement to limit work hours for house staff has gained momentum in recent years. The authors set out to review the literature on work hours reform, particularly as it applies to psychiatric residency training, and to provide two different viewpoints on the controversy. The authors present the historical background of work hours reform in the United States and review recent literature about resident work hours limitations. Using a debate format, the authors discuss whether the new regulations are having a positive or negative impact on residency training in psychiatry. Drs. Lomonaco and Auchincloss argue that currently-existing work hours restrictions may have unintended consequences for the health of patients and an untoward impact on residents' professional development and academic medicine's overall structure. Dr. Rasminsky argues that work hours restrictions do not go far enough in protecting residents and patients from the harmful effects of fatigue, and that our definition of professionalism needs to be reexamined in light of emerging scientific literature. There should be some limitation on resident work hours, with exact numbers to be determined by growing scientific knowledge about the effects of prolonged wakefulness. More study is needed, particularly in the area of psychiatric residency training.

  5. Poor safety climate, long work hours, and musculoskeletal discomfort among Latino horse farm workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanberg, Jennifer; Clouser, Jessica Miller; Gan, Wenqi; Flunker, John C; Westneat, Susan; Browning, Steven R

    2017-09-03

    This study investigated the prevalence of self-reported musculoskeletal discomfort (MSD) and work-related factors associated with elevated MSD among Latino thoroughbred farm workers. Participants (N = 225) were recruited using a community-based purposive sampling approach to participate in in-person interviews. Of these workers, 85% experienced MSD. MSD was divided into tertiles; the upper tertile was defined as elevated. Multivariable Poisson regression revealed associations between any elevated MSD and longer tenure on horse farms, longer work hours, and poor safety climate. Elevated neck/back MSD was associated with longer tenure, longer work hours, and poor safety climate. Elevated upper extremity MSD was associated with age and poor safety climate. Elevated lower extremity MSD was associated with longer tenure, longer work hours, and being female. Musculoskeletal discomfort is common among these workers. Improving safety climate and minimizing long work hours is recommended.

  6. Impact of Health Care System Delay in Patients With ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction on Return to Labor Market and Work Retirement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laut, Kristina Grønborg; Hjort, Jakob; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    system delay also impacts ability to stay in the labor market. Therefore, the aim of the study was to evaluate whether system delay is associated with duration of absence from work or time to retirement from work among patients with STEMI treated with PPCI. We conducted a population-based cohort study...... system delay and time to return to the labor market was analyzed using a competing-risk regression analysis. Association between system delay and time to retirement from work was analyzed using a Cox regression model. A total of 4,061 patients were included. Ninety-three percent returned to the labor...... market during 4 years of follow-up, and 41% retired during 8 years of follow-up. After adjustment, system delay >120 minutes was associated with reduced resumption of work (subhazard ratio 0.86, 95% confidence interval 0.81 to 0.92) and earlier retirement from work (hazard ratio 1.21, 95% confidence...

  7. Work hours and sleep/wake behavior of Australian hospital doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Sally A; Thomas, Matthew J W; Dorrian, Jillian; Jay, Sarah M; Weissenfeld, Adrian; Dawson, Drew

    2010-07-01

    The objective of the study was to describe the work and sleep patterns of doctors working in Australian hospitals. Specifically, the aim was to examine the influence of work-related factors, such as hospital type, seniority, and specialty on work hours and their impact on sleep. A total of 635 work periods from 78 doctors were analyzed together with associated sleep history. Work and sleep diary information was validated against an objective measure of sleep/wake activity to provide the first comprehensive database linking work and sleep for individual hospital doctors in Australia. Doctors in large and small facilities had fewer days without work than those doctors working in medium-sized facilities. There were no significant differences in the total hours worked across these three categories of seniority; however, mid-career and senior doctors worked more overnight and weekend on-call periods than junior doctors. With respect to sleep, although higher work hours were related to less sleep, short sleeps (hospital doctors, total hours worked do impact sleep, but the pattern of work, together with other nonwork factors are also important mediators.

  8. Association between rotating night shift work and metabolic syndrome in Korean workers: differences between 8-hour and 12-hour rotating shift work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jae-Il; Yim, Hyeon Woo

    2017-10-19

    This study aimed to analyze the association between the shift work schedule and metabolic syndrome (MetS). This is a retrospective longitudinal study based on the 2015 health checkup data of 2,090 workers evaluated for MetS in 2010 at a general hospital in Korea. The participants were divided according to their shift work schedule into daytime, three-shift (8-hour rotation), and two-shift (12-hour rotation) workers. The index that indicates the association between the shift work schedule and MetS is the odds ratio (OR) calculated using multivariate logistic regression. The analysis for the entire group of workers indicated that there was positive association between two-shift rotation and MetS (OR=1.58, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.09, 2.29). In the analysis of rotating night-shift workers, the years of rotating night shifts, frequency of night-shift work, and sleep disturbance were added to the confounding variables, and two-shift work remained positively associated with MetS (OR=1.72, 95% CI: 1.10, 2.70). The risk of MetS differs based on the shift work schedules they engage in. Hence, structural changes to the shift work schedules are required to prevent MetS in night-shift workers.

  9. Assessment of stress and autonomic nervous activity in Japanese female ambulance paramedics working 24-hour shifts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ayako Suzuki; Koichi Yoshioka; Susumu Ito; Yuko Naito

    2016-01-01

      Objectives: We studied the physical and mental conditions of 8 healthy young female ambulance paramedics working 24-hour shifts during their menstrual cycle, including assessment of cardiac autonomic nervous...

  10. Maternal Work Hours and Adolescents' School Outcomes among Low-Income Families in Four Urban Counties

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lisa A. Gennetian; Leonard M. Lopoo; Andrew S. London

    2008-01-01

    We examine how changes in maternal work hours affect adolescent children's school participation and performance outcomes using data from interviews in 1998 and 2001 with approximately 1,700 women who...

  11. Environmental Conservation in Agriculture: Land Retirement Versus Changing Practices on Working Land

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Hongli; Lyubov A. Kurkalova; Kling, Catherine L.; Philip W. Gassman

    2005-01-01

    The study develops a conceptual framework for analyzing the allocation of conservation funds via selectively offering incentive payments to farmers for enrolling in one of two mutually exclusive agricultural conservation programs: retiring land from production or changing farming practices on land that remains in production. We investigate how the existence of a pre-fixed budget allocation between the programs affects the amounts of environmental benefits obtainable under alternative policy i...

  12. Associations of work hours and actual availability of weekly rest days with cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itani, Osamu; Kaneita, Yoshitaka; Ikeda, Maki; Kondo, Shuji; Murata, Atsushi; Ohida, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of study was to determine the associations of work hours and actual availability of weekly rest days with the onset of lifestyle-related diseases such as obesity, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and hyperglycemia. For this longitudinal study, we used data from checkups conducted in 1999 and 2006 for 30,194 men who worked for a local public institution in Japan. We calculated the cumulative incidence rates of onset of obesity, hypertension, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL cholesterol over this 7-year period and performed a χ2 test to determine the association between the above diseases and work conditions (work hours and actual availability of weekly rest days) at the time of the baseline survey. We then performed multiple logistic regression analysis of the diseases that showed significant associations. The adjusted odds ratio for the onset of hypertriglyceridemia in subjects who worked ≥9 hours was high (1.11 [95% CI: 1.02-1.22], p=0.02) in comparison with those who worked work. These results show that work hours and actual availability of weekly rest days independently predict the onset of hypertriglyceridemia. Working only regular hours and taking advantage of weekly rest days can contribute to the prevention of hypertriglyceridemia.

  13. Relationship of Work Hours with Selected Health Behaviors and Academic Progress among a College Student Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kim; Danner, Fred; Staten, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 57% of college students work while attending school. Health risks related to working while in college have not been widely studied. Objective: The authors' purpose in this study was to determine associations between hours worked, binge drinking, sleep habits, and academic performance among a college student cohort. Participants and…

  14. Marriage markets as explanation for why heavier people work more hours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoshana Grossbard

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Is BMI related to hours of work through marriage market mechanisms? We empirically explore this issue using data from the NLSY79 and NLSY97 and a number of estimation strategies (including OLS, IV, and sibling FE. Our IV estimates (with same-sex sibling’s BMI as an instrument and a large set of controls including wage suggest that a one-unit increase in BMI leads to an almost 2% increase in White married women’s hours of work. However, BMI is not associated with hours of work of married men. We also find that a one-unit increase in BMI leads to a 1.4% increase in White single women’s hours of work, suggesting that single women may expect future in-marriage transfers that vary by body weight. We show that the positive association between BMI and hours of work of White single women increases with self-assessed probability of future marriage and varies with expected cumulative spousal income. Comparisons between the association between BMI and hours of work for White and Black married women suggest a possible racial gap in intra-marriage transfers from husbands to wives.

  15. The career intentions, work-life balance and retirement plans of dental undergraduates at the University of Bristol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puryer, J; Patel, A

    2016-02-26

    Aim To investigate the career intentions, work-life balance and retirement plans of dental undergraduates at the University of Bristol in 2015.Method Cross-sectional survey of 210 clinical undergraduates using an anonymous self-report questionnaire.Results The response rate was 79%. The majority (81.7%) were 'satisfied' or 'extremely satisfied' with their choice of career. The majority (78.7%) felt men and women are equally likely to succeed in dentistry, although 42.9% felt men had an advantage over women with regards to career success. The majority (81.6%) intend on working within general practice, 11.3% within hospital dental services and 2.1% within community dental services. The majority (70.5%) intend to specialise within dentistry. Only 1.8% of participants intend on providing only National Health Service (NHS) dental treatment whereas the 86.5% would provide both NHS and private dental treatment. Fifteen years after qualifying, 52.2% plan to work part-time, and 37.8% intend on retiring at the age of 60 or below. The majority (86.6%) felt that childcare should be shared equally between both parents. Female students intend to take more time out of their career to concentrate on childcare and felt that having a child would affect their career more than males.Conclusion The anticipated career plans, work-life balance and retirement plans of undergraduates change over time, and further research should be carried out to monitor future career intentions of dental students in order to help with dental workforce planning.

  16. Sunlight Exposure, Work Hours, Caffeine Consumption, and Sleep Duration in the Naval Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shattuck, Nita L; Matsangas, Panagiotis

    2017-06-01

    Sailors in the U.S. Navy are habitual shiftworkers, often experiencing circadian misalignment due to their irregular work/rest schedules. This study assessed the effect of sunlight exposure, work hours, and caffeinated beverage consumption on the daily sleep duration of crewmembers of a U.S. Navy ship during a 2-wk underway period. Working in an artificially lit area with no access to sunlight during work hours, U.S. Navy crew members (N = 91) used daily logs to report their daily activity, caffeinated beverage consumption, and exposure to sunlight while off-duty; sleep was assessed by wrist-worn actigraphy. Hours of sunlight exposure, work duration, and the amount of coffee/tea/soft drinks were statistically significant predictors of sleep duration. On average, crewmembers who reported more than one half-hour of sunlight each day slept on average ∼40 min (10%) less than their peers working the same shifts who received less than one half-hour of sunlight (on average 6.05 ± 0.90 h vs. 6.71 ± 0.91 h, respectively). Exposure to sunlight, work hours, and consumption of caffeinated beverages are important factors when planning watchstanding schedules at sea. Even though further research is needed, our results suggest that even brief exposure to sunlight may contribute to circadian misalignment that negatively affects sleep in the operational environment. Educating crewmembers about sleep hygiene, especially the important roles played by sunlight and caffeine, could potentially improve the sleep and fatigue levels of this population of maritime shiftworkers.Shattuck NL, Matsangas P. Sunlight exposure, work hours, caffeine consumption, and sleep duration in the naval environment. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(6):579-585.

  17. Working Hours Mismatch, Macroeconomic Changes, and Mental Well-being in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moortel, Deborah; Thévenon, Olivier; De Witte, Hans; Vanroelen, Christophe

    2017-06-01

    This study explores the association between involuntarily working less or more than the standard workweek and poor mental well-being, and whether this relationship is dependent upon (changing) national-level unemployment and gross domestic product growth rates. Data from the European Social Survey Round 2 (2004-2005) and Round 5 (2010) were analyzed. The sample included 16,224 male and 16,184 female employees. Mental well-being was assessed by the World Health Organization Well-being Index. Three-level linear multilevel modeling was used to account for clustering of employees within research years and countries. Working involuntary long hours was positively associated with poor mental well-being for men. For women, working voluntary long, involuntary long, and involuntary short hours were positively associated with poor mental well-being. The mental well-being of women working voluntary and involuntary long hours was negatively influenced by deteriorating economic conditions. This study suggests women are more vulnerable to the effects of long working hours and working hours mismatch on mental well-being, especially during difficult economic periods.

  18. Influence on working hours among shift workers and effects on sleep quality - An intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Anne Helene; Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Aust, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present intervention study was to examine if increased influence on working hours among shift workers led to better sleep quality. 391 employees were categorized into groups based on the performed activities: High (self-rostering), moderate (education and/or policy for working hours......), and low intensity intervention (meetings and discussions) and reference. Sleep quality was assessed by Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire (KSQ) at baseline and follow-up (12 months). To elucidate the process of the intervention interviews were conducted. Influence on one's own working hours increased only...... in the high intensity group (p sleep quality were observed. Thus, sleep quality was not improved by increasing work time influence in the present group of Danish elder care workers. This was partly due to program failure (failed intervention), but may also be due...

  19. [Adjustment to retirement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goewie, R

    1979-02-01

    Rather frequently a person's commitment to his work is taken as one of the factors that thwart his adaptation to retirement. However, research has pointed out that people of different socio-economic classes do not in the same degree commit themselves to their work. Moreover a strong commitment to work does not necessarily lead to a negative attitude towards retirement, nor does a loose tie to one's work always lead to a positive attitude towards retirement. Factors that are more important to facilitate adaptation to retirement, are: to have sufficient means of subsistence, satisfying relationships, a good health, and the possibility to lead an active life. These requirements will be more frequently met with people of the higher and middle occupational level than with those of the lower level. Therefore, the former may be expected to show a better adaptation to retirement.

  20. The relation between maternal work hours and cognitive outcomes of young school-aged children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Künn-Nelen, A.C.; de Grip, A.; Fouarge, D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is the first that analyzes the relation between maternal work hours and the cognitive outcomes of young school-going children. When children attend school, the potential time working mothers miss out with their children, is smaller than when children do not yet attend school. At the same

  1. The effectiveness of a four-hour challenge course on leadership efficacy and work efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theresa Odello; Eddie Hill; Edwin Gomez

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the effects of participation in a 4-hour challenge course on leadership efficacy and work efficacy of college students. The findings of this research indicate that both leadership and work efficacy increased significantly after participation in a challenge course and that increased levels of the participants' self-efficacy remained 6 weeks...

  2. Gender and the Effect of Working Hours on Firm-Sponsored Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picchio, Matteo; van Ours, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Using employees’ longitudinal data, we study the effect of working hours on the propensity of firms to sponsor training of their employees. We show that, whereas male part-time workers are less likely to receive training than male full-timers, parttime working women are as likely to receive training

  3. Telework: timesaving or time-consuming? An investigation into actual working hours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, P.; Wetzels, C.; Tijdens, K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to clarify the relationship between telework and the actual time employees put into their jobs. One of the reported threats to teleworkers’ personal lives is that in order to finish their work, they not only use up saved commuting time, but also part of their non-working hours, even

  4. Maintaining outcomes in a surgical residency while complying with resident working hour regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, James M; Nawotniak, Ruth; Cummiskey, Donna; Berger, Roseanne; Posner, Alan; Seibel, Roger; Hoover, E

    2002-10-01

    Regulatory requirements for resident working hours were designed to improve patient care. Compliance challenges a training program to meet procedural and clinical requirements. This is a retrospective study of a 5-year experience in addressing the challenges and studying the impact of compliance on resident caseload and board performance. Our surgical program adopted strict start/stop working hours for clinical contact. Program leadership modified the program to establish procedural and performance criteria. Procedures were prioritized and assignments were changed to maximize clinical and procedural experience while reducing redundancy of experience. Procedural activity was monitored frequently. Compliance with working hour regulations was monitored and behavior modified where necessary. A web based computer program was developed to improve measurement of compliance and provide feedback. Outcome measures included both the number of procedures as reported by the ACGME and performance on the American Board of Surgery, Qualifying Examination. Working hour compliance is greater than 95%. First time pass rate on the Qualifying examination is 90% (45/50). There is no significant difference in the procedural activity. Complying with working hour regulations improves the quality of a resident's life and can be achieved while maintaining procedural experience and guaranteeing academic development.

  5. Working hours, coping skills, and psychological health in Japanese daytime workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Yasumasa; Sasaki, Takeshi; Iwasaki, Kenji; Mori, Ippei

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between coping skills, working hours, and psychological health among Japanese daytime workers. Self-administered questionnaires were mailed to a randomly selected sample of 2,000 workers who were members of a pre-recruited market research panel. A total of 1,821 participants responded (response rate=91.1%). Participants completed a questionnaire regarding working hours, coping skills, and psychological health (negative emotions, fatigue, and concentration/activity levels). Analyses of covariance were conducted to determine the relations of number of working hours, coping skills, and their interactions to psychological health with control for sex, age, drinking, job type, and employment type. Results revealed that working hours were significantly associated with fatigue and concentration/activity levels. High levels of instrumental support and positive reframing were significantly associated with low levels of negative emotions, fatigue, and concentration/activity levels. High levels of self-blame, denial, substance use, venting, self-distraction, religion, and behavioral disengagement were significantly associated with high levels of negative emotions, fatigue, and concentration/activity levels. This study suggests that improving coping skills such as using instrumental support or positive reframing may reduce the adverse health effects of long working hours.

  6. New Zealanders working non-standard hours also have greater exposure to other workplace hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Sarah M; Gander, Philippa H; Eng, Amanda; Cheng, Soo; Douwes, Jeroen; Ellison-Loschmann, Lis; McLean, Dave; Pearce, Neil; 'tMannetje, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to workplace hazards, such as dust, solvents, and fumes, has the potential to adversely affect the health of people. However, the effects of workplace hazards on health may differ when exposure occurs at different times in the circadian cycle, and among people who work longer hours or who do not obtain adequate sleep. The aim of the present study was to document exposures to workplace hazards across a national sample of New Zealanders, comparing people who work a standard 08:00 -17:00 h Monday-to-Friday working week (Std hours) and those who do not (N-Std hours). New Zealanders (n = 10 000) aged 20-64 yrs were randomly selected from the Electoral Roll to take part in a nationwide survey of workplace exposures. Telephone interviews were conducted between 2004 and 2006, using a six-part questionnaire addressing demographics, detailed information on the current or most recent job (including exposures to a range of workplace hazards), sleep, sleepiness, and health status. N-Std hours were categorised on the basis of: being required to start work prior to 07:00 h or finish work after 21:00 h and/or; having a regular on-call commitment (at least once per week) and/or; working rotating shifts and/or; working night shift(s) in the last month. The response rate was 37% (n = 3003), with 22.2% of participants (n = 656) categorised as working N-Std hours. Industry sectors with the highest numbers of participants working N-Std hours were manufacturing, health and community services, and agriculture, fishing, and forestry. Response rate was 37% (n = 3003) with 22.2% (n = 656) categorised as working N-Std hours. Participants working N-Std hours were more likely to be exposed to all identified hazards, including multiple hazards (OR = 2.45, 95% CI = 2.01-3.0) compared to those working Std hours. Participants working N-Std hours were also more likely to report 'never/rarely' getting enough sleep (OR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.15-1.65), 'never/rarely' waking refreshed (OR = 1

  7. Employees' use of social media for private reasons during working hours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnlaugsdottir, Johanna

    2015-02-01

    The objectives of the study were to find out: Whether Icelandic organizations allowed open access to social media (SM), whether the respondents used SM for private reasons during working hours, which SM they used, how much time they devoted to such use, and what was the attitude of managers and the employees themselves towards such use. The respondents were asked to disclose whether they worked in the private or the public sector and the type of organization that they worked for. This was a two-dimensional study: A questionnaire sent to an internet panel and a telephone survey both based on a random sample selected from the National Registry in February 2013. A similar study has not been performed in Iceland before. Foreign studies of the same nature are not known, only related research. The main findings were that about half of the organizations allowed open access to SM, just below 50% of respondents took advantage of SM for personal use during working hours and the great majority used Facebook. Employees used a considerable part of their working hours for personal use of SM. The majority of respondents were of the opinion that managers objected to the use of SM during working hours and a larger majority believed that such use of themselves was unacceptable. The survey adds valuable information for a better understanding of the status of SM at places of work. The results could be of value to organizations that want to evaluate the pros and cons of SM for the organization.

  8. Long and atypical working hours and the impact on intimate family life social activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans H. K.

    An increasing number of families has to meet the challenges of working in a 24-7 society and at the same time striving to take part in everyday family life. Research is not conclusive with respect to what degree atypical working hours has an impact on, for example, work-family balance, instable...... participate in together with their children (e.g. enjoying breakfasts together). On the other hand other research shows that factors like both parents having atypical working hours and small children in the home suggests a negative impact on family life. In addition, not much research has scrutinized...... through our longitudinal survey study of everyday family and work-life. So in short, this paper will present and discuss an analysis of the relationship between work life and intimate family life social activities as they evolve over time and across households....

  9. Implementation of self-rostering (the PRIO-project) Effects on working hours, recovery and health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Anne Helene; Albertsen, Karen; Nabe Nielsen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to (i) investigate the consequences of self-rostering for working hours, recovery, and health, and (ii) elucidate the mechanisms through which recovery and health are affected. Methods Twenty eight workplaces were allocated to either an intervention or reference...... workplace reports of working hours (N=718) were obtained at baseline and 12 months later. The interaction term between intervention and time was tested in mixed models and multinomial logistic regression models. Results The odds ratio (OR) of having short [OR 4.8, 95 % confidence interval (95% CI) 1.......17, 95% CI -0.29– -0.04) and B (β= -0.17, 95% CI -0.27– -0.07). There were no effects on recovery and health in intervention C, and overall, there were no detrimental effects on recovery or health. The benefits of the intervention were not related to changes in working hours and did not differ by gender...

  10. Part-time work and work hour preferences : An international comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielers, Rudolf; Münderlein, Maria; Koster, Ferry

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this article is to explain cross-country differences in over- and under-employment. The focus is on the effects of the growth of part-time work. We argue and demonstrate that the spread and acceptance of part-time work results in a downward adaptation of descriptive norms regulating work

  11. Adjustment to Retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Solinge, H.; Krauss Withbourne, S.

    2016-01-01

    Retirement is an important life course event that marks the start of a new life stage in which work is no longer dominant. Thus, employees have to adjust to the significant life changes that accompany the transition and seek to achieve psychological comfort with their retirement life. This entry

  12. Paediatric cardiology fellowship training: effect of work-hour regulations on scholarly activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronai, Christina; Lang, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In 2003, work-hour regulations were implemented by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Much has been published regarding resident rest and quality of life as well as patient safety. There has been no examination on the effect of work-hour restrictions on academic productivity of fellows in training. Paediatric subspecialty fellows have a scholarly requirement mandated by the American Board of Pediatrics. We have examined the impact of work-hour restrictions on the scholarly productivity of paediatric cardiology fellows during their fellowship. We conducted a literature search for all paediatric cardiology fellows between 1998 and 2007 at a single academic institution as first or senior authors on papers published during their 3-year fellowship and 3 years after completion of their categorical fellowship (n=63, 30 fellows before 2003 and 33 fellows after 2003). The numbers of first- or senior-author fellow publications before and after 2003 were compared. We also collected data on final paediatric cardiology subspecialty career choice. There was no difference in the number of fellow first-author publications before and after 2003. Before work-hour restrictions, the mean number of publications per fellow was 2.1 (±2.2), and after work-hour restrictions it was 2.0 (±1.8), (p=0.89). By subspecialty career choice, fellows who select electrophysiology, preventative cardiology, and heart failure always published within the 6-year time period. Since the implementation of work-hour regulations, total number of fellow first-authored publications has not changed. The role of subspecialty choice may play a role in academic productivity of fellows in training.

  13. What are the mature men who do not work, do not look for a job, and are not retired doing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarano, Ana Amelia; Carvalho, Daniele Fernandes

    2015-09-01

    Reduced participation of the male population in economic activities is the result of their later entry and earlier leave from the labor market. This earlier exit is not only associated to "early" retirement. Between 1993 and 2013, there was an increase in the number of men aged 50-59 who were not working, not looking for a job, and were not retired (NER) . The literature stresses that work is the most important social event of a man's life, and the traditional gender contract establishes the breadwinner role for men and the caregiver one for women. This growth suggests changes in gender relations since a decrease was observed in the proportion of male household heads, and an increase in that of male spouses, and of those living with their parents. This may be a consequence of their difficulties in participating in the labor market, also given their low education level; therefore, requiring greater participation from women. This trend is contradictory with the new demographic regime. A later leave from economic activities is an important requirement to minimize the challenges brought about by the reducing workforce and aging population.

  14. Administrative Circular No. 22B (Rev. 2) - Compensation for hours of long-term shift work

    CERN Document Server

    Department Head Office - HR Department

    2016-01-01

    Administrative Circular No. 22B (Rev. 2) entitled "Compensation for hours of long-term shift work",  approved by the Director-General following discussion in the Standing Concertation Committee meeting on 22 March 2016, will be available on 1st September 2016 via the following link: https://cds.cern.ch/record/2208538.   This revised circular cancels and replaces Administrative Circular No. 22B (Rev. 1) also entitled "Compensation for hours of long-term shift work" of March 2011. This document contains minor changes to reflect the new career structure. This circular will enter into force on 1st September 2016.

  15. Work Hours Offer in Colombia: an Approach to its Determinants, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Eduardo Rangel Jiménez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available When participating in the job market, an individual must determine the amount of work hours to offer, a situation illustrated by economic theory through the income and substitution effects. This paper reports the results of the econometric estimation of a three-stage model of the hours of individual work for Colombia, based on the 2012 Quality of Life Survey. In the first stage, a model of the probability of being employed is made; then, a Mincer Equation corrected by selection bias is estimated and, finally, an equation of work hours is estimated using the Tobit model, in terms of wages predicted to correct endogeneity. Results show that the substitution effect takes precedence over the income effect; that age (up to a threshold, being head of household, having children under five years of age, being married or living in a common-law marriage and, finally, having a written employment contract, have a positive effect on the number of hours offered; on the other hand, unearned income has a negative effect on the number of hours offered.

  16. Weekly hours of informal caregiving and paid work, and the risk of cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jesper; Dich, Nadya; Lange, Theis

    2017-01-01

    Background: Little is known on the association between weekly hours of informal caregiving and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The objective was to investigate the individual and joint effects of weekly hours of informal caregiving and paid work on the risk of CVD. Methods: Pooled analysis...... with 1396 informal caregivers in gainful employment, from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health and the Whitehall II study. Informal caregiving was defined as care for an aged or disabled relative. The outcome was CVD during 10 years follow-up. Analyzes were adjusted for age, sex, children......, marital status and occupational grade. Results: There were 59 cases of CVD. Providing care >20 h weekly were associated with a higher risk of CVD compared to those providing care 1-8 h weekly (hazard ratio = 2.63, 95%CI: 1.20; 5.76), irrespectively of weekly work hours. In sensitivity analyzes, we found...

  17. Reducing Risks to Women Linked to Shift Work, Long Work Hours, and Related Workplace Sleep and Fatigue Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Claire C

    2015-10-01

    In the United States, an estimated 12% to 28% of working women are on shift work schedules, and 12% work more than 48 hours per week. Shift work and long work hours are associated with many health and safety risks, including obesity, injuries, and negative reproductive outcomes. Over time, the worker is at risk for developing a wide range of chronic diseases. These work schedules can also strain personal relationships, owing to fatigue and poor mood from sleep deprivation and reduced quality time to spend with family and friends. Worker errors from fatigue can lead to reduced quality of goods and services, negatively impacting the employer. In addition, mistakes by fatigued workers can have far-reaching negative effects on the community, ranging from medical care errors to motor vehicle crashes and industrial disasters that endanger others. To reduce the many risks that are linked to these demanding work hours, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducts research, develops guidance and authoritative recommendations, and translates and disseminates scientific information to protect workers, their families, employers, and the community. The key message to reduce these risks is making sleep a priority in the employer's systems for organizing work and in the worker's personal life. The NIOSH website has freely available online training programs with suggestions for workers and their managers to help them better cope with this workplace hazard.

  18. A Worry-Free Retirement in Korea: Effectiveness of Retirement Coaching Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyejin; Suh, Wookyung; Lee, Jiyoung; Jang, Younju; Kim, Minjung

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated a retirement coaching educational program using the mixed method research design. A structured survey was distributed to 48 financial planners who had undergone 50-hour retirement education including retirement coaching. The coaching was conducted in two sessions in 2015. Results revealed that first, the retirement coaching…

  19. Association among Working Hours, Occupational Stress, and Presenteeism among Wage Workers: Results from the Second Korean Working Conditions Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sung-Hwan; Leem, Jong-Han; Park, Shin-Goo; Heo, Yong-Seok; Lee, Bum-Joon; Moon, So-Hyun; Jung, Dal-Young; Kim, Hwan-Cheol

    2014-03-24

    The purpose of the present study was to identify the association between presenteeism and long working hours, shiftwork, and occupational stress using representative national survey data on Korean workers. We analyzed data from the second Korean Working Conditions Survey (KWCS), which was conducted in 2010, in which a total of 6,220 wage workers were analyzed. The study population included the economically active population aged above 15 years, and living in the Republic of Korea. We used the chi-squared test and multivariate logistic regression to test the statistical association between presenteeism and working hours, shiftwork, and occupational stress. Approximately 19% of the workers experienced presenteeism during the previous 12 months. Women had higher rates of presenteeism than men. We found a statistically significant dose-response relationship between working hours and presenteeism. Shift workers had a slightly higher rate of presenteeism than non-shift workers, but the difference was not statistically significant. Occupational stress, such as high job demand, lack of rewards, and inadequate social support, had a significant association with presenteeism. The present study suggests that long working hours and occupational stress are significantly related to presenteeism.

  20. Flexible working hours, health, and well-being in Europe: some considerations from a SALTSA project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, Giovanni; Akerstedt, Torbjorn; Nachreiner, Friedhelm; Baltieri, Federica; Carvalhais, José; Folkard, Simon; Frings-Dresen, Monique; Gadbois, Charles; Gartner, Johannes; Sukalo, Hiltraud Grzech; Härmä, Mikko; Kandolin, Irja; Sartori, Samantha; Silvério, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    The project brought together researchers from 9 EU-Countries and resulted in a number of actions, in particular the following: (a) There is an urgent need of defining the concept of flexible working hours, since it has been used in many different and even counterintuitive ways; the most obvious

  1. Mothers' and Fathers' Work Hours, Child Gender, and Behavior in Middle Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sarah; Li, Jianghong; Kendall, Garth; Strazdins, Lyndall; Jacoby, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the association between typical parental work hours (including nonemployed parents) and children's behavior in two-parent heterosexual families. Child behavior was measured by the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) at ages 5, 8, and 10 in the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study ("N" = 4,201 child-year…

  2. Long hours of work in the U.S.: associations with demographic and organizational characteristics, psychosocial working conditions, and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosch, James W; Caruso, Claire C; Rosa, Roger R; Sauter, Steven L

    2006-11-01

    There are relatively few studies of large national databases that contain information on working hours and health. The current study involved an analysis of data from a quality of work life (QWL) module developed for the 2002 General Social Survey. This module collected work and health data from a representative sample of the U.S. population (N=1,744). Descriptive analyses were conducted for five groups based on total hours worked per week: part-time (1-34 hr/week), full-time (35-40 hr/week), lower overtime (41-48 hr/week), medium overtime (49-69 hr/week), and higher overtime (70+ hr/week). Multiple logistic regression examined the association between these five categories and several measures of health and well-being. Compared to full-time workers, the three groups of overtime workers were more likely to be male, white, and middle-aged, with higher levels of education and income. They were also more likely to be self-employed, salaried, work as independent contractors, have more than one job, and work split/irregular/on-call shifts. Although overtime work was characterized by higher levels of job stress and perceptions of overwork, it was also associated with increased levels of participation in decision making and opportunities to develop special abilities. Several significant associations emerged between hours of work and measures of health and well-being, particularly for respondents in the higher overtime group (70+ hr/week). Overtime workers differ from their part-time and full-time counterparts in several important areas. Some of these differences tended to increase with the number of overtime hours worked, suggesting a linear relationship. However, caution is warranted before generalizing the results of this study to specific occupations or workplaces.

  3. Strategies to accommodate resident work-hour restrictions: impact on surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiburg, Carter; James, Ted; Ashikaga, Takamura; Moalem, Jacob; Cherr, Greg

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of duty-hour restrictions has impacted surgical training. Several strategies were introduced by training programs in response to these restrictions. The purpose of this study was to assess the various strategies employed by residency programs to comply with work-hour restrictions with respect to the impact on the quality of surgical education. A national survey was developed and distributed to resident members of the Resident and Associate Society of the American College of Surgeons in all accredited residency programs across North America. Questions in the survey addressed 10 separate accommodation strategies used by training programs to adhere to resident work-hour restrictions. Resident respondents completed a 5-point Likert scale rating each strategy according to its impact on surgical education (detrimental, not very helpful, neutral, somewhat helpful, and very helpful). A total of 599 (9.7%) responses were received from 6186 members of the Resident Associate Society. The use of health information technology (IT), nurse practitioners, and physician assistants were most highly rated. Hiring clinical fellows, establishing nonteaching services, and shift-work scheduling were the three most poorly rated accommodations to work-hour restrictions with respect to resident education. Hospital IT and nonphysician care providers were rated by residents to optimize surgical education in the current work-hour limitation environment. We infer that strategies which lead to increased efficiency and redistribution of resident workload allow surgical trainees to spend more time on activities perceived to have higher educational value. Copyright © 2011 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Implementing the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations on resident physician work hours, supervision, and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Alexander B; Shea, Sandra; Czeisler, Charles A; Landrigan, Christopher P; Leape, Lucian

    2011-01-01

    Long working hours and sleep deprivation have been a facet of physician training in the US since the advent of the modern residency system. However, the scientific evidence linking fatigue with deficits in human performance, accidents and errors in industries from aeronautics to medicine, nuclear power, and transportation has mounted over the last 40 years. This evidence has also spawned regulations to help ensure public safety across safety-sensitive industries, with the notable exception of medicine. In late 2007, at the behest of the US Congress, the Institute of Medicine embarked on a year-long examination of the scientific evidence linking resident physician sleep deprivation with clinical performance deficits and medical errors. The Institute of Medicine's report, entitled "Resident duty hours: Enhancing sleep, supervision and safety", published in January 2009, recommended new limits on resident physician work hours and workload, increased supervision, a heightened focus on resident physician safety, training in structured handovers and quality improvement, more rigorous external oversight of work hours and other aspects of residency training, and the identification of expanded funding sources necessary to implement the recommended reforms successfully and protect the public and resident physicians themselves from preventable harm. Given that resident physicians comprise almost a quarter of all physicians who work in hospitals, and that taxpayers, through Medicare and Medicaid, fund graduate medical education, the public has a deep investment in physician training. Patients expect to receive safe, high-quality care in the nation's teaching hospitals. Because it is their safety that is at issue, their voices should be central in policy decisions affecting patient safety. It is likewise important to integrate the perspectives of resident physicians, policy makers, and other constituencies in designing new policies. However, since its release, discussion of the

  5. Long working hours and metabolic syndrome among Japanese men: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Tomoko

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The link between long working hours and health has been extensively studied for decades. Despite global concern regarding metabolic syndrome, however, no studies to date have solely evaluated the relationship between long working hours and that syndrome. We therefore examined the association between long working hours and metabolic syndrome in a cross-sectional study. Methods Between May and October 2009, we collected data from annual health checkups and questionnaires from employees at a manufacturing company in Shizuoka, Japan. Questionnaires were returned by 1,601 workers (response rate: 96.2%; 1,314 men, 287 women. After exclusions, including women because of a lack of overtime work, the analysis was performed for 933 men. We calculated odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for metabolic syndrome. Further, we conducted a stratified analysis by age-group ( Results Metabolic syndrome was identified in 110 workers (11.8%. We observed a positive association between working hours and metabolic syndrome after adjusting for age, occupation, shift work, smoking status, frequency of alcohol consumption, and cohabiting status. Compared with subjects who worked 7–8 h/day, multivariate ORs for metabolic syndrome were 1.66 (95% CI, 0.91–3.01, 1.48 (95% CI, 0.75–2.90, and 2.32 (95% CI, 1.04–5.16 for those working 8–9 h/day, 9–10 h/day, and >10 h/day, respectively. Similar patterns were obtained when we excluded shift workers from the analysis. In age-stratified analysis, the corresponding ORs among workers aged ≥40 years were 2.02 (95% CI, 1.04–3.90, 1.21 (95% CI, 0.53–2.77, and 3.14 (95% CI, 1.24–7.95. In contrast, no clear association was found among workers aged Conclusions The present study suggests that 10 h/day may be a trigger level of working hours for increased risk of metabolic syndrome among Japanese male workers.

