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Sample records for wing nano air

  1. High Performance Piezoelectric Actuators and Wings for Nano Air Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-26

    process to monolithically fabricate flying robotic insects at the pico air ve- hicle ( PAV ) scale from SUEX dry film, an epoxy based negative photoresist...cost. It simul- taneously defines the PAV airframe, compliant flapping mechanism, and artificial insect wing using photolithography. Using this process...81 4.4.3 Simulated Average Lift Versus Frequency of the Redesigned LionFly 82 5.1.1 Potential Fabrication Process for PAV Flapping

  2. Nano-mechanical properties and structural of a 3D-printed biodegradable biomimetic micro air vehicle wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salami, E.; Montazer, E.; Ward, T. A.; Ganesan, P. B.

    2017-06-01

    The biomimetic micro air vehicles (BMAV) are unmanned, micro-scaled aircraft that are bio-inspired from flying organisms to achieve the lift and thrust by flapping their wings. The main objectives of this study are to design a BMAV wing (inspired from the dragonfly) and analyse its nano-mechanical properties. In order to gain insights into the flight mechanics of dragonfly, reverse engineering methods were used to establish three-dimensional geometrical models of the dragonfly wings, so we can make a comparative analysis. Then mechanical test of the real dragonfly wings was performed to provide experimental parameter values for mechanical models in terms of nano-hardness and elastic modulus. The mechanical properties of wings were measured by nanoindentre. Finally, a simplified model was designed and the dragonfly-like wing frame structure was bio-mimicked and fabricated using a 3D printer. Then mechanical test of the BMAV wings was performed to analyse and compare the wings under a variety of simplified load regimes that are concentrated force, uniform line-load and a torque. This work opened up the possibility towards developing an engineering basis for the biomimetic design of BMAV wings.

  3. Initial Investigation on the Aerodynamic Performance of Flapping Wings for Nano Air Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    drag) in still fluid [4, 5]. However, as the high aerodynamic performance of insect’s wings is achieved by three-degrees-of-freedom ( 3DOF ) motions...it will be very important to study its aerodynamic behavior under 3DOF conditions. Thus, a 3DOF system, i.e. pitch motion (α), dihedral motion (γ...the wing, all of the equipment was above the water surface, including a 3DOF gearbox, a 3DOF control system and a small five-component strain gauge

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics Studies of a Flapping Wing Nano Air Vehicle (NAV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-31

    24 Propeller as a flapper ... flapper The propeller blade described above was used as a flapping wing with reversing camber and twist. The robot fly rotation angle profile (Eq. 6c...frequency reduced to 80Hz, the mean thrust developed by this propeller blade as a flapper is 0.04725N and the mean aerodynamic power is 0.971 W, as

  5. Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicle Wing Manufacture and Force Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    manufacturing techniques have been developed by various universities for research on Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicles. Minimal attention though is given...collected at 2kHz (www.polytec.com/psv3d). A 0.25V band-limited white noise input signal is input to a Bogen HTA -125 High Performance Amplifier, which...manufacturing techniques have been developed by various universities for research on Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicles. Minimal attention though is given

  6. Nano-architecture of gustatory chemosensory bristles and trachea in Drosophila wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmalette, Jean Christophe; Raad, Hussein; Qiu, Nan; Ohara, Satoshi; Capovilla, Maria; Robichon, Alain

    2015-09-18

    In the Drosophila wing anterior margin, the dendrites of gustatory neurons occupy the interior of thin and long bristles that present tiny pores at their extremities. Many attempts to measure ligand-evoked currents in insect wing gustatory neurons have been unsuccessful for technical reasons. The functions of this gustatory activity therefore remain elusive and controversial. To advance our knowledge on this understudied tissue, we investigated the architecture of the wing chemosensory bristles and wing trachea using Raman spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy. We hypothesized that the wing gustatory hair, an open-ended capillary tube, and the wing trachea constitute biological systems similar to nano-porous materials. We present evidence that argues in favour of the existence of a layer or a bubble of air beneath the pore inside the gustatory hair. We demonstrate that these hollow hairs and wing tracheal tubes fulfil conditions for which the physics of fluids applied to open-ended capillaries and porous materials are relevant. We also document that the wing gustatory hair and tracheal architectures are capable of trapping volatile molecules from the environment, which might increase the efficiency of their spatial detection by way of wing vibrations or during flight.

  7. Micro- and Nano-Air Vehicles: State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Petricca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro- and nano air vehicles are defined as “extremely small and ultra-lightweight air vehicle systems” with a maximum wingspan length of 15 cm and a weight less than 20 grams. Here, we provide a review of the current state of the art and identify the challenges of design and fabrication. Different configurations are evaluated, such as fixed wings, rotary wings, and flapping wings. The main advantages and drawbacks for each typology are identified and discussed. Special attention is given to rotary-wing vehicles (helicopter concept; including a review of their main structures, such as the airframe, energy storage, controls, and communications systems. In addition, a review of relevant sensors is also included. Examples of existing and future systems are also included. Micro- and nano-vehicles with rotary wings and rechargeable batteries are dominating. The flight times of current systems are typically around 1 hour or less due to the limited energy storage capabilities of the used rechargeable batteries. Fuel cells and ultra capacitors are promising alternative energy supply technologies for the future. Technology improvements, mainly based on micro- and nanotechnologies, are expected to continue in an evolutionary way to improve the capabilities of future micro- and nano air vehicles, giving improved flight times and payload capabilities.

  8. Logistics Supply of the Distributed Air Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Event Graph The Consumption Process first instantiates the variables . The model follows a conveyor belt pattern, whereby after processing an event...to any part of the world. A capstone project, conducted by the system engineering curriculum, proposed to distribute the air assets from the aircraft...SUBJECT TERMS distributed air wing, logistics, supply, unmanned air systems , cargo UAS, unmanned systems , discrete event simulation, vehicle routing

  9. Air Base Wing and Air Mobility Wing Consolidating on AMC-LED Joint Bases: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    AIR BASE WING AND AIR MOBILITY WING CONSOLIDATION ON AMC-LED JOINT BASES: A DELPHI STUDY GRADUATE RESEARCH PAPER Mason E. MacGarvey... DELPHI STUDY GRADUATE RESEARCH PAPER Presented to the Faculty Graduate School of Engineering Management Air Force Institute of Technology...iv AIR BASE WING AND AIR MOBILITY WING CONSOLIDATION ON AMC-LED JOINT BASES: A DELPHI STUDY Mason E. MacGarvey, BS, MBA

  10. Fixed-Wing Micro Air Vehicles with Hovering Capabilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bataille, Boris; Poinsot, Damien; Thipyopas, Chinnapat; Moschetta, Jean-Marc

    2007-01-01

    Fixed-wing micro air vehicles (MAV) are very attractive for outdoor surveillance missions since they generally offer better payload and endurance capabilities than rotorcraft or flapping-wing vehicles of equal size...

  11. Artificial insect wings of diverse morphology for flapping-wing micro air vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, J K; Finio, B M; Wood, R J; Combes, S A

    2009-01-01

    The development of flapping-wing micro air vehicles (MAVs) demands a systematic exploration of the available design space to identify ways in which the unsteady mechanisms governing flapping-wing flight can best be utilized for producing optimal thrust or maneuverability. Mimicking the wing kinematics of biological flight requires examining the potential effects of wing morphology on flight performance, as wings may be specially adapted for flapping flight. For example, insect wings passively deform during flight, leading to instantaneous and potentially unpredictable changes in aerodynamic behavior. Previous studies have postulated various explanations for insect wing complexity, but there lacks a systematic approach for experimentally examining the functional significance of components of wing morphology, and for determining whether or not natural design principles can or should be used for MAVs. In this work, a novel fabrication process to create centimeter-scale wings of great complexity is introduced; via this process, a wing can be fabricated with a large range of desired mechanical and geometric characteristics. We demonstrate the versatility of the process through the creation of planar, insect-like wings with biomimetic venation patterns that approximate the mechanical properties of their natural counterparts under static loads. This process will provide a platform for studies investigating the effects of wing morphology on flight dynamics, which may lead to the design of highly maneuverable and efficient MAVs and insight into the functional morphology of natural wings.

  12. Damage Considerations of a Flexible Micro Air Vehicle Wing Using 3-D Laser Vibrometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mendoza, Jr, Leo L

    2007-01-01

    .... The flexible micro air vehicle wing studied was based on a University of Florida micro air vehicle wing design and was examined using measurements from the Polytec 400-3D Scanning Vibrometer. Comparisons of the wing?s natural frequencies and displacements were made between the wing?s undamaged and damaged states.

  13. Pitching stability analysis of half-rotating wing air vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyi; Wu, Yang; Li, Qian; Li, Congmin; Qiu, Zhizhen

    2017-06-01

    Half-Rotating Wing (HRW) is a new power wing which had been developed by our work team using rotating-type flapping instead of oscillating-type flapping. Half-Rotating Wing Air Vehicle (HRWAV) is similar as Bionic Flapping Wing Air Vehicle (BFWAV). It is necessary to guarantee pitching stability of HRWAV to maintain flight stability. The working principle of HRW was firstly introduced in this paper. The rule of motion indicated that the fuselage of HRWAV without empennage would overturn forward as it generated increased pitching movement. Therefore, the empennage was added on the tail of HRWAV to balance the additional moment generated by aerodynamic force during flight. The stability analysis further shows that empennage could weaken rapidly the pitching disturbance on HRWAV and a new balance of fuselage could be achieved in a short time. Case study using numerical analysis verified correctness and validity of research results mentioned above, which could provide theoretical guidance to design and control HRWAV.

  14. Flapping and flexible wings for biological and micro air vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyy, Wei; Berg, Mats; Ljungqvist, Daniel

    1999-07-01

    Micro air vehicles (MAVs) with wing spans of 15 cm or less, and flight speed of 30-60 kph are of interest for military and civilian applications. There are two prominent features of MAV flight: (i) low Reynolds number (10 4-10 5), resulting in unfavorable aerodynamic conditions to support controlled flight, and (ii) small physical dimensions, resulting in certain favorable scaling characteristics including structural strength, reduced stall speed, and low inertia. Based on observations of biological flight vehicles, it appears that wing motion and flexible airfoils are two key attributes for flight at low Reynolds number. The small size of MAVs corresponds in nature to small birds, which do not glide like large birds, but instead flap with considerable change of wing shape during a single flapping cycle. With flapping and flexible wings, birds overcome the deteriorating aerodynamic performance under steady flow conditions by employing unsteady mechanisms. In this article, we review both biological and aeronautical literatures to present salient features relevant to MAVs. We first summarize scaling laws of biological and micro air vehicles involving wing span, wing loading, vehicle mass, cruising speed, flapping frequency, and power. Next we discuss kinematics of flapping wings and aerodynamic models for analyzing lift, drag and power. Then we present issues related to low Reynolds number flows and airfoil shape selection. Recent work on flexible structures capable of adjusting the airfoil shape in response to freestream variations is also discussed.

  15. Heat Conduction of Air in Nano Spacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yao-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The scale effect of heat conduction of air in nano spacing (NS is very important for nanodevices to improve their life and efficiency. By constructing a special technique, the changes of heat conduction of air were studied by means of measuring the heat conduction with heat conduction instrument in NS between the hot plate and the cooling plate. Carbon nanotubes were used to produce the nano spacing. The results show that when the spacing is small down to nanometer scale, heat conduction plays a prominent role in NS. It was found that the thickness of air is a non-linear parameter for demarcating the heat conduction of air in NS and the rate of heat conduction in unit area could be regard as a typical parameter for the heat conduction characterization at nanometer scale.

  16. Study of nano-architecture of the wings of Paris Peacock butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghate, Ekata; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Kulkarni, G. R.

    Butterflies are one of the most colorful creatures in animal Kingdom. Wings of the male butterfly are brilliantly colored to attract females. Color of the wings plays an important role in camouflage. Study of structural colors in case of insects and butterflies are important for their biomimic and biophotonic applications. Structural color is the color which is produced by physical structures and their interaction with light. Paris Peacock or Papilio paris butterfly belongs to the family Papilionidae. The basis of structural color of this butterfly is investigated in the present study. The upper surface of the wings in this butterfly is covered with blue, green and brown colored scales. Nano-architecture of these scales was investigated with scanning electron microscope (SEM) and environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). Photomicrographs were analyzed using image analysis software. Goniometric color or iridescence in blue and green colored scales of this butterfly was observed and studied with the help of gonio spectrophotometer in the visible range. No iridescence was observed in brown colored scales of the butterfly. Hues of the blue and green color were measured with spectrophotometer and were correlated with nano-architecture of the wing. Results of electron microscopy and reflection spectroscopy are used to explain the iridescent nature of blue and green scales. Sinusoidal grating like structures of these scales were prominently seen in the blue scales. It is possible that the structure of these wings can act as a template for the fabrication of sinusoidal gratings using nano-imprint technology.

  17. CFD based aerodynamic modeling to study flight dynamics of a flapping wing micro air vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rege, Alok Ashok

    The demand for small unmanned air vehicles, commonly termed micro air vehicles or MAV's, is rapidly increasing. Driven by applications ranging from civil search-and-rescue missions to military surveillance missions, there is a rising level of interest and investment in better vehicle designs, and miniaturized components are enabling many rapid advances. The need to better understand fundamental aspects of flight for small vehicles has spawned a surge in high quality research in the area of micro air vehicles. These aircraft have a set of constraints which are, in many ways, considerably different from that of traditional aircraft and are often best addressed by a multidisciplinary approach. Fast-response non-linear controls, nano-structures, integrated propulsion and lift mechanisms, highly flexible structures, and low Reynolds aerodynamics are just a few of the important considerations which may be combined in the execution of MAV research. The main objective of this thesis is to derive a consistent nonlinear dynamic model to study the flight dynamics of micro air vehicles with a reasonably accurate representation of aerodynamic forces and moments. The research is divided into two sections. In the first section, derivation of the nonlinear dynamics of flapping wing micro air vehicles is presented. The flapping wing micro air vehicle (MAV) used in this research is modeled as a system of three rigid bodies: a body and two wings. The design is based on an insect called Drosophila Melanogaster, commonly known as fruit-fly. The mass and inertial effects of the wing on the body are neglected for the present work. The nonlinear dynamics is simulated with the aerodynamic data published in the open literature. The flapping frequency is used as the control input. Simulations are run for different cases of wing positions and the chosen parameters are studied for boundedness. Results show a qualitative inconsistency in boundedness for some cases, and demand a better

  18. The effects of wing flexibility on the flight performance and stability of flapping wing micro air vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluman, James Edward

    Insect wings are flexible. However, the influence of wing flexibility on the flight dynamics of insects and flapping wing micro air vehicles is unknown. Most studies in the literature consider rigid wings and conclude that the hover equilibrium is unstable. This dissertation shows that a flapping wing flyer with flexible wings exhibits stable natural modes of the open loop system in hover, never reported before. The free-flight insect flight dynamics is modeled for both flexible and rigid wings. Wing mass and inertia are included in the nonlinear equations of motion. The flapping wing aerodynamics are modeled using a quasi-steady model, a well-validated two dimensional Navier Stokes model, and a coupled, two dimensional Navier Stokes - Euler Bernoulli beam model that accurately models the fluid-structure interaction of flexible wings. Hover equilibrium is systematically and efficiently determined with a coupled quasi-steady and Navier-Stokes equation trimmer. The power and stability are reported at hover while parametrically varying the pitch axis location for rigid wings and the structural stiffness for flexible wings. The results indicate that the rigid wings possess an unstable oscillatory mode mainly due to their pitch sensitivity to horizontal velocity perturbations. The flexible wings stabilize this mode primarily by adjusting their wing shape in the presence of perturbations. The wing's response to perturbations generates significantly more horizontal velocity damping and pitch rate damping than in rigid wings. Furthermore, the flexible wings experience substantially less wing wake interaction, which, for rigid wings, is destabilizing. The power required to hover a fruit fly with actively rotating rigid wings varies between 16.9 and 34.2 W/kg. The optimal power occurs when the pitch axis is located at 30% chord, similar to some biological observations. Flexible wings require 23.1 to 38.5 W/kg. However, flexible wings exhibit more stable system dynamics and

  19. A program for scheduling a Patrol Air Wing training plan.

    OpenAIRE

    Hutson, David V.

    1988-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution in unlimited. This research examined the feasibility of a computerized scheduling system to assist the development of an annual training plan for a Patrol Air Wing. A prototype is proposed incorporating a modified A* search control structure to handle the combinatorial part of the problem. The system uses a pre-existing file for its database and is implemented on an ISI workstation using the Prolog computer language. Comparisons with...

  20. Gust Mitigation of Micro Air Vehicles Using Passive Articulated Wings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adetunji Oduyela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Birds and insects naturally use passive flexing of their wings to augment their stability in uncertain aerodynamic environments. In a similar manner, micro air vehicle designers have been investigating using wing articulation to take advantage of this phenomenon. The result is a class of articulated micro air vehicles where artificial passive joints are designed into the lifting surfaces. In order to analyze how passive articulation affects performance of micro air vehicles in gusty environments, an efficient 8 degree-of-freedom model is developed. Experimental validation of the proposed mathematical model was accomplished using flight test data of an articulated micro air vehicle obtained from a high resolution indoor tracking facility. Analytical investigation of the gust alleviation properties of the articulated micro air vehicle model was carried out using simulations with varying crosswind gust magnitudes. Simulations show that passive articulation in micro air vehicles can increase their robustness to gusts within a range of joint compliance. It is also shown that if articulation joints are made too compliant that gust mitigation performance is degraded when compared to a rigid system.

  1. Antibacterial titanium nano-patterned arrays inspired by dragonfly wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadra, Chris M.; Khanh Truong, Vi; Pham, Vy T. H.; Al Kobaisi, Mohammad; Seniutinas, Gediminas; Wang, James Y.; Juodkazis, Saulius; Crawford, Russell J.; Ivanova, Elena P.

    2015-11-01

    Titanium and its alloys remain the most popular choice as a medical implant material because of its desirable properties. The successful osseointegration of titanium implants is, however, adversely affected by the presence of bacterial biofilms that can form on the surface, and hence methods for preventing the formation of surface biofilms have been the subject of intensive research over the past few years. In this study, we report the response of bacteria and primary human fibroblasts to the antibacterial nanoarrays fabricated on titanium surfaces using a simple hydrothermal etching process. These fabricated titanium surfaces were shown to possess selective bactericidal activity, eliminating almost 50% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells and about 20% of the Staphylococcus aureus cells coming into contact with the surface. These nano-patterned surfaces were also shown to enhance the aligned attachment behavior and proliferation of primary human fibroblasts over 10 days of growth. These antibacterial surfaces, which are capable of exhibiting differential responses to bacterial and eukaryotic cells, represent surfaces that have excellent prospects for biomedical applications.

  2. Antibacterial titanium nano-patterned arrays inspired by dragonfly wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadra, Chris M.; Khanh Truong, Vi; Pham, Vy T. H.; Al Kobaisi, Mohammad; Seniutinas, Gediminas; Wang, James Y.; Juodkazis, Saulius; Crawford, Russell J.; Ivanova, Elena P.

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys remain the most popular choice as a medical implant material because of its desirable properties. The successful osseointegration of titanium implants is, however, adversely affected by the presence of bacterial biofilms that can form on the surface, and hence methods for preventing the formation of surface biofilms have been the subject of intensive research over the past few years. In this study, we report the response of bacteria and primary human fibroblasts to the antibacterial nanoarrays fabricated on titanium surfaces using a simple hydrothermal etching process. These fabricated titanium surfaces were shown to possess selective bactericidal activity, eliminating almost 50% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells and about 20% of the Staphylococcus aureus cells coming into contact with the surface. These nano-patterned surfaces were also shown to enhance the aligned attachment behavior and proliferation of primary human fibroblasts over 10 days of growth. These antibacterial surfaces, which are capable of exhibiting differential responses to bacterial and eukaryotic cells, represent surfaces that have excellent prospects for biomedical applications. PMID:26576662

  3. Piezoelectric energy harvesting from morphing wing motions for micro air vehicles

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelkefi, Abdessattar

    2013-09-10

    Wing flapping and morphing can be very beneficial to managing the weight of micro air vehicles through coupling the aerodynamic forces with stability and control. In this letter, harvesting energy from the wing morphing is studied to power cameras, sensors, or communication devices of micro air vehicles and to aid in the management of their power. The aerodynamic loads on flapping wings are simulated using a three-dimensional unsteady vortex lattice method. Active wing shape morphing is considered to enhance the performance of the flapping motion. A gradient-based optimization algorithm is used to pinpoint the optimal kinematics maximizing the propellent efficiency. To benefit from the wing deformation, we place piezoelectric layers near the wing roots. Gauss law is used to estimate the electrical harvested power. We demonstrate that enough power can be generated to operate a camera. Numerical analysis shows the feasibility of exploiting wing morphing to harvest energy and improving the design and performance of micro air vehicles.

  4. Reflection characterization of nano-sized dielectric structure in Morpho butterfly wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong

    2017-10-01

    Morpho butterflies living in Central and South America are well-known for their structural-colored blue wings. The blue coloring originates from the interaction of light with nano-sized dielectric structures that are equipped on the external surface of scales covering over their wings. The high-accuracy nonstandard finite-difference time domain (NS-FDTD) method is used to investigate the reflection characterization from the nanostructures. In the NS-FDTD calculation, a computational model is built to mimic the actual tree-like multilayered structures wherever possible using the hyperbolic tangent functions. It is generally known that both multilayer interference and diffraction grating phenomena can occur when light enters the nano-sized multilayered structure. To answer the question that which phenomenon is mainly responsible for the blue coloring, the NS-FDTD calculation is performed under various incidence angles at wavelengths from 360 to 500 nm. The calculated results at one incident wavelength under different incidence angles are visualized in a two-dimensional mapping image, where horizontal and vertical axes are incidence and reflection angles, respectively. The images demonstrate a remarkable transition from a ring-like pattern at shorter wavelengths to a retro-reflection pattern at longer wavelengths. To clarify the origin of the pattern transition, the model is separated into several simpler parts and compared their mapping images with the theoretical diffraction calculations. It can be concluded that the blue coloring at longer wavelengths is mainly caused by the cooperation of multilayer interference and retro-reflection while the effect of diffraction grating is predominant at shorter wavelengths.

  5. Environmental Assessment for the 920th Rescue Wing Beddown Patrick Air Force Base, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Vista Technologies Inc. Environmental Assessment, Development and Maintenance of Patrick Air Force Base, Florida. January 1997. Canter , Larry W...Space Wing 45 CES/CEVC PAFB, Florida 920th Rescue Wing Beddown Environmental Assessment 8-1 8.0 LIST OF PREPARERS 1. David B

  6. Air Force ALP AEF Initiative Wing-Level Cluster Development and Demonstration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stute, Nicholas

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the results for the Air Force ALP AEF Initiative Wing-Level Cluster Development and Demonstration task jointly sponsored by the Logistics Readiness Branch...

  7. Damage Considerations of a Flexible Micro Air Vehicle Wing Using 3-D Laser Vibrometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mendoza, Jr, Leo L

    2007-01-01

    .... The focus of this research is to evaluate the effects of damage on a flexible micro air vehicle wing, particularly its natural frequencies and mode shapes, using three dimensional laser vibrometry...

  8. Air Forces and Moments on Triangular and Related Wings With Subsonic Leading Edges Oscillating in Supersonic Potential Flow

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Watkins, Charles

    1961-01-01

    This analysis treats the air forces and moments in supersonic potential flow on oscillating triangular wings and a series of sweptback and arrow wings with subsonic leading edges and supersonic trailing edges...

  9. Experimental Characterization of Wings for a Hawkmoth-Sized Micro Air Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Management Air Force Institute of Technology Air University Air Education and Training Command In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of...24 3.1.2 Abaqus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 3.1.3 FEA Design Update Process...26 3.5 Abaqus Assembled Wing Layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 3.6 Sample Results

  10. Ornithopter Type Flapping Wings for Autonomous Micro Air Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutthiphong Srigrarom

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an ornithopter prototype that mimics the flapping motion of bird flight is developed, and the lift and thrust generation characteristics of different wing designs are evaluated. This project focused on the spar arrangement and material used for the wings that could achieves improved performance. Various lift and thrust measurement techniques are explored and evaluated. Various wings of insects and birds were evaluated to understand how these natural flyers with flapping wings are able to produce sufficient lift to fly. The differences in the flapping aerodynamics were also detailed. Experiments on different wing designs and materials were conducted and a paramount wing was built for a test flight. The first prototype has a length of 46.5 cm, wing span of 88 cm, and weighs 161 g. A mechanism which produced a flapping motion was fabricated and designed to create flapping flight. The flapping flight was produced by using a single motor and a flexible and light wing structure. A force balance made of load cell was then designed to measure the thrust and lift force of the ornithopter. Three sets of wings varying flexibility were fabricated, therefore lift and thrust measurements were acquired from each different set of wings. The lift will be measured in ten cycles computing the average lift and frequency in three different speeds or frequencies (slow, medium and fast. The thrust measurement was measure likewise but in two cycles only. Several observations were made regarding the behavior of flexible flapping wings that should aid in the design of future flexible flapping wing vehicles. The wings angle or phase characteristic were analyze too and studied. The final ornithopter prototype weighs only 160 g, has a wing span of 88.5 cm, that could flap at a maximum flapping frequency of 3.869 Hz, and produce a maximum thrust and lift of about 0.719 and 0.264 N respectively. Next, we proposed resonance type flapping wing utilizes the near

  11. Design and mechanical analysis of a 3D-printed biodegradable biomimetic micro air vehicle wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salami, E.; Ganesan, P. B.; Ward, T. A.; Viyapuri, R.; Romli, F. I.

    2016-10-01

    The biomimetic micro air vehicles (BMAV) are unmanned, micro-scaled aircraft that are bio-inspired from flying organisms to achieve the lift and thrust by flapping their wings. There are still many technological challenges involved with designing the BMAV. One of these is designing the ultra-lightweight materials and structures for the wings that have enough mechanical strength to withstand continuous flapping at high frequencies. Insects achieve this by having chitin-based, wing frame structures that encompass a thin, film membrane. The main objectives of this study are to design a biodegradable BMAV wing (inspired from the dragonfly) and analyze its mechanical properties. The dragonfly-like wing frame structure was bio-mimicked and fabricated using a 3D printer. A chitosan nanocomposite film membrane was applied to the BMAV wing frames through casting method. Its mechanical performance was analyzed using universal testing machine (UTM). This analysis indicates that the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the wing with a membrane is nearly double that of the wing without a membrane, which allow higher wing beat frequencies and deflections that in turn enable a greater lifting performance.

  12. Repeatable Manufacture of Wings for Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicles Using Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Fabrication Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    life span, and must be cared for and used expeditiously. Once a hawkmoth hatches from its cocoon, its wing is liberated, taking care to cut the...more controlled fashion than the butterfly, but is not sufficiently so for a Micro- MAV (courtesy of http://www.science-store.com/ life /specimens/la460...50. Michelson, Robert C. and Naqvi, Messam A. Extraterrestrial Flight. s.l. : RTO- AVT von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics Lecture Series, 2003

  13. Reliable Force Predictions for a Flapping-wing Micro Air Vehicle : A "Vortex-lift" Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thielicke, W.; Kesel, A. B.; Stamhuis, Eize

    2011-01-01

    Vertical and horizontal force of a flapping-wing micro air vehicle (MAV) has been measured in slow-speed forward flight using a force balance. Detailed information on kinematics was used to estimate forces using a blade-element analysis. Input variables for this analysis are lift and drag

  14. Aerodynamics of a bio-inspired flexible flapping-wing micro air vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, T; Liu, H; Tanaka, Y; Nishihashi, N; Wang, X; Sato, A

    2011-12-01

    MAVs (micro air vehicles) with a maximal dimension of 15 cm and nominal flight speeds of around 10 m s⁻¹, operate in a Reynolds number regime of 10⁵ or lower, in which most natural flyers including insects, bats and birds fly. Furthermore, due to their light weight and low flight speed, the MAVs' flight characteristics are substantially affected by environmental factors such as wind gust. Like natural flyers, the wing structures of MAVs are often flexible and tend to deform during flight. Consequently, the aero/fluid and structural dynamics of these flyers are closely linked to each other, making the entire flight vehicle difficult to analyze. We have recently developed a hummingbird-inspired, flapping flexible wing MAV with a weight of 2.4-3.0 g and a wingspan of 10-12 cm. In this study, we carry out an integrated study of the flexible wing aerodynamics of this flapping MAV by combining an in-house computational fluid dynamic (CFD) method and wind tunnel experiments. A CFD model that has a realistic wing planform and can mimic realistic flexible wing kinematics is established, which provides a quantitative prediction of unsteady aerodynamics of the four-winged MAV in terms of vortex and wake structures and their relationship with aerodynamic force generation. Wind tunnel experiments further confirm the effectiveness of the clap and fling mechanism employed in this bio-inspired MAV as well as the importance of the wing flexibility in designing small flapping-wing MAVs.

  15. Aerodynamics of a bio-inspired flexible flapping-wing micro air vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, T; Liu, H; Nishihashi, N; Wang, X; Sato, A; Tanaka, Y

    2011-01-01

    MAVs (micro air vehicles) with a maximal dimension of 15 cm and nominal flight speeds of around 10 m s −1 , operate in a Reynolds number regime of 10 5 or lower, in which most natural flyers including insects, bats and birds fly. Furthermore, due to their light weight and low flight speed, the MAVs' flight characteristics are substantially affected by environmental factors such as wind gust. Like natural flyers, the wing structures of MAVs are often flexible and tend to deform during flight. Consequently, the aero/fluid and structural dynamics of these flyers are closely linked to each other, making the entire flight vehicle difficult to analyze. We have recently developed a hummingbird-inspired, flapping flexible wing MAV with a weight of 2.4–3.0 g and a wingspan of 10–12 cm. In this study, we carry out an integrated study of the flexible wing aerodynamics of this flapping MAV by combining an in-house computational fluid dynamic (CFD) method and wind tunnel experiments. A CFD model that has a realistic wing planform and can mimic realistic flexible wing kinematics is established, which provides a quantitative prediction of unsteady aerodynamics of the four-winged MAV in terms of vortex and wake structures and their relationship with aerodynamic force generation. Wind tunnel experiments further confirm the effectiveness of the clap and fling mechanism employed in this bio-inspired MAV as well as the importance of the wing flexibility in designing small flapping-wing MAVs.

  16. Design of flapping wings for application to single active degree of freedom micro air vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kelvin Thomas

    This dissertation covers an experimental program to understand how wing compliance influences the performance of flapping micro air vehicle wings. The focus is the design of a membraned flapping wing for a single active degree of freedom mechanism, looking to maximize thrust performance in hover conditions. The optimization approach is unique in that experiments were the chosen engine as opposed to a computation model; this is because of the complexity involved in hover-mode flapping aerodynamics. The flapping mechanism and manufacturing process for fabricating the wings were carefully developed. The uncertainty in the thrust measurement was identified and reduced by implementing precision machining and repeatable techniques for fabrication. This resulted in a reduction of the manufacturing coefficient of variation from 16.8% to 2.6%. Optimization was then conducted for a single objective (Maximize thrust), using a three parameter design space, finding the highest thrust performance in wings with high aspect ratio; then, a multi-objective optimization was conducted with two objectives (Thrust and Power) and a four parameter space. The research then shifted focus to identifying the stiffness and deformation characteristics of high performance wing designs. Static stiffness measurements with a simple line load suggested that high chordwise stiffness or lower spanwise stiffness would be favorable for aerodynamic performance. To explore more components of the deformation, a full-field imaging technique was used and a uniform load was substituted to engage with the membrane. It was found that there is a range of torsional compliance where the wing is most efficient especially at higher flapping frequencies. The final component of the study was the dynamic deformation measurement. The two system, four camera digital image correlation setup uses stroboscopic measurement to capture the wing deformation. The phase shift between the twist and stroke, and the tip deflection

  17. Design and verification of a smart wing for an extreme-agility micro-air-vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickramasinghe, Viresh; Chen, Yong; Martinez, Marcias; Kernaghan, Robert; Wong, Franklin

    2011-01-01

    A special class of fixed-wing micro-air-vehicle (MAV) is currently being designed to fly and hover to provide range superiority as well as being able to hover through a flight maneuver known as prop-hanging to accomplish a variety of surveillance missions. The hover maneuver requires roll control of the wing through differential aileron deflection but a conventional system contributes significantly to the gross weight and complexity of a MAV. Therefore, it is advantageous to use smart structure approaches with active materials to design a lightweight, robust wing for the MAV. The proposed smart wing consists of an active trailing edge flap integrated with bimorph actuators with piezoceramic fibers. Actuation is enhanced by preloading the bimorph actuators with a compressive axial load. The preload is exerted on the actuators through a passive latex or electroactive polymer (EAP) skin that wraps around the airfoil. An EAP skin would further enhance the actuation by providing an electrostatic effect of the dielectric polymer to increase the deflection. Analytical modeling as well as finite element analysis show that the proposed concept could achieve the target bi-directional deflection of 30° in typical flight conditions. Several bimorph actuators were manufactured and an experimental setup was designed to measure the static and dynamic deflections. The experimental results validated the analytical technique and finite element models, which have been further used to predict the performance of the smart wing design for a MAV

  18. Design and verification of a smart wing for an extreme-agility micro-air-vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Viresh; Chen, Yong; Martinez, Marcias; Wong, Franklin; Kernaghan, Robert

    2011-12-01

    A special class of fixed-wing micro-air-vehicle (MAV) is currently being designed to fly and hover to provide range superiority as well as being able to hover through a flight maneuver known as prop-hanging to accomplish a variety of surveillance missions. The hover maneuver requires roll control of the wing through differential aileron deflection but a conventional system contributes significantly to the gross weight and complexity of a MAV. Therefore, it is advantageous to use smart structure approaches with active materials to design a lightweight, robust wing for the MAV. The proposed smart wing consists of an active trailing edge flap integrated with bimorph actuators with piezoceramic fibers. Actuation is enhanced by preloading the bimorph actuators with a compressive axial load. The preload is exerted on the actuators through a passive latex or electroactive polymer (EAP) skin that wraps around the airfoil. An EAP skin would further enhance the actuation by providing an electrostatic effect of the dielectric polymer to increase the deflection. Analytical modeling as well as finite element analysis show that the proposed concept could achieve the target bi-directional deflection of 30° in typical flight conditions. Several bimorph actuators were manufactured and an experimental setup was designed to measure the static and dynamic deflections. The experimental results validated the analytical technique and finite element models, which have been further used to predict the performance of the smart wing design for a MAV.

  19. Understanding of Low Reynolds Number Aerodynamics and Micro Rotary-Wing Air Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Justin Michael

    The goal of the present research is to understand aerodynamics at low Reynolds numbers and synthesize rules towards the development of hovering micro rotary-wing air vehicles (MRAVs). This entailed the rigorous study of airfoil characteristics at low Reynolds numbers through available experimental results as well as the use of an unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solver. A systematic, experimental, variation of parameters approach with physical rotors was carried out to design and develop a micro air vehicle-scale rotor which maximizes the hover Figure of Merit. The insights gained in low Reynolds number aerodynamics have been utilized in the systematic design of a high endurance micro-quadrotor. Based on available characteristics, the physical relations governing electric propulsion system and structural weights have been derived towards a sizing methodology for small-scale rotary-wing vehicles.

  20. Functional Alignment of the Wing-Level Logistics Plans Division in the Strategic Air Command.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER(S) S. MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER(S) 87-2250 6a. NAME OF PERFORMING ORGANIZATION 6b. OFFICE SYMBOL 7a. NAME...THIS PA(:4___ TTNC LASSI FIZD PREFACE What’s to be gained, or lost, if the Strategic Air Command (SAC) function- ally realigned Its wing-level...product as meeting academic requirements for graduation, the views and opinions expressed or implied are solely those of the author and should , not be

  1. An insect-inspired flapping wing micro air vehicle with double wing clap-fling effects and capability of sustained hovering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quoc-Viet; Chan, Woei Leong; Debiasi, Marco

    2015-03-01

    We present our recent flying insect-inspired Flapping-Wing Micro Air Vehicle (FW-MAV) capable of hovering flight which we have recently achieved. The FW-MAV has wing span of 22 cm (wing tip-to-wing tip), weighs about 16.6 grams with onboard integration of radio control system including a radio receiver, an electronic speed control (ESC) for brushless motor, three servos for attitude flight controls of roll, pitch, and yaw, and a single cell lithium-polymer (LiPo) battery (3.7 V). The proposed gear box enables the FW-MAV to use one DC brushless motor to synchronously drive four wings and take advantage of the double clap-and-fling effects during one flapping cycle. Moreover, passive wing rotation is utilized to simplify the design, in addition to passive stabilizing surfaces for flight stability. Powered by a single cell LiPo battery (3.7 V), the FW-MAV flaps at 13.7 Hz and produces an average vertical force or thrust of about 28 grams, which is sufficient for take-off and hovering flight. Finally, free flight tests in terms of vertical take-off, hovering, and manual attitude control flight have been conducted to verify the performance of the FW-MAV.

  2. Design of a high altitude long endurance flying-wing solar-powered unmanned air vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsahlani, A. A.; Johnston, L. J.; Atcliffe, P. A.

    2017-06-01

    The low-Reynolds number environment of high-altitude §ight places severe demands on the aerodynamic design and stability and control of a high altitude, long endurance (HALE) unmanned air vehicle (UAV). The aerodynamic efficiency of a §ying-wing configuration makes it an attractive design option for such an application and is investigated in the present work. The proposed configuration has a high-aspect ratio, swept-wing planform, the wing sweep being necessary to provide an adequate moment arm for outboard longitudinal and lateral control surfaces. A design optimization framework is developed under a MATLAB environment, combining aerodynamic, structural, and stability analysis. Low-order analysis tools are employed to facilitate efficient computations, which is important when there are multiple optimization loops for the various engineering analyses. In particular, a vortex-lattice method is used to compute the wing planform aerodynamics, coupled to a twodimensional (2D) panel method to derive aerofoil sectional characteristics. Integral boundary-layer methods are coupled to the panel method in order to predict §ow separation boundaries during the design iterations. A quasi-analytical method is adapted for application to flyingwing con¦gurations to predict the wing weight and a linear finite-beam element approach is used for structural analysis of the wing-box. Stability is a particular concern in the low-density environment of high-altitude flight for flying-wing aircraft and so provision of adequate directional stability and control power forms part of the optimization process. At present, a modified Genetic Algorithm is used in all of the optimization loops. Each of the low-order engineering analysis tools is validated using higher-order methods to provide con¦dence in the use of these computationally-efficient tools in the present design-optimization framework. This paper includes the results of employing the present optimization tools in the design of a

  3. Unsteady Aerodynamics of Flapping Wings at Re=10,000-100,000 for Micro-Air Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-11

    MICO AIR VEHICLE (MAV) APPLICATIONS , Proceedings of the 37th National & 4th International Conference on Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power, IIT...deviations on the aerodynamic forces. Then we used the knowledge gathered in this domain to attack the complex measured kinematics of a bat wing. The...immersed in a background grid. One surprising conclusion from this work was that in spite of the apparent complexity of wing motion, the motion could be

  4. Modeling and Closed Loop Flight Testing of a Fixed Wing Micro Air Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harikumar Kandath

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the nonlinear six degrees of freedom dynamic modeling of a fixed wing micro air vehicle. The static derivatives of the micro air vehicle are obtained through the wind tunnel testing. The propeller effects on the lift, drag, pitching moment and side force are quantified through wind tunnel testing. The dynamic derivatives are obtained through empirical relations available in the literature. The trim conditions are computed for a straight and constant altitude flight condition. The linearized longitudinal and lateral state space models are obtained about trim conditions. The variations in short period mode, phugoid mode, Dutch roll mode, roll subsidence mode and spiral mode with respect to different trim operating conditions is presented. A stabilizing static output feedback controller is designed using the obtained model. Successful closed loop flight trials are conducted with the static output feedback controller.

  5. Power Requirements for Bi-Harmonic Amplitude and Bias Modulation Control of a Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    nature, would have the inherent benefit of stealth through mimicry of insects. Such a MAV is referred to as a flapping wing micro air vehicle (FWMAV...S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. “The Animal Diversity Web”, 2013. URL http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Manduca_sexta

  6. Aircraft impact risk assessment data base for assessment of fixed wing air carrier impact risk in the vicinity of airports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akstulewicz, F.; Read, J.

    1979-06-01

    The FIXED WING AIRCRAFT accidents occurring to US air carriers during the years 1956 through 1977 are listed, with those resulting in impact within five miles of airports in the contiguous US being considered in detail as to location of impact relative to the airport runways

  7. Experimental Investigation of Pitch Control Enhancement to the Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kian, Chin C

    2006-01-01

    .... The MAV without the main fixed-wing is placed in a laminar flow field within a low speed wind tunnel with the wake after the flapping wings characterized with a constant temperature anemometer...

  8. An efficient fluid-structure interaction method for conceptual design of flexible micro air vehicle wings: Development, comparison, and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, Thomas P.

    This thesis summarizes the development, comparison, and applications of an efficient fluid-structure interaction method capable of simulating the effects that wing flexibility has on micro air vehicle (MAV) performance. Micro air vehicles wing designs often incorporate flexible wing structures that mimic the skeleton / membrane designs found in natural flyers such as bats and insects. However, accurate performance prediction for these wings requires the coupling of the simulation of the fluid physics around the wing and the simulation of the structural deformation. These fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulations are often accomplished using high fidelity, computationally expensive techniques such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for the fluid physics and nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) for the structural simulation. The main drawback of these methods, especially for use simulating vehicles that are able to be manufactured relatively quickly, is that the computational cost required to perform relevant trade studies on the design is prohibitively large and time-consuming. The main goal of this research is the development of a coupled fluid-structure interaction method computationally efficient and accurate enough to be used for conceptual design of micro air vehicles. An advanced potential flow model is used to calculate aerodynamic performance and loading, while a simplified finite element structural model using frame and shell elements calculates the wing deflection due to aerodynamic loading. The contents of this thesis include a literature survey of current approaches, an introduction to the efficient FSI formulation, comparison of the presented FSI method with higher-fidelity simulation methods, demonstrations of the method's capability for tradeoff and optimization studies, and an overview of contributions to a nonlinear dynamic algorithm for the simulation of flapping flight.

  9. Sensing the facet orientation in silver nano-plates using scanning Kelvin probe microscopy in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdellatif, M.H. [Department of Nanostructures, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, I-16163 Genova (Italy); Physics Department, National Research Center, Elbehoos st., 12622, Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Salerno, M., E-mail: marco.salerno@iit.it [Department of Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, I-16163 Genova (Italy); Polovitsyn, Anatolii [Department of Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, I-16163 Genova (Italy); Dipartimentodi Fisica, Università di Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146 Genova (Italy); Marras, Sergio [Department of Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, I-16163 Genova (Italy); De Angelis, Francesco [Department of Nanostructures, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, I-16163 Genova (Italy)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • The surface potential of drop cast nanocrystals was measured by SKPM in ambient air. • The nanocrystal facet work function was derived by theory. • By comparing theory and experiment we distinguished the nanocrystal facets. • Nanocrystal facet control is of practical interest for optoelectronic devices. - Abstract: The work function of nano-materials is important for a full characterization of their electronic properties. Because the band alignment, band bending and electronic noise are very sensitive to work function fluctuations, the dependence of the work function of nano-scale crystals on facet orientation can be a critical issue in optimizing optoelectronic devices based on these materials. We used scanning Kelvin probe microscopy to assess the local work function on samples of silver nano-plates at sub-micrometric spatial resolution. With the appropriate choice of the substrate and based on statistical analysis, it was possible to distinguish the surface potential of the different facets of silver nano-plates even if the measurements were done in ambient conditions without the use of vacuum. A phenomenological model was used to calculate the differences of facet work function of the silver nano-plates and the corresponding shift in Fermi level. This theoretical prediction and the experimentally observed difference in surface potential on the silver nano-plates were in good agreement. Our results show the possibility to sense the nano-crystal facets by appropriate choice of the substrate in ambient conditions.

  10. New compliant strain gauges for self-sensing dynamic deformation of flapping wings on miniature air vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wissman, James; Perez-Rosado, Ariel; Edgerton, Alex; Levi, Benjamin M; Karakas, Zeynep N; Kujawski, Mark; Philipps, Alyssa; Papavizas, Nicholas; Fallon, Danielle; Bruck, Hugh A; Smela, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Over the past several years there has been an increasing interest in the development of miniature air vehicles (MAVs) with flapping wings. To allow these MAVs to adjust to changes in wind direction and to maximize their efficiency, it is desirable to monitor the deformation of the wing during flight. This paper presents a step in this direction, demonstrating the measurement of strain on the surface of the wing using minimally invasive compliant piezoresistive sensors. The strain gauges consisted of latex mixed with electrically conducting exfoliated graphite, and they were applied by spray coating. To calibrate the gauges, both static and dynamic testing up to 10 Hz were performed using cantilever structures. In tension the static sensitivity was a linear 0.4 Ω με −1 and the gauge factor was 28; in compression, the gauge factor was −5. Although sensitivities in tension and compression differed by a factor of almost six, this was not reflected in the dynamic data, which followed the strain reversibly with little distortion. There was no attenuation with frequency, indicating a sufficiently small time constant for this application. The gauges were thin, compliant, and light enough to measure, without interference, deformations due to shape changes of the flexible wing associated with generating lift and thrust. During flapping the resistance closely tracked the generated thrust, measured on a test stand, with both signals tracing figure-8 loops as a function of wing position throughout each cycle. (paper)

  11. New compliant strain gauges for self-sensing dynamic deformation of flapping wings on miniature air vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissman, James; Perez-Rosado, Ariel; Edgerton, Alex; Levi, Benjamin M.; Karakas, Zeynep N.; Kujawski, Mark; Philipps, Alyssa; Papavizas, Nicholas; Fallon, Danielle; Bruck, Hugh A.; Smela, Elisabeth

    2013-08-01

    Over the past several years there has been an increasing interest in the development of miniature air vehicles (MAVs) with flapping wings. To allow these MAVs to adjust to changes in wind direction and to maximize their efficiency, it is desirable to monitor the deformation of the wing during flight. This paper presents a step in this direction, demonstrating the measurement of strain on the surface of the wing using minimally invasive compliant piezoresistive sensors. The strain gauges consisted of latex mixed with electrically conducting exfoliated graphite, and they were applied by spray coating. To calibrate the gauges, both static and dynamic testing up to 10 Hz were performed using cantilever structures. In tension the static sensitivity was a linear 0.4 Ω μɛ-1 and the gauge factor was 28; in compression, the gauge factor was -5. Although sensitivities in tension and compression differed by a factor of almost six, this was not reflected in the dynamic data, which followed the strain reversibly with little distortion. There was no attenuation with frequency, indicating a sufficiently small time constant for this application. The gauges were thin, compliant, and light enough to measure, without interference, deformations due to shape changes of the flexible wing associated with generating lift and thrust. During flapping the resistance closely tracked the generated thrust, measured on a test stand, with both signals tracing figure-8 loops as a function of wing position throughout each cycle.

  12. Experimental characterization and multidisciplinary conceptual design optimization of a bendable load stiffened unmanned air vehicle wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagdale, Vijay Narayan

    Demand for deployable MAVs and UAVs with wings designed to reduce aircraft storage volume led to the development of a bendable wing concept at the University of Florida (UF). The wing shows an ability to load stiffen in the flight load direction, still remaining compliant in the opposite direction, enabling UAV storage inside smaller packing volumes. From the design prospective, when the wing shape parameters are treated as design variables, the performance requirements : high aerodynamic efficiency, structural stability under aggressive flight loads and desired compliant nature to prevent breaking while stored, in general conflict with each other. Creep deformation induced by long term storage and its effect on the wing flight characteristics are additional considerations. Experimental characterization of candidate bendable UAV wings is performed in order to demonstrate and understand aerodynamic and structural behavior of the bendable load stiffened wing under flight loads and while the wings are stored inside a canister for long duration, in the process identifying some important wing shape parameters. A multidisciplinary, multiobjective design optimization approach is utilized for conceptual design of a 24 inch span and 7 inch root chord bendable wing. Aerodynamic performance of the wing is studied using an extended vortex lattice method based Athena Vortex Lattice (AVL) program. An arc length method based nonlinear FEA routine in ABAQUS is used to evaluate the structural performance of the wing and to determine maximum flying velocity that the wing can withstand without buckling or failing under aggressive flight loads. An analytical approach is used to study the stresses developed in the composite wing during storage and Tsai-Wu criterion is used to check failure of the composite wing due to the rolling stresses to determine minimum safe storage diameter. Multidisciplinary wing shape and layup optimization is performed using an elitist non-dominated sorting

  13. Active Air Force Wings as of 1 October 1995; USAF Active Flying, Space, and Missile Squadrons as of 1 October 1995

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Endicott, Judy G; Bailey, Carl E; Cully, George W; Harris, W. S; Hartman, Sara K; Heskett, K. D; Light, J. R; Perdue, Johnna A

    1998-01-01

    .... Among other initiatives, he directed the Air Force Historical Research Agency to compile a two-volume series publicizing the lineage and heraldry of the wings and flying squadrons that would remain...

  14. INVESTIGATION OF THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF AIR TO WATER HEAT EXCHANGER USING NANO-FLUIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawaf Hazim Saeid

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available 0 0 1 291 1661 International Islamic University 13 3 1949 14.0 Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} In the present study the three-dimensional numerical simulation is selected as a tool to investigate the effectiveness of a cross flow heat exchanger. Water is selected to be mixed with nano-particles and flow inside a circular pipe while a pure air is flowing across it. Numerical simulations is carried out under laminar flow for both water and air sides. The thickness of the pipe is neglected in the present preliminary study. From the physics of the problem, the governing parameters can be determined as: the Reynolds, the type and the volume fraction of the nono-fluid. The effect of these governing parameters is studied and the results are presented. The results show significant enhancement of heat transfer with introduction of nano-particles, such as titanium-oxide (TiO2 nano-powder, compared to the pure base fluid. The accuracy of the results presented in the present study depends on the accuracy of the effective properties of the nano-fluids, which are taken from the open literature. ABSTRAK: Dalam kajian ini, simulasi tiga dimensi berangka digunakan untuk mengkaji keberkesanan penukar haba aliran silang.  Air dipilih untuk dicampurkan dengan zarah bersaiz nano dan dialirkan di dalam paip berbentuk bulat, sementara udara tulen mengalir melaluinya.  Simulasi berangka dijalankan di bawah aliran lamina untuk kedua-dua belah air dan udara. Ketebalan paip diabaikan di dalam kajian permulaan ini.  Dari sudut permasalahan fizik, parameter pengawal imbang boleh ditentukan sebagai

  15. Unsteady Aerodynamic Investigation of the Propeller-Wing Interaction for a Rocket Launched Unmanned Air Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Q. Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aerodynamic characteristics of propeller-wing interaction for the rocket launched UAV have been investigated numerically by means of sliding mesh technology. The corresponding forces and moments have been collected for axial wing placements ranging from 0.056 to 0.5D and varied rotating speeds. The slipstream generated by the rotating propeller has little effects on the lift characteristics of the whole UAV. The drag can be seen to remain unchanged as the wing's location moves progressively closer to the propeller until 0.056D away from the propeller, where a nearly 20% increase occurred sharply. The propeller position has a negligible effect on the overall thrust and torque of the propeller. The efficiency affected by the installation angle of the propeller blade has also been analyzed. Based on the pressure cloud and streamlines, the vortices generated by propeller, propeller-wing interaction, and wing tip have also been captured and analyzed.

  16. A helicopter that flaps its wings : The Ornicopter flaps its wings like a bird to get into the air

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Holten, T.; Mols, B.

    2003-01-01

    No other type of aircraft is as manoeuvrable as a helicopter. Reverse in full flight, rotate in the air, hover at a standstill, the helicopter can do it all. The police, fire services, medical services, military and civil aviation all use the helicopter for the freedom of flight it offers. However,

  17. Flow characteristics of air in square duct using delta wing vortex generators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh R. Ingalagi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Performance improvement in terms of improving heat transfer coefficient and reducing pressure drop becomes essential in heat exchange applications and a large number of methods for reducing pressure drop exist in the literature and the present work is an investigation on use of delta wings as vortex generators for reducing pressure drop. Methodology includes air from a blower entering the test section through orificemeter and differential-micro manometer to measure the flow rate and pressure drop across the test section. Depending upon the pressure drops, friction factors for smooth and rough surface of the duct are estimated. The effect of geometrical parameters of delta wing and duct aspect ratio on friction factor ratios are reported Based on Reynolds number in the range of 8000−24000. The geometrical parameters of vortex generators varied in this study were the pitch-to-vortex generator height ratio (p/e, vortex generator height to duct hydraulic diameter ratio (e/Dh, aspect ratio of vortex generator (ar. Results are reported for 0.1 < e/Dh < 0.5, p/e = 4,8,12,16, (ar = 1.6,2.3,4, N = 1 in ducts having aspect ratio AR = 1, Detailed friction factor analysis for Re 8000−24000 has been presented for different configurations of vortex generators used in the square duct. The experimental results of the present study for friction factor in smooth square duct matches well with values taken from formula proposed by Blasius. The friction factor ratio increases with increase in e/Dh value, which may be attributed to increased blockage of the flow passage. For a given p/e, increasing e/Dh ratio for the same (ar has the effect of increasing circulation strength and core size of the vortex thereby offering more resistance to flow that results into a higher friction factor ratio. The results have been presented in the form of the friction factor ratio of the roughened and smooth ducts operating at equal Reynolds numbers. Semi

  18. Nano

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Bent; Engel, Lars Romann

    2007-01-01

    Gennem de sidste par år har et lille ord med et meget stort potentiale gentagende trængt sig på i den offentlige bevidsthed, det er ordet "nano". Nanovidenskab og nanoteknologi er lige nu to af de "hotteste" forskningsområder og betragtes af mange som porten til en helt ny verden af muligheder....... Muligheder, vi endnu ikke kender konsekvenserne af. Center for Kunst og Videnskabs forestilling NANO giver dig chancen for at blive bekendt med verdens mindste byggesten og idégrundlaget for nanoforskningen. Vi har skabt et rum, som på mange måder minder om et laboratorium. Rummet er forsynet med storskærme......, kolber, væsker og nanopartikler. Her vil du f.eks. opleve, hvordan forskere tilfører guld helt nye egenskaber. Forestillingen veksler mellem kemiske arbejdsdemonstrationer, stemningsskabende musik og livlig debat på storskærme mellem eksperter. NANO opfordrer publikum til at tage stilling til forskningen...

  19. Inerting a Boeing 747SP Center Wing Tank Scale Model With Nitrogen-Enriched Air

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cavage, William

    2002-01-01

    Tests were performed in a 0.24 scale model of a Boeing 747SP center wing tank to validate the existing assumptions for inerting complex geometric spaces, which were developed from previous experiments, and to facilitate design...

  20. Flow Control and High-Lift Performance for Flying-Wing Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle Configurations by inserting slots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U Ali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study on Unmanned Combat Air Vehicles (UCAVs are two-fold: first to control the flow by inserting leading-edge and cross-flow slots and analysing the viscous flow development over the outer panels of a flying-wing configuration to maximise the performance of the elevons control surfaces; second to predict high-lift performance particularly the maximum-lift characteristics. This is demonstrated using a variety of inviscid Vortex Lattice Method (VLM and Euler, and viscous CFD Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS methods. The computational results are validated against experiment measured in a wind tunnel. Two flying-wing planforms are considered based around a generic 40˚ edge-aligned configuration. The VLM predicts a linear variation of lift and pitching moment with incidence angle, and substantially under-predicts the induced drag. Results obtained from RANS and Euler agree well with experiment.

  1. Inertial attitude control of a bat-like morphing-wing air vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorado, J; Barrientos, A; Rossi, C; Parra, C

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a novel bat-like unmanned aerial vehicle inspired by the morphing-wing mechanism of bats. The goal of this paper is twofold. Firstly, a modelling framework is introduced for analysing how the robot should manoeuvre by means of changing wing morphology. This allows the definition of requirements for achieving forward and turning flight according to the kinematics of the wing modulation. Secondly, an attitude controller named backstepping+DAF is proposed. Motivated by biological evidence about the influence of wing inertia on the production of body accelerations, the attitude control law incorporates wing inertia information to produce desired roll (ϕ) and pitch (θ) acceleration commands (desired angular acceleration function (DAF)). This novel control approach is aimed at incrementing net body forces (F(net)) that generate propulsion. Simulations and wind-tunnel experimental results have shown an increase of about 23% in net body force production during the wingbeat cycle when the wings are modulated using the DAF as a part of the backstepping control law. Results also confirm accurate attitude tracking in spite of high external disturbances generated by aerodynamic loads at airspeeds up to 5 ms⁻¹.

