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Sample records for winner baruch blumberg

  1. Blumberg, Prof. Baruch Samuel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1987 Honorary. Blumberg, Prof. Baruch Samuel Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1976. Date of birth: 28 July 1925. Date of death: 5 April 2011. Last known address: Distinguished Scientist, Fox Chase Cancer Center, 333, Cottman Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19111, U.S.A.. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  2. Johann Blumberger – ein Sticker im Rudolfinischen Prag und im sächsischen Exil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šroněk, Michal

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2005), s. 285-295 ISSN 0049-5123 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA408/05/0574 Keywords : rudolfinian Prague * embroidery * Johann Blumberger Subject RIV: AL - Art , Architecture, Cultural Heritage

  3. "La coincidencia de los opuestos: actus et potentia en Nicolas de Cusa y Baruch de Spinoza"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Gonzalez Rios

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available El trabajo intenta mostrar, a partir de una introducción historiografica, uno de los modos posibles en que pueden vincularse el sistema filosófico de Nicolas de Cusa [1401 -1464], a traves de la reformulación que hace el Cusano de la coincidentia oppositorum en el Trialogus De possest' [1460], con la teoria sustancialista de Baruch de Spinoza [1632 -1677], tal como es presentada en el Liber Primus de su Ethic.

  4. A Factor-Analytic Validity Study of the Blumberg-Amidon "Teacher Perceptions of Supervisor-Teacher Conferences" Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirois, Herman A.; Gable, Robert K.

    1979-01-01

    It was found that the Blumberg-Amidon instrument, which was administered to 31 randomly selected in-service teachers, grades K-12, is a two-factor or two-scale measure (Relationships, Productivity) which may also be interpreted as a one-scale measure (Productive Relationships), each with a high degree of reliability. (Author/NQ)

  5. Photowalk contest winners

    CERN Multimedia

    Roberto Cantoni

    2010-01-01

    The local winners of the global particle physics Photowalk have been announced by the five participating laboratories. At CERN, Diego Giol and Christian Stephani were the jury’s favourites, and their photos will now go forward to the global vote, competing against the local winners from DESY in Germany, Fermilab in the US, KEK in Japan and TRIUMF in Canada. Two prizes are to be awarded, one selected by a global jury, the other by popular vote – it’s time to get voting!   Diego Giol #1 The global winners of the Photowalk contest will be revealed by the second week of October, but the local CERN winners were announced last week. After three weeks of work, two meetings of the jury and three successive selections, 20 photos were chosen from the 792 entries. The three highest-ranked will participate in the final competition. The public can vote for their favourite photos on the interactions.org website until 8 October. Only two photographers took the three winning photo...

  6. Everyone is a winner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuben, Ernesto; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    2010-01-01

    We test if cooperation is promoted by rank-order competition between groups in which all groups can be ranked first, i.e. when everyone can be a winner. This type of rank-order competition has the advantage that it can eliminate the negative externality a group's performance imposes on other groups....... However, it has the disadvantage that incentives to outperform others are absent, and therefore it does not eliminate equilibria where all groups cooperate at an equal but low level. We find that all-can-win competition produces a universal increase in cooperation and benefits a majority of individuals...

  7. Breast Cancer Startup Challenge winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten winners of a world-wide competition to bring emerging breast cancer research technologies to market faster were announced today by the Avon Foundation for Women, in partnership with NCI and the Center for Advancing Innovation (CAI). Avon is providing

  8. The Transitional Legend of Winners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Kovačević

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available During 2006 a number of stories that featured the motive of great gain under dramatic circumstances were repeatedly told in betting-houses in Kragujevac, a town in Serbia. The main character of these legends is an empoverished victim of transition who, thanks to luck and help of friends, wins a great sum of money betting. Besides describing the preceding transitional "fall" of the winner (getting fired, failing in private enterprise, the legends describe his economical and social prosperity initiated by capital gained through betting (starting succesfull enterprises, buying good shares. Diachronically following other "sudden wealth" legends this transitional legend speaks about the establishing of a new system of values that, in the categories of social promotion, makes up for the old principles that marked the period of socialism.

  9. And now, for the winners.

    CERN Multimedia

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    The Computer Security Day held on 10 June was a success. There were eight presentations, with some forty people attending each session.     The presentation videos can be viewed on Indico. The computer security team’s new website is now up and running, with a wealth of useful information and advice. Go to http://cern.ch/Computer.Security.     The quiz attracted 130 participants, and the answers have now been posted on line! The quiz winners are: Lars Aprin, Richard Baud, Thibaut Bernard, Brice Copy, Daniele de Ruschi, Sébastien Gadrat, Amanda Garcia Munoz, Stephen Gowdy, Joni Hahkala, Joseph Izen, Ryszard Erazm Jurga, Jukka Klem, Danila Oleynik, Ian Pong, Pascal Serge Roguet, Jani Tapani Taskinen, Jan Therhaag, Yves Thurel, Adrian Vogel, Thomas White. Well done to all! If you haven’t done so already, you should soon be getting your prize (i.e. a book, a T-shirt or a bag, etc.).  

  10. Why do winners keep winning? Androgen mediation of winner but not loser effects in cichlid fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Rui F.; Silva, Ana; Canário, Adelino V.M.

    2009-01-01

    Animal conflicts are influenced by social experience such that a previous winning experience increases the probability of winning the next agonistic interaction, whereas a previous losing experience has the opposite effect. Since androgens respond to social interactions, increasing in winners and decreasing in losers, we hypothesized that socially induced transient changes in androgen levels could be a causal mediator of winner/loser effects. To test this hypothesis, we staged fights between dyads of size-matched males of the Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). After the first contest, winners were treated with the anti-androgen cyproterone acetate and losers were supplemented with 11-ketotestosterone. Two hours after the end of the first fight, two contests were staged simultaneously between the winner of the first fight and a naive male and between the loser of first fight and another naive male. The majority (88%) of control winners also won the second interaction, whereas the majority of control losers (87%) lost their second fight, thus confirming the presence of winner/loser effects in this species. As predicted, the success of anti-androgen-treated winners in the second fight decreased significantly to chance levels (44%), but the success of androgenized losers (19%) did not show a significant increase. In summary, the treatment with anti-androgen blocks the winner effect, whereas androgen administration fails to reverse the loser effect, suggesting an involvement of androgens on the winner but not on the loser effect. PMID:19324741

  11. And the winners were... Innovation Awards

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    The winners of the 2003 Economist innovation awards included Tim Berners-Lee for the WWW and Dr. Damadian for his suggestion that NMR could be used as a medical detection device for cancer (1/2 page).

  12. Everyone Is a Winner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuben, Ernesto; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    In this paper, we study the effectiveness of intergroup competition in promoting cooperative behavior. We focus on intergroup competition that is non-rival in the sense that everyone can be a winner. This type of competition does not give groups an incentive to outcompete others. However, in spit...

  13. Winners of student essay contest receive awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, George Meguiar (center left) and George English (center right) present scholarships to two students who entered an essay contest in conjunction with the 30th Anniversary of Apollo 11. The winners shown are Kyla Davis Horn, of Cocoa Beach, and Kyle Rukaczewski, of Satellite Beach. A third winner, Jason Gagnon, of Viera, was unable to attend. Meguiar and English head the Apollo 11 Commemoration Association which sponsored the contest in conjunction with Florida Today newspaper. The presentation was made at the Apollo/Saturn V Center during an anniversary banquet that honored all the people who made the Apollo Program possible. Special guests included former Apollo astronauts Neil Armstrong, Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin, Gene Cernan and Walt Cunningham, who shared their experiences with the audience.

  14. Identifying Winners and Losers in Transportation

    OpenAIRE

    David Levinson

    2002-01-01

    This paper explores the issues surrounding transportation equity for effects both external and internal to transportation. Several examples of transportation "improvements" imposing transportation costs on more individuals than who are benefited are provided. Beyond counting the number of winners and losers, several quantitative measures of equity are suggested. To that end, transportation benefit cost analyses should include an "Equity Impact Statement". This statement would consider the dis...

  15. CERN welcomes Intel Science Fair winners

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    This June, CERN welcomed twelve gifted young scientists aged 15-18 for a week-long visit of the Laboratory. These talented students were the winners of a special award co-funded by CERN and Intel, given yearly at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF).   The CERN award winners at the Intel ISEF 2012 Special Awards Ceremony. © Society for Science & the Public (SSP). The CERN award was set up back in 2009 as an opportunity to bring some of the best and brightest young minds to the Laboratory. The award winners are selected from among 1,500 talented students participating in ISEF – the world's largest pre-university science competition, in which students compete for more than €3 million in awards. “CERN gave an award – which was obviously this trip – to students studying physics, maths, electrical engineering and computer science,” says Benjamin Craig Bartlett, 17, from South Carolina, USA, wh...

  16. Winners and Losers of Danish Football

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Rasmus K.

    performance outputs in relation to key factors of this function. The approach reflected represents a sociological supplement to the ordinary performance benchmarks often used in sports economics, revealing FC København and Brøndby IF as the main winners and AGF and Akademisk Boldklub (AB) as main losers......This paper deals with European and Danish soccer and its commercialization focusing on the Danish male first tier clubs. Based on the systems theoretical argument that sport serves as a mirror system in (late-) modern society, the Danish football clubs are measured against a simple matrix of main...

  17. Prática educativa bem-sucedida na escola: reflexões com base em L. S. Vigotski e Baruch de Espinosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELIANA DE SOUSA ALENCAR MARQUES

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available El texto reúne parte de los resultados de las investigaciones llevadas a cabo con el fin de investigar las mediaciones constitutivas de los profesores y estudiantes que desarrollan con éxito las prácticas educativas. El signifi - cado de la práctica educativa exitosa en la que nos basamos está anclado en las ideas de L. S. Vygotsky y Baruch Spinoza. Con base en los teóricos, entendemos prácticas educativas exitosas las que generan aprendizaje y desarrollo y permiten la expansión de afectos alegres que mejoran mentes y cuerpos humanos. La investigación tuvo lugar entre los años 2011 y 2014. Esto artículo presenta parte de los resultados alcanzados con los alumnos. Los resultados mostraron que, cuando alegres, las experiencias educativas convergen a la mayor potencia de ser un estudiante. El aumento de potencia reorienta la producción de nuevos sentidos que alteran significativamente la relación de estos con los estudios, con la escuela y con la vida.

  18. Google Science Fair winner visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Google Science Fair Grand Prize winner Brittany Michelle Wenger today wrapped up a day-and-a-half's visit of the CERN site. Her winning project uses an artificial neural network to diagnose breast cancer – a non-invasive technique with significant potential for use in hospitals.   Brittany Michelle Wenger at CERN's SM18 Hall. Besides winning a $50,000 scholarship from Google and work experience opportunities with some of the contest hosts, Brittany was offered a personal tour of CERN. “This visit has just been incredible,” she says. “I got to speak with [CERN's Director for Accelerators and Technology] Steve Myers about some of the medical applications and technologies coming out of the LHC experiments and how they can be used to treat cancer. We talked about proton therapy and hadron therapy, which could really change the way patients are treated, improving success rates and making treatment not such an excruciating process. That ...

  19. 2016 Federal Green Challenge Award Winners in the Southeast Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016 FGC award winners in the Southeast are: the Department of Human Services’ U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Southeast Regional Office and Department of Energy’s East Tennessee Technology Park.

  20. Chronic Hepatitis B Infection: New insights in therapy and predictors of response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Arends (Pauline)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The hepatitis B virus (HBV) was discovered by dr. Baruch Samuel Blumberg when he identified the ‘Australia antigen’ among an aboriginal in the 1960s. The ‘Australia antigen’ is nowadays known as the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). For his work dr. Blumberg was

  1. Winners and losers of IWRM in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara van Koppen,

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the application of the concept of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM in Tanzania. It asks: how did IWRM affect the rural and fast-growing majority of smallholder farmersʼ access to water which contributes directly to poverty alleviation and employment creation in a country where poverty and joblessness are high? Around 1990, there were both a strong government-led infrastructure development agenda and IWRM ingredients in place, including cost-recovery of state services aligning with the Structural Adjustment Programmes, water management according to basin boundaries and the dormant colonial water rights (permits system. After the 1990s, the World Bank and other donors promoted IWRM with a strong focus on hydroelectric power development, River Basin Water Boards, transformation of the water right system into a taxation tool, and assessment of environmental flows. These practices became formalised in the National Water Policy (2002 and in the Water Resources Management Act (2009. Activities in the name of IWRM came to be closely associated with the post-2008 surge in large-scale land and water deals. Analysing 25 years of IWRM, the paper identifies the processes and identities of the losers (smallholders and – at least partially – the government and the winners (large-scale water users, including recent investors. We conclude that, overall, IWRM harmed smallholdersʼ access to water and rendered them more vulnerable to poverty and unemployment.

  2. CERNland/Prince of Asturias competition winners tour CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Last week, the Laboratory rolled out the red carpet for the six young winners of the CERNland/Prince of Asturias competition. From a visit of the CMS detector to dessert with the Director-General, these young talents were given the full VIP treatment. Nothing less would do for our winners!   The competition's youngest winners study the CMS detector. For the CERNland/Prince of Asturias competition winners, Easter 2014 would be unforgettable. Besides visits to all the main CERN landmarks, they attended an award ceremony in the Main Building in their honour. Among the audience were CERN Director-General, Rolf Heuer, the Permanent Representative of Spain to the United Nations Office at Geneva, Ana Maria Menendez Perez, and the Director of the Prince of Asturias Foundation, Teresa Sanjurjo González. The ceremony was also an opportunity for the CERN community to interact with the young winners. “They brought with them such heartfelt enthusiasm,” says CERN&am...

  3. Winners & Sinners: What's Hot and What's Not in Alumni Merchandising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Wendy Ann

    1990-01-01

    A large part of any merchandising program is picking products that will sell. Sixty alumni professionals were asked about their ideas. Some of the winners included a watch with the institution's seal, a windsock, and athletic shoes. Some of the losers included a sweater and a commemorative plate. (MLW)

  4. Hybrid All-Pay and Winner-Pay Contests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerlöf, Johan

    2017-01-01

    In many contests in economic and political life, both all-pay and winner-pay expenditures matter for winning. This paper studies such hybrid contests under symmetry and asymmetry. The symmetric model is very general but still yields a simple closed-form solution. More contestants tend to lead to ...

  5. Steven MacCall: Winner of LJ's 2010 Teaching Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, John N., III

    2010-01-01

    This article profiles Steven L. MacCall, winner of "Library Journal's" 2010 Teaching Award. An associate professor at the School of Library and Information Studies (SLIS) at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, MacCall was nominated by Kathie Popadin, known as "Kpop" to the members of her cohort in the online MLIS program at SLIS. Sixteen of…

  6. 40 CFR 105.15 - How are award winners recognized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are award winners recognized? 105.15 Section 105.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER... ceremony as recognition for an outstanding technological achievement or an innovative process, method or...

  7. Winners of the 2017 IDRC Doctoral Research Awards | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-11-30

    Nov 30, 2017 ... Michelle Savard, a 2016 awardee, hands out a certificate for the completion of an entrepreneurial training program that she arranged for war-affected single mothers in Uganda. IDRC is pleased to announce the winners of the 2017 IDRC Doctoral Research Awards. Awardees will conduct field research in ...

  8. ¿TIENE SENTIDO LA VIOLENCIA, EN UN SISTEMA ÉTICO DONDE NO EXISTE EL MAL? UNA MIRADA SOBRE LA POSICIÓN ÉTICA DE BARUCH DE SPINOZA (1632-1677

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Da Silva Pinto

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Dentro de los linderos de un mundo que se desvela por explicarlo todo desde una racionalidad portadora de principios capaces de darle sentido a las causas y sus efectos, como también del tupido entramado de relaciones que tocan por igual a personas y cosas, tenemos que es de vital importancia puntualizar el lugar que ontológicamente posee el bien y la maldad. Para Baruch de Spinoza este era un problema de primer orden que debería ser abordado por el discurso filosófico, porque ayudaría a definir el rol del entendimiento, de las pasiones y con ello la factibilidad de un mundo capaz de ofrecer respuestas a las agresiones y violencias acostumbradas a maniobrar bajo el amparo del poder religioso, político y social de turno.

  9. Alert with destruction of stratospheric ozone: 95 Nobel Prize Winners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamaria, J.; Zurita, E.

    1995-01-01

    After briefly summarizing the discoveries of the 95 Nobel Prize Winners in Chemistry related to the threats to the ozone layer by chemical pollutants, we make a soft presentation of the overall problem of stratospheric ozone, starting with the destructive catalytic cycles of the pollutant-based free radicals, following with the diffusion mathematical models in Atmospheric Chemistry, and ending with the increasing annual drama of the ozone hole in the Antarctica. (Author)

  10. Spring Research Festival and NICBR Collaboration Winners Announced | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer, and Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer The winners of the 2014 Spring Research Festival (SRF), held May 7 and 8, were recognized on July 2, and included 20 NCI at Frederick researchers: Matthew Anderson, Victor Ayala, Matt Bess, Cristina Bergamaschi, Charlotte Choi, Rami Doueiri, Laura Guasch Pamies, Diana Haines, Saadia Iftikhar, Maria Kaltcheva, Wojciech Kasprzak, Balamurugan Kuppusamy, James Lautenberger, George Lountos, Megan Mounts, Uma Mudunuri, Martha Sklavos, Gloriana Shelton, Alex Sorum, and Shea Wright.

  11. Google Science Fair 2012 : Grand Prize Winner Brittany Wenger

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    17-18 age category AND Grand Prize Winner: Brittany Wenger (USA)—“Global Neural Network Cloud Service for Breast Cancer.” Brittany’s project harnesses the power of the cloud to help doctors accurately diagnose breast cancer. Brittany built an application that compares individual test results to an extensive dataset stored in the cloud, allowing doctors to assess tumors using a minimally-invasive procedure. Brittany Michelle Wenger, and her mother, passed through the CERN Control Centre accompanied by Mike Lamont, CERN Beams Department, Operation Group Leader.

  12. [Women in natural sciences--Nobel Prize winners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuskin, Eugenija; Mustajbegović, Jadranka; Lipozencić, Jasna; Kolcić, Ivana; Spoljar-Vrzina, Sanja; Polasek, Ozren

    2006-01-01

    Alfred Bernhard Nobel was the founder of the Nobel Foundation, which has been awarding world-known scientists since 1901, for their contribution to the welfare of mankind. The life and accomplishments of Alfred Bernhard Nobel are described as well as scientific achivements of 11 women, Nobel prize winners in the field of physics, chemistry, physiology and/or medicine. They are Marie Sklodowska Curie, Maria Goeppert Mayer, Irene Joliot-Curie, Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, Gerty Theresa Radnitz Cori, Rosalyn Sussman Yalow, Barbara McClintock, Rita Levi-Montalcini, Gertrude Elion, Christine Nusslein-Volhard and Linda B. Buck.

  13. The Google Science Fair winner comes to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Shree Bose, the Google Science Fair Grand Prize winner, will come to CERN for a three-day internship. She is looking forward to it and hopes to sit in the CERN Control Room, and to learn more about ALICE and in general the work going on here right now.   Google Science Fair winners Lauren Hodge (left) Shree Bose (middle) and Naomi Shah (right). (Image Copyright Google) Despite her young age, Shree Bose is already an experienced researcher. Indeed, she has already been awarded prestigious prizes in various science fairs and competitions. Aged 17, she found a way to improve ovarian cancer treatment for patients when they have built up a resistance to certain chemotherapy drugs. The project won the Grand Prize at the Google Science Fair, and together with an amazing 10-day trip to the Galapagos Islands with National Geographic Expeditions, she also won a trip to CERN. “Shree will visit several experimental sites here and will sit next to our physicists and engineers, in the CCC an...

  14. Nobel prize-winner Heinrich Rohrer visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The Nobel prize-winner Heinrich Rohrer met young scientists on a recent visit to the Laboratory. From left to right: Xavier Gréhant (CERN Openlab), Ewa Stanecka (ATLAS), Magda Kowalska (ISOLDE), Heinrich Rohrer, Stéphanie Beauceron (CMS) and Ana Gago Da Silva (UNOSAT).Heinrich Rohrer, who shared the 1986 Nobel prize for physics with Gerd Binnig for the design of the scanning tunnelling microscope, visited CERN on 25 June. Welcomed by the Director-General, Robert Aymar, he visited the ATLAS cavern and control room, the Computer Centre, the Unosat project, the Antimatter Decelerator and ISOLDE. At the end of his visit, he voiced his admiration for CERN and its personnel. As a renowned Nobel prize-winner Heinrich Rohrer has the opportunity to pass on his experience and enthusiasm to young scientists. During the evening meal, at which he met five young physicists and computer scientists, who were delighted with the chance to talk to him, he stressed the importance for re...

  15. Wins, winning and winners: the commercial advertising of lottery gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, John L; Miller, Delthia

    2009-09-01

    This study analyzed a sample of 920 lottery ads that were placed or played in Atlantic Canada from January 2005 to December 2006. A content analysis, involving quantitative and qualitative techniques, was conducted to examine the design features, exposure profiles and focal messages of these ads and to explore the connections between lottery advertising and consumer culture. We found that there was an "ethos of winning" in these commercials that provided the embedded words, signs, myths, and symbols surrounding lottery gambling and conveyed a powerful imagery of plentitude and certitude in a world of potential loss where there was little reference to the actual odds of winning. The tangible and emotional qualities in the ads were especially inviting to young people creating a positive orientation to wins, winning and winners, and lottery products that, in turn, reinforced this form of gambling as part of youthful consumption practices. We concluded that enticing people with the prospects of huge jackpots, attractive consumer goods and easy wins, showcasing top prize winners, and providing dubious depictions that winning is life-changing was narrow and misleading and exploited some of the factors associated with at-risk gambling.

  16. Characterizing and modelling persistence in the number of lottery winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio, Fernando J.; Mendes, Renio S.; Itami, Andreia S.; Picoli, Sergio

    2015-06-01

    Lottery is the most famous branch among all the games of chance. By analysing data from Mega-Sena, the major lottery in Brazil, we investigated the presence of persistent behaviour in the time series of the number of winners. We found that the demand for tickets grew collectively as an exponential driven by the size of the accumulated jackpot. Finally, we identified that a stochastic model grounded on the rolling-over feature of lotteries can generate correlations qualitatively similar to those observed empirically. The model is consistent with the idea that the growth in the number of bets, motivated by the size of the expected jackpot, is a mechanism generator of correlations in an apparently random scenario.

  17. CERN visit for a Norwegian Prize-winner

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    One of the prize-winners of the Contest «Life in the Universe», the final of which was held at CERN during the Science and Technology Week in November 2001 (See Bulletin n°47/2002), came to CERN to receive his prize last June. The 15-year old Norwegian Ivar Marthinusen won a two-day visit to the Laboratory. He poses on the picture surrounded by his CERN's guardian angels: from left to right, Frank Tecker and Georges-Henry Hemelsoet from PS, Tommy Eriksson from AD, Sandrine Sanchez from the Visits Service, Ivar Mathinusen with his parents, Egil Lillestol (CERN/EP), Jens Vigen from the Library, Régine Chareyron from the Visits Service, Richard Jacobsson (CERN/EP) and Sophie Baillard from the Visits Service.

  18. Winner-take-all in a phase oscillator system with adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burylko, Oleksandr; Kazanovich, Yakov; Borisyuk, Roman

    2018-01-11

    We consider a system of generalized phase oscillators with a central element and radial connections. In contrast to conventional phase oscillators of the Kuramoto type, the dynamic variables in our system include not only the phase of each oscillator but also the natural frequency of the central oscillator, and the connection strengths from the peripheral oscillators to the central oscillator. With appropriate parameter values the system demonstrates winner-take-all behavior in terms of the competition between peripheral oscillators for the synchronization with the central oscillator. Conditions for the winner-take-all regime are derived for stationary and non-stationary types of system dynamics. Bifurcation analysis of the transition from stationary to non-stationary winner-take-all dynamics is presented. A new bifurcation type called a Saddle Node on Invariant Torus (SNIT) bifurcation was observed and is described in detail. Computer simulations of the system allow an optimal choice of parameters for winner-take-all implementation.

  19. Neuronal Networks with NMDARs and Lateral Inhibition Implement Winner-Takes-All

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick A Shoemaker

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A neural circuit that relies on the electrical properties of NMDA synaptic receptors is shown by numerical and theoretical analysis to be capable of realizing the winner-takes-all function, a powerful computational primitive that is often attributed to biological nervous systems. This biophysically-plausible model employs global lateral inhibition in a simple feedback arrangement. As its inputs increase, high-gain and then bi- or multi-stable equilibrium states may be assumed in which there is significant depolarization of a single neuron and hyperpolarization or very weak depolarization of other neurons in the network. The state of the winning neuron conveys analog information about its input. The winner-takes-all characteristic depends on the nonmonotonic current-voltage relation of NMDA receptor ion channels, as well as neural thresholding, and the gain and nature of the inhibitory feedback. Dynamical regimes vary with input strength. Fixed points may become unstable as the network enters a winner-takes-all regime, which can lead to entrained oscillations. Under some conditions, oscillatory behavior can be interpreted as winner-takes-all in nature. Stable winner-takes-all behavior is typically recovered as inputs increase further, but with still larger inputs, the winner-takes-all characteristic is ultimately lost. Network stability may be enhanced by biologically plausible mechanisms.

  20. Unsupervised Feature Learning With Winner-Takes-All Based STDP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Ferré

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel strategy for unsupervised feature learning in image applications inspired by the Spike-Timing-Dependent-Plasticity (STDP biological learning rule. We show equivalence between rank order coding Leaky-Integrate-and-Fire neurons and ReLU artificial neurons when applied to non-temporal data. We apply this to images using rank-order coding, which allows us to perform a full network simulation with a single feed-forward pass using GPU hardware. Next we introduce a binary STDP learning rule compatible with training on batches of images. Two mechanisms to stabilize the training are also presented : a Winner-Takes-All (WTA framework which selects the most relevant patches to learn from along the spatial dimensions, and a simple feature-wise normalization as homeostatic process. This learning process allows us to train multi-layer architectures of convolutional sparse features. We apply our method to extract features from the MNIST, ETH80, CIFAR-10, and STL-10 datasets and show that these features are relevant for classification. We finally compare these results with several other state of the art unsupervised learning methods.

  1. Route de Meyrin-CERN: and the winner is...

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Last night, CERN’s engagement with society took an important step forward with the unveiling of the winner of the architectural competition for the Route de Meyrin between CERN’s entrances A and B. The winning entry is a project entitled “Metaphoros”, entered by Studio Bürgi of Ticino.   Metaphoros was selected by a jury, of which I was a member, from an impressive range of proposals from around the world. It will be some time before construction gets underway, but anyone who’d like a forward look at how the gateway to CERN will look from 2014 can visit an exhibition in the Globe opening today and running until 28 January. The exhibition focuses on the winning entry, but also has a place for the runners-up, and for the Cosmic Rings of CERN proposal for buildings and landscaping around the Globe, which, subject to external funding, will merge seamlessly with Metaphoros as the next phase in the redevelopment of CERN’s public sp...

  2. Salivary hormones and anxiety in winners and losers of an international judo competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papacosta, Elena; Nassis, George P; Gleeson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the responses of salivary hormones and salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) and anxiety in winners and losers during an international judo competition. Twenty-three trained, male, national-level judo athletes provided three saliva samples during a competition day: morning, in anticipation of competition after an overnight fast, mid-competition, and post-competition within 15 min post-fight for determination of salivary cortisol, salivary testosterone, salivary testosterone/cortisol ratio, SIgA absolute concentrations, SIgA secretion rate and saliva flow rate. The competitive state anxiety inventory questionnaire was completed by the athletes (n = 12) after the first saliva collection for determination of somatic anxiety, cognitive anxiety and self-confidence. Winners were considered 1-3 ranking place (n = 12) and losers (n = 11) below third place in each weight category. Winners presented higher anticipatory salivary cortisol concentrations (p = 0.03) and a lower mid-competition salivary testosterone/cortisol ratio (p = 0.003) compared with losers with no differences for salivary testosterone. Winners tended to have higher SIgA secretion rates (p = 0.07) and higher saliva flow rates (p = 0.009) at mid-competition. Higher levels of cognitive anxiety (p = 0.02) were observed in the winners, without differences according to the outcome in somatic anxiety and self-confidence. The results suggest that winners experienced higher levels of physiological arousal and better psychological preparedness in the morning, and as the competition progressed, the winners were able to control their stress response better.

  3. Simulated ocean acidification reveals winners and losers in coastal phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Fernandez, Santiago; Hornick, Thomas; Stuhr, Annegret; Riebesell, Ulf

    2017-01-01

    The oceans absorb ~25% of the annual anthropogenic CO2 emissions. This causes a shift in the marine carbonate chemistry termed ocean acidification (OA). OA is expected to influence metabolic processes in phytoplankton species but it is unclear how the combination of individual physiological changes alters the structure of entire phytoplankton communities. To investigate this, we deployed ten pelagic mesocosms (volume ~50 m3) for 113 days at the west coast of Sweden and simulated OA (pCO2 = 760 μatm) in five of them while the other five served as controls (380 μatm). We found: (1) Bulk chlorophyll a concentration and 10 out of 16 investigated phytoplankton groups were significantly and mostly positively affected by elevated CO2 concentrations. However, CO2 effects on abundance or biomass were generally subtle and present only during certain succession stages. (2) Some of the CO2-affected phytoplankton groups seemed to respond directly to altered carbonate chemistry (e.g. diatoms) while others (e.g. Synechococcus) were more likely to be indirectly affected through CO2 sensitive competitors or grazers. (3) Picoeukaryotic phytoplankton (0.2–2 μm) showed the clearest and relatively strong positive CO2 responses during several succession stages. We attribute this not only to a CO2 fertilization of their photosynthetic apparatus but also to an increased nutrient competitiveness under acidified (i.e. low pH) conditions. The stimulating influence of high CO2/low pH on picoeukaryote abundance observed in this experiment is strikingly consistent with results from previous studies, suggesting that picoeukaryotes are among the winners in a future ocean. PMID:29190760

  4. Can We Predict the Winner in a Market with Network Effects? Competition in Cryptocurrency Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Gandal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyze how network effects affect competition in the nascent cryptocurrency market. We do so by examining early dynamics of exchange rates among different cryptocurrencies. While Bitcoin essentially dominates this market, our data suggest no evidence of a winner-take-all effect early in the market. Indeed, for a relatively long period, a few other cryptocurrencies competing with Bitcoin (the early industry leader appreciated much more quickly than Bitcoin. The data in this period are consistent with the use of cryptocurrencies as financial assets (popularized by Bitcoin, and not consistent with winner-take-all dynamics. Toward the end of our sample, however, things change dramatically. Bitcoin appreciates against the USD, while other currencies depreciate against the USD. The data in this period are consistent with strong network effects and winner-take-all dynamics. This trend continues at the time of writing.

  5. Assessing and identifying transitional losers and winners in the Serbian society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifunović Vesna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents ways to assess and evaluate losers and winners in the Serbian transitional society, through several concrete examples. Therefore, the paper is a follow-up of the manuscript published in the previous Bulletin of Institute of ethnography, and fits into the theoretical framework already stated. The main indicator of a variety of assessment regarding losers and winners is found among comments made by visitors of relevant Internet web sites, referring to news about societal problems and issues during the process of post-socialist transformation. These are directly linked with a phenomenon of losing or winning in transition, such as unemployment, poverty, criminal, success, failure, wealth, and power. Hence, news from two internet sites "Blic" i "B92" served as a source, while their visitors ‘commentaries to the particular news served in the analysis. Specific news was used to define a particular problem or issue, and the commentaries were seen as reactions to the news. The commentaries contain readers’ attitudes, assessment of particular issues and discourses overview. These comments were chosen based on whether they refer directly to the problem of losing/winning in transition, and on their diversity regarding assessment of the problem itself. At the same time, posted texts on the mentioned sites were not unbiased, and they can also serve to identify losers and winners of transition. Defining a category of losers or winners in transition is a complex issue of various interpretations and constructions, making thus a discrepancy in attributed meanings among the members of Serbian society. Controversy and contradictions in expressed attitudes about losers and winners, as well as understanding of these categories, could be explained by various aspects and outlooks held. In brief, an existing particular social heteroglossia, assumes many different readings and attitudes regarding the categories, caused by various factors. The

  6. Winners and Losers in the Finfish Trade on Mafia Island: A Value ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winners and Losers in the Finfish Trade on Mafia Island: A Value Chain Analysis. 153 further achieved for some actors in the chain by reducing its length. There is growing concern regarding the continued deprivation of the fishing communities and the need to improve their livelihoods and livelihood diversification. The.

  7. Winners of the First 1960 Televised Presidential Debate between Kennedy and Nixon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Sidney

    1996-01-01

    Reviews the events, studies, and comments (from 1960 to the present) regarding the controversial question of who won the first 1960 televised debate between John F. Kennedy and Richard M. Nixon. Supports the view that, for television viewers, Kennedy was the winner, whereas radio listeners gave Nixon the edge. (SR)

  8. The Great Unknown: Daniel Handler Interviews National Book Award-Winner Judy Blundell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interview with National Book Award-winner Judy Blundell. For nearly 20 years, Blundell has toiled in anonymity, turning out more than 100 mysteries, romances, and media tie-ins under various pen names, such as Jude Watson. But in mid-November, the writer-for-hire was suddenly shoved into the spotlight. That's when "What I…

  9. "the winners" and "the losers" in a globalized world: the case of Amazon rainforest

    OpenAIRE

    Majewska, N.

    2012-01-01

    The present paper by using the approach of "the winners" and "the losers" both in economy and environment emphasizes the multiple outcomes that can emerge as a result of interaction between the eager will of profit over the need to protect the environment. The case of the "Amazonian rainforest from Brazil" was taken as an illustrative example

  10. ACCE/ACS National Educator and Leader of the Year Winners: AEC Congratulates These Outstanding Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Educational Computing, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the ACCE/ACS National Educator and Leader of the Year winners. Anne Mirtschin is the recipient of the ACCE/ACS 2012 Educator of the Year Award. Mirtschin is an innovative teacher at Hawkesdale P-12 College a small rural school that is isolated culturally and geographically. She uses online tools and technology to create…

  11. Thirty Years After: The Lives of Former Winners of Mathematical Olympiads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    This follow-up study surveyed earlier winners of the St. Petersburg (Russia) mathematical Olympiad in 1991 (n=58) and 2001 (n=30). Findings are detailed concerning respondents' academic degrees, employment, publications, schools attended, and perceived quality of mathematical education. Respondents' views about education were conservative and…

  12. National Academic Award Winners over Time: Their Family Situation, Education and Interpersonal Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekowski, Andrzej; Siekanska, Malgorzata

    2008-01-01

    The article presents the results of a study focusing on the family situation, education and interpersonal relations of adults (26-35 years old) who in their adolescence (16-19 years old) displayed exceptional giftedness. One group of those surveyed were national academic award winners (90). The control group consisted of 90 people of no…

  13. Biased Random-Key Genetic Algorithms for the Winner Determination Problem in Combinatorial Auctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Carlos Eduardo; Toso, Rodrigo Franco; Resende, Mauricio G C; Miyazawa, Flávio Keidi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we address the problem of picking a subset of bids in a general combinatorial auction so as to maximize the overall profit using the first-price model. This winner determination problem assumes that a single bidding round is held to determine both the winners and prices to be paid. We introduce six variants of biased random-key genetic algorithms for this problem. Three of them use a novel initialization technique that makes use of solutions of intermediate linear programming relaxations of an exact mixed integer linear programming model as initial chromosomes of the population. An experimental evaluation compares the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms with the standard mixed linear integer programming formulation, a specialized exact algorithm, and the best-performing heuristics proposed for this problem. The proposed algorithms are competitive and offer strong results, mainly for large-scale auctions.

  14. Forecasting a winner for Malaysian Cup 2013 using soccer simulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Muhammad Mat; Fauzee, Mohd Soffian Omar; Latif, Rozita Abdul

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates through soccer simulation the calculation of the probability for each team winning Malaysia Cup 2013. Our methodology used here is we predict the outcomes of individual matches and then we simulate the Malaysia Cup 2013 tournament 5000 times. As match outcomes are always a matter of uncertainty, statistical model, in particular a double Poisson model is used to predict the number of goals scored and conceded for each team. Maximum likelihood estimation is use to measure the attacking strength and defensive weakness for each team. Based on our simulation result, LionXII has a higher probability in becoming the winner, followed by Selangor, ATM, JDT and Kelantan. Meanwhile, T-Team, Negeri Sembilan and Felda United have lower probabilities to win Malaysia Cup 2013. In summary, we find that the probability for each team becominga winner is small, indicating that the level of competitive balance in Malaysia Cup 2013 is quite high.

  15. Hierarchical Winner-Take-All Particle Swarm Optimization Social Network for Neural Model Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coventry, Brandon S.; Parthasarathy, Aravindakshan; Sommer, Alexandra L.; Bartlett, Edward L.

    2016-01-01

    Particle swarm optimization (PSO) has gained widespread use as a general mathematical programming paradigm and seen use in a wide variety of optimization and machine learning problems. In this work, we introduce a new variant on the PSO social network and apply this method to the inverse problem of input parameter selection from recorded auditory neuron tuning curves. The topology of a PSO social network is a major contributor to optimization success. Here we propose a new social network which draws influence from winner-take-all coding found in visual cortical neurons. We show that the winner-take-all network performs exceptionally well on optimization problems with greater than 5 dimensions and runs at a lower iteration count as compared to other PSO topologies. Finally we show that this variant of PSO is able to recreate auditory frequency tuning curves and modulation transfer functions, making it a potentially useful tool for computational neuroscience models. PMID:27726048

  16. Highlights from e-EPS: the 2015 EPS High Energy Physics Prize winners

    CERN Multimedia

    Thomas Lohse, e-EPS News

    2015-01-01

    The EPS High Energy Physics Division announces the winners of its 2015 prizes, which will be awarded at the Europhysics Conference on High-Energy Physics (EPS-HEP 2015), Vienna (Austria) 22−29 July. Many people from CERN were among the winners.   The 2015 High Energy and Particle Physics Prize, for an outstanding contribution to High Energy Physics, is awarded to James D. Bjorken “for his prediction of scaling behaviour in the structure of the proton that led to a new understanding of the b interaction”, and to Guido Altarelli, Yuri L. Dokshitzer, Lev Lipatov, and Giorgio Parisi “for developing a probabilistic field theory framework for the dynamics of quarks and gluons, enabling a quantitative understanding of high-energy collisions involving hadrons”. The 2015 Giuseppe and Vanna Cocconi Prize, for an outstanding contribution to Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology in the past 15 years, is awarded to Francis Halzen “for his visiona...

  17. Ecotoxicological characterisation and ecofriendlier alternative formulations of a commercial herbicide (Winner Top®)

    OpenAIRE

    Queirós, Libânia Sofia Seixas

    2016-01-01

    Tem-se assistido a um uso potencialmente abusivo de produtos fitofarmacêuticos, com consequentes efeitos ambientais. Assim, o desenvolvimento de produtos mais eficazes e amigos do ambiente é um dos grandes desafios da atualidade. Neste contexto, este trabalho teve como principais objetivos: (i) avaliar a toxicidade dos formulantes ou adjuvantes utilizados nas formulações dos produtos comerciais, utilizando um herbicida modelo (Winner Top®), de forma a verificar se a designação destes ingredie...

  18. The result's dynamic of winners of men's open world powerlifting championships

    OpenAIRE

    Kotendzhy, L.; Stetsenko, A.

    2009-01-01

    The research is devoted to the problem of world mens powerlifting development. Performance of the winners of world mens powerlifting championships was analyzed, that enables to extend the notion of the laws of development and prospects of powerlifting. Productivity of world champions in powerlifting among men tends to body height. It testifi es to a permanent state of development of powerlifting. Dynamics of outcomes of world champions can depend on different factors.

  19. Recognizing 21. century citizenship: 1997 federal energy and water management award winners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Energy is a luxury that no one can afford to waste, and many Federal government agencies are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of using energy wisely. Thoughtful use of energy resources is important, not only to meet agency goals, but because energy efficiency helps improve air quality. Sound facility management offers huge savings that affect the agency`s bottom line, the environment, and workplace quality. Hard work, innovation, and vision are characteristic of those who pursue energy efficiency. That is why the Department of Energy, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is proud to salute the winners of the 1997 Federal Energy and Water Management Award. The 1997 winners represent the kind of 21st century thinking that will help achieve widespread Federal energy efficiency. In one year, the winners, through a combination of public and private partnerships, saved more than $100 million and 9.8 trillion Btu by actively identifying and implementing energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. The contributions of these individuals, small groups, and organizations are presented in this report.

  20. Join the CERN ISEF special award winners | 16 June - 3 p.m.

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Come and join the CERN ISEF special award winners at their lightning talks session on 16 June at 3.00 p.m. in the main auditorium.   The 2016 Intel ISEF CERN special award winners on stage with the selection committee on 17 May 2016 in Phoenix, Arizona, USA. (Picture: Society for Science and the Public) Between 11 and 17 June 2016, the ten finalists of the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) who won the CERN Special Award, will visit CERN to partake in various educational lectures. ISEF is the world's largest international pre-college science competition, with approximately 1,700 high school students from more than 75 countries taking part. They will present their projects in short 5 minutes lightning talks' sessions at the main auditorium on Thursday 16 June at 3 p.m. The award winners would be also very happy to have a chance to interact and discuss with you af...

  1. The conceptualization of winners and losers of transition in popular culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Trifunović

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about the reconstruction of social presentations (picture, vision of losers and winners of transition based on the products of the popular culture such as the domestic TV series. The given picture was considered in the context of the 1990s, when those TV series were filmed and aired (broadcast, which means that they are typical, primarily, for the period of the so-called first transition. The analysis meant the abstracting one of the dominant themes in both TV series which refers to a certain family of ordinary people, faced with the everyday problems of the time their time, and those problems being mainly existential ones. The identification of the messages about losers and winners of transition, which was being sent through these TV series, was later continued by establishing a formula based on which the mentioned theme (subject was structured, and in the end completed by putting in connection the perceived oppostitions via semiotic square. The conceptualization of losers and winners of transition, which is the result of this paper, in no way implies that this vision of theirs is the only and the dominant one in this society. On the other hand, it certainly exists (existed in the given moment and context and as such it came to surface through domestic TV series as the product of popular culture, through which often widespread and popular attitudes of a society are expressed.