  6. Longitudinal examination of temporality in the association between chronic disease diagnosis and changes in work status and hours worked.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetha, Arif; Chen, Cynthia; Mustard, Cameron; Ibrahim, Selahadin; Bielecky, Amber; Beaton, Dorcas; Smith, Peter

    2017-03-01

    To examine the longitudinal relationship between incidence of diagnosed chronic disease and work status and hours worked. A dynamic cohort approach was taken to construct our study sample using the Canadian National Population Health Survey. Participant inclusion criteria included being employed and without a chronic health condition in the survey cycle prior to diagnosis, and participation in consecutive surveys following diagnosis. Each respondent was matched with up to 5 respondents without a diagnosed health condition. The direct and indirect associations between chronic disease and work status and hours worked following diagnosis were examined using probit and linear regression path models. Separate models were developed for arthritis, back problems, diabetes, hypertension and heart disease. We identified 799 observations with a diagnosis of arthritis, 858 with back pain, 178 with diabetes, 569 with hypertension and 163 with heart disease, which met our selection criteria. An examination of total effects at time 1 and time 2 showed that, excluding hypertension, chronic disease diagnosis was related to work loss. The time 2 effect of chronic disease diagnosis on work loss was mediated through time 1 work status. With the exception of heart disease, an incident case of chronic disease was not related to changes in work hours among observations with continuous work participation. Chronic disease can result in work loss following diagnosis. Research is required to understand how modifying occupational conditions may benefit employment immediately after diagnosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. The effect of limiting residents' work hours on their surgical training: a Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanchuk, Ken

    2004-05-01

    Restrictions in residents' work hours have been in place in Canada for roughly a decade, having been negotiated rather than imposed. The changes in residents' schedules that resulted are roughly equivalent to the limitation of 80 duty hours per week in the United States. When work-hours restrictions began, surgery faculty were worried that residents' experience would be compromised. But these fears have not materialized. Why? The author maintains there are many reasons. (1) Most surgical procedures are now faster, and lengthy inpatient care has diminished, all of which saves time. (2) Formerly difficult or risky procedures are now performed more frequently and safely, which increases residents' education about difficult conditions. (3) A variety of resources (e.g., skills-transfer courses, surgical simulators, etc.) are now available for residents to learn and evolve surgical techniques, and residents take advantage of these resources, being highly motivated to learn the best in the time available to them. (4) There have been positive changes in residents' education that have helped them become more efficient learners than before, with improved resources and skills for faster access to information. The author maintains that in his present surgery residency program, the residents still work extremely hard but are more protected from the unending demands for patient care. They have more time for orderly study and greater opportunities to develop skills other than technical ones. They are in a happier work setting, which the author strongly believes facilitates improved patient care.

  8. The organization of working hours of selected employee categories in Czech businesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbancová Hana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current dynamic working environment, the adaptation of working hours is an important instrument for supporting the work and performance of all groups of employees. It also serves as an instrument that encourages their identification with the company. The aim of this article is to identify and evaluate the utilization of individual methods of work organization among selected groups of employees in Czech companies across the gamut of the business sector. The analysed data comes from a quantitative questionnairebased survey (n=315. The results show that in the Czech companies, flexitime is most frequent among regular employees (51.7% and graduates up to 30 years old (24.1%. A reduced work schedule is most frequently used by mothers with children and senior citizens (41.3%, 27% and as part-time work among students (41%. The use of flexible working hours is an instrument of diversity management and builds the company brand through enlisting the cooperation of different groups of employees.

  9. Working hours and the onset of depressive disorder: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Imamura, Kotaro; Kawakami, Norito

    2016-12-01

    : This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to examine whether working beyond the standard working hours was associated with a greater risk of depressive disorder among workers included in published prospective studies. This manuscript was prepared according to the PRISMA guideline checklist. A database search was conducted using MEDLINE (PubMed), PsycINFO, and PsycARTICLES using a relevant set of keywords. The eligibility criteria were as follows: (1) participants were adult workers; (2) exposure was defined as overtime work; (3) outcome were depressive disorders clinically diagnosed or assessed by a structured interview and (4) the study design was prospective or cohort. 7 studies were identified in the systematic review and meta-analysis. Overtime work was associated with a small, non-significant, elevated risk of depressive disorder (pooled relative risk=1.075; 95% CI 0.834 to 1.387; p=0.575) in a random effects model. The association tended to be greater for women. The risk of working 50 or more hours per week was slightly but not significantly increased (pooled relative risk=1.241; 95% CI 0.880 to 1.750; p=0.218). The effect of overtime work on depressive disorder remains inconclusive and may be small if not negligible. Sex differences and the effect of longer working hours on depressive disorder should be addressed in the future. Prospero CRD42015020003; Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Implementing the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations on resident physician work hours, supervision, and safety

    OpenAIRE

    Blum AB; Shea S; Czeisler CA; Landrigan CP; Leape L

    2011-01-01

    Long working hours and sleep deprivation have been a facet of physician training in the US since the advent of the modern residency system. However, the scientific evidence linking fatigue with deficits in human performance, accidents and errors in industries from aeronautics to medicine, nuclear power, and transportation has mounted over the last 40 years. This evidence has also spawned regulations to help ensure public safety across safety-sensitive industries, with the notable exception of...

  11. Changes in outcomes for internal medicine inpatients after work-hour regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Leora I; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Lin, Zhenqiu; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2007-07-17

    Limits on resident work hours are intended to reduce fatigue-related errors, but may raise risk by increasing transfers of responsibility for patients. To examine changes in outcomes for internal medicine patients after the implementation of work-hour regulations. Retrospective cohort study. Urban, academic medical center. 14,260 consecutive patients discharged from the teaching (housestaff) service and 6664 consecutive patients discharged from the nonteaching (hospitalist) service between 1 July 2002 and 30 June 2004. Outcomes included intensive care unit utilization, length of stay, discharge disposition, 30-day readmission rate to the study institution, pharmacist interventions to prevent error, drug-drug interactions and in-hospital death. The teaching service had net improvements in 3 outcomes. Relative to changes experienced by the nonteaching service, the rate of intensive care unit utilization decreased by 2.1% (95% CI, -3.3% to -0.7%; P = 0.002), the rate of discharge to home or rehabilitation facility versus elsewhere improved by 5.3% (CI, 2.6% to 7.6%; P error were reduced by 1.92 interventions per 100 patient-days (CI, -2.74 to -1.03 interventions per 100 patient-days; P < 0.001). Teaching and nonteaching services had similar changes over time in length of stay, 30-day readmission rate, and adverse drug-drug interactions. In-hospital death was uncommon in both groups, and change over time was similar in the 2 groups. The study was a retrospective, nonrandomized design that assessed a limited number of outcomes. Teaching and nonteaching cohorts may not have been affected similarly by secular trends in patient care. After the implementation of work-hour regulations, 3 of 7 outcomes improved for patients in the teaching service relative to those in the nonteaching service. The authors found no evidence of adverse unintended consequences after the institution of work-hour regulations.

  12. Inpatient safety outcomes following the 2011 residency work-hour reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Lauren; Jarlenski, Marian; Wu, Albert W; Feldman, Leonard; Conigliaro, Joseph; Swann, Jenna; Desai, Sanjay V

    2014-06-01

    The impact of the 2011 residency work-hour reforms on patient safety is not known. To evaluate the association between implementation of the 2011 reforms and patient safety outcomes at a large academic medical center. Observational study using difference-in-differences estimation strategy to evaluate whether safety outcomes improved among patients discharged from resident and hospitalist (nonresident) services before (2008-2011) and after (2011-2012) residency work-hour changes. All adult patients discharged from general medicine services from July 2008 through June 2012. Outcomes evaluated included length of stay, 30-day readmission, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, inpatient mortality, and presence of Maryland Hospital Acquired Conditions. Independent variables included time period (pre- vs postreform), resident versus hospitalist service, patient age at admission, race, gender, and case mix index. Patients discharged from the resident services in the postreform period had higher likelihood of an ICU stay (5.7% vs 4.5%, difference 1.4%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.5% to 2.2%), and lower likelihood of 30-day readmission (17.2% vs 20.1%, difference 2.8%; 95 % CI: 1.3 to 4.3%) than patients discharged from the resident services in the prereform period. Comparing pre- and postreform periods on the resident and hospitalist services, there were no significant differences in patient safety outcomes. In the first year after implementation of the 2011 work-hour reforms relative to prior years, we found no change in patient safety outcomes in patients treated by residents compared with patients treated by hospitalists. Further study of the long-term impact of residency work-hour reforms is indicated to ensure improvement in patient safety. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  13. Implementation of self-rostering (the PRIO-project): effects on working hours, recovery, and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garde, Anne Helene; Albertsen, Karen; Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Carneiro, Isabella Gomes; Skotte, Jørgen; Hansen, Sofie Mandrup; Lund, Henrik; Hvid, Helge; Hansen, Åse Marie

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to (i) investigate the consequences of self-rostering for working hours, recovery, and health, and (ii) elucidate the mechanisms through which recovery and health are affected. Twenty eight workplaces were allocated to either an intervention or reference group. Intervention A encompassed the possibility to specify preferences for starting time and length of shift down to 15 minutes intervals. Interventions B and C included the opportunity to choose between a number of predefined duties. Questionnaires (N=840) on recovery and health and objective workplace reports of working hours (N=718) were obtained at baseline and 12 months later. The interaction term between intervention and time was tested in mixed models and multinomial logistic regression models. The odds ratio (OR) of having short [OR 4.8, 95 % confidence interval (95% CI) 1.9-12.3] and long (OR 4.8, 95% CI 2.9-8.0) shifts increased in intervention A. Somatic symptoms (β= -0.10, 95% CI -0.19- -0.02) and mental distress (β= -0.13, 95% CI -0.23- -0.03) decreased, and sleep (β= 1.7, 95% CI 0.04-0.30) improved in intervention B, and need for recovery was reduced in interventions A (β= -0.17, 95% CI -0.29- -0.04) and B (β= -0.17, 95% CI -0.27- -0.07). There were no effects on recovery and health in intervention C, and overall, there were no detrimental effects on recovery or health. The benefits of the intervention were not related to changes in working hours and did not differ by gender, age, family type, degree of employment, or working hour arrangements. After implementation of self-rostering, employees changed shift length and timing but did not compromise most recommendations for acceptable shift work schedules. Positive consequences of self-rostering for recovery and health were observed, particularly in intervention B where worktime control increased but less extensively than intervention A. The effect could not be statistically explained by changes in actual working hours.

  14. Employment Trajectories Beyond Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkert, Carola; Hochfellner, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Within the political and academic debate on working longer, post-retirement employment is discussed as an alternative to maintain older workers in the labor market. Our article enhances this discussion by studying determinants of transitions into post-retirement jobs within differing work environments of birth cohorts 1940-1942. We estimate proportional subhazard models accounting for competing risks using unique German social security data linked to pension accounts. Our findings suggest that individuals' preferences to take up post-retirement jobs are not mutually exclusive. Our study provides evidence that taking up post-retirement jobs is related to seeking financial security, continuity, and work ability, suggesting that public policy has to develop target-oriented support through a public policy mix of different measures aligned to the different peer groups in the labor market.

  15. Early retirement among Danish female cleaners and shop assistants according to work environment characteristics and upper extremity complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lone Donbæk; Bonde, Jens Peter Ellekilde; Christensen, Michael Victor

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have shown a negative social gradient in the incidence of early retirement. To prevent undesired early retirement, there is a need for knowledge of specific predictors in addition to social factors with a limited potential for change. The main purpose of this study was to exam...

  16. From living wage to living hours – the Nordic version of the working poor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilsøe, Anna

    2016-01-01

    , the article demonstrates how the increasing use of part-time and Sunday work since the crisis interacts with the increasing shares of young workers and migrant workers. The analysis focuses on retail and hotels/restaurants, which employ the majority of low-wage service workers in Denmark, Norway and Sweden.......The development of service economies in the Western world has led to a debate on the quality of new service jobs as many are low-wage jobs with poor working conditions and career opportunities. Although the incidence of low-wage service work is somewhat lower in the Nordic countries than elsewhere...... in low-wage service work in the private sector of Denmark, Norway and Sweden. The concept of living hours is used to explain developments in low-wage service jobs that are not explained by the concept of a living wage. On the basis of cross-sectional data from the European Labour Force Survey...

  17. Predicting working beyond retirement in the Netherlands : An interdisciplinary approach involving occupational epidemiology and economics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scharn, Micky; van der Beek, Allard J; Huisman, Martijn; de Wind, Astrid; Lindeboom, Maarten; Elbers, Chris Tm; Geuskens, Goedele A; Boot, Cécile Rl

    2017-01-01

    Objectives No study so far has combined register-based socioeconomic information with self-reported information on health, demographics, work characteristics, and the social environment. The aim of this study was to investigate whether socioeconomic, health, demographic, work characteristics and

  18. Blended working and the employability of older workers, retirement timing, and bridge employment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Yperen, Nico W.; Wörtler, Burkhard

    2017-01-01

    Blended working, a term we recently introduced, combines on-site and off-site working, enabled by the utilization of information and communications technologies (ICTs) that provides workers with almost constant access to job-relevant information and coworkers. In this commentary, we respond to three

  19. Assessment of stress and autonomic nervous activity in Japanese female ambulance paramedics working 24-hour shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ayako; Yoshioka, Koichi; Ito, Susumu; Naito, Yuko

    2016-01-01

    We studied the physical and mental conditions of 8 healthy young female ambulance paramedics working 24-hour shifts during their menstrual cycle, including assessment of cardiac autonomic nervous system activity by heart rate variability power spectral analysis. The autonomic activity during the awake period of on- and off-duty days in the follicular, late luteal, and menstruation phases was measured. Questionnaires regarding fatigue and menstrual distress were administered and correlated with the autonomic profile. While degrees of fatigue significantly increased after work, the changes in autonomic activity during the awake period on on-duty days were not significantly different from those on off-duty days (LF/HF, p=0.123; HF/(HF+LF), p=0.153). As for the sleeping period, there were no significant differences. Although the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire (MDQ) revealed the presence of mild menstrual discomfort in the late luteal and menstruation phases, no significant difference was observed in the autonomic profile of the three menstrual cycle phases. No significant correlation was observed between the degree of menstrual distress and autonomic profile, though there was a significant correlation in the late luteal phase between degree of menstrual distress and fatigue after work (pmenstrual discomfort and fatigue after work, their autonomic profile did not alter in the menstrual cycle. It is suggested that healthy young female ambulance paramedics may tolerate 24-hour shifts, though attention should be paid to subjective menstrual symptoms and fatigue.

  20. Optimization of work and rest hours for navigation officers on the ship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simkuva H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The topic of the research as a whole is dedicated to studies of the work load of navigation officers and, consequently, is related to the current international research on the quality of working life. Issues of seafarers' working time are very topical because in recent years the load of navigation officers has significantly increased, either due to increase in shipping intensity, or in the context of the new international maritime law, for example, compliance with the requirements of the ISM CODE (International Management safety Code, THE ISPS (The International Ship and Port Facility Security Code. Irregularities are observed in practice of the seafarers' working hours and rest hours, and even the mismatch, as presented in the port of inspection materials. This article is intended to assess the 2nd and 3rd Officer's load compliance with the regulatory enactments for the work and rest regime to develop proposals to load optimization. Load analysis of Navigation officers is based on international maritime regulations that determine the work and rest regime on ships STCW (The International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, MLC (Maritime Labour Convention. In the article, concrete data is used from the research, which was conducted 18 months on the Handy type of tanker from July, 2012 till December, 2013 in the real time mode. In the article is also concrete data used from 340 survey respondents, which reflects the views of the navigation officers on violations of the work and rest regime on the ship and the fatigue issue.

  1. Motivating employees to work beyond retirement: A multi-level study of the role of I-deals and unit climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bal, P.M.; de Jong, S.; Jansen, P.G.W.; Bakker, A.B.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates what role I-deals (i.e. the idiosyncratic deals made between employees and their organization) play in the motivation of employees to continue working after retirement. We hypothesized two types of I-deals (i.e. development and flexibility I-deals) to be positively

  2. Mothers' Working Hours and Children's Obesity: Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2008-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Goeun; Kim, Hyoung-Ryoul

    2013-10-25

    The aim of this study is to find the association between mothers' working hours and obesity of their children according to children's age and gender. This study used data from the second and third year of KNHANES IV and the first year in KNHANES V (2008-2010). We calculate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) by using survey logistic regression to assess association of mother's working hours with overweight or obesity of her children. The model was adjusted with household income, mothers' education and obesity and mothers' job characteristics. 13-18 aged boys whose mothers worked under 40 hours per week were higher risk for obesity and overweight (including obesity) than 13-18 aged boys whose mothers worked 40-48 hours. 6-12 aged girls whose mothers worked 49-60 hours per week were more overweight (including obesity) than girls whose mothers worked 40-48 hours per week. 13-18 aged girls whose mothers worked over 60 hours were more overweight (including obesity) than the reference. This study showed that girls' obesity was associated with mothers' long working hours. Long working hours can influence health of workers' family.

  3. Work hours and incidence of hypertension among Spanish university graduates: the Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra prospective cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Adriano M; Beunza, Juan J; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Alonso, Alvaro; López, Celeste N; Velásquez-Meléndez, Gustavo; Martínez-González, Miguel A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association between work hours and incidence of hypertension in 8779 participants of a Spanish dynamic prospective cohort of university graduates. The baseline questionnaire included information about the weekly number of hours the participants devoted to work and to home chores. The work hours were grouped into four categories: 39 or less, 40-49, 50-59, and at least 60 for men; 29 or less, 30-39, 40-49, and at least 50 for women. We added up the number of hours working and spent in home chores in what we called 'total activity hours' that was categorized in quartiles, specific by sex. A participant was classified as an incident case of hypertension if he/she was initially free of hypertension at baseline and reported a physician-made diagnosis of hypertension in at least one of the follow-up questionnaires. The associations between work hours or 'total activity hours' and incidence of hypertension were estimated by calculating the multivariable-adjusted odds ratio and its 95% confidence interval, using logistic regression models. The cumulative incidence of hypertension during 4.2 years median follow-up was 5.8%. No association was found between work hours or 'total activity hours' and incidence of hypertension in either sex. The results of our study do not support any association between work hours and incidence of hypertension. Further longitudinal studies in the general population should be conducted to test this relationship.

  4. Lean principles optimize on-time vascular surgery operating room starts and decrease resident work hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Courtney J; Walsh, Daniel B; Horvath, Alexander J; Walsh, Teri R; Herrick, Daniel P; Prentiss, Steven J; Powell, Richard J

    2013-11-01

    Lean process improvement techniques are used in industry to improve efficiency and quality while controlling costs. These techniques are less commonly applied in health care. This study assessed the effectiveness of Lean principles on first case on-time operating room starts and quantified effects on resident work hours. Standard process improvement techniques (DMAIC methodology: define, measure, analyze, improve, control) were used to identify causes of delayed vascular surgery first case starts. Value stream maps and process flow diagrams were created. Process data were analyzed with Pareto and control charts. High-yield changes were identified and simulated in computer and live settings prior to implementation. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of on-time first case starts; secondary outcomes included hospital costs, resident rounding time, and work hours. Data were compared with existing benchmarks. Prior to implementation, 39% of first cases started on time. Process mapping identified late resident arrival in preoperative holding as a cause of delayed first case starts. Resident rounding process inefficiencies were identified and changed through the use of checklists, standardization, and elimination of nonvalue-added activity. Following implementation of process improvements, first case on-time starts improved to 71% at 6 weeks (P = .002). Improvement was sustained with an 86% on-time rate at 1 year (P < .001). Resident rounding time was reduced by 33% (from 70 to 47 minutes). At 9 weeks following implementation, these changes generated an opportunity cost potential of $12,582. Use of Lean principles allowed rapid identification and implementation of perioperative process changes that improved efficiency and resulted in significant cost savings. This improvement was sustained at 1 year. Downstream effects included improved resident efficiency with decreased work hours. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All

  5. Remaking Surgical Socialization: Work Hour Restrictions, Rites of Passage, and Occupational Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Joanna Veazey; Bosk, Charles L.

    2012-01-01

    We examine how a policy aimed at improving patient safety by limiting residents’ work hours brought with it an unintended and unexamined consequence: altered socialization due to modified rites of passage during residency that endangered the stereotypical “Surgical Personality” and created a potential rift between the occupational identities of surgical residents who train under duty hour regulations and those who trained before they were imposed. Through participant observation occurring between June 2008 and June 2010, in-depth interviews (n=13), and focus groups (n=2), we explore how surgical residents training in four U.S. hospitals think about the threats that the shift from unrestricted to restricted duty hours creates for their claims of competence and professionalism. We identify three types of resident responses: (1) neutralizing statements that deny any significant change to occupational identity has occurred; (2) embracing statements that express the belief that a changed and more balanced occupational identity is needed; and (3) apprehensive statements that expressed fear of an altered occupational identity and an anxiety about readiness for individual practice. PMID:22863331

  6. Effects of naps at work on the sleepiness of 12-hour night shift nursing personnel

    OpenAIRE

    Borges, Flávio Notarnicola da Silva; Fischer, Frida Marina; Rotenberg,Lúcia; SOARES, Nilson Silva; FONSECA, Mauro Breviglieri; SMOLENSKY, Michael Hale; Sackett-Lundeen, Linda; Haus, Erhard; Moreno, Claudia Roberta de Castro

    2009-01-01

    Background and objective: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a nap at work on the sleepiness of 12-hour, night-shift (registered and assistant) nursing personnel.Methods: Twelve nurses filled out daily logs, the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KS), and wore wrist actigraphs for two periods of four continuous days.Results: Mean nap duration during the night shifts was 138.3 (SD+39.8) minutes. The mean sleepiness level assessed by the KS score was lower, 3.3 (SD±1.6), ...

  7. An analysis of driving and working hour on commercial motor vehicle driver safety using naturalistic data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soccolich, Susan A; Blanco, Myra; Hanowski, Richard J; Olson, Rebecca L; Morgan, Justin F; Guo, Feng; Wu, Shih-Ching

    2013-09-01

    Current hours-of-service (HOS) regulations prescribe limits to commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers' operating hours. By using naturalistic-data-collection, researchers were able to assess activities performed in the 14-h workday and the relationship between safety-critical events (SCEs) and driving hours, work hours, and breaks. The data used in the analyses were collected in the Naturalistic Truck Driving Study and included 97 drivers and about 735,000 miles of continuous driving data. An assessment of the drivers' workday determined that, on average, drivers spent 66% of their shift driving, 23% in non-driving work, and 11% resting. Analyses evaluating the relationship between driving hours (i.e., driving only) and SCE risk found a time-on-task effect across hours, with no significant difference in safety outcomes between 11th driving hour and driving hours 8, 9 or 10. Analyses on work hours (i.e., driving in addition to non-driving work) found that risk of being involved in an SCE generally increased as work hours increased. This suggests that time-on-task effects may not be related to driving hours alone, but implies an interaction between driving hours and work hours: if a driver begins the day with several hours of non-driving work, followed by driving that goes deep into the 14-h workday, SCE risk was found to increase. Breaks from driving were found to be beneficial in reducing SCEs (during 1-h window after a break) and were effective in counteracting the negative effects of time-on-task. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Job-related stress in academia : the role of relative deprivation, hours worked for different tasks, and childre

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    We examine the role of income relative deprivation, hours worked for different tasks, and children in the job-related stress experienced by academics. Males' job-related stress increases when their incomes are lower than that of their peers', but females are not susceptible to such income comparisons. Job-related stress decreases with hours spent on research provided the hours are not excessive, but hours spent in teaching and on administrative tasks always increase job-related stress. The pr...

  9. Effects of new ways of working on work hours and work location, health and job-related outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijp, Hylco H.; Beckers, Debby G. J.; van de Voorde, F.C.; Geurts, Sabine A. E.; Kompier, Michiel A. J.

    2016-01-01

    New ways of working (NWW) is a type of work organization that is characterized by temporal and spatial flexibility, often combined with extensive use of information and communication technologies (ICT) and performance-based management. In a three-wave intervention study, we examined the effects of

  10. Implementing the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations on resident physician work hours, supervision, and safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blum AB

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Alexander B Blum1, Sandra Shea2, Charles A Czeisler3,4, Christopher P Landrigan3-5, Lucian Leape61Department of Health and Evidence Policy, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA; 2Committee of Interns and Residents, SEIU Healthcare Division, Service Employees International Union, New York, NY, USA; 3Harvard Work Hours, Health and Safety Group, Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 4Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 5Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 6Department of Health Policy and Management, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Long working hours and sleep deprivation have been a facet of physician training in the US since the advent of the modern residency system. However, the scientific evidence linking fatigue with deficits in human performance, accidents and errors in industries from aeronautics to medicine, nuclear power, and transportation has mounted over the last 40 years. This evidence has also spawned regulations to help ensure public safety across safety-sensitive industries, with the notable exception of medicine.

  11. Implementing the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations on resident physician work hours, supervision, and safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Alexander B; Shea, Sandra; Czeisler, Charles A; Landrigan, Christopher P; Leape, Lucian

    2011-01-01

    Long working hours and sleep deprivation have been a facet of physician training in the US since the advent of the modern residency system. However, the scientific evidence linking fatigue with deficits in human performance, accidents and errors in industries from aeronautics to medicine, nuclear power, and transportation has mounted over the last 40 years. This evidence has also spawned regulations to help ensure public safety across safety-sensitive industries, with the notable exception of medicine. In late 2007, at the behest of the US Congress, the Institute of Medicine embarked on a year-long examination of the scientific evidence linking resident physician sleep deprivation with clinical performance deficits and medical errors. The Institute of Medicine’s report, entitled “Resident duty hours: Enhancing sleep, supervision and safety”, published in January 2009, recommended new limits on resident physician work hours and workload, increased supervision, a heightened focus on resident physician safety, training in structured handovers and quality improvement, more rigorous external oversight of work hours and other aspects of residency training, and the identification of expanded funding sources necessary to implement the recommended reforms successfully and protect the public and resident physicians themselves from preventable harm. Given that resident physicians comprise almost a quarter of all physicians who work in hospitals, and that taxpayers, through Medicare and Medicaid, fund graduate medical education, the public has a deep investment in physician training. Patients expect to receive safe, high-quality care in the nation’s teaching hospitals. Because it is their safety that is at issue, their voices should be central in policy decisions affecting patient safety. It is likewise important to integrate the perspectives of resident physicians, policy makers, and other constituencies in designing new policies. However, since its release

  12. Influence of minor children and contribution to household income on work hours of female dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuthy, Raymond A; Jennings, Adrienne D; McQuistan, Michelle R; Marshall, Teresa A; Qian, Fang

    2013-01-01

    To study the association of having minor children and contribution to household income on weekly work hours of Iowa female dentists. A 28-question survey was mailed to all active Iowa dentists. This study represents female dentists who responded to the survey (n = 192; response rate = 63 percent). The dependent variable was whether dentists currently worked full- or part-time (≥ 32 versus 60 percent to household income (57.8 percent) were 3.0 times as likely to work full-time (P = 0.0129). The final regression model indicated that those who contributed >60 percent to household income (P = 0.0096) and had no leave of absence longer than 45 consecutive days within the prior 2 years (P = 0.0483) were more likely to work full-time compared with their counterparts. Iowa female dentists who provided more than 60 percent to household income and had not taken a leave of absence during the past 2 years were more likely to work full-time. The inclusion of leave of absence as a predictor variable negates any additional influence of the presence or absence of minor children in the regression model, indicating that these variables are highly correlated for this population. © 2013 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  13. Hours of Paid Work in Duel Earner Couples: The U.S. in Cross-National Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Jerry A. Jacobs; Gornick, Janet C.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we examine the hours of paid work of husbands and wives in ten industrialized countries, using data from the Luxembourg Income Study. We present results on the average hours of paid work put in jointly by couples, on the proportion working very long weekly hours, and on gender equality in working time within families. The United States ranks at or near the top on most indicators of working time for couples, because of 1) a high proportion of dual-earner couples; 2) long average ...

  14. The importance of individual preferences when evaluating the associations between working hours and indicators of health and well-being

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Kecklund, Göran; Ingre, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that the effect of a given shift schedule may depend on individual factors. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a misfit between individual preferences and actual working hours affected the association between working hours and self-reported indicator...

  15. The importance of individual preferences when evaluating the associations between working hours and indicators of health and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Kecklund, Göran; Ingre, Michael; Skotte, Jørgen; Diderichsen, Finn; Garde, Anne Helene

    2010-10-01

    Previous studies indicate that the effect of a given shift schedule may depend on individual factors. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a misfit between individual preferences and actual working hours affected the association between working hours and self-reported indicators of health and well-being. The study population consisted of 173 female eldercare workers who mainly worked day or evening shifts. We combined self-reported questionnaire data on preferences with actual work schedules during a four-week period. The study showed that a misfit between preferences on one hand and "non-day work", "weekend work" or "only a few consecutive days off" on the other hand was associated with an increased dissatisfaction with working hours and/or an increase in the intention to leave the workplace due to one's working hours.

  16. Whether Regular Working Hours Can Minimize The Blood Bbiochemical Effects of Shift Working: Across-Sectional Study In Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koroush Soleimani

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background:Irregular Working hours, including night work and shift work,have been found to be associated with alteration in various levels of biochemical factors. And some studies have showed association between shift work and blood biochemical disturbances in blood. In this epidemiological study we investigated,whether regular schedule of working hours can minimize the associated biochemical effects.Methods: Atotal of 442 air traffic controllers between the ages of 21 and 59 years in this study filled out questionnaire, and triglyceride, total cholesterol, and HDL-C concentration and FBS were measured after 12- hours fasting. The correlation between shift work and the biochemical variables was measured. The SPSS software version 11.5 and STATAversion 8 were used for statistical analysis, the X2 and fisher's exact test used for comparing the qualitative variables and the parametric tests for quantitative variables with normal distribution. Odd's ratio (OR, and 95% confidence interval (95% CI were used for estimating the effect of shift work on lipid profile and high blood glucose levels. Logistic regression modeling was used for multivariable analysis and adjusting the effect of different variables.Results: sample size of this cross-sectional study was consisted of 305(69% shift workers and 137(31% day workers. The mean age of the shift workers was 40 ± 10 years old and the day workers 40 ± 9.The mean of variables in the present study for total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, triglyceride and fasting blood glucose in the shift workers were respectively: 195±37mg/dl, 116.8±34.8mg/dl, 48.2±15.1mg/dl, 154±80mg/dl, 92±20mg/dl and in the day workers were respectively: 200±40mg/dl, 125.3±38.6mg/dl, 48.8±23.3mg/dl,151± 77mg/dl, 90± 14mg/dl. Adjusted Odd's ratio for the effect of shift working on the biochemical blood factors did not change the results.Conclusion: This study showed that air traffic control workers with various shift did not

  17. Wanting more or wanting less? Mismatches between actual and preferred working hours in Spain, 2005-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Torre Fernández

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Mismatches between the number of hours people actually work and the hours they would prefer to work are common, and they have important consequences for individual, family and organizational life. This study contributes to prior research examining how the quality of work is affected by the economic crisis. Using data from the Spanish Labor Force Survey from 2005 to 2014, it tests three possible competing predictions for trends in working hour mismatches during the economic downturn. The study reveals that the level of mismatches has increased significantly with the economic recession due to the growing number of people who would wish to work more hours than they actually do. Findings show that the increase in hour mismatches has been particularly striking among workers employed under fixed term contracts, part-time contracts, those in low-status occupations and women. The economic crisis has widened the gap between high- and low-status workers over the last decade.

  18. Exposure to bright light during evening class hours increases alertness among working college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Liliane; Lowden, Arne; Luz, Andréa Aparecida da; Turte, Samantha Lemos; Moreno, Claudia Roberta; Valente, Daniel; Nagai-Manelli, Roberta; Louzada, Fernando Mazzilli; Fischer, Frida Marina

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of exposure to bright light on sleepiness during evening hours among college students. Twenty-seven healthy college students, all males, with ages ranging from 21 to 24years, working during the day and studying in the evening, participated in this study. During the 3week study, the students wore actigraphs and recorded levels of sleepiness. In a crossover design, on the second and third weeks, the students were exposed to bright light (BL) at either 19:00 or 21:00h. Salivary melatonin samples were collected before and after BL exposure. ANOVA test for repeated measurements were performed. After BL exposure, sleepiness levels were reduced at 20:30 and 22:00h (F=2.2; ptime (F=4.84; p=0.04) and between day and time of BL exposure (F=4.24; p=0.05). The results showed effects of melatonin onset at 20:00 and 21:30h and sleepiness levels (F=7.67; p=0.02) and perception of sleepiness and intervention time (F=6.52; p=0.01). Controlled exposure to BL during evening hours increased alertness among college students. The effects of BL on sleepiness varied according to the time of melatonin onset. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Jokela, Markus; Nyberg, Solja T

    2015-01-01

    random-effects meta-analysis to combine effect estimates from published and unpublished data. FINDINGS: We included 25 studies from 24 cohorts in Europe, the USA, and Australia. The meta-analysis of coronary heart disease comprised data for 603,838 men and women who were free from coronary heart disease......), in which 1722 events were recorded. In cumulative meta-analysis adjusted for age, sex, and socioeconomic status, compared with standard hours (35-40 h per week), working long hours (≥55 h per week) was associated with an increase in risk of incident coronary heart disease (relative risk [RR] 1·13, 95% CI 1......·02-1·26; p=0·02) and incident stroke (1·33, 1·11-1·61; p=0·002). The excess risk of stroke remained unchanged in analyses that addressed reverse causation, multivariable adjustments for other risk factors, and different methods of stroke ascertainment (range of RR estimates 1·30-1·42). We recorded a dose...

  20. Resilience and Loss in Work Identities: A Narrative Analysis of Some Retired Teachers' Work-Life Histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, John; Wall, Christine

    2010-01-01

    The article examines the importance of "emotional labour" in the constitution of the "teacherly-self". Deriving from a research project on work and social identity, the article explores the ways teachers have negotiated the radical changes in the profession in recent years, and uses the notion of "teacher resilience" to explore the ways teachers…

  1. Retirement Maturity: A Valuable Concept for Preretirement Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard P.; Riker, Harold C.

    1981-01-01

    The construct of occupational maturity can be extended to create a concept of readiness to retire--retirement maturity. Two significant factors affecting retirement maturity are retirement work plans and retirement residence plans. The Career Development Inventory, Adult seems to be a valuable tool for preretirement counselors. (Author)

  2. Investigation of Psychophysiological and Subjective Effects of Long Working Hours – Do Age and Hearing Impairment Matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Wagner-Hartl

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Following current prognosis, demographic development raises expectations of an aging of the working population. Therefore, keeping employees healthy and strengthening their ability to work, becomes more and more important. When employees become older, dealing with age-related impairments of sensory functions, such as hearing impairment, is a central issue. Recent evidence suggests that negative effects that are associated with reduced hearing can have a strong impact at work. Especially under exhausting working situations such as working overtime hours, age and hearing impairment might influence employees’ well-being. Until now, neither the problem of aged workers and long working hours, nor the problem of hearing impairment and prolonged working time has been addressed explicitly. Therefore, a laboratory study was examined to answer the research question: Do age and hearing impairment have an impact on psychophysiological and subjective effects of long working hours. In total, 51 white-collar workers, aged between 24 and 63 years, participated in the laboratory study. The results show no significant effects for age and hearing impairment on the intensity of subjective consequences (perceived recovery and fatigue, subjective emotional well-being and physical symptoms of long working hours. However, the psychophysiological response (the saliva cortisol level to long working hours differs significantly between hearing impaired and normal hearing employees. Interestingly, the results suggest that from a psychophysiological point of view long working hours were more demanding for normal hearing employees.