  2. Inertial attitude control of a bat-like morphing-wing air vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colorado, J; Barrientos, A; Rossi, C; Parra, C

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel bat-like unmanned aerial vehicle inspired by the morphing-wing mechanism of bats. The goal of this paper is twofold. Firstly, a modelling framework is introduced for analysing how the robot should manoeuvre by means of changing wing morphology. This allows the definition of requirements for achieving forward and turning flight according to the kinematics of the wing modulation. Secondly, an attitude controller named backstepping+DAF is proposed. Motivated by biological evidence about the influence of wing inertia on the production of body accelerations, the attitude control law incorporates wing inertia information to produce desired roll (φ) and pitch (θ) acceleration commands (desired angular acceleration function (DAF)). This novel control approach is aimed at incrementing net body forces (F net ) that generate propulsion. Simulations and wind-tunnel experimental results have shown an increase of about 23% in net body force production during the wingbeat cycle when the wings are modulated using the DAF as a part of the backstepping control law. Results also confirm accurate attitude tracking in spite of high external disturbances generated by aerodynamic loads at airspeeds up to 5 ms −1 . (paper)

  3. Bioactive Nano-Filters to Control Legionella on Indoor Air

    OpenAIRE

    rodrigues, paf; sousa, siv; geraldes, mj; alvim-ferraz, mcm; martins, fg

    2012-01-01

    Several factors affect the indoor air quality, among which ventilation, human occupancy, cleaning products, equipment and material; they might induce the presence of aerosols (or bioaerosols in the presence of biological components) nitrogen oxides, ozone, carbon monoxide and dioxide, volatile organic compounds, radon and microorganisms. Microbiological pollution involves hundreds of bacteria and fungi species that grow indoors under specific conditions of temperature and humidity. Exposure t...

  4. Experimental Study on Indoor Air Cleaning Technique of Nano-Titania Catalysis Under Plasma Discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Deli; Yang Xuechang; Zhou Fei; Wu Yuhuang

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a new technique of air cleaning by plasma combined with catalyst was proposed, which consisted of electrostatic precipitation, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) decomposition and sterilization. A novel indoor air purifier based on this technique was adopted. The experimental results showed that formaldehyde decomposition by the plasma-catalyst hybrid system was more efficient than that by plasma only. Positive discharge was better than negative discharge in formaldehyde removal. Meanwhile, the outlet concentration of ozone byproduct was effectively reduced by the nano-titania catalyst.

  5. Micro-Scale Flapping Wings for the Advancement of Flying MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Then in 1959, Nobel Prize winner Richard Feynman would challenge the world to develop microsystems ranging from biological systems to computer data...of flapping wings for nano air vehicles,” tech. rep., FEB 2008. 3. R. P. Feynman , “There’s plenty of room at the bottom,” Journal of Microelec

  6. Active Air Force Wings as of 1 October 1995; USAF Active Flying, Space, and Missile Squadrons as of 1 October 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Office of Air Force History, 1984], by Charles A. Ravenstein , showed the overlapping of the lineages that conformed to the orders of the time. The...appeared in Charles A. Ravenstein , Air Force Combat Wings: Lineage and Honors Histories, 1947–1977, (Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office

  7. An Experimental Investigation of Flapping Wing Propulsion for Micro Air Vehicles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Duggan, Sean

    2000-01-01

    ...). Experimental work is conducted in the NPS 1.5 m x 1.5 m in-draft wind tunnel. A previously constructed model is suspended by thin wires and is used to measure the thrust performance of the flapping-wing MAV...

  8. Relocation of the Air National Guard 176th Wing to Elmendorf AFB, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    widely (from a soft whisper to a jet engine) and is measured on a logarithmic scale to accommodate this wide range. The use of logarithms is a...abbreviated SEL or LAE ) combines both of these characteristics into a single metric. Relocation of the ANG 176th Wing to Elmendorf AFB Page D-4

  9. An experimental investigation into the deployment of 3-D, finned wing and shape memory alloy vortex generators in a forced air convection heat pipe fin stack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aris, M.S.; McGlen, R.; Owen, I.; Sutcliffe, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    Forced air convection heat pipe cooling systems play an essential role in the thermal management of electronic and power electronic devices such as microprocessors and IGBT's (Integrated Gate Bipolar Transistors). With increasing heat dissipation from these devices, novel methods of improving the thermal performance of fin stacks attached to the heat pipe condenser section are required. The current work investigates the use of a wing type surface protrusions in the form of 3-D delta wing tabs adhered to the fin surface, thin wings punched-out of the fin material and TiNi shape memory alloy delta wings which changed their angles of attack based on the fin surface temperature. The longitudinal vortices generated from the wing designs induce secondary mixing of the cooler free stream air entering the fin stack with the warmer fluid close to the fin surfaces. The change in angle of the attack of the active delta wings provide heat transfer enhancement while managing flow pressure losses across the fin stack. A heat transfer enhancement of 37% compared to a plain fin stack was obtained from the 3-D tabs in a staggered arrangement. The punched-out delta wings in the staggered and inline arrangements provided enhancements of 30% and 26% respectively. Enhancements from the active delta wings were lower at 16%. However, as these devices reduce the pressure drop through the fin stack by approximately 19% in the de-activate position, over the activated position, a reduction in fan operating cost may be achieved for systems operating with inlet air temperatures below the maximum inlet temperature specification for the device. CFD analysis was also carried out to provide additional detail of the local heat transfer enhancement effects. The CFD results corresponded well with previously published reports and were consistent with the experimental findings. - Highlights: → Heat transfer enhancements of heat pipe fin stacks was successfully achieved using fixed and active delta

  10. Influence of turbulent flow on the explosion parameters of micro- and nano-aluminum powder-air mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueling; Zhang, Qi

    2015-12-15

    The environmental turbulence intensity has a significant influence on the explosion parameters of both micro- and nano-Al at the time of ignition. However, explosion research on turbulence intensity with respect to micro- and nano-Al powders is still insufficient. In this work, micro- and nano-aluminum powders were investigated via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and their particle size distributions were measured using a laser diffraction analyzer under dispersing air pressures of 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 MPa in a 20 L cylindrical, strong plexiglass vessel. The particle size distributions in three different mass ratio mixtures of micro- and nano-Al powders (micro-Al:nano-Al[massratio]=95:5, 90:10, and 85:15) were also measured. The results show that the agglomerate size of nano-Al powder is an order of magnitude larger than the nanoparticles' actual size. Furthermore, the turbulence intensity ranges (Urms) of the Al powder-air mixtures were measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) under dispersing air pressures of 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 MPa. The effect of turbulence intensity on the explosion characteristics of the micro- and nano-Al powders was investigated using a 20 L cylindrical explosion vessel. The results of micro-Al and nano-Al powder-air mixtures with a stoichiometric concentration of 337.00 g·m(-3) were discussed for the maximum explosion pressure, the maximum rate of pressure increase and the maximum effective burning velocity under the different turbulence intensity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of Photographic Dynamic Measurements Applicable to Evaluation of Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Selectable error plot from calib_gui.m……………………………………………… 27 Figure 16: O’Hara flapper ……………………………………………………………………….. 30 Figure 17: Record tab in Motion...Wing downstroke three dimensional point cloud, from the top of the wing stroke... 57 Figure 38: Deleón flapper with hightlighted reference points...purposes. One point is directly over the flapper mount and the other is placed near the mount. The two points can be considered rigid to one another

  12. A Rotary Wing System for Micro Air Vehicle Applications. Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin BUTOESCU

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the paper is to propose a new type of ornithopter that avoids the mechanical difficulties of a flapping system. It uses a modified design of a cycloidal propulsor. The modification regards the special setting of the wings that is intended to help the formation of a stable leading edge vortex (LEV. It is known that the LEV is the main feature that allows the insects to achieve the necessary lift to fly.

  13. Pointed wings, low wingloading and calm air reduce migratory flight costs in songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlin, Melissa S; Wikelski, Martin

    2008-05-14

    Migratory bird, bat and insect species tend to have more pointed wings than non-migrants. Pointed wings and low wingloading, or body mass divided by wing area, are thought to reduce energy consumption during long-distance flight, but these hypotheses have never been directly tested. Furthermore, it is not clear how the atmospheric conditions migrants encounter while aloft affect their energy use; without such information, we cannot accurately predict migratory species' response(s) to climate change. Here, we measured the heart rates of 15 free-flying Swainson's Thrushes (Catharus ustulatus) during migratory flight. Heart rate, and therefore rate of energy expenditure, was positively associated with individual variation in wingtip roundedness and wingloading throughout the flights. During the cruise phase of the flights, heart rate was also positively associated with wind speed but not wind direction, and negatively but not significantly associated with large-scale atmospheric stability. High winds and low atmospheric stability are both indicative of the presence of turbulent eddies, suggesting that birds may be using more energy when atmospheric turbulence is high. We therefore suggest that pointed wingtips, low wingloading and avoidance of high winds and turbulence reduce flight costs for small birds during migration, and that climate change may have the strongest effects on migrants' in-flight energy use if it affects the frequency and/or severity of high winds and atmospheric instability.

  14. Pointed wings, low wingloading and calm air reduce migratory flight costs in songbirds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa S Bowlin

    Full Text Available Migratory bird, bat and insect species tend to have more pointed wings than non-migrants. Pointed wings and low wingloading, or body mass divided by wing area, are thought to reduce energy consumption during long-distance flight, but these hypotheses have never been directly tested. Furthermore, it is not clear how the atmospheric conditions migrants encounter while aloft affect their energy use; without such information, we cannot accurately predict migratory species' response(s to climate change. Here, we measured the heart rates of 15 free-flying Swainson's Thrushes (Catharus ustulatus during migratory flight. Heart rate, and therefore rate of energy expenditure, was positively associated with individual variation in wingtip roundedness and wingloading throughout the flights. During the cruise phase of the flights, heart rate was also positively associated with wind speed but not wind direction, and negatively but not significantly associated with large-scale atmospheric stability. High winds and low atmospheric stability are both indicative of the presence of turbulent eddies, suggesting that birds may be using more energy when atmospheric turbulence is high. We therefore suggest that pointed wingtips, low wingloading and avoidance of high winds and turbulence reduce flight costs for small birds during migration, and that climate change may have the strongest effects on migrants' in-flight energy use if it affects the frequency and/or severity of high winds and atmospheric instability.

  15. Wingbeat Shape Modulation for Flapping-Wing Micro-Air-Vehicle Control During Hover (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    AUTHOR(S) David B. Doman, Michael W. Oppenheimer, and David O. Sigthorsson (AFRL/ RBCA ) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 2401 5e. TASK NUMBER N/A 5f. WORK UNIT...AFRL/ RBCA ) Control Sciences Division Air Force Research Laboratory, Air Vehicles Directorate Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7542 Air

  16. Precision Position Control of the DelFly II Flapping-wing Micro Air Vehicle in a Wind-tunnel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cunis, T.; Karasek, M.; de Croon, G.C.H.E.

    2016-01-01

    Flapping-wing MAVs represent an attractive alternative to conventional designs with rotary wings, since they promise a much higher efficiency in forward flight. However, further insight into the flapping-wing aerodynamics is still needed to get closer to the flight performance observed in natural

  17. A Finite Element Analysis of a Carbon Fiber Composite Micro Air Vehicle Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    Management Air Force Institute of Technology Air University Air Education and Training Command In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the...using a developed MATLAB code that generated finite element input files to be solved using ABAQUS , a finite element program. The developed MATLAB code...program that is capable of generating an input file to be submitted to ABAQUS , a finite element model solver. This technique was used in order to

  18. Making Marble Powder Waste Profitable by Using Nano-TiO2 Surface Modification for Air Quality Improvement Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaxiong Ji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a brand new recycling route of waste marble powder, by means of surface modification with homemade nano-TiO2 particles to produce low cost coating materials for the application in air quality improvement. The as-prepared nano-TiO2 in anatase phase exhibits excellent photocatalytic characteristic, reflected by the high degradation rate of over 95% of methylene blue within 6 hours of UV irradiation. The prepared coating consisting of nano-TiO2 clad marble powder was tested by monitoring the decomposition rate of formaldehyde gas. A high degradation efficiency of about 95% within 9 hours of illumination is achieved, demonstrating a promising potential for removing the harmful and toxic organic pollutants in air while applying this coating in buildings both interiorly and exteriorly.

  19. Effects of external stores on the air combat capability of a delta wing fighter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearman, M. L.; Sawyer, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    Delta wing point-design fighters with two pylon mounted missiles and aft tail controls (similar to several Soviet designs) have been investigated for a Mach number range from about 0.6 to 2.0. Whereas minimum drag penalties that are expected with the addition of external stores do occur, the effects at higher lifts, corresponding to maneuvering flight, are less severe and often favorable. The drag-due-to-lift factor is less with stores on although the lift curve slope is unaffected. The longitudinal stability level is reduced by the addition of stores while the pitch control effectiveness is unchanged. The directional stability was generally reduced at subsonic speeds and increased at supersonic speeds by the addition of stores but sufficiently high stability levels are obtainable that are compatible with the longitudinal maneuvering limits. Some examples of the potential maneuvering capability in terms of normal acceleration and turn radius are included.

  20. Altitude Control of a Single Degree of Freedom Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicle (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    NUMBER 62201F 6. AUTHOR(S) David B. Doman, Michael W. Oppenheimer, Michael A. Bolender, and David O. Sigthorsson (AFRL/ RBCA ) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...NUMBER Control Design and Analysis Branch (AFRL/ RBCA ) Control Sciences Division Air Force Research Laboratory, Air Vehicles Directorate Wright

  1. Evaluation of the adsorption capacity of nano-graphene and nano-graphene oxide for xylene removal from air and their comparison with the standard adsorbent of activated carbon to introduce the optimized one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Tabrizi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Volatile organic compounds from industrial activities are one of the most important pollutants released into the air and have adverse effects on human and environment. Therefore, they should be removed before releasing into atmosphere. The aim of the study was to evaluate xylene removal from air by nano-grapheme and nano-graphene oxide in comparison with activated carbon adsorbent. Material and Method:  After preparing adsorbents of activated carbon, nano-graphene, and nano-graphene oxide, experiments adsorption capacity in static mode (Batch were carried out in a glass vial. Some variables including contact time, the amount of adsorbent, the concentration of xylene, and the temperature were studied. Langmuir absorption isotherms were used in order to study the adsorption capacity of xylene on adsorbents. Moreover, sample analysis was done by gas chromatography with Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID. Results: The adsorption capacities of activated carbon, nano-graphene oxide and nano-graphene for removal of xylene were obtained 349.8, 14.5, and 490 mg/g, respectively. The results of Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM for nano-graphene and nano-graphene oxide showed particle size of less than 100 nm. While, the results of Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM showed particle size of 45nm for nano-graphene and 65 nm for nano-graphene oxide. Also, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD showed cube structure of nano-adsorbents. Conclusion: In constant humidity, increase in exposure time and temperature caused an increase in the adsorption capacity. The results revealed greater adsorption capacity of xylene removal for nano-graphene compared to the activated carbon, and nano-graphene oxide.

  2. Implementation of the Rauch-Tung-Striebel Smoother for Sensor Compatibility Correction of a Fixed-Wing Unmanned Air Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-Bin Hsiao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a complete procedure for sensor compatibility correction of a fixed-wing Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV. The sensors consist of a differential air pressure transducer for airspeed measurement, two airdata vanes installed on an airdata probe for angle of attack (AoA and angle of sideslip (AoS measurement, and an Attitude and Heading Reference System (AHRS that provides attitude angles, angular rates, and acceleration. The procedure is mainly based on a two pass algorithm called the Rauch-Tung-Striebel (RTS smoother, which consists of a forward pass Extended Kalman Filter (EKF and a backward recursion smoother. On top of that, this paper proposes the implementation of the Wiener Type Filter prior to the RTS in order to avoid the complicated process noise covariance matrix estimation. Furthermore, an easy to implement airdata measurement noise variance estimation method is introduced. The method estimates the airdata and subsequently the noise variances using the ground speed and ascent rate provided by the Global Positioning System (GPS. It incorporates the idea of data regionality by assuming that some sort of statistical relation exists between nearby data points. Root mean square deviation (RMSD is being employed to justify the sensor compatibility. The result shows that the presented procedure is easy to implement and it improves the UAV sensor data compatibility significantly.

  3. Relocation of the 146th Tactical Airlift Wing of the California Air National Guard. Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    Desert iguana Cnemidophorous tivis Western whiptail (observed) Cal lisau rus draconoide s Zebra -tailed lizard Crotaphytus collaris Collared lizard Uma...general plan amendments involving the El Toro Marine Corp Air Station (ETMAS) and its relationship to the urbanizing South Orange County area. I see many

  4. Comparison of Benzene & Toluene removal from synthetic polluted air with use of Nano photocatalyticTiO2/ ZNO process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Mitra; Nassehinia, Hamid Reza; Jonidi-Jafari, Ahmad; Nasseri, Simin; Esrafili, Ali

    2014-02-05

    Mono aromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX) are a group of hazardous pollutants which originate from sources such as refineries, gas, and oil extraction fields, petrochemicals and paint and glue industries.Conventional methods, including incineration, condensation, adsorption and absorption have been used for removal of VOCs. None of these methods is economical for removal of pollutants of polluted air with low to moderate concentrations. The heterogeneous photocatalytic processes involve the chemical reactions to convert pollutant to carbon dioxide and water. The aim of this paper is a comparison of Benzene & Toluene removal from synthetic polluted air using a Nano photocatalytic TiO2/ ZNO process. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns showed that Nano crystals of TiO2 and ZNO were in anatase and rutile phases. Toluene & benzene were decomposed by TiO2/ ZNO Nano photocatalyst and UV radiation. Kruskal-wallis Test demonstrated that there are significant differences (pvalue benzene increases with increasing UV intensity and decreasing initial concentrations. Effect of TiO2/ZNO Nano photocatalyst on benzene is less than that on toluene. In this research, Toluene & benzene removal by TiO2/ZNO and UV followed first-order reactions.

  5. NanoCapillary Network Proton Conducting Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen/Air Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pintauro, Peter [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    2012-07-09

    The objective of this proposal is to fabricate and characterize a new class of NanoCapillary Network (NCN) proton conducting membranes for hydrogen/air fuel cells that operate under high temperature, low humidity conditions. The membranes will be intelligently designed, where a high density interconnecting 3-D network of nm-diameter electrospun proton conducting polymer fibers is embedded in an inert (uncharged) water/gas impermeable polymer matrix. The high density of fibers in the resulting mat and the high ion-exchange capacity of the fiber polymer will ensure high proton conductivity. To further enhance water retention, molecular silica will be added to the sulfonated polymer fibers. The uncharged matrix material will control water swelling of the high ion-exchange capacity proton conducting polymer fibers and will impart toughness to the final nanocapillary composite membrane. Thus, unlike other fuel cell membranes, the role of the polymer support matrix will be decoupled from that of the proton-conducting channels. The expected final outcome of this 5-year project is the fabrication of fuel cell membranes with properties that exceed the DOE’s technical targets, in particular a proton conductivity of 0.1 S/cm at a temperature less than or equal to120°C and 25-50% relative humidity.

  6. Air Force Host and Tenant Agreements Between the 50th Space Wing, the Joint National Integration Center, and Tenants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2007-01-01

    .... The 50th Space Wing makes available by permit two buildings on the base's real property records, 720 and 730, to the Joint National Integration Center, a Component of the Missile Defense Agency...

  7. Nonlinear Structures Optimization for Flexible Flapping Wing MAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    nonlinear optimization, flapping wing, fluid structure interaction, micro -air vehicles, flexible wing, flapping mechanism 16. SECURITY... Structures Optimization for Flexible Flapping Wing Micro -Air Vehicles” was funded with Chief Scientist Innovative Research funds. This project was divided...predict a 10% resisting load to the model, and Python Scripting to wrap around everything. 2 Building the Model in Abaqus CAE The flapping wing

  8. Sensing the facet orientation in silver nano-plates using scanning Kelvin probe microscopy in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellatif, M. H.; Salerno, M.; Polovitsyn, Anatolii; Marras, Sergio; De Angelis, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    The work function of nano-materials is important for a full characterization of their electronic properties. Because the band alignment, band bending and electronic noise are very sensitive to work function fluctuations, the dependence of the work function of nano-scale crystals on facet orientation can be a critical issue in optimizing optoelectronic devices based on these materials. We used scanning Kelvin probe microscopy to assess the local work function on samples of silver nano-plates at sub-micrometric spatial resolution. With the appropriate choice of the substrate and based on statistical analysis, it was possible to distinguish the surface potential of the different facets of silver nano-plates even if the measurements were done in ambient conditions without the use of vacuum. A phenomenological model was used to calculate the differences of facet work function of the silver nano-plates and the corresponding shift in Fermi level. This theoretical prediction and the experimentally observed difference in surface potential on the silver nano-plates were in good agreement. Our results show the possibility to sense the nano-crystal facets by appropriate choice of the substrate in ambient conditions.

  9. The Distributed Air Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    typhoon strikes the Philippines, where nearly 100 million people live in an area of 116,000 square miles. Following the catastrophic storm food ...perform any designated missions. Thus, it is imperative to provide the operating crew with basic essentials like food and water, as well as hygienic...consist of both specially outfitted surveillance vessels as well as disguised fishing junks capable of passing along location data. It is assumed that

  10. Influence of nitrogen and air atmosphere during thermal treatment on micro and nano sized powders and sintered TiO2 specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labus N.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of air and nitrogen atmosphere during heating on TiO2 nano and micro sized powders as well as sintered polycrystalline specimens was analyzed. Sintering of TiO2 nano and micro powders in air atmosphere was monitored in a dilatometer. Non compacted nano and micro powders were analyzed separately in air and nitrogen atmospheres during heating using thermo gravimetric (TG and differential thermal analysis (DTA. The anatase to rutile phase transition temperature interval is influenced by the powder particle size and atmosphere change. At lower temperatures for nano TiO2 powder a second order phase transition was detected by both thermal techniques. Polycrystalline specimens obtained by sintering from nano powders were reheated in the dilatometer in nitrogen and air atmosphere, and their shrinkage is found to be different. Powder particle size influence, as well as the air and nitrogen atmosphere influence was discussed. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI172057 i br. III45014

  11. WHEN COMPASSION GROWS WINGS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicky

    antiretroviral roll-out in full swing, the. WHEN COMPASSION GROWS WINGS. The free time and expertise given by its deeply committed core of professional volunteers. (including pilots) is the lifeblood of the operation. Red Cross Air Mercy Service volunteer, German national Dr Florian Funk, at the AMS Durban base.

  12. Multispectral and DSLR sensors for assessing crop stress in corn and cotton using fixed-wing unmanned air systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valasek, John; Henrickson, James V.; Bowden, Ezekiel; Shi, Yeyin; Morgan, Cristine L. S.; Neely, Haly L.

    2016-05-01

    As small unmanned aircraft systems become increasingly affordable, reliable, and formally recognized under federal regulation, they become increasingly attractive as novel platforms for civil applications. This paper details the development and demonstration of fixed-wing unmanned aircraft systems for precision agriculture tasks. Tasks such as soil moisture content and high throughput phenotyping are considered. Rationale for sensor, vehicle, and ground equipment selections are provided, in addition to developed flight operation procedures for minimal numbers of crew. Preliminary imagery results are presented and analyzed, and these results demonstrate that fixed-wing unmanned aircraft systems modified to carry non-traditional sensors at extended endurance durations can provide high quality data that is usable for serious scientific analysis.

  13. Design and stable flight of a 21 g insect-like tailless flapping wing micro air vehicle with angular rates feedback control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Hoang Vu; Kang, Taesam; Park, Hoon Cheol

    2017-04-04

    An insect-like tailless flapping wing micro air vehicle (FW-MAV) without feedback control eventually becomes unstable after takeoff. Flying an insect-like tailless FW-MAV is more challenging than flying a bird-like tailed FW-MAV, due to the difference in control principles. This work introduces the design and controlled flight of an insect-like tailless FW-MAV, named KUBeetle. A combination of four-bar linkage and pulley-string mechanisms was used to develop a lightweight flapping mechanism that could achieve a high flapping amplitude of approximately 190°. Clap-and-flings at dorsal and ventral stroke reversals were implemented to enhance vertical force. In the absence of a control surface at the tail, adjustment of the location of the trailing edges at the wing roots to modulate the rotational angle of the wings was used to generate control moments for the attitude control. Measurements by a 6-axis load cell showed that the control mechanism produced reasonable pitch, roll and yaw moments according to the corresponding control inputs. The control mechanism was integrated with three sub-micro servos to realize the pitch, roll and yaw controls. A simple PD feedback controller was implemented for flight stability with an onboard microcontroller and a gyroscope that sensed the pitch, roll and yaw rates. Several flight tests demonstrated that the tailless KUBeetle could successfully perform a vertical climb, then hover and loiter within a 0.3 m ground radius with small variations in pitch and roll body angles.

  14. Quad-thopter: Tailless Flapping Wing Robot with 4 Pairs of Wings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wagter, C.; Karasek, M.; de Croon, G.C.H.E.; J.-M. Moschetta G. Hattenberger, H. de Plinval

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel design of a tailless flapping wing Micro Air Vehicle (MAV), which uses four independently driven pairs of flapping wings in order to fly and perform agile maneuvers. The wing pairs are arranged such that differential thrust generates the desired roll and pitch moments, similar to

  15. Synthesis of supported metallic nano-particles and their use in air depollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrault, J.; Valange, S.; Tatibouet, J.M.; Thollon, St.; Herlin-Boime, N.; Giraud, S.; Ruiz, J.Ch.; Bergaya, B.; Joulin, J.P.; Delbianco, N.; Gabelica, Z.; Daturi, M.

    2009-01-01

    The main objectives of the 'NACACOMO' Consortium ('Nano-materials: Catalysts for the Conversion of organic Molecules. Uses in fine chemicals and environment protection ') consisted in generating novel catalysts composed of nanoparticles of metals (Pt, Pd, Ag...) and/or oxides (TiO 2 ...) stabilized and well distributed over the surface of a support (foams, ceramics), by monitoring both the particle size and the 'coating' process itself, using new technologies: CVD, plasma-spray, laser pyrolysis, supercritical preparation, which were compared to conventional soft chemistry recipes. The most accurate characterization of particle morphology, local structure, texture, spatial arrangement but also of their reactivity, were achieved by privileging the utilization of various in situ methods. Details on formation mechanisms of a solid nano-particle at the atomic level (nucleation, growth and particle (re)distribution over the support...) could be obtained in selected cases, with opportunities for scaling up and shaping. The (chemical) nature of the so-obtained nano-materials was monitored for selected catalytic applications involving the development of environmental friendly processes, such as oxidation of VOC, with a priority for aromatics and chlorinated compounds. (authors)

  16. Error analysis and assessment of unsteady forces acting on a flapping wing micro air vehicle: free flight versus wind-tunnel experimental methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, J V; Percin, M; van Oudheusden, B W; Remes, B; de Wagter, C; de Croon, G C H E; de Visser, C C

    2015-08-20

    An accurate knowledge of the unsteady aerodynamic forces acting on a bio-inspired, flapping-wing micro air vehicle (FWMAV) is crucial in the design development and optimization cycle. Two different types of experimental approaches are often used: determination of forces from position data obtained from external optical tracking during free flight, or direct measurements of forces by attaching the FWMAV to a force transducer in a wind-tunnel. This study compares the quality of the forces obtained from both methods as applied to a 17.4 gram FWMAV capable of controlled flight. A comprehensive analysis of various error sources is performed. The effects of different factors, e.g., measurement errors, error propagation, numerical differentiation, filtering frequency selection, and structural eigenmode interference, are assessed. For the forces obtained from free flight experiments it is shown that a data acquisition frequency below 200 Hz and an accuracy in the position measurements lower than ± 0.2 mm may considerably hinder determination of the unsteady forces. In general, the force component parallel to the fuselage determined by the two methods compares well for identical flight conditions; however, a significant difference was observed for the forces along the stroke plane of the wings. This was found to originate from the restrictions applied by the clamp to the dynamic oscillations observed in free flight and from the structural resonance of the clamped FWMAV structure, which generates loads that cannot be distinguished from the external forces. Furthermore, the clamping position was found to have a pronounced influence on the eigenmodes of the structure, and this effect should be taken into account for accurate force measurements.

  17. Experimental investigation of CFRP cutting with nano second laser under air and Ar gas ambience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuji; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Matsuoka, Fumihiro; Yamashita, Kensuke; Takahashi, Kenjiro; Masuno, Shinichiro

    2015-03-01

    A carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) is widely used for automobile, aircraft and so on, because of having high strength, lightweight and weather resistance. A laser is one of useful tools for cutting CFRP. However, a matrix evaporated zone (MEZ) is formed around the laser irradiation area since heat property of the resin is different from that of carbon fiber. It is required for optimizing the laser processing condition to minimize the MEZ. In our experiment, the CFRP plate was cut with a nanosecond laser under air and Ar gas ambience. The ambient gas is an important factor for reduction of MEZ since formation of MEZ might be caused due to an oxidization of carbon fiber and epoxy resin. In order to evaluate the oxidization, spectroscopic analysis was carried out to investigate an ablation plume under air and Ar gas. Furthermore, a surface on CFRP plate was observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). As the results, the cutting quality for argon is better than that for air, and the MEZ for Ar gas is smaller than than that for air.

  18. Final Supplemental Environmental Assessment of Proposed Actions by the 58th Special Operations Wing, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Recreation - Commercial Service - Public & Institutional - Drainage & Flood Control D Single Family N Noise Contour D Industrial & Manufacturing D...Generator Saw 81 Industrial Saw 83 Welder 74 Truck 80 Forklift 67 Crane 83 Source: COL 2001 Final Supplemental Environmental Assessment of...Naval Air Systems Command  Hotaling ,  Jim R  USAF AFSOC/A5RX  CV‐22 Logistics  Air Force Special Operations Command/Plans and  Programs  Vandzura

  19. Nano Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, In Ju; Lee, Ik Mo; Kwon, Yeung Gu; and others

    2006-02-15

    This book introduces background of nano science such as summary, plenty room at the bottom, access way to nano technique, nanoparticles using bottom-up method which are a marvel of nature, and modern alchemy : chemical synthesis of artificial nano structure, understanding of quantum mechanics, STM/AFM, nano metal powder, ceramic nanoparticles, nano structure film, manufacture of nanoparticles using reverse micelle method, carbon nano tube, sol-gel material, nano energy material, nano catalyst nano bio material technology and spintronics.

  20. Nano Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, In Ju; Lee, Ik Mo; Kwon, Yeung Gu

    2006-02-01

    This book introduces background of nano science such as summary, plenty room at the bottom, access way to nano technique, nanoparticles using bottom-up method which are a marvel of nature, and modern alchemy : chemical synthesis of artificial nano structure, understanding of quantum mechanics, STM/AFM, nano metal powder, ceramic nanoparticles, nano structure film, manufacture of nanoparticles using reverse micelle method, carbon nano tube, sol-gel material, nano energy material, nano catalyst nano bio material technology and spintronics.

  1. The Effects of Leadership on Carrier Air Wing Sixteen’s Loss Rates during Operation Rolling Thunder, 1965-1968

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-16

    forces could operate freely in a Soviet SAM environment, there were serious repercussions for Soviet forces in Europe . Likewise, if North...... neophytes in the air war. But these junior aviators were going to be wingmen for them during an extremely dangerous combat tour, and the senior officers

  2. Nano technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In Sik

    2002-03-01

    This book is introduction of nano technology, which describes what nano technology is, alpha and omega of nano technology, the future of Korean nano technology and human being's future and nano technology. The contents of this book are nano period is coming, a engine of creation, what is molecular engineering, a huge nano technology, technique on making small things, nano materials with exorbitant possibility, the key of nano world the most desirable nano technology in bio industry, nano development plan of government, the direction of development for nano technology and children of heart.

  3. Final Environmental Assessment for Proposed Construction Projects for the 140th Wing, Colorado Air National Guard at Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    biologica l resou rces, cultura l resomces, environmenta l justice, socioeconomics, geology, soUs and topography, water resources, solid and hazardous...emissions associated with the implementation of the Proposed Action were to cause or contribute to a violation of any national or state ambient air...control technology MOA Memorandum of Agreement MSA munitions storage areas NAAQS National Ambient Air Quality Standards NEPA National Environmental

  4. Using silver nano particles for sampling of toxic mercury vapors from industrial air sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Osanloo

    2014-05-01

    .Conclusion: The presented adsorbent is very useful for sampling of the trace amounts of mercury vapors from air. Moreover, it can be regenerated easily is suitable or sampling at 25 to 70 °C. Due to oxidation of silver and reduction in uptake of nanoparticles, oven temperature of 245 °C is used for the recovery of metallic silver. Low amount of adsorbent, high absorbency, high repeatability for sampling, low cost and high accuracy are of the advantages of the presented method.

  5. Study of design parameters of flapping-wings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Q.; Goosen, J.F.L.; Van Keulen, F.

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most important components of a flapping-wing micro air vehicle (FWMAV), the design of an energy-efficient flapping-wing has been a research interest recently. Research on insect flight from different perspectives has been carried out, mainly with regard to wing morphology, flapping

  6. High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Zirconium Alloy with Nano structured Oxide Layer in Air Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y. J.; Kim, J. W.; Park, J. W.; Cho, S. O.

    2016-01-01

    If the temperature of the cladding materials increases above 1000 .deg. C, which can be caused by a loss of coolant accident (LOCA), Zr becomes an auto-oxidation catalyst and hence produces a huge amount of hydrogen gas from water. Therefore, many investigations are being carried out to prevent (or reduce) the hydrogen production from Zr-based cladding materials in the nuclear reactors. Our team has developed an anodization technique by which nanostructured oxide can be formed on various flat metallic elements such as Al, Ti, and Zr-based alloy. Anodization is a simple electrochemical technique and requires only a power supply and an electrolyte. In this study, Zr-based alloys with nanostructured oxide layers were oxidized by using Thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) and compared with the pristine one. It reveals that the nanostructured oxide layer can prevent oxidation of substrate metal in air. Oxidation behavior of the pristine Zr-Nb-Sn alloy and the Zr-Nb-Sn alloy with nanostructured oxide layer evaluated by measuring weight gain (TGA). In comparison with the pristine Zr-Nb-Sn alloy, weight gain of the Zr-Nb-Sn alloy with nanostructured oxide layer is lower than 10% even for 12 hours oxidation in air.

  7. Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Rectangular Air-Duct Entrances in the Leading Edge of an NACA 23018 Wing, Special Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermann, David; McLellan, Charles H.

    1940-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of a number of duct entrances of rectangular shape installed in the leading edge of a wing was conducted in the NACA 20-foot tunnel to determine the external drag, the available pressure, the critical Mach numbers, and the effect on the maximum lift. The results showed that the most satisfactory entrances, which had practically no effect on the wing characteristics, had their lips approximately in the vertical plane of the leading edge of the wing. This requirement necessitated extending the lips outside the wing contour for all except the small entrances. Full dynamic pressure was found to be available over a fairly wide range of angle of attack. The critical Mach number for a small entrance was calculated to be as high as that for the plain wing but was slightly lower for the larger entrances tested.

  8. Relocation of the 146th Tactical Airlift Wing of the California Air National Guard. Volume 2. Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    lAth Street Sacr,•eto. CA 9M14 SaerMa . CA 9614916/322-2996 916/445-7416 James R--groueO Dept. of G*eeCl Services 1125 Teeth Street Sacramento . CA 9...Species from Fish and Wildlife Service’s Endnagered Species Office in Sacramento at 2800 Cottage Way, Room E-1823, Sacramento , California 95825...proposed addition to Naval Air Station Point Mugu was located within the Rancho El Rio de Santa Clara o La Colonia . The rancho was granted in 1837, by

  9. Role of wing morphing in thrust generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ghommem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the role of morphing on flight dynamics of two birds by simulating the flow over rigid and morphing wings that have the characteristics of two different birds, namely the Giant Petrel and Dove Prion. The simulation of a flapping rigid wing shows that the root of the wing should be placed at a specific angle of attack in order to generate enough lift to balance the weight of the bird. However, in this case the generated thrust is either very small, or even negative, depending on the wing shape. Further, results show that morphing of the wing enables a significant increase in the thrust and propulsive efficiency. This indicates that the birds actually utilize some sort of active wing twisting and bending to produce enough thrust. This study should facilitate better guidance for the design of flapping air vehicles.

  10. Power and Thermal Technology for Air and Space. Delivery Order 0006: Nano-filled Polymers for Electrical Insulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klosterman, Donald A; Galaska, Mary

    2006-01-01

    .... Improved polymers could be used in wiring, cabling, potting compounds, and capacitors. Specifically, this effort involved research in areas such as nano-filler dispersion, bulk sample fabrication, and thin film processing...

  11. The Realization and Study of Optical Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artusio-Glimpse, Alexandra Brae

    Consider the airfoil: a carefully designed structure capable of stable lift in a uniform air flow. It so happens that air pressure and radiation (light) pressure are similar phenomena because each transfer momentum to flow-disturbing objects. This, then, begs the question: does an optical analogue to the airfoil exist? Though an exceedingly small effect, scientists harness radiation pressure in a wide gamut of applications from micromanipulation of single biological particles to the propulsion of large spacecrafts called solar sails. We introduce a cambered, refractive rod that is subjected to optical forces analogous to those seen in aerodynamics, and I call this analogue the optical wing. Flight characteristics of optical wings are determined by wing shape and material in a uniform radiation field. Theory predicts the lift force and axial torque are functions of the wing's angle of attack with stable and unstable orientations. These structures can operate as intensity-dependent, parametrically driven oscillators. In two-dimensions, the wings exhibit bistability when analyzed in an accelerating frame. In three-dimensions, the motion of axially symmetric spinning hemispherical wings is analogous to a spinning top. Experiments on semi-buoyant wings in water found semicylindrically shaped, refractive microparticles traversed a laser beam and rotated to an illumination-dependent stable orientation. Preliminary tests aid in the development of a calibrated force measurement experiment to directly evaluate the optical forces and torque on these samples. A foundational study of the optical wing, this work contributes to future advancements of flight-by-light.

  12. Veins improve fracture toughness of insect wings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Henning Dirks

    Full Text Available During the lifetime of a flying insect, its wings are subjected to mechanical forces and deformations for millions of cycles. Defects in the micrometre thin membranes or veins may reduce the insect's flight performance. How do insects prevent crack related material failure in their wings and what role does the characteristic vein pattern play? Fracture toughness is a parameter, which characterises a material's resistance to crack propagation. Our results show that, compared to other body parts, the hind wing membrane of the migratory locust S. gregaria itself is not exceptionally tough (1.04±0.25 MPa√m. However, the cross veins increase the wing's toughness by 50% by acting as barriers to crack propagation. Using fracture mechanics, we show that the morphological spacing of most wing veins matches the critical crack length of the material (1132 µm. This finding directly demonstrates how the biomechanical properties and the morphology of locust wings are functionally correlated in locusts, providing a mechanically 'optimal' solution with high toughness and low weight. The vein pattern found in insect wings thus might inspire the design of more durable and lightweight artificial 'venous' wings for micro-air-vehicles. Using the vein spacing as indicator, our approach might also provide a basis to estimate the wing properties of endangered or extinct insect species.

  13. Gliding swifts attain laminar flow over rough wings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lentink

    Full Text Available Swifts are among the most aerodynamically refined gliding birds. However, the overlapping vanes and protruding shafts of their primary feathers make swift wings remarkably rough for their size. Wing roughness height is 1-2% of chord length on the upper surface--10,000 times rougher than sailplane wings. Sailplanes depend on extreme wing smoothness to increase the area of laminar flow on the wing surface and minimize drag for extended glides. To understand why the swift does not rely on smooth wings, we used a stethoscope to map laminar flow over preserved wings in a low-turbulence wind tunnel. By combining laminar area, lift, and drag measurements, we show that average area of laminar flow on swift wings is 69% (n = 3; std 13% of their total area during glides that maximize flight distance and duration--similar to high-performance sailplanes. Our aerodynamic analysis indicates that swifts attain laminar flow over their rough wings because their wing size is comparable to the distance the air travels (after a roughness-induced perturbation before it transitions from laminar to turbulent. To interpret the function of swift wing roughness, we simulated its effect on smooth model wings using physical models. This manipulation shows that laminar flow is reduced and drag increased at high speeds. At the speeds at which swifts cruise, however, swift-like roughness prolongs laminar flow and reduces drag. This feature gives small birds with rudimentary wings an edge during the evolution of glide performance.

  14. Veins Improve Fracture Toughness of Insect Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, Jan-Henning; Taylor, David

    2012-01-01

    During the lifetime of a flying insect, its wings are subjected to mechanical forces and deformations for millions of cycles. Defects in the micrometre thin membranes or veins may reduce the insect’s flight performance. How do insects prevent crack related material failure in their wings and what role does the characteristic vein pattern play? Fracture toughness is a parameter, which characterises a material’s resistance to crack propagation. Our results show that, compared to other body parts, the hind wing membrane of the migratory locust S. gregaria itself is not exceptionally tough (1.04±0.25 MPa√m). However, the cross veins increase the wing’s toughness by 50% by acting as barriers to crack propagation. Using fracture mechanics, we show that the morphological spacing of most wing veins matches the critical crack length of the material (1132 µm). This finding directly demonstrates how the biomechanical properties and the morphology of locust wings are functionally correlated in locusts, providing a mechanically ‘optimal’ solution with high toughness and low weight. The vein pattern found in insect wings thus might inspire the design of more durable and lightweight artificial ‘venous’ wings for micro-air-vehicles. Using the vein spacing as indicator, our approach might also provide a basis to estimate the wing properties of endangered or extinct insect species. PMID:22927966

  15. The Morphological Characterization of the Forewing of the Manduca sexta Species for the Application of Biomimetic Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    on tobacco and tomato plants, but will occasionally feed on potato and pepper crops and other plants in the Solenaceae family, hence their name... composite plates and is applied here [8]. The experimental sample is harvested from a wing in which the membrane scales have been removed. Then a section

  16. 33 CFR 334.540 - Banana River at the Eastern Range, 45th Space Wing, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Banana River at the Eastern Range... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.540 Banana River at the Eastern Range, 45th Space Wing, Cape... navigable waters of the United States, as defined at 33 CFR part 329, within the Banana River contiguous to...

  17. Low Reynolds Number Wing Transients in Rotation and Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Anya; Schlueter, Kristy

    2012-11-01

    The unsteady aerodynamic forces and flow fields generated by a wing undergoing transient motions in both rotation and translation were investigated. An aspect ratio 2 flat plate wing at a 45 deg angle of attack was driven over 84 deg of rotation (3 chord-lengths of travel at 3/4 span) and 3 and 10 chord-lengths of translation in quiescent water at Reynolds numbers between 2,500 and 15,000. Flow visualization on the rotating wing revealed a leading edge vortex that lifted off of the wing surface, but remained in the vicinity of the wing for the duration of the wing stroke. A second spanwise vortex with strong axial flow was also observed. As the tip vortex grew, the leading edge vortex joined the tip vortex in a loop-like structure over the aft half of the wing. Near the leading edge, spanwise flow in the second vortex became entrained in the tip vortex near the corner of the wing. Unsteady force measurements revealed that lift coefficient increased through the constant-velocity portion of the wing stroke. Forces were compared for variations in wing acceleration and Reynolds number for both rotational and translational motions. The effect of tank blockage was investigated by repeating the experiments on multiple wings, varying the distance between the wing tip and tank wall. U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, Summer Faculty Fellowship Program.

  18. A thin polymer membrane, nano-suit, enhancing survival across the continuum between air and high vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, Yasuharu; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Ohta, Isao; Ishii, Daisuke; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Shimomura, Masatsugu; Hariyama, Takahiko

    2013-05-07

    Most multicellular organisms can only survive under atmospheric pressure. The reduced pressure of a high vacuum usually leads to rapid dehydration and death. Here we show that a simple surface modification can render multicellular organisms strongly tolerant to high vacuum. Animals that collapsed under high vacuum continued to move following exposure of their natural extracellular surface layer (or that of an artificial coat-like polysorbitan monolaurate) to an electron beam or plasma ionization (i.e., conditions known to enhance polymer formation). Transmission electron microscopic observations revealed the existence of a thin polymerized extra layer on the surface of the animal. The layer acts as a flexible "nano-suit" barrier to the passage of gases and liquids and thus protects the organism. Furthermore, the biocompatible molecule, the component of the nano-suit, was fabricated into a "biomimetic" free-standing membrane. This concept will allow biology-related fields especially to use these membranes for several applications.

  19. Rice- and butterfly-wing effect inspired self-cleaning and low drag micro/nanopatterned surfaces in water, oil, and air flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, Gregory D.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2013-12-01

    In search of new solutions to complex challenges, researchers are turning to living nature for inspiration. For example, special surface characteristics of rice leaves and butterfly wings combine the shark skin (anisotropic flow leading to low drag) and lotus leaf (superhydrophobic and self-cleaning) effects, producing the so-called rice and butterfly wing effect. In this paper, we study four microstructured surfaces inspired by rice leaves and fabricated with photolithography techniques. We also present a method of creating such surfaces using a hot embossing procedure for scaled-up manufacturing. Fluid drag, self-cleaning, contact angle, and contact angle hysteresis data are presented to understand the role of sample geometrical dimensions. Conceptual modeling provides design guidance when developing novel low drag, self-cleaning, and potentially antifouling surfaces for medical, marine, and industrial applications.

  20. Synthesis of supported metallic nano-particles and their use in air depollution; Des nanoparticules metalliques supportees pour la depollution de l'air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrault, J. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 86 - Poitiers (France); Valange, S. [Poitiers Univ., 86 (France); Tatibouet, J.M. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Lab. de Catalyse en Chimie Organique, UMR CNRS 6503, 86 - Poitiers (France); Thollon, St. [CEA Grenoble (DRT/DTNM/LTS), 38 (France); Herlin-Boime, N. [CEA Saclay, IRAMIS, Service des Photons, Atomes et Molecules, Lab. Francis Perrin, CEA-CNRS URA 2453, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Giraud, S. [CEA Saclay (DEN/SRMA), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ruiz, J.Ch. [CEA Marcoule (DTCD/SPDE/LFSM), 30 (France); Bergaya, B. [CRT Plasma lASER, 45 - Orleans (France); Joulin, J.P.; Delbianco, N. [Ceramiques Techniques Industrielles (CTI-SA), 30 - Salindres (France); Gabelica, Z. [Universite de Haute-Alsace (LPI-GSEC), ENSCMu, 68 - Mulhouse (France); Daturi, M. [Ecole Nationale Superieure d' Ingenieurs de Caen (ENSICAEN), CNRS-LCS, UMR 6506, 14 - Caen (France)

    2009-06-15

    The main objectives of the 'NACACOMO' Consortium ('Nano-materials: Catalysts for the Conversion of organic Molecules. Uses in fine chemicals and environment protection ') consisted in generating novel catalysts composed of nanoparticles of metals (Pt, Pd, Ag...) and/or oxides (TiO{sub 2}...) stabilized and well distributed over the surface of a support (foams, ceramics), by monitoring both the particle size and the 'coating' process itself, using new technologies: CVD, plasma-spray, laser pyrolysis, supercritical preparation, which were compared to conventional soft chemistry recipes. The most accurate characterization of particle morphology, local structure, texture, spatial arrangement but also of their reactivity, were achieved by privileging the utilization of various in situ methods. Details on formation mechanisms of a solid nano-particle at the atomic level (nucleation, growth and particle (re)distribution over the support...) could be obtained in selected cases, with opportunities for scaling up and shaping. The (chemical) nature of the so-obtained nano-materials was monitored for selected catalytic applications involving the development of environmental friendly processes, such as oxidation of VOC, with a priority for aromatics and chlorinated compounds. (authors)

  1. Structural Technology Evaluation and Analysis Program (STEAP). Delivery Order 0035: Dynamics and Control and Computational Design of Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    prototype FWMAVs. A brushless DC motor was used to drive a four-bar crank- rocker mechanism to transform rotational motion into a rocking motion, i.e...stroke actuation using brushless DC motors . Furthermore, the microcontrollers were required to communicate with a remote controller and with each other...low-level motor control laws that enable wing beat motion profiles to be produced that generate desired cycle-averaged control forces and moments

  2. Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ Home The environment and your health Air Air While we don’t often think about the ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be ...

  3. General overview: European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality interactions (EUCAARI) - integrating aerosol research from nano to global scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulmala, M.; Asmi, A.; Lappalainen, H. K.; Baltensperger, U.; Brenguier, J.-L.; Facchini, M. C.; Hansson, H.-C.; Hov, Ø.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Pöschl, U.; Wiedensohler, A.; Boers, R.; Boucher, O.; de Leeuw, G.; Denier van der Gon, H. A. C.; Feichter, J.; Krejci, R.; Laj, P.; Lihavainen, H.; Lohmann, U.; McFiggans, G.; Mentel, T.; Pilinis, C.; Riipinen, I.; Schulz, M.; Stohl, A.; Swietlicki, E.; Vignati, E.; Alves, C.; Amann, M.; Ammann, M.; Arabas, S.; Artaxo, P.; Baars, H.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Bergström, R.; Beukes, J. P.; Bilde, M.; Burkhart, J. F.; Canonaco, F.; Clegg, S. L.; Coe, H.; Crumeyrolle, S.; D'Anna, B.; Decesari, S.; Gilardoni, S.; Fischer, M.; Fjaeraa, A. M.; Fountoukis, C.; George, C.; Gomes, L.; Halloran, P.; Hamburger, T.; Harrison, R. M.; Herrmann, H.; Hoffmann, T.; Hoose, C.; Hu, M.; Hyvärinen, A.; Hõrrak, U.; Iinuma, Y.; Iversen, T.; Josipovic, M.; Kanakidou, M.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kirkevåg, A.; Kiss, G.; Klimont, Z.; Kolmonen, P.; Komppula, M.; Kristjánsson, J.-E.; Laakso, L.; Laaksonen, A.; Labonnote, L.; Lanz, V. A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Rizzo, L. V.; Makkonen, R.; Manninen, H. E.; McMeeking, G.; Merikanto, J.; Minikin, A.; Mirme, S.; Morgan, W. T.; Nemitz, E.; O'Donnell, D.; Panwar, T. S.; Pawlowska, H.; Petzold, A.; Pienaar, J. J.; Pio, C.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Pryor, S.; Reddington, C. L.; Roberts, G.; Rosenfeld, D.; Schwarz, J.; Seland, Ø.; Sellegri, K.; Shen, X. J.; Shiraiwa, M.; Siebert, H.; Sierau, B.; Simpson, D.; Sun, J. Y.; Topping, D.; Tunved, P.; Vaattovaara, P.; Vakkari, V.; Veefkind, J. P.; Visschedijk, A.; Vuollekoski, H.; Vuolo, R.; Wehner, B.; Wildt, J.; Woodward, S.; Worsnop, D. R.; van Zadelhoff, G.-J.; Zardini, A. A.; Zhang, K.; van Zyl, P. G.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Carslaw, K. S.; Pandis, S. N.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we describe and summarize the main achievements of the European Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions project (EUCAARI). EUCAARI started on 1 January 2007 and ended on 31 December 2010 leaving a rich legacy including: (a) a comprehensive database with a year of observations of the physical, chemical and optical properties of aerosol particles over Europe, (b) comprehensive aerosol measurements in four developing countries, (c) a database of airborne measurements of aerosols and clouds over Europe during May 2008, (d) comprehensive modeling tools to study aerosol processes fron nano to global scale and their effects on climate and air quality. In addition a new Pan-European aerosol emissions inventory was developed and evaluated, a new cluster spectrometer was built and tested in the field and several new aerosol parameterizations and computations modules for chemical transport and global climate models were developed and evaluated. These achievements and related studies have substantially improved our understanding and reduced the uncertainties of aerosol radiative forcing and air quality-climate interactions. The EUCAARI results can be utilized in European and global environmental policy to assess the aerosol impacts and the corresponding abatement strategies.

  4. General overview: European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality interactions (EUCAARI – integrating aerosol research from nano to global scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Simpson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe and summarize the main achievements of the European Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions project (EUCAARI. EUCAARI started on 1 January 2007 and ended on 31 December 2010 leaving a rich legacy including: (a a comprehensive database with a year of observations of the physical, chemical and optical properties of aerosol particles over Europe, (b comprehensive aerosol measurements in four developing countries, (c a database of airborne measurements of aerosols and clouds over Europe during May 2008, (d comprehensive modeling tools to study aerosol processes fron nano to global scale and their effects on climate and air quality. In addition a new Pan-European aerosol emissions inventory was developed and evaluated, a new cluster spectrometer was built and tested in the field and several new aerosol parameterizations and computations modules for chemical transport and global climate models were developed and evaluated. These achievements and related studies have substantially improved our understanding and reduced the uncertainties of aerosol radiative forcing and air quality-climate interactions. The EUCAARI results can be utilized in European and global environmental policy to assess the aerosol impacts and the corresponding abatement strategies.

  5. General overview: European integrated project on aerosol cloud climate and air quality interactions (EUCAARI) - integrating aerosol research from nano to global scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulmala, M.; Asmi, A.; Lappalainen, H.K.; De Leeuw, G.; Riipinen, I.; Laakso, L.; Makkonen, R.; Manninen, H.E.; Merikanto, J.; Vakkari, V.; Vuollekoski, H.; Worsnop, D.R.; Lappalainen, H.K.; Lihavainen, H.; Hyvarinen, A.; Kolmonen, P.; Laakso, L.; Laaksonen, A.; Worsnop, D.R.; Baltensperger, U.; Canonaco, F.; Lanz, V.A.; Prevot, A.S.H.; Brenguier, J.L.; Gomes, L.; Facchini, M.C.; Decesari, S.; Hansson, H.C.; Krejci, R.; Tunved, P.; Hov, O.; Schulz, M.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Seland, O.; Simpson, D.; O'Dowd, C.D.; Poschl, U.; Shiraiwa, M.; Wiedensohler, A.; Baars, H.; Herrmann, H.; Iinuma, Y.; Siebert, H.; Wehner, B.; Boers, R.; Roberts, G.; Veefkind, J.P.; Van Zadelhoff, G.J.; Boucher, O.; Halloran, P.; Woodward, S.; De Leeuw, G.; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.; Visschedijk, A.; Feichter, J.; Zhang, K.; Laj, P.; Lohmann, U.; Sierau, B.; McFiggans, G.; Coe, H.; McMeeking, G.; Morgan, W.T.; Topping, D.; Mentel, T.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Wildt, J.; Pilinis, C.; Schulz, M.; Vuolo, R.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe and summarize the main achievements of the European Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions project (EUCAARI). EUCAARI started on 1 January 2007 and ended on 31 December 2010 leaving a rich legacy including: (a) a comprehensive database with a year of observations of the physical, chemical and optical properties of aerosol particles over Europe, (b) comprehensive aerosol measurements in four developing countries, (c) a database of airborne measurements of aerosols and clouds over Europe during May 2008, (d) comprehensive modeling tools to study aerosol processes from nano to global scale and their effects on climate and air quality. In addition a new Pan-European aerosol emissions inventory was developed and evaluated, a new cluster spectrometer was built and tested in the field and several new aerosol parameterizations and computations modules for chemical transport and global climate models were developed and evaluated. These achievements and related studies have substantially improved our understanding and reduced the uncertainties of aerosol radiative forcing and air quality-climate interactions. The EUCAARI results can be utilized in European and global environmental policy to assess the aerosol impacts and the corresponding abatement strategies. (authors)

  6. Controlled deposition of functionalized silica coated zinc oxide nano-assemblies at the air/water interface for blood cancer detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Chandra Mouli [Biomedical Instrumentation Section, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Nanobioelectronics Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Delhi Technological University, Delhi 110042 (India); Dewan, Srishti [Biomedical Instrumentation Section, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Biomedical Engineering Department, Deenbandhu Chhotu Ram University of Science & Technology, Haryana 131039 (India); Chawla, Seema [Biomedical Engineering Department, Deenbandhu Chhotu Ram University of Science & Technology, Haryana 131039 (India); Yadav, Birendra Kumar [Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute and Research Centre, Rohini, Delhi 110085 (India); Sumana, Gajjala, E-mail: sumanagajjala@gmail.com [Biomedical Instrumentation Section, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Malhotra, Bansi Dhar, E-mail: bansi.malhotra@gmail.com [Biomedical Instrumentation Section, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Nanobioelectronics Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Delhi Technological University, Delhi 110042 (India)

    2016-09-21

    We report results of the studies relating to controlled deposition of the amino-functionalized silica-coated zinc oxide (Am-Si@ZnO) nano-assemblies onto an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. The monolayers have been deposited by transferring the spread solution of Am-Si@ZnO stearic acid prepared in chloroform at the air-water interface, at optimized pressure (16 mN/m), concentration (10 mg/ml) and temperature (23 °C). The high-resolution transmission electron microscopic studies of the Am-Si@ZnO nanocomposite reveal that the nanoparticles have a microscopic structure comprising of hexagonal assemblies of ZnO with typical dimensions of 30 nm. The surface morphology of the LB multilayer observed by scanning electron microscopy shows uniform surface of the Am-Si@ZnO film in the nanometer range (<80 nm). These electrodes have been utilized for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) detection by covalently immobilizing the amino-terminated oligonucleotide probe sequence via glutaraldehyde as a crosslinker. The response studies of these fabricated electrodes carried out using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy show that this Am-Si@ZnO LB film based nucleic acid sensor exhibits a linear response to complementary DNA (10{sup −6}–10{sup −16} M) with a detection limit of 1 × 10{sup −16} M. This fabricated platform is validated with clinical samples of CML positive patients and the results demonstrate its immense potential for clinical diagnosis. - Graphical abstract: Controlled deposition of functionalized silica coated zinc oxide nano-assemblies at the air/water interface for label free electrochemical detection of chronic myelogenous leukemia. - Highlights: • Stable and controlled deposition of Am-Si@ZnO nano-assemblies using LB technique. • Uniform monolayer deposition of the Am-Si@ZnO LB film within the nanometer range. • Am-Si@ZnO LB film shows enhanced electrochemical properties. • Fabricated

  7. Model identification of a flapping wing micro aerial vehicle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguiar Vieira Caetano, J.V.