  2. Wingless signaling regulates winner/loser status in Minute cell competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akai, Nanami; Igaki, Tatsushi; Ohsawa, Shizue

    2018-03-01

    Cells heterozygously mutant for a ribosomal protein gene, called Minute/+ mutants, are eliminated from epithelium by cell competition when surrounded by wild-type cells. Whereas several factors that regulate Minute cell competition have been identified, the mechanisms how winner/loser status is determined and thereby triggers cell competition are still elusive. To address this, we established two assay systems for Minute cell competition, namely (i) the CORE (competitive elimination of RpS3-RNAi-expressing cells) system in which RpS3-RNAi-expressing wing pouch cells are eliminated from wild-type wing disc and (ii) the SURE (supercompetition of RpS3-expressing clones in RpS3/+ tissue) system in which RpS3-over-expressing clones generated in RpS3/+ wing disc outcompete surrounding RpS3/+ cells. An ectopic over-expression screen using the CORE system identified Wg signaling as a critical regulator of Minute cell competition. Activation of Wg signaling in loser cells suppressed their elimination, whereas down-regulation of Wg signaling in loser cells enhanced their elimination. Furthermore, using the SURE system, we found that down-regulation of Wg signaling in winner cells suppressed elimination of neighboring losers. Our observations suggest that cellular Wg signaling activity is crucial for determining winner/loser status and thereby triggering Minute cell competition. © 2018 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. An Organizational Model for Excellence in Healthcare Delivery: Evidence From Winners of the Baldrige Quality Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, John R

    Winners of the Baldrige National Quality Award in healthcare have documented top quartile clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction across a variety of American communities and a full spectrum of care. Their results also show high levels of satisfaction among physicians, nurses, and other workers, as well as effective financial performance. The managerial methods they use-collectively, the Baldrige model-are consistent with organizational theory literature and are found across all winners. The winners have sustained excellence after winning and expanded it by acquisition of other healthcare organizations.The model differs substantially from traditional management approaches in healthcare delivery. It is a comprehensive program that emphasizes a shared focus on excellence, systematically responsive management, evidence-based medicine, multidimensional measures and negotiated goals, improvement of work processes, thorough training, and extensive rewards. The model could be expanded on a much larger scale. Doing so successfully would substantially improve the quality and cost of healthcare, as well as the satisfaction and commitment of care providers and other staff. The opportunity deserves further study and trial by large healthcare delivery systems, insurers, and consulting companies.

  4. Imitating winner or sympathizing loser? Quadratic effects on cooperative behavior in prisoners' dilemma games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peng

    2015-10-01

    Cooperation is vital in human societies and therefore is widely investigated in the evolutionary game theory. Varieties of mechanisms have been proposed to overcome temptation and promote cooperation. Existing studies usually believe that agents are rational, but irrationalism such as emotions and feelings matters as well. Winner and loser are defined by their payoffs. In addition to admiring and imitating winners, the mechanism of sympathizing and imitating losers is introduced into the model as an alternative action rule, and each one plays the prisoners' dilemma game with eight neighbors under the influence of both irrationalism and rationalism. Rationalism refers to imitating winner to get highest payoff, and irrationalism means that people sympathize and adopt the actions of losers. As it is widely recognized that temptation reduces cooperation, this study focuses on the effect of sympathy on cooperation within a certain group or society. If it overcomes temptation that leads to defection, sympathy will be a powerful mechanism to promote cooperative behavior. Simulation results indicate that sympathy and temptation shares similar quadratic relationships with cooperation. Both sympathy and temptation undermine cooperation below their thresholds, and they both promote cooperation above their thresholds. Temptation not only reduces cooperation but also promote it as temptation goes beyond the threshold. Although sympathy is a good merit or human nature that is beneficial to society, a crisis or collapse of cooperation is inevitable when the sympathy propensity is relatively smaller. After cooperation reaches a minimal bottom, it then rises increasingly and dramatically, which brings a much brighter future of the society.

  5. Fast block matching algorithm based on the winner-update strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y S; Hung, Y P; Fuh, C S

    2001-01-01

    Block matching is a widely used method for stereo vision, visual tracking, and video compression. Many fast algorithms for block matching have been proposed in the past, but most of them do not guarantee that the match found is the globally optimal match in a search range. This paper presents a new fast algorithm based on the winner-update strategy which utilizes an ascending lower bound list of the matching error to determine the temporary winner. Two lower bound lists derived by using partial distance and by using Minkowski's inequality are described. The basic idea of the winner-update strategy is to avoid, at each search position, the costly computation of the matching error when there exists a lower bound larger than the global minimum matching error. The proposed algorithm can significantly speed up the computation of the block matching because: 1) computational cost of the lower bound we use is less than that of the matching error itself; 2) an element in the ascending lower bound list will be calculated only when its preceding element has already been smaller than the minimum matching error computed so far; 3) for many search positions, only the first several lower bounds in the list need to be calculated. Our experiments have shown that, when applying to motion vector estimation for several widely-used test videos, 92% to 98% of operations can be saved while still guaranteeing the global optimality. Moreover, the proposed algorithm can be easily modified either to meet the limited time requirement or to provide an ordered list of best candidate matches. Our source codes of the proposed algorithm are available at http://smart.iis.sinica.edu.tw/html/winup.html.

  6. Age and sex differences in game-related statistics which discriminate winners from losers in elite basketball games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruhiko Madarame

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract AIMS To advance knowledge of long-term development of basketball players, this study investigated age and sex differences in game-related statistics which discriminate winners from losers in World Basketball Championships held after the 2010 rule change. METHODS A total of 935 games from six categories (under-17, under-19 and open age for both men and women were analyzed. All games were classified into three types (balanced, unbalanced and very unbalanced according to point differential by a k-means cluster analysis. A discriminant analysis was performed to identify game-related statistics which discriminate winners from losers in each game type. An absolute value of a structural coefficient (SC equal to or above 0.30 was considered relevant for the discrimination. RESULTS In balanced games, assists discriminated winners from losers in open games (men, |SC| = 0.32; women, |SC| = 0.34, whereas successful free throws did so in under-17 games (men, |SC| = 0.30; women, |SC| = 0.31. Successful 2-point field goals discriminated winners from losers only in women’s games (under-19, |SC| = 0.38; open, |SC| = 0.36. CONCLUSION There were three novel findings in balanced games: 1 successful free throws but not assists discriminated winners from losers in under-17 games; 2 successful 2-point field goals discriminated winners from losers in women’s games but not in men’s games; and 3 discriminating power of successful 3-point field goals was extremely small in women’s games. These results may be related to the new rules for the shot clock and the 3-point distance.

  7. Mechanisms of Winner-Take-All and Group Selection in Neuronal Spiking Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanqing

    2017-01-01

    A major function of central nervous systems is to discriminate different categories or types of sensory input. Neuronal networks accomplish such tasks by learning different sensory maps at several stages of neural hierarchy, such that different neurons fire selectively to reflect different internal or external patterns and states. The exact mechanisms of such map formation processes in the brain are not completely understood. Here we study the mechanism by which a simple recurrent/reentrant neuronal network accomplish group selection and discrimination to different inputs in order to generate sensory maps. We describe the conditions and mechanism of transition from a rhythmic epileptic state (in which all neurons fire synchronized and indiscriminately to any input) to a winner-take-all state in which only a subset of neurons fire for a specific input. We prove an analytic condition under which a stable bump solution and a winner-take-all state can emerge from the local recurrent excitation-inhibition interactions in a three-layer spiking network with distinct excitatory and inhibitory populations, and demonstrate the importance of surround inhibitory connection topology on the stability of dynamic patterns in spiking neural network.

  8. Technical and physical analysis of the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil: winners vs. losers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpf, Michael C; Silva, Joao R; Hertzog, Maxime; Farooq, Abdulaziz; Nassis, George

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the technical and physical performance parameters that distinguish between teams winning and losing matches in the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil. Data were derived from the FIFA website and from live-statistics provided during each game of the world cup. Twelve physical (such as total distance covered in meters (TD), TD in distinct locomotor categories: low-intensity running (LIR; 14 km/h)) and 21 technical parameters (total passes, short-, medium- and long-distance passes, total pass completion rate, dangerous attacks, attacking attempts, delivery in penalty area, ball possession, goals, goals from set-pieces, goals per shot on goal, defending saves, shots, shots on goal, shot accuracy, set-pieces, crosses, corners, clearances, yellow cards) were analyzed. Forty-two games in which a winner and consequently a loser were presented after 90 minutes of game time were investigated with independent t-tests. A binary-logistic regression was utilized to investigate whether the significant variables predicted success of the winning teams. The winning teams scored significantly (PTechnical performance related to goal scoring parameters play a decisive role in World Cup games. Furthermore, scoring efficacy from open-play as well as from set-pieces are crucial to win matches in a World Cup tournament. At this level, physical performance was not the factor to discriminate between winners and losers.

  9. Meet the winner artists of Accelerate@CERN Taiwan | 3 February

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The winners of Accelerate@CERN Taiwan are WenChi Su (left) and Pei-Ying Lin (right). Accelerate@CERN is the country-specific, one-month research award for artists who have never been in a science laboratory before. Accelerate@CERN Taiwan, is funded by the Ministry of Culture for Taiwan. From within thirty outstanding applicants, the winners of Accelerate@CERN Taiwan are WenChi Su - dancer and choreographer - and Pei-Ying Lin - digital artist. This is the first opportunity for two talented artists to work and research together on the joint creation of a new dance project which engages with the digital realm and is inspired by the world of particle physics. In the past month they have been exploring CERN together, and now they are working on their project. Meet the artists on Wednesday 3 February at 4:30 p.m. in Restaurant 1. For more information on Accelerate@CERN, see here. Follow the artists blog to know what they have been doing for the past month at CERN.

  10. Winners and losers: analysing post-disaster spatial economic demand shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yu; Nilawar, Uttara

    2013-10-01

    Disasters produce winners and losers. This paper evaluates such winners and losers in a spatial context. The hypothesis is that, because of severe damage to the core disaster area and the constraints associated with the cost of transportation, economic demand would shift to the immediate edge of the disaster zone where either minor or no damage is observed. Empirical analysis of growth patterns in counties/parishes in the states of Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi in the United States after Hurricane Katrina (August 2005) verified the spatial demand shift hypothesis. The study found that the post-Katrina core disaster area became a 'doughnut hole' of low income and employment growth, surrounded by a ring of high growth counties/parishes on the edge of the hole. The short-run adjustment in growth rates may have altered permanently the spatial distribution of employment and income both at the core and in the areas at the edge. © 2013 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2013.

  11. A reversal of fortunes: climate change 'winners' and 'losers' in Antarctic Peninsula penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clucas, Gemma V; Dunn, Michael J; Dyke, Gareth; Emslie, Steven D; Naveen, Ron; Polito, Michael J; Pybus, Oliver G; Rogers, Alex D; Hart, Tom

    2014-06-12

    Climate change is a major threat to global biodiversity. Antarctic ecosystems are no exception. Investigating past species responses to climatic events can distinguish natural from anthropogenic impacts. Climate change produces 'winners', species that benefit from these events and 'losers', species that decline or become extinct. Using molecular techniques, we assess the demographic history and population structure of Pygoscelis penguins in the Scotia Arc related to climate warming after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). All three pygoscelid penguins responded positively to post-LGM warming by expanding from glacial refugia, with those breeding at higher latitudes expanding most. Northern (Pygoscelis papua papua) and Southern (Pygoscelis papua ellsworthii) gentoo sub-species likely diverged during the LGM. Comparing historical responses with the literature on current trends, we see Southern gentoo penguins are responding to current warming as they did during post-LGM warming, expanding their range southwards. Conversely, Adélie and chinstrap penguins are experiencing a 'reversal of fortunes' as they are now declining in the Antarctic Peninsula, the opposite of their response to post-LGM warming. This suggests current climate warming has decoupled historic population responses in the Antarctic Peninsula, favoring generalist gentoo penguins as climate change 'winners', while Adélie and chinstrap penguins have become climate change 'losers'.

  12. Can We Tell Winners and Losers Apart? : Social and Cultural Effects on Facial Expressions of Children and Adults in Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mui, Hoi Ching; Goudbeek, Martijn; Swerts, Marc; Freitas-magalhães, A

    2015-01-01

    Can we tell winners and losers apart, on the basis of their facial expressions? In this chapter, we investigate the effects of social and cultural factors on expressions associated with winning and losing in games. Eight-year-olds and adults, who were either Dutch or Chinese, played games alone or

  13. An Evaluation of the Trends of Realism in Caldecott Winner and First Honor Books 1966-1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, John A., Jr.; Napier, Georgia

    To determine if there were any consistent tendencies toward the abstract or toward impressionism in the illustration of children's books between the years 1966 and 1986, a study examined the illustrations of Caldecott winners and Honor books. The study replicated John Stewig's study (using his evaluation instrument) of the same topic which covered…

  14. Measuring Excellence: A Closer Look at Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award Winners in the Manufacturing Category

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Cazzell

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award is the nation’s highest quality award. The application and review process is outlined in this work. The objective of this study was to examine the five previous winners in the Manufacturing category and to establish a firm conclusion about the award’s impact. The impact of the award was examined in several categories including financial performance, market share, and employee productivity. This study explored the accomplishments of each company and compared the common factors they shared with one another. It was found that all five companies experienced tremendous financial growth on average of 100% in either sales or revenue as a result of their dedication to quality which ultimately led to winning the MBNQA.

  15. GRASP with Hybrid Path Relinking for Bi-Objective Winner Determination in Combinatorial Transportation Auctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Buer

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The procurement of transportation services via large-scale combinatorial auctions involves a couple of complex decisions whose outcome highly influences the performance of the tender process. This paper examines the shipper's task of selecting a subset of the submitted bids which efficiently trades off total procurement cost against expected carrier performance. To solve this bi-objective winner determination problem, we propose a Pareto-based greedy randomized adaptive search procedure (GRASP. As a post-optimizer we use a path relinking procedure which is hybridized with branch-and-bound. Several variants of this algorithm are evaluated by means of artificial test instances which comply with important real-world characteristics. The two best variants prove superior to a previously published Pareto-based evolutionary algorithm.

  16. Using transactional analysis to improve clinical and educational supervision: the Drama and Winner's triangles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKimm, Judy; Forrest, Kirsty

    2010-05-01

    The supervisor-trainee relationship is fundamental in ensuring the best continuing education for all trainees. One of the key skills of supervision is being able to communicate effectively; however, this is sometimes difficult. In this article we explore how two transactional analysis models, the Drama and Winner's triangles, can help supervisors work and communicate more effectively with trainees. All supervisors will have had a 'heartsink moment' before meeting a known trainee. The models can be used to explain these situations and what exactly is happening to the communication. The models provide methods of breaking free from these frustrating encounters and moving on with the relationship with your trainee. The models also help us understand the ways in which we can easily be pulled into games and offer insight into our own behaviours and relationships, not only with trainees, but also with patients, carers and colleagues. Real life scenarios are used throughout to explain the models.

  17. Self-deception's adaptive value: effects of positive thinking and the winner effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jason Kido; Fuxjager, Matthew J

    2012-03-01

    There is a puzzle about why self-deception, a process that obscures the truth, is so pervasive in human behavior given that tracking the truth seems important for our survival and reproduction. William von Hippel and Robert Trivers argue that, despite appearances, there is good reason to think that self-deception is an adaptation by arguing: (1) self-deception leads to a positive self-perception and (2) a positive self-perception increases an individual's fitness. D.S. Neil Van Leeuwen, however, gives persuasive arguments against both steps. In response, we will defend both propositions, thereby supporting the conclusion that self-deception indeed has adaptive value. The first premise will be bolstered by a survey of the philosophical literature and empirical work on self-deception, whereas the second will be strengthened by empirical research on a behavioral phenomenon known as the winner effect. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Quality in the 21st century perspectives from ASQ Feigenbaum medal winners

    CERN Document Server

    Saraiva, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    This book is a compilation of perspectives provided by several winners of the ASQ Feigenbaum Medal, which is awarded each year to an individual under the age of 35 who has made a significant contribution to the field of Quality. As such, it serves as a valuable reference book in this area. It is primarily based on the medalists’ vision to "refresh" and "re-think" the quality concepts that have been used over the past century and the future development of the topic. Maximizing readers’ understanding of the ways in which Quality is created, it provides insights from pioneers in this field from around the globe and anticipates how and what Quality will be in the future, as well as how people and organizations can benefit from it today.

  19. The Stock Performance of C. Everett Koop Award Winners Compared With the Standard & Poor's 500 Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetzel, Ron Z.; Fabius, Raymond; Fabius, Dan; Roemer, Enid C.; Thornton, Nicole; Kelly, Rebecca K.; Pelletier, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the link between companies investing in the health and well-being programs of their employees and stock market performance. Methods: Stock performance of C. Everett Koop National Health Award winners (n = 26) was measured over time and compared with the average performance of companies comprising the Standard and Poor's (S&P) 500 Index. Results: The Koop Award portfolio outperformed the S&P 500 Index. In the 14-year period tracked (2000–2014), Koop Award winners’ stock values appreciated by 325% compared with the market average appreciation of 105%. Conclusions: This study supports prior and ongoing research demonstrating a higher market valuation—an affirmation of business success by Wall Street investors—of socially responsible companies that invest in the health and well-being of their workers when compared with other publicly traded firms. PMID:26716843

  20. The thrill of victory and the agony of defeat: spontaneous expressions of medal winners of the 2004 Athens Olympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, David; Willingham, Bob

    2006-09-01

    Facial behaviors of medal winners of the judo competition at the 2004 Athens Olympic Games were coded with P. Ekman and W. V. Friesen's (1978) Facial Affect Coding System (FACS) and interpreted using their Emotion FACS dictionary. Winners' spontaneous expressions were captured immediately when they completed medal matches, when they received their medal from a dignitary, and when they posed on the podium. The 84 athletes who contributed expressions came from 35 countries. The findings strongly supported the notion that expressions occur in relation to emotionally evocative contexts in people of all cultures, that these expressions correspond to the facial expressions of emotion considered to be universal, that expressions provide information that can reliably differentiate the antecedent situations that produced them, and that expressions that occur without inhibition are different than those that occur in social and interactive settings. ((c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Winners, losers, and posers: The effect of power poses on testosterone and risk-taking following competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kristopher M; Apicella, Coren L

    2017-06-01

    A contribution to a special issue on Hormones and Human Competition. The effect of postural power displays (i.e. power poses) on hormone levels and decision-making has recently been challenged. While Carney et al. (2010) found that holding brief postural displays of power leads to increased testosterone, decreased cortisol and greater economic risk taking, this failed to replicate in a recent high-powered study (Ranehill et al. 2015). It has been put forward that subtle differences in social context may account for the differences in results. Power displays naturally occur within the context of competitions, as do changes in hormones, and researchers have yet to examine the effects of poses within this ecologically relevant context. Using a large sample of 247 male participants, natural winners and losers of a physical competition were randomly assigned to hold a low, neutral or high-power postural display. We found no main effect of pose type on testosterone, cortisol, risk or feelings of power. Winners assigned to a high-power pose had a relative, albeit small, rise in testosterone compared to winners who held neutral or low-power poses. For losers, we found little evidence that high-power poses lead to increased testosterone relative to those holding neutral or low-powered poses. If anything, the reverse was observed - losers had a reduction in testosterone after holding high-power poses. To the extent that changes in testosterone modulate social behaviors adaptively, it is possible that the relative reduction in testosterone observed in losers taking high-powered poses is designed to inhibit further "winner-like" behavior that could result in continued defeat and harm. Still, effects were small, multiple comparisons were made, and the results ran counter to our predictions. We thus treat these conclusions as preliminary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Learning and Stabilization of Winner-Take-All DynamicsThrough Interacting Excitatory and Inhibitory Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eBinas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Winner-Take-All (WTA networks are recurrently connected populations of excitatory and inhibitory neurons that represent promising candidate microcircuits for implementing cortical computation. WTAs can perform powerful computations, ranging from signal-restoration to state-dependent processing. However, such networks require fine-tuned connectivity parameters to keep the network dynamics within stable operating regimes. In this article, we show how such stability can emerge autonomously through an interaction of biologically plausible plasticity mechanisms that operate simultaneously on all excitatory and inhibitory synapses of the network. A weight-dependent plasticity rule is derived from the triplet spike-timing dependent plasticity model, and its stabilization properties in the mean-field case are analyzed using contraction theory. Our main result provides simple constraints on the plasticity rule parameters, rather than on the weights themselves, which guarantee stable WTA behavior. The plastic network we present is able to adapt to changing input conditions, and to dynamically adjust its gain, therefore exhibiting self-stabilization mechanisms that are crucial for maintaining stable operation in large networks of interconnected subunits. We show how distributed neural assemblies can adjust their parameters for stable WTA function autonomously while respecting anatomical constraints on neural wiring.

  3. Versatile Networks of Simulated Spiking Neurons Displaying Winner-Take-All Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanqing eChen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe simulations of large-scale networks of excitatory and inhibitory spiking neurons that can generate dynamically stable winner-take-all (WTA behavior. The network connectivity is a variant of center-surround architecture that we call center-annular-surround (CAS. In this architecture each neuron is excited by nearby neighbors and inhibited by more distant neighbors in an annular-surround region. The neural units of these networks simulate conductance-based spiking neurons that interact via mechanisms susceptible to both short-term synaptic plasticity and STDP. We show that such CAS networks display robust WTA behavior unlike the center-surround networks and other control architectures that we have studied. We find that a large-scale network of spiking neurons with separate populations of excitatory and inhibitory neurons can give rise to smooth maps of sensory input. In addition, we show that a humanoid Brain-Based-Device (BBD under the control of a spiking WTA neural network can learn to reach to target positions in its visual field, thus demonstrating the acquisition of sensorimotor coordination.

  4. Winners and losers: Ecological and biogeochemical changes in a warming ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, S.; Scott, J. R.; Follows, M. J.

    2013-04-01

    We employ a marine ecosystem model, with diverse and flexible phytoplankton communities, coupled to an Earth system model of intermediate complexity to explore mechanisms that will alter the biogeography and productivity of phytoplankton populations in a warming world. Simple theoretical frameworks and sensitivity experiments reveal that ecological and biogeochemical changes are driven by a balance between two impacts of a warming climate: higher metabolic rates (the "direct" effect), and changes in the supply of limiting nutrients and altered light environments (the "indirect" effect). On globally integrated productivity, the two effects compensate to a large degree. Regionally, the competition between effects is more complicated; patterns of productivity changes are different between high and low latitudes and are also regulated by how the supply of the limiting nutrient changes. These complex regional patterns are also found in the changes to broad phytoplankton functional groups. On the finer ecological scale of diversity within functional groups, we find that ranges of some phytoplankton types are reduced, while those of others (potentially minor players in the present ocean) expand. Combined change in areal extent of range and in regionally available nutrients leads to global "winners and losers." The model suggests that the strongest and most robust signal of the warming ocean is likely to be the large turnover in local phytoplankton community composition.

  5. Winners of the Skylab Student Program at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    One of the most successful of the Skylab educational efforts was the Skylab Student Project. A nationwide scientific competition was sponsored by the National Science Teachers Association and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in which secondary students were encouraged to submit proposals for experiments to be conducted on Skylan in Earth orbit the following year. After the official announcement of this project, over 4,000 students responded with 3,409 proposals. The winning 25 students, along with their parents and sponsor teachers, visited Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the lead center for Skylab, where they met with scientists and engineers, participated in design reviews for their experiments, and toured MSFC facilities. Of the 25 students, 6 did not see their experiments conducted on Skylab because the experiments were not compatible with Skylab hardware and timelines. Of the 19 remaining, 11 experiments required the manufacture of additional equipment. This photograph is a group shot of the 25 winners, parents, and sponsors when they met for the first time on the steps of Building 4200 at MSFC in the Spring of 1972.

  6. Selective positive-negative feedback produces the winner-take-all competition in recurrent neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Liu, Bo; Li, Yangming

    2013-02-01

    The winner-take-all (WTA) competition is widely observed in both inanimate and biological media and society. Many mathematical models are proposed to describe the phenomena discovered in different fields. These models are capable of demonstrating the WTA competition. However, they are often very complicated due to the compromise with experimental realities in the particular fields; it is often difficult to explain the underlying mechanism of such a competition from the perspective of feedback based on those sophisticate models. In this paper, we make steps in that direction and present a simple model, which produces the WTA competition by taking advantage of selective positive-negative feedback through the interaction of neurons via p-norm. Compared to existing models, this model has an explicit explanation of the competition mechanism. The ultimate convergence behavior of this model is proven analytically. The convergence rate is discussed and simulations are conducted in both static and dynamic competition scenarios. Both theoretical and numerical results validate the effectiveness of the dynamic equation in describing the nonlinear phenomena of WTA competition.

  7. STDP Installs in Winner-Take-All Circuits an Online Approximation to Hidden Markov Model Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, David; Nessler, Bernhard; Maass, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    In order to cross a street without being run over, we need to be able to extract very fast hidden causes of dynamically changing multi-modal sensory stimuli, and to predict their future evolution. We show here that a generic cortical microcircuit motif, pyramidal cells with lateral excitation and inhibition, provides the basis for this difficult but all-important information processing capability. This capability emerges in the presence of noise automatically through effects of STDP on connections between pyramidal cells in Winner-Take-All circuits with lateral excitation. In fact, one can show that these motifs endow cortical microcircuits with functional properties of a hidden Markov model, a generic model for solving such tasks through probabilistic inference. Whereas in engineering applications this model is adapted to specific tasks through offline learning, we show here that a major portion of the functionality of hidden Markov models arises already from online applications of STDP, without any supervision or rewards. We demonstrate the emergent computing capabilities of the model through several computer simulations. The full power of hidden Markov model learning can be attained through reward-gated STDP. This is due to the fact that these mechanisms enable a rejection sampling approximation to theoretically optimal learning. We investigate the possible performance gain that can be achieved with this more accurate learning method for an artificial grammar task. PMID:24675787

  8. Winners and losers of national and global efforts to reconcile agricultural intensification and biodiversity conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, Lukas; Meyer, Carsten; Scherber, Christoph; Kreft, Holger; Tscharntke, Teja

    2018-05-01

    Closing yield gaps within existing croplands, and thereby avoiding further habitat conversions, is a prominently and controversially discussed strategy to meet the rising demand for agricultural products, while minimizing biodiversity impacts. The agricultural intensification associated with such a strategy poses additional threats to biodiversity within agricultural landscapes. The uneven spatial distribution of both yield gaps and biodiversity provides opportunities for reconciling agricultural intensification and biodiversity conservation through spatially optimized intensification. Here, we integrate distribution and habitat information for almost 20,000 vertebrate species with land-cover and land-use datasets. We estimate that projected agricultural intensification between 2000 and 2040 would reduce the global biodiversity value of agricultural lands by 11%, relative to 2000. Contrasting these projections with spatial land-use optimization scenarios reveals that 88% of projected biodiversity loss could be avoided through globally coordinated land-use planning, implying huge efficiency gains through international cooperation. However, global-scale optimization also implies a highly uneven distribution of costs and benefits, resulting in distinct "winners and losers" in terms of national economic development, food security, food sovereignty or conservation. Given conflicting national interests and lacking effective governance mechanisms to guarantee equitable compensation of losers, multinational land-use optimization seems politically unlikely. In turn, 61% of projected biodiversity loss could be avoided through nationally focused optimization, and 33% through optimization within just 10 countries. Targeted efforts to improve the capacity for integrated land-use planning for sustainable intensification especially in these countries, including the strengthening of institutions that can arbitrate subnational land-use conflicts, may offer an effective, yet

  9. The response of Baruch Spinoza to the fundamental question of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to the fundamental question of philosophy and his indebtedness to the common patrimony of philosophy. For Spinoza, something exists and it is substance, God, nature (three names for the same reality). For Spinoza, we can know it through intuition. Keywords: Spinoza; Fundamental Questions; Philosophy; Patrimony ...

  10. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Awards Ceremony for 2011 Award Winners (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The winners for 2011 of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award were recognized in a ceremony held May 21, 2012. Dr. Steven Chu and others spoke of the importance of the accomplishments and the prestigious history of the award. The recipients of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award for 2011 are: Riccardo Betti (University of Rochester); Paul C. Canfield (Ames Laboratory); Mark B. Chadwick (Los Alamos National Laboratory); David E. Chavez (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Amit Goyal (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); Thomas P. Guilderson (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Lois Curfman McInnes (Argonne National Laboratory); Bernard Matthew Poelker (Thomas Jeffereson National Accelerator Facility); and Barry F. Smith (Argonne National Laboratory).

  11. A novel recurrent neural network with one neuron and finite-time convergence for k-winners-take-all operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingshan; Dang, Chuangyin; Cao, Jinde

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, based on a one-neuron recurrent neural network, a novel k-winners-take-all ( k -WTA) network is proposed. Finite time convergence of the proposed neural network is proved using the Lyapunov method. The k-WTA operation is first converted equivalently into a linear programming problem. Then, a one-neuron recurrent neural network is proposed to get the kth or (k+1)th largest inputs of the k-WTA problem. Furthermore, a k-WTA network is designed based on the proposed neural network to perform the k-WTA operation. Compared with the existing k-WTA networks, the proposed network has simple structure and finite time convergence. In addition, simulation results on numerical examples show the effectiveness and performance of the proposed k-WTA network.

  12. David Bowie and the Art of Slow Innovation: A Fast-Second Winner Strategy for Biotechnology and Precision Medicine Global Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Vural; Patrinos, George P

    2017-11-01

    Original ideas and innovation cannot always be ordered like a courier service and delivered fresh to our desk at 9 am. Yet, most creativity-based organizations, careers, and professions, science and biotechnology innovation included, emphasize the speed as the prevailing ideology. But a narrow focus on speed has several and overlooked shortcomings. For example, it does not offer the opportunity to draw from, and stitch together disparate concepts and practices for truly disruptive innovation. Preventing false starts, learning from others' or our own mistakes, and customizing innovations for local community needs are difficult in a speed-hungry innovation ecosystem. We introduce a new strategy, the Fast-Second Winner, specifically in relation to global development of biotechnologies and precision medicine. This à la carte global development strategy envisions a midstream entry into the innovation ecosystem. Moreover, we draw from the works of the late David Bowie who defied rigid classifications as an artist and prolific innovator, and introduce the concept and practice of slow innovation that bodes well with the Fast-Second Winner strategy. A type of slow innovation, the Fast-Second Winner is actually fast and sustainable in the long term, and efficient by reducing false starts in new precision medicine application contexts and geographies, learning from other innovators' failures, and shaping innovations for the local community needs. The establishment of Centers for Fast-Second Innovation (CFSIs), and their funding, for example, by crowdfunding and other innovative mechanisms, could be timely for omics and precision medicine global development. If precision medicine is about tailoring drug treatments and various health interventions to individuals, we suggest to start from tailoring new ideas, and focus not only on how much we innovate but also what and how we innovate. In principle, the Fast-Second Winner can be applied to omics and other biotechnology

  13. A little helps a lot The overall winners of this year's Nursing Standard Nurse of the Year awards have enhanced the lives of hundreds of African children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alison

    2003-11-05

    This year's overall Nurse 2003 award is unusual in that there are two winners, Clare McKenzie and Pauline Stratton. Sadly Ms Stratton receives the award posthumously as she died earlier this year in an accident while visiting the award-winning project in Malawi. The nurses, from the North Cumbria Acute Hospitals NHS Trust, won the Robert Tiffany International award and overall prize for their collaboration with Malawian nurses.

  14. Statistical correction of the Winner's Curse explains replication variability in quantitative trait genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Palmer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified hundreds of SNPs responsible for variation in human quantitative traits. However, genome-wide-significant associations often fail to replicate across independent cohorts, in apparent inconsistency with their apparent strong effects in discovery cohorts. This limited success of replication raises pervasive questions about the utility of the GWAS field. We identify all 332 studies of quantitative traits from the NHGRI-EBI GWAS Database with attempted replication. We find that the majority of studies provide insufficient data to evaluate replication rates. The remaining papers replicate significantly worse than expected (p < 10-14, even when adjusting for regression-to-the-mean of effect size between discovery- and replication-cohorts termed the Winner's Curse (p < 10-16. We show this is due in part to misreporting replication cohort-size as a maximum number, rather than per-locus one. In 39 studies accurately reporting per-locus cohort-size for attempted replication of 707 loci in samples with similar ancestry, replication rate matched expectation (predicted 458, observed 457, p = 0.94. In contrast, ancestry differences between replication and discovery (13 studies, 385 loci cause the most highly-powered decile of loci to replicate worse than expected, due to difference in linkage disequilibrium.

  15. Fine-scale ecological and economic assessment of climate change on olive in the Mediterranean Basin reveals winners and losers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, Luigi; Gutierrez, Andrew Paul; Ruti, Paolo Michele; Dell’Aquila, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The Mediterranean Basin is a climate and biodiversity hot spot, and climate change threatens agro-ecosystems such as olive, an ancient drought-tolerant crop of considerable ecological and socioeconomic importance. Climate change will impact the interactions of olive and the obligate olive fruit fly (Bactrocera oleae), and alter the economics of olive culture across the Basin. We estimate the effects of climate change on the dynamics and interaction of olive and the fly using physiologically based demographic models in a geographic information system context as driven by daily climate change scenario weather. A regional climate model that includes fine-scale representation of the effects of topography and the influence of the Mediterranean Sea on regional climate was used to scale the global climate data. The system model for olive/olive fly was used as the production function in our economic analysis, replacing the commonly used production-damage control function. Climate warming will affect olive yield and fly infestation levels across the Basin, resulting in economic winners and losers at the local and regional scales. At the local scale, profitability of small olive farms in many marginal areas of Europe and elsewhere in the Basin will decrease, leading to increased abandonment. These marginal farms are critical to conserving soil, maintaining biodiversity, and reducing fire risk in these areas. Our fine-scale bioeconomic approach provides a realistic prototype for assessing climate change impacts in other Mediterranean agro-ecosystems facing extant and new invasive pests. PMID:24706833

  16. Fine-scale ecological and economic assessment of climate change on olive in the Mediterranean Basin reveals winners and losers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, Luigi; Gutierrez, Andrew Paul; Ruti, Paolo Michele; Dell'Aquila, Alessandro

    2014-04-15

    The Mediterranean Basin is a climate and biodiversity hot spot, and climate change threatens agro-ecosystems such as olive, an ancient drought-tolerant crop of considerable ecological and socioeconomic importance. Climate change will impact the interactions of olive and the obligate olive fruit fly (Bactrocera oleae), and alter the economics of olive culture across the Basin. We estimate the effects of climate change on the dynamics and interaction of olive and the fly using physiologically based demographic models in a geographic information system context as driven by daily climate change scenario weather. A regional climate model that includes fine-scale representation of the effects of topography and the influence of the Mediterranean Sea on regional climate was used to scale the global climate data. The system model for olive/olive fly was used as the production function in our economic analysis, replacing the commonly used production-damage control function. Climate warming will affect olive yield and fly infestation levels across the Basin, resulting in economic winners and losers at the local and regional scales. At the local scale, profitability of small olive farms in many marginal areas of Europe and elsewhere in the Basin will decrease, leading to increased abandonment. These marginal farms are critical to conserving soil, maintaining biodiversity, and reducing fire risk in these areas. Our fine-scale bioeconomic approach provides a realistic prototype for assessing climate change impacts in other Mediterranean agro-ecosystems facing extant and new invasive pests.

  17. Climate change winners: receding ice fields facilitate colony expansion and altered dynamics in an Adélie penguin metapopulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRue, Michelle A; Ainley, David G; Swanson, Matt; Dugger, Katie M; Lyver, Phil O'B; Barton, Kerry; Ballard, Grant

    2013-01-01

    There will be winners and losers as climate change alters the habitats of polar organisms. For an Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) colony on Beaufort Island (Beaufort), part of a cluster of colonies in the southern Ross Sea, we report a recent population increase in response to increased nesting habitat as glaciers have receded. Emigration rates of birds banded as chicks on Beaufort to colonies on nearby Ross Island decreased after 2005 as available habitat on Beaufort increased, leading to altered dynamics of the metapopulation. Using aerial photography beginning in 1958 and modern satellite imagery, we measured change in area of available nesting habitat and population size of the Beaufort colony. Population size varied with available habitat, and both increased rapidly since the 1990s. In accord with glacial retreat, summer temperatures at nearby McMurdo Station increased by ~0.50 °C per decade since the mid-1980s. Although the Ross Sea is likely to be the last ocean with an intact ecosystem, the recent retreat of ice fields at Beaufort that resulted in increased breeding habitat exemplifies a process that has been underway in the Ross Sea during the entire Holocene. Furthermore, our results are in line with predictions that major ice shelves and glaciers will retreat rapidly elsewhere in the Antarctic, potentially leading to increased breeding habitat for Adélie penguins. Results further indicated that satellite imagery may be used to estimate large changes in Adélie penguin populations, facilitating our understanding of metapopulation dynamics and environmental factors that influence regional populations.

  18. Climate change winners: receding ice fields facilitate colony expansion and altered dynamics in an Adélie penguin metapopulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle A LaRue

    Full Text Available There will be winners and losers as climate change alters the habitats of polar organisms. For an Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae colony on Beaufort Island (Beaufort, part of a cluster of colonies in the southern Ross Sea, we report a recent population increase in response to increased nesting habitat as glaciers have receded. Emigration rates of birds banded as chicks on Beaufort to colonies on nearby Ross Island decreased after 2005 as available habitat on Beaufort increased, leading to altered dynamics of the metapopulation. Using aerial photography beginning in 1958 and modern satellite imagery, we measured change in area of available nesting habitat and population size of the Beaufort colony. Population size varied with available habitat, and both increased rapidly since the 1990s. In accord with glacial retreat, summer temperatures at nearby McMurdo Station increased by ~0.50 °C per decade since the mid-1980s. Although the Ross Sea is likely to be the last ocean with an intact ecosystem, the recent retreat of ice fields at Beaufort that resulted in increased breeding habitat exemplifies a process that has been underway in the Ross Sea during the entire Holocene. Furthermore, our results are in line with predictions that major ice shelves and glaciers will retreat rapidly elsewhere in the Antarctic, potentially leading to increased breeding habitat for Adélie penguins. Results further indicated that satellite imagery may be used to estimate large changes in Adélie penguin populations, facilitating our understanding of metapopulation dynamics and environmental factors that influence regional populations.

  19. Deep sleep after social stress: NREM sleep slow-wave activity is enhanced in both winners and losers of a conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphuis, Jeanine; Lancel, Marike; Koolhaas, Jaap M; Meerlo, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Sleep is considered to be a recovery process of prior wakefulness. Not only duration of the waking period affects sleep architecture and sleep EEG, the quality of wakefulness is also highly important. Studies in rats have shown that social defeat stress, in which experimental animals are attacked and defeated by a dominant conspecific, is followed by an acute increase in NREM sleep EEG slow wave activity (SWA). However, it is not known whether this effect is specific for the stress of social defeat or a result of the conflict per se. In the present experiment, we examined how sleep is affected in both the winners and losers of a social conflict. Sleep-wake patterns and sleep EEG were recorded in male wild-type Groningen rats that were subjected to 1h of social conflict in the middle of the light phase. All animals were confronted with a conspecific of similar aggression level and the conflict took place in a neutral arena where both individuals had an equal chance to either win or lose the conflict. NREM sleep SWA was significantly increased after the social conflict compared to baseline values and a gentle stimulation control condition. REM sleep was significantly suppressed in the first hours after the conflict. Winners and losers did not differ significantly in NREM sleep time, NREM sleep SWA and REM sleep time immediately after the conflict. Losers tended to have slightly more NREM sleep later in the recovery period. This study shows that in rats a social conflict with an unpredictable outcome has quantitatively and qualitatively largely similar acute effects on subsequent sleep in winners and losers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Winners and losers in flexible labor markets: the fate of women with chronic illness in contrasting policy environments--Sweden and Britain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burström, Bo; Holland, Paula; Diderichsen, Finn

    2003-01-01

    This study compares employment rates among men and women with and without chronic illness in the contrasting policy environments of Britain and Sweden, through analysis of household surveys for 1979-1995. Professional and managerial groups were winners in both countries, including during recession...... unskilled manual workers in Britain. British women with a chronic illness in the 1990s had less than half the employment rates of healthy women. Such social inequalities were much smaller and less consistent in Sweden, where the impact of illness was softened for all social groups. In Britain, workless men...

  1. Project winners - Ademe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The French agency of environment and energy management (Ademe) is the operator in charge of innovation for accelerating the ecological and environmental transition. A credit of 3.3 billion euros is allocated to this goal in the framework of forward-looking investment. This budget aims at financing innovative projects of any size with the objective of developing tomorrow's industries. The projects cover the following topics: 1 - carbon-free energies and green chemistry: renewable energy sources (marine, solar, wind and geothermal energies), green chemistry and energy challenges (bio-resources, buildings, energy storage, hydrogen, CO 2 capture, storage and valorization, industry and agriculture), 2 - smart grids, 3 - circular economy (wastes and industrial ecology, sites and soils cleansing, water and biodiversity), 4 - future vehicles: road vehicle (mobility and logistics, electric-powered vehicles and charging facilities, hybrid and thermal engines, vehicles lightering, heavy-duty vehicles), rail and maritime transport. This document presents the financing system, a report of the previous investment campaign (2014), and the list of retained projects for the 2015 investment program

  2. Agribusiness Career Exploration Winner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutshall, Bill

    1976-01-01

    Describes the planning, development, status, and instructional materials used in a career awaremess program in agribusiness in Chillicothe, Missouri. The four classes in the program and the results of an appraisal are also described. (HD)

  3. Winner Take All

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giacomin, Valeria

    focusing on collaboration across distant locations, to the dynamics of competition. The analysis concludes that: (i) clusters interact and advance through the exchange of knowledge on a shared institutional platform; (ii) competition emerges when players from one location increase their influence over...... the institutional platform to gain control over knowledge generation and transmission; and (iii) the comparative evaluation of business environments and their political risk complement location specificity in assessing cluster competitiveness.......Historically, agricultural crops have been transferred from their native locations to climatically similar ones. In the case of palm oil, the new location (Southeast Asia) outcompeted the native one (West Africa), thanks to a superior cluster organizational structure inherited from rubber...

  4. Be a Winner!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Marty

    1991-01-01

    Describes a step-by-step process for writing a winning application for the U.S. Department of Education Elementary (or Secondary) School Recognition Program. Underscores the importance of faculty involvement. Explains the application process, covering brainstorming, administrative questions, the first and final drafts, and use of various readers.…

  5. The Unintended Consequences of Technological Change: Winners and Losers from GM Technologies and the Policy Response in the Organic Food Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Smyth

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is often said that innovations create winners and losers. All innovations are somewhat disruptive, but some have more distributed effects. We have a sense of who the winners are and how much they gain. Yet, how much do losers actually lose? Organic farmers frequently like to publicly announce that they are the losers following the commercialization of genetically modified (GM crops, yet consumers in search of non-GM products have helped increase demand for organic products, something that would not have occurred in the absence of GM crops. Are organic farmers really losers? This article lays out the argument that were it not for the commercialization of GM crop varieties in the mid-1990s, organic production and food sectors would not be at the level they enjoy today. That is, the commercialization of GM crops has made the organic industry better off than had GM crops not been commercialized. Theoretical modelling of the organic benefits is complemented by supportive market data. The article concludes that in spite of numerous vocal offerings about the adverse impacts suffered by the organic industry due to GM crop production, the organic industry has gained significantly from that which they vociferously criticize.