  3. New Results on the Effect of Mothers’ Working Hours on Children’s Overweight Status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Jane

    During the last 30 years almost all developed countries have experienced an increase in the number of overweight children. Existing empirical research derives mainly from the U.S., Canada, Australia and the UK, and points at maternal employment as an explanation for the increasing trend in child...... in exploring possible bias due to omitted variable bias. In contrast to the existing literature this paper shows that an increase in mothers’ working hours has a reducing effect on child weight. Subgroup analyses on formal and informal daycare suggest that the quality of childcare determines the effect......, as results show that maternal employment has a reducing effect on children’s overweight status in formal daycare (kindergarten). For children in informal daycare (family daycare), maternal employment has no significant effect....

  4. The contribution from psychological, social, and organizational work factors to risk of disability retirement: a systematic review with meta-analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stein Knardahl

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies indicate that psychological, social, and organizational factors at work contribute to health, motivation, absence from work, and functional ability. The objective of the study was to assess the current state of knowledge of the contribution of psychological, social, and organizational factors to disability retirement by a systematic review and meta-analyses. Methods Data sources: A systematic literature search for studies of retirement due to disability in Medline, Embase, and PsychINFO was performed. Reference lists of relevant articles were hand-searched for additional studies. Data extraction: Internal validity was assessed independently by two referees with a detailed checklist for sources of bias. Conclusions were drawn based on studies with acceptable quality. Data synthesis: We calculated combined effect estimates by means of averaged associations (Risk ratios across samples, weighting observed associations by the study’s sample size. Thirty-nine studies of accepted quality were found, 37 of which from the Nordic countries. Results There was moderate evidence for the role of low control (supported by weighted average RR = 1.40; 95% CI = 1.21-1.61 and moderate evidence for the combination of high demands and low control (although weighted average was RR = 1.45; 95% CI = 0.96-2.19 as predictors of disability retirement. There were no major systematic differences in findings between the highest rated and the lowest rated studies that passed the criterion for adequate quality. There was limited evidence for downsizing, organizational change, lack of employee development and supplementary training, repetitive work tasks, effort-reward imbalance to increase risk of disability pension. Very limited evidence was found for job demands, evening or night work, and low social support from ones superior. Conclusions Psychological and organizational factors at work contribute to disability

  5. The contribution from psychological, social, and organizational work factors to risk of disability retirement: a systematic review with meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knardahl, Stein; Johannessen, Håkon A; Sterud, Tom; Härmä, Mikko; Rugulies, Reiner; Seitsamo, Jorma; Borg, Vilhelm

    2017-02-08

    Previous studies indicate that psychological, social, and organizational factors at work contribute to health, motivation, absence from work, and functional ability. The objective of the study was to assess the current state of knowledge of the contribution of psychological, social, and organizational factors to disability retirement by a systematic review and meta-analyses. Data sources: A systematic literature search for studies of retirement due to disability in Medline, Embase, and PsychINFO was performed. Reference lists of relevant articles were hand-searched for additional studies. Internal validity was assessed independently by two referees with a detailed checklist for sources of bias. Conclusions were drawn based on studies with acceptable quality. We calculated combined effect estimates by means of averaged associations (Risk ratios) across samples, weighting observed associations by the study's sample size. Thirty-nine studies of accepted quality were found, 37 of which from the Nordic countries. There was moderate evidence for the role of low control (supported by weighted average RR = 1.40; 95% CI = 1.21-1.61) and moderate evidence for the combination of high demands and low control (although weighted average was RR = 1.45; 95% CI = 0.96-2.19) as predictors of disability retirement. There were no major systematic differences in findings between the highest rated and the lowest rated studies that passed the criterion for adequate quality. There was limited evidence for downsizing, organizational change, lack of employee development and supplementary training, repetitive work tasks, effort-reward imbalance to increase risk of disability pension. Very limited evidence was found for job demands, evening or night work, and low social support from ones superior. Psychological and organizational factors at work contribute to disability retirement with the most robust evidence for the role of work control. We recommend the measurement of

  6. The Identification of a Threshold of Long Work Hours for Predicting Elevated Risks of Adverse Health Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Sadie H; Pompeii, Lisa A; Gimeno Ruiz de Porras, David; Follis, Jack L; Roberts, Robert E

    2017-07-15

    Working long hours has been associated with adverse health outcomes. However, a definition of long work hours relative to adverse health risk has not been established. Repeated measures of work hours among approximately 2,000 participants from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (1986-2011), conducted in the United States, were retrospectively analyzed to derive statistically optimized cutpoints of long work hours that best predicted three health outcomes. Work-hours cutpoints were assessed for model fit, calibration, and discrimination separately for the outcomes of poor self-reported general health, incident cardiovascular disease, and incident cancer. For each outcome, the work-hours threshold that best predicted increased risk was 52 hours per week or more for a minimum of 10 years. Workers exposed at this level had a higher risk of poor self-reported general health (relative risk (RR) = 1.28; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 1.53), cardiovascular disease (RR = 1.42; 95% CI: 1.24, 1.63), and cancer (RR = 1.62; 95% CI: 1.22, 2.17) compared with those working 35-51 hours per week for the same duration. This study provides the first health risk-based definition of long work hours. Further examination of the predictive power of this cutpoint on other health outcomes and in other study populations is needed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Sleep deprivation in resident physicians, work hour limitations, and related outcomes: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansukhani, Meghna P; Kolla, Bhanu Prakash; Surani, Salim; Varon, Joseph; Ramar, Kannan

    2012-07-01

    Extended work hours, interrupted sleep, and shift work are integral parts of medical training among all specialties. The need for 24-hour patient care coverage and economic factors have resulted in prolonged work hours for resident physicians. This has traditionally been thought to enhance medical educational experience. These long and erratic work hours lead to acute and chronic sleep deprivation and poor sleep quality, resulting in numerous adverse consequences. Impairments may occur in several domains, including attention, cognition, motor skills, and mood. Resident performance, professionalism, safety, and well-being are affected by sleep deprivation, causing potentially adverse implications for patient care. Studies have shown adverse health consequences, motor vehicle accidents, increased alcohol and medication use, and serious medical errors to occur in association with both sleep deprivation and shift work. Resident work hour limitations have been mandated by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in response to patient safety concerns. Studies evaluating the impact of these regulations on resident physicians have generated conflicting reports on patient outcomes, demonstrating only a modest increase in sleep duration for resident physicians, along with negative perceptions regarding their education. This literature review summarizes research on the effects of sleep deprivation and shift work, and examines current literature on the impact of recent work hour limitations on resident physicians and patient-related outcomes.

  8. Some effects of 8- vs 10-hour work schedules on the test performance/alertness of air traffic control specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-12-01

    A 10-hour, 4-day rotating shift schedule worked by some Air Traffic Control Specialists (ATCSs) was compared to the more traditional 8-hour, 2-2-1 rapidly rotating schedule. Measures of performance and alertness were obtained from a group of 52 ATCSs...

  9. 29 CFR 553.230 - Maximum hours standards for work periods of 7 to 28 days-section 7(k).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-section 7(k). 553.230 Section 553.230 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR... Compensation Rules § 553.230 Maximum hours standards for work periods of 7 to 28 days—section 7(k). (a) For... 28 consecutive days, no overtime compensation is required under section 7(k) until the number of...

  10. Impact of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education work-hour regulations on neurosurgical resident education and productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Jay; Vates, G Edward; Pouratian, Nader; Sheehan, Jason P; Patrie, James; Grady, M Sean; Jane, John A

    2009-05-01

    Recently, the Institute of Medicine examined resident duty hours and their impact on patient safety. Experts have suggested that reducing resident work hours to 56 hours per week would further decrease medical errors. Although some reports have indicated that cutbacks in resident duty hours reduce errors and make resident life safer, few authors have specifically analyzed the effect of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty-hour limits on neurosurgical resident education and the perceived quality of training. The authors have evaluated multiple objective surrogate markers of resident performance and quality of training to determine the impact of the 80-hour workweek. The United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 data on neurosurgical applicants entering ACGME-accredited programs between 1998 and 2007 (before and after the implementation of the work-hour rules) were obtained from the Society of Neurological Surgeons. The American Board of Neurological Surgery (ABNS) written examination scores for this group of residents were also acquired. Resident registration for and presentations at the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) annual meetings between 2002 and 2007 were examined as a measure of resident academic productivity. As a case example, the authors analyzed the distribution of resident training hours in the University of Virginia (UVA) neurosurgical training program before and after the institution of the 80-hour workweek. Finally, program directors and chief residents in ACGME-accredited programs were surveyed regarding the effects of the 80-hour workweek on patient care, resident training, surgical experience, patient safety, and patient access to quality care. Respondents were also queried about their perceptions of a 56-hour workweek. Despite stable mean USMLE Step 1 scores for matched applicants to neurosurgery programs between 2000 and 2008, ABNS written examination scores for residents

  11. Working Hours of Surgical Residence: Perspective of a Group of Surgeons in a Regional Hospital in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siu-Fai Lo

    2007-01-01

    Conclusion: Most respondents opine that resident work hours should be regulated and welcome minor rescheduling of residents' workflow. The impacts on residents' training and patient care require further evaluation.

  12. It is worth 10 million working hours a year to have your toilet paper folded?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljung, Rickard; Ljung, Hedvig; Ljung, Harald

    2016-01-01

    From our experience the toilet paper is folded in the bathrooms in rooms in branded hotels. We aimed to study the total time yearly spent in the world on folding hotel toilet paper. Three investigators clocked 60 folding toilet paper events and calculated the mean time. The mean folding time was 5.73 s (interquartile range 4.50-6.56). Using the calculated extra time it takes to fold the toilet paper and the number of hotel nights spent we estimated the total time spent in the world each year to fold the toilet paper. For sensitivity analyses we used different assumptions on number of hotel beds, occupancy rate and folding time. Assuming an extra 10 s spent on folding toilet paper, approximately 10 million hours are globally spent on folding toilet paper every year. This corresponds to more than 5000 man-years of work. In a hotel with yearly full coverage of 200 beds skipping folding the toilet paper corresponds to around 200 h of time that could be spent elsewhere. To take away unnecessary duties from hotel room cleaners would increase their health and well-being and save time that could be better spent. Is it really defendable and appropriate that someone else has spent time on folding the toilet paper you are just about to use?

  13. From Minimum Wage to Standard Work Hour: HKSAR Labour Politics in Regime Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence K. K. Ho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to highlight the significance of labour issues – namely, the minimum wage (MW and standard working hours (SWH – in shaping candidates’ electoral platforms in the 2012 chief executive (CE election of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR under the sovereignty of the People’s Republic of China (PRC. We first offer a brief review of labour politics regarding the MW case as a precursor to the SWH drafting and enactment process. We then provide an analytical delineation of some of the labour and socio-economic dimensions of the CE electoral contest by comparing the candidates’ campaign planks in relation to SWH. We then attempt to predict the likely course of the SWH debate under the leadership of Leung Chun-ying, who eventually won the CE election and assumed power on 1 July 2012. We conclude by examining Leung’s social engineering attempts to increase popular support amongst low- and middle-income (LMI households as part of his long-term strategy for the 2017 CE elections and his broader Beijing-entrusted political agenda.

  14. 24-hour society and working environment; 24 jikan shakai to rodo kankyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Jun' ichi [Kansai Electric Power Corp., Osaka (Japan)

    1999-07-25

    Naturally, a human being has a rhythm with a period of about one day for hormone distribution and body temperature. This rhythm is called circadian rhythm. An ecological watch controlling this rhythm exists in supraoptic nucleus of brain, and its inherent period is clarified to be about 25 hours. Light, temperature, sound, smell and the like are the elements to improve arousal degree of brain and adjust the interior watch. However, a strong light does not only have the direct effect on improving immediately arousal degree and performance but can also shift the interior watch. Specifically, the interior watch becomes slower when a human body is bathed in an intensive light in midnight, whereas it becomes faster when bathed in an intensive light at daybreak. Consequently, this phenomenon can be used to shift the sleepy peak of a person on night duty from the working time to daytime sleeping time zone. The technology using light to improve arousal degree is utilized in space shuttles, atomic power plants, petroleum refineries and the like in USA. (NEDO)

  15. Experiences of reduced work hours for nurses and assistant nurses at a surgical department: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyllensten, Kristina; Andersson, Gunnar; Muller, Helena

    2017-01-01

    There is a shortage of registered nurses in the European Union (EU), and job dissatisfaction and perceived high work-family conflict have been identified as causes of nursing staff turnover. Reducing work hours is an organisational intervention that could have a positive effect on nurses' and assistant nurses' job satisfaction, work-life balance, and willingness to stay in the job. An orthopaedic surgery department at a large hospital in Sweden introduced reduced work hours for nurses and assistant nurses in order to improve the working situation. The aim of the study was to investigate the experiences of reduced work hours and no lunch breaks among nurses and assistant nurses at an orthopaedic surgery department at a hospital in Sweden, with a particular focus on recovery and psychosocial working environment. A qualitative design was used in the study. Eleven nurses and assistant nurses working at the particular orthopaedic department took part in the study, and semi-structured interviews were used to collect data. The interviews were analysed by interpretative phenomenological analysis. Four main themes were developed in the analysis of the data: A more sustainable working situation, Improved work-life balance, Consequences of being part of a project, and Improved quality of care. Each theme consisted of subthemes. Overall, reduced work hours appeared to have many, mainly positive, effects for the participants in both work and home life.

  16. Health experiences of Korean immigrant women in retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Kushner, Kaysi E; Mill, Judy; Lai, Daniel W L

    2014-01-01

    In this focused ethnographic study, we explored the health experiences of 15 Korean immigrant women after retirement in an urban center in Western Canada. Almost all women began their lives in Canada without adequate personal finances, making their employment essential for supporting their families financially. Most women lived with more than two chronic diseases, attributed to long hours and difficult work conditions. They experienced improved psychological health after retiring, irrespective of positive or negative changes in their physical health. Spiritual faith and exercise were important strategies to maintain and enhance their health and to postpone and manage chronic diseases.

  17. Will Early Retirement Retire Early?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, James W.

    1976-01-01

    Management should recognize and consider both the advantages of early retirement programs and the countervailing forces of financial conditions, individual attitudes, and age discrimination laws. (Available from American Management Associations, Subscription Services, Box 319, Saranac Lake, NY 12983; $15.00 annually) (Author/MLF)

  18. Survival After Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Clark; Youngblood, Stuart A.

    1986-01-01

    Examined survival rates after retirement in a large corporation. A regression analysis was performed to control for age, sex, job status, and type of work differences that may influence longevity. Short-term suvivors seemed to undergo a different adjustment process than long-term survivors. (Author/ABL)

  19. Retirement and Learning: A Longitudinal Qualitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Maureen

    2018-01-01

    This paper discusses retirement as a learning process, where learning, be it formal or informal, enables retirees to adjust to the transition from work to retirement. Such discussion is important given the fact that the world population is aging and that more people are retiring in the next few decades. Moreover, people are experiencing an…

  20. Age-related differences in working hours among male and female GPs: an SMS-based time-use study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassel, D. van; Velden, L. van der; Bakker, D. de; Batenburg, R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In several countries, the number of hours worked by general practitioners (GPs) has decreased, raising concern about current and impending workforce shortages. This shorter working week has been ascribed both to the feminisation of the workforce and to a younger generation of GPs who

  1. Age-related differences in working hours among male and female GPs: An SMS-based time use study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassel, D. van; Velden, L.F.J. van der; Bakker, D.H.; Batenburg, R.S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In several countries, the number of hours worked by general practitioners (GPs) has decreased, raising concern about current and impending workforce shortages. This shorter working week has been ascribed both to the feminisation of the workforce and to a younger generation of GPs who

  2. What effects have resident work-hour changes had on education, quality of life, and safety? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joshua D; Staheli, Greg; LeClere, Lance; Andersone, Diana; McCormick, Frank

    2015-05-01

    More than 15 years ago, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) identified medical error as a problem worthy of greater attention; in the wake of the IOM report, numerous changes were made to regulations to limit residents' duty hours. However, the effect of resident work-hour changes remains controversial within the field of orthopaedics. We performed a systematic review to determine whether work-hour restrictions have measurably influenced quality-of-life measures, operative and technical skill development, resident surgical education, patient care outcomes (including mortality, morbidity, adverse events, sentinel events, complications), and surgeon and resident attitudes (such as perceived effect on learning and training experiences, personal benefit, direct clinical experience, clinical preparedness). We performed a systematic review of PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), and Google Scholar using PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. Inclusion criteria were any English language peer-reviewed articles that analyzed the effect(s) of orthopaedic surgery resident work-hour restrictions on patient safety, resident education, resident/surgeon quality of life, resident technical operative skill development, and resident surgeon attitudes toward work-hour restrictions. Eleven studies met study inclusion criteria. One study was a prospective analysis, whereas 10 studies were of level IV evidence (review of surgical case logs) or survey results. Within our identified studies, there was some support for improved resident quality of life, improved resident sleep and less fatigue, a perceived negative impact on surgical operative and technical skill, and conflicting evidence on the topic of resident education, patient outcomes, and variable attitudes toward the work-hour changes. There is a paucity of high-level or clear evidence evaluating the effect of the changes to resident work

  3. Long Work Hours, Part-Time Work, and Trends in the Gender Gap in Pay, the Motherhood Wage Penalty, and the Fatherhood Wage Premium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim A. Weeden

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We assess how changes in the social organization and compensation of work hours over the last three decades are associated with changes in wage differentials among mothers, fathers, childless women, and childless men. We find that large differences between gender and parental status groups in long work hours (fifty or more per week, coupled with sharply rising hourly wages for long work hours, contributed to rising gender gaps in wages (especially among parents, motherhood wage penalties, and fatherhood wage premiums. Changes in the representation of these groups in part-time work, by contrast, is associated with a decline in the gender gap in wages among parents and in the motherhood wage penalty, but an increase in the fatherhood wage premium. These findings offer important clues into why gender and family wage differentials still persist.

  4. Scientific activity and working hours of physicians in university hospitals: results from the Innsbruck and Salzburg physician lifestyle assessment (TISPLA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Bernhard; Colvin, Hans Peter; Rieder, Josef

    2009-01-01

    Controllable lifestyle has become an important factor influencing career decision-making among physicians. In academic medicine, doctors are required to combine both patient care and research in their daily routine. Insufficient release of clinicians for research during contracted work hours may lead to increased weekly working hours in academic medical centers and deter medical graduates from academia. We tested for an association between numbers of scientific publications and an increased hourly workload among physicians. This was a cross-sectional online survey among all salaried physicians working in the university hospitals of Innsbruck and Salzburg, Austria. The main outcome measures were the self-reported total number of scientific papers published in peer-reviewed medical journals over the past two years and self-reported working hours. Of 590 returned surveys, 393 were fully completed and included in the study. The sample was stratified into three groups according to scientific output in the past two years: Group A, >/= 6 publications; Group B, 1-5 publications; Group C, no publications. Men were more likely than women to have a scientific publication: in Group A there was a male predominance of 75%, whereas in Group C only 48% were men (P = 0.0034). A total of 59% (n = 232) of all participants had not published a scientific article in the past two years (Group C) and worked a mean of 58.3 +/- 12 h/week. Physicians in Group B (n = 113) had published 2.4 +/- 1.4 papers and worked 62.8 +/- 12.9 h/week; those in Group A (n = 48) had published 11.5 +/- 6.6 papers and worked 73 +/- 13.1 h/week (P hours, reflecting the fact that research was mainly performed during overtime. Research activity among clinicians in academic medical centers is associated with significantly increased overtime hours. Measures need to be taken to allow medical graduates an academic career at reasonable impairment of personal lifestyle.

  5. RETIRO LABORAL Y AJUSTE A LA JUBILACIÓN DE HOMBRES Y MUJERES EN LA MEDIANA EDAD (WORK RETIREMENT AND ADJUSTMENT TO RETIREMENT OF MEN AND WOMEN IN THE MIDDLE-AGED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz Meléndez Roxana

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Resumen:En este artículo se presentan los resultados de una investigación aplicada cuyo objeto de estudio fue un grupo de hombres exfuncionarios y mujeres exfuncionarias del área administrativa de la Universidad de Costa Rica (UCR que se encuentran en la etapa de vida denominada “la mediana edad” y que enfrentan el proceso trabajo-retiro laboral. El estudio consistió en identificar los principales factores que inciden en el retiro laboral a una edad más temprana; la viviencia del proceso, el ajuste a la jubilación y sus implicaciones a nivel personal y social. La información recopilada se obtuvo a partir de la técnica “la entrevista fenomenológica” concebida como una exploración profunda que proporciona datos de gran valor conceptual y humana; en ella, tanto la persona que entrevista como la entrevistada mantienen un compromiso para que la búsqueda de la información sea dentro de una relación empática. Partiendo de lo subjetivo por su historia de vida al mandato social por lo roles asignados y asumidos por la población en estudio. Los resultados obtenidos indican que pareciera que la valoración que cada uno de los participantes hace de su rol laboral y el significado del trabajo en sus vidas es determinante en el proceso de retiro laboral y su ajuste al rol de persona jubilada.Abstract: This article presents the results of applied research study that was aimed at a group of men and women, former administrative staff of the University of Costa Rica that are in the stage of life called middle age and facing work-retirement process work. The study consist in identify the main factors affecting the removal from work at a younger age, the experiencing process, adjustment to retirement and its implications for personal and social level. Information collected was obtained from the technique "the phenomenological interview “conceived as a deep exploration that provides valuable data conceptual and human, in her interview both

  6. Shift work, long working hours, and later risk of dementia: A long-term follow-up of the Copenhagen Male Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Garde, Anne Helene; Ishtiak-Ahmed, Kazi; Gyntelberg, Finn; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Phung, Thien Kieu Thi; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Waldemar, Gunhild; Westendorp, Rudi Gj; Hansen, Åse Marie

    2017-11-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of shift work and long working hours in midlife on the risk of dementia in old age. Methods The present study comprised 4766 participants from the Copenhagen Male Study. We used information on shift work (collected in 1970-1971 and 1985-1986), long working hours defined as >45 hours per week (collected in 1970-1971), socioeconomic status, sleep, stress, and cardiovascular risk factors. Information about dementia diagnoses was obtained from registers. Participants were followed until 2014 (mean length of follow-up was 17.8 years). We employed Poisson regression for the survival analyses and estimated incidence rate ratios (IRR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results We found no statistically significant association between shift work (IRR 0.86, 95% CI 0.70-1.05) or long working hours (IRR 0.97, 95% CI 0.79-1.19) and dementia. Adjustment for potential confounders and mediators did not change the estimates. Working shifts at both time points of exposure assessment was not associated with a higher incidence of dementia compared with non-shift workers at both time points (IRR 0.99, 95% CI 0.69-1.42). The lowest incidence of dementia was observed among participants who reported shift work at one time point (only in 1985-1986: IRR 0.44, 95% CI 0.16-1.23 and only in 1970-1971: IRR 0.58, 95% CI 0.31-1.11). Conclusion We did not find positive evidence of an association between shift work or long working hours and the incidence of dementia, but the negative findings may reflect the crude assessment of shift work and long working hours, which is a major limitation of the present study.

  7. A Revealing Window on the U.S. Economy in Depression and War: Hours Worked, 1929-1950

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Higgs

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Interpretation of macroeconomic events in the 1930s and 1940s is complicated by the era’s institutional peculiarities, especially the massive work-relief programs during the Depression and the displacement of market-based pricing and resource allocation during the war. These difficulties can be avoided to some extent by examining hours worked, rather than such standard indicators as estimated real GDP and the rate of unemployment.From such an examination, we may conclude that (1 the depression had a flat trough in 1932, 1933, and 1934; (2 civilian government hours accounted for three-eighths of the increase in total hours worked between 1932 and 1936; (3 as late as 1939, private nonfarm hours were 16 percent below their 1929 level and 21 percent below the trend high-employment level for 1939; (4 the tremendous mismatch between the increase in private hours worked and the estimated increase in real GDP from 1940 to 1944 calls into serious question the accuracy of the estimated increase in real output; and (5 substitution of lower-productivity workers for the higher-productivity workers being drained into the armed forces from 1940 to 1944 only adds to doubts about the reality of the estimated increase in real output during that period.

  8. Schedule Control, Supervisor Support and Work Engagement: A Winning Combination for Workers in Hourly Jobs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanberg, Jennifer E.; McKechnie, Sharon P.; Ojha, Mamta U.; James, Jacquelyn B.

    2011-01-01

    The changing natures of both work and the lives of the U.S. workforce have created an array of challenges for organizations attempting to foster work engagement. To accommodate the work and family needs of an increasingly diverse workforce, many firms are offering flexible work solutions to employees. However, the distribution of these types of…

  9. The influence of hours worked prior to delivery on maternal and neonatal outcomes: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Catherine E; Aiken, Abigail R; Scott, James G; Brockelsby, Jeremy C

    2016-11-01

    Long continuous periods of working contribute to fatigue, which is an established risk factor for adverse patient outcomes in many clinical specialties. The total number of hours worked by delivering clinicians before delivery therefore may be an important predictor of adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. We aimed to examine how rates of adverse delivery outcomes vary with the number of hours worked by the delivering clinician before delivery during both day and night shifts. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 24,506 unscheduled deliveries at an obstetrics center in the United Kingdom from 2008-2013. We compared adverse outcomes between day shifts and night shifts using random-effects logistic regression to account for interoperator variability. Adverse outcomes were estimated blood loss of ≥1.5 L, arterial cord pH of ≤7.1, failed instrumental delivery, delayed neonatal respiration, severe perineal trauma, and any critical incident. Additive dynamic regression was used to examine the association between hours worked before delivery (up to 12 hours) and risk of adverse outcomes. Models were controlled for maternal age, maternal body mass index, parity, birthweight, gestation, obstetrician experience, and delivery type. We found no difference in the risk of any adverse outcome that was studied between day vs night shifts. Yet, risk of estimated blood loss of ≥1.5 L and arterial cord pH of ≤7.1 both varied by 30-40% within 12-hour shifts (P<.05). The highest risk of adverse outcomes occurred after 9-10 hours from the beginning of the shift for both day and night shifts. The risk of other adverse outcomes did not vary significantly by hours worked or by day vs night shift. Number of hours already worked before undertaking unscheduled deliveries significantly influences the risk of certain adverse outcomes. Our findings suggest that fatigue may play a role in increasing the risk of adverse delivery outcomes later in shifts and that obstetric work

  10. [Results of Training for Personnel Involved in Blood-Transfusion Testing Outside of Regular Work Hours at Saga University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Marie; Yamada, Naotomo; Higashitani, Takanori; Ohta, Shoichiro; Sueoka, Eisaburo

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory testing prior to blood transfusion outside of regular hours in many hospitals and clinics is frequently conducted by technicians without sufficient experience in such testing work. To obtain consistent test results regardless of the degree of laboratory experience with blood transfusion testing, the number of facilities introducing automated equipment for testing prior to blood transfusion is increasing. Our hospital's blood transfusion department introduced fully automated test equipment in October of 2010 for use when blood transfusions are conducted outside of regular hours. However, excessive dependence on automated testing can lead to an inability to do manual blood typing or cross-match testing when necessitated by breakdowns in the automated test equipment, in the case of abnormal specimen reactions, or other such case. In addition, even outside of normal working hours there are more than a few instances in which transfusion must take place based on urgent communications from clinical staff, with the need for prompt and flexible timing of blood transfusion test and delivery of blood products. To address this situation, in 2010 we began training after-hours laboratory personnel in blood transfusion testing to provide practice using test tubes manually and to achieve greater understanding of blood transfusion test work (especially in cases of critical blood loss). Results of the training and difficulties in its implementation for such after-hours laboratory personnel at our hospital are presented and discussed in this paper. [Original

  11. 48 CFR 852.222-70 - Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement. 852.222-70 Section 852.222-70 Federal...—nursing home care contract supplement. As prescribed in 822.305, for nursing home care requirements, insert the following clause: Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act—Nursing Home Care Contract...

  12. Cross-National Differences in the Association between Parental Work Hours and Time with Children in Europe: A Multilevel Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeters, Anne

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates cross-national differences in the association between parental work hours and parent-child interaction time and explains differences in this individual-level association on the basis of country characteristics. It extends prior research by testing the moderating effects of country characteristics through multilevel analyses…

  13. The employment and hours of work effects of the changing National Minimum Wage

    OpenAIRE

    Dickens, Richard; Riley, Rebecca; Wilkinson, David,

    2009-01-01

    This report is about the employment impacts of National Minimum Wage (NMW) rises in the period 2001-2006. This was a period where the NMW rose substantially in excess of average earnings. \\ud \\ud The report presents results based on analysis of individual Labour Force Survey (LFS) data and Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE) data together with local area analysis.\\ud \\ud The focus of the analysis is threefold. First, it investigates changes in wages as a response to increases in the NM...

  14. Self-Reported Recovery from 2-Week 12-Hour Shift Work Schedules: A 14-Day Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne L. Merkus

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: After 2-week 12-hour night and swing shifts, only the course for sleep quality differed from that of day work. Sleep quality was poorer for night and swing shift workers on the 1st day off and remained poorer for the 14-day follow-up. This showed that while working at night had no effect on feeling rested, tiredness, and energy levels, it had a relatively long-lasting effect on sleep quality.

  15. Physicians' attentional performance following a 24-hour observation period: do we need to regulate sleep prior to work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, P; Maximova, K; Jirsch, J D

    2017-08-01

    The tradition of physicians working while sleep deprived is increasingly criticised. Medical regulatory bodies have restricted resident physician duty-hours, not addressing the greater population of physicians. We aimed to assess factors such as sleep duration prior to a 24-hour observation period on physicians' attention. We studied 70 physicians (mean age 38 years old (SD 10.8 years)): 36 residents and 34 faculty from call rosters at the University of Alberta. Among 70 physicians, 52 (74%) performed overnight call; 18 did not perform overnight call and were recruited to control for the learning effect of repetitive neuropsychological testing. Attentional Network Test (ANT) measured physicians' attention at the beginning and end of the 24-hour observation period. Participants self-reported ideal sleep needs, sleep duration in the 24 hours prior to (ie, baseline) and during the 24-hour observation period (ie, follow-up). Median regression models examined effects on ANT parameters. Sleep deprivation at follow-up was associated with reduced attentional accuracy following the 24-hour observation period, but only for physicians more sleep deprived at baseline. Other components of attention were not associated with sleep deprivation after adjusting for repetitive testing. Age, years since medical school and caffeine use did not impact changes in ANT parameters. Our study suggests that baseline sleep before 24 hours of observation impacts the accuracy of physicians' attentional testing at 24 hours. Further study is required to determine if optimising physician sleep prior to overnight call shifts is a sustainable strategy to mitigate the effects of sleep deprivation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Working hours and incidence of metabolic syndrome and its components in a Mediterranean cohort: the SUN project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Adriano M; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Sayon-Orea, Carmen; Gea, Alfredo; Aguinaga-Ontoso, Enrique; Lopez-Iracheta, Roberto; Martinez-Gonzalez, Miguel A

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is an important and priority public health problem globally. Long working hours have been proposed as a modifiable risk factor for MetS, despite sparse epidemiological evidence. Thus, the aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the associations between working hours and incidence of MetS and each of its components. We assessed 6845 participants of a Spanish dynamic prospective cohort of university graduates (the SUN project), initially free of any specific criteria of MetS, and followed-up for a median of 8.3 years. Weekly working hours were collected at baseline and grouped into four categories: >0-24, 25-39, 40-49 and ≥50 h. MetS was defined according to the updated harmonizing criteria. We estimated multivariable adjusted Relative Risks (RR) of MetS and their 95% Confidence Intervals (95% CI), using Poisson regression models. The cumulative incidence of MetS was 6.0%. Working hours were not independently related to MetS (25-39 h/week = RR: 1.42, 95% CI 0.90-2.25; 40-49 h/week = RR: 1.45, 95% CI 0.91-2.30; ≥50 h/week = RR: 1.49, 95% CI 0.91-2.42, P for trend = 0.235) nor to any of its individual definition criteria. Our findings do not suggest that long working hours increase the risk of MetS development or each of its components. Further longitudinal studies in general population should be conducted to confirm these results. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  17. A survey of retirement intentions of Baby Boomers: an overview of health, social and economic determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Anne W; Pilkington, Rhiannon; Feist, Helen; Dal Grande, Eleonora; Hugo, Graeme

    2014-04-14

    Governments have been implementing policies aimed at halting the trend towards early retirement for Baby Boomers. Public policies can have a strong effect on when a person retires and this analysis contributes to an improved understanding of retirement aspirations in regards to health, social, workplace and economic determinants. In October 2011 a telephone survey was undertaken with participants aged 50 to 65 years who were in paid employment and who had been in the workforce for the previous three years. Participants were obtained from two identical South Australian cohort studies - the North West Adelaide Health Study and the Florey Adelaide Male Ageing Study. The results of the telephone survey were linked to the original cohort data. Data were weighted by sex, age, postcode and probability of selection in the household. Work related questions included how much they thought about their retirement, current occupation, employment status, type of workplace and hours worked per week. Health related questions included current smoking status, physical activity, body mass index, self-reported health status and overall life satisfaction. Uni-variable and multi-variable analyses were undertaken to compare the different associations between people who were and were not intending to retire. In total, 25.9% (n = 210) of people who were currently in paid employment indicated that they intend to retire completely from the workforce. The remainder indicated that they will continue to work (41.8% retire from full-time work but work part-time, 25.7% continue working part-time but reduce their current hours, and 6.7% never retire). The multi-variable results indicate that those with lower education, having a savings habit, and sales workers more likely to anticipate complete retirement. The self-employed, and those thinking only moderately about retirement, were more likely to extend their working life beyond age 65. An important finding of this study is the large number of

  18. The longitudinal relationship between control over working hours and depressive symptoms: Results from SLOSH, a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Sophie C; Kecklund, Göran; Rajaleid, Kristiina; Leineweber, Constanze

    2017-06-01

    Psychosocial work factors can affect depressive moods, but research is inconclusive if flexibility to self-determine working hours (work-time control, WTC) is associated with depressive symptoms over time. We investigated if either sub-dimension of WTC, control over daily hours and control over time off, was related to depressive symptoms over time and examined causal, reversed-causal, and reciprocal pathways. The study was based on four waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health which is a follow-up of representative samples of the Swedish working population. WTC was measured using a 5-item index. Depressive symptoms were assessed with a brief subscale of the Symptom Checklist. Latent growth curve models and cross-lagged panel models were tested. Best fit was found for a model with correlated intercepts (control over daily hours) and both correlated intercepts and slopes (control over time off) between WTC and depressive symptoms, with stronger associations for control over time off. Causal models estimating impacts from WTC to subsequent depressive symptoms were best fitting, with a standardised coefficient between -0.023 and -0.048. Results were mainly based on self-report data and mean age in the study sample was relatively high. Higher WTC was related to fewer depressive symptoms over time albeit small effects. Giving workers control over working hours - especially over taking breaks and vacation - may improve working conditions and buffer against developing depression, potentially by enabling workers to recover more easily and promoting work-life balance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Retirement Choice 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    3 Here, we update that work for those making the retirement choice in 2015. We start by describing the $30,000 bonus as an early , partial cash-out...so we err on the side of caution and use an overall life expectancy of 79 years for military retirees. In a later section, we explore what happens...Ensure that all affected Marines receive appropriate counseling about this choice .  Certify that Marines electing REDUX/bonus are recommended and

  20. From Gods to goddesses : Horai management as an approach to coordinating working hours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alis, D.; Karsten, L.; Leopold, J.