    2016-01-01

    Different flapping wing micro aerial vehicles (FWMAV) have been developed for academic (Harvard’s RoboBee), military (Israel Aerospace Industries’ Butterfly) and technology demonstration (Aerovironment’s NanoHummingBird) purposes. Among these, theDelFly II is recognized as one of themost successful

  8. Flapping wing actuation using resonant compliant mechanisms : An insect-inspired design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolsman, C.T.

    2010-01-01

    The realization of a wing actuation mechanism for a flapping wing micro air vehicle requires a move away from traditional designs based on gears and links. An approach inspired by nature’s flyers is better suited. For flapping flight two wing motions are important: the sweeping and the pitching

  9. Nano dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, S.; Park, Y.B.; Kim, S.; Jin, S.

    2014-01-01

    Nano technology in dentistry has drawn many scientists’ and clinicians’ attention to significant advances in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of oral disease. Also, nano materials in dentistry have been studied to overcome the physical and chemical characteristics of conventional dental materials. These interesting facts are the motivation of this special issue. The presented issue provides a variety of topics in the field of dentistry such as novel nano filled composite resin, the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles deposited on orthodontic bands, the osseointegration of 3D nano scaffold, and nano surface treated implant.

  10. Measurement of shape and deformation of insect wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Duo; Wei, Zhen; Wang, Zeyu; Zhou, Changqiu

    2018-01-01

    To measure the shape and deformation of an insect wing, a scanning setup adopting laser triangulation and image matching was developed. Only one industry camera with two light sources was employed to scan the transparent insect wings. 3D shape and point to point full field deformation of the wings could be obtained even when the wingspan is less than 3 mm. The venation and corrugation could be significantly identified from the results. The deformation of the wing under pin loading could be seen clearly from the results as well. Calibration shows that the shape and deformation measurement accuracies are no lower than 0.01 mm. Laser triangulation and image matching were combined dexterously to adapt wings' complex shape, size, and transparency. It is suitable for insect flight research or flapping wing micro-air vehicle development.

  11. Optimization of aerodynamic efficiency for twist morphing MAV wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.I. Ismail

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Twist morphing (TM is a practical control technique in micro air vehicle (MAV flight. However, TM wing has a lower aerodynamic efficiency (CL/CD compared to membrane and rigid wing. This is due to massive drag penalty created on TM wing, which had overwhelmed the successive increase in its lift generation. Therefore, further CL/CDmax optimization on TM wing is needed to obtain the optimal condition for the morphing wing configuration. In this paper, two-way fluid–structure interaction (FSI simulation and wind tunnel testing method are used to solve and study the basic wing aerodynamic performance over (non-optimal TM, membrane and rigid wings. Then, a multifidelity data metamodel based design optimization (MBDO process is adopted based on the Ansys-DesignXplorer frameworks. In the adaptive MBDO process, Kriging metamodel is used to construct the final multifidelity CL/CD responses by utilizing 23 multi-fidelity sample points from the FSI simulation and experimental data. The optimization results show that the optimal TM wing configuration is able to produce better CL/CDmax magnitude by at least 2% than the non-optimal TM wings. The flow structure formation reveals that low TV strength on the optimal TM wing induces low CD generation which in turn improves its overall CL/CDmax performance.

  12. Machine Learning for Flapping Wing Flight Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedhart, Menno; van Kampen, E.; Armanini, S.F.; de Visser, C.C.; Chu, Q.

    2018-01-01

    Flight control of Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicles is challenging, because of their complex dynamics and variability due to manufacturing inconsistencies. Machine Learning algorithms can be used to tackle these challenges. A Policy Gradient algorithm is used to tune the gains of a

  13. Flow structure of vortex-wing interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Christopher K.

    streamwise (axial) vorticity, as well as relatively large root-mean-square values of streamwise velocity and vorticity. Along the chord of the wing, the vortex interaction gives rise to distinct modes, which may involve either enhancement or suppression of the vortex generated at the tip of the wing. These modes are classified and interpreted in conjunction with computed modes at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Occurrence of a given mode of interaction is predominantly determined by the dimensionless location of the incident vortex relative to the tip of the wing and is generally insensitive to the Reynolds number and dimensionless circulation of the incident vortex. The genesis of the basic modes of interaction is clarified using streamline topology with associated critical points. Whereas formation of an enhanced tip vortex involves a region of large upwash in conjunction with localized flow separation, complete suppression of the tip vortex is associated with a small-scale separation-attachment bubble bounded by downwash at the wing tip. Oscillation of the wing at an amplitude and velocity nearly two orders of magnitude smaller than the wing chord and free stream velocity respectively can give rise to distinctive patterns of upwash, downwash, and shed vorticity, which are dependent on the outboard displacement of the incident vortex relative to the wing tip. Moreover, these patterns are a strong function of the phase of the wing motion during its oscillation cycle. At a given value of phase, the wing oscillation induces upwash that is reinforced by the upwash of the incident vortex, giving a maximum value of net upwash. Conversely, when these two origins of upwash counteract, rather than reinforce, one another during the oscillation cycle, the net upwash has its minimum value. Analogous interpretations hold for regions of maximum and minimum net downwash located outboard of the regions of upwash. During the oscillation cycle of the wing, the magnitude and scale of the

  14. Basal Complex and Basal Venation of Odonata Wings: Structural Diversity and Potential Role in the Wing Deformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Rajabi

    Full Text Available Dragonflies and damselflies, belonging to the order Odonata, are known to be excellent fliers with versatile flight capabilities. The ability to fly over a wide range of speeds, high manoeuvrability and great agility are a few characteristics of their flight. The architecture of the wings and their structural elements have been found to play a major role in this regard. However, the precise influence of individual wing components on the flight performance of these insects remains unknown. The design of the wing basis (so called basal complex and the venation of this part are responsible for particular deformability and specific shape of the wing blade. However, the wing bases are rather different in representatives of different odonate groups. This presumably reflects the dimensions of the wings on one hand, and different flight characteristics on the other hand. In this article, we develop the first three-dimensional (3D finite element (FE models of the proximal part of the wings of typical representatives of five dragonflies and damselflies families. Using a combination of the basic material properties of insect cuticle, a linear elastic material model and a nonlinear geometric analysis, we simulate the mechanical behaviour of the wing bases. The results reveal that although both the basal venation and the basal complex influence the structural stiffness of the wings, it is only the latter which significantly affects their deformation patterns. The use of numerical simulations enabled us to address the role of various wing components such as the arculus, discoidal cell and triangle on the camber formation in flight. Our study further provides a detailed representation of the stress concentration in the models. The numerical analysis presented in this study is not only of importance for understanding structure-function relationship of insect wings, but also might help to improve the design of the wings for biomimetic micro-air vehicles (MAVs.

  15. A Conceptual Development of a Shape Memory Alloy Actuated Variable Camber Morphing Wing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, J.P.; De Breuker, R.

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the development of a morphing wing concept for a Portuguese Air Force Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV), the UAS-30. Nowadays, optimized fuel efficiency is a primary requirement in the aerospace industry, and it can be significantly improved by designing adaptive wings which can change

  16. Bending the Eagle’s Wing - How Advanced Air Defenses put the Enemy’s Vital Centers Beyond the Reach of American Airpower

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-04

    29 Carl von Clausewitz, On War, ed. and trans. Michael Howard and Peter Paret (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1976), 358. 68 More so...Air University Press, 1994. Clausewitz, Carl von. On War. Edited and Translated by Michael Howard and Peter Paret. Princeton, NJ: Princeton...Randolph, Stephen P. Powerful and Brutal Weapons. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2007. Sagan , Scott D. and Kenneth N. Waltz. The Spread of

  17. Spatial characterization of red and white skin potatoes using nano-second laser induced breakdown in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehan, Imran; Rehan, Kamran; Sultana, S.; Haq, M. Oun ul; Niazi, Muhammad Zubair Khan; Muhammad, Riaz

    2016-01-01

    We presents spectroscopic study of the plasma generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser irradiation of the flesh of red and white skin potatoes. From the spectra recorded with spectrometer (LIBS2500+, Ocean Optics, USA) 11 elements were identified in red skin potato, whereas, the white skin potato was found to have nine elements. Their relative concentrations were estimated using CF-LIBS method for the plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The target was placed in ambient air at atmospheric pressure. The electron temperature and number density were calculated from Boltzmann plot and stark broadened line profile methods, respectively using Fe I spectral lines. The spatial distribution of plasma parameters were also studied which show a decreasing trend of 6770 K-4266 K and (3-2.0) × 1016 cm-3. Concentrations of the detected elements were monitored as a function of depth of the potatoes. Our study reveals a decreasing tendency in concentration of iron from top to the centre of potato's flesh, whereas, the concentrations of other elements vary randomly.

  18. Variable camber wing based on pneumatic artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weilong; Liu, Libo; Chen, Yijin; Leng, Jinsong

    2009-07-01

    As a novel bionic actuator, pneumatic artificial muscle has high power to weight ratio. In this paper, a variable camber wing with the pneumatic artificial muscle is developed. Firstly, the experimental setup to measure the static output force of pneumatic artificial muscle is designed. The relationship between the static output force and the air pressure is investigated. Experimental result shows the static output force of pneumatic artificial muscle decreases nonlinearly with increasing contraction ratio. Secondly, the finite element model of the variable camber wing is developed. Numerical results show that the tip displacement of the trailing-edge increases linearly with increasing external load and limited with the maximum static output force of pneumatic artificial muscles. Finally, the variable camber wing model is manufactured to validate the variable camber concept. Experimental result shows that the wing camber increases with increasing air pressure and that it compare very well with the FEM result.

  19. The Characterization of Material Properties and Structural Dynamics of the Manduca Sexta Forewing for Application to Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicle Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Ryan P.

    Collateral damage presents a significant risk during air drops and airstrikes, risking citizens' lives and property, straining the relationship between the United States Air Force and host nations. This dissertation presents a methodology to determine the optimal location for making supply airdrops in order to minimize collateral damage while maintaining a high likelihood of successful recovery. A series of non-linear optimization algorithms are presented along with their relative success in finding the optimal location in the airdrop problem. Additionally, we present a quick algorithm for accurately creating the Pareto frontier in the multi-objective airstrike problem. We demonstrate the effect of differing guidelines, damage functions, and weapon employment selection which significantly alter the location of the optimal aimpoint in this targeting problem. Finally, we have provided a framework for making policy decisions in fast-moving troops-in-contact situations where observers are unsure of the nature of possible enemy forces in both finite and infinite time horizon problems. Through a recursive technique of solving this Markov decision process we have demonstrated the effect of improved intelligence and differing weights in the face of uncertain situations.

  20. WINGS Data Release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moretti, A.; Poggianti, B. M.; Fasano, G.

    2014-01-01

    Context. To effectively investigate galaxy formation and evolution, it is of paramount importance to exploit homogeneous data for large samples of galaxies in different environments. Aims. The WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) project aim is to evaluate physical properties of galaxies...... in a complete sample of low redshift clusters to be used as reference sample for evolutionary studies. The WINGS survey is still ongoing and the original dataset will be enlarged with new observations. This paper presents the entire collection of WINGS measurements obtained so far. Methods. We decided to make......, and on the cluster redshift, reaching on average 90% at V ≲ 21.7. Near-infrared photometric catalogs for 26 (in K) and 19 (in J) clusters are part of the database and the number of sources is 962 344 in K and 628 813 in J. Here again the completeness depends on the data quality, but it is on average higher than 90...

  1. Preliminary development of a wing in ground effect vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Razali; Ahamat, Mohamad Asmidzam; Ahmad, Tarmizi; Saad, Mohd Rasdan; Hafizi, Ezzat

    2018-02-01

    Wing in ground vehicle is one of the mode of transportation that allows high speed movement over water by travelling few meters above the water level. Through this manouver strategy, a cushion of compressed air exists between the wing in ground vehicle wings and water. This significantly increase the lift force, thus reducing the necessity in having a long wing span. Our project deals with the development of wing in ground vehicle with the capability of transporting four people. The total weight of this wing in ground vehicle was estimated at 5.4 kN to enable the prediction on required wing area, minimum takeoff velocity, drag force and engine power requirement. The required takeoff velocity is decreases as the lift coefficient increases, and our current mathematical model shows the takeoff velocity at 50 m/s avoid the significant increase in lift coefficient for the wing area of 5 m2. At the velocity of 50 m/s, the drag force created by this wing in ground vehicle is well below 1 kN, which required a 100-120 kW of engine power if the propeller has the efficiency of 0.7. Assessment on the stresses and deflection of the hull structural indicate the capability of plywood to withstand the expected load. However, excessive deflection was expected in the rear section which requires a minor structural modification. In the near future, we expect that the wind tunnel tests of this wing in ground vehicle model would enable more definite prediction on the important parameters related to its performance.

  2. AERODYNAMIC LOAD OF AN AIRCRAFT WITH A HIGHLY ELASTIC WING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Schoř

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a method for calculation of air loads of an aircraft with an elastic wing is presented. The method can predict a redistribution of air loads when the elastic wing deforms. Unlike the traditional Euler or Navier-Stokes CFD to FEM coupling, the method uses 3D panel method as a source of aerodynamic data. This makes the calculation feasible on a typical recent workstation. Due to a short computational time and low hardware demands this method is suitable for both the preliminary design stage and the load evaluation stage. A case study is presented. The study compares a glider wing performing a pull maneuver at both rigid and and elastic state. The study indicates a significant redistribution of air load at the elastic case.

  3. Twisted Winged Endoparasitoids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 10. Twisted Winged Endoparasitoids - An Enigma for Entomologists. Alpana Mazumdar. General Article Volume 9 Issue 10 October 2004 pp 19-24. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  4. Modeling the Motion of a Flapping Wing Aerial Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorochaeva L.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the vertical flight of a flapping wing aerial vehicle, which is also called an ornithopter. The robot is a chain of five links connected in series by active cylindrical hinges with the central link being the body and the remainder forming folding wings in pairs. The distinctive feature of this device is that the flaps of its wings imitate those of a seagull i.e. the device has a biological prototype. We construct a mathematical model of this device; much attention is given to the model of the interaction of the wings with the air environment and we determine the positions and velocities of points of application of the reduced aerodynamic forces to each of the links. Based on the results of numerical modelling of the vertical flight of the robot three modes of flight were established: ascent, hovering at a certain height and descent. The device can operate in these modes based on the oscillation parameters of the wings in particular flapping frequency and amplitude, the ratio of the amplitudes of two links and one wing and the shift of the equilibrium oscillation position of the wings relative to zero.

  5. Fabrication of corrugated artificial insect wings using laser micromachined molds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroto; Wood, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication of an artificial insect wing with a rich set of topological features by micromolding a thermosetting resin. An example 12 mm long hoverfly-like wing is fabricated with 50–125 µm vein heights and 100 µm corrugation heights. The solid veins and membrane were simultaneously formed and integrated by a single molding process. Employing a layered laser ablation technique, three-dimensional molds were created with 5 µm resolution in height. Safe demolding of the wing was achieved with a water-soluble sacrificial layer on the mold. Measured surface profiles of the wing matched those of the molds, demonstrating the high replication accuracy of this molding process. Using this process, the morphological features of insect wings can be replicated at-scale with high precision, enabling parametric experiments of the functional morphology of insect wings. This fabrication capability also makes it possible to create a variety of wing types for micro air vehicles on scales similar to insects.

  6. The world of Nano

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Seung Jeong; Hyun, Jun Won; An, Yong Hyeon; Lee, Sung Uk; Jee, Hye Gu; Kim, Young Seon

    2006-07-01

    The contents of this book are the beginning of nano technology, definition of nano, commercialization of nano technology, prospect of nano technology, survive with nano t-, development strategy of n-t in the U.S, and Japan, Korea, and other countries, comparison of development strategy of n-t among each country, various measurement technology for practical n-t, scanning tunneling microscopy, nano device, carbon nano tube, nano belt and nano wire, application of sensor in daily life, energy, post-Genome period and using as medicine with nano bio technology.

  7. Application of SMP composite in designing a morphing wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kai; Yin, Weilong; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2008-11-01

    A new concept of a morphing wing based on shape memory polymer (SMP) and its reinforced composite is proposed in this paper. SMP used in this study is a thermoset styrene-based resin in contrast to normal thermoplastic SMP. In our design, the wing winded on the airframe can be deployed during heating, which provides main lift for a morphing aircraft to realize stable flight. Aerodynamic characteristics of the deployed morphing wing are calculated by using CFD software. The static deformation of the wing under the air loads is also analyzed by using the finite element method. The results show that the used SMP material can provide enough strength and stiffness for the application.

  8. Insect-inspired wing actuation structures based on ring-type resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolsman, C.T.; Goosen, J.F.L.; Van Keulen, F.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we illustrate and study the opportunities of resonant ring type structures as wing actuation mechanisms for a flapping wing Micro Air Vehicle (MAV). Various design alternatives are presented and studied based on computational and physical models. Insects provide an excellent source of

  9. A micro-scale hot wire anemometer based on low stress (Ni/W) multi-layers deposited on nano-crystalline diamond for air flow sensing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Talbi, A.; Gimeno, L.; Gerbedoen, J.-C.; Viard, R.; Soltani, A.; Mortet, Vincent; Preobrazhensky, V.; Merlen, A.; Pernod, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 2 (2015), s. 1-8, č. článku 125029. ISSN 0960-1317 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : hot wire * nano-crystalline diamond * active flow control * anemometry Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.768, year: 2015

  10. Structural dynamics and aerodynamics measurements of biologically inspired flexible flapping wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, P; Stanford, B K; Sällström, E; Ukeiley, L; Ifju, P G

    2011-03-01

    Flapping wing flight as seen in hummingbirds and insects poses an interesting unsteady aerodynamic problem: coupling of wing kinematics, structural dynamics and aerodynamics. There have been numerous studies on the kinematics and aerodynamics in both experimental and computational cases with both natural and artificial wings. These studies tend to ignore wing flexibility; however, observation in nature affirms that passive wing deformation is predominant and may be crucial to the aerodynamic performance. This paper presents a multidisciplinary experimental endeavor in correlating a flapping micro air vehicle wing's aeroelasticity and thrust production, by quantifying and comparing overall thrust, structural deformation and airflow of six pairs of hummingbird-shaped membrane wings of different properties. The results show that for a specific spatial distribution of flexibility, there is an effective frequency range in thrust production. The wing deformation at the thrust-productive frequencies indicates the importance of flexibility: both bending and twisting motion can interact with aerodynamic loads to enhance wing performance under certain conditions, such as the deformation phase and amplitude. By measuring structural deformations under the same aerodynamic conditions, beneficial effects of passive wing deformation can be observed from the visualized airflow and averaged thrust. The measurements and their presentation enable observation and understanding of the required structural properties for a thrust effective flapping wing. The intended passive responses of the different wings follow a particular pattern in correlation to their aerodynamic performance. Consequently, both the experimental technique and data analysis method can lead to further studies to determine the design principles for micro air vehicle flapping wings.

  11. Structural dynamics and aerodynamics measurements of biologically inspired flexible flapping wings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, P; Stanford, B K; Ifju, P G; Saellstroem, E; Ukeiley, L

    2011-01-01

    Flapping wing flight as seen in hummingbirds and insects poses an interesting unsteady aerodynamic problem: coupling of wing kinematics, structural dynamics and aerodynamics. There have been numerous studies on the kinematics and aerodynamics in both experimental and computational cases with both natural and artificial wings. These studies tend to ignore wing flexibility; however, observation in nature affirms that passive wing deformation is predominant and may be crucial to the aerodynamic performance. This paper presents a multidisciplinary experimental endeavor in correlating a flapping micro air vehicle wing's aeroelasticity and thrust production, by quantifying and comparing overall thrust, structural deformation and airflow of six pairs of hummingbird-shaped membrane wings of different properties. The results show that for a specific spatial distribution of flexibility, there is an effective frequency range in thrust production. The wing deformation at the thrust-productive frequencies indicates the importance of flexibility: both bending and twisting motion can interact with aerodynamic loads to enhance wing performance under certain conditions, such as the deformation phase and amplitude. By measuring structural deformations under the same aerodynamic conditions, beneficial effects of passive wing deformation can be observed from the visualized airflow and averaged thrust. The measurements and their presentation enable observation and understanding of the required structural properties for a thrust effective flapping wing. The intended passive responses of the different wings follow a particular pattern in correlation to their aerodynamic performance. Consequently, both the experimental technique and data analysis method can lead to further studies to determine the design principles for micro air vehicle flapping wings.

  12. Structural dynamics and aerodynamics measurements of biologically inspired flexible flapping wings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, P; Stanford, B K; Ifju, P G [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, MAE-A 231, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Saellstroem, E; Ukeiley, L, E-mail: diccidwp@ufl.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Shalimar, FL 32579 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Flapping wing flight as seen in hummingbirds and insects poses an interesting unsteady aerodynamic problem: coupling of wing kinematics, structural dynamics and aerodynamics. There have been numerous studies on the kinematics and aerodynamics in both experimental and computational cases with both natural and artificial wings. These studies tend to ignore wing flexibility; however, observation in nature affirms that passive wing deformation is predominant and may be crucial to the aerodynamic performance. This paper presents a multidisciplinary experimental endeavor in correlating a flapping micro air vehicle wing's aeroelasticity and thrust production, by quantifying and comparing overall thrust, structural deformation and airflow of six pairs of hummingbird-shaped membrane wings of different properties. The results show that for a specific spatial distribution of flexibility, there is an effective frequency range in thrust production. The wing deformation at the thrust-productive frequencies indicates the importance of flexibility: both bending and twisting motion can interact with aerodynamic loads to enhance wing performance under certain conditions, such as the deformation phase and amplitude. By measuring structural deformations under the same aerodynamic conditions, beneficial effects of passive wing deformation can be observed from the visualized airflow and averaged thrust. The measurements and their presentation enable observation and understanding of the required structural properties for a thrust effective flapping wing. The intended passive responses of the different wings follow a particular pattern in correlation to their aerodynamic performance. Consequently, both the experimental technique and data analysis method can lead to further studies to determine the design principles for micro air vehicle flapping wings.

  13. A comparative study of the hovering efficiency of flapping and revolving wings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, L; Mittal, R; Hedrick, T

    2013-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations are used to explore the hovering performance and efficiency for hawkmoth-inspired flapping and revolving wings at Reynolds (Re) numbers varying from 50 to 4800. This range covers the gamut from small (fruit fly size) to large (hawkmoth size) flying insects and is also relevant to the design of micro- and nano-aerial vehicles. The flapping wing configuration chosen here corresponds to a hovering hawkmoth and the model is derived from high-speed videogrammetry of this insect. The revolving wing configuration also employs the wings of the hawkmoth but these are arranged in a dual-blade configuration typical of helicopters. Flow for both of these configurations is simulated over the range of Reynolds numbers of interest and the aerodynamic performance of the two compared. The comparison of these two seemingly different configurations raises issues regarding the appropriateness of various performance metrics and even characteristic scales; these are also addressed in the current study. Finally, the difference in the performance between the two is correlated with the flow physics of the two configurations. The study indicates that viscous forces dominate the aerodynamic power expenditure of the revolving wing to a degree not observed for the flapping wing. Consequently, the lift-to-power metric of the revolving wing declines rapidly with decreasing Reynolds numbers resulting in a hovering performance that is at least a factor of 2 lower than the flapping wing at Reynolds numbers less than about 100. (paper)

  14. Design optimization of deployable wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddam, Pradeep

    Morphing technology is an important aspect of UAV design, particularly in regards to deployable systems. The design of such system has an important impact on the vehicle's performance. The primary focus of the present research work was to determine the most optimum deployable wing design from 3 competing designs and develop one of the deployable wing designs to test in the research facility. A Matlab code was developed to optimize 3 deployable wing concepts inflatable, inflatable telescopic and rigid-folding wings based on a sequential optimization strategy. The constraints that were part of the code include the packaging constraints during its stowed state, fixed length of the deployed section and the minimum L/D constraint. This code resulted in determining the optimum weight of all the 3 designs, the most optimum weight design is the inflatable wing design. This is a result of the flexible skin material and also due to no rigid parts in the deployed wing section. Another goal of the research involved developing an inflatable telescopic wing. The prototype was tested in a wind tunnel, while the actual wing was tested in the altitude chamber to determine the deployment speed, input pressure, analyze and predict the deployment sequence and behavior of the wing at such high wind speeds and altitudes ranging from 60,000 ft to 90,000 ft. Results from these tests allowed us to conclude the deployment sequence of the telescopic wing followed from the root to the tip section. The results were used to analyze the deployment time of the wing. As expected the deployment time decreased with an increase in input pressure. The results also show us that as the altitude increases, the deployment speed of the wing also increased. This was demonstrated when the wing was tested at a maximum altitude pressure of 90,000ft, well above the design altitude of 60,000ft.

  15. Air

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Air is all around us. Learn how it is used in art, technology, and engineering. Five easy-to-read chapters explain the science behind air, as well as its real-world applications. Vibrant, full-color photos, bolded glossary words, and a key stats section let readers zoom in even deeper. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Abdo Zoom is a division of ABDO.

  16. Low Aspect-Ratio Wings for Wing-Ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filippone, Antonino; Selig, M.

    1998-01-01

    Flying on ground poses technical and aerodynamical challenges. The requirements for compactness, efficiency, manouverability, off-design operation,open new areas of investigations in the fieldof aerodynamic analysis and design. A review ofthe characteristics of low-aspect ratio wings, in- and out...... of ground, is presented. It is shownthat the performance of such wings is generally inferior to that of slender wings, although in ground placement can yield substantial improvements in the aerodynamic efficiency....

  17. 3D nano-structures for laser nano-manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gediminas Seniutinas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The resputtering of gold films from nano-holes defined in a sacrificial PMMA mask, which was made by electron beam lithography, was carried out with a dry plasma etching tool in order to form well-like structures with a high aspect ratio (height/width ≈ 3–4 at the rims of the nano-holes. The extraordinary transmission through the patterns of such nano-wells was investigated experimentally and numerically. By doing numerical simulations of 50-nm and 100-nm diameter polystyrene beads in water and air, we show the potential of such patterns for self-induced back-action (SIBA trapping. The best trapping conditions were found to be a trapping force of 2 pN/W/μm2 (numerical result exerted on a 50-nm diameter bead in water. The simulations were based on the analytical Lorentz force model.

  18. Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gugele, B.; Scheider, J.; Spangl, W.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years several regulations and standards for air quality and limits for air pollution were issued or are in preparation by the European Union, which have severe influence on the environmental monitoring and legislation in Austria. This chapter of the environmental control report of Austria gives an overview about the legal situation of air pollution control in the European Union and in specific the legal situation in Austria. It gives a comprehensive inventory of air pollution measurements for the whole area of Austria of total suspended particulates, ozone, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, heavy metals, benzene, dioxin, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and eutrophication. For each of these pollutants the measured emission values throughout Austria are given in tables and geographical charts, the environmental impact is discussed, statistical data and time series of the emission sources are given and legal regulations and measures for an effective environmental pollution control are discussed. In particular the impact of fossil-fuel power plants on the air pollution is analyzed. (a.n.)

  19. Wake Characteristics of a Flapping Wing Optimized for both Aerial and Aquatic Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izraelevitz, Jacob; Kotidis, Miranda; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Multiple aquatic bird species (including murres, puffins, and other auks) employ a single actuator to propel themselves in two different fluid media: both flying and swimming using primarily their flapping wings. This impressive design compromise could be adopted by engineered implementations of dual aerial/aquatic robotic platforms, as it offers an existence proof for favorable flow physics. We discuss one realization of a 3D flapping wing actuation system for use in both air and water. The wing oscillates by the root and employs an active in-line motion degree-of-freedom. An experiment-coupled optimization routine generates the wing trajectories, controlling the unsteady forces throughout each flapping cycle. We elucidate the wakes of these wing trajectories using dye visualization, correlating the wake vortex structures with simultaneous force measurements. After optimization, the wing generates the large force envelope necessary for propulsion in both fluid media, and furthermore, demonstrate improved control over the unsteady wake.

  20. Nano-bio-sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Carrara, Sandro

    2011-01-01

    This book examines state-of-the-art applications of nano-bio-sensing. It brings together researchers from nano-electronics and bio-technology, providing multidisciplinary content from nano-structures fabrication to bio-sensing applications.

  1. Phasing of dragonfly wings can improve aerodynamic efficiency by removing swirl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usherwood, James R; Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2008-11-06

    Dragonflies are dramatic, successful aerial predators, notable for their flight agility and endurance. Further, they are highly capable of low-speed, hovering and even backwards flight. While insects have repeatedly modified or reduced one pair of wings, or mechanically coupled their fore and hind wings, dragonflies and damselflies have maintained their distinctive, independently controllable, four-winged form for over 300Myr. Despite efforts at understanding the implications of flapping flight with two pairs of wings, previous studies have generally painted a rather disappointing picture: interaction between fore and hind wings reduces the lift compared with two pairs of wings operating in isolation. Here, we demonstrate with a mechanical model dragonfly that, despite presenting no advantage in terms of lift, flying with two pairs of wings can be highly effective at improving aerodynamic efficiency. This is achieved by recovering energy from the wake wasted as swirl in a manner analogous to coaxial contra-rotating helicopter rotors. With the appropriate fore-hind wing phasing, aerodynamic power requirements can be reduced up to 22 per cent compared with a single pair of wings, indicating one advantage of four-winged flying that may apply to both dragonflies and, in the future, biomimetic micro air vehicles.

  2. Electro-Magnetic Flow Control to Enable Natural Laminar Flow Wings Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This research team has developed a solid-state electromagnetic device that, when embedded along the leading edge of an aircraft wing, can disrupt laminar air flow on...

  3. Electro-Magnetic Flow Control to Enable Natural Laminar Flow Wings

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This research team has developed a solid-state electromagnetic device that, when embedded along the leading edge of an aircraft wing, can disrupt laminar air flow on...

  4. Application of Piezoelectrics to Flapping-Wing MAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widstrand, Alex; Hubner, J. Paul

    2015-11-01

    Micro air vehicles (MAVs) are a class of unmanned aerial vehicles that are size-restricted and operate at low velocities and low Reynolds numbers. An ongoing challenge with MAVs is that their flight-related operations are highly constrained by their size and weight, which limits battery size and, therefore, available power. One type of MAV called an ornithopter flies using flapping wings to create both lift and thrust, much like birds and insects do. Further bio-inspiration from bats led to the design of membrane wings for these vehicles, which provide aerodynamic benefits through passive vibration. In an attempt to capitalize on this vibration, a piezoelectric film, which generates a voltage when stressed, was investigated as the wing surface. Two wing planforms with constant area were designed and fabricated. The goal was to measure the wings' flight characteristics and output energy in freestream conditions. Complications with the flapper arose which prevented wind tunnel tests from being performed; however, energy data was obtained from table-top shaker tests. Preliminary results indicate that wing shape affects the magnitude of the charge generated, with a quarter-elliptic planform outperforming a rectangular planform. Funding provided by NSF REU Site Award number 1358991.

  5. Getting Started with PEAs-Based Flapping-Wing Mechanisms for Micro Aerial Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Durán Hernández

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces recent advances on flapping-wing Micro and Nano Aerial Vehicles (MAVs and NAVs based on Piezoelectric Actuators (PEA. Therefore, this work provides essential information to address the development of such bio-inspired aerial robots. PEA are commonly used in micro-robotics and precise positioning applications (e.g., micro-positioning and micro-manipulation, whereas within the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs domain, motors are the classical actuators used for rotary or fixed-wing configurations. Therefore, we consider it pertinent to provide essential information regarding the modeling and control of piezoelectric cantilever actuators to accelerate early design and development stages of aerial microrobots based on flapping-wing systems. In addition, the equations describing the aerodynamic behavior of a flapping-wing configuration are presented.

  6. Monitoring of a Full-Scale Wing Fatigue Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, Jaap; Hwang, Joong Sun

    2014-01-01

    A wing of a decommissioned aircraft of the Royal Netherlands Air Force (RNLAF) was fatigue tested to more than two times the design life. Part of the test was the evaluation of load monitoring and Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques. For load monitoring the data of conventional resistance

  7. Aeroelastic Modelling and Design of Aeroelastically Tailored and Morphing Wings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werter, N.P.M.

    2017-01-01

    In order to accommodate the growth in air traffic whilst reducing the impact on the environment, operational efficiency is becoming more and more important in the design of the aircraft of the future. A possible approach to increase the operational efficiency of aircraft wings is the use of

  8. Study on bird's & insect's wing aerodynamics and comparison of its analytical value with standard airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Md. Nesar; Alam, Mahbubul; Hossain, Md. Abed; Ahmed, Md. Imteaz

    2017-06-01

    Flight is the main mode of locomotion used by most of the world's bird & insect species. This article discusses the mechanics of bird flight, with emphasis on the varied forms of bird's & insect's wings. The fundamentals of bird flight are similar to those of aircraft. Flying animals flap their wings to generate lift and thrust as well as to perform remarkable maneuvers with rapid accelerations and decelerations. Insects and birds provide illuminating examples of unsteady aerodynamics. Lift force is produced by the action of air flow on the wing, which is an airfoil. The airfoil is shaped such that the air provides a net upward force on the wing, while the movement of air is directed downward. Additional net lift may come from airflow around the bird's & insect's body in some species, especially during intermittent flight while the wings are folded or semi-folded. Bird's & insect's flight in nature are sub-divided into two stages. They are Unpowered Flight: Gliding and Soaring & Powered Flight: Flapping. When gliding, birds and insects obtain both a vertical and a forward force from their wings. When a bird & insect flaps, as opposed to gliding, its wings continue to develop lift as before, but the lift is rotated forward to provide thrust, which counteracts drag and increases its speed, which has the effect of also increasing lift to counteract its weight, allowing it to maintain height or to climb. Flapping flight is more complicated than flight with fixed wings because of the structural movement and the resulting unsteady fluid dynamics. Flapping involves two stages: the down-stroke, which provides the majority of the thrust, and the up-stroke, which can also (depending on the bird's & insect's wings) provide some thrust. Most kinds of bird & insect wing can be grouped into four types, with some falling between two of these types. These types of wings are elliptical wings, high speed wings, high aspect ratio wings and soaring wings with slots. Hovering is used

  9. Synthesis of Boron Nano wires, Nano tubes, and Nano sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, R.B.; Chou, T.; Iqbal, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of boron nano wires, nano tubes, and nano sheets using a thermal vapor deposition process is reported. This work confirms previous research and provides a new method capable of synthesizing boron nano materials. The materials were made by using various combinations of MgB 2 , Mg(BH 4 ) 2 , MCM-41, NiB, and Fe wire. Unlike previously reported methods, a nanoparticle catalyst and a silicate substrate are not required for synthesis. Two types of boron nano wires, boron nano tubes, and boron nano sheets were made. Their morphology and chemical composition were determined through the use of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. These boron-based materials have potential for electronic and hydrogen storage applications.

  10. Nano-technology and nano-toxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Maynard, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid developments in nano-technology are likely to confer significant benefits on mankind. But, as with perhaps all new technologies, these benefits are likely to be accompanied by risks, perhaps by new risks. Nano-toxicology is developing in parallel with nano-technology and seeks to define the hazards and risks associated with nano-materials: only when risks have been identified they can be controlled. This article discusses the reasons for concern about the potential effects on health of ...

  11. Aeroelastic Wing Shaping Using Distributed Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan T. (Inventor); Reynolds, Kevin Wayne (Inventor); Ting, Eric B. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An aircraft has wings configured to twist during flight. Inboard and outboard propulsion devices, such as turbofans or other propulsors, are connected to each wing, and are spaced along the wing span. A flight controller independently controls thrust of the inboard and outboard propulsion devices to significantly change flight dynamics, including changing thrust of outboard propulsion devices to twist the wing, and to differentially apply thrust on each wing to change yaw and other aspects of the aircraft during various stages of a flight mission. One or more generators can be positioned upon the wing to provide power for propulsion devices on the same wing, and on an opposite wing.

  12. Butterflies regulate wing temperatures using radiative cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Chia; Shi, Norman Nan; Ren, Crystal; Pelaez, Julianne; Bernard, Gary D.; Yu, Nanfang; Pierce, Naomi

    2017-09-01

    Butterfly wings are live organs embedded with multiple sensory neurons and, in some species, with pheromoneproducing cells. The proper function of butterfly wings demands a suitable temperature range, but the wings can overheat quickly in the sun due to their small thermal capacity. We developed an infrared technique to map butterfly wing temperatures and discovered that despite the wings' diverse visible colors, regions of wings that contain live cells are the coolest, resulting from the thickness of the wings and scale nanostructures. We also demonstrated that butterflies use behavioral traits to prevent overheating of their wings.

  13. Pneumatic artificial muscle and its application on driving variable trailing-edge camber wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weilong; Liu, Libo; Chen, Yijin; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2010-04-01

    As a novel bionic actuator, pneumatic artificial muscle has high power to weight ratio. In this paper, the experimental setup to measure the static output force of pneumatic artificial muscle was designed and the relationship between the static output force and the air pressure was investigated. Experimental result shows the static output force of pneumatic artificial muscle decreases nonlinearly with increasing contraction ratio. A variable camber wing based on the pneumatic artificial muscle was developed and the variable camber wing model was manufactured to validate the variable camber concept. Wind tunnel tests were conducted in the low speed wind tunnel. Experimental result shows that the wing camber increases with increasing air pressure.

  14. Comparative Analysis of Uninhibited and Constrained Avian Wing Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jordan A.

    The flight of birds has intrigued and motivated man for many years. Bird flight served as the primary inspiration of flying machines developed by Leonardo Da Vinci, Otto Lilienthal, and even the Wright brothers. Avian flight has once again drawn the attention of the scientific community as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) are not only becoming more popular, but smaller. Birds are once again influencing the designs of aircraft. Small UAVs operating within flight conditions and low Reynolds numbers common to birds are not yet capable of the high levels of control and agility that birds display with ease. Many researchers believe the potential to improve small UAV performance can be obtained by applying features common to birds such as feathers and flapping flight to small UAVs. Although the effects of feathers on a wing have received some attention, the effects of localized transient feather motion and surface geometry on the flight performance of a wing have been largely overlooked. In this research, the effects of freely moving feathers on a preserved red tailed hawk wing were studied. A series of experiments were conducted to measure the aerodynamic forces on a hawk wing with varying levels of feather movement permitted. Angle of attack and air speed were varied within the natural flight envelope of the hawk. Subsequent identical tests were performed with the feather motion constrained through the use of externally-applied surface treatments. Additional tests involved the study of an absolutely fixed geometry mold-and-cast wing model of the original bird wing. Final tests were also performed after applying surface coatings to the cast wing. High speed videos taken during tests revealed the extent of the feather movement between wing models. Images of the microscopic surface structure of each wing model were analyzed to establish variations in surface geometry between models. Recorded aerodynamic forces were then compared to the known feather motion and surface

  15. Stiffness of desiccating insect wings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mengesha, T E; Vallance, R R [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The George Washington University, 738 Phillips Hall, 801 22nd St NW, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Mittal, R, E-mail: vallance@gwu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 126 Latrobe Hall, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    The stiffness of insect wings is typically determined through experimental measurements. Such experiments are performed on wings removed from insects. However, the wings are subject to desiccation which typically leads to an increase in their stiffness. Although this effect of desiccation is well known, a comprehensive study of the rate of change in stiffness of desiccating insect wings would be a significant aid in planning experiments as well as interpreting data from such experiments. This communication presents a comprehensive experimental analysis of the change in mass and stiffness of gradually desiccating forewings of Painted Lady butterflies (Vanessa cardui). Mass and stiffness of the forewings of five butterflies were simultaneously measured every 10 min over a 24 h period. The averaged results show that wing mass declined exponentially by 21.1% over this time period with a time constant of 9.8 h, while wing stiffness increased linearly by 46.2% at a rate of 23.4 {mu}N mm{sup -1} h{sup -1}. For the forewings of a single butterfly, the experiment was performed over a period of 1 week, and the results show that wing mass declined exponentially by 52.2% with a time constant of 30.2 h until it reached a steady-state level of 2.00 mg, while wing stiffness increased exponentially by 90.7% until it reached a steady-state level of 1.70 mN mm{sup -1}. (communication)

  16. AERODYNAMICS OF WING TIP SAILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSHTAK AL-ATABI

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Observers have always been fascinated by soaring birds. An interesting feature of these birds is the existence of few feathers extending from the tip of the wing. In this paper, small lifting surfaces were fitted to the tip of a NACA0012 wing in a fashion similar to that of wing tip feathers. Experimental measurements of induced drag, longitudinal static stability and trailing vortex structure were obtained.The tests showed that adding wing tip surfaces (sails decreased the induced drag factor and increased the longitudinal static stability. Results identified two discrete appositely rotated tip vortices and showed the ability of wing tip surfaces to break them down and to diffuse them.

  17. Nano-technology and nano-toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    Rapid developments in nano-technology are likely to confer significant benefits on mankind. But, as with perhaps all new technologies, these benefits are likely to be accompanied by risks, perhaps by new risks. Nano-toxicology is developing in parallel with nano-technology and seeks to define the hazards and risks associated with nano-materials: only when risks have been identified they can be controlled. This article discusses the reasons for concern about the potential effects on health of exposure to nano-materials and relates these to the evidence of the effects on health of the ambient aerosol. A number of hypotheses are proposed and the dangers of adopting unsubstantiated hypotheses are stressed. Nano-toxicology presents many challenges and will need substantial financial support if it is to develop at a rate sufficient to cope with developments in nano-technology.

  18. Synthesise of Zn O nano wires by direct oxidation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farbod, M.; Ahangarpour, A.

    2007-01-01

    Zn O is a semiconductor which has a direct and wide energy band which is about 3.37 eV at room temperature. It has various applications from UV lasers, sensitive sensors, solar cells to photo catalysis applications. Zn O has different nano structures such as nanoparticles, nano wires, nano rods, nano tubes and nano belts. The one dimensional Zn O nano structures such as nano wires are very important because of their applications in nano electronics and nano photonics so different methods have been proposed to synthesize them. In this work large scale of Zn O nano wires are produced by direct oxidation a Zn substrate (which was cleaned by chemical methods) in air or oxygen atmosphere at 400 d eg C . Nano wires were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray measurements. Their diameter is about 30-150 nanometer and their length is about several micrometer. This method which acts without any catalyst is a convenient method to synthesis semiconductor nano wires.

  19. A novel mechanism for emulating insect wing kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seshadri, Pranay; Benedict, Moble; Chopra, Inderjit

    2012-01-01

    A novel dual-differential four-bar flapping mechanism that can accurately emulate insect wing kinematics in all three degrees of freedom (translation, rotation and stroke plane deviation) is developed. The mechanism is specifically designed to be simple and scalable such that it can be utilized on an insect-based flapping wing micro air vehicle. Kinematic formulations for the wing stroke position, pitch angle and coning angle for this model are derived from first principles and compared with a 3D simulation. A benchtop flapping mechanism based on this model was designed and built, which was also equipped with a balance for force measurements. 3D motion capture tests were conducted on this setup to demonstrate the capability of generating complex figure-of-eight flapping motions along with dynamic pitching. The dual-differential four-bar mechanism was implemented on a light-weight vehicle that demonstrated tethered hover. (paper)

  20. Wing bone geometry reveals active flight in Archaeopteryx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voeten, Dennis F A E; Cubo, Jorge; de Margerie, Emmanuel; Röper, Martin; Beyrand, Vincent; Bureš, Stanislav; Tafforeau, Paul; Sanchez, Sophie

    2018-03-13

    Archaeopteryx is an iconic fossil taxon with feathered wings from the Late Jurassic of Germany that occupies a crucial position for understanding the early evolution of avian flight. After over 150 years of study, its mosaic anatomy unifying characters of both non-flying dinosaurs and flying birds has remained challenging to interpret in a locomotory context. Here, we compare new data from three Archaeopteryx specimens obtained through phase-contrast synchrotron microtomography to a representative sample of archosaurs employing a diverse array of locomotory strategies. Our analyses reveal that the architecture of Archaeopteryx's wing bones consistently exhibits a combination of cross-sectional geometric properties uniquely shared with volant birds, particularly those occasionally utilising short-distance flapping. We therefore interpret that Archaeopteryx actively employed wing flapping to take to the air through a more anterodorsally posteroventrally oriented flight stroke than used by modern birds. This unexpected outcome implies that avian powered flight must have originated before the latest Jurassic.

  1. Structural Analysis of a Dragonfly Wing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerius, S.R.; Lentink, D.

    2010-01-01

    Dragonfly wings are highly corrugated, which increases the stiffness and strength of the wing significantly, and results in a lightweight structure with good aerodynamic performance. How insect wings carry aerodynamic and inertial loads, and how the resonant frequency of the flapping wings is tuned

  2. Flight Testing of Novel Compliant Spines for Passive Wing Morphing on Ornithopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissa, Aimy; Guerreiro, Nelson; Grauer, Jared; Altenbuchner, Cornelia; Hubbard, James E., Jr.; Tummala, Yashwanth; Frecker, Mary; Roberts, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are proliferating in both the civil and military markets. Flapping wing UAVs, or ornithopters, have the potential to combine the agility and maneuverability of rotary wing aircraft with excellent performance in low Reynolds number flight regimes. The purpose of this paper is to present new free flight experimental results for an ornithopter equipped with one degree of freedom (1DOF) compliant spines that were designed and optimized in terms of mass, maximum von-Mises stress, and desired wing bending deflections. The spines were inserted in an experimental ornithopter wing spar in order to achieve a set of desired kinematics during the up and down strokes of a flapping cycle. The ornithopter was flown at Wright Patterson Air Force Base in the Air Force Research Laboratory Small Unmanned Air Systems (SUAS) indoor flight facility. Vicon motion tracking cameras were used to track the motion of the vehicle for five different wing configurations. The effect of the presence of the compliant spine on wing kinematics and leading edge spar deflection during flight is presented. Results show that the ornithopter with the compliant spine inserted in its wing reduced the body acceleration during the upstroke which translates into overall lift gains.

  3. Pulsed eddy current inspection of CF-188 inner wing spar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, Peter Francis

    Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) CF-188 Hornet aircraft engineering authorities have stated a requirement for a Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) technique to detect Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) in the inner wing spars without fastener or composite wing skin removal. Current radiographic inspections involve significant aircraft downtime, and Pulsed Eddy Current (PEC) inspection is proposed as a solution. The aluminum inner wing spars of CF-188 Hornet aircraft may undergo stress corrosion cracking (SCC) along the spar between the fasteners that secure carbon-fiber/ epoxy composite skin to the wing. Inspection of the spar through the wing skin is required to avoid wing disassembly. The thickness of the wing skin varies between 8 and 20 mm (0.3 to 0.8 inch) and fasteners may be either titanium or ferrous. PEC generated by a probe centered over a fastener, demonstrates capability of detecting simulated cracks within spars with the wing skin present. Comparison of signals from separate sensors, mounted to either side of the excitation coil, is used to detect differences in induced eddy current fields, which arise in the presence of cracks. To overcome variability in PEC signal response due to variation in 1) skin thickness, 2) fastener material and size, and 3) centering over fasteners, a large calibration data set is acquired. Multi-dimensional scores from a Modified Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of the data are reduced to one dimension (1D) using a Discriminant Analysis method. Under inspection conditions, calibrated PCA scores combined with discriminant analysis permit rapid real time go/no-go PEC detection of cracks in CF-188 inner wing spar. Probe designs using both pickup coils and Giant Magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors were tested on samples with the same ferrous and titanium fasteners found on the CF-188. Flaws were correctly detected at lift-offs of up to 21mm utilizing a variety of insulating skin materials simulating the carbon-fibre reinforced polymer

  4. Effect of outer wing separation on lift and thrust generation in a flapping wing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahardika, Nanang; Viet, Nguyen Quoc; Park, Hoon Cheol

    2011-01-01

    We explore the implementation of wing feather separation and lead-lagging motion to a flapping wing. A biomimetic flapping wing system with separated outer wings is designed and demonstrated. The artificial wing feather separation is implemented in the biomimetic wing by dividing the wing into inner and outer wings. The features of flapping, lead-lagging, and outer wing separation of the flapping wing system are captured by a high-speed camera for evaluation. The performance of the flapping wing system with separated outer wings is compared to that of a flapping wing system with closed outer wings in terms of forward force and downward force production. For a low flapping frequency ranging from 2.47 to 3.90 Hz, the proposed biomimetic flapping wing system shows a higher thrust and lift generation capability as demonstrated by a series of experiments. For 1.6 V application (lower frequency operation), the flapping wing system with separated wings could generate about 56% higher forward force and about 61% less downward force compared to that with closed wings, which is enough to demonstrate larger thrust and lift production capability of the separated outer wings. The experiments show that the outer parts of the separated wings are able to deform, resulting in a smaller amount of drag production during the upstroke, while still producing relatively greater lift and thrust during the downstroke.

  5. Research of Morphing Wing Efficiency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Komarov, Valery

    2004-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking Samara State Aerospace University (SSAU) as follows: The contractor will develop and investigate aerodynamic and structural weight theories associated with morphing wing technology...

  6. Enhanced biomimic bactericidal surfaces by coating with positively-charged ZIF nano-dagger arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Yugen

    2017-10-01

    Cicada wing surfaces are covered with dense patterns of nano-pillar structure that prevent bacterial growth by rupturing adhered microbial cells. To mimic the natural nano-pillar structure, we developed a general and simple method to grow metal organic framework (MOF) nano-dagger arrays on a wide range of surfaces. These nano-daggers possess high bactericidal activity, with log reduction >7 for Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. It was hypothesized that the positively-charged ZIF-L nano-dagger surfaces enhance bacterial cell adhesion, facilitating selective and efficient bacteria killing by the rigid and sharp nano-dagger tips. This research provides a safe and clean antimicrobial surface technology which does not require external chemicals and will not cause drug resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Drag Performance of Twist Morphing MAV Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail N.I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphing wing is one of latest evolution found on MAV wing. However, due to few design problems such as limited MAV wing size and complicated morphing mechanism, the understanding of its aerodynamic behaviour was not fully explored. In fact, the basic drag distribution induced by a morphing MAV wing is still remained unknown. Thus, present work is carried out to compare the drag performance between a twist morphing wing with membrane and rigid MAV wing design. A quasi-static aeroelastic analysis by using the Ansys-Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI method is utilized in current works to predict the drag performance a twist morphing MAV wing design. Based on the drag pattern study, the results exhibits that the morphing wing has a partial similarities in overall drag pattern with the baseline (membrane and rigid wing. However, based CD analysis, it shows that TM wing induced higher CD magnitude (between 25% to 82% higher than to the baseline wing. In fact, TM wing also induced the largest CD increment (about 20% to 27% among the wings. The visualization on vortex structure revealed that TM wing also produce larger tip vortex structure (compared to baseline wings which presume to promote higher induce drag component and subsequently induce its higher CD performance.

  8. 6. international conference on Nano-technology in Carbon: from synthesis to applications of nano-structured carbon and related materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This is the sixth international conference sponsored this year by the French Carbon Group (GFEC), the European Research Group on Nano-tubes GDRE 'Nano-E', in collaboration with the British Carbon Group and the 'Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel' (local organizer). The aim of this conference is to promote carbon science in the nano-scale as, for example, nano-structured carbons, nano-tubes, nano-wires, fullerenes, etc. This conference is designed to introduce those with an interest in materials to current research in nano-technology and to bring together research scientists working in various disciplines in the broad area of nano-structured carbons, nano-tubes and fullerene-related nano-structures. Elemental carbon is the simplest exemplar of this nano-technology based on covalent bonding, however other systems (for example containing hetero-atoms) are becoming important from a research point of view, and provide alternative nano-materials with unique properties opening a broad field of applications. Nano-technology requires an understanding of these materials on a structural and textural point of view and this will be the central theme. This year the conference will feature sessions on: S1. Control and synthesis of nano-materials 1.1 Nano-structured carbons: pyrolysis of polymers, activation, templates,... 1.2 Nano-tubes: Catalytic method, HiPCO, graphite vaporization, electrolysis,... 1.3 Fullerenes S2. Chemistry of carbon nano-materials 2.1 Purification of carbon nano-tubes 2.2 Functionalization - Self-assembling S3. Structural characterization S4. Theory and modelling S5. Relationship between structure and properties S6. Applications Water and air purification, Gas and energy storage, Composite materials, Field emission, Nano-electronics, Biotechnology,... S7. Environmental impact. Only one paper concerning carbon under irradiation has been added to the INIS database. (authors)

  9. XPS study of palladium sensitized nano porous silicon thin film

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Nano porous silicon (PS) was formed on p-type monocrystalline silicon of 2–5 Ω cm resistivity and (100) orientation by electrochemical anodization method using HF and ethanol as the electrolytes. High density of surface states, arising due to its nano structure, is responsible for the uncontrolled oxidation in air and ...

  10. Local elasticity and adhesion of nanostructures on Drosophila melanogaster wing membrane studied using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Ryan, E-mail: rbwagner@purdue.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States); Brick Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States); Pittendrigh, Barry R. [Department of Entomology, University of Illinois, Champaign (United States); Raman, Arvind, E-mail: raman@purdue.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States); Brick Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied the wing membrane of Drosophila melanogaster with atomic force microscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report the structure, elasticity, and adhesion on the wing membrane in air and nitrogen environments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results provide insight into the nature of the wing membrane enabling the development of biomimetic surface and micro air vehicles. - Abstract: Insect wings have a naturally occurring, complex, functional, hierarchical microstructure and nanostructure, which enable a remarkably water-resistant and self-cleaning surface. Insect wings are used as a basis for engineering biomimetic materials; however, the material properties of these nanostructures such as local elastic modulus and adhesion are poorly understood. We studied the wings of the Canton-S strain of Drosophila melanogaster (hereafter referred to as Drosophila) with atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantify the local material properties of Drosophila wing surface nanostructures. The wings are found to have a hierarchical structure of 10-20 {mu}m long, 0.5-1 {mu}m diameter hair, and at a much smaller scale, 100 nm diameter and 30-60 nm high bumps. The local properties of these nanoscale bumps were studied under ambient and dry conditions with force-volume AFM. The wing membrane was found to have a elastic modulus on the order of 1000 MPa and the work of adhesion between the probe and wing membrane surface was found to be on the order of 100 mJ/m{sup 2}, these properties are the same order of magnitude as common thermoplastic polymers such as polyethylene. The difference in work of adhesion between the nanoscale bump and membrane does not change significantly between ambient (relative humidity of 30%) or dry conditions. This suggests that the nanoscale bumps and the surrounding membrane are chemically similar and only work to increase hydrophobicity though surface roughening or the geometric lotus effect.