  6. Differences in certain features of the basketball game of players in the final game, against the criteria: The winner/loser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubin Pavle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the characteristics of the game (applied technical and tactical activity for attack realisation, shooting performance, position of players in team, the segment of the field where the ball is received and where the shot is made from in the final matches of top three club competitions. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are differences in observed characteristics of the basketball game between teams separated by the winner/loser criteria. The sample consisted of all matches of the final games of three league competitions (American professional (NBA league, the Euro-league and the Serbian Super-league played in the season 2011/12. By applying multivariate statistical procedures in the monitored segment application of technical and tactical activities of players, it was observed that the winning team, unlike the defeated team, significantly featured a technical - tactical element of shooting, while in the defeated teams (as opposed to the winners elements of action were dominant: dribbling, penetration, shot and dribbling, jump stop, fake, shot. Higher percentage of using only shooting (without the requirement for other elements of attack used to create an opportunity for the eventual shot realization can point primarily to the successful organization of the attacks (in this case - the winning team. As for the position of players in the team, with the teams that won in the monitored matches, statistically significant was the dominance of the forwards in relation to the defeated teams, which featured more centers in the offense attempts.

  7. 9th Annual Webby Awards(R) Unveil Best Sites Of The Year; Former Vice President Al Gore, Webby Winners to be Honored at June 6th Ceremony in New York

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Winners of the Webby Awards, selected by the Academy, were revealed today in over 60 countries - from popular favorites like Community, Fashion, Film, and Politics to new categories making their debut this year, such as Blog, Beauty, Real Estate, Retail, and Social Networking (1/2 page)

  8. High Temperature Superconductors: From Delivery to Applications (Presentation from 2011 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award-winner, Dr. Amit Goyal, and including introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Amit

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Amit Goyal, a high temperature superconductivity (HTS) researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was named a 2011 winner of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award honoring U.S. scientists and engineers for exceptional contributions in research and development supporting DOE and its mission. Winner of the award in the inaugural category of Energy Science and Innovation, Dr. Goyal was cited for his work in 'pioneering research and transformative contributions to the field of applied high temperature superconductivity, including fundamental materials science advances and technical innovations enabling large-scale applications of these novel materials.' Following his basic research in grain-to-grain supercurrent transport, Dr. Goyal focused his energy in transitioning this fundamental understanding into cutting-edge technologies. Under OE sponsorship, Dr. Goyal co-invented the Rolling Assisted Bi-Axially Textured Substrate technology (RABiTS) that is used as a substrate for second generation HTS wires. OE support also led to the invention of Structural Single Crystal Faceted Fiber Substrate (SSIFFS) and the 3-D Self Assembly of Nanodot Columns. These inventions and associated R and D resulted in 7 R and D 100 Awards including the 2010 R and D Magazine's Innovator of the Year Award, 3 Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in Technology Transfer National Awards, a DOE Energy100 Award and many others. As a world authority on HTS materials, Dr. Goyal has presented OE-sponsored results in more than 150 invited talks, co-authored more than 350 papers and is a fellow of 7 professional societies.

  9. Human behaviours associated with dominance in elite amateur boxing bouts: A comparison of winners and losers under the Ten Point Must System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humberstone, Clare E.; Iredale, K. Fiona; Martin, David T.; Blazevich, Anthony J.

    2017-01-01

    Humans commonly ascertain physical dominance through non-lethal fighting by participating in combat sports. However, the behaviours that achieve fight dominance are not fully understood. Amateur boxing competition, which is judged using the subjective “Ten Point Must-System”, provides insight into fight dominance behaviours. Notational analysis was performed on 26 elite male competitors in a national boxing championship. Behavioural (guard-drop time; movement style [stepping/bouncing time]; clinch-time; interaction-time) and technical (total punches; punches landed [%Hit]; air punches [%Air]; defence) measures were recorded. Participants reported effort required (0–100%) and perceived effect of fatigue on their own performance (5-point Likert scale) following bouts. Differences between winners and losers, and changes across the duration of the bout were examined. Winners punched more accurately than losers (greater %Hit [33% vs. 23%] and lower %Air [17% vs. 27%]) but total punches, defence and interaction-time were similar. From rounds 1–2, clinch-time and guard drops increased whilst bouncing decreased. Perceived effect of fatigue increased throughout the bout while perceived effort increased only from rounds 2–3. %Hit and movement index together in regression analysis correctly classified 85% of bout outcomes, indicating that judges (subjectively) chose winning (dominant) boxers according to punch accuracy and style, rather than assertiveness (more punches thrown). Boxers appear to use tactical strategies throughout the bout to pace their effort and minimise fatigue (increased guard drops, reduced bouncing), but these did not influence perceived dominance or bout outcome. These results show that judges use several performance indicators not including the total number of successful punches thrown to assess fight dominance and superiority between fighters. These results provide valuable information as to how experienced fight observers subjectively rate

  10. Baltika ishtshet dopolnitelnõje garantii dlja banka / Kärt Blumberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Blumberg, Kärt

    2008-01-01

    Baltika juhid peavad otsima lisatagatisi, et vältida nende kontrolli all olevate laenuga ostetud Baltika aktsiate sundmüüki. Diagrammid: Firma, sozdannaja rukovoditeljami Baltika, - pod kontrolem semji Milder; Tsena zalozhennõhh aktsii Baltika rezko upala

  11. Power lies in interdisciplinary cooperation / Kärt Summatavet ; interv. Kärt Blumberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Summatavet, Kärt, 1963-

    2008-01-01

    Ehtekunstnik Kärt Summatavet oma uudsest meetodist ehete valmistamisel - paberil oleva kujutise ülekandmisest arvuti abil metallile, mille ta töötas väljas oma doktoritöö raames Soomes Helsingi Kunsti- ja Disainiülikoolis ning mis pälvis Soulis toimunud ülemaailmsel naisleiutajate konkursil hõbemedali

  12. Ilves tunnistas lõpuks Eesti majanduse kriisi / Kadrin Karner, Kärt Blumberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Karner, Kadrin

    2008-01-01

    President Toomas Hendrik Ilvese majandusteemalisest videoläkitusest portaalis YouTube. Artiklis meenutatakse ühtlasi presidendi telepöördumist 31. detsembril 2007, kus riigipea pidas vajalikuks rahvast hoiatada kriisist rääkijate eest. Arvamust avaldavad valuutavahetusfirma Tavid nõukogu liige Meelis Atonen, ASi Eften Capital juhatuse liige Viljar Arakas, ASi Estiko nõukogu esimees Neinar Seli

  13. Habicht: loodame sõltumatut hinnangut / Jarno Habicht ; küsitlenud Kärt Blumberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Habicht, Jarno, 1976-

    2010-01-01

    Maailma Tervishoiuorganisatsiooni (WHO) välja kuulutatud uue gripi A/H1N1 pandeemia ja väidetavalt ravimifirmade huvide eest seismise asjus vastab küsimustele WHO esinduse Eestis juht Jarno Habicht

  14. A Kiss Lajos-díj 2016. évi nyertese: dr. Póczos Rita [Winner of the 2016 Lajos Kiss Prize: Dr Rita Póczos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann, István

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Lajos Kiss Prize, awarded every two or three years since 2006, is considered to be a highly prestigious award for young onomasticians. The 2016 winner of the prize is Dr Rita Póczos, senior lecturer at the Department of Hungarian Linguistics of the University of Debrecen. She was given this award for her contribution to Hungarian Historical Onomastics, especially for her research on place names.

  15. A Kiss Lajos-díj 2014. évi nyertese: dr. Slíz Mariann [The 2014 winner of Lajos Kiss Prize: Dr Mariann Slíz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann, István

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Lajos Kiss Prize, awarded every two or three years since 2006, is considered to be a highly prestigious award for young onomasticians. The 2014 winner of the prize is Dr Mariann Slíz, senior lecturer at the Department of Hungarian Linguistics and Finno-Ugric Studies of Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest. She earned this award for her contribution to Hungarian Onomastics, especially in research on personal names.

  16. Maximal feeding with active prey-switching: A kill-the-winner functional response and its effect on global diversity and biogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallina, S. M.; Ward, B. A.; Dutkiewicz, S.; Follows, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Predators' switching towards the most abundant prey is a mechanism that stabilizes population dynamics and helps overcome competitive exclusion of species in food webs. Current formulations of active prey-switching, however, display non-maximal feeding in which the predators' total ingestion decays exponentially with the number prey species (i.e. the diet breadth) even though the total prey biomass stays constant. We analyse three previously published multi-species functional responses which have either active switching or maximal feeding, but not both. We identify the cause of this apparent incompatibility and describe a kill-the-winner formulation that combines active switching with maximal feeding. Active switching is shown to be a community response in which some predators become prey-selective and the formulations with maximal or non-maximal feeding are implicitly assuming different food web configurations. Global simulations using a marine ecosystem model with 64 phytoplankton species belonging to 4 major functional groups show that the species richness and biogeography of phytoplankton are very sensitive to the choice of the functional response for grazing. The phytoplankton biogeography reflects the balance between the competitive abilities for nutrient uptake and the degree of apparent competition which occurs indirectly between species that share a common predator species. The phytoplankton diversity significantly increases when active switching is combined with maximal feeding through predator-mediated coexistence.

  17. Hue opponency: chromatic valence functions, individual differences, cortical winner-take-all opponent modeling, and the relationship between spikes and sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billock, Vincent A

    2018-04-01

    Neural spike rate data are more restricted in range than related psychophysical data. For example, several studies suggest a compressive (roughly cube root) nonlinear relationship between wavelength-opponent spike rates in primate midbrain and color appearance in humans, two rather widely separated domains. This presents an opportunity to partially bridge a chasm between these two domains and to probe the putative nonlinearity with other psychophysical data. Here neural wavelength-opponent data are used to create cortical competition models for hue opponency. This effort led to creation of useful models of spiking neuron winner-take-all (WTA) competition and MAX selection. When fed with actual primate data, the spiking WTA models generate reasonable wavelength-opponent spike rate behaviors. An average psychophysical observer for red-green and blue-yellow opponency is curated from eight applicable studies in the refereed and dissertation literatures, with cancellation data roughly every 10 nm in 18 subjects for yellow-blue opponency and 15 subjects for red-green opponency. A direct mapping between spiking neurons with broadband wavelength sensitivity and human psychophysical luminance yields a power law exponent of 0.27, similar to the cube root nonlinearity. Similarly, direct mapping between the WTA model opponent spike rates and psychophysical opponent data suggests power law relationships with exponents between 0.24 and 0.41.

  18. El poder natural como derecho y el contrato social de racional utilidad en Baruch Spinoza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Roberto Darós

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Se define primeramente la idea de conocimiento y de naturaleza de los que parte Spinoza. Se pasa luego a exponer el sentido de derecho, unido al de poder natural que yace en la filosofía spinoziana. Se analiza luego el origen del pacto social, centrado en la idea de utilidad común descubierta por la razón y vivida en la razón, ante el temor, y contra el interés particular de las pasiones individuales. Se deducen luego las formas de gobierno, sus características y ventajas. Se exponen las características de las personas en el ejercicio del poder político y la condición humana. En consecuencia, se reflexiona sobre el poder del Estado y la debilidad del individuo. Se deriva luego la reflexión sobre la concepción de la educación para un mejor Estado y un mejor ciudadano. En ese contexto, se analizan los derechos individuales y los derechos civiles. Finalmente se hace una crítica a la concepción spinoziana que centra la idea de pacto en la idea de utilidad y no en la justicia y en la persona sede del derecho, sin la cual ninguna sociedad puede respetar las características del ser humano. La utilidad es aceptable solo si sigue a la justicia, no si se antepone a ella.

  19. Baruch Spinoza and the naturalisation of the Bible: An epistemological investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolaas J. Gronum

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the naturalisation of the Bible. Three voices are of special importance in the narrative presented in this article; they are Aristotle (384–322 BC, Rene Descartes (1596–1650 and Baruc Spinoza (1632–1677. This article will investigate the scientific method and metaphysics espoused by each of the three scholars, thereby highlighting changes in scientific method and metaphysics that lead to the naturalisation of the Bible. Firstly, Aristotle pioneered a scientific method (his logic that would dominate for centuries, as well as a highly influential metaphysics. Secondly, Descartes, witnessing the horrors of the Thirty Years War and seeing first-hand the new discoveries that brought about the scientific revolution, reacted against Aristotle’s metaphysics. Ironically he then used Aristotle’s scientific method to provide a foundation for the new science resulting in Descartes’s famous dualism. Thirdly, Spinoza, equally horrified by the amount of religious violence of his time, reacts against Descartes’s dualism, providing scholars with a monist metaphysics that would contribute greatly to the naturalisation of the Bible. This article will be relevant to theologians who wish to engage more fully with contemporary Western culture.

  20. The College Archivist as College Historian: Baruch College Celebrates Its Historical Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roff, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    College and universities were slow to start collecting records relating to the history of their institutions. In the nineteenth and into the twentieth century it was usually a dedicated librarian, administrator, or professor who decided to rescue the history of their school. Educating archivists to assume this role has become a top priority for…

  1. Il timore della guerra giusta le vie della pace nella filosofia politica di Baruch Spinoza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliviero Angeli

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper identifies and analyses two distinct views that characterize Spinoza’s position on (just war, namely Machiavellism and a sort of Kantianism ante litteram. While Machiavellism influences Spinoza’s considerations about international relations, kantian-like arguments can be found in all passages that concern foreign policy. Hence, a complete account of Spinoza’s thoughts about war and peace can be given only if each one of these dimensions is given due attention. His arguments about the unconditional rightfulness of war may indeed appear to be anything but pacifistic, but they do not preclude a sincere concern about peace. On the contrary, as I’m arguing in this paper, Spinoza’s ingenious idea of a pacific foreign policy can be understood as a reaction to the historical failure of early modern theories of just war.

  2. Modern Multi-line Slot Machine Games: The Effect of Lines Wagered on Winners, Losers, Bonuses, and Losses Disguised as Wins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, K; Dixon, M; Brown, D

    2015-06-01

    We simulated the commercially available multi-line slot machine game "Money Storm," including its bonus wins. Our results show that after a specified amount of time (such as 1 or 50 h), when players played a single line, there were marked differences between one player and the next-a few won a lot, others lost far more than average. When playing 20 lines there were fewer big winners and fewer players quickly losing a large percentage of their money. We simulated a Gambler's Ruin scenario whereby players arrived with $100 and made $1 wagers until broke. Again we saw a reduction in the variability among player as the number of lines wagered increased, fewer players lost their entire bankroll quickly, and fewer players had big wins. The bonus wins in Money Storm contribute approximately 24% to the payback of the game, and our simulations of bonus wins shows that with 20 lines wagered the players spend approximately 11% of their time in bonus wins. With one line wagered, there are no losses disguised as wins while with 20 lines wagered the majority of hits are losses disguised as wins. Players using multi-line machines can thus tune the characteristics of the machine gambling experience to match their preferred pattern, though most seem in practice to bet on the most possible lines. Our results serve to inform researchers, counsellors, gamblers and others about how slot machines are designed, and the effect that wagering on multiple lines has on short-term and long-term play, bonus wins, and losses disguised as wins.

  3. Efficient reinforcement learning of a reservoir network model of parametric working memory achieved with a cluster population winner-take-all readout mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhenbo; Deng, Zhidong; Hu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Bo; Yang, Tianming

    2015-12-01

    The brain often has to make decisions based on information stored in working memory, but the neural circuitry underlying working memory is not fully understood. Many theoretical efforts have been focused on modeling the persistent delay period activity in the prefrontal areas that is believed to represent working memory. Recent experiments reveal that the delay period activity in the prefrontal cortex is neither static nor homogeneous as previously assumed. Models based on reservoir networks have been proposed to model such a dynamical activity pattern. The connections between neurons within a reservoir are random and do not require explicit tuning. Information storage does not depend on the stable states of the network. However, it is not clear how the encoded information can be retrieved for decision making with a biologically realistic algorithm. We therefore built a reservoir-based neural network to model the neuronal responses of the prefrontal cortex in a somatosensory delayed discrimination task. We first illustrate that the neurons in the reservoir exhibit a heterogeneous and dynamical delay period activity observed in previous experiments. Then we show that a cluster population circuit decodes the information from the reservoir with a winner-take-all mechanism and contributes to the decision making. Finally, we show that the model achieves a good performance rapidly by shaping only the readout with reinforcement learning. Our model reproduces important features of previous behavior and neurophysiology data. We illustrate for the first time how task-specific information stored in a reservoir network can be retrieved with a biologically plausible reinforcement learning training scheme. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Dreaming with a sense of reality. Winner of the 2004 Royal Shell Award for biofuels research professor Wim van Swaaij; Dromen met realiteitszin. Prof. Wim van Swaaij wint Koninklijke/Shell prijs voor biobrandstoffen-research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Wit, P. (ed.)

    2004-12-01

    According to the winner of the 2004 Royal Shell Award for Sustainable Development biofuels will play a very important role in the world energy supply. However, the cultivation of energy crops may not be at the expense of the cultivation of crops for food. [Dutch] Biobrandstoffen gaan een zeer belangrijke rol spelen in de wereldenergievoorziening, stelt prof. Wim van Swaaij. Deze winnaar van de Koninklijke/Shell Prijs voor duurzame ontwikkeling 2004 vindt wel dat de teelt van energiegewassen niet ten nadele mag gaan van de teelt van voedingsgewassen.

  5. Genomic Medicine Without Borders: Which Strategies Should Developing Countries Employ to Invest in Precision Medicine? A New "Fast-Second Winner" Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitropoulos, Konstantinos; Cooper, David N; Mitropoulou, Christina; Agathos, Spiros; Reichardt, Jürgen K V; Al-Maskari, Fatima; Chantratita, Wasun; Wonkam, Ambroise; Dandara, Collet; Katsila, Theodora; Lopez-Correa, Catalina; Ali, Bassam R; Patrinos, George P

    2017-11-01

    Genomic medicine has greatly matured in terms of its technical capabilities, but the diffusion of genomic innovations worldwide faces significant barriers beyond mere access to technology. New global development strategies are sorely needed for biotechnologies such as genomics and their applications toward precision medicine without borders. Moreover, diffusion of genomic medicine globally cannot adhere to a "one-size-fits-all-countries" development strategy, in the same way that drug treatments should be customized. This begs a timely, difficult but crucial question: How should developing countries, and the resource-limited regions of developed countries, invest in genomic medicine? Although a full-scale investment in infrastructure from discovery to the translational implementation of genomic science is ideal, this may not always be feasible in all countries at all times. A simple "transplantation of genomics" from developed to developing countries is unlikely to be feasible. Nor should developing countries be seen as simple recipients and beneficiaries of genomic medicine developed elsewhere because important advances in genomic medicine have materialized in developing countries as well. There are several noteworthy examples of genomic medicine success stories involving resource-limited settings that are contextualized and described in this global genomic medicine innovation analysis. In addition, we outline here a new long-term development strategy for global genomic medicine in a way that recognizes the individual country's pressing public health priorities and disease burdens. We term this approach the "Fast-Second Winner" model of innovation that supports innovation commencing not only "upstream" of discovery science but also "mid-stream," building on emerging highly promising biomarker and diagnostic candidates from the global science discovery pipeline, based on the unique needs of each country. A mid-stream entry into innovation can enhance collective

  6. Picking Winners or Making Them?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chase, Robert S.; Christensen, Rikke Nørding

    2010-01-01

    This paper evaluates how a community driven development project in Thailand impacts social capital by using quantitative and qualitative analytic techniques. Propensity score matching and semi-structured interviews are some of the techniques that are used to investigate whether treatment villages...... differ significantly in their social capital characteristics from matched comparison villages. The results show that villages with more trust and stronger norms of collective action were more likely to participate, which may suggest that the project acted as a mechanism to select these social capital...... characteristics. Moreover it appears like the project enhanced other social capital characteristics, such as information sharing, leadership, and empowerment. The presentation is accessible to readers with an intermediate level of statistics. A prior exposure to propensity score matching is helpful...

  7. More honors for Horton Winner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Bill

    The first grand slam in hydrogeology has been achieved by John Cherry (University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada). This year's Horton Award recipient, AGU's most prestigious award for hydrologists, (see “John Cherry Wins Horton Award,” p. 91), has also received the O.E. Meinzer Award from the Geological Society of America and has been selected the first Henry Darcy Distinguished Lecturer for the National Water Well Association. The Meinzer Award was given for a “significant body of work” on aquifer contamination that was published in volume 63 of the Journal of Hydrology.

  8. And the Winner is - Acquired

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henkel, Joachim; Rønde, Thomas; Wagner, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    New entrants to a market tend to be superior to incumbents in originating radical innovations. We provide a new explanation for this phenomenon, based on markets for technology. It applies in industries where successful entrepreneurial firms, or their technologies, are acquired by incumbents...... that then commercialize the innovation. To this end we analyze an innovation game between one incumbent and a large number of entrants. In the first stage, firms compete to develop innovations of high quality. They do so by choosing, at equal cost, the success probability of their R&D approach, where a lower probability...... the incumbent performs the least radical project. Entrants pick pairwise different projects; the bigger the number of entrants, the more radical the most radical project. Generally, entrants tend to choose more radical R&D approaches and generate the highest value innovation in case of success. We illustrate...

  9. 2015 Gulf Guardian Award Winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Gulf of Mexico Program Partnership developed the Gulf Guardian awards as a way to recognize and honor the businesses, community groups, individuals, and agencies that are taking positive steps to keep the Gulf healthy, beautiful and productive.

  10. 2017 Gulf Guardian Award Winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Gulf of Mexico Program Partnership developed the Gulf Guardian awards as a way to recognize and honor the businesses, community groups, individuals, and agencies that are taking positive steps to keep the Gulf healthy, beautiful and productive.

  11. Christmas comic caption competition: the winner

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    Thank you to everyone who participated in our December 2017 competition, to fill in the speech bubble for Santa in our special “A very LIGO Christmas” comic, drawn by Nutsinee Kijbunchoo – a physicist and member of the LIGO Collaboration.

  12. Two Nobel Prize winners in two days

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Living legend of physics, Professor Chen Ning Yang, delivered his CERN Colloquium in the Main Auditorium on 12th October (see photo). His numerous contributions to physics include the famous Yang-Mills theory, which underlies the Standard Model of particle physics, and the prediction of parity violation in weak interactions, for which he shared the Nobel prize with T. D. Lee in 1957. The day before, another Nobel laureate, Norman Ramsey, gave a TH Exceptional Seminar in the same auditorium. Ramsey shared the Nobel Prize with Hans G. Dehmelt and Wolfgang Paul in 1989 for developments in atomic precision spectroscopy.

  13. CHDS Announces 2012 Essay Competition Winner

    OpenAIRE

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security

    2012-01-01

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security, PRESS RELEASES The human body’s multi-layered biological defense systems can provide insight into securing increasingly complex information security systems, suggests the winning entry of the Center for Homeland Defense and Security’s 2012...

  14. And the Winner is – Acquired

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henkel, Joachim; Rønde, Thomas; Wagner, Marcus

    value in case of success—that is, a more radical innovation. In the second stage, successful entrants bid to be acquired by the incumbent. We assume that entrants cannot survive on their own, so being acquired amounts to a ‘prize’ in a contest. We identify an equilibrium in which the incumbent chooses...

  15. Higgs boson: the winner takes it all?

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    Since its discovery in 2012, the Higgs boson has been in the spotlight for both experimentalists and theorists. In addition to its confirmed role in the mass mechanism, recent papers have discussed its possible role in the inflation of the universe and in the matter-antimatter imbalance. Can a single particle be responsible for everything?   “Since 2012 we have known that the Higgs boson exists, but its inner properties are yet to be completely uncovered,” says Gian Giudice, a member of the CERN Theory Unit. “Precise measurements of its decay modes are still ongoing and the LHC Run 2 will be essential to understand the nature of this particle at a deeper level.” What we know is that this boson is not “yet another particle” among the hundreds that we deal with every day in physics labs. In agreement with the Standard Model theory, the recent experimental data confirms that the particle discovered by the CERN experiments is the key pa...

  16. Case Study: "Care" as a Political Winner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Loomis Quinlan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Through face-to-face conversations and open-ended questions designed to elicit stories and deeper interactions, the Michigan People’s Campaign (MPC may have altered voting patterns more effectively than using traditional electoral engagement strategies. During the 2016 election, by campaigning on issues of family care, MPC helped elect a progressive state house candidate in a Downriver Detroit district that Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump carried by over 6,000 votes.

  17. Winners and Losers in Danish Soccer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Rasmus K.

    2011-01-01

    This article deals with the commercialization of European and Danish football, focusing on the Danish male first-tier clubs. Based on the argument drawn from systems theory that sport serves as a mirror system in (late-) modern society, the Danish football clubs are measured against a simple matr...

  18. A Nobel Prize winner visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Nobel Prize-winning astrophysicist George Smoot visited CERN on 2 February with a message for particle physicists and cosmologists alike. After a tour of ATLAS and CMS, Smoot gave a talk to a packed Council Chamber about the connections between particle physics and cosmology, and how the two disciplines can help each other to find answers to their cosmic questions. Smoot's group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is currently working on the development of the Max Planck Surveyor, the next generation of satellite to study cosmic microwave background anisotropy, which will teach us about how our universe was formed.

  19. Bike2Work: and the winners are...

    CERN Multimedia

    Jens Vigen, "Bike2Work" coordinator for CERN

    2015-01-01

    Bike2Work is a popular initiative to promote cycling that was launched in Switzerland in 2004. Every summer, it mobilises some 50,000 employees from more than 1100 companies and organisations across Switzerland. This year, CERN established itself as the main player in French-speaking Switzerland.   The main motivation for Bike2Work is the joy of the cycle commute. Biking contributes to your fitness and reduces pollution and congestion on the roads and in car parks. During this year’s Bike2Work, over 9 million kilometres were recorded across Switzerland! Out of these, 97,462 kilometres were pedaled by the 126 CERN teams participating in the initiative. In this friendly competition, CERN established itself as the main player in French-speaking Switzerland, although EPFL was not far behind with 124 teams. However, CERN beat EPFL by a large margin with regard to the number of kilometres cycled, as our colleagues in the canton of Vaud reached only 63,000 kilometres. Even ETH in Zurich w...

  20. How to Make Your Child a Winner!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc., Chicago, IL.

    Ideas and activities for helping children attain success in school, in friendships and in sports are presented in this handbook for parents. The areas covered are: (1) developing a winning attitude; (2) increasing self-confidence; (3) improving reading skills; (4) gaining good study habits; (5) improving test-taking skills; (6) doing homework; (7)…

  1. Association between mood states and performance of Brazilian elite sailors: Winners vs. non-winners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Brandt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Debido a sus peculiaridades, la navegación a vela es un deporte que requiere un equilibrio emocional ópti- mo de los atletas para obtener un alto rendimiento, en el que se identificaron seis estados de ánimo como de- cisivos para el mejor rendimiento deportivo; por ejem- plo: alto nivel de vigor y niveles más bajos de tensión, depresión, ira, fatiga y confusión mental. El objetivo de este estudio es evaluar la asociación entre los estados de ánimo y el rendimiento deportivo de los atletas que practican navegación a vela en diferentes competen- cias. Participaron en esta investigación sesenta y dos na- vegantes de alto nivel en clases colectivas e individuales, en cuatro competencias diferentes de vela. Las evalua- ciones se realizaron en los lugares de las competencias y para valorar el estado de ánimo se utilizó la escala de ánimo de Brunel. Los ganadores presentaron diferen- tes estados de ánimo. Atletas con menor depresión ( p < 0.01, ( OR = 0.70 y fatiga ( p < 0.001, (OR = 0.80 y mayor vigor ( p < 0.001, ( OR = 1.26 son más propensos a ganar la competición. Los resultados revelaron la rela- ción entre estados de ánimo y el rendimiento deportivo.

  2. ‘Sou niet te duchten staen gewetens scharpe dwang’: Politieke beschouwingen in Joost van den Vondels Palamedes en Baruch de Spinoza’s Theologisch-Politiek Traktaat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Keirsbilck

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In 1625 Joost van den Vondel published Palamedes, a play that is usually readas an allegory on the execution of Johan van Oldenbarnevelt. When reading Spinoza's Theological-Political Treatise (1670 it appears that the history of thisexecution still was relevant. Because the two authors share this topic one would suppose a certain connection. Yet, in the factual Vondel and Spinoza studies, the dominant theory states there is little that binds the two authors. With my analyses of their texts I would like to show that it could be useful to approach their connection from another perspective.

  3. Quem são os vencedores e os perdedores dos jogos olímpicos? Who are the winners and the losers in the olympic games? Quienes son los vencedores y los perdedores de los juegos olímpicos?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Vencedores e perdedores dos Jogos Olímpicos são normalmente concebidos em termos de resultados esportivos. Todavia, em face das candidaturas de cidades brasileiras à sede dos Jogos, o objetivo deste artigo é investigar como os interesses e efeitos agregados aos Jogos podem gerar ganhos e perdas sociais, políticas e econômicas. Como procedimento, fez-se uma revisão da literatura a respeito das experiências de Jogos anteriores. Enquanto os interesses permitem detectar os vencedores, os efeitos gerados pela concretização dos Jogos indicam os potenciais perdedores com sua realização. Sugere-se que estes efeitos sejam criticamente examinados quando da candidatura de uma cidade brasileira à sede dos Jogos Olímpicos no futuro. PALAVRAS-CHAVE: jogos olímpicos – esporte – educação física. Winners and losers of the Olympic Games are normally determined by their sports results. However, as Brazilian cities have bidded to host the Games, the aim of this article is to investigate how the interests and the effects added to the Games may generate social, political, and economic wins and losses. As a procedure, we have revised the literature with respect to previous Games experiences. As the interests allow us to detect the winners, the effects generated by the accomplishment of the Games indicate the potential losers. We suggest that these effects be critically examined the next time a Brazilian city bids to host the Olympic Games. KEY WORDS: olympic games – sport – physical education. Vencedores y perdedores de los Juegos Olímpicos son normalmente concebidos en términos de resultados deportivos. Aunque, mirando a las candidaturas de ciudades brasileñas la sede de los Juegos, el objetivo de este artículo es investigar como los intereses y efectos agregados a los Juegos pueden generar aumentos y pierdas sociales, políticas y económicas. Como procedimiento, hizo una revisión de la literatura a respecto de las experiencias de

  4. The Librarian as Winner: Eugenie Prime of Hewlett-Packard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searcher, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Eugenie Prime, Manager of Corporate Libraries at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories is interviewed. Discussion focuses on her previous position heading Glendale Adventist Hospital's CINAHL database program; the scope of library services at Hewlett-Packard; content of the company's Web site; change and the role of professional associations and…

  5. Golden Hadrons 2004: and the winners are …

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    For the third year running, CERN has awarded a prize to its best LHC suppliers. Three companies were presented with the Golden Hadron 2004. On Friday 30 July, three of the two hundred suppliers for the LHC were presented with Golden Hadron awards by Lyn Evans. This is the third year that the awards have been presented. This year it was the turn of Alstom-MSA (France), Ernesto Malvestiti S.p.A. (Italy) and Simic S.p.A. (Italy) to receive awards, not only for their technical and financial achievements but also for their compliance with contractual deadlines. From left to right: Sandro Ferraris (SIMIC), Guiseppi Ginola (SIMIC), Gérard Grunblatt (ALSTOM), Phillippe Mocaer (ALSTOM), Gianfranco Malvestiti (ERNESTO MALVESTITI), Ernesto Malvestiti (ERNESTO MALVESTITI) Alstom-MSA was awarded the prize for manufacturing superconducting cable for the LHC's main magnets, the dipoles designed to steer the particles round the accelerator and the quadrupoles designed to focus the particle beams. Seven thousand kilometres ...

  6. Shepard Award Winners, Part 1: Dr. Stephen Thacker

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-07-22

    This podcast highlights the accomplishments of Dr. Stephen Thacker, recipient of the prestigious 2009 CDC Charles C. Shepard Award.  Created: 7/22/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/22/2009.

  7. Shepard Award Winners, Part 2: Dr. Tracie Williams

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-07-29

    This podcast highlights the accomplishments of Dr. Tracie Williams, recipient of the prestigious 2009 CDC Charles C. Shepard Award.  Created: 7/29/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/29/2009.

  8. Shepard Award Winners, Part 3: Dr. Larissa Roux

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-09-22

    This podcast highlights the accomplishments of Dr. Larissa Roux, recipient of the prestigious 2009 CDC Charles C. Shepard Award.  Created: 9/22/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/22/2009.

  9. Giving Back — IDRC photo contest winner shares prize with ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    EWB) on a clean-water project in Ziguinchor, a remote town in Senegal. Working with the community, EWB developing a system to draw water from a well using a pump made from a tube, a wheel, rope, and countless pistons. Local resident ...

  10. Nobel Prize winner visits CERN’s superconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    On Wednesday 23 April Georg Bednorz, who won the Nobel Prize for physics in 1987, visited CERN along with 44 of his colleagues from the IBM Zurich Research Laboratory. Georg Bednorz (second from right) with colleagues from the IBM Zurich Research Laboratory in the LHC tunnel. On their arrival, Jos Engelen, the Chief Scientific Officer, gave the IBM group an introduction to CERN. Bednorz came to CERN only recently for the Open Days to give a seminar, but unfortunately did not have time to visit the experiments, so this trip was organised instead. Along with Alex Müller, Bednorz was awarded the Noble Prize for his discovery of superconductivity for the so-called high temperature superconductors, essentially copper-oxide-based compounds showing superconductivity at temperatures much higher than had previously been thought possible. The LHC magnets are built with low-temperature superconductors but many current leads that supply power to the LHC cryostats are made with...

  11. The Who's who of Nobel Prize winners, 1901-2000

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sherby, Louise S; Odelberg, Wilhelm

    2002-01-01

    ... steamer from New York to Southampton, went by train to Harwich, from there to Esbjerg in Denmark, and so to Sweden. An English gentleman who boarded the boat at Harwich happened to be given a seat at the same dining table as Michelson. During the voyage a somewhat heated discussion ensued between the two of them. The English gentleman spoke dispar...

  12. QUALITY LEADERS - LEARNING FROM THE DEMING PRIZE WINNERS IN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadeesh Rajashekharaiah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Different governments and professional agencies have set up a number of awards to recognize and reward quality initiatives. Deming Prize is one such award and ever since it was open for companies from outside Japan, maximum number of winning companies are from India, with 20 companies winning the Deming Prize and four among them also winning the Deming Grand Prize. This paper traces the path taken by these companies to know how these companies embarked a journey of Total Quality Management (TQM and reached their goal of winning the prestigious Deming Prize. The common working principles of these companies and the various tools and techniques used by them are described in a concise manner in this paper. Further, the paper highlights the lessons from these companies to inspire others. The data taken from the respective websites of the companies has been used to list out the objectives, methodologies, and the benefits accrued by the companies.

  13. Energy prize winner for municipalities; Laureat energia municipalite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lajoie, R.

    1997-04-01

    Steps taken by the city of Lachine in Quebec to reduce its electricity consumption in the heating and pumping system of its water filtration plant were described. The water treatment plant was built in the 1960`s and treats about 70,000 cubic metres of water daily. The project to retrofit the building gave priority to the pumping room for the water reservoir and to the offices of the building. In an effort to maximize energy consumption and to ensure the comfort of personnel, the following measures were taken: (1) insulation was added to all easily accessible walls, (2) weather stripping was installed on all windows and doors, (3) a fan was installed on the ceiling of the pump room in order to redistribute the heat generated by the water pumps. The total cost of this retrofit was $40,000, and the reported annual savings since the retrofit has been $20,000. A combination of high pressure and low pressure pumping systems have also contributed to a reduction in total energy costs.

  14. Coping with Family Transitions: Winners, Losers, and Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetherington, E. Mavis

    1989-01-01

    Discusses results of a longitudinal study of effects of divorce and remarriage on children's adjustment. Results suggest that individual characteristics play an important role in either protecting children from negative consequences associated with their parents' marital transitions or in making children vulnerable to such consequences. (RJC)

  15. Templeton Prize winner defends Christianity's credibility in a scientific age

    CERN Multimedia

    Heffern, Rich

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 Templeton Prize has gone to the Rev. John C. Polkinghome, a British mathematical physicist and Anglican priest, and a key spokesperson for belief in God in an age of science, defending the ideal that faith is not against science but inconcert with it

  16. Orphan crops can turn into winners | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-10-06

    Oct 6, 2010 ... The food security of a billion people on the planet is threatened by climate change, increased demand, and volatile prices. In the face of these grave threats, the recent G8 and G20 meetings reaffirmed the need to take urgent action to assure food security for the world's most vulnerable.

  17. Interview with 2018 Hooke medal winner Andrew McAinsh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-14

    Andrew McAinsh received his PhD from the University of Cambridge, UK, working in the laboratory of Steve Jackson on DNA damage and repair mechanisms in yeast. He then joined the laboratory of Peter Sorger as a Jane Coffin Childs Fellow to work as a post-doc on kinetochore biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, USA. In 2005, he returned to the UK to establish his independent laboratory at the Marie Curie Research Institute, Surrey, before moving to the University of Warwick in 2009 to co-found the Centre for Mechanochemical Cell Biology (CMCB). Subsequently, Andrew was appointed Professor of Cell Biology and became a Wellcome Senior Investigator, and was awarded a Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award. He co-directs the MRC Doctoral Training Partnership in Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research, and in 2017 became Head of Division of Biomedical Sciences at Warwick Medical School. Andrew is interested in understanding how the chromosomal multi-protein complex, the kinetochore, ensures error-free chromosome segregation. He is the recipient of the 2018 Hooke medal, established to recognize an emerging leader in cell biology. The Hooke medal is awarded at the annual spring meeting of the British Society for Cell Biology (BSCB). © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Brain Drain and LDCs' Growth: Winners and Losers

    OpenAIRE

    Michel Beine; Frédéric Docquier; Hillel Rapoport

    2002-01-01

    We present an empirical evaluation of the growth effects of the brain drain for the source countries of migrants. Using recent US data on migration rates by education levels (Carrington and Detragiache, 1998), we find empirical support for the ?beneficial brain drain hypothesis? in a cross-section of 50 developing countries. At the country-level, we find that most countries combining low levels of human capital and low migration rates of skilled workers tend to be positively affected by the b...

  19. And the winner is ... An interview with Brendan Baker | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-02-02

    Feb 2, 2011 ... Baker felt a need to highlight the importance of the social and environmental effects of engineering. ... How have your experiences in Senegal changed your attitude towards the developing world? BB: ... What do you think it would take to change Canadians' attitudes toward the developing world? BB:.

  20. Attentional bias in competitive situations: Winner does not take all

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongqiang eSun

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Compared to previous studies of competition with participants’ direct involvement, the current study for the first time investigated the influence of competitive outcomes on attentional bias from a perspective of an onlooker. Two simple games were employed: the Rock-Paper-Scissors game (Experiment 1 in which the outcome is based on luck, and Arm-wrestling (Experiment 2, in which the outcome is based on the competitors’ strength. After observing one of these games, participants were asked to judge a stimulus presented on either the winner’s or loser’s side of a screen. Both experiments yielded the same results, indicating that the onlookers made much quicker judgments on stimuli presented on the loser’s side than the winner’s side. This suggests the existence of an attention bias for loser-related information once a competition has ended. Our findings provide a new lens through which the influence of competition results on human cognitive processing can be understood.

  1. Table tops game:and the winner is...

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    The challenge to identify the events on the coffee tables in Restaurant 1 was clearly a tough one. Congratulations to the few brave entrants! Tuula Maki was the only person to correctly identify all 16 events on the coffee tables in Restaurant 1 and so receives the prize of a copy of the pop-up book, Voyage to the Heart of Matter. An LHC key-ring will go to runners-up Vincent Chabaud,  Eric Jansen, and Andre David Tinoco Mendes, with 14/16 correct.  

  2. And the Winner Is: Inviting Hollywood into the Neuroscience Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiertelak, Eric P.

    2002-01-01

    Both short excerpts from, and full-length presentation of feature films have been used with success in undergraduate instruction. Studies of such use of films has revealed that incorporation of film viewing within courses can promote both content mastery and the development of critical thinking skills. This article discusses and provides examples of successful use of two methods that may be used to incorporate a variety of full-length feature films into neuroscience instruction. One, the “neuro-cinema” pairs the presentation of a film featuring extensive neuroscience content with primary literature reading assignments, group discussion and writing exercises. The second, a neuroscience film series, features group discussion of movies of perhaps more limited relevance to neuroscience. An additional goal of this article is provide the reader with initial resources for the selection of potential film titles for use in neuroscience education. Three extensive tables are included to provide a wide range of title suggestions appropriate for use in activities such as the neuro-cinema, the neuroscience film series, or for more limited use as short “clips” in classroom instruction. PMID:23493171

  3. Is the Chinese Army the Real Winner in PLA Reforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    increased emphasis on Taiwan contin - gencies and protecting maritime interests in the South and East China seas, all of which required power...traditional status as a continental power. PLAA leaders may have believed that the mission of protecting Chinese territory from invasion was important...able to influence selec- tion, evaluation, and promotion criteria Soldier makes fish trap during survival phase of Exercise Kowari 2016, Australian

  4. Winner of video contest inspired by the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    A video contest was launched this year to mark the 10th anniversary of the Frederick Phineas and Sandra Priest Rose Centre for Earth and Space. Luke Cahill, a 27 year-old BFA graduate, has just won the contest with a movie about CERN.   Luke, who works in the film industry in Los Angeles and also takes physics classes, came across a video promoting the contest while he was browsing the American Natural History Museum website. "It seemed like a perfect opportunity to combine my passion for science with my craft of filmmaking", says Luke. Luke decided to make a video about the LHC. To him, CERN embodies the ideals of scientific progress and discovery, continually expanding the boundaries of our knowledge. "I have never actually been to CERN but it's high on the list of places I want to visit when I travel to Europe", says Luke. There is a lot of misleading information on the Internet about CERN – especially about the LHC. Luke wanted to clarify what the ...