    Flexibility in working time arrangements may lead to heterogeneity of working-time patterns. Drawing on the societal perspective, we consider three interrelated spheres of: professional relations, organizational, and domestic space. Greek mythology assists us to contrast chrono management and Horai

  1. Predicting medical specialists' working (long) hours: Testing a contemporary career model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, B.R.; Eisinga, R.N.; Doorewaard, J.A.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    With the feminization (in numbers) of several professions, changing gender role prescriptions regarding parenthood and an increased attention for work-life balance, career theorists recently addressed the need for a more contemporary career model taking a work-home perspective. In this study, we

  2. Are shorter work hours good for the environment? A comparison of U.S. and European energy consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosnick, David; Weisbrot, Mark

    2007-01-01

    European employees work fewer hours per year, and use less energy per person, than their American counterparts. This article compares the European and U.S. models of labor productivity, supply, and energy consumption. It finds that if employees in the EU-15 worked as many hours as those in the United States, they would consume at least 15 percent more energy. This aspect of the debate over Europe's economic model reaches globally. Over the coming decades, developing countries will decide how to make use of their increasing productivity. If, by 2050, the world works as do Americans, total energy consumption could be 15 to 30 percent higher than it would be if following a more European model. Translated directly into higher carbon emissions, this could mean an additional 1 to 2 degrees Celsius in global warming.

  3. Are Tedious Working Hours and Their Wages are an Acknowledged Type of Child Abuse for Working Children a Study Conducted in Apprenticeship Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Büken

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Article 9 of the Universal Declaration Of The Rights Of Children regulates that children are not to be employed before having reached a certain age. Both in our country and the world, the method and principles of the employement of the underaged, the duration of their shifts and break intervals and the amounts they are to earn have been subject to legislation. The object of this study is to compare the real shift durations of working children and the amounts of money they recieve in return, with the regulation for it in the law. Material and Method: In the 2006-2007 school year, 580 (546 male, 34 female students of apprentice schools have been subject to a survey which questioned the duration of their working shifts and their wages. Findings: The average daily shift being 12 (11.089 ± 2,24 SD hours,  57.8% have been found to be working over 8 hours a day. No difference has been found between children of different age groups and sex, as regards the duration of their working shifts. No important difference has been found between children who are employed in different sectors, as regards their working hours. 3.6% of the participants have been found to work longer than 16 hours a day (median: 12.00,  range: 6-18, SD: 0.11. 3.6% of the participants have been found to earn less than the minimum wage provided by the law. Discussion and Conclusion: While the employement of children is already an issue by itself, it is great risk to make children work long shifts, which is why it should be viewed to be a branch of child exploitation. The wages that seem to be in accordance with the law are usually fairly inadequate, when the working hours are taken into consideration. It will be argued that in the inspection of workplaces where the employement of children is allowed, working hours of children should also be inspected, in order to prevent at least some harm from being done. Keywords: working children,economical abuse,long working hours,salary

  4. FEMINISATION OF POVERTY AND THE BURDEN OF THE OLDER WOMAN: BALANCING WORK AND FAMILY IN PRE-RETIREMENT LIFE AND THE ACCUMULATED DISADVANTAGE FOR OLDER WOMEN IN ALBANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elona Dhembo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The number one goal of the United Nations on the millennium development agenda is the eradication of extreme poverty and hunger. But poverty, as other problems, reveals more when examined from a multi-dimensional and dynamic perspective, and gender-sensitive lenses can make a major contribution. The “feminisation of poverty” (ranging from a higher incidence of women among the poor to poverty in terms of a lack of or limited choices has been documented by research throughout the world as a result of the interaction of three main factors: the introduction of gender elements in the research and literature on poverty; the high incidence of specific groups of women under the poverty line; and the mismatch between women’s life cycles and policies in place. This paper provides additional evidence on the “feminisation of poverty” by looking at the case of Albania as representative of an under-researched category of countries emerging as new democracies in the 1990s. The argument put forward is that the intersectionality of gender and age results in a larger burden of poverty among older women. To support the argument, the paper goes beyond the limited official poverty statistics in Albania by looking at the economic activity of women and men, analysing the work-family reconciliation policy framework in Albania, and providing evidence of the work-family tension based on secondary data analysis. It is found that combining work and family life in the pre-retirement period in Albania presents more disadvantages for women than for men, leading to the  “feminisation of poverty” in the post-retirement stages in life. This is then fuelling a new trend for unemployed women and retired women to work as informal caregivers, filling the deficiency in care for the eldest and youngest people in their own families or in the families of wealthier women. The policy logic and respective provisions in Albania, at best, are not discouraging the phenomenon.

  5. Preparation for Retirement Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The Human Resources Department is organizing a preparation for retirement seminar, which will take place on the afternoons of the 11, 13, 25 and 27 November 2009. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of a person’s working life and the start of a new chapter. This period of transition is experienced differently from one individual to another. In all cases, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members below 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned and the limited capacity of the main auditorium, you are requested to register in advance via ...

  6. Preparation for Retirement Seminar

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The Human Resources Department is organizing a preparation for retirement seminar, which will take place in the afternoons of 11, 13, 25 and 27 November 2009. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of a person’s working life and the start of a new chapter. This period of transition is experienced differently from one individual to another. In all cases, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members below 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to the availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned and the limited capacity of the Main Auditorium, you are requested to register in advance via Ind...

  7. Preparation for Retirement Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The Human Resources Department is organizing a preparation for retirement seminar, which will take place on the afternoons of the 11, 13, 25 and 27 November 2009. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of a person’s working life and the start of a new chapter. This period of transition is experienced differently from one individual to another. In all cases, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members under the age of 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to the availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned and the limited capacity of the Main Auditorium, you are requested to register ...

  8. Preparation for Retirement Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The Human Resources Department is organizing a preparation for retirement seminar, which will take place on the afternoons of the 11, 13, 25 and 27 November 2009. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of a person’s working life and the start of a new chapter. This period of transition is experienced differently from one individual to another. In all cases, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members below 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to the availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned and the limited capacity of the Main Auditorium, you are requested to register in advance ...

  9. Administrative circular n°23 (Rev. 3) – Special working hours

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Administrative Circular No. 23 (Rev. 3) entitled “Special working hours”, approved by the Director-General following discussion at the Standing Concertation Committee meeting of 11 October 2012 and entering into force on 1 January 2013, is available on the intranet site of the Human Resources Department.   This circular is applicable to staff members and fellows. It cancels and replaces Administrative Circular No. 23 (Rev. 2) entitled “Special working hours” of December 2008. Paragraph 6 a) of Annex II of this circular was revised following the modification of Article III 1.04 of the Staff Regulations approved by Council on 14 December 2012. The modification serves to adapt the minimum rest time to the fact that, in case of rapidly alternating shifts, a maximum of seven consecutive shifts may be performed. Department Head Office HR Department

  10. Effects of 24-hour shift work with nighttime napping on circadian rhythm characteristics in ambulance personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Y; Takano, T

    1993-12-01

    Forty-two ambulance personnel engaged in a 24-h shift system participated in a chronobiological field study to study the effects of 24-h shift work on circadian rhythm characteristics. Autorhythmometry of circadian rhythms of oral temperature, right and left grip strengths, and heart rate plus subjective assessment of drowsiness, fatigue, and attention was performed every approximately 4 h except during sleep for 7 days. Cosinor and power spectral analyses were applied to the longitudinal data of each individual. Changes in circadian period different from 24 h of oral temperature, grip strengths, and heart rate plus subjective drowsiness, fatigue, and attention were observed in ambulance personnel. The incidence of circadian periodicity different from 24 h in oral temperature and right and left grip strength was 28.6%, 35.7%, and 47.6%, respectively. The incidence was relatively lower than that of shift workers engaged in a discontinuous 8-h shift system we reported on previously. Working conditions allowing ambulance personnel to nap when not called for emergency (for > 4 h) might contribute to a stabilization of circadian rhythms. Furthermore, long nighttime ambulance service amounting to > 100 min was significantly associated with a high incidence of at least one prominent circadian period among oral temperature and right and left grip strength rhythms different from 24 h. In conclusion, 24-h shift work altered the characteristics of circadian rhythms of ambulance personnel; nighttime naps seemed to have a favorable effect on averting changes in circadian rhythms.

  11. Developments in working long and unsocial hours in a Danish prospective cohort study on family and work life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans H. K.; Westerling, Allan

    , medical professionals and food processing workers. Several of the studies included pointed at life style behavior, well-being, fatigue and dys-functional sleep patterns as mediating factors while none of the studies had looked at work-family life interaction. The panel study is based on a randomized...

  12. Worked to death? A census-based longitudinal study of the relationship between the numbers of hours spent working and mortality risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Dermot; Rosato, Michael

    2013-12-01

    There has been an increasing interest in the health effects of long working hours, but little empirical evidence to substantiate early case series suggesting an increased mortality risk. The aim of the current study is to quantify the mortality risk associated with long working hours and to see if this varies by employment relations and conditions of occupation. A census-based longitudinal study of 414 949 people aged 20-59/64 years, working at least 35 h/week, subdivided into four occupational classes (managerial/professional, intermediate, own account workers, workers in routine occupations) with linkage to deaths records over the following 8.7 years. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine all-cause and cause-specific mortality risk. Overall 9.4% of the cohort worked 55 or more h/week, but this proportion was greater in the senior management and professional occupations and in those who were self-employed. Analysis of 4447 male and 1143 female deaths showed that hours worked were associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality only for men working for more than 55 or more h/week in routine/semi-routine occupations [adjusted hazard ratios (adjHR) 1.31: 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11, 1.55] compared with their peers working 35-40 h/week. Their equivalent risk of death from cardiovascular disease was (adjHR 1.49: 95% CI 1.10, 2.00). These findings substantiate and add to the earlier studies indicating the deleterious impact of long working hours but also suggest that the effects are moderated by employment relations or conditions of occupation. The policy implications of these findings are discussed.

  13. [Working hour preferences of female and male residents : Developments over 4 years of postgraduate medical training in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Stine; Krause-Solberg, Lea; Scherer, Martin; van den Bussche, Hendrik

    2017-10-01

    This article addresses developments regarding working hours and working hour preferences of residents undergoing postgraduate training in Germany and analyses if, and for what reasons, full-time or part-time working models are preferred. The source of data is the KarMed study, which is based on yearly postal surveys carried out among graduates of the year 2008/2009 from seven medical faculties in Germany. The interviews took place during the entire postgraduate training period. Response rates were 48% in the first year, with subsequent rates of above 85%. For analysis, descriptive statistics and regression models were applied. There is a considerable discrepancy between the actual and the preferred working hours of residents undergoing postgraduate training. Postgraduate training is mostly linked to full-time contracts, usually with additional overtime, even though a considerable proportion of doctors prefer a part-time position. More female residents want to work part-time than male doctors. The same applies for the period after medical specialism: in particular, female doctors with children, female doctors trained in former Western Germany states, and those seeking an occupation in outpatient care request part-time contracts for their professional future. A similar trend has been increasingly observed over the years for male doctors. Despite the huge number of residents requesting part-time contracts - during postgraduate training and afterward - the reality is still far behind this model. It is apparent that measures should be taken for both genders. Those measures should facilitate the implementation of the favored working-time model.

  14. 24-hour pattern of work-related injury risk of French firemen: nocturnal peak time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Marc; Berrez, Stéphane; Pelisse, Didier; Brousse, Eric; Forget, Coralie; Marlot, Michel; Smolensky, Michael H; Touitou, Yvan; Reinberg, Alain

    2011-10-01

    The first aim of the study was to assess clock-time patterning of work-related injuries (WRIs) of firemen (FM) of Saône et Loire-71 (France) during the 4-yr span of 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2007. FM of this service are legally required to log every WRI and seek its evaluation by the medical service, whether the WRI was the result of worksite duties or exercise/sport activities at the station. WRI was defined specifically as a (nonexercise, nonsport, and nonemotional/stress) work-associated trauma, verified both by log book and medical records. For the corresponding years, the 24-h pattern of emergency calls (Calls) plus road traffic (Traffic) on the main roads of the service area was also assessed. Relative risk (R) of WRI was calculated as the quantity of WRIs/h divided by the quantity of Call responses/h × 1000, which takes into account the number of at-risk FM/unit time, since each dispatched emergency vehicle is staffed with 4 FM. Comparably trained regular (RFM) and volunteer (VFM) FM experienced a total of 187 WRIs. The 24-h WRI curve patterns of RFM and VFM were correlated (r = 0.4, p difference (p > .05). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) validated comparable clock-time patterns in WRIs of RFM and VFM each year and each season (all p  .0006; Cosinor analysis, p work performance) of FM of the same service to urgent medical calls for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. Highest R of WRI at 02:00 h corresponded closely to longest LT (raw data at ∼02:00 h and Cosinor derived Ø of 02.54 h ± 71 min [SD]), thereby supporting the hypothesis of a common mechanism underlying the two 24-h profiles. A third aim was to determine the relevance of a new concept in work safety, "chronoprevention," for future FM training programs.

  15. Preparation for Retirement Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Human Resources is organising a preparation for retirement seminar which will take place on the four successive afternoons of 2 to 5 October 2007. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of one’s working life and the start of a new period of life. This period of transition and change is experienced differently from one individual to another. In any case, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above as well as those who have retired during the year have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members below 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned and the limited capacity of th...

  16. Ozone, Electrostatic Precipitators, and Particle Number Concentrations: Correlations Observed in a Real Office during Working Hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jianbang; Weschler, Charles J; Mo, Jinhan; Day, Drew; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhang, Yinping

    2016-09-20

    This study investigates the impacts of outdoor and indoor ozone concentrations, ESP operation and occupancy on particle number concentrations within a modern office in Changsha, China. The office's one-pass air handling system contains a mini-bag filter (MERV 12) followed by an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. Over a five-week period the system was operated either without the ESP (Stage 1, first-third week) or with the ESP (Stage 2, fourth and fifth week). Ozone and particle number concentrations were measured on working days. During both stages, indoor ozone and particle number concentrations tracked the outdoor ozone concentration. When operating, the ESP produced approximately 29 mg h(-1) of ozone, increasing supply air ozone by 15 ppb and steady-state indoor ozone by about 3 ppb. Occupancy tended to decrease indoor ozone and increase particle levels. During occupancy, indoor particle levels were low (∼2600 particle/cm(3)) when the supply air ozone level was less than 18 ppb. Above this threshold, the supply air ozone concentration and indoor particle number concentration were linearly related, and ESP operation increased the average indoor particle level by about 22 000 particles/cm(3). The implications for worker exposure to both ozone and particles are discussed.

  17. Effects of long working hours and the night shift on severe sleepiness among workers with 12-hour shift systems for 5 to 7 consecutive days in the automobile factories of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Mia; Kong, Jeong-Ok; Koh, Sang-Baek; Kim, Jaeyoung; Härmä, Mikko

    2008-12-01

    We investigated the effects of 12-hour shift work for five to seven consecutive days and overtime on the prevalence of severe sleepiness in the automobile industry in Korea. [Correction added after online publication 28 Nov: Opening sentence of the summary has been rephrased for better clarity.] A total of 288 randomly selected male workers from two automobile factories were selected and investigated using questionnaires and sleep-wake diaries in South Korea. The prevalence of severe sleepiness at work [i.e. Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) score of 7 or higher] was modeled using marginal logistic regression and included theoretical risk factors related to working hours and potential confounding factors related to socio-economic status, work demands, and health behaviors. Factors related to working hours increased the risk for severe sleepiness at the end of the shift in the following order: the night shift [odds ratio (OR): 4.7; 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.6-6.0)], daily overtime (OR: 2.2; 95% CI: 1.7-2.9), weekly overtime (OR: 1.6; 95% CI: 1.0-2.6), and night overtime (OR: 1.6; 95% CI: 0.8-3.0). Long working hours and shift work had a significant interactive effect for severe sleepiness at work. Night shift workers who worked for 12 h or more a day were exposed to a risk of severe sleepiness that was 7.5 times greater than day shift workers who worked less than 11 h. Night shifts and long working hours were the main risk factors for severe sleepiness among automobile factory workers in Korea. Night shifts and long working hours have a high degree of interactive effects resulting in severe sleepiness at work, which highlight the need for immediate measures to address these characteristics among South Korean labor force patterns.

  18. Factors influencing the decisions of senior UK doctors to retire or remain in medicine: national surveys of the UK-trained medical graduates of 1974 and 1977

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Fay; Lachish, Shelly; Goldacre, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Objective To report attitudes to retirement of late-career doctors. Design Questionnaires sent in 2014 to all UK medical graduates of 1974 and 1977. Setting United Kingdom. Participants 3695 medical graduates. Main outcome measures Factors which influenced doctors’ decisions to retire and factors which encouraged doctors to remain in work. Results The response rate was 85% (3695/4369). 55% of respondents overall were still working in medicine (whether they had not retired or had retired and returned; 61% of men, 43% of women). Of the retirees, 67% retired when they had originally planned to, and 28% had changed their retirement plans. Fifty per cent of retired doctors cited ‘increased time for leisure/other interests’ as a reason; 43% cited ‘pressure of work’. Women (21%) were more likely than men (11%) to retire for family reasons. Women (27%) were more likely than men (9%) to retire because of the retirement of their spouse. General practitioners (GPs) were more likely than doctors in other specialties to cite ‘pressure of work’. Anaesthetists and GPs were more likely than doctors in other specialties to cite the ‘possibility of deteriorating skill/competence’. Radiologists, surgeons, obstetricians and gynaecologists, and anaesthetists were most likely to cite ‘not wanting to do out-of-hours work’. Doctors who were still working were asked what would encourage them to stay in medicine for longer. Factors cited most frequently were ‘reduced impact of work-related bureaucracy’ (cited by 45%) and ‘workload reduction/shorter hours’ (42%). Men (30%) were more motivated than women (20%) by ‘financial incentivisation’. Surgeons were most motivated by ‘reduction of on-call or emergency commitments’. Conclusions Retention policy should address ways of optimising the clinical contribution of senior doctors while offering reduced workloads in the areas of bureaucracy and working hours, particularly in respect of emergency commitments

  19. Information Meeting- Working Hours

    CERN Multimedia

    Maurin

    1972-01-01

    Mons. Maurin préside la séance et fait part des résultats aux questionnaires pour définir une ligne de conduite de l'association- ramener et harmoniser les horaires- changer les contrats de 44 à 40 heures- des gens travaillent en partie encore 48 h

  20. The association between long working hours and the metabolic syndrome: evidences from the 5th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey of 2010 and 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jae Uk; Jeon, Man Joong; Sakong, Joon

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to evaluate the association between the working hours of Korean employees and the metabolic syndrome and the effects of long working hours on metabolic syndrome based on the 5th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2010-2012). Based on the 5th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2010-2012), 4,456 Korean employees without shift work, aged over 15, who work 30 hours or more per week were targeted in this study. The association between the general characteristics, including age, smoking, alcohol drinking, exercise, and the metabolic syndrome criteria defined by International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and weekly working hours were analyzed. In addition, the association between weekly working hours and the metabolic syndrome of the subjects stratified by gender was analyzed through multiple logistic regression analyses and generalized linear mixed model after adjusting the general characteristics. In the results of stratified analysis by gender, in male subjects, in comparison with the 30-39 weekly working hours group, there were no significant adjusted odds ratios to the other working hours groups. In female subjects, in comparison with the 30-39 weekly working hours group, there were no significant adjusted odds ratios to the other working hours groups. In addition, no trend associations were observed among weekly working hour groups in both stratified genders. No significant differences in prevalence of metabolic syndrome of the subjects stratified by gender were found according to weekly increasing working hours. However, due to some limitations of this study, further prospective studies may be necessary for verification.

  1. Company Policies on Working Hours and Night Work in Relation to Older Workers' Work Ability and Work Engagement: Results From a Dutch Longitudinal Study with 2 Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Laudry; Leijten, Fenna R M; Heuvel, Swenneke G; Ybema, Jan F; de Wind, Astrid; Burdorf, Alex; Geuskens, Goedele A

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To longitudinally investigate (1) whether lower work ability and work engagement predict the use of company policies on reduced working hours and exemption from evening/night work among older workers, and (2) whether using such policies subsequently contribute to higher work ability and work engagement. Methods In total 6922 employees (45-64 years) participating in the first three waves of the Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation were included. Participants yearly filled out an online questionnaires. Regression analyses were applied to study the influence of baseline work ability and work engagement on the incident use of policies during the first year of follow-up, and the incident use of these policies on work ability and work engagement during the second year of follow-up. Results Employees with a higher work ability were less likely to start using the policy 'reduced working hours' [OR 0.91 (95 % CI 0.83-0.98)]. Starting to use this policy was in turn related to lower work ability 1 year later [B -0.28 (95 % CI -0.47 to -0.08)]. Starting to use the policy 'exemption from evening/night work' was related to higher work engagement 1 year later [B 0.23 (95 % CI 0.07-0.39)]. Conclusions Low work ability precedes the use of some company policies aiming to support sustainable employability of older workers. Further research is needed to explore whether company policies result in a (longstanding) improvement, or reduced deterioration, of older workers' employability.

  2. Relationship between Long Working Hours and Suicidal Thoughts: Nationwide Data from the 4th and 5th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Ha Yoon

    Full Text Available Long working hours are a worldwide problem and may increase the risk of various health issues. However, the health effects of long working hours on suicidal thoughts have not been frequently studied. Our goal was to investigate the relationship between long working hours and suicidal thoughts in the rapidly developing country of Korea.Data from 12,076 participants (7,164 men, 4,912 women from the 4th and 5th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were used for the current analysis. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for suicidal thoughts. Combined effects of long working hours and lower socioeconomic status or sleep disturbance were also estimated.Compared to groups who worked less than 52 hours per week, odds ratios (95% confidence intervals for suicidal thoughts in groups who worked 60 hours or more per week were 1.36 (1.09-1.70 for males and 1.38 (1.11-1.72 for females, even after controlling for household income, marital status, history of hypertension or diabetes mellitus, health-related behaviors, and past two weeks' experience of injury, intoxication, or acute or chronic diseases, as well as type of work. The combined effects of long working hours with lower socioeconomic status, or with sleep disturbance, were also significantly higher compared to participants who worked less than 52 hours per week with higher socioeconomic status, or with 6-8 hours of nighttime sleep.In this study, long working hours were linked to suicidal thoughts for both genders. Additionally, the odds of those suicidal thoughts were higher for lower socioeconomic groups. To prevent adverse psychological health problems such as suicidal thoughts, a strategy regarding long working hours should be investigated.

  3. 24-hour care: Work and sleep conditions of migrant Filipino live-in caregivers in Los Angeles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Kevin; Nazareno, Jennifer; Malish, Sterling

    2016-12-01

    Live-in formal caregivers spend consecutive days in patients' homes, raising questions about their ability to secure adequate sleep while on duty. Few studies have examined sleeping conditions and outcomes for this growing workforce. We collected weeklong sleep logs and interview data from 32 Filipino caregivers in Los Angeles who provide live-in services at least 3 consecutive days per week. Respondents recorded a total average of 6.4 sleep hours during workdays divided over 2.4 sleep periods. Caregivers rated sleep quality as lower while at work; over 40% indicated excessive daytime sleepiness. Female caregivers reported worse sleep outcomes than their male counterparts. Some variations in sleep outcomes were found by employment arrangements. Live-in caregivers experience frequent sleep interruptions at all hours of the day and night to attend to patients' needs. The resulting impacts on sleep quality pose risks for both work-related injury and errors in patient care. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:1120-1129, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Job Satisfaction, Retirement Attitude and Intended Retirement Age: A Conditional Process Analysis across Workers’ Level of Household Income

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davies, E.M.M.; Heijden, B.I.J.M. van der; Flynn, M.

    2017-01-01

    In the contemporary workplace, insight into retirement behaviors is of crucial importance. Previous empirical evidence has found mixed results regarding the relationship between work attitudes, such as job satisfaction, and retirement behaviors, suggesting that further scholarly examination

  5. Associations of work hours with carotid intima-media thickness and ankle-brachial index: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Luenda E; Fekedulegn, Desta; Burchfiel, Cecil M; Fujishiro, Kaori; Landsbergis, Paul; Diez Roux, Ana V; Macdonald, Leslie; Foy, Capri G; Andrew, Michael E; Stukovsky, Karen H; Baron, Sherry

    2012-10-01

    Long working hours may be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). The objective was to investigate cross-sectional associations of work hours with carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and ankle-brachial index (ABI). Participants were 1694 women and 1868 men from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. CIMT and ABI were measured using standard protocols. Information on work hours was obtained from questionnaires. Mean values of CIMT and ABI were examined across five categories of hours worked per week (≤20, 21-39, 40, 41-50 and >50) using analysis of variance/analysis of covariance. p Values for trend were obtained from linear regression models. Mean age of participants was 56.9±8.4 years; 52.4% were men. Distinct patterns of association between work hours and the subclinical CVD biomarkers were found for women and men, although this heterogeneity by gender was not statistically significant. Among women only, work hours were positively associated with common (but not internal) CIMT (p=0.073) after full risk factor adjustment. Compared with women working 40 h, those working >50 h were more likely to have an ABI work hours and ABI were inversely associated (p=0.046). There was some evidence that the association between work hours and ABI was modified by occupational category (interaction p=0.061). Among persons classified as management/professionals, longer work hours was associated with lower ABI (p=0.015). No significant associations were observed among other occupational groups. Working longer hours may be associated with subclinical CVD. These associations should be investigated using longitudinal studies.

  6. Integrating Retirement Models

    OpenAIRE

    Gustman, Alan L.; Thomas Steinmeier

    2009-01-01

    This paper advances the specification and estimation of models of retirement and saving in two earner families. The complications introduced by the interaction of retirement decisions by husbands and wives have led researchers to adopt a number of simplifications to increase the feasibility of estimating family retirement models. Our model relaxes these restrictions. It includes the extended choice set created when each spouse makes an independent retirement decision. It also includes the ful...

  7. 5 CFR 842.206 - Involuntary retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... position must be— (i) In the employee's agency, including an agency to which the employee would be... geographic mobility is a condition of the employee's employment; (iii) Of the same tenure and work schedule... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-BASIC ANNUITY Eligibility § 842.206 Involuntary retirement...

  8. Working hours, sleep duration and the risk of acute coronary heart disease: a case-control study of middle-aged men in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yawen; Du, Chung-Li; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Chen, I-Shin; Chen, Ming-Fong; Su, Ta-Chen

    2014-02-15

    This study aimed to examine whether long working hours and short sleep duration were associated with an increased risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or severe coronary heart diseases (SCHD), independent of established psychosocial work-related factors. A case-control study was conducted. Cases were 322 men, aged cases on age, education and area of residence. Odds ratios of total CHD and confirmed AMI in relation to average weekly working hours and daily hours of sleep were calculated. Men with average working hours longer than 60 h/week were found to have significantly increased risks for total CHD (OR=2.2) as compared to those with weekly working hours in 40-48 h, and those with daily hours of sleep fewer than 6 h were found to have increased risks for CHD (OR=3.0) as compared to those with sleeping hours in 6-9 h. Restriction to confirmed AMI yielded a greater risk and these associations remained consistent with adjustment of smoking status, body mass index and psychosocial work factors including job demands, job control, workplace justice, job insecurity and shift work. The results support the hypothesis that long working hours and short sleep duration contribute independently to the risk of cardiovascular diseases in men. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. When Priests Retire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Marvin A.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A conceptual framework for analyzing later life adjustment was used to study retired diocesan priests (N=27). Access to and utilization of opportunities for continuing earlier life patterns had significant impact upon the retirement adjustment of priests. The data, collected by means of intensive interviews, resulted in three retirement patterns.…

  10. Educational Mismatch and Retirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Keith A.; Heywood, John S.

    2017-01-01

    Using a panel data set of scientists in the US, we examine the hypothesis that workers in jobs poorly matched to their education are more likely to retire. In pooled estimates, we confirm that the mismatched are more likely to retire and that among retirees, the mismatched retire at younger ages. Hazard function estimates also support the…

  11. 5 CFR 894.704 - What happens if I retire and then come back to work for the Federal Government?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... position, you have 60 days to enroll in FEDVIP. (c) If you enroll as an employee the Administrator will... back to work for the Federal Government? 894.704 Section 894.704 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION...

  12. 5 CFR 847.910 - If a retiree who elected to credit NAFI service for CSRS immediate retirement returns to work for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... OF NONAPPROPRIATED FUND INSTRUMENTALITIES Computing the Retirement Annuity for Employees Who Elect To... Government elects to credit NAFI service under subpart B of this part to qualify for a new immediate...

  13. Old European Couples' Retirement Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pozzoli, Dario; Ranzani, Marco

    This study investigates old European couples' retirement choices in order to bridge the gap between the European and the American literature. The typical European family approaching retirement is a dual-earner family: the dataset used in this paper reveals that 78 percent of working males...... correlated with education, age, and health status, together with partner's employment status, partner's education and partner's health status. We also perform a sensitivity analysis in order to check whether the results on the correlation of health status are robust to two alternative measures of health...

  14. Column Generation for a Multitrip Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows, Driver Work Hours, and Heterogeneous Fleet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Povlovitsch Seixas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses a vehicle routing problem with time windows, accessibility restrictions on customers, and a fleet that is heterogeneous with regard to capacity and average speed. A vehicle can perform multiple routes per day, all starting and ending at a single depot, and it is assigned to a single driver whose total work hours are limited. A column generation algorithm is proposed. The column generation pricing subproblem requires a specific elementary shortest path problem with resource constraints algorithm to address the possibility for each vehicle performing multiple routes per day and to address the need to set the workday’s start time within the planning horizon. A constructive heuristic and a metaheuristic based on tabu search are also developed to find good solutions.

  15. The Relation between Maternal Work Hours and Primary School Students' Affect in China: The Role of the Frequency of Mother-Child Communication (FMCC) and Maternal Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huan; Lv, Bo; Guo, Xiaolin; Liu, Chunhui; Qi, Bing; Hu, Weiping; Liu, Zhaomin; Luo, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although substantial evidence suggests that maternal work hours may have a negative effect on children's cognitive development, the link between maternal work hours and children's affect remains unclear. Some studies have observed that non-daytime maternal work hours are associated with more emotional problems among children. However, few studies have focused on the effects of maternal work hours on workdays and non-workdays. Therefore, this study separately investigated the relation between maternal work hours on workdays and on non-workdays and explored the mediating role of the frequency of mother-child communication (FMCC) and the moderating role of maternal education. Method: Using cluster sampling, this study selected 879 students in grades 4-6 at two primary schools in the Hebei and Shandong provinces in China and their mothers as the study subjects. A multi-group structural equation model (SEM) was used to test the relations between maternal work hours, FMCC and children's affect and the moderating effect of maternal education. Results: (1) Non-college-educated mothers' work hours on workdays negatively predicted FMCC, but there was no such effect for college-educated mothers; (2) non-workday work hours of all employed mothers negatively predicted FMCC; (3) the FMCC of all employed mothers positively predicted children's positive affect; (4) the FMCC of college-educated mothers negatively predicted children's negative affect although there was no such relation for non-college-educated mothers; (5) there was a significant mediating effect of FMCC on the relation between maternal work hours and children's affect only for non-college-educated mothers; and (6) the workday work hours of non-college-educated mothers positively predicted children's negative affect, but this correlation was negative for college-educated mothers. Conclusion: Maternal work hours have a marginally significant negative effect on children's affect through FMCC only for non

  16. The Relation between Maternal Work Hours and Primary School Students’ Affect in China: The Role of the Frequency of Mother–Child Communication (FMCC and Maternal Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Zhou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although substantial evidence suggests that maternal work hours may have a negative effect on children’s cognitive development, the link between maternal work hours and children’s affect remains unclear. Some studies have observed that non-daytime maternal work hours are associated with more emotional problems among children. However, few studies have focused on the effects of maternal work hours on workdays and non-workdays. Therefore, this study separately investigated the relation between maternal work hours on workdays and on non-workdays and explored the mediating role of the frequency of mother-child communication (FMCC and the moderating role of maternal education.Method: Using cluster sampling, this study selected 879 students in grades 4–6 at two primary schools in the Hebei and Shandong provinces in China and their mothers as the study subjects. A multi-group structural equation model (SEM was used to test the relations between maternal work hours, FMCC and children’s affect and the moderating effect of maternal education.Results: (1 Non-college-educated mothers’ work hours on workdays negatively predicted FMCC, but there was no such effect for college-educated mothers; (2 non-workday work hours of all employed mothers negatively predicted FMCC; (3 the FMCC of all employed mothers positively predicted children’s positive affect; (4 the FMCC of college-educated mothers negatively predicted children’s negative affect although there was no such relation for non-college-educated mothers; (5 there was a significant mediating effect of FMCC on the relation between maternal work hours and children’s affect only for non-college-educated mothers; and (6 the workday work hours of non-college-educated mothers positively predicted children’s negative affect, but this correlation was negative for college-educated mothers.Conclusion: Maternal work hours have a marginally significant negative effect on children

  17. [24-hour work: the interaction of stress and changes in the sleep-wake cycle in the police force].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbarino, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Disruption in police officers. In recent years there has been a widespread growth in services, available regardless of time or day organization (24/7 service) and a diffuse increase in their use, both in work and private lives, generally ignoring the importance of a regular sleep organization. Police officers - often need to work extended shifts and long hours under highly stressful conditions, which results in reduced levels of safety and operational effectiveness. In numerous studies, perceived stress has been found to correlate with both subjective and objective disturbances in sleep. Consequently, excessive daytime sleepiness is one of the most frequent health and safety hazards that police officers have to deal with. Sleep deprivation affects performance outcomes through a wide range of cognitive domains. Sleepiness and fatigue, caused by sleep loss, extended work and wakefulness, circadian misalignment and sleep disorders are major causes of workplace human errors, incidents, and accidents. Therefore, prevention of sleep loss, high levels of stress and fatigue is a key factor to consider when assessing emergency intervention. In order to combat fatigue and sleepiness, a 30-90 minutes nap before night shift could be a viable option.

  18. From employee to retiree: Life histories and retirement in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Damman, M.

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation aims to improve our understanding of work to retirement transitions in the Netherlands, by taking a life course perspective. Specifically it focuses on the associations between educational, work, health, and family experiences earlier in life and retirement-related outcomes. Different aspects of retirement transitions are examined, such as late-career work disengagement, retirement timing, and postretirement adjustment. Analyses based on the NIDI Work and Retirement Panel da...

  19. Anchoring Vignettes in the Health and Retirement Study: How Do Medical Professionals and Disability Recipients Characterize the Severity of Work Limitations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiland, Frank; Yin, Na

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies report systematic differences in how individuals categorize the severity of identical health and work limitation vignettes. We investigate how health professionals and disability recipients characterize the severity of work limitations and whether their reporting patterns are robust to demographic, education, and health characteristics. We use the results to illustrate the potential impact of reporting heterogeneity on the distribution of work disability estimated from self-reported categorical health and disability data. Method Nationally representative data on anchoring disability vignettes from the 2004 Health and Retirement Study (HRS) are used to investigate how respondents with an occupation background in health and Social Security disability beneficiaries categorize work limitation vignettes. Using pain, cardiovascular health, and depression vignettes, we estimate generalized ordered probit models (N = 2,660 individuals or 39,681 person-vignette observations) that allow the severity thresholds to vary by respondent characteristics. Results We find that health professionals (excluding nurses) and disability recipients tend to classify identical work limitations as more severe compared to non-health professional non-disabled respondents. For disability recipients, the differences are most pronounced and particularly visible in the tails of the work limitations distribution. For health professionals, we observe smaller differences, affecting primarily the classification of mildly and moderately severe work limitations. The patterns for health professionals (excluding nurses) are robust to demographics, education, and health conditions. The greater likelihood of viewing the vignette person as more severely work limited observed among disability recipients is mostly explained by the fact that these respondents also tend to be in poorer health which itself predicts a more inclusive scale. Conclusions Knowledge of reporting scales from health

  20. Preparation for Retirement Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    The Human Resources Department is organizing a Preparation for Retirement Seminar, which will take place on 18 and 21 October 2011 in the afternoon in the Main Auditorium and on 19 October and 15 and 16 November 2011 in the afternoon in the Council Chamber. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of a person’s working life and the start of a new chapter. This period of transition is experienced differently from one individual to another. In all cases, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members under the age of 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned, you are ...