  11. Local elasticity and adhesion of nanostructures on Drosophila melanogaster wing membrane studied using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Ryan; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Raman, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We studied the wing membrane of Drosophila melanogaster with atomic force microscopy. ► We report the structure, elasticity, and adhesion on the wing membrane in air and nitrogen environments. ► Results provide insight into the nature of the wing membrane enabling the development of biomimetic surface and micro air vehicles. - Abstract: Insect wings have a naturally occurring, complex, functional, hierarchical microstructure and nanostructure, which enable a remarkably water-resistant and self-cleaning surface. Insect wings are used as a basis for engineering biomimetic materials; however, the material properties of these nanostructures such as local elastic modulus and adhesion are poorly understood. We studied the wings of the Canton-S strain of Drosophila melanogaster (hereafter referred to as Drosophila) with atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantify the local material properties of Drosophila wing surface nanostructures. The wings are found to have a hierarchical structure of 10–20 μm long, 0.5–1 μm diameter hair, and at a much smaller scale, 100 nm diameter and 30–60 nm high bumps. The local properties of these nanoscale bumps were studied under ambient and dry conditions with force-volume AFM. The wing membrane was found to have a elastic modulus on the order of 1000 MPa and the work of adhesion between the probe and wing membrane surface was found to be on the order of 100 mJ/m 2 , these properties are the same order of magnitude as common thermoplastic polymers such as polyethylene. The difference in work of adhesion between the nanoscale bump and membrane does not change significantly between ambient (relative humidity of 30%) or dry conditions. This suggests that the nanoscale bumps and the surrounding membrane are chemically similar and only work to increase hydrophobicity though surface roughening or the geometric lotus effect.

  12. Timed Knickkopf function is essential for wing cuticle formation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kaixia; Zhang, Xubo; Zuo, Ying; Liu, Weimin; Zhang, Jianzhen; Moussian, Bernard

    2017-10-01

    The insect cuticle is an extracellular matrix that consists of the polysaccharide chitin, proteins, lipids and organic molecules that are arranged in distinct horizontal layers. In Drosophila melanogaster, these layers are not formed sequentially, but, at least partially, at the same time. Timing of the underlying molecular mechanisms is conceivably crucial for cuticle formation. To study this issue, we determined the time period during which the function of Knickkopf (Knk), a key factor of chitin organization, is required for wing cuticle differentiation in D. melanogaster. Although knk is expressed throughout metamorphosis, we demonstrate that its expression 30 h prior and 48 h after pupariation is essential for correct wing cuticle formation. In other words, expression beyond this period is futile. Importantly, manipulation of Knk expression during this time causes wing bending suggesting an effect of Knk amounts on the physical properties of the wing cuticle. Manipulation of Knk expression also interferes with the structure and function of the cuticle surface. First, we show that the shape of surface nano-structures depends on the expression levels of knk. Second, we find that cuticle impermeability is compromised in wings with reduced knk expression. In summary, despite the extended supply of Knk during metamorphosis, controlled amounts of Knk are important for correct wing cuticle differentiation and function in a concise period of time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Outperforming hummingbirds' load-lifting capability with a lightweight hummingbird-like flapping-wing mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leys, Frederik; Reynaerts, Dominiek; Vandepitte, Dirk

    2016-08-15

    The stroke-cam flapping mechanism presented in this paper closely mimics the wing motion of a hovering Rufous hummingbird. It is the only lightweight hummingbird-sized flapping mechanism which generates a harmonic wing stroke with both a high flapping frequency and a large stroke amplitude. Experiments on a lightweight prototype of this stroke-cam mechanism on a 50 mm-long wing demonstrate that a harmonic stroke motion is generated with a peak-to-peak stroke amplitude of 175° at a flapping frequency of 40 Hz. It generated a mass lifting capability of 5.1 g, which is largely sufficient to lift the prototype's mass of 3.39 g and larger than the mass-lifting capability of a Rufous hummingbird. The motor mass of a hummingbird-like robot which drives the stroke-cam mechanism is considerably larger (about five times) than the muscle mass of a hummingbird with comparable load-lifting capability. This paper presents a flapping wing nano aerial vehicle which is designed to possess the same lift- and thrust-generating principles of the Rufous hummingbird. The application is indoor flight. We give an overview of the wing kinematics and some specifications which should be met to develop an artificial wing, and also describe the applications of these in the mechanism which has been developed in this work. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Outperforming hummingbirds’ load-lifting capability with a lightweight hummingbird-like flapping-wing mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Leys

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The stroke-cam flapping mechanism presented in this paper closely mimics the wing motion of a hovering Rufous hummingbird. It is the only lightweight hummingbird-sized flapping mechanism which generates a harmonic wing stroke with both a high flapping frequency and a large stroke amplitude. Experiments on a lightweight prototype of this stroke-cam mechanism on a 50 mm-long wing demonstrate that a harmonic stroke motion is generated with a peak-to-peak stroke amplitude of 175° at a flapping frequency of 40 Hz. It generated a mass lifting capability of 5.1 g, which is largely sufficient to lift the prototype's mass of 3.39 g and larger than the mass-lifting capability of a Rufous hummingbird. The motor mass of a hummingbird-like robot which drives the stroke-cam mechanism is considerably larger (about five times than the muscle mass of a hummingbird with comparable load-lifting capability. This paper presents a flapping wing nano aerial vehicle which is designed to possess the same lift- and thrust-generating principles of the Rufous hummingbird. The application is indoor flight. We give an overview of the wing kinematics and some specifications which should be met to develop an artificial wing, and also describe the applications of these in the mechanism which has been developed in this work.

  15. General overview: European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality interactions (EUCAARI) – integrating aerosol research from nano to global scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulmala, M.; Asmi, A.; Lappalainen, H. K.

    2011-01-01

    for chemical transport and global climate models were developed and evaluated. These achievements and related studies have substantially improved our understanding and reduced the uncertainties of aerosol radiative forcing and air quality-climate interactions. The EUCAARI results can be utilized in European...... and global environmental policy to assess the aerosol impacts and the corresponding abatement strategies.......In this paper we describe and summarize the main achievements of the European Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions project (EUCAARI). EUCAARI started on 1 January 2007 and ended on 31 December 2010 leaving a rich legacy including: (a) a comprehensive database with a year...

  16. Effect of torsional stiffness and inertia on the dynamics of low aspect ratio flapping wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qing; Hu, Jianxin; Liu, Hao

    2014-03-01

    Micro air vehicle-motivated aerodynamics in biological flight has been an important subject in the past decade. Inspired by the novel flapping wing mechanisms in insects, birds and bats, we have carried out a numerical study systematically investigating a three-dimensional flapping rigid wing with passively actuated lateral and rotational motion. Distinguishing it from the limited existing studies, this work performs a systematic examination on the effects of wing aspect ratio (AR = 1.0 to infinity), inertia (density ratio σ = 4-32), torsional stiffness (frequency ratio F = 1.5-10 and infinity) and pivot point (from chord-center to leading edge) on the dynamics response of a low AR rectangular wing under an initial zero speed flow field condition. The simulation results show that the symmetry breakdown of the flapping wing results in a forward/backward motion with a rotational pitching. When the wing reaches its stable periodic state, the induced pitching frequency is identical to its forced flapping frequency. However, depending on various kinematic and dynamic system parameters, (i.e. flapping frequency, density ratio and pitching axis), the lateral induced velocity shows a number of different oscillating frequencies. Furthermore, compared with a one degree of freedom (DoF) wing in the lateral direction only, the propulsion performance of such a two DoF wing relies very much on the magnitude of torsional stiffness adding on the pivot point, as well as its pitching axis. In all cases examined here, thrust force and moment generated by a long span wing is larger than that of a short wing, which is remarkably linked to the strong reverse von Kármán vortex street formed in the wake of a wing.

  17. Aerodynamics of wing-assisted incline running in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobalske, Bret W; Dial, Kenneth P

    2007-05-01

    Wing-assisted incline running (WAIR) is a form of locomotion in which a bird flaps its wings to aid its hindlimbs in climbing a slope. WAIR is used for escape in ground birds, and the ontogeny of this behavior in precocial birds has been suggested to represent a model analogous to transitional adaptive states during the evolution of powered avian flight. To begin to reveal the aerodynamics of flap-running, we used digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and measured air velocity, vorticity, circulation and added mass in the wake of chukar partridge Alectoris chukar as they engaged in WAIR (incline 65-85 degrees; N=7 birds) and ascending flight (85 degrees, N=2). To estimate lift and impulse, we coupled our DPIV data with three-dimensional wing kinematics from a companion study. The ontogeny of lift production was evaluated using three age classes: baby birds incapable of flight [6-8 days post hatching (d.p.h.)] and volant juveniles (25-28 days) and adults (45+ days). All three age classes of birds, including baby birds with partially emerged, symmetrical wing feathers, generated circulation with their wings and exhibited a wake structure that consisted of discrete vortex rings shed once per downstroke. Impulse of the vortex rings during WAIR was directed 45+/-5 degrees relative to horizontal and 21+/-4 degrees relative to the substrate. Absolute values of circulation in vortex cores and induced velocity increased with increasing age. Normalized circulation was similar among all ages in WAIR but 67% greater in adults during flight compared with flap-running. Estimated lift during WAIR was 6.6% of body weight in babies and between 63 and 86% of body weight in juveniles and adults. During flight, average lift was 110% of body weight. Our results reveal for the first time that lift from the wings, rather than wing inertia or profile drag, is primarily responsible for accelerating the body toward the substrate during WAIR, and that partially developed wings, not yet

  18. General overview: European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality interactions (EUCAARI)-integrating aerosol research from nano to global scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulmala, M.; Asmi, A.; Lappalainen, H.K.; Baltensperger, U.; Brenguier, J.-L.; Facchini, M.C.; Hansson, H.-C.; Hov, Ø.; O'Dowd, C.D.; Pöschl, U.; Wiedensohler, A.; Boers, R.; Boucher, O.; Leeuw, G. de; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.; Feichter, J.; Krejci, R.; Laj, P.; Lihavainen, H.; Lohmann, U.; McFiggans, G.; Mentel, T.; Pilinis, C.; Riipinen, I.; Schulz, M.; Stohl, A.; Swietlicki, E.; Vignati, E.; Alves, C.; Amann, M.; Ammann, M.; Arabas, S.; Artaxo, P.; Baars, H.; Beddows, D.C.S.; Bergström, R.; Beukes, J.P.; Bilde, M.; Burkhart, J.F.; Canonaco, F.; Clegg, S.L.; Coe, H.; Crumeyrolle, S.; D'Anna, B.; Decesari, S.; Gilardoni, S.; Fischer, M.; Fjaeraa, A.M.; Fountoukis, C.; George, C.; Gomes, L.; Halloran, P.; Hamburger, T.; Harrison, R.M.; Herrmann, H.; Hoffmann, T.; Hoose, C.; Hu, M.; Hyvärinen, A.; Hõrrak, U.; Iinuma, Y.; Iversen, T.; Josipovic, M.; Kanakidou, M.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kirkevåg, A.; Kiss, G.; Klimont, Z.; Kolmonen, P.; Komppula, M.; Kristjánsson, J.-E.; Laakso, L.; Laaksonen, A.; Labonnote, L.; Lanz, V.A.; Lehtinen, K.E.J.; Rizzo, L.V.; Makkonen, R.; Manninen, H.E.; McMeeking, G.; Merikanto, J.; Minikin, A.; Mirme, S.; Morgan, W.T.; Nemitz, E.; O'Donnell, D.; Panwar, T.S.; Pawlowska, H.; Petzold, A.; Pienaar, J.J.; Pio, C.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Prévôt, A.S.H.; Pryor, S.; Reddington, C.L.; Roberts, G.; Rosenfeld, D.; Schwarz, J.; Seland, O.; Sellegri, K.; Shen, X.J.; Shiraiwa, M.; Siebert, H.; Sierau, B.; Simpson, D.; Sun, J.Y.; Topping, D.; Tunved, P.; Vaattovaara, P.; Vakkari, V.; Veefkind, J.P.; Visschedijk, A.; Vuollekoski, H.; Vuolo, R.; Wehner, B.; Wildt, J.; Woodward, S.; Worsnop, D.R.; Zadelhoff, G.J. van; Zardini, A.A.; Zhang, K.; Zyl, P.G. van; Kerminen, V.-M.; Carslaw, K.S.; Pandis, S.N.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe and summarize the main achievements of the European Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions project (EUCAARI). EUCAARI started on 1 January 2007 and ended on 31 December 2010 leaving a rich legacy including: (a) a comprehensive database with a year of

  19. Numerical and Theoretical Considerations for the Design of the AVT-183 Diamond-Wing Experimental Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelens, Okko J.; Luckring, James M.; Breitsamter, Christian; Hovelmann, Andreas; Knoth, Florian; Malloy, Donald J.; Deck, Sebatien

    2015-01-01

    A diamond-wing configuration has been developed to isolate and study blunt-leading edge vortex separation with both computations and experiments. The wing has been designed so that the results are relevant to a more complex Uninhabited Combat Air Vehicle concept known as SACCON. The numerical and theoretical development process for this diamond wing is presented, including a view toward planned wind tunnel experiments. This work was conducted under the NATO Science and Technology Organization, Applied Vehicle Technology panel. All information is in the public domain.

  20. Biomimetic zinc oxide replica with structural color using butterfly (Ideopsis similis) wings as templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wang; Zhang, Di; Fan, Tongxiang; Ding, Jian; Gu, Jiajun; Guo, Qixin; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2006-09-01

    Nano-structured colorful zinc oxide (ZnO) replicas were produced using the wings of the Ideopsis similis butterfly as templates. The ZnO replicas we obtained exhibit iridescence, which was clearly observed under an optical microscope (OM). Field emission scanning electron microscope analysis shows that all the microstructure details are maintained faithfully in the ZnO replica. A computer model was established to simulate the diffraction spectral results, which agreed well with the OM images.

  1. Protection against wing icing for Airbus A300 and A310

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelfer, G.

    1981-01-01

    To improve economy of operation, it is now planned to modify the anti-icing system used on the A300 Airbus wing. Thus, for the A310 Airbus, the deicing system will be applied to only half the wing length. Other essential modifications are a substantial simplification of the warm-air system and discontinuation of the use of a double wall in slats.

  2. Nano devices and sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Liaw, Shien-Kuei; Chung, Yung-Hui

    2016-01-01

    This volume on semiconductor devices focuses on such topics as nano-imprinting, lithography, nanowire charge-trapping, thermo-stability in nanowires, nano-electrodes, and voltage and materials used for fabricating and improving electrical characteristics of nano-materials.

  3. Comments on prospects of fully adaptive aircraft wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Daniel J.; Gern, Frank H.; Robertshaw, Harry H.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Pettit, Greg; Natarajan, Anand; Sulaeman, Erwin

    2001-06-01

    New generations of highly maneuverable aircraft, such as Uninhabited Combat Air Vehicles (UCAV) or Micro Air Vehicles (MAV) are likely to feature very flexible lifting surfaces. To enhance stealth properties and performance, the replacement of hinged control surfaces by smart wings and morphing airfoils is investigated. This requires a fundamental understanding of the interaction between aerodynamics, structures, and control systems. The goal is to build a model consistent with distributed control and to exercise this model to determine the progress possible in terms of flight control (lift, drag and maneuver performance) with an adaptive wing. Different modeling levels are examined and combined with a variety of distributed control approaches to determine what types of maneuvers and flight regimes may be possible. This paper describes the current progress of the project and highlights some recent findings.

  4. Pretreated Butterfly Wings for Tuning the Selective Vapor Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piszter, Gábor; Kertész, Krisztián; Bálint, Zsolt; Biró, László Péter

    2016-01-01

    Photonic nanoarchitectures occurring in the scales of Blue butterflies are responsible for their vivid blue wing coloration. These nanoarchitectures are quasi-ordered nanocomposites which are constituted from a chitin matrix with embedded air holes. Therefore, they can act as chemically selective sensors due to their color changes when mixing volatile vapors in the surrounding atmosphere which condensate into the nanoarchitecture through capillary condensation. Using a home-built vapor-mixing setup, the spectral changes caused by the different air + vapor mixtures were efficiently characterized. It was found that the spectral shift is vapor-specific and proportional with the vapor concentration. We showed that the conformal modification of the scale surface by atomic layer deposition and by ethanol pretreatment can significantly alter the optical response and chemical selectivity, which points the way to the efficient production of sensor arrays based on the knowledge obtained through the investigation of modified butterfly wings. PMID:27618045

  5. Elastically Shaped Wing Optimization and Aircraft Concept for Improved Cruise Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh; Reynolds, Kevin; Kless, James; Aftosmis, Michael; Urnes, James, Sr.; Ippolito, Corey

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a study conducted tn 2010 by the NASA Innovation Fund Award project entitled "Elastically Shaped Future Air Vehicle Concept". The study presents three themes in support of meeting national and global aviation challenges of reducing fuel burn for present and future aviation systems. The first theme addresses the drag reduction goal through innovative vehicle configurations via non-planar wing optimization. Two wing candidate concepts have been identified from the wing optimization: a drooped wing shape and an inflected wing shape. The drooped wing shape is a truly biologically inspired wing concept that mimics a seagull wing and could achieve about 5% to 6% drag reduction, which is aerodynamically significant. From a practical perspective, this concept would require new radical changes to the current aircraft development capabilities for new vehicles with futuristic-looking wings such as this concept. The inflected wing concepts could achieve between 3% to 4% drag reduction. While the drag reduction benefit may be less, the inflected-wing concept could have a near-term impact since this concept could be developed within the current aircraft development capabilities. The second theme addresses the drag reduction goal through a new concept of elastic wing shaping control. By aeroelastically tailoring the wing shape with active control to maintain optimal aerodynamics, a significant drag reduction benefit could be realized. A significant reduction in fuel burn for long-range cruise from elastic wing shaping control could be realized. To realize the potential of the elastic wing shaping control concept, the third theme emerges that addresses the drag reduction goal through a new aerodynamic control effector called a variable camber continuous trailing edge flap. Conventional aerodynamic control surfaces are discrete independent surfaces that cause geometric discontinuities at the trailing edge region. These discontinuities promote

  6. How the pterosaur got its wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokita, Masayoshi

    2015-11-01

    Throughout the evolutionary history of life, only three vertebrate lineages took to the air by acquiring a body plan suitable for powered flight: birds, bats, and pterosaurs. Because pterosaurs were the earliest vertebrate lineage capable of powered flight and included the largest volant animal in the history of the earth, understanding how they evolved their flight apparatus, the wing, is an important issue in evolutionary biology. Herein, I speculate on the potential basis of pterosaur wing evolution using recent advances in the developmental biology of flying and non-flying vertebrates. The most significant morphological features of pterosaur wings are: (i) a disproportionately elongated fourth finger, and (ii) a wing membrane called the brachiopatagium, which stretches from the posterior surface of the arm and elongated fourth finger to the anterior surface of the leg. At limb-forming stages of pterosaur embryos, the zone of polarizing activity (ZPA) cells, from which the fourth finger eventually differentiates, could up-regulate, restrict, and prolong expression of 5'-located Homeobox D (Hoxd) genes (e.g. Hoxd11, Hoxd12, and Hoxd13) around the ZPA through pterosaur-specific exploitation of sonic hedgehog (SHH) signalling. 5'Hoxd genes could then influence downstream bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling to facilitate chondrocyte proliferation in long bones. Potential expression of Fgf10 and Tbx3 in the primordium of the brachiopatagium formed posterior to the forelimb bud might also facilitate elongation of the phalanges of the fourth finger. To establish the flight-adapted musculoskeletal morphology shared by all volant vertebrates, pterosaurs probably underwent regulatory changes in the expression of genes controlling forelimb and pectoral girdle musculoskeletal development (e.g. Tbx5), as well as certain changes in the mode of cell-cell interactions between muscular and connective tissues in the early phase of their evolution. Developmental data now

  7. General Overview: European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions (EUCAARI)– Integrating Aerosol Research from Nano to Global Scales

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kulmala, M.; Asmi, A.; Lappalainen, H.K.; Baltensperger, U.; Brenguier, J.-L.; Facchini, M.C.; Hansson, H.-C.; Hov, O.; O'Dowd, C.D.; Pöschl, U.; Wiedensohler, A.; Boers, R.; Boucher, O.; de Leeuw, G.; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.; Feichter, J.; Krejčí, R.; Laj, P.; Lihavainen, H.; Lohmann, U.; McFiggans, G.; Mentel, T.; Pilinis, C.; Riipinen, I.; Schulz, M.; Stohl, A.; Swietlicki, E.; Vignati, E.; Alves, C.; Amann, M.; Ammann, M.; Arabas, S.; Artaxo, P.; Baars, H.; Beddows, D.C.S.; Bergström, R.; Beukes, J.P.; Bilde, M.; Burkhart, J.F.; Canonaco, F.; Clegg, S.L.; Coe, H.; Crumeyrolle, S.; D'Anna, B.D.; Decesari, S.; Gilardoni, S.; Fischer, M.; Fjaeraa, A.M.; Fountoukis, C.; George, C.; Gomes, L.; Halloran, P.; Hamburger, T.; Harrison, R.M.; Herrmann, H.; Hoffmann, T.; Hoose, C.; Hu, M.; Hyvärinen, A.; Hörrak, U.; Iinuma, Y.; Iversen, T.; Josipovic, M.; Kanakidou, M.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kirgevak, A.; Kiss, G.; Klimont, Z.; Kolmonen, P.; Komppula, M.; Kristjánsson, J.-E.; Laakso, L.; Laaksonen, A.; Labonnote, L.; Lanz, V.A.; Lehtinen, K.E.J.; Rizzo, L.V.; Makkonen, R.; Manninen, H.E.; McMeeking, G.; Merikanto, J.; Minikin, A.; Mirme, S.; Morgan, W.T.; Nemitz, E.; O'Donell, D.; Panwar, T.S.; Pawlowska, H.; Petzold, A.; Pienaar, J.J.; Pio, C.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Prévot, A.S.H.; Pryor, S.; Reddington, C.L.; Roberts, G.; Rosenfeld, D.; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Seland, O.; Sellegri, K.; Shen, X.J.; Shiraiwa, M.; Siebert, H.; Sierau, B.; Simpson, D.; Sun, J.Y.; Topping, D.; Tunved, P.; Vaattovaara, P.; Vakkari, V.; Veefkind, J.P.; Visschedijk, A.; Vuollekoski, H.; Vuolo, R.; Wehner, B.; Wildt, J.; Woodward, S.; Worsnop, D.R.; van Zadelhoff, G.-J.; Zardini, A.A.; Zhang, K.; van Zyl, P.G.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Carslaw, K.S.; Pandis, S.N.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 24 (2012), s. 13061-13143 ISSN 1680-7316 Grant - others:AFCE(FI) 1118615; EUCAARI(XE) 34684; ERC AG(FI) ATMNUCLE:227463; EUSAAR(XE) RII3-CT-2006-026140 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : aerosol radiative forcing * air quality-climate interactions * abatement strategies Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.510, year: 2012

  8. Meso-pores carbon nano-tubes (CNTs) tissues-perfluorocarbons (PFCs) hybrid air-electrodes for Li-O2 battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaish, Moran; Ein-Eli, Yair

    2018-03-01

    Adding immiscible perfluorocarbons (PFCs), possessing superior oxygen solubility and diffusivity, to a free-standing (metal-free and binder-free) CNTs air-electrode tissues with a meso-pore structure, fully maximized the advantages of PFCs as oxygenated-species' channels-providers. The discharge behavior of hybrid PFCs-CNT Li-O2 systems demonstrated a drastic increase in cell capacity at high current density (0.2 mA cm-2), where oxygen transport limitations are best illustrated. The results of this research revealed several key factors affecting PFCs-Li-O2 systems. The incorporation of PFCs with higher superoxide solubility and oxygen diffusivity, but more importantly higher PFCs/electrolyte miscibility, in a meso-pore air-electrode enabled better exploitation of PFCs potential. Consequently, the utilization of the air-electrode' surface area was enhanced via the formation of artificial three phase reaction zones with additional oxygen transportation routes, leading to uniform and intimate Li2O2 deposit at areas further away from the oxygen reservoir. Associated mechanisms are discussed along with insights into an improved Li-O2 battery system.

  9. Aerodynamics and Ecomorphology of Flexible Feathers and Morphing Bird Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen van Oorschot, Brett

    Birds are talented fliers capable of vertical take-off and landing, navigating turbulent air, and flying thousands of miles without rest. How is this possible? What allows birds to exploit the aerial environment with such ease? In part, it may be because bird wings are unlike any engineered wing. They are flexible, strong, lightweight, and dynamically capable of changes in shape on a nearly instantaneous basis (Rayner, 1988; Tobalske, 2007). Moreover, much of this change is passive, modulated only by changes in airflow angle and velocity. Birds actively morph their wings and their feathers morph passively in response to airflow to meet aerodynamic demands. Wings are highly adapted to myriad aeroecological factors and aerodynamic conditions (e.g. Lockwood et al., 1998; Bowlin and Winkler, 2004). This dissertation contains the results of my research on the complexities of morphing avian wings and feathers. I chose to study three related-but-discrete aspects of the avian wing: 1) the aerodynamics of morphing wings during take-off and gliding flight, 2) the presence and significance of wing tip slots across the avian clade, and 3) the aerodynamic role of the emarginate primary feathers that form these wing tip slots. These experiments ask fundamental questions that have intrigued me since childhood: Why do birds have different wing shapes? And why do some birds have slotted wing tips? It's fair to say that you will not find definitive answers here--rather, you will find the methodical, incremental addition of new hypotheses and empirical evidence which will serve future researchers in their own pursuits of these questions. The first chapter explores active wing morphing in two disparate aerodynamic regimes: low-advance ratio flapping (such as during takeoff) and high-advance ratio gliding. This chapter was published in the Journal of Experimental Biology (Klaassen van Oorschot et al., 2016) with the help of an undergraduate researcher, Emily Mistick. We found that wing

  10. Wing Infrastructure and Development Outlook (WINDO) Final Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    divert airfield for military aircraft training in the NTTR and support the flying operations of the 57th Wing, other Air Force units, Navy, Marine ...includes desert iguana (Dipsosaurus dorsalis), zebra-tailed lizard (Callosaurus draconoides), side-blotched lizard, horned lizards (Phrynosoma spp...be stored or used in work areas. Marine mammal —any mammal that is morphologically adapted to the marine environment, or primarily inhabits the

  11. Conceptual Study of Rotary-Wing Microrobotics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chabak, Kelson D

    2008-01-01

    This thesis presents a novel rotary-wing micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) robot design. Two MEMS wing designs were designed, fabricated and tested including one that possesses features conducive to insect level aerodynamics...

  12. Aerodynamic control with passively pitching wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravish, Nick; Wood, Robert

    Flapping wings may pitch passively under aerodynamic and inertial loads. Such passive pitching is observed in flapping wing insect and robot flight. The effect of passive wing pitch on the control dynamics of flapping wing flight are unexplored. Here we demonstrate in simulation and experiment the critical role wing pitching plays in yaw control of a flapping wing robot. We study yaw torque generation by a flapping wing allowed to passively rotate in the pitch axis through a rotational spring. Yaw torque is generated through alternating fast and slow upstroke and and downstroke. Yaw torque sensitively depends on both the rotational spring force law and spring stiffness, and at a critical spring stiffness a bifurcation in the yaw torque control relationship occurs. Simulation and experiment reveal the dynamics of this bifurcation and demonstrate that anomalous yaw torque from passively pitching wings is the result of aerodynamic and inertial coupling between the pitching and stroke-plane dynamics.

  13. Waving Wing Aerodynamics at Low Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    wing. An attached leading edge vortex has been observed by multiple research groups on both mechanical wing flappers (8; 22; 21; 4) and revolving wing...observed by Ellington et al. (8) in their earlier experiments on the mechanical hawkmoth flapper at Re ≈ 10,000. In these experiments the spanwise flow...on mechanical wing flappers at similar Reynolds numbers, Re ≈ 1,000 and 1,400 respectively. Both sets of experiments revealed a stable attached

  14. Air/Liquid-pressure and heartbeat-driven flexible fiber nanogenerators as a micro/nano-power source or diagnostic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zetang; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2011-01-04

    We present a new approach for fabricating flexible fiber nanogenerators (FNGs) that can be used for smart shirts, flexible electronics, and medical applications. These FNGs are based on carbon fibers that are covered cylindrically by textured zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films. Once subjected to uni-compression by applying a pressure, the cylindrical ZnO thin film is under a compressive strain, resulting in a macroscopic piezopotential across its inner and exterior surfaces owing to the textured structure of the film, which is the driving force for generating an electric current in the external load. Using such a structure, an output peak voltage of 3.2 V and average current density of 0.15 μA cm(-2) are demonstrated. The FNGs rely on air pressure, so that it can work in a non-contact mode in cases of rotating tires, flowing air/liquid, and even in blood vessels. Pressure-driven FNGs added to a syringe show potential to harvest energy in blood vessels, gas pipes, and oil pipes, as long as there is a fluctuation in pressure (or turbulence). Heart-pulse driven FNGs can serve as ultrasensitive sensors for monitoring the behavior of the human heart, which may possibly be applied to medical diagnostics as sensors and measurement tools.

  15. Wing area, wing growth and wing loading of common sandpipers Actitis hypoleucos

    OpenAIRE

    Yalden, Derek; Yalden, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the changes in wing length, area and loading in Common Sandpipers as chicks grow, and as adults add extra mass (during egg-laying or before migration). Common Sandpiper chicks weigh about 17 g and have "hands" that are about 35 mm long at one week old, when the primaries are just emerging from their sheaths. They grow steadily to reach about 40 g, with hands about 85 mm long, at 19 days, when they are just about fledging. Their wings have roughly adult chord width at t...

  16. Aerodynamic improvement of a delta wing in combination with leading edge flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadateru Ishide

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, various studies of micro air vehicle (MAV and unmanned air vehicle (UAV have been reported from wide range points of view. The aim of this study is to research the aerodynamic improvement of delta wing in low Reynold’s number region to develop an applicative these air vehicle. As an attractive tool in delta wing, leading edge flap (LEF is employed to directly modify the strength and structure of vortices originating from the separation point along the leading edge. Various configurations of LEF such as drooping apex flap and upward deflected flap are used in combination to enhance the aerodynamic characteristics in the delta wing. The fluid force measurement by six component load cell and particle image velocimetry (PIV analysis are performed as the experimental method. The relations between the aerodynamic superiority and the vortex behavior around the models are demonstrated.

  17. How Do Wings Generate Lift?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Newton's second law of motion. Hence if a wing can generate lift equal to its weight (total weight of the vehicle) it can balance the gravitational pull and can maintain level flight. The equations for fluid flow that are equivalent to the second law are the well- known Navier–Stokes (N–S) equations [1]. These equations have.

  18. Werner helicase wings DNA binding

    OpenAIRE

    Hoadley, Kelly A.; Keck, James L.

    2010-01-01

    In this issue of Structure, Kitano et al. describe the structure of the DNA-bound winged-helix domain from the Werner helicase. This structure of a RecQ/DNA complex offers insights into the DNA unwinding mechanisms of RecQ family helicases.

  19. On Wings: Aerodynamics of Eagles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millson, David

    2000-01-01

    The Aerodynamics Wing Curriculum is a high school program that combines basic physics, aerodynamics, pre-engineering, 3D visualization, computer-assisted drafting, computer-assisted manufacturing, production, reengineering, and success in a 15-hour, 3-week classroom module. (JOW)

  20. Book Review: Nano physics & Nano technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolkhaled Zaree

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available During last decades, there are a lot of emphases on studying material behavior in atomic scale. In most scientific and engineering fields, one can see the effect of nanotechnology. The aim of nanoscience is to design and fabrication of new and applicable materials. Nowadays, Nano is a popular science which chemists, physicist, doctors, engineers, financial managers and environment's fans for creating a good life via nanoscience have a great cooperation with each others. Materials in nano scale such as nanotubes and nanowires have extraordinary properties which by optimization of these properties in nano scale and then develop these properties to macro scale, they've been challenging issues. For instance, materials in nano scale improve mechanical properties of polymers and metallic materials via nano particles and on the other hand by producing a thin film on surfaces improve surface hardening. Besides, nanotechnology is in hi-tech industries such as magnetic devices, surface coating, and biomaterial, material having sensors, polymers, gels, ceramics and intelligent membrane. Nano-carbon tubes are considered intelligent due to the fact that they couple electrochemical and elastic properties simultaneously, hence have greater activation energy density in comparison with other intelligent materials. Studying nanoscience is important because it causes the life to be better. Future Materials and structures will have a lot of outstanding properties. Intelligent machines can repair, recycle and reconstruct themselves. All these features are only possible in nano zone. Nano in engineering science can provide the possibility of making light missiles for exploring space. The reduced weight can be achieved by replacing traditional materials with hybrid nanocomposites.

  1. Role of wing color and seasonal changes in ambient temperature and solar irradiation on predicted flight efficiency of the Albatross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanalian, M; Throneberry, G; Ali, M; Ben Ayed, S; Abdelkefi, A

    2018-01-01

    Drag reduction of the wings of migrating birds is crucial to their flight efficiency. Wing color impacts absorption of solar irradiation which may affect drag but there is little known in this area. To this end, the drag reduction induced by the thermal effect of the wing color of migrating birds with unpowered flight modes is presented in this study. Considering this natural phenomenon in the albatross as an example of migrating birds, and applying an energy balance for this biological system, a thermal analysis is performed on the wings during the summer and winter to obtain different ranges of air density, viscosity, and wing surface temperature brought about from a range of ambient temperatures and climatic conditions seen in different seasons and to study their effects. The exact shape of the albatross wing is used and nine different wing colors are considered in order to gain a better understanding of the effect different colors' absorptivities make on the change in aerodynamic performances. The thermal effect is found to be more important during the summer than during the winter due to the higher values of solar irradiation and a maximum drag reduction of 7.8% is found in summer changing the wing color from light white to dark black. The obtained results show that albatrosses with darker colored wings are more efficient (constant lift to drag ratio and drag reduction) and have better endurance due to this drag reduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Wing-pitch modulation in maneuvering fruit flies is explained by an interplay between aerodynamics and a torsional spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatus, Tsevi; Cohen, Itai

    2015-08-01

    While the wing kinematics of many flapping insects have been well characterized, understanding the underlying sensory, neural, and physiological mechanisms that determine these kinematics is still a challenge. Two main difficulties in understanding the physiological mechanisms arise from the complexity of the interaction between a flapping wing and its own unsteady flow, as well as the intricate mechanics of the insect wing hinge, which is among the most complicated joints in the animal kingdom. These difficulties call for the application of reduced-order approaches. Here this strategy is used to model the torques exerted by the wing hinge along the wing-pitch axis of maneuvering fruit flies as a damped torsional spring with elastic and damping coefficients as well as a rest angle. Furthermore, we model the air flows using simplified quasistatic aerodynamics. Our findings suggest that flies take advantage of the passive coupling between aerodynamics and the damped torsional spring to indirectly control their wing-pitch kinematics by modulating the spring parameters. The damped torsional-spring model explains the changes measured in wing-pitch kinematics during roll correction maneuvers through modulation of the spring damping and elastic coefficients. These results, in conjunction with the previous literature, indicate that flies can accurately control their wing-pitch kinematics on a sub-wing-beat time scale by modulating all three effective spring parameters on longer time scales.

  3. Aerodynamics, sensing and control of insect-scale flapping-wing flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyy, Wei; Kang, Chang-Kwon; Chirarattananon, Pakpong; Ravi, Sridhar; Liu, Hao

    2016-02-01

    There are nearly a million known species of flying insects and 13 000 species of flying warm-blooded vertebrates, including mammals, birds and bats. While in flight, their wings not only move forward relative to the air, they also flap up and down, plunge and sweep, so that both lift and thrust can be generated and balanced, accommodate uncertain surrounding environment, with superior flight stability and dynamics with highly varied speeds and missions. As the size of a flyer is reduced, the wing-to-body mass ratio tends to decrease as well. Furthermore, these flyers use integrated system consisting of wings to generate aerodynamic forces, muscles to move the wings, and sensing and control systems to guide and manoeuvre. In this article, recent advances in insect-scale flapping-wing aerodynamics, flexible wing structures, unsteady flight environment, sensing, stability and control are reviewed with perspective offered. In particular, the special features of the low Reynolds number flyers associated with small sizes, thin and light structures, slow flight with comparable wind gust speeds, bioinspired fabrication of wing structures, neuron-based sensing and adaptive control are highlighted.

  4. Wings as a new route of exposure to pesticides in the honey bee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poquet, Yannick; Kairo, Guillaume; Tchamitchian, Sylvie; Brunet, Jean-Luc; Belzunces, Luc P

    2015-09-01

    In pesticide risk assessment, estimating the routes and levels of exposure is critical. For honey bees subjected to pesticide spray, toxicity is assessed by thorax contact to account for all possible contact exposures. In the present study, the authors tested 6 active substances with different hydrophobicity. For the first time, the authors demonstrated that it is possible to induce mortality by pesticide contact with only the wings of the honey bee. The toxicities induced by contact with the wings and thorax were similar, with the wing median lethal dose (LD50) being 0.99 to 2.23 times higher than that of the thorax. This finding demonstrates that the wings represent a relevant route of exposure in the honey bee. In a second approach, the authors estimated the air volume displaced by the wings during 1 beating cycle to be 0.51 ± 0.03 cm(3), which corresponds to a volume of 116.8 ± 5.8 cm(3)  s(-1) at a wing beat frequency of 230 Hz. The authors then tested realistic scenarios of exposure for bees flying through a pesticide cloud at different concentrations. In the worst-case scenario, the dose accumulated during the flight reached 525 ng bee(-1)  s(-1). These results show that the procedure used to assess the risk posed by contact with pesticides could be improved by accounting for wing exposure. © 2015 SETAC.

  5. Environmental Assessment for Shoreline Stabilization at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dischner, David M; Lingner, David; Rock, Howard B; Combs, Jennifer; Brandenburg, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    The United States Air Force (Air Force), 1st Fighter Wing (1 FW) proposes to implement various methods to stabilize the shoreline at several locations along the Back River waterfront at Langley Air Force Base (AFB...

  6. Drying nano particles solution on an oscillating tip at an air liquid interface: what we can learn, what we can do

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariolle Denis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractEvaporation of fluid at micro and nanometer scale may be used to self-assemble nanometre-sized particles in suspension. Evaporating process can be used to gently control flow in micro and nanofluidics, thus providing a potential mean to design a fine pattern onto a surface or to functionalize a nanoprobe tip. In this paper, we present an original experimental approach to explore this open and rather virgin domain. We use an oscillating tip at an air liquid interface with a controlled dipping depth of the tip within the range of the micrometer. Also, very small dipping depths of a few ten nanometers were achieved with multi walls carbon nanotubes glued at the tip apex. The liquid is an aqueous solution of functionalized nanoparticles diluted in water. Evaporation of water is the driving force determining the arrangement of nanoparticles on the tip. The results show various nanoparticles deposition patterns, from which the deposits can be classified in two categories. The type of deposit is shown to be strongly dependent on whether or not the triple line is pinned and of the peptide coating of the gold nanoparticle. In order to assess the classification, companion dynamical studies of nanomeniscus and related dissipation processes involved with thinning effects are presented.

  7. Review Results on Wing-Body Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frolov Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overview of results for wing-body interference, obtained by the author for varied wing-body combinations. The lift-curve slopes of the wing-body combinations are considered. In this paper a discrete vortices method (DVM and 2D potential model for cross-flow around fuselage are used. The circular and elliptical cross-sections of the fuselage and flat wings of various forms are considered. Calculations showed that the value of the lift-curve slopes of the wing-body combinations may exceed the same value for an isolated wing. This result confirms an experimental data obtained by other authors earlier. Within a framework of the used mathematical models the investigations to optimize the wing-body combination were carried. The present results of the optimization problem for the wing-body combination allowed to select the optimal geometric characteristics for configuration to maximize the values of the lift-curve slopes of the wing-body combination. It was revealed that maximums of the lift-curve slopes for the optimal mid-wing configuration with elliptical cross-section body had a sufficiently large relative width of the body (more than 30% of the span wing.

  8. DAST in Flight just after Structural Failure of Right Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    conducting in-flight experiments from a remote ground site. DAST explored the technology required to build wing structures with less than normal stiffness. This was done because stiffness requires structural weight but ensures freedom from flutter-an uncontrolled, divergent oscillation of the structure, driven by aerodynamic forces and resulting in structural failure. The program used refined theoretical tools to predict at what speed flutter would occur. It then designed a high-response control system to counteract the motion and permit a much lighter wing structure. The wing had, in effect, 'electronic stiffness.' Flight research with this concept was extremely hazardous because an error in either the flutter prediction or control system implementation would result in wing structural failure and the loss of the vehicle. Because of this, flight demonstration of a sub-scale vehicle made sense from the standpoint of both safety and cost. The program anticipated structural failure during the course of the flight research. The Firebee II was a supersonic drone selected as the DAST testbed because its wing could be easily replaced, it used only tail-mounted control surfaces, and it was available as surplus from the U. S. Air Force. It was capable of 5-g turns (that is, turns producing acceleration equal to 5 times that of gravity). Langley outfitted a drone with an aeroelastic, supercritical research wing suitable for a Mach 0.98 cruise transport with a predicted flutter speed of Mach 0.95 at an altitude of 25,000 feet. Dryden and Langley, in conjunction with Boeing, designed and fabricated a digital flutter suppression system (FSS). Dryden developed an RPRV (remotely piloted research vehicle) flight control system; integrated the wing, FSS, and vehicle systems; and conducted the flight program. In addition to a digital flight control system and aeroelastic wings, each DAST drone had research equipment mounted in its nose and a mid-air retrieval system in its tail. The drones

  9. Performance of direct-driven flapping-wing actuator with piezoelectric single-crystal PIN-PMN-PT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Takashi; Hamaguchi, Kanae

    2018-02-01

    We present a prototype flapping-wing actuator with a direct-driven mechanism to generate lift in micro- and nano-aerial vehicles. This mechanism has an advantage of simplicity because it has no transmission system between the actuator and wing. We fabricated the piezoelectric unimorph actuator from single-crystal PIN-PMN-PT, which achieved a lift force up to 1.45 mN, a value about 1.9 times larger than the mass of the actuator itself. This is the first reported demonstration of an insect-scale actuator with a direct-driven mechanism that can generate a lift force greater than its own weight.

  10. Locating Air Force Base Sites History’s Legacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Ravenstein , Air Force Combat Wings (Washington, D.C.: Office of Air Force History, 1984), (hereafter, Ravenstein ) 141–142; Mueller, 1989 edition, 467–468... Ravenstein , author checked aircraft types and bases under each bombardment and strategic wing; Knaack, 156, 200–201, 292–293. 26. Lemmer, 194. History...Goldberg, 58–89. 36. Charles A. Ravenstein , The Organization and Lineage of the United States Air Force (Washington, D.C.: Office of Air Force History

  11. Template-assisted growth of nano structured functional materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, K.K.; Nur Ubaidah Saidin; Khuan, N.I.; Suhaila Hani Ilias; Foo, C.T.

    2012-01-01

    Template-assisted growth is an important nano electrochemical deposition technique for synthesizing one-dimensional (1-D) nano structures with uniformly well-controlled shapes and sizes. A good template with well-defined dimensions is imperative for realizing this task. Porous anodic alumina (PAA) has been a favorable candidate for this purpose as it can be tailor-made with precise pore geometries, such as pore length and diameter as well as inter-pore distances, via the anodization of pure aluminium. This paper reports the fabrication of PAA templates and electrochemical synthesis of functional nano structures in the form of nano wires using PAA templates as scaffolds. Axial heterostructure and homogeneous nano wires formed by engineering materials configuration via composition and/ or layer thickness variations were fabricated for different functionalities. X-ray diffraction and imaging techniques were used to alucidate the microstructures, morphologies and chemical compositions of the nano wires produced. Due to their large surface area-to-volume ratios, and therefore high sensitivities, these functional nano structures have useful applications as critical components in nano sensor devices and various areas of nano technology. Potential applications include as hydrogen gas sensors in nuclear power plant for monitoring structural integrity of reactor components and containment building, as well as environmental monitoring of air pollution and leakages of toxic gases and chemicals. (Author)

  12. DESY NanoLab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Stierle

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The DESY NanoLab is a facility providing access to nano-characterization, nano-structuring and nano-synthesis techniques which are complementary to the advanced X-ray techniques available at DESY’s light sources. It comprises state-of-the art scanning probe microscopy and focused ion beam manufacturing, as well as surface sensitive spectroscopy techniques for chemical analysis. Specialized laboratory x-ray diffraction setups are available for a successful sample pre-characterization before the precious synchrotron beamtimes. Future upgrades will include as well characterization of magnetic properties.

  13. The NRL MITE Air Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kellogg, James; Bovais, Christopher; Dahlburg, Jill; Foch, Richard; Gardner, John; Gordon, Diana; Hartley, Ralph; Kamgar-Parsi, Behrooz; McFarlane, Hugh; Pipitone, Frank; Ramamurti, Ravi; Sciambi, Adam; Spears, William; Srull, Donald; Sullivan, Carol

    2001-01-01

    .... The NRL Micro Tactical Expendable "MITE" air vehicle is a result of this research. The operational MITE is a hand-launched, dual-propeller, fixed-wing air vehicle, with a 9-inch chord and a wingspan of 8 to 18 inches, depending on payload weight...

  14. Sleeping on the wing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattenborg, Niels C

    2017-02-06

    Wakefulness enables animals to interface adaptively with the environment. Paradoxically, in insects to humans, the efficacy of wakefulness depends on daily sleep, a mysterious, usually quiescent state of reduced environmental awareness. However, several birds fly non-stop for days, weeks or months without landing, questioning whether and how they sleep. It is commonly assumed that such birds sleep with one cerebral hemisphere at a time (i.e. unihemispherically) and with only the corresponding eye closed, as observed in swimming dolphins. However, the discovery that birds on land can perform adaptively despite sleeping very little raised the possibility that birds forgo sleep during long flights. In the first study to measure the brain state of birds during long flights, great frigatebirds ( Fregata minor ) slept, but only during soaring and gliding flight. Although sleep was more unihemispheric in flight than on land, sleep also occurred with both brain hemispheres, indicating that having at least one hemisphere awake is not required to maintain the aerodynamic control of flight. Nonetheless, soaring frigatebirds appeared to use unihemispheric sleep to watch where they were going while circling in rising air currents. Despite being able to engage in all types of sleep in flight, the birds only slept for 0.7 h d -1 during flights lasting up to 10 days. By contrast, once back on land they slept 12.8 h d -1 . This suggests that the ecological demands for attention usually exceeded that afforded by sleeping unihemispherically. The ability to interface adaptively with the environment despite sleeping very little challenges commonly held views regarding sleep, and therefore serves as a powerful system for examining the functions of sleep and the consequences of its loss.

  15. A Drosophila wing spot test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayaki, Toshikazu; Yoshikawa, Isao; Niikawa, Norio; Hoshi, Masaharu.

    1986-01-01

    A Drosophila wing spot test system was used to investigate the effects of low doses of X-rays, gamma rays, and both 2.3 and 14.1 MeV neutrons on somatic chromosome mutation (SCM) induction. The incidence of SCM was significantly increased with any type of radiation, with evident linear dose-response relationship within the range of 3 to 20 cGy. It was estimated that relative biological effectiveness value for SCM induction of 2.3 MeV neutrons to X-rays and gamma rays is much higher than that of 14.1 MeV neutrons to those photons (2.4 vs 8.0). The Drosophila wing spot test system seems to become a promising in vivo experimental method for higher animals in terms of the lack of necessity for a marvelously large number of materials required in conventional test system. (Namekawa, K.)

  16. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re ≈ 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small robotic

  17. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P

    2010-03-06

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re approximately 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small

  18. Effects of wing locations on wing rock induced by forebody vortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Baofeng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that asymmetric vortex wakes over slender bodies exhibit a multi-vortex structure with an alternate arrangement along a body axis at high angle of attack. In this investigation, the effects of wing locations along a body axis on wing rock induced by forebody vortices was studied experimentally at a subcritical Reynolds number based on a body diameter. An artificial perturbation was added onto the nose tip to fix the orientations of forebody vortices. Particle image velocimetry was used to identify flow patterns of forebody vortices in static situations, and time histories of wing rock were obtained using a free-to-roll rig. The results show that the wing locations can affect significantly the motion patterns of wing rock owing to the variation of multi-vortex patterns of forebody vortices. As the wing locations make the forebody vortices a two-vortex pattern, the wing body exhibits regularly divergence and fixed-point motion with azimuthal variations of the tip perturbation. If a three-vortex pattern exists over the wing, however, the wing-rock patterns depend on the impact of the highest vortex and newborn vortex. As the three vortices together influence the wing flow, wing-rock patterns exhibit regularly fixed-points and limit-cycled oscillations. With the wing moving backwards, the newborn vortex becomes stronger, and wing-rock patterns become fixed-points, chaotic oscillations, and limit-cycled oscillations. With further backward movement of wings, the vortices are far away from the upper surface of wings, and the motions exhibit divergence, limit-cycled oscillations and fixed-points. For the rearmost location of the wing, the wing body exhibits stochastic oscillations and fixed-points.

  19. Sustainable nano-catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    A novel nano-catalyst system which bridges the homogenous and heterogeneous system is described that is cheaper, easily accessible (sustainable) and requires no need of catalyst filtration during the work-up. Because of its nano-size, i.e. high surface area, the contact between r...

  20. The Nano Solar Case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollensen, Svend; Lindgren, Peter

    2011-01-01

    ISO PAINT Nordic A/S produces roof coatings, facade painting as well as specialised products for surface treatments. The company decided that they would develop a nano solar ICT based project having the capacity to change the whole cost structure of a building, for example by a nano roof coating...

  1. The costae presenting in high-temperature-induced vestigial wings ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Most of the wings have defects in the wing blade and partially formed wing margin, which are the result of autonomous cell death in the ... [Yang D. 2007 The costae presenting in high-temperature-induced vestigial wings of Drosophila: implications for anterior wing margin formation. J. Genet. .... The relevant gene(s) may be.

  2. Analysis of bat wings for morphing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leylek, Emily A.; Manzo, Justin E.; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2008-03-01

    The morphing of wings from three different bat species is studied using an extension of the Weissinger method. To understand how camber affects performance factors such as lift and lift to drag ratio, XFOIL is used to study thin (3% thickness to chord ratio) airfoils at a low Reynolds number of 100,000. The maximum camber of 9% yielded the largest lift coefficient, and a mid-range camber of 7% yielded the largest lift to drag ratio. Correlations between bat wing morphology and flight characteristics are covered, and the three bat wing planforms chosen represent various combinations of morphological components and different flight modes. The wings are studied using the extended Weissinger method in an "unmorphed" configuration using a thin, symmetric airfoil across the span of the wing through angles of attack of 0°-15°. The wings are then run in the Weissinger method at angles of attack of -2° to 12° in a "morphed" configuration modeled after bat wings seen in flight, where the camber of the airfoils comprising the wings is varied along the span and a twist distribution along the span is introduced. The morphed wing configurations increase the lift coefficient over 1000% from the unmorphed configuration and increase the lift to drag ratio over 175%. The results of the three different species correlate well with their flight in nature.

  3. Aerodynamic efficiency of a bioinspired flapping wing rotor at low Reynolds number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Guo, S

    2018-03-01

    This study investigates the aerodynamic efficiency of a bioinspired flapping wing rotor kinematics which combines an active vertical flapping motion and a passive horizontal rotation induced by aerodynamic thrust. The aerodynamic efficiencies for producing both vertical lift and horizontal thrust of the wing are obtained using a quasi-steady aerodynamic model and two-dimensional (2D) CFD analysis at Reynolds number of 2500. The calculated efficiency data show that both efficiencies (propulsive efficiency- η p , and efficiency for producing lift- P f ) of the wing are optimized at Strouhal number ( St ) between 0.1 and 0.5 for a range of wing pitch angles (upstroke angle of attack α u less than 45°); the St for high P f ( St  = 0.1 ∼ 0.3) is generally lower than for high η p ( St  = 0.2 ∼ 0.5), while the St for equilibrium rotation states lies between the two. Further systematic calculations show that the natural equilibrium of the passive rotating wing automatically converges to high-efficiency states: above 85% of maximum P f can be obtained for a wide range of prescribed wing kinematics. This study provides insight into the aerodynamic efficiency of biological flyers in cruising flight, as well as practical applications for micro air vehicle design.

  4. Performance study of winglets on tapered wing with curved trailing edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ara, Ismat; Ali, Mohammad; Islam, Md. Quamrul; Haque, M. Nazmul

    2017-06-01

    Induced drag is the result of wingtip vortex produced from generating lift by finite wing. It is one of the main drags that an aircraft wing encounters during flight. It hampers aircraft performance by increasing fuel consumption and reducing endurance, range and speed. Winglets are used to reduce the induced drag. They weakens wingtip vortex and thus reduces induced drag. This paper represents the experimental investigation to reduce induced drag using winglet at the wingtip. A model of tapered wing with curved trailing edge (without winglet) as well as two similar wings with blended winglet and double blended winglet are prepared using NACA 4412 aerofoil in equal span and surface area. All the models are tested in a closed circuit subsonic wind tunnel at air speed of 108 km/h (0.09 Mach). Reynolds number of the flow is 2.28 × 105 on the basis of average chord length of the wings. The point surface static pressures at different angles of attack from -4° to 24° are measured for each of the wing and winglet combinations through different pressure tapings by using a multi-tube water manometer. From the static pressure distribution, lift coefficient, drag coefficient and lift to drag ratio of all models are calculated. From the analysis of calculated values, it is found that both winglets are able to minimize induced drag; however, the tapered curved trailing edge span with blended winglet provides better aerodynamic performance.

  5. Development of Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap for Performance Adaptive Aeroelastic Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Kaul, Upender; Lebofsky, Sonia; Ting, Eric; Chaparro, Daniel; Urnes, James

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarizes the recent development of an adaptive aeroelastic wing shaping control technology called variable camber continuous trailing edge flap (VCCTEF). As wing flexibility increases, aeroelastic interactions with aerodynamic forces and moments become an increasingly important consideration in aircraft design and aerodynamic performance. Furthermore, aeroelastic interactions with flight dynamics can result in issues with vehicle stability and control. The initial VCCTEF concept was developed in 2010 by NASA under a NASA Innovation Fund study entitled "Elastically Shaped Future Air Vehicle Concept," which showed that highly flexible wing aerodynamic surfaces can be elastically shaped in-flight by active control of wing twist and bending deflection in order to optimize the spanwise lift distribution for drag reduction. A collaboration between NASA and Boeing Research & Technology was subsequently funded by NASA from 2012 to 2014 to further develop the VCCTEF concept. This paper summarizes some of the key research areas conducted by NASA during the collaboration with Boeing Research and Technology. These research areas include VCCTEF design concepts, aerodynamic analysis of VCCTEF camber shapes, aerodynamic optimization of lift distribution for drag minimization, wind tunnel test results for cruise and high-lift configurations, flutter analysis and suppression control of flexible wing aircraft, and multi-objective flight control for adaptive aeroelastic wing shaping control.

  6. Modeling, design and optimization of flapping wings for efficient hovering flighth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Q.

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by insect flights, flapping wing micro air vehicles (FWMAVs) keep attracting attention from the scientific community. One of the design objectives is to reproduce the high power efficiency of insect flight. However, there is no clear answer yet to the question of how to design flapping

  7. Three-dimensional wake reconstruction of a flapping-wing MAV using a Kriging regression technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Percin, M.; De Baar, J.H.S.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.; Dwight, R.P.

    2013-01-01

    The work explores the three-dimensional unsteady wake of a flapping-wing Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) ‘DelFly II’, applying a Kriging regression technique for the spatial regression of time-resolved Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (Stereo-PIV) data. In the view of limited number of measurement

  8. A Tribute to Professor Rene H. Miller - A Pioneer in Aeromechanics and Rotary Wing Flight Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.; Johnson, Wayne; Scully, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    Rene H. Miller (May 19, 1916 January 28, 2003), Emeritus H. N. Slater Professor of Flight Transportation, was one of the most influential pioneers in rotary wing aeromechanics as well as a visionary whose dream was the development of a tilt-rotor based short haul air transportation system. This paper pays a long overdue tribute to his memory and to his extraordinary contributions.

  9. DYNAMIC TUNING OF INSECT AND BIRD WINGS AND COPEPOD AND DAPHNIA APPENDAGES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compressible flow theory suggests, and dimensional analysis and growing empirical evidence confirm that, to aid flight, many insects and even some birds, notably hummingbirds, tune their wing-beat frequency to a corresponding characteristic harmonic frequency of air. The same pro...

  10. Vorticity Transport on a Flexible Wing in Stall Flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkala, James; Buchholz, James; Farnsworth, John; McLaughlin, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    The circulation budget within dynamic stall vortices was investigated on a flexible NACA 0018 wing model of aspect ratio 6 undergoing stall flutter. The wing had an initial angle of attack of 6 degrees, Reynolds number of 1 . 5 ×105 and large-amplitude, primarily torsional, limit cycle oscillations were observed at a reduced frequency of k = πfc / U = 0 . 1 . Phase-locked stereo PIV measurements were obtained at multiple chordwise planes around the 62.5% and 75% spanwise locations to characterize the flow field within thin volumetric regions over the suction surface. Transient surface pressure measurements were used to estimate boundary vorticity flux. Recent analyses on plunging and rotating wings indicates that the magnitude of the pressure-gradient-driven boundary flux of secondary vorticity is a significant fraction of the magnitude of the convective flux from the separated leading-edge shear layer, suggesting that the secondary vorticity plays a significant role in regulating the strength of the primary vortex. This phenomenon is examined in the present case, and the physical mechanisms governing the growth and evolution of the dynamic stall vortices are explored. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research through the Flow Interactions and Control Program monitored by Dr. Douglas Smith, and through the 2014 AFOSR/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program (JA and JB).