  5. The Looks of a Winner: Beauty, Gender and Electoral Success

    OpenAIRE

    Berggren, Niclas; Jordahl, Henrik; Poutvaara, Panu

    2006-01-01

    We study the role of beauty in politics. For the first time, focus is put on differences in how women and men evaluate female and male candidates and how different candidate traits relate to success in real and hypothetical elections. We have collected 16,218 assessments by 2,772 respondents of photos of 1,929 Finnish political candidates. Evaluations of beauty explain success in real elections better than evaluations of competence, intelli-gence, likability, or trustworthiness. The beauty pr...

  6. Winners and losers – responses to recent environmental change by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By contrast, numbers of Cape Gannets Morus capensis and Swift (Crested) Terns Thalasseus bergii increased. The success of the gannet and the tern in the face of recent change is attributable to a rapid increase in South Africa's eastern colony of gannets, aided by high survival of adult birds and perhaps by immigration of ...

  7. Giving Back — IDRC photo contest winner shares prize with ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-01-28

    Jan 28, 2011 ... Local resident Abdoulaye Lo devised a fast and inexpensive way to produce the pistons using plastic recycled from broken buckets. In late 2006, Baker revisited Senegal. Upon his return to Canada, the 26-year-old wrote to IDRC the following postscript to winning the contest: “One huge thrill during the trip ...

  8. Ten NCI Researchers Among Spring Research Festival Award Winners | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a ceremony at the Fort Detrick Community Activities Center earlier this week, Maj. Gen. Barbara R. Holcomb, the commanding officer of the Fort Detrick garrison, distributed the awards for outstanding presentations and posters at the 2017 Spring Research Festival.

  9. The European Parliament in the 2000 IGC and the Constitutional Treaty negotiations: from loser to winner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beach, Derek

    2007-01-01

      Abstract           Why did two rounds of EU constitutional reform held within a five year period yield very different results? The 2000 IGC resulted in the modest Treaty of Nice, whereas the 2002-04 round drafted the Constitutional Treaty, which although it did not involve major substantive...... changes, did mark a major symbolic step forward. This article argues that the change in outcomes can to a large degree be explained by the change in negotiating structure due to the use of a convention that drafted most of the Constitutional Treaty's text, creating a context which privileged MEPs. While...

  10. Winners, Losers, Insiders, and Outsiders: Comparing Hierometer and Sociometer Theories of Self-Regard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Nikhila; Gregg, Aiden P.; Sedikides, Constantine; de Waal-Andrews, Wendy G.

    2016-01-01

    What evolutionary function does self-regard serve? Hierometer theory, introduced here, provides one answer: it helps individuals navigate status hierarchies, which feature zero-sum contests that can be lost as well as won. In particular, self-regard tracks social status to regulate behavioral assertiveness, augmenting or diminishing it to optimize performance in such contests. Hierometer theory also offers a conceptual counterpoint that helps resolve ambiguities in sociometer theory, which offers a complementary account of self-regard’s evolutionary function. In two large-scale cross-sectional studies, we operationalized theoretically relevant variables at three distinct levels of analysis, namely, social (relations: status, inclusion), psychological (self-regard: self-esteem, narcissism), and behavioral (strategy: assertiveness, affiliativeness). Correlational and mediational analyses consistently supported hierometer theory, but offered only mixed support for sociometer theory, including when controlling for confounding constructs (anxiety, depression). We interpret our results in terms of a broader agency-communion framework. PMID:27065896

  11. SUSTAINABLE COMPETITIVENESS THROUGH QUALITY TRANSFORMATION: A LONGITUDINAL ANALYSIS OF QUALITY AWARD WINNERS AND A PROPOSED FRAMEWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Ashari Idris

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality management is a dynamic philosophy that underlines the organisational adaptation and proactive transformation that enables firms to reap real benefits from market opportunities. The faster the market changes, the quicker the transformation that is required for sustaining the firm's internal capabilities and its external competitiveness. Under a competitive pressure, a firm will need to learn faster and lead in best practice for operational excellence and continuously finding ways to shield its advantage from imitation.In the search for determinants for sustainability, this article analyses best practices adopted by quality award-winning organisations and synthesises a collection of critical factors that could assist organisations in improving their performance. From a longitudinal learning on how these leading organisations led themselves into a new sustaining paradigm, the article makes explicit the factors that were considered of paramount importance to sustainability. These success factors become a basis for others to leapfrog ahead into a new performance orbit. A proposed model for sustaining competitiveness has been developed from the creative learning of best practices of leading organisations. This proposed framework presents companies with an opportunity to emulate successful implementation of TQ-based initiatives, and to embed these pioneering concepts, particularly in the context of emerging countries.

  12. A six-time Ultraman winner and a normal heart: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Gil Soares de Araújo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Number of subjects currently participating in high-endurance aerobic exercise training regimens and competitions has substantially increased in recent years. While there is no doubt that regular exercise practice is fundamental for the maintenance of a good health, there have been reports of cardiac structural changes of subjects exposed to strenuous endurance physical exercise. This article reports a case of a 47-year-old male very successful sportsman—including being a six-time Ultraman winner—who has accumulated more than 50,000 h of training and competition in his 35-year career, averaging 25–30 h/week. Despite this huge amount of aerobic exercise, about 25 times larger than typically recommended dose for health purposes (i.e. 75 min of vigorous exercise per week, no major abnormalities were detected in electrocardiograms (rest and maximal exercise, transthoracic echocardiogram, and magnetic resonance imaging. In fact, after this complete evaluation, his heart was found to be quite normal.

  13. Swing States, The Winner-Take-All Electoral College, and Fiscal Federalism

    OpenAIRE

    Duquette, Christopher; Mixon, Franklin; Cebula, Richard

    2013-01-01

    There is a debate regarding the impact of swing or independent voters in American politics. While some argue that swing voters either do not swing or have a marginal impact on campaigns, the decline in voter partisan identification and the rise of independents means that they have a potential impact on elections, making them a desirable commodity to candidates. Additionally, presidential elections represent a unique case for swing voters. A robust literature notes that during the presidenti...

  14. Socializing Young Readers: A Content Analysis of Body Size Images in Caldecott Medal Winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedwick, Linda; Latham, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have examined gender issues in children's literature, but a review of the literature reveals that few studies have examined the instances of fatness in the images. Studying the fat representation in the images of children's literature is important because exposure to a variety of body types may slow the rate of children's body…

  15. Winners and losers in the complex web of global supply chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendon, Lee

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses how supply chain, risk and business continuity professionals can collaboratively address the consequences of increasing supply chain complexity in order to deliver both resilient and sustainable supply chains. The paper identifies the key drivers of complexity supported by recent case examples, including the equine DNA scandal and the Rana Plaza tragedy in Bangladesh.

  16. ISSLS prize winner: cost-effectiveness of two forms of circumferential lumbar fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freeman, Brian J C; Steele, Nicholas A; Sach, Tracey H

    2007-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Economic evaluation alongside a prospective, randomized controlled trial from a secondary care National Health Service (NHS) perspective. OBJECTIVE: To determine the cost-effectiveness of titanium cages (TC) compared with femoral ring allografts (FRA) in circumferential lumbar spinal...... fusion. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: A randomized controlled trial has shown the use of TC to be clinically inferior to the established practice of using FRA in circumferential lumbar fusion. Health economic evaluation is urgently needed to justify the continued use of TC, given that this treatment...... is less effective and, all things being equal, is assumed more costly than FRA. METHODS: Eighty-three patients were randomly allocated to receive either the TC or FRA as part of a circumferential lumbar fusion between 1998 and 2002. NHS costs related to the surgery and revision surgery needed during...

  17. Winners and losers. What are the criteria for success. The service industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, M.R.

    1996-12-31

    The paper deals with the oil service company strategies. Following themes are discussed: The oil service shake out; active rig count; oil service industry recovery; listed public upstream oil service companies; international spread of public oil service companies; consolidation has created growth for some; hydrocarbon demand on the march; sample of per capita hydrocarbon demand; hydrocarbon demand model; hydrocarbon impact of new demand and replacing depleting base; ``turning on the tap`` era ending; the oil service bubble evaporates; age of the current fleets; illustration of replacement economics; illustration of operating leverage; new era management challenges. 14 figs.

  18. Winners and Losers in a World with Global Warming: Noncooperation, Altruism, and Social Welfare

    OpenAIRE

    Caplan, Arthur J.; Ellis, Christopher J.; Silva, Emilson C. D.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, global warming is an asymmetric transboundary externality which benefits some countries or regions and harms others. We use a simple two-country model to analyze the effects of global warming on resource allocations, the global-warming stock, and national and global welfare.

  19. More losers than winners in a century of future Southern Ocean seafloor warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Huw J.; Meijers, Andrew J. S.; Bracegirdle, Thomas J.

    2017-10-01

    The waters of the Southern Ocean are projected to warm over the coming century, with potential adverse consequences for native cold-adapted organisms. Warming waters have caused temperate marine species to shift their ranges poleward. The seafloor animals of the Southern Ocean shelf have long been isolated by the deep ocean surrounding Antarctica and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, with little scope for southward migration. How these largely endemic species will react to future projected warming is unknown. By considering 963 invertebrate species, we show that within the current century, warming temperatures alone are unlikely to result in wholesale extinction or invasion affecting Antarctic seafloor life. However, 79% of Antarctica's endemic species do face a significant reduction in suitable temperature habitat (an average 12% reduction). Our findings highlight the species and regions most likely to respond significantly (negatively and positively) to warming and have important implications for future management of the region.

  20. Response of marine copepods to a changing tropical environment: winners, losers and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lee Chew

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Climate change concurrent with anthropogenic disturbances can initiate serial changes that reverberate up the food chain with repercussions for fisheries. To date, there is no information available concerning the combined effects of global warming and human impacts on tropical marine food webs. While temperate copepods respond differently to warming and environmental stressors, the extent to which tropical copepods can adapt to rising temperature of already warm waters remains unknown. We hypothesize that sea warming and other anthropogenic disturbances over the long term will have the greatest impact on the copepod community in nearshore waters where their effects are accentuated, and therefore vulnerable and resilient species could be identified. Methods. Zooplankton samples were collected during two time periods (1985–86 and 2014–15 interposed by marked anthropogenic disturbances, and at the same five stations located progressively from inshore to offshore in Klang Strait, Malaysia, following the asymmetrical before-after-control-impact (BACI design. Copepods were identified to species, and results were interpreted by univariate (ANOVA and multivariate (PERMANOVA, PCO analyses of the computed species abundance and diversity measures. Results. Copepod total abundance was not significantly different among stations but higher after disturbance than before disturbance. However, changes in the abundance of particular species and the community structure between time periods were dramatic. Coastal large-bodied calanoid species (e.g., Acartia spinicauda, Calanopia thompsoni, Pseudodiaptomus bowmani and Tortanus forcipatus were the most vulnerable group to disturbance. This however favored the opportunistic species (e.g., Oithona simplex, O. attenuata, Hemicyclops sp., Pseudomacrochiron sp. and Microsetella norvegica. Small-bodied copepods (e.g., Paracalanus sp., Parvocalanus crassirostris and Euterpina acutifrons were unaffected. Centropages tenuiremis was likely an introduced species. There was no significant loss in species richness of copepods despite the dramatic changes in community structure. Discussion. Sea warming and other human-induced effects such as eutrophication, acidification and coastal habitat degradation are likely the main factors that have altered copepod community structure. The large-bodied estuarine and coastal calanoid copepods are surmised to be vulnerable to eutrophication and hypoxia, while both resilient and opportunistic species are largely unaffected by, or adaptable to, degraded coastal environments and observed sea surface temperature (SST rise. It is forecasted that SST rise with unmitigated anthropogenic impacts will further reduce large-bodied copepod species the favoured food for fish larvae with dire consequences for coastal fish production.

  1. The Status of the Testing Effect for Complex Materials: Still a Winner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    The target articles in the special issue address a timely and important question concerning whether practice tests enhance learning of complex materials. The consensus conclusion from these articles is that the testing effect does not obtain for complex materials. In this commentary, I discuss why this conclusion is not warranted either by the…

  2. The Winners and Losers in Finfish Trade in Mafia Island: A Value ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fish trade in Mafia involves several players in the value chain from fishing to the plate either in Mafia Island itself and or mainland Tanzania. This paper investigates the different actors in the value chain to establish how much each of them contributes to the process of adding value to fish as a traded commodity in the ...

  3. The Winner Curse and Social Inefficiency: Double Whammy of R&D Tournament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arijit Mukherjee

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In a R&D tournament setting with free entry and knowledge spillover, we show that the society would suffer from excessive entry and the patent holder would endure lower profits than non-patent holders because it bears the cost of commercializing and further technology development, while the other firms are beneficiaries of the spillover effects. This result is instructive to R&D and competition policy.

  4. Nobel prize winner returns home to tell a fascinating 'Big Science' story

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angiolillo, C.; Dranga, R. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    This paper is about the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment. SNO achieved a major breakthrough on the study of the behavior of an elementary and enigmatic particle of the universe - the neutrino. The experiment was the result of the synthesis of over 30-years of work on particle physics, astrophysics and nuclear science that saw early germination at Chalk River Laboratories. Preliminary SNO results led to a major leap forward on how to measure sub-atomic phenomena that were never used to this extent before and have also provided new insights into the Standard Model of physics, and indeed in our fundamental understanding of the entire universe.

  5. HGSA DNA day essay contest winner 60 years on: still coding for cutting-edge science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    MESSAGE FROM THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE: In 2013, the Education Committee of the Human Genetics Society of Australasia (HGSA) established the DNA Day Essay Contest in Australia and New Zealand. The contest was first established by the American Society of Human Genetics in 2005 and the HGSA DNA Day Essay Contest is adapted from this contest via a collaborative partnership. The aim of the contest is to engage high school students with important concepts in genetics through literature research and reflection. As 2013 marks the 60th anniversary of the discovery of the double helix of DNA by James Watson and Francis Crick and the 10th anniversary of the first sequencing of the human genome, the essay topic was to choose either of these breakthroughs and explain its broader impact on biotechnology, human health and disease, or our understanding of basic genetics, such as genetic variation or gene expression. The contest attracted 87 entrants in 2013, with the winning essay authored by Patrick Yates, a Year 12 student from Melbourne High School. Further details about the contest including the names and schools of the other finalists can be found at http://www.hgsa-essay.net.au/. The Education Committee would like to thank all the 2013 applicants and encourage students to enter in 2014.

  6. Trash + Creativity = Problem Solved: Award Winners Give Plastic Bottles Second Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tech Directions, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Judge Harry T. Roman, an electrical engineer and inventor, has selected the best of the crop in the 2006/2007 Tech Directions Inventors Award Competition. The challenge this year called on students to slow the filling of landfills by devising uses for discarded plastic water, juice, soda, and sports-drink bottles. Judge Roman noted "many common…

  7. Robust logistic regression to narrow down the winner's curse for rare and recessive susceptibility variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselmeier, Miriam; Lorenzo Bermejo, Justo

    2017-11-01

    Logistic regression is the most common technique used for genetic case-control association studies. A disadvantage of standard maximum likelihood estimators of the genotype relative risk (GRR) is their strong dependence on outlier subjects, for example, patients diagnosed at unusually young age. Robust methods are available to constrain outlier influence, but they are scarcely used in genetic studies. This article provides a non-intimidating introduction to robust logistic regression, and investigates its benefits and limitations in genetic association studies. We applied the bounded Huber and extended the R package 'robustbase' with the re-descending Hampel functions to down-weight outlier influence. Computer simulations were carried out to assess the type I error rate, mean squared error (MSE) and statistical power according to major characteristics of the genetic study and investigated markers. Simulations were complemented with the analysis of real data. Both standard and robust estimation controlled type I error rates. Standard logistic regression showed the highest power but standard GRR estimates also showed the largest bias and MSE, in particular for associated rare and recessive variants. For illustration, a recessive variant with a true GRR=6.32 and a minor allele frequency=0.05 investigated in a 1000 case/1000 control study by standard logistic regression resulted in power=0.60 and MSE=16.5. The corresponding figures for Huber-based estimation were power=0.51 and MSE=0.53. Overall, Hampel- and Huber-based GRR estimates did not differ much. Robust logistic regression may represent a valuable alternative to standard maximum likelihood estimation when the focus lies on risk prediction rather than identification of susceptibility variants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Shared Roles of Halobacteriovorax and Viruses in Bacterial Mortality: The Environment Dictates the Winner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Laws, E. A.; Gulig, P. A.; Berhane, T. K.; Martin, J. L.; Williams, H.

    2016-02-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are considered to be a major contributor to bacterial mortality. Although recent evidence shows a similar role for the predatory bacterium, Halobacteriovorax (HBx), this organism has been largely ignored. We designed controlled laboratory microcosm studies to examine and compare the predation of a virus and an HBx strain on Vibrio vulnificus (Vv), under a range of environmental conditions. Predator-prey models were used to simulate the results and interpolated using Matlab software. The results show that although the HBx and virus both preyed on Vv, the magnitudes of their respective responses were different and were largely driven by environmental conditions. In low nutrient seawater, HBx was highly active in preying on Vv, resulting in a 4.4 log reduction of prey within 40 hours, whereas phage contributed little to bacterial mortality. However, when nutrients were added to the seawater, phage was the more active predator. At moderate levels of nutrient concentrations (DNB 1:10 and DNB 1:100) both predators were active. Both virus and HBx grew well at salt concentrations ranging from 9 to 30 ppt. Phage reproduction was optimized at 30 ppt and also occurred at higher levels at 40 and 45 ppt. HBx, on the other hand, grew best at 9 ppt and did not grow at 40 and 45 ppt. At temperatures between 15 and 37˚C both predators grew well. The impact of predation on Vv was positively correlated with temperature. The collective results of this study suggest that both HBx and phages can play significant roles in bacterial mortality and hence in shaping microbial communities and cycling nutrients. However, whether HBx or phages play the larger role in any circumstance may be orchestrated by environmental conditions. These results warrant reconsideration of the roles of different biological agents and the environment in bacteria mortality.

  9. Multi-period emissions trading in the electricity sector-winners and losers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bode, Sven

    2006-01-01

    In the context of controlling greenhouse gas emissions, the directive on a Europe-wide trading scheme may be perceived as one of the most important milestones in recent years. Prior to its start, however, a number of very specific design features have to be agreed upon. Regarding the allocation of allowances, a distribution (almost) free of charge seems to be the most likely choice. An aspect that has interestingly attracted little attention in the past is the question of how to allocate emission rights over time. The following paper analyses different allocation options in multi-period emissions trading that are currently discussed in the European context. The options are applied for the electricity sector which is simulated over two periods. The paper distinguishes between a market effect of emissions trading and compliance costs for meeting the emission reduction obligation. The market effect results from a price increase which is due to the fact that opportunity costs for using allowances must be considered. It turns out that the electricity sector as a whole gains from the introduction of the instrument due to the increase of the electricity price. With regard to the different allocation options, it is found that utilities have different preferences depending on the fuel used

  10. Emotions, immunity and sport: Winner and loser athlete's profile of fighting sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Mirko; Fratta, Irene La; Ialenti, Valentina; Patruno, Antonia; Ferrone, Alessio; Franceschelli, Sara; Rizzuto, Alessia; Tatangelo, Raffaella; Campagna, Giovanna; Speranza, Lorenza; Felaco, Mario; Grilli, Alfredo

    2015-05-01

    Several studies have focused on the relationship between hormonal changes and affective states in sporting contexts relating to an agonistic outcome. More recently, pro-inflammatory cytokines have also been successfully associated with affective state modulation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether athletes who won or lost show different levels of steroid hormones (testosterone and cortisol), pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β, or expressions of anger and anxiety during six training fights in seasonal competitions down to the main seasonal competition. In 25 male kick-boxing athletes (age±SD, 28.68±5.34), anger states (RS score) and anxiety states (AS score) were assessed by STAXI-2 and STAI-Y, respectively. Cortisol (C), testosterone (T) and IL-1β salivary levels were measured by the ELISA method. The saliva samples were taken in the afternoon, 30min prior to the start and 30min from the end of both simulated and official competitions. The results showed that the RS score, T, T/C ratio salivary levels increased during the season, whereas the AS score, C and IL-1β suggested an opposite trend. Close to an official competition, the RS score, T, T/C ratio and IL-1β salivary concentrations were significantly higher, and then decreased during competition. By contrast, the AS score and C levels significantly increased throughout the official competition. In addition, significant differences were found for hormones and IL-1β concentrations as well as psychometric assessment close to the outcome of an official match. Athletes who lost showed an higher AS score and C level, while those who won were characterized by an higher level during the pre-competition RS score, T, T/C ratio, and IL-1β. Note that these factors were positively and significantly correlated at the pre-official competition time, while in a linear regression analysis, IL-1β, T and T/C ratio concentrations explained 43% of the variance in the RS score observed at the same time (adjusted R(2)=0.43, ANOVA Pperformance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. And the Winner Is … : Inter-Rater Reliability among Scholarship Assessors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Lucy; Schluter, Philip J.

    2017-01-01

    With increasing competition for postgraduate research scholarships, awarding processes demand attention and scrutiny. We examine inter-rater reliability for two prestigious New Zealand scholarships, the Shirtcliffe Fellowship and the Gordon Watson Scholarship. For each scholarship, five assessors (three academic; two non-academic) independently…

  12. Norman Ramsey. Nobel Prize Winner in Physics (1989); Norman Ramsey. Premio Nobel de fisica (1989)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    Norman Ramsey (Washington 1915) received the Nobel Prize in Physics (shared with con H. G. Dehmelt and W. Paul) for the development of study techniques for Atomic Physics. This tireless researcher participated in the discovery of the Magnetic Resonance Method for Molecular Emission. He invented the hydrogen maser and the hydrogen atomic clock, in addition to being a profile author. (Author)

  13. Following Zahka: Using Nobel Prize Winners' Speeches and Ideas to Teach Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Martin P.; Wilson, John K.; Becker, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Over 20 years ago, the late William Zahka (1990, 1998) outlined how the acceptance speeches of those who received the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Science could be used to teach undergraduates. This article updates and expands Zahka's work, identifying some of the issues discussed by recent Nobel Laureates, classifying their speeches by topic…

  14. Video of Christian Skau and Martin Raussen's interview with the Abel Prize Winner John Milnor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skau, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The television interview with Abel Laureate John Milnor that was broadcasted on Norwegian television in June is now available on the Abel Prize multimedia page. John Milnor received the Abel Prize «for pioneering discoveries in topology, geometry and algebra» to quote the Abel Committee. King...... Harald presented the Abel Prize to John Milnor at the award ceremony in Oslo, Norway on 24 May. Before the interview there is a short presentation of the award ceremony. John Milnor is interviewed by Martin Raussen and Christian Skau. The Abel Prize that carries a cash award of NOK 6 million (about EUR...

  15. Radiation risk and nuclear medicine: An interview with a Nobel Prize winner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yalow, R.S.

    1995-12-01

    In a speech given years ago at the Veterans Administration Medical Center, Bronx, NY, Rosalyn S. Yalow, 1977 Nobel Prize recipient for her invention of radioimmunoassay, made several salient points on the perception of fear or hazards from exposure to low-level radiation and low-level radioactive wastes. For the past three years, Yalow has been concerned with the general fear of radiation. In this interview, Newsline solicited Yalow`s views on public perceptions on radiation risk and what the nuclear medicine community can do to emphasize the fact that, if properly managed, the use of isotopes in medicine and other cases is not dangerous.

  16. And the tax winner is ... A note on endogenous timing in the commodity taxation race

    OpenAIRE

    Hubert Kempf; Grégoire Rota-Graziosi

    2010-01-01

    This note investigates the endogenous choice of leadership in commodity tax competition. We apply an endogenous timing game, where jurisdictions commit themselves to lead or to follow, to the Kanbur and Keen (1993) model. We show that the Subgame Pefect Nash Equilibria (SPNE) correspond to the two Stackelberg situations, yielding to a coordination issue. Selecting an equilibrium by means of the risk-dominance criterion, we prove that the smaller country has to lead. If asymmetry among countri...

  17. A lecture by Saul Perlmutter, winner of the 2011 Nobel prize in physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The CNRS National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Particle Physics (IN2P3), Pierre et Marie Curie University and the Laboratory of Nuclear and High-energy Physics (LPNHE) are happy to invite you to a talk by Nobel laureate Saul Perlmutter.   Perlmutter shared the 2011 Nobel prize in physics "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae." He will give a public talk in Paris on 17 December at 5pm: "Supernovae, Dark Energy, and the Accelerating Universe" Amphithéâtre Farabeuf des Cordeliers 21, rue de l’école de Médecine 75006 Paris Free entrance (places are limited) and live translation available.

  18. Werner Forssmann - A Nobel Prize Winner and His Political Attitude before and after 1945.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packy, Lisa-Maria; Krischel, Matthis; Gross, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    In 1956, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded jointly to Werner Forssmann, André Frédéric Cournand and Dickinson W. Richards for their development of cardiac catheterization. Forssmann performed a self-experiment in 1929 by inserting a urethral catheter into his right ventricular cavity via his antecubital vein. Despite his popularity as one of the first German Nobel Laureates after 1945, little is known about Forssmann personally. This contribution aims to close this gap regarding the Nazi period and early post-war Germany. Primary historical sources from Forssmann's private archive were examined, evaluated and interpreted for the first time. Additionally, a comparative analysis based on further archival and secondary sources was performed. Werner Forssmann joined the Nazi Party, the Sturmabteilung (Stormtroopers, SA) and the Nationalsozialistischer Deutscher Ärztebund (Nazi Doctors' Association) in 1932, a year before Hitler's assumption of power. In his autobiography, Forssmann referred to the political situation in passing. However, he expressed his personal thoughts in private letters which he wrote as a medical officer during the war. After World War II, Forssmann underwent denazification and was banned from practicing medicine for 3 years. He did not seem to be averse to Hitler's politics and in some ways expressed his approval. However, correspondence from the 1960s with 2 Jewish colleagues reveals that Forssmann may have changed his attitude toward National Socialism later. Werner Forssmann's political attitudes during the Third Reich and in the post-war era can be characterized as early agreement that gradually changed to a more critical distance to Nazi ideology. In this respect, Forssmann appears to be quite a typical example of a larger proportion of German medical doctors during these eras. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Nobel prize winner returns home to tell a fascinating 'Big Science' story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angiolillo, C.; Dranga, R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is about the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment. SNO achieved a major breakthrough on the study of the behavior of an elementary and enigmatic particle of the universe - the neutrino. The experiment was the result of the synthesis of over 30-years of work on particle physics, astrophysics and nuclear science that saw early germination at Chalk River Laboratories. Preliminary SNO results led to a major leap forward on how to measure sub-atomic phenomena that were never used to this extent before and have also provided new insights into the Standard Model of physics, and indeed in our fundamental understanding of the entire universe.

  20. Big Bad Banks? The Winners and Losers From Bank Deregulation in the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, T.H.L.; Levine, R.; Levkov, A.

    2009-01-01

    We assess the impact of bank deregulation on the distribution of income in the United States. From the 1970s through the 1990s, most states removed restrictions on intrastate branching, which intensified bank competition and improved bank performance. Exploiting the cross-state, cross-time variation

  1. SpineCor treatment for Juvenile Idiopathic Scoliosis: SOSORT award 2010 winner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coillard, Christine; Circo, Alin B; Rivard, Charles H

    2010-11-10

    Juvenile idiopathic scoliosis is a condition used to describe patients who are least 4 years of age but younger than 10 when the deformity is first identified. In these patients, the condition is usually progressive and those that are diagnosed at five years or younger have a high chance of progression to a large curve, with additional pulmonary and cardiac complications. The main form of conservative treatment for juvenile scoliosis is the use of a bracing system. This prospective interventional study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the Dynamic SpineCor orthosis for juvenile idiopathic scoliosis as well as to evaluate the stability of the spine after the weaning point. For this study, 150 juvenile patients were treated by the SpineCor orthosis between 1993 and 2009. Of these, 67 patients had a definite outcome and 83 are still actively being treated. To determine the effectiveness of the brace the OUTCOME criteria recommended by the SRS was used. The results from our study showed that of the 67 patients with a definite outcome, 32.9% corrected their Cobb angle by at least 5° and 10.5% had a stabilization of their Cobb angle. Within the patients with a definite outcome, 37.3% of patients where recommended for surgery before authorized end of treatment. For this group of patients, surgery was postponed. Looking at the stability of the curves 2 years after the end of the treatment, we found 12.5% of the patients continued their correction without the brace being used and 71.4% remained stable. From our study we can clearly see that the effectiveness of the SpineCor orthosis in obtaining and maintaining the neuromuscular integration of the corrective movement can be achieved effectively for juvenile patients. Over 75% of all patients that finished the treatment had remained stable with a few continuing to correct their Cobb angle after the use of the SpineCor orthosis was discontinued. Our conclusion from this study is that the SpineCor orthosis is a very effective method of treatment of juvenile idiopathic scoliosis. The results obtained also indicate that treatment outcomes are better with early bracing. Most encouraging perhaps is the fact that the positive outcome appears to be maintained in the long term, and that surgery can be avoided or at least postponed.

  2. SpineCor treatment for Juvenile Idiopathic Scoliosis: SOSORT award 2010 winner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Circo Alin B

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Juvenile idiopathic scoliosis is a condition used to describe patients who are least 4 years of age but younger than 10 when the deformity is first identified. In these patients, the condition is usually progressive and those that are diagnosed at five years or younger have a high chance of progression to a large curve, with additional pulmonary and cardiac complications. The main form of conservative treatment for juvenile scoliosis is the use of a bracing system. This prospective interventional study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the Dynamic SpineCor orthosis for juvenile idiopathic scoliosis as well as to evaluate the stability of the spine after the weaning point. Material and Methods For this study, 150 juvenile patients were treated by the SpineCor orthosis between 1993 and 2009. Of these, 67 patients had a definite outcome and 83 are still actively being treated. To determine the effectiveness of the brace the OUTCOME criteria recommended by the SRS was used. Results The results from our study showed that of the 67 patients with a definite outcome, 32.9% corrected their Cobb angle by at least 5° and 10.5% had a stabilization of their Cobb angle. Within the patients with a definite outcome, 37.3% of patients where recommended for surgery before authorized end of treatment. For this group of patients, surgery was postponed. Looking at the stability of the curves 2 years after the end of the treatment, we found 12.5% of the patients continued their correction without the brace being used and 71.4% remained stable. Discussion From our study we can clearly see that the effectiveness of the SpineCor orthosis in obtaining and maintaining the neuromuscular integration of the corrective movement can be achieved effectively for juvenile patients. Over 75% of all patients that finished the treatment had remained stable with a few continuing to correct their Cobb angle after the use of the SpineCor orthosis was discontinued. Conclusion Our conclusion from this study is that the SpineCor orthosis is a very effective method of treatment of juvenile idiopathic scoliosis. The results obtained also indicate that treatment outcomes are better with early bracing. Most encouraging perhaps is the fact that the positive outcome appears to be maintained in the long term, and that surgery can be avoided or at least postponed.

  3. Teaching and Learning Competent Historical Documentary Making: Lessons from National History Day Winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehn, Bruce R.; Schul, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Today's students grow up in a technological milieu of hand-held computers with high storage capacities, internet access, and the ability to shoot high definition photographs and video. As such, they are empowered to construct representations of the past virtually "on the run." In this article, the authors investigated the historical "and"…

  4. [Ilya Ilich Metchnikov and Paul Ehrlich: 1908 Nobel Prize winners for their research on immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokaj, J; John, C

    2008-11-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1908 was awarded to Ilya I. Mechnikov and Paul Ehrlich for recognition of their work on immunity. Mechnikov have discovered phagocytes and phagocytosis as the basis of natural cellular immunity. His ,,phagocytic theory" is the principle of immunological concept "self and not self" as the prerequisition of physiological inflammation, and selfmaintaining of organism. Ehrlich developed the methods for standardization of antibody activity in immune sera, described neutralizing and complement-depending effect of antibodies and enunciated the ,"ide-chain" theory of the formation of antibodies. Their concept of the key-stone of immunity was different, but they expressed the basic paradigma of immunology: immunity imply the protection of identity and guarantee the integrity of organism. Both are the founders of immunology as the scientific discipline. Discoveries and conceptions of I. Mechnikov and P. Ehrlich exceedingly influenced development of immunology and are also applicable, instructive and suggestive in contemporary immunology and microbiology.

  5. Creativity in Early and Established Career: Insights into Multi-Level Drivers from Nobel Prize Winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eubanks, Dawn L.; Palanski, Michael E.; Swart, Juani; Hammond, Michelle M.; Oguntebi, Joy

    2016-01-01

    The freedom to try new things plays a vital role for employees engaging in creative endeavors. This freedom can be influenced by one's relationship with her supervisor, relationship with her team, and various work pressures. One of the first steps to reaching creative output is to have a playful attitude toward work where there is encouragement…

  6. Relative health performance in BRICS over the past 20 years: the winners and losers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Dennis; Tang, Kam Ki

    2014-06-01

    To determine whether the health performance of Brazil, the Russian Federation, India, China and South Africa--the countries known as BRICS--has kept in step with their economic development. Reductions in age- and sex-specific mortality seen in each BRICS country between 1990 and 2011 were measured. These results were compared with those of the best-performing countries in the world and the best-performing countries with similar income levels. We estimated each country's progress in reducing mortality and compared changes in that country's mortality rates against other countries with similar mean incomes to examine changes in avoidable mortality. The relative health performance of the five study countries differed markedly over the study period. Brazil demonstrated fairly even improvement in relative health performance across the different age and sex subgroups that we assessed. India's improvement was more modest and more varied across the subgroups. South Africa and the Russian Federation exhibited large declines in health performance as well as large sex-specific inequalities in health. Although China's levels of avoidable mortality decreased in absolute terms, the level of improvement appeared low in the context of China's economic growth. When evaluating a country's health performance in terms of avoidable mortality, it is useful to compare that performance against the performance of other countries. Such comparison allows any country-specific improvements to be distinguished from general global improvements.

  7. A very special visit to ATLAS: America's Cup Winner Team Alinghi

    CERN Multimedia

    Jenni, P

    It is an honour for ATLAS to frequently welcome in its cavern and the assembly sites VIP visits by Heads of State, Ministers, Directors of Funding Agencies and other political dignitaries. Rarely, however, have we had such an illustrious and competent visitor group as on December 3rd, 2003, when the full Research and Design Team from the Swiss America's Cup Team Alinghi looked at the ATLAS integration work in Halls 180 and 191 and visited Pit-1. The Team was led by 'their' Technical Coordinator Grant Simmer and principal designer Rolf Vrolijk. The Alinghi R&D team spans a very broad range of engineering and management competence; just to list a few of the team's special skills: mechanical and material engineering, electronics and software engineering, sail design, construction management, performance analysis and predictions, and last but not least direct feedback from the actual sailing team (strategist Murray Jones). Amazingly there are a lot of commonalities between Team Alinghi and ATLAS which made...

  8. Winners and losers of state electricity boards reforms an organisational analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruet, J.

    2001-01-01

    The power sector in India is often described - in newspapers, in official reports, in reform programmes - as too 'poor' in money... and too 'rich' in politicians. These analyses hence propose corporatisation, un-bundling, setting up of regulatory commissions, as a vade mecum. The sole problem is that they have proved insufficient in improving the health of State Electricity Boards (SEBs). The ultimate tool, privatisation, has also been a deceptive one. This paper suggests that the above analyses should be balanced and completed with another element: the internal organisation itself of SEBs has to be questioned, which, surprisingly enough, is not done in the current reforms. This is not done because SEBs actually behave and are organised as administrations, whose objectives are different from those of a public enterprise. This is not done because consultants implicitly regard SEBs as inefficient enterprises. This paper thus enters into the black box of SEBs, and shows why and how the behaviour of its agents is rational, given the administrative system in which they are. It gives some practical ways to change this system, by developing on the 'enterprisation' of SEBs (turning them from bodies with an administration-style way of running into actual public enterprises), a concept which was coined from the reforms in Eastern Europe. But ultimately reforms are not undertaken per se. Their final aim is a better quality and availability to the people. Their impact on various categories of users and stakeholders can be discussed within this framework of enterprisation, to establish on which conditions reforms can be beneficial to everybody but the 'waste consumer'. This article is mainly based on repeated field inquires in Haryana, Andhra Pradesh and Orissa, at different stages of reform. In these States, the reform, far from precluding to analyse what are classical SEBs, brought to light some processes formerly in the dark. This article aims at giving a detailed analysis of the working and the rationality within the 'black box' that SEBs represent for many consultants. Indeed, SEBs are too often described as irrational bodies, and simplistic explanations in terms of 'political interference' or 'lack of credit' are given as reasons. Since the author feels that one cannot reform an organisation without understanding it from within, these rather narrow statements are discussed in section I. The systemic rationality of SEBs which is discussed in section II, shows the way the internal organisation of SEBs itself coherently leads to certain kind of decisions, at the expense of efficiency. It also focuses on how far the various organisational characteristics of SEBs are mutually enforcing. Section III points out that the 'structural reforms' taking place at the moment in India, do not substantially modify this systemic logic. It therefore calls for the very 'enterprisation' of SEBs (turning them from bodies with administrative functioning into actual public enterprises). Finally, all these analyses aim at casting a new light on the debate on privatisation. Section IV primarily shows that enterprisation is a prerequisite to proper privatisation, and that the question of 'whether to privatize or not' is less stringent than the one of 'how to enterprise'. Indeed, privatisation, like any economic tool, has its pros and cons. The very rationale of this article is based on the fact that in the present state of the Indian power sector, privatisation presents many cons, simply because investors are reluctant to bid. Since the push for privatisation is propelled by partly misleading visions of SEBs as being too rich in politicians and too poor in funds, this article attempts to focus on these arguments and their limits. (author)

  9. 77 FR 64851 - Announcement Date Postponed for the Grand Prize Winner Announcement for the America COMPETES...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... for the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2011: Project REACH Homelessness Mobile App Contest...'s Project REACH Homelessness Mobile App Contest, authorized under section 105 of the America... end Veteran homelessness. This notice serves as an update to the original notice affecting only the...

  10. Strategic Decisions & Staff Collaboration Highlight the 2009 Award for Excellence Winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, J. Thomas; Taylor, Matthew M.; Lewis, Dan; Ertzberger, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    APPA's highest institutional honor, the Award for Excellence (AFE) in Facilities Management, recognizes those educational institutions whose facilities management organizations demonstrate quality in overall operations and effectiveness. Fewer than 40 institutions have received this distinct honor. The Award for Excellence is based on a set of…

  11. When Winners Become Losers: Predicted Nonlinear Responses of Arctic Birds to Increasing Woody Vegetation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J Thompson

    Full Text Available Climate change is facilitating rapid changes in the composition and distribution of vegetation at northern latitudes, raising questions about the responses of wildlife that rely on arctic ecosystems. One widely observed change occurring in arctic tundra ecosystems is an increasing dominance of deciduous shrub vegetation. Our goals were to examine the tolerance of arctic-nesting bird species to existing gradients of vegetation along the boreal forest-tundra ecotone, to predict the abundance of species across different heights and densities of shrubs, and to identify species that will be most or least responsive to ongoing expansion of shrubs in tundra ecosystems. We conducted 1,208 point counts on 12 study blocks from 2012-2014 in northwestern Alaska, using repeated surveys to account for imperfect detection of birds. We considered the importance of shrub height, density of low and tall shrubs (i.e. shrubs >0.5 m tall, percent of ground cover attributed to shrubs (including dwarf shrubs <0.5 m tall, and percent of herbaceous plant cover in predicting bird abundance. Among 17 species considered, only gray-cheeked thrush (Catharus minimus abundance was associated with the highest values of all shrub metrics in its top predictive model. All other species either declined in abundance in response to one or more shrub metrics or reached a threshold where further increases in shrubs did not contribute to greater abundance. In many instances the relationship between avian abundance and shrubs was nonlinear, with predicted abundance peaking at moderate values of the covariate, then declining at high values. In particular, a large number of species were responsive to increasing values of average shrub height with six species having highest abundance at near-zero values of shrub height and abundance of four other species decreasing once heights reached moderate values (≤ 33 cm. Our findings suggest that increases in shrub cover and density will negatively affect abundance of only a few bird species and may potentially be beneficial for many others. As shrub height increases further, however, a considerable number of tundra bird species will likely find habitat increasingly unsuitable.

  12. Wonder Woman: Eliza Dresang, Winner of the Scholastic Library Publishing Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Debra Lau

    2007-01-01

    This article features Eliza Dresang, an award-winning author, and her achievements. Dresang was responsible for making a radical shift in how teachers and parents understand modern children literature when she wrote her groundbreaking book, "Radical Change." She found the motivation to write this book after realizing how teachers and parents were…

  13. US Baltic Foundation award winners from Estonia are Arvo Pärt and Enn Kunila

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2010-01-01

    Washingtonis toimunud tänavusel U.S Baltic Foundationi auhinnagalal tunnustati kahte eestlast: helilooja Arvo Pärti auhinnaga Baltimaade kuvandi rikastamise eest (Baltic Image Enhancement Award) ja ettevõtjast kunstikollektsionääri Enn Kunilat Baltimaade filantroopiaauhinnaga

  14. Sounds like a winner: voice pitch influences perception of leadership capacity in both men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klofstad, Casey A; Anderson, Rindy C; Peters, Susan

    2012-07-07

    It is well known that non-human animals respond to information encoded in vocal signals, and the same can be said of humans. Specifically, human voice pitch affects how speakers are perceived. As such, does voice pitch affect how we perceive and select our leaders? To answer this question, we recorded men and women saying 'I urge you to vote for me this November'. Each recording was manipulated digitally to yield a higher- and lower-pitched version of the original. We then asked men and women to vote for either the lower- or higher-pitched version of each voice. Our results show that both men and women select male and female leaders with lower voices. These findings suggest that men and women with lower-pitched voices may be more successful in obtaining positions of leadership. This might also suggest that because women, on average, have higher-pitched voices than men, voice pitch could be a factor that contributes to fewer women holding leadership roles than men. Additionally, while people are free to choose their leaders, these results clearly demonstrate that these choices cannot be understood in isolation from biological influences.

  15. Losers and winners in coral reefs acclimatized to elevated carbon dioxide concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabricius, Katharina E.; Langdon, Chris; Uthicke, Sven; Humphrey, Craig; Noonan, Sam; de'Ath, Glenn; Okazaki, Remy; Muehllehner, Nancy; Glas, Martin S.; Lough, Janice M.