  1. Preparation for retirement seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

      The Human Resources Department is organizing a preparation for retirement seminar, which will take place on the afternoons of the 25 and 27 November 2009. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of a person’s working life and the start of a new chapter. This period of transition is experienced differently from one individual to another. In all cases, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members under the age of 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to the availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned and the limited capacity of the Main Auditorium, you are requested to register in advance via Indico. &a...

  2. Preparation for Retirement Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    The Human Resources Department is organizing a Preparation for Retirement Seminar, which will take place on 18 and 21 October 2011 in the afternoon in the Main Auditorium and on 19 October and 15 and 16 November 2011 in the afternoon in the Council Chamber. Similar seminars in the past have always proved highly successful. Retirement marks the end of a person’s working life and the start of a new chapter. This period of transition is experienced differently from one individual to another. In all cases, being well-informed and prepared greatly facilitates the change in lifestyle. We would like to draw your attention to the following information: Staff concerned: All staff members aged 58 and above have been sent a personal invitation to attend. Spouses are welcome. Staff members under the age of 58 who are interested in attending the seminar may also apply. Their applications will be accepted subject to availability of places. Registration: In view of the number of people concerned, you are r...

  3. Buffering effects of job resources on the association of overtime work hours with psychological distress in Japanese white-collar workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Ayako; Inoue, Akiomi; Kawakami, Norito; Tsuno, Kanami; Tomioka, Kimiko; Nakanishi, Mayuko; Mafune, Kosuke; Hiro, Hisanori

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the buffering effects of job resources, utilizing the job demands-control (or demand-control-support) and effort-reward imbalance models (i.e., job control, workplace social support, and extrinsic reward), on the association of overtime work hours with psychological distress in Japanese employees. A total of 1,198 participants (valid response rate = 93.7 %) from five branches of a manufacturing company in Japan completed a self-administered questionnaire comprising the scales assessing job resources, psychological distress, and demographic characteristics. We obtained the information on working hours in the most recent month from the personnel records of the surveyed company. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted. In a series of analyses, interaction term of overtime work hours with each job resource was included in the model. Significant interaction effect of overtime work hours with job control was observed. Among the low job control group, the long overtime (80 h or more) subgroup had a significantly higher prevalence odds ratio of psychological distress compared to the short overtime (44 h or less) subgroup. No significant association of overtime work hours with psychological distress was found among the high job control group. On the other hand, there was no significant interaction effect of overtime work hours with workplace social support or extrinsic reward. The present findings suggest that high job control has an effect on reducing psychological distress in relation to overtime work hours in Japanese employees.

  4. Retirement postponed!

    CERN Document Server

    Joannah Caborn Wengler

    2012-01-01

    As the LHC celebrates a highly successful year so far, the world accelerator community is already looking ahead to the next collider. It has appointed a CERN past master of accelerator building to coordinate the development of future linear collider efforts.   Lyn Evans at SM-18. Lyn Evans, former LHC project leader, has just been appointed director of the new Linear Collider organisation which brings together the two existing linear collider programmes under one roof. “We will initially continue to work in parallel on both CLIC and the ILC,” says Evans. The two proposed accelerators have a number of elements in common, from the damping rings to the final focus systems. Both have very similar detector designs, with the exception of the data acquisition systems as the machines have very different time structures. “The technologies for the two accelerators are at very different levels of maturity,” summarises Evans. When the time comes to make t...

  5. The Influence of the Early Retirement Process on Satisfaction with Early Retirement and Psychological Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potocnik, Kristina; Tordera, Nuria; Peiro, Jose Maria

    2010-01-01

    The present study explores the influence of the early retirement process on adjustment to early retirement, taking into account the roles of individual characteristics and social context in this process. We proposed a systematic model integrating perceived ability to continue working, organizational pressures toward early retirement and group…

  6. Excessive working hours and health complaints among hospital physicians: a study based on a national sample of hospital physicians in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosta, Judith

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine correlations between excessively long working hours and subjectively experienced somatic health complaints among hospital physicians. Methods: Quantitative data were collected as part of the survey “Working life, Lifestyle and Health of Hospital Physicians in Germany 2006” using self-reporting questionnaires. The individually experienced health was assessed on the basis of Zerssen’s [1] list of somatic complaints. The indicator of excessively long working hours was defined as 10 or more working hours per working day and 6 or more on-call shifts a month among full-time employees. The net sample consisted of 3295 randomly selected physicians from 515 hospitals. Results: The response rate was 58% (n=1917. Physicians with excessively long working hours (19% had significantly higher sum score of health complaints (p=0.0001 and significantly increased mental and physical fatigue symptoms (feeling faint, languor, uneasiness, heavy legs, excessive need for sleep, trembling; p=0.0001 to 0.047, mood changes (irritability, brooding; p=0.008 to 0.014, gastrointestinal (nausea, loss of weight; p=0.0001 to 0.014 and heart disorders (lumpy sensation in the throat, chest pain; p=0.0001 to 0.042. When the sum score of health complaints was controlled for selected confounders, being female (B=-3.44, p=0.0001 and having excessively long working hours (B=2.76, p=0.0001 were significantly correlated with health complaints. In a separate gender analysis, being exposed to excessively long working hours remained a significant predictor for health complaints among both females (B=3.78, p=0.001 and males (B=2.28, p=0.004. Conclusions: Excessively long working hours are associated with an increased risk of health complaints. Reducing working hours may be the first step to improving physicians' health.

  7. Family Health Histories and Their Impact on Retirement Confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zick, Cathleen D; Mayer, Robert N; Smith, Ken R

    2015-08-01

    Retirement confidence is a key social barometer. In this article, we examine how personal and parental health histories relate to working-age adults' feelings of optimism or pessimism about their overall retirement prospects. This study links survey data on retirement planning with information on respondents' own health histories and those of their parents. The multivariate models control for the respondents' socio-demographic and economic characteristics along with past retirement planning activities when estimating the relationships between family health histories and retirement confidence. Retirement confidence is inversely related to parental history of cancer and cardiovascular disease but not to personal health history. In contrast, retirement confidence is positively associated with both parents being deceased. As members of the public become increasingly aware of how genetics and other family factors affect intergenerational transmission of chronic diseases, it is likely that the link between family health histories and retirement confidence will intensify. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Associations between social ecological factors and self-reported short physical activity breaks during work hours among desk-based employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennie, Jason A; Timperio, Anna F; Crawford, David A; Dunstan, David W; Salmon, Jo L

    2011-01-01

    To examine the associations between potential social ecological correlates and self-reported short physical activity breaks during work hours (defined as any interruption in sitting time during a typical work hour) among a sample of employees who commonly sit for working tasks. 801 employed adults aged 18-70 years from metropolitan Melbourne, Australia were surveyed in 2009 about their short physical activity breaks from sitting during work hours and potential social ecological correlates of this behaviour. Men reported significantly more short physical activity breaks per work hour than did women (2.5 vs. 2.3 breaks/h, p=0.02). A multivariable linear regression analysis adjusting for clustering and meeting the public health physical activity recommendations showed that the factors associated with frequency of short physical activity breaks per work hour were perceptions of lack of time for short physical activity breaks for men (-0.31 breaks/h, 95% confidence intervals [CI] -0.52, -0.09) and lack of information about taking short physical activity breaks for women (-0.20 breaks/h, CI -0.47, -0.05). These findings suggest that providing male employees with support for short physical activity breaks during work hours, and female employees with information on benefits of this behaviour may be useful for reducing workplace sedentary time. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A comparison of job descriptions for nurse practitioners working in out-of-hours primary care services: implications for workforce planning, patients and nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teare, Jean; Horne, Maria; Clements, Gill; Mohammed, Mohammed A

    2017-03-01

    To compare and contrast job descriptions for nursing roles in out-of-hours services to obtain a general understanding of what is required for a nurse working in this job. Out-of-hours services provide nursing services to patients either through telephone or face-to-face contact in care centres. Many of these services are newly created giving job opportunities to nurses working in this area. It is vital that nurses know what their role entails but also that patients and other professionals know how out-of-hours nurses function in terms of competence and clinical role. Content analysis of out-of-hours job descriptions. Content analysis of a convenience sample of 16 job descriptions of out-of-hours nurses from five out-of-hours care providers across England was undertaken. The findings were narratively synthesised, supported by tabulation. Key role descriptors were examined in terms of job titles, managerial skills, clinical skills, professional qualifications and previous experience. Content analysis of each out-of-hours job description revealed a lack of consensus in clinical competence and skills required related to job title although there were many similarities in skills across all the roles. This study highlights key differences and some similarities between roles and job titles in out-of-hours nursing but requires a larger study to inform workforce planning. Out-of-hours nursing is a developing area of practice which requires clarity to ensure patient safety and quality care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Long work hours and physical fitness: 30-year risk of ischaemic heart disease and all-cause mortality among middle-aged Caucasian men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, Andreas; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Burr, Hermann

    2010-01-01

    No previous long-term studies have examined if workers with low physical fitness have an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality due to long work hours. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis.......No previous long-term studies have examined if workers with low physical fitness have an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality due to long work hours. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis....

  11. Fatigue and related factors among hotel workers: the effects of emotional labor and non-standard working hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Jong; Moon, Hyun Jey; Lee, Kyung-Jae; Kim, Joo Ja

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed fatigue and its association with emotional labor and non-standard working hours among hotel workers. A structured self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 1,320 employees of five hotels located in Seoul. The questionnaire survey included questions concerning the participants' sociodemographics, health-related behaviors, job-related factors, emotional labor, and fatigue. Fatigue was assessed using the Multidimensional Fatigue Scale (MFS). Multiple logistic regression modeling was used to determine the associations between fatigue and emotional labor. Among male workers, there was a significant association between fatigue and both emotional disharmony (OR=5.52, 95% CI=2.35-12.97) and emotional effort (OR=3.48, 95% CI=1.54-7.86). These same associations were seen among the female workers (emotional disharmony: OR=6.91, 95% CI=2.93-16.33; emotional effort: OR=2.28, 95% CI=1.00-5.16). These results indicate that fatigue is associated with emotional labor and, especially, emotional disharmony among hotel workers. Therefore, emotional disharmony management would prove helpful for the prevention of fatigue.

  12. Different views about work-hour limitations in medicine: a qualitative content analysis of surgeons', lawyers', and pilots' positive and negative arguments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian P Businger

    Full Text Available Whereas work-hour regulations have been taken for granted since 1940 in other occupational settings, such as commercial aviation, they have been implemented only recently in medical professions, where they lead to a lively debate. The aim of the present study was to evaluate arguments in favour of and against work-hour limitations in medicine given by Swiss surgeons, lawyers, and pilots.An electronic questionnaire survey with four free-response items addressing the question of what arguments speak in favour of or against work-hour limitations in general and in medicine was sent to a random sample of board-certified surgeons, lawyers in labour law, and pilots from SWISS International Airlines Ltd.In all, 279/497 (56% of the respondents answered the survey: 67/117 surgeons, 92/226 lawyers, and 120/154 pilots. Support for work-hour limitations in general and in medicine was present and higher among lawyers and pilots than it was in surgeons (p<0.001. The latter agreed more with work-hour limitations in general than in medicine (p<0.001. The most often cited arguments in favour of work-hour limitations were "quality and patient safety," "health and fitness," and "leisure and work-family balance," whereas the lack of "flexibility" was the most important argument against. Surgeons expected more often that their "education" and the "quality of their work" would be threatened (p<0.001.Work-hour limitations should be supported in medicine also, but a way must be found to reduce problems resulting from discontinuity in patient care and to minimise the work in medicine, which has no education value.

  13. 78 FR 33911 - Phased Retirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ... making an election of phased retirement, the procedures for electing phased retirement, the requirements... return to regular employment status, the effective date of the decision to end phased retirement, and... retirement contributions and Social Security old-age benefits, the phased retirement annuity equals (1) the...

  14. 'All those things together made me retire': qualitative study on early retirement among Dutch employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeuwijk, Kerstin G; de Wind, Astrid; Westerman, Marjan J; Ybema, Jan Fekke; van der Beek, Allard J; Geuskens, Goedele A

    2013-05-28

    Due to the aging of the population and subsequent higher pressure on public finances, there is a need for employees in many European countries to extend their working lives. One way in which this can be achieved is by employees refraining from retiring early. Factors predicting early retirement have been identified in quantitative research, but little is known on why and how these factors influence early retirement. The present qualitative study investigated which non-health related factors influence early retirement, and why and how these factors influence early retirement. A qualitative study among 30 Dutch employees (60-64 years) who retired early, i.e. before the age of 65, was performed by means of face-to-face interviews. Participants were selected from the cohort Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation (STREAM). For most employees, a combination of factors played a role in the transition from work to early retirement, and the specific factors involved differed between individuals. Participants reported various factors that pushed towards early retirement ('push factors'), including organizational changes at work, conflicts at work, high work pressure, high physical job demands, and insufficient use of their skills and knowledge by others in the organization. Employees who reported such push factors towards early retirement often felt unable to find another job. Factors attracting towards early retirement ('pull factors') included the wish to do other things outside of work, enjoy life, have more flexibility, spend more time with a spouse or grandchildren, and care for others. In addition, the financial opportunity to retire early played an important role. Factors influenced early retirement via changes in the motivation, ability and opportunity to continue working or retire early. To support the prolongation of working life, it seems important to improve the fit between the physical and psychosocial job characteristics on the one hand, and

  15. Improving education under work-hour restrictions: comparing learning and teaching preferences of faculty, residents, and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Megan C; Kenkare, Sonya B; Saville, Benjamin R; Beidler, Stephanie K; Saba, Sam C; West, Alisha N; Hanemann, Michael S; van Aalst, John A

    2010-01-01

    Faced with work-hour restrictions, educators are mandated to improve the efficiency of resident and medical student education. Few studies have assessed learning styles in medicine; none have compared teaching and learning preferences. Validated tools exist to study these deficiencies. Kolb describes 4 learning styles: converging (practical), diverging (imaginative), assimilating (inductive), and accommodating (active). Grasha Teaching Styles are categorized into "clusters": 1 (teacher-centered, knowledge acquisition), 2 (teacher-centered, role modeling), 3 (student-centered, problem-solving), and 4 (student-centered, facilitative). Kolb's Learning Style Inventory (HayGroup, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) and Grasha-Riechmann's TSS were administered to surgical faculty (n = 61), residents (n = 96), and medical students (n = 183) at a tertiary academic medical center, after informed consent was obtained (IRB # 06-0612). Statistical analysis was performed using χ(2) and Fisher exact tests. Surgical residents preferred active learning (p = 0.053), whereas faculty preferred reflective learning (p teaching preferences, although both groups preferred student-centered, facilitative teaching, faculty preferred teacher-centered, role-modeling instruction (p = 0.02) more often. Residents had no dominant teaching style more often than surgical faculty (p = 0.01). Medical students preferred converging learning (42%) and cluster 4 teaching (35%). Statistical significance was unchanged when corrected for gender, resident training level, and subspecialization. Significant differences exist between faculty and residents in both learning and teaching preferences; this finding suggests inefficiency in resident education, as previous research suggests that learning styles parallel teaching styles. Absence of a predominant teaching style in residents suggests these individuals are learning to be teachers. The adaptation of faculty teaching methods to account for variations in resident

  16. EFFECTS OF LONG-TIME COMMUTING AND LONG-HOUR WORKING ON LIFESTYLE AND MENTAL HEALTH AMONG SCHOOL TEACHERS IN TOKYO, JAPAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Marino; Hara, Akiko; Kikuchi, Kimiyo

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of long-time commuting and long-hour working on lifestyle including sleeping, physical exercise, breakfast, smoking, alcohol intake and mental health. In this cross-sectional study, data were collected from 146 school teachers in Tokyo. The binary associations of commuting time and working hours with lifestyle, mental stress measured by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) and stress coping measured by the Sense of Coherence (SOC) scores were examined. The Chi-square test was used for statistical analyses. Our results indicated that the mean commuting time and working hours per week of the respondents were 42.1 (SD 22.5) minutes and 50.4 (SD 8.6) hours, respectively. Longer commuting time was significantly associated with shorter working hours (p = 0.023), less physical exercise (p lifestyle for long-time com- muters or long-hour workers. Key words: stress; stress coping; general health questionnaire; sense of coherence

  17. Retirement Applicant Satisfaction Survey Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This dataset contains information about the Retirement Applicant Survey (RAS). The survey measured satisfaction results with the retirement application process. The...

  18. Extension of the pre-retirement programmes

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Following a recommendation by the Standing Concertation Commitee at its meeting on 9 November 2015 and approval by the Director-General, please note that:   the Progressive Retirement Programme has been extended by one year, from 1 April 2016 until 31 March 2017;   the Scheme of Part-Time Work as a Pre-retirement Measure has also been extended by one year, from 1 January 2016 until 31 December 2016. Further information is available from the following sites: - https://admin-eguide.web.cern.ch/en/procedure/progressive-retirement-programme-prp - https://admin-eguide.web.cern.ch/en/procedure/part-time-work-pre-retirement-measure-ptp Human Resources Department Tel.: 79257 / 73903

  19. Retirement routes and economic incentives to retire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Martin

    We estimate the effect of benefit rates on individuals’ retirement behaviour. Compared to most other studies in the field, the characterising feature of this paper is to use a cross-country panel data set of individuals (the European Community Household Panel, ECHP) to estimate economic effects a...

  20. RETIREMENT AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN SENIORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idalia Alpízar Jiménez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Interest in retirement is on the increase, especially given the rapid demographic changes and increasing life expectancy. Retirement is a process that requires a comprehensive approach and gerontological intervention. Since it is associated with old age it often implies a threat, particularly for those who have made work their source of identity. The impact of the transition from an active stage to a less active period may trigger some conditions that may be detrimental to the individual´s physical and emotional health. This happens because retirees have not undergone the appropriate retirement preparation and adaptation processes. Adaptation is therefore essential for retirement to be pleasant and for the retiree to enjoy a higher quality of life. Consequently, it is pertinent that all entities have programs aimed at providing proper orientation for the retirement process. In particular, the National University of Costa Rica has not implemented proper guidelines to address the retirees´ situation. Although actions have been taken on some occasions, they have not been followed up on. Within this context, it makes sense to have a retirement adaptation program designed to include gerontological aspects in the National University retirement process. From a holistic point of view, intervention contributes to a better acceptance of old age and its accompanying transitions, which are characterized by a series of losses, mainly including the loss of the employment role and status.

  1. Preparation à la retraite - Preparing for retirement

    CERN Multimedia

    WHO/OMS Geneva

    2009-01-01

    Retirement implies an important change from a working environment to a new lifestyle. Every individual copes with this transition in his own way. In this video, registered already a few years ago, Dr. Sartorius from WHO addresses some of his colleagues close to retirement and explains what situations they can expect to encounter. We make this video available to CERN personnel to stimulate their own thinking on the subject.

  2. RETIREMENT AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN SENIORS

    OpenAIRE

    Alpízar Jiménez, Idalia

    2011-01-01

    Interest in retirement is on the increase, especially given the rapid demographic changes and increasing life expectancy. Retirement is a process that requires a comprehensive approach and gerontological intervention. Since it is associated with old age it often implies a threat, particularly for those who have made work their source of identity. The impact of the transition from an active stage to a less active period may trigger some conditions that may be detrimental to the individual´s ph...

  3. [Relationship between Working Schedule and Sleeping Hours with Overweight and Obesity in Spanish Adult Population According to Data from the National Health Survey 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marqueta de Salas, María; Rodríguez Gómez, Lorena; Enjuto Martínez, Diego; Juárez Soto, José Juan; Martín-Ramiro, José Javier

    2017-03-01

    Obesity is a public health problem worldwide. The aim of the present study was to determine the association between the type of working schedule and the sleeping hours per day with obesity and overweight. Cross-sectional study of the National Health Survey in 2012. We conducted an analysis of multinomial logistic regression and estimated the rates of possible risk of obesity and overweight versus the normal weight in relation to the type of working schedule and sleeping hours. Obesity among those who worked at night was 17,50% and those who had irregular works was 17,92%. Overweight among those who performed part-time works was 40,81% and 39,17% in night works. The obesity and overweight among those who slept less than six hours a day were 24,42% and 40,99% respectively. Regression analysis logistic showed OR=1,83 (IC95% 1,15-1,75) in irregular works and OR= 1,83 (IC95% 1,59-2,11) in people who slept less than six hours. Whenever overweight and obesity are present, a positive association between irregular jobs and short patterns of rest has been found, but stadistical significance is lost when estimating the OR adjusting the confounding factors.

  4. Behavioral and psychological aspects of the retirement decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Melissa A Z

    2011-01-01

    The majority of research on the retirement decision has focused on the health and wealth aspects of retirement. Such research concludes that people in better health and those enjoying a higher socioeconomic status tend to work longer than their less healthy and less wealthy counterparts. While financial and health concerns are a major part of the retirement decision, there are other issues that may affect the decision to retire that are unrelated to an individual's financial and health status. Judgment and decision-making and behavioral-economics research suggests that there may be a number of behavioral factors influencing the retirement decision. The author reviews and highlights such factors and offers a unique perspective on potential determinants of retirement behavior, including anchoring and framing effects, affective forecasting, hyperbolic discounting, and the planning fallacy. The author then describes findings from previous research and draws novel connections between existing decision-making research and the retirement decision.

  5. Self-Reported Recovery from 2-Week 12-Hour Shift Work Schedules: A 14-Day Follow-Up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merkus, S.L.; Holte, K.A.; Huysmans, M.A.; van de Ven, P.M.; van Mechelen, W.; van der Beek, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recovery from fatigue is important in maintaining night workers' health. This study compared the course of self-reported recovery after 2-week 12-hour schedules consisting of either night shifts or swing shifts (i.e., 7 night shifts followed by 7 day shifts) to such schedules consisting

  6. Retirement Information Center Blog

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — A place for the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) to share information about retirement benefits for new, prospective, and current Federal employees, as well...

  7. Job Satisfaction, Retirement Attitude and Intended Retirement Age: A Conditional Process Analysis across Workers’ Level of Household Income

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Eleanor M. M.; Van der Heijden, Beatrice I. J. M.; Flynn, Matt

    2017-01-01

    In the contemporary workplace, insight into retirement behaviors is of crucial importance. Previous empirical evidence has found mixed results regarding the relationship between work attitudes, such as job satisfaction, and retirement behaviors, suggesting that further scholarly examination incorporating moderating and mediating variables into retirement models is needed. Drawing on comparative models of attitude to retirement, we hypothesized a direct relationship between job satisfaction and intended retirement age for workers with a high household income and an indirect relationship between job satisfaction and intended retirement age, via retirement attitude, for workers with a low or mean household income. We collected data from a sample of 590 United Kingdom workers aged 50+. Using conditional process analysis, we found that the underlying mechanisms in our research model differ according to socio-economic status. We found no direct effect between job satisfaction and intended retirement age. However, an indirect effect was observed between job satisfaction and intended retirement age, via retirement attitude, for both low- and mean-household income individuals. Specifically, the relationship between job satisfaction and retirement attitude differed according to socio-economic group: for high-household income older workers, there was no relationship between job satisfaction and retirement attitude. However, for low- and mean-household income older workers, we observed a negative relationship between job satisfaction and retirement attitude. Otherwise stated, increases in job satisfaction for mean and low household income workers are likely to make the prospect of retirement less attractive. Therefore, we argue that utmost care must be taken around the conditions under which lower income employees will continue their work when getting older in order to protect their sustainable employability. PMID:28620329

  8. Job Satisfaction, Retirement Attitude and Intended Retirement Age: A Conditional Process Analysis across Workers' Level of Household Income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Eleanor M M; Van der Heijden, Beatrice I J M; Flynn, Matt

    2017-01-01

    In the contemporary workplace, insight into retirement behaviors is of crucial importance. Previous empirical evidence has found mixed results regarding the relationship between work attitudes, such as job satisfaction, and retirement behaviors, suggesting that further scholarly examination incorporating moderating and mediating variables into retirement models is needed. Drawing on comparative models of attitude to retirement, we hypothesized a direct relationship between job satisfaction and intended retirement age for workers with a high household income and an indirect relationship between job satisfaction and intended retirement age, via retirement attitude, for workers with a low or mean household income. We collected data from a sample of 590 United Kingdom workers aged 50+. Using conditional process analysis, we found that the underlying mechanisms in our research model differ according to socio-economic status. We found no direct effect between job satisfaction and intended retirement age. However, an indirect effect was observed between job satisfaction and intended retirement age, via retirement attitude, for both low- and mean-household income individuals. Specifically, the relationship between job satisfaction and retirement attitude differed according to socio-economic group: for high-household income older workers, there was no relationship between job satisfaction and retirement attitude. However, for low- and mean-household income older workers, we observed a negative relationship between job satisfaction and retirement attitude. Otherwise stated, increases in job satisfaction for mean and low household income workers are likely to make the prospect of retirement less attractive. Therefore, we argue that utmost care must be taken around the conditions under which lower income employees will continue their work when getting older in order to protect their sustainable employability.

  9. The absence of conflict between paid-work hours and the provision of instrumental support to elderly parents among middle-aged women and men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. van Putten (Anne); J.D. Vlasblom (Jan Dirk); P.A. Dykstra (Pearl); J.J. Schippers (Joop)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis study assesses the relationship between the number of work hours and the provision of instrumental support to parents among 779 middle-aged women and men in dual-worker couples in The Netherlands. Using data from the Netherlands Kinship Panel Study collected during 2002-04, we

  10. 45 CFR 261.31 - How many hours must a work-eligible individual participate for the family to count in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... does not have a traditional Food Stamp Program, to deem core hours, it must include the value of food... activities listed in paragraph (b) of this section. (b) The following nine activities count toward the first... public-sector employment; work experience; on-the-job training; job search and job readiness assistance...

  11. Increasing Teachers' Workloads in the Form of Quantitative Expansion in Extracurricular Activities: Aggregated Data Analysis of Past Working Hours Using a General Linear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanbayashi, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, teachers' increased workloads have become an issue for policy, and have been multiply pointed out, deriving as they do from peripheral duties such as paperwork, in academic research as well. However, these mentions have not been based on sufficiently solid proof. Here, this paper compares teacher working hours surveys extant from…

  12. So now what? Effects of retirement on civic engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaard, L.; Henkens, K.; Kalmijn, M.

    2014-01-01

    Retirement is an event that often brings about great changes in a person’s personal and social life. For many people, work is not only a way to fill time and earn money, but also important for their identity and meaning in life. After retirement, these benefits of work are lost, and it is expected

  13. Pathways through which health influences early retirement: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wind, Astrid; Geuskens, Goedele A; Reeuwijk, Kerstin G; Westerman, Marjan J; Ybema, Jan Fekke; Burdorf, Alex; Bongers, Paulien M; van der Beek, Allard J

    2013-04-03

    Due to the aging of the population, there is a societal need for workers to prolong their working lives. In the Netherlands, many employees still leave the workforce before the official retirement age of 65. Previous quantitative research showed that poor self-perceived health is a risk factor of (non-disability) early retirement. However, little is known on how poor health may lead to early retirement, and why poor health leads to early retirement in some employees, but not in others. Therefore, the present qualitative study aims to identify in which ways health influences early retirement. Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with 30 employees (60-64 years) who retired before the official retirement age of 65. Participants were selected from the Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation. The interviews were transcribed verbatim, a summary was made including a timeline, and the interviews were open coded. In 15 of the 30 persons, health played a role in early retirement. Both poor and good health influenced early retirement. For poor health, four pathways were identified. First, employees felt unable to work at all due to health problems. Second, health problems resulted in a self-perceived (future) decline in the ability to work, and employees chose to retire early. Third, employees with health problems were afraid of a further decline in health, and chose to retire early. Fourth, employees with poor health retired early because they felt pushed out by their employer, although they themselves did not experience a reduced work ability. A good health influenced early retirement, since persons wanted to enjoy life while their health still allowed to do so. The financial opportunity to retire sometimes triggered the influence of poor health on early retirement, and often triggered the influence of good health. Employees and employers barely discussed opportunities to prolong working life. Poor and good health influence early

  14. Effects of working full-time and studying in the evening hours among young apprentices and trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Luz, Andréa Aparecida; da Silva, Miryam Cristina Mazieiro Vergueiro; Turte, Samantha Lemos; Lopes, Marildo de Oliveira; Fischer, Frida Marina

    2012-12-01

    This research aims to assess apprentices' and trainees' work conditions, psychosocial factors at work, as well as health symptoms after joining the labor force. Despite the fact that there are over 3.5 million young working students in Brazil,this increasing rate brings with it difficult working conditions such as work pressure, heavy workloads,and lack of safety training. This study was carried out in a nongovernmental organization (NGO) with 40 young members of a first job program in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. They filled out a comprehensive questionnaire focused on sociodemographic variables, working conditions,and health symptoms. Individual and collective semi-structured interviews were conducted. Empirical data analysis was performed using analysis of content. The majority of participants mentioned difficulties in dealing with the pressure and their share of responsibilities at work. Body pains, headaches, sleep deprivation during the workweek, and frequent colds were mentioned. Lack of appropriate task and safety training contributed to the occurrence of work injuries. Having a full-time job during the day coupled with evening high school attendance may jeopardize these people's health and future. This study can make a contribution to the revision and implementation of work training programs for adolescents. It can also help in the creation of more sensible policies regarding youth employment.

  15. [Psychological factors for planning early retirement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszkowska, Małgorzata; Drabek, Marcin

    2010-01-01

    Over the recent years the proportion of retired persons in the over 54 years age group has systematically increased in the European Union (EU). In Poland, work force participation rate for people aged 54-65 years is particularly low compared to other countries. The aim of the presented study was to explore psychological and socio-demographic factors affecting the early retirement decision. The study was performed on 199 manual and skilled workers aged 50-64 years. The data were obtained by means of: Effort-Reward Imbalance questionnaire, Organizational Commitment Scale and adapted items from Work Description Inventory. To explore the risk factors for an early retirement, the logistic regression was used. The following risk factors of an early retirement were identified: low education (primary and vocational Exp(B) = 10.394, p = 0.001; secondary and Bachelor's degree Exp(B) = 3.462, p = 0.001), low health status (Exp(B) = 3.36, p = 0.006, Exp(B) = 7.73, p = 0.002) and lack of reward at work (ERI R) (Exp(B) = 1.09, p = 0.002). The results of the study suggest that psychological variables play a secondary role in the process of making early retirement decision, while they probably exert a stronger effect on the decision to continue occupational activities than to quit them. This problem should be explored more deeply in the future research.

  16. Modafinil, d-amphetamine and placebo during 64 hours of sustained mental work. I. Effects on mood, fatigue, cognitive performance and body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigeau; Naitoh; Buguet; McCann; Baranski; Taylor; Thompson; MacK

    1995-12-01

    Modafinil is an alerting substance that is considered safer than amphetamine with fewer side effects. Although modafinil has been used successfully to treat narcolepsy, relatively little is known about its ability to ameliorate fatigue and declines in mental performance due to sleep deprivation (SD) in a normal population. Forty-one military subjects received either 300 mg of modafinil, 20 mg of d-amphetamine, or placebo on 3 separate occasions during 64 hours of continuous cognitive work and sleep loss. Three drug treatments were given: at 23.30 hours and 05.30 hours during the first and second SD nights, respectively, and once at 15.30 hours during the third day of continuous work. Subjective estimates of mood, fatigue and sleepiness, as well as objective measures of reaction time, logical reasoning and short-term memory clearly showed better performance with both modafinil and amphetamine relative to placebo. Both modafinil and amphetamine maintained or increased body temperature compared to the natural circadian cycle observed in the placebo group. Also, from subject debriefs at the end of the study, modafinil elicited fewer side-effects than amphetamine, although more than the placebo group. Modafinil appears to be a good alternative to amphetamine for counteracting the debilitating mood and cognitive effects of sleep loss during sustained operations.

  17. Who opts for self-employment after retirement? A longitudinal study in the Netherlands

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    van Solinge, H

    2014-01-01

    .... By bridging the gap in the literature on work/retirement decision-making and entrepreneurship, the present study examines the factors associated with entry into self-employment post-retirement...

  18. Nature contact and organizational support during office working hours: Benefits relating to stress reduction, subjective health complaints, and sick leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnstad, Siv; Patil, Grete G; Raanaas, Ruth K

    2015-01-01

    Improving social support, and providing nature contact at work are potential health promoting workplace interventions. The objective was to investigate whether nature contact at work is associated with employee's health and participation, and to study whether the possible associations between nature contact and health can be explained by perceived organizational support. Data were collected through a web-based, cross-sectional survey of employees in seven public and private office workplaces in Norway (n = 707, 40% response rate). Multiple linear and logistic regression analysis were performed on 565 participants fulfilling inclusion criteria. A greater amount of indoor nature contact at work was significantly associated with less job stress (B = -0.18, CI = -0.318 to -0.042), fewer subjective health complaints (B = -0.278, CI = -0.445 to -0.112) and less sickness absence (B = -0.061, CI = -0.009 to -0.002). Perceived organizational support mediated the associations between indoor nature contact and job stress and sickness absence, and partly mediated the association with subjective health complaints. Outdoor nature contact showed no reliable association with the outcomes in this study. Extending nature contact in the physical work environment in offices, can add to the variety of possible health-promoting workplace interventions, primarily since it influences the social climate on the workplace.

  19. Ageing, government budgets, retirement, and growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez Eiras, Martin; Niepelt, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    changes of taxes, government spending components and the retirement age in politico-economic equilibrium. Growth is driven by capital accumulation and productivity increases fueled by public investment. The closed-form solutions of the model predict taxation and the retirement age in OECD economies...... to increase in response to demographic ageing and per-capita growth to accelerate. If the retirement age were held constant, the growth rate in politico-economic equilibrium would essentially remain unchanged, due to a surge of social security transfers and crowding out of public investment.......We analyze the short and long run effects of demographic ageing - increased longevity and reduced fertility - on per-capita growth. The OLG model captures direct effects, working through adjustments in the savings rate, labor supply, and capital deepening, and indirect effects, working through...

  20. Changes in leisure time physical activity and subsequent disability retirement: A register-linked cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahti, Jouni; Holstila, Ansku; Mänty, Minna; Lahelma, Eero; Rahkonen, Ossi

    2016-09-06

    Disability retirement is an economic, public health and work life issue causing costs for employees, workplaces and society. Adopting physical activity at middle-age has been associated with reduced risk of sickness absence and mortality. The aim of this study was to examine how changes over time in leisure time physical activity are associated with subsequent disability retirement among midlife employees. The Helsinki Health Study cohort baseline (phase 1) mail questionnaire survey data were collected in 2000, 2001 and 2002 among 40-60-year-old employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland. A phase 2 survey was conducted in 2007 (N = 3943). Respondents were classified into three groups: 1. low-active ( = 14 MET-hours/week in moderate-intensity physical activity) and 3. vigorously active (> = 14 MET-hours/week including vigorous physical activity) at both phases. This yielded nine groups for describing stability and change of leisure time physical activity. Disability retirement data were derived from the registry of the Finnish Centre for Pensions until the end of 2013. A Cox regression analysis was used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and their 95 % confidence intervals (CI) adjusting for covariates. During the follow-up, 264 (6.7 %) participants retired due to disability. Compared with those who were persistently low-active, those who increased their physical activity from low to vigorous had a lower risk of subsequent disability retirement (HR = 0.38, 95 % CI = 0.15-0.97) when adjusting for age, gender, occupational social class, strenuousness of work, smoking and binge drinking. Similarly, compared with those who were persistently moderately active, those increasing from moderate to vigorous (HR = 0.50, 95 % CI = 0.28-0.86) had a reduced risk. In contrast, those decreasing their physical activity from vigorous to low (HR = 2.42, 95 % CI = 1.32-4.41) or moderate (HR = 1.70, 95 % CI = 1.03-2.82) had an increased

  1. Measuring emergency physicians' work: factoring in clinical hours, patients seen, and relative value units into 1 metric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silich, Bert A; Yang, James J

    2012-05-01

    Measuring workplace performance is important to emergency department management. If an unreliable model is used, the results will be inaccurate. Use of inaccurate results to make decisions, such as how to distribute the incentive pay, will lead to rewarding the wrong people and will potentially demoralize top performers. This article demonstrates a statistical model to reliably measure the work accomplished, which can then be used as a performance measurement.