  11. The analysis of the flying wing in morphing concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionică CÎRCIU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The combination between the flying wing morphing concept and the use of modern command and control system offers exponential advantages having a leverage effect in the economy and research. The flying wing architecture has the advantage of low cost against efficiency, the morphing of this concept defining the new characteristic frontiers and aerodynamic performances which derive immediately. On designing an unmanned aerial vehicle for a various range of missions, its lifting surface needs to display optimal geometrical features, so that the UAV may maintain the induced drag and the moment coefficient at reasonable levels. The command and control of the lifting surfaces in morphing concept offer characteristics and in-flight performances at a superior level. The limits of the system depend on the reliability of the execution elements and the grade of accuracy for the control laws which are implemented in the calculation module. The paper aims at presenting an analysis regarding the robotic air systems of flying wing type through the aerodynamic analysis and with the help of specific software instruments. The performances and flight qualities depend directly on the geometry of the lifting surface of the aerial vehicle.

  12. Environmental Assessment Addressing the Defense Language Institute English Language Center (DLIELC), and the Inter-American Air Forces Academy (IAAFA) Area Development Plan at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Medical Wing; the Air Force Intelligence , Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Agency; and the 67th Network Warfare Wing (LAFB undated b). There are 18 Air...Combat Command units under the Air Force Intelligence , Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Agency and the 67th Network Warfare Wing at Lackland AFB. The...recorded in the Texan Biotic Province (LAFB 2006a). Most reptiles and amphibians would likely not occur within the Project area. The majority of

  13. Adaptive wing : Investigations of passive wing technologies for loads reduction in the cleansky smart fixed wing aircraft (SFWA) project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruger, W.R.; Dillinger, J; De Breuker, R.; Reyes, M.; Haydn, K.

    2016-01-01

    In the work package “Adaptive Wing” in the Clean-Sky “Smart Fixed Wing Aircraft” (SFWA) project, design processes and solutions for aircraft wings have been created, giving optimal response with respect to loads, comfort and performance by the introduction of passive and active concepts. Central

  14. Nano-electromembrane extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Payán, María D Ramos; Li, Bin; Petersen, Nickolaj J.

    2013-01-01

    The present work has for the first time described nano-electromembrane extraction (nano-EME). In nano-EME, five basic drugs substances were extracted as model analytes from 200 μL acidified sample solution, through a supported liquid membrane (SLM) of 2-nitrophenyl octyl ether (NPOE......), and into approximately 8 nL phosphate buffer (pH 2.7) as acceptor phase. The driving force for the extraction was an electrical potential sustained over the SLM. The acceptor phase was located inside a fused silica capillary, and this capillary was also used for the final analysis of the acceptor phase by capillary...... as extraction selectivity. Compared with conventional EME, the acceptor phase volume in nano-EME was down-scaled by a factor of more than 1000. This resulted in a very high enrichment capacity. With loperamide as an example, an enrichment factor exceeding 500 was obtained in only 5 min of extraction...

  15. NanoAODs

    CERN Document Server

    Husova, Lucia Anna

    2017-01-01

    The scientist on LHC experiment analyse a huge amount of data every day on the Grid. Thus new methods are requested, how to make the analysis more efficient. The NanoAOD is a derived dataset from AOD, where only information necessary for the analysis is stored. Thus the analysis can be more than two times faster, because of the smaller file size, which can be read faster on the Grid. The main goal of this summer student project was to help other users to start using NanoAODs by rewriting their user tasks. Two example users tasks were converted to NanoAODs and tested with the local train test. A speed up of 3.5 was reached. The results of the analysis tasks are identical independent if they use AODs or NanoAODs.

  16. Nano Dust Analyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a new highly sensitive instrument to confirm the existence of the so-called nano-dust particles, characterize their impact parameters, and...

  17. Carbon nano tubes embedded in polymer nano fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dror, Y.; Kedem, S.; Khalfin, R.L.; Paz, Y.; Cohenl, Y.; Salalha, Y.; Yarin, A.L.; Zussman, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text: The electro spinning process was used successfully to embed Multi-walled carbon nano tubes (MWCNTs) and single-walled carbon nano tubes (SWCNTs) in a matrix of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) forming composite nano fibers. Initial dispersion of SWCNTs in water was achieved by the use of an amphphilic alternating copolymer of styrene and sodium maleate. MWNT dispersion was achieved by ionic and nonionic surfactants. The distribution and conformation of the nano tubes in the nano fibers were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Oxygen plasma etching was used to expose the nano tubes within the nano fibers to facilitate direct observation. Nano tube alignment within the nano fibers was shown to depend strongly on the quality of the initial dispersions. Well-dispersed and separated nano tubes were embedded in a straight and aligned form while entangled non-separated nano tubes were incorporated as dense aggregates. X-ray diffraction demonstrated a high degree of orientation of the PEO crystals in the electro spun nano fibers with embedded SWCNTs, whereas incorporation of MVCNTs had a detrimental effect on the polymer orientation. Composite polymer nano fibers containing dispersed phases of nanometric TiO 2 particles and MWCNTs were also prepared electro spinning. In this case, the polymer matrix was poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN). The morphology and possible applications of these composite nano fibers will be discussed

  18. The Crest Wing Wave Energy Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Antonishen, Michael Patrick

    This report presents the results of a continuation of an experimental study of the wave energy converting abilities of the Crest Wing wave energy converter (WEC), in the following referred to as ‘Phase 2'. The Crest Wing is a WEC that uses its movement in matching the shape of an oncoming wave...

  19. Effect of leading edge roundness on a delta wing in wing-rock motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, T. Terry; Malcolm, Gerald N.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of wing leading-edge roundness on wing rock was investigated using flow visualization in a water tunnel. Eighty degree delta wing models were tested on free-to-roll and forced oscillation rigs. The onset of wing rock was delayed by increasing the roundness of the leading edges. The wing rock amplitude and frequency results suggested that damping was increased at lower angles of attack but reduced at higher angles of attack. Vortex lift-off and vortex breakdown, especially during dynamic situations, were strongly affected by the leading edge roundness. Different forms of wing rock motion could be sustained by combinations of vortex breakdown and vortex lift-off. Behaviors of the wing and vortex motions were explained by the influence of leading edge roundness on the separation location, vortex trajectory, and vortex breakdown.

  20. Nano-composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland

    2010-05-25

    Nano-composite materials are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a nano-composite material may comprise co-sputtering a transition metal and a refractory metal in a reactive atmosphere. The method may also comprise co-depositing a transition metal and a refractory metal composite structure on a substrate. The method may further comprise thermally annealing the deposited transition metal and refractory metal composite structure in a reactive atmosphere.

  1. Cancer Nano medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Pike, M.M.; Luo, X.; Liu, L.H.

    2013-01-01

    Bioengineered nano materials have inspired revolutionary imaging and drug delivery methods whose clinical application in cancer research has resulted in powerful medical devices for early diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cancer. Recent advances in super imaging agents have resulted in improved resolution and sensitivity. For instance, fluorescent quantum dots with wavelength-tunable emissions, plasmon-resonant gold nano structures with shape-controlled near-infrared absorptions, and MRI-active iron oxide nanoparticles are well-established molecular imaging probes for noninvasive cancer imaging. Nano materials are also considered to be the most effective vectors that can break through transport bio barriers and deliver a constant dose of multiple therapeutic agents to tumors and intracellular endocytic compartments for cancer gene therapy, immunotherapy, or chemotherapy. Furthermore, nano wire- or nano tube-based electronic devices demonstrate extraordinary sensitivity capable of detection at the single molecule or protein level. It is anticipated that developing nano technology-driven imaging, sensing, and therapeutic systems will dramatically advance cancer research and clinical treatments.

  2. Aerodynamic performance of two-dimensional, chordwise flexible flapping wings at fruit fly scale in hover flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Madhu; Kang, Chang-kwon

    2015-05-06

    Fruit flies have flexible wings that deform during flight. To explore the fluid-structure interaction of flexible flapping wings at fruit fly scale, we use a well-validated Navier-Stokes equation solver, fully-coupled with a structural dynamics solver. Effects of chordwise flexibility on a two dimensional hovering wing is studied. Resulting wing rotation is purely passive, due to the dynamic balance between aerodynamic loading, elastic restoring force, and inertial force of the wing. Hover flight is considered at a Reynolds number of Re = 100, equivalent to that of fruit flies. The thickness and density of the wing also corresponds to a fruit fly wing. The wing stiffness and motion amplitude are varied to assess their influences on the resulting aerodynamic performance and structural response. Highest lift coefficient of 3.3 was obtained at the lowest-amplitude, highest-frequency motion (reduced frequency of 3.0) at the lowest stiffness (frequency ratio of 0.7) wing within the range of the current study, although the corresponding power required was also the highest. Optimal efficiency was achieved for a lower reduced frequency of 0.3 and frequency ratio 0.35. Compared to the water tunnel scale with water as the surrounding fluid instead of air, the resulting vortex dynamics and aerodynamic performance remained similar for the optimal efficiency motion, while the structural response varied significantly. Despite these differences, the time-averaged lift scaled with the dimensionless shape deformation parameter γ. Moreover, the wing kinematics that resulted in the optimal efficiency motion was closely aligned to the fruit fly measurements, suggesting that fruit fly flight aims to conserve energy, rather than to generate large forces.

  3. The effect of aspect ratio on the leading-edge vortex over an insect-like flapping wing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Nathan; Knowles, Kevin; Bomphrey, Richard J

    2015-10-09

    Insect wing shapes are diverse and a renowned source of inspiration for the new generation of autonomous flapping vehicles, yet the aerodynamic consequences of varying geometry is not well understood. One of the most defining and aerodynamically significant measures of wing shape is the aspect ratio, defined as the ratio of wing length (R) to mean wing chord (c). We investigated the impact of aspect ratio, AR, on the induced flow field around a flapping wing using a robotic device. Rigid rectangular wings ranging from AR = 1.5 to 7.5 were flapped with insect-like kinematics in air with a constant Reynolds number (Re) of 1400, and a dimensionless stroke amplitude of 6.5c (number of chords traversed by the wingtip). Pseudo-volumetric, ensemble-averaged, flow fields around the wings were captured using particle image velocimetry at 11 instances throughout simulated downstrokes. Results confirmed the presence of a high-lift, separated flow field with a leading-edge vortex (LEV), and revealed that the conical, primary LEV grows in size and strength with increasing AR. In each case, the LEV had an arch-shaped axis with its outboard end originating from a focus-sink singularity on the wing surface near the tip. LEV detachment was observed for AR > 1.5 around mid-stroke at ~70% span, and initiated sooner over higher aspect ratio wings. At AR > 3 the larger, stronger vortex persisted under the wing surface well into the next half-stroke leading to a reduction in lift. Circulatory lift attributable to the LEV increased with AR up to AR = 6. Higher aspect ratios generated proportionally less lift distally because of LEV breakdown, and also less lift closer to the wing root due to the previous LEV's continuing presence under the wing. In nature, insect wings go no higher than AR ~ 5, likely in part due to architectural and physiological constraints but also because of the reducing aerodynamic benefits of high AR wings.

  4. Standardization of Alternative Methods for Nano genotoxicity Testing in Drosophila melanogaster Using Iron Nanoparticles: A Promising Link to Nanodosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvathi, D. P.; Rajagopal, K.; Sumitha, R.

    2016-01-01

    The remarkable advancement of nano technology has triggered enormous production of metal nanoparticles and nano materials for diverse applications in clinical diagnostics and biomedical research. Nano technology has facilitated understanding and analysing nano toxicology in a holistic approach. Iron nanoparticles have been of special interest in recent research owing to their dynamic, paramagnetic, and catalytic properties. Research studies (in vitro model) have demonstrated the lack of toxicity in nano iron. The present study design involves in vivo toxicity assessment of nano iron at specific concentrations of 0.1mM, 1 mM, 5 mM, and 10 mM in Drosophila. DNA fragmentation assay in exposed and F1 population showed first-line toxicity to flies. Viability and reproductive ability were assessed at 24-hour and 48-hour intervals and thus indicated no statistical significance between the exposed and control groups. The wing spot assay has expressed transparent lack of toxicity in the studied concentrations of nano iron. Protein profiling has demonstrated that the protein profiles have been intact in the larvae which confirm lack of toxicity of nano iron. This leads to concluding that nano iron at the defined concentrations is neither genotoxic nor mutagenic.

  5. Hovering hummingbird wing aerodynamics during the annual cycle. II. Implications of wing feather moult

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir, Nir; Elimelech, Yossef

    2018-01-01

    Birds usually moult their feathers in a particular sequence which may incur aerodynamic, physiological and behavioural implications. Among birds, hummingbirds are unique species in their sustained hovering flight. Because hummingbirds frequently hover-feed, they must maintain sufficiently high flight capacities even when moulting their flight feathers. A hummingbird wing consists of 10 primary flight feathers whose absence during moult may strongly affect wing performance. Using dynamic similarity rules, we compared time-accurate aerodynamic loads and flow field measurements over several wing geometries that follow the natural feather moult sequence of Calypte anna, a common hummingbird species in western North America. Our results suggest a drop of more than 20% in lift production during the early stages of the moult sequence in which mid-wing flight feathers are moulted. We also found that the wing's ability to generate lift strongly depended on the morphological integrity of the outer primaries and leading-edge. These findings may explain the evolution of wing morphology and moult attributes. Specifically, the high overlap between adjacent wing feathers, especially at the wing tip, and the slow sequential replacement of the wing feathers result in a relatively small reduction in wing surface area during moult with limited aerodynamic implications. We present power and efficiency analyses for hover flight during moult under several plausible scenarios, suggesting that body mass reduction could be a compensatory mechanism that preserves the energetic costs of hover flight. PMID:29515884

  6. Pegasus Rocket Wing and PHYSX Glove Undergoes Stress Loads Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The Pegasus Hypersonic Experiment (PHYSX) Project's Pegasus rocket wing with attached PHYSX glove rests after load-tests at Scaled Composites, Inc., in Mojave, California, in January 1997. Technicians slowly filled water bags beneath the wing, to create the pressure, or 'wing-loading,' required to determine whether the wing could withstand its design limit for stress. The wing sits in a wooden triangular frame which serves as the test-rig, mounted to the floor atop the waterbags. Pegasus is an air-launched space booster produced by Orbital Sciences Corporation and Hercules Aerospace Company (initially; later, Alliant Tech Systems) to provide small satellite users with a cost-effective, flexible, and reliable method for placing payloads into low earth orbit. Pegasus has been used to launch a number of satellites and the PHYSX experiment. That experiment consisted of a smooth glove installed on the first-stage delta wing of the Pegasus. The glove was used to gather data at speeds of up to Mach 8 and at altitudes approaching 200,000 feet. The flight took place on October 22, 1998. The PHYSX experiment focused on determining where boundary-layer transition occurs on the glove and on identifying the flow mechanism causing transition over the glove. Data from this flight-research effort included temperature, heat transfer, pressure measurements, airflow, and trajectory reconstruction. Hypersonic flight-research programs are an approach to validate design methods for hypersonic vehicles (those that fly more than five times the speed of sound, or Mach 5). Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, provided overall management of the glove experiment, glove design, and buildup. Dryden also was responsible for conducting the flight tests. Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, was responsible for the design of the aerodynamic glove as well as development of sensor and instrumentation systems for the glove. Other participating NASA centers included Ames Research

  7. Nano surface generation of grinding process using carbon nano tubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    holes need different processing techniques. Conventional finishing methods used so far become almost impossible or cumbersome. In this paper, a nano material especially multi wall carbon nano tube is used in the machining process like ...

  8. Semi-automated quantitative Drosophila wings measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Sheng Yang Michael; Ogawa, Yoshitaka; Kawana, Sara; Tamura, Koichiro; Lee, Hwee Kuan

    2017-06-28

    Drosophila melanogaster is an important organism used in many fields of biological research such as genetics and developmental biology. Drosophila wings have been widely used to study the genetics of development, morphometrics and evolution. Therefore there is much interest in quantifying wing structures of Drosophila. Advancement in technology has increased the ease in which images of Drosophila can be acquired. However such studies have been limited by the slow and tedious process of acquiring phenotypic data. We have developed a system that automatically detects and measures key points and vein segments on a Drosophila wing. Key points are detected by performing image transformations and template matching on Drosophila wing images while vein segments are detected using an Active Contour algorithm. The accuracy of our key point detection was compared against key point annotations of users. We also performed key point detection using different training data sets of Drosophila wing images. We compared our software with an existing automated image analysis system for Drosophila wings and showed that our system performs better than the state of the art. Vein segments were manually measured and compared against the measurements obtained from our system. Our system was able to detect specific key points and vein segments from Drosophila wing images with high accuracy.

  9. Novel Control Effectors for Truss Braced Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Edward V.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Joshi, Shiv

    2015-01-01

    At cruise flight conditions very high aspect ratio/low sweep truss braced wings (TBW) may be subject to design requirements that distinguish them from more highly swept cantilevered wings. High aspect ratio, short chord length and relative thinness of the airfoil sections all contribute to relatively low wing torsional stiffness. This may lead to aeroelastic issues such as aileron reversal and low flutter margins. In order to counteract these issues, high aspect ratio/low sweep wings may need to carry additional high speed control effectors to operate when outboard ailerons are in reversal and/or must carry additional structural weight to enhance torsional stiffness. The novel control effector evaluated in this study is a variable sweep raked wing tip with an aileron control surface. Forward sweep of the tip allows the aileron to align closely with the torsional axis of the wing and operate in a conventional fashion. Aft sweep of the tip creates a large moment arm from the aileron to the wing torsional axis greatly enhancing aileron reversal. The novelty comes from using this enhanced and controllable aileron reversal effect to provide roll control authority by acting as a servo tab and providing roll control through intentional twist of the wing. In this case the reduced torsional stiffness of the wing becomes an advantage to be exploited. The study results show that the novel control effector concept does provide roll control as described, but only for a restricted class of TBW aircraft configurations. For the configuration studied (long range, dual aisle, Mach 0.85 cruise) the novel control effector provides significant benefits including up to 12% reduction in fuel burn.

  10. Exploration of the rotational power consumption of a rigid flapping wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truppel, Michael; Rossi, Lionel

    2011-10-01

    The development of Micro Air Vehicles with flapping wings is inspired from the observation and study of natural flyers such as insects and birds. This article explores the rotational power consumption of a flapping wing using a mechanical flapper at Re ≃ 4,500. This mechanical flapper is simplified to a 2D translation and a rotation in a water tank. Moreover, the wing kinematics are reduced to a linear translation and a rotation for the purpose of our study. We introduce the notion of non-ideal flapper and associated non-ideal rotational power. Such non-ideal devices are defined as consuming power for adding and removing mechanical power to and from the flow, respectively. First, we use a traditional symmetrical wing kinematic which is a simplified kinematic inspired from natural flyers. The lift coefficient of this flapping is about C L ≃ 1.5. This symmetrical wing kinematic is chosen as a reference. Further, wing kinematics with asymmetric rotations are then compared with this one. These new kinematics are built using a differential velocity defined according to the translational kinematics, a time lag and a distance, r kp. The analogy of this distance is discussed as a key point to follow along the chord. First, the wing kinematics are varied keeping a similar shape for the profiles of the angular velocity. It is shown that when compared to the reference wing kinematic, a 10% reduction in the rotational power is obtained whilst the lift is reduced by 9%. Second, we release the limitation to a similar shape for the profiles of the angular velocity leading to a novel shape for the angular velocity profile named here as "double bump" profile. With these new wing kinematics, we show that a 60% reduction in the non-ideal rotational power can be achieved whilst the lift coefficient is only reduced by 1.7%. Such "double bump kinematics" could then be of interest to increase the endurance of Micro Air Vehicles.

  11. Aerodynamic and aeroelastic characteristics of the DARPA Smart Wing Phase II wind tunnel model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Brian P.; Martin, Christopher A.; Cowan, David L.

    2001-06-01

    A wind tunnel demonstration was conducted on a scale model of an unmanned combat air vehicle (UCAV). The model was configured with traditional hinged control surfaces and control surfaces manufactured with embedded shape memory alloys. Control surfaces constructed with SMA wires enable a smooth and continuous deformation in both the spanwise and cordwise directions. This continuous shape results in some unique aerodynamic effects. Additionally, the stiffness distribution of the model was selected to understand the aeroelastic behavior of a wing designed with these control surfaces. The wind tunnel experiments showed that the aerodynamic performance of a wing constructed with these control surfaces is significantly improved. However, care must be taken when aeroelastic effects are considered since the wing will show a more rapid reduction in the roll moment due to increased moment arm about the elastic axis. It is shown, experimentally, that this adverse effect is easily counteracted using leading edge control surfaces.

  12. Variable Camber Continuous Aerodynamic Control Surfaces and Methods for Active Wing Shaping Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An aerodynamic control apparatus for an air vehicle improves various aerodynamic performance metrics by employing multiple spanwise flap segments that jointly form a continuous or a piecewise continuous trailing edge to minimize drag induced by lift or vortices. At least one of the multiple spanwise flap segments includes a variable camber flap subsystem having multiple chordwise flap segments that may be independently actuated. Some embodiments also employ a continuous leading edge slat system that includes multiple spanwise slat segments, each of which has one or more chordwise slat segment. A method and an apparatus for implementing active control of a wing shape are also described and include the determination of desired lift distribution to determine the improved aerodynamic deflection of the wings. Flap deflections are determined and control signals are generated to actively control the wing shape to approximate the desired deflection.

  13. ON NANO Λg-CLOSED SETS

    OpenAIRE

    Rajasekaran, Ilangovan; Nethaji, Ochanan

    2017-01-01

    Abstaract−In this paper, we introduce nano ∧g-closed sets in nano topological spaces. Some properties of nano ∧g-closed sets and nano ∧g-open sets are weaker forms of nano closed sets and nano open sets

  14. Generic Wing-Body Aerodynamics Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Terry L.; Olsen, Thomas H.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The wing-body aerodynamics data base consists of a series of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations about a generic wing body configuration consisting of a ogive-circular-cylinder fuselage and a simple symmetric wing mid-mounted on the fuselage. Solutions have been obtained for Nonlinear Potential (P), Euler (E) and Navier-Stokes (N) solvers over a range of subsonic and transonic Mach numbers and angles of attack. In addition, each solution has been computed on a series of grids, coarse, medium and fine to permit an assessment of grid refinement errors.

  15. Unemployment and Right-Wing Extremist Crime

    OpenAIRE

    Falk, Armin; Zweimüller, Josef

    2005-01-01

    Right-wing extremism is a serious problem in many societies. A prominent hypothesis states that unemployment plays a crucial role for the occurrence of right-wing extremist crime. In this paper we empirically test this hypothesis. We use a previously not used data set which includes all officially recorded right-wing criminal acts in Germany. These data are recorded by the German Federal Criminal Police Office on a monthly and state level basis. Our main finding is that there is in fact a sig...

  16. Flapping and fixed wing aerodynamics of low Reynolds number flight vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viieru, Dragos

    Lately, micro air vehicles (MAVs), with a maximum dimension of 15 cm and nominal flight speed around 10m/s, have attracted interest from scientific and engineering communities due to their potential to perform desirable flight missions and exhibit unconventional aerodynamics, control, and structural characteristics, compared to larger flight vehicles. Since MAVs operate at a Reynolds number of 105 or lower, the lift-to-drag ratio is noticeably lower than the larger manned flight vehicles. The light weight and low flight speed cause MAVs to be sensitive to wind gusts. The MAV's small overall dimensions result in low aspect ratio wings with strong wing tip vortices that further complicate the aerodynamics of such vehicles. In this work, two vehicle concepts are considered, namely, fixed wings with flexible structure aimed at passive shape control, and flapping wings aimed at enhancing aerodynamic performance using unsteady flow fields. A finite volume, pressure-based Navier-Stokes solver along with moving grid algorithms is employed to simulate the flow field. The coupled fluid-structural dynamics of the flexible wing is treated using a hyperelastic finite element structural model, the above-mentioned fluid solver via the moving grid technique, and the geometric conservation law. Three dimensional aerodynamics around a low aspect ratio wing for both rigid and flexible structures and fluid-structure interactions for flexible structures have been investigated. In the Reynolds numbers range of 7x10 4 to 9x104, the flexible wing exhibits self-initiated vibrations even in steady free-stream, and is found to have a similar performance to the identical rigid wing for modest angles of attack. For flapping wings, efforts are made to improve our understanding of the unsteady fluid physics related to the lift generation mechanism at low Reynolds numbers (75 to 1,700). Alternative moving grid algorithms, capable of handling the large movements of the boundaries (characteristic

  17. Kinematics and wing shape across flight speed in the bat, Leptonycteris yerbabuenae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhea Von Busse

    2012-10-01

    The morphology and kinematics of a flying animal determines the resulting aerodynamic lift through the regulation of the speed of the air moving across the wing, the wing area and the lift coefficient. We studied the detailed three-dimensional wingbeat kinematics of the bat, Leptonycteris yerbabuenae, flying in a wind tunnel over a range of flight speeds (0–7 m/s, to determine how factors affecting the lift production vary across flight speed and within wingbeats. We found that the wing area, the angle of attack and the camber, which are determinants of the lift production, decreased with increasing speed. The camber is controlled by multiple mechanisms along the span, including the deflection of the leg relative to the body, the bending of the fifth digit, the deflection of the leading edge flap and the upward bending of the wing tip. All these measures vary throughout the wing beat suggesting active or aeroelastic control. The downstroke Strouhal number, Std, is kept relatively constant, suggesting that favorable flow characteristics are maintained during the downstroke, across the range of speeds studied. The Std is kept constant through changes in the stroke plane, from a strongly inclined stroke plane at low speeds to a more vertical stroke plane at high speeds. The mean angular velocity of the wing correlates with the aerodynamic performance and shows a minimum at the speed of maximum lift to drag ratio, suggesting a simple way to determine the optimal speed from kinematics alone. Taken together our results show the high degree of adjustments that the bats employ to fine tune the aerodynamics of the wings and the correlation between kinematics and aerodynamic performance.

  18. A CFD-informed quasi-steady model of flapping wing aerodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Toshiyuki; Liu, Hao; Bomphrey, Richard J

    2015-11-01

    Aerodynamic performance and agility during flapping flight are determined by the combination of wing shape and kinematics. The degree of morphological and kinematic optimisation is unknown and depends upon a large parameter space. Aimed at providing an accurate and computationally inexpensive modelling tool for flapping-wing aerodynamics, we propose a novel CFD (computational fluid dynamics)-informed quasi-steady model (CIQSM), which assumes that the aerodynamic forces on a flapping wing can be decomposed into the quasi-steady forces and parameterised based on CFD results. Using least-squares fitting, we determine a set of proportional coefficients for the quasi-steady model relating wing kinematics to instantaneous aerodynamic force and torque; we calculate power with the product of quasi-steady torques and angular velocity. With the quasi-steady model fully and independently parameterised on the basis of high-fidelity CFD modelling, it is capable of predicting flapping-wing aerodynamic forces and power more accurately than the conventional blade element model (BEM) does. The improvement can be attributed to, for instance, taking into account the effects of the induced downwash and the wing tip vortex on the force generation and power consumption. Our model is validated by comparing the aerodynamics of a CFD model and the present quasi-steady model using the example case of a hovering hawkmoth. It demonstrates that the CIQSM outperforms the conventional BEM while remaining computationally cheap, and hence can be an effective tool for revealing the mechanisms of optimization and control of kinematics and morphology in flapping-wing flight for both bio-flyers and unmanned air systems.

  19. Environmental silicate nano-biocomposites

    CERN Document Server

    Pollet, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Environmental Silicate Nano-Biocomposites focuses on nano-biocomposites, which are obtained by the association of silicates such as bioclays with biopolymers. By highlighting recent developments and findings, green and biodegradable nano-composites from both renewable and biodegradable polymers are explored. This includes coverage of potential markets such as packaging, agricultures, leisure and the fast food industry. The knowledge and experience of more than twenty international experts in diverse fields, from chemical and biochemical engineering to applications, is brought together in four different sections covering: Biodegradable polymers and Silicates, Clay/Polyesters Nano-biocomposites, Clay/Agropolymers Nano-biocomposites, and Applications and biodegradation of Nano-biocomposites. By exploring the relationships between the biopolymer structures, the processes, and the final properties Environmental Silicate Nano-Biocomposites explains how to design nano-materials to develop new, valuable, environmenta...

  20. Autonomous Aerodynamic Control of Micro Air Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-19

    29 Design of the Air Force Research Laboratory Micro Aerial Vehicle Research Configuration Kelly Stewart*, Jeffrey Wagener †, and Gregg Abate‡ Air...Development and Initial Flight Tests of a Single-Jointed Articulated-Wing Micro Air Vehicle Kelly C. Stewart*, Ken Blackburn†, Jeffrey Wagener ‡, Lt... Wagener , J., Abate, G., and Salichon, M., “Design of the Air Force Research Laboratory Micro Aerial Vehicle Research Configuration,” AIAA 45th Aerospace

  1. Nano technology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takriti, S.

    2015-01-01

    Nano technology is the engineering of functional systems at the molecular scale. This covers both works and concepts that are more advanced. In its original sense, nano technology refers to the projected ability to construct items from the bottom up, using techniques and tools being developed today to make complete high performance products. Development of applications incorporating semiconductor nanoparticles to be used in the next generation of products, such as display technology, lighting, solar cells and biological imaging and others are widely progressives. Progress has been made in using medical applications (Nano medicine) which provided the possibility of delivering drugs to specific cells using nanoparticles. Otherwise, nanoparticles have high surface area to volume ratio, allowing many functional groups to be attached to a nanoparticle, which can seek out and bind to certain tumor cells (cancer). (author)

  2. Nano-scratching and nano-machining in different environments on Cr2N/Cu multilayer thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jen-Ching; Lee, Jyh-Wei; Li, Chia-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Five nanostructured Cr 2 N/Cu multilayer coatings were deposited by a bipolar asymmetric reactive pulsed DC magnetron sputtering system, and various bilayer periods (Λ) were achieved by controlling the holding time of Si substrates in the plasma of Cr or Cu. The hardness and elastic modulus of multilayer coatings were investigated by means of a nanoindenter. Nano-scratch and nano machining experiments on multilayered coatings were conducted using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in air and DI-water, respectively. According to the groove depth, width, and coefficient of friction (COF) obtained from nano-scratch tests, influences of scratch cycle numbers and bilayer periods on the scratchability of Cr 2 N/Cu multilayered thin films were examined. It was observed that after nano-scratch experiments in air and water, the COF values and the amount of removed material increased with increasing bilayer period. After nano-machining tests in air and water, different types of the cutting chip pile-ups were observed. In this work, the surface tribological properties and machinability of Cr 2 N/Cu multilayered thin films when using an AFM are discussed.

  3. FijiWings: an open source toolkit for semiautomated morphometric analysis of insect wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobens, Alexander C; Dobens, Leonard L

    2013-08-07

    Development requires coordination between cell proliferation and cell growth to pattern the proper size of tissues, organs, and whole organisms. The Drosophila wing has landmark features, such as the location of veins patterned by cell groups and trichome structures produced by individual cells, that are useful to examine the genetic contributions to both tissue and cell size. Wing size and trichome density have been measured manually, which is tedious and error prone, and although image processing and pattern-recognition software can quantify features in micrographs, this approach has not been applied to insect wings. Here we present FijiWings, a set of macros designed to perform semiautomated morphophometric analysis of a wing photomicrograph. FijiWings uses plug-ins installed in the Fiji version of ImageJ to detect and count trichomes and measure wing area either to calculate trichome density of a defined region selected by the user or generate a heat map of overall trichome densities. For high-throughput screens we have developed a macro that directs a trainable segmentation plug-in to detect wing vein locations either to measure trichome density in specific intervein regions or produce a heat map of relative intervein areas. We use wing GAL4 drivers and UAS-regulated transgenes to confirm the ability of these tools to detect changes in overall tissue growth and individual cell size. FijiWings is freely available and will be of interest to a broad community of fly geneticists studying both the effect of gene function on wing patterning and the evolution of wing morphology.

  4. The hydraulic mechanism in the hind wing veins of Cybister japonicus Sharp (order: Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyu Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The diving beetles (Dytiscidae, Coleoptera are families of water beetles. When they see light, they fly to the light source directly from the water. Their hind wings are thin and fragile under the protection of their elytra (forewings. When the beetle is at rest the hind wings are folded over the abdomen of the beetle and when in flight they unfold to provide the necessary aerodynamic forces. In this paper, the unfolding process of the hind wing of Cybister japonicus Sharp (order: Coleoptera was investigated. The motion characteristics of the blood in the veins of the structure system show that the veins have microfluidic control over the hydraulic mechanism of the unfolding process. A model is established, and the hind wing extending process is simulated. The blood flow and pressure changes are discussed. The driving mechanism for hydraulic control of the folding and unfolding actions of beetle hind wings is put forward. This can assist the design of new deployable micro air vehicles and bioinspired deployable systems.

  5. The hydraulic mechanism in the hind wing veins of Cybister japonicus Sharp (order: Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiyu; Wu, Wei; Ling, Mingze; Bhushan, Bharat; Tong, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The diving beetles (Dytiscidae, Coleoptera) are families of water beetles. When they see light, they fly to the light source directly from the water. Their hind wings are thin and fragile under the protection of their elytra (forewings). When the beetle is at rest the hind wings are folded over the abdomen of the beetle and when in flight they unfold to provide the necessary aerodynamic forces. In this paper, the unfolding process of the hind wing of Cybister japonicus Sharp (order: Coleoptera) was investigated. The motion characteristics of the blood in the veins of the structure system show that the veins have microfluidic control over the hydraulic mechanism of the unfolding process. A model is established, and the hind wing extending process is simulated. The blood flow and pressure changes are discussed. The driving mechanism for hydraulic control of the folding and unfolding actions of beetle hind wings is put forward. This can assist the design of new deployable micro air vehicles and bioinspired deployable systems.

  6. Generation of Fullspan Leading-Edge 3D Ice Shapes for Swept-Wing Aerodynamic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camello, Stephanie C.; Lee, Sam; Lum, Christopher; Bragg, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    The deleterious effect of ice accretion on aircraft is often assessed through dry-air flight and wind tunnel testing with artificial ice shapes. This paper describes a method to create fullspan swept-wing artificial ice shapes from partial span ice segments acquired in the NASA Glenn Icing Reserch Tunnel for aerodynamic wind-tunnel testing. Full-scale ice accretion segments were laser scanned from the Inboard, Midspan, and Outboard wing station models of the 65% scale Common Research Model (CRM65) aircraft configuration. These were interpolated and extrapolated using a weighted averaging method to generate fullspan ice shapes from the root to the tip of the CRM65 wing. The results showed that this interpolation method was able to preserve many of the highly three dimensional features typically found on swept-wing ice accretions. The interpolated fullspan ice shapes were then scaled to fit the leading edge of a 8.9% scale version of the CRM65 wing for aerodynamic wind-tunnel testing. Reduced fidelity versions of the fullspan ice shapes were also created where most of the local three-dimensional features were removed. The fullspan artificial ice shapes and the reduced fidelity versions were manufactured using stereolithography.

  7. Dipteran wing motor-inspired flapping flight versatility and effectiveness enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harne, R L; Wang, K W

    2015-03-06

    Insects are a prime source of inspiration towards the development of small-scale, engineered, flapping wing flight systems. To help interpret the possible energy transformation strategies observed in Diptera as inspiration for mechanical flapping flight systems, we revisit the perspective of the dipteran wing motor as a bistable click mechanism and take a new, and more flexible, outlook to the architectural composition previously considered. Using a representative structural model alongside biological insights and cues from nonlinear dynamics, our analyses and experimental results reveal that a flight mechanism able to adjust motor axial support stiffness and compression characteristics may dramatically modulate the amplitude range and type of wing stroke dynamics achievable. This corresponds to significantly more versatile aerodynamic force generation without otherwise changing flapping frequency or driving force amplitude. Whether monostable or bistable, the axial stiffness is key to enhance compressed motor load bearing ability and aerodynamic efficiency, particularly compared with uncompressed linear motors. These findings provide new foundation to guide future development of bioinspired, flapping wing mechanisms for micro air vehicle applications, and may be used to provide insight to the dipteran muscle-to-wing interface. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Beneficial aerodynamic effect of wing scales on the climbing flight of butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slegers, Nathan; Heilman, Michael; Cranford, Jacob; Lang, Amy; Yoder, John; Habegger, Maria Laura

    2017-01-30

    It is hypothesized that butterfly wing scale geometry and surface patterning may function to improve aerodynamic efficiency. In order to investigate this hypothesis, a method to measure butterfly flapping kinematics optically over long uninhibited flapping sequences was developed. Statistical results for the climbing flight flapping kinematics of 11 butterflies, based on a total of 236 individual flights, both with and without their wing scales, are presented. Results show, that for each of the 11 butterflies, the mean climbing efficiency decreased after scales were removed. Data was reduced to a single set of differences of climbing efficiency using are paired t-test. Results show a mean decrease in climbing efficiency of 32.2% occurred with a 95% confidence interval of 45.6%-18.8%. Similar analysis showed that the flapping amplitude decreased by 7% while the flapping frequency did not show a significant difference. Results provide strong evidence that butterfly wing scale geometry and surface patterning improve butterfly climbing efficiency. The authors hypothesize that the wing scale's effect in measured climbing efficiency may be due to an improved aerodynamic efficiency of the butterfly and could similarly be used on flapping wing micro air vehicles to potentially achieve similar gains in efficiency.

  9. ACCELERATING NANO-TECHNOLOGICAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Stissing; Koch, Christian

    2007-01-01

    By viewing the construction industry as a technological innovation system (TIS) this paper discusses possible initiatives to accelerate nanotechnological innovations. The point of departure is a recent report on the application of nano-technology in the Danish construction industry, which concludes...... of the system are furthermore poorly equipped at identifying potentials within high-tech areas. In order to exploit the potentials of nano-technology it is thus argued that an alternative TIS needs to be established. Initiatives should identify and support “incubation rooms” or marked niches in order...

  10. The leading-edge vortex of swift-wing shaped delta wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Rowan; Arredondo-Galeana, Abel; Viola, Ignazio Maria

    2017-11-01

    Recent investigations on the aerodynamics of natural fliers have illuminated the significance of the Leading-Edge Vortex (LEV) for lift generation in a variety of flight conditions. In this investigation, a model non-slender delta shaped wing with a sharp leading-edge is tested at low Reynolds Number, along with a delta wing of the same design, but with a modified trailing edge inspired by the wing of a common swift Apus apus. The effect of the tapering swift wing on LEV development and stability is compared with the flow structure over the un-modified delta wing model through particle image velocimetry. For the first time, a leading-edge vortex system consisting of a dual or triple LEV is recorded on a swift-wing shaped delta wing, where such a system is found across all tested conditions. It is shown that the spanwise location of LEV breakdown is governed by the local chord rather than Reynolds Number or angle of attack. These findings suggest that the trailing-edge geometry of the swift wing alone does not prevent the common swift from generating an LEV system comparable with that of a delta shaped wing. This work received funding from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council [EP/M506515/1] and the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT).

  11. Fruit fly scale robots can hover longer with flapping wings than with spinning wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Elliot W; Lentink, David

    2016-10-01

    Hovering flies generate exceptionally high lift, because their wings generate a stable leading edge vortex. Micro flying robots with a similar wing design can generate similar high lift by either flapping or spinning their wings. While it requires less power to spin a wing, the overall efficiency depends also on the actuator system driving the wing. Here, we present the first holistic analysis to calculate how long a fly-inspired micro robot can hover with flapping versus spinning wings across scales. We integrate aerodynamic data with data-driven scaling laws for actuator, electronics and mechanism performance from fruit fly to hummingbird scales. Our analysis finds that spinning wings driven by rotary actuators are superior for robots with wingspans similar to hummingbirds, yet flapping wings driven by oscillatory actuators are superior at fruit fly scale. This crossover is driven by the reduction in performance of rotary compared with oscillatory actuators at smaller scale. Our calculations emphasize that a systems-level analysis is essential for trading-off flapping versus spinning wings for micro flying robots. © 2016 The Author(s).

  12. Flow Modulation and Force Control of Flapping Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-29

    tested on a flapping wing model in the oil tank. Robotic flapper equipped with DC motors drove the wing model, and the imbedded servo motor could flap...the overall wake structure on the hovering wings. Totally, two volumetric flow measurements were performed on two mechanical flappers with different...wing kinematics but similar wing geometry. On the flappers with small stroke angle and passive rotation, the general vortex wake structure

  13. Left-Wing Extremism: The Current Threat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karl A. Seger

    2001-04-30

    Left-wing extremism is ''alive and well'' both in the US and internationally. Although the current domestic terrorist threat within the U. S. is focused on right-wing extremists, left-wing extremists are also active and have several objectives. Leftist extremists also pose an espionage threat to U.S. interests. While the threat to the U.S. government from leftist extremists has decreased in the past decade, it has not disappeared. There are individuals and organizations within the U.S. who maintain the same ideology that resulted in the growth of left-wing terrorism in this country in the 1970s and 1980s. Some of the leaders from that era are still communicating from Cuba with their followers in the U.S., and new leaders and groups are emerging.

  14. A galactic microquasar mimicking winged radio galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, Josep; Luque-Escamilla, Pedro L; Bosch-Ramon, Valentí; Paredes, Josep M

    2017-11-24

    A subclass of extragalactic radio sources known as winged radio galaxies has puzzled astronomers for many years. The wing features are detected at radio wavelengths as low-surface-brightness radio lobes that are clearly misaligned with respect to the main lobe axis. Different models compete to account for these peculiar structures. Here, we report observational evidence that the parsec-scale radio jets in the Galactic microquasar GRS 1758-258 give rise to a Z-shaped radio emission strongly reminiscent of the X and Z-shaped morphologies found in winged radio galaxies. This is the first time that such extended emission features are observed in a microquasar, providing a new analogy for its extragalactic relatives. From our observations, we can clearly favour the hydrodynamic backflow interpretation against other possible wing formation scenarios. Assuming that physical processes are similar, we can extrapolate this conclusion and suggest that this mechanism could also be at work in many extragalactic cases.

  15. Numerical and experimental investigations on unsteady aerodynamics of flapping wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Meilin

    suggestions to the design of micro-air-vehicles (MAVs), 3D simulations of the flapping wings are carried out in this work. Both the rectangular and bio-inspired wings with different kinematics are investigated. The formation process of two-jet-like wake patterns behind the finite-span flapping wing is found to be closely related to the interaction between trailing edge vortices and tip vortices. Then the effects of the wing planforms on the aerodynamics performance of the finite-span flapping wings are elucidated in terms of the evolution and dynamic interaction of unsteady vortex structures.

  16. Low-speed wind tunnel investigation of a semispan STOL jet transport wing body with an upper surface blown jet flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, A. E., III; Letko, W.; Henderson, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation of the static longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a semispan STOL jet transport wing-body with an upper-surface blown jet flap for lift augmentation was conducted in a low-speed wind tunnel having a 12-ft octagonal test section. The semispan swept wing had an aspect ratio of 3.92 (7.84 for the full span) and had two simulated turbofan engines mounted ahead of and above the wing in a siamese pod equipped with an exhaust deflector. The purpose of the deflector was to spread the engine exhaust into a jet sheet attached to the upper surface of the wing so that it would turn downward over the flap and provide lift augmentation. The wing also had optional boundary-layer control provided by air blowing through a thin slot over a full-span plain trailing-edge flap.

  17. Analytical modeling and experimental evaluation of a passively morphing ornithopter wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissa, Aimy A.

    compliant spine design insert. A research ornithopter platform was tested in air and in vacuum as well as in free and constrained flight with various compliant spine designs inserted in its wings. Results from the constrained flight tests indicated that the ornithopter with a compliant spine inserted in its wings consumed 45% less electrical power and produced 16% of its weight in additional lift, without incurring any thrust penalties. Results from, the vacuum constrained tests attributed these benefits to aerodynamic effects rather than inertial effects. Free flight tests were performed at Wright Patterson Air Force Base, which houses the largest indoor flight laboratory in the country. The wing kinematics along with the vehicle dynamics were captured during this testing using ViconRTM motion tracking cameras. These flight tests proved to be successful in producing consistent and repeatable flight data over more than eight free flight flapping cycles of free flight and validated a new and novel testing technique. The ornithopter body dynamics were shown to be significant, i.e. +/-4gs. Inserting the compliant spine into the leading edge spar of the ornithopter during free flight reduced the baseline configuration body vertical center of mass positive acceleration by 69%, which translates into overall lift gains. It also increased the horizontal propulsive force by 300%, which translates into thrust gains.

  18. Duplex-imprinted nano well arrays for promising nanoparticle assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangping; Manz, Andreas

    2018-02-01

    A large area nano-duplex-imprint technique is presented in this contribution using natural cicada wings as stamps. The glassy wings of the cicada, which are abundant in nature, exhibit strikingly interesting nanopillar structures over their membrane. This technique, with excellent performance despite the nonplanar surface of the wings, combines both top-down and bottom-up nanofabrication techniques. It transitions micro-nanofabrication from a cleanroom environment to the bench. Two different materials, dicing tape with an acrylic layer and a UV optical adhesive, are used to make replications at the same time, thus achieving duplex imprinting. The promise of a large volume of commercial manufacturing of these nanostructure elements can be envisaged through this contribution to speeding up the fabrication process and achieving a higher throughput. The contact angle of the replicated nanowell arrays before and after oxygen plasma was measured. Gold nanoparticles (50 nm) were used to test how the nanoparticles behaved on the untreated and plasma-treated replica surface. The experiments show that promising nanoparticle self-assembly can be obtained.

  19. PRODUKSI NANOFIBER DAN APLIKASINYA DALAM PENGOLAHAN AIR

    OpenAIRE

    Krisnandika, Vania Elita

    2017-01-01

    Abstrak Kebutuhan air meningkat seiring meningkatnya jumlah penduduk dan taraf kehidupan masyarakat. Pembangunan yang dilakukan secara terus-menerus dan sangat cepat di Indonesia mengakibatkan penurunan kualitas air permukaan. Teknologi membran merupakan salah satu teknologi pengolahan air yang menghasilkan produk dengan kualitas tinggi. Membran berstruktur nano, khususnya nanofiber, saat ini menjadi perhatian karena menjawab kebutuhan teknologi filtrasi yang efektif dan hemat biaya. Pr...

  20. Synthesis of nano-particle and highly porous conducting perovskites ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    EDTA–citrate complexing process under air at high tempe- rature has demonstrated promising results (Zhou et al. 2006). Recently, the effectiveness of carbon template method for the synthesis of nano-structured/high surface area oxides has been recognized (Ozawa and Kimura. Figure 5. XRD patterns of LSM powders: (a) ...

  1. Wing and body kinematics of takeoff and landing flight in the pigeon (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Angela M; Biewener, Andrew A

    2010-05-01

    Takeoff and landing are critical phases in a flight. To better understand the functional importance of the kinematic adjustments birds use to execute these flight modes, we studied the wing and body movements of pigeons (Columba livia) during short-distance free-flights between two perches. The greatest accelerations were observed during the second wingbeat of takeoff. The wings were responsible for the majority of acceleration during takeoff and landing, with the legs contributing only one-quarter of the acceleration. Parameters relating to aerodynamic power output such as downstroke amplitude, wingbeat frequency and downstroke velocity were all greatest during takeoff flight and decreased with each successive takeoff wingbeat. This pattern indicates that downstroke velocity must be greater for accelerating flight to increase the amount of air accelerated by the wings. Pigeons used multiple mechanisms to adjust thrust and drag to accelerate during takeoff and decelerate during landing. Body angle, tail angle and wing plane angles all shifted from more horizontal orientations during takeoff to near-vertical orientations during landing, thereby reducing drag during takeoff and increasing drag during landing. The stroke plane was tilted steeply downward throughout takeoff (increasing from -60+/-5 deg. to -47+/-1 deg.), supporting our hypothesis that a downward-tilted stroke plane pushes more air rearward to accelerate the bird forward. Similarly, the stroke plane tilted upward during landing (increasing from -1+/-2 deg. to 17+/-7 deg.), implying that an upward-tilted stroke plane pushes more air forward to slow the bird down. Rotations of the stroke plane, wing planes and tail were all strongly correlated with rotation of the body angle, suggesting that pigeons are able to redirect aerodynamic force and shift between flight modes through modulation of body angle alone.

  2. Temperature and saturation dependence in the vapor sensing of butterfly wing scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kertész, K., E-mail: kertesz.krisztian@ttk.mta.hu [Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, 1525 Budapest, PO Box 49 (Hungary); Piszter, G. [Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, 1525 Budapest, PO Box 49 (Hungary); Jakab, E. [Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, P O Box 17 (Hungary); Bálint, Zs. [Hungarian Natural History Museum, H-1088, Budapest, Baross utca 13 (Hungary); Vértesy, Z.; Biró, L.P. [Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, 1525 Budapest, PO Box 49 (Hungary)

    2014-06-01

    The sensing of gasses/vapors in the ambient air is the focus of attention due to the need to monitor our everyday environment. Photonic crystals are sensing materials of the future because of their strong light-manipulating properties. Natural photonic structures are well-suited materials for testing detection principles because they are significantly cheaper than artificial photonic structures and are available in larger sizes. Additionally, natural photonic structures may provide new ideas for developing novel artificial photonic nanoarchitectures with improved properties. In the present paper, we discuss the effects arising from the sensor temperature and the vapor concentration in air during measurements with a photonic crystal-type optical gas sensor. Our results shed light on the sources of discrepancy between simulated and experimental sensing behaviors of photonic crystal-type structures. Through capillary condensation, the vapors will condensate to a liquid state inside the nanocavities. Due to the temperature and radius of curvature dependence of capillary condensation, the measured signals are affected by the sensor temperature as well as by the presence of a nanocavity size distribution. The sensing materials used are natural photonic nanoarchitectures present in the wing scales of blue butterflies. - Highlights: • We report optical gas sensing on blue butterfly wing scale nanostructures. • The sample temperature decrease effects a reversible break-down in the measured spectra. • The break-down is connected with the vapor condensation in the scales and wing surface. • Capillary condensation occurs in the wing scales.

  3. The leading-edge vortex of swift wing-shaped delta wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Rowan Eveline; Arredondo-Galeana, Abel; Viola, Ignazio Maria

    2017-08-01

    Recent investigations on the aerodynamics of natural fliers have illuminated the significance of the leading-edge vortex (LEV) for lift generation in a variety of flight conditions. A well-documented example of an LEV is that generated by aircraft with highly swept, delta-shaped wings. While the wing aerodynamics of a manoeuvring aircraft, a bird gliding and a bird in flapping flight vary significantly, it is believed that this existing knowledge can serve to add understanding to the complex aerodynamics of natural fliers. In this investigation, a model non-slender delta-shaped wing with a sharp leading edge is tested at low Reynolds number, along with a delta wing of the same design, but with a modified trailing edge inspired by the wing of a common swift Apus apus . The effect of the tapering swift wing on LEV development and stability is compared with the flow structure over the unmodified delta wing model through particle image velocimetry. For the first time, a leading-edge vortex system consisting of a dual or triple LEV is recorded on a swift wing-shaped delta wing, where such a system is found across all tested conditions. It is shown that the spanwise location of LEV breakdown is governed by the local chord rather than Reynolds number or angle of attack. These findings suggest that the trailing-edge geometry of the swift wing alone does not prevent the common swift from generating an LEV system comparable with that of a delta-shaped wing.

  4. Editorial Emerging Multifunctional Nano structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, H.; Lu, Y.; Ramanath, G.; Pomposo, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    The interest in emerging nano structures is growing exponentially since they are promising building blocks for advanced multifunctional nano composites. In recent years, an evolution from the controlled synthesis of individual monodisperse nanoparticles to the tailored preparation of hybrid spherical and also unsymmetrical multiparticle nano structures is clearly observed. As a matter of fact, the field of nano structures built around a nano species such as inside, outside, and next to a nanoparticle is becoming a new evolving area of research and development with potential applications in improved drug delivery systems, innovative magnetic devices, biosensors, and highly efficient catalysts, among several others Emerging nano structures with improved magnetic, conducting and smart characteristics are currently based on the design, synthesis, characterization and modeling of multifunctional nano object-based materials. In fact, core-shell nanoparticles and other related complex nano architectures covering a broad spectrum of materials (from metal and metal oxide to fused carbon, synthetic polymer, and bio polymer structures) to nano structure morphologies (spherical, cylindrical, star-like, etc.) are becoming the main building blocks for next generation of drug delivery systems, advanced sensors and biosensors, or improved nano composites. The five papers presented in this special issue examine the preparation and characterization of emerging multifunctional materials, covering from hybrid asymmetric structures to engineering nano composites.

  5. An aerodynamic model for insect flapping wings in forward flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jong-Seob; Chang, Jo Won; Han, Jae-Hung

    2017-03-31

    This paper proposes a semi-empirical quasi-steady aerodynamic model of a flapping wing in forward flight. A total of 147 individual cases, which consisted of advance ratios J of 0 (hovering), 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1 and  ∞, and angles of attack α of  -5 to 95° at intervals of 5°, were examined to extract the aerodynamic coefficients. The Polhamus leading-edge suction analogy and power functions were then employed to establish the aerodynamic model. In order to preserve the existing level of simplicity, K P and K V , the correction factors of the potential and vortex force models, were rebuilt as functions of J and α. The estimations were nearly identical to direct force/moment measurements which were obtained from both artificial and practical wingbeat motions of a hawkmoth. The model effectively compensated for the influences of J, particularly showing outstanding moment estimation capabilities. With this model, we found that using a lower value of α during the downstroke would be an effective strategy for generating adequate lift in forward flight. The rotational force and moment components had noticeable portions generating both thrust and counteract pitching moment during pronation. In the upstroke phase, the added mass component played a major role in generating thrust in forward flight. The proposed model would be useful for a better understanding of flight stability, control, and the dynamic characteristics of flapping wing flyers, and for designing flapping-wing micro air vehicles.

  6. Nano-Satellite Avionics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Harry

    1999-01-01

    Abstract NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is currently developing a new class of satellites called the nano-satellite (nano-sat). A major objective of this development effort is to provide the technology required to enable a constellation of tens to hundreds of nano-satellites to make both remote and in-situ measurements from space. The Nano-sat will be a spacecraft weighing a maximum of 10 kg, including the propellant mass, and producing at least 5 Watts of power to operate the spacecraft. The electronics are required to survive a total radiation dose rate of 100 krads for a mission lifetime of two years. There are many unique challenges that must be met in order to develop the avionics for such a spacecraft. The first challenge is to develop an architecture that will operate on the allotted 5 Watts and meet the diverging requirements of multiple missions. This architecture will need to incorporate a multitude of new advanced microelectronic technologies. The microelectronics developed must be a modular and scalable packaging of technology to solve the problem of developing a solution to both reduce cost and meet the requirements of various missions. This development will utilize the most cost effective approach, whether infusing commercially driven semiconductor devices into spacecraft applications or partnering with industry to design and develop low cost, low power, low mass, and high capacity data processing devices. This paper will discuss the nano-sat architecture and the major technologies that will be developed. The major technologies that will be covered include: (1) Light weight Low Power Electronics Packaging, (2) Radiation Hard/Tolerant, Low Power Processing Platforms, (3) High capacity Low Power Memory Systems (4) Radiation Hard reconfiguragble field programmable gate array (rFPGA)

  7. Aeroelasticity of morphing wings using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Anand

    In this dissertation, neural networks are designed to effectively model static non-linear aeroelastic problems in adaptive structures and linear dynamic aeroelastic systems with time varying stiffness. The use of adaptive materials in aircraft wings allows for the change of the contour or the configuration of a wing (morphing) in flight. The use of smart materials, to accomplish these deformations, can imply that the stiffness of the wing with a morphing contour changes as the contour changes. For a rapidly oscillating body in a fluid field, continuously adapting structural parameters may render the wing to behave as a time variant system. Even the internal spars/ribs of the aircraft wing which define the wing stiffness can be made adaptive, that is, their stiffness can be made to vary with time. The immediate effect on the structural dynamics of the wing, is that, the wing motion is governed by a differential equation with time varying coefficients. The study of this concept of a time varying torsional stiffness, made possible by the use of active materials and adaptive spars, in the dynamic aeroelastic behavior of an adaptable airfoil is performed here. Another type of aeroelastic problem of an adaptive structure that is investigated here, is the shape control of an adaptive bump situated on the leading edge of an airfoil. Such a bump is useful in achieving flow separation control for lateral directional maneuverability of the aircraft. Since actuators are being used to create this bump on the wing surface, the energy required to do so needs to be minimized. The adverse pressure drag as a result of this bump needs to be controlled so that the loss in lift over the wing is made minimal. The design of such a "spoiler bump" on the surface of the airfoil is an optimization problem of maximizing pressure drag due to flow separation while minimizing the loss in lift and energy required to deform the bump. One neural network is trained using the CFD code FLUENT to

  8. Hovering hummingbird wing aerodynamics during the annual cycle. I. Complete wing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achache, Yonathan; Sapir, Nir; Elimelech, Yossef

    2017-08-01

    The diverse hummingbird family (Trochilidae) has unique adaptations for nectarivory, among which is the ability to sustain hover-feeding. As hummingbirds mainly feed while hovering, it is crucial to maintain this ability throughout the annual cycle-especially during flight-feather moult, in which wing area is reduced. To quantify the aerodynamic characteristics and flow mechanisms of a hummingbird wing throughout the annual cycle, time-accurate aerodynamic loads and flow field measurements were correlated over a dynamically scaled wing model of Anna's hummingbird ( Calypte anna ). We present measurements recorded over a model of a complete wing to evaluate the baseline aerodynamic characteristics and flow mechanisms. We found that the vorticity concentration that had developed from the wing's leading-edge differs from the attached vorticity structure that was typically found over insects' wings; firstly, it is more elongated along the wing chord, and secondly, it encounters high levels of fluctuations rather than a steady vortex. Lift characteristics resemble those of insects; however, a 20% increase in the lift-to-torque ratio was obtained for the hummingbird wing model. Time-accurate aerodynamic loads were also used to evaluate the time-evolution of the specific power required from the flight muscles, and the overall wingbeat power requirements nicely matched previous studies.