    2011-06-01

    Experiments have shown that ocean acidification due to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations has deleterious effects on the performance of many marine organisms. However, few empirical or modelling studies have addressed the long-term consequences of ocean acidification for marine ecosystems. Here we show that as pH declines from 8.1 to 7.8 (the change expected if atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations increase from 390 to 750ppm, consistent with some scenarios for the end of this century) some organisms benefit, but many more lose out. We investigated coral reefs, seagrasses and sediments that are acclimatized to low pH at three cool and shallow volcanic carbon dioxide seeps in Papua New Guinea. At reduced pH, we observed reductions in coral diversity, recruitment and abundances of structurally complex framework builders, and shifts in competitive interactions between taxa. However, coral cover remained constant between pH 8.1 and ~7.8, because massive Porites corals established dominance over structural corals, despite low rates of calcification. Reef development ceased below pH 7.7. Our empirical data from this unique field setting confirm model predictions that ocean acidification, together with temperature stress, will probably lead to severely reduced diversity, structural complexity and resilience of Indo-Pacific coral reefs within this century.

  16. Prior contest experience exerts a long-term influence on subsequent winner and loser effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Animals are capable of using information from recent experiences to modify subsequent behavioral responses. Animals' ability or propensity to modify their behavior in the light of new information has repeatedly been shown to correlate with, or be influenced by, either their intrinsic competitive ability or their dominance experience - an influence which can be long-lasting. Using a mangrove killifish, Kryptolebias marmoratus, as the study organism, we investigated whether and if so how the effect of a winning or a losing experience one day prior to a dyadic contest was modulated by both competitive ability measured two months previously and a winning or losing experience forced on the contestants one month previously. Results Winning/losing experience forced on the fish one month previously affected how they utilized information from their winning/losing experience one day before Test Day: Individuals that were randomly assigned a losing experience one month previously were more susceptible to the influence of their 1-day winning/losing experience than those assigned a winning experience. Competitive ability measured two months previously, winning/losing experience from one month previously and the winning/losing experience received one day previously all significantly influenced the fish's contest behaviors on Test Day, although only 2-month competitive ability significantly influenced escalation duration, indicating that it was still a good index for the fish's competitive ability two months later. Conclusions These results suggest that the value to the fish of information from a recent win or loss depends on the outcome of their past contests and show that contest experience has a long-term effect on contest behavior. PMID:22051441

  17. Winners, Losers, Insiders, and Outsiders: Comparing Hierometer and Sociometer Theories of Self-Regard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Nikhila; Gregg, Aiden P; Sedikides, Constantine; de Waal-Andrews, Wendy G

    2016-01-01

    What evolutionary function does self-regard serve? Hierometer theory, introduced here, provides one answer: it helps individuals navigate status hierarchies, which feature zero-sum contests that can be lost as well as won. In particular, self-regard tracks social status to regulate behavioral assertiveness, augmenting or diminishing it to optimize performance in such contests. Hierometer theory also offers a conceptual counterpoint that helps resolve ambiguities in sociometer theory, which offers a complementary account of self-regard's evolutionary function. In two large-scale cross-sectional studies, we operationalized theoretically relevant variables at three distinct levels of analysis, namely, social (relations: status, inclusion), psychological (self-regard: self-esteem, narcissism), and behavioral (strategy: assertiveness, affiliativeness). Correlational and mediational analyses consistently supported hierometer theory, but offered only mixed support for sociometer theory, including when controlling for confounding constructs (anxiety, depression). We interpret our results in terms of a broader agency-communion framework.

  18. Lecture by the winner of the 2007 Nobel Prize for physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Professor Albert Fert, who has just been awarded the Nobel Prize for physics for his work on giant magneto-resistance and spintronics, will give a lecture at the University of Geneva on 16 November on this booming field of science. (c) CNRS Photothèque - C. LebedinskyOn 9 October, the 2007 Nobel Prize for physics was jointly awarded to Albert Fert of the CNRS and Peter Grünberg of the Jülich Research Centre for their simultaneous and independent discovery of giant magneto-resistance (GMR) in 1988. This discovery had a significant impact in the fields of information technology and communications as it was rapidly used to develop extremely sensitive hard disk read-out heads that are capable of reading information stored at very high densities, thereby allowing further progress in the miniaturisation of data-storage devices. Since the first GMR read-out head was launched in 1997, the technology has become the standard in the m...

  19. Winners and losers. What are the criteria for success. The service industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    The paper deals with the oil service company strategies. Following themes are discussed: The oil service shake out; active rig count; oil service industry recovery; listed public upstream oil service companies; international spread of public oil service companies; consolidation has created growth for some; hydrocarbon demand on the march; sample of per capita hydrocarbon demand; hydrocarbon demand model; hydrocarbon impact of new demand and replacing depleting base; ''turning on the tap'' era ending; the oil service bubble evaporates; age of the current fleets; illustration of replacement economics; illustration of operating leverage; new era management challenges. 14 figs

  20. From the Performance Principle to the Developmental Principle: Every Kid a Winner?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, Alan G.; Chase, Melissa A.; Butt, Joanne

    2002-01-01

    Addresses the hegemony of the Prolympic system, especially its effects on children, asserting that it abrogates the liberal democratic promise that all people are entitled to develop their talents to the fullest extent and making suggestions to combine sport psychology and sociology when thinking about a sport pedagogy system oriented to…

  1. And the winner of the Golden CinéGlobe is…

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    Three years after the first CinéGlobe festival, the CERN film club has just organised a second international festival of short films and science documentaries, attended by a host of film-makers and film fans alike. Six special prizes were awarded.   One of the Golden CinéGlobe awards The second Golden CinéGlobe award ceremony was held in the Globe on the evening of Saturday, 20 February. Now something of a magnet for local fans of short films and science documentaries, the CinéGlobe festival has become one of the most successful events organised by a CERN club. "Organising the festival has been a gratifying experience as many people have taken part in and enjoyed the event", says Quentin King, vice-chairman of the CERN film club, Open Your Eyes Films. "Time was our worst enemy. It took us a year to bring the project to fruition but we could have done with another year to refine some of the details". The 18 screenings...

  2. The hidden winners of renewable energy promotion: Insights into sector-specific wage differentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoni, Manfred; Janser, Markus; Lehmer, Florian

    2015-01-01

    In light of Germany's energy system transformation, this paper examines differences in employment structures and wage differentials between renewable energy establishments and their sector peers. To do so, we have developed a novel data set by linking company-level information from the German Renewable Energy Federation with administrative establishment-level data from the Institute for Employment Research. Descriptive evidence shows significant differences in wages and several other characteristics between renewable energy establishments and their sector peers. Our estimates give evidence that human capital and other establishment-level characteristics mostly explain the wage differential among manufacturers and energy providers. However, we find a persistent ‘renewable energy wage premium' of more than ten percent in construction/installation activities and architectural/engineering services. We interpret this premium as a positive indirect effect of the promotion of renewable energies for the benefit of employees in renewable energy establishments within these two sectors. - Highlights: • Renewable energy (RE) firms pay considerably more than their non-RE sector peers. • In manufacturing and energy supply, firm attributes explain mainly the wage gap. • In installation, planning and project management one third remains unexplained. • This unexplained rest represents a ‘RE wage premium’ of around 10 percent. • The employees in both sectors are the ‘hidden winners’ of RE promotion.

  3. No clear winner: effects of The Biggest Loser on the stigmatization of obese persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jina H

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has largely ignored the question of whether watching reality weight-loss TV shows influences viewers to form a negative obesity stereotype. This study examines antecedents and outcomes of watching The Biggest Loser with the Orientation1-Stimulus-Orientation2-Response (O-S-O-R) model. The study found that individuals who are more concerned with their weight (O1) watch more episodes of The Biggest Loser (S). Meanwhile, consumption of The Biggest Loser leads to greater perceived locus of weight control (O2), indicating that body weight is under personal control. Perceived locus of weight control, in turn, significantly predicts the attribution of obesity to personal responsibility (R). Ultimately, attributing obesity to personal responsibility leads to the formation of anti-fat attitudes (R). This study offers an integrative theoretical framework to investigate media effects on the formation of an obesity stigma by using the O-S-O-R model. The results imply that certain lifestyle transformation media, such as The Biggest Loser, might reinforce the notion that individuals control their own weight and thus further amplify the obesity stigma.

  4. The European Metropolis in the late Twentieth Century: Winners and Losers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Clark (Peter)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis paper offers a commentary on some of the recent work on globalisation in the context of the European city in the late 20th century. It points out that the current European urban hierarchy has a strong historical dimension. It notes the considerable degree of convergence in the

  5. [Competition between physicians and hospitals--are hospitals the big winners?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Bidjan; Kersting, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Competition and cooperation are contradictory aspects of economic systems; in the healthcare system they also govern the process of creation and distribution of value. Both are needed to reach higher levels of efficiency and innovation. Regarding competition as a universal remedy which only has to be applied in higher doses in order to cure the multiple illnesses of the healthcare sector is a single-sided view and does not match economic reality. As politics introduce more and more elements of competition the question arises as to what degree hospitals are in competition with private practice physicians. In contrast to statements of lobbyists we came to the conclusion that the degree of competition between hospitals and physicians is negligible when compared to the vast potential of cooperation.

  6. CiSE Computational Physics Challenge Winner: Electron Wave Packet Propagation in Graphene Nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Steven M.

    2008-04-01

    While graphene has been studied by theoreticians for over half a century, the two dimensional crystal lattice has only recently been realized experimentally. As such, theoretical work in the properties of graphene has exploded. A variety of these properties, which are truly exceptional and unique, have engendered much research into carbon based electronics, of which graphene is generally the most fundamental unit. In this thesis, we seek to characterize basic electronic properties of graphene nanoribbons. We begin with a tight-binding model of graphene and an analysis of the electronic band structure of the infinite sheet and semi-infinite nanoribbons. Also employing the spectral method, we create, inject, and propagate various types of wave packets infinite wires. A key effect that is expected is the so called Zitterbewegung oscillation of the wave packet center. Results are compared to theoretical predictions based on analytical methods rather than numerical simulations.

  7. Winners, Losers, Insiders, and Outsiders: Comparing Hierometer and Sociometer Theories of Self-Regard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhila eMahadevan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available What evolutionary function does self-regard serve? Hierometer theory, introduced here, provides one answer: it helps individuals navigate status hierarchies, which feature zero-sum contests that can be lost as well as won. In particular, self-regard tracks social status to regulate behavioral assertiveness, augmenting or diminishing it to optimize performance in such contests. Hierometer theory also offers a conceptual counterpoint that helps resolve ambiguities in sociometer theory, which offers a complementary account of self-regard’s evolutionary function. In two large-scale cross-sectional studies, we operationalized theoretically relevant variables at three distinct levels of analysis, namely, social (relations: status, inclusion, psychological (self-regard: self-esteem, narcissism, and behavioral (strategy: assertiveness, affiliativeness. Correlational and mediational analyses consistently supported hierometer theory, but offered only mixed support for sociometer theory, including when controlling for confounding constructs (anxiety, depression. We interpret our results in terms of a broader agency-communion framework.

  8. Performance management excellence among the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award Winners in Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Neville T; Goodson, Jane R; Arnold, Edwin W

    2013-01-01

    When carefully constructed, performance management systems can help health care organizations direct their efforts toward strategic goals, high performance, and continuous improvement needed to ensure high-quality patient care and cost control. The effective management of performance is an integral component in hospital and health care systems that are recognized for excellence by the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award in Health Care. Using the framework in the 2011-2012 Health Care Criteria for Performance Excellence, this article identifies the best practices in performance management demonstrated by 15 Baldrige recipients. The results show that all of the recipients base their performance management systems on strategic goals, outcomes, or competencies that cascade from the organizational to the individual level. At the individual level, each hospital or health system reinforces the strategic direction with performance evaluations of leaders and employees, including the governing board, based on key outcomes and competencies. Leader evaluations consistently include feedback from internal and external stakeholders, creating a culture of information sharing and performance improvement. The hospitals or health care systems also align their reward systems to promote high performance by emphasizing merit and recognition for contributions. Best practices can provide a guide for leaders in other health systems in developing high-performance work systems.

  9. Alvin C. Kraenzlein, DDS and Walter B. Tewksbury, DDS: Olympic medal winners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, A G; Christen, J A

    2001-11-01

    As contemporaries, Alvin C. Kraenzlein, and Walter B. Tewksbury had a great deal in common. They were both outstanding athletic performers and each became an intercollegiate record holder in track and field. In 1898, the New York Times reported that the University of Pennsylvania "at present has the best college athletes in the world, its two particular stars being Kraenzlein and Tewksbury." As close friends and college roommates during their student years at the University of Pennsylvania College of Dentistry, these two young men graduated in close succession (Walter, 1899; Alvin, 1900). Between them, Alvin and Walter won nine Olympic medals in Paris in 1900. Ultimately, as dentists and athletes, they individually and corporately left indelible imprints on track and field for all time.

  10. Tryptophan biosynthesis in stramenopiles: eukaryotic winners in the diatom complex chloroplast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiroutová, Kateřina; Horák, Aleš; Bowler, C.; Oborník, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 5 (2007), s. 496-511 ISSN 0022-2844 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500220502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : tryptophan synthesis * mosaic origin * diatom * Oomycetes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2007

  11. EU energy-intensive industries and emissions trading: losers becoming winners?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wettestad, Joergen

    2008-11-15

    The EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) initially treated power producers and energy-intensive industries similarly, despite clear structural differences between these industries regarding pass through of costs and vulnerability to global competition. Hence, the energy-intensive industries could be seen as losing out in the internal distribution. In the January 2008 proposal for a reformed ETS post-2012, a differentiated system was proposed where the energy-intensive industries come out relatively much better. What is the explanation for the change taking place? Although power producers still have a dominant position in the system, the increasing consensus about windfall profits has weakened their standing. Conversely, the energy-intensive industries have become better organised and more active. This balance shift is first and foremost noticeable in several important EU-level stake holder consultation processes. Energy-intensive industries have, however, also successfully utilised the national pathway to exert influence on Brussels policy-making. Finally, growing fear of lax global climate policies and related carbon leakage has strengthened the case of these industries further. The latter dimension indicates that although energy-intensive industries have managed to reduce internal distribution anomalies, external challenges remain. (author). 9 refs

  12. Are PhDs Winners or Losers? Wage Premiums for Doctoral Degrees in Private Sector Employment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Heidi Skovgaard

    2016-01-01

    Policy makers expect that increasing shares of PhDs will find employment within the private sector. However, the incentive structure for undertaking PhD education and subsequently seeking private sector employment has not been adequately assessed in the literature. This paper investigates...... to choose private sector employment immediately after award of the PhD degree....

  13. 2011 IEEE Visualization Contest winner: Visualizing unsteady vortical behavior of a centrifugal pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Mathias; Kuhn, Alexander; Engelke, Wito; Theisel, Holger

    2012-01-01

    In the 2011 IEEE Visualization Contest, the dataset represented a high-resolution simulation of a centrifugal pump operating below optimal speed. The goal was to find suitable visualization techniques to identify regions of rotating stall that impede the pump's effectiveness. The winning entry split analysis of the pump into three parts based on the pump's functional behavior. It then applied local and integration-based methods to communicate the unsteady flow behavior in different regions of the dataset. This research formed the basis for a comparison of common vortex extractors and more recent methods. In particular, integration-based methods (separation measures, accumulated scalar fields, particle path lines, and advection textures) are well suited to capture the complex time-dependent flow behavior. This video (http://youtu.be/oD7QuabY0oU) shows simulations of unsteady flow in a centrifugal pump.

  14. Why RCN Nurse of the Year is such an inspiring winner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-10

    Remember the name: Melanie Davies, RCN Nurse of the Year 2017 and a truly extraordinary woman. She has transformed care for people with learning disabilities on her ward, driven through changes across her hospital and health board in south Wales, and inspired others to follow suit across the country.

  15. Cold Vs. Heat After Exercise-Is There a Clear Winner for Muscle Soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrofsky, Jerrold S; Khowailed, Iman Akef; Lee, Haneul; Berk, Lee; Bains, Gurinder S; Akerkar, Siddhesh; Shah, Jinal; Al-Dabbak, Fuad; Laymon, Mike S

    2015-11-01

    Because of the differences in the exercise type, temperature, and timing of the use of cold and heat after exercise in different studies, there is no clear conclusion as to the efficacy of either modality on reducing delayed onset muscle soreness. One hundred subjects at similar fitness levels were examined. They accomplished leg squats for 15 minutes and heat and cold were applied after or 24 hours after exercise using ThermaCare heat or cold wraps. Measurements obtained were strength, the force to passively move the knee, analog visual pain scales, and blood myoglobin. Control subjects lost 24% strength after exercise. Subjects with heat or cold just after exercise only lost 4% strength (p < 0.01). For strength recovery, cold applied after 24 hours was better than heat at 24 hours. Heat or cold applied after exercise was significantly better to prevent elastic tissue damage (p < 0.01), whereas heat and cold immediately after exercise caused no loss in muscle myoglobin and heat or cold after 24 hours showed no less muscle damage from myoglobin than in control subjects. Myoglobin in the control and heat and cold 24-hour groups averaged 135.1% of the baseline data but averaged 106.1% of baseline in the immediate heat and cold groups. For reducing pain, control subjects showed a significant amount of pain the days after exercise. But cold immediately after exercise or 24 hours later was superior to heat in reducing pain. In conclusion, both cold and heat appear to be efficacious in reducing muscle damage after exercise.

  16. Interview with Xiaoli Wang PhD winner of CACA 2016 Young Investigator Award

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoli Wang is currently an R&D Senior Scientist in Agilent’s HPLC instrument R&D group at Agilent Technologies, Waldbronn, Germany. Prior to this, he was an R&D manager in Agilent’s CrossLab Group in the US focusing on development of novel chromatographic columns. He has a B.S. degree in Chemistry from Peking University, Beijing China and a PhD. degree in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Minnesota in 2006. He started his industrial career in the pharmaceutical industry at AstraZeneca for four years before joining Agilent Technologies in 2010. Recently, he won the prestigious 2016 Young Investigator Award from Chinese American Chromatography Association (CACA. This interview was conducted by Roland J.W. Meesters PhD, Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Applied Bioanalysis.

  17. 2011 IEEE Visualization Contest Winner: Visualizing Unsteady Vortical Behavior of a Centrifugal Pump

    KAUST Repository

    Otto, Mathias

    2012-09-01

    In the 2011 IEEE Visualization Contest, the dataset represented a high-resolution simulation of a centrifugal pump operating below optimal speed. The goal was to find suitable visualization techniques to identify regions of rotating stall that impede the pump\\'s effectiveness. The winning entry split analysis of the pump into three parts based on the pump\\'s functional behavior. It then applied local and integration-based methods to communicate the unsteady flow behavior in different regions of the dataset. This research formed the basis for a comparison of common vortex extractors and more recent methods. In particular, integration-based methods (separation measures, accumulated scalar fields, particle path lines, and advection textures) are well suited to capture the complex time-dependent flow behavior. This video (http://youtu.be/ oD7QuabY0oU) shows simulations of unsteady flow in a centrifugal pump. © 2012 IEEE.

  18. Wheatley Award 2017 Winner: How Physics Can Help Africa Transform, from a Problem to an Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turok, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Africa represents the world's greatest untapped pool of scientific and technical talent. The African Institute for Mathematical Sciences (AIMS) is providing outstanding postgraduate training and research opportunities to gifted students across the continent. Its alumni proceed to employment in fields ranging from epidemiology to natural resource management, information technology and mathematical finance, to engineering and pure research in physics and mathematics. Many have already had a major impact in revitalising Africa's universities, in tackling major epidemics, and in raising skills levels in industry and government. AIMS has opened six centres of excellence so far, in South Africa, Senegal, Ghana, Cameroon, Tanzania, and, most recently, Rwanda, and plans to grow to a network of fifteen centres over the next decade. Its 1200 alumni are at the leading edge of Africa's transformation into a knowledge-based society.

  19. ASB clinical biomechanics award winner 2016: Assessment of gaze stability within 24-48hours post-concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Nicholas G; D'Amico, Nathan R; Powell, Douglas; Mormile, Megan E; Grimes, Katelyn E; Munkasy, Barry A; Gore, Russell K; Reed-Jones, Rebecca J

    2017-05-01

    Approximately 90% of athletes with concussion experience a certain degree of visual system dysfunction immediately post-concussion. Of these abnormalities, gaze stability deficits are denoted as among the most common. Little research quantitatively explores these variables post-concussion. As such, the purpose of this study was to investigate and compare gaze stability between a control group of healthy non-injured athletes and a group of athletes with concussions 24-48hours post-injury. Ten collegiate NCAA Division I athletes with concussions and ten healthy control collegiate athletes completed two trials of a sport-like antisaccade postural control task, the Wii Fit Soccer Heading Game. During play all participants were instructed to minimize gaze deviations away from a central fixed area. Athletes with concussions were assessed within 24-48 post-concussion while healthy control data were collected during pre-season athletic screening. Raw ocular point of gaze coordinates were tracked with a monocular eye tracking device (240Hz) and motion capture during the postural task to determine the instantaneous gaze coordinates. This data was exported and analyzed using a custom algorithm. Independent t-tests analyzed gaze resultant distance, prosaccade errors, mean vertical velocity, and mean horizontal velocity. Athletes with concussions had significantly greater gaze resultant distance (p=0.006), prosaccade errors (pconcussions had less control of gaze during play of the Wii Fit Soccer Heading Game. This could indicate a gaze stability deficit via potentially reduced cortical inhibition that is present within 24-48hours post-concussion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 2000 Volvo Award winner in biomechanical studies: Monitoring in vivo implant loads with a telemeterized internal spinal fixation device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlmann, A; Graichen, F; Weber, U; Bergmann, G

    2000-12-01

    Implant loads were measured in 10 patients using telemeterized internal spinal fixation devices. To determine the postoperative temporal course of implant loads. Little information exists regarding the temporal course of loads on internal spinal fixation devices. The telemeterized internal spinal fixator allows the measurement of three force components and three moments acting in the fixator. Implant loads were determined in up to 20 measuring sessions for different activities, including walking, standing, sitting, lying in the supine position, and lifting an extended leg while in the supine position. Implant loads often increased shortly after anterior interbody fusion was performed. Several patients retained the same high level even after fusion had taken place. This explains the reason why screw breakage sometimes occurs more than half a year after implantation. The time of fusion could not be pinpointed from the loading curves. The results show that fixators may be highly loaded even after fusion has occurred. A flexion bending moment acts on the implant even with the body in a relaxed lying position. This means that already shortly after the anterior procedure, the shape of the spine is not neutral and unloaded, but slightly deformed, which loads the fixators. Pedicle screw breakage more than half a year after insertion does not prove that anterior interbody fusion has not occurred.

  1. 1997 Volvo Award winner in biomechanical studies. Kinematic behavior of the porcine lumbar spine: a chronic lesion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaigle, A M; Holm, S H; Hansson, T H

    1997-12-15

    Experimental models of intervertebral disc and facet joint degeneration were created in vivo in the porcine lumbar spine for studying spinal kinematics, using a dynamic technique. To quantify the changes in spinal kinematics and the stabilizing capacity of the lumbar musculature caused by chronic lesions in the intervertebral disc and facet joints. Segmental kinematics are detrimentally altered by acute injury to passive structures of the motion segment. However, stimulation of the surrounding musculature adds stability to the motion segment. The in vivo kinematics of a degenerated lumbar motion segment and the stabilizing function of the surrounding musculature have not been quantified dynamically. Forty-four pigs were used in six chronic lesions models: sham, disc anulus, disc nucleus, facet capsule, facet joint slit, and facet joint wedge. Three months after injury, an instrumented linkage was used to measure continuously the sagittal kinematics of the L3-L4 motion segment during flexion-extension, with and without stimulation of the lumbar paraspinal musculature. Flexion-extension end point and maximum ranges of motion, and hysteresis were analyzed. Significant alterations in the kinematics caused by chronic lesions were observed, particularly when using the maximum range of motion and when comparing changes in axial translation. Muscular stimulation reduced the hysteresis in the sham, facet capsule, and disc nucleus groups; however, increased hysteresis was observed in the remaining lesion groups. The kinematic behavior of motion segments with chronic lesions was established. The maximum range of motion, which must be measured using a dynamic technique, was a more sensitive parameter for identifying changes in segmental kinematics caused by chronic lesions than was the end range of motion. The lumbar musculature was less efficient overall in stabilizing the motion segment, possibly because of altered mechanisms in the neuromuscular feedback system.

  2. 1997 Volvo Award winner in basic science studies. Immunohistologic markers for age-related changes of human lumbar intervertebral discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerlich, A G; Schleicher, E D; Boos, N

    1997-12-15

    The authors performed a correlative macroscopic, histologic, and immunohistochemical investigation on human lumbar intervertebral discs using complete motion segment slices, including all age groups and stages of degeneration. To identify markers for age-related changes of human lumbar intervertebral discs. In particular, to investigate changes in the distribution pattern of collagen Types I, II, III, IV, V, VI, IX, and X. In addition, to study posttranslational protein modification by the immunolocalization of N-(carboxylmethyl)lysine (CML), which is regarded as a biomarker for oxidative stress. Data on a correlation of age-related changes in disc morphology and disc matrix composition is sparse. So far, no comprehensive analysis considered a correlation of macroscopic, histologic, and biochemical age-related alterations using complete sections of intervertebral discs (i.e., including nucleus pulposus, anulus fibrosus, endplates, and vertebral bodies). In addition, there is need for specific markers for these disc changes to allow for a better correlation with disc function. After photodocumentation of the macroscopic appearance, 229 sagittal lumbar motion segments obtained from 47 individuals (fetal to 86 years) during routine autopsy were processed for histologic and immunohistochemical analysis. All slices were investigated for histologic alterations of disc degeneration. A randomly selected subset of these specimens (n = 45) was used for a correlative analysis of interstitial collagens and molecular modifications of matrix proteins. The presence of CML-modification of extracellular matrix proteins, mainly collagen, was observed first in the nucleus pulposus of a 13-year-old individual and increased significantly with age. In elderly people, both the nucleus pulposus and the anulus fibrosus showed extensive CML deposition. This CML deposition was accentuated in areas of macroscopic and histologic disc degeneration. After the occurrence of CML in the nucleus pulposus, we found a change in the collagen type pattern. An initial increase in nuclear collagen Types II, III, and VI staining was followed by a loss of collagen Type II, the occurrence of collagen Type I, and the persistence of high collagen Type III and VI levels, which were finally decreased again. The nuclear chondrocytes revealed significant changes in their immediate pericellular matrix, indicating phenotypic changes. Thus, exclusively in the nucleus pulposus of adolescents and young adults a significant proportion of cells positively stained for the basement membrane collagen Type IV. Collagen Type X was expressed by nuclear chondrocytes at a higher age and was associated with advanced degenerative disc alterations. The authors present the first study in which age-related changes are correlated on a macroscopic, histologic, and molecular level using complete sections of lumbar motion segments. They reconfirm the notion that disc degeneration starts as early as in the second decade of life. Therefore, only early prevention of disc damage may inhibit disc degeneration and its sequelae. Phenotypic alterations of nuclear chondrocytes as monitored by collagen Type IV in young adults with minor lesions and collagen Type X in advanced lesions indicate distinct cellular reactions, possibly as a reaction to enhanced oxidative stress. The degree of this oxidative stress is reflected by the CML-staining pattern which, in turn, indicates that the disc undergoes an accumulative stress, possibly leading to altered properties of the collagen fibrils and, thereby, tissue destruction. The deposition of CML proved to be the best marker for ongoing age-related changes in the intervertebral disc.

  3. 2000 Volvo Award winner in clinical studies: Lumbar high-intensity zone and discography in subjects without low back problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carragee, E J; Paragioudakis, S J; Khurana, S

    2000-12-01

    A prospective observational study of patients with low back pain and those without was performed. To investigate the prevalence and significance of a high-intensity zone in a group of patients asymptomatic for low back pain, but who had known risk factors for lumbar disc degeneration. This asymptomatic group was compared with a symptomatic group of patients with respect to the presence of anular high-intensity zone and the pain response with discography. Some authors have estimated the prevalence of a high-intensity zone in a group of symptomatic patients to be 86%. They have reported a strong correlation between a high-intensity zone and positive discography in patients with low back pain. Other investigators have reported evidence either supporting or discounting these findings. Patients with low back pain and those without underwent physical examination, psychometric testing, plain radiograph, magnetic resonance imaging, and discography. The presence of a high-intensity zone, anular disruption, and positive discographic pain then were compared between the two groups. There were strict inclusion criteria for both groups. A total of 109 discs in 42 patients were evaluated in the symptomatic group and compared with 143 discs in 54 patients in the asymptomatic group. The presence of a high-intensity zone was determined by a standardized criteria on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images. Psychometric testing also was administered to each patient before discography. Standard discography was performed on all the patients, and the pain response was recorded using a visual analog scale according to the Walsh et al criteria. The prevalence of a high-intensity zone in the patient populations was 59% in the symptomatic group and 24% in the asymptomatic group. In the symptomatic group, 33 (30.2%) of 109 discs were found to have a high-intensity zone. In the asymptomatic group, 13 of 143 discs were found to have a high-intensity zone. In the symptomatic group, 72.7% of the discs with a high-intensity zone were positive on discography, whereas 38.2% of the discs without a high-intensity zone were positive. In the asymptomatic group, 69.2% of the discs with a high-intensity zone were positive on discography, whereas 10% of the discs without a high-intensity zone were positive. In the patients with normal psychometric testing, 50% of the discs with a high-intensity zone were positive on discography, as compared with 100% positive discography results in patients with abnormal psychometric testing or chronic pain. The presence of a high-intensity zone does not reliably indicate the presence of symptomatic internal disc disruption. Although higher in symptomatic patients, the prevalence of a high-intensity zone in asymptomatic individuals with degenerative disc disease (25%) is too high for meaningful clinical use. When injected during discography, the same percentage of asymptomatic and symptomatic discs with a high-intensity zone were shown to be painful.

  4. 1980 Volvo award winner in basic science. Nutritional pathways of the intervertebral disc. An experimental study using hydrogen washout technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, K; Whiteside, L A

    1981-01-01

    The pathways of material transfer to the intervertebral disc were studied in adult dogs by measuring diffusion of hydrogen molecules in the nucleus pulposus before and after disruption of the route through the annulus fibrosus and before and after disruption of the end-plate route. The interfaces was only in the central two-thirds of one side, caused significantly greater decrease in the rate of hydrogen washout than the disruption of the annulus route. Histologically, the bone-cartilage interface was frequently perforated by marrow cavity and vascular buds. These findings suggest that the end-plate route is a major pathway for material transfer to the intervertebral disc.

  5. Dimensions of Conventionality and Innovation in Film: The Cultural Classification of Blockbusters, Award Winners, and Critics' Favourites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Kersten (Annemarie); M.N.M. Verboord (Marc)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractToday's complex film world seems to upset the dual structure corresponding with Bourdieu's categorization of 'restricted' and 'large-scale' fields of cultural production. This article examines how movies in French, Dutch, American and British film fields are classified in terms of

  6. "Anyone Can Make It, but There Can Only Be One Winner": Modelling Neoliberal Learning and Work on Reality Television

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windle, Joel

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates how reality television talent-quest formats model the normative neoliberal worker and learner--roles which are increasingly drawn together. In the age of "life-long learning" and shifting employment demands, new models of the supple, adaptable and willing learner are increasingly important both to meeting…

  7. Girls in Technology Essay Contest Winner Spends a Day in the Life of a Scientist | FNLCR Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sixteen-year-old Celina Paudel solidified her career interest in biomedical engineering after winning a scholarship through the national Girls in Technology (GIT) program. Then, thanks to Rachel Bagni, she got to see what it really means to be a scie

  8. Winners and losers in transition: preferences for redistribution and nostalgia for communism in Eastern Europe / Adam Okulicz- Kozaryn

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Okulicz- Kozaryn, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Artikli teema on üleminekuperioodi võitjad ja kaotajad Ida-Euroopas (sh. Eesti), täpsemalt käsitletakse nostalgiat kommunismi järele. Andmed pärinevad uurimusest „Demokraatia konsolideerumine Kesk- ja Ida-Euroopas 1990-2001”.

  9. Marie and Irene Curie. The first female Nobel Prize winners; Marie en IreneCurie. De eerste vrouwelijke Nobelprijswinnaars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noordenbos, G. [Joke Smit Instituut voor Vrouwenstudies, Universiteit Leiden, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2003-07-01

    Marie Curie was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1903 and in 1911. Also her daughter, Irene Joliot-Curie, received a Nobel Prize for science in 1935. In this book an overview is given of the academic world at that time: limited access to universities for women, the carriers of both women in physics and their pioneering research and discoveries, the refusal of Marie Curie by the French Academy of Sciences, the awarding of the Nobel Prize and the assignment of Irene Joliot-Curie as the first female minister in France, the impact of the two World Wars, their married and private lives and the constant smear campaign of the press against both women. The lives and works of both women are hold against the light of the present position of women in physical sciences. [Dutch] In 1903, precies honderd jaar geleden, ontving Marie Curie als eerste vrouw de Nobelprijs voor de Wetenschap, gevolgd door een tweede Nobelprijs in 1911. Ook haar dochter Irene Joliot-Curie kreeg de Nobelprijs voor de wetenschap in 1935. Marie and Irene Curie schetst een breed beeld van de academische wereld waarin beide vrouwen zich bewogen: de beperkte toegang van vrouwen tot de universiteit, hun carrisres in de natuurkunde en baanbrekende ontdekkingen, de afwijzing van Marie door de Franse Academie des Sciences, de toekenning van de Nobelprijs en de benoeming van Irene als eerste vrouwelijke minister in Frankrijk, de invloed van de twee Wereldoorlogen, hun huwelijks- en priveleven en de niet aflatende hetze van de pers tegen beiden. In de door mannen gedomineerde wereld van de natuurwetenschappen liep de uitzonderingspositie van beide vrouwen als rode draad door hun curieuze levens. Het leven en werk van de Curies wordt geactualiseerd door deze tegen het licht te houden van de huidige positie van vrouwen in de natuurwetenschappen. Het bereiken van de top van de wetenschap door vrouwen blijkt nog steeds uitzonderlijk.

  10. Glucocorticoid excess and the developmental origins of disease: two decades of testing the hypothesis--2012 Curt Richter Award Winner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Rebecca M

    2013-01-01

    Low birthweight, a marker of an adverse in utero environment, is associated with cardiometabolic disease and brain disorders in adulthood. The adaptive changes made by the fetus in response to the intra-uterine environment result in permanent changes in physiology, structure and metabolism, a phenomenon termed early life programming. One of the key hypotheses to explain programming, namely over exposure of the developing fetus to glucocorticoids, was proposed nearly two decades ago, following the observation that the fetus was protected from high glucocorticoid levels in the mother by the actions of the placental barrier enzyme, 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, which converts active glucocorticoids into inactive products. Numerous mechanistic studies in animal models have been carried out to test this hypothesis using manipulations to increase maternal glucocorticoids. Overall, these have resulted in offspring of lower birthweight, with an activated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and an adverse metabolic profile and behavioural phenotype in adulthood. Altered glucocorticoid activity or action is a good candidate mechanism in humans to link low birthweight with cardiometabolic and brain disorders. We have carried out detailed studies in men and women showing that high levels of endogenous glucocorticoids, or treatment with exogenous glucocorticoids, is associated with an adverse metabolic profile, increased cardiovascular disease and altered mood and cognitive decline. Our laboratory carried out the first translational studies in humans to test the glucocorticoid hypothesis, firstly demonstrating in studies of adult men and women, that low birthweight was associated with high fasting cortisol levels. We went on to dissect the mechanisms underlying the high fasting cortisol, demonstrating activation of the HPA axis, with increased cortisol responses to stimulation with exogenous adrenocorticotrophin hormone, lack of habituation to the stress of venepuncture, and increased cortisol responses to psychosocial stress. We have developed new dynamic tests to dissect the mechanisms regulating HPA axis central negative feedback sensitivity in humans, and demonstrated that this may be altered in obesity, one component of the metabolic syndrome. There are now studies in humans demonstrating that high circulating levels of maternal cortisol during pregnancy correlate negatively with birthweight, suggesting that excess glucocorticoids can by-pass the placental barrier. Deficiencies in the barrier enzyme, potentially increasing fetal glucocorticoid exposure, can also arise in association with maternal stress, malnutrition and disease, and can be inhibited by consumption of liquorice, which contains glycyrrhizin, an HSD inhibitor. Importantly, studies in humans have now demonstrated that high maternal cortisol in pregnancy and/or inhibition of HSD2 are associated with programmed outcomes in childhood including higher blood pressure, behavioural disorders as well as altered brain structure. We are investigating this further, using novel magnetic resonance imaging techniques to study the developing fetal brain in utero. The translational studies in support of the glucocorticoid hypothesis, and demonstrating that glucocorticoids are both mediators and targets of programming, are exciting and raise the question of whether this information can be used to identify those individuals most at risk of later life disease. In a recent study we showed that alterations in DNA methylation at genes important in regulating cortisol levels, tissue glucocorticoid action, blood pressure and fetal growth, are present in adulthood in association with both early life parameters and cardiometabolic risk factors. These preliminary data add to the limited literature in humans indicating a persisting epigenetic link between early life events and subsequent disease risk. Such findings open novel avenues for further exploration of the contribution of glucocorticoids to later life disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Redistributive Impact of Restrictive Measures on EU Members: Winners and Losers from Imposing Sanctions on Russia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giumelli, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    EU sanctions on Russia created concerns among its members. It is well known that sanctions impose a cost on their targets as well as on the senders, as lamented by European governments, but the costs of EU sanctions on its members have not been fully explored. This article intends to fill this gap

  12. Fine-scale ecological and economic assessment of climate change on olive in the Mediterranean Basin reveals winners and losers

    OpenAIRE

    Ponti, Luigi; Gutierrez, Andrew Paul; Ruti, Paolo Michele; Dell’Aquila, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Inability to determine reliably the direction and magnitude of change in natural and agro-ecosystems due to climate change poses considerable challenge to their management. Olive is an ancient ubiquitous crop having considerable ecological and socioeconomic importance in the Mediterranean Basin. We assess the ecological and economic impact of projected 1.8 °C climate warming on olive and its obligate pest, the olive fly. This level of climate warming will have varying impact on olive yield an...

  13. 2016 Writing Contest graduate Winner: Cardiovascular Disease Training for Community Health Workers Serving Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Peoples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moleta, Chace DI; Look, Mele A; Trask-Batti, Mililani K; Mabellos, Tricia; Mau, Marjorie L

    2017-07-01

    To help community health workers (CHW) meet increased demand for their services, it is essential to have data supported strategies for approaches to their training and capacity development. The objective of this paper is to report on the development, implementation, and evaluation of "Heart 101," a cardiovascular disease (CVD) training program, conducted among CHW in Hawai'i who serve Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Peoples (NHPP). Principles from Community-Based Participatory Research provided a framework to develop and implement the 5-hour training curriculum. Developers incorporated teaching strategies shown to be effective among learners that represent the majority of CHW, and included principles of adult learning theory and culture-based education. Training participants completed pre-, post-, and 6-months post-training knowledge tests, as well as demographic and participant satisfaction surveys. Data analysis based on pre- and post-training knowledge tests (n=30) indicated that Heart 101 significantly increased CVD knowledge by 32% (P < .001, t test). Long-term CVD competency measured at six-months post-training (n = 20) was also shown to be significant (P < .001, t test). Analysis of knowledge by subtopic suggested CHW strengths in clinical aspects of CVD and weaknesses in medical terminology and basic science aspects. These results, along with positive participant satisfaction, suggest that a culturally relevant and interactive course is a strong approach for CVD information dissemination to CHW serving NHPP communities, and provides insight on potential areas for special focus in their training. The demonstrated success of Heart 101 has positive implications for the standardization of CHW education and for their professional development.

  14. Bio-inspired feedback-circuit implementation of discrete, free energy optimizing, winner-take-all computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genewein, Tim; Braun, Daniel A

    2016-06-01

    Bayesian inference and bounded rational decision-making require the accumulation of evidence or utility, respectively, to transform a prior belief or strategy into a posterior probability distribution over hypotheses or actions. Crucially, this process cannot be simply realized by independent integrators, since the different hypotheses and actions also compete with each other. In continuous time, this competitive integration process can be described by a special case of the replicator equation. Here we investigate simple analog electric circuits that implement the underlying differential equation under the constraint that we only permit a limited set of building blocks that we regard as biologically interpretable, such as capacitors, resistors, voltage-dependent conductances and voltage- or current-controlled current and voltage sources. The appeal of these circuits is that they intrinsically perform normalization without requiring an explicit divisive normalization. However, even in idealized simulations, we find that these circuits are very sensitive to internal noise as they accumulate error over time. We discuss in how far neural circuits could implement these operations that might provide a generic competitive principle underlying both perception and action.

  15. And the winner is…. The male academy oder: Die ungleichen Auswirkungen universitärer Prekarität

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annekathrin Müller

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Der vorliegende Essay beleuchtet die ungleichen Auswirkungen von prekären Arbeitsbedingungen an deutschen Universitäten. Dabei vertreten wir die These, dass diese ganz unmittelbar zur Reproduktion sozialer Ungleichheit innerhalb des wissenschaftlichen Feldes beitragen, insofern Frauen und andere Menschen, die weniger privilegiert sind als weiße Cis-Männer mit bildungsbürgerlichem Hintergrund, die akademische Laufbahn in der PostDoc-Phase eher verlassen. Wir plädieren nicht nur für bessere Arbeitsbedingungen – weniger Befristungen, einen Abbau feudaler Strukturen, mehr Dauerstellen, und eine „kurze Vollzeit“ –, die Aufrechterhaltung und den Ausbau von Gleichstellungsmaßnahmen, sondern auch für eine Wissenschaftskultur, die sich vom männlichen Geniemythos abwendet, nicht mehr auf permanente Entgrenzung setzt und kollektive Prozesse in der Produktion wissenschaftlicher Erkenntnisse in Rechnung stellt.

  16. Visual Scanning Training, Limb Activation Treatment, and Prism Adaptation for rehabilitating left neglect: Who is the winner?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos ePriftis

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We compared, for the first time, the overall and differential effects of three of the most widely used left neglect (LN treatments: Visual Scanning Training (VST, Limb Activation Treatment (LAT, and Prism Adaptation (PA. Thirty-three LN patients were assigned in quasi-random order to the three groups (VST, LAT, or PA. Each patient received only one type of treatment. LN patients’ performance on everyday life tasks was assessed four times (over a period of six weeks: A1 and A2 (i.e., the two pre-treatment assessments; A3 and A4 (i.e., the two post-treatment assessments. LN patients in each of the three treatment conditions were treated for the same number of sessions (i.e., 20. The results showed that improvements were present in the majority of the tests assessing the peripersonal space in everyday life activities. Our findings were independent of unspecific factors and lasted for at least two weeks following the end of the treatments. There were no interactions, however, between LN treatments and assessments. We suggest that all three treatments can be considered as valid rehabilitation interventions for LN and could be employed for ameliorating LN signs.