  2. Relationship between Working Hours and Power of Attention, Memory, Fatigue, Depression and Self-Efficacy One Year after Diagnosis of Clinically Isolated Syndrome and Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Wesnes, Keith; van Geel, Björn; Pop, Paul; Schrijver, Hans; Visser, Leo H.; Gilhuis, H. Jacobus; Sinnige, Ludovicus G.; Brands, Augustina M.

    2014-01-01

    The role of cognitive domain dysfunction with respect to vocational changes in persons with Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS) and early Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (eRRMS) is insufficiently known. We investigated thirty-three patients - 14 CIS, 19 eRRMS -, mean (standard deviation [SD]) time since diagnosis 13.5 (4.8) months and mean (SD) Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score 1.3 (1.1). Patients were assessed on the CDR System, a set of automated tests of cognitive function, which yielded scores for Power of Attention (ms), Continuity of Attention (#), Working Memory (SI), Episodic Memory (#) and Speed of Memory (ms). Work-related items and the confounding variables fatigue, depression, disease impact and self-efficacy, were assessed by self-report questionnaires. Patients had poorer Power of Attention compared to normative data (1187 [161.5] vs. 1070 [98.6]; P<0.0001) and slower Speed of Memory (4043 [830.6]) vs. 2937 [586.1]; P<0.0001). Power of Attention (Pearson r = −0.42; P<0.04), Working Memory (r = 0.42; P<0.04) and depression r = −0.41; P<0.05) correlated with number of days worked per week. Fatigue (r = −0.56; P<0.005), self-efficacy (r = 0.56; P<0.005) and disease impact (r = −0.46; P<0.05) correlated with number of hours worked per week. Persons who wished to work less had poorer Power of Attention (1247 vs. 1116 ms; P<0.02), those who wished to change job had poorer Episodic Memory (1.35 vs. 1.57; p<0.03). People who reduced working hours within 12 months after diagnosis had higher fatigue and disease impact, and lower self-efficacy. The findings of this pilot study indicate that one year after the diagnosis of CIS and RRMS Power of Attention and Speed of Memory are reduced, that Power of Attention and Memory are associated with a capability of working less hours, and that fatigue, depression and disease impact may negatively, and self-efficacy positively affect working hours. PMID:24787714

  3. Mitigating the Adjustment and Change Problems of Retiring Workers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The event of retirement from public service in Nigeria has carried enormous adjustment and change problems among the retirees. This is because rather than being a natural event, retirement is now a nightmare in Nigeria considering the less than satisfactory situation on the ground. Working on the assumption that retirees ...

  4. Retirement planning among South African professional soccer players

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While retirement traditionally occurs for most non-athletes after a long working career that allows them to plan and anticipate the likely demands and ... It is therefore important for soccer clubs and agents to assist professional soccer players in career counselling to be both mentally and financially prepared for retirement.

  5. Age Differences in Demographic Predictors of Retirement Investment Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Guyla D.; Chen, Yiwei

    2008-01-01

    Increased longevity coupled with inadequate savings makes retirement savings and investment research increasingly important. A policy-capturing method was used to examine the relative importance of 6 demographic predictors on the retirement investment decisions of 64 working adults. All predictors were significant predictors of the investment. In…

  6. A Future-Oriented Retirement Transition Adjustment Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesketh, Beryl; Griffin, Barbara; Loh, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    This theoretical paper presents a person-environment fit framework that extends the Minnesota Theory of Work Adjustment to retirement transition and adjustment. The proposed Retirement Transition and Adjustment Framework (RTAF) also accommodates dynamic intra-individual and environment change over time, configural combinations of variables, and an…

  7. Progressive Retirement Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    Following discussion at the Standing Concertation Committee at its meeting on 30 January 2007, the Director-General has approved the extension of the Progressive Retirement Programme with effect from 1 April 2007 until 31 March 2008. Human Resources Department Tel. 74484/74128

  8. Professor Kalkman retires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, Pieter

    1991-01-01

    On 13 December 1990 Prof. Dr. Cornelis (Kees) Kalkman retired from the positions of Professor of Plant Systematics and Scientific Director of the Rijksherbarium/ Hortus Botanicus by presenting his valedictory lecture to the academic community of Leiden University and the assembled Dutch Botanical

  9. Health Shocks and Retirement:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Larsen, Mona

    of elderly male workers by 8% in Denmark and that this increase in the baseline retirement probability is not affected by eligibility to early exit programs and persist even after accounting for selection due to take-up of disability pension. Neither is it affected by the relatively long duration of sickness...

  10. Claus Madsen Retires

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zeeuw, T.; Walsh, J.

    2016-12-01

    Claus Madsen began at ESO as a photographer in 1980 and recently retired as senior advisor on international relations. During his career he authored several books, the most notable being a history of ESO from the late 1980s to the 50th anniversary in 2012. A brief appreciation of his career is presented.

  11. Mental retirement and schooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingley, Paul; Martinello, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    We assess the validity of differences in eligibility ages for early and old age pension benefits as instruments for estimating the effect of retirement on cognitive functioning. Because differences in eligibility ages across country and gender are correlated with differences in years of schooling...... of the “mental retirement” effects which have recently been found...

  12. Sleep pattern and decision making in physicians from mobile emergency care service with 12-hour work schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Eleni de Araújo Sales; de Almondes, Katie Moraes

    2017-11-03

    Shift work schedules are biological standpoint worse because compel the body to anticipate periods of wakefulness and sleep and thus eventually cause a disruption of biological rhythms. To evaluate the sleep pattern and decision making in physicians working in mobile units of emergency attention undergoing Day Shift and Rotating Shift. The study included 26 physicians. The instruments utilized were a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Sleep Habits Questionnaire, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Chronotype Identification Questionnaire of Horne-Ostberg, the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) and hypothetical scenarios of decision-making created according to the Policy-Capturing Technique. For inclusion and exclusion criteria, the participants answered the Chalder Fatigue Scale, the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Inventory of Stress Symptoms for adults of Lipp (ISSL). It was found good sleep quality for physicians on Day Shift schedule and bad sleep quality for physicians on Rotating Shift schedule. The IGT measure showed no impairment in decision-making, but the hypothetical scenarios revealed impairment decision-making during the Shift for both schedules. Good sleep quality was related to a better performance in decision-making. Good sleep quality seems to influence a better performance in decision-making.

  13. Retirement plans, personal saving, and saving adequacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoboski, P

    2000-03-01

    have been earmarked for retirement and been available to fund retirement expenses. As rollovers become larger, this "partnership" of employment-based qualified plans and IRAs will grow even more important. The evidence indicates that many groups of American workers appear unlikely to be able to afford a retirement that maintains their current lifestyle (at least not without working more years than currently planned). Consensus does not exist on how many workers are at risk or the typical magnitude of their retirement saving shortfall. There is a consensus, however, that a substantial number of individuals are at risk. This is not surprising--despite the fact that the 70 percent of workers are saving for retirement--since relatively few workers know how much it is that they need to accumulate to fund their retirement.

  14. Relationship between working hours and power of attention, memory, fatigue, depression and self-efficacy one year after diagnosis of clinically isolated syndrome and relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Wesnes, Keith; van Geel, Björn; Pop, Paul; Sanders, Evert; Schrijver, Hans; Visser, Leo H; Gilhuis, H Jacobus; Sinnige, Ludovicus G; Brands, Augustina M

    2014-01-01

    The role of cognitive domain dysfunction with respect to vocational changes in persons with Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS) and early Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (eRRMS) is insufficiently known. We investigated thirty-three patients--14 CIS, 19 eRRMS -, mean (standard deviation [SD]) time since diagnosis 13.5 (4.8) months and mean (SD) Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score 1.3 (1.1). Patients were assessed on the CDR System, a set of automated tests of cognitive function, which yielded scores for Power of Attention (ms), Continuity of Attention (#), Working Memory (SI), Episodic Memory (#) and Speed of Memory (ms). Work-related items and the confounding variables fatigue, depression, disease impact and self-efficacy, were assessed by self-report questionnaires. Patients had poorer Power of Attention compared to normative data (1187 [161.5] vs. 1070 [98.6]; PMemory (4043 [830.6]) vs. 2937 [586.1]; PAttention (Pearson r =  -0.42; PWorking Memory (r = 0.42; Pworked per week. Fatigue (r =  -0.56; Pworked per week. Persons who wished to work less had poorer Power of Attention (1247 vs. 1116 ms; PMemory (1.35 vs. 1.57; pworking hours within 12 months after diagnosis had higher fatigue and disease impact, and lower self-efficacy. The findings of this pilot study indicate that one year after the diagnosis of CIS and RRMS Power of Attention and Speed of Memory are reduced, that Power of Attention and Memory are associated with a capability of working less hours, and that fatigue, depression and disease impact may negatively, and self-efficacy positively affect working hours.

  15. Extension of the pre-retirement programmes

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Following a recommendation by the Standing Concertation Commitee at its meeting on 5 December 2013 and approval by the Director-General, please note that:   the Progressive Retirement Programme has been extended by one year, from 1 April 2014 until 31 March 2015; the Scheme of Part-Time Work as a Pre-retirement Measure has also been extended by one year, from 1 January 2014 until 31 December 2014. Further information is available from the following sites: https://cern.ch/admin-eguide/retraite/proc_prp_fr.asp https://cern.ch/admin-eguide/retraite/proc_pTp_fr.asp Human Resources Department Tel. 79257/ 73903

  16. Extension of the pre-retirement programmes

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Following a recommendation by the Standing Concertation Committee at its meeting on 27 November 2014 and approval by the Director-General, please note that: the Progressive Retirement Programme has been extended by one year, from 1 April 2015 until 31 March 2016; the Scheme of Part-Time Work as a Pre-retirement Measure has also been extended by one year, from 1 January 2015 until 31 December 2015. Further information is available at the following sites: https://admin-eguide.web.cern.ch/node/447 https://admin-eguide.web.cern.ch/node/484 Human Resources Department Tel. 79257 / 73903

  17. Extension of the pre-retirement programmes

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Following a recommendation by the Standing Concertation Commitee at its meeting on 4 December 2012 and approval by the Director-General, please note that: the Progressive Retirement Programme has been extended by one year, from 1 April 2013 until 31 March 2014; and the Scheme of Part-Time Work as a Pre-retirement Measure has also been extended by one year, from 1 January 2013 until 31 December 2013.   Further information is available from the following sites: https://cern.ch/admin-eguide/retraite/proc_prp_fr.asp https://cern.ch/admin-eguide/retraite/proc_pTp_fr.asp   Human Resources Department Tel. 73903

  18. The conscientious retiree: The relationship between conscientiousness, retirement, and volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mike, Anissa; Jackson, Joshua J; Oltmanns, Thomas F

    2014-10-01

    The current study examined the relationship between conscientiousness, work status, and volunteering utilizing two large samples, the St. Louis Personality and Aging Network (SPAN) and the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). It was hypothesized that conscientious adults who were retired would be more likely to volunteer because, after retirement, they gain a substantial amount of free time, while losing an outlet for their industrious and achievement-striving tendencies. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses revealed that conscientious, retired individuals were more likely to volunteer than conscientious, working individuals. Further analyses revealed that facets of conscientiousness provide differential information from the general trait. These findings indicate that volunteering during retirement fills an important niche for high-striving, conscientious individuals.

  19. Predicting the retirement intentions and attitudes of professional workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilty, K M; Behling, J H

    1985-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the intentions about and attitudes toward retirement of professional workers, one of the more neglected groups in the retirement literature. Four types of professionals were represented: attorneys, social workers, high school teachers, and college professors. Intentions were defined in terms of projections regarding when respondents planned to retire, consideration of early retirement, and thinking about life after retirement. Attitudes were measured by using a set of three previously developed attitude scales. Six kinds of independent variables were controlled: (a) certain social factors (gender, age, and profession), (b) alienation from work and everyday life, (c) work history, (d) life-long habits of using free time constructively, (e) extensiveness of financial preparation, and plans for second careers and new involvements were the most consistent predictors of both intentions and attitudes. Alienation and certain types of financial preparation were by far the major variables.

  20. Implications of full and partial retirement for replacement rates in a defined benefit system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kantarci, T.; Smeets, I.; van Soest, A.H.O.

    2013-01-01

    Flexible retirement arrangements in which workers can retire abruptly or gradually at the age of their choice with higher retirement income as a reward for working more or longer fit well with the changes in life course patterns in the past decades and may help to keep pension systems sustainable in

  1. Tax reform options: promoting retirement security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDerhei, Jack

    2011-11-01

    retirement income security is whether a worker has access to a retirement plan at work. EBRI has found that voluntary enrollment in 401(k) plans under the current set of tax incentives has the potential to generate a sum that, when combined with Social Security benefits, would replace a sizeable portion of a worker's preretirement income, and that auto-enrollment could produce even larger retirement accumulations. POTENTIAL INCREASE OF AMERICANS FACING INADEQUATE RETIREMENT INCOME: The potential increase of at-risk percentages resulting from (1) employer modifications to existing plans, and (2) a substantial portion of low-income households decreasing or eliminating future contributions to savings plans as a reaction to the proposed elimination of the exclusion of employee contributions for retirement savings plans from taxable income, needs to be analyzed carefully when considering the overall impact of proposals to change existing tax incentives for retirement savings.

  2. When do people want to retire? The preferred retirement age gap between Eastern and Western Europe explained

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter de Tavernier

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Debates surrounding working longer focus mainly on increasing legal and effective retirement ages, leaving the preferred retirement age largely overlooked. There is a large East-West divide in Europe regarding the latter, with individuals in Eastern Europe wanting to retire earlier. We aim to explain this gap in terms of differences in working conditions and state-level legal conditions. Using the 2010 European Social Survey data on employed individuals aged 50-70 in 24 countries enriched with country-level information, we find that part of the explanation is found in the lower levels of job control found in Eastern Europe. Moreover, the results suggest that Karasek’s job demand/control model fits better in Western than Eastern European countries. Another explanation is found at the country level, where the legal retirement age accounts for a major part of the gap in preferred retirement ages between East and West.

  3. Insomnia, excessive sleepiness, excessive fatigue, anxiety, depression and shift work disorder in nurses having less than 11 hours in-between shifts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fagerbakke Eldevik

    Full Text Available STUDY OBJECTIVE: To assess if less than 11 hours off work between work shifts (quick returns was related to insomnia, sleepiness, fatigue, anxiety, depression and shift work disorder among nurses. METHODS: A questionnaire including established instruments measuring insomnia (Bergen Insomnia Scale, sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale, fatigue (Fatigue Questionnaire, anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and shift work disorder was administered. Among the 1990 Norwegian nurses who participated in the study; 264 nurses had no quick returns, 724 had 1-30 quick returns and 892 had more than 30 quick returns during the past year. 110 nurses did not report the number of quick returns during the past year. The prevalence of insomnia, excessive sleepiness, excessive fatigue, anxiety, depression and shift work disorder was calculated within the three groups of nurses. Crude and adjusted logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the relation between quick returns and such complaints. RESULTS: We found a significant positive association between quick returns and insomnia, excessive sleepiness, excessive fatigue and shift work disorder. Anxiety and depression were not related to working quick returns. CONCLUSIONS: There is a health hazard associated with quick returns. Further research should aim to investigate if workplace strategies aimed at reducing the number of quick returns may reduce complaints among workers.

  4. To stop or not to stop: an empirical assessment of the determinants of early retirement among active and retired senior teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Droogenbroeck, Filip; Spruyt, Bram

    2014-11-01

    While the official retirement age for most Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries is 65 years, the average employee in the majority of OECD countries retires considerably earlier. With the coming retirement of the baby boom generation, increasing life expectancy, and budget restrictions due to the financial crisis, most countries want to motivate employees to work longer. For these reasons, studying early retirement is highly relevant. In this article, we examine the determinants of early retirement among working and retired senior teachers between 45 and 65 years old in Flanders, Belgium. Although a widespread early exit culture exists among teachers and teacher shortages are expected in several countries, little attention has been given to the specific determinants of early retirement among teachers. Using multivariate linear regression analysis, we study the preferred retirement age of working teachers (n = 1,878) and the actual retirement age of retired teachers (n = 1,246). Financial factors, feelings of emotional exhaustion, and dissatisfaction with nonteaching-related workload (such as meetings and paperwork) have an important influence on the retirement decision. Results show that the majority of teachers make use of early exit schemes. This illustrates the existence of a widespread early exit culture among senior teachers in Flanders. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Living hours under pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilsøe, Anna; Larsen, Trine Pernille; Felbo-Kolding, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of part-time work on absolute wages. The empirical focus is wages and working hours in three selected sectors within private services in the Danish labour market – industrial cleaning, retail, hotels and restaurants – and their agreem......Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of part-time work on absolute wages. The empirical focus is wages and working hours in three selected sectors within private services in the Danish labour market – industrial cleaning, retail, hotels and restaurants...... in industrial cleaning includes a minimum floor of 15 weekly working hours – this is not the case in retail, hotels and restaurants. This creates a loophole in the latter two sectors that can be exploited by employers to gain wage flexibility through part-time work. Originality/value The living wage literature...

  6. A 360 degrees evaluation of a night-float system for general surgery: a response to mandated work-hours reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Michael J; Kim, Eugene; Widmann, Warren D; Hardy, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    New York State Code 405 and societal/political pressure have led the RRC and ACGME to mandate strict limitations on resident work hours. In an attempt to meet these limitations, we have switched from the previous Q3 call schedule to a specialized night float (NF) system, the continuity-care system (CCS). The purpose of this CCS is to maximize resident duty time spent on direct patient care, operative experience, and outpatient clinics, while reducing duty hours spent on performing routine tasks and call coverage. The implementation of the CCS is the fundamental step in the restructuring of our residency program. In addition to a change in the call system, we added physician assistants to aid in performing some service tasks. We performed a 360 degrees evaluation of this work in progress. In May 2002, the standard Q3 call system was abolished on the general surgery services at the New York Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia campus. Two dedicated teams were created to provide day and night coverage, a day continuity-care team (DCT) and a night continuity-care team (NCT). The DCTs, consisting of PGY1-5 residents, provide daily in-house coverage from 6 AM to 5 PM with no regular weekday night-call responsibilities. The DCT residents provide Friday night, Saturday, and daytime Sunday call coverage 3 to 4 days per month. The NCT, consisting of 5 PGY1-5 residents, provides nightly continuous care, 5 PM to 6 AM, Sunday through Thursday, with no other weekend call responsibilities. This system creates a schedule with less than 80 duty hours per week, on average, with one 24-hour period off a week, one complete weekend off per month, and no more than 24 hours of consecutive duty time. After 1 year of use, the system was evaluated by a 360 degrees method in which residents, residents' spouses, nurses, and faculty were surveyed using a Likert-type scale. Statistical significance was calculated using the Student t-test. Patient satisfaction was measured both by internal review of

  7. A case study of Missouri's deferred retirement incentive for state employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curl, Angela L; Havig, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Delayed retirement incentives can promote employee retention. Survey data results (N = 261) were used to explore factors associated with retirement and participation in Missouri's Deferred Retirement Option Provision (BackDROP), using a social stratification framework. Logistic regression analyses found that older age for full-retirement benefit eligibility increased the odds of delayed retirement, as did working more years for the state of Missouri. Longer length of work for Missouri increased the likelihood of being aware of one's eligibility for BackDROP and of taking the BackDROP option, while working for pay in a non-state position decreased the odds of awareness and selection. Those who retired to do other things (rather than for health reasons or disliking the work) were also more likely to be knowledgeable of their BackDROP eligibility status. Race, sex, education, and marital status were not significant predictors. These findings inform design and implementation of delayed retirement policies in other states.

  8. Projection of retirement adequacy using wealth-need ratio: A case study in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaudin, Ros Idayuwati; Ismail, Noriszura; Isa, Zaidi

    2015-02-01

    Adequacy of retirement income is very important to maintain a comfortable living standard during retirement. Under a life cycle model, assets are mainly accumulated during an individual's work life to finance consumption after retirement. A generally accepted goal of retirement planning is to provide enough income during retirement to prevent the level of living from dropping much below the pre-retirement level. Retirement wealth can be defined as adequate if the total retirement income is equal or greater than the desired total retirement consumption (or needs). In this study, retirement adequacy is projected using the Malaysian Household Income Survey (HIS) 2009 data which is based on 5881 sample of households and contains information on income, demographic and socioeconomic status of each household. Besides the projection of retirement adequacy, a regression of the ratio of projected wealth to needs (or wealth-needs ratio) is performed to investigate the demographic and socioeconomic determinants of retirement adequacy in Malaysia. The results show that 69% of households in Malaysia are adequately prepared for retirement.

  9. RETIREMENT AS AN EFFECT OF EMPLOYER-EMPLOYEE RELATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Turek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Employers are the key actors in defining conditions for retirement, as well as the conditions for retaining employees; their role, however, is still not well recognised and expressed in theoretical frameworks. In order to better understand individual retirement and to design successful ageing policies we should consider the behaviour and attitudes of employers.The article presents the organisational perspective on retirement and contributes to a theoretical consideration of the role of employers and work environments in the retirement process. It discusses the classic economic approaches, including the deferred payment model, and in referring to sociology of economy and management sciences it presents the employer’s perspective in relations with older workers. The main goal of the article is to consider the retirement process as an effect of employer-employee relations.

  10. Retirement as Meaningful: Positive Retirement Stereotypes Associated with Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Reuben; Allore, Heather G.; Monin, Joan K.; Levy, Becca R.

    2016-01-01

    Studies examining the association between retirement and health have produced mixed results. This may be due to previous studies treating retirement as merely a change in job status rather than a transition associated with stereotypes or societal beliefs (e.g., retirement is a time of mental decline or retirement is a time of growth). To examine whether these stereotypes are associated with health, we studied retirement stereotypes and survival over a 23-year period among 1,011 older adults. As predicted by stereotype embodiment theory, it was found that positive stereotypes about physical health during retirement showed a survival advantage of 4.5 years (hazard ratio = 0.88, p = .022) and positive stereotypes about mental health during retirement tended to show a survival advantage of 2.5 years (hazard ratio = 0.87, p = .034). Models adjusted for relevant covariates such as age, gender, race, employment status, functional health, and self-rated health. These results suggest that retirement preparation could benefit from considering retirement stereotypes. PMID:27346893

  11. Early Retirement in the Day-Care Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gørtz, Mette

    2012-01-01

    with a problematic social background. Third, the share of trained teachers is considered an indicator of working conditions. And fourth, the size of the institution is assessed as an indicator of working conditions. Regressions in a duration model framework show that there is no significant relationship between...... the child-to-teacher ratio or the size of the institution and early retirement (ERP). However, working conditions measured by the social background of the children and the share of trained day-care teachers have a significant effect on the probability of early retirement. Finally, a poor health condition......This paper studies the role of working conditions and health for elderly female day-care teachers’ decision to enter early retirement. Entry into retirement is analysed in a duration framework that allows for unobserved heterogeneity in the baseline hazard. Data are from a Danish longitudinal data...

  12. Sex Inequalities in Physical and Mental Functioning of British, Finnish, and Japanese Civil Servants: Role of Job Demand, Control and Work Hours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Michikazu; Tatsuse, Takashi; Kagamimori, Sadanobu; Chandola, Tarani; Cable, Noriko; Marmot, Michael; Martikainen, Pekka; Lallukka, Tea; Rahkonen, Ossi; Lahelma, Eero

    2011-01-01

    In general, women report more physical and mental symptoms than men. International comparisons of countries with different welfare state regimes may provide further understanding of the social determinants of sex inequalities in health. This study aims to evaluate (1) whether there are sex inequalities in health functioning as measured by the Short Form 36 (SF-36), and (2) whether work characteristics contribute to the sex inequalities in health among employees from Britain, Finland, and Japan, representing liberal, social democratic, and conservative welfare state regimes, respectively. The participants were 7340 (5122 men and 2218 women) British employees, 2297 (1638 men and 659 women) Japanese employees, and 8164 (1649 men and 6515 women) Finnish employees. All the participants were civil servants aged 40-60 years. We found that more women than men tended to have disadvantaged work characteristics (i.e. low employment grade, low job control, high job demands, and long work hours) but such sex differences were relatively smaller among employees from Finland, where more gender equal policies exist than Britain and Japan. The age-adjusted odds ratio (OR) of women for poor physical functioning was the largest for British women (OR=2.08), followed by for Japanese women (OR=1.72), and then for Finnish women (OR=1.51). The age-adjusted OR of women for poor mental functioning was the largest for Japanese women (OR=1.91), followed by for British women (OR=1.45), and then for Finnish women (OR=1.07). Thus, sex differences in physical and mental health was the smallest in the Finnish population. The larger the sex differences in work characteristics, the larger the sex differences in health and the reduction in the sex differences in health after adjustment for work characteristics. These results suggest that egalitarian and gender equal policies may contribute to smaller sex differences in health, through smaller differences in disadvantaged work characteristics between

  13. The XWHO directory retires

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    On 11 May a new web-based phonebook will take over from the 16-year old XWHO directory. It will provide access to basic contact information for people and services at CERN. A user-friendly interface will allow you to look for people and services using criteria such as first or last name, organisational unit and phone number. All requests submitted to the retired XWHO directory will be redirected to the new phonebook.   The new CERN Phonebook's user interface. CERN’s first electronic phonebook was created in 1995. The XWHO directory was first presented in July that year in a CERN Computer Newsletter (CNL) article entitled “Migrating the access to central directory services” by Miguel Marquina and Bernd Pollermann. Since then, it has been used by thousands of people at CERN and around the world looking for contact details of other members of the Organization. The XWHO directory is now retiring and is to be replaced by the new web-based CERN Phonebook. For several month...

  14. PRE-RETIREMENT PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Special Meeting concerning the TAXATION OF PENSIONS IN FRANCE Following the pre-retirement seminar held at CERN in March 2001, the Human Resources Division and the CERN Pensioners Association (GAC) are organising a special information session on the Taxation of CERN pensions in France The speaker will be S. Agarrat, a barrister specialising in tax law (practising in Lyon) and the meeting will take the form of a general presentation of the subject, followed by a question-and-answer session. This meeting is intended for CERN pensioners residing in France, as well as for staff due to retire from the Organization in 2001/2002. Registration is not necessary. The meeting will take place on Wednesday, 28 November 2001, from 4.30 p.m. to 6.30 p.m., in the Main Auditorium N.B.: Questions concerning the taxation rules applicable to salaries paid by CERN, in particular questions relating to the CRDS tax, will not be dealt with during this meeting.

  15. Healthier lifestyles after retirement in Europe? Evidence from SHARE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celidoni, Martina; Rebba, Vincenzo

    2017-09-01

    This paper investigates changes in health behaviours upon retirement, using data drawn from the Survey of Health Ageing and Retirement in Europe. By exploiting changes in eligibility rules for early and statutory retirement, we identify the causal effect of retiring from work on smoking, alcohol drinking, engagement in physical activity and visits to the general practitioner or specialist. We provide evidence about individual heterogeneous effects related to gender, education, net wealth, early-life conditions and job characteristics. Our main results--obtained using fixed-effect two-stage least squares--show that changes in health behaviours occur upon retirement and may be a key mechanism through which the latter affects health. In particular, the probability of not practicing any physical activity decreases significantly after retirement, and this effect is stronger for individuals with higher education. We also find that different frameworks of European health care systems (i.e. countries with or without a gate-keeping system to regulate the access to specialist services) matter in shaping individuals' health behaviours after retirement. Our findings provide important information for the design of policies aiming to promote healthy lifestyles in later life, by identifying those who are potential target individuals and which factors may affect their behaviour. Our results also suggest the importance of policies promoting healthy lifestyles well before the end of the working life in order to anticipate the benefits deriving from individuals' health investments.

  16. Burnout syndrome among psychiatric trainees in 22 countries: Risk increased by long working hours, lack of supervision, and psychiatry not being first career choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, N; Podlesek, A; Volpe, U; Barrett, E; Ferrari, S; Rojnic Kuzman, M; Wuyts, P; Papp, S; Nawka, A; Vaida, A; Moscoso, A; Andlauer, O; Tateno, M; Lydall, G; Wong, V; Rujevic, J; Platz Clausen, N; Psaras, R; Delic, A; Losevich, M A; Flegar, S; Crépin, P; Shmunk, E; Kuvshinov, I; Loibl-Weiß, E; Beezhold, J

    2016-02-01

    Postgraduate medical trainees experience high rates of burnout, but evidence regarding psychiatric trainees is missing. We aim to determine burnout rates among psychiatric trainees, and identify individual, educational and work-related factors associated with severe burnout. In an online survey psychiatric trainees from 22 countries were asked to complete the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI-GS) and provide information on individual, educational and work-related parameters. Linear mixed models were used to predict the MBI-GS scores, and a generalized linear mixed model to predict severe burnout. This is the largest study on burnout and training conditions among psychiatric trainees to date. Complete data were obtained from 1980 out of 7625 approached trainees (26%; range 17.8-65.6%). Participants were 31.9 (SD 5.3) years old with 2.8 (SD 1.9) years of training. Severe burnout was found in 726 (36.7%) trainees. The risk was higher for trainees who were younger (Pburnout, severe burnout remained associated with long working hours (Pburnout. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Rush Hour

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    5 July 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a cratered plain west of Schiaparelli Crater, Mars. The area captured in this image, and areas adjacent to it, are known for high dust devil traffic and the day this image was acquired in March 2006 was no exception. Near the top of the image, diagonally from the large impact crater cut by the left (west) edge of the image, there is a large dust devil traversing the plain and casting a shadow to the east. Also, near the bottom of the image, a smaller dust devil, is working its way across the plain. Location near: 5.9oS, 349.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Autumn

  18. Retirement Options to Offer College Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicetti, Daniel A.

    1982-01-01

    Retirement options available to institutions are outlined, including early retirement incentives, phased retirement, facilitating consulting opportunities, travel and outplacement services, maintaining community involvement, annuities, and pensions. Suggestions are made for increasing cost-effectiveness and fitting the options to local…

  19. Retirement Decisions; Incentives and Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhauser, Richard V.

    Recent studies of retirement have recognized the importance of pension plans and social security on the retirement decisions. A pension system that is neutral with respect to the timing of benefits encourages or discourages the acceptance of these benefits and subsequent job separation at any particular age only to the extent that any asset…

  20. All those things together made me retire : Qualitative study on early retirement among Dutch employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reeuwijk, K.G.; Wind, A. de; Westerman, M.J.; Ybema, J.F.; Beek, A.J. van der; Geuskens, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Due to the aging of the population and subsequent higher pressure on public finances, there is a need for employees in many European countries to extend their working lives. One way in which this can be achieved is by employees refraining from retiring early. Factors predicting early

  1. The Last Adventure: Retirement Migration, Climate and "Amenities"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saša Božić

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The rising number of European retirement migrants on the Mediterranean coasts, especially in the EU countries shows that the practical and scientific relevance of the new forms of migration in Europe is on the rise. "Retirement migration" evolved from a descriptive term to a candidate for a scientific or a research concept, at least if the use of the term IRM (international retirement migration is considered. However, it is necessary to solve several problems before this term can really become a coherent concept, useful for the research and explanation of the "new" migration phenomena. The author claims that the studies usually do not distinguish clearly between the migration of the elderly and retirement migration. The naming of the concept in this case mixes the characteristics of the migrants with the reasons for migration. The author shows that the usually mentioned reasons for retirement migration cannot be clearly formulated as factors which explain retirement migration. Further on, retirement as such is not a pull, push or staying put factor. Migration rates of retired, although rising, are still lower than the migration rates of the working age population and the Mediterranean coasts are also a destination for professionals who have the means to detach the job from the working place. Only a combination of conditions that enable migration and migration decisions, as well as a combination of motives and perceptions of reasons for migration, can partially "explain" retirement migration. One of the problems that has to be solved before retirement migration is affirmed as a concept is the treatment of the temporal and spatial dimension of the mobility of the retirement migrants. The author shows that a clear positioning of retirement migration on the temporal scale of mobility is hardly possible. Retirement migration is too wide and too complex a phenomenon to be easily localised in the temporal continuum. A similar problem emerges when the

  2. Blood Pressure, Sleep Quality and Fatigue in Shift Working Police Officers: Effects of a Twelve Hour Roster System on Cardiovascular and Sleep Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Jaymen L; Lal, Sara

    2016-01-29

    Police officers have been reported to exhibit a high incidence of pathologies, which present prematurely in an otherwise healthy population. Shift work has also been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and sleep disorders, attributable to its propensity for circadian rhythm dysfunction. However, contention exists as to whether shift work has a direct effect upon blood pressure (BP) regulation. This cross-sectional study sought to determine changes in BP and associations with the overall sleep quality and fatigue in 206 general duties police officers (n = 140 males) of the New South Wales Police Force in Australia. The subjects' BP was assessed before and after their twelve hour shift, during which time they also completed the Lifestyle Appraisal Questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS). Poor sleep quality (PSQI) and fatigue severity (FSS) were found to predominate in the sample (69% and 51% respectively). Although there was no change in BP for male participants, female officers' systolic blood pressure (SBP) was found to increase significantly across the shift (p shift SBP (r = -0.26, p = 0.001; r = -0.25, p = 0.001, respectively) and DBP (r = -0.26, p = 0.001; r = -0.26, p = 0.001, respectively) were significantly correlated with lower FSS scores after accounting for age, waist-hip ratio and lifestyle risk factors. Based on these preliminary findings, there was a significant increase in SBP of female police officers after shift work, while BP and fatigue levels in all police officers were strongly related. Moreover, the predominating poor sleep quality and impact of fatigue in this sample remain a concern. Further research is required to ensure the physiological welfare of police officers, while strategies must be implemented to manage the detrimental effects shift work may be having upon their cardiovascular and sleep health.

  3. Social Security, Pensions and Retirement Behavior Within the Family

    OpenAIRE

    Gustman, Alan L.; Steinmeier, Thomas L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper further extends our efforts to understand how household decisionmaking works and the relation of decisions made within the household to incentives from Social Security and pensions. A structural model of family retirement decision making is estimated using U.S. data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), which includes comparable labor market histories for husbands and wives. Compared to our earlier results, the coefficient on the age variables are substantially lower when par...