  9. THE FUTURE OF THE EUROPEAN AIR TRANSPORT COMMAND: AN ANALYSIS OF CAPABILITY ENHANCEMENTS FROM THE ITALIAN AIR FORCE AND AIR MOBILITY COMMAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-15

    from 1 July 2009; moreover, in the following years Spain and Luxembourg joined the venture and from January 2016 also Italy is part of the EATC. The...Mazzini is assigned to the Air War College, Air University, Maxwell AFB, AL. He joined the Italian Air Force Academy in 1994. He earned his pilot wings...essay identifies Italy’s decision to join the European Air Transport Command as a pivotal opportunity. The research argues that the European Air

  10. Radiation induced nano structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibragimova, E.M.; Kalanov, M.U.; Khakimov, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Nanometer-size silicon clusters have been attracting much attention due to their technological importance, in particular, as promising building blocks for nano electronic and nano photonic systems. Particularly, silicon wires are of great of interest since they have potential for use in one-dimensional quantum wire high-speed field effect transistors and light-emitting devices with extremely low power consumption. Carbon and metal nano structures are studied very intensely due to wide possible applications. Radiation material sciences have been dealing with sub-micron objects for a long time. Under interaction of high energy particles and ionizing radiation with solids by elastic and inelastic mechanisms, at first point defects are created, then they form clusters, column defects, disordered regions (amorphous colloids) and finally precipitates of another crystal phase in the matrix. Such irradiation induced evolution of structure defects and phase transformations was observed by X-diffraction techniques in dielectric crystals of quartz and corundum, which exist in and crystal modifications. If there is no polymorphism, like in alkali halide crystals, then due to radiolysis halogen atoms are evaporated from the surface that results in non-stoichiometry or accumulated in the pores formed by metal vacancies in the sub-surface layer. Nano-pores are created by intensive high energy particles irradiation at first chaotically and then they are ordered and in part filled by inert gas. It is well-known mechanism of radiation induced swelling and embrittlement of metals and alloys, which is undesirable for construction materials for nuclear reactors. Possible solution of this problem may come from nano-structured materials, where there is neither swelling nor embrittlement at gas absorption due to very low density of the structure, while strength keeps high. This review considers experimental observations of radiation induced nano-inclusions in insulating

  11. Design and Control of Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    haltere in Diptera . The halteres are small appendages, apparently evolved from the hindwing, that oscillate in flight at the same frequency as the...maneuverability of Diptera , though numerous other sufficiently agile taxa get by without them. Experiments on the pathways between these sensors and the flight...applicable, as MAVs are further miniaturized, they may be an attractive option given their high power density and low voltage requirements

  12. Composite corrugated structures for morphing wing skin applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thill, C; Etches, J A; Bond, I P; Potter, K D; Weaver, P M

    2010-01-01

    Composite corrugated structures are known for their anisotropic properties. They exhibit relatively high stiffness parallel (longitudinal) to the corrugation direction and are relatively compliant in the direction perpendicular (transverse) to the corrugation. Thus, they offer a potential solution for morphing skin panels (MSPs) in the trailing edge region of a wing as a morphing control surface. In this paper, an overview of the work carried out by the present authors over the last few years on corrugated structures for morphing skin applications is first given. The second part of the paper presents recent work on the application of corrugated sandwich structures. Panels made from multiple unit cells of corrugated sandwich structures are used as MSPs in the trailing edge region of a scaled morphing aerofoil section. The aerofoil section features an internal actuation mechanism that allows chordwise length and camber change of the trailing edge region (aft 35% chord). Wind tunnel testing was carried out to demonstrate the MSP concept but also to explore its limitations. Suggestions for improvements arising from this study were deduced, one of which includes an investigation of a segmented skin. The overall results of this study show that the MSP concept exploiting corrugated sandwich structures offers a potential solution for local morphing wing skins for low speed and small air vehicles

  13. Multi-disciplinary design optimization of subsonic fixed-wing unmanned aerial vehicles projected through 2025

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundlach, John Frederick, IV

    Through this research, a robust aircraft design methodology is developed for analysis and optimization of the Air Vehicle (AV) segment of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) systems. The analysis functionality of the AV design is integrated with a Genetic Algorithm (GA) to form an integrated Multi-disciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) methodology for optimal AV design synthesis. This research fills the gap in integrated subsonic fixed-wing UAV AV MDO methods. No known single methodology captures all of the phenomena of interest over the wide range of UAV families considered here. Key advancements include: (1) parametric Low Reynolds Number (LRN) airfoil aerodynamics formulation, (2) UAV systems mass properties definition, (3) wing structural weight methods, (4) self-optimizing flight performance model, (5) automated geometry algorithms, and (6) optimizer integration. Multiple methods are provided for many disciplines to enable flexibility in functionality, level of detail, computational expediency, and accuracy. The AV design methods are calibrated against the High-Altitude Long-Endurance (HALE) Global Hawk, Medium-Altitude Endurance (MAE) Predator, and Tactical Shadow 200 classes, which exhibit significant variations in mission performance requirements and scale from one another. All three UAV families show significant design gross weight reductions as technology improves. The overall technology synergy experienced 10--11 years after the initial technology year is 6.68% for Global Hawk, 7.09% for Predator, and 4.22% for the Shadow 200, which means that the technology trends interact favorably in all cases. The Global Hawk and Shadow 200 families exhibited niche behavior, where some vehicles attained higher aerodynamic performance while others attained lower structural mass fractions. The high aerodynamic performance Global Hawk vehicles had high aspect ratio wings with sweep, while the low structural mass fraction vehicles had straight, relatively low aspect ratios and

  14. Grill Nano topological spaces with grill Nano generalized closed sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Azzam

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The grill Nano generalized closed sets is an expansion of Nano generalized closed sets in grill Nano topological spaces, which is the frame of reference measurement, inference and reasoning in many applications such as computer science and information systems. So, this paper aims to study and analyze this expansion through the topological structure via the concept of grill. Some important characteristics and main properties which are related with these sets are obtained.

  15. Aerodynamic characteristics of a wing with Fowler flaps including flap loads, downwash, and calculated effect on take-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Robert C

    1936-01-01

    This report presents the results of wind tunnel tests of a wing in combination with each of three sizes of Fowler flap. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the aerodynamic characteristics as affected by flap chord and position, the air loads on the flaps, and the effect of flaps on the downwash.

  16. [Wing 1 radiation survey and contamination report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, K.

    1991-01-01

    We have completed the 5480.11 survey for Wing 1. All area(s)/item(s) requested by the 5480.11 committee have been thoroughly surveyed and documented. Decontamination/disposal of contaminated items has been accomplished. The wing 1 survey was started on 8/13/90 and completed 9/18/90. However, the follow-up surveys were not completed until 2/18/91. We received the final set of smear samples for wing 1 on 1/13/91. A total of 5,495 smears were taken from wing 1 and total of 465 smears were taken during the follow-up surveys. There were a total 122 items found to have fixed contamination and 4 items with smearable contamination in excess of the limits specified in DOE ORDER 5480.11 (AR 3-7). The following area(s)/item(s) were not included in the 5480.11 survey: Hallways, Access panels, Men's and women's change rooms, Janitor closets, Wall lockers and item(s) stored in wing 1 hallways and room 1116. If our contract is renewed, we will include those areas in our survey according to your request of April 15, 1991

  17. Flapping wing aerodynamics: from insects to vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Diana D; Lentink, David

    2016-04-01

    More than a million insects and approximately 11,000 vertebrates utilize flapping wings to fly. However, flapping flight has only been studied in a few of these species, so many challenges remain in understanding this form of locomotion. Five key aerodynamic mechanisms have been identified for insect flight. Among these is the leading edge vortex, which is a convergent solution to avoid stall for insects, bats and birds. The roles of the other mechanisms - added mass, clap and fling, rotational circulation and wing-wake interactions - have not yet been thoroughly studied in the context of vertebrate flight. Further challenges to understanding bat and bird flight are posed by the complex, dynamic wing morphologies of these species and the more turbulent airflow generated by their wings compared with that observed during insect flight. Nevertheless, three dimensionless numbers that combine key flow, morphological and kinematic parameters - the Reynolds number, Rossby number and advance ratio - govern flapping wing aerodynamics for both insects and vertebrates. These numbers can thus be used to organize an integrative framework for studying and comparing animal flapping flight. Here, we provide a roadmap for developing such a framework, highlighting the aerodynamic mechanisms that remain to be quantified and compared across species. Ultimately, incorporating complex flight maneuvers, environmental effects and developmental stages into this framework will also be essential to advancing our understanding of the biomechanics, movement ecology and evolution of animal flight. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. 59th Medical Wing Office of the Chief Scientists Research Highlights Flyer-April 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-09

    Air Force Basic Training " (Pl: Capt Bryant Webber (59 MOOS)), presented to the 37 Training Wing Commander and the 559 Medical Group Commander. Capt... Occlusion of the Aorta (REBOA Inventors: Col Todd Rasmussen, MC, USAF MEDCOM USAMRMC and Jonathan Eliason, MD, University of Michigan) Is a fluoroscopy-free...thoracic aortic balloon occlusion system to control non-compressible hemorrh and assess the effect of an occluding aorta. Research to develop the

  19. Principle of bio-inspired insect wing rotational hinge design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Fan

    A principle for designing and fabricating bio-inspired miniature artificial insect flapping wing using flexure rotational hinge design is presented. A systematic approach of selecting rotational hinge stiffness value is proposed. Based on the understanding of flapping wing aerodynamics, a dynamic simulation is constructed using the established quasi-steady model and the wing design. Simulations were performed to gain insight on how different parameters affect the wing rotational response. Based on system resonance a model to predict the optimal rotational hinge stiffness based on given wing parameter and flapping wing kinematic is proposed. By varying different wing parameters, the proposed method is shown to be applicable to a wide range of wing designs with different sizes and shapes. With the selected hinge stiffness value, aspects of the rotational joint design is discussed and an integrated wing-hinge structure design using laminated carbon fiber and polymer film is presented. Manufacturing process of such composite structure is developed to achieve high accuracy and repeatability. The yielded hinge stiffness is verified by measurements. To validate the proposed model, flapping wing experiments were conducted. A flapping actuation set up is built using DC motor and a controller is implemented on a microcontroller to track desired wing stroke kinematic. Wing stroke and rotation kinematic were extracted using a high speed camera and the lift generation is evaluated. A total of 49 flapping experiments were presented, experimental data shows good correlation with the model's prediction. With the wing rotational hinge stiffness designed so that the rotational resonant frequency is twice as the stroke frequency, the resulting wing rotation generates near optimal lift. With further simulation, the proposed model shows low sensitivity to wing parameter variation. As a result, giving a design parameter of a flapping wing robot platform, the proposed principle can

  20. Nano semiconducting materials

    CERN Document Server

    Saravanan, R

    2016-01-01

    The main focus of the present book is the characterization of a number of nano-semiconducting materials, using such techniques as powder X-ray diffraction, UV-visible spectrophotometry, Raman spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry. The materials studied include ZnS, TiO2, NiO, Ga doped ZnO, Mn doped SnO2, Mn doped CeO2 and Mn doped ZrO2.

  1. Natural Nano-Machines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    diation pressure of the laser light; this trap can grab a dielectric ob ject w hich then can be m anipulated just ... tures of the structure and dynam ics of biological nano- m achines. T hey also investigate the corresponding .... sum ing fuel w hereas rotary m otors are like A lice's hair dryer. A lex: C ould you please give m e exam ...

  2. Engine Conceptual Design Studies for a Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Michael T.; Jones, Scott M.; Haller, William J.; Handschuh, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    Worldwide concerns of air quality and climate change have made environmental protection one of the most critical issues in aviation today. NASA s current Fundamental Aeronautics Research program is directed at three generations of aircraft in the near, mid and far term, with initial operating capability around 2015, 2020, and 2030, respectively. Each generation has associated goals for fuel burn, NOx, noise, and field-length reductions relative to today s aircrafts. The research for the 2020 generation is directed at enabling a hybrid wing body (HWB) aircraft to meet NASA s aggressive technology goals. This paper presents the conceptual cycle and mechanical designs of the two engine concepts, podded and embedded systems, which were proposed for a HWB cargo freighter. They are expected to offer significant benefits in noise reductions without compromising the fuel burn.

  3. Vibration receptive sensilla on the wing margins of the silkworm moth Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Akihiro; Yokohari, Fumio

    2010-03-01

    Bristles along the wing margins (wm-bristles) of the silkworm moth, Bombyx mori, were studied morphologically and electrophysiologically. The male moth has ca. 50 wm-bristles on each forewing and hindwing. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that these wm-bristles are typical mechanosensilla. Leuco-methylene blue staining demonstrated that each wm-bristle has a single receptor neuron, which is also characteristic of the mechanosensillum. The receptor neuron responded to vibrating air currents but did not respond to a constant air current. The wm-bristles showed clear directional sensitivity to vibrating air currents. The wm-bristles were classified into two types, type I and type II, by their response patterns to sinusoidal movements of the bristle. The neuron in type I discharged bursting spikes immediately following stimulation onset and also discharged a single spike for each sinusoidal cycle for frequencies less than ca. 60 Hz. The neuron in type II only responded to vibrations over 40 Hz and, specifically at 75 Hz, discharged a single spike for each sinusoidal cycle throughout the stimulation period. These results suggest that the two types of wm-bristles are highly tuned in different ways to detect vibrations due to the wing beat. The roles of the wm-bristles in the wing beat are discussed. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of wing kinematics of freely flying birds downstream the wake of flapping wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Krishnamoorthy; Gurka, Roi

    2016-11-01

    Avian aerodynamics has been a topic of research for centuries. Avian flight features such as flapping, morphing and maneuvering make bird aerodynamics a complex system to study, analyze and understand. Aerodynamic performance of the flapping wings can be quantified by measuring the vortex structures present in the downstream wake. Still, the direct correlation between the flapping wing kinematics and the evolution of wake features need to be established. In this present study, near wake of three bird species (western sandpiper, European starling and American robin) have been measured experimentally. Long duration, time-resolved, particle image velocimetry technique has been used to capture the wake properties. Simultaneously, the bird kinematics have been captured using high speed camera. Wake structures are reconstructed from the collected PIV images for long chord distances downstream. Wake vorticities and circulation are expressed in the wake composites. Comparison of the wake features of the three birds shows similarities and some key differences are also found. Wing tip motions of the birds are extracted for four continuous wing beat cycle to analyze the wing kinematics. Kinematic parameters of all the three birds are compared to each other and similar trends exhibited by all the birds have been observed. A correlation between the wake evolutions with the wing motion is presented. It was found that the wings' motion generates unique flow patterns at the near wake, especially at the transition phases. At these locations, a drastic change in the circulation was observed.

  5. Investigating the Force Production of Functionally-Graded Flexible Wings in Flapping Wing Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudbhari, Durlav; Erdogan, Malcolm; He, Kai; Bateman, Daniel; Lipkis, Rory; Moored, Keith

    2015-11-01

    Birds, insects and bats oscillate their wings to propel themselves over long distances and to maneuver with unprecedented agility. A key element to achieve their impressive aerodynamic performance is the flexibility of their wings. Numerous studies have shown that homogeneously flexible wings can enhance force production, propulsive efficiency and lift efficiency. Yet, animal wings are not homogenously flexible, but instead have varying material properties. The aim of this study is to characterize the force production and energetics of functionally-graded flexible wings. A partially-flexible wing composed of a rigid section and a flexible section is used as a first-order model of functionally-graded materials. The flexion occurs in the spanwise direction and it is affected by the spanwise flexion ratio, that is, the ratio of the length of the rigid section compared to the total span length. By varying the flexion ratio as well as the material properties of the flexible section, the study aims to examine the force production and energetics of flapping flight with functionally-graded flexible wings. Supported by the Office of Naval Research under Program Director Dr. Bob Brizzolara, MURI grant number N00014-14-1-0533.

  6. Aeroelastic Analysis of Modern Complex Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.; Bhardwaj, Manoj K.; Reichenbach, Eric; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1996-01-01

    A process is presented by which aeroelastic analysis is performed by using an advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code coupled with an advanced computational structural dynamics (CSD) code. The process is demonstrated on an F/A-18 Stabilator using NASTD (an in-house McDonnell Douglas Aerospace East CFD code) coupled with NASTRAN. The process is also demonstrated on an aeroelastic research wing (ARW-2) using ENSAERO (an in-house NASA Ames Research Center CFD code) coupled with a finite element wing-box structures code. Good results have been obtained for the F/A-18 Stabilator while results for the ARW-2 supercritical wing are still being obtained.

  7. Nano Manufacturing - Products and Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Alting, Leo

    2004-01-01

    The use of micro and nano technologies in components and products not only sets new demands to the manufacturing technologies. Product concepts have to be rethought and redefined in order to implement the micro and nano technologies into functional systems. Both a technology driven and a product...... driven approach can be used in this process. A framework for the product driven approach in nano manufacturing is presented and discussed. The general discussion will be supported by case studies covering polymers and metals....

  8. Nano technologies in food industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capuano, V.

    2007-01-01

    Nano technologies have high potential for useful applications in many sectors. Innovations now under development or already on the market address practically all aspects of the food-products industry, from farming to processing, quality control and smart packaging. Nano formulations of pesticides, advanced sensors networks, very sensitive contaminants monitoring, nano encapsulations of nutrients, interactive foods, new materials for packaging are among the innovations. The development of these technologies should be accompanied by a careful assessment of their risks and social implications

  9. Active Twist Control for a Compliant Wing Structure, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Blended wing body (BWB) aircraft provide an aerodynamically superior solution over traditional tube-and-wing designs for a number of mission profiles. These...

  10. Bio-mimicking nano and micro-structured surface fabrication for antibacterial properties in medical implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggessar, Alka; Shahali, Hesam; Mathew, Asha; Yarlagadda, Prasad K D V

    2017-10-02

    Orthopaedic and dental implants have become a staple of the medical industry and with an ageing population and growing culture for active lifestyles, this trend is forecast to continue. In accordance with the increased demand for implants, failure rates, particularly those caused by bacterial infection, need to be reduced. The past two decades have led to developments in antibiotics and antibacterial coatings to reduce revision surgery and death rates caused by infection. The limited effectiveness of these approaches has spurred research into nano-textured surfaces, designed to mimic the bactericidal properties of some animal, plant and insect species, and their topographical features. This review discusses the surface structures of cicada, dragonfly and butterfly wings, shark skin, gecko feet, taro and lotus leaves, emphasising the relationship between nano-structures and high surface contact angles on self-cleaning and bactericidal properties. Comparison of these surfaces shows large variations in structure dimension and configuration, indicating that there is no one particular surface structure that exhibits bactericidal behaviour against all types of microorganisms. Recent bio-mimicking fabrication methods are explored, finding hydrothermal synthesis to be the most commonly used technique, due to its environmentally friendly nature and relative simplicity compared to other methods. In addition, current proposed bactericidal mechanisms between bacteria cells and nano-textured surfaces are presented and discussed. These models could be improved by including additional parameters such as biological cell membrane properties, adhesion forces, bacteria dynamics and nano-structure mechanical properties. This paper lastly reviews the mechanical stability and cytotoxicity of micro and nano-structures and materials. While the future of nano-biomaterials is promising, long-term effects of micro and nano-structures in the body must be established before nano-textures can

  11. Nano materials for Energy and Environmental Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, S.; Kannan, A.M.; Kothurkar, N.; Khalil, Y.; Kuravi, S.

    2015-01-01

    Nano materials enabled technologies have been seamlessly integrated into applications such as aviation and space, chemical industry, optics, solar hydrogen, fuel cell, batteries, sensors, power generation, aeronautic industry, building/construction industry, automotive engineering, consumer electronics, thermoelectric devices, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetic industry. Clean energy and environmental applications often demand the development of novel nano materials that can provide shortest reaction pathways for the enhancement of reaction kinetics. Understanding the physicochemical, structural, microstructural, surface, and interface properties of nano materials is vital for achieving the required efficiency, cycle life, and sustain ability in various technological applications. Nano materials with specific size and shape such as nano tubes, nano fibers/nano wires, nano cones, nano composites, nano rods, nano islands, nanoparticles, nanospheres, and nano shells to provide unique properties can be synthesized by tuning the process conditions.

  12. Combined particle-image velocimetry and force analysis of the three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction of a natural owl wing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winzen, A; Roidl, B; Schröder, W

    2016-04-01

    Low-speed aerodynamics has gained increasing interest due to its relevance for the design process of small flying air vehicles. These small aircraft operate at similar aerodynamic conditions as, e.g. birds which therefore can serve as role models of how to overcome the well-known problems of low Reynolds number flight. The flight of the barn owl is characterized by a very low flight velocity in conjunction with a low noise emission and a high level of maneuverability at stable flight conditions. To investigate the complex three-dimensional flow field and the corresponding local structural deformation in combination with their influence on the resulting aerodynamic forces, time-resolved stereoscopic particle-image velocimetry and force and moment measurements are performed on a prepared natural barn owl wing. Several spanwise positions are measured via PIV in a range of angles of attack [Formula: see text] 6° and Reynolds numbers 40 000 [Formula: see text] 120 000 based on the chord length. Additionally, the resulting forces and moments are recorded for -10° ≤ α ≤ 15° at the same Reynolds numbers. Depending on the spanwise position, the angle of attack, and the Reynolds number, the flow field on the wing's pressure side is characterized by either a region of flow separation, causing large-scale vortical structures which lead to a time-dependent deflection of the flexible wing structure or wing regions showing no instantaneous deflection but a reduction of the time-averaged mean wing curvature. Based on the force measurements the three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction is assumed to considerably impact the aerodynamic forces acting on the wing leading to a strong mechanical loading of the interface between the wing and body. These time-depending loads which result from the flexibility of the wing should be taken into consideration for the design of future small flying air vehicles using flexible wing structures.

  13. Nonlinear Dynamics of Wind Turbine Wings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper Winther

    Wind turbines with a nominal effect of 5MW with a rotor diameter of up to 126m are produced today. With the increasing size wind turbines also become more and more optimized with respect to structural dimensions and material usage, without increasing the stiffness proportionally. Consequently......, large wind turbines become increasingly flexible and dynamically sensitive. This project focuses on the structural analysis of highly flexible wind turbine wings, and the aerodynamic loading of wind turbine wings under large changes in flow field due to elastic deformations and changing wind conditions....

  14. Stability and transition on swept wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckert, Greg; Herbert, Thorwald; Esfahanian, Vahid

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the extension and application of the Parabolized Stability Equations (PSE) to the stability and transition of the supersonic three-dimensional laminar boundary layer on a swept wing. The problem formulation uses a general coordinate transformation for arbitrary curvilinear body-fitted computational grids. Some testing using these coordinates is briefly described to help validate the software used for the investigation. The disturbance amplitude ratios as a function of chord position for supersonic (Mach 1.5) boundary layers on untapered, untwisted wings of different sweep angles are then presented and compared with those obtained from local parallel analyses.

  15. Integrated multi-disciplinary design of a sailplane wing

    OpenAIRE

    Strauch, Gregory J.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the techniques and payoffs of integrated aircraft design. Lifting line theory and beam theory are used for the analysis of the aerodynamics and the structures of a composite sailplane wing. The wing is described by 33 - 34 design variables which involve the planform geometry, the twist distribution, and thicknesses of the spar caps, spar webs, and the skin at various stations along the wing. The wing design must satisfy 30 â ...

  16. Wind tunnel and numerical data on the ventilation performance of windcatcher with wing wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payam Nejat

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article were the basis for the study reported in the research articles entitled “Evaluation of a two-sided windcatcher integrated with wing wall (as a new design and comparison with a conventional windcatcher” (P. Nejat, J.K. Calautit, M.Z.A. Majid, B.R. Hughes, I. Zeynali, F. Jomehzadeh, 2016 [1] which presents the effect of wing wall on the air flow distribution under using the windcatchers as a natural ventilation equipment. Here, we detail the wind tunnel testing and numerical set-up used for obtaining the data on ventilation rates and indoor airflow distribution inside a test room with a two-sided windcatcher and wing wall. Three models were integrated with wing wall angled at 30°, 45° and 60° and another windcatcher was a conventional two-sided device. The computer-aided design (CAD three-dimensional geometries which were produced using Solid Edge modeler are also included in the data article.

  17. Wind tunnel and numerical data on the ventilation performance of windcatcher with wing wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejat, Payam; Calautit, John Kaiser; Abd Majid, Muhd Zaimi; Hughes, Ben Richard; Zeynali, Iman; Jomehzadeh, Fatemeh

    2016-12-01

    The data presented in this article were the basis for the study reported in the research articles entitled "Evaluation of a two-sided windcatcher integrated with wing wall (as a new design) and comparison with a conventional windcatcher" (P. Nejat, J.K. Calautit, M.Z.A. Majid, B.R. Hughes, I. Zeynali, F. Jomehzadeh, 2016) [1] which presents the effect of wing wall on the air flow distribution under using the windcatchers as a natural ventilation equipment. Here, we detail the wind tunnel testing and numerical set-up used for obtaining the data on ventilation rates and indoor airflow distribution inside a test room with a two-sided windcatcher and wing wall. Three models were integrated with wing wall angled at 30°, 45° and 60° and another windcatcher was a conventional two-sided device. The computer-aided design (CAD) three-dimensional geometries which were produced using Solid Edge modeler are also included in the data article.

  18. Wing and body motion and aerodynamic and leg forces during take-off in droneflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mao Wei; Zhang, Yan Lai; Sun, Mao

    2013-12-06

    Here, we present a detailed analysis of the take-off mechanics in droneflies performing voluntary take-offs. Wing and body kinematics of the insects during take-off were measured using high-speed video techniques. Based on the measured data, the inertia force acting on the insect was computed and the aerodynamic force of the wings was calculated by the method of computational fluid dynamics. Subtracting the aerodynamic force and the weight from the inertia force gave the leg force. In take-off, a dronefly increases its stroke amplitude gradually in the first 10-14 wingbeats and becomes airborne at about the 12th wingbeat. The aerodynamic force increases monotonously from zero to a value a little larger than its weight, and the leg force decreases monotonously from a value equal to its weight to zero, showing that the droneflies do not jump and only use aerodynamic force of flapping wings to lift themselves into the air. Compared with take-offs in insects in previous studies, in which a very large force (5-10 times of the weight) generated either by jumping legs (locusts, milkweed bugs and fruit flies) or by the 'fling' mechanism of the wing pair (butterflies) is used in a short time, the take-off in the droneflies is relatively slow but smoother.

  19. Magnetic Nano-Materials: Truly Sustainable Green Chemistry Nano Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    We envisioned a novel nano-catalyst system, which can bridge the homogenous and heterogeneous system, and simultaneously be cheaper, easily accessible (sustainable) and possibly does not require elaborate work-up. Because of its nano-size, i.e. high surface area, the contact betw...

  20. Nano surface generation of grinding process using carbon nano tubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nano surface finish has become an important parameter in the semiconductor, optical, electrical and mechanical industries. The materials used in these industries are classified as difficult to machine materials such as ceramics, glasses and silicon wafers. Machining of these materials up to nano accuracy is a great ...

  1. Use of wing morphometry for the discrimination of some Cerceris ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-14

    Dec 14, 2011 ... Figure 12. Thin spline plate graphics for the species belonging to the genus Cerceris. Figure 13. Fore wing landmarks of the significant wing characteristics in the honeybee Apis mellifera. Linnaeus. stated as the traditional wing morphometry that enables the practical discrimination of the honeybee (Apis sp ...

  2. How swifts control their glide performance with morphing wings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lentink, D.; Muller, U. K.; Stamhuis, E. J.; de Kat, R.; van Gestel, W.; Veldhuis, L. L. M.; Henningsson, P.; Hedenstrom, A.; Videler, J. J.

    2007-01-01

    Gliding birds continually change the shape and size of their wings(1-6), presumably to exploit the profound effect of wing morphology on aerodynamic performance(7-9). That birds should adjust wing sweep to suit glide speed has been predicted qualitatively by analytical glide models(2,10), which

  3. 1D Nano materials 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanqiu Zhu, Y.; Ma, R.; Whitby, R.; Acquah, S.

    2013-01-01

    We witnessed an initial hyped period and enthusiasm on carbon nano tubes in the 1990s later went through a significant expansion into nano tubes of other materials (metal di chalcogenides, boron nitride, etc.) as well as various nano wires and nano rods. While much of the hype might have gone, the research on one-dimensional (1D) nano materials has matured as one of the most active research areas within the nano science and nano technology community, flourishing with ample, exciting, and new research opportunities. Just like any other research frontier, researchers working in the 1D nano materials field are constantly striving to develop new fundamental science as well as potential applications. It remains a common belief that versatility and tunability of 1D nano materials would challenge many new rising tasks coming from our resource and energy demanding modern society. The traditional semiconductor industry has produced so many devices and systems from transistors, sensors, lasers, and LEDs to more sophisticated solar panels, which are now part of our daily lives. By down sizing the core components or parts to 1D form, one might wonder how fundamentally the dimensionality and morphology would impact the device performance, this is, as always, requiring us to fully understand the structure-property relationship in 1D nano materials. It may be equally crucial in connecting discovery-driven fundamental science to market-driven technology industry concerning potentially relevant findings derived from these novel materials. The importance of a platform that allows active researchers in this field to present their new development in a timely and efficient manner is therefore self-evident. Following the success of two early special issues devoted to 1D nano materials, this is the third one in a row organized by the same group of guest editors, attesting that such a platform has been well received by the readers

  4. THE EFFECTS OF SWIRL GENERATOR HAVING WINGS WITH HOLES ON HEAT TRANSFER AND PRESSURE DROP IN TUBE HEAT EXCHANGER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeki ARGUNHAN

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effect of turbulance creators on heat transfer and pressure drop used in concentric heat exchanger experimentaly. Heat exchanger has an inlet tube with 60 mm in diameter. The angle of swirl generators wings is 55º with each wing which has single, double, three and four holes. Swirl generators is designed to easily set to heat exchanger entrance. Air is passing through inner tube of heat exhanger as hot fluid and water is passing outer of inner tube as cool fluid.

  5. Assessment of radiological status of underground tunnel of radiochemistry wing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patre, D.K.; Thanamani, S.; Ojha, Shashikala; Murali, S.

    2012-01-01

    Radiochemistry Wing, RLG has design based safety systems for lab exhaust and glove box ventilation exhaust. The respective exhaust headers are routed from the lab exhaust point to the filter house. The concretized underground tunnel runs between Radiochemistry wing, RLG and Filter house about 100 m away. It houses the main exhaust tunnel made of MS, has reportedly developed leakage in the MS lines of exhaust due to ageing. It was indicated by the inadequate ventilation to the lab exhaust which reduced ∼ 10 % of the total exhaust. It was decided to carry out the replacement of main exhaust duct subject to radiological safety and clearance from the regulatory agencies. Since the duct had been in use since past 40 years, HP assessment on contamination status, clearance from local safety committee and related regulatory agency are mandatory. In view of the same, the study on radiological parameters was taken up and the paper describes the results of our radiological surveillance. Proposed replacement work involves approximately estimated surface area of duct as 520 m 2 , volume of the material as 106 m 3 and the weight of material of exhaust duct as 12.5 tons. Underground tunnel of radiochemistry wing consists of 3 main segments. It was monitored thoroughly by radiation survey. Spot air sample was collected during the radiological survey. Around 200 swipes were taken from various portions of the segments and the effluent pipelines. Last two tunnel segment were not approachable. Smear swipes were taken from top, side, bottom and floor of each segment. Calibrated scintillation counters were used for assessment of μ air activity and μ contamination check. Spot air samples were taken during different operations showed no activity. Dose rate in the tunnel was found to be less than 1 μSv/h (0.1 mR/h). The μ contamination levels were found in increasing order from the first segment to the last segment. (0.05 - 0.1 Bq/cm 2 ). Effluent pipelines were found to have

  6. PREFACE: Nano- and microfluidics Nano- and microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Karin

    2011-05-01

    The field of nano- and microfluidics emerged at the end of the 1990s parallel to the demand for smaller and smaller containers and channels for chemical, biochemical and medical applications such as blood and DNS analysis [1], gene sequencing or proteomics [2, 3]. Since then, new journals and conferences have been launched and meanwhile, about two decades later, a variety of microfluidic applications are on the market. Briefly, 'the small flow becomes mainstream' [4]. Nevertheless, research in nano- and microfluidics is more than downsizing the spatial dimensions. For liquids on the nanoscale, surface and interface phenomena grow in importance and may even dominate the behavior in some systems. The studies collected in this special issue all concentrate on these type of systems and were part ot the priority programme SPP1164 'Nano- and Microfluidics' of the German Science Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG). The priority programme was initiated in 2002 by Hendrik Kuhlmann and myself and was launched in 2004. Friction between a moving liquid and a solid wall may, for instance, play an important role so that the usual assumption of a no-slip boundary condition is no longer valid. Likewise, the dynamic deformations of soft objects like polymers, vesicles or capsules in flow arise from the subtle interplay between the (visco-)elasticity of the object and the viscous stresses in the surrounding fluid and, potentially, the presence of structures confining the flow like channels. Consequently, new theories were developed ( see articles in this issue by Münch and Wagner, Falk and Mecke, Bonthuis et al, Finken et al, Almenar and Rauscher, Straube) and experiments were set up to unambiguously demonstrate deviations from bulk, or 'macro', behavior (see articles in this issue by Wolff et al, Vinogradova and Belyaev, Hahn et al, Seemann et al, Grüner and Huber, Müller-Buschbaum et al, Gutsche et al, Braunmüller et al, Laube et al, Brücker, Nottebrock et al

  7. Morphing Wing: Experimental Boundary Layer Transition Determination and Wing Vibrations Measurements and Analysis =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondji Chendjou, Yvan Wilfried

    This Master's thesis is written within the framework of the multidisciplinary international research project CRIAQ MDO-505. This global project consists of the design, manufacture and testing of a morphing wing box capable of changing the shape of the flexible upper skin of a wing using an actuator system installed inside the wing. This changing of the shape generates a delay in the occurrence of the laminar to turbulent transition area, which results in an improvement of the aerodynamic performances of the morphed wing. This thesis is focused on the technologies used to gather the pressure data during the wind tunnel tests, as well as on the post processing methodologies used to characterize the wing airflow. The vibration measurements of the wing and their real-time graphical representation are also presented. The vibration data acquisition system is detailed, and the vibration data analysis confirms the predictions of the flutter analysis performed on the wing prior to wind tunnel testing at the IAR-NRC. The pressure data was collected using 32 highly-sensitive piezoelectric sensors for sensing the pressure fluctuations up to 10 KHz. These sensors were installed along two wing chords, and were further connected to a National Instrument PXI real-time acquisition system. The acquired pressure data was high-pass filtered, analyzed and visualized using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Standard Deviation (SD) approaches to quantify the pressure fluctuations in the wing airflow, as these allow the detection of the laminar to turbulent transition area. Around 30% of the cases tested in the IAR-NRC wind tunnel were optimized for drag reduction by the morphing wing procedure. The obtained pressure measurements results were compared with results obtained by infrared thermography visualization, and were used to validate the numerical simulations. Two analog accelerometers able to sense dynamic accelerations up to +/-16g were installed in both the wing and the aileron boxes

  8. Migration on Wings Aerodynamics and Energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Kantha, Lakshmi

    2012-01-01

    This book is an effort to explore the technical aspects associated with bird flight and migration on wings. After a short introduction on the birds migration, the book reviews the aerodynamics and Energetics of Flight and presents the calculation of the Migration Range. In addition, the authors explains aerodynamics of the formation flight and finally introduces great flight diagrams.

  9. Oblique-Flying-Wing Supersonic Transport Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Velden, Alexander J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Oblique-flying-wing supersonic airplane proposed as possible alternative to B747B (or equivalent). Tranports passengers and cargo as fast as twice speed of sound at same cost as current subsonic transports. Flies at same holding speeds as present supersonic transports but requires only half takeoff distance.

  10. Chemical evaluation of winged beans ( Psophocarpus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical evaluation of winged beans ( Psophocarpus Tetragonolobus ), Pitanga cherries ( Eugenia uniflora) and orchid fruit ( Orchid fruit myristic a) ... The acid value ranged between 0.71 and 2.82 mg/KOH/g while iodine value ranged between 91.15 and 144.57. The refractive index ranged between 1.465 and 1.474 in all ...

  11. ``Schooling'' of wing pairs in flapping flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramananarivo, Sophie; Zhang, Jun; Ristroph, Leif; AML, Courant Collaboration; Physics NYU Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The experimental setup implements two independent flapping wings swimming in tandem. Both are driven with the same prescribed vertical heaving motion, but the horizontal motion is free, which means that the swimmers can take up any relative position and forward speed. Experiments show however clearly coordinated motions, where the pair of wings `crystallize' into specific stable arrangements. The follower wing locks into the path of the leader, adopting its speed, and with a separation distance that takes on one of several discrete values. By systematically varying the kinematics and wing size, we show that the set of stable spacings is dictated by the wavelength of the periodic wake structure. The forces maintaining the pair cohesion are characterized by applying an external force to the follower to perturb it away from the `stable wells'. These results show that hydrodynamics alone is sufficient to induce cohesive and coordinated collective locomotion through a fluid, and we discuss the hypothesis that fish schools and bird flocks also represent stable modes of motion.

  12. Aerodynamic comparison of a butterfly-like flapping wing-body model and a revolving-wing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kosuke; Yoshino, Masato

    2017-06-01

    The aerodynamic performance of flapping- and revolving-wing models is investigated by numerical simulations based on an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method. As wing models, we use (i) a butterfly-like model with a body and flapping-rectangular wings and (ii) a revolving-wing model with the same wings as the flapping case. Firstly, we calculate aerodynamic performance factors such as the lift force, the power, and the power loading of the two models for Reynolds numbers in the range of 50-1000. For the flapping-wing model, the power loading is maximal for the maximum angle of attack of 90°, a flapping amplitude of roughly 45°, and a phase shift between the flapping angle and the angle of attack of roughly 90°. For the revolving-wing model, the power loading peaks for an angle of attack of roughly 45°. In addition, we examine the ground effect on the aerodynamic performance of the revolving-wing model. Secondly, we compare the aerodynamic performance of the flapping- and revolving-wing models at their respective maximal power loadings. It is found that the revolving-wing model is more efficient than the flapping-wing model both when the body of the latter is fixed and where it can move freely. Finally, we discuss the relative agilities of the flapping- and revolving-wing models.

  13. Micro/Nano manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Micro- and nano-scale manufacturing has been the subject of an increasing amount of interest and research effort worldwide in both academia and industry over the past 10 years.Traditional (MEMS) manufacturing, but also precision manufacturing technologies have been developed to cover micro......-scale dimensions and accuracies. Furthermore, these fundamentally different technology ecosystems are currently combined in order to exploit strengths of both platforms. One example is the use of lithography-based technologies to establish nanostructures that are subsequently transferred to 3D geometries via...

  14. Paleozoic Nymphal Wing Pads Support Dual Model of Insect Wing Origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Jakub; Pecharová, Martina; Nel, André; Hörnschemeyer, Thomas; Krzemińska, Ewa; Krzemiński, Wiesław; Engel, Michael S

    2017-01-23

    The appearance of wings in insects, early in their evolution [1], has been one of the more critical innovations contributing to their extraordinary diversity. Despite the conspicuousness and importance of wings, the origin of these structures has been difficult to resolve and represented one of the "abominable mysteries" in evolutionary biology [2]. More than a century of debate has boiled the matter down to two competing alternatives-one of wings representing an extension of the thoracic notum, the other stating that they are appendicular derivations from the lateral body wall. Recently, a dual model has been supported by genomic and developmental data [3-6], representing an amalgamation of elements from both the notal and pleural hypotheses. Here, we reveal crucial information from the wing pad joints of Carboniferous palaeodictyopteran insect nymphs using classical and high-tech techniques. These nymphs had three pairs of wing pads that were medially articulated to the thorax but also broadly contiguous with the notum anteriorly and posteriorly (details unobservable in modern insects), supporting their overall origin from the thoracic notum as well as the expected medial, pleural series of axillary sclerites. Our study provides support for the formation of the insect wing from the thoracic notum as well as the already known pleural elements of the arthropodan leg. These results support the unique, dual model for insect wing origins and the convergent reduction of notal fusion in more derived clades, presumably due to wing rotation during development, and they help to bring resolution to this long-standing debate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Reconfigurable Nano-Plasmonics Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    30 Sept. 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Reconfigurable Nano-Plasmonics Holography 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...of plasmonic holography by Reconfigurable Surface Plasmon Phase Modulators from micro-electromechanical devices. High dielectric constant...Project Title: Reconfigurable Nano-Plasmonics Holography Award Number: FA9550-09-1-0698 Start Date: Sept. 30

  16. Air tankers in Southern California Fires...effectiveness in delivering retardants rated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore G. Storey; Leon W. Cooley

    1967-01-01

    Eleven air attack experts were asked to rate 12 models of fixed-wing tankers and light helitankers for effectiveness ill delivering chemical fire retardants under 21 typical situations. They rated fixed-wing tankers as more effective in strong wind crosswinds, and downwind approaches, but helitankers as more effective in narrow canyons and on steep slopes. Certain...

  17. Multiple cues for winged morph production in an aphid metacommunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mehrparvar

    Full Text Available Environmental factors can lead individuals down different developmental pathways giving rise to distinct phenotypes (phenotypic plasticity. The production of winged or unwinged morphs in aphids is an example of two alternative developmental pathways. Dispersal is paramount in aphids that often have a metapopulation structure, where local subpopulations frequently go extinct, such as the specialized aphids on tansy (Tanacetum vulgare. We conducted various experiments to further understand the cues involved in the production of winged dispersal morphs by the two dominant species of the tansy aphid metacommunity, Metopeurum fuscoviride and Macrosiphoniella tanacetaria. We found that the ant-tended M. fuscoviride produced winged individuals predominantly at the beginning of the season while the untended M. tanacetaria produced winged individuals throughout the season. Winged mothers of both species produced winged offspring, although in both species winged offspring were mainly produced by unwinged females. Crowding and the presence of predators, effects already known to influence wing production in other aphid species, increased the percentage of winged offspring in M. tanacetaria, but not in M. fuscoviride. We find there are also other factors (i.e. temporal effects inducing the production of winged offspring for natural aphid populations. Our results show that the responses of each aphid species are due to multiple wing induction cues.

  18. EDITORIAL: Nano Meets Spectroscopy Nano Meets Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, David J. S.

    2012-08-01

    The multidisciplinary two-day Nano Meets Spectroscopy (NMS) event was held at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Teddington, UK, in September 2011. The event was planned from the outset to be at the interface of several areas—in particular, spectroscopy and nanoscience, and to bring together topics and people with different approaches to achieving common goals in biomolecular science. Hence the meeting cut across traditional boundaries and brought together researchers using diverse techniques, particularly fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. Despite engaging common problems, these techniques are frequently seen as mutually exclusive with the two communities rarely interacting at conferences. The meeting was widely seen to have lived up to its billing in good measure. It attracted the maximum capacity of ~120 participants, including 22 distinguished speakers (9 from outside the UK), over 50 posters and a vibrant corporate exhibition comprising 10 leading instrument companies and IOP Publishing. The organizers were Professor David Birch (Chair), Dr Karen Faulds and Professor Duncan Graham of the University of Strathclyde, Professor Cait MacPhee of the University of Edinburgh and Dr Alex Knight of NPL. The event was sponsored by the European Science Foundation, the Institute of Physics, the Royal Society of Chemistry, NPL and the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance. The full programme and abstracts are available at http://sensor.phys.strath.ac.uk/nms/program.php. The programme was quite ambitious in terms of the breadth and depth of scope. The interdisciplinary and synergistic concept of 'X meets Y' played well, cross-fertilization between different fields often being a source of inspiration and progress. Fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy provided the core, but the meeting had little repetition and also attracted contributions on more specialist techniques such as CARS, super-resolution, single molecule and chiral methods. In terms of application the

  19. The biomechanical origin of extreme wing allometry in hummingbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skandalis, Dimitri A; Segre, Paolo S; Bahlman, Joseph W; Groom, Derrick J E; Welch, Kenneth C; Witt, Christopher C; McGuire, Jimmy A; Dudley, Robert; Lentink, David; Altshuler, Douglas L

    2017-10-19

    Flying animals of different masses vary widely in body proportions, but the functional implications of this variation are often unclear. We address this ambiguity by developing an integrative allometric approach, which we apply here to hummingbirds to examine how the physical environment, wing morphology and stroke kinematics have contributed to the evolution of their highly specialised flight. Surprisingly, hummingbirds maintain constant wing velocity despite an order of magnitude variation in body weight; increased weight is supported solely through disproportionate increases in wing area. Conversely, wing velocity increases with body weight within species, compensating for lower relative wing area in larger individuals. By comparing inter- and intraspecific allometries, we find that the extreme wing area allometry of hummingbirds is likely an adaptation to maintain constant burst flight capacity and induced power requirements with increasing weight. Selection for relatively large wings simultaneously maximises aerial performance and minimises flight costs, which are essential elements of humming bird life history.

  20. Nano-ceramics and its molding technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jian; Xu Yunshu

    2007-01-01

    Nano-ceramics and its related knowledge were introduced. Fabrication of nano-ceramic powder, as well as the molding and sintering technologies of nano-ceramics were reviewed. Features of the present molding technologies were analyzed. The applications of nano-ceramics were prospected. (authors)

  1. Lift and Power Required for Flapping Wing Hovering Flight on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohly, Jeremy; Sridhar, Madhu; Bluman, James; Kang, Chang-Kwon; Landrum, D. Brian; Fahimi, Farbod; Aono, Hikaru; Liu, Hao

    2017-11-01

    Achieving flight on Mars is challenging due to the ultra-low density atmosphere. Bio-inspired flapping motion can generate sufficient lift if bumblebee-inspired wings are scaled up between 2 and 4 times their nominal size. However, due to this scaling, the inertial power required to sustain hover increases and dominates over the aerodynamic power. Our results show that a torsional spring placed at the wing root can reduce the flapping power required for hover by efficiently storing and releasing energy while operating at its resonance frequency. The spring assisted reduction in flapping power is demonstrated with a well-validated, coupled Navier-Stokes and flight dynamics solver. The total power is reduced by 79%, whereas the flapping power is reduced by 98%. Such a reduction in power paves the way for an efficient, realizable micro air vehicle capable of vertical takeoff and landing as well as sustained flight on Mars. Alabama Space Grant Consortium Fellowship.

  2. Laser Noise Reduction in Air

    OpenAIRE

    Bejot, Pierre; Kasparian, Jerome; Salmon, Estelle; Ackermann, Roland; Gisin, Nicolas; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Fluctuations of the white-light supercontinuum produced by ultrashort laser pulses in selfguided filaments (spatio-temporal solitons) in air are investigated. We demonstrate that correlations exist within the white-light supercontinuum, and that they can be used to significantly reduce the laser intensity noise by filtering the spectrum. More precisely, the fundamental wavelength is anticorrelated with the wings of the continuum, while conjugated wavelength pairs on both sides of the continuu...

  3. KARAKTERISASI TEBAL LAPISAN BATAS FLUIDA NANO ZrO2 DI PERMUKAAN PEMANAS PADA PROSES KONVEKSI ALAMIAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Indriati Sri Wardhani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK KARAKTERISASI Tebal Lapisan Batas Fluida Nano ZrO2 di permukaan pemanas pada Proses Konveksi Alamiah. Pendinginan sistem sangat dipengaruhi oleh proses perpindahan panas konveksi dari sumber panas ke fluida pendingin. Biasanya sebagai fluida pendingin digunakan fluida konvensional seperti air. Pendinginan suatu sistem dengan air tersebut dapat ditingkatkan dengan menggunakan fluida lain seperti fluida nano, yaitu fluida yang dibuat dari campuran air ditambah partikel dengan ukuran nano. Peneliti Batan Bandung telah membuat fluida nano ZrO2 dari bahan local. Telah dibuat pula peralatan eksperimen untuk mempelajari sifat-sifat termohidrolik fluida nano tersebut. Hal ini dilakukan untuk mendapatkan fluida nano yang tepat jika digunakan sebagai fluida pendingin sistem. Dalam penelitian ini dilakukan eksperimen untuk mempelajari sifat-sifat termohidrolik fluida nano ZrO2 yang terbuat dari campuran air dengan partikel nano ZrO2 yang berukuran 10-7-10-9nm dengan konsentrasi 1 gr/lt yang digunakan sebagai pendingin pada proses pendinginan konveksi alamiah. Proses tersebut sangat bergantung pada perubahan temperatur dari sumber panas ke fluida pendingin. Dalam pendinginan konveksi alamiah perubahan temperatur itu akan terjadi di dalam tebal lapisan batas termalnya. Oleh karena itu perlu diteliti tebal lapisan batas termal dari fluida nano ZrO2 yang selanjutnya juga dapat untuk menentukan kecepatan aliran lokalnya. Eksperimen dilakukan melalui proses perpindahan panas konveksi alamiah dengan memasukkan beberapa variasi daya pemanas, kemudian dilakukan pengukuran temperatur di beberapa titik secara horizontal untuk melihat distribusi temperaturnya. Hasil pengukuran distribusi temperatur tersebut dapat digunakan untuk menentukan tebal lapisan batas dan kecepatan alirannya. Diperoleh bahwa tebal lapisan batas termal dan kecepatan konveksi alamiah fluida nano ZrO2 tidak jauh berbeda dari fluida konvensional air. Kata kunci: Lapisan batas, fluida

  4. Frontiers in nano-therapeutics

    CERN Document Server

    Tasnim, Nishat; Sai Krishna, Katla; Kalagara, Sudhakar; Narayan, Mahesh; Noveron, Juan C; Joddar, Binata

    2017-01-01

    This brief highlights recent research advances in the area of nano-therapeutics. Nanotechnology holds immense potential for application in a wide range of biological and engineering applications such as molecular sensors for disease diagnosis, therapeutic agents for the treatment of diseases, a vehicle for delivering therapeutics and imaging agents for theranostic applications, both in-vitro and in-vivo. The brief is grouped into the following sections namely, A) Discrete Nanosystems ; B) Anisotropic Nanoparticles; C) Nano-films/coated/layered and D) Nano-composites.

  5. Nellis and Creech Air Force Bases Capital Improvements Program Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    57th Wing, other Air Force units, Navy, Marine Corps and allied air forces. Creech AFB is also the primary training site for the United States Air...Forces, Air National Guard, U.S. Air Force Reserve, Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and allied air forces. They are led by a Blue Forces commander who...includes desert iguana (Dipsosaurus dorsalis), zebra-tailed lizard (Callosaurus draconoides), side-blotched lizard, horned lizards (Phrynosoma spp

  6. Nano boron nitride flatland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakdel, Amir; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2014-02-07

    Recent years have witnessed many breakthroughs in research on two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, among which is hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), a layered material with a regular network of BN hexagons. This review provides an insight into the marvellous nano BN flatland, beginning with a concise introduction to BN and its low-dimensional nanostructures, followed by an overview of the past and current state of research on 2D BN nanostructures. A comprehensive review of the structural characteristics and synthetic routes of BN monolayers, multilayers, nanomeshes, nanowaves, nanoflakes, nanosheets and nanoribbons is presented. In addition, electronic, optical, thermal, mechanical, magnetic, piezoelectric, catalytic, ecological, biological and wetting properties, applications and research perspectives for these novel 2D nanomaterials are discussed.

  7. Nano threats and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, Peter

    2003-07-01

    Worries in the science community about a public backlash against nanotechnology have been growing in recent months. Currently, public fears range from the reasonable, such as the unknown effects of nanoparticles on health and the environment, to what scientists consider to be the ridiculous - a world overrun by plagues of self-replicating nanorobots. This is the 'grey goo' scenario that looms large in Prey, the recent novel by Michael Crichton that seems to have kick-started this current bout of nano-angst. The nightmare scenario for scientists is that the public - egged on by various pressure groups - will reject nanotechnology in the same way that the UK and other countries have rejected genetically modified (GM) food. (U.K.)

  8. Nano-optomechanical transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakich, Peter T; El-Kady, Ihab F; Olsson, Roy H; Su, Mehmet Fatih; Reinke, Charles; Camacho, Ryan; Wang, Zheng; Davids, Paul

    2013-12-03

    A nano-optomechanical transducer provides ultrabroadband coherent optomechanical transduction based on Mach-wave emission that uses enhanced photon-phonon coupling efficiencies by low impedance effective phononic medium, both electrostriction and radiation pressure to boost and tailor optomechanical forces, and highly dispersive electromagnetic modes that amplify both electrostriction and radiation pressure. The optomechanical transducer provides a large operating bandwidth and high efficiency while simultaneously having a small size and minimal power consumption, enabling a host of transformative phonon and signal processing capabilities. These capabilities include optomechanical transduction via pulsed phonon emission and up-conversion, broadband stimulated phonon emission and amplification, picosecond pulsed phonon lasers, broadband phononic modulators, and ultrahigh bandwidth true time delay and signal processing technologies.

  9. Carbon nanotubes: from nano test tube to nano-reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2011-12-27

    Confinement of molecules and atoms inside carbon nanotubes provides a powerful strategy for studying structures and chemical properties of individual molecules at the nanoscale. In this issue of ACS Nano, Allen et al. explore the nanotube as a template leading to the formation of unusual supramolecular and covalent structures. The potential of carbon nanotubes as reactors for synthesis on the nano- and macroscales is discussed in light of recent studies.

  10. The optimal design of UAV wing structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Długosz, Adam; Klimek, Wiktor

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents an optimal design of UAV wing, made of composite materials. The aim of the optimization is to improve strength and stiffness together with reduction of the weight of the structure. Three different types of functionals, which depend on stress, stiffness and the total mass are defined. The paper presents an application of the in-house implementation of the evolutionary multi-objective algorithm in optimization of the UAV wing structure. Values of the functionals are calculated on the basis of results obtained from numerical simulations. Numerical FEM model, consisting of different composite materials is created. Adequacy of the numerical model is verified by results obtained from the experiment, performed on a tensile testing machine. Examples of multi-objective optimization by means of Pareto-optimal set of solutions are presented.

  11. Adjoint-based optimization for flapping wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min; Wei, Mingjun

    2012-11-01

    Adjoint-based methods show great potential in flow control and optimization of complex problems with high- or infinite-dimensional control space. It is attractive to solve an adjoint problem to understand the complex effects from multiple control parameters to a few performance indicators of the flight of birds or insects. However, the traditional approach to formulate the adjoint problem becomes either impossible or too complex when arbitrary moving boundary (e.g. flapping wings) and its perturbation is considered. Here, we use non-cylindrical calculus to define the perturbation. So that, a simple adjoint system can be derived directly in the inertial coordinate. The approach is first applied to the optimization of cylinder oscillation and later to flapping wings. Supported by AFOSR.