  17. “And the winner is…”: Hierarchies of language competence and fashion sense in Tanzanian beauty pageants

    OpenAIRE

    Billings, Sabrina

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses how successful Tanzanian beauty contestants mark themselves as educated sophisticates through clusters of semiotic materials. At lower-level and provincial competitions, contestants’ ability to speak ‘pure,’ if non-fluent and non-standard, English helps them achieve victory. This register is coupled with local, often outlandish, interpretations of international fashions and hairstyles. Yet in the capital city, and especially at the national competition, winning contesta...

  18. McJimsey Award Winner: Ideologies of the Shri Meenakshi Goushala: Hindu and Jain Motivations for a Madurai Cow Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Evans

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay describes and analyzes the motivations underlying the creation and current organization of a recently constructed 'goshala '(cow home in the south Indian city of Madurai.  Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork carried out in 2012, I highlight the divergent visions of the 'goshala'’s purpose and future that were articulated by the institution’s Hindu and Jain members.  Interviews and informal conversations with participants indicate that many individuals conceptualize only one “authentic” tradition of animal homes.  However, within Madurai’s 'goshala 'and likely many others like it, these stakeholders referred to distinctly different traditions.  I argue that Hindu and Jain understandings of 'ahimsa '(nonviolence and the cow vary significantly, and this strongly affects individual expectations of the mission of animal homes.  Utilizing Hobsbawm and Ranger’s framework (1983, I note that the many “invented traditions” of animal homes may be difficult to accommodate within one institution, especially one with a religiously diverse membership.  I further suggest that transparent discussions which clearly indicate an animal home’s goals and mission are necessary and that the outcomes of these discussions should be effectively communicated to the wider community supporting the institution.

  19. 2016 Arte Poster Competition First Place Winner: Circadian Rhythm and UV-Induced Skin Damage: An In Vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Linna; Suggs, Amanda; Ahsanuddin, Sayeeda; Tarrillion, Madeline; Selph, Jacqueline; Lam, Minh; Baron, Elma

    2016-09-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation causes many detrimental effects through mechanisms related to oxidative stress and DNA damage. Excessive oxidative stress can cause apoptosis and cellular dysfunction of epidermal cells leading to cellular senescence and connective tissue degradation. Direct and indirect damage to DNA predisposes the skin to cancer formation. Chronic UV exposure also leads to skin aging manifested as wrinkling, loss of skin tone, and decreased resilience. Fortunately, human skin has several natural mechanisms for combating UV-induced damage. The mechanisms operate on a diurnal rhythm, a cycle that repeats approximately every 24 hours. It is known that the circadian rhythm is involved in many skin physiologic processes, including water regulation and epidermal stem cell function. This study evaluated whether UV damage and the skin's natural mechanisms of inflammation and repair are also affected by circadian rhythm. We looked at UV-induced erythema on seven human subjects irradiated with simulated solar radiation in the morning (at 08:00 h) versus in the afternoon (at 16:00 h). Our data suggest that the same dose of UV radiation induces significantly more inflammation in the morning than in the afternoon. Changes in protein expression relevant to DNA damage, such as xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group A (XPA), and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) from skin biopsies correlated with our clinical results. Both XPA and CPD levels were higher after the morning UV exposure compared with the afternoon exposure. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(9):1124-1130.

  20. 2015 Arte Poster Competition First Place Winner: Assessing the Correlation Between Patient Anxiety and Satisfaction for Mohs Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Maren C; Wilkerson, Eric C; Mistur, Rachel L; Nisar, Mahrukh; Love, W Elliot

    2015-09-01

    Skin cancer and the surgical treatment thereof have the potential to be sources of great anxiety for patients. Examination of patient satisfaction, anxiety, and contributing factors has the potential to provide information surgeons can use to implement practices that have an impact on patient anxiety and satisfaction regarding dermatologic surgery. This study used a prospective interview to catalog patients' anxiety and experiences before and during the surgical process. Our results indicate that several pre- and perioperative factors have the potential to decrease a patient's overall anxiety. Notably, 33% of surgical patients reported a decrease in anxiety from the time of diagnosis until the day of surgery. Factors that contributed to this included a call discussing the diagnosis and what to expect on the day of surgery as well as reading written material or searching the internet for more information regarding the procedure. Furthermore, a call from the physician compared to a call from a nurse or other team member showed a greater effect on decreasing anxiety. During the surgical procedure, our results highlight several factors that can decrease a patient's anxiety. Most notably, eating, watching TV, bringing a guest, and engaging in small talk with surgeon and staff during the procedure subjectively decreased patients' anxiety. In summary, our results suggest that patients respond to a variety of factors to reduce anxiety and that each patient derives relief from anxiety in different manners. Therefore, offering a spectrum of comforting or distracting activities during the Mohs procedure is ideal and may reduce the need for pharmacologic anxiolytics.

  1. Differences in performance indicators among winners and losers of group a of the spanish basketball amateur league (EBA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Parejo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio es identificar las diferencias existentes en los indicadores de rendimiento entre equipos ganadores y perdedores, en función del tipo de partido, en el Grupo A de la Liga Española de Baloncesto Amateur. La muestra del estudio estuvo constituida por 231 partidos (N = 462 casos disputados durante la temporada 2005/2006 por los equipos del Grupo A durante la Fase Regular de la Liga EBA (Española de Baloncesto Amateur. Las variables del estudio fueron los indicadores de rendimiento y las variables secundarias, posesiones de balón y coeficientes de eficacia ofensiva y defensiva. El análisis inferencial entre ganadores y perdedores mostró que existían diferencias significativas en varios de los indicadores de rendimiento y los coeficientes de eficacia en los tres tipos de partido, aumentando el número de indicadores que diferencian a medida que se desequilibran los encuentros. En los partidos equilibrados son los lanzamientos de 2 puntos fallados, los tiros libres anotados, los rebotes defensivos, las asistencias y las faltas personales, así como los coeficientes de eficacia, los que diferencian entre ganadores y perdedores. En los partidos desequilibrados se añaden los lanzamientos de campo anotados, las pérdidas y los tapones efectuados. En el caso de los partidos muy desequilibrados casi todos los indicadores de rendimiento excepto las recuperaciones, los rebotes ofensivos y los lanzamientos de 3 puntos fallados diferencian a los ganadores de los perdedores. Se pone de manifiesto que existen un mayor número de indicadores de rendimiento de media que diferencian a los equipos ganadores de los perdedores con respecto a otras ligas más profesionales, por lo que se puede afirmar que existe mayor heterogeneidad entre el nivel de los equipos que conforman este tipo de ligas amateur.

  2. Mechanisms of Bactericide Resistance in Phytopathogenic Bacteria(Abstracts of the Research by the Winners of the Young Scientist Award)

    OpenAIRE

    Masami, NAKAJIMA; School of Agriculture, Ibaraki University

    2002-01-01

    Bactericides containing copper and streptomycin have been widely used to control bacterial plant diseases. However, the efficacy of copper and streptomycin have been reduced by the development of copper- and streptomycin-resistant bacterial strains. Understanding the mechanism of resistance is necessary for the prevention and management of resistance. In this study, the mechanisms of copper and streptomycin resistance in Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae were analyzed.

  3. Winners, Socially Displaced and Cinderellas: Representations of Race and Social Climbing in the Second Half of the Twentieth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Pisano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available From the study of articles published in Colombian magazines (particularly Cromos magazine in the second half of the twentieth century, this article proposes the analysis of some representations about upward mobility of black people. Consideration is given to the stories of some characters at different times: the judge Jose Antonio Camacho, the boxer Kid Pambelé, the model Laura Mosquera and the pianist Teresa Gómez. Although they emerged in different professional contexts, narratives about their paths have in common the emphasis on how the class representations articulated with the race and gender ones and were used to show the difficulty for a black person to be inserted in a social context different from the popular sectors, showing both their alleged incompatibility with the values of the middle class as well as the inability to fully integrate into a society dominated by whites.

  4. Kahe sajandi vanune Langguth - kvaliteet ja loovus! / Erik Aru

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Aru, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Saksamaa veinifirma F.W.Langguth Erben ja Šveitsi konteinervedudega tegeleva firma AAE kogemused töö organiseerimisel. Lisa: F. W. Langguth Erben GMBH. Vt. samas: Kärt Blumberg. Tark investeering valel ajal

  5. The Dynamics of the Microbial Population as Measured by the Quantification of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) at Three Sampling Locations Within the North Inlet Estuary, Georgetown, SC: 1981-1985.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — Water samples were collected daily at approximately 10:00 AM, from a depth of 50 cm at three stations, and transported immediately to the laboratory. The three...

  6. Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Macrobenthos Data for the North Inlet Estuary, Georgetown, South Carolina: 1981-1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — Samples were taken from two estuarine tidal creek stations (designated BB and DD) in the North Inlet Estuary, SC. Two large cores, with a sediment surface area of...

  7. Groundwater Dynamics along Forest-Marsh-Tidal Creek Transects in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: 1994-1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — Ground water level elevations were collected every 10 to 15 days from piezometers stationed along three forest-marsh-tidal creek transects (B, C, and D) across the...

  8. Analyses of otoliths from juvenile black sea bass collected from estuaries in SC, FL, NJ, and NY: 2008-2009.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — Snappers/Groupers have traditionally been some of the most desired demersal fishes in the South Atlantic Bight and are the most abundant and diverse group of large...

  9. CREEK Project: RUI: the Role of Oyster Reefs in the Structure and Function of Tidal Creeks. A Project Overview: 1996-2000.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight tidal creeks dominated by oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated BACI (Before - After...

  10. North Inlet-Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve’s (NERR) Estuarine Surface Water Nutrient, Suspended Sediment, and Chlorophyll a Data for the North Inlet and Winyah Bay Estuaries, Georgetown, South Carolina: 2002-2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — National Estuarine Research Reserve System The National Estuarine Research Reserve System was established by the Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972 (as amended) and...

  11. North Inlet • Winyah Bay (NIW) National Estuarine Research Reserve Meteorological Data, North Inlet Estuary, Georgetown, South Carolina: 2000 • 2004.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — National Estuarine Research Reserve System The National Estuarine Research Reserve System was established by the Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972 (as amended) and...

  12. Crab Haul Creek Tide Gauge Data, North Inlet Estuary, Georgetown, South Carolina: 2001 • Feb2008.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — The Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services The Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) collects, analyzes and...

  13. CISNet Project’s Water Quality Monitoring Database for North Inlet and ACE Basin Estuaries, South Carolina: 1999-2001.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — EPA/NOAA/NASA CISNet Partnership The Coastal Intensive Site Network (CISNet) was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Oceanic and...

  14. CISNet Project's Phytoplankton Pigment Monitoring Database for the North Inlet and Ace Basin Estuaries, South Carolina: 1999-2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — EPA/NOAA/NASA CISNet Partnership The Coastal Intensive Site Network (CISNet) was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Oceanic and...

  15. CREEK Project's Nekton Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: 1997-1998.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight intertidal creeks with high densities of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated...

  16. CREEK Project's Microzooplankton Seasonal Monitoring Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: 1997-1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight intertidal creeks with high densities of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated...

  17. CREEK Project's Phytoplankton Pigment Monitoring Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: 1997-1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — The CREEK Project began in January of 1996 and was designed to help determine the role of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in tidal creeks of the North Inlet Estuary,...

  18. CREEK Project's Internal Creek Habitat Survey for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: January 1998.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight intertidal creeks with high densities of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated...

  19. CREEK Project's Oyster Growth and Survival Monitoring Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: 1997-1999.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight intertidal creeks with high densities of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated...

  20. CREEK Project's Oyster Biomass Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight tidal creeks dominated by oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated BACI (Before -...

  1. North Inlet-Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve's (NERR) Estuarine Water Quality Data for the North Inlet and Winyah Bay Estuaries, Georgetown, South Carolina: 1993-2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — The North Inlet Estuary and the adjacent lower northeastern section of the Winyah Bay Estuary were designated as part of the National Estuarine Research Reserve...

  2. Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) National Weather Service Station Data for the North Inlet Estuary, Georgetown, South Carolina: 1986 - 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — Meteorological data were collected on a daily basis from December 1, 1986 through March 3, 1996 at the Oyster Landing Research site in the North Inlet Estuary,...

  3. CREEK Project's Water Chemistry, Chlorophyll a, and Suspended Sediment Weekly Monitoring Database for Eight Creeks in the North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina: 1997-2000.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A group of eight tidal creeks dominated by oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in North Inlet Estuary, South Carolina, USA were studied using a replicated BACI (Before -...

  4. Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Climate Data with Water Parameters from North Inlet Meteorological Station, North Inlet Estuary, Georgetown, South Carolina: 1982-1996.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — Meteorological data with water parameters were collected on an hourly basis from June 3, 1982 through April 29, 1996 in the North Inlet Estuary, Georgetown County,...

  5. North Inlet • Winyah Bay (NIW) National Estuarine Research Reserve Meteorological Data, North Inlet Estuary, Georgetown, South Carolina: 1997 • 1999.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — The North Inlet Estuary and the adjacent lower northeastern section of Winyah Bay Estuary were designated as part of the National Estuarine Research Reserve System...

  6. Long-Term Spartina alterniflora biomass, productivity, porewater chemistry and marsh elevation in North Inlet Estuary, Georgetown, SC: 1984-2011.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — The salt marsh in the North Inlet estuary was sampled approximately monthly for estimates of biomass, productivity, porewater chemistry, and salt marsh elevation....

  7. A Silver Medal Winner at the 13th World Wu Shu Championship 2015 17 Months After Selective Thoracic Fusion for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chris Yin Wei; Aziz, Izzuddin; Chai, Fong Wei; Kwan, Mun Keong

    2017-02-15

    Case report. To report the successful rehabilitation and the training progress of an elite high performance martial art exponent after selective thoracic fusion for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS). Posterior spinal fusion for AIS will result in loss of spinal flexibility. The process of rehabilitation after posterior spinal fusion for AIS remains controversial and there are few reports of return to elite sports performance after posterior spinal fusion for AIS. We report a case of a 25-year-old lady who was a national Wu Shu exponent. She was a Taolu (Exhibition) exponent. She underwent Selective Thoracic Fusion (T4 to T12) using alternate level pedicle screw placement augmented with autogenous local bone graft in June 2014. She commenced her training at 3-month postsurgery and the intensity of her training was increased after 6 months postsurgery. We followed her up to 2 years postsurgery and showed no instrumentation failure or lost of correction. After selective thoracic fusion, her training process consisted of mainly speed training, core strengthening, limb strengthening, and flexibility exercises. At 17 months of postoperation, she participated in 13th World Wu Shu Championship 2015 and won the silver medal. Return to elite high-performance martial arts sports was possible after selective thoracic fusion for AIS. The accelerated and intensive training regime did not lead to any instrumentation failure and complications. 2.

  8. Effects of cortisol on cognition in major depressive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder and borderline personality disorder - 2014 Curt Richter Award Winner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingenfeld, Katja; Wolf, Oliver T

    2015-01-01

    Stress hormones influence a wide range of cognitive functions, including memory performance and executive function. It is well established that glucocorticoids enhance memory consolidation but impair memory retrieval. While most of the effects have been attributed to glucocorticoid receptors (GR), the importance of mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) has been also emphasized. Dysfunctions in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis have been reported for several mental disorders. While major depressive disorder (MDD) as well as borderline personality disorder (BPD) seem to be characterized by enhanced cortisol release in concert with a reduced feedback sensitivity of the HPA axis, in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) a contrary picture has been reported. Despite the fact that altered GR function has been discussed for these disorders only very few studies have investigated the effects of glucocorticoids on cognitive performance in these patients so far. In a series of studies, we investigated the effects of glucocorticoids on cognition (i.e. declarative memory, working memory and response inhibition) in different mental disorders such as MDD, PTSD and BPD. While in patients with MDD cortisol administration failed to effect memory retrieval, patients with PTSD and BPD showed enhanced rather than impaired memory retrieval after cortisol administration. These results indicate an altered sensitivity to cortisol in these disorders. Results from one of our recent studies in the field of social cognition underline the importance of the MR. We found that emotional empathy was enhanced through stimulation of the MR via fludrocortisone in healthy participants and women with BPD. This review aims to integrate these findings and discuss potential mechanisms and implications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Deep sleep after social stress : NREM sleep slow-wave activity is enhanced in both winners and losers of a conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, Jeanine; Lancel, Marike; Koolhaas, Jaap M.; Meerlo, Peter

    Sleep is considered to be a recovery process of prior wakefulness. Not only duration of the waking period affects sleep architecture and sleep EEG, the quality of wakefulness is also highly important. Studies in rats have shown that social defeat stress, in which experimental animals are attacked

  10. 2000 Volvo Award winner in basic science studies: Exogenous tumor necrosis factor-alpha mimics nucleus pulposus-induced neuropathology. Molecular, histologic, and behavioral comparisons in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, T; Kikuchi, S; Shubayev, V; Myers, R R

    2000-12-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the 17-kDa form of tumor necrosis factor-alpha is the pathophysiologic agent expressed by herniated nucleus pulposus in vivo that is primarily responsible for the histologic and behavioral manifestations of experimental sciatica associated with herniated lumbar discs. The authors determined the molecular weight and concentration of active tumor necrosis factor-alpha in rat herniated disc and used exogenous tumor necrosis factor-alpha at the same molecular weight to study its neuropathologic effect on rat nerve root and dorsal root ganglion preparations in vivo. Expressed by herniated nucleus pulposus in culture, tumor necrosis factor-alpha causes neuropathologic injury in nerve roots and neuropathic pain states in which mechanical allodynia is seen in response to peripheral stimuli. Western blotting was used to identify the molecular weight of the operative tumor necrosis factor-alpha protein form, and measures of optical density were used for semiquantitative determination of concentration. Plastic-embedded nerve roots and dorsal root ganglion were used for neuropathologic evaluation, and von Frey stimulation was used to quantify mechanical allodynia. The 17-kDa form of tumor necrosis factor-alpha is expressed by herniated nucleus pulposus at a concentration of approximately 0.48 ng per herniated rat lumbar disc. Exogenous tumor necrosis factor-alpha applied in vivo to rat nerve roots produced neuropathologic changes and behavior deficits that mimicked experimental studies with herniated nucleus pulposus applied to nerve roots. The data reinforce other evidence that tumor necrosis factor-alpha is involved in mechanisms of neuropathic pain.

  11. 2001 Volvo Award Winner in Basic Science Studies: Effect of nutrient supply on the viability of cells from the nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, H A; Urban, J P

    2001-12-01

    Disc cell viability was analyzed in relation to nutrient supply and cellular demand in vitro in a diffusion chamber. To determine relations among nutrient supply, nutrient concentrations. and cell viability. Although a fall in nutrient supply has long been thought the cause of disc degeneration in vivo, little information exists about the effects of nutrient levels or supply on cell viability and metabolism. Isolated bovine nucleus cells were cultured in agarose gels in a diffusion chamber up to 13 days. Nutrients were supplied to the open sides of the chamber and diffused through the gel to the center, 12.5 mm away from the nutrient supply, in a configuration analogous to that of the disc in vivo. Profiles of cell viability and concentration of glycosaminoglycans across the chamber were measured in relation to cell density and medium composition. Cells remained viable across the chamber at low cell densities. However, at higher densities, cells in the center of the chamber died. The viable distance from the nutrient supply fell with an increase in cell density. Glucose was a critical nutrient. Survival was also poor at acidic pH (6.0). At 0% oxygen, disc cells survived up to 13 days with no loss of viability, but produced very little proteoglycan. The results support the idea that maximum cell density in the disc is regulated by nutritional constraints, and that a fall in nutrient supply reduces the number of viable cells in the disc and thus leads to degeneration.

  12. 1997 Volvo Award winner in clinical studies. Degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis with spinal stenosis: a prospective, randomized study comparing decompressive laminectomy and arthrodesis with and without spinal instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischgrund, J S; Mackay, M; Herkowitz, H N; Brower, R; Montgomery, D M; Kurz, L T

    1997-12-15

    This prospective study analyzed the influence of transpedicular instrumented on the operative treatment of patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis and spinal stenosis. To determine whether the addition of transpedicular instrumented improves the clinical outcome and fusion rate of patients undergoing posterolateral fusion after decompression for spinal stenosis with concomitant degenerative spondylolisthesis. Decompression is often necessary in the treatment of symptomatic patients who have degenerative spondylolisthesis and spinal stenosis. Results of recent studies demonstrated that outcomes are significantly improved if posterolateral arthrodesis is performed at the listhesed level. A meta-analysis of the literature concluded that adjunctive spinal instrumentation for this procedure can enhance the fusion rate, although the effect on clinical outcome remains uncertain. Seventy-six patients who had symptomatic spinal stenosis associated with degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis were prospectively studied. All patients underwent posterior decompression with concomitant posterolateral intertransverse process arthrodesis. The patients were randomized to a segmental transpedicular instrumented or noninstrumented group. Sixty-seven patients were available for a 2-year follow-up. Clinical outcome was excellent or good in 76% of the patients in whom instrumentation was placed and in 85% of those in whom no instrumentation was placed (P = 0.45). Successful arthrodesis occurred in 82% of the instrumented cases versus 45% of the noninstrumented cases (P = 0.0015). Overall, successful fusion did not influence patient outcome (P = 0.435). In patients undergoing single-level posterolateral fusion for degenerative spondylolisthesis with spinal stenosis, the use of pedicle screws may lead to a higher fusion rate, but clinical outcome shows no improvement in pain in the back and lower limbs.

  13. The 2003 ISMS Practice Prize Winner: Optimizing Rhenania's Direct Marketing Business Through Dynamic Multilevel Modeling (DMLM) in a Multicatalog-Brand Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Ralf Elsner; Manfred Krafft; Arnd Huchzermeier

    2004-01-01

    We introduce Dynamic Multilevel Modeling (DMLM) to a multicatalog-brand environment to determine the optimal frequency, size, and customer segmentation of direct marketing activities. This optimization method leverages multicatalog-brand effects including the utilization of prior customer ordering behavior, maximization of customer value and customer share, and economies of scale and scope in printing and mailing. This enhancement of the original DMLM-approach is called Dynamic Multidimension...

  14. Which Dengue Vaccine Approach Is the Most Promising, and Should We Be Concerned about Enhanced Disease after Vaccination? There Is Only One True Winner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Scott B

    2017-07-17

    The scientific community now possesses information obtained directly from human beings that makes it possible to understand why breakthrough-enhanced dengue virus (DENV) infections occurred in children receiving Sanofi Pasteur's Dengvaxia tetravalent live attenuated vaccine and to predict the possibility of breakthrough-enhanced DENV infections following immunization with two other tetravalent live attenuated vaccines now in phase III testing. Based upon recent research, Dengvaxia, lacking DENV nonstructural protein antigens, did not protect seronegatives because it failed to raise a competent T-cell response and/or antibodies to NS1. It is also possible that chimeric structure does not present the correct virion conformation permitting the development of protective neutralizing antibodies. A premonitory signal shared by the Sanofi Pasteur and the Takeda vaccines was the failure of fully immunized subhuman primates to prevent low-level viremia and/or anamnestic antibody responses to live DENV challenge. The vaccine developed by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (National Institutes of Health [NIH]) has met virtually all of the goals needed to demonstrate preclinical efficacy and safety for humans. Each monovalent vaccine was comprehensively studied for reactogenicity and immunogenicity in human volunteers. Protective immunity in subjects receiving tetravalent candidate vaccines was evidenced by the fact that when vaccinated subjects were given further doses of vaccine or different strains of DENV the result was "solid immunity," a nonviremic and nonanamnestic immune response. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  15. Using Young Adult Literature to Provide Case Studies for Discussion of Bullying: An Analysis of the 2014 Pura Belpré Award Winner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing Meg Medina's young adult novel "Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass" (2013) through the lens of multidisciplinary research on school bullying provides a case study in using young adult literature (YAL) to stimulate high school discussions about bullying. Strategies for using anti-bullying YAL and recommendations of additional…

  16. Winner of Young Writer's Competition: How loud is the unquiet mind? William Sargant (1907-88) and British psychiatry in the mid-20th century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Shen Ooi, Joanne

    2012-05-01

    William Walters Sargant (1907-1988) is credited, for better or for worse, with putting physicalist psychiatry on the map--at the expense of the dictum 'primum non nocere' (first do no harm). He was an outspoken supporter and practitioner of what he termed the 'practical rather than philosophical approaches' to the treatment of mental illness. This paper examines Sargant's fascinating career, beginning with the reasons behind lifelong passion for radical psychiatry, then discusses the various physical treatments he pioneered and publicized during his three decades at St Thomas' including prolonged electroconvulsive therapy, insulin coma therapy, dangerous combinations of antidepressants and, most notably, prefrontal leucotomy. His heady mix of dogma and charisma enabled him to get away with flying in the face of evidence-based medicine--but not without courting the considerable controversy and contempt that was to so blacken his reputation posthumously. This paper ends with comments on misguided and misplaced enthusiasm in the history of therapeutics, acknowledgement of Sargant's positive contributions to psychiatry and finally a reminder not to be tempted to pass post hoc judgement on the man or his legacy all too quickly.

  17. Professor Paul Crutzen, the winner of the Nobel prize: The discovery of the ozone hole - knowledge and vision; Nobelpreistraeger Prof. Paul Crutzen: Entdeckung des Ozonlochs - Wissen und Vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crutzen, P.; Dellert-Ritter, M.

    1997-02-01

    On 10 December 1995, Professor Crutzen was awarded the Nobel prize for his epoch-making achievements in the field of atmospheric chemistry. This award underlines also Professor Crutzen`s commitment to the protection of the atmosphere. The atmospheric researcher discovered how sensitively the ozone layer reacts to air pollution. His work, together with that of others, led to the ban on ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons. As early as in 1970, Professor Crutzen demonstrated that nitrogen oxides react catalytically with ozone. His think tank provided numerous stimuli for further, intense research on atmospheric chemistry, which triggered a debate on the protection of the thinning ozone layer also among politicians. (orig.) [Deutsch] Am 10. Dezember 1995 wurde Prof. Crutzen fuer seine bahnbrechenden Leistungen auf dem Gebiet der Atmosphaerenchemie mit dem Nobelpreis geehrt. Diese Anerkennung unterstreicht auch das Engagement von Prof. Crutzen zum Schutz der Ozonschicht. Der Atmosphaerenforscher Prof. Crutzen entdeckte, wie empfindlich die Ozonschicht auf Luftverunreinigungen reagiert. Seine Arbeiten fuehrten mit zum Verbot der ozonvernichtenden Fluorchlorkohlenwasserstoffe. Bereits 1970 wies Prof. Crutzen nach, dass Stickstoffoxide katalytisch mit Ozon reagieren. Aus der Ideenfabrik von Prof. Crutzen kamen zahlreiche Anregungen fuer weitere intensive Forschungen zur Chemie der Atmosphaere, die auch unter Politikern eine Debatte ueber den Schutz der hauchduennen Ozonschicht ausloeste. (orig.)

  18. ISSLS Prize winner: Increased innervation and sensory nervous system plasticity in a mouse model of low back pain due to intervertebral disc degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, Masayuki; Millecamps, Magali; Danco, Alexander T; Ohtori, Seiji; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Stone, Laura S

    2014-08-01

    Immunohistochemical and behavioral study using the SPARC (secreted protein, acidic, rich in cysteine)-null mouse model of low back pain (LBP) associated with accelerated intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. To determine if behavioral signs of LBP in SPARC-null mice are accompanied by sensory nervous system plasticity. IVD pathology is a significant contributor to chronic LBP. In humans and rodents, decreased expression of SPARC is associated with IVD degeneration. We previously reported that SPARC-null mice exhibit age-dependent behavioral signs of chronic axial LBP and radiating leg pain. SPARC-null and age-matched control young, middle-aged, and old mice (1.5, 6, and 24 mo of age, respectively) were evaluated. Cutaneous hind paw sensitivity to cold, heat, and mechanical stimuli were evaluated as measures of radiating pain. The grip force and tail suspension assays were performed to evaluate axial LBP. Motor impairment was assessed using an accelerating rotarod. IVD innervation was identified by immunohistochemistry targeting the nerve fiber marker PGP9.5 and the sensory neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Sensory nervous system plasticity was evaluated by quantification of CGRP- and neuropeptide-Y-immunoreactivity (-ir) in dorsal root ganglia neurons and CGRP-ir, GFAP-ir (astrocyte marker), and Iba-1-ir (microglia marker) in the spinal cord. SPARC-null mice developed hypersensitivity to cold, axial discomfort, age-dependent motor impairment, age-dependent increases in sensory innervation in and around the IVDs, age-dependent upregulation of CGRP and neuropeptide-Y in dorsal root ganglia, and age-dependent upregulation of CGRP, microglia, and astrocytes in the spinal cord dorsal horn. Increased innervation of degenerating IVDs by sensory nerve fibers and the neuroplasticity in sensory neurons and spinal cord could contribute to the underlying pathobiology of chronic discogenic LBP. N/A.

  19. Duncan Tanner Essay Prize Winner 2014. Against the 'Sacred Cow': NHS Opposition and the Fellowship for Freedom in Medicine, 1948-72.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaton, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This essay recovers organized opposition to the National Health Service (NHS) by considering the Fellowship for Freedom in Medicine (FFM), a conservative organization of doctors who challenged the 'Sacred Cow' of nationalized healthcare in the 1950s and 1960s. While there has been little interest in anti-NHS politics because of shortcomings in the institution's historiography, this study suggests ways a new history of the service can be written. Central to that project is taking the broader ideological and emotive quality of the NHS seriously, and appreciating the way, for all sides of the political spectrum, as well as the general public, the service has always been a contested symbol of post-war British identity. This essay argues that two NHS 'crises'--panics over costs, and disillusionment within general practice--were not merely disagreements over budgets and pay-packets but politically charged moments infused with conservative anxieties over Britain's post-war trajectory. The FFM imagined the NHS as an economically dangerous bureaucratic machine that crushed medical independence and risked pushing the country towards dictatorship. Allies within the Conservative Party, private health insurance industry, and free-market 'think-tanks' worked with the FFM to challenge defences of both the service's operation and meaning. To appreciate why the NHS remains 'the closest thing the English have to a religion', one must consider the apostates as well as the faithful.

  20. The Princess and the Poor Self-Image: An Analysis of Newbery Medal Winners for Gender Bias and Female Underrepresentation Leading into the Twenty-First Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A. McCleary

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes how 12 recent (2000-2011 Newbery Medal-winning books represent gender. The study counts how many of the books’ characters represent progressive or traditional gender roles, how many male and female characters represent each character category (protagonist, antagonist, major, and minor, how many strong female characters are accepted or rejected by their peers, how many characters hold stereotypical gender beliefs about themselves or their peers, and how many works contain balanced feminist perspectives. The study finds equitable female representation, but the study also finds a bias toward traditional male stereotypes. The results indicate a general acceptance of strong female characters and a balanced representation of females, regardless of a historical fiction classification. These results suggest that characters in Newbery Medal-winning books represent gender more equally and less stereotypically compared to characters in works of earlier decades.

  1. Share and share alike or winner take all?: the influence of social value orientation upon coice and recall of negotiation heuristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Dreu, C.K.W.; Boles, T.

    1998-01-01

    Two experiments test the hypothesis that social value orientation influences choice and recall of heuristics in individuals preparing for negotiation. Consistent with predictions, Study 1 shows that in the preparation phase, negotiators with a prosocial value orientation choose more cooperative

  2. MO-DE-207B-01: JACK FOWLER JUNIOR INVESTIGATOR COMPETITION WINNER: Between Somatic Mutations and PET-Based Radiomic Features in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, S; Coroller, T; Rios Velazquez, E; Parmar, C; Mak, R; Aerts, H [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Kim, J [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Although PET-based radiomic features have been proposed to quantify tumor heterogeneity and shown promise in outcome prediction, little is known about their relationship with tumor genetics. This study assessed the association of [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET-based radiomic features with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) mutations. Methods: 348 NSCLC patients underwent FDG-PET/CT scans before treatment and were tested for genetic mutations. 13% (44/348) and 28% (96/348) patients were found to harbor EGFR (EGFR+) and KRAS (KRAS+) mutations, respectively. We evaluated nineteen PET-based radiomic features quantifying phenotypic traits, and compared them with conventional PET features (metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and maximum-SUV). The association between the feature values and mutation status was evaluated using the Wilcoxcon-rank-sum-test. The ability of each measure to predict mutations was assessed by the area under the receiver operating curve (AUC). Noether’s test was used to determine if the AUCs were significantly from random (AUC=0.50). All p-values were corrected for multiple testing by controlling the false discovery rate (FDR{sub Wilcoxon} and FDR{sub Noether}) of 10%. Results: Eight radiomic features, MTV, and maximum-SUV, were significantly associated with the EGFR mutation (FDR{sub Wilcoxon}=0.01–0.10). However, KRAS+ demonstrated no significantly distinctive imaging features compared to KRAS− (FDR{sub Wilcoxon}≥0.92). EGFR+ and EGFR− were significantly discriminated by conventional PET features (AUC=0.61, FDR{sub Noether}=0.04 for MTV and AUC=0.64, FDR{sub Noether}=0.01 for maximum-SUV). Eight radiomic features were significantly predictive for EGFR+ compared to EGFR− (AUC=0.59–0.67, FDR{sub Noether}=0.0032–0.09). Normalized-inverse-difference-moment outperformed all features in predicting EGFR mutation (AUC=0.67, FDR{sub Noether}=0.0032). Moreover, only the radiomic feature normalized-inverse-difference-moment could significantly predict KRAS+ from EGFR+ (AUC=0.65, FDR{sub Noether}=0.05). All measures failed to predict KRAS+ from KRAS− (AUC=0.50–0.54, FDR{sub Noether}≥0.92). Conclusion: PET imaging features were strongly associated with EGFR mutations in NSCLC. Radiomic features have great potential in predicting EGFR mutations. Our study may help develop a non-invasive imaging biomarker for EGFR mutation. R.M. has consulting interests with Amgen.

  3. A prospective randomized controlled trial of the natural history of idiopathic scoliosis versus treatment with the SpineCor brace. Sosort Award 2011 winner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coillard, C; Circo, A B; Rivard, C H

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the efficacy of the Dynamic SpineCor brace for early idiopathic scoliosis (15°-30°) compared to the natural evolution of the disease. 68 patients participated in this study (32 treated and 36 controls) with at least 5 years follow-up. The inclusion criteria were: 1) high risk of evolution: family history and/or proven progressive; 2) no significant pathological malformation of the spine; 3) initial Cobb angle between 15° and 30°; 4) risser 0, 1 or 2. Assessment of brace efficacy included the percentage of patients who have 5º or less curve progression and the percentage of patients who have 6º or more progression at skeletal maturity. At five-year follow-up a correction was achieved in 50% of treated patient and only in 9.5% of controls, stabilization in 42.3% treated and 47.7% in controls and progression in 26.9% for the treated group and 42.8% for controls. For the control patients we considered as a failure if the Cobb angle worsened by more then 5° from the original angle and the patient then received treatment. The results 5 years after the treatment suggested that the SpineCor brace reduced the probability of the progression of early idiopathic scoliosis comparing with its natural history. Moreover, the positive outcome appears to be maintained in the long term.

  4. Energy Performance and Thermal Comfort of a High Efficiency House: RhOME for denCity, Winner of Solar Decathlon Europe 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Battista

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The increase of people living in large cities and the expansion of new urban areas are keys to defining new sustainable models. It is estimated that about 70% of the EU population lives in urban areas, and it is expected to reach 80% by 2030. Consequently, it is important to find a new concept of buildings that can reduce the total energy consumption. The Solar Decathlon is an international university competition, born in 2002, created by the U.S. State Energy Department (DOE. Students are challenged to design and operate a full-scale, innovative and sustainable house able to exploit solar radiation as its sole energy source. The objective of the competition is to promote research and education in sustainable architecture and solar energy fields. This paper presents an overview on the contribution of LIFT (Interdisciplinary Laboratory of Technical Physics of Roma Tre University to the winning project of the Solar Decathlon Europe 2014 competition: The RhOME for denCity. This project consists of a building properly designed to produce a solar-powered house that is cost-effective, energy-efficient, and attractive.

  5. Gerir a dissidência: vencedores e vencidos na espanha franquista Managing dissent: winners and losers in Franco’s Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Ampudia de Haro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available O objectivo do artigo é oferecer uma perspectiva geral acerca da dicotomia “vencedor/vencido” como resultado do novo equilíbrio de poder que emerge em Espanha após a guerra civil. A administração deste equilíbrio por parte do regime franquista inclui a gestão do contingente dos vencidos. Argumenta-se que a distinção “vencedor/vencido” proporciona o fundamento sociológico necessário que converte a metáfora meta-histórica das “duas Espanhas” numa realidade social durante o franquismo.The aim of this paper is to offer a general perspective on the “victor/vanquished” dichotomy as a result of the new power balance in the period following the Spanish Civil war. The power balance administered by the Franco regime includes, inevitably, the “vanquished” management. I argue that the “victor/vanquished” distinction provides a sociological background to speak about the “two Spains” meta-historical metaphor as a social reality during Francoism.

  6. British Orthodontic Society, Chapman Prize Winner 2003. A novel in vitro culture model to investigate the reaction of the dentine-pulp complex to orthodontic force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhopatkar, A A; Sloan, A J; Rock, W P; Cooper, P R; Smith, A J

    2005-06-01

    To develop a novel mandible slice organ culture model to investigate the effects of externally applied force on the dentine-pulp complex. In vitro organ culture. School of Dentistry, Birmingham, UK. Transverse 2 mm thick sections were cut from the mandibles of five 28-day-old male Wistar rats. Serial sections were used for control and test pairs. Springs made from 0.016-inch and 0.019 x 0.025-inch stainless steel wires were used to apply a 50 g tensile or compressive force, respectively, to test specimens. Control and test specimens were cultured for 5 days in a humidified incubator with 5% CO(2) at 37 degrees C and processed for routine histological investigation. Nine more rats were used to provide control and compression test pairs where the pulps were extirpated after 3 days culture and total RNA isolated for gene expression analysis by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Histology showed the dental and supporting tissues maintained a healthy appearance in the control cultures after culture. Histomorphometric analysis revealed a 20-27% increase in pulp fibroblast density in test specimens compared with controls. Gene expression analyses revealed up-regulation in the test groups of PCNA, c-Myc, Collagen 1alpha, TGF-beta1 and alkaline phosphatase, whilst expression of osteocalcin was reduced. The results demonstrated that the present organ culture technique provides a valuable in vitro experimental model for studying the effects of externally applied forces. These forces stimulated a cellular response in the pulp chamber characterized by altered gene expression and proliferation of fibroblasts; the latter being unaffected by the nature of the force in terms of compression or tension.

  7. Society News: Fellow sets new world record; RAS thesis prize winners; Galileo in the courtyard; Need a room? Society announces new award for early-career researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    Generous sponsorship from Winton Capital Management has made possible two new RAS Awards, to be given annually to postdoctoral researchers who have made outstanding progress in the years immediately after their PhD.

  8. Stress-induced redistribution of immune cells--from barracks to boulevards to battlefields: a tale of three hormones--Curt Richter Award winner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhabhar, Firdaus S; Malarkey, William B; Neri, Eric; McEwen, Bruce S

    2012-09-01

    The surveillance and effector functions of the immune system are critically dependent on the appropriate distribution of immune cells in the body. An acute or short-term stress response induces a rapid and significant redistribution of immune cells among different body compartments. Stress-induced leukocyte redistribution may be a fundamental survival response that directs leukocyte subpopulations to specific target organs during stress, and significantly enhances the speed, efficacy and regulation of an immune response. Immune responses are generally enhanced in compartments (e.g., skin) that are enriched with leukocytes, and suppressed in compartments that are depleted of leukocytes during/following stress. The experiments described here were designed to elucidate the: (1) Time-course, trajectory, and subpopulation-specificity of stress-induced mobilization and trafficking of blood leukocytes. (2) Individual and combined actions of the principal stress hormones, norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (EPI), and corticosterone (CORT), in mediating mobilization or trafficking of specific leukocyte subpopulations. (3) Effects of stress/stress hormones on adhesion molecule, L-selectin (CD62L), expression by each subpopulation to assess its adhesion/functional/maturation status. Male Sprague Dawley rats were stressed (short-term restraint, 2-120 min), or adrenalectomized and injected with vehicle (VEH), NE, EPI, CORT, or their combinations, and blood was collected for measurement of hormones and flow cytometric quantification of leukocyte subpopulations. Acute stress induced an early increase/mobilization of neutrophils, lymphocytes, helper T cells (Th), cytolytic T cells (CTL), and B cells into the blood, followed by a decrease/trafficking of all cell types out of the blood, except neutrophil numbers that continued to increase. CD62L expression was increased on neutrophils, decreased on Th, CTL, and natural killer (NK) cells, and showed a biphasic decrease on monocytes & B cells, suggesting that CD62L is involved in mediating the redistribution effects of stress. Additionally, we observed significant differences in the direction, magnitude, and subpopulation specificity of the effects of each hormone: NE increased leukocyte numbers, most notably CD62L⁻/⁺ neutrophils and CD62L⁻ B cells. EPI increased monocyte and neutrophil numbers, most notably CD62L⁻/⁺ neutrophils and CD62L⁻ monocytes, but decreased lymphocyte numbers with CD62L⁻/⁺ CTL and CD62L⁺ B cells being especially sensitive. CORT decreased monocyte, lymphocyte, Th, CTL, and B cell numbers with CD62L⁻ and CD62L⁺ cells being equally affected. Thus, naïve (CD62L⁺) vs. memory (CD62L⁻) T cells, classical (CD62L⁺) vs. non-classical (CD62L⁻) monocytes, and similarly distinct functional subsets of other leukocyte populations are differentially mobilized into the blood and trafficked to tissues by stress hormones. Stress hormones orchestrate a large-scale redistribution of immune cells in the body. NE and EPI mobilize immune cells into the bloodstream, and EPI and CORT induce traffic out of the blood possibly to tissue surveillance pathways, lymphoid tissues, and sites of ongoing or de novo immune activation. Immune cell subpopulations appear to show differential sensitivities and redistribution responses to each hormone depending on the type of leukocyte (neutrophil, monocyte or lymphocyte) and its maturation/functional characteristics (e.g., non-classical/resident or classical/inflammatory monocyte, naïve or central/effector memory T cell). Thus, stress hormones could be administered simultaneously or sequentially to induce specific leukocyte subpopulations to be mobilized into the blood, or to traffic from blood to tissues. Stress- or stress hormone-mediated changes in immune cell distribution could be clinically harnessed to: (1) Direct leukocytes to sites of vaccination, wound healing, infection, or cancer and thereby enhance protective immunity. (2) Reduce leukocyte traffic to sites of inflammatory/autoimmune reactions. (3) Sequester immune cells in relatively protected compartments to minimize exposure to cytotoxic treatments like radiation or localized chemotherapy. (4) Measure biological resistance/sensitivity to stress hormones in vivo. In keeping with the guidelines for Richter Award manuscripts, in addition to original data we also present a model and synthesis of findings in the context of the literature on the effects of short-term stress on immune cell distribution and function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. WE-DE-BRA-01: SCIENCE COUNCIL JUNIOR INVESTIGATOR COMPETITION WINNER: Acceleration of a Limited-Angle Intrafraction Verification (LIVE) System Using Adaptive Prior Knowledge Based Image Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y; Yin, F; Ren, L [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Zhang, Y [UT Southwestern Medical Ctr at Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an adaptive prior knowledge based image estimation method to reduce the scan angle needed in the LIVE system to reconstruct 4D-CBCT for intrafraction verification. Methods: The LIVE system has been previously proposed to reconstructs 4D volumetric images on-the-fly during arc treatment for intrafraction target verification and dose calculation. This system uses limited-angle beam’s eye view (BEV) MV cine images acquired from the treatment beam together with the orthogonally acquired limited-angle kV projections to reconstruct 4D-CBCT images for target verification during treatment. In this study, we developed an adaptive constrained free-form deformation reconstruction technique in LIVE to further reduce the scanning angle needed to reconstruct the CBCT images. This technique uses free form deformation with energy minimization to deform prior images to estimate 4D-CBCT based on projections acquired in limited angle (orthogonal 6°) during the treatment. Note that the prior images are adaptively updated using the latest CBCT images reconstructed by LIVE during treatment to utilize the continuity of patient motion.The 4D digital extended-cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom was used to evaluate the efficacy of this technique with LIVE system. A lung patient was simulated with different scenario, including baseline drifts, amplitude change and phase shift. Limited-angle orthogonal kV and beam’s eye view (BEV) MV projections were generated for each scenario. The CBCT reconstructed by these projections were compared with the ground-truth generated in XCAT.Volume-percentage-difference (VPD) and center-of-mass-shift (COMS) were calculated between the reconstructed and the ground-truth tumors to evaluate the reconstruction accuracy. Results: Using orthogonal-view of 6° kV and BEV- MV projections, the VPD/COMS values were 12.7±4.0%/0.7±0.5 mm, 13.0±5.1%/0.8±0.5 mm, and 11.4±5.4%/0.5±0.3 mm for the three scenarios, respectively. Conclusion: The technique enables LIVE to accurately reconstruct 4D-CBCT images using only orthogonal 6° angle, which greatly improves the efficiency and reduces dose of LIVE for intrafraction verification.