  4. A survey-based cross-sectional study of doctors' expectations and experiences of non-technical skills for Out of Hours work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael; Shaw, Dominick; Sharples, Sarah; Jeune, Ivan Le; Blakey, John

    2015-02-16

    The skill set required for junior doctors to work efficiently and safely Out of Hours (OoH) in hospitals has not been established. This is despite the OoH period representing 75% of the year and it being the time of highest mortality. We set out to explore the expectations of medical students and experiences of junior doctors of the non-technical skills needed to work OoH. Survey-based cross-sectional study informed by focus groups. Online survey with participants from five large teaching hospitals across the UK. 300 Medical Students and Doctors Participants ranked the importance of non-technical skills, as identified by literature review and focus groups, needed for OoH care. The focus groups revealed a total of eight non-technical skills deemed to be important. In the survey 'Task Prioritisation' (mean rank 1.617) was consistently identified as the most important non-technical skill. Stage of training affected the ranking of skills, with significant differences for 'Communication with Senior Doctors', 'Dealing with Clinical Isolation', 'Task Prioritisation' and 'Communication with Patients'. Importantly, there was a significant discrepancy between the medical student expectations and experiences of doctors undertaking work. Our findings suggest that medical staff particularly value task prioritisation skills; however, these are not routinely taught in medical schools. The discrepancy between expectations of students and experience of doctors reinforces the idea that there is a gap in training. Doctors of different grades place different importance on specific non-technical skills with implications for postgraduate training. There is a pressing need for medical schools and deaneries to review non-technical training to include more than communication skills. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. A survey-based cross-sectional study of doctors’ expectations and experiences of non-technical skills for Out of Hours work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael; Shaw, Dominick; Sharples, Sarah; Jeune, Ivan Le; Blakey, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The skill set required for junior doctors to work efficiently and safely Out of Hours (OoH) in hospitals has not been established. This is despite the OoH period representing 75% of the year and it being the time of highest mortality. We set out to explore the expectations of medical students and experiences of junior doctors of the non-technical skills needed to work OoH. Design Survey-based cross-sectional study informed by focus groups. Setting Online survey with participants from five large teaching hospitals across the UK. Participants 300 Medical Students and Doctors Outcome measure Participants ranked the importance of non-technical skills, as identified by literature review and focus groups, needed for OoH care. Results The focus groups revealed a total of eight non-technical skills deemed to be important. In the survey ‘Task Prioritisation’ (mean rank 1.617) was consistently identified as the most important non-technical skill. Stage of training affected the ranking of skills, with significant differences for ‘Communication with Senior Doctors’, ‘Dealing with Clinical Isolation’, ‘Task Prioritisation’ and ‘Communication with Patients’. Importantly, there was a significant discrepancy between the medical student expectations and experiences of doctors undertaking work. Conclusions Our findings suggest that medical staff particularly value task prioritisation skills; however, these are not routinely taught in medical schools. The discrepancy between expectations of students and experience of doctors reinforces the idea that there is a gap in training. Doctors of different grades place different importance on specific non-technical skills with implications for postgraduate training. There is a pressing need for medical schools and deaneries to review non-technical training to include more than communication skills. PMID:25687899

  6. Administrative circulars No. 22A (rev. 1) – Award of additional periods of membership in the Pensions Fund for long-term shift work and No. 22B (rev. 1) – Compensation for long-term shift work hours

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    Administrative Circulars No. 22A (Rev. 1) entitled "Award of additional periods of membership in the Pension Fund for long-term shift work" and No. 22B (Rev.1) entitled “Compensation for long-term shift work hours”, adopted following discussion in the Standing Concertation Committee meeting of 21 September 2010 and entering into force on 1 March 2011, are available on the intranet site of the Human Resources Department: http://cern.ch/hr-docs/admincirc/admincirc.asp They cancel and replace Administrative Circulars No. 22A and 22B entitled "Award of additional periods of membership in the Pension Fund to shift workers (Early Departure)” and “Duration and special compensation for shift work” of January 2000. This new version clarifies, in particular, the compensation of effective long-term shift work hours. Department Head Office  

  7. National survey of the association of depressive symptoms with the number of off duty and on-call, and sleep hours among physicians working in Japanese hospitals: a cross sectional study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wada, Koji; Yoshikawa, Toru; Goto, Takahisa; Hirai, Aizan; Matsushima, Eisuke; Nakashima, Yoshifumi; Akaho, Rie; Kido, Michiko; Hosaka, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to determine the associations of depressive symptoms with taking days of off duty, hours of sleep, and the number of days of on-call and overnight work among physicians...

  8. Is retirement good for your health? A systematic review of longitudinal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heide, Iris; van Rijn, Rogier M; Robroek, Suzan J W; Burdorf, Alex; Proper, Karin I

    2013-12-13

    Several studies regarding the effect of retirement on physical as well as mental health have been performed, but the results thereof remain inconclusive. The aim of this review is to systematically summarise the literature on the health effects of retirement, describing differences in terms of voluntary, involuntary and regulatory retirement and between blue-collar and white-collar workers. A search for longitudinal studies using keywords that referred to the exposure (retirement), outcome (health-related) and study design (longitudinal) was performed using several electronic databases. Articles were then selected for full text analysis and the reference lists of the selected studies were checked for relevant studies. The quality of the studies was rated based on predefined criteria. Data was analysed qualitatively by using a best evidence synthesis. When possible, pooled mean differences and effect sizes were calculated to estimate the effect of retirement on health. Twenty-two longitudinal studies were included, of which eleven were deemed to be of high quality. Strong evidence was found for retirement having a beneficial effect on mental health, and contradictory evidence was found for retirement having an effect on perceived general health and physical health. Few studies examined the differences between blue- and white-collar workers and between voluntary, involuntary and regulatory retirement with regards to the effect of retirement on health outcomes. More longitudinal research on the health effects of retirement is needed, including research into potentially influencing factors such as work characteristics and the characteristics of retirement.

  9. Aging Filipino Domestic Workers and the (In)Adequacy of Retirement Provisions in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Ilyan

    2017-03-01

    Although domestic work scholarship in Canada has focused primarily on the immigration/migration and labour experiences of domestic workers under the Foreign Domestic Movement and the Live-in-Caregiver Program, research is scarce on how these workers retire and consequently age in Canadian society. This article focuses on the aging experiences of retired Filipino domestic workers who, upon entering retirement, find themselves working in the secondary and/or underground economy while providing and receiving care from spouses, grandchildren, and local/transnational family members. Data were drawn from six qualitative, in-depth interviews with older Filipina domestic workers who discussed experiences of immigration, caring labour, retirement, and aging. Findings underscore (1) the poverty that older Filipino domestic workers encounter as they approach their retirement; (2) the necessity but insufficiency of the state's retirement provisions; (3) the need to find work in the unreported labour market; and (4) how caring labour is provided intergenerationally as a survival strategy.

  10. Time to talk about work-hour impact on anesthesiologists: The effects of sleep deprivation on Profile of Mood States and cognitive tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat, Haleh; Bissonnette, Bruno; Tumin, Dmitry; Thung, Arlyne; Rice, Julie; Barry, N'Diris; Tobias, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    A physician's fatigue raises significant concerns regarding personal and patient safety. Effects of sleep deprivation on clinical performance and the quality of patient care are major considerations of today's health care environment. To evaluate the impact of partial sleep deprivation after a 17-h overnight call (3 pm-7 am) on the mood status and cognitive skills of anesthesiologists in an academic clinical hospital setting, as compared to these parameters during regular working hours. Taking circadian rhythm into account, the following measures were assessed in 21 pediatric anesthesiologists at two time points over the course of the study; (i) between 7 and 8 am on a regular non call day, and (ii) between 7 and 8 am after a 17-h in-house call (3 pm-7 am). Six mood states were assessed using the Profile of Mood States. A Total Mood Disturbance (TMD) score was obtained as the sum of all mood scores minus vigor. The total score provides a global estimate of affective state. Simple cognitive tests were similarly administered to assess cognitive skills. A two-tailed paired t-test was used to compare data between regular and post call days. A P sleep deprivation affects the total mood status of anesthesiologists and impacts their cognitive skills. These findings are particularly relevant in a context of increased work expectation, particularly on clinical performance in our modern medical system. Such observations suggest that there may be changes that impact the safety of our patients and the quality of health care that is provided. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Blood Pressure, Sleep Quality and Fatigue in Shift Working Police Officers: Effects of a Twelve Hour Roster System on Cardiovascular and Sleep Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaymen L. Elliott

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Police officers have been reported to exhibit a high incidence of pathologies, which present prematurely in an otherwise healthy population. Shift work has also been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and sleep disorders, attributable to its propensity for circadian rhythm dysfunction. However, contention exists as to whether shift work has a direct effect upon blood pressure (BP regulation. Methods: This cross-sectional study sought to determine changes in BP and associations with the overall sleep quality and fatigue in 206 general duties police officers (n = 140 males of the New South Wales Police Force in Australia. The subjects’ BP was assessed before and after their twelve hour shift, during which time they also completed the Lifestyle Appraisal Questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS. Results: Poor sleep quality (PSQI and fatigue severity (FSS were found to predominate in the sample (69% and 51% respectively. Although there was no change in BP for male participants, female officers’ systolic blood pressure (SBP was found to increase significantly across the shift (p < 0.001, but with no change found in females’ diastolic blood pressure (DBP. Finally, higher pre and post-shift SBP (r = −0.26, p = 0.001; r = −0.25, p = 0.001, respectively and DBP (r = −0.26, p = 0.001; r = −0.26, p = 0.001, respectively were significantly correlated with lower FSS scores after accounting for age, waist-hip ratio and lifestyle risk factors. Conclusions: Based on these preliminary findings, there was a significant increase in SBP of female police officers after shift work, while BP and fatigue levels in all police officers were strongly related. Moreover, the predominating poor sleep quality and impact of fatigue in this sample remain a concern. Further research is required to ensure the physiological welfare of police officers, while strategies

  12. Metaphors for Retirement: Unshackled from Schedules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Leisa D.; Bataille, Christine D.; Vough, Heather C.; Lee, Mary Dean

    2011-01-01

    This study uses metaphor analysis to examine the meanings of retirement for a group of 35 retired Canadian executives and managers. Our analysis identified eight metaphors relating to the meanings of retirement. The findings provide us with a range of insights into the experience of retirement, from loss of purpose and identity to liberation from…

  13. Does Stock Market Performance Influence Retirement Intentions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Gopi Shah; Shoven, John B.; Slavov, Sita Nataraj

    2012-01-01

    Media reports predicted that the stock market decline in October 2008 would cause changes in retirement intentions, due to declines in retirement assets. We use panel data from the Health and Retirement Study to investigate the relationship between stock market performance and retirement intentions during 1998-2008, a period that includes the…

  14. Preparing for retirement - new seminars

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2015-01-01

    We would like to take the opportunity to inform you about a new programme related to retirement, organised by the Human Resources Department. Retirement marks the end of a career and the start of a new chapter in life.  In all cases, being well-informed and prepared is necessary to cope successfully with this transition. The programme has been developed for staff members and consists of two seminars: Leaving CERN (half day seminar): short presentations by internal speakers, focusing on what options CERN offers at the end of your career: organised once per year, next session scheduled on 24 November 2015, in the afternoon, enrolment and more information on Indico.   Preparation for retirement (2-day seminar): interactive workshop (in small groups) delivered by external experts, focusing on how to prepare psychologically as well as practically to cope with all the changes retirement brings: organised regularly in 2016, in English or ...

  15. Transitions to Retirement: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Jeff Borland

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual framework for thinking about issues associated with the transition to retirement by older workers, and then reviews available Australian and international empirical evidence and literature on this topic.

  16. Preparing for Time after Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernau, C.

    1983-01-01

    One important area of activities for which retiring workers could be prepared is undoubtedly that which lies in the field of social services in which trade unions everywhere are increasingly engaged. (SSH)

  17. Preparation for retirement seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    (Health insurance and wealth and succession planning) During the preparation for retirement seminar in November 2009, the sessions on health insurance in Switzerland and in France unfortunately had to be postponed. Participants in the seminar also expressed interest in an information session on “How to manage your wealth and organize your succession”. The sessions on health insurance will be held on 16 March 2010 and those on managing wealth and succession on 18 March 2010. Programme for Tuesday 16 March 2010 (TH Theory Conference Room, Building 4/3-006): 09:00 Health insurance in Switzerland by Mr. Sandro Breitenstein, Service de l'Assurance Maladie du Canton de Genève 10:00 Coffee break 10:20 Health insurance in France by Mr. Dominique Curtiaud, Caisse Primaire d'Assurance Maladie de l'Ain Programme for Thursday 18 March 2010 (TH Theory Conference Room, Building 4/3-006): 09:00 How to manage your wealth and organize your succession in Switzerland by Mr. Jean-Marc W...

  18. Trusted counsellor retires

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    His astute counsel, knowing smile and distinguished eloquence will be missed by many. With a pang of regret, the man himself admits that 'CERN was like a drug for me'. Last week, Jean-Daniel Mandica retired, after 40 years of loyal service. He was the trusted counsellor of every Director of the Administration and Director-General for eighteen years, from 1986 to 2003. Head of the planning unit for the Directorate and the Administration from 1986 to 1996, he was then named Head of the Directorate Services Unit in 1996, a position he held until the end of 2003. Throughout that time, he conducted key tasks for the Organization, such as restructuring the Administration and carrying out audits. His role in the creation of Microcosm and his commitment to CERN's participation in the Universal Exposition at Seville in 1992 contributed in no small part to the spread of the Laboratory's fame. Jean-Daniel Mandica's incomparable knowledge of the Administration, sense of diplomacy and great ability to listen made him a v...

  19. Baby boom generation at the retirement onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojilković Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden increase in the number of live births after the Second World War due to an increase in fertility rates has led to the formation of cohorts with specific characteristics or baby boom generation. This generation is unique in the history of the demographic phenomenon that has affected and affects the functioning of many segments of society. The aim of this paper is to assess structure of baby boomers who are few years away from retirement, using demographic data. Impact of baby boomer age structure of current and future retirees is described with a graphical display of current and projected age pyramid of baby boomers. Demographic pattern that women live longer than men is evident in the projected pyramid. In addition, the number of baby boomers will lead to a "younger" old population. The imbalance in the number of men and women pensioners, as well as older cohorts of women and female baby boomers was analyzed. As a result, an increasing trend of women's age pensioners who are members of the baby boom generation was clearly observed, which is opposite to the older cohort of women who often were family pensioners. Different circumstances and conditions in which female boomers lived and worked will form a new "pension model" because they will gain their benefits as well as men, for the first time in significant number, unlike their mothers, which gained the right to retire after they become widows. Number of women age pensioners is getting greater comparing to men, as the result of changes in the economic activities of women in the last half of the 20th century. When baby boomers retire and exit the working population, this will create a vacuum, because the numerically smaller generations will enter working population, while the sudden and very shortly, the number of population older than 60 or 65 will increase, most of them will likely to acquire the right to a pension. It is undeniable that baby boomers had impact on demographic structure

  20. The impact of nurse working hours on patient safety culture: a cross-national survey including Japan, the United States and Chinese Taiwan using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yinghui; Fujita, Shigeru; Seto, Kanako; Ito, Shinya; Matsumoto, Kunichika; Huang, Chiu-Chin; Hasegawa, Tomonori

    2013-10-07

    A positive patient safety culture (PSC) is one of the most critical components to improve healthcare quality and safety. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS), developed by the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, has been used to assess PSC in 31 countries. However, little is known about the impact of nurse working hours on PSC. We hypothesized that long nurse working hours would deteriorate PSC, and that the deterioration patterns would vary between countries. Moreover, the common trends observed in Japan, the US and Chinese Taiwan may be useful to improve PSC in other countries. The purpose of this study was to clarify the impact of long nurse working hours on PSC in Japan, the US, and Chinese Taiwan using HSOPS. The HSOPS questionnaire measures 12 sub-dimensions of PSC, with higher scores indicating a more positive PSC. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using a generalized linear mixed model to evaluate the impact of working hours on PSC outcome measures (patient safety grade and number of events reported). Tukey's test and Cohen's d values were used to verify the relationships between nurse working hours and the 12 sub-dimensions of PSC. Nurses working ≥60 h/week in Japan and the US had a significantly lower OR for patient safety grade than those working teamwork within units' was significantly lower in the ≥60-h group than in the teamwork within units' in Japan, the US and Chinese Taiwan.

  1. Plan now to make your retirement active, productive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlepp, S

    1989-12-01

    In his book Planning to the Years Ahead, Lester I. Tenney, PhD, professor emeritus at Arizona State University, Tempe, links Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs to retirement planning. According to Maslow, economic and security needs can be achieved through a family environment (eg, food clothing, shelter), and social acceptance, self-worth, and self-satisfaction can be achieved from social interaction, work, or leisure activities. After the basic needs of food, clothing, and shelter have been achieved, people are able to move to the next level of achieving safety and security. The level of dependency that people have on satisfying these needs through work will determine how well they are at adapting to retirement. The more people depend on work alone, the harder will be the adjustment; people who are less dependent on work will find retirement easier to accept.

  2. The influence of marital status and spousal employment on retirement behavior in Germany and Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radl, Jonas; Himmelreicher, Ralf K

    2015-05-01

    This article analyzes the impact of marital status and spousal employment on the timing of retirement in Germany and Spain. Retirement behavior is examined by means of event-history models, with a competing risks framework being used to distinguish between voluntary and involuntary work-exit transitions. To take account of the role of social policies, we adopt a comparative approach. Data are drawn from a 2006 special retirement module implemented analogously in national labor force surveys. The results show that spousal labor market participation plays a large role in work-exit transitions, even when retirement is involuntary. This finding questions the widespread belief that coretirement is exclusively due to preference for joint retirement shared among spouses. Moreover, widows and widowers tend to retire prematurely in Germany, whereas no such effect could be found in Spain. This finding is explained by reference to specific economic incentives arising from national pension legislation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. From employee to retiree: Life histories and retirement in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, M.

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation aims to improve our understanding of work to retirement transitions in the Netherlands, by taking a life course perspective. Specifically it focuses on the associations between educational, work, health, and family experiences earlier in life and retirement-related outcomes.

  4. The role of job-related rewards in retirement planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosloski, K; Ekerdt, D; DeViney, S

    2001-05-01

    The authors used data from the first wave of the Health and Retirement Study ( F. Juster and R. Suzman 1995) to evaluate whether certain job-related gratifications might reduce retirement planning. Three definitions of retirement planning were evaluated and then regressed separately on a set of variables that included 3 types of job-related satisfactions (intrinsic gratification, positive social relations, and ascendance in the workplace) and 7 covariates: education, age, sex, health, marital status, race, and pension eligibility. Findings indicated that jobs high in ascendance were related to an increase in certain types of retirement planning, but jobs high in intrinsic rewards and positive social relations were related to less planning, regardless of how planning was defined. The findings suggest that information about work-related rewards may be useful in targeting individuals who might benefit from retirement planning programs, in developing planning programs to help workers realize more complex retirement plans, and in assisting employers who hope to retain older workers.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of 40-hour versus 100-hour vocational rehabilitation on work participation for workers on sick leave due to subacute or chronic musculoskeletal pain: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beemster, Timo T; van Velzen, Judith M; van Bennekom, Coen A M; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; Reneman, Michiel F

    2015-07-28

    Although vocational rehabilitation is a widely advocated intervention for workers on sick leave due to subacute or chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain, the optimal dosage of effective and cost-effective vocational rehabilitation remains unknown. The objective of this paper is to describe the design of a non-inferiority trial evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of 40-h multidisciplinary vocational rehabilitation compared with 100-h multidisciplinary vocational rehabilitation on work participation for workers on sick leave due to subacute or chronic musculoskeletal pain. A non-inferiority study design will be applied. The study population consists of workers who are on part-time or full-time sick leave due to subacute or chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain. Two multidisciplinary vocational rehabilitation programs following the bio-psychosocial approach will be evaluated in this study: 40-h vocational rehabilitation and 100-h vocational rehabilitation, both delivered over a maximum of 15 weeks. The 100-h vocational rehabilitation comprises five modules: work participation coordination, graded activity, cognitive behavioral therapy, group education, and relaxation. The 40-h vocational rehabilitation comprises work participation coordination and a well-reasoned choice from the other four modules. Four rehabilitation centers will participate in this study, each delivering both interventions. Patients will be randomized into one of the interventions, stratified for the duration of sick leave (Cost outcomes are absenteeism, presenteeism, healthcare usage, and travelling costs. Cost-effectiveness will be evaluated from the societal and employer perspectives. The results obtained from this study will be useful for vocational rehabilitation practice and will provide stakeholders with relevant insights into two versions of vocational rehabilitation. Dutch Trial Register identifier: NTR4362 (registered 17 March 2014).

  6. Retirement and mental health: dose social participation mitigate the association? A fixed-effects longitudinal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Koichiro; Kondo, Naoki; Kondo, Katsunori; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2017-05-30

    Empirical evidence investigating heterogeneous impact of retirement on mental health depending on social backgrounds is lacking, especially among older adults. We examined the impact of changes in working status on changes in mental health using Japanese community-dwelling adults aged ≥65 years participating in the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study between 2010 and 2013 (N = 62,438). Between-waves changes in working status ("Kept working", "Retired", "Started work", or "Continuously retired") were used to predict changes in depressive symptoms measured by the Geriatric Depression Scale. First-difference regression models were stratified by gender, controlling for changes in time-varying confounding actors including equivalised household income, marital status, instrumental activities of daily living, incidence of serious illnesses and family caregiving. We then examined the interactions between changes in working status and occupational class, changes in marital status, and post-retirement social participation. Participants who transitioned to retirement reported significantly increased depressive symptoms (β = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.21-0.45 for men, and β = 0.29, 95% CI: 0.13-0.45 for women) compared to those who kept working. Men who were continuously retired reported increased depressive symptoms (β = 0.13, 95% CI: 0.05-0.20), whereas males who started work reported decreased depressive symptoms (β = -0.20, 95% CI: -0.38--0.02). Men from lower occupational class (compared to men from higher class) reported more increase in depressive symptoms when continuously retired (β = -0.16, 95% CI: -0.25--0.08). Those reporting recreational social participation after retirement appeared to be less influenced by transition to retirement. Retirement may increase depressive symptoms among Japanese older adults, particularly men from lower occupational class backgrounds. Encouraging recreational social participation may mitigate the adverse effects of

  7. Power Plant Retirements: Trends and Possible Drivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Andrew D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wiser, Ryan H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Seel, Joachim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-11-29

    This paper synthesizes available data on historical and planned power plant retirements. Specifically, we present data on historical generation capacity additions and retirements over time, and the types of plants recently retired and planned for retirement. We then present data on the age of plants that have recently retired or that have plans to retire. We also review the characteristics of plants that recently retired or plan to retire vs. those that continue to operate, focusing on plant size, age, heat rate, and SO2 emissions. Finally, we show the level of recent thermal plant retirements on a regional basis and correlate those data with a subset of possible factors that may be contributing to retirement decisions. This basic data synthesis cannot be used to precisely estimate the relative magnitude of retirement drivers. Nor do we explore every possible driver for retirement decisions. Moreover, future retirement decisions may be influenced by different factors than those that have affected past decisions. Nonetheless, it is clear that recently retired plants are relatively old, and that plants with stated planned retirement dates are—on average—no younger. We observe that retired plants are smaller, older, less efficient, and more polluting than operating plants. Based on simple correlation graphics, the strongest predictors of regional retirement differences appear to include SO2 emissions rates (for coal), planning reserve margins (for all thermal units), variations in load growth or contraction (for all thermal units), and the age of older thermal plans (for all thermal units). Additional apparent predictors of regional retirements include the ratio of coal to gas prices and delivered natural gas prices. Other factors appear to have played lesser roles, including the penetration variable renewable energy (VRE), recent non-VRE capacity additions, and whether the region hosts an ISO/RTO.

  8. Changes in Health and Health Behavior Associated With Retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astri Syse; Marijke Veenstra; Trude Furunes; Per Erik Solem; Reidar Mykletun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: While poor health contributes to early work exits, it is less clear how early work exits affect health. This study therefore examines changes in health associated with retirement. Method: Survey data from gainfully employed individuals aged 57 to 66 in 2002 were used to assess changes in

  9. Pensions at a glance 2011 retirement-income systems in OECD and G20 countries

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2011-01-01

    The theme of this fourth edition of Pensions at a Glance is pensions, retirement and life expectancy. Many countries have increased pension ages in the face of population ageing and longer lives. Some have introduced an automatic link between pensions and life expectancy. Improvements to the incentives to work rather than retire are also a common part of recent pension-reform packages. However, ensuring that there are enough jobs for older workers remains a challenge. An in-depth look at these important policy issues is provided by five special chapters on: pension ages, retirement behaviour, pension incentives to retire, the demand for older workers and linking pensions to life expectancy. This edition updates information on the key features of pension provision in OECD countries and provides projections of retirement income for today’s workers. It offers an expanded range of 34 indicators, covering the design of national retirement-income provision, pension entitlements, incomes of older people, the fin...

  10. The Moderating Influences of Retirement Transition, Age, and Gender on Daily Stressors and Psychological Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jen D; Shobo, Yetty

    2017-06-01

    This study investigated the influences of retirement transition, age, and gender on aspects of daily experiences in adults (aged 50-75 years) who stayed working ( n = 138) and who transitioned into retirement ( n = 72). Data derived from the first and second waves of the Daily Diary Study of the National Survey of Midlife in the United States. Participants completed telephone interviews about their experiences across eight consecutive days. Findings showed a significant interaction effect of retirement transition and age on daily stressors. Gender did not significantly moderate the associations between retirement transition and daily experiences. These findings suggest that retirement transition must be considered in the context of life course influences, especially age, to better determine the quality of daily experiences of midlife and older adults, and these life course influences should be considered in programs and services aimed to help adults navigate the retirement experiences.

  11. Foreign Service Retirement and Disability System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The Foreign Service Retirement and Disability System (FSRDS) is the Foreign Service equivalent to the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) as described in 5 U.S.C....

  12. The Meaning of Retirement: Cross-national Patterns and Trends

    OpenAIRE

    Smeeding, Timothy

    1990-01-01

    LIS database is used to demonstrate the complexity of defining 'retirement,' examine the patterns of several definitions of retirement across nations, investigate the impact of retirements on poverty, and look at the variations in retirement across time.

  13. John Knox Village: Community Education and Retired Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, Pat; Wilkins, Arthur

    1976-01-01

    Describes a successful cooperative venture between a community college and a retirement complex. Classes are held at the retirement center and teachers are drawn from the retirement complex as well as from the retired community at large. (DC)

  14. Mental retirement and its relations with obsolenscence training and job enrichment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuskens, G.A.; Sanders, J.M.A.F.; Kraan, K.O.; Liebregts, W.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Mental retirement may occur when workers approach the end of their career and stop investing in new knowledge and social relationships at work. If workers stop investing in new knowledge, their skills may lose economic value and become obsolete. The processes of mental retirement itself

  15. Holland's Theory and Retired Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, James D.

    1982-01-01

    Studied retired teachers (N=102) representing five subject areas that were related to the Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, and Conventional Scales of the Vocational Preference Inventory. Results indicated congruence between tested and environmental codes, especially in artistic and conventional areas. (RC)

  16. Lassoing the Determinants of Retirement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallestrup-Lamb, Malene; Kock, Anders Bredahl; Kristensen, Johannes Tang

    This paper uses Danish register data to explain the retirement decision of workers in 1990 and 1998.Many variables might be conjectured to influence this decision such as demographic, socio-economic, financially and health related variables as well as all the same factors for the spouse in case t...

  17. The employer's perspective on retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henkens, K.; van Dalen, H.P.; Wang, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we discuss the literature with respect to the role of employers in retirement processes of older workers and provide suggestions for future research. In the first part of this chapter we will review existing theoretical insights regarding the employers’ actions and attitudes toward

  18. Back to School for Retired Baby Boomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumgardner, Stan

    2009-01-01

    Across the nation, schools increasingly are tapping into a vast resource pool--retired educators. The potential effects of the retirement boom--baby boomers reaching retirement age--have been well documented. An April 2009 "New York Times" article estimates that by 2013, more than one-third of the nation's 3.2 million teachers could…

  19. The Ever-Changing Meanings of Retirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVittie, Chris; Goodall, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Shultz and Wang (April 2011) drew attention to the ways in which understandings of retirement have changed over time, both in terms of the place of retirement in the lives of individuals and in terms of how retirement can no longer usefully be taken to comprise a single defining event. As the authors pointed out, psychological research has…

  20. The Role of Financial Education in Retirement Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ntalianis

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Governments in many countries are facing the challenge of providing sufficient retirement incomes for apopulation that is ageing as a result of lower mortality and fertility rates. An ageing population placesconsiderable financial stress on government budgets as spending on welfare increases, further compoundedby a proportional reduction in working-age taxpayers. Exposure to financial education programs canpositively influence the retirement planning and savings behaviour of individuals. Research indicates thatseminars, written communications and website information are effective methods in communicating financialeducation. In this study an investigation is conducted into the views of retirement fund members regardingelements of financial education resources made available to them through their retirement fund. Four aspectsare investigated, that is, whether there are differences with respect to members’ views between the genders,older and younger members, levels of qualification, and size of superannuation balances. Empirical evidencesuggests that gender and age are important factors with females and younger people less likely to utiliseeducational information and more at risk of not accumulating sufficient funds for retirement.

  1. Australian baby boomers face retirement during the global financial crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendig, Hal; Wells, Yvonne; O'Loughlin, Kate; Heese, Karla

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the impact in Australia of the global financial crisis on the baby boom cohort approaching later life. Data from national focus groups of people aged 50 to 64 years (N = 73), conducted in late 2008, found widespread but variable concern and uncertainty concerning work and retirement plans and experiences. A national survey (N = 1,009) of those aged 50 to 64 years in mid-2009 reported lower levels of financial satisfaction compared with other life domains; many planned to postpone retirement. Findings are interpreted in the context of policies and markets that differed significantly from those in the United States, notwithstanding the global nature of the financial crisis.

  2. A retirement and a reservation: a retrospective autobiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sok K

    2012-01-01

    A retirement is a rite of passage that requires careful planning, because it forces a retiree to make a shift in the paradigm in life. For 37 years, I was a healing professional, a breadwinner, and a working spouse. I am now a jobless loner, an inactive pensioner, and a homebound spouse. In this retrospective autobiography, I suggest a few points to help my younger colleagues to better their upcoming retirement: professional, financial, social, and familial. To overcome Erikson's identity crisis, I volunteered to be a wounded healer at Warm Springs Indian Reservation. My volunteer medical service at Warm Springs Indian Reservation was a good antidote to creatively overcome my postretirement blues.

  3. Pathways through which health influences early retirement: A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. de Wind (Astrid); G.A. Geuskens (Goedele); K.G. Reeuwijk (Kerstin); M.J. Westerman (Marjan); J.F. Ybema (Jan Fekke); A. Burdorf (Alex); P.M. Bongers (Paulien); A.J. van der Beek (Allard)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Due to the aeging of the population, there is a societal need for workers to prolong their working lives. In the Netherlands, many employees still leave the workforce before the official retirement age of 65. Previous quantitative research showed that poor self-perceived

  4. National survey of the association of depressive symptoms with the number of off duty and on-call, and sleep hours among physicians working in Japanese hospitals: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Koji; Yoshikawa, Toru; Goto, Takahisa; Hirai, Aizan; Matsushima, Eisuke; Nakashima, Yoshifumi; Akaho, Rie; Kido, Michiko; Hosaka, Takashi

    2010-03-12

    Physicians' mental health may be adversely affected by the number of days of work and time spent on-call, and improved by sleep and days-off. The aim of this study was to determine the associations of depressive symptoms with taking days of off duty, hours of sleep, and the number of days of on-call and overnight work among physicians working in Japanese hospitals. A cross-sectional study as a national survey was conducted by mail. The study population was 10,000 randomly selected physicians working in hospitals who were also members of the Japan Medical Association (response rate 40.5%). Self-reported anonymous questionnaire was sent to assess the number of days off-duty, overnight work, and on-calls, and the average number of sleep hours on days not working overnight in the previous one month. Depressive state was determined by the Japanese version of the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology. Logistic regression analysis was used to explore the associations between depressive symptoms and the studied variables. Among the respondents, 8.3% of men and 10.5% of women were determined to be depressed. For both men and women, depressive state was associated with having no off-duty days and averaging less than 5 hours of sleep on days not doing overnight work. Depressive state was positively associated with being on-call more than 5 days per month for men, and more than 8 days per month for women, and was negatively associated with being off-duty more than 8 days per month for men. Some physicians need some support to maintain their mental health. Physicians who do not take enough days-off, who reduced sleep hours, and who have certain number of days on-calls may develop depressive symptoms.

  5. Occupational class inequalities in disability retirement after hospitalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietiläinen, Olli; Laaksonen, Mikko; Lahelma, Eero; Salonsalmi, Aino; Rahkonen, Ossi

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether hospitalisation is associated with increased risk of disability retirement differently across four occupational classes. 170,510 employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland were followed from 1990 to 2013 using national registers for hospitalisations and disability retirement. Increases in the risk of disability retirement after hospitalisation for any cause, cardiovascular diseases, musculoskeletal disorders, mental disorders, malignant neoplasms, respiratory diseases and injuries were assessed across four occupational classes: professional, semi-professional, routine non-manual and manual, using competing risks models. In general, hospitalisation showed a slightly more increased risk of disability retirement in the lower ranking occupational classes. Hospitalisation among women for mental disorders showed a more increased risk in the professional class (hazard ratio 14.73, 95% confidence interval 12.67 to 17.12) compared to the routine manual class (hazard ratio 7.27, 95% confidence interval 6.60 to 8.02). Occupational class differences were similar for men and women. The risk of disability retirement among women increased most in the routine non-manual class after hospitalisation for musculoskeletal disorders and injuries, and most in the professional class after hospitalisation for cardiovascular diseases. The corresponding risks among men increased most in the two lowest ranking classes after hospitalisation for injuries. Ill-health as measured by hospitalisation affected disability retirement in four occupational classes differently, and the effects also varied by the diagnostic group of hospitalisation. Interventions that tackle work disability should consider the impact of ill-health on functioning while taking into account working conditions in each occupational class.

  6. Depression and Anxiety in Greek Male Veterans After Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kypraiou, Aspa; Sarafis, Pavlos; Tsounis, Andreas; Bitsi, Georgia; Andreanides, Elias; Constantinidis, Theodoros; Kotrotsiou, Evaggelia; Malliarou, Maria

    2017-03-01

    Retirement is a turning point in human life, resulting in changes to physical and mental health status. The aim of this study was to examine the factors that are related with depression and anxiety symptoms in Greek male veterans after retirement. A total of 502 veterans participated in a cross-sectional study. Beck Depression Inventory for depression assessment and Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory for anxiety assessment were used. The Ethics Committee of the Technological Educational Institution of Thessaly granted permission for conducting the research, and informed consent was obtained from all the participants. Questionnaires were filled in electronically using a platform that was made for the specific research. Mean values, standard deviations, Student t test, nonparametric cluster analysis of variance, Pearson's and Spearman's coefficients, and linear regression were conducted, using the Statistical Program for Social Services version 19.0. Severe depression was found in 3.8% of veterans with a mean score of 6.78, whereas 23.2% displayed mild-to-moderate symptoms of depression. Mean score of state anxiety was found to be 36.55 and of trait anxiety 33.60. Veterans who were discharged because of stressful working conditions, those who have a high body mass index, consume regularly alcohol, smoke and were not satisfied by changes in their everyday life after retirement had significantly more symptoms of depression and anxiety, although those who retired because of family problems had significantly more symptoms of depression. Multivariate linear regression analyses indicated that dissatisfaction related to lifestyle changes had statistically significant effect on symptoms of depression and anxiety, and stressful working conditions as a leading cause for retirement had statistically significant effect on depression. Finally, according to linear regression analyses results, those who were satisfied with their professional evolution had 1.80 times lower score in

  7. Intergeneration Transfers and Retiring Farmers

    OpenAIRE

    Caldwell, John; Culver, David

    2007-01-01

    The percentage of farmers who are approaching retirement age is increasing. The census of agriculture shows that in 2001 there were a larger percentage of farmers over 55 years of age than was the case in the previous censuses. The transferring of the assets held by these farmers to the next generation has important policy implications for the structure of Canadian agriculture. It also raises several policy questions for future research. Using data from 2005 Farm Financial Survey this paper e...

  8. [A preparatory course for retirement by the Israeli Medical Association].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashiah, Tonni; Kushnir, Yacov

    2005-01-01

    Retirement can be traumatic, and physicians are not immune. The Israeli Medical Association (IMA) has been conducting a preparatory course for retirement for its members reaching retirement. The objective of the present study was to survey the characteristics of participating physicians, to map their activities following retirement, to gauge their appreciation of the course, and to assess their willingness to continue their association with the IMA. Questionnaires were mailed to 210 attendees of the IMA course in 2000-2002, and responses were tabulated and analyzed. The response rate was 33%--40 male and 30 female physicians, and 75% of them were still working at the time of response. They classified their quality-of-life as appropriate (70%), modest (2%), and unfitting (27%). Continued work was directly related to the preservation of fitting lifestyle (p music, going on trips and cultural events and engaged in sports; the minority spent time learning, busy with hobbies or volunteer work. Approximately half of the respondents attended continuing medical education classes. Much satisfaction was recorded for most activities, but television, friends, volunteer work or continuing education were only partly enjoyable. The IMA preparatory course was satisfactory according to 94% of the respondents, but many requested to broaden its scope. Over 92% wanted to maintain an "open-line" with the IMA, for obtaining information, counseling, and participation in social activities and continuing education. The majority was willing to volunteer in the IMA. No gender bias was found in most of the responses. This preliminary survey of physician retirement in Israel found that once physicians ceased working, many considered their life quality unfitting. The need to remain associated with the IMA is indicative of the large social and emotional importance of this membership.