  12. Quantifying the dynamic wing morphing of hovering hummingbird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Masateru; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Kitamura, Ikuo; Tanaka, Hiroto; Liu, Hao

    2017-09-01

    Animal wings are lightweight and flexible; hence, during flapping flight their shapes change. It has been known that such dynamic wing morphing reduces aerodynamic cost in insects, but the consequences in vertebrate flyers, particularly birds, are not well understood. We have developed a method to reconstruct a three-dimensional wing model of a bird from the wing outline and the feather shafts (rachides). The morphological and kinematic parameters can be obtained using the wing model, and the numerical or mechanical simulations may also be carried out. To test the effectiveness of the method, we recorded the hovering flight of a hummingbird ( Amazilia amazilia ) using high-speed cameras and reconstructed the right wing. The wing shape varied substantially within a stroke cycle. Specifically, the maximum and minimum wing areas differed by 18%, presumably due to feather sliding; the wing was bent near the wrist joint, towards the upward direction and opposite to the stroke direction; positive upward camber and the 'washout' twist (monotonic decrease in the angle of incidence from the proximal to distal wing) were observed during both half-strokes; the spanwise distribution of the twist was uniform during downstroke, but an abrupt increase near the wrist joint was found during upstroke.

  13. CFD Analysis of UAV Flying Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile PRISACARIU

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerical methods for solving equations describing the evolution of 3D fluid experienced a significant development closely related to the progress of information systems. Today, especially in the field of fluid mechanics, numerical simulations allow the study of gas-thermodynamic confirmed by experimental techniques in wind tunnel conditions and actual flight tests for modeling complex aircraft. The article shows a case of numerical analysis of the lifting surface on the UAV type flying wing.

  14. Topology Optimization of an Aircraft Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-11

    can combine the advantages of a variable stiffness design with- out the use of actuators. Curved beams, which couple torsion and bending , counteract... torsional deflection, control natural frequency, exploit coupling of bending and tor- sion to control flutter, reduce thickness to chord ratios due to...disregarded any bending or torsional effects caused by displacement of the wing, and was thus not considered. Therefore, the initial design analysis

  15. Tracing the evolution of avian wing digits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xing; Mackem, Susan

    2013-06-17

    It is widely accepted that birds are a subgroup of dinosaurs, but there is an apparent conflict: modern birds have been thought to possess only the middle three fingers (digits II-III-IV) of an idealized five-digit tetrapod hand based on embryological data, but their Mesozoic tetanuran dinosaur ancestors are considered to have the first three digits (I-II-III) based on fossil evidence. How could such an evolutionary quirk arise? Various hypotheses have been proposed to resolve this paradox. Adding to the confusion, some recent developmental studies support a I-II-III designation for avian wing digits whereas some recent paleontological data are consistent with a II-III-IV identification of the Mesozoic tetanuran digits. A comprehensive analysis of both paleontological and developmental data suggests that the evolution of the avian wing digits may have been driven by homeotic transformations of digit identity, which are more likely to have occurred in a partial and piecemeal manner. Additionally, recent genetic studies in mouse models showing plausible mechanisms for central digit loss invite consideration of new alternative possibilities (I-II-IV or I-III-IV) for the homologies of avian wing digits. While much progress has been made, some advances point to the complexity of the problem and a final resolution to this ongoing debate demands additional work from both paleontological and developmental perspectives, which will surely yield new insights on mechanisms of evolutionary adaptation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Unsteady fluid dynamics around a hovering wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Swathi; Green, Melissa; Mulleners, Karen

    2017-11-01

    The unsteady flow around a hovering flat plate wing has been investigated experimentally using particle image velocimetry and direct force measurements. The measurements are conducted on a wing that rotates symmetrically about the stroke reversal at a reduced frequency of k = 0.32 and Reynolds number of Re = 220 . The Lagrangian finite-time Lyapunov exponent method is used to analyse the unsteady flow fields by identifying dynamically relevant flow features such as the primary leading edge vortex (LEV), secondary vortices, and topological saddles, and their evolution within a flapping cycle. The flow evolution is divided into four stages that are characterised by the LEV (a)emergence, (b)growth, (c)lift-off, and (d)breakdown and decay. Tracking saddle points is shown to be helpful in defining the LEV lift-off which occurs at the maximum stroke velocity. The flow fields are correlated with the aerodynamic forces revealing that the maximum lift and drag are observed just before LEV lift-off. The end of wing rotation in the beginning of the stroke stimulates a change in the direction of the LEV growth and the start of rotation at the end of the stroke triggers the breakdown of the LEV.

  17. A Systems Engineering Approach in Providing Air Defense Support to Ground Combat Vehicle Maneuver Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    SLAMRAAM surface launched advanced medium range air-to-air missile SME subject matter expert SOS system of systems UAV unmanned aerial vehicle UCAV ...threats of fixed wing aircraft and attack helicopters, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and unmanned combat aerial vehicles ( UCAVs ) are fast becoming a... UCAVs and capable of conducting offensive attacks. UAVs/ UCAVs are physically smaller in size compared to fixed wing aircraft or attack helicopters and

  18. Golden Legacy, Boundless Future: Essays on the United States Air Force and the Rise of Aerospace Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Charles A. Ravenstein , The Organization and Lineage of the United States Air Force (D.C.: Office of Air Force History, 1986), 17. 13. James L... Ravenstein , Air Force Combat Wings: Lineage and Honors, 1947-1977 (Washington, D.C: Office of Air Force History, 1984), pp. 47-48, 88-89. 14. Monograph, "H 0

  19. Wing geometry of Triatoma sordida (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) populations from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrami, Daniel Pagotto; Obara, Marcos Takashi; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Ceretti-Junior, Walter; Marrelli, Mauro Toledo

    2017-04-01

    Triatoma sordida has a widespread distribution in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay and is frequently found in peridomestic environments. We investigated size and shape variability of T. sordida wings across Brazil. Field-collected adults from twelve populations were studied. For each individual female, seven landmarks on the right wing were digitalized. Shape variables derived from Procrustes superimposition were used in Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Wing size and shape variations among populations was explored by means of ANOVA. Wing centroid size was significantly different among T. sordida populations; specimens from Bahia (East) were larger than those of Mato Grosso do Sul (West). PCA based on wing shape variables showed low wing shape variability. These results reinforce previous data showing low genetic variability among T. sordida populations from Brazil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Chemical Functionalization, Self-Assembly, and Applications of Nano materials and Nano composites 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, X.; Jiao, T.; Balan, L.; Chen, X.; Hu, M.Z.; Liu, W.

    2014-01-01

    The growing interests in nano materials and nano composites call for the development of processing techniques to obtain multiple functionalization nano structures and achieve the tailoring of specific features of the nanometer size. Functional nano materials and nano composites will expand the applied range of the original material and at the same time promote the development of inter discipline. Thus, the chemical functionalization and bottom-up assemblies of nano materials and subsequent applications will accelerate the development of nano science and nano technology.

  1. Hierarchical Micro-Nano Coatings by Painting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirveslahti, Anna; Korhonen, Tuulia; Suvanto, Mika; Pakkanen, Tapani A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the wettability properties of coatings with hierarchical surface structures and low surface energy were studied. Hierarchically structured coatings were produced by using hydrophobic fumed silica nanoparticles and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) microparticles as additives in polyester (PES) and polyvinyldifluoride (PVDF). These particles created hierarchical micro-nano structures on the paint surfaces and lowered or supported the already low surface energy of the paint. Two standard application techniques for paint application were employed and the presented coatings are suitable for mass production and use in large surface areas. By regulating the particle concentrations, it was possible to modify wettability properties gradually. Highly hydrophobic surfaces were achieved with the highest contact angle of 165∘. Dynamic contact angle measurements were carried out for a set of selected samples and low hysteresis was obtained. Produced coatings possessed long lasting durability in the air and in underwater conditions.

  2. Free vibration analysis of dragonfly wings using finite element method

    OpenAIRE

    M Darvizeh; A Darvizeh; H Rajabi; A Rezaei

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, investigations on the microstructure and mechanicalproperties of the dragonfly wing are carried out and numerical modelingbased on Finite Element Method (FEM) is developed to predict Flightcharacteristics of dragonfly wings. Vibrational behavior of wings typestructures is immensely important in analysis, design and manufacturing ofsimilar engineering structures. For this purpose natural frequencies andmode shapes are calculated. In addition, the kind of deformation in eac...

  3. Electrochemically synthesized Si nano wire arrays and thermoelectric nano structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khuan, N.I.; Ying, K.K.; Nur Ubaidah Saidin; Foo, C.T.

    2012-01-01

    Thermoelectric nano structures hold great promise for capturing and directly converting into electricity some vast amount of low-grade waste heats now being lost to the environment (for example from nuclear power plant, fossil fuel burning, automotive and household appliances). In this study, large-area vertically-aligned silicon nano wire (SiNW) arrays were synthesized in an aqueous solution containing AgNO 3 and HF on p-type Si (100) substrate by self-selective electroless etching process. The etching conditions were systematically varied in order to achieve different stages of nano wire formation. Diameters of the SiNWs obtained varied from approximately 50 to 200 nm and their lengths ranged from several to a few tens of μm. Te/ Bi 2 Te 3 -Si thermoelectric core-shell nano structures were subsequently obtained via galvanic displacement of SiNWs in acidic HF electrolytes containing HTeO 2 + and Bi 3+ / HTeO 2 + ions. The reactions were basically a nano-electrochemical process due to the difference in redox potentials between the materials. the surface-modified SiNWs of core-shell structures had roughened surface morphologies and therefore, higher surface-t-bulk ratios compared to unmodified SiNWs. They have potential applications in sensors, photovoltaic and thermoelectric nano devices. Growth study on the SiNWs and core-shell nano structures produced is presented using various microscopy, diffraction and probe-based techniques for microstructural, morphological and chemical characterizations. (Author)

  4. Poster Puzzler Solution: Taking in Air | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current Poster Puzzler image shows the top of Building 560, where a new supply air handler was recently installed by Facilities Maintenance and Engineering (FME) staff, as part of lab renovations in wing 1, floor 1. FME staff enlarged the attic of the building to make space for the air handler. Building 560, the largest building at the NCI at Frederick campus, houses about 120 labs and has 19 air handlers. A supply air handler draws in outside air, filters it, cools or heats it, and adjusts the humidity to provide clean conditioned air to the laboratories. The Building 560 air handler weighs approximately 22,500 pounds and moves 22,000 cubic feet of air per minute.

  5. Investigation and design of a C-Wing passenger aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan BIKKANNAVAR

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel nonplanar wing concept called C-Wing is studied and implemented on a commercial aircraft to reduce induced drag which has a significant effect on fuel consumption. A preliminary sizing method which employs an optimization algorithm is utilized. The Airbus A320 aircraft is used as a reference aircraft to evaluate design parameters and to investigate the C-Wing design potential beyond current wing tip designs. An increase in aspect ratio due to wing area reduction at 36m span results in a reduction of required fuel mass by 16%. Also take-off mass savings were obtained for the aircraft with C-Wing configuration. The effect of a variations of height to span ratio (h/b of C-Wings on induced drag factor k, is formulated from a vortex lattice method and literature based equations. Finally the DOC costing methods used by the Association of European Airlines (AEA was applied to the existing A320 aircraft and to the C-Wing configuration obtaining a reduction of 6% in Direct Operating Costs (DOC for the novel concept resulted. From overall outcomes, the C-Wing concept suggests interesting aerodynamic efficiency and stability benefits.

  6. Effects of Canard on the Flowfield over a Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayebzadeh, Arash

    2015-11-01

    Surface and flowfield pressure measurements have been done over delta wing/canard configuration in a variety of canard vertical and horizontal locations and angles of attack. The experimental model consisted of wing, canard and a body to accommodate pressure tubing and canard rotation mechanism. All the tests have been performed at subsonic velocities and the effect of canard were analyzed through comparison between surface and flowfield pressure distributions. It was found that vortex flow pattern over the wing is dominated mainly by canard vertical position and in some cases, by merging of canard and wing vortices. In addition, the pressure loss induced by canard vortex on the wing surface moves the wing vortex toward the leading edge. In the mid canard configuration, canard and wing vortices merge at x/c greater than 0.5 and as a result of this phenomenon, abrupt pressure loss induces more stable vortex flow over the wing. It is also shown that canard plays a vital role in vortex break down over the wing.

  7. Improvement of the aerodynamic performance by wing flexibility and elytra–hind wing interaction of a beetle during forward flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tuyen Quang; Truong, Tien Van; Park, Soo Hyung; Quang Truong, Tri; Ko, Jin Hwan; Park, Hoon Cheol; Byun, Doyoung

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the aerodynamic performance of beetle wing in free-forward flight was explored by a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) simulation with measured wing kinematics. It is shown from the CFD results that twist and camber variation, which represent the wing flexibility, are most important when determining the aerodynamic performance. Twisting wing significantly increased the mean lift and camber variation enhanced the mean thrust while the required power was lower than the case when neither was considered. Thus, in a comparison of the power economy among rigid, twisting and flexible models, the flexible model showed the best performance. When the positive effect of wing interaction was added to that of wing flexibility, we found that the elytron created enough lift to support its weight, and the total lift (48.4 mN) generated from the simulation exceeded the gravity force of the beetle (47.5 mN) during forward flight. PMID:23740486

  8. 76 FR 75453 - Restricted Areas and Danger Zones at Eglin Air Force Base, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    ... and Danger Zones at Eglin Air Force Base, FL AGENCY: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Department of... within the Eglin Air Force Base (AFB) facilities and along the Eglin AFB facility shoreline in Florida... have the permission of the Commander, 96 Air Base Wing, Eglin AFB or his/her authorized representative...

  9. Folding wings like a cockroach: a review of transverse wing folding ensign wasps (Hymenoptera: Evaniidae: Afrevania and Trissevania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Mikó

    Full Text Available We revise two relatively rare ensign wasp genera, whose species are restricted to Sub-Saharan Africa: Afrevania and Trissevania. Afrevania longipetiolata sp. nov., Trissevania heatherae sp. nov., T. hugoi sp. nov., T. mrimaensis sp. nov. and T. slideri sp. nov. are described, males and females of T. anemotis and Afrevania leroyi are redescribed, and an identification key for Trissevaniini is provided. We argue that Trissevania mrimaensis sp. nov. and T. heatherae sp. nov. populations are vulnerable, given their limited distributions and threats from mining activities in Kenya. We hypothesize that these taxa together comprise a monophyletic lineage, Trissevaniini, tr. nov., the members of which share the ability to fold their fore wings along two intersecting fold lines. Although wing folding of this type has been described for the hind wing of some insects four-plane wing folding of the fore wing has never been documented. The wing folding mechanism and the pattern of wing folds of Trissevaniini is shared only with some cockroach species (Blattodea. It is an interesting coincidence that all evaniids are predators of cockroach eggs. The major wing fold lines of Trissevaniini likely are not homologous to any known longitudinal anatomical structures on the wings of other Evaniidae. Members of the new tribe share the presence of a coupling mechanism between the fore wing and the mesosoma that is composed of a setal patch on the mesosoma and the retinaculum of the fore wing. While the setal patch is an evolutionary novelty, the retinaculum, which originally evolved to facilitate fore and hind wing coupling in Hymenoptera, exemplifies morphological exaptation. We also refine and clarify the Semantic Phenotype approach used in previous taxonomic revisions and explore the consequences of merging new with existing data. The way that semantic statements are formulated can evolve in parallel, alongside improvements to the ontologies themselves.

  10. Cantilever Wings for Modern Aircraft: Some Aspects of Cantilever Wing Construction with Special Reference to Weight and Torsional Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieger, H J

    1929-01-01

    In the foregoing remarks I have made an attempt to touch on some of the structural problems met with in cantilever wings, and dealt rather fully with a certain type of single-spar construction. The experimental test wing was a first attempt to demonstrate the principles of this departure from orthodox methods. The result was a wing both torsionally stiff and of light weight - lighter than a corresponding biplane construction.

  11. Variable multilayer reflection together with long-pass filtering pigment determines the wing coloration of papilionid butterflies of the nireus group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trzeciak, Tomasz M.; Wilts, Bodo D.; Stavenga, Doekele G.; Vukusic, Peter; Sterke, C. Martijn de

    2012-01-01

    The dorsal wing surfaces of papilionid butterflies of the nireus group are marked by bands of brilliant blue-green-colored cover scales. The thin, cuticular lower lamina of the scales acts as a blue reflector. The thick upper lamina forms a dense two-dimensional cuticular lattice of air cavities

  12. Preliminary Study on CHF Enhancement of Cellulose Nano Fiber (CNF) Fluid with Wire Pool Boiling Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Won Ki; Lee, Yun Seok; Lim, Dong Young; Song, Sub Lee; Lee, Jae Young; Lee, Kwon Yeong [Hanyang Global University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Dong Soo [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Critical heat flux (CHF) is enhancement of a boiling system will make more compact and effective cooling systems, for examples, nuclear reactors, and air conditioning units. For decades, researchers have been trying to develop more efficient working fluid for heat transfer. This is where nano-fluid could play a key role. There have been a lot of researches for CHF enhancements in nucleate boiling by using nano-fluid which are composed of metal such as copper, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ceramic. And a critical factor of the enhancement is deposition of nano-particles on heating surface, although some results of recent studies are contrary. Also, previous nano-fluid are expensive and have a problem in mass production, so they are difficult to apply to practical industries. Therefore we chose a new material, cellulose nano fiber (CNF) as a solution. CNF can be applied to real situation because it has some advantages which are cost-effectiveness, easiness to get and to make it in nano scale. CHF performance of CNF fluid was different from that of distilled water. Compared to CHF of distilled water, CHF of the CNF fluid which had 0.001V%, 0.01V%, and 0.1V% volumetric concentrations were enhanced to 1%, 104%, and 13% respectively. Likewise other nano-fluid, deposition phenomena was observed in this CNF fluid boiling experiment.

  13. Demonstration of an in situ morphing hyperelliptical cambered span wing mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzo, Justin; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2010-01-01

    Research on efficient shore bird morphology inspired the hyperelliptical cambered span (HECS) wing, a crescent-shaped, aft-swept wing with vertically oriented wingtips. The wing reduces vorticity-induced circulation loss and outperforms an elliptical baseline when planar. Designed initially as a rigid wing, the HECS wing makes use of morphing to transition from a planar to a furled configuration, similar to that of a continuously curved winglet, in flight. A morphing wing concept mechanism is presented, employing shape memory alloy actuators to create a discretized curvature approximation. The aerodynamics for continuous wing shapes is validated quasi-statically through wind tunnel testing, showing enhanced planar HECS wing lift-to-drag performance over an elliptical wing, with the furled HECS wing showing minimal enhancements beyond this point. Wind tunnel tests of the active morphing wing prove the mechanism capable of overcoming realistic loading, while further testing may be required to establish aerodynamic merits of the HECS wing morphing maneuver

  14. A novel hovering type of fixed wing aircraft with stealth capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriu DRĂGAN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The tactical need for fixed wing aircraft with hovering capably has long been recognized bythe military for two reasons: increased safety when landing on aircraft carriers and higher velocitiesthat the ones obtainable with rotary wing aircraft.Thus far, the only concept governing the field of vertical flight was to use thrust either from a liftfan-F35, puffer ducts –Harrier or smaller jet engines-D0 31 or Yak-141, i.e. direct lift thrust.In this paper we will look at the prospect of using a combination of the Coanda effect with theVenturi effect to generate lift by so- called “supercirculation”. This novel approach can yield manyadvantages to conventional vertical lifting by providing a more stable platform and requiring lowerpower settings – and thus lower fuel consumption.The aircraft has a fixed, negatively sweped wing that uses circulation control to achieve lift atzero air speed. The fluid used for supercirculation will come from the fan thrust reversers – which, ifcorrectly managed, can give a sufficient flow for lifting the craft and also a negative thrust componentto compensate for the positive thrust of the primary flow (not diverted.

  15. Flight dynamic investigations of flying wing with winglet configured unmanned aerial vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Kapseong

    2006-05-01

    A swept wing tailless vehicle platform is well known in the radio control (RC) and sailing aircraft community for excellent spiral stability during soaring or thermaling, while exhibiting no Dutch roll behavior at high speed. When an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is subjected to fly a mission in a rugged mountainous terrain where air current or thermal up-drift is frequently present, this is great aerodynamic benefit over the conventional cross-tailed aircraft which requires careful balance between lateral and directional stability. Such dynamic characteristics can be studied through vehicle dynamic modeling and simulation, but it requires configuration aerodynamic data through wind tunnel experiments. Obtaining such data is very costly and time consuming, and it is not feasible especially for low cost and dispensable UAVs. On the other hand, the vehicle autonomy is quite demanding which requires substantial understanding of aircraft dynamic characteristics. In this study, flight dynamics of an UAV platform based on flying wing with a large winglet was investigated through analytical modeling and numerical simulation. Flight dynamic modeling software and experimental formulae were used to obtain essential configuration aerodynamic characteristics, and linear flight dynamic analysis was carried out to understand the effect of wing sweep angle and winglet size on the vehicle dynamic characteristics.

  16. Measurement of circulation around wing-tip vortices and estimation of lift forces using stereo PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Shinichiro; Sato, Haru; Sakakibara, Jun

    2017-11-01

    Applying the flapping flight to the development of an aircraft as Mars space probe and a small aircraft called MAV (Micro Air Vehicle) is considered. This is because Reynolds number assumed as the condition of these aircrafts is low and similar to of insects and small birds flapping on the earth. However, it is difficult to measure the flow around the airfoil in flapping flight directly because of its three-dimensional and unsteady characteristics. Hence, there is an attempt to estimate the flow field and aerodynamics by measuring the wake of the airfoil using PIV, for example the lift estimation method based on a wing-tip vortex. In this study, at the angle of attack including the angle after stall, we measured the wing-tip vortex of a NACA 0015 cross-sectional and rectangular planform airfoil using stereo PIV. The circulation of the wing-tip vortex was calculated from the obtained velocity field, and the lift force was estimated based on Kutta-Joukowski theorem. Then, the validity of this estimation method was examined by comparing the estimated lift force and the force balance data at various angles of attack. The experiment results are going to be presented in the conference.

  17. Control of wing-tip vortex using winglets at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seunghyun; Choi, Haecheon

    2014-11-01

    Winglets are considered as one of the effective devices for reducing induced drag, and thus many studies have been conducted, but mainly at high Reynolds numbers (Re ~106 ~107) for commercial airplanes. However, small-size unmanned air vehicles (UAV), operating at low Reynolds numbers (Re PIV measurements are conducted at several cross-flow planes for a few different angles of attack (α) . At high angles of attack (7° ~13°) , the winglets with the cant angle of 70° increase the aerodynamic performance, whereas at low angles of attack (2° ~6°) , the wing-tip extension (cant angle of 0°) shows better performances. The velocity fields measured from PIV indicate that, with the winglet, the wing-tip vortex moves away from the wing surface at α =12° , and the downwash motion in the wake behind the trailing edge is decreased, reducing the magnitude of the induced drag. A concept of changing the cant angle during flight is also suggested at this talk. Supported by 2011-0028032.

  18. Biomechanics of smart wings in a bat robot: morphing wings using SMA actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colorado, J; Barrientos, A; Rossi, C; Breuer, K S

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a bat-like micro aerial vehicle with actuated morphing wings. NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs) acting as artificial biceps and triceps muscles are used for mimicking the morphing wing mechanism of the bat flight apparatus. Our objective is twofold. Firstly, we have implemented a control architecture that allows an accurate and fast SMA actuation. This control makes use of the electrical resistance measurements of SMAs to adjust morphing wing motions. Secondly, the feasibility of using SMA actuation technology is evaluated for the application at hand. To this purpose, experiments are conducted to analyze the control performance in terms of nominal and overloaded operation modes of the SMAs. This analysis includes: (i) inertial forces regarding the stretchable wing membrane and aerodynamic loads, and (ii) uncertainties due to impact of airflow conditions over the resistance–motion relationship of SMAs. With the proposed control, morphing actuation speed can be increased up to 2.5 Hz, being sufficient to generate lift forces at a cruising speed of 5 m s −1 . (paper)

  19. Biomechanics of smart wings in a bat robot: morphing wings using SMA actuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorado, J; Barrientos, A; Rossi, C; Bahlman, J W; Breuer, K S

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents the design of a bat-like micro aerial vehicle with actuated morphing wings. NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs) acting as artificial biceps and triceps muscles are used for mimicking the morphing wing mechanism of the bat flight apparatus. Our objective is twofold. Firstly, we have implemented a control architecture that allows an accurate and fast SMA actuation. This control makes use of the electrical resistance measurements of SMAs to adjust morphing wing motions. Secondly, the feasibility of using SMA actuation technology is evaluated for the application at hand. To this purpose, experiments are conducted to analyze the control performance in terms of nominal and overloaded operation modes of the SMAs. This analysis includes: (i) inertial forces regarding the stretchable wing membrane and aerodynamic loads, and (ii) uncertainties due to impact of airflow conditions over the resistance-motion relationship of SMAs. With the proposed control, morphing actuation speed can be increased up to 2.5 Hz, being sufficient to generate lift forces at a cruising speed of 5 m s(-1).

  20. A parametric wing design study for a modern laminar flow wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koegler, J. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The results of a parametric wing design study using a modern laminar flow airfoil designed to exhibit desirable stall characteristics while maintaining high cruise performance are presented. It was found that little is sacrificed in cruise performance when satisfying the stall margin requirements if a taper ratio of 0.65 or greater is used.

  1. SUPERDENSE MASSIVE GALAXIES IN WINGS LOCAL CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentinuzzi, T.; D'Onofrio, M.; Fritz, J.; Poggianti, B. M.; Bettoni, D.; Fasano, G.; Moretti, A.; Omizzolo, A.; Varela, J.; Cava, A.; Couch, W. J.; Dressler, A.; Moles, M.; Kjaergaard, P.; Vanzella, E.

    2010-01-01

    Massive quiescent galaxies at z > 1 have been found to have small physical sizes, and hence to be superdense. Several mechanisms, including minor mergers, have been proposed for increasing galaxy sizes from high- to low-z. We search for superdense massive galaxies in the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) of X-ray selected galaxy clusters at 0.04 10 M sun , are mostly S0 galaxies, have a median effective radius (R e ) = 1.61 ± 0.29 kpc, a median Sersic index (n) = 3.0 ± 0.6, and very old stellar populations with a median mass-weighted age of 12.1 ± 1.3 Gyr. We calculate a number density of 2.9 x 10 -2 Mpc -3 for superdense galaxies in local clusters, and a hard lower limit of 1.3 x 10 -5 Mpc -3 in the whole comoving volume between z = 0.04 and z = 0.07. We find a relation between mass, effective radius, and luminosity-weighted age in our cluster galaxies, which can mimic the claimed evolution of the radius with redshift, if not properly taken into account. We compare our data with spectroscopic high-z surveys and find that-when stellar masses are considered-there is consistency with the local WINGS galaxy sizes out to z ∼ 2, while a discrepancy of a factor of 3 exists with the only spectroscopic z > 2 study. In contrast, there is strong evidence for a large evolution in radius for the most massive galaxies with M * > 4 x 10 11 M sun compared to similarly massive galaxies in WINGS, i.e., the brightest cluster galaxies.

  2. Functional Nano fibers: Production and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatri, Z.; Kim, I.S.; Kim, S.H.

    2016-01-01

    Nano fibers are lighter material with higher surface area in comparison to polymeric film. The ease of producing functional nano fiber is another advantage over many nano materials. Functional nano fiber in particular has attained a greater interest in recent years. The applications of functional nano fibers are increasing in various technical fields such as water filter membranes, tissue engineering, biosensors, drug delivery systems, wound dressings, catalysis, antibacterial. This special issue is comprised of well-selective articles that discuss production of functional nano fibers their applications in different emerging fields. M. Zhang et al. have presented exciting work on drug delivery using nano fibers. They used collagen that was extracted from abandoned Rana chensinensis skin in northeastern China via an acid enzymatic extraction method. They demonstrated two different nano fiber-vancomycin (VCM) systems, that is, VCM blended nano fibers and core-shell nano fibers with VCM in the core, and both systems sustained control release for a period of 80 hours. Another work was presented by R. Takai et al. on blood purification using composite nano fibers. About 10% of the population worldwide is affected by chronic kidney disease (CKD). The authors developed nano fiber meshes zeolite-polymer composite nano fibers for efficient adsorption of creatinine, which is a simpler and more accessible method for hemodialysis (HD) patients.

  3. Effects of boundary layer forcing on wing-tip vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw-Ward, Samantha

    The nature of turbulence within wing-tip vortices has been a topic of research for decades, yet accurate measurements of Reynolds stresses within the core are inherently difficult due to the bulk motion wandering caused by initial and boundary conditions in wind tunnels. As a result, characterization of a vortex as laminar or turbulent is inconclusive and highly contradicting. This research uses several experimental techniques to study the effects of broadband turbulence, introduced within the wing boundary layer, on the development of wing-tip vortices. Two rectangular wings with a NACA 0012 profile were fabricated for the use of this research. One wing had a smooth finish and the other rough, introduced by P80 grade sandpaper. Force balance measurements showed a small reduction in wing performance due to surface roughness for both 2D and 3D configurations, although stall characteristics remained relatively unchanged. Seven-hole probes were purpose-built and used to assess the mean velocity profiles of the vortices five chord lengths downstream of the wing at multiple angles of attack. Above an incidence of 4 degrees, the vortices were nearly axisymmetric, and the wing roughness reduced both velocity gradients and peak velocity magnitudes within the vortex. Laser Doppler velocimetry was used to further assess the time-resolved vortex at an incidence of 5 degrees. Evidence of wake shedding frequencies and wing shear layer instabilities at higher frequencies were seen in power spectra within the vortex. Unlike the introduction of freestream turbulence, wing surface roughness did not appear to increase wandering amplitude. A new method for removing the effects of vortex wandering is proposed with the use of carefully selected high-pass filters. The filtered data revealed that the Reynolds stress profiles of the vortex produced by the smooth and rough wing were similar in shape, with a peak occurring away from the vortex centre but inside of the core. Single hot

  4. Folding in and out: passive morphing in flapping wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowers, Amanda K; Lentink, David

    2015-03-25

    We present a new mechanism for passive wing morphing of flapping wings inspired by bat and bird wing morphology. The mechanism consists of an unactuated hand wing connected to the arm wing with a wrist joint. Flapping motion generates centrifugal accelerations in the hand wing, forcing it to unfold passively. Using a robotic model in hover, we made kinematic measurements of unfolding kinematics as functions of the non-dimensional wingspan fold ratio (2-2.5) and flapping frequency (5-17 Hz) using stereo high-speed cameras. We find that the wings unfold passively within one to two flaps and remain unfolded with only small amplitude oscillations. To better understand the passive dynamics, we constructed a computer model of the unfolding process based on rigid body dynamics, contact models, and aerodynamic correlations. This model predicts the measured passive unfolding within about one flap and shows that unfolding is driven by centrifugal acceleration induced by flapping. The simulations also predict that relative unfolding time only weakly depends on flapping frequency and can be reduced to less than half a wingbeat by increasing flapping amplitude. Subsequent dimensional analysis shows that the time required to unfold passively is of the same order of magnitude as the flapping period. This suggests that centrifugal acceleration can drive passive unfolding within approximately one wingbeat in small and large wings. Finally, we show experimentally that passive unfolding wings can withstand impact with a branch, by first folding and then unfolding passively. This mechanism enables flapping robots to squeeze through clutter without sophisticated control. Passive unfolding also provides a new avenue in morphing wing design that makes future flapping morphing wings possibly more energy efficient and light-weight. Simultaneously these results point to possible inertia driven, and therefore metabolically efficient, control strategies in bats and birds to morph or recover

  5. Spatial perturbation of a wing-tip vortex using pulsed span-wise jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, A. L.; Smith, D. A. R.

    The separation distance required between transport aircraft to avoid wake vortices remains a limiting factor on airport capacity. The dissipation of the wake can be accelerated by perturbing co-operative instabilities between multiple pairs of vortices. This paper presents the results of a preliminary experimental investigation into the use of pulsed span-wise air jets in the wing tip to perturb a single tip vortex in the very near field. Velocity measurements were made using PIV and hot-wire anemometry. The results demonstrate that the vortex position can be modulated at frequencies up to 50 Hz and, as such, the method shows promise for forcing instability in multiple vortex wakes.

  6. Video change detection for fixed wing UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelsen, Jan; Müller, Thomas; Ring, Jochen; Mück, Klaus; Brüstle, Stefan; Erdnüß, Bastian; Lutz, Bastian; Herbst, Theresa

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we proceed the work of Bartelsen et al.1 We present the draft of a process chain for an image based change detection which is designed for videos acquired by fixed wing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). From our point of view, automatic video change detection for aerial images can be useful to recognize functional activities which are typically caused by the deployment of improvised explosive devices (IEDs), e.g. excavations, skid marks, footprints, left-behind tooling equipment, and marker stones. Furthermore, in case of natural disasters, like flooding, imminent danger can be recognized quickly. Due to the necessary flight range, we concentrate on fixed wing UAVs. Automatic change detection can be reduced to a comparatively simple photogrammetric problem when the perspective change between the "before" and "after" image sets is kept as small as possible. Therefore, the aerial image acquisition demands a mission planning with a clear purpose including flight path and sensor configuration. While the latter can be enabled simply by a fixed and meaningful adjustment of the camera, ensuring a small perspective change for "before" and "after" videos acquired by fixed wing UAVs is a challenging problem. Concerning this matter, we have performed tests with an advanced commercial off the shelf (COTS) system which comprises a differential GPS and autopilot system estimating the repetition accuracy of its trajectory. Although several similar approaches have been presented,23 as far as we are able to judge, the limits for this important issue are not estimated so far. Furthermore, we design a process chain to enable the practical utilization of video change detection. It consists of a front-end of a database to handle large amounts of video data, an image processing and change detection implementation, and the visualization of the results. We apply our process chain on the real video data acquired by the advanced COTS fixed wing UAV and synthetic data. For the

  7. Metrology at the nano scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheridan, B.; Cumpson, P.; Bailey, M.

    2006-01-01

    Progress in nano technology relies on ever more accurate measurements of quantities such as distance, force and current industry has long depended on accurate measurement. In the 19th century, for example, the performance of steam engines was seriously limited by inaccurately made components, a situation that was transformed by Henry Maudsley's screw micrometer calliper. And early in the 20th century, the development of telegraphy relied on improved standards of electrical resistance. Before this, each country had its own standards and cross border communication was difficult. The same is true today of nano technology if it is to be fully exploited by industry. Principles of measurement that work well at the macroscopic level often become completely unworkable at the nano metre scale - about 100 nm and below. Imaging, for example, is not possible on this scale using optical microscopes, and it is virtually impossible to weigh a nano metre-scale object with any accuracy. In addition to needing more accurate measurements, nano technology also often requires a greater variety of measurements than conventional technology. For example, standard techniques used to make microchips generally need accurate length measurements, but the manufacture of electronics at the molecular scale requires magnetic, electrical, mechanical and chemical measurements as well. (U.K.)

  8. How wing kinematics affect power requirements and aerodynamic force production in a robotic bat wing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahlman, Joseph W; Swartz, Sharon M; Breuer, Kenneth S

    2014-01-01

    Bats display a wide variety of behaviors that require different amounts of aerodynamic force. To control and modulate aerodynamic force, bats change wing kinematics, which, in turn, may change the power required for wing motion. There are many kinematic mechanisms that bats, and other flapping animals, can use to increase aerodynamic force, e.g. increasing wingbeat frequency or amplitude. However, we do not know if there is a difference in energetic cost between these different kinematic mechanisms. To assess the relationship between mechanical power input and aerodynamic force output across different isolated kinematic parameters, we programmed a robotic bat wing to flap over a range of kinematic parameters and measured aerodynamic force and mechanical power. We systematically varied five kinematic parameters: wingbeat frequency, wingbeat amplitude, stroke plane angle, downstroke ratio, and wing folding. Kinematic values were based on observed values from free flying Cynopterus brachyotis, the species on which the robot was based. We describe how lift, thrust, and power change with increases in each kinematic variable. We compare the power costs associated with generating additional force through the four kinematic mechanisms controlled at the shoulder, and show that all four mechanisms require approximately the same power to generate a given force. This result suggests that no single parameter offers an energetic advantage over the others. Finally, we show that retracting the wing during upstroke reduces power requirements for flapping and increases net lift production, but decreases net thrust production. These results compare well with studies performed on C. brachyotis, offering insight into natural flight kinematics. (paper)

  9. Preliminary wing model tests in the variable density wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Max M

    1926-01-01

    This report contains the results of a series of tests with three wing models. By changing the section of one of the models and painting the surface of another, the number of models tested was increased to five. The tests were made in order to obtain some general information on the air forces on wing sections at a high Reynolds number and in particular to make sure that the Reynolds number is really the important factor, and not other things like the roughness of the surface and the sharpness of the trailing edge. The few tests described in this report seem to indicate that the air forces at a high Reynolds number are not equivalent to respective air forces at a low Reynolds number (as in an ordinary atmospheric wind tunnel). The drag appears smaller at a high Reynolds number and the maximum lift is increased in some cases. The roughness of the surface and the sharpness of the trailing edge do not materially change the results, so that we feel confident that tests with systematic series of different wing sections will bring consistent results, important and highly useful to the designer.

  10. Blended Wing Body Concept Development with Open Rotor Engine Intergration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitera, David M.; DeHaan, Mark; Brown, Derrell; Kawai, Ronald T.; Hollowell, Steve; Camacho, Peter; Bruns, David; Rawden, Blaine K.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to perform a systems analysis of a Blended Wing Body (BWB) open rotor concept at the conceptual design level. This concept will be utilized to estimate overall noise and fuel burn performance, leveraging recent test data. This study will also investigate the challenge of propulsion airframe installation of an open rotor engine on a BWB configuration. Open rotor engines have unique problems relative to turbofans. The rotors are open, exposed to flow conditions outside of the engine. The flow field that the rotors are immersed in may be higher than the free stream flow and it may not be uniform, both of these characteristics could increase noise and decrease performance. The rotors sometimes cause changes in the flow conditions imposed on aircraft surfaces. At high power conditions such as takeoff and climb out, the stream tube of air that goes through the rotors contracts rapidly causing the boundary layer on the body upper surface to go through an adverse pressure gradient which could result with separated airflow. The BWB / Open Rotor configuration must be designed to mitigate these problems.

  11. Small-scale fixed wing airplane software verification flight test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Natasha R.

    The increased demand for micro Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV) driven by military requirements, commercial use, and academia is creating a need for the ability to quickly and accurately conduct low Reynolds Number aircraft design. There exist several open source software programs that are free or inexpensive that can be used for large scale aircraft design, but few software programs target the realm of low Reynolds Number flight. XFLR5 is an open source, free to download, software program that attempts to take into consideration viscous effects that occur at low Reynolds Number in airfoil design, 3D wing design, and 3D airplane design. An off the shelf, remote control airplane was used as a test bed to model in XFLR5 and then compared to flight test collected data. Flight test focused on the stability modes of the 3D plane, specifically the phugoid mode. Design and execution of the flight tests were accomplished for the RC airplane using methodology from full scale military airplane test procedures. Results from flight test were not conclusive in determining the accuracy of the XFLR5 software program. There were several sources of uncertainty that did not allow for a full analysis of the flight test results. An off the shelf drone autopilot was used as a data collection device for flight testing. The precision and accuracy of the autopilot is unknown. Potential future work should investigate flight test methods for small scale UAV flight.

  12. Design and Performance of Insect-Scale Flapping-Wing Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, John Peter

    Micro-air vehicles (MAVs)---small versions of full-scale aircraft---are the product of a continued path of miniaturization which extends across many fields of engineering. Increasingly, MAVs approach the scale of small birds, and most recently, their sizes have dipped into the realm of hummingbirds and flying insects. However, these non-traditional biologically-inspired designs are without well-established design methods, and manufacturing complex devices at these tiny scales is not feasible using conventional manufacturing methods. This thesis presents a comprehensive investigation of new MAV design and manufacturing methods, as applicable to insect-scale hovering flight. New design methods combine an energy-based accounting of propulsion and aerodynamics with a one degree-of-freedom dynamic flapping model. Important results include analytical expressions for maximum flight endurance and range, and predictions for maximum feasible wing size and body mass. To meet manufacturing constraints, the use of passive wing dynamics to simplify vehicle design and control was investigated; supporting tests included the first synchronized measurements of real-time forces and three-dimensional kinematics generated by insect-scale flapping wings. These experimental methods were then expanded to study optimal wing shapes and high-efficiency flapping kinematics. To support the development of high-fidelity test devices and fully-functional flight hardware, a new class of manufacturing methods was developed, combining elements of rigid-flex printed circuit board fabrication with "pop-up book" folding mechanisms. In addition to their current and future support of insect-scale MAV development, these new manufacturing techniques are likely to prove an essential element to future advances in micro-optomechanics, micro-surgery, and many other fields.

  13. Nano structures for Medical Diagnostics Md

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellah, M.; Iqbal, S.M.; Bellah, M.; Iqbal, S.M.; Christensen, S.M.; Iqbal, S.M.; Iqbal, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Nano technology is the art of manipulating materials on atomic or molecular scales especially to build nano scale structures and devices. The field is expanding quickly, and a lot of work is ongoing in the design, characterization, synthesis, and application of materials, structures, devices, and systems by controlling shape and size at nanometer scale. In the last few years, much work has been focused on the use of nano structures toward problems of biology and medicine. In this paper, we focus on the application of various nano structures and nano devices in clinical diagnostics and detection of important biological molecules. The discussion starts by introducing some basic techniques of micro-/nano scale fabrication that have enabled reproducible production of nano structures. The prospects, benefits, and limitations of using these novel techniques in the fields of bio detection and medical diagnostics are then discussed. Finally, the challenges of mass production and acceptance of nano technology by the medical community are considered.

  14. Morphing Wing Design with an Innovative Three-Dimensional Warping Actuation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced wing configurations where traditional control surfaces are replaced by dynamically controlled distribution of wing twist and/or camber can provide...

  15. Variable Geometry Aircraft Wing Supported by Struts And/Or Trusses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, John E. (Inventor); Dudley, Michael R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention provides an aircraft having variable airframe geometry for accommodating efficient flight. The aircraft includes an elongated fuselage, an oblique wing pivotally connected with said fuselage, a wing pivoting mechanism connected with said oblique wing and said fuselage, and a brace operably connected between said oblique wing and said fuselage. The present invention also provides an aircraft having an elongated fuselage, an oblique wing pivotally connected with said fuselage, a wing pivoting mechanism connected with said oblique wing and said fuselage, a propulsion system pivotally connected with said oblique wing, and a brace operably connected between said propulsion system and said fuselage.

  16. Numerical simulation of X-wing type biplane flapping wings in 3D using the immersed boundary method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tay, W B; Van Oudheusden, B W; Bijl, H

    2014-01-01

    The numerical simulation of an insect-sized ‘X-wing’ type biplane flapping wing configuration is performed in 3D using an immersed boundary method solver at Reynolds numbers equal to 1000 (1 k) and 5 k, based on the wing's root chord length. This X-wing type flapping configuration draws its inspiration from Delfly, a bio-inspired ornithopter MAV which has two pairs of wings flapping in anti-phase in a biplane configuration. The objective of the present investigation is to assess the aerodynamic performance when the original Delfly flapping wing micro-aerial vehicle (FMAV) is reduced to the size of an insect. Results show that the X-wing configuration gives more than twice the average thrust compared with only flapping the upper pair of wings of the X-wing. However, the X-wing's average thrust is only 40% that of the upper wing flapping at twice the stroke angle. Despite this, the increased stability which results from the smaller lift and moment variation of the X-wing configuration makes it more suited for sharp image capture and recognition. These advantages make the X-wing configuration an attractive alternative design for insect-sized FMAVS compared to the single wing configuration. In the Reynolds number comparison, the vorticity iso-surface plot at a Reynolds number of 5 k revealed smaller, finer vortical structures compared to the simulation at 1 k, due to vortices’ breakup. In comparison, the force output difference is much smaller between Re = 1 k and 5 k. Increasing the body inclination angle generates a uniform leading edge vortex instead of a conical one along the wingspan, giving higher lift. Understanding the force variation as the body inclination angle increases will allow FMAV designers to optimize the thrust and lift ratio for higher efficiency under different operational requirements. Lastly, increasing the spanwise flexibility of the wings increases the thrust slightly but decreases the efficiency. The thrust result is similar

  17. Air Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's air research provides the critical science to develop and implement outdoor air regulations under the Clean Air Act and puts new tools and information in the hands of air quality managers and regulators to protect the air we breathe.

  18. Wing design for light transport aircraft with improved fuel economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welte, D.; Birrenbach, R.; Haberland, W.

    An advanced technology wing has been designed for a light utility and commuter service aircraft with the requirements for economy, safety and flexibility. Trade-off studies give optimum area and aspect-ratio of the wing. A new airfoil was developed to fulfill the performance requirements. Wing planform and twist were chosen to give high maximum lift, low drag and good stall characteristics. Preset ailerons were optimized for wheel forces and lateral control. The applied aerodynamic methods, including two- and three-dimensional wind tunnel tests are shown. Various structural configurations of the wing and various flap systems are evaluated. The cantilever tapered wing and a Fowler-flap with a two-lever mechanism were found to be the most economic ones. The wing was constructed and flight-tested with a modified Dornier Do 28 Skyservant as a test bed. The new wing is being applied to a family of light transport aircraft. Finally, aircraft with the new wing are compared performancewise with contemporary aircraft.

  19. Design and Testing of Aeroelastically Tailored Wings Under Maneuver Loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werter, N.P.M.; Sodja, J.; De Breuker, R.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present paper is to provide experimental validation data for the aeroelastic analysis of composite aeroelastically tailored wings with a closed-cell cross-sectional structure. Several rectangular wings with differ- ent skin thicknesses and composite layups are designed in order to

  20. Optimisation of the Sekwa blended-wing-Body research UAV

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Broughton, BA

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A variable stability, blended-wing-body research mini-UAV was developed at the CSIR in South Africa. The purpose of the UAV was to study some of the aerodynamic design and control issues associated with flying wing geometries and to develop a...

  1. Flapping-wing mechanical butterfly on a wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy-Diana, Ramiro; Thiria, Benjamin; Pradal, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    We examine the propulsive performance of a flapping-wing device turning on a ``merry-go-round'' type base. The two-wing flapper is attached to a mast that is ball-bearing mounted to a central shaft in such a way that the thrust force produced by the wings makes the flapper turn around this shaft. The oscillating lift force produced by the flapping wings is aligned with the mast to avoid vibration of the system. A turning contact allows to power the motor that drives the wings. We measure power consumption and cruising speed as a function of flapping frequency and amplitude as well as wing flexibility. The design of the wings permits to change independently their flexibility in the span-wise and chord-wise directions and PIV measurements in various planes let us examine the vorticity field around the device. A complete study of the effect of wing flexibility on the propulsive performance of the system will be presented at the conference.

  2. Use of wing morphometry for the discrimination of some Cerceris ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The outline analysis, in which geometric and traditional morphometry potentials are insufficient, was performed by using the Fourier transformation. As a result of the comprehensive wing morphometry study, it was found that both Cerceris species can be distinguished according to their wing structures and the metric ...

  3. Energy-based Aeroelastic Analysis and Optimisation of Morphing Wings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Breuker, R.

    2011-01-01

    Morphing aircraft can change their shape radically when confronted with a variety of conflicting flight conditions throughout their mission. For instance the F-14 Tomcat fighter aircraft, known from the movie Top Gun, was able to sweep its wings from a straight wing configuration to a highly swept

  4. COLIBRI : A hovering flapping twin-wing robot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roshanbin, A.; Altartouri, H.; Karasek, M.; Preumont, André

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a six-year project aiming at designing and constructing a flapping twin-wing robot of the size of hummingbird (Colibri in French) capable of hovering. Our prototype has a total mass of 22 g, a wing span of 21 cm and a flapping frequency of 22 Hz; it is actively

  5. Design, Development and Testing of Shape Shifting Wing Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean Ninian

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The design and development of morphing (shape shifting aircraft wings—an innovative technology that has the potential to increase the aerodynamic efficiency and reduce noise signatures of aircrafts—was carried out. This research was focused on reducing lift-induced drag at the flaps of the aerofoil and to improve the design to achieve the optimum aerodynamic efficiency. Simulation revealed a 10.8% coefficient of lift increase for the initial morphing wing and 15.4% for the optimized morphing wing as compared to conventional wing design. At angles of attack of 0, 5, 10 and 15 degrees, the optimized wing has an increase in lift-to-drag ratio of 18.3%, 10.5%, 10.6% and 4% respectively when compared with the conventional wing. Simulations also showed that there is a significant improvement on pressure distribution over the lower surface of the morphing wing aerofoil. The increase in flow smoothness and reduction in vortex size reduced pressure drag along the trailing edge of the wing as a result an increase in pressure on the lower surface was experienced. A morphing wing reduced the size of the vortices and therefore the noise levels measured were reduced by up to 50%.

  6. Temporal variation of wing geometry in Aedes albopictus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Oliveira Vidal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Although native to the tropical and subtropical areas of Southeast Asia, Aedes albopictus is now found on five continents, primarily due to its great capacity to adapt to different environments. This species is considered a secondary vector of dengue virus in several countries. Wing geometric morphometrics is widely used to furnish morphological markers for the characterisation and identification of species of medical importance and for the assessment of population dynamics. In this work, we investigated the metric differentiation of the wings of Ae. albopictus samples collected over a four-year period (2007-2010 in São Paulo, Brazil. Wing size significantly decreased during this period for both sexes and the wing shape also changed over time, with the wing shapes of males showing greater differences after 2008 and those of females differing more after 2009. Given that the wings play sex-specific roles, these findings suggest that the males and females could be affected by differential evolutionary pressures. Consistent with this hypothesis, a sexually dimorphic pattern was detected and quantified: the females were larger than the males (with respect to the mean and had a distinct wing shape, regardless of allometric effects. In conclusion, wing alterations, particularly those involving shape, are a sensitive indicator of microevolutionary processes in this species.

  7. Temporal variation of wing geometry in Aedes albopictus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Paloma Oliveira; Carvalho, Eneas; Suesdek, Lincoln

    2012-12-01

    Although native to the tropical and subtropical areas of Southeast Asia, Aedes albopictus is now found on five continents, primarily due to its great capacity to adapt to different environments. This species is considered a secondary vector of dengue virus in several countries. Wing geometric morphometrics is widely used to furnish morphological markers for the characterisation and identification of species of medical importance and for the assessment of population dynamics. In this work, we investigated the metric differentiation of the wings of Ae. albopictus samples collected over a four-year period (2007-2010) in São Paulo, Brazil. Wing size significantly decreased during this period for both sexes and the wing shape also changed over time, with the wing shapes of males showing greater differences after 2008 and those of females differing more after 2009. Given that the wings play sex-specific roles, these findings suggest that the males and females could be affected by differential evolutionary pressures. Consistent with this hypothesis, a sexually dimorphic pattern was detected and quantified: the females were larger than the males (with respect to the mean) and had a distinct wing shape, regardless of allometric effects. In conclusion, wing alterations, particularly those involving shape, are a sensitive indicator of microevolutionary processes in this species.

  8. Stable structural color patterns displayed on transparent insect wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevtsova, Ekaterina; Hansson, Christer; Janzen, Daniel H; Kjærandsen, Jostein

    2011-01-11

    Color patterns play central roles in the behavior of insects, and are important traits for taxonomic studies. Here we report striking and stable structural color patterns--wing interference patterns (WIPs)--in the transparent wings of small Hymenoptera and Diptera, patterns that have been largely overlooked by biologists. These extremely thin wings reflect vivid color patterns caused by thin film interference. The visibility of these patterns is affected by the way the insects display their wings against various backgrounds with different light properties. The specific color sequence displayed lacks pure red and matches the color vision of most insects, strongly suggesting that the biological significance of WIPs lies in visual signaling. Taxon-specific color patterns are formed by uneven membrane thickness, pigmentation, venation, and hair placement. The optically refracted pattern is also stabilized by microstructures of the wing such as membrane corrugations and spherical cell structures that reinforce the pattern and make it essentially noniridescent over a large range of light incidences. WIPs can be applied to map the micromorphology of wings through direct observation and are useful in several fields of biology. We demonstrate their usefulness as identification patterns to solve cases of cryptic species complexes in tiny parasitic wasps, and indicate their potentials for research on the genetic control of wing development through direct links between the transregulatory wing landscape and interference patterns we observe in Drosophila model species. Some species display sexually dimorphic WIPs, suggesting sexual selection as one of the driving forces for their evolution.

  9. Hydraulic Evaluation of the Crest Wing Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Antonishen, Michael Patrick

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the wave energy converting abilities of the Crest Wing wave energy converter (WEC). The Crest Wing is a WEC that uses its movement in matching the shape of an oncoming wave to generate power. Model tests have been performed using a scal...

  10. Unsteady Aerodynamics of Flapping Wing of a Bird

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Agoes Moelyadi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The unsteady flow behavior and time-dependent aerodynamic characteristics of the flapping motion of a bird’s wing were investigated using a computational method. During flapping, aerodynamic interactions between bird wing surfaces and surrounding flow may occur, generating local time-dependent flow changes in the flow field and aerodynamic load of birds. To study the effect of flapping speed on unsteady aerodynamic load, two kinds of computational simulations were carried out, namely a quasi-steady and an unsteady simulation. To mimic the movement of the down-stroke and the upstroke of a bird, the flapping path accorded to a sinus function, with the wing attitude changing in dihedral angle and time. The computations of time-dependent viscous flow were based on the solution of the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations by applying the k-e turbulence model. In addition, the discretization for the computational domain around the model used multi-block structured grid to provide more accuracy in capturing viscous flow, especially in the vicinity of the wing and body surfaces, to obtain a proper wing-body geometry model. For this research, the seagull bird was chosen, which has high aspect ratio wings with pointed wing-tips and a high camber wing section. The results include mesh movement, velocity contours as well as aerodynamic coefficients of the flapping motion of the bird at various flapping frequencies.

  11. Vortex coupling in trailing vortex-wing interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.; Wang, Z.; Gursul, I.

    2018-03-01

    The interaction of trailing vortices of an upstream wing with rigid and flexible downstream wings has been investigated experimentally in a wind tunnel, using particle image velocimetry, hot-wire, force, and deformation measurements. Counter-rotating upstream vortices exhibit increased meandering when they are close to the tip of the downstream wing. The upstream vortex forms a pair with the vortex shed from the downstream wing and then exhibits large displacements around the wing tip. This coupled motion of the pair has been found to cause large lift fluctuations on the downstream wing. The meandering of the vortex pair occurs at the natural meandering frequency of the isolated vortex, with a low Strouhal number, and is not affected by the frequency of the large-amplitude wing oscillations if the downstream wing is flexible. The displacement of the leading vortex is larger than that of the trailing vortex; however, it causes highly correlated variations of the core radius, core vorticity, and circulation of the trailing vortex with the coupled meandering motion. In contrast, co-rotating vortices do not exhibit any increased meandering.

  12. Closed-type wing for drones: positive and negative characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid I. Gretchihin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the aerodynamics of a wing of a closed oval ellipsoidal shape, designed with the use of the molecular-kinetic theory. The positive and negative characteristics of aircraft - drones with an oval wing are described. The theoretical calculations have been experimentally checked.

  13. DETERMINATION OF COMMERCIAL AIRCRAFT WING GEOMETRY DURING THE FLIGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Shevyakov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the task of determination of wing shape for sub-sonic commercial aircraft by photogrammetric method. It provides the procedure for measurements taken on ground and in flight. It also provides the outcome of wing twist for commercial aircraft at cruise.

  14. Global Local Structural Optimization of Transportation Aircraft Wings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciampa, P.D.; Nagel, B.; Van Tooren, M.J.L.

    2010-01-01

    The study presents a multilevel optimization methodology for the preliminary structural design of transportation aircraft wings. A global level is defined by taking into account the primary wing structural components (i.e., ribs, spars and skin) which are explicitly modeled by shell layered finite

  15. Wing flexibility effects in clap-and-fling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Percin, M.; Hu, Y.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.; Remes, B.; Scarano, F.

    2011-01-01

    The work explores the use of time-resolved tomographic PIV measurements to study a flapping-wing model, the related vortex generation mechanisms and the effect of wing flexibility on the clap-and-fling movement in particular. An experimental setup is designed and realized in a water tank by use of a

  16. 14 CFR 23.302 - Canard or tandem wing configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Canard or tandem wing configurations. 23.302 Section 23.302 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure General § 23.302 Canard or tandem wing...

  17. Quantitative-genetic analysis of wing form and bilateral asymmetry ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Overall wing size was analysed here using centroid size. (defined as the square root of the sum .... For those isochromosomal lines that were common to both experimental temperatures .... subobscura reared at 18ºC. CS refers to centroid size (values in pixels2; 1 mm = 144 pixels), and WS to wing shape (all values ×. 104).