  10. The life of Georges Charpak : a mini-exhibition all about the winner of the 1992 Nobel Prize for Physics in the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    This renowned scientist revolutionised the detection of elementary particles, but is equally interested in other fields, such as medicine and primary science education. Follow the course of his life, a truly scientific and human story, through original manuscripts, archive film, and actual scientific instruments.

  11. Cult of the Sexless Casement with Special Reference to the Novel The Dream of the Celt by Mario Vargas Llosa (Nobel Prize Winner for Literature 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Dudgeon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Irish revolutionary Roger Casement, executed in 1916, has spawned an army of books, articles, and news stories, more about his diaries and the authenticity controversy that still surrounds them than about his seminal work encouraging and arming Irish separatism or his humanitarian investigations in the Congo and the Peruvian Amazon. His aura and image in life, and more so in death, was Christ-like. A cult developed that required him to be sexless. The more he was said to be an active homosexual, as graphically revealed in his journals, ironically, the more he was revered as an icon by his Catholic nationalist supporters. The entry of Nobel prizewinning novelist Mario Vargas Llosa to the field and his adoption of a mixed, even contradictory, view of Casement’s sexuality in his Dream of the Celt (2010 has sparked a new round of disputation particularly from Angus Mitchell, the foremost proponent of the diary forgery theory. This emerges in his extensive Field Day Review articles, one of which provides a full history of the controversy. 

  12. WE-DE-BRA-01: SCIENCE COUNCIL JUNIOR INVESTIGATOR COMPETITION WINNER: Acceleration of a Limited-Angle Intrafraction Verification (LIVE) System Using Adaptive Prior Knowledge Based Image Estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y; Yin, F; Ren, L; Zhang, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an adaptive prior knowledge based image estimation method to reduce the scan angle needed in the LIVE system to reconstruct 4D-CBCT for intrafraction verification. Methods: The LIVE system has been previously proposed to reconstructs 4D volumetric images on-the-fly during arc treatment for intrafraction target verification and dose calculation. This system uses limited-angle beam’s eye view (BEV) MV cine images acquired from the treatment beam together with the orthogonally acquired limited-angle kV projections to reconstruct 4D-CBCT images for target verification during treatment. In this study, we developed an adaptive constrained free-form deformation reconstruction technique in LIVE to further reduce the scanning angle needed to reconstruct the CBCT images. This technique uses free form deformation with energy minimization to deform prior images to estimate 4D-CBCT based on projections acquired in limited angle (orthogonal 6°) during the treatment. Note that the prior images are adaptively updated using the latest CBCT images reconstructed by LIVE during treatment to utilize the continuity of patient motion.The 4D digital extended-cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom was used to evaluate the efficacy of this technique with LIVE system. A lung patient was simulated with different scenario, including baseline drifts, amplitude change and phase shift. Limited-angle orthogonal kV and beam’s eye view (BEV) MV projections were generated for each scenario. The CBCT reconstructed by these projections were compared with the ground-truth generated in XCAT.Volume-percentage-difference (VPD) and center-of-mass-shift (COMS) were calculated between the reconstructed and the ground-truth tumors to evaluate the reconstruction accuracy. Results: Using orthogonal-view of 6° kV and BEV- MV projections, the VPD/COMS values were 12.7±4.0%/0.7±0.5 mm, 13.0±5.1%/0.8±0.5 mm, and 11.4±5.4%/0.5±0.3 mm for the three scenarios, respectively. Conclusion: The technique enables LIVE to accurately reconstruct 4D-CBCT images using only orthogonal 6° angle, which greatly improves the efficiency and reduces dose of LIVE for intrafraction verification.

  13. Assessing Values in Historical Fiction Written for Children: A Content Analysis of the Winners of the Scott O'Dell Historical Fiction Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgington, William D.; Brabham, Edna Greene; Frost, Jami Bice

    1999-01-01

    Considers how teachers engage children in character education and analyzes core values in books winning the Scott O'Dell Historical Fiction Award. Finds that these books are rich sources for examples of core values that are common features of character-education programs. Observes many teachers using short stories and picture books to insert…

  14. Spacelabs Innovative Project Award winner--2008. Megacode simulation workshop and education video--a megatonne of care and Code blue: live and interactive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Lynda; Leskowski, Jessica; Fallis, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Skill acquisition and knowledge translation of best practices can be successfully facilitated using simulation methods. The 2008 Spacelabs Innovative Project Award was awarded for a unique training workshop that used simulation in the area of cardiac life support and resuscitation to train multiple health care personnel in basic and advanced skills. The megacode simulation workshop and education video was an educational event held in 2007 in Winnipeg, MB, for close to 60 participants and trainers from multiple disciplines across the provinces of Manitoba and Northwestern Ontario. The event included lectures, live simulation of a megacode, and hands-on training in the latest techniques in resuscitation. The goals of this project were to promote efficiency and better outcomes related to resuscitation measures, to foster teamwork, to emphasize the importance of each team member's role, and to improve knowledge and skills in resuscitation. The workshop was filmed to produce a training DVD that could be used for future knowledge enhancement and introductory training of health care personnel. Substantial positive feedback was received and evaluations indicated that participants reported improvement and expansion of their knowledge of advanced cardiac life support. Given their regular participation in cardiac arrest codes and the importance of staying up-to-date on best practice, the workshop was particularly useful to health care staff and nurses working in critical care areas. In addition, those who participate less frequently in cardiac resuscitation will benefit from the educational video for ongoing competency. Through accelerating knowledge translation from the literature to the bedside, it is hoped that this event contributed to improved patient care and outcomes with respect to advanced cardiac life support.

  15. Long-term Shifts in Coral Communities On Shallow to Deep Reef Slopes of Curaçao and Bonaire: Are There Any Winners?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bakker, D.M.; Meesters, E.H.; Bak, R.P.M.; Nieuwland, G.; van Duyl, F.C.

    2016-01-01

    Tropical coral reefs are among the most biologically diverse and economically important ecosystems on earth. Nevertheless, we found dramatic changes in coral communities on the reef slopes of Curaçao and Bonaire since 1973. Cover and abundance declined for virtually all coral species. The data show

  16. Physicians for the prevention of nuclear war. A portrayal of the Nobel prize winner. Betrifft: Aerzte gegen den Atomkrieg. Ein Portraet des Friedensnobelpreistraegers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jogschies, R.

    1986-01-01

    The publication abstracted reports on the history and aims of IPPNW (International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War). In recognition of their continuous and consistent international campaign of enlightenment its 140,000 members were awarded the peace Nobel prize in 1985. Emphasis is placed on the achievements and work of the Western Germany section of ''Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War''. The portrait is the first of its kind to comprehensibly acquaint even non-experts with the background, history and difficulties of the medical resistance to the dangers of nuclear war. Neither stopping at national or at political borders the medical hippocratic mission of fighting against a nuclear holocaust has brought about and developed a professional disinterestedness which is not equalled by any other kind of social and moral devotion. The publication analyses the worldwide threatening situation, the forgotten lesson taught by the past and the chances of medical protest. The result pointed out expresses an optimistic view. Chances are good if IPPNW does not only supply us with facts but also sets an example of modern morality. Interesting rudimentary attempts of initation can already be observed with other professions, for example among journalists.

  17. EDITORIAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    resistance data. A standardised chloroquine in vivo study, basd on the World Health Organisation (WHO) protocol, with 28- day follow-up, was conducted at these ... catalysed a national policy change from chloroquine to SP for .... J. Durrheim ON, Ogunbanjo GA, Blumberg L Managing """"'ergen' malaria in South Africa.

  18. Arts-Based Instructional Leadership: Crafting a Supervisory Practice that Supports the Art of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelehear, Zach

    2008-01-01

    If teaching at its best is an art (Davis, 2005; Sarason, 1999; Grumet, 1993; Eisner, 1985; Barone, 1983; Greene, 1971; Smith 1971), then instructional leadership of teaching, done best, must also be based in art (Behar-Horenstein, 2004; Klein, 1999; Eisner, 1983 & 1998a; Blumberg, 1989; Barone, 1998). The author examines possible applications of…

  19. South African Medical Journal - Vol 103, No 10 (2013)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case management of malaria: Treatment and chemoprophylaxis · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. IS Ukpe, D Moonasar, J Raman, KI Barnes, L Baker, L Blumberg, 793-798. http://dx.doi.org/10.7196/SAMJ.7443 ...

  20. EDITORIAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , chloroquine is often still used in areas of stable malaria because of the additive effect of host immune factors resulting in clinical but not .... Durrheim D , Ogunbanjo GA, Blumberg L Managing re-energent malaria in South Africa. SA Fam Prad ...

  1. Joshua Lederberg – a remembrance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Joshua Lederberg, an iconic figure in microbiology, passed away on 2 February 2008 at the age of 83. Many obituar- ies have since appeared describing his work in and outside of science (Balaram 2008; Blumberg 2008; Crow 2008a,b;. Oransky 2008; Sgaramella 2008). As a practising micro- biologists, we take ...

  2. Meeting on the Physical Oceanography of Sea Straits (2nd). Held in Villefanche-sur-Mer, France on 15-19 April 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-19

    43,769-S35, 1996. Morel , Y., and J. C. McWilliams, Effects of diapycnal mixing on the stability of oceanic currents. J. Phys. Oceanogr. 31.2280...Strait of Lo I Gibraltar using the Princeton Ocean Model (POM) Depth i (Blumberg and Mellor, 1987) in a very high- Morocco (r’• resolution

  3. Lembitu : Eesti muistepõlve mälestustest kasvanud luuletus / Friedrich Reinhold Kreutzwald

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kreutzwald, Friedrich Reinhold, 1803-1882

    2003-01-01

    Faksiimileväljaanne: Kreutzwald, Friedrich Reinhold. Lembitu : Eesti muistepõlwe mälestustest kaswanud luuletus / Puhkama läinud lauliku Friedrich Reinhold Kreutzwaldi järel jäetud paberitest wälja antud. Tartu : G. Blumberg, 1885

  4. EDITORIAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    resistance data. A standardised chloroquine in vivo study, basd on the World Health Organisation (WHO) protocol, with 28- day follow-up, was conducted at these health ... introduction of the change in first-line treatment.15 This .... J. Durrheim ON, Ogunbanjo GA, Blumberg L Managing """"'ergen' malaria in South Africa.

  5. Analysis of Parental Involvement and Self-Esteem on Secondary School Students in Kieni West Sub-County, Nyeri County, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wairimu, Mburu Josephine; Macharia, Susan M.; Muiru, Ann

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between parental involvement and the self-esteem among adolescents in secondary school students in Kieni West District in Nyeri County. It was guided by Self Determination Theory (SDT) by James William and Baumrind Theory of Parenting Styles by Diana Blumberg Baumrind. Some of the gaps identified in the…

  6. Review of Related Research Literature on Educational Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, G. Llewellyn

    Although a large number of studies on supervision have been redundant, some important empirical knowledge has been gained from research in this area. Gwaltney, Andburg, Blumberg, Weber and Amidon, and Marquit have studied the differing perceptions of supervisory behavior by teachers, supervisors, and administrators. Gross and Herriot and later…

  7. Topical Application of Tranexamic Acid to Reduce Blood Loss during Complex Combat-Related Spine Trauma Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Transfusion. Apr 2004;44(4):489-500. 3. Triulzi DJ, Vanek K, Ryan DH, Blumberg N. A clinical and immunologic study of blood transfusion and...FDA Approved Drug Products, Cyklokapron Label and Approval History . http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2013/019281s031lbl.pdf

  8. Kütus, mida saadakse põllult / ref. Axel Novak

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Bioetanooli autokütusena kasutamise probleemidest Saksamaal, Brasiilia positiivsest näitest biokütuste kasutamisel ning autotootjate huvist alternatiivkütuste kasutamise vastu. Skeem: Teraviljast alkoholini. Lisa: Etanooli liikumine - Stinnesi tarneahel. Vt. samas: Kärt Blumberg. Biodiisli müük Eestis võtab hoogu

  9. Long-Term Large Mesozooplankton (Motile Epibenthos) Data for the North Inlet Estuary, Georgetown, South Carolina: 1981-2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — Three consecutive tows of an epibenthic sled fitted with a 365-micron mesh net were used to collect small (1-20 mm) motile animals from just above the bottom of two...

  10. ORIGINAL ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    environmental stresses largely due to the increased heavey metal pollution. Anabaena ...... Laboratory Press. Cold Spring. Harbour, New York. Zingmark, R.G and Miller, T.G. (1975). The effect of mercury on the photosynthesis and growth of estuarine phytoplankton. Bellow. Baruch Libr. Marine. Science, 3: 45-47. and oceanic.

  11. The telescopes of Duke Ernst I, the Pious, of Saxony-Gotha. (German Title: Die Fernrohre von Herzog Ernst I., dem Frommen, von Sachsen-Gotha)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Inge

    Already in the 17th century, there was an interest in astronomy at the court of Gotha, where Duke Ernst I hold one of the largest collections of telescopes at his times, with instruments made by the Augsburg optician Johann Wiesel, by Baruch Spinoza and others. By the help of the inventory of the Kunstkammer the holdings may be documentarily demonstrated.

  12. 78 FR 57916 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Order Approving...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... School of Business, Baruch College, Member Deutsch Lipner, dated July 11, 2013 (``Lipner Letter''); Peter... Letter''); Jill I. Gross, Director, Crystal Green, Student Intern, Susan Papacostas, Student Intern... the documents enumerated in the Lists. It would also stress that the Customer Code provides a...

  13. 75 FR 55799 - Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... broad applications in the studies of polyomavirus infection mechanisms and carcinogenesis. Notably, they... phosphorylation sites. Exp Cell Res. 2008 Jan 15;314(2):352-365. [PubMed: 17996233]. 3. A Ben-Baruch, et al. The... countries. 251,000 new cases are reported annually. Post-operative five year survival rate of HCC patients...

  14. The Logic of Sense Incorporated to the Notion of Inquiry as an Orientation for Learning: Two Classroom Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez, Gonzalo Camacho

    2017-01-01

    A reflection about two classroom experiences is presented in the attempt to incorporate the Logic of Sense into the notion of inquiry for learning. The author used the method of Experimentation introduced by Deleuze and Guattari, who based its principles on philosophical conceptions by Baruch Spinoza. The first experience is conducted with…

  15. Long-Term Low Tide Monitoring Data for Fishes, Shrimps, & Crabs in Oyster Landing Creek, North Inlet Estuary, Georgetown, South Carolina: 1983-2003.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — Seine samples of the nekton community were taken every 2 weeks with a 6-millimeter mesh bag seine at low tide, in an intertidal creek pool in the Oyster Landing...

  16. Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Daily Estuarine Surface Water Nutrient and Water Quality, Suspended Sediment, and Chlorophyll a Data for the North Inlet Estuary, Georgetown, South Carolina: 1978-1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A one 1000 ml (one Liter) water sample was collected daily (at approximately 1000 hrs EST - but see note below in section 1.2.3 Supplemental Information) at a depth...

  17. North Inlet-Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve's (NERR) Estuarine Surface Water Nutrient, Suspended Sediment, and Chlorophyll a Data for the North Inlet and Winyah Bay Estuaries, Georgetown, South Carolina: 1993-2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — A one 1000 ml (one Liter) water sample was collected every 20 days at 2 hour and 4 minute intervals for 2 complete tidal cycles (26 hours) with an ISCO automated...

  18. Why academic boycot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhart, T.

    2002-01-01

    Dear Baruch Kimmerling, Last week, you published in Ha'aretz a moving letter defending the freedom of expression of a group of Israeli professors, including myself, who signed a European petition calling for a moratorium on European support to the Israeli academia. Here is what you wrote:

  19. Death in the Aljama of Huesca: the Jews and Royal Taxation in Fourteenth-Century Aragon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerson, Alexandra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1385, Baruch Alentienz was beaten to death by fellow Jews while exercising his duties as treasurer of the Jewish community of Huesca. This article analyzes Baruch’s murder in the context of the growing fiscal pressures imposed on communities – whether Christian, Jewish, or Muslim – throughout the Mediterranean in the fourteenth century. With the third largest Jewish community of the kingdom of Aragon and being responsible for 18% of the total contributions expected by the Crown from the Jews of Aragon, Huesca provides us with an ideal case study of these larger patterns. The case of Baruch Alentienz gives us a unique opportunity to shed light on the fiscal and economic history of the kingdom of Aragon but perhaps more importantly, shows how this growing taxation led to growing conflict inside local communities.En 1385, el judío Baruch Alentienz fue asesinado por miembros de la aljama judía mientras ejercía la función de tesorero en la comunidad judía de Huesca. Este artículo analiza el asesinato de Baruch en el contexto del crecimiento de la presión tributaria sobre las comunidades mediterráneas –tanto cristianas, como judías y musulmanas– en el siglo XIV. Como tercera comunidad judía más grande del reino de Aragón, la aljama de Huesca era responsable del 18% del total de contribuciones tributarias demandadas por la Corona a los judíos aragoneses. El caso de Baruch Alentienz nos ofrece una oportunidad única para explorar la historia fiscal y económica del Reino de Aragón y demuestra cómo el desarrollo del sistema fiscal y el crecimiento tributario del estado derivó en muchos conflictos internos en las comunidades locales.

  20. Low delay and area efficient soft error correction in arbitration logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Yutaka

    2013-09-10

    There is provided an arbitration logic device for controlling an access to a shared resource. The arbitration logic device comprises at least one storage element, a winner selection logic device, and an error detection logic device. The storage element stores a plurality of requestors' information. The winner selection logic device selects a winner requestor among the requestors based on the requestors' information received from a plurality of requestors. The winner selection logic device selects the winner requestor without checking whether there is the soft error in the winner requestor's information.

  1. 2001 Volvo Award Winner in Clinical Studies: Effects of a media campaign on back pain beliefs and its potential influence on management of low back pain in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, R; Jolley, D; Wyatt, M

    2001-12-01

    Quasi-experimental, nonrandomized, nonequivalent, parallel group-controlled study involving before and after telephone surveys of the general population and postal surveys of general practitioners was conducted, with an adjacent state used as a control group. To evaluate the effectiveness of a population-based intervention designed to alter beliefs about back pain, influence medical management, and reduce disability and workers' compensation-related costs. A multimedia campaign begun during 1997 in Victoria, Australia, positively advised patients with back pain to stay active and exercise, not to rest for prolonged periods, and to remain at work. The campaign's impact on population beliefs about back pain and fear-avoidance beliefs was measured in telephone surveys, and the effect of the campaign on the potential management of low back pain by general practitioners was assessed by eliciting their likely approach to two hypothetical scenarios in mailed surveys. Demographically identical population groups in Victoria and the control state, New South Wales, were surveyed at three times: before, during, and after intervention in Victoria. The studies were completed by 4730 individuals in the general population and 2556 general practitioners. There were large statistically significant improvements in back pain beliefs over time in Victoria (mean scores on the Back Beliefs Questionnaire, 26.5, 28.4, and 29.7), but not in New South Wales (26.3, 26.2, and 26.3, respectively). Among those who reported back pain during the previous year, fear-avoidance beliefs about physical activity improved significantly in Victoria (mean scores on the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire for physical activity, 14, 12.5, and 11.6), but not in New South Wales (13.3, 13.6, and 12.7, respectively). General practitioners in Victoria reported significant improvements over time in beliefs about back pain management, as compared with their interstate colleagues. There were statistically significant interactions between state and time for 7 of 10 responses on management of acute low back pain, and for 6 of 10 responses on management of subacute low back pain. A population-based strategy of providing positive messages about back pain improves the beliefs of the general population and general practitioners about back pain and appears to influence medical management.

  2. 2001 Volvo Award Winner in Clinical Studies: Lumbar fusion versus nonsurgical treatment for chronic low back pain: a multicenter randomized controlled trial from the Swedish Lumbar Spine Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzell, P; Hägg, O; Wessberg, P; Nordwall, A

    2001-12-01

    A randomized controlled multicenter study with a 2-year follow-up by an independent observer. To determine whether fusion of the lower lumbar spine could reduce pain and diminish disability more effectively when compared with nonsurgical treatment in patients with severe chronic low back pain (CLBP). The reported results after fusion surgery on patients with CLBP vary considerably, and the evidence of treatment efficacy is weak in the absence of randomized controlled studies. A total of 294 patients referred to 19 spinal centers from 1992 through 1998 were randomized blindly into four treatment groups. Patients aged 25-65 years with CLBP for at least 2 years and with radiologic evidence of disc degeneration at L4-L5, L5-S1, or both were eligible to participate in the study. The surgical group (n=222) included three different fusion techniques, not analyzed separately in this study. Patients in the nonsurgical group (n=72) were treated with different kinds of physical therapy. The surgical group comprised 49.5% men, and the mean age was 43 years. The corresponding figures for the nonsurgical group were 48.6% and 44 years. The patients had suffered from low back pain for a mean of 7.8 and 8.5 years and been on sick leave due to back pain for a mean of 3.2 and 2.9 years, respectively. The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was used to measure pain. The Oswestry Low Back Pain Questionnaire, the Million Score and the General Function Score (GFS) were used to measure disability. The Zung Depression Scale was used to measure depressive symptoms. The overall result was assessed by the patient and by an independent observer. Records from the Swedish Social Insurance were used to evaluate work disability. Patients who changed groups were included in the analyses of significance according to the intention-to-treat principle. At the 2-year follow-up 289 of 294 (98%) patients, including 25 who had changed groups, were examined. Back pain was reduced in the surgical group by 33% (64 to 43), compared with 7% (63 to 58) in the nonsurgical group (P=0.0002). Pain improved most during the first 6 months and then gradually deteriorated. Disability according to Oswestry was reduced by 25% (47 to 36) compared with 6% (48 to 46) among nonsurgical patients (P=0.015), according to Million by 28% (64 to 46) compared with 8% (66 to 60) (P=0.004), and accordingtoGFS by 31% (49 to 34) compared with 4% (48 to 46) (P=0.005). The depressive symptoms, according to Zung, were reduced by 20% (39 to 31) in the surgical group compared with 7% (39 to 36) in the nonsurgical group (P=0.123). In the surgical group 63% (122/195) rated themselves as "much better" or "better" compared with 29% (18/62) in the nonsurgical group (P<0.0001). The "net back to work rate" was significantly in favor of surgical treatment, or 36% vs. 13% (P=0.002). The early complication rate in the surgical group was 17%. Lumbar fusion in a well-informed and selected group of patients with severe CLBP can diminish pain and decrease disability more efficiently than commonly used nonsurgical treatment.

  3. A review of the 2001 Volvo Award winner in clinical studies: lumbar fusion versus nonsurgical treatment for chronic low back pain: a multicenter randomized controlled trial from the Swedish lumbar spine study group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Brian; Katz, Jeffrey N; Kim, David H; Jenis, Louis G

    2006-01-15

    The current debate over the efficacy of lumbar fusion for low back pain has not been settled. Fritzell et al published a landmark paper entitled "Lumbar fusion versus nonsurgical treatment for chronic low back pain: a multicenter randomized controlled trial from the Swedish lumbar spine study group." Their goal was to provide objective evidence supporting lumbar fusion. While it was well designed and important to our knowledge base, it has limitations. We set out to review their work in an unbiased yet critical manner. Our goals are to summarize the strengths and weaknesses of the paper, place it in the context of current knowledge, and highlight its significance for present-day practice and research. From technical and study design perspectives, Fritzell et al were able to validate the use of lumbar fusion for the treatment of low back pain. However, their use of "usual nonoperative" care and nonspecific definition of low back pain precluded a truly genuine comparison of operative and nonoperative groups. We commend the Swedish lumbar spine study group and their remarkable efforts; they elevated the sophistication of spine research and spawned many more excellent works to help settle the ongoing controversy on the ideal treatment of low back pain.

  4. 1997 Volvo Award winner in clinical studies. The effect of pedicle screw instrumentation on functional outcome and fusion rates in posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion: a prospective, randomized clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, K; Christensen, F B; Eiskjaer, S P; Hansen, E S; Fruensgaard, S; Bünger, C E

    1997-12-15

    A prospective randomized clinical study. To evaluate supplementary pedicle screw fixation (Cotrel-Dubousset) in posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion. The rationale behind lumbar fusion is to eliminate pathologic motion to relieve pain. To improve fusion rates and to allow reduction, a rigid transpedicular screw fixation may be beneficial, but the positive effect of this may be counter-balanced by an increase in complications. The inclusion criteria were severe, chronic low back pain from spondylolisthesis Grades 1 and 2 or from primary or secondary degenerative segmental instability. One hundred thirty patients were randomly allocated to receive no instrumentation (n = 66) or Cotrel-Dubousset instrumentation (n = 64) in posterolateral lumbar fusion. Variables were registered at the time of surgery and at 1 and 2 years after surgery. Follow-up was achieved in 97.7% of the patients. Fusion rates deduced from plain radiographs were not significantly different between instrumented and noninstrumented groups. The functional outcome assessed by the Dallas Pain Questionnaire improved significantly in both groups, and there were no significant differences in results between the two groups, except for significantly better (P < 0.06) functional outcome in relation to daily activities in the instrumented group when neural decompression had been performed. The global patients' satisfaction was 82% in the instrumented group versus 74% in the noninstrumented group (not significant). Fixation of instrumentation increased operation time, blood loss, and early reoperation rate significantly. Patients experienced only a few minor postoperative complications; none were major. Two infections appeared in the Cotrel-Dubousset group. Significant symptoms from misplacement of pedicle screws were seen in 4.8% of the instrumented patients. Lumbar posterolateral fusion with pedicle screw fixation increases the operation time, blood loss, and reoperation rate, and leads to a significant risk of nerve injury. The functional outcome improves significantly with high patient satisfaction, with or without instrumentation. No significant differences were observed between the two groups in functional outcome and fusion rate. The only gain in functional outcome from instrumentation was found in the daily activity category in patients with supplementary neural decompression. The results of this study do not justify the general use of pedicle screw fixation alone as an adjunct to posterolateral lumbar fusion.

  5. A review of 1985 Volvo Award winner in clinical science: objective assessment of spine function following industrial injury: a prospective study with comparison group and 1-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainville, James; Kim, Richard S; Katz, Jeffrey N

    2007-08-15

    It is now 2 decades since Mayer et al published their Volvo Award-winning paper entitled "Objective assessment of spine function following industrial injury: a prospective study with comparison group and one-year follow-up." Their landmark paper reported that return to work rates of patients that underwent a "functional restoration" treatment program were double that of a comparative group of patients that were denied treatment by their insurers. These results were considered extraordinary and inspired both debate and enthusiasm. Our goal is to review this landmark study, report on its strengths and weaknesses, and review the studies that have attempted to replicate this work in other settings. We also highlight its contribution to our current knowledge about the treatment of back pain and disability. The major weaknesses of the paper of Mayer et al are the possibility of selection bias in the development of their cohort of patients and the lack of a true randomized controlled study design. These factors may have inflated the rates of return to work. Regardless, their reported results were robust, and cannot be easily dismissed. During the last 20 years, this treatment model has received considerable study worldwide, and it is generally agreed that it is superior to standard care for reducing work absence in patients with chronic low back pain. Additionally, the concepts underlying functional restoration have been found to be highly relevant to patients with chronic low back pain, medical providers, and disability systems and continue to gain acceptance and integration into the care of patients throughout the industrialized world.

  6. Practical aspects of informative providing organization of educational process in winner of the «Red Banner of Labour» award agro-industrial college of V.I. Vernadsky Crimean Federal University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengelay M.A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available the article describes the modern stage of evolution of information management of educational process from classical paper-based libraries to modern digital ones. The principles of organization, advantages and disadvantages of web-based electronic information provision are characterized, it is shown how to design a digital library by the educational establishment.

  7. Escaping Adolescence: Sonya Hartnett's "Surrender" as a Gothic Bildungsroman for the Twenty-First Century: Winner of the 2016 Children's Literature in Education Emerging Scholar Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kealley, Adam

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the subversion of the bildungsroman in the young adult novel, "Surrender" (Penguin, Camberwell, 2005), by the Australian author, Sonya Hartnett. It is suggested that, in reinscribing the traditional bildungsroman within a Gothic discourse, this novel reveals the effect on subjectivity that the horrors of postmodernity…

  8. Winner of the Lund Science Award 1992. Thermosensitization induced by step-down heating. A review on heat-induced sensitization to hyperthermia alone or hyperthermia combined with radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindegaard, J C

    1992-01-01

    A few minute's exposure to a high temperature (sensitizing treatment, ST) may substantially increase the cytotoxic and the radiosensitizing effect of a subsequent heating at a lower temperature (test treatment, TT). This phenomenon, which is known as step-down heating (SDH) or thermosensitization, has been observed both in cultured cells in vitro and in tumours and normal tissues in vivo. The effect of SDH increases with a lowering of TT temperature, but it is rapidly lost at temperatures very close to 37 degrees C. SDH-induced thermosensitization decays within a few hours, when an interval is inserted between ST and TT. In vitro results suggest an exponential decay of the SDH effect with half times ranging from 1.5- to 3.1 h. The effect of SDH increases with increasing ST time or temperature. For single heating, the Arrhenius plot is biphasic with activation energies of 500-800 and 1200-1700 kJ/mol above and below a break point temperature in the region 42.5-43.0 degrees C, respectively. For SDH, the Arrhenius plot gradually becomes monophasic with increasing severity of ST and it approaches asymptotically to an activation energy of about 400 kJ/mol. The reduction of the activation energy depends on cell survival after the priming ST and not on the specific ST heating time or temperature. SDH strongly enhances hyperthermic radiosensitization with a 5-6-fold reduction of the radiation dose required to achieve tumour control. The thermosensitizing and the radiosensitizing effects of SDH have several features in common. Both effects become more prominent when the TT temperature is decreased and when the ST heating time or temperature increases. In addition, the decay kinetics for both effects are comparable. For heat alone, the effect of SDH in tumour and normal tissue seems to be quantitatively similar. However, the therapeutic ratio may be increased by combining SDH with radiation. Biologically, the critical subcellular targets involved in the SDH effect have not been revealed. However, the ability of SDH to inhibit the clearance of heat-induced aggregation of proteins in the nucleus is interesting. Blockage of the nuclear function by proteins is a central theory in the present molecular biological models for both cell kill by heat and heat radiosensitization. Clinically, SDH may be an advantage since even a short exposure to high temperature increases the effect of an otherwise inadequate heat treatment. The disadvantages are that SDH complicates thermal dose calculations, and may cause unacceptable damage to normal tissue.

  9. ``Models'' CAVEAT EMPTOR!!!: ``Toy Models Too-Often Yield Toy-Results''!!!: Statistics, Polls, Politics, Economics, Elections!!!: GRAPH/Network-Physics: ``Equal-Distribution for All'' TRUMP-ED BEC ``Winner-Take-All'' ``Doctor Livingston I Presume?''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preibus-Norquist, R. N. C.-Grover; Bush-Romney, G. W.-Willard-Mitt; Dimon, J. P.; Adelson-Koch, Sheldon-Charles-David-Sheldon; Krugman-Axelrod, Paul-David; Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig; D. N. C./O. F. P./''47''%/50% Collaboration; R. N. C./G. O. P./''53''%/49% Collaboration; Nyt/Wp/Cnn/Msnbc/Pbs/Npr/Ft Collaboration; Ftn/Fnc/Fox/Wsj/Fbn Collaboration; Lb/Jpmc/Bs/Boa/Ml/Wamu/S&P/Fitch/Moodys/Nmis Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    ``Models''? CAVEAT EMPTOR!!!: ``Toy Models Too-Often Yield Toy-Results''!!!: Goldenfeld[``The Role of Models in Physics'', in Lects.on Phase-Transitions & R.-G.(92)-p.32-33!!!]: statistics(Silver{[NYTimes; Bensinger, ``Math-Geerks Clearly-Defeated Pundits'', LATimes, (11/9/12)])}, polls, politics, economics, elections!!!: GRAPH/network/net/...-PHYSICS Barabasi-Albert[RMP (02)] (r,t)-space VERSUS(???) [Where's the Inverse/ Dual/Integral-Transform???] (Benjamin)Franklin(1795)-Fourier(1795; 1897;1822)-Laplace(1850)-Mellin (1902) Brillouin(1922)-...(k,)-space, {Hubbard [The World According to Wavelets,Peters (96)-p.14!!!/p.246: refs.-F2!!!]},and then (2) Albert-Barabasi[]Bose-Einstein quantum-statistics(BEQS) Bose-Einstein CONDENSATION (BEC) versus Bianconi[pvt.-comm.; arXiv:cond-mat/0204506; ...] -Barabasi [???] Fermi-Dirac

  10. WE-G-18A-01: JUNIOR INVESTIGATOR WINNER - Low-Dose C-Arm Cone-Beam CT with Model-Based Image Reconstruction for High-Quality Guidance of Neurosurgical Intervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, A; Stayman, J; Otake, Y; Gallia, G; Siewerdsen, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To address the challenges of image quality, radiation dose, and reconstruction speed in intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) for neurosurgery by combining model-based image reconstruction (MBIR) with accelerated algorithmic and computational methods. Methods: Preclinical studies involved a mobile C-arm for CBCT imaging of two anthropomorphic head phantoms that included simulated imaging targets (ventricles, soft-tissue structures/bleeds) and neurosurgical procedures (deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode insertion) for assessment of image quality. The penalized likelihood (PL) framework was used for MBIR, incorporating a statistical model with image regularization via an edgepreserving penalty. To accelerate PL reconstruction, the ordered-subset, separable quadratic surrogates (OS-SQS) algorithm was modified to incorporate Nesterov's method and implemented on a multi-GPU system. A fair comparison of image quality between PL and conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) was performed by selecting reconstruction parameters that provided matched low-contrast spatial resolution. Results: CBCT images of the head phantoms demonstrated that PL reconstruction improved image quality (∼28% higher CNR) even at half the radiation dose (3.3 mGy) compared to FBP. A combination of Nesterov's method and fast projectors yielded a PL reconstruction run-time of 251 sec (cf., 5729 sec for OS-SQS, 13 sec for FBP). Insertion of a DBS electrode resulted in severe metal artifact streaks in FBP reconstructions, whereas PL was intrinsically robust against metal artifact. The combination of noise and artifact was reduced from 32.2 HU in FBP to 9.5 HU in PL, thereby providing better assessment of device placement and potential complications. Conclusion: The methods can be applied to intraoperative CBCT for guidance and verification of neurosurgical procedures (DBS electrode insertion, biopsy, tumor resection) and detection of complications (intracranial hemorrhage). Significant improvement in image quality, dose reduction, and reconstruction time of ∼4 min will enable practical deployment of low-dose C-arm CBCT within the operating room. AAPM Research Seed Funding (2013-2014); NIH Fellowship F32EB017571; Siemens Healthcare (XP Division)

  11. Student Award for Outstanding Research Winner in the Undergraduate Category for the 2017 Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition, April 5-8, 2017, Minneapolis, Minnesota: Development and characterization of stimuli-responsive hydrogel microcarriers for oral protein delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Colleen; Steichen, Stephanie; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2017-05-01

    A family of pH-responsive terpolymers composed of methacrylic acid (MAA), N-vinyl pyrrolidone (NVP), and poly(ethylene glycol) monomethylether monomethacrylate (PEGMMA) have been developed and evaluated for their pH-responsive swelling behavior, protein-loading capabilities, and cytocompatibility. These terpolymer hydrogels, designated as P((MAA-co-NVP)-g-EG), were synthesized with varying PEG chain lengths and monomer feed ratios. The incorporation of MAA into the terpolymer structure was quantified with potentiometric titration. Equilibrium and dynamic swelling studies confirmed the pH-responsive behavior of the hydrogel, with the system remaining collapsed/complexed in acidic pH conditions and swollen/decomplexed in neutral pH conditions. The ability of the hydrogels to partition protein into the swollen network was assessed for two model proteins of varying molecular weight: insulin and porcine growth hormone. Finally, the cytocompatibility of the hydrogels in the presence of two model intestinal cell lines was investigated and confirmed minimal cytotoxicity at and below 2.5 mg/mL. The developed P((MAA-co-NVP)-g-EG) hydrogels exhibit unique properties that could potentially be utilized for drug delivery and separation applications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1243-1251, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. ISSLS Prize winner: Long-term follow-up suggests spinal fusion is associated with increased adjacent segment disc degeneration but without influence on clinical outcome: results of a combined follow-up from 4 randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, Anne F; Leivseth, Gunnar; Brox, Jens-Ivar; Fritzell, Peter; Hägg, Olle; Fairbank, Jeremy C T

    2014-08-01

    Cross-sectional analysis of long-term follow-up (LTFU) data from 4 randomized controlled trials of operative versus nonoperative treatment for chronic low back pain. To examine the influence of spinal fusion on adjacent segment disc space height as an indicator of disc degeneration at LTFU. There is ongoing debate as to whether adjacent segment disc degeneration results from the increased mechanical stress of fusion. Plain standing lateral radiographs were obtained at LTFU (mean, 13 ± 4 yr postrandomization) in 229 of 464 (49%) patients randomized to surgery and 140 of 303 (46%), to nonoperative care. Disc space height and posteroanterior displacement were measured for each lumbar segment using a validated computer-assisted distortion compensated roentgen analysis technique. Values were reported in units of standard deviations above or below age and sex-adjusted normal values. Patient-rated outcomes included the Oswestry Disability Index and pain scales. Radiographs were usable in 355 of 369 (96%) patients (259 fusion and 96 nonoperative treatment). Both treatment groups showed significantly lower values for disc space height of the adjacent segment than norm values. There was a significant difference between treatment groups for the disc space height of the cranial adjacent segment (in both as-treated and intention-to-treat analyses). The mean treatment effect of fusion on adjacent segment disc space height was -0.44 SDs (95% CI, -0.77 to -0.11; P = 0.01; as-treated analysis); there was no group difference for posteroanterior displacement (0.18 SDs, 95% confidence interval, -0.28 to 0.64, P = 0.45). Adjacent level disc space height and posteroanterior displacement were not correlated with Oswestry Disability Index or pain scores at LTFU (r = 0.010-0.05; P > 0.33). Fusion was associated with lower disc space height at the adjacent segment after an average of 13 years of FU. The reduced disc space height had no influence on patient self-rated outcomes (pain or disability). 2.

  13. Increased gait variability may not imply impaired stride-to-stride control of walking in healthy older adults: Winner: 2013 Gait and Clinical Movement Analysis Society Best Paper Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingwell, Jonathan B; Salinas, Mandy M; Cusumano, Joseph P

    2017-06-01

    Older adults exhibit increased gait variability that is associated with fall history and predicts future falls. It is not known to what extent this increased variability results from increased physiological noise versus a decreased ability to regulate walking movements. To "walk", a person must move a finite distance in finite time, making stride length (L n ) and time (T n ) the fundamental stride variables to define forward walking. Multiple age-related physiological changes increase neuromotor noise, increasing gait variability. If older adults also alter how they regulate their stride variables, this could further exacerbate that variability. We previously developed a Goal Equivalent Manifold (GEM) computational framework specifically to separate these causes of variability. Here, we apply this framework to identify how both young and high-functioning healthy older adults regulate stepping from each stride to the next. Healthy older adults exhibited increased gait variability, independent of walking speed. However, despite this, these healthy older adults also concurrently exhibited no differences (all p>0.50) from young adults either in how their stride variability was distributed relative to the GEM or in how they regulated, from stride to stride, either their basic stepping variables or deviations relative to the GEM. Using a validated computational model, we found these experimental findings were consistent with increased gait variability arising solely from increased neuromotor noise, and not from changes in stride-to-stride control. Thus, age-related increased gait variability likely precedes impaired stepping control. This suggests these changes may in turn precede increased fall risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. MedlinePlus: Awards and Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... winner of the 2005 World Summit on the Information Society Awards for e-health. Winner of the Thomas Reuters/Frank Bradway Rogers Information Advancement Award in 2014 for MedlinePlus Connect and ...

  15. 77 FR 26015 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for “Seeing My World through a Safer Lens: What...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ... outside the scope of their employment should consult their ethics official prior to developing their..., finalists, and winners of the Contest. Information is not collected for commercial marketing. Winners are...

  16. Sexospécificités | Page 196 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    -urban South Asia and find fair and sustainable solutions. ... Yoseth Ariza Araύjo, Sarah Olson, and Coll Hutchison, winners of the Student Poster Awards, and Dr Susilowati Tana, Ecohealth Research Presentation Award winner, were all ...