  9. PREPARATION FOR RETIREMENT PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    27 March 2001 from 2.00 p.m. to 5.30 p.m. 28 March 2001 from 2.00 p.m. to 5.30 p.m. 29 March 2001 from 2.00 p.m. to 5.30 p.m. 30 March 2001 from 2.00 p.m. to 4.45 p.m. Auditorium (Main Building) After the success of the preparation seminars held in recent years, it has been decided that the programme should continue. The forthcoming seminar has been prepared in close collaboration with the CERN Pensioners' Association. The programme will be organised over several half-day sessions. Once again this year, a special session will be devoted to the 10th revision of the Swiss state pension scheme, the 'AVS' (Assurance-Vieillesse et Survivants), and the consequences for international civil servants. A talk will be given by Mrs Danièle Siebold, Director of the Caisse Cantonale Genevoise de Compensation, aimed mainly at those residing in or intending to move to Switzerland, or who worked in Switzerland before joining CERN. To enable Mrs Siebold to respond to your concerns as effectively as possible, please ...

  10. The neoliberal political economy and erosion of retirement security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polivka, Larry; Luo, Baozhen

    2015-04-01

    The origins and trajectory of the crisis in the United States retirement security system have slowly become part of the discussion about the social, political, and economic impacts of population aging. Private sources of retirement security have weakened significantly since 1980 as employers have converted defined benefits precisions to defined contribution plans. The Center for Retirement Research (CRR) now estimates that over half of boomer generation retirees will not receive 70-80% of their wages while working. This erosion of the private retirement security system will likely increase reliance on the public system, mainly Social Security and Medicare. These programs, however, have increasingly become the targets of critics who claim that they are not financially sustainable in their current form and must be significantly modified. This article will focus on an analysis of these trends in the erosion of the United States retirement security system and their connection to changes in the United States political economy as neoliberal, promarket ideology, and policies (low taxes, reduced spending, and deregulation) have become dominant in the private and public sectors. The neoliberal priority on reducing labor costs and achieving maximum shareholder value has created an environment inimical to maintain the traditional system of pension and health care benefits in both the private and public sectors. This article explores the implications of these neoliberal trends in the United States economy for the future of retirement security. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Interventions aiming to reduce early retirement due to rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Almeida Laires

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aging of the population and early retirement translates into productivity losses to society. Persistence of working life is crucial to counteract this sustainability issue faced by western countries. Musculoskeletal and rheumatic diseases (RD may cause work disability and early exit from work, including early retirement. The objective of this article is to review the current knowledge about interventions aiming to reduce early retirement due to RD. Methods: We searched PubMed and The Cochrane Library for studies either in English or Portuguese between January 2000 and June 2016 that evaluated the impact of interventions targeting early retirement in RD patients still at work. We also searched for grey literature from Portuguese institutional repositories. Results: We identified several published studies testing pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic vocational rehabilitation interventions. None was specifically identified for Portugal. The general low quality of the literature and its inconsistency makes it unfeasible to draw definitive conclusions. However, some broad recommendations might be outlined. An effective intervention must: 1 act upon different levels (e.g. RD patient, workplace, involving several stakeholders (e.g. rheumatologists, occupational physicians, employers; 2 prioritize the right patients (e.g. more disabling RD; and 3 consider the patients’ role, for instance by including an element of patient education and support. Despite the lack of good quality evidence on this field, there seems to be a growing interest in the international scientific community with several ongoing studies promoting such interventions. This promising data will be very useful to set up effective policies. Conclusions: This article summarizes the current knowledge about the impact of interventions to avoid or mitigate early retirement in RD patients. It highlights the demand for further research and it also contributes to aware decision

  12. Surface Weather Observations Hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard hourly observations taken at Weather Bureau/National Weather Service offices and airports throughout the United States. Hourly observations began during the...

  13. Military Retirement: Background and Recent Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-12

    retention. Military retirees, families , and veterans’ service organizations closely monitor potential future changes to the retirement system. When...survivors and the veterans’ service organizations that support them. In addition, there are roughly 6 million to 8 million family members, who...0.3472) produces a monthly retirement annuity of $3,042 per month. Number of Non-Disability Retirees by Retirement System Table 2 reflects retirees by

  14. Retaining nursing faculty beyond retirement age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Marvel L; Cook, Linda; Salmeron, Lois; Burton, Denise

    2010-01-01

    The number of nursing faculty planning to retire by 2020 is alarming. To develop strategies for retaining faculty, researchers asked: What factors influence the decision by nursing faculty to stay in the workforce past retirement age? What barriers could be removed that would encourage faculty to stay longer? Using Giorgi's analysis method, findings from 6 faculty teaching past retirement age revealed key meaning units and grand themes that match Maslow's Hierarchy of Inborn Needs.

  15. Discrimination problems of retirement age employees

    OpenAIRE

    Krinitsyna, Zoya Vasilievna; Mikhailova, T. R.; German, M. V.

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that there is an increasing number of people of retirement age; however, they face great obstacles in the labor market. Different types of age discrimination are named: open and indirect discrimination. The analysis of internal and external factors of integration of retirement age people into the labor market is given. The main causes of discrimination of people of retirement age are shown. The basic problems in the labor market of elderly workers and possible ways of their soluti...

  16. Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brehm, W. F.; Church, W. R.; Biglin, J. W.

    2003-02-26

    This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

  17. Satisfaction with early retirement: making choices in the auto industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, M A; Quadagno, J

    1995-07-01

    In recent decades, the expanded availability of early retirement incentive plans has allowed an increasing number of workers to retire at an age younger than normally allowed by their pension plans. On the surface, these retirement incentives appear to offer older workers more flexibility in deciding when to retire. However, the offer of early retirement incentives frequently occurs when employers are attempting to reduce employment; therefore, the opportunity for early retirement may be counterbalanced by downsizing goals that place older workers' continued employment in jeopardy. Early retirement incentive programs are thereby characterized by an unusual combination of inducement and coercion. In this study, we examined how the structure of the early retirement program shapes the way older male auto workers evaluate their retirement transitions. We conclude that the structure of the early retirement program, the timing of the retirement decision, and job security are important in framing the retirement transition and in distinguishing levels of satisfaction with the retirement experience.

  18. Job satisfaction mediates the association between perceived leadership styles and early retirement intentions

    OpenAIRE

    Koponen, Sirpa; von Bonsdorff, Monika; Innanen, Hely

    2016-01-01

    The ageing of the population is particularly challenging for the healthcare sector, which is at the same time facing a nursing shortage. Therefore, improving work conditions and well-being at work in order to prolong nurses’ careers and retention in their profession until retirement age has become one of the key issues of healthcare leaders and policymakers. This study tested a structural model linking nurses’ perceived leadership styles and early retirement intentions. We tested the...

  19. Mental retirement and health selection: Analyses from the U.S. Health and Retirement Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouston, Sean A P; Denier, Nicole

    2017-04-01

    Research has recently suggested that retirement may decrease cognitive engagement, resulting in cognitive aging. Few studies have systematically documented whether or how selectivity into retirement shapes the relationship between retirement and cognitive aging. We draw on data from the Health and Retirement Study (1998-2012) to examine the relationship between cognition and retirement for 18,575 labor force participants. Longitudinal regression discontinuity modeling was used to examine performance and decline in episodic memory. Models differentiated three forms of selection bias: indirect and direct selection as well as reverse causation. To further interrogate the disuse hypothesis, we adjust for confounding from health and socioeconomic sources. Results revealed that individuals who retired over the course of the panel were substantially different in terms of health, wealth and cognition when compared to those who remained employed. However, accounting for observed selection biases, significant associations were found linking longer retirement with more rapid cognitive decline. This study examined respondents who were in the labor force at baseline and transitioned into retirement. Analyses suggested that those who retired over the course of the panel had worse overall functioning, but also experienced more rapid declines after retirement that increased the rate of aging by two-fold, resulting in yearly losses of 3.7% (95% CI = [3.5, 4.0]) of one standard deviation in functioning attributable to retirement. Results are supportive of the view that retirement is associated with more rapid cognitive aging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Correlation of 2 hour, 4 hour, 8 hour and 12 hour urine protein with 24 hour urinary protein in preeclampsia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savita Rani Singhal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available To find shortest and reliable time period of urine collection for determination of proteinuria.It is a prospective study carried out on 125 pregnant women with preeclampsia after 20 weeks of gestation having urine albumin >1 using dipstick test. Urine was collected in five different time intervals in colors labeled containers with the assistance of nursing staff; the total collection time was 24 hours. Total urine protein of two-hour, four-hour, eight-hour, 12-hour and 24-hour urine was measured and compared with 24-hour collection. Data was analyzed using the Pearson correlation coefficient.There was significant correlation (p value < 0.01 in two, four, eight and 12-hour urine protein with 24-urine protein, with correlation coefficient of 0.97, 0.97, 0.96 and 0.97, respectively. When a cut off value of 25 mg, 50 mg. 100 mg, and 150 mg for urine protein were used for 2-hour, 4-hours, 8-hour and 12-hour urine collection, a sensitivity of 92.45%, 95.28%, 91.51%, and 96.23% and a specificity of 68.42%, 94.74%, 84.21% and 84.21% were obtained, respectively.Two-hour urine proteins can be used for assessment of proteinuria in preeclampsia instead of gold standard 24-hour urine collection for early diagnosis and better patient compliance.

  1. Measuring Years of Inactivity, Years in Retirement, Time to Retirement, and Age at Retirement Within the Markov Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    SKOOG, GARY R.; CIECKA, JAMES E.

    2010-01-01

    Retirement-related concepts are treated as random variables within Markov process models that capture multiple labor force entries and exits. The expected number of years spent outside of the labor force, expected years in retirement, and expected age at retirement are computed—all of which are of immense policy interest but have been heretofore reported with less precisely measured proxies. Expected age at retirement varies directly with a person’s age; but even younger people can expect to retire at ages substantially older than those commonly associated with retirement, such as age 60, 62, or 65. Between 1970 and 2003, men allocated most of their increase in life expectancy to increased time in retirement, but women allocated most of their increased life expectancy to labor force activity. Although people can exit and reenter the labor force at older ages, most 65-year-old men who are active in the labor force will not reenter after they eventually exit. At age 65, the probability that those who are inactive will reenter the labor force at some future time is .38 for men and .27 for women. Life expectancy at exact ages is decomposed into the sum of the expected time spent active and inactive in the labor force, and also as the sum of the expected time to labor force separation and time in retirement. PMID:20879680

  2. PREPARATION FOR RETIREMENT - AVS SEMINAR

    CERN Multimedia

    Social Service

    2001-01-01

    The 500 or so participants in the fifth Preparation for Retirement seminar held at the end of March were unfortunately deprived of the planned session on the AVS due to the unavailability of the Director of the Caisse Cantonale Genevoise de Compensation (CCGC). We have since had formal confirmation that because of an extra workload due to important changes in the Swiss tax and social legislation and the implementation this summer of the maternity insurance in Geneva, the CCGC has suspended its participation in preparation for retirement seminars in the international organisations for the time being. Conscious of the necessity of offering a session dedicated to the AVS, it is with pleasure that we can inform you that one of our legal advisers, Mr Lorenz Stampfli, has accepted to lead this session. In order to allow for adequate preparation we have reserved the following date: Wednesday 26 September from 14.00 to 16.00 in the Main Amphitheatre The session will be open to all people already registered and any o...

  3. Trauma morning report is the ideal environment to teach and evaluate resident communication and sign-outs in the 80 hour work week.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottinger, Mary E; Monaghan, Sean F; Gregg, Shea C; Stephen, Andrew H; Connolly, Michael D; Harrington, David T; Adams, Charles A; Cioffi, William G; Heffernan, Daithi S

    2017-09-01

    The 80h work week has raised concerns that complications may increase due to multiple sign-outs or poor communication. Trauma Surgery manages complex trauma and acute care surgical patients with rapidly changing physiology, clinical demands and a large volume of data that must be communicated to render safe, effective patient care. Trauma Morning Report format may offer the ideal situation to study and teach sign-outs and resident communication. Surgery Residents were assessed on a 1-5 scale for their ability to communicate to their fellow residents. This consisted of 10 critical points of the presentation, treatment and workup from the previous night's trauma admissions. Scores were grouped into three areas. Each area was scored out of 15. Area 1 consisted of Initial patient presentation. Area 2 consisted of events in the trauma bay. Area 3 assessed clarity of language and ability to communicate to their fellow residents. The residents were assessed for inclusion of pertinent positive and negative findings, as well as overall clarity of communication. In phase 1, residents were unaware of the evaluation process. Phase 2 followed a series of resident education session about effective communication, sign-out techniques and delineation of evaluation criteria. Phase 3 was a resident-blinded phase which evaluated the sustainability of the improvements in resident communication. 50 patient presentations in phase 1, 200 in phase 2, and 50 presentations in phase 3 were evaluated. Comparisons were made between the Phase 1 and Phase 2 evaluations. Area 1 (initial events) improved from 6.18 to 12.4 out of 15 (planguage) improved from 8.36 to 12.22 out of 15 (Pteaching and evaluation of sign-outs and reinforcing good communication skills in residents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Teaching retirement financial literacy in an undergraduate gerontology classroom: broadening the concept of the tripod or three-legged stool of retirement income utilizing active learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Hallie E; Brown, Pamela Pitman

    2015-01-01

    The three-legged stool concept is widely used in gerontological and geriatric education as an explanation on how one should fiscally approach his or her retirement. Financial managers, planners, retirees, business owners, even the Social Security Administration uses this metaphor of fiscal soundness in retirement planning. Gerontologists are moving away from the "tripod of retirement income" and "three-legged stool" term, as more often market work is needed for financial security. This activity focuses on the tripod or three-legged stool concepts of retirement planning using active learning, allowing the students to work collaboratively in a group, reflect upon the activity, and most importantly have fun. The game also allows for an expansion of the tripod concepts into the four pillars of economic security, broaching the use of personal assets and the possible need for longer employment. Game scenarios also emphasize macro- and microlevel forces, such as race, gender, health status, education, or marital status, which can influence timing of retirement or the level of retirement income available. The authors include instructions on how to set up the learning experience including worksheets, as well as reflection questions posed throughout the process.

  5. Perceived Support and the Retirement Expectations of Sexual Minority Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Steven E; Schryer, Emily

    2017-06-01

    Despite the importance of retirement planning among an aging population, little is known about the retirement planning of sexual minority adults (e.g., gay, lesbian, bisexual) and their potentially unique challenges. We compared retirement planning perceptions of these adults with heterosexual adults and examined the potential role of social support. There were no significant differences between sexual minorities and heterosexual adults regarding their expected retirement age, certainty of retirement age, and anticipated income adequacy in retirement, and higher levels of perceived support were associated with younger anticipated retirement age and greater certainty in retirement planning perceptions. Perceived support also had a stronger association with retirement planning perceptions for sexual minority adults compared to heterosexuals, such that lower perceived support was associated with a later retirement age and less certainty about retirement age, and lower levels of perceived support were linked to diminished anticipated retirement income adequacy for sexual minority adults.

  6. 20 CFR 404.1050 - Retirement payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Retirement payments. Payments made after 1983 to you (including any amount paid by an employer for insurance... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retirement payments. 404.1050 Section 404.1050 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY...

  7. 30 CFR 56.19024 - Retirement criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Retirement criteria. 56.19024 Section 56.19024 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Ropes § 56.19024 Retirement criteria. Unless damage or deterioration is removed by cutoff, wire ropes...

  8. 30 CFR 57.19024 - Retirement criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Retirement criteria. 57.19024 Section 57.19024 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Wire Ropes § 57.19024 Retirement criteria. Unless damage or deterioration is removed by cutoff, wire...

  9. 30 CFR 77.1434 - Retirement criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Retirement criteria. 77.1434 Section 77.1434 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... Hoisting Wire Ropes § 77.1434 Retirement criteria. Unless damage or deterioration is removed by cutoff...

  10. Pre-Retirement Peer Counselling Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinger, David J.

    This manual was developed to facilitate the initial training of a group of pre-retirement peer counselors and to introduce them to the basics of helping for clients facing pre-retirement issues. An introduction explains the use of the manual and urges users to complete suggested exercises when reading the manual. The next section lists learning…

  11. Is retirement bad for your health?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the world's first pension scheme in Germany. Until then, you toiled in the fields until you dropped in front of the plough. When is the best time to retire? There does seem to be a correct time to retire, which politicians, who grip onto power at all costs, seem to ignore. Some doctors close the books while they are clear of eye.

  12. 78 FR 68981 - Electronic Retirement Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... Folder (eOPF) means an electronic version of the hardcopy Official Personnel Folder (OPF), providing Web-enabled access for federal employees and HR staff to view eOPF documents. Electronic Retirement Record...OPF) data; and (3) Documents, including hardcopy versions of the Individual Retirement Record (SF 2806...

  13. 29 CFR 452.93 - Retired members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Retired members. 452.93 Section 452.93 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor OFFICE OF LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS... OF 1959 Right To Vote § 452.93 Retired members. The right of retirees to vote may be restricted to...

  14. 78 FR 14233 - Electronic Retirement Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 5 CFR Part 850 RIN 3206-AM45 Electronic Retirement Processing AGENCY: Office... part so that it better serves OPM's ongoing modernization of the processing of benefits under the Civil... electronic recordkeeping and automated retirement processing improvements being deployed by OPM, agencies...

  15. A systematic review of physician retirement planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Michelle Pannor; Hamilton, Angela D; Biswas, Aviroop; Warrick, Natalie Irene

    2016-11-15

    Physician retirement planning and timing have important implications for patients, hospitals, and healthcare systems. Unplanned early or late physician retirement can have dire consequences in terms of both patient safety and human resource allocations. This systematic review examined existing evidence on the timing and process of retirement of physicians. Four questions were addressed: (1) When do physicians retire? (2) Why do some physicians retire early? (3) Why do some physicians delay their retirement? (4) What strategies facilitate physician retention and/or retirement planning? English-language studies were searched in electronic databases MEDLINE, Web of Science, Scopus, CINAHL, AgeLine, Embase, HealthSTAR, ASSA, and PsycINFO, from inception up to and including March 2016. Included studies were peer-reviewed primary journal articles with quantitative and/or qualitative analyses of physicians' plans for, and opinions about, retirement. Three reviewers independently assessed each study for methodological quality using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale for quantitative studies and Critical Appraisal Tool for qualitative studies, and a fourth reviewer resolved inconsistencies. In all, 65 studies were included and analyzed, of which the majority were cross-sectional in design. Qualitative studies were found to be methodologically strong, with credible results deemed relevant to practice. The majority of quantitative studies had adequate sample representativeness, had justified and satisfactory sample size, used appropriate statistical tests, and collected primary data by self-reported survey methods. Physicians commonly reported retiring between 60 and 69 years of age. Excessive workload and burnout were frequently cited reasons for early retirement. Ongoing financial obligations delayed retirement, while strategies to mitigate career dissatisfaction, workplace frustration, and workload pressure supported continuing practice. Knowledge of when physicians plan to

  16. Retirees' social identity and satisfaction with retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michinov, Estelle; Fouquereau, Evelyne; Fernandez, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the structure of retirees' social identity and its impact on satisfaction with retirement. From social identity theory formulations, we assumed that (1) retiree-identity was comprised of three distinct components (cognitive, evaluative, and affective), and (2) only the affective component would play a role in satisfaction with retirement. Results of the present study conducted with 154 retired people in France revealed only two components of social identity: a cognitive identity which refers to self-categorization as "retired people", and an affective identity which refers to evaluation of the group and affective involvement. As expected, regression analyses results indicated that only affective identity was a predictor of satisfaction with retirement. These results will be discussed in the framework of social identity theory literature.

  17. Retirement: Institutional Pathways and Individual Trajectories in Britain and Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Anette E. Fasang

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1970s people have retired increasingly early across advanced societies. Parallel to this trend, numerous institutional early retirement pathways evolved, such as bridge unemployment and pre-retirement schemes. This article compares retirement in Britain and Germany to show how individuals progress through these institutional retirement pathways. The analysis uses longitudinal data and recent innovations in sequence analysis to capture the sequential nature of retirement as a series ...

  18. Does retirement reduce the risk of mental disorders?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Kasper; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Madsen, Ida E.H.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The effect of retirement on mental health is not well understood. We examined the prevalence of hospital treatment for depression and purchase of antidepressant medication before, during and after retirement in a Danish population sample. We hypothesised that retirement was followed...... in the years around retirement, but continued after retirement (retirement +2 years). CONCLUSIONS: Overall, this study did not confirm the hypothesis that retirement is beneficial for mental health measured by hospitalisation with depression and treatment with antidepressants. Although the temporary levelling...... off of the increase in antidepressant treatment around time of retirement might indicate a beneficial effect, this possible effect was only short-term....

  19. Cracking the Credit Hour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, Amy

    2012-01-01

    The basic currency of higher education--the credit hour--represents the root of many problems plaguing America's higher education system: the practice of measuring time rather than learning. "Cracking the Credit Hour" traces the history of this time-based unit, from the days of Andrew Carnegie to recent federal efforts to define a credit…

  20. Susceptibility for Depression in Current and Retired Student Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Weigand, Sabrina; Cohen, Jared; Merenstein, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Background: Depression, a disabling mental disorder, adversely affects work, sleeping and eating habits, and family. Research does not exist on depression among athletes who have recently graduated from college and retired from their sport after exhausting their collegiate eligibility. Hypothesis: Changes in lifestyle and loss of personal identity, which follow college athletics, would put former college athletes at an increased risk for depression. Methods: A survey was sent to former (n = 1...

  1. Changes in Sleep Duration and Sleep Timing Associated with Retirement Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Erika W; Barnet, Jodi H; Hale, Lauren; Peppard, Paul E

    2016-03-01

    Investigate whether retirement transitions are associated with changes in sleep duration and sleep timing, and whether these associations are modified by age, sex, mental health, or circadian preference. The Retirement and Sleep Trajectories (REST) study is a longitudinal study consisting of four annual mailed surveys that collected information about employment, sleep, and health. Differences in reported sleep duration, bedtime and wake time between successive surveys were calculated to estimate change over 1, 2, and 3 y. Linear regression models were used to estimate changes in these sleep parameters associated with retirement 1, 2, and 3 y posttransition. Retiring from full-time work was associated with bedtimes that were 30, 31, and 36 min later 1, 2, and 3 y postretirement; wake times that were 63, 69, and 78 min later; and sleep durations that were 15, 16, and 22 min longer 1, 2, and 3 y postretirement. These associations did not differ by sex or mental health status. Age and circadian preference modified the associations between retirement and change in sleep parameters; the increase in sleep duration was shorter and the wake time extension was lesser with advancing retirement age; those with evening preference had longer wake time extensions than those with morning preference. Transitioning to retirement is associated with longer sleep duration, later bedtimes, and later wake times. These changes were detectable about 1 y postwork transition and were persistent up to 3 y later. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  2. Does being a retired or employed caregiver affect the association between behaviours in Alzheimer's disease and caregivers' health-related quality-of-life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majoni, Melissa; Oremus, Mark

    2017-12-21

    We examined whether caregivers' employment status (i.e., retired or employed) might modify the association between the behaviours of persons with Alzheimer's disease (PwAD) and caregivers' health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL). Data came from a cross-sectional study of the primary informal caregivers of 200 persons with mild or moderate Alzheimer's disease. Caregivers completed the EQ-5D-3L to rate their HRQoL and generate health utility scores, and the Dementia Behaviour Disturbance Scale (DBDS) to assess the degree to which PwAD exhibited each of 28 behaviours. Caregivers' health utility scores were regressed on overall DBDS scores, with caregiver employment status (retired, employed) treated as an effect modifier and confounder in separate regression models. We also controlled for age, sex, income, education, caregivers' relationship to the PwAD, and whether caregivers gave up paid employment/cut down working hours to care for PwAD. Effect modification by caregiver employment status is possible, with the inverse association between DBDS score and health utility score largely existing for retired versus employed caregivers. Research using larger samples and longitudinal data would further inform this area of inquiry.

  3. Optimal pay-as-you-go social security when retirement is endogenous and labor productivity depreciates

    OpenAIRE

    Miyazaki, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers an overlapping-generations model with pay-as-you-go social security and retirement decision making by an old agent. In addition, the paper assumes that labor productivity depreciates. Under this setting, socially optimal allocations are examined. The first-best allocation is an allocation that maximizes welfare when a social planner distributes resources and forces an old agent to work and retire as she wants. The second-best allocation is an allocation that maximizes wel...

  4. An Experimental Evaluation of Competing Age-Predictions of Future Time Perspective between Workplace and Retirement Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Kerry

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Future time perspective (FTP is defined as “perceptions of the future as being limited or open-ended” (Lang and Carstensen, 2002; p. 125. The construct figures prominently in both workplace and retirement domains, but the age-predictions are competing: Workplace research predicts decreasing FTP age-change, in contrast, retirement scholars predict increasing FTP age-change. For the first time, these competing predictions are pitted in an experimental manipulation of subjective life expectancy (SLE. A sample of N = 207 older adults (age 45–60 working full-time (>30-h/week were randomly assigned to SLE questions framed as either ‘Live-to’ or ‘Die-by’ to evaluate competing predictions for FTP. Results indicate general support for decreasing age-change in FTP, indicated by independent-sample t-tests showing lower FTP in the ‘Die-by’ framing condition. Further general-linear model analyses were conducted to test for interaction effects of retirement planning with experimental framings on FTP and intended retirement; While retirement planning buffered FTP’s decrease, simple-effects also revealed that retirement planning increased intentions for sooner retirement, but lack of planning increased intentions for later retirement. Discussion centers on practical implications of our findings and consequences validity evidence in future empirical research of FTP in both workplace and retirement domains.

  5. Does More Respect from Leaders Postpone the Desire to Retire? Understanding the Mechanisms of Retirement Decision-Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M. Wöhrmann

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The demographic trends (i.e., low birth rates and increasing longevity pose challenges with regard to the increase of the average employee age along with a lack of skilled personnel on the labor market. Society, organizations, and individuals are confronted with the question on how to prolong working lives in the future. Based on socioemotional selectivity theory, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between respectful leadership and older workers’ desired retirement age. In particular, we took a closer look at job satisfaction, subjective health, and work-to-private life conflict as underlying mechanisms. Further, we tested for the moderating role of occupational self-efficacy as an auxiliary condition for the assumed relationships of respectful leadership. We tested our hypothesized model using data from 1,130 blue- and white-collar workers aged 45–65 years. The results of structural equation modeling indicated that respectful leadership was positively related to older workers’ desired retirement age and that this relationship was mediated by subjective health and work-to-private life conflict but not by job satisfaction. The findings add to the literature on resources in retirement decision-making; notably, they highlight the importance of leadership behavior for older workers’ motivation and socioemotional needs.

  6. ‘All those things together made me retire’: qualitative study on early retirement among Dutch employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to the aging of the population and subsequent higher pressure on public finances, there is a need for employees in many European countries to extend their working lives. One way in which this can be achieved is by employees refraining from retiring early. Factors predicting early retirement have been identified in quantitative research, but little is known on why and how these factors influence early retirement. The present qualitative study investigated which non-health related factors influence early retirement, and why and how these factors influence early retirement. Methods A qualitative study among 30 Dutch employees (60–64 years) who retired early, i.e. before the age of 65, was performed by means of face-to-face interviews. Participants were selected from the cohort Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation (STREAM). Results For most employees, a combination of factors played a role in the transition from work to early retirement, and the specific factors involved differed between individuals. Participants reported various factors that pushed towards early retirement (‘push factors’), including organizational changes at work, conflicts at work, high work pressure, high physical job demands, and insufficient use of their skills and knowledge by others in the organization. Employees who reported such push factors towards early retirement often felt unable to find another job. Factors attracting towards early retirement (‘pull factors’) included the wish to do other things outside of work, enjoy life, have more flexibility, spend more time with a spouse or grandchildren, and care for others. In addition, the financial opportunity to retire early played an important role. Factors influenced early retirement via changes in the motivation, ability and opportunity to continue working or retire early. Conclusion To support the prolongation of working life, it seems important to improve the fit between the physical and

  7. Discrimination problems of retirement age employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krinitcyna Z.V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that there is an increasing number of people of retirement age; however, they face great obstacles in the labor market. Different types of age discrimination are named: open and indirect discrimination. The analysis of internal and external factors of integration of retirement age people into the labor market is given. The main causes of discrimination of people of retirement age are shown. The basic problems in the labor market of elderly workers and possible ways of their solutions are given.

  8. Hours Constraints Within and Between Jobs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Euwals, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    In the empirical literature on labour supply, several models are developed to incorporate constraints on working hours. These models do not address the question to which extent working hours are constrained within and between jobs. In this paper I investigate the effect of individual changes in

  9. 24-hour urine protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urine protein - 24 hour; Chronic kidney disease - urine protein; Kidney failure - urine protein ... Bladder tumor Heart failure High blood pressure during pregnancy ( preeclampsia ) Kidney disease caused by diabetes, high blood pressure, autoimmune disorders, ...

  10. The Evasion of Retirement Insurance Contributions in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Bejakovic

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the evasion of retirement insurance contributions in Croatia. This problem can be connected to the weakness of the administration and the inefficacy of the competent bodies, to high rates of contributions and a general lack of trust in the public pension system based on intergenerational solidarity. One of the most important determinants of evasion is the benefit deriving from the insurance, that is, the relation between the contributions and the pension. Insured persons who have worked their whole lives and have reached old-age pensions have an unfavourable ratio of contributions paid in and amount of pension received, because funds for pensions have been redistributed to several other categories. After a brief explanation of the pension reform, we draw attention to certain legislative inconsistencies connected with retirement insurance. The paper closes with a proposal for possible measures for the improvement of collection.

  11. How do baby boomers' mobility patterns change with retirement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siren, Anu; Haustein, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    working had a high car reliance that did not decline over time. This study suggests that retirement is a transition point associated with decreasing car use. Hence, the ageing of the population is likely to have a decreasing effect on transportation demand. However, informal care-giving, prolonged careers......Baby boomers will comprise a considerable share of tomorrow's older population. Previous research has indicated higher travel activity and car use amongst baby boomers than amongst older cohorts. However, little evidence exists on the effects of boomers' ageing on the transportation system....... To analyse how retirement affects baby boomers' travel and the related future travel demand, we compared three groups, distinguished by employment status as ‘still working’, ‘early retirees’ and ‘recent retirees’, in a longitudinal setting. Data for 864 individuals were collected via standardised telephone...

  12. Impacts of Pre-Retirement Guidance and Family Involvement on Retirement Adjustment of Retirees in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.O. Olatomide

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The study examined retirement adjustment of teacher-retirees in Osun State, and explored the interaction effects of pre-retirement guidance and family in-volvement on retirement adjustment. Exposit-facto design was used. The population comprised retirees from public, civil and private establishments from which 122 teacher-retirees were selected using a multi-stage sampling technique. An instrument: Family Involvement, Pre-retirement Guidance and Retirement Adjustment Questionnaire was used for data collection. Three research questions and three hypotheses guided the study. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results revealed that retirees in Osun State are not optimally adjusted, and positive significant interaction effect was found between family involvement and pre-retirement guidance on retirees adjustment, among others. Appropriate policy implications are outlined.

  13. 100 years of applied psychology research on individual careers: From career management to retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mo; Wanberg, Connie R

    2017-03-01

    This article surveys 100 years of research on career management and retirement, with a primary focus on work published in the Journal of Applied Psychology. Research on career management took off in the 1920s, with most attention devoted to the development and validation of career interest inventories. Over time, research expanded to attend to broader issues such as the predictors and outcomes of career interests and choice; the nature of career success and who achieves it; career transitions and adaptability to change; retirement decision making and adjustment; and bridge employment. In this article, we provide a timeline for the evolution of the career management and retirement literature, review major theoretical perspectives and findings on career management and retirement, and discuss important future research directions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Non-financial determinants of retirement : A Literature Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Erp, F.A.M.; Vermeer, Niels; Vuuren, D.

    Retirement is often concentrated at specific ages-in particular the 'normal retirement age' and an 'early retirement age'. Financial incentives cannot fully explain this. Moreover, the participation effect of a higher normal retirement age importantly exceeds the encompassing income effect. Based on

  15. 38 CFR 3.754 - Emergency officers' retirement pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...' retirement pay. 3.754 Section 3.754 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... officers' retirement pay. A retired emergency officer of World War I has basic eligibility to retirement pay by the Department of Veterans Affairs under Pub. L. 87-875 (sec. 11(b), Pub. L. 85-857) from date...

  16. Attitudes toward Retirement and Preretirement Education among Nigerian Bank Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunbameru, Olakunle A.; Bamiwuye, Sina

    2004-01-01

    Retirement is viewed as a passage that can result in psychological, physiological, and economic problems among some retirees. Adequate preparation for retirement through preretirement education, as practiced in the Western-European societies, has been found to ease transition into retirement and adjustment in retirement. Preretirement education is…

  17. Retirement Plan Options Require Board Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Louis R.

    1989-01-01

    With the variety of available investment options and a volatile securities market, it is vital that boards make wise choices about employee retirement programs. Issues to consider when discussing pension-plan changes are presented. (Author/MLW)

  18. Optimizing the aging, retirement, and pensions dilemma

    CERN Document Server

    Bertocchi, Marida; Ziemba, William T.

    2010-01-01

    A straightforward guide focused on life cycle investing-namely aging, retirement, and pensions Life cycle investing and the implications of aging, retirement, and pensions continues to grow in importance. With people living longer, the relative and absolute number of retirees is growing while the number of workers contributing to pension funds is declining. This reliable resource develops a detailed economic analysis-at the micro (individual) and macro (economy wide) levels-which addresses issues regarding the economics of an aging population. Topics touched upon include retirement and the associated health care funding of the aged as well as social security and the asset classes that are considered asset-liability choices over time. The probability of achieving adequate return patterns from various investment strategies and asset classes is reviewed Shares rich insights on the aging, retirement, and pensions dilemma An assessment of the resources the real economy will be able to commit to non-workers is prov...

  19. Optimal Time to Enter a Retirement Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We consider the financial planning problem of a retiree wishing to enter a retirement village at a future uncertain date. The date of entry is determined by the retiree’s utility and bequest maximisation problem within the context of uncertain future health states. In addition, the retiree must choose optimal consumption, investment, bequest and purchase of insurance products prior to their full annuitisation on entry to the retirement village. A hyperbolic absolute risk-aversion (HARA utility function is used to allow necessary consumption for basic living and medical costs. The retirement village will typically require an initial deposit upon entry. This threshold wealth requirement leads to exercising the replication of an American put option at the uncertain stopping time. From our numerical results, active insurance and annuity markets are shown to be a critical aspect in retirement planning.

  20. The effect of group-based exercise on cognitive performance and mood in seniors residing in intermediate care and self-care retirement facilities: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A K; Liu-Ambrose, T; Tate, R; Lord, S R

    2009-08-01

    To determine the effect of a general group-based exercise programme on cognitive performance and mood among seniors without dementia living in retirement villages. Randomised controlled trial. Four intermediate care and four self-care retirement village sites in Sydney, Australia. 154 seniors (19 men, 135 women; age range 62 to 95 years), who were residents of intermediate care and self-care retirement facilities. Participants were randomised to one of three experimental groups: (1) a general group-based exercise (GE) programme composed of resistance training and balance training exercises; (2) a flexibility exercise and relaxation technique (FR) programme; or (3) no-exercise control (NEC). The intervention groups (GE and FR) participated in 1-hour exercise classes twice a week for a total period of 6 months. Using standard neuropsychological tests, we assessed cognitive performance at baseline and at 6-month re-test in three domains: (1) fluid intelligence; (2) visual, verbal and working memory; and (3) executive functioning. We also assessed mood using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS). The GE programme significantly improved cognitive performance of fluid intelligence compared with FR or NEC. There were also significant improvements in the positive PANAS scale within both the GE and FR groups and an indication that the two exercise programmes reduced depression in those with initially high GDS scores. Our GE programme significantly improved cognitive performance of fluid intelligence in seniors residing in retirement villages compared with our FR programme and the NEC group. Furthermore, both group-based exercise programmes were beneficial for certain aspects of mood within the 6-month intervention period.