  18. Nano-particles;Les nanoparticules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuto, G. [Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Service de medecine nucleaire, 13 - Marseille (France); Chaumet-Riffaud, P. [CHU de Bicetre, Service de medecine nucleaire, 94 - Le Kremlin Bicetre (France)

    2010-06-15

    Nano-particles (N.P.) are structures comprising from some hundred to some thousand atoms. Owing to their size (1 to 100 nanometers), the physical and chemical properties of these nano-objects differ from those of classical materials. They cover a wide development area, which includes medical research: they can be classified into two major groups, organic N.P. (liposomes, polymers N.P., carbon nano tubes, fullerenes) and inorganic N.P. (quantum dots, magnetic N.P., Raman probes). N.P. can be conceived to act as a drug delivery system (therapeutic), imaging probe (diagnostic) or both (theranostic). We report recent data from scientific literature and describe main N.P. within medical area, their state of development, and the limited knowledge of their toxicity in human being. (author)

  19. Nano market and analysis of technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    This book gives descriptions of summary of nano technology with meaning, character and field, trend of technical development in domestic, current condition of nano basic research in domestic, trend of technical development in foreign country such as summary, trend of technology by industrial field, machine and metronics, material and process, standard of nano mechanism, scale of market and trend, competitiveness of nano technology of major country and research development system in Japan, Korean company and major countries.

  20. Mixed ice accretion on aircraft wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjua, Zaid A.; Turnbull, Barbara; Hibberd, Stephen; Choi, Kwing-So

    2018-02-01

    Ice accretion is a problematic natural phenomenon that affects a wide range of engineering applications including power cables, radio masts, and wind turbines. Accretion on aircraft wings occurs when supercooled water droplets freeze instantaneously on impact to form rime ice or runback as water along the wing to form glaze ice. Most models to date have ignored the accretion of mixed ice, which is a combination of rime and glaze. A parameter we term the "freezing fraction" is defined as the fraction of a supercooled droplet that freezes on impact with the top surface of the accretion ice to explore the concept of mixed ice accretion. Additionally we consider different "packing densities" of rime ice, mimicking the different bulk rime densities observed in nature. Ice accretion is considered in four stages: rime, primary mixed, secondary mixed, and glaze ice. Predictions match with existing models and experimental data in the limiting rime and glaze cases. The mixed ice formulation however provides additional insight into the composition of the overall ice structure, which ultimately influences adhesion and ice thickness, and shows that for similar atmospheric parameter ranges, this simple mixed ice description leads to very different accretion rates. A simple one-dimensional energy balance was solved to show how this freezing fraction parameter increases with decrease in atmospheric temperature, with lower freezing fraction promoting glaze ice accretion.

  1. Computation of Lifting Wing-Flap Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantwell, Brian; Kwak, Dochan

    1996-01-01

    Research has been carried out on the computation of lifting wing-flap configurations. The long term goal of the research is to develop improved computational tools for the analysis and design of high lift systems. Results show that state-of-the-art computational methods are sufficient to predict time-averaged lift and overall flow field characteristics on simple high-lift configurations. Recently there has been an increased interest in the problem of airframe generated noise and experiments carried out in the 7 x 10 wind tunnel at NASA Ames have identified the flap edge as an important source of noise. A follow-on set of experiments will be conducted toward the end of 1995. The computations being carried out under this project are coordinated with these experiments. In particular, the model geometry being used in the computations is the same as that in the experiments. The geometry consists of a NACA 63-215 Mod B airfoil section which spans the 7 x lO tunnel. The wing is unswept and has an aspect ratio of two. A 30% chord Fowler flap is deployed modifications of the flap edge geometry have been shown to be effective in reducing noise and the existing code is currently being used to compute the effect of a modified geometry on the edge flow.

  2. New aeroelastic studies for a morphing wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra Mihaela BOTEZ*

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available For this study, the upper surface of a rectangular finite aspect ratio wing, with a laminar airfoil cross-section, was made of a carbon-Kevlar composite material flexible skin. This flexible skin was morphed by use of Shape Memory Alloy actuators for 35 test cases characterized by combinations of Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers and angles of attack. The Mach numbers varied from 0.2 to 0.3 and the angles of attack ranged between -1° and 2°. The optimized airfoils were determined by use of the CFD XFoil code. The purpose of this aeroelastic study was to determine the flutter conditions to be avoided during wind tunnel tests. These studies show that aeroelastic instabilities for the morphing configurations considered appeared at Mach number 0.55, which was higher than the wind tunnel Mach number limit speed of 0.3. The wind tunnel tests could thus be performed safely in the 6’×9’ wind tunnel at the Institute for Aerospace Research at the National Research Council Canada (IAR/NRC, where the new aeroelastic studies, applied on morphing wings, were validated.

  3. A flight investigation of oscillating air forces: Equipment and technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, W. H., III

    1975-01-01

    The equipment and techniques are described which are to be used in a project aimed at measuring oscillating air forces and dynamic aeroelastic response of a swept wing airplane at high subsonic speeds. Electro-hydraulic inertia type shakers installed in the wing tips will excite various elastic airplane modes while the related oscillating chordwise pressures at two spanwise wing stations and the wing mode shapes are recorded on magnetic tape. The data reduction technique, following the principle of a wattmeter harmonic analyzer employed by Bratt, Wight, and Tilly, utilizes magnetic tape and high speed electronic multipliers to record directly the real and imaginary components of oscillatory data signals relative to a simple harmonic reference signal. Through an extension of this technique an automatic flight-flutter-test data analyzer is suggested in which vector plots of mechanical admittance or impedance would be plotted during the flight test.

  4. COMPARISON OF A FIXED-WING AND MULTI-ROTOR UAV FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MAPPING APPLICATIONS: A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Boon

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The advent and evolution of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs and photogrammetric techniques has provided the possibility for on-demand high-resolution environmental mapping. Orthoimages and three dimensional products such as Digital Surface Models (DSMs are derived from the UAV imagery which is amongst the most important spatial information tools for environmental planning. The two main types of UAVs in the commercial market are fixed-wing and multi-rotor. Both have their advantages and disadvantages including their suitability for certain applications. Fixed-wing UAVs normally have longer flight endurance capabilities while multi-rotors can provide for stable image capturing and easy vertical take-off and landing. Therefore, the objective of this study is to assess the performance of a fixed-wing versus a multi-rotor UAV for environmental mapping applications by conducting a specific case study. The aerial mapping of the Cors-Air model aircraft field which includes a wetland ecosystem was undertaken on the same day with a Skywalker fixed-wing UAV and a Raven X8 multi-rotor UAV equipped with similar sensor specifications (digital RGB camera under the same weather conditions. We compared the derived datasets by applying the DTMs for basic environmental mapping purposes such as slope and contour mapping including utilising the orthoimages for identification of anthropogenic disturbances. The ground spatial resolution obtained was slightly higher for the multi-rotor probably due to a slower flight speed and more images. The results in terms of the overall precision of the data was noticeably less accurate for the fixed-wing. In contrast, orthoimages derived from the two systems showed small variations. The multi-rotor imagery provided better representation of vegetation although the fixed-wing data was sufficient for the identification of environmental factors such as anthropogenic disturbances. Differences were observed utilising the respective DTMs

  5. Comparison of a Fixed-Wing and Multi-Rotor Uav for Environmental Mapping Applications: a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, M. A.; Drijfhout, A. P.; Tesfamichael, S.

    2017-08-01

    The advent and evolution of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and photogrammetric techniques has provided the possibility for on-demand high-resolution environmental mapping. Orthoimages and three dimensional products such as Digital Surface Models (DSMs) are derived from the UAV imagery which is amongst the most important spatial information tools for environmental planning. The two main types of UAVs in the commercial market are fixed-wing and multi-rotor. Both have their advantages and disadvantages including their suitability for certain applications. Fixed-wing UAVs normally have longer flight endurance capabilities while multi-rotors can provide for stable image capturing and easy vertical take-off and landing. Therefore, the objective of this study is to assess the performance of a fixed-wing versus a multi-rotor UAV for environmental mapping applications by conducting a specific case study. The aerial mapping of the Cors-Air model aircraft field which includes a wetland ecosystem was undertaken on the same day with a Skywalker fixed-wing UAV and a Raven X8 multi-rotor UAV equipped with similar sensor specifications (digital RGB camera) under the same weather conditions. We compared the derived datasets by applying the DTMs for basic environmental mapping purposes such as slope and contour mapping including utilising the orthoimages for identification of anthropogenic disturbances. The ground spatial resolution obtained was slightly higher for the multi-rotor probably due to a slower flight speed and more images. The results in terms of the overall precision of the data was noticeably less accurate for the fixed-wing. In contrast, orthoimages derived from the two systems showed small variations. The multi-rotor imagery provided better representation of vegetation although the fixed-wing data was sufficient for the identification of environmental factors such as anthropogenic disturbances. Differences were observed utilising the respective DTMs for the mapping

  6. Effects of Wing-Cuff on NACA 23015 Aerodynamic Performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meftah S.M.A

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The main subject of this work is the numerical study control of flow separation on a NACA 23015 airfoil by using wing cuff. This last is a leading edge modification done to the wing. The modification consists of a slight extension of the chord on the outboard section of the wings. Different numerical cases are considered for the baseline and modified airfoil NACA 23015 according at different angle of incidence. The turbulence is modeled by two equations k-epsilon model. The results of this numerical investigation showed several benefits of the wing cuff compared with a conventional airfoil and an agreement is observed between the experimental data and the present study. The most intriguing result of this research is the capability for wing cuff to perform short take-offs and landings.

  7. Experimental Investigation of a Wing-in-Ground Effect Craft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mobassher Tofa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aerodynamic characteristics of the wing-in-ground effect (WIG craft model that has a noble configuration of a compound wing was experimentally investigated and Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM wind tunnel with and without endplates. Lift and drag forces, pitching moment coefficients, and the centre of pressure were measured with respect to the ground clearance and the wing angle of attack. The ground effect and the existence of the endplates increase the wing lift-to-drag ratio at low ground clearance. The results of this research work show new proposed design of the WIG craft with compound wing and endplates, which can clearly increase the aerodynamic efficiency without compromising the longitudinal stability. The use of WIG craft is representing an ambitious technology that will help in reducing time, effort, and money of the conventional marine transportation in the future.

  8. Computational wing design studies relating to natural laminar flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Edgar G.

    1986-01-01

    Two research studies are described which directly relate to the application of natural laminar flow (NLF) technology to transonic transport-type wing planforms. Each involved using state-of-the-art computational methods to design three-dimensional wing contours which generate significant runs of favorable pressure gradients. The first study supported the Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment and involves design of a full-span glove which extends from the leading edge to the spoiler hinge line on the upper surface of an F-14 outer wing panel. A wing was designed computationally for a corporate transport aircraft in the second study. The resulting wing design generated favorable pressure gradients from the leading edge aft to the mid-chord on both upper and lower surfaces at the cruise design point. Detailed descriptions of the computational design approach are presented along with the various constraints imposed on each of the designs.

  9. Experimental investigation of a wing-in-ground effect craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofa, M Mobassher; Maimun, Adi; Ahmed, Yasser M; Jamei, Saeed; Priyanto, Agoes; Rahimuddin

    2014-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the wing-in-ground effect (WIG) craft model that has a noble configuration of a compound wing was experimentally investigated and Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) wind tunnel with and without endplates. Lift and drag forces, pitching moment coefficients, and the centre of pressure were measured with respect to the ground clearance and the wing angle of attack. The ground effect and the existence of the endplates increase the wing lift-to-drag ratio at low ground clearance. The results of this research work show new proposed design of the WIG craft with compound wing and endplates, which can clearly increase the aerodynamic efficiency without compromising the longitudinal stability. The use of WIG craft is representing an ambitious technology that will help in reducing time, effort, and money of the conventional marine transportation in the future.

  10. Experimental Investigation of a Wing-in-Ground Effect Craft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofa, M. Mobassher; Ahmed, Yasser M.; Jamei, Saeed; Priyanto, Agoes; Rahimuddin

    2014-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the wing-in-ground effect (WIG) craft model that has a noble configuration of a compound wing was experimentally investigated and Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) wind tunnel with and without endplates. Lift and drag forces, pitching moment coefficients, and the centre of pressure were measured with respect to the ground clearance and the wing angle of attack. The ground effect and the existence of the endplates increase the wing lift-to-drag ratio at low ground clearance. The results of this research work show new proposed design of the WIG craft with compound wing and endplates, which can clearly increase the aerodynamic efficiency without compromising the longitudinal stability. The use of WIG craft is representing an ambitious technology that will help in reducing time, effort, and money of the conventional marine transportation in the future. PMID:24701170

  11. A Short History of The Air University, Maxwell AFB, and the 42nd Air Base Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-31

    bombers in 1956. Operated out of Ramey AFB, Puerto Rico (bombers), and Goose AB, Labrador (tankers), while runway repairs were made at Loring, 10 Jul–5...November 2011. In 2006-2007, AU’s structure and program effectiveness underwent an in-depth review that led to major changes in AU’s structure. In... hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans, Maxwell-Gunter served as an evacuation center for over 1,000 displaced evacuees from the Gulf coast and as a

  12. Fundamental Issues of Nano-fluid Behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Wesley C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper will elucidate some of the behaviors of nano-fluids other than the abnormal conductivity enhancement, which are of importance to the experimental and engineering use of nano-fluids. Nano-fluid is the common name of any sol colloid involving nano-scale (less than 100 nm) sized particles dispersed within a base fluid. It has been shown previously that the dispersion of nano-particulate metallic oxides into water can increase thermal conductivity up to 30-40% over that of the base fluid and anomalously more than the mere weighed average of the colloid. There is a great potential for the use of nano-fluids as a way to enhance fluid/thermal energy transfer systems. Due to the recentness of nano-fluid science, there are still many issues which have not been fully investigated. This paper should act as a primer for the basic understanding of nano-fluid behavior. Particle size and colloid stability are of key importance to the functionality of nano-fluids. The pH and concentration/loading of nano-fluids can alter the size of the nano-particles and also the stability of the fluids. It will be shown through experiment and colloid theory the importance of these parameters. Furthermore, most of the existing literature uses volume percentage as the measure of particle loading, which can often be misleading. There will be discussion of this and other misleading ideas in nano-fluid science. (author)

  13. Managing collaboration in the nanoManipulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudson, Thomas C.; Heiser, Aron T.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2003-01-01

    We designed, developed, deployed, and evaluated the Collaborative nanoManipulator (CnM), a system supporting remote collaboration between users of the nanoManipulator interface to atomic force microscopes. To be accepted by users, the shared nanoManipulator application had to have the same high...

  14. Dimensional micro and nano metrology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; da Costa Carneiro, Kim; Haitjema, Han

    2006-01-01

    The need for dimensional micro and nano metrology is evident, and as critical dimensions are scaled down and geometrical complexity of objects is increased, the available technologies appear not sufficient. Major research and development efforts have to be undertaken in order to answer...... these challenges. The developments have to include new measuring principles and instrumentation, tolerancing rules and procedures as well as traceability and calibration. The current paper describes issues and challenges in dimensional micro and nano metrology by reviewing typical measurement tasks and available...

  15. Cardiotoxicity of nano-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostan, Hasan Badie; Rezaee, Ramin; Valokala, Mahmoud Gorji; Tsarouhas, Konstantinos; Golokhvast, Kirill; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Karimi, Gholamreza

    2016-11-15

    Nano-particles (NPs) are used in industrial and biomedical fields such as cosmetics, food additives and biosensors. Beside their favorable properties, nanoparticles are responsible for toxic effects. Local adverse effects and/or systemic toxicity are described with nanoparticle delivery to target organs of the human body. Animal studies provide evidence for the aforementioned toxicity. Cardiac function is a specific target of nanoparticles. Thus, reviewing the current bibliography on cardiotoxicity of nanoparticles and specifically of titanium, zinc, silver, carbon, silica and iron oxide nano-materials is the aim of this study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nano wire conductance experiments above and below the reservoirs Curie temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa-Kraemer, J. L.; Briones, F. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Serena, P. A. [Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2001-03-01

    The transport properties of Ni nano wires are studied using a Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) under clean high vacuum conditions. A basically flat nano wire conductance histogram is found independently of the magnetic state of the electrodes. This agrees with our previous studies in air but disagrees with recently published results. The possible origin of these discrepancies, together with additional experiments trying to discern the existence of a spin-dependent conductance in ferromagnetic nano wires, are presented. [Spanish] Las propiedades de transporte de nanoalambres de Ni son estudiadas usando un microscopio de efecto tunel bajo condiciones limpias de alto vacio. Se encuentra un histograma esencialmente plano independiente del estado magnetico de los electrodos. Esto concuerda con nuestros estudios previos en aire pero contrasta con resultados publicados recientemente. Se presentara una discusion sobre el posible origen experimental de estas discrepancias, con el fin de discernir sobre la existencia de una conductancia dependiente del espin en nanoalambres ferromagneticos.

  17. Aerodynamic performance of a hovering hawkmoth with flexible wings: a computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Toshiyuki; Liu, Hao

    2012-02-22

    Insect wings are deformable structures that change shape passively and dynamically owing to inertial and aerodynamic forces during flight. It is still unclear how the three-dimensional and passive change of wing kinematics owing to inherent wing flexibility contributes to unsteady aerodynamics and energetics in insect flapping flight. Here, we perform a systematic fluid-structure interaction based analysis on the aerodynamic performance of a hovering hawkmoth, Manduca, with an integrated computational model of a hovering insect with rigid and flexible wings. Aerodynamic performance of flapping wings with passive deformation or prescribed deformation is evaluated in terms of aerodynamic force, power and efficiency. Our results reveal that wing flexibility can increase downwash in wake and hence aerodynamic force: first, a dynamic wing bending is observed, which delays the breakdown of leading edge vortex near the wing tip, responsible for augmenting the aerodynamic force-production; second, a combination of the dynamic change of wing bending and twist favourably modifies the wing kinematics in the distal area, which leads to the aerodynamic force enhancement immediately before stroke reversal. Moreover, an increase in hovering efficiency of the flexible wing is achieved as a result of the wing twist. An extensive study of wing stiffness effect on aerodynamic performance is further conducted through a tuning of Young's modulus and thickness, indicating that insect wing structures may be optimized not only in terms of aerodynamic performance but also dependent on many factors, such as the wing strength, the circulation capability of wing veins and the control of wing movements.

  18. Harmonization of measurement strategies for exposure to manufactured nano-objects; Report of a workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, D.; Berges, M.; Virji, M.A.; Fransman, W.; Bello, D.; Hodson, L.; Gabriel, S.; Tielemans, E.

    2012-01-01

    The present paper summarizes the outcome of the discussions at the First International Scientific Workshop on Harmonization of Strategies to Measure and Analyze Exposure to (Manufactured) Nano-objects in Workplace Air that was organized and hosted by the Netherlands Organization for Applied

  19. Increasing Possibilities of Nano suspension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutradhar, K.B.; Khatun, S.; Luna, I.P.

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, a very large proportion of new drug candidates emerging from drug discovery programmes are water insoluble and thus poorly bioavailable. To avoid this problem, nano technology for drug delivery has gained much interest as a way to improve the solubility problems. Nano refers to particles size range of 1-1000 nm. The reduction of drug particles into the submicron range leads to a significant increase in the dissolution rate and therefore enhances bioavailability. Nanosuspensions are part of nano technology. This interacts with the body at subcellular (i.e., molecular) scales with a high degree of specificity and can be potentially translated into targeted cellular and tissue-specific clinical applications designed to achieve maximal therapeutic efficacy with minimal side effects. Production of drugs as nanosuspensions can be developed for drug delivery systems as an oral formulation and no noral administration. Here, this review describes the methods of pharmaceutical nano suspension production including advantages and disadvantages, potential benefits, characterization tests, and pharmaceutical applications in drug delivery

  20. Seminar on Nano-biotechnology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 12. Seminar on Nano-biotechnology. Information and Announcements Volume 13 Issue 12 December 2008 pp 1191-1191. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/013/12/1191-1191 ...

  1. Nano materials for Cancer Phototheranostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, P.; Ling, D.; Song, J; Liu, G.; Xie, J.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of advanced nano technology promises the integration of multiple diagnostic/therapeutic modalities into one nano platform for cancer theranostics. This issue compiles 3 review articles and 7 high-quality original research articles related to the field of nano material-based cancer theranostics. Photo therapies, such as photothermal therapy (PTT), photodynamic therapy (PDT), or photo-triggered drug/gene delivery, have gained considerable attention because of specific spatiotemporal selectivity and minimal invasiveness. Considering the inherent biocompatibility and biodegradability of proteins and peptides, P. Huang and coworkers summarized recent advances in the development of protein/peptide-based photothermal cancer theranostics, using protein/peptide as delivery vehicles or synthesis bio templates of PTT agents. M. G. O∼Toole and coworkers developed a near-infrared (NIR) responsive oligonucleotide-coated (AS1411, hairpin, or both) gold nanoplate loaded with doxorubicin (DOX), which is demonstrated to be nontoxic to cells without triggered release, while being acutely toxic to cells after 5 minutes of laser exposure to trigger DOX release. K. Na and coworkers described an acidic tumor pH-responsive nanophotomedicine (pH-NanoPM), which was prepared by self-assembly of a pH-responsive polymeric photo sensitizer (pH-PPS) consisting of pH-cleavable methoxypolyethylene glycol (pH-C-mPEG), for targeted PDT

  2. Pegasus Rocket Wing and PHYSX Glove Being Prepared for Stress Loads Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A technician adjusts the Pegasus Hypersonic Experiment (PHYSX) Project's Pegasus rocket wing with attached PHYSX glove before a loads-test at Scaled Composites, Inc., in Mojave, California, in January 1997. For the test, technicians slowly filled water bags beneath the wing to create the pressure, or 'wing-loading,' required to determine whether the wing could withstand its design limit for stress. The wing sits in a wooden triangular frame which serves as the test-rig, mounted to the floor atop the waterbags. PHYSX was launched aboard a Pegasus rocket on October 22, 1998. Pegasus is an air-launched space booster produced by Orbital Sciences Corporation and Hercules Aerospace Company (initially; later, Alliant Tech Systems) to provide small satellite users with a cost-effective, flexible, and reliable method for placing payloads into low earth orbit. Pegasus has been used to launch a number of satellites and the PHYSX experiment. That experiment consisted of a smooth glove installed on the first-stage delta wing of the Pegasus. The glove was used to gather data at speeds of up to Mach 8 and at altitudes approaching 200,000 feet. The flight took place on October 22, 1998. The PHYSX experiment focused on determining where boundary-layer transition occurs on the glove and on identifying the flow mechanism causing transition over the glove. Data from this flight-research effort included temperature, heat transfer, pressure measurements, airflow, and trajectory reconstruction. Hypersonic flight-research programs are an approach to validate design methods for hypersonic vehicles (those that fly more than five times the speed of sound, or Mach 5). Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, provided overall management of the glove experiment, glove design, and buildup. Dryden also was responsible for conducting the flight tests. Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, was responsible for the design of the aerodynamic glove as well as development of sensor and

  3. Digital Morphing Wing: Active Wing Shaping Concept Using Composite Lattice-Based Cellular Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenett, Benjamin; Calisch, Sam; Cellucci, Daniel; Cramer, Nick; Gershenfeld, Neil; Swei, Sean; Cheung, Kenneth C

    2017-03-01

    We describe an approach for the discrete and reversible assembly of tunable and actively deformable structures using modular building block parts for robotic applications. The primary technical challenge addressed by this work is the use of this method to design and fabricate low density, highly compliant robotic structures with spatially tuned stiffness. This approach offers a number of potential advantages over more conventional methods for constructing compliant robots. The discrete assembly reduces manufacturing complexity, as relatively simple parts can be batch-produced and joined to make complex structures. Global mechanical properties can be tuned based on sub-part ordering and geometry, because local stiffness and density can be independently set to a wide range of values and varied spatially. The structure's intrinsic modularity can significantly simplify analysis and simulation. Simple analytical models for the behavior of each building block type can be calibrated with empirical testing and synthesized into a highly accurate and computationally efficient model of the full compliant system. As a case study, we describe a modular and reversibly assembled wing that performs continuous span-wise twist deformation. It exhibits high performance aerodynamic characteristics, is lightweight and simple to fabricate and repair. The wing is constructed from discrete lattice elements, wherein the geometric and mechanical attributes of the building blocks determine the global mechanical properties of the wing. We describe the mechanical design and structural performance of the digital morphing wing, including their relationship to wind tunnel tests that suggest the ability to increase roll efficiency compared to a conventional rigid aileron system. We focus here on describing the approach to design, modeling, and construction as a generalizable approach for robotics that require very lightweight, tunable, and actively deformable structures.

  4. Control Power Optimization using Artificial Intelligence for Forward Swept Wing and Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft

    OpenAIRE

    Adegbindin, Moustaine Kolawole Agnide

    2017-01-01

    Many futuristic aircraft such as the Hybrid Wing Body have numerous control surfaces that can result in large hinge moments, high actuation power demands, and large actuator forces/moments. Also, there is no unique relationship between control inputs and the aircraft response. Distinct sets of control surface deflections may result in the same aircraft response, but with large differences in actuation power. An Artificial Neural Network and a Genetic Algorithm were used here for the control a...

  5. Nano-JASMINE Data Analysis and Publication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Y.; Hara, T.; Yoshioka, S.; Kobayashi, Y.; Gouda, N.; Miyashita, H.; Hatsutori, Y.; Lammers, U.; Michalik, D.

    2012-09-01

    The core data reduction for the Nano-JASMINE mission is planned to be done with Gaia's Astrometric Global Iterative Solution (AGIS). A collaboration between the Gaia AGIS and Nano-JASMINE teams on the Nano-JASMINE data reduction started in 2007. The Nano-JASMINE team writes codes to generate AGIS input, and this is called Initial Data Treament (IDT). Identification of observed stars and their observed field of view, getting color index, are different from those of Gaia because Nano-JASMINE is ultra small satellite. For converting centroiding results on detector to the celestial sphere, orbit and attitude data of the satellite are used. In Nano-JASMINE, orbit information is derived from on board GPS data and attitude is processed from on-board star sensor data and on-ground Kalman filtering. We also show the Nano-JASMINE goals, status of the data publications and utilizations, and introduce the next Japanese space astrometric mission.

  6. Pharmaceutical Applications of Polymeric Nano materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, L.; Sun, L.

    2011-01-01

    With significant attention focused on nano science and nano technology in recent years, nano materials have been used in a wide variety of applications such as automotive, environmental, energy, catalysis, biomedical, drug delivery, and polymeric industries. Among those fields, the application of nano materials with pharmaceutical science is an emerging and rapidly growing field and has drawn increasing attention recently. Research and development in this field is mainly focused on several aspects such as the discoveries of novel functional nano materials, exploration on nanoparticles with controlled and targeted drug delivery characteristics, and investigation of bio functionalized and diagnostic nano materials. In this special issue, we have invited a few papers related to recent advances in pharmaceutical application of polymeric nano materials

  7. Prediction of Wing Downwash Using CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed MAHDI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Wing downwash study and estimation of downwash effect on the tail plane is an important task during the aircraft design process, although a lot of papers and works has been done, but the experimental work is the most important, the progress in CFD simulation has reached to the point it is able to reduce the number of runs in the wind tunnel. In this work CFD has been utilized to calculate the downwash angle and downwash gradient with respect to the angle of attack over a high aspect ratio of a typical UAV. The results of the simulation shall be used in the estimation and calculation of the longitudinal static stability analysis of the UAV.

  8. Static Aeroelastic Effects of Formation Flight for Slender Unswept Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Curtis E.

    2009-01-01

    The static aeroelastic equilibrium equations for slender, straight wings are modified to incorporate the effects of aerodynamically-coupled formation flight. A system of equations is developed by applying trim constraints and is solved for component lift distribution, trim angle-of-attack, and trim aileron deflection. The trim values are then used to calculate the elastic twist distribution of the wing box. This system of equations is applied to a formation of two gliders in trimmed flight. Structural and aerodynamic properties are assumed for the gliders, and solutions are calculated for flexible and rigid wings in solo and formation flight. It is shown for a sample application of two gliders in formation flight, that formation disturbances produce greater twist in the wingtip immersed in the vortex than for either the opposing wingtip or the wings of a similar airplane in solo flight. Changes in the lift distribution, resulting from wing twist, increase the performance benefits of formation flight. A flexible wing in formation flight will require greater aileron deflection to achieve roll trim than a rigid wing.

  9. Antibiotics, primary symbionts and wing polyphenism in three aphid species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardie, Jim; Leckstein, Peter

    2007-08-01

    The possible role of the primary Buchnera symbionts in wing polyphenism is examined in three aphid species. Presumptive winged aphids were fed on antibiotic-treated beans to destroy these symbionts. As previously reported, this leads to inhibited growth and low/zero fecundity. When such treatment is applied to the short-day-induced gynoparae (the winged autumn migrant) of the black bean aphid, Aphis fabae, it also causes many insects to develop as wingless or winged/wingless intermediate adult forms (apterisation). However, whilst antibiotic treatment of crowd-induced, long-day winged forms of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (a green and a pink clone) and the vetch aphid, Megoura viciae has similar effects on size and fecundity, it does not affect wing development. Food deprivation also promotes apterisation in A. fabae gynoparae but not in the crowd-induced winged morphs of the other two species. Thus, it appears that apterisation in A. fabae is not a direct effect of antibiotic treatment or a novel role for symbionts but is most likely related to impaired nutrition induced by the loss of the symbiont population.

  10. Computational Optimization of a Natural Laminar Flow Experimental Wing Glove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartshom, Fletcher

    2012-01-01

    Computational optimization of a natural laminar flow experimental wing glove that is mounted on a business jet is presented and discussed. The process of designing a laminar flow wing glove starts with creating a two-dimensional optimized airfoil and then lofting it into a three-dimensional wing glove section. The airfoil design process does not consider the three dimensional flow effects such as cross flow due wing sweep as well as engine and body interference. Therefore, once an initial glove geometry is created from the airfoil, the three dimensional wing glove has to be optimized to ensure that the desired extent of laminar flow is maintained over the entire glove. TRANAIR, a non-linear full potential solver with a coupled boundary layer code was used as the main tool in the design and optimization process of the three-dimensional glove shape. The optimization process uses the Class-Shape-Transformation method to perturb the geometry with geometric constraints that allow for a 2-in clearance from the main wing. The three-dimensional glove shape was optimized with the objective of having a spanwise uniform pressure distribution that matches the optimized two-dimensional pressure distribution as closely as possible. Results show that with the appropriate inputs, the optimizer is able to match the two dimensional pressure distributions practically across the entire span of the wing glove. This allows for the experiment to have a much higher probability of having a large extent of natural laminar flow in flight.

  11. Sexual selection on wing interference patterns in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Natsu; Abbott, Jessica K; Kjærandsen, Jostein; Takahashi, Yuma; Svensson, Erik I

    2014-10-21

    Animals with color vision use color information in intra- and interspecific communication, which in turn may drive the evolution of conspicuous colored body traits via natural and sexual selection. A recent study found that the transparent wings of small flies and wasps in lower-reflectance light environments display vivid and stable structural color patterns, called "wing interference patterns" (WIPs). Such WIPs were hypothesized to function in sexual selection among small insects with wing displays, but this has not been experimentally verified. Here, to our knowledge we present the first experimental evidence that WIPs in males of Drosophila melanogaster are targets of mate choice from females, and that two different color traits--saturation and hue--experience directional and stabilizing sexual selection, respectively. Using isogenic lines from the D. melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel, we compare attractiveness of different male WIPs against black and white visual backgrounds. We show that males with more vivid wings are more attractive to females than are males with dull wings. Wings with a large magenta area (i.e., intermediate trait values) were also preferred over those with a large blue or yellow area. These experimental results add a visual element to the Drosophila mating array, integrating sexual selection with elements of genetics and evo-devo, potentially applicable to a wide array of small insects with hyaline wings. Our results further underscore that the mode of sexual selection on such visual signals can differ profoundly between different color components, in this case hue and saturation.

  12. The design and testing of subscale smart aircraft wing bolts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vugampore, J M V; Bemont, C

    2012-01-01

    Presently costly periodic inspection is vital in guaranteeing the structural integrity of aircraft. This investigation assesses the potential for significantly reducing aircraft maintenance costs without modification of aircraft structures by implementing smart wing bolts, manufactured from TRIP steel, which can be monitored for damage in situ. TRIP steels undergo a transformation from paramagnetic austenite to ferromagnetic martensite during deformation. Subscale smart aircraft wing bolts were manufactured from hot rolled TRIP steel. These wing bolts were used to demonstrate that washers incorporating embedded inductance coils can be utilized to measure the martensitic transformation occurring in the TRIP steel during bolt deformation. Early in situ warning of a critical bolt stress level was thereby facilitated, potentially reducing the costly requirement for periodic wing bolt removal and inspection. The hot rolled TRIP steels that were utilized in these subscale bolts do not however exhibit the mechanical properties required of wing bolt material. Thus warm rolled TRIP steel alloys were also investigated. The mechanical properties of the best warm rolled TRIP steel alloy tested almost matched those of AISI 4340. The warm rolled alloys were also shown to exhibit transformation before yield, allowing for earlier warning when overload occurs. Further work will be required relating to fatigue crack detection, environmental temperature fluctuation and more thorough material characterization. However, present results show that in situ early detection of wing bolt overload is feasible via the use of high alloy warm rolled TRIP steel wing bolts in combination with inductive sensor embedded washers. (paper)

  13. NASA Innovation Fund 2010 Project Elastically Shaped Future Air Vehicle Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a study conducted in 2010 under the NASA Innovation Fund Award to develop innovative future air vehicle concepts. Aerodynamic optimization was performed to produce three different aircraft configuration concepts for low drag, namely drooped wing, inflected wing, and squashed fuselage. A novel wing shaping control concept is introduced. This concept describes a new capability of actively controlling wing shape in-flight to minimize drag. In addition, a novel flight control effector concept is developed to enable wing shaping control. This concept is called a variable camber continuous trailing edge flap that can reduce drag by as much as 50% over a conventional flap. In totality, the potential benefits of fuel savings offered by these concepts can be significant.

  14. X-38 on B-52 Wing Pylon - View from Observation Window

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A unique, close-up view of the X-38 under the wing of NASA's B-52 mothership prior to launch of the lifting-body research vehicle. The photo was taken from the observation window of the B-52 bomber as it banked in flight. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also supported eight orbiter (space shuttle) drag chute tests in 1990. In

  15. From Gold Nano-particles through Nano-wire to Gold Nano-layers on Substrate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švorčík, V.; Kolská, Z.; Slepička, P.; Siegel, J.; Hnatowicz, Vladimír

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2010, G (2010), s. 1-57. ISBN 978-1-61668-009-1 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : thin films * Au nano layers * AFM Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism https://www.novapublishers.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=12909

  16. Free vibration analysis of dragonfly wings using finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Darvizeh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, investigations on the microstructure and mechanicalproperties of the dragonfly wing are carried out and numerical modelingbased on Finite Element Method (FEM is developed to predict Flightcharacteristics of dragonfly wings. Vibrational behavior of wings typestructures is immensely important in analysis, design and manufacturing ofsimilar engineering structures. For this purpose natural frequencies andmode shapes are calculated. In addition, the kind of deformation in eachmode shape evaluated and the ratio between numerical natural frequencyand experimental natural frequency presented as damping ratio. Theresults obtain from present method are in good agreement with sameexperimental methods.

  17. A Video-Based Experimental Investigation of Wing Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-01

    maintained a negative damping in roll (Fig. 6b). Ross concluded that wing tanks act like an aerodynamic fence, controlling flow separation over the wing...to Ross that wing rock was initiated by a nonlinear yawing moment due to sideslip, which caused a divergent Dutch roll oscillation to grow into the...20 30 40 50 e) (p (D EG) * Fig. 128 Continued S * 158 (Fig. 128a) and cycle B (Fig. 128b ) both occurred early in the 0 build-up and consisted of

  18. Dynamics and control of robotic aircraft with articulated wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranjape, Aditya Avinash

    There is a considerable interest in developing robotic aircraft, inspired by birds, for a variety of missions covering reconnaissance and surveillance. Flapping wing aircraft concepts have been put forth in light of the efficiency of flapping flight at small scales. These aircraft are naturally equipped with the ability to rotate their wings about the root, a form of wing articulation. This thesis covers some problems concerning the performance, stability and control of robotic aircraft with articulated wings in gliding flight. Specifically, we are interested in aircraft without a vertical tail, which would then use wing articulation for longitudinal as well as lateral-directional control. Although the dynamics and control of articulated wing aircraft share several common features with conventional fixed wing aircraft, the presence of wing articulation presents several unique benefits as well as limitations from the perspective of performance and control. One of the objective of this thesis is to understand these features using a combination of theoretical and numerical tools. The aircraft concept envisioned in this thesis uses the wing dihedral angles for longitudinal and lateral-directional control. Aircraft with flexible articulated wings are also investigated. We derive a complete nonlinear model of the flight dynamics incorporating dynamic CG location and the changing moment of inertia. We show that symmetric dihedral configuration, along with a conventional horizontal tail, can be used to control flight speed and flight path angle independently of each other. This characteristic is very useful for initiating an efficient perching maneuver. It is shown that wing dihedral angles alone can effectively regulate sideslip during rapid turns and generate a wide range of equilibrium turn rates while maintaining a constant flight speed and regulating sideslip. We compute the turning performance limitations that arise due to the use of wing dihedral for yaw control

  19. Aeroelastic Tailoring of Transport Wings Including Transonic Flutter Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Jutte, Christine V.

    2015-01-01

    Several minimum-mass optimization problems are solved to evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of novel tailoring schemes for subsonic transport wings. Aeroelastic stress and panel buckling constraints are imposed across several trimmed static maneuver loads, in addition to a transonic flutter margin constraint, captured with aerodynamic influence coefficient-based tools. Tailoring with metallic thickness variations, functionally graded materials, balanced or unbalanced composite laminates, curvilinear tow steering, and distributed trailing edge control effectors are all found to provide reductions in structural wing mass with varying degrees of success. The question as to whether this wing mass reduction will offset the increased manufacturing cost is left unresolved for each case.

  20. Winging of scapula due to serratus anterior tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Singh Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Winging of scapula occurs most commonly due to injury to long thoracic nerve supplying serratus anterior muscle. Traumatic injury to serratus anterior muscle itself is very rare. We reported a case of traumatic winging of scapula due to tear of serratus anterior muscle in a 19-year-old male. Winging was present in neutral position and in extension of right shoulder joint but not on "push on wall" test. Patient was managed conservatively and achieved satisfactory result. Key words: Serratus anterior tear; Scapula; Wounds and injuries

  1. The air pollution: sources, effects, prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elichegaray, C.

    2008-01-01

    The author offers a detailed and illustrated panorama of the air pollution sources and effects. The study is realized at the individual scale with the indoor pollution and at a global scale with the consequences of the greenhouse effect gases. Added to classical pollutants, the book takes into account new pollutants (organic, nano particulates, biological) and the epidemiology. (A.L.B.)

  2. Program for establishing long-time flight service performance of composite materials in the center wing structure of C-130 aircraft. Phase 5: flight service and inspection. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizer, J.A.

    1981-10-01

    Inspections of the C-130 composite-reinforced center wings were conducted over the flight service monitoring period of more than six years. Twelve inspections were conducted on each of the two C-130H airplanes having composite reinforced center wing boxes. Each inspection consisted of visual and ultrasonic inspection of the selective boron-epoxy reinforced center wings which included the inspection of the boron-epoxy laminates and the boron-epoxy reinforcement/aluminum structure adhesive bondlines. During the flight service monitoring period, the two C-130H aircraft accumulated more than 10,000 flight hours and no defects were detected in the inspections over this period. The successful performance of the C-130H aircraft with composite-reinforced center wings allowed the transfer of the responsibilities of inspecting and maintaining these two aircraft to the U. S. Air Force

  3. Application of Carbon Based Nano-Materials to Aeronautics and Space Lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wal, Randy L. Vander

    2007-01-01

    The tribology program at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, is investigating carbon based nano-particles for their potential in advanced concept lubrication products. Service conditions range from high temperature atmospheric to low temperature vacuum. Some of the lubricants and surface coatings of tribological significance that we have evaluated include neat nano-particles, both grown in-situ and as bulk material deposited on the substrate, and nano-particles dispersed in oils which are all highly substrate interactive. We discuss results of testing these systems in a spiral orbit tribometer (SOT) and a unidirectional pin-on-disc (PoD) tribometer. A nano-onions/Krytox mixture evaluated as a lubricant for angular contact bearings in air caused a marked lowering of the coefficient of friction (CoF) (0.04 to 0.05) for the mixture with an eight-fold improvement in lifetime over that of the Krytox alone. In vacuum, no effect was observed from the nano-onions. Multi-walled nanotubes (MWNT) and graphitized MWNT were tested under sliding friction in both air and vacuum. The MWNT which were grown in-situ oriented normal to the sliding surface exhibited low CoF (0.04) and long wear lives. Bulk MWNT also generate low CoF (0.01 to 0.04, vacuum; and 0.06, air) and long wear life (>1 million orbits, vacuum; and >3.5 million, air). Dispersed graphitized MWNT were superior to MWNT and both were superior to aligned MWNT indicating that orientation is not an issue for solid lubrication. Single-walled nanotubes (SWNT) were modified by cutting into shorter segments and by fluorination. All SWNTs exhibited low CoF in air, with good wear lives. The SWNT with slight fluorination yielded an ultra-low CoF of 0.002 although the best wear life was attributed to the nascent SWNT.

  4. Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, dust, pollen and ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, ...

  5. Waiting in the wings: what can we learn about gene co-option from the diversification of butterfly wing patterns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiggins, Chris D; Wallbank, Richard W R; Hanly, Joseph J

    2017-02-05

    A major challenge is to understand how conserved gene regulatory networks control the wonderful diversity of form that we see among animals and plants. Butterfly wing patterns are an excellent example of this diversity. Butterfly wings form as imaginal discs in the caterpillar and are constructed by a gene regulatory network, much of which is conserved across the holometabolous insects. Recent work in Heliconius butterflies takes advantage of genomic approaches and offers insights into how the diversification of wing patterns is overlaid onto this conserved network. WntA is a patterning morphogen that alters spatial information in the wing. Optix is a transcription factor that acts later in development to paint specific wing regions red. Both of these loci fit the paradigm of conserved protein-coding loci with diverse regulatory elements and developmental roles that have taken on novel derived functions in patterning wings. These discoveries offer insights into the 'Nymphalid Ground Plan', which offers a unifying hypothesis for pattern formation across nymphalid butterflies. These loci also represent 'hotspots' for morphological change that have been targeted repeatedly during evolution. Both convergent and divergent evolution of a great diversity of patterns is controlled by complex alleles at just a few genes. We suggest that evolutionary change has become focused on one or a few genetic loci for two reasons. First, pre-existing complex cis-regulatory loci that already interact with potentially relevant transcription factors are more likely to acquire novel functions in wing patterning. Second, the shape of wing regulatory networks may constrain evolutionary change to one or a few loci. Overall, genomic approaches that have identified wing patterning loci in these butterflies offer broad insight into how gene regulatory networks evolve to produce diversity.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evo-devo in the genomics era, and the origins of morphological

  6. Editorial Nano structures for Medicine and Pharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing-Jie, L.; Kumar, A.; Donglu, S.; Daxiang, C.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid developments in nano structured materials and nano technology will have profound impact in many areas of biomedical applications including delivery of drugs and biomolecules, tissue engineering, detection of bio markers, cancer diagnosis, cancer therapy, and imaging. This field is expanding quickly, and a lot of work is ongoing in the design, characterization, synthesis, and application of materials, for controlling shape and size at nanometer scale to develop highly advanced materials for biomedical application and even to design better pharmaceutical products. In recent years, novel nano structure with multi functionalities has been focused on the use of nano structures toward solving problems of biology and medicine. The main scope of this special issue is to demonstrate the latest achievement of nano technology and its application in nano medicine particularly in new approaches for drug delivery such as targeted drug delivery system, nano structure for drug storage, nano materials for tissue engineering, medical diagnosis and treatment, and generation of new kinds of materials from biological sources. Therefore, many critical issues in nano structured materials, particularly their applications in biomedicine, must be addressed before clinical applications. This special issue devotes several review and research articles encompassing various aspects of nano materials for medicine and pharmaceuticals.

  7. Nano catalysis: Academic Discipline and Industrial Realities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olveira, S.; Forster, S.P.; Seeger, S.

    2014-01-01

    Nano technology plays a central role in both academic research and industrial applications. Nano enabled products are not only found in consumer markets, but also importantly in business to business markets (B2B). One of the oldest application areas of nano technology is nano catalysis—an excellent example for such a B2 B market. Several existing reviews illustrate the scientific developments in the field of nano catalysis. The goal of the present review is to provide an up-to-date picture of academic research and to extend this picture by an industrial and economic perspective. We therefore conducted an extensive search on several scientific databases and we further analyzed more than 1,500 nano catalysis-related patents and numerous market studies. We found that scientists today are able to prepare nano catalysts with superior characteristics regarding activity, selectivity, durability, and recoverability, which will contribute to solve current environmental, social, and industrial problems. In industry, the potential of nano catalysis is recognized, clearly reflected by the increasing number of nano catalysis-related patents and products on the market. The current nano catalysis research in academic and industrial laboratories will therefore enable a wealth of future applications in the industry

  8. Manufacturing and Evaluation of a Biologically Inspired Engineered MAV Wing Compared to the Manduca Sexta Wing Under Simulated Flapping Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    thorax to the wings will continue for a short period of time, preserving the integrity of these wings. This small window was considered in order to...PromasterTM Digital XR EDO Aspherical LD (IF) 17-50 mm 1:2.8 Macro φ 67. Photomodeler provides the means to calibrate a camera via subroutine within...36. 20. DeLeón, N., O’Hara, R., and Palazotto, A., “Manufacturing of Engineering Bio- logically Inspired Flapping Wings,” 25th Annual US- Japan

  9. Lightweight Aluminum/Nano composites for Automotive Drive Train Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelluri, Bhanumathi; Knoth, Edward A.; Schumaker, Edward J.

    2012-12-14

    During Phase I, we successfully processed air atomized aluminum powders via Dynamic Magnetic Compaction (DMC) pressing and subsequent sintering to produce parts with properties similar to wrought aluminum. We have also showed for the first time that aluminum powders can be processed without lubes via press and sintering to 100 % density. This will preclude a delube cycle in sintering and promote environmentally friendly P/M processing. Processing aluminum powders via press and sintering with minimum shrinkage will enable net shape fabrication. Aluminum powders processed via a conventional powder metallurgy process produce too large a shrinkage. Because of this, sinter parts have to be machined into specific net shape. This results in increased scrap and cost. Fully sintered aluminum alloy under this Phase I project has shown good particle-to-particle bonding and mechanical properties. We have also shown the feasibility of preparing nano composite powders and processing via pressing and sintering. This was accomplished by dispersing nano silicon carbide (SiC) powders into aluminum matrix comprising micron-sized powders (<100 microns) using a proprietary process. These composite powders of Al with nano SiC were processed using DMC press and sinter process to sinter density of 85-90%. The process optimization along with sintering needs to be carried out to produce full density composites.

  10. A comparative study of gelatin and starch-based nano-composite films modified by nano-cellulose and chitosan for food packaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorbakhsh-Soltani, S M; Zerafat, M M; Sabbaghi, S

    2018-06-01

    Environmental concerns have led to extensive research for replacing polymer-based food packaging with bio-nano-composites. In this study, incorporation of nano-cellulose into gelatin and starch matrices is investigated for this purpose. Chitosan is used to improve mechanical, anti-fungal and waterproof properties. Experiments are designed and analyzed using response surface methodology. Nano-Cellulose is synthesized via acid hydrolysis and incorporated in base matrices through wet processing. Also, tensile strength test, food preservation, transparency in visible and UV and water contact angle are performed on the nano-composite films. DSC/TGA and air permeability tests are also performed on the optimal films. The results show that increasing nano-cellulose composition to 10% leads to increase the tensile strength at break to 8121 MN/m 2 and decrease the elongation at break. Also, increasing chitosan composition from 5% to 30% can enhance food preservation up to 15 days. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Silent and Efficient Supersonic Bi-Directional Flying Wing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a Phase I study for a novel concept of a supersonic bi-directional (SBiDir) flying wing (FW) that has the potential to revolutionize supersonic flight...

  12. Toward Wing Aerostructural Optimization Using Simultaneous Analysis and Design Strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elham, A.; van Tooren, M.J.L.

    2017-01-01

    The application and computational efficiency of wing aerostructural optimization us- ing simultaneous analysis and design (SAND) strategy is investigated. A coupled adjoint aerostructural analysis method based on quasi-three-dimensional aerodynamic analysis is used for this research. Two different

  13. Supercritical Wing Technology: A Progress Report on Flight Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The papers in this compilation were presented at the NASA Symposium on "Supercritical Wing Technology: A Progress Report on Flight Evaluation" held at the NASA Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif., on February 29, 1972. The purpose of the symposium was to present timely information on flight results obtained with the F-8 and T-2C supercritical wing configurations, discuss comparisons with wind-tunnel predictions, and project [ ] flight programs planned for the F-8 and F-III (TACT) airplanes.

  14. Wing sexual dimorphism of pathogen-vector culicids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginio, Flávia; Oliveira Vidal, Paloma; Suesdek, Lincoln

    2015-03-14

    Sexual dimorphism in animals has been studied from different perspectives for decades. In 1874 Darwin hypothesized that it was related to sexual selection, and even after nearly 140 years, when additional empirical data has become available and the subject has been investigated from a contemporary viewpoint, this idea is still supported. Although mosquito (Culicidae) wings are of great importance as they play a sex-specific role, little is known about wing sexual dimorphism in these pathogen-vector insects. Detection and characterization of wing sexual dimorphism in culicids may indirectly enhance our knowledge of their epidemiology or reveal sex-linked genes, aspects that have been discussed by vector control initiatives and developers of genetically modified mosquitoes. Using geometric morphometrics, we carried out a comparative assessment of wing sexual dimorphism in ten culicid species of medical/veterinary importance from genera Culex, Aedes, Anopheles and Ochlerotatus collected in Brazil. Discriminant analysis revealed significant sexual dimorphism in all the species studied, indicating that phenotypic expression of wing shape in mosquitoes is indeed sex-specific. A cross-validated test performed to reclassify the sexes with and without allometry yielded very similar results. Mahalanobis distances among the ten species showed that the species had different patterns of shape sexual dimorphism and that females are larger than males in some species. Wing morphology differed significantly between species. The finding of sexual dimorphism in all the species would suggest that the wing geometry of Culicidae is canalized. Although sexual dimorphism is prevalent, species-specific patterns occur. Allometry was not the main determinant of sexual dimorphism, which suggests that sexual selection or other evolutionary mechanisms underlie wing sexual dimorphism in these insects.

  15. Simulating Bird Strike on Aircraft Composite Wing Leading Edge.

    OpenAIRE

    Ericsson, Max

    2012-01-01

    In this master thesis project the possibility to model the response of a wing when subjected to bird strike using finite elements is analyzed. Since this transient event lasts only a few milliseconds the used solution method is explicit time integration. The wing is manufactured using carbon fiber laminate. Carbon fiber laminates have orthotropic material properties with different stiffness in different directions. Accordingly, there are damage mechanisms not considered when using metal that ...

  16. Humidification and perceived indoor air quality in the office environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinikainen, L M; Aunela-Tapola, L; Jaakkola, J J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of humidification on the odour, acceptability, and stuffiness of indoor air. METHODS: In a six period cross over trial at the Pasila Office Center, Helsinki, the air of two wings of the building in turn were ventilated with air of 30%-40% humidity. A third wing served as a non-humidified control area. The quality of indoor air was assessed weekly by a panel containing 18 to 23 members. The intraindividual differences in the ratings for odour, stuffiness, and acceptability between humidified and non-humidified wings were used to assess the effect of humidification. The roles of sex, current smoking, and age as potential effect modifiers were assessed by comparing the mean intraindividual differences in ratings between the groups. RESULTS: Humidified air was found to be more odorous and stuffy (paired t test P = 0.0001) and less acceptable than the non-humidified air (McNemar's test P humidification decreases the perceived air quality. This effect is strongest in women and young subjects. PMID:9196454

  17. Nano- and micro-electromechanical systems fundamentals of nano- and microengineering

    CERN Document Server

    Lyshevski, Sergey Edward

    2005-01-01

    NANOTECHNOLOGY AND MICROTECHNOLOGY (NANO- AND MICRO- SCIENCE, ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY), AND BEYOND Introduction and Overview: From Micro- to Nano- and Beyond to Stringo-Scale Introductory Definitions to the Subjects Current Developments and Needs for Coherent Revolutionary Developments Societal Challenges and Implications NANO- AND MICROSCALE SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND STRUCTURES Sizing Features: From Micro- to Nano-, and from Nano- to Stringo-Scale MEMS and NEMS Definitions Introduction to Taxonomy of Nano- and Microsystem Synthesis and Design Introduction to Design and Optimization of Nano- and Microsystems in the Behavioral Domain NANO- AND MICROSYSTEMS: CLASSIFICATION AND CONSIDERATION Biomimetics, Biological Analogies,and Design of NEMS and MEMS Micro- and Nanoelectromechanical Systems: Scaling Laws and Mathematical Modeling MEMS Examples and MEMS Architectures Introduction to Microfabrication and Micromachining FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROFABRICATION AND MEMS FABRICATION TECHNOLOGIES Introducti...

  18. Shock/shock interactions between bodies and wings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaoxiang XIANG

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the Shock/Shock Interactions (SSI between the body and wing of aircraft in supersonic flows. The body is simplified to a flat wedge and the wing is assumed to be a sharp wing. The theoretical spatial dimension reduction method, which transforms the 3D problem into a 2D one, is used to analyze the SSI between the body and wing. The temperature and pressure behind the Mach stem induced by the wing and body are obtained, and the wave configurations in the corner are determined. Numerical validations are conducted by solving the inviscid Euler equations in 3D with a Non-oscillatory and Non-free-parameters Dissipative (NND finite difference scheme. Good agreements between the theoretical and numerical results are obtained. Additionally, the effects of the wedge angle and sweep angle on wave configurations and flow field are considered numerically and theoretically. The influences of wedge angle are significant, whereas the effects of sweep angle on wave configurations are negligible. This paper provides useful information for the design and thermal protection of aircraft in supersonic and hypersonic flows. Keywords: Body and wing, Flow field, Hypersonic flow, Shock/shock interaction, Wave configurations

  19. Unsteady flow over flexible wings at different low Reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genç Mustafa Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, unsteady flow around flexible membrane wing which had aspect ratio of 1 (AR=1 was investigated experimentally at various Reynolds numbers (Re = 25000 and Re = 50000. Smoke-wire technique for flow visualization over the flexible membrane wing was utilized in the experiments. Digital Image Correlation system (DIC was used for measuring deformation of AR = 1 flexible membrane wing. Instantaneous deformation measurements of membrane wing were combined with the flow field measurements. In low aspect ratio flexible membrane wings, unsteadiness includes tip vortices and vortex shedding, and the combination of tip vortices. In these types of wings, complex unsteady deformations occurred due to vortex shedding. The results showed that the increasing angle of attack results in increase of membrane deformation. Moreover, it was concluded that analysis of the instantaneous deformation revealed chordwise and spanwise, modes which were due to the shedding of leading-edge vortices as well as tip vortices. Consequently, vibrational mode decreased and maximum standard deviation location approached to the trailing edge by reason of increasing angle of attack.

  20. Effect of flexibility on flapping wing characteristics under forward flight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Jianyang; Jiang, Lin; Zhou, Chaoying; Wang, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Through two-dimensional numerical simulation and by solving the unsteady incompressible Navier–Stokes (NS) equations, coupled with the structural dynamic equation for the motion of the wing, the effect of flexibility on flapping wing characteristics during forward flight is systematically studied. The flapping wing is considered as a cantilever, which performs the translational and rotational motion at its leading edge, and the other part is passively deformed by the aerodynamic force. The frequency ratio ω* and mass ratio m* are defined and used to characterize the flexibility of the flapping wing. It has been found that an optimal range of the frequency ratio exists in which the flexible wing possesses both a larger propulsive efficiency and lifting efficiency than their rigid counterpart. Also, the flexible wing with the smaller mass ratio may be of benefit to generate thrust, while the larger mass ratio may be of benefit to generate lift. In addition, a stronger leading edge vortex and reattachment vortex are observed around the appropriate flexibility wing’s surface, which therefore leads to better aerodynamic characteristics. (paper)