  17. Voting paradoxes and group coherence the condorcet efficiency of voting rules

    CERN Document Server

    Gehrlein, William V

    2011-01-01

    This book argues that strange election outcomes should become less likely as voters' preferences become more mutually coherent. It also focuses on the Condorcet Criterion, which states that pairwise majority rule winner should be chosen as the election winner.

  18. "Be Sickle Smart!" | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Table of Contents Singing star and former American Idol winner Ruben Studdard wrote the song,"I Am ... sickle cell disease Recording artist and former American Idol winner Ruben Studdard has made the fight against ...

  19. Chemical solution deposition of CaCu3Ti4O12 thin film

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Ramirez A P, Subramanian M A, Gardel M G, Blumberg G, Li. D, Vogt T and Shapiro S M 2000 Solid State Commun. 115 217. Schwartz R W 1997 Chem. Mater. 9 2325. Shri Prakash B, Varma K B R, Michau D and Maglione M 2008. Thin Solid Films 516 2874. Si W, Cruz E M, Johnson P D, Barnes P W, Woodward P and.

  20. Kant on empiricism and rationalism

    OpenAIRE

    Vanzo, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to correct some widely held misconceptions concerning Kant's role in the formation of a widespread narrative of early modern philosophy. According to this narrative, which dominated the English-speaking world throughout the twentieth century, the early modern period was characterized by the development of two rival schools: René Descartes's, Baruch Spinoza's, and G. W. Leibniz's rationalism; and John Locke's, George Berkeley's, and David Hume's empiricism. Empiricists and rati...

  1. The impact in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, M.

    1985-01-01

    President Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace program represented a radical departure from the policy of secrecy and denial that existed during the immediate postwar period, after the rejection of the Baruch Plan for international control of nuclear energy and nuclear weapons. Although the genesis and philosophy of the program are well known, the author emphasizes certain general aspects and considers specific situations in Latin America about the purposes and premises of Atoms for Peace

  2. ATLAS Thesis Awards 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Biondi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on Thursday 25 February. The winners also presented their work in front of members of the ATLAS Collaboration. Winners: Javier Montejo Berlingen, Barcelona (Spain), Ruth Pöttgen, Mainz (Germany), Nils Ruthmann, Freiburg (Germany), and Steven Schramm, Toronto (Canada).

  3. Bribery: Greed versus reciprocity

    OpenAIRE

    Gneezy, Uri; Saccardo, Silvia; van Veldhuizen, Roel

    2016-01-01

    It is estimated that a trillion dollars are annually exchanged in bribes, distorting justice and economic efficiency. In a novel experiment, we investigate the drivers of bribery. Two participants compete for a prize; a referee picks the winner. Participants can bribe the referee. When the referee can keep only the winner's bribe, bribes distort her judgment. When the referee keeps the bribes regardless of the winner, bribes no longer influence her judgment. An extra-laboratory experiment in ...

  4. Eosinophilic acute appendicitis caused by Strongyloides stercoralis and Enterobius vermicularis in an HIV-positive patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Dennis Baroni; Friedrisch, Bruno Kras; Fontanive Junior, Vilmar; da Rocha, Vívian Wünderlich

    2012-03-27

    A 29 year old female HIV-positive patient presented in emergency with acute right lower quadrant abdominal pain, fever, tenderness and positive Blumberg sign. Laboratorial tests revealed eosinophilia, anaemia and leukocytosis. She underwent exploratory laparotomy followed by appendectomy. The pathological analysis of the appendix revealed acute appendicitis, accentuated eosinophilia and infestation by Strongyloides stercoralis and Enterobius vermicularis. She did well after surgery and adequate treatment. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of eosinophilic acute appendicitis caused by these two parasitic worms reported in the medical literature.

  5. Ureteral Involvement Within an Incarcerated Inguinal Hernia in a Patient With Crossed-fused Renal Ectopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udit Singhal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Crossed-fused renal ectopy is an uncommon abnormality of the genitourinary tract that results from errors during embryological development. Ureteral herniation represents another rare anatomic event and can often occur from spontaneous, postoperative, and congenital causes (Allam, Johnson, Grewal & Johnson 2015; Pollack, Popky & Blumberg 1975. Here, we discuss the complex clinical course of a patient with crossed-fused renal ectopia who presents with symptoms due to ureteroinguinal herniation and provide a brief overview of the literature. We highlight the clinical considerations in the management of this patient and provide a potential anatomical and embryological explanation for his presentation.

  6. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2009 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2009 award winner, Professor Krzysztof Matyjaszewski, developed Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization to make polymers with copper catalysts and environmentally friendly reducing agents.

  7. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2010 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2010 award winner, Clarke, developed Natular, a plaster matrix that encapsulates the pesticide spinosad, slowly releasing it into water and effectively controlling mosquito larvae.

  8. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2014 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2014 award winner, The Solberg Company, replaced fluorinated surfactants in its firefighting foam concentrates with a blend of non-fluorinated surfactants and sugars.

  9. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2001 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2001 award winner, EDEN Bioscience, discovered and commercialized harpins: nontoxic, naturally occurring, biodegradable proteins that activate a plant's defense and growth mechanisms.

  10. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2005 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2005 award winner, Archer Daniels Midland, developed Archer RC, a nonvolatile, biobased, reactive coalescent that replaces volatile organic coalescents in architectural latex paints.

  11. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2014 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2014 award winner, Solazyme, engineered microalgae to produce oils tailored to customers’ needs that can mimic or enhance properties of traditional vegetable oils.

  12. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2007 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2007 award winner, Headwaters Technology Innovation, developed a metal nanocatalyst to synthesize hydrogen peroxide directly from hydrogen and oxygen, eliminating hazardous chemicals.

  13. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2004 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winner, Buckman Laboratories International, developed Optimyze technology, which uses an esterase enzyme to remove sticky contaminants from paper products prior to recycling.

  14. Surgery on Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Snapshot of Pregnancy & Infant Development Advances Snapshot of Child Development Advances Snapshot of Adult & Family Health Advances NICHD Nobel Prize Winners Leadership & Other ...

  15. 2004 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winner, Jeneil Biosurfactant Company, makes biobased, rhamnolipid surfactants by fermentation that are less toxic and more biodegradable than conventional surfactants.

  16. Perceived risk, dread, and benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, R.; Mendelsohn, R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper uses regression techniques to take a second look at a classic risk-perception data set originally collected by Paul Slovic, Sarah Lichtenstein, and Baruch Fischhoff. As discussed in earlier studies, the attributes expected mortality, effects on future generations, immediacy, and catastrophic potential all significantly affect risk ratings. However, the authors find that perceived risk and dread show different regression patterns; most importantly, only perceived risk ratings correlate with expected mortality. In addition, average risk ratings are found to be significantly affected by perceived individual benefits, which suggests that perceptions of risk are net rather than gross indicators of harm. 14 refs., 3 tabs

  17. Mil Homeros e mais um: Borges e a literatura grega

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Virgínia Ribeiro Barbosa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available O artigo trata de uma leitura pessoal e “classicista” de algumas conferências de Jorge Luis Borges e do conto Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius. Pretendemos mostrar a importância dos poemas homéricos para uma nova direção interpretativa. Examinamos passagens do texto e propomos quatro analogias genéricas: Ashe/Schliemann; Uqbar/Baruch/Spinoza; Tlön/Troia e, finalmente, a obra de Thomas Browne, Urn burial (1893, e o último canto da Ilíada de Homero.

  18. The neurobiology of attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insel, T R; Young, L J

    2001-02-01

    It is difficult to think of any behavioural process that is more intrinsically important to us than attachment. Feeding, sleeping and locomotion are all necessary for survival, but humans are, as Baruch Spinoza famously noted, "a social animal" and it is our social attachments that we live for. Over the past decade, studies in a range of vertebrates, including humans, have begun to address the neural basis of attachment at a molecular, cellular and systems level. This review describes some of the important insights from this work.

  19. Chico Pereira, Ganador del Premio Cinematográfico de la Agencia Europea para la Seguridad y la Salud en el Trabajo con el largometraje "El Invierno de Pablo" The Film "Pablo's Winter" of Chico Pereira, Winner of the film award fron the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Dolores Limón Tamés

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available La Agencia Europea para la Seguridad y la Salud en el Trabajo (EU-OSHA organiza cada año el Festival de Cine Documental de Leipzig (DOK, Leipzig en el que se otorga el Premio Cinematográfico "Lugares de Trabajo Saludables" al documental que destaque como promotor del debate y la reflexión entre los ciudadanos europeos sobre la importancia de la seguridad y la salud en el trabajo. Este año 2012, el Premio ha sido otorgado al largometraje "El invierno de Pablo" del director español Chico Pereira, que narra la cruda historia de Pablo, un minero jubilado que trabajó extrayendo cinabrio durante 30 años y que actualmente presenta unos pulmones y un corazón seriamente dañados como consecuencia de la continua exposición al sulfuro de mercurio. En España, la Red Española de Seguridad y Salud en el Trabajo, coordinada por el Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo, organizará durante 2013 sesiones de cine forum en la que se podrán visionar las películas ganadoras del Certamen Cinematográfico "Lugares de Trabajo Saludables", como actividad divulgativa para el debate y la promoción de la cultura preventiva.The European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA is supporting every year the Healthy Workplaces Film Award for the best documentary on work-related topics. The award is presented at the International Leipzig Festival for Documentary and Animated Film (DOK Leipzig. The award honours a documentary film that promotes the importance of workplace health and safety across Europe. The film "Pablo's Winter" won this year the edition, telling the story of a retired miner who had been working during 30 years in an old mercury mine in Spain and currently has his heart and lungs severely damaged as a result of continued exposure to mercury sulfide. In Spain, the Spanish Network of Safety and Health at Work, coordinated by the National Institute of Safety and Health at Work, is organizing during 2013 video screenings of documentary films awarded, as an activity for promoting health and safety at work to encourage preventive culture. Key words: Human Rights, Copyright, authorship, Open Access, Creative Commons.

  20. RSJ/CCCU Article Prize Winner: "The Infanta will marry the person who provides the Peace or the one who gives us the means to continue the War”. The negotiations for the marriage between Infanta María Teresa of Austria and Emperor Leopold I (1654-1657.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Martínez López

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Prince Baltasar Carlos’s death in 1646 turned his little sister, María Teresa, into the direct heiress of King Felipe IV of Spain. For this reason, her marriage became a key issue regarding the European politics of the central decades of the seventeenth century. Her marriage with the heir of Emperor Ferdinand III was the option chosen by Felipe IV as the most convenient for his territories as long as there was no male heir for his throne. But the negotiations to achieve that end were far from easy. In this essay, we will examine the negotiations conducted between Madrid and Vienna during the years 1654 and 1657, to arrange the marriage between Infanta María Teresa and the future emperor Leopold I, through the correspondence interchanged between King Felipe IV and his ambassadors in the imperial court..

  1. I. 'Street of twins': multiple births in Cuba II. The Cuban twin registry: an update / twin research reports: cord entanglement; heritability of clubfoot; school separation / twins and twin researchers in the news: reunited at seventy-eight; basketball duo dissolved; delivered holding hands; the better brew; award winners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Nancy L; Marcheco-Teruel, Beatriz

    2014-08-01

    I was part of a people-to-people tour of Havana, Cuba during the first week in April 2014. Among the many highlights of that adventure were an informal meeting with Dr Beatriz Marcheco-Teruel, from Cuba's National Center for Medical Genetics, and a visit to the famous 'Street of Twins'. A fortuitous meeting with parents of twins in the fishing town of Jaimanitas was also an extraordinary event. The Cuban experience is followed by summaries of recent twin research, covering umbilical cord entanglement, the heritability of clubfoot and school separation policies for twins. Media reports include twins reunited at age 78, the future of UCLA's twin basketball players, MZ twins born holding hands, a twin conflict over beer and a pair of American Psychological Association honors for Drs Nancy L. Segal and Thomas J. Bouchard, Jr.

  2. Student award winner in the Ph.D. category for the 2013 society for biomaterials annual meeting and exposition, april 10-13, 2013, Boston, Massachusetts : biomaterial-mediated cancer-specific DNA delivery to liver cell cultures using synthetic poly(beta-amino ester)s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Stephany Y; Higgins, Luke J; Pomper, Martin G; Green, Jordan J

    2013-07-01

    Liver cancer is a leading cause of cancer death. Most patients are treated by arterial injection of chemoembolizing agents, providing a convenient avenue for local treatment by novel therapies, including gene therapy. Poly(beta-amino ester)s (PBAEs) were synthesized and used to form nanoparticles for non-viral transfection of buffalo rat hepatoma (MCA-RH7777) and hepatocyte (BRL-3A) lines with eGFP and luciferase DNA. Hepatoma cells were transfected with up to (98 ± 0.4)% efficacy with no measurable cytotoxicity. Hepatocytes were transfected with as high as (73 ± 0.4)% efficacy with (10 ± 4)% non-specific cytotoxicity. In contrast, positive controls (branched polyethylenimine, Lipofectamine™ 2000, and X-tremeGENE(®) DNA HP) caused 30-90% toxicity in BRL-3A cells at doses required for >50% transfection. Of the 21 optimized PBAE-DNA formulations tested, 12 showed significant specificity for hepatoma cells over hepatocytes in monoculture (p biomaterial-mediated specificity to prevent toxic side-effects on healthy hepatocytes. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Student award for outstanding research winner in the Ph.D. category for the 2017 society for biomaterials annual meeting and exposition, april 5-8, 2017, Minneapolis, Minnesota: Characterization of protein interactions with molecularly imprinted hydrogels that possess engineered affinity for high isoelectric point biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, John R; Zhong, Justin X; Irani, Afshan S; Gu, Joann; Spencer, David S; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2017-06-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with selective affinity for protein biomarkers could find extensive utility as environmentally robust, cost-efficient biomaterials for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In order to develop recognitive, synthetic biomaterials for prohibitively expensive protein biomarkers, we have developed a molecular imprinting technique that utilizes structurally similar, analogue proteins. Hydrogel microparticles synthesized by molecular imprinting with trypsin, lysozyme, and cytochrome c possessed an increased affinity for alternate high isoelectric point biomarkers both in isolation and plasma-mimicking adsorption conditions. Imprinted and non-imprinted P(MAA-co-AAm-co-DEAEMA) microgels containing PMAO-PEGMA functionalized polycaprolactone nanoparticles were net-anionic, polydisperse, and irregularly shaped. MIPs and control non-imprinted polymers (NIPs) exhibited regions of Freundlich and BET isotherm adsorption behavior in a range of non-competitive protein solutions, where MIPs exhibited enhanced adsorption capacity in the Freundlich isotherm regions. In a competitive condition, imprinting with analogue templates (trypsin, lysozyme) increased the adsorption capacity of microgels for cytochrome c by 162% and 219%, respectively, as compared to a 122% increase provided by traditional bulk imprinting with cytochrome c. Our results suggest that molecular imprinting with analogue protein templates is a viable synthetic strategy for enhancing hydrogel-biomarker affinity and promoting specific protein adsorption behavior in biological fluids. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1565-1574, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Winner of the society for biomaterials student award in the Ph.D. category for the annual meeting of the society for biomaterials, april 11-14, 2018, Atlanta, GA: Development of a bimodal, in situ crosslinking method to achieve multifactor release from electrospun gelatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishan, Alysha; Walker, Taneidra; Sears, Nick; Wilems, Thomas; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth

    2018-01-17

    To better mimic native tissue microenvironments, current efforts have moved beyond single growth factor delivery to more complex multiple growth factor delivery with distinct release profiles. Electrospun gelatin, a widely investigated drug delivery vehicle, requires postprocessing crosslinking techniques that generate a mesh with uniform crosslinking density, limiting the ability to deliver multiple factors at different rates. Herein, we describe a method to independently control release of multiple factors from a single electrospun gelatin mesh. Two in situ crosslinking modalities, photocrosslinking of methacyrlated gelatin and reactive crosslinking of gelatin with a diisocyanate, are coelectrospun to generate distinct fiber populations with different crosslinking chemistry and density in a single mesh. The photocrosslinked gelatin-methacrylate resulted in a relatively rapid release of a model protein (48 ± 12% at day 1, 96 ± 3% at day 10) due to diffusion of embedded protein from the crosslinked fibers. The reactive crosslinking system displayed a more sustained release (7 ± 5% at day 1, 33 ± 2% at day 10) that was attributed to the conjugation of protein to gelatin with the diisocyanate, requiring degradation of gelatin prior to diffusion out of the fibers. Both modalities displayed tunable release profiles. Subsequent release studies of a cospun mesh with two different crosslinked fiber populations confirmed that the cospun mesh displayed multifactor release with independent release profiles. Overall, this bimodal, in situ crosslinking approach enables the delivery of multiple factors with distinct release kinetics from a single mesh and is expected to have broad utility in tissue engineering. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Cynthia J. Najdowski: Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association's Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award. The 2012 winner is Cynthia J. Najdowski for an outstanding research paper that examines how jurors' judgments are influenced by a juvenile defendant's confession and status as intellectually disabled. Through…

  6. The Mathematics of Mikhael Gromov

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    2009-01-01

    Laudatio for the Abel Prize winner Mikhael Gromov in Oslo, Norway, March 26, 2009. The lecture is recorded at htttp://media01.smartcom.no/ Microsite/webcast.aspx?eventid=4117......Laudatio for the Abel Prize winner Mikhael Gromov in Oslo, Norway, March 26, 2009. The lecture is recorded at htttp://media01.smartcom.no/ Microsite/webcast.aspx?eventid=4117...

  7. Bethany Ann Teachman: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology. The 2012 winner is Bethany Ann Teachman for transformative, translational research integrating social cognition, life-span, and perceptual approaches to investigating clinical…

  8. Performance analysis of the Malaysian elite youth squash players ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The straight and cross court drives were the most frequent strokes used by both genders, with more on the backhand side. The drop shot and straight drives contributed to most winners for the men and women respectively. Most winners were produced by the players when they occupied the middle areas of the court.

  9. Kenyan farmers discover the Internet | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-10-20

    Oct 20, 2010 ... With the Internet linking producers to consumers, the farmer is likely to get better value for her/his produce. "The expectation is that DrumNet ... Kenyan journalist Ken Opala is the recent Gold Medal winner of the 2003 Natali Prize — one of the world's leading awards for journalists. He is also the winner of ...

  10. U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Procurement Lessons Impacts on the Offshore Patrol Cutter Program Affordability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Guard web page (U.S. Coast Guard, 1996), The Deepwater program was initiated in response to the Deepwater Mission Analysis Report (MAR), approved...program design winners. Retrieved from http://www.informationdissemination.net/2008/02/jhsv-program- desgin - winners.html Gansler, J. S. P. (2012

  11. Market Competition and Efficient Cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandts, J.; Riedl, Arno

    2016-01-01

    We find that in market-partners, market experience has adverse effects on the efficiency of cooperation on both market-winner and market-loser pairs. In market-strangers, pairs of market-winners manage to cooperate more efficiently. These results indicate that it is not market experience per se that

  12. 76 FR 66306 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Leading Health Indicators App Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ... place winner will receive $10,000. The second place winner will receive $3,000. And the third place... liability release will use the following language: By participating in this competition, I agree to assume... Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and ones that incorporate plain language and health...

  13. Laurie R. Santos: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology. The 2012 winner is Laurie R. Santos for creative and insightful investigations of cognition across a broad range of species and psychological domains, illuminating cognitive…

  14. Bernice Lott: Award for Distinguished Senior Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Senior Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest. The 2012 winner is Bernice Lott. Lott's commitment to the public interest has always guided her career, as her groundbreaking research on gender, ethnicity, and race…

  15. Winning a competition predicts dishonest behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurr, Amos; Ritov, Ilana

    2016-02-16

    Winning a competition engenders subsequent unrelated unethical behavior. Five studies reveal that after a competition has taken place winners behave more dishonestly than competition losers. Studies 1 and 2 demonstrate that winning a competition increases the likelihood of winners to steal money from their counterparts in a subsequent unrelated task. Studies 3a and 3b demonstrate that the effect holds only when winning means performing better than others (i.e., determined in reference to others) but not when success is determined by chance or in reference to a personal goal. Finally, study 4 demonstrates that a possible mechanism underlying the effect is an enhanced sense of entitlement among competition winners.

  16. Some Learning Properties of Modular Network SOMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Manabu; Ikeda, Kazushi; Furukawa, Tetsuo

    The Modular Network Self-Organizing Map (mnSOM) is a generalization of the SOM, where each node represents a parametric function such as a multi-layer perceptron or another SOM. Since given datasets are, in general, fewer than nodes, some nodes never win in competition and have to update their parameters from the winners in the neighborhood. This is a process that can be regarded as interpolation. This study derives the interpolation curve between winners in simple cases and discusses the distribution of winners based on the neighborhood function.

  17. Stability Analysis of Numerical Methods for a 1.5-Layer Shallow-Water Ocean Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-an Zou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 1.5-layer reduced-gravity shallow-water ocean model in spherical coordinates is described and discretized in a staggered grid (standard Arakawa C-grid with the forward-time central-space (FTCS method and the Leap-frog finite difference scheme. The discrete Fourier analysis method combined with the Gershgorin circle theorem is used to study the stability of these two finite difference numerical models. A series of necessary conditions of selection criteria for the time-space step sizes and model parameters are obtained. It is showed that these stability conditions are more accurate than the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL condition and other two criterions (Blumberg and Mellor, 1987; Casulli, 1990, 1992. Numerical experiments are proposed to test our stability results, and numerical model that is designed is also used to simulate the ocean current.

  18. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1999 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1999 award winner, Dow AgroSciences, developed spinosad, a highly selective, low-toxicity, nonpersistant insecticide made by a soil microorganism. It controls many chewing insect pests.

  19. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1999 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1999 award winner, Lilly Research Laboratories, developed a low-waste drug synthesis using yeast for a stereospecific reduction, reducing solvent amounts, and replacing chromium oxide.

  20. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1997 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1997 award winner, Legacy Systems, developed the Coldstrip process, which uses only water and oxygen to remove photoresist from silicon semiconductors. It replaces corrosive acids.

  1. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2007 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2007 award winner, Professor Michael J. Krische, developed selective C-C bond-forming hydrogenation without organometallic reagents, eliminating hazardous reagents and hazardous waste.

  2. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2001 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2001 award winners, Bayer Corporation and Bayer AG, developed a waste-free manufacturing process for sodium iminodisuccinate (Baypure CX), a biodegradable, nontoxic chelating agent.

  3. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2002 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2002 award winner, Chemical Specialties, developed an alkaline copper quaternary wood preservative to replace chromated copper arsenate preservative phased out due to risk to children.

  4. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2012 Academic Award (Waymouth and Hedrick)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2012 award winners, Professor Robert M. Waymouth and Dr. James L. Hedrick, developed a broad class of highly active, environmentally benign, metal-free catalysts for synthesizing plastics.

  5. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2002 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2002 award winner, Pfizer, improved its synthesis of sertraline, the active ingredient in its drug, Zoloft, to double the yield and reduce the use of raw materials, energy, and water.

  6. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2006 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2006 award winner, Merck, discovered the asymmetric catalytic hydrogenation of unprotected enamines to make beta-amino acids. Merck applied this to synthesize sitagliptin (Januvia).

  7. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2009 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2009 award winner, Eastman Chemical Co., makes esters for emollients and emulsifiers in cosmetics with immobilized enzymes, saving energy and avoiding strong acids and organic solvents.

  8. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2005 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2005 award winner, Professor Robin D. Rogers, used ionic liquids to dissolve and process cellulose from wood, cloth, or paper to make new biorenewable or biocompatible materials.

  9. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2013 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2013 award winner, Prof Richard P. Wool of the University of Delaware, created high-performance materials using vegetable oils, feathers, and flax. Can be used as adhesives, composites, foams, and circuit boards.

  10. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2006 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2006 award winners, Arkon Consultants and NuPro Technologies, developed a safer processing system for flexographic printing that includes washout solvents and reclamation/recycling.

  11. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2016 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2016 award winner, Professor Chirik, discovered a class of catalysts used to produce silicones for consumer goods without using hard-to-mine platinum (less mining, reduces costs, greenhouse gas emissions, and waste).

  12. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2013 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2013 award winner, Faraday Technology, Inc., process high-performance chrome coatings to be made from the less toxic, trivalent chromium. Reduce millions of pounds hexavalent chromium without comprising performance.

  13. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2000 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2000 award winner, Roche Colorado, developed a greener synthesis for gancyclovir (Cytovene, a potent antiviral drug) that uses a second-generation Guanine Triester (GTE) process.

  14. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1997 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1997 award winner, Professor Joseph M. DeSimone, developed surfactants that allow carbon dioxide to be a solvent for chemical manufacturing, replacing hazardous chemical solvents.

  15. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2003 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2003 winner, Sud-Chemie, developed a synthesis for solid oxide catalysts used to make hydrogen and clean fuels. The process creates little wastewater, no nitrates, and no or little NOx.

  16. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2006 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2006 award winner, Professor Galen J. Suppes, developed a process to convert waste glycerin from biodiesel production into propylene glycol to replace ethylene glycol in antifreeze.

  17. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2009 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2009 award winners, Procter & Gamble Co. (P&G) and Cook Composites and Polymers Co. (CCP), developed Chempol MPS resins and Sefose sucrose esters to enable high-performance low-VOC alkyd paints.

  18. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2008 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2008 award winner, Battelle, developed a biobased soy toner for laser printers and copiers. The technology saves energy and improves de-inking, allowing more paper fiber to be recycled.

  19. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2011 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2011 award winner, Professor Bruce H. Lipshutz, designed a novel, second-generation surfactant called TPGS-750-M. It is a designer surfactant composed of safe, inexpensive ingredients.

  20. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2006 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2006 award winner, S.C. Johnson & Son, developed Greenlist, a rating system for environmental and health effects of ingredients. SC Johnson uses it to reformulate many of its products.

  1. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1999 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1999 award winner, Professor Terry Collins, developed a series of TAML oxidant activators that work with hydrogen peroxide to replace chlorine bleaches for paper making and laundry.

  2. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2004 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winner, Bristol-Myers Squibb, manufactures paclitaxel, the active ingredient in the anticancer drug, Taxol, using plant cell fermentation and extraction to replace synthesis.

  3. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1997 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1997 award winner, BHC Company, developed a highly atom-efficient method to make ibuprofen, a common painkiller, using three catalytic steps instead of six stoichiometric ones.

  4. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2016 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2016 award winner, Verdezyne, developed a yeast to produce USDA Certified Biobased dodecanedioic acid (DDDA) used to make high performance nylon 6,12. Lower greenhouse gas emissions, no high temperature or nitric acid

  5. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2016 Designing Greener Chemicals and Specific Environmental Benefit: Climate Change Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2016 award winner, Newlight Technologies, developed a net carbon negative plastic made from methane-based GHG. It is cheaper than petroleum-based plastic; used to make cell phone cases, furniture, and other products.

  6. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2011 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2011 award winner, BioAmber, developed an integrated technology to produce large, commercial quantities of succinic acid by bacterial fermentation, replacing petroleum-based feedstocks.

  7. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2010 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2010 award winner, LS9, engineered microorganisms to convert fermentable sugars selectively to alkanes, olefins, fatty alcohols, or fatty esters, each in a single-unit biorefinery.

  8. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2011 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2011 award winner, Sherwin-Williams, developed water-based acrylic alkyd paints with VOCs that can be made from recycled soda bottle (PET), acrylics, and soybean oil.

  9. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2005 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award (Merck & Co., Inc.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2005 award winner, Merck, designed an atom-economical, energy- and water-saving, convergent synthesis for aprepitant, the active ingredient in Emend, a drug for nausea and vomiting.

  10. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2016 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2016 award winners, Albemarle and CB&I, developed a safer technology to produce alkylate, a clean gasoline component by replacing liquid acid catalysts with a lower environmental impact catalyst

  11. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2012 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2012 award winner, Codexis and Professor Yi Tang, developed a synthesis for the high cholesterol drug, simvastatin, using an engineered acyltransferase enzyme and a low-cost acyl donor as a feedstock.

  12. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2007 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2007 award winner, NovaSterilis, invented a way to sterilize delicate biological materials such as graft tissue without harming them, using supercritical carbon dioxide and a peroxide.

  13. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2015 Specific Environmental Benefit: Climate Change Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2015 award winner, Algenol, blue-green algae to produce ethanol and other fuels, uses CO2 from air or industrial emitters, reduces the carbon footprint, costs and water usage, no reliance on food crops

  14. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1996 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1996 award winner, Donlar, developed thermal polyaspartate, a nontoxic, biodegradable, biobased polymer made in a highly efficient process for use in agriculture, water treatment, etc.

  15. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1998 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1998 award winner, Rohm and Haas, developed CONFIRM, a highly selective, reduced risk insecticide that disrupts the molting process of caterpillar pests in turf and a variety of crops.

  16. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2013 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2013 award winner, Cargill, Inc., developed a vegetable-oil-based transformer fluid that is much less flammable, provides superior performance, is less toxic, and has a substantially lower carbon footprint.

  17. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1996 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1996 award winner, Rohm and Haas, developed Sea-Nine, a marine antifoulant to control plants and animals on ship hulls. Sea-Nine replaces persistent, toxic organotin antifoulants.

  18. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2015 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2015 award winner, LanzaTech Inc. developed a method to utilize gas streams with a range of CO and H2 compositions to produce fuels such as ethanol and chemicals at high selectivities and yields

  19. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2000 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2000 award winner, Dow AgroSciences, developed Sentricon to eliminate termites with bait applied only where termites are active; it replaces widespread applications of pesticide to soil.

  20. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1998 Academic Award (Draths and Frost)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1998 award winners, Dr. Karen M. Draths and Professor John W. Frost, used benign, genetically engineered microbes and sugars (instead of benzene) to synthesize adipic acid and catechol.

  1. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2010 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2010 award winners, Dow and BASF, jointly developed a route to make propylene oxide from hydrogen peroxide that eliminates almost all waste and greatly reduces water and energy use.

  2. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1996 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1996 award winner, Professor Mark Holtzapple, developed methods to convert waste biomass (e.g., sewage sludge, agricultural wastes), into animal feed, industrial chemicals, or fuels.

  3. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1997 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1997 award winner, Albright & Wilson Americas, discovered that tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium sulfate, THPS, is an effective, safer biocide for use in industrial water systems.

  4. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2008 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2008 award winner, Dow AgroSciences, used an artificial neural network to discover spinetoram, an improved spinosad biopesticide to replace organophosphates for key pests of fruit trees.

  5. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2003 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2003 award winner, Shaw Industries, developed EcoWorx carpet tiles with a backing that uses less toxic materials. The carpet tile fiber and backing are readily separated for recycling.

  6. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2000 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2000 award winner, RevTech, developed a process to print top-quality labels directly on glass. Their Envirogluv inks have no heavy metals, have little to no VOCs, and are biodegradable.

  7. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2014 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2014 award winner, Amyris, engineered yeast to make a chemical called farnesene, which is a building block hydrocarbon that can be converted into a renewable, drop-in replacement for petroleum diesel.

  8. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2012 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2012 award winner, Elevance Renewable Sciences, used Nobel-prize-winning metathesis catalysis to produce high-value difunctional chemicals from renewable feedstocks including natural oils.

  9. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2003 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2003 award winner, Professor Richard A. Gross, developed a transesterification to make polyol-containing polyesters using lipase, replacing heavy metal catalysts and hazardous solvents.

  10. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2008 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2008 award winners, Professors Robert E. Maleczka, Jr. and Milton R. Smith, III, developed halogen-free, catalytic C-H activation/borylation to make aryl and heteroaryl boronic esters.

  11. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2002 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2002 award winner, SC Fluids, with Los Alamos National Laboratory, developed supercritical CO2 resist remover technology to clean residues from semiconductor wafers during manufacture.

  12. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2007 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2007 award winners, Professor Kaichang Li, Columbia Forest Products, and Hercules, developed an adhesive for wood composites based on soy flour instead of resins with formaldehyde.

  13. What is Climate Leadership: Spotlight on Innovative Partnerships Webinar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innovative Partnerships category winners from the 2015 Climate Leadership Award recipients discuss their innovative and collaborative initiatives and achievements that allowed them to measure the successes of their greenhouse gas reduction goals.

  14. 77 FR 61378 - Government in the Sunshine Act Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... David Burke Distinguished Journalism Awards winners. The BBG will receive and consider proposed BBG... recognize the anniversaries of Agency language services, receive a Middle East trip report, receive a...

  15. 77 FR 40364 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Million Hearts TM

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... their employment should consult their ethics official prior to developing their submission. (5) May not... Contest. Information is not collected for commercial marketing. Winners are permitted to cite that they...

  16. Next Generation Software Processes and Their Environment Support

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boehm, Barry

    1998-01-01

    .... It is based on three primary foundations: (1) Theory W, a management theory and approach. It is based on making winners of all of the system's key stakeholders as a necessary and sufficient condition for project success. (2...

  17. A la découverte du CERN et du château de Voltaire

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The Lions Club, Bellegarde Pays de Gex, organised a visit to CERN and to Voltaire's castle for the delegates of the Lions de Charente and the winners of a scientific competition organized by them (1/2 page).

  18. Disain parandab maailma / Tanel Veenre

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Veenre, Tanel, 1977-

    2009-01-01

    Rändnäitus "INDEX : Award Exhibition 2007: winners of tour" Tallinnas Harju tänava haljasalal 19. juulini. Võistlusel INDEX : Award osalevatelt toodetelt oodatakse peale hea väljanägemise, et nad muudaksid elu paremaks

  19. American Academy of Forensic Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Graduate Thesis Assistance Grant Winner Call for Nominees: Anthropology Section T. Dale Stewart Award 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting Registration Information You’ve Decided You Want a Career in Forensic Science … Now What? Young Forensic Scientists Forum (YFSF) ...

  20. Climate Leadership in the Financial Sector Webinar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Financial sector winners from the 2015 Climate Leadership Awards discuss best practices and challenges faced by their corporations based on their experience of attempting to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and address climate risk.

  1. A Simple Neural Network System for Wisconsin Card Sorting Test

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaplan, Gulay

    2001-01-01

    .... A simple model based on winner take all network and multi layer perceptron suffices to model the affect of frontal lobe damage, which leads to perseveration as diminishing the influence of reinforcement...

  2. IDG's InfoWorld names 100 most innovative corporate IT solutions for 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "IDG's InfoWorld has announced the winners of its InfoWorld 100 Awards. The annual awards honor IT projects that demonstrate the most creative use of cutting-edge technologies to further their business goals." (2 pages)

  3. Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar Awardees | Women in Science | Initiatives ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-04-16

    Women Scientists: Reflections, Challenges, and Breaking Boundaries. Posted on April 16, 2015. Contains portraits of sixty notable female scientists, including eight of the sixteen women Nobel prize winners. MORE ...

  4. The Binomial Distribution in Shooting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalikias, Miltiadis S.

    2009-01-01

    The binomial distribution is used to predict the winner of the 49th International Shooting Sport Federation World Championship in double trap shooting held in 2006 in Zagreb, Croatia. The outcome of the competition was definitely unexpected.

  5. OBITUARY: In memory of Vasilii Ivanovich Shveikin (4 February 1935 – 4 January 2018)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krokhin, O. N.; Gulyaev, Yu V.; Sigov, A. S.; Shcherbakov, I. A.; Vasil'ev, M. G.; Duraev, V. P.; Zabrodskii, A. G.; Zverev, G. M.; Kovsh, I. B.; Krotov, Yu A.; Kuznetsov, E. V.; Marmalyuk, A. A.; Popov, Yu M.; Semenov, A. S.; Simakov, V. A.

    2018-03-01

    Vasilii Ivanovich Shveikin, originator of semiconductor laser research and development at OJSC M.F. Stel'makh Polyus Research Institute, doctor of engineering, professor and Lenin Prize winner, passed away on 4 January after a long, serious illness.

  6. Nobel Prize winning physicist to speak at Rensselaer Nov. 20 Leon Lederman to discuss pre college science education

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Leon Lederman, Nobel Prize-winner, will offer some radical ideas for improving pre-college science education when he delivers the annual Robert Resnick Lecture at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute's Russell Sage Laboratory (1/2 page).

  7. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1999 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1999 award winner, Biofine, developed a process to convert waste cellulose in paper mill sludge, municipal solid waste, etc. into levulinic acid (LA), a building block for other chemicals.

  8. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2007 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2007 award winner, Cargill, developed biobased polyols for polyurethane applications, including flexible foams. Cargill makes BiOH polyols from vegetable oils, not petroleum products.

  9. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2012 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2012 award winner, Buckman International, developed Maximyze enzymes that modify the cellulose in wood fibers to increase binding between fibers in paper and improve paper strength.

  10. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2001 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2001 award winner, PPG Industries, developed cationic electrodeposition coatings with yttrium that resist corrosion in automobiles. Yttrium is a safe replacement for lead in this use.

  11. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2004 Designing Greener Chemicals Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winner, Engelhard Corporation, developed a wide range of environmentally friendly Rightfit azo pigments that contain calcium, strontium, or barium instead of heavy metals.

  12. Surgery on Fetus Reduces Complications of Spina Bifida

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Pregnancy & Infant Development Advances Snapshot of Child Development Advances Snapshot of Adult & Family Health Advances NICHD Nobel Prize Winners Leadership & Other Staff Profiles Leadership Biosketches Get to Know ...

  13. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1998 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1998 award winner, Flexsys America, developed nucleophilic aromatic substitution for hydrogen to eliminate waste from a common reaction and to produce 4-ADPA, a high-volume chemical.

  14. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2008 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2008 award winner, SiGNa Chemistry, stabilized highly reactive sodium and lithium by encapsulating them in porous, sand-like powder, maintaining their usefulness in synthetic reactions.

  15. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2000 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2000 award winners, Bayer and Bayer AG, Covestro, developed high-performance, water-based, two-component polyurethane (PU) coatings that eliminate most or all VOCs and HAPs in other PU coatings.

  16. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2016 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2016 award winner, Dow Agrosciences LLC, developed Instinct®, a technology that reduces fertilizer nitrate leaching to ground and surface waters and atmospheric nitrous oxide emissions. More corn and reduces CO2.

  17. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1998 Academic Award (Trost)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1998 award winner Professor Barry M. Trost, developed the concept of atom economy: chemical reactions that do not waste atoms. This is a fundamental cornerstone of green chemistry.

  18. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2009 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2009 award winner, CEM Corporation, developed a fast, automated analytical process using less toxic reagents and less energy to distinguish protein from the food adulterant, melamine.

  19. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2008 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2008 award winner, Nalco Company, developed 3D TRASAR technology to monitor the condition of cooling water continuously and add chemicals only when needed, saving water and energy.

  20. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2001 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2001 award winner, Novozymes North America, developed BioPreparation, an enzyme technology to separate natural waxes, oils, and contaminants from cotton before it is made into fabric.

  1. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2002 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2002 award winner, Cargill Dow, developed the NatureWorks process to make biobased, compostable, and recyclable polylactic acid polymers for fibers and plastic packaging.

  2. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2012 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2012 award winner, Cytec Industries, developed the MAX HT sodalite scale inhibitor for heat exchangers and pipes in the Bayer process, which converts bauxite into alumina.

  3. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2005 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2005 award winner, BASF, invented a one-component, urethane acrylate oligomer primer system for automobile refinishing that is UV-curable, has VOCs, and is free of diisocyanates.

  4. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2000 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2000 award winner, Professor Chi-Huey Wong, developed reactions with enzymes and safer solvents that can replace traditional reactions done with toxic metals and hazardous solvents.

  5. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2013 Greener Synthetic Pathways Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2013 award winner, Life Technologies, developed a one-pot synthesis for polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which is a much more efficient process that prevents about 1.5 million pounds of hazardous waste a year.

  6. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2003 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2003 award winner, DuPont, developed a genetically engineered microorganism jointly with Genencor International to manufacture 1,3-propanediol, a building block for Sorona polyester.

  7. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2010 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2010 award winners, Merck & Co. and Codexis, developed an enzymatic synthesis for sitagliptin (Januvia) that reduces waste, improves yield and safety, and eliminates a metal catalyst.

  8. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2004 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winners, Professors Charles A. Eckert and Charles L. Liotta, use supercritical CO2 as a solvent to combine reactions and separations, improve efficiency, and reduce waste.

  9. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2011 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2011 award winner, Kraton Performance Polymers, developed halogen-free, high-flow NEXAR polymer membranes using less solvent that save energy during reverse osmosis to desalinate water.

  10. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2001 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2001 award winner, Professor Chao-Jun Li, uses metal catalysts in water to carry out chemical reactions that used to need both an oxygen-free atmosphere and hazardous organic solvents.

  11. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1999 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1999 award winner, Nalco Chemical Co., developed homogeneous dispersion polymerization with water as the solvent to make polymers to treat water in industrial and municipal operations.

  12. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1996 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1996 award winner, Dow Chemical Company, developed a process to manufacture polystyrene foam sheet packaging that uses carbon dioxide (CO2) as a blowing agent, eliminating CFC-12 and HCFC-22.

  13. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2006 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2006 award winner, Codexis, directed the evolution of three designer enzymes to produce the key chiral building block for atorvastatin, the active ingredient in the drug Lipitor.

  14. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1998 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1998 award winner, Argonne National Laboratory, developed an efficient, membrane-based process to synthesize lactate esters from sugars. These esters can replace toxic solvents.

  15. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1997 Greener Reaction Conditions Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1997 award winner, Imation, developed DryView Imaging Systems, which use a special photographic film for medical imaging that replaces hazardous developer chemicals and water with heat.

  16. Commercial Power Centers in Emerging Markets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Treverton, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    ...), stabilizing their currencies, and opening their economies to foreign competition. In each case, the process is producing winners and losers even as it alters the rules of the economic game and thus changes the balance...

  17. Dutch research reforms cause a stir

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Calmthout, Martijn

    2015-02-01

    All 69 winners of the Spinoza prize - the highest award in Dutch science - have signed a petition against proposed reforms to the country's leading funding agency, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

  18. Outback is put through its paces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-03

    Ashley Rubens, winner of the competition to find the BVA member facing the toughest driving conditions in the UK, has spent the past few months putting a Subaru Outback through its paces. British Veterinary Association.

  19. Effective and Innovative Practices for Stronger Facilities Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banick, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    Describes the five winners of the APPA's Effective & Innovative Practices Award. These facilities management programs and processes were recognized for enhancing service delivery, lowering costs, increasing productivity, improving customer service, generating revenue, or otherwise benefiting the educational institution. (EV)

  20. SDI’s Small Business Innovation Program (Videorecording).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical description: 1 VHS video; col., sd., playing time 20 minutes. A general introduction to Strategic Defense Initiative’s Small Business Innovation Program with general guidelines and success stories of SBIR winners.